Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th May 1828.
Reference Number: 18280529
Reference Number: f18280529-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS, MAYOR.

FIFTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 29th DAY OF MAY, 1828, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. HUCKLER:

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1828.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Draper Best , Knt., Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and Anthony Brown , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Thompson , Esq.; John Key , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Daniel Elgar Spinks

John Eyre ,

Fred. S. Hopkins ,

Wm. Thos. Huggins ,

Richard Lamb ,

William H. Sinclair ,

George Kent ,

Henry Wollet ,

Thomas W. Smales ,

Pickard Arnold ,

William C. Buss ,

James Simms .

Second

Thomas Whitfield ,

John Timothy Oxley

Thomas Briggs ,

Henry Patten ,

James Modlin ,

John Cantis ,

Joseph Rob. Baylis ,

John Spooner ,

George Hodgkinson

William Robertson ,

Edward Jenkins ,

Thomas Jones .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Moore ,

Samuel May ,

William Mills ,

Henry Morgan ,

Beaumont Marshall ,

Samuel Pope ,

Gilbert Mc. Cabe ,

Thomas Mason ,

Frederick Morris ,

William Moon ,

William Mead ,

Charles Newbery .

Second

James Nutting ,

Joshua Nunn ,

Henry Oak ,

Joseph Phole ,

Henry Ridley ,

Edward Rolls ,

Henry Payne ,

Henry Pettifer ,

Henry Perring ,

Robert Moliner Pite

Richard Oldfield ,

John L. Marchant .

Third

John W. Nettlefold .

George Phelps ,

John Mc. Lean ,

John Manning ,

Ashur Prior ,

Thomas Peck ,

Fred. W. Pinkerton ,

Isaac Page ,

Noah Marshal ,

John Relf ,

Joseph Oates ,

William Pelham .

Fourth

Noah Mann ,

William Martin ,

Edward Mason ,

Liana Mesure ,

Thomas Mason ,

Francis Marshall ,

William Moore ,

John Maddle ,

William Mortimer ,

Charles Mordent ,

Robert Nelmes ,

Abraham Nash .

Fifth

Richard Owen ,

Richard Pitt ,

Samuel A. Pearce ,

John Parker .

John Ottam ,

Henry Porter

John Procter ,

James Pinnock ,

Francis Roxburgh ,

Duncan Rymer ,

Samuel Rudduck ,

Thomas Robinson .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, MAY 29, 1828.

LUCAS, MAYOR. - FIFTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18280529-1

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1077. MICHAEL CANNON and THOMAS BURN were indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-2

1078. LEVI BRETT was indicted for that he, and divers others evil-disposed persons to the number of three and more (to wit) to the number of seventy, whose names are as yet unknown, heretofore. (to wit) on the 23d day of January , at Eastbourne, in the County of Sussex (to wit) at Westminster, in Middlesex , being then and there armed with fire-arms and other offensive weapons (to wit) with guns, blunderbusses, pistols, bludgeons, bats, clubs, staves, and hedgstakes, unlawfully and feloniously did assemble themselves, and were then and there unlawfully and feloniously assembled in order to be aiding and assisting in the illegal landing, running, and carrying away of certain uncustomed goods, and goods liable to pay certain duties of Customs, which had not then been paid or secured, that is to say, two hundred gallons of foreign brandy, and two hundred gallons of foreign Geneva ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only omitting the words printed in italics, and substituting the following"was aiding and assisting" in the illegal landing, running, &c.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18280529-3

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1079. ADAM WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 2 silver candlesticks, value 18l.; 14 silver spoons, value 6l.; 1 pair of salt holders, value 3l.; 1 mug, value 2l.; 1 tea-pot, value 1l., and 1 wine-strainer, value 1l., the goods of Thomas Field Savory , in his dwelling-house .

MR. THOMAS FIELD SAVORY. I live at No. 22, Sussex-place, Regent's-park , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone; the prisoner was in my service on the 30th of April, and for eleven months before; my plate was entrusted to him, and him only. On the 29th and 30th of April he was tipsy, and on the Wednesday I complained of his conduct; he was excessively abusive - I desired an officer to be sent for, and while the officer was sent for he left the house; this was at my house in Bond-street - the plate was taken from my house in Regent's-park; I searched my plate chest at my house in Regent's-park on the following day; I searched minutely, and on the first day I missed a pair of silver candlesticks and some table-spoons - how many I could not ascertain, because in the inventory of the plate there was something put over the number of spoons; I could not see the number - this was on Thursday; I missed dessert spoons and table spoons.

Q. Having searched in your pantry and plate-chest, was it possible for these candlesticks for instance, to have been in the place without your observing them? A. Certainly not. On the Saturday morning on my getting up, Kirby showed me the candlesticks and the rest of the plate.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long had he lived with you? A. He came to me in May last; I did not desire him to leave the house on Wednesday - he went away when I mentioned sending for the officer - he was drunk: I did not then suspect any robbery.

JOSEPH KIRBY . I am in Mr. Savory's service. Wright left the house on Wednesday - I and Mr. Savory searched the pantry and plate-room minutely and attentively; these candlesticks could not have been there. On Saturday morning between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came and rang the bell; I was getting up - I opened the shutters and saw him in the area with a bundle under his arm; I asked him where the candlesticks were, and said there was a great piece of work about them; he said they were wrapped in paper in pantry; I said it was impossible for them to be there, for I and master had searched every place; I opened the door, he came into the kitchen, stood about a minute, and then went into the room adjoining the pantry, where the plate was kept; he stood there a minute or two and then went into the pantry - my fellow-servant came down - the prisoner then came out of the plate-room into the pantry with this pair of candlesticks; he put them down and returned to the room again without saying anything; he returned into the room and brought the tea-pot, wine-strainer and other things, which were not there when we searched; he produced a mug, some spoons, and other things - he then asked my fellow-servant Elizabeth, if that was all right; she said No, there was a table-spoon still missing - he turned round, went out, saying he would go and see if he could find the spoon; he took no bundle out with him - he said he would not see master till he had

found the spoon; he returned between two and three o'clock in the afternoon and brought the spoon into the kitchen and gave it to me. I am certain this plate was not in the house before he came.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you still in Mr. Savory's employ? A. Yes - I am his groom; I did not see the prisoner open his bundle - the plate-room is darkish - there is only one closet it it; I am sure I made accurate search; Mr. Savory was not at home when he came in the afternoon, and I did not detain him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When he went away in the morning, did he mention at what hour he would return? A. No, not to my recollection; he said he would go and see if he could find the spoon.

JOHN KERRY . I am assistant to Mr. Gofton, a pawnbroker. On the 18th of April the prisoner pawned a pair of silver candlesticks with me for 3l. 10s. 4d.; I believe those produced to be the same; he had before that pawned a table and tea-spoon for 11s.; I know this to be the table-spoon - I asked him if they were his own property - he said they were, and that he wanted some money; he gave me his right name and address; I observed the prisoner's initials on the spoons.

Q. Did you think the letters T.F.S. corresponded with A. Wright? A. No. He said they were all his own, and he wanted 3l. 10s. on the candlesticks, just for the present - he redeemed the table-spoons in April, the candlesticks on the 3rd of May: we live in Guildford-street, Oxford-street, about a mile from Bond-street; the candlesticks are worth about 14l.

Cross-examined. Q. These were separate pledges? A. Yes. He pawned the candlesticks on the day he took the spoon out; silver is worth 5s. an ounce; I include the manufacture in the value of the candlesticks; 10s. 6d. or 14s. an ounce is at times charged for fashionable articles.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 4th of May, I apprehended the prisoner at No. 23, Cirencester-place; I watched there two days for him; he denied the charge.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that his character was unexceptionable, and at the time he was apprehended, the prosecutor was in possession of all his property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-4

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1080. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Septimus Wray , on the 17th of May , and stealing 1 picture and frame, value 5s., his property .

JOHN JAMES HALLETT . I live with Mr. Septimus Wray, a surgeon , of Salisbury-square . On the 17th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was in an inner room on the ground floor, and heard a noise at the lobby door; I looked, and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, closing the street door - he was then going out: I saw him sufficiently to be able to recognize him; I had seen the lobby door latched about five minutes before, and think I must have heard if anybody came in after that, as the room I was in is about twenty feet from the door; I looked in the direction the prisoner was walking, and saw he had a picture under his arm, which had previously hung in the lobby - it was framed; I caught sight of him before he got one third of the way to Fleet-street - he turned the corner into Fleet-street; I lost sight of him for about three minutes: I laid hold of him within ten minutes from the time of his leaving the door; he had then got this picture in his hand - it is a sporting piece, and is Mr. Wray's property. If anybody had opened the door I think I must have heard them.

Prisoner. Q. What door are you speaking of? A. The outer street door is generally open, but the inner one, communicating with the lobby, is invariably closed; if that had been open I must have heard it, as there was no door shut between me and that door.

COURT. Q. Did you hear it opened? was it that that attracted your attention? A. I cannot say; I heard a noise, but whether it was the door being opened I cannot say.

Prisoner. Q. When you came up to me, was I walking or running? A. Walking; he did not object to my taking the picture from him; he was confused, and when I took it from him he ran away, and dodged me about the shambles of the market, but he made no violent resistance.

HENRY WADE . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a foreigner, and was out of employ. I was coming through Fleet-street, and saw a person running; he dropped the print; I took it up almost immediately afterwards; this gentleman found me in Fleet-market, and on asking what I was doing with it, I, of course, knowing it was not my own, surrendered it to him. GUILTY. Aged 35. Of stealing only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280529-5

1081. WILLIAM ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Charles Holland , from his person .

CHARLES HOLLAND. I live in Canonbury-square, Islington, and am a professor of medicine . On the 5th of May, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Fleet-market , going towards home; I felt my handkerchief safe as I entered the market - I felt something at my pocket, and my pocket come against me; I turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand - he was slipping it behind his coat; a boy about his own age passed me as I turned round; I collared the prisoner, and he dropped the handkerchief; I said nothing to him till he said it was not him, but the other boy, who had taken it - there was no other boy but the one who had passed me; I delivered the handkerchief to the constable.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see two or three lads running away? A. I saw none but the boy I have mentioned - he was dressed in a white jacket and walked away fast.

JOHN HOLLAND . I am an officer. I was passing, and saw Dr. Holland holding the prisoner; he gave him to me with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Fleet-market after delivering a parcel for my father; I picked this handkerchief up - the prosecutor took it from me, and said he had no doubt I had stolen it. GUILTY. Aged 17. Recommended to Mercy by Prosecutor, understanding that he had borne a good character. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280529-6

1082. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 carpet bag, value 6s. , the goods of William West .

WILLIAM WEST. I am a trunk-maker , and live in Cannon-street . On the 9th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went out, and left this bag hanging outside the door-post; I returned at ten, and it was gone.

WILLIAM NEWMAN . I am waiter at the Windmill chop-house, opposite Mr. West's. On the 9th of May, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was going out with a pint of beer, and saw the prisoner take this bag off the hook at Mr. West's shop - he put it under his left arm, and ran away with it; I alarmed West's boy, and pursued him myself, down Nicholas-lane; I saw him drop the bag, and he was secured in a minute and a half.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSIAH EVANS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge in Cannon-street - he did not deny the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280529-7

1083. JAMES BYGRAVE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Henry Coles , from his person .

HENRY COLES. I live in Addle-street, Aldermanbury, and am clerk to Messrs. Miller and Co. On the 25th of April, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I was going down Camomile-street ; I had felt my handkerchief safe when I was in Bishopsgate-street; I did not feel it taken, but I saw the prisoner throw it away; he was only half a yard from me.

Q. How came you to see him throw it away? A. He went past me with the handkerchief, and dropped it; I knew it to be mine, and picked it up; I saw nobody with him - he was quite a stranger to me: an officer went after him.

GEORGE LOCK . I am a patrol of the City. I saw Mr. Coles in Bishopsgate-street; I saw the prisoner at the same time: the prosecutor turned down Wormwood-street, and went into a boot-maker's shop. The prisoner went to the window, and waited till Mr. Coles came out; he then followed him into Camomile-street, and just by the corner of Camomile-mews I saw him take Mr. Coles' handkerchief out, and put it into his breeches; he turned round, and saw me following him; he immediately pulled the handkerchief out, and threw it into the kennel; I did not know him before, but I had been watching him for a quarter of an hour; he ran as far as Houndsditch before he was stopped; I am certain of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280529-8

1084. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 5lbs. weight of brass tube cuttings, value 6s. 8d., the goods of John Stanton , his master .

JOHN STANTON. I am a brass tube manufacturer . The prisoner was in my employ for about five months; I received an excellent character with him. On the 17th of April I went to Mr. Woodruff's, in Cow-cross, to order some copper; Mrs. Woodruff brought me a piece of tube cutting, which I thought was mine, but it had no particular mark; I took it home, and compared it with my tubes - it corresponded with them; I never gave anybody authority to dispose of it; they were pieces which I sold to chance customers, to cut into ferrels; I never sold any to the prisoner.

SARAH WOODRUFF . I am the wife of John Woodruff, a brass-founder and finisher of Cow-cross-street; we buy brass to melt and work up. On the 29th of March I bought 1 1/2lb. of brass tube cuttings of the prisoner, at 6d. per lb.; I bought 5 lbs. more of him on the 1st or 2d of April, at the same price; I did not know he was Mr. Stanton's servant, but on the Saturday following he brought me a bill of 19s. 10d. which I owed Mr. Stanton - my daughter paid the bill; I afterwards showed Mr. Stanton a piece of tube, which I bought of the prisoner - it weighed about 1 oz. - I cannot swear it is part of what he sold, for my daughter bought it of him, and she is not here.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge, and said he was very sorry the circumstance had happened.

MR. STANTON. I have no doubt of this tube having originally been mine, but I may have sold it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-9

1085. ABRAHAM SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of David Sandall , from his person .

DAVID SANDALL. I am a stationer , and live in Sherbourne-lane. On the 19th of April I was on the dickey of the Clapham coach, coming to town; and on London-bridge I perceived the prisoner hanging behind the dickey - he had an apron on, and thinking he was in a hurry to get into the City, I did not disturb him. When the stage got about the middle of the bridge, I thought I saw a scuffle; I turned, and saw the prisoner away from the coach, throwing my handkerchief from him; a gentleman was collaring him; the handkerchief was picked up and shown to me - it was mine.

DUNCAN HOSSACK . I am a tea-dealer. I was on London-bridge at a quarter to ten o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner and another little lad with him; the prisoner was hanging to the coach, close behind the prosecutor, and the lad was sitting on the step of the dickey; I saw the prisoner put his hand once or twice to the prosecutor's pocket - he took out a silk handkerchief, folded it up in his hand, and jumped down - I directly seized him; the lad jumped off, and ran into the Borough - he was eight or nine years old, or rather more. The prisoner never got from me - he threw the handkerchief on the ground when I seized him.

EDWARD THOROWGOOD . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was riding behind the coach, and when I was tired I dropped off; the gentleman caught hold of me, and accused me of stealing the handkerchief - he searched, but could not find one on me; the coach stopped about twenty yards off, and they picked one up: the boy was not with me. I was riding over to my sisters.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280529-10

1086. WILLIAM HYDER was indicted for stealing,

on the 5th of May , 1 Port wine pipe, value 13s. , the goods of Thomas Scarborough .

THOMAS SARBOROUGH. I am cellarman to a wine-merchant , and live in Brewer-street, Borough. This Port wine cask was on some ruins where there had been a fire some time ago; I had leave to put it there with several others - it is an open place. I saw the pipe safe on the morning of the 5th of May: I have known the prisoner a long time; he was jobbing as a wine porter . I found the pipe the same evening, at Mr. Osmond's warehouse, and knew it by its general appearance; I had no mark on it: the place was locked up at night, but was open all day.

THOMAS SCARBOROUGH, JUN. I am the prosecutor's son, and am fourteen years old. I saw the prisoner on the morning of the 5th of May, about twenty yards from the pipe; I had not known him long - I saw him again about half-past four o'clock the same afternoon, rolling the pipe towards Fish-street-hill; I did not then know it was my father's; I asked where he got it from - he said he bought it of a man named Kennett, on Dowgate-hill; Kennett is a wine-cooper. I then went to Kennett - the prisoner was not present; in about a quarter of an hour afterwards I saw the pipe at Osmond's, in Little Tower-street, and am certain it is the same I saw the prisoner rolling; I knew it as there were the same number of hoops off it at one end.

EDMUND OSMOND . I bought a Port wine pipe of the prisoner on the 5th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; it was claimed in a quarter of an hour by Scarborough; I had frequently bought pipes of the prisoner, under an impression that he dealt in old casks - none of them were ever claimed before. I gave him 12s. for this, which is the usual price.

THOMAS KILBY . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge; he said he bought the pipe of a man on Dowgate-hill - that he did not know him, but could point him out; I went with him there, but he could not find the man. I know Kennett - he lives five or six doors from the end of the street; he did not mention his name, but said he bought it of a man in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it on Dowgate-hill; I was rolling it along - Scarborough's son asked where I bought it, and I told him near Kennett's house.

THOMAS SCARBOROUGH, JUN. I did not apply to Kennett to come here; I am sure the prisoner said he bought it of Mr. Kennett.

JURY. Q. How do you know the pipe? Is it branded at all? A. No; when I saw him with it it was very little dirty; it was a very muddy day, and he could not have rolled it far without getting it muddy - if he had brought it from Dowgate-hill it must have been much dirtier; I had noticed the hoops being off at one end when I saw it on the ruins, and in the same state as when he was rolling it.

THOMAS SCARBOROUGH. I am certain it is the pipe which I lost; it had stood on the ruins for a week - I had no other there like it; nobody else puts casks there.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-11

1087. STEPHEN WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 11 ozs. of cochineal, value 8s., the goods of Henry Kirk and another, his masters .

HENRY KIRK. I am in partnership with Richard Knight . The prisoner has been about twelve months in our employ, and had a guinea a week; this cochineal is usually kept on the first floor; we do not sell less than about 1 cwt. On the 8th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, Cavanagh, our porter, who resides on the premises, gave me information; I went to the second floor, and found 11 ozs. of cochineal, concealed by the side of an old fender by the fire place; a quantity of brown paper was put over it; it was taken from a bag down stairs, but was too small a quantity to be missed. I determined to watch, and went on 'Change, desiring that no person should be allowed to leave the premises; I returned from 'Change, and found it in the same place; I placed myself in the inner counting-house, which leads to a back stair-case, and about six o'clock, when the men were leaving work, I placed the counting-house door a little ajar, and heard the prisoner creeping up stairs; I opened the door, and saw him - I ran round through the first counting-house, and told Cavanagh to stop whoever came down; I then ran up, and found the cochineal was gone, but a little canvas bag, in which it was concealed, was put aside, and the brown paper strewed about; I came down stairs, and found the prisoner had been stopped; I accused him of having the property on his person - he called God to witness that he had not got it; I felt his pocket, and found he had got it - I put my hand in, and produced it before him - he did not then deny it; it is worth about 8s. I sent one of my clerks for a sheet of paper, to put the cochineal into. An officer was afterwards fetched, and took him in charge. I only took 9 ozs. from him; two more ounces were afterwards found by the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many persons were in your employ? A. Two clerks and four porters; the porters had all been about eighteen months with me, and Cavanagh has been there nearly twenty years - the prisoner has been about twelve months in the concern, and was in my brother's employ about fourteen years: I believe he has a wife and five children; the men work without their coats; I do not myself know where his coat hung - everybody who was on the premises when this took place, is here to night, except the senior clerk - two of the porters had left.

Q. I thought you had given orders that nobody should leave? A. That was in the morning, before I went to 'Change; they were there when I returned from 'Change, and left afterwards, with my permission, at the usual time - the prisoner denied all knowledge of it till I produced the cochineal in my hand.

Q. On your oath, when you produced it, did he not say it must have been put into his pocket? A. He said nothing of the kind; he told the Lord Mayor his coat had been hanging up; he did not deny it after it was produced: he might have said something in the tone of a guilty man - he was agitated, and I thought he would have fallen.

Q. When you produced it, do you mean to say he did not deny knowing how it came there? A. He did not.

JAMES SEWARD FIELD . I am clerk to Mr. Kirk. I took some cochineal from the prisoner's pocket, in Mr. Kirk's presence; he did not say how he came by it till after the officer had searched his lodging; I then heard him say the devil had tempted him at the moment; this

was after the officer had found 2 ozs. more in his pocket - the cochineal I took from him weighed 9 ozs.

Q. Had your master discovered it before you took it from him? A. Yes, he called me for the purpose of taking it from his pocket; I knew nothing of it before he was stopped.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your master present, and did he hear him say the devil tempted him? A. Yes - it might not have occurred to his recollection to mention it - I went before the Grand Jury, but they said there was no occasion to examine me - I was not called till after Mr. Kirk had seen it in his pocket, and I emptied it out; he did not say he did not know how it came there; I do not exactly know where his coat had hung - he used to hang it in the second floor room; if any man was wickedly disposed he might have put it into his pocket.

BRYAN CAVANAGH . I have been many years in the prosecutors' service. On the 8th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I found this cochineal between the fender and the edge of the fire-place, in a canvass bag, under some brown paper - I placed it there again, and told Mr. Kirk, who came and looked at it; I live in the house. I was on the watch about six o'clock, when the men left work, and saw the prisoner come into the back warehouse, to brush his clothes; two other men did the same - the two men went with me and shut up the warehouse - I then told them they might go; I did not see the prisoner again till he came down to go out - Mr. Kirk said he wanted him - I told him so, and he said, "What does he want with me? I saw him a few minutes ago;" I said, "Perhaps he wants you to go to the dyers;" Mr. Kirk came down, and said, What is that you have in your basket?" he said, "Nothing at all;" then said Mr. Kirk, "You must have something about your person;" he said he had nothing at all; I told Mr. Kirk he had better search him, if he had any doubt; Mr. Kirk put his hand on his right-hand coat pocket, and asked what was there; I cannot exactly say what answer he gave, but Mr. Kirk pulled out some cochineal, and sent Field for some clean paper to put it on - 9 ozs. were found; I went with him and the constable, and saw 2 ozs. more found in the same pocket - he said the devil tempted him to do it, and it was the first act he had done.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that he said so? A. I do not know; I answered what questions were put to me; I do not think I did mention it - I have heard Field state it here, and I also heard the prisoner say it - my master serve dyers with goods. I never myself knew the prisoner to be in Mr. Russel Kirk's employ; his coat hung in the room where the cochineal was found; there were books in the kitchen on purpose for the coats, but he hung his in that place - he was asked what he meant to do with the cochineal, and would not give an answer. I never heard him say he did not know it was in his pocket.

JOSIAH EVANS . I am a constable, and was sent for: 9 ozs. of cochineal were given to me, which they said were found on the prisoner; I searched him afterwards, and found 2 ozs. more in his coat pocket; he did not say it had been placed there by anybody else.

Cross-examined. Q. You heard nothing about the devil, did you? A. I cannot recollect it, but will not say he never said so.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to the warehouse I drove a nail for my hat and coat, and always hung it on that nail; I do not know who put the cochineal into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-12

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, MAY 30.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1088. JOHN MONTGOMERY was indicted for that he, on the 19th of March , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, setting it forth No. 25,879, for 10l., dated November 14, 1827, and signed C. Phillips, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing such note to be forged and counterfeited ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only charging the intent to be to defraud William Coleman .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18280529-13

1089. JOHN MONTGOMERY was again indicted for that he, on the 22d of March , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, setting it forth "No. 28,578, for 10l., dated November 14, 1827, and signed N. Stock, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only charging the intent to be to defraud William Newby .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18280529-14

1090. JAMES BRENNOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 13 gross of buttons, value 10s.; 3 gross of hooks and eyes, value 3s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 12s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 pair of shears, value 7s.; 2 pieces of linen, value 2l.; 2 yards of cloth, value 1l., and 8 silver spoons, value 4l., the goods of John James Dolan and Lawrence Dolan , his masters, in the dwelling-house of the said John James Dolan ; and JOHN LOYNES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

LAWRENCE DOLAN. I am in partnership with my brother John James Dolan, and live in St. Martin's-lane . The prisoner Brennock was my errand-boy ; he had left us for a day or two - I sent to say I wanted to speak to him at nine o'clock the next morning; at which time he came. Lincoln the officer was waiting there, and asked him what he had done with the silver spoons - he said he knew nothing about them: I went away on business and Lincoln fetched me. The prisoner then took me down to the dust-hole, and told me the duplicates were there; he had told me a good many lies, and I said he had better tell the truth; he then made a statement, and took me to the dust-hole, where I found the duplicates of the silver spoons; after that he took us to the rag-hole, and in a bag under the rags were two pieces

of linen and a pair of shoes, which were mine; I saw the officer find this memorandum upon him, he told me I should find part of my property at Loyne's in Cleveland-street, Fitzroy-square; I went there with Lincoln and found in his shop some blue Artillery cloth - we are contractors for the Artillery corps, and nobody but ourselves have occasion for that cloth; it is made purposely for us - I also found some bone buttons, some hooks and eyes, two pairs of trousers, one pair of which he had made up for himself - I knew the cloth. Lincoln found a duplicate of some scarlet cloth which I believe was ours; a pair of our shears were also found - the goods were all found in the shop - Loynes came in just as we entered; he is a small tailor or piece-broker; Lincoln said he had a search-warrant - he made no reply to that; when we found the things, he said he had bought them of the boy - we had not mentioned any boy; he said the boy's father had been there that morning asking for work: I laid hold of a superfine coat in the shop; he said "That don't belong to you" but when I laid hold of the shears he seemed to nod assent to their being mine; whenever I touched anything that was not mine, he said"That don't belong to you." I had not mentioned my name, or even the boy's name; we only said we had a search-warrant - about thirteen gross of buttons were found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had Brennock been with you? A. He came about March last. When I sent for him he cried, and said he hoped I would not prosecute him; I said I would make no promise, but he had better tell the truth, because he was telling a parcel of lies; he cried and said he wanted to see his father.

Q. Did you not offer to take your oath that you would not prosecute him? A. No; I certainly said nothing about my oath - I said he might see his father, but did not say I would send for his father if he would give up the duplicates, or anything of the sort.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you know his father? A. Yes; he is a tailor and had worked for me many years; Loynes keeps an open shop - he made no objection to my searching; I found some of the things on the top of a cupboard.

JOHN LINCOLN . I an an officer. I went to Mr. Dolan's on the 30th of April, and saw Brennock; I asked if he knew anything of the silver spoons; he took Mr. Dolan to the dust-hole and they brought four duplicates; I found a memorandum on him - after Mr. Dolan had said he had better speak the truth I went with him to the rag-hole, he pointed out a bag containing two pieces of linen and a pair of shoes; he said he had taken a great quantity of things and disposed of them to Loynes in Cleveland-street - I went there with a search-warrant, Loynes came in at the same time with us; I told him I had a warrant to search for cloth and other things, and that there was a boy in custody - I did not mention either the boy's name or Mr. Dolan's. Mr. Dolan's evidence is correct; I got on a stool, and found the shears on the top of a cupboard - the boy said he had sold them to him for 4s. - Mr. Dolan said the blue cloth was made expressly to his order.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you present when Mr. Dolan was speaking to the boy? A. Not all the time; I heard something about his father - as near as I can recollect, the boy said if he would send for his father he might say something; Mr. Dolan said nothing about taking his oath; or that he would not hurt him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You told Loynes a boy was in custody? A. Yes.

RICHARD WINGHAM . I live in Grafton-street, Tottenham-court-road. I produce ten spoons, part of which Brennock pawned with me.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE . I am servant to Mr. Lowther, a pawnbroker of Tottenham-court-road. I have a piece of blue cloth pawned in the name of Loynes, and I believe by himself.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I believe he often pawned with you? A. I have seen him at our shop.

- MURPHY . I am in Mr. Dolan's employ; I heard the prisoner say, if Mr. Dolan sent for his father he would tell him about it - Mr. Dolan said he would make him no promises.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BRENNOCK'S Defence. Master said he would be on his oath that he would not prosecute, but would send for my father and settle it.

LOYNES' Defence. Whatever I bought of Brennock I considered as from his father - that cloth is used by tailors for padding coats.

BRENNOCK - GUILTY. Aged 14. Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

LOYNES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-15

Before Lord Chief Justice Best.

1091. FREDERICK THOMAS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Burn , on the 25th of February , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , and stealing therein, child's dress, value 6s.; 2 pinafores, value 1s.; 2 frocks, value 2s., and one apron, value 1s., his property .

WILLIAM BURN. On the 25th of February I kept a public-house in Kingsland-road , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. About half-past eight o'clock in the evening of that day I was in the bar; it was quite dark - I heard Mrs. Burn,who was up stairs, call Murder! I went and caught the prisoner running down from my stairs in the house, and secured him - he had none of the property about him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you at this time a broker named Storey in your employ? A. Yes - he is here.

MARY ANN BURN . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 25th of February I was in the bar; I went up stairs about half-past eight o'clock, to put some silver by; I put the key into the bed-room door, and found it unlocked; I opened the door and saw the drawers turned out, and saw the prisoner standing behind the door, he rushed out and ran down stairs; I raised an alarm; he had pulled two drawers half open, and the two looking-glass drawers quite out and left them on the table; several things were lying on the table which he had taken out of the drawers - out street-door was open at the time; I cannot say how he got up stairs; Mr. Storey, the broker, was the last person in the bed-room; the lock had not been opened by violence, but in the regular way.

Cross-examined. Q. You had received the key from Mr. Storey, I believe? A. Yes

JOHN THOMAS STOREY . I am an auctioneer and appraiser; I had taken an inventory of the value of the effects in the prosecutor's bed-room, on the 25th of February; I left the room about eight or a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening; I believe I locked the door - I am sure of it; I returned the key to Mrs. Burn - I left the house afterwards, and know nothing more.

Cross-examined. Q. Recollect yourself: you at first said, you believed you locked the door; why did you say you believed? A. Because, though I might have locked it, still from circumstances it might be left open; I thought I locked it: when I left the room, the key was in the door; I turned the key and took it out; I believe it was locked: I did not tell the Magistrate I could not swear whether it was open or not; I said I believed I locked it, and I say now, to the best of my belief, I locked it.

COURT. Q. Have you a distinct recollection of giving the key to Mrs. Burn? A. I have.

BARNARD JEFFERY . I am constable of the parish. The prisoner was delivered to me; I took him to the office, and from there to the watch-house, and when I returned, the things had been put back into the drawer: I asked Mrs. Burn for them, she said she would look them out; she gave them to me on Saturday; when the prisoner was given into my charge, I asked who and what he was, he made no reply; I searched him, and in his coat and waistcoat pockets found twelve skeleton keys; I have tried them to the door, and this one will open it; I also found on him some matches and a phosphorus bottle; I found in his hat a dark lantern, a candle, a pair of gloves, a comb, and handkerchief; I took him to the office; he made a resistance to get from me - that is all I know.

MRS. BURN. These things are all ours, and were in the drawers, but had been moved out - they are worth about 10s. - more things were moved, but I cannot swear to any but these; nothing was carried quite away.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have mixed them with other things? A. No; I put them back into a drawer, but kept them separate; we left the house a few days afterwards and took them with us - I have three children; I have more frocks and articles, but they are made different; I was agitated, but put them all into the drawer, and did not mix them with other things; the servants had access to the room; I had been into the bed-room about half an hour before the broker gave me the key; I have two servants; I am certain nobody had been to the room after me, as I had the key which Mr. Storey had given me; when I went up, I found these things lying on the table.

CHARLES CONSTABLE . I secured the prisoner after he knocked the officer down.

Prisoner's Defence. They did not bring the things forward at the office the first time, and said nothing about their being moved.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18280529-16

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1092. THOMAS DORMER and JAMES CARTER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edmund Sayers , on the 29th of April at Fulham , and stealing therein 3 spoons, value 7s.; 1 teapot, value 3s.; 2 tea caddies, value 10s.; 1 brooch, value 5s.: 1 pair of ear-rings, value 4s.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 frock, value 5s.; 6 shirts, value 18s.; 3 shifts, value 3s.; 16 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 table-cloth, value 18d.; 1 pair of pockets, value 18d.; 2 pinafores, value 18d.; 1 sleeping gown, value 1s; 1 pillow case, value 1s.; 7 aprons, value 10s.; 1 jacket, value 4s.; 2 stockings, value 9d.; 4 caps, value 4s.; two shawls, value 5s., and 1 towel, value 6d., his property .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

CICELY SAYERS . I am the wife of Edmund Sayers; we live at North-end , in the parish of Fulham, Middlesex. On Monday night, the 28th of April, I went to bed a little before eleven o'clock - I was the last person up; I heard a little noise, I think about two hours after I had gone to bed: my children slept in the cottage with me that night: my husband is a gardener - he lives and always sleeps at his master's house, but I live in this house and my husband pays the rent; I got up about five o'clock next morning, and missed my clothes which I had washed the day before - I also missed three silver tea-spoons and two odd cotton stockings, the fellows to which I have here: I had fastened the windows and shutters when I went to bed, and when I came down, the ground-floor window was open - they had broken a pane of glass to open the hasp - anybody could then get in and take the things; the window opens into the kitchen; I missed a great many more things which have not been found - a metal tea-pot was taken from the cupboard, three silver spoons, two mahogany tea caddies, and several articles.

THOMAS PACE . I am a constable of Queen-square. I received information from Sanders, and went to Brooks' sale shop, Great Tothill-street, Westminster, on Tuesday morning, the 29th of April - I got from him these three broken tea-spoons, which I have had ever since.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a hardwareman, and live in Great Tothill-street. On Tuesday, the 29th of April, at nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner Dormer came to me with the three tea-spoons produced - they were broken at that time - I gave him 5s. for them; I asked whose they were; he said he worked at a dust-hill, and found them in the dust; I asked why he broke them; he said they were cracked, and he thought he might as well break them; I took his address, which I gave to Pace, with the same spoons as he brought.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am constable of Fulham. I, in company with Sanders, apprehended the prisoners together, at the Star public-house, North-end, Fulham, on Tuesday afternoon, the 29th of April, about three or four o'clock, I took two odd stockings which I now produce, off Carter's legs - I asked where he got them; he said he bought them, and had paid for them, and had washed them out himself - that he had had them in his possession three or five weeks, I am not certain which, but am sure it was three weeks at least; he did not say of whom he bought them. When I apprehended Dormer I told him I wanted him about the spoons - he said he knew nothing about them, and I did not question him further.

CICELY SAYERS. These are my husband's spoons - they have our initials on them, E.C.S.; they are what were missing: I had seen these two stockings at seven o'clock the evening before, and washed them; here are the fellows; I know them by my own work on them -

they were marked, but the marks have been cut off those that were stolen; it remains on the fellows - they belong to my son, who is nineteen years old; he does not live at home; I had them to wash for him; they are worth 6d., and the tea-spoons 7s.

CARTER'S Defence. She is a false-swearing woman; she did not see the stockings for two days after the robbery. I think it is hard she should be allowed to swear to them.

DORMER'S Defence. On Tuesday morning I was going to look for work, and between the Five Fields and the Bag of Nails public-house, I picked up the spoons, wrapped in paper, and a piece of rag; I asked several people who came by if they were silver; they said they were, and I sold them. I gave Brooks my own name.

WILLIAM BROOKS re-examined. I think I had seen Dormer before; I asked his name, and he said Thomas Dormer; I asked his address, and he said, "Mr. Brooks, you know me - I live at No. 5, Perkins'-rents, next door to a customer of your's;" I do not know whether he did live there; I put that address down in a book, in his presence, with the weight of the spoons, which was 1 oz. 1 dwt.

THOMAS PACE re-examined. Brooks gave me the address which Dormer had given; I went there - it is a house of ill-fame; I could find no such person, nor hear of any such name; I searched every room in the house.

DORMER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

CARTER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18280529-17

Before Lord Chief Justice Best.

1093. HENRY JONES and WILLIAM RICE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Esther Ann Freeman , on the 16th of April , at Tottenham , and stealing therein 1 piece of linen, value 1s.; 4 shifts, value 8s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 4s.; 1 spoon, value 2s.; 1 thimble, value 6d.; part of a bracelet, value 5s.; 1 pair of sleeves, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 1s.; 1 piece of foreign coin, called a dollar, and 2 sixpences, her property; 1 thimble, value 15s., and 2 forks, value 20s., the goods of Elizabeth Susanna Chapman , spinster ; 1 thimble, value 1s., and 1 spoon, value 6d., the goods of Eliza King , spinster .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

MISS ESTHER ANN FREEMAN. I live in White Hart-lane , in the parish of Tottenham. On the night of the 16th of April I was the last person up - I saw the windows communicating with the gardens, at the back of the house, fastened; an iron bar crossed them, and was put into a nook with a spring; there were two windows in the room; all the shutters had similar fastenings; there is a cabinet in that room, with six drawers to it, four of which were locked. I was not alarmed during the night; I saw Offerd, who is Mr. Alexander's gardener, soon after six o'clock in the morning - he is also my gardener. I went down to the room in question, in company with him and my servant; I found every drawer in the cabinet opened and drawers out- the scrutoire was broken open, and everything turned out; the window and the shutters were wide open; the bar was unfastened - it is attached to the shutter at one end, and swings on a pivet; there was a small hole in the shutter, as if it had been bored with an auger; there are bolts on the parlour door, communicating with the passage and the rest of the house - there was a hole made in the door sufficient for a hand to pass through and unbolt it; the door was open, and the bolt drawn; the lock of a cupboard in the hall was forced - I missed a variety of property from that cupboard and other parts of the premises. I am single, and rent the house.

ELIZABETH WEBSTER . I am in Miss Freeman's service, and was with her and Offerd on the morning in question, when the premises were examined; I did not see the rooms before my mistress came down; Miss Chapman lodged at the house; I put two silver forks belonging to her into the kitchen drawer, on Tuesday night, the 15th; she did not dine at home on the 16th, and the forks were not used. I missed them from the drawer on the morning of the robbery.

ELIZA KING. I was in the prosecutrix's service on the night in question, and had a thimble and caddy-spoon; I left them in a work-box in the kitchen cupboard the night before the robbery - they were gone in the morning.

SARAH WILSON . I am in the service of Mr. Alexander, who lives next door to the prosecutrix. On the morning of the 17th of April, I saw the prosecutrix's parlour window open, and part of the shutter open; I told the gardener when he came.

JOHN HAMMET . I am a watchman of Tottenham, and was so on the night in question; my box is not a quarter of a mile from Miss Freeman's house. An alarm was given that night, at Mr. Alexander's house: about half-past four o'clock that morning, (after that alarm) I saw both the prisoners up against Scotland-green, which is nearly half a mile from the prosecutrix's house; I was on one side of the road, and they on the other. I went over to them, and said to Jones, "Good morning to you - ayn't you the young man whom I spoke to before this morning;" he said No; I said, "I think you are;" he said, "Ayn't there a little job been done down there to night?" pointing towards the prosecutrix's house; I said Yes - he said, "You never saw me down here before;" he said, "There has been several little jobs done down here lately, and it is time to look out," and he said he would make me remember stopping him on the road; he had stood and talked to me about three minutes, but I had not laid hold of him - he then went away; Rice had gone away, leaving him talking to me; they were both together before: when Jones left he went in the same direction as Rice: he turned out of the road. Soon after this I saw Griffiths, the constable; I followed Jones while he talked to me, and as he was going away he said he would make me remember stopping him on the road; Griffiths and I followed them down into the marsh; we went towards Chingford, to the mills there, and went on to Ponder's-end mills; we did not get sight of them till we got to Ponder's-end; we saw both of them there - Hummerstone was then with us, and he took Jones; Rice left him, and ran away up into Ponder's-end.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was half a mile from the prosecutrix's house that you first met Jones? A. Nearly so; I had heard then that the prosecutrix's house had been robbed; an alarm had been given of the robbery - there were a great many people about.

Q. Was Jones alone when you spoke to him? A. They were both together; Rice went on - Jones remained behind talking to me for two or three minutes; I had my

watchman's coat on and my rattle and cutl ass - Rice had turned out of the road into Scotland-green, and was out of my sight; there are houses on both sides of the road, there was nothing to prevent my giving an alarm - Jones did not appear anxious to get away; he said if I would follow him, he would tell me where he lived - it is a public place, the houses extend for a quarter of a mile; I saw Jones searched, nothing was found on him that was claimed; he had a little money, no picklock-keys or angers - it rained a little, and was rather a gloomy morning.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you mean to say that at the time you saw the prosecutor, you had heard of Miss Freemen's robbery? A. No - I had heard of Alexander being robbed, the prisoners did not come over to me - I went over to them.

COURT. Q. You say Rice was out of sight before Jones left you? A. Yes because he turned out of the road, I saw him turn out of the road; we found them both together afterwards, I saw them go by Tweed's-mill-field.

THOMAS HUMMERSTONE . I am a shepherd. On the 17th of April, about ten minutes before six in the morning - I saw the two prisoners in my master's field - the field belongs to Tyler's farm, and is near Endfield-mill; they were both running when I saw them - I asked what business they had that way, and told them it was no thoroughfare; one of them said something - I cannot exactly say what - they went on, and I tried to meet them; I had my crook in my hand - they went into Mr. George's premises - I followed; they got over his fence, and jumped into a brook of water; I jumped in also, and after I got through the water; I ran up the field, put out my crook, and caught Jones by the leg; I collared him - after I had secured him, I saw Hammet and Griffiths come up: I gave him into their custody; when I took hold of Jones I saw a shift drop from him, and there was a little bit of linen, which I suppose was an old shift - I gave them both to Griffiths, the constable; Rice ran away after I took Jones.

Prisoner RICE. Q. What did you say to us when we were crossing the fields? A. I told you it was no thoroughfare; whether you heard me or not I cannot say - the shift dropped from Jones, whether it was from his pocket or from his clothes, I cannot say; I told him he had dropped something - he said that was not his - I picked it up and put it into my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How near was Rice to you when you picked up the shift? A. He was gone away; Jones dropped it - it did not lay in the road Rice had gone - I cannot say that he had gone over just that spot.

Q. This was a hazy wet morning? A. It might be; I was standing still, when I took it up - I had been running about ten minutes before.

Q. What had you been doing for ten minutes then? A. Sometimes walking and sometimes running; I cannot say how long before I had been running - it might be a minute before.

Q. Was Jones walking? A. No - he was getting away as fast as he could; he was nearly exhausted - I could walk nearly as fast as he could run; I had not been walking above a minute - I had not heard of any robbery at that time.

MR. BODKIN. Q. This was about six o'clock? A. About ten minutes before; it was broad day light; Rice had got quite away when I picked up the shift - I am certain I saw the shift drop from Jones's person.

MR. PHILLIPS to JOHN HAMMET. Q. What time did you first hear of Mr. Alexander's house being broken open? A. It wanted about ten minutes to three o'clock; I met the prisoners about half-past four - they were not above half a mile from the house when the alarm was given- Mr. Franklin and others were about.

CHARLES BAYLIE . I am a gardener, and live with my father at Edmonton. On the 17th of April I found part of a shift which had been torn, by the side of a tree near Tweed's-mill - I gave it to Griffiths at the Just ice-room.

JOHN VERDON . I live with my father, a barge-master, at Edmonton. On the morning of the 17th of April I joined in pursuit of the prisoners - they went by our place; I followed them all the way to Ponder's-end - they both went through a ditch, and I saw Jones throw a shift or a bundle into the ditch; I went into the ditch, and found a shift and a pair of sleeves - I gave them to Griffiths; the prisoners were then close together, running.

Cross-examined. Q. At the time the shift and sleeves dropped they were both together? A. Yes, as close as they well could be in the ditch; I was about twenty yards from them, and running - they were not touching each other; I found the shift in the ditch through which they both passed; it was a gloomy morning and darkish, but not raining.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How soon after Jones threw the shift down did you see him stopped? A. About two minutes after - I knew him to be the person who had thrown the shift into the ditch.

THOMAS THIRGOOD . I am a carter, and live at Ponders-end. On the 17th of April, about 6 o'clock in the morning, in consequence of what passed between me and Verdon, I stopped Rice at Ponder's-end - he was running; I pursued him about fifty yards before I took him; I delivered him to Griffiths; I afterwards searched in the direction he had ran, and found a thimble and a seal, which I gave to Griffiths at the office.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Jones searched? A. No.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am constable of Tottenham. I was coming off duty about twenty minutes before five o'clock, and saw Jones talking to Hammet, the watchman; I afterwards went in pursuit - I never lost sight of Jones; I pursued him about four miles and a half - they got as far as the mills at Ponder's-end; I was not present when they were taken into custody, they were afterwards given into my charge by Harrison and Thirgood; I searched Rice before I took him to the watch-house, and found in his hat a shift and a pair of sleeves - I found a silver crown piece and part of a bracelet in his waistcoat pocket, and a phosphorous-bottle and matches; in his coat pocket I found this chiseel and gimblet, nothing else - I have since applied the chissel to the outside part of the prosecutrix's premises, and to a closet in the drawing-room - it corresponds with the impression made on them; I produce several parcels which I have received from Hummerstone and Verdon; a silver thimble and seal from Thirgood - a shift from Baylie; on our way to the watch-house with the prisoners, I had not held out any threat or promise whatever to them - Jones said, 5l., 10l., or

50l. would be no object if I could make it right, and not take him to the watch-house; Rice said nothing - he was by his side at the time; I afterwards went with them to gaol - when they were committed, Jones said, he supposed the might get lagged, but he should not mind, for he had had five years upon the salt-water - I suppose lagged to mean transported; Rice said, he did not mind if he was not topped - I do not know the meaning of that.

Prisoner RICE. I should not have used such an expression as that. Witness. I declare positively he did say he should not mind if he was not topped.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Jones in a sailor's-dress as he is now? A. No, he had a surtout coat on: I searched him accurately, and found a case-knife on him and 16s. or 18s.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were any sixpences found on Jones? A. Yes, several sixpences, shillings, and half crowns.

THOMAS IVES . I am a barge-master, and live at Ponder's-end; I assisted in conveying the prisoners in a cart to the watch-house, and on the road, I heard Jones say, he wished not to go to the cage, and that 5l., 10l., or 50l. would be no object to him, not to go to the cage - I said, I should have no compromising there.

WILLIAM FENSON . I am a labourer, and live at Ponder's-end; about seven o'clock on the morning in question, I found a coat in the long mead, which is over the hedge of the Eighteen-acres field, it is the next field to it; I picked it up, and found in the pockets of it two silver forks, and two screw-drivers - a woman named Shadbolt picked up a stock and centre-bit, which I put into the pockets of the coat, with the screw-driver and forks, and gave them to Mr. William Boards; the coat was near the hedge of the field.

JAMES GRIFFITHS re-examined. They both ran through the Eighteen-acrcs field, and went through the hedge described.

CATHERINE SHADBOLT . I was at work in the Eighteen-acres field on the morning in question, and found the stock of a centre bit close against the hedge; I gave it to Mr. Boards, my master, in Fenson's presence.

WILLIAM BOARDS . I am a farmer, and live at Ponder's-end; Fenson and Shadbolt are in my employ - the coat was given to me; I believe I took it off the ground - I gave it to Brooks in the same state as I received it.

CHARLES BROOKS . I received a coat from Mr. Boards with these articles in the pocket; I gave it to Forster in the same state as I received it.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a constable. I produce the coat which I received from Brooks; these things in the pocket were there then - here are two silver forks, two screw-drivers, and the stock of a centre bit.

JAMES GRIFFITHS. I was present when the coat was claimed; this examination of the prisoners is signed by Mr. Robinson, the magiatrate (read.)

"The prisoners being asked if they had anything to say, Rice says, the great coat now produced belongs to him."

JAMES GRIFFITHS. This was the coat I produced.

MISS FREEMAN. (Looking at the shift found in Rice's hat.) This is mine, and the sleeves also; I have no doubt of them - here is my mark on them, and this shift that was found on the ground, that has my mark on it.

THOMAS HUMMERSTONE. That shift dropped from Jones.

ELIZABETH SUSANNA CHAPMAN. I resided with Miss Freeman: these forks are mine and were in her house at the time in question - my initials are on them; I had a work-box which was left locked the night before the robbery - it was found open in the morning, but every thing left in it except a gold thimble; I had also a desk which was forced open - I found a match in that desk, which I produce: I do not know that it was inside the desk, for every thing was turned out on the floor - I found it in the house among the things.

JAMES GRIFFITHS. This match is exactly of the same description, and the same length as the others which were found on Rice.

THOMAS THIRGOOD. I produce a silver thimble which I found in a field at Ponder's-end where I took Rice.

ELIZA KING. This is my thimble, I have not found the spoon.

JONES' Defence. I am innocent of the charge - I have got my living at sea for the last seven years, and have only been a short time on shore; I had every thing prepared to go another voyage - I went down to Enfield to see my aunt, and on my return being rather intoxicated, the watchman stopped me - he asked me what he says, and I gave him the answer he says: as to my saying a bit of a job had been done, it is false, he has added that himself.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

RICE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutrix as no personal violence was used.

Reference Number: t18280529-18

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1094. THOMAS MADDOCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , at St. George, Hanover-square , 1 harp, value 50l., the goods of James Delveau , in his dwelling-house .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES DELVEAU. I live at No.28, Conduit-street , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. I left my house about seven o'clock in the evening of the 8th of May, leaving my harp quite safe in the first floor front room; I returned about eleven o'clock the same evening, and missed it. The prisoner was in the employ of Jennings, my gilder, and very often came to and fro to my house; Elizabeth Davis is servant to the people who lodge on the ground floor of the house.

Q. Do you occupy the house? A. The house belongs to some orphan children, of whose father I am executor - I have lived there five years; it was let out before I became executor; the rents are paid to Mr. Dawson, the house-agent; the taxes are paid to the agent appointed by the Court of Chancery; I received the rent before the agent was appointed.

Q. Did the deceased person ever live in the house? - A. Yes, but he did not die there; he died in the country- I lived there long before he died, as a lodger. I must account for the rent for the lodgings to the Court of Chancery; the deceased's name was John George Boehu; I

have paid no rent since his death. I occupy the first floor- the persons on the ground floor pay rent to us as executors; we are accountable to the receiver for the rent of the whole house; the other executors do not live in the house, nor do the orphans - they are at school; my occupation of the first floor is entirely distinct from the other lodgers.

COURT. Q. There are nobody but lodgers in the house besides yourself? A. No; we used to carry on business with the people below, for the children; but the partnership has been dissolved by the Court of Chancery; there has been no change whatever in the occupation since the testator's death. The harp was in my own room, on the first floor; I found it on the Sunday following, in the possession of Twigg, at a house in Rose-street, Long-acre - it was worth fifty guineas, and was my property; fifty guineas is a moderate value.

ELIZABETH DAVIS. I was in the service of Mr. Smoat, who lives on the ground floor of the premises occupied by Mr. Delveau, in Conduit-street. On the 8th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, or a few minutes afterwards, the prisoner came to the house - I let him in; he asked me if Mr. Delveau was at home; I told him I did not know - I had frequently seen him at Mr. Delveau's before, and I told him he had better go up stairs and see; he went up; I went down stairs, and saw no more of him - I was at home all the evening, and am certain nobody else called for Mr. Delveau.

MR. DELVEAU. I never gave the prisoner authority to take the harp to be gilded, or for any purpose; it had been gilded about two months before; no part of the house is occupied by the other executor; neither he nor the children used any part of it.

THOMAS TWIGG . I live at No. 10, Rose-street, Longacre, and also rent the house No. 9, but let that out in lodgings. On the 8th of May I was going home about eight o'clock in the evening, and saw a person taking down the parlour window shutters of No.9; I do not know who he was - it was not the prisoner; I saw a harp there; I put some questions to the person, and in consequence of what he said I refused to deliver it up to him; it stood in parlour of No. 9; he did not rent the room.

WILLIAM HENRY JENNINGS . I am a gilder, and live in Berwick-street, Soho. The prisoner was my apprentice in May; the prosecutor was a customer of mine, and I was in the habit of sending the prisoner to his house very often. On Sunday, the 4th of May, he left my house as usual - I did not see him again till he was in custody; he had no authority from me to fetch Mr. Delveau's harp, on the 8th of May, or at any time; he had been three years with me; I believed him to be honest.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I went to Tothillfields prison on Sunday, the 11th of May, in company with the prisoner's mother; I had some conversation with the prisoner - I had used no inducement or threat to him - on the contrary, I cautioned him; I showed him a printed bill, offering a reward for the recovery of the harp; he said he did not wish any more of those bills to be distributed, nor yet to put the gentleman, or his master, to any expense - his mother said nothing to induce him to confess- I have one of the bills here; he said, "I am the person who took the harp, and I will tell you where you can find it - it is at Rose-street, Long-acre; I asked if he was sure it was there - he said it had been detained there by the landlord, because they could not give a correct account of the number and maker's name, and that it was there still; I directly went to Rose-street, with his mother; Mr. Delveau came there afterwards - I there found the harp now produced; Twigg was there - the prisoner did not mention the number of the house, but described it as well as he could: I went to No. 10, near a gateway, where Twigg resides; I waited till he came home - I showed him the bill; he said he had got the harp, and showed it to me in the parlour of No. 9; Delveau claimed it; he mentioned the number of it before he saw it - it has been in my possession ever since, and is here. The prisoner was detained on the charge.

MR. DELVEAU. I know the harp to be mine, by the number and maker's name; it is engraved on a brass plate.

ELIZABETH DAVIS re-examined. I had not been in Mr. Delveau's room from the time he went out till he returned, nor had any one else, to my knowledge; the harp was not missed till he came home.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18280529-19

Before Lord Chief Justice Best.

1095. JOSEPH PING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 2 half-crowns, and three 5l. Bank notes, the property of Thomas Harrison , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES DAVIS . I live in Cork-street. On the 10th of April I enclosed three 5l. Bank notes, and 2l. 5s., in a letter, for Captain Field . I took no account of the numbers- I had drawn a cheque on Messrs. Ransom's, and sent Pugh with it - he brought me back the notes; Captain Field is not here.

PHILIP EDWARDS . I am clerk to Messrs. Ransom. I paid a 15l. draft, drawn by the prosecutor; I have a memorandum which I extracted from the waste-book; the book itself is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-20

Before Lord Chief Justice Best.

1096. THOMAS CALVER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Rolls , with intent to steal .

JOHN ROLLS. I live in North Audley-street ; the prisoner was nearly fourteen months in my service, I discharged him on the 15th of April. On Saturday night the 26th of April , I was sitting up with a brace of pistols - I had secured the house; I was sitting in the parlour opposite the bar, and heard the bolt of the bar door go distinctly; after this I heard the cellar door unlocked, I then heard the kitchen door go back - I heard a candlestick which I had placed against it, scrape along the floor; I expected every minute to see the prisoner enter the bar, but did not - I went down about three o'clock and found the place entirely open, I let the watchman in; the cellar door had been attempted, but they had not got the bolt of the lock back - the sash of the tap-room window was up, it slides up; I found nobody in the house - I missed two handkerchiefs and a brush next

day, which I had seen two or three days before; I cannot say the prisoner was in my house that night, but I have seen him about my place at different times, after he left me; I found the brush in his box, at a house where he took it to after leaving me; I knew it was his box, he was taken on the 30th of April - I found a skeleton key on him which opens my cellar door, he could then come up stairs to the bar; I also found a phosphorus box on him; I lost a handkerchief from the bar.

Prisoner. Q. Did you find that phosphorus box in my possession? A. It was in your box: the box was not locked but corded.

JOHN SCHACKE . I am a watchman of North Audley-street. I have seen the prisoner about the prosecutor's premises; Rolls let me into his house on the night in question - I had seen the prisoner in the early part of the night in Oxford-street, but not near the premises; he went up Oxford-street, came down North-row, and there I lost him; he and another person with a young woman before them - they might be about 20 yards from the prosecutor's; I knocked at Rolls window, and told him I had seen a man about - and went down to the cellar; that is all I know.

PETER MATES . I am a watchman of North-row. I did not see the prisoner near the premises.

JOSEPH LORTER . I am a labourer. I was taken up for this offence, but was not concerned in it; the prisoner came to me on Friday the 25th of April, and he came again on Sunday - he said he had been into Rolls' house the night before, and opened the cellar door, and went down; that he got up into the tap-room, and discovered a cloth before the parlour door window; that he lifted it up, and saw Mr. Rolls sitting in the parlour - he then made the best of his way out; that he took nothing that night.

Q. How came he to tell you this? A. I had met him in Oxford-street, I was in the habit of using this house - I did not mention this till I was taken up, I drive a horse and cart for Mr. Silvester a bricklayer; I left him on Easter Sunday, and have had no work since. I am now in custody.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. On the 2nd of May Mr. Rolls desired me to look for Lorter, I apprehended him at Lisson-grove; I went to see the prisoner in Tothill-fields in company with the prosecutor, and told him that Lorter had told me all about it - and about the handkerchiefs being taken, he said he had taken two handkerchiefs on the 25th; and pawned one in St. Giles' he took them out of the bar, he did not say how he got into the house - he said Lorter knew as much about it as he did, he mentioned nothing about the Saturday night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-21

1097. THOMAS CALVER was again indicted, for stealing, on the 1st of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 brush, value 6d. , the goods of John Rolls .

JOHN ROLLS. I lost a handkerchief and brush on the 29th of April; I had seen them safe when I was going to bed that night, lying on the locker of the bar, and missed them next morning.

JANE BAKER . I am Roll's sister-in-law and act as barmaid. I saw the handkerchief in the bar on the night of the 25th of April.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE . I am a pawnbroker. This handkerchief was pawned with me on the 25th of April, by the prisoner - I am positive of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I supported Lorter for a week, and because I did not do it any longer he has done this out of spite.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE. I am sure the handkerchief was pawned on the 25th - I have my duplicate here.

JANE BAKER. I saw it safe on the locker of the bar when I went to bed; it was on Thursday night, but I understand it was the 25th - it was the night before the watchman said he saw a light in our house at half-past three.

JOHN SCHACKE . It was Thursday night that I saw the light. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-22

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1098. HARRIET WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 1 quilt, value 4s.; 1 tablecloth, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 2 tea-spoons, value 4s., and 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of Francis North : also for stealing on the 17th of March , 2 pillows, value 6s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s., and 1 blanket, value 7s. , the goods of Francis North.

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-23

1099. WILLIAM FORD was indicted for embezzlement .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS BOYD . I am in partnership with Thomas French and William Thomas Boyd ; we are wholesale drapers and haberdashers . In April last the prisoner was in our employ as clerk - we carry on business in Skinner-street ; he lived and boarded in the house and had 150l. a year - he generally posted up the bought and sold ledgers- it was his duty to received money from the different customers, and to answer letters; Mr. Mules was a customer of ours.

JOHN MULES . I am a linen-draper and live in Great Surrey-street. On the 1st of April last, I paid the prisoner on the prosecutor's account 206l. 15s. 4d.; at the time he received the money he made this entry in my book, which I produce (reads) "Memorandum, 1st April, 1828, paid Boyd and Co. 206l. 15s. 4d. - W. Ford;" he wrote this in my presence - I cannot exactly say what money I paid him; it was in cash and bills - the larger part was in cash.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How happens the entry to be in this form? A. It is usual for us to have such a memorandum made by the person receiving the money; I have a perfect recollection of paying it to him on that day.

MR. BOYD re-examined. (Looking at Mr. Mules' book;) this memorandum is in the prisoner's hand-writing; he has been fourteen years with us - here is the receipt cash book, to which the prisoner and all the clerks have access when they receive money; there is no entry of the cash received from Mr. Mules on the 1st of April; here is an

entry in the prisoner's hand-writing, dated the 3d of April(reads) "J. Mules, creditor by bill, due 17th of April, 73l. 15s. 4d.; ditto 5th of May, 20l.; cheque 8l. - total 101l. 15s. 4d.

Q. Is there any other entry in any book in which any cash is entered, on account of Mr. Mules? A. None but this book; the prisoner left our employ on the 11th of April, and up to that time we had no knowledge of Mr. Mules having paid more than 101l. 15s. 4d. - the prisoner was apprehended on the 11th of April, but not on this charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He was in a confidential situation? A. He was our head clerk; our bills are entered before they become due - it was his daty to account for bills the very day he received them, not to keep them till they became cash.

Q. Did he not, in fact, hold bills till they became due, and having received the cash, then make the entry? A. Decidedly not - he never had authority from us to advance money to our customers - I am certain of that; I never knew of such a thing, and if he had done it I should not have approved of it; if a customer wanted assistance he ought to have asked us to do it; I never knew of his advancing money to one Buck - this is the first time I have heard of it; Buck is a customer of ours.

Q. Do you mean to swear that 50l. was not advanced to Buck by the prisoner with your approbation? A. Never to my knowledge - nor did he ever advance money to Davis.

Q. Did you not know of it, and approve of it afterwards? A. Never; Davis was a customer; Buck wanted bills renewed once or twice, which the firm did: the prisoner has never advanced money for bills before they became due - I will swear that most positively.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was he ever authorized to keep money in his hands after he received it? A. No - no sum whatever, nor a bill of any kind.

COURT. Q. After he received bills, where should they he deposited? A. They should be brought into the partner's counting-house, with the cash-book entry to correspond, the partner signs the book, and they are put by; this memorandum is signed by Mr. French as having received the bills entered.

WILLIAM EWINS . I am a conveyancer - my office is in Tokenhouse-yard - I know the prisoner. When he was in the Compter I carried a message for him to Mr. Mules by his desire: I delivered the exact message he gave me; I told Mules, by desire of the prisoner, that a person wanted to speak to him in the neighbourhood of Newgate-street - I had a coach, and wished him to go with me to see him; he went with me to the Compter, where he saw Ford - I told him on the road that it was the prisoner wished to speak to him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? A. About two years and a half; I had some dealings with him, and ever since that I have been an acquaintance of his; there was an account between us when I saw him in the Compter - there is a transaction between us, which will make the balance against me more than 200l.; I never dealt with the prosecutors - I have taken friends from the country to their house to make purchases.

Q. Has the prisoner applied to you lately for payment of the money you are indebted to him? A. I beg to explain - there were securities in my hands; I had engaged to pay him money, but had not paid it - I promised to pay him money in February and March, but did not do it; I had securities in my hand, out of which I was to pay him money, besides what I owed him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was this transaction entirely independent of the prosecutor's business? A. It has nothing to do with their business.

MR. MULES. In consequence of a message from the last witness I went to the prisoner at the Compter - he told me that a portion of the money he had received from me he had not given me credit for; he said a female had applied to him for assistance, and he had lent her a sum of money - he did not say what amount; he then took a large quantity of notes from his pocket, and requested me to receive them, and desired me to alter my book; he said he did not know the exact amount he had given me credit for, but the money he had in his hand would be sufficient to balance the account - I said I could not think of receiving any money whatever, and immediately withdrew; what amount he produced I do not know - it looked like notes.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You understood him to mean he had not given you credit in his employer's books? A. Yes - I made that communication to Messrs. Boyd; they knew nothing about it before I gave the information.

THOMAS FRENCH . I am one of the firm; the letter F. to this entry is my writing; I never received any account from the prisoner, of his having received more from Mr. Mules than is contained in this entry; we have received other money before, but not near this date.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you know of any advance of 50l. made by the prisoner to Buck? - A. No; he never communicated anything of the kind to me.

Q. Did you not say, "Don't let Buck know that: I know of it?" A. I did not; I do not know of his ever having advanced Buck money - I swear that most positively; if I were in doubt about it I should say so; it is my province to keep the cash book - I balance it whenever it is convenient to me - I have no stated period; nobody balances the book but me - it is quite uncertain when I balance; I had not done it between the 1st and 11th of April - it is not a very easy job; I at times begin it and cannot finish: I had not balanced since the beginning of the year, but I have since the 11th of April; the prisoner was never allowed to hold bills or money; the moment he received them it was his duty to enter them in the cash received book, and then bring them to the partners in their counting-house; I have found fault with him for keeping cash even ten minutes. Buck has dishonoured two or three bills; I believe there was one due on the 4th of March, and another on the 4th of April; he sent some money on account of the bill, stating that he could not provide the balance, and requesting us to draw for it; we ourselves provided what he was short - it was not provided by the prisoner. I have had frequent communications with him respecting Buck's account.

Q. Do not you know that the prisoner advanced him

50l., and you told him not to let Buck know that you knew of it? A. I remember nothing of the kind.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever tell the prisoner to keep or use the money he received from Mules, to satisfy this bill of Bucks? A. Oh no, certainly not; I did not know he had received it when Buck's bill was due; I could not detect anything wrong by balancing my books, unless I was told it had been paid.

COURT. Q. What was the amount of Buck's bill? - About 280l.; he provided 130l., and, I think, a 16l. bill. I believe it came in a letter, expressing his regret that he could not provide the balance, and requesting it might stand over, or be drawn for; we sent the whole of the money to our banker's, and took up the bill, out of our own funds, placing what he sent to his account; the prisoner had nothing whatever to do with it; he might have been sent to take the bill up; I was quite ignorant of his having received more money from Mules than is entered in the book.

Prisoner. I am sure I can bring to Mr. French's recollection that about fifteen months ago Buck came and told me he could not take up his bill; I said it was almost the first bill of his, and I thought it might injure his credit with the house if they knew it - I advanced him the 50l. myself; I went into the counting-house and told Mr. French, he said, "Well, if you have lent him 50l., keep it to yourself, you can get it from Buck better than us, if he is aware that we lent it, we shall not get if from him."

MR. FRENCH. I have some slight recollection of 50l. being advanced about fifteen months ago; I considered before, that he was speaking of a recent transaction; it was a matter that did not concern us at all, and made no impression on my mind.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not aware when I entered the Court that this charge would have been gone into first, nor did I know this indictment would have been gone on with until Monday; I was taken up on the 11th of April on a charge which I defy them to substantiate, well knowing that one of the partners of the firm paid the money, which they charge me with stealing; they said at the Mansion House that this charge was sufficient for the ends of justice, and they would not enter on that for 105l.; I do not believe they suppose for a moment that I took the 105l. to appropriate to my own use to defraud them of it; I solemnly declare in the presence of my Maker I never thought of defrauding them, nor can they prove it before any Court; let them bring forward any charge and I can defend it; I have been upwards of fourteen years in their employ, their returns are about 300,000l. a year upwards of four millions and a half of money passed through my hands during the fourteen years, and I never defrauded them, nor had I any cause to be dishonest; it is well known the first houses have bondsmen for their clerks, but I had none, my character was sufficient; I had no tie - I admit I received the sum charged on the 29th of March - on the 11th of April I was taken into custody, and had possession of 108l. about thirteen days, and after having served them faithfully for fourteen years, I say it is very dishonourable to prosecute me on this charge; I was not aware I had committed a felony by retaining that money - the first time I was aware of the circumstance it came from Mr. Harmer himself, I told him everything. As to the first charge which I expected to be tried on, I am certain you would have acquitted me; I was told it was the only charge that would be preferred; the prosecutors sent to me saying, if I would plead guilty, that was all they wanted, but they must have a conviction - although in the eye of the law I may be guilty, it was unintentional; I have on one or two occasions lent the prosecutors money for a few days, and they have lent me money; once a customer owed them about 2100l.; about two years ago he was in difficulties, I met him, his father, and uncle, he said, if he could get 500l. or 600l. he thought he could get through his difficulties, I persuaded his father and uncle to lend it to him, and wished to place that money to the account of my employers, and got some persons who threatened to arrest him for 260l., to take my acceptance; before it became due he was a bankrupt, they threatened to arrest me, and my employers advanced me part of the money. I have perhaps in a dozen cases advanced money in this way; we collect our debts every month - a person has paid me 150l., and I have paid my employers on their account 300l. deducting the interest which is allowed for prompt payment, and I thought as I had to pay a Miss Walker 260l. on the 29th of March, I might take the 105l. as she wanted the money, but I considered it merely a debtor and creditor's account, having paid them at times more than I received - I should have repaid the money the next day, or the day after had I not been taken up. This 105l. would not have been discovered, but the moment I was aware of the charge being serious, I sent for Mules and presented him with 126l. to make up the deficiency, telling him, I was not aware of the serious crime. I feel confident you will acquit me of any intention of defrauding them of a farthing; they have kept all my papers, memorandums, and letters which I received from female friends, and they have kept notes of hand and other property to six times this amount; I cannot think they it is, unless they wish to crush me entirely; even my friends have been deterred from coming forward to this Court to speak to my character, from the vindictive manner they have conducted this prosecution. Instead of a prosecution it is a persecution; if I had pleaded guilty Mr. Boyd would have recommended me to mercy, but a conviction they say they must have; I believe if my life was in their hands they must take it, but I have no doubt they have a motive: perhaps they fear my getting into other houses and injuring their connexions; there are other circumstances I could mention, but I will not behave to them as they have to me, I will not even allude to them; there are prosecutions over their heads, and they suppose I might be called as a witness, and if I am convicted my evidence would be done away with. I think that is one motive. I hope you will take into your serious consideration how this prosecution has been got up, how conducted, and that they would not have been in possession of the circumstances, had it not come from me at first, in my over anxiety to do them justice.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-24

1100. ROBERT BASS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 79 1/2 yards of Persian silk, value

5l. 5s. 6d.; 50 yards of other silk, value 8l. 10s. 10d.; 12 yards of satin, value 34s: 5 pieces of silk handkerchiefs, value 6l. 6s.; 1 dozen of silk handkerchiefs, value 32s., and 1 box, value 2s. 9d. , the goods of Zachary Langton and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of George Webb .

JOHN STONE . I am in the employ of Moore, Agnes and Co., warehousemen. On Saturday, the 10th of May, about six o'clock in the afternoon. I went out with a cart load of goods; I drove down the Castle inn, Wood-street , and delivered five boxes; I got my book signed and put them down in the yard in front of the booking-office; I was sitting in my cart ready to get out of the yard which was blocked up; I saw the prisoner walk up, and take one of the five boxes (which was directed for George Webb, of Stafford) on his shoulder; he walked out of the yard with it, and turned down Wood-street; I jumped out of the cart and followed: I lost sight of him for a quarter of a minute, and secured him with the box still on his shoulder, in Wood-street, about twenty yards from the inn; I asked where he was going with the box; he said what odds was it to me; he gave a plunge, let go of the box, and ran away; I followed, crying Stop thief! he was stopped in Love-lane; I am certain of his person; I gave him in charge - the box contained the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth 33l. 11s., Zachary Langton is the proprietor of the inn .

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see a man give me the box? A. No - I saw you take it yourself; I was on the top of my goods in the cart, and could see all over the yard.

GEORGE EVANS . I packed up this box - I afterwards opened it at Guildhall, it contained the articles stated in the indictment.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES POWNER . I am a clerk at the Castle, and saw Stone put the box down; Zachary Langton is proprietor of the inn.

JAMES TONKIN . I am a constable. I was coming down Aldermanbury about half-past six o'clock - somebody called, Stop thief! I ran across into Love-lane - the prisoner came up very fast - a porter stopped him just as I came up; I took him back to the inn, and the box was brought there by Stone; the prisoner said a person offered him 1s. to carry it to the White Horse, Cripplegate, and he thought the man was in the yard then - I gave him time to look round, but there was nobody there.

Prisoner's Defence. They would not let me look about for the man who employed me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-25

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, MAY 31.

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1101. JAMES KORLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 pair of stays, value 10s. , the goods of Richard Langdale .

SARAH LANGDALE . I am the wife of Richard Langdale - we live at Beech-hill, near Barnet ; he is a farmer's servant . These stays were put in the drying ground to bleach; the ground is attached to the house, near the road side, and is hedged round; I missed the stays about five o'clock in the morning - the constable brought them to me the next day; the prisoner served bread about the village about a year ago, and lived about a mile off.

FREDERICK PROPSTRING . I am constable of Barnet. On the 12th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, I overtook the prisoner behind Barnet church, about two miles from the prosecutor's, and found these stays in his hat, quite wet - I had information about him and two others; he said he had found them on Barnet common.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-26

1102. WILLIAM SAVILLE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Pack , on the 7th of May , and stealing one pair of trousers, value 7s.; 3 yards of cloth, value 20s., and 3 sixpences, his property .

JOHN PACK. I am a journeyman weaver , and lodge in King-street, Brick-lane, Spitalfields - I occupy the first and second floors, and pay my rent to the landlord, who lives below. The prisoner worked with me at this house- he had not left my employ, but was only waiting till more work came in. On the 7th of May I went out in the morning - I locked the door of the bed-room where this property was, and put the key in the other room, where my wife was; when I returned I found the key where I had left it, but the door was unlocked, and the property gone; I went with the officer about four o'clock in the afternoon, and apprehended the prisoner playing in a skittle ground - my trousers were found in his hat.

CHARLES PADDEN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. I have three yards of cloth, and two remnants, pawned by the prisoner on the 7th of May, at 11 o'clock in the morning.

JAMES HANDLEY . I found the trousers in the prisoner's hat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 23. Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-27

1103. RICHARD CROZIER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Ferguson , on the 1st May , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 shilling, and 1 handkerchief, value 6d., her property .

JANE FERGUSON. I live in Kensington workhouse. On the 1st of May, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Jew's-row, Chelsea ; I had been to see my sister, who lives there - I am an unfortunate girl; I knew the prisoner by sight, but never spoke to him before this happened; I met him by the Coach and Horses public-house at Chelsea- I had seen him there before; he came up, stopped me, and asked me to give him some gin: I heard what a character he was, and gave him some out of fear, to get rid of him - he did not threaten to use me ill, but I had heard how he used other females; I gave him 3d. of gin, and then came out of the public-house - I had 1s. 3d. in my hand, which a man had given to me; he asked me to give

him the shilling - I said I would not and put it into my bosom; I was about ten yards from the public-house - he knocked me down and hit me on the eye; took the shilling from my bosom, and the handkerchief from my neck, and ran away: he then returned and gave me my handkerchief back - he ran away with the shilling; I called out, but there was no watchman near.

Q. Did you not see him coming back to return your handkerchief? A. No; I was looking down, he threw the handkerchief at me, and ran back again - two officers came by and saw what a state I was in; I screamed out as loud as I could while he was robbing me, but nobody came up- I was only ten yards from the public-house.

EDWARD SOUTHWOOD . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took the prisoner about half-past one o'clock on the morning of the night this happened; I was returning home and found the prosecutrix standing against the rails of Chelsea College, crying very much - she said she had been knocked down and robbed; she described the person - I found the prisoner in Queen's-yard, Chelsea, with four more who I took with him.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. I went with Southwood to the top of a house, and took the prisoner with three more.

Prisoner's Defence. I and a man named Drummond were coming from the play; we met this woman - she called to me by name, and asked me to go and have some gin; I asked if I should pay for it - she said No; she snatched Drummond's handkerchief off his neck, and as she was going away, I said "Ayn't you going to give him his handkerchief?" she said No; I snatched at it, and took hers by mistake; when I saw it was wrong, I threw it down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-28

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1104. JOSEPH PALMER was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Ford .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL GODFREY . On the 15th of May , I was at the back of the Rabbits public-house at Ilford ; I saw the prisoner and William Ford fighting for about half an hour - Ford then seemed to be very ill; the people were dispersing - I took Ford to the doctor, who bled him, and gave him a draught out of a table-spoon - I afterwards took him home in my cart; he seemed very bad indeed and was not sensible - I heard him groan as I brought him along in the cart; I did not see the last round fought - I was thirty yards off; I did not see him knocked down, but I saw them both down in some of the rounds - I did not hear him groan after I got to Bow; I took him to his father's in Dog-row, Bethnal-green, which is nearly seven miles from Ilford: when I took him out of the cart, he appeared to he dead; the last time I heard him groan was on this side Bow church - I am sure of that, and am sure when I heard him groan last, he was in Middlesex.

FREDERICK AGAR . I am a surgeon and live in Whitechapel. On the 17th of May I examined the body of the deceased and opened it - his death was caused by an effusion of blood on the brain, and among the membranes; the concussion of a fall in a fight was very likely to occasion that - there was a great many contusions on his neck, breast and shoulders, but they were not sufficient of themselves to cause death.

WILLIAM SCOTFORD . I saw part of this fight; I did not see the last round - after it was over, the deceased was given to me and Godfrey, to take care of; I had seen them fall - they got up and fought again, voluntarily; neither of them endeavoured to avoid fighting - they fell a great many times; there was no unfair play at all - they were both young, and appeared fairly matched; I do not know how it began.

The prisoner put in a written defence, expressing his regret at the result of the combat, which had occured through a dispute respecting an old public-house score; that the deceased had insisted on his fighting, much against his own inclination, but that he at last agreed to meet him, having been repeatedly called a coward. - He received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280529-29

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1105. GEORGE ROWE and ROBERT FINCH were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , at St. Pancras , 1 gelding, price 40l. , the property of Isaac Turtle .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS TURTLE . I am the son of Isaac Turtle, who lives in Tottenham-court-road - his stables are in the parish of St. Pancras; he had a light bay gelding, which I saw safe in the stable at eleven o'clock on Saturday night, the 10th of May, when I locked the stable-door; the stable is in a yard which is a throughfare; there is no gate to the yard; the stable-door was safely fastened with a padlock by myself; the watchman alarmed me about four o'clock the following morning; I went to the stable, found the door open, and the horse gone; my brother found the padlock in the stable.

JAMES WATERS . I am a watchman of St. Pancras; I know New Inn-yard, Tottenham-court-road, where this stable is. On the night of the 10th of May, I was passing by there, but did not go down the yard; about three o'clock in the morning as I was going by the yard to the watch-house with a charge, I saw a horse come out of the yard with the prisoner Rowe on its back; I proceeded on with my charge - this was about eight minutes before three o'clock. I knew Rowe's person well before - I knew him by the name of Cooper - I have not the least doubt of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you tell anybody of it that night? A. I told the master (the prosecutor) of it at four o'clock in the morning, and gave him a description of the prisoner: I did not mention his name- it was on Sunday morning, the 11th of May.

Q. When you went to deliver up your coat at the watch-house that morning, did you mention it to the night officer? A. I did; his name is Burchman - I did not tell him the name of the person I had seen on the horse; I knew him well by sight - I described him as a short stiff man, and described his dress; I swear I gave Burchman that description; I mentioned it to all who were at the watch-house; Burchman was present, but I did not mention any name; I have known Rowe for twelve months by name, but not by the name he is indicted.

Q. Did you give any name to Burchman, or to any body till you heard Rowe was in custody? A. No, I did not

- a reward of 10l. was offered, but I never knew that till I had described the prisoner; I did not mention his name till I heard of the reward; I did not hear that 10l. was offered till the Sunday night.

Q. If you had known Rowe's name for twelve months, what is the reason that you did not mention it to your own night constable? A. I could not recollect the name at all; I described his dress - I did not describe his person.

Q. Did you not say you said it was a short thick man? A. Yes, but I never mentioned his name; I described his dress - I did not particularly describe him to Burchman, but he was present; I was not able to recollect his name till after I heard a reward was offered - that did not bring it to my memory.

Q. What brought the name to your memory? A. I saw the man at Marlborough-street - I saw him that night, but he goes by so many nick names.

Q. Did not Burchman mention the robbery to you? A. I will not be sure which of them mentioned it - whether I mentioned it to him or he to me first; the other watchman was talking about the horse; I said I saw a horse that morning, and said it was a short stiff man, and had a dark dress on; I said that in the presence of several; Burchman was in the chair; I heard of the reward between eleven and twelve o'clock on the Sunday night - I did not see Rowe till the Thursday following; I never mentioned his name, only to my fellow watchman, Halliher; I mentioned the name to him on the Monday; that was after I heard of the reward; I never had a quarrel with the prisoner: I was once at a fight.

Q. Has he not been continually sneering at you about that fight? A. He never insulted me any more than at the fight; I was chucking a skittle ball; and he gave me a push down at the fight; I have no ill will to him; I was not fighting myself at all.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long ago was this fight? A. About eighteen months; I have seen him about the streets at nights since that; I never knew him by the name of Rowe, before he was apprehended; I knew him by the name of Cooper - when I saw him in custody he was at Marlborough-street, among other persons; I looked round the yard where they were, and pointed him out; I described him to the constable of the night, between five and six o'clock in the morning, when we were going off duty.

THOMAS HALLIHER . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, the 11th of May, I and Waters were going to the watch-house with a charge, and saw the horse come out of the New Inn yard, with a man on it; I was compelled to stop for it to pass - I did not know the man before, but I knew him afterwards; it was the prisoner Rowe; I am positive he is the man - I took particular notice of his clothes and gaiters, and am certain of him; I pointed him out among fifteen prisoners at Marlborough-street; I went on with my charge to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. You never knew him before? A. No; it was about 5 minutes before 3 o'clock in the morning; we were taking a drunken man to the watch-house, and had hold of him; he was rather angry - we had to stop till the horse passed by; it came out quite easy; I went to the watch-house with Waters - Burchman was in the chair; I did not hear Waters mention the prisoner's name; he came to me on the Wednesday, and told me I was to go to Marlborough-street; and said the man's name was Cooper; I am sure he said that on Wednesday; I did not hear of a reward till Thursday; Waters did not tell me of the reward on Sunday night -Wednesday night was the first time he mentioned Cooper's name to me; I never heard of the reward till after I came out of the office; I then saw it stuck up in the office; Waters told me there was a reward on Wednesday night.

Q. Did you not swear you never heard of it till you came out of the office on Thursday? A. I mistook you- he told me of it on Wednesday.

JOHN AMBROSE . I am a carrier, and live in New Inn-yard, Tottenham-court-road. On Saturday night, the 10th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw Rowe facing the prosecutor's stables; he had no business there- he does not live in the yard; I went to the privy, knocked at the privy door - nobody answered, but at last Finch came out of the privy - that is all I know.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you first mention Rowe's name? A. I told Mr. Turtle's son on the Sunday morning. I had a bill filed against me some time ago, and was in prison for an assault; I do not know how many years ago that was; I was once accused of robbing a man of 15s., but was innocent - I was here about a fortnight for the robbery; I was in Clerkenwell prison - I was not there more than three weeks; that was for the assault - it was about two years ago; I was imprisoned here on the charge of robbery in December; I was brought here from the New prison - I was in custody on that charge five or six weeks altogether, as near as I can recollect; I was not tried - I was never in prison on any other charge - I was taken on suspicion about three coats one Saturday night; I cannot tell how long ago - it was after the assault; the watchman stopped me, and I was taken before a Magistrate, but I was not in prison about the coats, nor for anything, except what I have mentioned.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you sent to prison for the assault? A. No, I was discharged; when I was stopped with the coats I was sent down for bail; and when I was brought here for a robbery I was discharged, without being indicted; I have known Finch many years - I have had no quarrel with the prisoners, and have no malice against either of them.

JOHN PERRY . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, about two o'clock, I went down the New Inn-yard, and at half-past two o'clock; the prosecutor's stable was perfectly safe and fastened then; I went again about half-past three o'clock, and the padlock was broken off.

THOMAS TURTLE. We have not recovered the horse.

ROWE'S Defence. I can prove I was in bed and asleep before one o'clock in the morning.

MARY ANN GREAVES . I live in the same house as Finch, at No. 7, Lower Fitzroy-place, Fitzroy-square. I never spoke to Rowe in my life, nor yet to Finch; I have repeatedly seen Rowe, but am not acquainted with him; Mrs. Woodward is landlady of the house; she is not here - she cannot come. On the night of the 10th

of May I saw both the prisoners come into the house at half-past twelve o'clock, as near as I can guess; I was up till near four, and nobody went out of the house, for I fastened the door after them; I am in the habit of sitting up; I am an odd woman, and go out to wash in the day; I sit up to do little jobs for myself; I came in about half-past twelve o'clock that night, and left the door open - these two young men came in; it was impossible for them to go out without my seeing them - they slept in the house; Finch lodged there, in the next room to me; Woodward has been here two days; she is not very well- her husband is a tailor, and he will not let her come.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time of night do they come in? A. Between twelve and one o'clock; it might be a quarter or half-past - it was not later - I was in the back parlour till after three o'clock; Finch lodged in the front room; there is a back door leading into a small yard - there is no admittance the back way. I was not examined at Marlborough-street - I went there.

Q. Did you not tell the Justice what you had to say? A. Yes; I did not mention Rowe's name - I said the two men came in; I did not confine my evidence to Finch- Finch is a married man, and has a wife there; Rowe came in and staid all night, and what made me curious was, the landlady said she did not like two men being in one room; Finch could not be out at one o'clock, or Rowe either, for I saw them come in, and I fastened the door.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you examined on oath at the office? A. No.

COURT. Q. You think it impossible for them to be out at one o'clock? A. Quite so; I have seen Rowe before repeatedly on the stairs, and have heard his name; I was busy ironing a few things for myself, with the back room door open all the time - that is how I am confident- I do not generally keep my door open, but it was a very close night.

Q. I suppose it is always close in a small room, when you are ironing - do not you always sit with your door open? A. Repeatedly, every day; I am confident neither of them went out.

Q. The reason you give for the landlady not being here, is that she is ill? A. She is not very well, and their work is wanted, so they cannot come, and they know no more than what I can say, as I was the last person up.

Q. Was Finch in the habit of bringing Rowe home with him? A. He was at meal times; I never remember his bringing him home at night, but I am seldom at home myself; it struck me as remarkable, and my landlady said, "What, is two men come in?" and she followed them up stairs, to see, and I said, "Why, it is that Mr. George Rowe."

JURY to THOMAS HALLIHER. Q. You state, that when you were going by the end of the yard with a charge, you were obliged to stop, in consequence of Rowe coming out with a horse; you swear it was him? A. Yes; it was twilight; I had a full view of him, and am certain it was him.

ROWE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

FINCH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-30

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1106. EDMUND MORGAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Thomas Roberts Taylor , on the 28th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 purse, value 1s.; and 5 shillings, his property .

GEORGE THOMAS ROBERTS TAYLOR. I am a surgeon . On Sunday night, the 28th of April, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was coming along Holborn from Fitzroy-square, and by Little Queen-street the prisoner came up and struck me a violent blow in the face; I saw him before he came up to me; there was a gas-light, and it was a light night - he met me; there were two or three others with him; I fell from the violence of his blow, and was stunned - I arose on my feet in about two minutes, and my hat was gone; I do not know what became of it - I cannot say what was done while I was down, for I was stunned; when I got up, the prisoner was still standing there close to me - he stood motionless; the others had gone from me, they were standing behind at some distance off; I got to the watch-house in about half an hour, and missed my handkerchief from my coat pocket, and my purse from my left hand breeches pocket - it contained 5s.; every thing was safe in my pockets when I left Fitzroy-square; I had called no where, nor met anybody who could have robbed me before this, not till I got to the watch-house; neither of my pockets were buttoned - three or four persons came to my assistance; the prisoner came upon me suddenly - I had done nothing to provoke him, nor said anything; I looked round directly I got up - but could not see my hat; the value of all I lost was about 17s.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you got up you saw the prisoner standing motionless, and the others at a distance behind? A. Yes; he stood in front of me; I never said I was not hurt - I was not sober nor yet intoxicated; I had taken a bottle of wine with a friend - I was stunned with the blow, or I should have known what passed; I did not go to the office till I was summoned, which was on Thursday - I never said. I believe the prisoner did not rob me; I said I believed he was labouring under a state of intoxication; I was waited upon by two women who said they were his mother and sister - they came twice - I did not tell them I did not believe he intended to rob me, or anything like it; I had ordered a new hat; I gave them the hatter's address, and said if they would go and pay for the hat, I would not appear against him, and I did receive a new hat - he is the person who knocked me down; I cannot say he intended to rob me - it was not my wish to prosecute him; I heard nothing about his being held to bail for assaulting me - I got a hat of 23s. value; I did not pay for it - I told these women I had paid for a bottle of wine and received change for half a sovereign; but what it was I could not tell - I did not say I could not tell whether I had put it into my purse or not; I did put it in with other silver - the officer called and told me he would be before the Magistrate on the Monday; I understand he told the Magistrate I was unable to attend, but I was able although

I was greatly abused - I was up at five o'clock that morning, and at the hatters by seven; I told the officer if it was consistent with his duty, to let the prisoner go, after I had seen his mother, as I could not prove he had stolen the articles - I might have lost them before he met me; my handkerchief could not have dropped out of my pocket, my coat was buttoned up - after I was summoned I went to his mother to see if he was a deserving character; as a friend said I had done wrong by shewing so much lenity - I then saw the same two women and another, but did not tell them I was not sober, and could not tell whether I took the change of the half sovereign or not - I said, I did not wish to prosecute, but not that I did not believe he did not intend to rob me; I told the Magistrate I was unable to say he had robbed me, or that he intended, as nothing was found on him; that was my only reason - I will not swear I did not lose my money before; I had not drank to excess - I believe he was intoxicated, but cannot say to what extent.

Q. Is this the memorandum you wrote for the hatter's address? A. Yes.

EDWARD HUGGLESTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoner and two others beating the prosecutor - that was before he fell; I saw the prisoner knock him down - they all three ran away immediately he fell; I did not see either of them stop, or endeavour to take anything from him; I was crossing the road when they ran - that was before the prosecutor had got up - I am sure of that; I pursued the prisoner, and my partner went after the other two, but did not overtake them; I took the prisoner - he had run round the coach stand - there were about three coaches on the stand; I brought him back to the prosecutor immediately - he had run about fifty yards; we searched for the hat, but could not find it; I did not see either of them take it.

Q. When you brought the prisoner back was the prosecutor on the ground, or had he got up? A. He was up; I gave the prisoner to a watchman, and went away - the prosecutor appeared intoxicated, and said he had lost his hat; I think the prisoner appeared sober - I am sure he is the man who knocked the prosecutor down.

Cross-examined. Q. There was a good deal of beating before you got up, I suppose? A. No, not that I saw; I ran across, and they ran away - I saw all three strike him; he was bleeding at the nose and mouth; I took the prisoner about one hundred yards, and then gave him to another watchman, as I had to go to another desperate row; I am certain the prosecutor had got up before I returned to him with the prisoner - he was not standing motionless by him when he got up; I brought him up to him by the collar in custody - the other men had run away; the prosecutor could not have seen them a little way behind him; I went before the Magistrate the same day, and expected to find the prosecutor there - I did not tell the Magistrate I had seen him, and he was unable to leave his bed; I swear that deliberately - I never said so; the Magistrates sent me to tell him to come on Thursday, but he did not appear then, and I told the Magistrate he did not wish to appear, not liking his name to be in the newspapers; Mr. Taylor had told me so; the Magistrate ordered a summons - he did not tell me he could not swear the prisoner was the man who robbed him; De Caster, the night constable, told the Magistrate on the Monday, that the gentleman was so ill-used he dare say he could not attend; the Magistrate talked of holding the prisoner to bail for an assault.

Prisoner's Defence. I was so durnk I have not the slightest recollection of the transaction.

ELIZABETH MOSS . I am a widow, and live at Kentish-town; I am not related to the prisoner. On the Tuesday after this happened I went with Esther Porter to Mr. Taylor; I saw him at Mr. Barnet's, a surgeon, where he is assistant; he said nothing to me about the half sovereign - he said he had no wish to prosecute the prisoner, and did not believe he intended to rob him; he said if he had his hat made good it would be all very well - he did not mention the loss of his purse or money; he said "I am a hat and handkerchief out of pocket," and if that was restored it would be very well.

ESTHER PORTER . My husband is a gentleman's coachman. I accompanied Mrs. Moss to Mr. Taylor - he said to the best of his recollection all he had was the change of a half sovereign, which he had given for a bottle of wine, and he was not quite sure whether he had taken up the change or not; and that he rather believed the prisoner's intention was to rescue a cabriolet man from the watchman, than to rob him; and if his hat was made good he should hear nothing more of the matter; he said nothing about losing a purse or money; I was with the prisoner's mother when she paid for the hat - I went on Sunday with his mother to Taylor; he said the hat was not new, but if we made him amends for the crape and hat it would do.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-31

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1107. JAMES DRUMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 box, value 6d., and a bond for payment of, and value 25l., the property of Richard Wright , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD WRIGHT. I live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea , and am a hair-dresser . On the 26th of April, between three and four o'clock, my daughter was cleaning the bed-room, which is on the ground floor; I was at the lower end of the passage, and saw the prisoner come out of the bed-room window (which opens into the passage) with something under his arm, but I could not tell what - the window was open to let the air in; I have known him six or seven years; I ran up as hard as I could, but he got out before me, and by the hospital wall I saw him running; I called, Stop thief! he pulled this box from under his arm, and threw it away - I took it up; I was within two yards of him, and am certain of his person - he got away, and was taken in three days; I have had the box in my possession ever since - it is mine; I had seen it on my bed-room drawers that morning, and taken some receipts out of it - it now contains several receipts, but the bond (which was in it) is gone; I had seen it in the box on Sunday - the box is generally in the drawers, but I took it out the day before; the drawer was not locked - the box had no lock; when he threw it down, the papers flew out, and I think the bond

was lost in that way; I picked up all I saw - I cannot swear the bond was there when he took the box.

MARY ANN WRIGHT . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I cleaned the room out about three o'clock - I was on my knees, and did not see the prisoner in the room; I heard a cry of Stop thief! went out and saw him running - I have known him many years; the box was on the drawers - I saw him throw it away, and the papers flew about, as the lid came off; whether my father picked them all up I cannot say.

WILLIAM LEES . I am an officer. On the 2d of May I was at Chelsea with four prisoners; I took the prisoner in charge - he said he had made it all right, for they had taken him and let him go again.

EDWARD SOUTHWOOD . I was with Leer; we had four prisoners; the prisoner came up and said, "Oh! they have not been doing anything wrong!" I secured him.

The prisoner being called upon for his defence, handed in a petition from his mother, requesting he might be sent to sea.

GUILTY. Of stealing the box only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280529-32

1108. ROBERT HIGGS and EDWARD HALES were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 2 coats, value 3l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 25s.; 1 waistcoat, value 12s.; 4 shirts, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 knife, value 1s., the goods of Henry Young , in the dwelling-house of William Lane .

HENRY YOUNG. I am a carpenter , and lodge with Mr. Lane, in Henry-street, Hampstead-road ; Higgs lodged with us and slept in the same bed with me, for about three weeks. On Tuesday, the 22d of April, about twelve o'clock I missed all this property out of my box, which I kept locked; it was not broken open, but the lock must have been picked - I found it still locked - some of the things were almost new; they were worth more than 5l. - I saw Higgs at the Crown and Anchor Drummond-street, Hampstead-road, about three o'clock in the afternoon, with Hales; they were coming out as I went in; I went after them to look at their faces, as Higgs was differently dressed; he turned round, saw me, and then ran off - he was secured, but nothing found on him. As we were taking him to the watch-house Hales came up to him, and said, "Young man, shall I go and acquaint your friends of your being taken;" he said, "Oh, No - I want nothing of you;" he followed him to the watch-house; the officers afterwards went out and brought him in - I found one of my shirts in his (Hales) hat. I had seen all my things safe the night before, at ten o'clock; the officer found two duplicates in Hales' fob - Higgs did not know he was in custody. The coat is worth 38s.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Higgs did not know Hales was in custody? A. He did not; we had taken Higgs into the watch-house, about twenty minutes before we came out for Hales - he did not attempt to escape, but denied the charge; he did not lodge with me - I never saw him before; I had left Higgs in bed when I went out at six o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS JONES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 22d of April, at one o'clock in the day, the prisoners came to my father's shop, in Blackfriars'-road, together; Higgs pawned a coat and trousers for 28s., and a shirt for 1s. 6d. - he took the shirt away, as he was not satisfied with my offer, but returned, and pledged it; I am certain they came together - I had seen Hales before; Higgs gave the name of Hales as the person who belonged to them; Hales was present.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the value of the coat, trousers, and shirt? A. Under 2l.; the coat is not worth 1l. - I did not know where Hales resided, but knew his person and his name.

WILLIAM HOLT . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took Hales into custody, and found a shirt in his hat, and two duplicates in his fob.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you first come up? A. As Higgs was going to the watch-house; I had not got my police waistcoat on.

THOMAS BUCKERIDGE . I took Higgs in charge, but found nothing on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Higgs put in a written defence pleading distress, and received a good character.

LOUISA BAKER . My husband is employed with Mr. Gye, of Fleet-street, he is proprietor of Vanxhall Gardens; Hale lodged with us, he came in between one and two o'clock on the morning of the 21st of April, and said he had been to the play - he went out about a quarter-past eight next morning; I live in Temple-street, Elephant and Castle.

JAMES KEEN . I am a shoemaker, and live in Clifford-street, Blackfriars-road. On the 22d of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was at breakfast; I heard Hales at work in my house, but did not see him.

HIGGS - GUILTY. Aged 19. Of stealing to the value of 99s. only . - Confined 1 Year .

HALES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-33

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1109. WILLIAM WATT was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FORSYTH . I am a draper, and live at Birmingham; I deal with Messrs. Morrison and Co. On the 3d of August last I bought some goods of them for which I paid the prisoner in their counting-house - I paid him a banker's bill for 200l. and 35l. 6s. 5d. in cash; this is the bill I paid him, (looking at it) here is the invoice - I saw the prisoner write this; the discount is deducted - the actual sum I paid him was 232l. 7s. 6d. I paid it to him as the servant of Morrison and Co.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. Not to my knowledge; I have not seen him since, till to-day; I might pass him in the street without noticing him, but I know him at the bar - I was not more than three minutes paying him the money; he had his hat off - I have not the least doubt of him.

Q. Do you mean to swear the person to whom you gave the paper did not take it to the desk for somebody else to write on it? A. No - I am certain I saw him write it himself, when I paid him the money - he wrote

this memorandum on the bill, with his own hand; when I paid him the money I was close to him.

MR. JOHN DILLON , I am in partnership with James Morrison and Richard Pearson - we carry on business in Fore-street, City , as wholesale haberdashers, mercers, and warehousemen , and have one hundred and fifty or one hundred and sixty persons in our employ - our returns are more than a million in a year. The prisoner was in out employ up to the 3d of August, and beyond that; it was his duty to receive money for us, which he was immediately to enter in the cash received book - that would be the only mode by which we could ascertain that he had received money - here is the cash received book of August last; there is not entry of this sum received by the prisoner, from Mr. Forsyth, on the 3d of August. I have examined the book most carefully, and repeatedly, and it is not entered: I have not carried my examination personally further than the 3d of August; we balance our books daily - there is no such entry in any other book, and he never accounted for the money; that I have ascertained.

Q. Have you another book called a ledger? A. We have; the prisoner had no business whatever to write in the ledger; I am bound to add, he was at other times, during a press of business, allowed to enter in the ledger, but not at this time, and it was not his duty: he was never allowed to do it except when specially appointed; one side of the ledger is a copy from the cash received book - there are no original entries in it; I find, that in our ready money ledger, Mr. Forsyth is charged with goods, 182l. 2s. 8d., and 48l. 3s. 3d.; those charges are in the hand-writing of the original posting clerk, and there is on the credit side an entry in the prisoner's writing, "3d of August, 210," which purports to be the number of a bill - "77," denoting the folio; the entry is posted from the cash received book, but there is no such entry in that book; the next item is 2l. 17s. 11d. interest, then 228l., importing that that sum had been posted from folio 77 of the cash received book; the 228l. odd, added to 2l. 17s. 11d., balances the sums of 182l. 8s. and 48l. 3s. 3d. - the bill should have been marked 210, and given over to me, but it was never done; the account is closed in the ledger by this entry, and we should never have thought of applying for the money - but the entry is altogether a deception; it is a fictitious entry. The account produced by Mr. Forsyth is in the prisoner's hand-writing; he left our service on the 2d of January, this year; we had not then discovered the transaction; if we had known of Mr. Forsyth having had these goods, we should have applied for the money within a month, he being a ready money customer. The prisoner went from our employ to Mr. Ellis, of Ludgate-street; we afterwards made a discovery, but not of this transaction - I went to Mr. Ellis', with Mr. Ashurst, our solicitor, on the 9th or 10th of March - I saw the prisoner there, and said to him, "There are some entries in the books, made by you, which we cannot understand; I wish you to go with us and explain them" - his answers were confused; I cannot give them, except that he asked to go to get his hat, in great agitation of manner - he said, "Let me go and get my hat;" we said we must go with him - he made a motion to go to the door at which we had entered, but suddenly turned to a French glass door, forced it open violently, ran across some leads into another house belonging to Mr. Ellis; we followed him, crying, "Stop, Watt - Stop thief!" he escaped out of a back door; I did not see him again till he was in custody, about a month ago.

Q. Look at the endorsement on this bill of exchange, and tell me whose hand-writing it is? A. It is endorsed by Mr. Forsyth, and this receipt, "August 4, 1827, received the contents, William Watt ," is in the prisoner's writing; the bill is for 200l. on the Cardiff Bank, at thirty-five days' date, payable at Messrs. Glyn's bank, London - here is a letter which came into my possession in consequence of my writing to Mr. Symer, a banker, of Dundee - he is agent for the British Banking Company, for Dundee - the letter is all in the prisoner's hand-writing, the figures and all.

JOHN LUKEY . I am a clerk to Messrs. Glyn and Co. This Cardiff Bank bill was brought to our house for payment - I paid it with a 200l. Bank note, No. 9529, dated the 9th of July, 1827; here is the book with the entry, in my own hand-writing.(Letter read.)

To Mr. Symer, Dundee. - August 6th, 106, Fore-street.

SIR, - The enclosed also place to my credit with the British Linen Company - is it meant by your letter that no money deposited in your bank can be withdrawn by means of a cheque? I am led to put this question from your request that I send a receipt endorsed, when money is required. I may not withdraw the whole at once, it may be part; if any respectable party were presenting a cheque for payment from me, would it be dishonoured? I regret giving you trouble by such inquiries, but am compelled to do so, from ignorance of the system adopted by your bank. Oblige me by advising of the receipt, as under. Yours, respectfully, WM. WATT.

N. B. I shall desire a gentleman to call and pay 2s. 5d. postage of the last remittance, which I ommitted to pay.

200l. No. 9529 - 20l. No. 1735. - Total 220l.

MR. DILLON. The figures, and all this letter are his writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Nothing passed at Ellis' about this transaction? A. No; the ledger is posted by a young man named Wilkins; we can refer to it at any time, and cheque it by the cash book, if we chose. The prisoner very seldom made an entry in the ledger; I cannot find the hand-writing of any other clerk in it, except the one who kept it - we only keep one cash received book, but have several ledgers. Boon and Slater are in our employ; it is not the business of either of them to make entries in the ledger - I am certain Boon never did - it is barely possible that Slater might; the number 210 is merely to distinguish that it was a bill and not cash; the whole sum is entered as 228l., not 232l.; I can explain that - Mr. Forsyth made a separate purchase, which came to 4l. 8s. 6d., and that is the next entry. The prisoner received money, and Slater also. The prisoner was never employed as an entering clerk.

Q. Suppose these entries were made by one person, the clerk who came next would see them? A. Why, the clerk who enters in the book has a great deal to do, and would attend to nothing but what he was about; he certainly ought to have been sharp enough to discover the entry.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is it your practice to look into that ledger often? A. No; we look into the cash received book - if we find the money posted in the ledger we conclude all is right.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Can you say positively, from your recollection, that this bill was not paid to you? A. Not from my recollection, but from the course of our business, I say decidedly not - we have no entry of it except this fictitious one in the ledger: if it had been in the cashbook it would have been regular - the person posting the ledger has the cash-book at his side; it is not called over by one, and entered by another.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If that payment had been entered in the book, should you not have discovered it? A. Yes; if it had been entered there and not brought to account I should have discovered it that day, the cash would have been wrong; this entry could not be made by mistake, for he has put the folio from which it purports to be brought, and no such entry is in that folio. I am positive this 200l. bill has never passed through our hands, it has none of our marks on it whatever.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a City officer. I made search in London for the prisoner, and in consequence of information I went to Edinburgh on the 26th of April and found him there, at ten o'clock on Sunday night the 27th I was waiting the arrival of a smack and took him near St. Andrew's-square; he then had on a pair of mustachios; I went in front of him and seized him by the throat; we had a struggle and both fell - some person came up to my assistance and secured him. He answered to the name of Watt, and gave me up everything he had about him - I found this paper on him.

MR. DILLON. This is in the prisoner's hand-writing -(read.)

To Mrs. Williams, Post Office - to be called for.

MY DEAR CAROLINE. - Be careful, at Stall's,121, Rose-street. To prevent watching go into several houses and ask after furnished lodgings, and you will see if any one is coming after you. - I am, your affectionate husband WILLIAMS.

Prisoner. I do not conceive it necessary to say any thing to the charge, it may go to the Jury as it is.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-34

1110. HENRY FOWLER was indicted for embezzlement .

MARIA CAUGHT . I am servant to Mr. Gilbert, of Upper Thames-street. On the 6th of February I paid the prisoner 16s. 9 1/2d. on account of Mr. Frazer, his master, who is our baker, and saw him write this receipt (read) and on the 5th or 7th of March I paid him another sum of 16s. 9 1/2d., and saw him write this receipt.

WILLIAM FRAZER . I am a baker , and live in Upper Thames-street . The prisoner was in my employ - he carried out bread, and received money for it ; Gilbert owed me 16s. 9 1/2d., and more, according to my account; the prisoner did not pay me that sum in February, nor in March; I found it had been paid, and asked if it was settled - he stood confounded, but said nothing. I have never received any part of these sums. I took him in charge on the 17th of April - he said he was sorry for it.

Prisoner. My master stopped so much a week out of my wages for this, when he found it out.

MR. FRAZER. I stopped 8s. a week for four weeks, but there was a variety of other sums; it was not for these sums; I began to stop it before I found this out; they are still unsatisfied to me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-35

1111. JOHN BUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 17 window-sashes, value 2l. , the goods of Joseph Jackson .

JOSEPH JACKSON. I am a broker , and live in Old-street-road. These sashes were in some houses of mine, in Bow-common-lane ; four of them were not fixed; I did not miss them till I found the prisoner in custody with them.

JEREMIAH THOMAS DUGGAN . I am a shoemaker, and live in Bow-common-lane. Last Friday, in consequence of information from Holcroft's sister; I found the prisoner at Holcroft's - she desired me to apprehend him; I asked how he came by these sashes; he said he was ordered by a person to drive them in a horse and cart from the corner of Union-street to Holcroft's - that he drove them there, and returned to the man, and was to call next day at Holcroft's for half a crown, and he had come for it then; he said he did not know the man who had employed him, nor where he lived.

MARIA HAWKINS . I live at No. 27, Liverpool-street, Bishopsgate, at Holcroft's. Late on Thursday night the prisoner knocked at the door, and asked if Holcroft was at home - I said he would not be in till late, but he could see him at eight o'clock in the morning, or from eleven till two; I heard a cart driving, but did not see it- he came again on Friday, after one o'clock, and asked for Holcroft; the officer took him before he saw Holcroft; Mrs. Holcroft said."This is the man who came to our house last night with the sashes;" when he came at night he asked if I would give him leave to leave the sashes, and he did so.

JOHN HOLCROFT . I am a plumber and glazier. On Friday morning, at seven o'clock, I found some sashes at my house, which the prosecutor claimed. I never saw the prisoner myself.

JAMES LOVEL . I am a constable. On Friday, between one and two o'clock, I went to Holcroft's with Duggan, and waited till the prisoner came; I asked if he had brought these sashes there; he said he had - that he was employed by a man the night before, at the end of Union-street, which is about four hundred yards from Holcroft's house; he said he did not know the man's name; I asked what he had come there for then - he then denied having brought the sashes; I found seventeen sashes there, which Duggan claimed as Jackson's.

JEREMIAH THOMAS DUGGAN . I know the prosecutor's premises; some of the sashes were stolen from the house I live in. I have the care of all his houses; I had glazed the sashes, and put ropes to them; I know them to be his.

Prisoner's Defence. This man asked me to take the cart and leave the things at Holcroft's; when I went back he said he would give me half a crown, but he had

no change, but if I would call there between one and two o'clock next day, he would give me half a crown.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280529-36

1112. THOMAS PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 1 piece of handkerchiefs, value 36s.; 9 gauze handkerchiefs, value 36s., and 1 other gauze handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of Stephen Sewell .

FRANCES SEWELL . I am the wife of Stephen Sewell; we keep a haberdasher's shop in Fetter-lane . On the 24th of April, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop with two others, and asked for ribbons - I showed him some; he bought a small quantity, which came to 2 1/2d., and paid for it; all these handkerchiefs were in the shop window, within his reach; they all left together - the others bought nothing; one of them had asked to see some stockings - he was close by the prisoner, and drew my attention from him; I was alone in the shop, and did not see the handkerchiefs taken; a neighbour came in almost immediately after they left, and alarmed me; I went out, and saw the prisoner a few doors off; this gauze handkerchief was found on him.

GEORGE TICKELL . I am a linen-draper, and live in Leadenhall-street. I followed the prisoner, in company with two others, from my own house to Fetter-lane; they went into Sewell's shop - I saw the prisoner and one of the others come out; the prisoner was in the act of putting something into his pocket, which he had some difficulty in doing; I did not see what became of the third person - I sent for Mrs. Sewell; the prisoner and his companion walked up a court, which is a thoroughfare; I stood at the end of the court, and saw the prisoner pull something out, which he gave to his companion; I went up, collared the prisoner, and told him to pull those things out of his pocket; his companion then struck me on the back of my neck; I kept hold of the prisoner, pushed him into a little cheesemonger's shop, and told him to pull out what he had in his pocket; he pulled out his own handkerchief and a new gauze one; Mrs. Sewell claimed it; it was some time before the constable came; he asked me to give him a little liberty; he got on a hamper, and then gave me a severe kick in a certain place, but I held him, and he was secured; he also attempted to stab me with a knife, and tore my trousers and drawers.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am a constable, and took him in charge; I found 3s. on him.(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had bought the handkerchief in Petticoat-lane for 2s. 6d., and had called at the prosecutrix's shop for a dozen of pins, and that Mrs. Sewell could not identify the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-37

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JUNE 2.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1113. JANE WILLIAMS and JANE WHITE were indicted for feloniously assaulting Abraham Jacobs , on the 8th of May , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 48 pencils, value 4s. 6d.; 3 spoons, value 6d., and 8 ozs. of cedar shavings, value 1s., his property .

ABRAHAM JACOBS. I live in Samuel-street, Cannon-street-road, and am a spectacle-maker ; I sell my goods about. On the 8th of May, at half-past ten o'clock at night, as I was going home to my family, the prisoners came up to me in Whitechapel , and asked where I was going - I had drank nothing but a pint of beer and was quite sober; I told them I was going home - they said I should go with them - I refused; one of them then knocked me down - the other took my bundle and ran away with it; it contained the property stated - one of them used me most cruel, and cut my hand and knee.

Q. Was your bundle snatched away, or did you receive the blow first? A. I received the blow first; I would not part with my bundle - I kept it as long as I could, but they overpowered me; I called out "Watchman, I am robbed! Stop thief!" and I ran after them myself - I never lost sight of them, and am certain they are the women; White knocked me down and the other ran away with my bundle: the watchman got it from them in the same state as I had lost it - I received a terrible cut on my ear from the blow; it was two hours before my wife could stop the blood.

Prisoner WHITE. I have been so ill, I could not knock him down.

ABRAHAM JACOBS. She was hearty enough at the time - she was quite well then, and made fun of me at the office, and dared me very much - she was in perfect health; the blood was drawn by a blow from the fist, when I was knocked down.

JOSEPH BENNETT . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. On the 8th of May, about half-past ten or eleven o'clock, I was standing opposite Swan-yard on the right hand side of the way - I was looking over and saw the prisoners talking together for about three minutes; I was standing there and kept noticing them - I saw the two prisoners run away, and he immediately hallooed out Stop thief! he ran after them and fell down - he did not fall before that; I crossed over, and they ran up Swan-yard - I secured them up in the corner of the yard, which is no thoroughfare - anybody might see them: I found the bundle on the ground, between them both - the prosecutor came up as soon as he could; he had a little blood on his ear, which I suppose had arisen from the fall - he certainly was not knocked down; he described the bundle before he saw the contents; the prisoners said they had met him, and he asked them to go home with him - that he took them into a shop, and gave them liquor, and he had given the bundle into their hands, to take care of for him - White appeared rather white and delicate, but was able to run.

JOSEPH BREN . I am a watchman. My attention was attracted by seeing persons running; I saw these persons running down Swan-yard; White came out of the yard, and I stopped her - Williams was at the bottom of the yard; Bennett picked up the bundle; White looked pale, and was certainly ill, but not so ill as she is now.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WHITE's Defence. We met him - he asked us to take him home; he took us into a liquor shop, and gave us some gin - he gave us the bundle to carry, but we would not go home with him; he was very tipsy, and with attempting to run to catch hold of us he fell.

JOSEPH BREN. He was so intoxicated; we were obliged to lead him to the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-38

Second London Jury - before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1114. JAMES FEHRMANN was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain bill of exchange , which is as follows: -

Vienna, 26th December, 1827 - £500.

Three months after sight please to pay, for this my first of exchange, to the order of Messrs. St. Lurman and Co. the sum of 500l. sterling, which place to the account of

Your most obedient servant, HARRIET BARNARD .

To N. M. Rothschild, Esq. London.

with intent to defraud John Masterman and others; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

THIRD COUNT, for feloniously forging an acceptance on the said bill, as follows: -

9th January, 1828 - 8001.

Accepted £500, payable at Messrs. Mastermans and Co.

N. M. ROTHSCHILD.

with the like intent.

NINE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. BRODRICK and LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DODD FIDLER , clerk to Mr. Gates, solicitor, proved the service of a notice on the prisoner, to produce in Court two bills of exchange, referred to in the evidence of Mr. Wright.

MR. JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a merchant, and live in Aldermanbury. On the 15th of January I saw the prisoner in my counting-house; he produced to me this bill of exchange for 500l. (looking at it,) - I have put my name on it; he said he had brought that bill in payment of two drafts which I had upon him - one, which was for 200l., became due that day, the other was for 209l. 19s., and was due on the 26th of December, and was unpaid; I handed the draft of 500l. to my clerk in Fehrmann's presence - he said he would call the following day, in order to have the discount of the bill adjusted, and to receive a cheque for the balance; he did call on the 16th, and received the difference from my clerk - I was present, but did not adjust it with him; my clerk had the charge of the bill - he kept it some time, and then paid it into my bankers; the balance paid to the prisoner was 84l. odd.

Q. Now, previous to the 15th of January, had you made any communication to the prisoner on the subject of the bill over due, and the one about to become due on the 15th of January? A. Yes; I am not certain whether I sent my clerk, or whether I wrote to him, but I applied to him for payment of the draft; and on the 15th of January he stated that he was obliged to me for waiting for the payment of the bill till that date. I had not heard or seen him since my application; he had made a reply to it; my own hand-writing is on this 500l. bill - I also know it by its general character; I wrote upon it previous to its being paid into my bankers - I do not think I ever saw it after that morning till the evening it became due; when it was returned to me with the words, "acceptance forged" written on it, which was not on it when I parted with it - the acceptance was on it when I received it, or I should not have taken it - the endorsement by the payee to Fehrmann was also on it; I am not aware of any alteration on it since I received it from him, except the words, "acceptance forged" being on it; and an endorsement purporting to be by Messrs. Lubbock - also my own endorsement which I have struck out.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You knew at the time you have been speaking of, that the prisoner was in the employ of Messrs. Ward & Co.? A. Yes; they are merchants of Broad-street; I did not know it of my own knowledge, but was informed so - I made no inquiry as to the bill being genuine, before he called on the 16th; he left it with me on the 15th - I cannot tell the time, but it was previous to my leaving business before dinner; if it was not in the morning, I should think it was early in the afternoon - he called about the middle of the day, on the 16th I think; I had plenty of time to make inquiry about the bill, but did not.

Q. I presume you speak from the general appearance of the instrument when you say you are not aware of any alteration, except what you have mentioned? A. Yes: I see a number which my clerk added when he entered it; that is, No. 920 - I cannot tell whether these other numbers were on it, or the letter S. in the right hand lower corner.

Q. I see under the words, "In need with Messrs. Doxat and Co." is, "St. L. & Co.;" are you able to say whether that was on it when you took it? A. No, I did not look at those particulars; I observed, "Doxat and Co." on it - I am not sure whether those words were there or not; I observed the name of Rothschild on the acceptance, and that satisfied me - I should state that the acceptance was not a very legible one; but I have been in the habit of receiving bills on him, and thought the acceptance was similar; I believe the prisoner had told me he was in expectation of an acceptance from the Mauritius, and I think he said, from the Rio de la Plata - he also spoke of a remittance from Germany: I do not know of his having any speculation with Weise and Co. - the two bills I had previously held, were drawn by Weise and Co. on him; I had had other bills drawn by them on him some time ago, and paid by the prisoner - they are hat-manufacturers; I never heard of bills being transmitted from abroad with the endorsement in blank, to be inserted by the correspondent - I do not know whether there is such a firm as Stephen Lurman, Son, and Co., abroad.

MR. LAW. Q. Do you know of any such firm as Saint Lurman and Co., or Stephen Lemain and Co.? A. I do not.

SAMUEL COCKAIN . I am clerk to Mr. Wright; I paid this bill to Messrs. Lubbock's, his bankers; about a month before it became due; I saw one endorsement on it besides Mr. Wright's; he endorsed it when I paid it

in - I looked at the acceptance, and know the same acceptance was on it then as now.

JOHN GEORGE . I am clerk to Sir John Lubbock and Co., bankers, of Mansion-house-street; I presented this bill on the 12th of April to Mr. Clemson, Messrs. Masterman's clearing-clerk, at the clearing-house in Lombard-street; I left it in his possession, and a very few minutes after that, I saw the prisoner at the clearing-house, it was about twelve o'clock; he said, "You have a bill of 500l. accepted at Mastermans, by Mr. Rothschild" - I referred to my book, and said, I had delivered it to Messrs. Masterman's clerk; I saw him go to Masterman's clerk - it is not usual to apply at a clearing-house to take up bills; it is sometimes done, I believe - I never gave up a bill; I have been applied to for them, and refused - the bill was brought to me again in the course of the afternoon; I did not receive it, but the gentleman who brought it to me took it to our house - this was between four and five o'clock; the words, "Acceptance forged" were then written on it - I do not know whether the gentleman who produced it to me, was one of Messrs. Masterman's firm, or a clerk; the same person took it away again.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not know that person? A. I did not; he is here - the words, "Acceptance forged," are in large characters - whether anything else has been written on it, I do not know; I received it on the 12th of April, with a number of other bills to take to the clearing-house; I received them from no one - they are laid on the desk by one of the partners, and I take them off when I want them; I only know what hands it had been in from the endorsement - I presume it was kept in our safe while in our hands.

EDMUND CLEMSON . I am clerk to Messrs. John Masterman and Co.; there are four other partners I believe; On the 12th of April I was at the clearing-house, and received this bill from Messrs. Lubbock's clerk, to enter in my book to their credit, as it purports to be payable at our house; after I had received it, the prisoner applied to me at the clearing-house - he said he wanted to take up a bill of 500l. of Rothschild's acceptance, which I had received from Lubbocks; I told him I could not give it up without authority from our house, and referred him to them, he then went away; he assigned as his reason that he wanted to send it into the country; his application being rather unusual, induced me to look at the bill, and I did not think the signature of Mr. Rothschild authentic; I never gave up bills on such an application. I made a minute of the bill in my book and took it home; I delivered it to Mr. Daniel Mildred, one of our firm.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You say it was rather an unusual application; I gather from that, that you have known such applications made? A. I have; persons, not in the employ of bankers, have access to the clearing-house; there were not so many clerks there at this time as there would have been in the morning; there could be only one from each house at that time, that would be about thirty; I am accustomed to see Mr. Rothschild's acceptance daily; the bill had not been actually cleared when the prisoner applied to me; I had not taken it down in my book - it was returned to Messrs. Lubbock's; we do not consider bills actually cleared till five o'clock; it had been taken down in account.

COURT. Q. You do not consider the transaction complete till five o'clock? A. No; after the application was made, I entered the bill in my book, but that was not a final settlement.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. It is usual to take an account of all bills you have on that house? A. Yes, in order to allow them in account, if there are funds to meet them; there is sometimes a difference in Mr. Rothschilds acceptance, some are more legible than others, that is the only difference; I never knew his first names entirely omitted.

Q. Is there any first names to this? looking at it) A. Here is a mark, purporting to be the initials N. & M. - I will swear that - I have seen acceptances like this - I have been with Messrs. Masterman nearly twelve years, and believe he has kept an account there all that time.

Q. Did you never know him sign a different name altogether? A. No; I never saw him write; he signs all his bills and cheques himself; except his wife, she signs a great many for him; I cannot speak to her signing acceptances; I never knew an acceptance signed N. De Rothschild, nor have I ever seen acceptances which could not be read, and yet have turned out to be his; I never knew acceptances of his refused as forgeries, which afterwards proved to be genuine - but I do not pay the bills myself, I only take them down; the acceptance in question bears some resemblance to his.

Q. Pray do you know whether or not Masterman's have received the 500l. for this bill? A. They have received 500l. I understand; I have heard that it was paid in on the same day, but do not know of my own knowledge - I do not keep the book in which discharges are written against bills.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you in the first instance receive this bill as the acceptance of Mr. Rothschild? A. I took it as a bill, as I do all others; I have nothing to do with the acceptance - I take them down in my book, and they are examined at home; my duty is only to take an account of such bills as are sent to me; I should not have looked at the acceptance except from the application made by the prisoner.

REUBEN BROWNING . I am a clerk to Mr. Nathan Meyer Rothschild , and am well acquainted with his hand-writing - (looking at the bill) - I believe this acceptance is not his; I am certain the words above the signature are not his, and I do not know the hand-writing; I know Mrs. Rothschild's writing - it is not her's; she does not accept bills for Mr. Rothschild - I am acquainted with Mr. Rothschild's correspondents at Vienna - he has none of the name of Harriet Barnard; I do not myself write to Vienna - I write to other places; Mr. Kerchner writes to Vienna; Mr. Rothschild has no account with the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you been in Mr. Rothschild's employ? A. Eight or nine years; he has an immense correspondence in pecuniary matters, and accepts bills for many foreign parties - they circulate very readily both on the continent and in England; I do not know of the prisoner being particularly acquainted with Mr. Rothschild, so as to give him an op

portunity of knowing his mode of hand-writing - I believe he is a German.

Q. During the time you have been with Mr. Rothschild, how many persons have accepted bills for him to your knowledge? A. Mrs. Rothschild in general, and on one occasion, when Mr. Rothschild went to the Continent, he left Mr. B. Cohen and Samuel Cohen, with a power of procuration for him; I think that was the case, but am not certain - they are the only persons I ever knew accept for him: I think he has been to the Continent twice since I have lived with him - he was there last, about three years ago; I believe he once added De to Rothschild - he does now occasionally sign so.

Q. Is not his hand-writing in acceptances almost illegible? A. Not so to me; at times I can decypher the whole, but not always - he writes very indistinctly.

Q. There is at times a scratch, and then a letter emerges? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. You know his hand-writing, we suppose, whether it is distinct or not - you can tell whether it is the character of his hand-writing? A. I think I can.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Does it not happen that some times one letter is legible, and at another time another; sometimes, for instance, an R, or an o, and no others? A. In general the ths is legible, almost always the oths is legible; I never knew a genuine acceptance of his being returned as forged; I never of my own knowledge knew any acceptance, cheque, or papers, sent from the bankers to inquire whether the signature was his or not, and the answer to be given that it was. I am corresponding clerk - I know nothing of Harriet Barnard.

MR. LAW. Q. Should you have had the means of knowing if there had been such a correspondent with the house? A. I think I should.

EDWARD TURNER . I am clerk to Mr. Rothschild, and have been so about nineteen years; the signature to the acceptance of this bill is not his hand-writing; I do not know whose writing the words "accepted, &c." are - it is not the hand-writing of any clerk in his house, nor is it his writing; I know most of the correspondents of the house - I know no such person as Harriet Barnard, of Vienna, or any where.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You are not the Vienna corresponding clerk? A. I am not, nor a corresponding clerk at all now: bills are sometimes drawn by persons who do not come within the general class of correspondents, but I think I must have some previous knowledge of the transaction, if a person has been authorized to draw a bill; I must have had some knowledge of them first, for those instances must have arisen from letters of credit - I write the letters of credit from this country; Mr. Rothschild has a brother at Vienna; Mr. Rothschild very seldom signs his name De Rothschild now, if he does ever - he may at times in correspondence.

Q. Look at the bill - is that signature N.M. Rothschild? A. Yes, I suppose it is intended for it; I have no doubt it is meant for that - there is something like N or M, I do not know which - it is nothing like De; Mr. Rothschild is not in the habit of accepting with one signature only; this is so indistinct I can hardly tell whether it is N or M; Mrs. Rothschild signs by procuration only.

COURT. Q. And she expresses it to be by procuration, does she? A. Always, my Lord, and she signs cheques by procuration always - she never signs but by procuration.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you ever known a genuine acceptance of Mr. Rothschild's rejected as a forgery? A. Never; I believe a cheque was once doubted, and sent back to be ascertained whether it was correct; Mr. Rothschild has not many correspondents in Vienna - he differs sometimes in signing his acceptances.

Q. That circumstance arises from the haste in which he has to transact his affairs? A. I think that is the only cause.

HENRY PARNELL MOORE DESPARD . I am clerk to Messrs. Wards; the prisoner was a fellow clerk - I am well acquainted with his hand-writing.

Q. Will you look at the endorsement on this bill, purporting to be that of Messrs. St. Lurman and Son, in whose hand-writing, to the best of your belief, is that? A. To my belief it is Mr. Fehrmann's hand-writing, the whole of the endorsement except the signature "Pay Mr. J. Fehrmann or order value account, J.F.B.G., Bremen, Jan. 5, 1828;" I cannot say whose hand-writing "St. Lurman and Son" is- I know no hand-writing similar to it; I believe the words"In need with Messrs. Doxat and Co.," on the face of the bill, to be the prisoner's hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is it not customary when a foreign bill comes endorsed in blank, for the person who receives it to write a special direct on to pay it to himself; have you not known it done many times? A. No, I have not; I have seen a good deal of bills - I do not know of such a thing, but should not think it unlikely - I do not know the signature of St. Lurman and Co.

Q. The writing above it is without disguise, the writing of the prisoner; you have no doubt of recognizing it? A. There is a slight difference from his usual writing; but I believe it to be his - I cannot say what caused the difference; the words, "In need at Doxat and Co." is nothing that binds anybody.

WILLIAM WARD , ESQ. M.P. The prisoner has been a clerk in our house for the last two years; I am acquainted with his hand-writing - I believe the words "Pay J. Fehrmann or order, value on account," on the back of this bill, to be his hand-writing; I cannot swear to these initials - there is a blot on the word, "Bremen;" I cannot tell whether that is his hand-writing - I have no belief whatever as to the signature; I believe the words."In need with Messrs. Doxat and Co." on the face of it to be his writing - but the initials I cannot give an opinion on; it is a common practice with parties abroad, to put a not a bene to their bills in order, that if the party to whom it is addressed do not pay it, the party referred to will; that is the object of this "In need, &c.," it might be written by any party interested in the bill - I cannot make out the initials at the end of it?

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner in your employ up to the day he was apprehended? A. Yes, he had been transacting my business up to that moment, he was withdrawn from me by no other circumstance.

Q. From your experience of him, what was your opinion of his character? A. He was not in that very confidential situation with me to enable me to give him

the hightest character for responsibility; I believe him to have spent too much money, and to have become embarrassed by that circumstance - I could not give him the most favourable character; I did not know sufficient of him to discharge him - at the same time I had not the highest opinion of his character.

Q. Did you known anything against his honesty at all, or was it merely his embarrassments? A. I cannot give any other answers than I have; as far as my means of judging went, I did not place the highest estimate upon his character.

MR. LEWIS DOXAT . I am a partner in the house of Doxat and Co.; there is no firm of that name except ours - we have no correspondents named St. Lurman and Son, nor Stephen Lurman; there is no name in this bill that had authority to refer to us in case of need - the prisoner had no authority to do so.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If a bill was drawn, although you were not advised of it at the time, and a reference had been made to you, it might happen that it might be communicated to you afterwards? A. That is the object of the endorsement, but merchants are not in the habit of receiving advice of undertakings, in case of need.

COURT. Q. You have no such correspondent as II. Barnard? A. No.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am a marshal of the City. I took the prisoner into custody on the 12th of April, at the Terrace, Kentish-town, between five and six o'clock in the evening; I saw him come out of a house on the terrace; I searched him, and received from him a 40l. and two 10l. notes; I searched his house, and got a bunch of keys from Mrs. Fehrmann - he was not present; I had previously heard him acknowledge her as his wife - he had gone into the house with me for two or three minutes.

MR. COPE also deposed to finding some papers in a wardrobe in the prisoner's house, but they were not given in evidence.

The bill was here read.

Prisoner's Defence. Gentlemen, - Embarrassed and overwhelmed by the perilous situation in which I am placed, and being also a foreigner, wholly ignorant of your laws, and but imperfectly acquainted with your language, I feel myself very incompetent to the task of defending myself with proper effect against this most serious charge, - but relying on your justice and liberality to make allowances for my difficulties, I shall narrate to you a short history of the circumstances which have brought me to my present distressing and degrading situation. My parents, who are highly respectable, placed me out at an early age as a mercantile clerk, and about six years ago I came over to this country, with excellent recommendations, and entered into service with Messrs. - and Co., with whom I staid till their failure: I then went into the house of Mr. Elster, and after living with him two years, with unblemished reputation, I engaged myself to the respectable firm of Messrs. Ward's, with whom I lived up to the moment of this charge; and the beginning of last year married an amiable and respectable young lady: until that period my salary was more than sufficient for my support, and as my wife had a small fortune, which was settled on herself and her offspring, we might have lived comfortably; but having the prospect of a family, I was induced to enter into a mercantile speculation, of sending hats to the Mauritius, which Mr. Weise, the hatter, led me to expect would be a prosperous adventure; I gave him my acceptance, at nine months, which I was given to understand would be the time by which the returns would be made; I afterwards made a shipment to Rio Janeiro; unfortunately, the remittances for the goods did not come to hand in sufficient time to enable me to take up my acceptances, and as Mr. Wright held two acceptances which he was pressing me to pay, I became embarrassed and alarmed, lest I should be involved in law proceedings; my credit injured, and the loss of my situation incurred; in this dilemma I consulted a most respectable individual, on whose advice I placed most implicit reliance, as we had been friends from my boyhood; this friend offered to relieve me from my difficulties, saying he had a bill just transmitted to him from abroad, which had been transmitted from Mr. Rothschild, who had accepted it under circumstances which it was unnecessary for him to tell, or for us to know; the bill had three months to run, and I was welcome to the loan of it; provided I pledged my word to take it up, or provide for it, as Mr. Rothschild, (he said) had accepted it on the promise that it should be provided for by the drawer, or on the drawer's account; my friend also engaged me in the most solemn assurance, that if a question arose about the bill, I was to keep his name a profound secret - these promises I gave, and consider myself bound most sacredly and inviolably to adhere to them, whatever may be the consequence; unfortunately, my friend left England shortly after the transaction, and I have been unable to obtain any explanation from him, or a release from my engagement: but from the knowledge I have of his character, I cannot conceive he would have endangered my liberty, or my life, by placing in my hands a fabricated document. I am led to believe, as the bill appears to be drawn by a female, there may be circumstances of a delicate nature about it, which might be wished to be concealed, and this was my impression at the first moment I received it. So anxious was I to perform my promise, I even endeavoured to take up the bill in the morning, wishing to send it out of the country, as the clerk has stated; but not succeeding - I even went and paid 500l. into the banker's, on Messrs. Rothschild's account. After my hours of business were over, I went home in the stage, as was my custom, to enjoy the society of my dear wife and infant; when I was taken into custody by Mr. Cope, the marshal. I may be permitted here to state, that if I had been conscious of any criminality, I had sufficent warning given me to make my escape; for several minutes before I was taken, I was informed the officers were about my house, inquiring for me, but as I had done nothing dishonest, I went home, and surrendered myself to Mr. Cope and the gentleman who accompanied him. I trust, gentleman, from this simple statement of facts, you will see nothing to justify the present charge; I have always been taught to revere the English law, because it not only protects the innocent, but presumes every one to be innocent till the contrary is proved; would not, however, this excellent maxim be reversed, if by any legal perversion, an innocent individual was supposed to be guilty of fraud, when all the facts prove no such intention existed? and may I not, with humble confidence, refer to the facts in my case, and assert there is nothing to prove I uttered

this bill with a fraudulent intention? is not the contrary shown in every stage of the proceedings? if fraud had been intended, was it likely I should have put my name to the bill, or passed it to a gentleman to whom I was well known? or if fraud had been contemplated, should I have shown such anxiety to take up the bill? A fraudulent and guilty man, when he had succeeded in his object, flies from justice with the produce of his fraud; but my anxiety was to repay that which I considered a loan; and so far from attempting flight, when I was told the officers were in search of me, I went and resigned myself to them. As a further proof of my innocence, permit me to say, if I had been dishonestly disposed, I might have procured money without the slightest risk of detection; in the present instance detection was certain; but with the thousands passing through my hands, I might have taken to any amount, without discovery. Gentlemen, I beg to assure you I have never been a gamester or profligate; I have never squandered money in heedless expences - but on the contrary, every one who knows me can prove my habits have been correct and proper, and I have always passed my leisure hours either in the company of sedate friends, or generally in the bosom of my family. My embarrassments arose from what might be supposed to be imprudent speculations; even the morning I was taken to the Mansion-house, Mr. Cope handed me a letter, containing a bill of lading from the Mauritius, for part of the property I had before expected. I will not trouble you with further observations, trusting I have already offered sufficient to prove my innocence; if, however, from the peculiarity of the circumstances under which I became possessed of this bill, I am unable to preserve myself from suspicion, I very confidently hope you will not, on suspicion alone, consign a fellow creature to the grave; by the humane practice of the English law, if a doubt exists, the prisoner is saved, on the principle, that it is far better that nine hundred and ninety-nine guilty persons should escape, than an innocent man suffer; this kind benevolent feeling will, I trust, operate in my case, and by your verdict of not guilty, I shall be restored to the dear connexions I have in society, my aged and beloved parents, my amiable and excellent wife, and my darling infant, all of whose future happiness or misery depends on the result of this trial, and who are now, with trembling anxiety, awaiting your decision. - Gentlemen, my life, and the interests of all those dear to me, are in your hands, and to your kind and feeling hearts we all most humbly resign ourselves.

MR. CLARKSON to MR. COPE. Q. Do you remember the prisoner's examination at the Mansion-house? A. Yes; I delivered him a foreign letter on the Monday, it was brought to me from Messrs. Wards; I delivered it to him by the Lord Mayor's order, and I was to see what it contained, which was a bill of lading.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am proprietor of a Kentish-town stage. On the morning of the 12th of April, the prisoner was a passenger to town; and about a quater-past five in the evening I saw Mr. Cope at Kentish-town, he was alone when he first spoke to me, and I afterwards told the prisoner there were three men wanting him - I was returning from Highgate-hill to London; the prisoner was standing at his gate on the terrace as I passed - he walked off the terrace into the road to me, and I told him three persons wanted him; he walked to the back of my coach; whether he beckoned to the parties who wanted him or not, I cannot say - but he stood there till they came up to him; he was about two hundred yards from them when this passed - he stood still till they came up to him.

COURT. Q. Did you see Mr. Cope? A. Yes, he was dressed in plain clothes; he said he was going to dine with the prisoner, and asked me the number.

COURT. Q. You went and told the prisoner some persons were after him? A. No, he came to me; I stopped my coach to deliver a parcel - I did not tell him this in consequence of anything which had been previously said to me.

Q. Did not Mr. Cope come up the moment you had told him? A. No, I had driven about fifty yards before they came up to him; I looked over the back of my coach and saw them - I thought there was a sheriff's writ against him.

JOHN ROWOOD . I am in Mr. Rothschild's service, and have been so twenty-five years; Mrs. Rothschild is in the habit of accepting bills for him - she has done it without procuration, merely by his letters.

COURT. Q. You do not know how she signed? A. Hannah Rothschild; I have seen her signature without stating it was by procuration - I never knew any other person to accept for Mr. Rothschild.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-39

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1115. RICHARD MARCH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 2 sheep, price 1l ., the property of Thomas Henry White .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am servant to Thomas Henry White, of Chase Lodge, Enfield . On Saturday night, the 19th of April, he had eleven sheep; I counted them about seven o'clock in the evening - I went there again about eight next morning, and missed two; I examined the fences round the field, and could not find where they could have strayed - I afterwards accompanied Mead round the field; we noticed two corners of the field where the sheep appeared to have been driven up together; and about one o'clock that day we went to the prisoner's house - he lives on Chase-side, nearly half a mile from where the sheep were taken; we found him at dinner - he had got part of a neck of mutton (I think) on his plate; I am sure it was mutton, and his wife had part of the breast.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You think it was mutton? A. It certainly was mutton; I think it was boiled - he lives ten or fifteen yards out of the high road; there is a little lane up to his house - it is a thoroughfare, but not for carriages; I do not think it had rained in the night, but it had on Saturday.

JOHN MEAD . I am constable of Enfield, I went to Mr. White's premises, and examined the field with Westcoat; the sheep had been driven into two corners - I found against the gate a place where a man had been standing with very large nails in his shoes; there were two footsteps on the side of the gate; and on the hedge some wool - there was half a tip on the inside of the heel of the right foot mark; and on the outside a great many

nails, and more nails round the toe; and there were a great many nails all round the left foot mark - I traced these footsteps out of the field, about half-way down the road towards the prisoner's house; I got a warrant and searched his house in consequence of suspicion - we found him at dinner; his wife was eating a breast of mutton - and he had part of the breast and neck on his plate - I asked him where he bought the mutton; he said, at Mr. Taylor's, and had given half a crown for it - I took him to Mr. Taylor's, who said, in his presence, that he had not sold him any mutton, and had not seen him; I had received information, and asked the prisoner where the pie was, he gave no answer - I went into the wash-house and found a mutton pie; and in a large iron pot I found a quantity of mutton stewed down - there was part of the neck, breast, loin, and head; I should think sixteen or twenty pounds in weight - it was small Welch mutton, and Mr. White's were small Welch ewes; I searched the privy and found part of a pluck, crammed down with this sheep's-foot - it is the foot of a very small sheep; the pluck appeared very fresh, and two or three spots of blood lay on the privy; it had evidently been recently killed - I took the prisoner to the watch-house, took off his shoes, and compared them with the foot marks at the gate of the field; they fitted - here is the shoe of the right foot; it has half a tip - I applied it to the impression; it corresponded, and the other shoe fitted the other impression; I applied them to two or three impressions over the gate, in the road - they matched; he had a kind of short jacket on, and there was some blood just across the hind part of his shoulder - he had a smock frock on; but that did not come so high.

Cross-examined. Q. How near to his house did you trace the foot marks? A. Not within a quarter of a mile; as when I got into the main road it was hard - the lane his house is in, is also hard; carts and horses go down there, but they cannot get through - the privy of the next house discharges itself into his; I cannot say whose mutton it was - there is no mark on the sheep's foot; many countrymen wear these kind of shoes; but it is a large foot - this has been a whole tip. but worn off; I have been a shoemaker - it is not common to make labourers shoes with half tips; one of these has no tip.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-40

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1116. WILLIAM PAHLE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , at St. Peter-le-Poor , 1 case of surgical intruments, value 5l. 5s.; 1 box, value 5s.; 1 stomach-pump, value 3l.; 2 catbeters and case, value 4s.; 1 instrument, called a sound, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 14s.; 1 pillow-case, value 2s.; 1 quilt, value 10s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 pair of silver sugar-bows, value 5s., and 1 glass tumbler, value 1s., the goods of John Dunston , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DUNSTON. I am a surgeon , and live in Adams-court, Old Broad-street - I have apartments there; the house is let out in different apartments; the landlord does not live there - it is in the parish of St. Peter-le-Poor- I occupy the upper part of the house; the prisoner is a perfect stranger to me. The articles stated in the indictment were stolen from there on the 24th of May - they are worth about 10l. altogether; I had seen them safe at eleven o'clock in the morning, and on my return, at three o'clock, they were gone; I found the prisoner in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you alone occupy these apartments? A. Yes; it is a public staircase. I had been out from eleven to three o'clock - I had left Harris, my boy, to attend my apartments.

JOHN HARRIS . I am in my seventeenth year; I had the care of Mr. Dunston's apartments - I was going down to my dinner a little before two o'clock; I dine in the lower part of the house, with another person belonging to the house; every thing was safe when I went down - I remained below about half an hour; I left the door locked, and put the key on the ledge over the door. When I returned I found the prisoner, (who was a stranger,) on the fourth floor stairs; my master occupies the third and fourth floors; the prisoner asked me for a strange man, who I knew nothing of: I said if he would be so good as to go down stairs, I would ask Mr. Gale, and while I was asking Mr. Gale for the name he gave me, the prisoner ran out of the house; I ran after him - he never got out of my sight, before I stopped him myself; he had a case of instruments and a box, containing the stomach-pump, and a pair of sheets, a pillow-case, and a glass tumbler; I delivered them over to Mr. Gale - I gave him into Mr. Gale's hands, and did not leave him till the constable had taken him; I went into the apartment, and found these things missing, which were safe when I went down to dinner; he said nothing when I stopped him.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose the street door is open all day? A. Yes; the house is let out in chambers - a great many people pass up and down stairs; I am certain I saw him on the fourth flight of stairs; the key of the door could easily be got down. I went down into the kitchen to dine; I could not see the street door from there; the linen was master's; I found all the property on the prisoner - he came back voluntarily.

WILLIAM GALE . I have the care of the whole of this house; the rent is paid to Mr. Boyle, who does not live there. On the 24th of May, Harris came down stairs, and asked me about a name, and the prisoner ran out at the door; he was a stranger; Harris called out "Mr. Gale"- I immediately ran up the stairs, and in a minute or two saw him come back with the prisoner in charge: I went to Mr. Dunston's room - as soon as the prisoner came up to the door he asked me to let him go down stairs; I said, No, he should not, and he walked up stairs; I took him up stairs - he put a bag down which he had got; I opened it, and found it contained this property.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not come out till he was in custody? A. No, I was standing at the door - I was called up from the kitchen; a great many people might have been up stairs for what I know - he made no resistance.

JOHN BARNETT . I am constable of the Ward. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner on the landing-place of the third floor - the property was half in and half out of the bag; I found some common keys on his person - he trembled and seemed sorry for it.

JOHN BRADY . I am a constable. I was going into the room, and looking round I found this picklock-key close to the prisoner, as he sat on the bed; I tried the key to the

lock of the door - it would not open it; but one of the keys found on the prisoner opened one of the drawers.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the regular door key? A. Yes - that was in the door.

JOHN HARRIS re-examined. One key opens the third and fourth floor doors; I found the key of master's door in the bed-room door, which communicates with the staircase.

MR. DUNSTON. I know these sheets - they are marked with my name, and were taken from a drawer in the bed-room, and are worth 14s. - also the pillow-case, which is worth 2s.; this case of instruments is mine - it cost me between five and six guineas; some of them are made by my particular direction; I conceive them to be fully worth five guineas; this stomach-pump is worth between 3l. and 4l.; a table-cloth was missing, which is here; this quilt is worth 10s.; the whole property is worth about 10l. I am certain they were all safe when I left the apartment.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain they were all there? A. I did not see the sheets and pillow-case, but have no doubt they were in the drawers; the instruments cost me more than I have valued them at; I had no doubt about any of my property before the Magistrate; two shirts were produced, which were not mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a foreigner, and not able to make myself properly understood. Mr. Dunston said before the Magistrate, that he could not swear to a particular piece of cloth.

MR. DUNSTON. I have said there were some shirts there which I could not swear to.

Prisoner to MR. GALE. Q. At what time did you come up stairs? A. Between two and three o'clock; I was waiting at the door for the boy to come back - I took you up stairs myself: I did not come out of the kitchen to lay hold of you.

Prisoner to JOHN BARNETT. Q. Was I in the room when given into your charge? A. On the third staircase; I searched and found a bunch of common keys in your pocket; I found the key and sugar-tongs on the bed; you were sitting on the bed when they were found.

MR. DUNSTON. These sugar-tongs are mine; they were kept in a closet in the sitting-room, not in the bed-room.

Prisoner. When I was taken into the room everything was looked over; this young man found the key and sugar-tongs near the head of the bed, and I stood by the drawers, not near the bed.

JOHN HARRIS. The prisoner opened the room door, and walked about the room before the officer came.

Prisoner. I positively deny being in one of the rooms before I was taken up; these things were on the stairs of the fourth flight - I went up to inquire for Mr. Crowther, a maker of German lamps - he lived there about six months ago.

MR. GALE. I went to live there on the 4th of September; a Mr. Carder lived there before the prosecutor - he was a dealer in Birmingham were and lamps.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Reference Number: t18280529-41

1117. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 3 sovereigns and one 5l. Bank note , the property of John Beatson and others.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

CHRISTOPHER CIRIACKES . I am clerk to Messrs, Beatson and Co., who are merchants ; their counting-house is at No. 3, George-yard, Lombard-street . On Friday, the 11th of April, I received from them a cheque on Messrs. Grote and Co. for 30l., for which I received a 10l. and four 5l. Bank notes - I did not take the numbers of them; I paid the 10l. and one 5l. note to Mr. Randall, at the London Docks, the same day; and another 5l. note to Mr. Duval, of the Trinity Company; and another 5l. note the same day to Mr. Braysher, at the Custom-house; I had one 5l. note left, and three sovereigns in change, which I received at different places; I wrapped the sovereigns in the note, and put them both into a pigeon-hole in my desk, on the Saturday evening, about half-past seven o'clock; there are three other clerks, one of whom (Beck) I left in the counting-house when I came away, about a quarter to eight o'clock; the prisoner was in the house with her father, who keeps the house, and takes care of the counting-house - they have access to the counting-house in our absence. I arrived at the counting-house about half-past nine o'clock on Monday morning, and the money was gone: I had to call at several places before I got there - I did not miss the money till about two o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you lock your desk when you left it? A. I did not; I was not the last person there - the pigeon-holes were inside the desk; I mentioned the loss of my money about an hour after I missed it, but not to my employers; I did not go home to see if I had left it there - I went home in the evening, but not to look for it; I never said so, nor did I look for it at home - I did not mention it to my employers till about half-past two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon.

Q. Did you not, when you was asked at the Mansion-house why you did not tell your master on the Monday, say because you had another place to look for it? A. I did not, nor anything to that effect, there or any where; the prisoner constantly lived in the house; I have been in the prosecutor's employ two years and a half - I have heard from my employers that she once found a 14l. cheque, and restored it: I never heard of her finding a 50l. Bank note, or any other property, and restoring it; I have no doubt of her being a respectable well conducted young woman.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Had you any doubt of leaving the money in the counting-house? A. I had not; the 14l. cheque had been stopped the day before she gave it up; I cannot say whether she knew that.

HENRY CREEK . I am in the employ of Mr. Pearson, a jeweller, of Whitechapel. On a Monday (the 11th of April, I believe) the prisoner came to the shop about the middle of the day, and bought a small gold neck-chain for 25s.; I gave her change for a 5l. note - I am quite satisfied she is the person - I have not the least doubt of her; this is the note she paid me - (looking at it) - I have written on it- I asked her name and address; she said her name was Martin, and she lived at the Bull inn, Bishopsgate; I have written that on the note; my employer wrote the date on it the same day - it is the 14th.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the person, whoever it was, buy anything of you before? A. I do not recollect ever seeing her; we cannot remember every person who comes; I was fetched to the prosecutor's counting-house about a fortnight or three weeks after; I had not seen her between

the day I took the note and my going there - nearly a month had elapsed.

Q. When she saw you, did she not immediately say,"You are the person I bought a pair of snaps of?" A. She had seen me before that, in the morning; she said, "You are the person of whom I bought a pair of snaps," and produced one; the officer searched, and found the other; I do not remember selling her a pair of snaps - I had never seen the person who I sold the chain to before, that I recollect.

Q. Did she not say "Your shop is in Whitechapel I do not know the number; but if you will take me out I will show you the shop?" A. I do not recollect it - I will not swear she did not say so; several persons were present; I cannot describe her dress - she came about the middle of the day - twelve, one, or two o'clock; I cannot say precisely which hour - I dine about one; I cannot recollect whether it was after dinner or before - I cannot say what weather it was.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You do not recollect selling her any snaps? A. I never recollect seeing her, except the day the note was passed - when the inquiry was made she said she had never seen the chain, or something of that sort.

COURT. Q. Had the snaps ever belonged to your master? A. We cannot say, for almost every shop has the same sort - it is a common gilt snap which every body keeps; I have not seen the gold chain - I cannot say what sort of a dress or bonnet she wore, but I knew her countenance the moment I saw her - whether she wore a hat or a close bonnet I do not know; or whether she had a cap on.

ROBERT CARTER . I am the employer of the first witness. I stated to the prisoner's father, in her presence that the note was traced to her - that she had paid it away to Mr. Pierson, of Whitechapel for a neck-chain; she said she had a neck-chain in her possession, which was given her by a gentleman, a foreigner; and I think she said recently, but am not certain: the officer went up to search and brought down what they said were all the trinkets she had - I never saw the neck-chain.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was the officer there when she said she had a neck chain given to her? A. No; I sent for him immediately - he came in a few minutes.

Q. Did she and her father remain with you till he came? A. They went up stairs, and when he came I sent for them, and they went up with him; they afterwards all came down to the counting-house, and no neck-chain was produced - we have been nine or ten years at the house; I never heard of her finding a 50l. note on our floor and bringing it to us - it was not to anybody in our house, I am certain; I one day dropped a 14l. cheque in the counting-house - I missed it the very day I drew it, and stopped payment immediately; it was brought to me next day by the prisoner or some of the family - I am not aware that I mentioned to anybody that I had stopped it.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you remain at your counting-house after you lost it? A. Till six or seven o'clock in the morning; when they returned it they said it was found in the ashes, and I recollected standing there.

COURT. Q. What time did you drop it? A. In the course of the morning I believe; the counting-house was not left any part of the day - I never heard of it being presented.

ROBERT PIERSON . I am a jeweller; Ciriackes was in my employ. I was in the shop when the neck-chain was bought, but have not the least recollection of the prisoner; I was attending to other ladies - Ciriackes gave me the 5l. note; I went up stairs, and got change for it, which was given to the person who bought the chain: I paid the 5l. note to my brother (looking at it) this is it; it has my man's writing on it, and my brother's also.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you recollect at what time the note came into your possession? A. I should think between two and three o'clock - I do not think it was later.

Q. Have you not said the person who paid the note was as tall as your wife? was it not a taller woman than the prisoner? A. No; I do not think it was; I said I was not positive of the person's height, and that she was as tall as a person in my shop - that person is about her height, not taller - I have not brought my book here; Mr. Butler. the prisoner's solicitor saw it - he asked me to bring it here; I told him I could swear to my entry - I did not think it of any use to bring it here - there is nothing in my notice to produce it; there is an entry in the book of a pair of snaps bought on the 1st of April, and I sold Mr. Butler a pair exactly like them - I cannot say whether those sold on the 1st of April, was to a woman.

COURT. Q. Did they correspond in appearance with those sold on the 1st of April? A. Mr. Butler brought a pair, and I gave him a pair of the same pattern exactly.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. If you had been called upon to identify that young woman, could you venture to swear to her? A. No; I cannot say that I sold the snaps myself - we sold no others about that time; we sold none between the 1st and 14th of April.

COURT. Q. Were you the person who dealt with her? A. No; I was attending to two ladies - these snaps may he had at any shop; Mr. Butler called to examine my books, and I shewed them to him - my shop is No. 92, near Whitechapel-church.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am clerk to Messrs. Grote and Co.; I paid this 30l. check - a 5l. note, No. 14,235, dated 29th of February, 1828, was one of the notes I gave for it.

RICHARD RANDALL . I received from Ciriackes a 5l. note, No. 14,587.

JAMES BRAYSHER . I am employed at the Custom-house; I received a 5l. note, No. 4,244 from Ciriackes.

JOSEPH THACKERAY . I received a 5l. note, No. 14,527 from Ciriackes.

THOMAS WHITE . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of May - it was stated in her presence that she had bought a gold neck-chain in Whitechapel - she did not produce it, but said, she had not got one, and never had one; that is what she said in my presence up stairs, while I was searching the premises - Mr. Carter was not present; I believe he came up stairs afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you produce to Mr. Carter every trinket you found? A. I did; there was no appearance of a gold chain - I found a snap

and she produced the fellow from her person; she said she bought it in Whitechapel, and mentioned the name of the shop - but I do not recollect it; she said she would point it out if we took her there - I left her at home; she afterwards came before the Lord Mayor herself - I believe he sent her to the Compter, and directed her to be treated with the utmost kindness, and kept apart from other prisoners - she has surrendered here to-day.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Her father undertook for her appearance to you? A. Yes; the prosecutor was willing for me to take his word.

JAMES SMITH . I have lived at the Bull, Bishopsgate-street, about eleven months; no person named Martin lived there to my knowledge.

The prisoner put in a long written defence, positively asserting her innocence; and stating that she had purchased some snaps at Mr. Pierson's shop, of the witness; and that he must have confused the transactions; it then went on to state how she was engaged at the time in question, which is narrated in the following evidence.

MR. ROGERS. I am a chymist, and live at No. 93, Cheapside; the prisoner has been several times at my shop with prescriptions - we copy prescriptions the first time they are brought; in case they should be lost (looking at one) - I copied this when I received it from the prisoner; which was on the 14th of April - it had been in our shop before, but for particular reasons which are in it, I did not enter it till then; I did not receive it myself from the prisoner, but from my assistant - after entering it, I delivered it to the prisoner; I wrote this on the envelope(looking at it) - "Monday, April 14th, Mrs. Taylor, 3s. 1d.;" I returned this prescription to her at near four o'clock - I do not recollect seeing her before that day; our shop is not in the way from George Yard to Whitechapel.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You gave her the prescription made up on the 14th? A. Yes; it had been left at my house at near twelve o'clock that day - by whom I do not know.

ALFRED KENT . I am apprentice to Mr. Rogers; I remember the prisoner coming to the shop on the 14th of April; to the best of my belief it was near twelve o'clock; she brought a prescription, which I delivered to Mr. Rogers - she left it with me and went away, and when she called again it was nearly ready for her; I cannot say at what times he called; it required at least half an hour to make it up.

MR. ADOLPHUS to CHRISTOPHER CIRIACKES. Q. There are other counting-houses in the same house? A. Yes, on the same staircase; the street door is open in the day time.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Has any person access with your permission except this young woman, her father, and mother? A. No.

- TAYLOR. I am the prisoner's father. On the 14th of April I was at home, also my wife and daughter - I have another daughter who was ill; my brother came about eleven o'clock, and stopped till about a quarter-past one - my wife was washing a few things; I was going to an excise sale, in Old Broad-street, with my brother; my daughter(the prisoner) was sent by her mother to Mr. Roger's, with a prescription, soon after eleven o'clock - it was between eleven and twelve; she told her to make what haste she could, as she wanted her to attend the door, and to the gentlemen - we were without a servant; we only keep one occasionally; it was, I think, not more than twenty or twenty-five minutes when she returned; she then began preparing our dinner; I and my brother dined, and went away about twenty minutes past one o'clock; my family dined with us - we had beef-steaks; when we went out we left her at home - she had not left the house after she returned from the chemist's, and she went there much quicker than I could; I returned from the sale a little before three o'clock- my wife and both daughters were at home; the prisoner was sent out about four for the medicine, and returned with it in as short a time as before, and prepared the tea; my brother drank tea with us, and left between five and six o'clock - near six.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Does this young woman always cook the dinner? A. In general when we have no servant - she is rather fond of a domestic life.

Q. Did she not, when called upon to give an account of her time on the afternoon of the 14th, say she had been abroad? A. She did not; I do not recollect her saying a word about being out; she was sent for the medicine; she did not say she was never in Mr. Pierson's shop, to purchase snaps or anything; she said to the young man, "I know you - I bought the snaps of you;" she said, "I cannot tell the number of the house, but you are the young man who sold me the snaps; I know you now your hat is off."

Q. Did she not say she had a neck-chain, which was given to her by a young man? A. No; she said she had a locket; she never said she had a chain - I never heard her say so; she never said it in my presence; the locket can be produced - she produced it at the time with a ribbon on it; I never saw her with a gold chain.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was the locket worn round her neck with the snap which fastened the ribbon? A. It was - she took it off to show the snap; the snap was not mentioned till she mentioned it.

SARAH TAYLOR . I am the prisoner's mother; she is in her eighteenth year. On the 14th of April, about eleven o'clock, I sent her to get a prescription made up; she was gone about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, at the very farthest, and remained in the house till about four o'clock, when she went to fetch it; she was engaged at home the whole time, attending to the gentlemen and answering the door; I was washing - she got the dinner; her father was at home till about half-past one o'clock; she was not out till I sent her for the medicine - she was gone about a quarter of an hour; we provide her with everything she wishes - I never saw her with a gold chain; I remember her buying a pair of snaps - she wore a black ribbon round her neck with a locket to it, fastened with one of the snaps; no money was found in her box.

SARAH ANN TAYLOR . I am the prisoner's sister. On the 14th of April I had a bad swelling in my throat, and was at home - my father and uncle were there part of the time; my sister was sent about eleven o'clock to Mr. Rogers, of Cheapside, for a prescription to be mixed; she returned in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes; I remarked her haste when she came back - she prepared the dinner - I was unable to do it; my father and uncle went out about a quarter-past one o'clock, and returned about

three; my sister had been at home all that time - she was constantly in my presence; she went out about four for the medicine, and returned in about the same time as before - my uncle left about five. Mr. Henderson has a counting-house in the house - he knocked about two o'clock; my sister went up to him, and came down with the rent, which she gave to my father when he came home, and he sent the change.

MR. ALLEY here expressed the prosecutor's wish to press the case no further.

NOT GUILTY .

COURT. We hope it will be considered that this young woman leaves this Court with as unblemished a character, as if this inquiry had never been instituted.

Reference Number: t18280529-42

1118. RICHARD NICHOLSON was indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of James Newton , on the 23d of May , and stealing 4 stone bottles, value 6s. and 2 wooden bound casks, value 2s., his property .

GEORGE STAKER . I am in the employ of James Newton, a wine and brandy merchant - his warehouse has no communication with the house, and does not join it - it is not a warehouse, but vaults; they are in Aldgate High-street . On the 23d of May, about half-past eight or nine o'clock in the morning, I went to the vaults, and was informed a lad had been taken with some bottles; I found the prisoner in custody with four stone bottles, with master's name on them - there was a space in the vault where four had been taken from - I had not noticed the vacancy the day before.

PATRICK GARVAY . I am a patrol. On the 23d of May, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner on Tower-hill, with four stone bottles; I asked if they were for sale - he said they were, and that he had got them from John Williams, of No. 17, Somerset-street; I took him to the watch-house, and went to Somerset-street; no such person lived there; seeing Mr. Newton's name on the bottles, I went there - his cellar is in the City. I know nothing about any casks.

THOMAS OBORNE . I asked the prisoner how he came by the bottles; he said a lad left them with him while he went to look for a shop to sell them, and he lived at No. 17, Somerset-street.

Prisoner's Defence. A lad asked me to mind them while he went down Rosemary-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-43

1119. JOHN KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 4 wine-glasses, value 3s., the goods of John Gibb , his master .

JOHN GIBB. I am head waiter at the Baptist's-head, coffee-house . On the 16th of April I engaged the prisoner and three more as extra waiters; the glasses used were mine - there was a dinner there; the waiters did not leave till between one and two o'clock in the morning - some plate was missing; I asked the prisoner if he had seen it - he said not; I told him to go down stairs, and thinking he looked bulky, I followed, brought him back, and found three wine-glasses in his pocket, which I had not missed; he gave no account of them - he was intoxicated.

THOMAS PALMER . I am inspector of the watch. I took the prisoner to the Compter, and found one glass in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not aware of their being in my pocket: if I had wished to take anything I could have had plate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-44

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JUNE 3.

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

1120. BENJAMIN NEWMAN was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-45

1121. THOMAS MILLS alias MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , one 10l. and one 5l. Bank-note, the property of Samuel Probart , from his person .

SAMUEL PRORART. I live at Maidstone, in Hertfordshire. On the 21st of April I was in London; I fell into company with the prisoner and another man about a quarter or half-past two o'clock - they were strangers to me: I first met the other person in Smithfield; he appeared to be a horse-jobber; and in about ten minutes the prisoner came up; we went into a public-house before the prisoner came; they appeared quite strangers; when I saw the other man I was going to Chiswell-street, and asked him to show me the way - he said said he would, and asked who I was going to see; I said, Mr. Smith - he asked me to go into a public-house and take a glass of ale, as he found himself rather thirsty, and in about five minutes the prisoner came in; we were sitting down at a table - the prisoner sat at a distance off, quite in the middle of the room; he got up and shook hands with me, and claimed acquaintance - I said I knew nothing of him - I had never seen him before; the other man was telling me about different people in Gloucestershire, horse-dealers and others, whom I knew, and that made me think him a countryman. The prisoner went and sat down; he pulled out a bag, and said his old aunt had left him 800l., and he meant to spend it - he was sitting quite by himself; only one other person was in the room; he said he had come out of Leicestershire, where he had resided, and was determined to spend it; he pulled some papers out of the bag, which appeared to be notes; we had two pints of ale, and he had two glasses of porter by himself; he did not join our company at that house; I was perfectly sober - the prisoner appeared as if he was half tipsy, but I found afterwards that was sham; before we left the house he said he had been paying a d-d rogue of a lawyer 60l. to put his money right and get it; I came out with the other man, and went on to go to Chiswell-street; the prisoner followed us down stairs - I believe this house was the Punch Bowl public-house; I went on to look for Smith, in Chiswell-street, as I had a letter to deliver to him; the other man walked along the street - the prisoner came and caught hold of my arm; I told him I could walk by myself; he forced his company on me; he only walked a few yards with me; the first man I met said, "Now, can you see yonder butcher's shop?" I said Yes: he said,"You go there and inquire - they will tell you where Smith lives; I want to step back for a necessary purpose;" I had lost the prisoner before that; I went to the butcher, who said Smith had moved; I then returned back to Smithfield, and lit on this countryman, but not Mills - he said,

"Where are you going?" I said to the Bank; he said,"Very well, I am going that way;" I went with him along the street a good way, and through several passages, into a small square, and there we lit on the prisoner at the bar; he came and said, "Here is a drop of very nice ale - come and have a drop with me;" the other man said, "Let us go, it won't hinder us a minute - he seems a good kind young man," and so we went, and there was a quart of porter ordered; we drank some porter, and then there was a cloth put on the table, and some beef-steaks put down - it was not by my order - I knew nothing about it; they had been talking about something to eat; I eat some of the steak; as soon as it came in the prisoner asked me to give him change for a half-sovereign, saying he had no small notes, his notes were all hundreds and hundred and fifties; I gave him change, and when I pulled out the silver my notes were in the same pocket; I pulled them out, and put them into another pocket - he saw I had got notes; I gave him four half-crowns; he then asked me to give him change for half a crown, to give the girl something, as he wished to behave like a gentleman, and he had plenty of money; in giving him change the half-sovereign fell; he pulled it between his fingers - I said, "That won't do to give half a sovereign for a sixpence," and I had that back- he gave the girl sixpence, and before the steaks were taken away, in came three pipes and three glasses of gin and water; I did not order any of them; they asked me to take a pipe - I would not, and said gin and water I did not like; they said I should have brandy; I said I would have neither rum nor brandy; the prisoner said, "Taste it, you never drank any so good;" I tasted it, and found it was all gin, or gin and water, as they say; but sometimes they draw gin and water out of the same cask; I said I had two or three places to go to, and could not stop any longer; then the countryman got up, and said, "If you are determined to go, I shall be very much obliged to you to show me the difference in appearance between the notes you have, and these large notes this man has, for notes of 100l. and 150l. are notes I am not accustomed to, and I am in the habit of taking a great deal of money in horse-dealing; I told him he had better show some of his own, as no doubt he had some; he said he had nothing but country notes, or he would not ask me; I said as he was so good as to show me where Smith lived, I ought to do him a favour if I could, but it was not customary to show notes in a public-house; I produced them, and the prisoner pulled out some notes, and folded them over his finger; one finger was at the top - I could see "Fifty," but could not see what bank it was, as he held his hand over that. The prisoner was on my right hand, and the other man on the left; the prisoner took hold of my notes, whipped them out of my hand, and turned from the table; the other man kept his finger on the notes when they were down on the table; I caught hold of the notes - the prisoner ran off with my notes, leaving the flash notes behind; the other man did not offer to move. I gave the constable the flash notes. I went out directly to see for the prisoner; the other man said, "You go that way and I will go this," and so I lost them both; it was of no use to detain the other man, as he had not got the money. I surrendered next day in discharge of bail, at the King's Bench prison, and before twelve o'clock that day the prisoner came in there to play at rackets - I knew him directly, and laid hold of him; the officer searched him, but neither of my notes were found; I am certain of his person - I could tell him from five hundred; I saw him with four or five hundred in the King's Bench.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you ever seen any one since who is very much like him? A. Not but what I could swear to the prisoner; I never said I had seen another person exceedingly like him, nor did I ever think so; I have seen nobody at all like him - he might be about two hours in my company; he bragged so much about his money and his old aunt, which made me notice him, and he had a little bit of a sore on his lip - it has got better since.

JOHN DUTTON . I am a constable. I went to the Sun and Punch Powl public-house, Long-lane, with the prosecutor; it was not there he lost his notes - we were five or six hours looking for the house where he was robbed, but could not find it: I searched about Bartholomew-close and Smithfield - he never took me out of the City to look for it; I was sent for to the lobby of the King's Bench to take the prisoner - I first saw Probart on the 23d of April and received the two flash notes from him; I asked Probart in the prisoner's presence, what he charged him with; he said he had robbed him of a 10l. and a 5l. Bank note - he said he had had no such thing from him; next morning as I was coming to Guildhall with the prisoner, he said he had had the money - I told him not to say anything to me to criminate himself; he said he had nothing to say further than that he thought it hard he should suffer, for four of them shared the money, and he got but 3l. odd for his share.

Cross-examined. Q. Was anybody present when he told you this? A. Two or three were behind me; whether they heard it I cannot say - there was the prosecutor, a friend of the prisoner's, and the tipstaff; 2the prosecutor was not above three or four yards behind, I suppose, but I did not look behind - all the places the prosecutor took me to, to look for the house were about Bartholourew-hospital; he showed me one or two houses and said they were like it, but when he got in he said they were not the house; I cannot swear he was robbed in the City.

COURT. Q. Did he ever take you out of the City boundary? A. No, not by a considerable distance.

SAMUEL PRORART re-examined. The notes produced are what the prisoner left behind instead of mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the sign of the house, or the street you were robbed in? A. No - I do not say it was in the City.

COURT. Q. How far might it be from the New Postoffice? A. A very short distance.

The flash notes were here read, one was headed Bank of Fashion, engaging to cut hair in the first style or forfeit 10,000l. the other headed Bank of Elegance, engaging to do the same, or forfeit 50l.

JOHN WILLIAM STANLEY . I am a constable of the King's Bench, where the prisoner was taken. I was sent for and searched him - I found nothing on him but 6d. and a few halfpence; not being well I sent for Dutton to take him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you follow him to Guildhall? A. I did; the prosecutor was in my custody - he was suffered to go before the Magistrate on my word to bring him back; I did not hear the prisoner say he had the money, but he was not in my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. It is totally false, as to what Dutton says; I do not think he is a fit man - his evidence should not be taken, for I know his character - he keeps a brothel, and lives on the prostitution of young women. I never stated such a thing to him - the prosecutor has taken me for another person.

JURY to SAMUEL PROBART. Q. What part of Smithfield did you meet the other man in, after you returned from Chiswell-street? A. Just before I came to the house, we turned into at first - I believe it is the Punch Bowl; we went from there down to the Post-office - he said he was going to the Bank, and would show me the way; we went through several lanes - he said they were the nearest way.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280529-46

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1122. MORRIS MARTIN and JAMES KENNEDY , were indicted for feloniously forging certain stamps, on certain stained-paper hangings, with intent to defraud his Majesty .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. BOLLAND, LAW, AND CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

GOLDING BIRD . I am a general surveyor of the Excise; the prisoner Martin carried on business as a paper-stainer in Regent-street , and in Smith's-yard, Brewer-street ; Kennedy was his foreman and manager of his business.

Q. Take these papers in your hand, and state what are the stamps imposed on paper, first in the hands of the manufacturer, and afterwards in the hands of the stainer? A. The stamps used by the manufacturer are not here; here are the duty stamps, which are made on stained paper - the duty on stained paper is seven farthings on a square yard; about 1s. 0 1/2d. on a piece - there are nearly seven square yards in a piece; here is an impression taken from what we call the first account stamp, which is imposed on the paper - for which we have authority, from seeing the label on the wrapper of the manufacturers, that is imposed without a charge; this bottom impression is the second stamp, and is called the frame-mark - here are several compartments in it, one shews the number of the stamp, 69, and on that is a moveable letter to check the trade; the next is for the purpose of inserting the progressive number of the piece - we take an account in a book of the papers so stamped; the number here corresponds with the number entered in the book - the next compartment shews the length of the paper which here is 12, meaning 12 yards long - another compartment contains the breadth, which is 58-100th of a yard; that multiplied by the length, would be nearly seven square yards, and by that we ascertain the duty to be calculated; the next compartment shews the year - this enables us to know what the duty should be hereafter; the third stamp is called the duty, or charge stamp; that is imposed after the paper has been framed, and denotes that the duty has been paid - that is the stamp respecting which we receive the duty ultimately. On the 16th of February last I went to Martin's premises in Regent's-street, with Mr. Hall, our general surveyor, and Mr. Notweller, a surveyor of Excise - I directly sent somebody to take charge of the premises in Smith's-yard; I saw Mrs. Martin at Regent-street, and enquired for Mr. Martin- I did not find him there; I examined the stock in the work-shop and selected some bits of paper, which I left in Hall's possession I think - but there was paper selected from both places; I afterwards went to Smith's-yard with Mr. Notweller, and selected some there - some pieces there were wet and had just been printed; they could not be moved - Kennedy was with us at both places backward and forward; he remarked that the wet paper would be disturbed if I took them away, and I left them; I told him we considered the pieces to be seized, and it would be at his peril to remove them; that I seized them because the impressions of the duty-stamp and the framestamp were forged - we seized sixty-seven pieces at Regent-street, and ninety-eight at Smith's-yard, exclusive of the wet ones; by the request of Mrs. Martin and Kennedy they were removed as privately as possible from the premises - Kennedy and some boys removed them; we took them to an Excise chamber in Great Pulteney-street; Kennedy, as he was moving some of them, said, it was a rum start-the pieces seized on the 16th are here; these are part of them - here is them stamp on them; I found the wet ones again on the premises - I can swear to them by the pattern; I took them away on Monday, the 18th - the stamps on these papers are forged; I have not the least doubt of it - here is a forged date-stamp, and a forged frame-mark; here are two pieces, and the stamps on both are forged - the stamp on this piece is not so perfect as the other, but still, I can swear it is not my stamp.

Q. Who has the custody of the duty stamp? A. The surveying officers, Clutton and Claggett; their stamp is only used at one paper-stainers besides Martin's - his name is Henderson; it is the duty of Clutton and Claggett to affix those stamps; the surveyor may do it if he thinks proper, but it must be done in the presence of one or both of those persons; here is another piece of the wet paper - the stamps on it are forged in both respects (here the witness examined several other pieces of paper, which he deposed to have forged stamps on them) - all these were seized on the 16th, and taken away on the 18th, being wet.

Q. Now look at some of those you removed on the 16th? A. Here is some - I have examined them all; they bear the impressions of forged stamps, and appear to have been impressed with the same false stamps as the wet paper - one stamp has been used on them all; the compartment, shewing the date and frame-mark, is rather larger - the letters are rather irregular and larger, and stand at a different distance to those on our stamp; in the space which shews the lengths of the paper there is a very slight difference - they are very nearly alike in size; the difference is in the year - there is no year to be seen; there are two characters which run alike through the pieces, but I cannot tell what it is; when we fetched

away the wet paper on the 18th, I think part of it was rolled up, and part hanging up.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you, yourself, mark the papers? A. No; I did not put any mark on what I brought away on the 16th - I only know them by the pattern and the forged impressions; I stated to Kennedy on the 16th, in Smith's-yard, that I seized them because they were forged stamps; I did not see Martin at all - I told Mrs. Martin so on my return to Regent-street; the business continued to be carried on by Mr. Martin till they were taken into custody on the 1st of May.

Q. Do you know that in that interval Martin presented a petition to the Board of Excise, to have the matter investigated and the paper restored? A. I do; I cannot say whether he attended to be examined - he was not examined; he called on me two or three times afterwards - it was partly to know what answer there was to his petition; I told him it would meet with every attention from the Board - I believe the matter was referred to me by the Board, but I have so many referred me I am not certain; if the report came into my hands I went into the investigation; I had no occasion to send for him, he came to me - the Commissioners generally refer these petitions to the reporting officers.

Q. They, having a petition presented against the act of the officer, refer it to the reporting officers themselves? A. Yes. (The petition was here produced by the Counsel for the Crown.)

Q. Now, have you seen that petition? A. I have - here is my report upon it; it was referred to me, but it is not with reference to the seizure of the 16th, according to my report.

Q. Did you make this impression (producing one)? A. I do not know - I have made several - it is a genuine duty-stamp; many of the impressions on the paper are very faint, and it will occur at times that genuine impressions are faint - that sometimes happens from the hurry of the officers, and from the manner the trader hurries the officer.

Q. Do you mean to say that stamp is sufficiently distinct for you to say it is genuine or feigned? A. From the character of the impression I believe it to be forged; I can only see part of it - it is sufficiently distinct to enable me to say it is forged; that part which is perfect, is forged, (here the witness pointed out the part he could ascertain to be forged.)

Q. This you swear you can tell is a forged stamp? A. From my belief it is forged - I swear that; it is not so regular, and the letters are not so upright - our letters are all fixed, and must be even and upright whatever way it is turned; I do not keep the stamps.

Q. Look at this piece of paper (producing one), has the duty been paid on that? A. From the appearance at this end I should suppose it had, but I do not see any impression of the date mark on the other end - this end, as far as I can see it, is a very good impression of the duty stamp, and I should consider it genuine; but if I was in possession of a genuine stamp I could better tell- the number of this stamp is 233, and is not my stamp; it is not Martin's number, and would not be his manufacture.

Q. Do you mean to say it is not manufactured by Martin, and stamped by the officer who stamps his papers? A. I believe he has a manufactory at Starch-green - it may have been made there, but that is not in our district; the frame-mark here is certainly imperfect, and the duty stamp is not so perfect as it ought to be, in consequence of it being placed over the account-stamp, but the part I can see of it is genuine.

JURY. Q. Did you find any paper resembling that mark on his premises? A. I found paper there bearing good impressions.

COURT. Q. Are those papers made at either of those two places? A. I say from the number of the stamp they are not; they do not belong to Regent-street nor Smith's-yard.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. On the papers you seized are not many of the stamps exceedingly imperfect? A. Yes, and genuine stamps are very imperfect at times; I judge whether they are genuine or not by comparison, and the number of the stamp - it takes four or five days to dry the paper; it depends on the nature of the place they hang in.

JURY. Q. Did you use a comparison at the first seizure? A. Yes; the first seizure was on the 1st of October; the whole paper was found in entered rooms; the officers could go there at any hour in the night, and it is their duty to go there sometimes.

MR. LAW. Q. You stated that you informed Mr. Martin and Kennedy that the stamps were forged, and that the prisoners were not apprehended then? A. No; I apprehended them on the 1st of May; I made no seizure then- I made one on the 28th of February; I brought away what I considered forged, and left the genuine stamps - I gave information to the Excise, leaving them to act for the best.

COURT. Q. You say the genuine stamps are not always perfect, not withstanding the stamp is not complete; can you distinguish by that which really exists on the paper, that one stamp is regular, and the other forged? A. Yes; some are not so perfect as other - still there is sufficient difference to enable me to say it is forged.

OWEN CLUTTON . I am an Excise-officer. On the 16th of February I was sent for and went to Martin's, in Regent-street; I found Mr. Bird, Notweller, and Hall there; and I believe there was some of Mr. Martin's men; I cannot say whether Kennedy was there - when I arrived they were examining the paper, some of it was seized - I did not examine the stamps; I have got the genuine stamp here - there are four stamps; the first account - the frame-mark - the charge - and the remmant stamp; the duty-stamp used at Martin's, is No. 99 - there is one paperstainer in that district using that number; his name is James Henderson - I think it was in the afternoon when I went to Regent-street; our usual time of going to stamp there, is from nine to twelve o'clock in the morning generally; the stamps are kept in a box which I keep, but Clagget has the key of the box, and I have the key of the place the box is kept in - I am obliged to send for Clagget before I can get at the duty or first accountstamp.

JOHN CLAGGET here produced the stamp, No. 99, from a box.

Witness. This is the duty-stamp, No. 99; I have surveyed at Martin's between five and six years, and have had no other duty-stamp for him besides this.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How often in a week do you go to Martin's? A. Every day, Sunday excepted; Martin has been very little in Regent-street, or Smith's-yard for a long time before the 16th of February - it was my duty to notice what paper is there, and see what is in the process of manufacture, but not to take an account of it.

Q. Could it have escaped your observation if 140 pieces of forged stamped paper, had been added to his stock? A. His stock was too large for me to perceive the increase; the duty is paid at the Excise-office - the paper produced is very like a paper that many makers may have.

MR. LAW. Q. Other paper-stainers have the same pattern; but no other maker has the same number? A. Except Henderson.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you ever lend your stamps to any of the work people to use? A. No; they have been in their possession to use in my presence; but they never went out of my sight - they have worked them on one side while I was at the other.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see them work with any other stamp than that which you lent them? A. No; that must have made a genuine impression.

MR. LAW. Q. Have you not invariably gone to the premises in the morning, during the hours you have mentioned, except at the time in question? A. Yes.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you ever been between one and four o'clock? A. I might, as I pass the house so much; my regular hours were from nine to twelve - I have no recollection of going out of those hours.

MR. CLARKSON to JOHN CLAGGETT. Q. Are your usual hours for attending to stamp in the morning? A. Yes, from eleven to one is the general time; I have not been after those hours, till after the seizure - the premises are open to us at all hours.

Q. Have you not been frequently sent for to stamp at one hour, and come much later? A. I keep to my time as well as possible - I might have been an hour later at times; I never charged in the afternoon, to my knowledge - I have been sent for to go there and stamp, but not in the afternoon; I do not recollect charging in the afternoon; - I never recollect going three hours after I was sent for.

Q. Have you not frequently made the impressions at so rapid a rate, that you could not tell yourself whether they were your impressions or not, when they were dry? A. The impressions were always correct, as far as I knew - I could always tell they were genuine impressions: the colouring would alter them at times.

JURY. Q. Could you always tell without comparison? A. I could always tell whether it was our stamp or not; I never knew an instance to the contrary.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do not you know, on your oath, that there have been many? A. To the best of my knowledge there has not.

COURT. Q. Have you ever seen impressions made by you, and you did not know whether they had beed made by the right stamp or not? A. I could tell if they were made from our stamp.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You mean to swear that? A. I can, to the best of my knowledge; I should always know my own stamp; I never saw an impression on paper in his manufactory, that I could not tell whether it was from our stamp or not; I have sometimes examined impressions after they were dry occasionally, just by chance; I could not always distinguish them; sometimes they get obliterated a little.

COURT. Q. But from the state they were in, could you say whether they were from a genuine stamp or not? A. To the best of my knowledge they were; according to what I had seen, that was our stamp.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. On your oath, has it not happened more than once, twice, or thrice, that after you have stamped paper on Martin's premises, when they have become dry, and you inspected them, you could not tell whether they were genuine or not? A. I have seen the stamps and all perfect, to the best of my knowledge; I have never, when I have been on duty, doubted about stamps.

Q. Then why have you hesitated so long in answering? A. I was considering about the seizure - I was not at the seizure; I thought you were speaking of the seizure. - When the paper gets dry we cannot see it so perfectly; there might be here and there a piece which I could not distinguish, but I have always found the genuine stamp, whatever I have seen; it might be obliterated, but I could make some of the stamp out to see that it was a genuine impression.

JOHN SMITH . I am engraver to the Board of Excise. I have examined impressions of the duty-stamp on several pieces of paper which were seized at Martin's - (looking at one) this is a forged duty-stamp - it is No. 99; here is another - the duty-stamp on that is forged, and on this also; the 99 is not very clear on this, but it is a forged stamp; here is another, which is also forged; I have examined them before, or I should take more time to examine them; the letters are not in the line, and the crown is very cramped; I call it a very bad impression; the letter Y seems tumbling down; I engrave all the Excise stamps with my own hands, and am quite positive I never made the stamp this is impressed from. (Looking at the paper produced by the prisoner's Counsel) this is a genuine stamp - it is No. 233, not 99.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You make the stamps with your own hands, but do not fix them to the paper? A. No; a negligent manner of impressing them would make a varied appearance, of course, but I must know them to be genuine, even if only a small part is impressed - if that part was clear I could not be deceived. I was questioned about this by the Board in October, and I think twice afterwards, before I went to Bow-street; I examined different papers each time; these were the second I examined, to the best of my recollection; I had no hesitation in declaring them forged, either in October or at any time; I went to Bow-street in May; I know nothing of Martin presenting a petition; Bird did not call on me about that.

THOMAS HALL . I am a general surveyor of the Excise. I accompanied Bird on the 16th of February to Martin's, in Regent-street; I found a quantity of paper in the front shop, which Bird told me to take charge of; I cannot say how many - I was not at Smith's-yard: one hundred and sixty-five pieces were carried away from the two places, to Great Pulteney-street; Martin's men carried some - I fol

lowed them behind; I took it from their to the Excise-office in Broad-street, and locked it up.

GOLDING BIRD re-examined. I left Hall in Regent-street; the paper seized in Smith's yard was brought direct from there to Great Pulteney-street; the whole was then delivered to Hall; there were one hundred and sixty-five pieces in all.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is there a Mr. Hall, a stamper? A. No; I never saw paper stamped at Martin's; I only went there in consequence of these seizures.

WILLIAM EDWARD NOTWELLER . I am a surveyor of the Excise. On the 16th of February I accompanied the other officers to Martin's; I remained there till Bird came - I saw the paper examined, and observed a difference in the stamps; one hundred and sixty-six pieces were seized - ninety-eight pieces were taken from Smith's yard; we left eighteen hanging up wet, to remain till Monday; it was carried to the Excise chamber in Pulteney-street, and delivered to Hall.

JOSEPH DUFFIELD . I am eighteen years old, and am the son of William Duffield , a paper-hanger. I was apprenticed to Mr. Martin, and have been about two years with him; I have had some quarrel with him. I know the manufactory in Regent-street and Smith's-yard; Kennedy was the foreman; I went to live there about two years ago this Whitsuntide; shortly after I went I saw the paper come in, tied up, with strings round both ends; we only had one shop then; that was in Smith's yard - I looked at the stamps, and saw there was a difference in them, but I did not then know what was the officer's stamp.

Q. Did you afterwards observe anything going on? - A. The youngest apprentice first called my attention to it- his name is Wilson; he pointed out which was the offcer's (the fourth stamp) when I first went there; the small G. and the date was not to be perceived; a quarrel had taken place between Martin and Kennedy before the 1st of October; master was going to part with Kennedy, and Kennedy came into the shop in Smith's-yard, with thirty pieces of plain paper under his arm, and laid them on the table, and in his other hand he had a handkerchief, with something tied in it; this was about the latter end of September; he was stupidly drunk, and I do not think he knew what he was about; he came up into the upper shop, where I was at work, and began playing with the boys; I went down, and opened the handkerchief, and in it were three stamps; the frame-mark, the duty-mark, and the first account-stamp; I compared the frame-mark with the impressions on the papers, and it was just the same; they must have been made with the stamps in the handkerchief. After the 16th of February (and after the third seizure) Kennedy said it was me who had informed, and if I had not informed, nobody would have known the difference; I denied it then, and said it was not me - he then blamed me for it all, and said it was me that informed all about it; he used a great many oaths, and blackguarded me for it all; I told him I had seen the stamps, and he said it was a d-d lie, I never had seen them; I said there was not one in the place but what knew it.

JURY. Q. Did you ever see them use the stamps? A. No - I never saw them afterwards.

MR. LAW. Q. There were three seizures; after the first seizure did you see any impressions of the stamp which you had seen before? A. No - the greater part of that was seized; the forgery was stopped; there was no more forgery carried on till after New-year's day, and then it began again, but it was a different stamp; they had altered it - it was not the officer's stamp; the only difference in the stamp was the date; the date was not to be seen; I could not make the date out; they date the frame-mark by the year; the officer generally stamped about one hundred and twenty pieces a week; there were as many as five sixties in a week which were not stamped by the officers; there are sixty in a bundle; they were stamped, but not by the officer; I had to work on it - it was given to me with that which was properly stamped. The day the third seizure was made was the first time I gave information that I had seen the stamps; I did not see the officers till after the second seizure.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When was the first time you quarrelled with your master? A. I quarrelled with him several times; I do not exactly know the first time; my father came into Martin's employ after I became his apprentice; it was above a twelvemonth after; he remained there a good bit, at paper-hanging - I lived with my father; he was working there on and off several times. Martin did not turn him away till after the first seizure - I told nobody in the factory of my having seen the stamps in the handkerchief; I did not say everybody knew of the stamps, but of the forgery; I had talked about that - only one person is here who I told of it.

Q. Perhaps none of them quarrelled with their master? A. They have had petty quarrels - mine was no great quarrel; I respected my master, and Kennedy also; I never said I would do anything that would get Kennedy transported, nor anything like it; I know the servant of the house - I never told her so; I never worked down at Regent-street to talk to her about it; I saw her sometimes - I never talked to the gardener.

Q. What suggested to you the propriety of telling of this? A. I met the Excise officers, and communicated it to them - I never saw any but the two who came to survey. I met Bird and Hall in Rose-street, and told them.

Q. What made you select the day of the third seizure to inform of it? A. I had no particular reason; my father had seen Bird, and Bird wished to see us - my father had not seen Bird till he was turned away. I saw the stamps in February, and told my father of it, but nobody else; I told him of it the day I saw the stamps; I never talked to the servant in Regent-street about the stamps - I worked down there three weeks after the first seizure, but never said anything to her about either Martin or Kennedy; my brother quarrelled with Kennedy; I never heard him say he would do what he could to transport him. After Bird made the seizure I shewed some forged paper to Mr. Slowman; I said."They are going on with the old game again;" he said, "Put them under the table, and I will have the officers here in the morning." I took the stamp off the paper and kept it till the morning: I said I thought it was forged, and tore off the end to ascertain the fact; the officer admitted that it was genuine. I told him Bird had told me if I saw any forged to let him know; if it had not been for Slowman the officer would not have known it - it is very easy to discover forged stamps; I am speaking of the frame-stamp

(pointing it out) I never saw any difference in the chargestamp; there is no difference between that charge-mark and the officer's charge mark.

JURY. Q. Were the three stamps you saw in the handkerchief, similar to the one you pointed out as being forged? A. Only the long one (the frame-mark.) I had about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour to look at the stamps; the stamp I tore off and fancied was forged proved not to be so - the stamp I tore off was at Starch-green, and a different frame-mark altogether to that in the handkerchief.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. The frame-mark appears to be much easier to imitate than the duty mark? A. Yes, the duty mark in the handkerchief was exactly like the original, and the first account stamp; any one might see the difference in the frame-mark, if they had the two impressions laid together: my observations have been confined entirely to the frame-mark.

Q. Is this sort of stamp like one of them? A. That is the sort of stamp - it is not the same; the difference is, it is clogged up with colour, and this handle is larger; when the impression was made on the paper I could see no difference between the officer's mark and that; I observed no cramping in the crown; the letters were not tumbling down - I never saw any difference in the duty-mark; it was all in the frame-mark; no duty is payable on the frame-mark; no benefit is attached to that, but there is to the duty-mark. My former master's name was Wiltshire - I was apprenticed to him for seven years, and was about eighteen months with him; he had nothing to do for a long while, and we quarrelled; I was an in-door apprentice; he was always telling me I did not earn my victuals; he had to find me in clothes; I could not get any, and wished him to give up my indentures; he would not, but he burnt them; there was a fire at Martin's premises in Regent-street; I did not work there at the time - my brother did; he was not the cause of the fire: my father does not go by the name of lying Duffield, that I know of; I have heard it from several persons in Martin's employ. - When I showed the officer the paper at Starch-green, he showed me the difference, how they altered the frame-mark - he told me I was doing wrong, but not that I ought to be hung; his name is Cole - he said, "Don't you know I could send you to prison for this, and if you do it again I will;" I said, "I have seen the thing carried on so long;" the mark was afterwards pasted on again - it was not destroyed.

MR. LAW. Q. You are not an engraver? A. No; what I know of the stamp is from memory; the duty mark is not put on till the frame-mark is.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever tell John Kearns that Kennedy was the cause of your having so many stoppages in your wages? A. I did, and said, perhaps I should have the laugh at him some day - this was before I thought of informing; I also said revenge was sweet, and I would do all in my power to have him transported - I never said to Henry Williams that I would transport Kennedy, nor did I tell James Fanning that or anything like it.

JURY. Q. At what time of the day did you see these stamps in the handkerchief? A. In the afternoon, between three and four o'clock I believe; there was only one man at work in the shop besides me - I do not know whether he saw him come in with the handkerchief; he was at work up stairs, and this was down stairs in the lower shop.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many men had Martin on his premises the day you saw the stamp? A. Only me and one man - there are four on the premises at one time, but not at that time.

ABRAHAM DUFFIELD . I was apprenticed to Martin, and lived with him not quite a twelvemonth; I have not left - he holds my indeatures now; I worked at the premises in Regent-street - my duty was to join the sheets of paper; Kennedy used to give them to me - the officers used first to account them.

Q. Did you ever join any sheets that were unfirst accounted? A. Yes - on the Saturday after the seizure was made, I joined a ream at that time; some first accounted paper was joined with it - that was placed mostly at the beginning, the back-end and the head-end; on the Saturday after the second seizure, which was in February, Kennedy brought me down this unfirst accounted paper - the ream was open when he brought it down, and on Monday he brought down another ream; he cut that and laid part of it out, and set the boy to lay the rest out - he told me to join it; I had joined not quite three reams altogether when the officer came and seized them; I think I have seen Kennedy with a stamp in his hand, but I will not be sure - it was about a fortnight before the second seizure.

Q. Where were you that day? A. Mr. Kennedy sent me out about four o'clock in the afternoon to Turner and Co., Bond-street, and when I came back I ran down stairs into the shop - Mr. Martin came to me at the bottom of the stairs; I could see quite plainly into the lower shop- I was within four stairs of the bottom, and could see about half over the shop; I saw Kennedy there - Mr. Martin came to me, and told me to go down to the other shop for a tub; I saw some paper laid on the table waiting for drying - directly I went to the bottom of the stairs Kennedy had something in his hand, and directly Martin came to me, Kennedy held his hand below the table; I was about a quarter of an hour gone for the tub - when I came back I went into the shop again; I saw this paper, which was on the table, charged and ready to roll off - it had got the duty stamp on it; if I recollect right there were two sixties - I had joined part of that paper myself in the morning; I did not notice whether it was first accounted, but when I came back it had the first account-mark, the frame and duty-mark on it - this was about a fortnight before the second seizure; when I went into the shop after the third seizure, Martin said to me, - Duffield, ayn't you ashamed to come to the shop again after joining the sheets in and then going and informing against me?" - I said, "Sir, it was not me that mixed the sheets. it was Mr. Kennedy:" he said, "I will have both you and Kennedy up" - he did not take me before a Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where was Kennedy standing with something in his hand? A. In Regent-street, on the side of the table in the shop under the show shop; the Excise people go to that shop - there is a gate and stairs to go to it; I am certain neither the charge nor the frame-mark were on the paper when I left; I had been join

ing paper there that day, and Kennedy was working there; but nobody else - now and then a boy might come down from the other shop, but nobody worked there constantly; Kennedy and I were not very good friends - I believe he hit me two or three days before that, but we made it up; we have had several quarrels, but he never hit me before, and I have quarreled with him since I have been working at Starch-green - I cannot exactly say how long ago; we were not continually quarrelling.

Q. Did you ever hear anything about a fire? A. Yes; some paper caught fire under my table while I was out - that was in Regent-street; it was in the morning - I had a candlestick against the wall; it burnt down to where it was stuck and fell while I was out - there were papershavings there, but no wood-shavings that I am aware of; I had left the candle burning, and was out about a quarter of an hour - there was no one working in the room; Kennedy was gone down to Brewer-street - I believe the wall was not wood, but brick.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you leave the candle there to burn the house down? A. No; it was always put there.

GOLDING BIRD. The wet paper was left till Monday, and then taken to Great Pultney-street, and left in charge of Broad.

ABEL BROAD . I am surveyor at Great Pultney-street; a quantity of paper was delivered into my charge - I locked it up; it was delivered next day to Leader and Major, our officers, to take to the Excise-office.

JAMES LEADER . I am an Excise-officer; Broad gave me some paper to take to the office - I took it to the end of Rose-street, and delivered it to Bird in a Hackneycoach.

WILLIAM MAJOR . I brought some paper with Leader from the office in Pultney-street, and delivered it to Bird.

JOHN BEVAN . I am foreman to James Henderson, a paper-stainer; he is in partnership with Mr. Fricker - I have lived with them twenty years; we had no transactions in business with Martin, and never sold him any paper; the paper produced is not their manufacture, I am certain.

JAMES HENDERSON . I never sold any paper to Martin.

MR. CLARKSON to DUFFIELD. Q. What was the day on which you went for the tub? A. I cannot say; but it was about a fortnight before the second seizure, in the early part of February.

The prisoner Martin handed in a long written defence, stating, that after the seizure of the papers, conscious of his innocence, he had petitioned the Excise to restore the paper in question, and had been constantly in his business, and communicating with the officers relative to his petition; that nearly three months elapsed before criminal proceedings were adopted; that he was possessed of considerable property, and could have no inducement to resort to such frauds - that the evidence of Duffield was the result of revenge - and the alledged forged impressions must have been impressed in the presence of all the workmen, and when the Excise-officers had access to the premises. - Kennedy put in a written defence declaring his innocence, and contending that the evidence of Duffield was given from a malicious motive.

The petition presented by Martin to the Board of Excise requesting the return of the papers, as the stamps were put on by the regular officer, was here read.

JOHN KEARNS . I know Joseph Duffield; he told me Kennedy was the cause of Mr. Martin having made so many stoppages in his money; that revenge was sweet, and he would do all he could to have him transported.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Where do you live? A. With Mr. Martin's foreman at present; I am employed at Martin's - I am his apprentice; Duffield said this about a fortnight ago, last Thursday, in the lower shop; his brother was there at the time - he first commenced the discourse; he was talking about the officers being there - I then asked him if he had actually seen any of the stamps; Kennedy was in custody - nobody told me to ask him; he had mentioned about the stamps being used, at the other shop - which was the reason why I asked if he had seen the stamps; he said, no, he had not seen them, but that revenge was sweet and he would do anything to transport Kennedy.

COURT. Q. You asked if he had seen the stamps? A. Yes; this was about another affair at Starch-green.

ROBERT BRIGGS . I am a gardener, and live at Shepherd's-bush. On the 3d of May, I saw Joseph Duffield at the factory, Starch-green; Mr. Martin is my master.

Q. Did Duffield say to you that he would do anything to do the fellows up as he had been ill used by them? A. Yes: he said he had been used very ill, and would do anything to do the b - g - rs.

HUGH WILLIAMS . I am a block-cutter, and cut blocks for paper-stainers; I am employed by Mr. Martin - I knew Joseph Duffield. On the 14th of May I saw him at the manufactory at Starch-green; I work at the next table but one to him - he at first told the men they were carrying on the game as usual, and that there were forged stamps; a person came to me with the framemark of the stamps, and said he was afraid to work - I put on my spectacles, examined it, and found a little variation; I went to Duffield's table, he pointed out one piece.

Q. Did he say at any time what he would do? A. That was on the 15th; some of the boys were talking about his turning informer, and he said Kennedy had served him out so, he would say anything to transport Jem Kennedy, for he had often caused him to be docked many a shilling.

MR. LAW Q. They were observing that he had given information? A. They were calling him an informer, and he said this; he had before that produced paper to us which he said had not the regular stamps, and I saw a difference in them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Those you had seen a difference in, the officer pronounced to be good? A. Yes, that very day; Joe said, "I am wrong for once;" three officers were there, and examined them by the dividers.

MR. LAW. Q. That was the frame-mark? A. Yes; the officer said it was all right, and blamed him very much.

ANN JACKSON . I am Mr. Martin's servant; Joseph Duffield told me he would go twenty miles to hang Mr. Kennedy; that was about twelve months ago - he has said nothing of the kind since.

ROBERT COLE. I am a supervisor of the Excise. I was sent for to Martin's premises at Starch-green; the persons of the factory took me there to see some stamps, alledged to be forged - it was a frame-mark which had been torn off: I examined it, and it agreed with the genuine stamp; I understood that Duffield had torn it off; I found fault with him for it - it was a perfectly honest and fair mark.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long have you surveyed paperstainers? A. About a twelvemonth; before that I was not acquainted with the duty; the figures 28 in the stamp were moved out a little distance by the wedge; being moveable figures, the appearance would depend on the size of the wedge placed between them - it had been placed in a different way to what it had before.

Q. Then it produced a different appearance? A. It did - that might produce a mistake, in his opinion; I found by putting the wedge right it would be as before.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Could any person, using a fair observation of it, suppose it to be forged? A. It struck me the moment I saw it how it happened; Duffield did not tell me he was sure it was forged.

FRANCIS RALT . I am an Excise-officer. I have surveyed Martin's factory since the 5th of April; I never was employed in such work before - I was called on in consequence of some complaint, and saw Joseph Duffield- he did not produce anything to me; a piece of paper was produced to know if it was our charging, or not - I said it was; I found no difference between that and our stamp, with the exception of the figures being turned; I asked to see the other end - Duffield said there was no stamp on the other end; I asked where it was - he said he had it, and gave it to me from his pocket; he said the stamp was not right, and he would swear it was not the officer's doing.

MR. LAW. Q. Was it not the frame-mark that was pointed out as incorrect? A. Yes - not the charging-stamp; the figures were not placed straight - other papers were produced to me, and the figures were straight; he might suppose it to be wrong, certainly - I do not recollect whether Abraham Duffield was present.

JURY to JOHN CLAGGETT. Q. Was there never an occasion when you and Clutton had both keys? A. No - I keep the key of the box, and he of the cupboard; I never had that, nor had he ever the key of the box.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-47

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1123. SAMUEL JACOBS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-48

1124. HENRY WOOD was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

REBECCA ANDERSON . I live at the Red Lion public-house, Fenchurch-street . On Saturday, the 24th of May , between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and had a glass of gin and peppermint. and tendered me half a crown; I rather doubted it, and referred it to Tayler in the bar - I then gave change for it, and kept it; he came again in about twenty minutes for another glass, and gave me another half-crown, which I shewed to Tayler, and he was detained.

HENRY TAYLER. I received the two half-crowns from Anderson; I took the prisoner into custody, and found a good half-crown in his waistcoat pocket - I marked the two which he tendered; I found no change whatever on him.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear I am the person who came the first time? A. I did not see you the first time.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of coin. These two half-crowns are counterfeit, and of the same cast - they are not made from a die.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of passing the first.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and to find sureties for his good behaviour for Six Months then to come .

Reference Number: t18280529-49

1125. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOSEPH BURCH . I am a wholesale stationer , in partnership with Joseph Thorpe - we live in Jewry-street. On the 26th of April , the prisoner came with an order signed R. Johnson, for four reams of paper, and having done business with Johnson, I delivered him the paper, believing the order genuine - I did not know him before; on the Tuesday following he came with another order, signed Gadenne, and I had him taken up, and sent one of our porters to Mr. Gadenne with him.

Prisoner. Can you positively swear I am the person who came with the first order? A. I will not positively swear it, but I have no doubt of it.

The orders were as follow:-

Messrs. Thorpe and Burch, - I should feel particularly obliged if you will send by bearer, four reams of thick yellow wove post.

London-wall. (Signed,) R.JOHNSON.

Messrs. Thorpe and Burch, - I shall feel obliged if you will send by bearer four reams of thick large yellow wove post.

Moor-lane. (Signed,) J. GADENNE.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am a stationer, and deal with Mr. Burch. This order is not written by me, nor any one in my house; I do not know the prisoner.

JOSEPH REYNOLDS . I live with the prosecutor. On the 26th the prisoner brought the order, signed R. Johnson - the paper was given to him; he came again on the 29th with the other order; Mr. Gadenne not having paper from us excited my suspicion, and the paper being the same as the first order - I have no doubt of his being the man who brought the first order.

DANIEL GADENNE . I gave the prisoner no order on Messrs. Burch and Co; I never saw him before.

JOHN WASHER . I am a porter to the prosecutors, and was sent with the prisoner to ascertain if he came from Mr. Gadenne. He took me first to Messrs. Magnays, then he went by Gadenne's house; I took him in, and then gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in the place till I went on the Tuesday; I was at a public-house all day on the Saturday, and have no doubt the person who gave me this order is the one who got the first paper.

JOSEPH REYNOLDS . When I saw him at Guildhall he had his hat off and I could not identify him, but when I saw him with his hat on I had no doubt of him; I helped the goods on his head on Saturday, as he asked for assistance.

WILLIAM BISHOP . I delivered the goods to the person on the Saturday - I put them on the counter as I was going out to dinner; I cannot swear to the prisoner - I said at Guildhall I thought the man rather more bald in front.

The prisoner, in a long address, stated that he was at a public-house at Bow all day on the Saturday; that he was out of em

ploy, and had met a man in Fore-street, who gave him the second order, and told him to bring the goods to St. Mary Axe.

MR. BURCH. I have no doubt of him in my own mind, but will not swear to him.

GUILTY. Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be his first offence .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-50

1126. JOSEPH HARRIS was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

No evidence NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-51

1127. ROBERT(alias JOHN) NELSON and JOHN LAWRENCE were indicted for entering the yard of the dwelling-house of Robert Goodwin , with intent burglariously to break and enter the said dwelling-house .

ROBERT GOODWIN. I keep a public-house in Shoe-lane ; I have a large passage in my house, and a yard at the end of it; there is no door out of the yard except through the house. On the 14th of May I shut the house up about half-past eleven o'clock; I had not seen the prisoners in the house that day, as I had been out, but I had two days before - they had been to my house twice in company; I found them in my back yard at twelve o'clock on this night, about three yards from the back door; Lawrence was hid behind some loose fire wood, sitting down in a basket; I did not see Nelson then, for I immediately ran up stairs, fastened the door, and got the watchman in; Lawrence was certainly concealing himself; when the watchman came we found them both in the yard.

Q. How came you to go to the yard? A. I always go to see if all is safe; they were taken to the watch-house - a candle was found in Lawrence's hat, and a penknife on Nelson; I had cleared my house at half-past eleven o'clock; my wife went to the yard with me.

ROBERT GRIFFITHS . I lodge in this house. On Tuesday night I was at supper in the tap-room; the two prisoners came in, and entered into conversation with me, respecting Mr. Goodwin - I am not certain of their coming in together; they were strangers to me; Nelson particularly entered into conversation with me, saying he had been in Goodwin's employ, and how glad he was that he was doing well - he inquired particularly concerning what lodgers there were, and how they were let out in the morning - I said Goodwin let them out himself, I believed; Nelson asked if there was any back entrance, and if - Goodwin had any private room; I answered them every question, thinking they were his friends; they came again next night, about eleven o'clock; I do not know whether they were there before that, but I happened to be in the same box, opposite the entrance of the tap-room; we had a pint of beer, and about half-past eleven o'clock the company all departed; I moved from the box facing the front passage, and sat by the fire; Nelson immediately got up out of the box where he sat, and went, as I thought. towards the front door; Lawrence followed him; Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin generally go round the house; they came into the tap-room saw nobody but me, and went down to lock up the house; I went to bed, but was afterwards called up, and found the prisoners in custody; I knew them to be the same men. I had told Goodwin on Tuesday what an excellent character they gave him; I told them where he slept and everything - I gave them all the information I could.

JOHN ASTELL . I am a constable, and was fetched to the house soon after twelve o'clock; I found the prisoners in the back yard together, and took them to the watch-house; Nelson endeavoured to escape - a candle was found in Lawrence's hat; I returned to the premises, and found two large clasp knives and a penknife; the point of one knife was broken, like a glazier's knife, to cut glass; in the other part of the yard, where the prisoners had been concealing themselves, I found a phosphorus-box, with matches, a screw-driver, and a small bit of candle, and near that spot a small crow-bar and hammer.

HENRY BOLTON . I am superintendent of the watch. I was at the watch-house door a little after one o'clock, and heard a rattle spring; I ran up Fleet-lane, and saw Nelson in custody; I went to Goodwin's house, and saw Astle pick up some housebreaking implements in the yard.

The prisoners put in a written defence, stating that they had been taken ill, and went to the yard, but could not find the privy.

NELSON - GUILTY .

LAWRENCE - GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280529-52

1128. MATTHEW BONACHI was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-53

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1129. JOHN DONOHOUGH was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Patrick Holland , on the 6th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 hat, value 18s.; 14 shillings, and 5d. in copper, his property .

JOHN PATRICK HOLLAND. I am foreman to Henry Fisher, a stereotype-founder and printer in ordinary to His Majesty; I live in Charles-place, Parrs-place, Goswell-road. On the 6th of April, about five minutes past ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Turk's Head-court, Green Arbour-court, Golden-lane, St. Luke's, Middlesex ; I was going to call on my sister, and instead of passing through the court, as there were some loose girls and young men about the court. I went through a public-house; as I knew the landlord who kept the house, which is a thoroughfare; my sister's door is sixteen or eighteen feet from the door of the public-house; my sister was ill, and I was going to see her - as I passed through the house I asked for the landlord; they told me he was in the tap-room, or something to that effect.

Q. Who told you that? A. The people in the bar; I did not like the appearance of the people who I saw in the bar - that made me ask for the landlord: as I passed through the house I was stopped by a young man whom I knew from childhood; he recognized me; he shook hands with me, and I passed on to the door, and on putting my hand out to lay hold of the door, the prisoner at the bar took hold of my hat, and took it off - he was at the back of me; I did not notice where he stood as I was going out; he must have stood more to the right of me; he was in the house at the time he took my hat off - he

was a perfect stranger to me; I had no recollection of him.

Q. Were there other people with him? A. I think there was another one, but will not speak positive: I turned round and saw him with my hat in his right hand- it was a drab hat; I seized it with my left hand, and endeavoured to recover it; he called others to his assistance.

Q. In what way did he call? A. I do not recollect the words he made use of; a confusion immediately took place, and I then struck him once or twice.

Q. He appeared to call for some one? A. Yes; I struck him; the landlord's son (I believe it was) said to him, "Give the man his hat and left him go; I know his sister - you will get yourself into trouble;" I was then forcibly dragged or carried through a door into the skittle-ground, by five or six persons; there might be more.

Q. Was the prisoner one of those who forced or dragged you? A. He was one of the party; I do not think he ever left - they forced me on the ground; one held me by the throat, by my handkerchief, which was tied closely round my neck, and they pulled my shoes off; I called for assistance - the landlord came in, and asked what they were about; one of them said, "It is a bl - y lark - we will punish the obstreperous b-g-r." I called to the landlord, knowing his voice perfectly well; I called to him for assistance; he asked who I was, and what my name was: he said he did not know me - I said"I will tell you my brother's name;" he said, "Who is your brother?" I said Early; he said, "Oh, you must get out of it the best way you can;" I said "It is very hard to be punished in a relation's house;" he is a distant relation of my wife; he left, and I do not think he had any hand in it; I was much kicked about the hips - I became very weak, and struggled with them; they beat my lips, as they said with the intention of stopping me from hallooing; I received blows in various parts of my body; there were five or six of them on me; I cannot say the prisoner was one of those in the skittle-ground, as it was dark; I could not recognize any face; they took from me my hat, a blue surfont coat, my shoes, waistcoat, and I had at the time 14s. or more in my lefthand waistcoat pocket, and three penny pieces in my other pocket; my waistcoat was torn off, and they scrambled for my money; I was left with my trousers torn. I laid for some short time before I recovered; I then got up, and got out of the door, and when I got up to go to the door they kicked me into the gutter; I said, "I don't care for that, now I have got out;" I knocked at my sister's door, and told her to let me in; I have omitted to say that while taking off my things I said to them,"Don't ill-use me - take what you like;" I was very much ill-used - I could not put my foot to the ground for two or three days. I saw the prisoner again on the 24th of April; the landlord's son had given information, and he was taken on the 23d, I believe; I am quite sure he is the man who took my hat; I pointed him out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He took your hat off - at that time was he not perfectly alone? A. I have not asserted that they were with him then; I cannot say he was alone; I will not swear that he was not; it happened on Easter Sunday.

Q. I believe they were all pretty tipsy? A. I cannot speak to that; I was perfectly sober: the landlord and his son were looking at part of the transaction.

Q. Do not you know the whole business was a frolic until you hit the prisoner two blows in the face, as hard as you could? A. I acknowledge I did give him two desperate blows in the face - I stood in my own defence. I consider if a man takes my hat off it is with intent to rob me; that was done in the house, not in the skittleground; I was stripped of my coat and things in the skittle-ground: I have not said that the prisoner was in the skittle-ground, or that he was not; I struck him with my right arm - that was the worst of the two, but I had hold of my hat with my left hand; I struck him somewhere about the side of his face, as hard as I could.

Q. Had he done more to you than just twisted your hat off in a frolic? A. I cannot call it a frolic, for I was not one of their party; I have given my reason for going through the house - I know it was dangerous to go through even any of the passages leading to the house; there are several ways out of the house; if you had a sister who you understood was laying in a dangerous state, you would run all hazards to see her. The landlord is not here - his son is, who saw part of the transaction.

Q. Did you say before the Magistrate, that you were struck anywhere except in your heel? A. I did; I have the trousers which I had on; I have not produced them, but they are completely destroyed: I cannot tell whether he was in the skittle-ground - there was one whom I held by the collar; I can describe the dress the prisoner had on; I cannot say what he said when he called out, as there was a confusion altogether.

Q. If he called out, was it not an exclamation at the pain you gave him with the blow? A. No, it was to call his fellow confederates; I believe the whole of them are most desperate characters; they came to his assistance when he called out; I cannot tell what he called out; I was not more than a yard from him. I have known the landlord twenty years - he came into the skittle-ground: when I speak of knowing him twenty years, the landlord had forgot the greater part of my knowing him, for even with regard to the relationship between my wife and him, when he first received the property of his wife's to take this house, he did not know me; he would not know me in the skittle-ground; whether he did know me or not I cannot say; his son knew me - he saw some of the desperate usage.

Q. Had you drank anything that night? A. I had been ill all the week before; I had drank part of two pints of porter - that was at the Weavers' Arms public-house, Grub-street; I went there to see the person who keeps the house; I had not been in any other public-house - I had drank one glass of gin and cloves; it is my usual drink - I cannot do without it, for mine is most injurious business; it is necessary to take something - I am positive I drank nothing else - I had not the appearance of a man intoxicated.

WILLIAM BLOWER . My father keeps the Queen's Head public-house, Green Arbour-court, Turk's Head-court, Golden-lane. On Easter Sunday night Mr. Holland came

by my father's bar; I was going out into Green Arbour-court; he was seized hold of by Donohough, who took off his hat - I was standing at the door; I looked round and said to him, "Give the man his hat;" with that the other thieves came directly - took hold of me, and said,"If you speak a word I will kick your entrails out;" then they took hold of Holland and pulled his coat off - they took him between the yard-door, going towards the skittle-ground; they pulled off his coat and waistcoat.

Q. Was he on the ground? A. No, not then; they then pulled off his shoes, then shoved him down on the ground between the yard door and passage, and ran away - then they let me go; I got to my father and told him.

Did you see Holland receive any blows? A. No; when they let me go, he got up and went to his sister's house - he had neither coat, waistcoat, nor shoes on; they took them away.

Q. Were these young men who you call thieves, in company with the prisoner? A. Yes, he was in company with them, and with them assisting in pulling off his coat and things.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your father present at any part of the transaction? A. No; he was not - I swear that; I heard what the prosecutor has sworn about my father - he was not present at any part of the transaction, and knew nothing of it till I told him.

Q. If Holland has sworn your father was present at any part of it, it is not true? A. It is not; I did not call out, as they said, if I spoke a word, they would kick my entrails out.

Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate, that you desired them to let the young man alone, because you knew him? A. I told them I knew his sister.

Q. Did not the Magistrate say, "Then I suppose if it had been a stranger you would not have minded?" A. I told the Magistrate if I saw any robbery done I would prevent it if I could; my father has kept the house about three years and a half - I was standing at the door when Holland came in; his hat was taken off in the house - he turned round, and caught hold of the prisoner; he did not give the prisoner any blows - I was behind his back; he did not strike the prisoner - he could not strike him without my seeing him.

Q. Is all the rest you have sworn quite as true as that? A. Yes; Holland did not appear to me to be in liquor - he had not drank in my father's house; the young men had been drinking ale - they appeared high up in liquor.

Q. Had they not been larking about all the evening? A. Yes, they had; they had been drinking in my father's house about half an hour before Holland came in - Holland's sister lives in Green Arbour-court; he could go directly out of Golden-lane to the court - that is a broad street; he could go into the court without coming through our house - I should not have been afraid to have gone; he did not appear to have been drinking - Mr. Bennett, the Magistrate of Worship-street, told my father he had no occasion to come here; he did not see anything of the transaction at all.

COURT. Q. You did not see Holland strike the prisoner; were you not surrounded by these people? A. I was surround directly Holland's hat was taken off - there was no violent blows used at all; neither to the prisoner nor the prosecutor.

Q. Had you seen these parties whom you call thieves, at your father's house before? A. I had seen them in the neighbourhood; they had been to the bar to have a drop of liquor - but never to sit down and stop at our house before; I had seen them before that in company, in the neighbourhood, and at my father's bar.

JURY. Q. Was you in the bar when the prosecutor first came into the house? A. I was at the door going out to Green Arbour-court; I saw him come in - he had not been in the house long; he came through one door, and was going out at another - he did not stop in the house.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23d of April - I had been looking for him ever since the 7th of April, three or four nights.

SARAH EATLY . My husband is a bricklayer; I am Holland's sister; I had been ill, and under the doctor's hands since November last. On the 6th of April my brother knocked at my door, and as he knocked I heard footsteps running past the house; I let him in; he was without coat, waistcoat, or shoes; he appeared very much exhausted; I took him in - he had a scratch on his face, rather on the lip, and on his left ear; I begged of him to go up stairs; after taking him in, I went to Mr. Blower, the landlord; I saw him with a party round the bar, called him aside, and asked if he knew anything about the robbery; he was very saucy, and very much in liquor; the pot-boy was called, and he knew nothing about it; the son was called, and he knew nothing about it; I said they should hear of it in the morning, and in the morning Mr. Blower came to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Then the blows have come to a scratch on his lip? A. Yes, he had a scratch on his lip, and seemed very much exhausted; the son said that night that he knew nothing about it, but next morning he came and acknowledged it.

JOHN PATRICK HOLLAND. I have got none of my property back.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Of stealing the hat from the person, but not with force or violence . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280529-54

Before Mr. Recorder.

1130. JAMES ANDERSON , MARY YOUNG , and GEORGE MORRIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Johnson , on the 10th of May , at St. John, Westminster , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s., and 1 sovereign, his property .

THOMAS JOHNSON. I live in Cooper's-court, Knightsbridge, and am a labourer ; I do not work for anybody in particular. On the 10th of May I was going from home - it was about half-past ten o'clock at night when I was going down Grosvenor-place; I met a girl there, and went home with her - she was a woman of the town; that woman is not here; I went home with her to a court in Pye-street, Westminster ; I had a sovereign, four shillings, and 10 1/2d. in my pocket at the time, and two handkerchiefs - they were in my pocket; I got to Pye-street about eleven

o'clock; I went into a room with her - she asked what I was going to give her; I told her I had not much change - I had bought a bunch of raddishes and onions and a candle, and when I entered the room I had 4s. 7 1/2d.; she asked what I was going to give her; I said I had not much change; I gave her 4s. in silver, and 6d. in copper; I sat down in a chair, and the girl went to bed - I had only had one pint of beer, and was quite sober; she said in about a quarter of an hour, "Are you coming to bed?" I said I was in no hurry, I would sit there a little; I went to the beside, and began to undo my shoes; she then got up, went out of the room, and said, "I will return in a few minutes; don't you go away:" then in came a man and woman - that was the prisoners Anderson and Young; I did not see the girl again till she was in custody - there was only one bed in the room; Young said, "What are you doing here?" I said I came there with a girl: she said, "You must go out of here; this room belongs to me - you must go and look for the girl:" I said I should not go out of the room - I had paid for the room; I refused to go out; the man and woman went out, and returned; while I was putting on my shoes Young returned into the room, and two men with her, Anderson and the other prisoner - she had both the male prisoner with her; they said, "Now we will see whether you will go out or not;" with that they seized hold of me, Anderson on my right, and Morris on my left - one held each arm, and they began to kick me; after they began kicking me, Anderson put his right hand into my right-hand breeches pocket, where the sovereign was, wrapped up in a bit of paper; while his hand was in my pocket, the woman struck me across the shoulder with a stick which I had brought into the room, and which belonged to an umbrella - the stick broke in two; the other man kicked me, and Anderson had his right hand in my breeches pocket - he turned my pocket inside out; they dragged me out into the court - my knee-cap was put out by their kicks, and my ribs were very much hurt; I called out Watch! and Murder! and received another kick on my left ribs - that was given to me by Morris.

Q. Did anybody come to your assistance? A. Not at that time; after that Anderson said, "Let me kill the b-g-r out of the way;" Morris said, "We will serve him out;" I then received another kick in the ribs; they then dragged me out of the court into the street, and left me.

Q. How far was it from the spot where you were in the street? A. It is not a very long court, about the length of this Court; Dempsey, (the watchman) and another man, came up to my assistance; I had then been laying in the street nearly a quarter of an hour - I could not get up in consequence of the injury I had received; they asked me what was the matter; I told them I had been ill-used: they asked me where the house was; I said if they would assist me I would take them to the room where it happened; they carried me there; when we got there the door was locked outside with a padlock; the watchman said he would break it open; I said, "Before you break it open I will give you a description of the room, so that you may know I tell you of the right room:" they broke the door open, and found nobody there; they then carried me to the watch-house, and from there to the Westminster Infirmary - I was bled there, examined, and dressed; all the beds in the Infirmary were occupied - there was no coach, and the men carried me home; my knee-pan was set.

Q. When did you next see either of the prisoner? A. This happened on Saturday, and on the next Monday I was fetched to the office, and saw Anderson, Young, and the girl who had taken me there; the girl was discharged; I have found one handkerchief and one shoe - my shoe was left in the room; I did not see it found - it had come off with their pulling me about; I have found one handkerchief which was stolen from me - it was produced at the office.

Q. When you saw the girl whom you had met, and Anderson and Young, were you quite certain of their persons? A. I was, and spoke positively to them; I am quite certain I cannot be mistaken in their persons: the Magistrate asked if I should know the other man - Morris was fetched into the office, as he was waiting outside; he was fetched in, and I was certain of him, and spoke positively to him - I am quite certain of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Pray, are you a married man? A. No; I met the girl at half-past ten o'clock - it commenced about eleven; I was not in anybody's employ at the time.

Q. I do not mean were you going to work at the time, but had you got a master? A. Yes; I get 2s. 4d. a day; nobody here saw me with the sovereign, that I know of; I told the girl I had a sovereign, that I know of; I had taken a pint of beer at the White Horse public-house, Knightsbridge - this happened at Westminster; I went all the way, from home to Westminster - the woman met me in Grosvenor-place; I had drank nothing but the porter all day, except a pint of table-beer; I did not go into any public-house with the girl I met - she asked me to go, but I did not; that girl is here, but not in Court; I drank no gin with her - I did not taste gin that day; I would swear I drank no gin that night if I were on my death-bed; the stick had been taken out of an umbrella.

Q. When these men came into the room, did you strike either of them with your stick, in the first instance? A. I did not; I had never seen Anderson before, to my knowledge.

Q. When was the row over altogether? A. About twelve o'clock, or it might be a little after; I had been in the room about twenty minutes before the men came in; they might be in the room knocking and scuffling together a quarter of an hour - I will swear it was five minutes and more; they had their hats on. I received my wages on Saturday morning, from Mr. Howell, the watch-house-keeper of Mary-le-bone; he was my employer - he had given me a sovereign and 9s. 4d.; he is not here.

Q. Are you in the habit of going to places with women who pick you up, when you are quite sober? A. No - I had never seen her before, to my knowledge; I did not tell her I had a sister who kept a house of accommodation, nor anything of the kind. I told her I had a sister who followed that business, the same as she was.

Q. That kept a b-w-y-house? A. Yes, who had kept one; I have not seen her for a long time, and know nothing about her. I have been a porter at Mr. Vin's oil-shop, at Knightsbridge, for twelve months, and have worked in the Park twelve months; Howell paid me the money because I have been a watchman there this last two months; I was not on duty on this night, but I was a

watchman; when I want to miss a night I have leave - I had been a watchman about three months.

Prisoner MORRIS. Q. Did I offer to meddle with you when I came into the room? A. Yes, when they both came in together.

Q. You said I had another coat on - I have none but this? A. I observed his coat; he had a different loose coat on over the one he has now, a light coloured loose coat, and I could see the same coat he has on now under it, and the same waistcoat; I looked strictly at him when he came in, for I thought I was going to suffer.

Prisoner YOUNG. Q. Did I not come into the room a second time, and take some in off the mantel-piece, which you had sent for? A. No; I had not sent for any gin.

Prisoner YOUNG. You sent into us on Sunday morning, by this man (Morris), that if we would give you 1l. you would make it up. Witness. I never saw that man on Sunday morning.

Prisoner MORRIS. I am that man; he sent me into them. Witness. I sent no such message whatever; I did not know they were taken till the officer came up to my room to see how I was.

COURT. Q. Did you send any message by anybody to these people, that if they gave you 1l. you would not go on with the prosecution? A. No; Morris' brother came to me.

Prisoner YOUNG. Q. Can you swear you saw me the second time in the room? A. Yes; I am certain that she hit me with a stick.

JOHN DEMPSEY . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutor some time after twelve o'clock on Saturday night, in Old Pye-street; he was sitting down on the ground, with his legs stretched out: he was about ten yards from the corner of the court where the robbery happened; I had heard a faint call of Watch! before I saw him - when I came up he was not able to stand; he appeared in great pain, as if he had been hurt - he complained of his loins, and that he thought his thigh was broken; I asked him how it happened - he gave the same account he has now, and said he had lost a sovereign, the handkerchiefs, and one shoe, and if we would assist him to the room he would show us where it was; the witness, I, and another man carried him to the room - he was quite unable to walk; the room was padlocked outside; he said there were raddishes and onions on the table, and a pot of water at the foot of the bed; we broke the door open, and found the raddishes, onions, and water as he had described - his description was accurate.

Q. When did you next see either of the prisoners? A. I came from the Infirmary, after seeing him bled; in an hour and three quarters or two hours; I called Phillips, and we went into the court, and found the door which we had broken open was bolted inside; I went for a light, leaving Phillips at the door; they opened the door when we knocked, and we found Morris and a woman, who stated that she was his wife - she answered the description of the woman the prosecutor had said took him there, and there was a boy in the room with them; Johnson saw the woman on Monday, and said she was the woman who took him there - they declared their innocence. About half an hour after I took Morris, I found Anderson and Young in the second house from where I found the others; we found Anderson and Young in bed in the parlour, and there was another woman also in the bed; Anderson had all his clothes on but his coat. The prosecutor saw them on Monday morning, before the Magistrate, and identified them directly he got into the lobby; Morris pleaded his innocence so strongly at the watch-house, when we took him there, and not having a white coat on, like a coachman, as Johnson had described him; I was rather doubtful of him - when he dressed himself he put on the same coat as he has now, but the side of his waistcoat was torn down; I never could find a white coat, and on that account the constable did not think right to detain him. When we gave evidence before the Magistrate he was about the office, and was fetched in; the prosecutor said, "That is the man, but he had a white upper coat on;" I was present when Phillips found a handkerchief on the bed where Anderson was laying; the prosecutor identified it, and said it had never been hemmed on one side, and I found it so; we found three or four handkerchiefs - Phillips kept them; Johnson claimed this one - it has not been hemmed on one side.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you smell the prosecutor's breath that night? A. I did not exactly smell his breath - I was near enough to him to smell if he had been in liquor; he did not smell of liquor in the least; I never said so - I could not say so.

Q. Did the other watchman, in your presence, say so? A. Never, to my recollection; Phillips never was with the prosecutor; Wakefield helped to carry him - I do not recollect Anderson being searched - I did not search him - I think Phillips did.

COURT. Q. In your judgement had the prosecutor any appearance of being intoxicated? A. Not at all.

Prisoner MORRIS. I asked the watchman what Hospital the man was at when I was discharged; I at first asked him to have something to drink; he said he did not mind; it was about four o'clock in the morning - we went and had half a pint of gin.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. I did not see the prosecutor to speak to him - I saw him going to the watch-house on a man's back; Dempsey came from the door bolted inside - we knocked; nobody answered - I sent Dempsey for a light; he brought one - I said,"There is somebody inside, for the door is bolted, and if they don't open it we will break it open;" Morris then got up and opened it - I found him and young woman, and a boy in bed; the prosecutor saw the woman before the Magistrate, and said, she was the woman he had gone to the room with - I was present on Monday morning when he saw Morris; he swore positively to him directly he came into the office, and never expressed a doubt of him - he had not described his dreas to me; we found the raddishes and onions in the room; a little before three o'clock the same night, I apprehended Anderson, Young, and another woman in bed together - Anderson had his clothes on, except his coat; Young and another woman were in bed - the prosecutor saw Anderson and Young before the Magistrate, on Monday morning, and spoke to them with confidence;

I found three handkerchiefs in the room - this one which was on the bed, the prosecutor spoke to; he described it as being only hemmed on one side - there are no letters on it, but it is not hemmed on one side; Dempsey picked up a shoe in the room where I found Anderson; it was outside the window.

Cross-examined. Q. You searched Anderson? A. The constable searched him in the watch-house; I saw him being searched - no sovereign was found on him; I searched the room minutely - but found on sovereign.

JOHN DEMPSEY . The shoe produced by Phillips is the one I found outside the window of the room Anderson was taken in; it was just on the window.

THOMAS JOHNSON. This is my handkerchief; I described it - it was taken from me when I was ill-used; here is a place in it which I had sewn up myself; I have not the least doubt about it - I lost it that night with another silk handkerchief; this shoe is mine - it came off my foot in the room where the woman took me; I saw the woman who was taken up with Morris - she is the woman I went with; I lost the handkerchief in the same room.

Prisoner YOUNG. I can take an oath to that handkerchief being mine.

THOMAS JOHNSON. I am quite positive of it being mine.

THOMAS WAKEFIELD . I am a labourer, and live at No. 17, Old Pye-street, within one hundred and fifty yards of the court - I was returning home between eleven and twelve o'clock, and heard the cry of Murder! I went to the spot and found Johnson lying at the front door of a house in Pye-street - he appeared to be in pain, as if he was hurt; but not at all affected by liquor - I assisted in taking him to the door of a house where he directed us; the door was padlocked outside - I afterwards carried him to the watch-house; he was not able to walk.

ANDERSON'S Defence. When I came down I met Morris, who said, "There is a man in my house who has bolted the door;" I said, "Let us go and see who it is;" we went and found the door bolted - I asked them to open it; no answer was given; I asked them to open the door - no answer was made; but a man was inside - I pushed against the door; it went open and I entered - the man immediately hit me over the head with a stick; I directly laid hold of the stick, and twisted it out of his hands - he kicked at me; I laid hold of him, and pulled him out - that is all I did to him.

YOUNG'S Defence. I have nothing more to say; I never saw the man after I went out of the room the first time.

MORRIS' Defence. When I came home from work I met Anderson, and said to him, "You can come to work with me in the morning if you like;" he said, he had been working at the Haymarket all day; I said,"There is a man in my room;" he said, "Let us go and see who it is;" he knocked at the door, no answer was given - he knocked again; and there was no answer - he pushed the door open and the man struck him with a stick; as to my laying hand on him or touching him I did not - I had no coat but this one on.

HANNAH MORRIS . I am not related to the prisoner Morris. I live at No. 53, Old Pye-street; at the time this matter happened I lived in the court in Old Pye-street.

Q. Did you live in the room the officer found padlocked? A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Johnson? are you the person who picked him up and asked him to come to your room? A. I never asked him, he asked me to take him there; I have come to speak the truth, and nothing but the truth - I am not Morris' wife; I was living with George Morris.

Q. And took another man to the same room? A. Yes; he did not wish me to take him to an accommmodation house, as he said, his sister kept a house - I said, he could not stop; he said, he did not want to stop - I am an unfortunate girl - I left him in the room.

Q. What! leave a perfect stranger in the room? A. Yes; he was tipsy; I told him when I went in, that he could not stop but for a few minutes; he said, he did not want to stop - he gave me 2s.

Q. Why did you not stay to see him leave the room? A. Because he would not go out; I asked him to go out - he said, he should not; he was very tipsy.

Q. Attend to what you are saying; though you are in a state of prostitution, do not add perjury to prostitution - three witnesses who saw him, swear positively he was quite sober? A. I do not know whether he was shamming it, but he appeared to me to be tipsy.

Q. Take care what you say, for you are liable to be committed for perjury; and to be transported if found guilty; now, tell me what you mean to say on this occasion - mind, your words will be taken down, and if you speak false, I shall certainly commit you for perjury? A. I met the prosecutor in Grosvenor-place, about half-past nine o'clock; he at first had a kind of white stick in his hand - he hit me with the stick; I turned to him and said, "What do you mean by hitting me?" he said,"Will you have any gin;" I was talking to a groom at the time - I turned round and asked, what he meant by hitting me; he said nothing; he said, "Will you have any gin?" I said, "I don't mind;" we went to the Feathers public-house, and had a quartern of gin; he drank two glasses, and I drank one, and as we came out, a man was standing with radishes and onions; a watchman was passing - he said, "I say, ask the watchman for a light;" the watchman said, "There is one, you may get it" - well, he got a light, and he bought some radishes and onions; he asked if I would take him home - I said, I could not take him home, but would take him to an accommodation house - he said he could not go to an accommodation house; for his sister kept an accommodation house.

Q. And you took him to the room you and this man lived in? A. Yes; and he said he would give me 3s. to stop a few minutes - he gave me 2s. 4 1/2d., and when he gave me the 2s. he said he would stop all night. I said, "I told you, you could not stop;" he said, he would - I said, he could not; I left the room a short time - and while I was gone, the door was bolted; I came back and said, "Let me in;" he said, he would let nobody in - I said, "It is me;" he said, "You shall not come in" - I left the room, and did not go again till two o'clock; when I went at two o'clock, the man was

gone, and my bed was turned upside down, and the bed in the middle of the room - I did not speak to anybody.

Q. Did you see either of the three prisoners after you left the room? A. No; I did not tell them the man was there - I do not know how they found it out.

Q. How came you to stay away two hours? A. I was engaged with a gentleman at another house; a blue handkerchief was claimed on Mary Young's bed; and I saw that handkerchief on Young's bed on the Friday morning - I had only known Young two days.

Q. Look at that handkerchief; is that the handkerchief you mean to speak to? A. That is the handkerchief I saw Young have on Friday morning - I was not intimate with her; I did not examine the handkerchief - she was tossing it about in this way, and she tore it by hanging it on a nail; I cannot say who mended it.

THOMAS JOHNSON. On my oath I mended that handkerchief myself about a fortnight before.

Witness. I only know it by the handkerchief being sewn in the middle; that is all I know it by - it is not exactly in the middle.

Q. Did you examine it? A. No; I merely saw it in her hand - I swear to it only by its being torn in the middle; I do not know whether it was hemmed - but it was torn in the middle.

ANDERSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

YOUNG - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

MORRIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

The witness Harriet Morris was committed.

Reference Number: t18280529-55

1131. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 breeching, value 8s.; 1 bridle, value 50s.; 1 horse-collar, value 30s.; 1 pair of hames, value 26s.; 2 traces, value 28s., and 1 saddle, value 26s., the goods of John Davis , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DAVIS. I keep a public-house in High-street, Shadwell . On the 17th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in the lobby of my house - he was a stranger; I cannot say whether he had been in the tap-room - it was Saturday night, and my doors were not closed; he was in company with two or three more; I saw him go from the lobby into the yard - he never came up stairs afterwards to my knowledge; this harness was in my kitchen; I had seen it safe at six o'clock - he must go down stairs to get to the yard; I went down stairs after twelve o'clock, and closed the doors - I went into the yard, and found the back gate undone, which I am certain was fastened before; both the top and bottom bolts were undone; I did not go into the kitchen till seven o'clock on Sunday morning; the harness was then gone - I have not found it. The prisoner was brought to me by the constable about eleven o'clock that morning; he was dressed the same as the man I saw in the lobby, but I never saw his face. I have not found the property.

EDWARD STERN . I am shopman to Mr. Hart, a slopseller, of Ratcliff-highway - he lives seven or eight doors from Davis. I went into Davis' house on the 17th of May, about half-past ten o'clock; I saw something going on, and saw the prisoner and two others coming out of the tap-room; the prisoner has another dress on now, but I am certain he is the man; I saw him go down the stairs, but whether he went to the yard or the lobby I cannot say- I waited there till after twelve o'clock, when the house was cleared; he never returned up stairs while I was there, or I must have seen him, for I sat right opposite the door; I saw him in custody on the Monday, and was certain of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Had you seen him before? A. Never; he came out of the tap-room about eleven o'clock; he went down stairs, and the other two went out at the front door; I had seen him for five or ten minutes before; I saw him standing at the back room door - there were two lights; my attention was directed to him, as I knew he was after no good; I mentioned it to Mr. Davis: I sat opposite the door, drinking ale; I had my eye on the door, and did not see him return.

MARY BLACKWELL . I am nurse at Mr. Davis'. I went into the kitchen at ten o'clock, and the harness was all safe - I went into the yard, found the kitchen window open, and shut it; I went into the kitchen about ten or eleven o'clock next morning, and it was gone.

HARRIET PAYNE . I live at Mr. Davis', and am his sister. I saw the harness safe at six o'clock; I went down at twelve, to fasten the window shutters, and it was gone, with a cap which hung on it.

JOHN WILLIAM BIRD . I am a surgeon - my house is directly opposite the gateway which leads to the prosecutor's back premises. About twelve o'clock on Saturday night, or a few minutes after, I saw a man come from under the gateway, with a suit of brass harness on his shoulder; I could not notice him much, as he mixed with the crowd, which had collected, as an accident had happened; it was a man about the prisoner's size, but I cannot swear to him.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner about ten o'clock on Monday, in Bluegatefields; he denied the charge; Davis said he was the man who went down into the yard; Stern came running after me, and said, "That is the man who ran down Dean's - yard;" the prisoner said he was a weaver, and lived at No. 99, Osborne-street; I said there was no such number - he said then it was No. 99, Brick-lane - I went to all the numbers in Brick-lane which had a 9 in them, and he was not known; I returned to the office, and told him I found he lodged at 98 or 99, Wentworth-street, and had been there; he said nothing to that; he said to a person who stood just behind me, "Oh, it is not so bad as the last, if I can get counsel I shall get through it - not one of them can swear to me;" I told him the people he lodged with had told me he was not at home at twelve o'clock on Saturday night; he had told me he was at home and in bed at the time.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a watchman; my beat is at the bottom of the street. At a quarter to four o'clock on Sunday morning, the 18th, I was about ten yards from the end of the street, and saw three men going along; one of them was dressed like the prisoner was when he was taken - one of them had a horse collar on his shoulder; it was broad day-light: I did not stop them.

JOHN DAVIS . Stern told me he saw the person go down stairs; I went down in a quarter of an hour after; persons go into my yard for a necessary purpose, but neither come in or out at the back gate.

Prisoner's Defence. At my first examination only Wilson was examined; if Stern saw me in custody, why did he not attend? NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-56

NEW COURT, (1st DAY.)

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1132. ANN SHUTTLEWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 3 sheets, value 15s.; 1 table-cloth, value 5s.; 3 gowns, value 9s.; 10 napkins, value 5s.; 3 shifts, value 9s.; 1 shirt, value 3s., and 1 book, value 1s., the goods of James Stallard , her master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-57

1133. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 3 lbs. weight of mutton, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Pash .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18280529-58

1134. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 piece of printed muslin, value 20s. , the goods of John Graham .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-59

1135. JOHN CHARLES MUSSARED was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 27 yards of cotton, value 2l.; 50 yards of silk, value 9l., and 3 yards of stuff, value 3s., the goods of John Fenwick , his master .

JOHN FENWICK. I am a silk-mercer and linen-draper , in Regent-circus, Oxford-street . The prisoner was in my service from the 18th of June till the 4th of December last; I received information last month, and went to several pawnbrokers, where I saw a number of articles. The officer, in my presence, searched the apartments of Elizabeth Brown , and found some duplicates.

MARY BROWN . My brother was a porter to Mr. Fenwick; I used to go to fetch his dirty linen; I saw the prisoner there - he has taken things off the counter and put in with the dirty linen, and I took them away: I have seen him take pieces of silk and cotton; I gave them to my mother, who pawned them; the prisoner told me to tell my mother to make as much as she could of them; I never pawned any, nor went with my mother to pawn them; I got them two or three times; the linen was washed and taken to my brother; I took the prisoner the money which my mother gave me - I took 10s., 15s., and 1l.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Your brother was porter to the prosecutor? A. Yes, but he is not there now - he was dimissed after the prisoner gave me the articles; he is not here - he is at home, but was not there when we came out; I do not know why he went out; my brother was in the shop, cleaning lamps when the prisoner gave them to me; there was no one else in the shop - it was between seven and eight o'clock in the morning; I did not tell the Magistrate that I had pawned them: I did not think I was doing wrong; he told my mother at one time, when I was in the room, that they were all down in the book; he did not tell me he had a number of articles left on his hands, and that he had intended formerly to have gone into business.

ELIZABETH BROWN. I am mother of the last witness; she has brought some silks and cottons in my son's linen from the shop - she sometimes said I was to make as much as I could; she said she brought them from Mr. Mussared - I pawned them at different pawnbroker's; I think I twice got 1l., and sometimes 10s., 15s., or 18s.; I sometimes sent the money by the child, and sometimes I took it him myself; I sometimes gave him the duplicates, and sometimes kept them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they not threaten you with a prosecution? A. I was taken and locked up for three days; I was then ill for a fortnight, and was carried to the Westminster workhouse; I had no communication with any one. I should not have liked to have pawned things for my son unless I knew he had come by them honestly; I knew the prisoner was a shopman; they were remnants, but that did not excite my suspicion; I knew he had been going into business for himself, and being a repectable man I thought he might have them of his connections; my son is at home - I did not leave him there when I came out - he did not know he was required to be here, or he would have come; he has been living with me ever since he left the prosecutor, which was about a month after the prisoner.

COURT. Q. What did you get for your trouble? A. Very little, sometimes enough to get me a loaf or a cup of tea: I do not know how I came to go to different pawnbrokers.

JOHN WILLOUGHBY PEROOTZEY . I am a pawnbroker, of Stafford-street. I have a piece of cotton pawned on the 21st of November, by Elizabeth Brown.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known her? A. Perhaps twelve months, by coming to the shop - I cannot swear exactly how long; I have seen her daughter coming to the shop.

HUGH GAULY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a remnant of cotton pawned on the 30th of November, in the name of Mary Brown; I cannot say by whom.

JAMES SPENCER . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker. I have a remnant of stuff, and a remnant of silk - I took in the stuff, in the name of Mary Brown; I do not know who pawned it.

JAMES MOODY . I am a pawnbroker. I have some silks pawned with me on the 2d of July, 19th of September, and 12th of October, all by Elizabeth Brown.

JOHN BROWN . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have three articles pawned at our shop, but I do not know who by.

HENRY BAILEY . I am assistant to Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker, of Edgeware-road; I have ten yards of cotton pawned on the 22d of October, and ten yards of cotton on the 4th of December, and on the 28th of September seven yards of silk, pawned by Elizabeth Brown, in her own name.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I went to Brown's lodgings on the 9th of April, and found duplicates of most of these articles; I took her, and went and took the prisoner at his master's shop, where he was then living.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not engaged in his business? A. Yes; he said I was at liberty to search his box; Brown said nothing particular when she was taken, but at the office she said, "I will exculpate my son - it was from Mussared I received the things."

COURT. Q. When the prisoner was charged with having taken these things did he deny it? Q. No; he said, "I shall decline answering any question here:" meaning before the Magistrate; I do not remember that he said till his trial.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. I went with Clements; I never heard the prisoner deny having anything to do with these things; Mrs. Brown told me she had destroyed some of the duplicates.

MR. FENWICK. Brown was my porter; he came in October, and left about a month after the prisoner; I have seen these articles, and have no doubt whatever that they are mine; I have a counterpart of one of them, and have no doubt whatever that they are all mine.

Cross-examined. Q. How many of them are there? A. Eight or ten; I have the strongest recollection of three or four of them - I have no doubt of them all, except this piece of stuff, which I do not so well recollect; the prisoner had been in my service five months - he came with a good character from Messrs. Williams and Pearce, silk mercers, two doors from my house; when he left me he went to live with Mr. Clift; I had not discovered the robbery then, but he had staid out two hours, and I dismissed him; I have since heard he was going into partnership; he never told me that he had any goods of his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I have heard with great agitation the evidence produced against me; it becomes my duty to declare my innocence. I have not my witnesses here, or they could have proved I had goods in my possession of the same sort as those now produced.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-60

1136. JOHN HOLDER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 cast-iron plate, value 1s. 6d.; 6 iron bars, value 2s., and 3 iron hurdle-bars, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Braithwaite .

JOHN BRAITHWAITE. I live at Paddington , and am an engineer . The prisoner was in my employ, and was dismissed on the 26th of April: I received information in the afternoon of the 28th of April, and went to my house between one and two o'clock; I found the prisoner and William Needes there; the prisoner said he came to vindicate his character, in consequence of a report being spread that he had taken away some of my property; he said he had taken some iron by the desire of one of the persons employed on the premises, and was going to take it to his own house; I said I had better send for an officer, and while the man was gone for him, the prisoner attempted to run away; he then went on his knees, and said if I would forgive him he would tell me all about it; I told him not to say anything to implicate himself; he said, "I took the iron - it is of no use denying it" - he said he did not wish to implicate other people; he said he had sold it at an old iron shop close by, and directed us where to go; the officer and I went and found it there - I know it to be mine.

WILLIAM NEEDES. I met the prisoner in Paddington on the Monday, with some iron on his shoulder; I asked where he was going - he said to Wingrove's who serves my master with gravel; I told my master of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was discharged from a master; I was out looking for work, and found this iron in a field, tied up with a cord; I never took it off the premises; I went to an iron shop with it; the man was not at home - the woman said it was worth nothing, as it was all burnt iron, but if I would call again I should see her husband; I went and saw him - he asked where I got it; I said just over the bridge: he gave me 3s. 6d. for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-61

1137. WILLIAM HAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 11 pairs of gloves, value 16s.; 6 pairs of socks, value 3s., and 12 pairs of stockings, value 20s., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , his masters .

WILLIAM EVANS . I am shopman to George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross, linen-drapers , of Compton-street - the prisoner was their private watchman . On the 11th of May, in consequence of suspicion, the boxes of all the porters and servants were searched, and in the prisoner's box these articles were found; I believe the box was locked, and he kept the key - he opened it; I did not see whether he unlocked it or not; he said he bought them at a shop on Ludgate-hill, and mentioned the name, but I forget it; I said I was certain they were ours - he still persisted that he bought them, but at length he said he had taken them out of the shop at the time he was watching the premises; there was no threat or promise held out to him; I was there the whole time - he slept in the day, and watched at night; he had sixteen guineas a year, and board and lodging.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You are certain there was no promise or threat made? A. Yes - he has been four months in the service, and they had a three years' character with him.

CHARLES OSWALD . I am beadle of St. Ann's. I took the prisoner and goods.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. At the commencement of it Mr. Evans was not there - Mr. Cross came to the room, and desired to search my box; I did not hesitate, and he turned everything out - Mr. Cross then called me aside and said if I would tell him the extent of the robbery, he would not expose me in public, nor proceed farther; I was afterwards taken by the officer - when I was in the watch-house, Mr. Evans came and asked if I could account for 2l. 15s. 6d. found on my person, and said he would not prosecute me - but I could not.

MR. EVANS. I went to the watch-house concerning some money which he could not account for - when he came into our service he had about 4l. in his possession, and plenty of clothes - he had a larger wardrobe than myself; he came as porter first, and then was made private watchman, thinking him the most honest man we had.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 23. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of his character .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-62

1138. JOHN SIMS , was indicted for stealing on the 2d of May , 25 phials, value 2s., the goods of Benjamin Brooks , his master .

BENJAMIN BROOKS. I am a surgeon , and live in Bedford-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner had been in my employ five or six months; I missed some phials on the 2d of May, and charged him with taking them; he said he had not taken any - I desired him to let me

look at his pocket, I found twenty-three or twenty-five, in his breeches, waistcoat and coat pockets; he then said it was the first time.

JAMES BELL JARDINE . I am assistant to Mr. Brooks. I had missed bottles for some time, and suspected the prisoner - I watched him that morning in a room adjoining the surgery, and when he came from the surgery I told him to stop a few minutes, and sent for Mr. Brooks; he said that it was the first time; and at Bow-street he said he had them for use.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to put brass stuff into, to clean the harness.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-63

1139. JEPTHA COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Watts , from his person .

WILLIAM WATTS. On the 29th of April, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Cockspur-street ; I felt my handkerchief drawn from me, and turned round; I saw the prisoner and another person close to me - I saw their hands shuffle together, and my handkerchief go from one to the other; I gave the prisoner in charge to a watchman, and on the road to the watch-house the prisoner dropped the handkerchief; I had not lost sight of him - he sneaked across the road.

HENRY HOWLETT . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner - I did not see the handkerchief fall.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Clare-market - there was no person near me; a person walked past the watchman - the prosecutor then tapped him on the shoulder, and told him to take me; I know nothing of the handkerchief - there were several persons passing.

HENRY HOWLETT . There were no persons passing at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-64

1140. RICHARD DICKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 watch, value 8l.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 1d.; 1 steal, value 30s.; 1 ring, value 5s., and 1 key, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Pugh Williams , from his person .

THOMAS PUGH WILLIAMS. I was in Kensington-gardens on the 19th of February, waiting to see the nobility pass; there were about fifty people about me; I do not remember feeling my watch go, but on leaving the archway I missed it - I had had it about ten minutes before; my waistcoat was turned up, and I am positive it had been taken from my pocket - I had not seen the prisoner there.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What sort of a watch was it? A. A silver hunting watch, No. 3,896; I gave information at Marlborough-street and Bow-street, and about a month after I lost it I received a letter from Mr. Read; I afterwards saw my watch at Hatton-garden - I said I considered it altogether worth 10l. or 12l., but it was given to me; I do not remember the Magistrate saying he thought that a great deal - the Magistrate said there was a mistake about the maker's name, but I believe it was in the pronunciation - it is Dubois, a French name.

EDWARD READ . I am high-constable of Leeds. I apprehended the prisoner and some others at Leeds, on the 17th of April; I found this watch in his waistband, and another watch in his pocket, with this seal, ring and key attached to it - the number of this watch is 3,896; I asked who it belonged to, he said to his brother, and he had brought it that morning from Ripon to Leeds to be cleaned; the Mayor of Leeds directed it to be advertised, but no one owned it - I then searched the Hue and Cry from London, and found a description of the watch; I then told the prisoner I had found an owner for the property, and he said he would tell me the truth how he got it - that he had it of a Jew at Ripon, and had given his own watch and 26s. for it; I asked him if the key and seal which were to the other watch belonged to this - he said they did; the other watch he said he had had a long time, but did not say how long; I asked him if he had been in London - he said a long time ago, before Christmas.

Cross-examined. What induced you to apprehend him? A. I found him with some suspicions characters - I took them all; the others were discharged; I was at the office when the prosecutor claimed the watch - he gave the same statement he has to-day; the Magistrate said there was a mistake in the advertisement in the name of Dubois - the prosecutor said it must be the mistake of the person who gave it.

COURT to PROSECUTOR. Q. Was this seal and key attached to your watch? A. Yes, and this watch is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave my own watch and 26s. for this watch, to a Jew, at the Black Bull public-house, at Ripon.

DAVID WATSON . I have known the prisoner upwards of five years; I was informed in February last that he was at Ripon; I live within a mile and a half of that town - he was residing in the Market-place; I saw him there, but not every day - he has a very bad state of health; he sent for me from my own house to the Black Bull, to pay me for a pair of shoes, and to order another pair - this was the latter end of March; a man came in with a box of jewellery and other goods, and asked if we wanted any - I saw the prisoner give his watch, and 25s. or 26s., for a hunting watch, with a key and seal; it was such a one as this - I did not take notice of the ribbon.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-65

1141. WILLIAM SAMUELS , THOMAS BAKER , and THOMAS LACK were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 2 shifts, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 3s., and 2 night-caps, value 6d. the goods of Sarah Ward , widow ; and 1 pair of trousers, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Ward .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

ANN MOULD . I am in the service of Sarah Ward, a widow, of Tottenham ; she is a laundress . Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning of the 21st of April, I hung out these articles in a green which joins Broad-lane , about one hundred yards from her house; I missed them in about an hour; they were afterwards shown to me at the watch-house.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am gardener to Mr. Pratt, of Tot

tenham. On the 21st of April I was in Broad-lane, about twelve o'clock; I saw the three prisoners there; Lack went towards the Seven Sisters public-house, and the other two came towards me; I know the green very well where this linen was bung up; I saw some linen lying in a bundle, but did not take notice of it; I was cutting bushes behind the hedge, and saw Samuels take some linen up, and tuck under his coat - Baker was close to him - they then went on together; I went and told Fowler; we waited till they came up, then pursued and took them; I saw Samuels throw this shirt into a pond, and I got it out - Mould saw, and claimed it; three or four of us pursued Lack; Webster and I took him to the cage; these shifts and night-caps were found in his hat.

JAMES FOWLER . I took Baker, and found these trousers on him.

WILLIAM BENNETT WEBSTER . I am a constable. I assisted in taking Lack; these articles were found on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Lack received a good character.

SAMUELS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

LACK - GUILTY. Aged 19. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18280529-66

1142. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 watch, value 18l.; 2 seals, value 2l.; 2 watch-keys, value 1l., and 1 watch-chain, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Johnston Barton , from his person .

THOMAS JOHNSTON BARTON. At a quarter before one o'clock, on the morning of the 2d of May, I was coming out of the Theatre; when I got to the corner of Brydges-street , I saw the prisoner come and take my watch, and run off; I followed directly, and collared him, when he had got eight or ten yards; I threw him on the ground, and called for assistance; the officer came up directly, and told me he had it.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. This was coming out of the Theatre? A. Yes, there were a great number of persons: I was coming out at the front door; I could not see his features when he took my watch, but it was found in his hand.

WILLIAM RAYNER . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner take the watch, and I took it from his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 28. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-67

1143. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 1 purse, value 1d.; 2 sovereigns, 9 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Oliver Beman , from his person .

OLIVER BEMAN. On the 11th of May, after eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner accosted me in Ratcliff-highway ; she affected to be in liquor; I disengaged myself from her, and walked about twenty yards; she came to me again - I again got from her; we walked on to the next turning, when I missed my purse; I took hold of her, and called the watch; she then threw part of the money down; I got my purse from her hand - it had been in my trousers pocket.

JOHN BUTCHER . I am a watchman. I was called, and assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house; I saw some money on the ground, which the prosecutor took up, but I cannot say how much; I did not see the purse taken from her, but I heard a noise, and the gentleman said he had been drawn of his purse; it was then in his hand.(Purse produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying the charge, and pleading poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-68

1144. TIMOTHY MAGRATH and BENJAMIN DANIELS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 1 watch, value 2l., the goods of James Melson , from his person .

JAMES MELSON. I was in Mr. Nash's skittle-ground, in Margaret-street, near the Regent's-park , on the 5th of May; I lost my watch from my right hand breeches pocket; I did not miss it till Mr. Nash told me of it, and it was brought into the house; I know Daniels very well; he is a butcher , and was shaking hands with me as a friend at the time the watch was taken, which was about ten minutes before Mr. Nash told me it was gone. I had been drinking a little.

WILLIAM NASH . I am a publican, and live in Margaret-street. I was in the skittle-ground on the 5th of May; Daniels played one game, the other prisoner did not play; Melson was very tipsy, and was showing his watch in the ground; I told him to put it into his pocket, or to give it to me; he said he could take care of it himself - I soon afterwards saw Magrath setting close by him; his hand was near his breeches pocket; and at the same time I saw Daniels take hold of the prosecutor's hand, and shake it heartily; at that moment Magrath left the ground - I followed him, and when he got outside the door he ran; I called out Stop him! he stopped, came back, and asked what I wanted him for; I said I believed he had got something that did not belong to him; I sent for an officer, and sent for Melson; I asked if he had got his watch - he said No; the officer then came, and soon after I saw Daniels coming in out of the ground; he was stopped, and the two prisoners were both searched, but nothing found on them; a witness brought the watch into my house about ten minutes after I went out after Magrath; the prisoners had been in company, and had spoken, but I had not seen them drinking together.

PETER LE BLOND . I was standing at my shop door about thirty yards from the skittle-ground; Thorn came and said, she saw Magrath throw something from him - I went to Drury, who found the watch in the garden; I gave it to Mr. Nash.

ELIZABETH DRURY . I am servant at a house nearly opposite the skittle-ground. I went into our garden a little after four o'clock, and found this watch, which I gave to Le Blond.

MARY THORN . I saw Magrath running down the street on the 5th of May, he threw something over the garden wall.

JOHN REID . I took charge of the prisoners, and this watch which I received from Nash.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MAGRATH's Defence. I went out to buy a bit of

tobacco, and Mr. Nash called me; I turned round, and came to him; he said, he wanted me - I made no resistance; when Thorn was at the office she said, she did not know what I threw; it was a pipe I threw away - there were about three dozen people in the skittle-ground; it was not likely I should take a watch from a man, I was not sitting by for a minute.

DANIEL's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

MAGRATH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

DANIELS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-69

1145. MATTHEW BERRY was indicted, for that he, on the 3d of April , feloniously did, break and enter a certain building, within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Richard Hodges Munday , and occupied therewith; but not being part thereof, and stealing therein, 1 fixture; that is to say 1 copper, value 2l., his property, and then fixed to the said building ; against the Statue, &c.

MR. CHURCHILL conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD HODGES MUNDAY, ESQ. I reside at Fulham . I have a wash-house adjoining my premises - I had a copper fixed there on the 3d of April, and that night, or the next morning it was taken away; I saw it again on the 4th - it fitted the place exactly; and I have no doubt it was my copper - though I had no private mark on it; I know nothing of the prisoner.

MARIA BEHENNA . I am servant to Mr. Munday. I remember the copper being lost on the 4th of April - I saw it safe the evening before.

ANN ELIZABETH MATTHEWS . I am daughter of Thomas Matthews , he lives at North-end. On Good Friday morning, the 4th of April, I got up at six o'clock; I looked out at the window and saw the prisoner take a copper, and put it into the privy; it seemed heavy - I told my mother what I saw; I am sure the prisoner is the man; it was only two houses from ours.

JOHN CROUCH . I am headborough of Fulham. In consequence of information, I went on the 4th of April to an uninhabited house, three houses from where this little girl lives, and found three coppers in the privy; I left them in the care of Fox, while I went for another officer - these are the coppers.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a constable. I was on duty at Fulham, on the 4th of April, and passed Mr. Munday's at four o'clock in the morning; I saw the muck of a copper in the road - I went and rang them up, and they missed the copper; I traced it by the smut to the back of the prisoner's house, where he has lived for many years - I have known him a long time; I live not more than a quarter of a mile from him - I gave information, and the other officer went and got the coppers; I have fitted them all - they fitted exactly in the different places; this one fitted at Mr. Munday's.

HENRY FOX . I went to take charge of the coppers and delivered them to Crouch.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not possible I could lift them; there are pales round the house six feet high, and that child was fifty yards from the place.

JURY to MATTHEWS. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. Yes; he and his brother live in the house; it is three or four doors from us.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-70

1146. KATHARINE COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 hat, value 5s., and 1 sovereign, the property of Robert Clark , from his person .

ROBERT CLARK. I am a seaman . I have known the prisoner three or four years, by seeing her sell oysters in Ratcliff-highway; she came into a house where I was on the 12th of May, and I went with her sister to a house in Sun-court ; while I was there the prisoner came in, and answered as mistress of the house - she asked for the money; I gave her 3s. out of my pocket - I had three or four sovereigns in my pocket; I took my money out in my hand, and the prisoner said, "What is that?" I said a sovereign; she said, "Let me look at it?" I said I would if she would give it me back: she snatched it out of my hand, and ran away; I pursued her; a man stood at the door, who struck me on the forehead; I caught hold of him and the prisoner, and sung out for the watchman - I should have kept them till he came up, but an old woman came up and assailed me, and I was forced to let them go; I had left my hat up stairs, and when I went up again it was gone - I was quite sober.

JOHN KAILL . I am the watchman. The witness called me; I went to the house, but before I got there they were all gone; the witness seemed quite sober, and said he had lost a sovereign and a hat; I afterwards met the prisoner and her mother going along the Back-lane-road; the prosecutor said that was the woman, and gave her in charge; she said she knew nothing about it; I took her to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. My sister rents a room in Sun-court; my mother came to me at half-past ten o'clock at night, and said a man was there, and there was a piece of work in her room, and somebody was robbed; I met the prosecutor and the watchman; he looked at me, and said,"I think that is the person."

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-71

1147. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 1 watch, value 4l. , the goods of Thomas Greenwood .

THOMAS GREENWOOD. I am a coachman , and live with Mr. T. Broadham; my watch hung up in the stable, behind the horses, on the 12th of April; I went up into the loft, and in about two or three minutes I missed it; my fellow-servant knew the prisoner, and I had employed him, but when the watch was missing he was gone.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of April.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-72

1148. MARY PULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 2 table-cloths, value 6s., and 1 flat-iron, value 1s. , the goods of William Dyas .

WILLIAM DYAS. I am a publican , and live in North Audley-street . On the 20th of February some property

was missing; the prisoner had been employed as washerwoman ; these two table-cloths and flat-iron are mine.

MARY HARDY . I got these articles from the pawnbroker.

MARY MEADS . The prisoner lodged with me. One day she dropped a duplicate of one of these table-cloths in the room; I gave it to Hardy; the prisoner said she gave it her to pawn; I asked the prisoner to lend me an iron, and she did - she said her grandmother gave it to her; I pawned it at Mr. Law's.

GEORGE LAW . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this iron of Mary Meads.

MARY HARDY. I never gave these cloths to the prisoner.

THOMAS LEWIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; the two last witnesses produced these things.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-73

1149. CHARLES MAYNARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 2 books, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Hamilton .

CHARLES HAMILTON. I am a bookseller and live in Wardour-street . I have a board outside my shop - I went out and missed two books on the 6th of May, about half-past three o'clock; I was out at the time they were taken - I saw them afterwards at Mr. Swindell's shop.

THOMAS SWINDELL . I bought these books of the prisoner on the 6th of May.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Swindell's shop and waited for the prisoner, who was to come for 1s. more; I took him - he said it was the first time, and he was very sorry - he has borne a good character.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them against the Pantheon, and being in distress I sold them.

The prisoner received a good character, and his brother engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-74

1150. MONICA MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 cap, value 8s. , the goods of John Jay .

JOHN JAY. I am a Leghorn and lace dealer , and live in Greek-street Soho . On the 2d of May, the prisoner came to my shop at half-past nine o'clock at night; she asked for some mourning-caps - I said we did not keep them; she then asked for some plain net caps - I showed her some, towhich she objected; I showed her a number of others and then missed one which I had shown her - I said I missed it; she said "It must be on the counter;" I said it was not - I called Mrs. Jay and told the prisoner she must go into the room and be searched; she then put her hand to her back, took the cap out of her pocket-hole and put it on the counter.

JOSHUA IVORY . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; she said she had no pocket on; but the watch-house-keeper's wife found an opening behind her gown.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am really innocent; I neither intended to take a cap nor did I see it till it was at the watch-house - I was dressed as I am now, and had no pocket on; I could not put a cap into my pocket - my gown fastens behind, and I must have lifted up my gown to have got it under; I wanted a small mourning-cap for a child - I never went near the counter till I went to take up my glove and money.

JOHN JAY. She was two or three yards from the counter; I was close to her, and saw her take it out - she did not ask for her glove till she got into the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-75

1151. ELIZABETH DALY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 24 yards of printed cotton, value 16s. , the goods of John Jenner and John Wharton Soppett .

DAVID EVANS . I am in the employ of John Jenner and John Wharton Soppett. On the 3d of May, a person called out that somebody had stolen a piece of print; I went out and saw the prisoner with it next door but one - it had been hanging outside the door, five minutes before.

HENRY WARDELL . I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-76

1152. GEORGE BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 ass, price 2l. the property of the Right Honourable Earl Cowper .

SECOND COUNT stating it to belong to Henry Denne .

HENRY DENNE. I live near Welling in Herts . I had an ass in my possession for three years - it was the property of the Earl of Cowper, but it came astray; I told them of it and they said I might use it - I lost it on the 29th of April, and found it the following Friday in Smithfield, in possession of Mr. Kyffen; it is a very large one - I am sure of it.

JOHN KYFFEN . I deal in asses. I bought the ass of the prisoner at Turnham-green for 35s. on the 2d of May, and was going home with it - I gave the same to the prosecutor.

EDWARD MITCHELL . I was present when the prisoner sold three asses to Mr. Kyffen at Turnham-green.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB. On Friday the 2d of May, I was in Smithfield, the prosecutor came to me and said he had lost an ass, and Mr. Kyffen had got it there; Kyffen said he bought it at Turnham-green, and he had no doubt the prisoner was there - but while my brother officer went there, the prisoner came into the market.

JOHN ROE . I went to Turnham-green but the prisoner was not there.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Kyffen is a false-swearing man. I never had an ass in my life: and never was at Turnham-green.

MR. KYFFEN. I am sure he is the man - he said he lived at Chesham, near the Golden Ball public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-77

1100. THOMAS CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 2 shirts, value 14s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 bag, value 3s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s. , the goods of John Walter Joyce .

JOHN WALTER JOYCE. I am a servant . The prisoner has been an officer's servant ; he was out of a situation, and slept in the same room with me; on the 12th and 13th of April; I missed these articles, and spoke to him about them; he said he had seen a person put them into a trunk in the room; I spoke to the landlord, and the trunk was broken open, but they were not there; he did not assist to look for them, but tried to get away, but I would not let him.

THOMAS LEONARD . I live in the same house with the prosecutor. On Sunday morning, the 13th of April, the prisoner came to me while I was in bed, and said "Here are your clothes and Joyce's;" I said very well; he came in again in a quarter of an hour, while I was dressing myself, and said, "I will take these for Joyce" - but what he took I do not know.

ROBERT DONKIN . I took the prisoner into custody; he said he hoped I would not put the handcuffs on him, and he would go quietly - I was taking him to Marlborough-street, but he got from me, and ran two or three hundred yards, when I retook him.

JAMES HILL . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this shirt for 3s. with me - these other articles were pawned at my house, but I do not think I took them in.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has perjured himself - I assisted in looking for the articles for an hour or more: I took his things, and put them on the bed, and saw no more of them. I had an opportunity to make my escape, I went down to get a jug of water; and if I had been guilty I should not have gone to sleep there.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-78

1154. BENJAMIN FROST HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 oz. weight of silver, value 4s., the goods of James Charles Edington , his master .

JAMES CHARLES EDINGTON. I am a silversmith . The prisoner was my apprentice , and was employed in filing silver plate; on the 20th of May I missed 1 oz. 1 dwt. of silver - I sent for an officer, who asked him if he had got any of his master's silver in his possession; he said No - the officer took off his coat and jacket, and searched his pockets - nothing was found; but as he was pulling off his boot a purse fell from his shirt; the officer took it up, and it contained the silver cuttings which I had lost; here are three small dots on this piece, which I had put on it with a tool.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He was your apprentice, not your servant? A. Yes, my apprentice; this is a part of his indenture - I have the other part; it states that there were 4l. received by me, but this I received from the Drapers' Company; these receipts are for 10l. more, but that was under an agreement between his father and me; his father was to pay the expence of the binding; but he was very poor, and he said he had heard of a charity in the City which would grant me 4l.; I went to the hall, and told the gentleman I had received 10l., but he said I must say nothing about that, or the 4l. would not be allowed - but it made no difference in the stamps. I have received 14l.; I do not remember that the prisoner was told it would be better for him to confess: he was taken on the 20th of May; he said if I would forgive him he would do so no more.

GEORGE AVIS . I was sent for to take the prisoner; I said his master charged him with robbing him of some silver - he denied having it; I said I should search him as naked as he was born; I was searching him, and this bag was round his neck; he said he was sorry for what he had done, and told his master where he had sold some before.

Cross-examined. Q. Was anything said about confessing? A. He said he was very sorry; but he was not told if he would tell where he sold it, he should not be prosecuted.

COURT. Q. What did he say? A. His master accused him of taking some silver before, he said he had, and had sold it in Broad-street, St. Giles's - he told me where, and I took a summons, and took the people, but he could not swear to them.

MR. CLARKSON to MR. EDGINTON. Q. I see this 5l. bill was due on the 19th of May - did you receive it the day before the prisoner was taken up? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. He promised me forgiveness if I would confess; and his father came to the prison and said the same.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-79

1155. WILLIAM CARLE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April, 1827 , 1 jacket, value 10s. , the goods of John Cragg .

JOHN CRAGG. I lived at the Plasterers' Arms public-house, Seymour-street, Euston-square . I missed a jacket from the tap-room on the 30th of April, 1827, in the evening, when I wanted to put it on; the prisoner used the house, as a customer; he came there once after this, and when he saw me he got out at a window.

GEORGE WHITE . I was employed at the Poulterers' Arms- I was there on the evening in question, and saw the prisoner take the jacket off the back part of the seat - he was intoxicated, and I thought he did not mean to steal it; I told him to take an old sailor's jacket which laid there, but not this one.

CHARLES COUSINS . I took the prisoner on the 4th of this month; he said he took it out of a drunken spree.

The prisoner handed in a written statement, which is fully detailed in the following evidence.

- CARLE . I am the prisoner's brother; he came to my house to dine on the day he was taken - he sat down to dinner; the prosecutor came into the room with a constable; he pointed to my brother, and said, "That is the man;" I said, "What is the matter?" he told me, and held out his hand to my brother, and said, "Never mind, William, all I want is satisfaction for my jacket;" the constable sat down, and said, "We will wait till three o'clock;" we sent out for something to drink in the mean time; I said to the constable, "I never knew they allowed a cripple to act as a constable;" this offended him - he got up and collared my brother; I said, "As it is the Sabbath-day, let him go;" he did, and sent for Mr. Cousins, who came; the prisoner went away quietly, and was locked up. I never sent to the prosecutor, but he came to my room, and there, in the presence of three witnesses, said he was sorry for what he had done - he would not have entered the room for the world, and said he would freely give 100l. to get him released; he then went to a public-house, drew

up an agreement, valued the jacket at 10s., and said he would take it at 2s. a week; all this was voluntarily from himself: the agreement was signed regularly, and then he asked me to go to the watch-house, which I did; he shook hands, and told my brother if possible he would get him out that night, if not, he would in the morning; he said to the watch-house keeper, "All I want is to get that man discharged - I am satisfied, and if Mr. Cousins comes tell him to let him he discharged;" he said, "I am going to look for him;" he came to me again, and said he came to give us consolation, and said he had done wrong; he came again to my brother's wife, and said he was obligated to come forward against him - that he had been fetched from his work. I have seen the prosecutor once since - he said he believed it was only a frolic - he did not think he meant to steal it. I saw my brother that evening dancing to an organ in the tap-room, and I believe he might have taken it, not knowing whether it was old or new.

PROSECUTOR. I saw the prisoner's mother, and she was so frightened that I said I would have given 100l. rather than have done it: I did value it at first at 10s., but I did agree to take it at 2s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-80

1156. WILLIAM CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 4 waistcoats, value 8s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 jacket, value 3s.; 1 hat, value 8s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 bag, value 1d. , the goods of John Morrow .

JOHN MORROW. I am a wax and tallow-chandler . -The prisoner is a labourer , and lodged at my father's house- I had all these articles in a box in a cupboard in the room where the prisoner slept; I saw them safe on Friday, and missed them after breakfast on Saturday, the 3d of May; this handkerchief and bag are all that have been found; the bag was given me by a person from the East Indies.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I took the prisoner on the 15th of May; I took this handkerchief off his neck at the watch-house, and this bag was in his pocket.

EDWARD DAVIS . I live in the same house with the prosecutor. As I was going to bed on the 2d of May, the prisoner said he was going to lie down; I said he had better go to bed altogether - I saw no more of him till the 15th of May, when I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-81

1157. ANN DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 3 rings, value 4l.; 2 shawls, value 1l.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 tooth-pick, value 6d.; 2 yards of lace, value 3s.; 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 2 1/2d. in copper monies , the property of Elizabeth Robertson , widow .

ELIZABETH ROBERTSON. I am a widow - the prisoner lodged in my house. I went to a closet on the 11th of May, at half-past eight o'clock, to get some money, and missed all the articles stated in the indictment; they were all safe at four o'clock that day, and were all found on the prisoner.

JOHN MARDON . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner on the 11th of May; I found these three rings, and these two shawls, on her.

GEORGE STRIPLING . I was with Mardon, and found the prisoner in bed; I found this purse, with this money in it, this tooth-pick, and two yards of lace, by the bedside; she was taken to the watch-house, and made her escape; we took her again.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-82

1158. MARY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 7 lbs. weight of soap, value 4s. , the goods of Samuel Messent .

SAMUEL MESSENT. I am an oilman , and live at Wapping . On the 9th of May, I left two parcels of soap on my counter - I went to my back premises, returned in about twenty minutes and it was gone.

SARAH MESSENT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw a person in the shop; but I cannot say it was the prisoner - I went to the back premises, and heard a woman go from the shop; I came in and the soap was missing.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you not heard that she is of a very respectable family? A. Yes.

SARAH DAVIS . I saw the prisoner about ten o'clock in the morning; which was half an hour after the soap was missing - she had a parcel tied up in a light brown paper, and wrapt up in her apron; I do not know what was in it.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know the time? A. Because the prosecutor's daughter came to ask if I had seen a person pass with a black gown on: I had only seen the prisoner once before, which was on the Thursday.

WILLIAM HAMILTON . I am porter to the prosecutor; the soap was packed up for me to take to Deptford - I saw it on the counter, in a whitey brown paper; and when I came to take it, it was gone - I went to the prisoner's house with my master and the officer, and saw the ashes turned up in the dust-hole; where I found this soap, in this apron.

Cross-examined. Q. Who else lives in the house? A. Mr. King, a widower, lives in the lower part; the prisoner lives up stairs.

RICHARD DOLBY . I am an officer. I produce the soap, which I got from Hamilton; I charged the prisoner with taking it - she denied it, and said, if she was poor, she was honest.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-83

1159. FRANCIS HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 spade, value 2s. , the goods of George Matyear .

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a constable of Fulham. I had information of the robbery on the 20th, and went and took the prisoner.

HENRY SAUNDERS . I work for Mr. George Matyear; the prisoner had worked for him - but did not at this time.

JAMES ROUSE . I was going home from work on Friday afternoon, and bought this spade of the prisoner; he told me he was out of work, and wanted to sell it.

WILLIAM ROUT . On the 16th of April, I was using this spade till one o'clock; when I returned from dinner

it was gone - I had seen the prisoner before, but not that day.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get anything to eat for two days and a half, that made me go to steal the spade.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-84

1160. HENRY LILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 brass lamp, value 2s. , the goods of Sir Peter Laurie , knight , and others, Trustees of the Westminster General Dispensary .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Sir Peter Laurie and others.

RICHARD COLEMAN . I went to Gerrard-street on the 7th of May, and saw the prisoner with this lamp concealed about him; it had been taken from the shelf in the Westminster Dispensary - Sir Peter Laurie is one of the Trustees, and there are several others.

MERCY DAY . I saw the prisoner come down the kitchen steps of the Dispensary; I asked what he wanted - he made no answer; but I went into the kitchen and missed the lamp - I told Coleman, who went and took him.

JAMES HODGES . This is the lamp which Coleman gave me with the prisoner; he said, he and another went in merely out of a lark to be cupped - and they saw the lamp and took it away.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the lamp was given to him by a man named Brown.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280529-85

Fifth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1161. MARY ANN RAFFEL was indicted for stealing on the 5th of May , 3 yards of printed cotton, value 2s. , the goods of John Mingard .

PHILLIS MINGARD . I am the wife of John Mingard, a plasterer ; we live in Wilson-street . The prisoner with a young man came to my room; they were strangers - the young man said he had been looking for my husband for a long time, to tell him of a job; I said, I was much obliged to him, as my husband had been out of work nineteen weeks, and I expected him home at four o'clock; he said, he could tell me of a good place of work - where he could have 5s. a day; I asked them up to my room - the people below called me down; and while I was gone, the prisoner went away, and took a piece of print from off my bedstead.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I took the young man on Monday, the 5th of May; he was committed for re-examination - I took the prisoner on Thursday, and found where the cotton was pawned.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a piece of cotton, which I took in of the prisoner, I believe; on the evening of the 5th of May, in the name of Ann Raffel - she was in the habit of pawning with me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutrix in the New-road, Somers'-town; she asked me to go and have something to drink in the Rising Sun public-house - we then met the young man; and she insisted upon his coming to the Orange Tree public-house, and having something more - he did not want to go; but she would make him, as he was an old acquaintance - she drank to such excess that she was obliged to send him to tell her sister to come and fetch home her child; she then took us home to tea - she sat on the young man's knee; and said, if her husband came home and found her so intoxicated, he would be angry - she wanted him to take her somewhere for that night; she then said, she had not much money and gave me the print to pawn for her; which I did, for 1s. 6d., and she told me to bring in a quartern of gin, and I gave her the 1s. 3d.

MRS. MINGARD. I never received the duplicate; there is not a word of truth in what she has stated - the young man was a perfect stranger to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-86

1162. MARY ANN RAFFELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 2 caps, value 4s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; and 1 blanket, value 7s. , the goods of Mary Ann Cooper , widow , now the wife of Henry Burdett Gast .

MARY ANN GAST . I am now the wife of Henry Burdett Gast; on the 25th of April my name was Mary Ann Cooper; the prisoner was in distress - and about the latter end of March I took her into my house. On the 25th of April I had occasion to leave my house, and gave her leave to go and see her friends - I returned on Saturday, and missed the articles stated; I never permitted her to take my things - I saw her on the Sunday going into the Catholic Chapel, and told her I must take her up.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I took up the prisoner; I said,"Is not this cap on your head your mistress'?" she said, Yes, and I took it off.

WILLIAM CRASH . I am a pawnbroker of Clarendon-square. I took in this blanket, cap, and petticoat of the prisoner, on the 26th of April.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-87

1163. ELIZABETH RIX was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 watch, value 3l. the goods of Elizabeth Wyer , spinster .

ANN PRESTON . I live in Charles-street ; my husband is a servant. I received a watch from Elizabeth Wyer (who is a servant ) to get cleaned for her; it is a fortnight ago last Tuesday, but I do not know the day of the month; I sent it by my husband to a watch-maker in Shepherd's-market - the same watch was returned to me last Tuesday week; my husband put it on the table: I took it and put it into a drawer: the prisoner had been with me for three weeks as a servant out of place - she had half a bed there; I looked at the watch to see the time at two o'clock, and missed it about seven.

JAMES HILL . I am a pawnbroker. I bought this watch of Mrs. Goodwin; she came to ask me the value of it; I said it was worth three guineas to any one to wear; but it would not suit me to give more than two guineas for it; she took it away, but brought it back again and took the two guineas.

ELIZABETH GOODWIN . I am a widow. The prisoner came to my house at No. 10, George-street, last Tuesday

week, and wanted half a bed; I thought her a decent woman and took her in; she gave me this watch to dispose of for her, and said it was given to her by her sweetheart, and cost five guineas; I took it to the pawnbroker's, as I thought they were fair dealing people, and then I sold it.

ELIZABETH WYER. I am single; I left this watch with Preston to get cleaned.

LEWIS JULIAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on Friday last; she said she had taken the watch and sold it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-88

1164. WILLIAM THOMAS WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 piece of mahogany, value 26s. , the goods of Robert Ward .

ROBERT WARD. I am a sawyer , and live in Kingsgate-street, Holborn . On the 19th of May I had some pieces of mahogany on my premises, which are under a cabinetmaker's shop; I opened the premises at half-past six o'clock that morning, and lost this piece of mahogany a quarter before seven; I saw the prisoner about ten yards from my premises with it; I went to look if I had lost any; I was hardly certain, but I went after the prisoner, and took him in Red Lion-square; it is my property, and is worth about 6s. - he was quite a stanger to me; I asked him to take it back again to where he took it from - he tried to throw it on my toes; I caught it, and put it on the iron rails.

JOHN MARDON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work eight weeks: I was coming along, and met a gentleman, who said he would pay me to carry it a little way.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-89

1165. FLORINDA WISEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 7 yards of ribbon, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 5s. , the goods of William Hare .

RICHARD HARE . I am servant to William Hare, a silk mercer , of Marchmont-street . On the evening of the 3d of May, about seven o'clock, the prisoner came and asked for some bonnet-ribbon; a shop-woman showed her some; I then went and undertook to serve her, as I thought she wanted to steal - she came in with two other women, and said to one of them, "Will this ribbon suit?" she said No; the other two then asked the price of some ribbon in the window, and while I was telling them, the prisoner put one ribbon into her basket, which she took from the counter - I believe one of the others had removed it from the box; the prisoner then went down the shop, and asked a female for some prints - she called me to cut it, which I did; she paid 3s. 6d. for it, and put it into her basket - she went to the door, and I saw her put her hand in and take up the ribbon; I had not sold the other women any ribbon; I took the box off the counter, and said I could not serve them, as they had been in the day before and bought nothing; I went after the prisoner and brought her back, and in her basket was found this ribbon and this handkerchief, which I believe is master's - I can swear to the ribbon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to say she was ever in your shop before? A. Yes, on the Saturday before; I took her about ten yards from the house - I followed her as soon as I could get from some ladies I was serving; I thought she might return the ribbon to the drawer; I had seen her at the shop before - I believe she has been there a dozen times; she remained in the shop about five minutes after she took the ribbon.

COURT. Q. Why did not you at once charge her with it? A. Because I was nearly confident that she had returned it to the box again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-90

1166. JOHN BAYS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 6 lbs. weight of beef, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Lee ; and that he, at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on Wednesday, the 14th of February, in the 2d year of the present King, was convicted of felony .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 22d of April I was on duty near the Bluecoat Boy public-house, at ten o'clock at night: I saw the prisoner going along very fast in the road, with something under his arm; I went and stopped him, and found he had a bit of beef, which he said the turnpike man gave him; I said I did not believe it- he said, "Well, I will tell you the truth; a boy was carrying it in a tray along the lower road, and I snatched it and ran away."

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am servant to Thomas Lee, a butcher , of Islington . The officer brought this beef to our shop the next morning - there were 6 lbs. of it, and I knew it to be my master's; I had seen it safe about halfpast eight o'clock in the evening - I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty with Thompson, and saw what he has stated; I found the owner of the beef next morning.

Prisoner. I picked up the beef, wrapped up in some white paper.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a conductor of the Bow-street patrol. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from the office; it is signed Thomas Shelton.

The certificate of the prisoner's conviction of stealing two mahogany frames of William Shelton Ritchie, and his being sentenced to be transported for seven years, was here read.

WILLIAM SHELTON RITCHIE . I am a plumber, and live at No. 7, Silver-street; I did live in Tabernacle-walk. I prosecuted the prisoner seven years ago; he was tried here and convicted, and ordered to be transported for seven years; I am certain he is the man; it was in the 2d year of the reign of his present Majesty.

Prisoner. The constable went and brought that man up at Hatton-garden; I have got my bread by honest industry, standing with goods in the street. I was coming home, and found the beef.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-91

1167. JOHN CARTER was indicted for that he, on the 21st of April, in the 5th year of the present King, was married to Martha Smith , and afterwards, on the 23d of January, in the 8th year of the present King , feloniously

did marry Sarah Sapseed , his former wife being then alive .

There being no proof of the second marriage the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280529-92

1168. HENRY LEVERIDGE was indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of William Neal and John Neal , on the 20th of April , and stealing 12 lbs. weight of hemp, value 6s., their property .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am a constable. I met the prisoner on the 20th of April, in Virginia-row, Bethnal-green, with a bundle; I asked what he had got - he said only some hemp which he had been fetching for his master, Mr. Lowe, and he was going to take it to him; I said I would go to his master; he took me to one place, where they knew nothing about him; I at last went to Messrs. Neals', where the clerk identified it.

JAMES GLIBBERY . I was with West; his statement is correct; I found these keys on the prisoner.

JOHN TRUDGET . I have been in the service of William Neal and John Neal for fourteen months. I know the prisoner - I understand he has been in their service twenty-four years; his last weekly earning was 27s. 7d. - he can always earn more than a guinea a week; the officer brought him with this hemp to our warehouse; the key of the warehouse, which is usually kept in the kitchen, was found in his possession; I know this hemp to be my masters'; I compared it with what was in the warehouse, and I know it by the private mark; I never knew the prisoner to be guilty of any dishonesty.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-93

1169. WILLIAM HARDY and JOHN KENNEDY were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 3 pints of wine, value 3s. , the goods of the West India Dock Company .

JOHN GAY . I am a foreman to the West India Dock Company. On the 24th of April the Catherine Stewart Forbes was in the dock, and the prisoners were employed in removing some captain's stores from it; there was a case on board, containing bottles, which the mate told me were bottles of wine, but I do not know what was in them, - the mate is gone to sea.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-94

1170. JOHN NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 necklace, value 5s., the goods of George Clark , from the person of Charlotte Clark , spinster .

MARY ANN CLARK . I am ten years old, and live with my father in Church-street, Bethnal-green . I was nursing my sister Charlotte, who is nine months old, opposite my father's house - she had a necklace round her neck; the prisoner came round her, and then I missed the necklace - I cried out; my father came and ran after him; the necklace has not been found - I did not see him take it; I had seen it on not long before; there was only him and another boy near us; my father could not catch the prisoner, but I am sure he is the boy - I saw his face.

GEORGE CLARK. I am the father of this witness; my daughter told me a boy had stolen Charlotte's beads, and run up Tyson-street - I pursued, but could see no boy; when I came to the mount there were several boys, and the prisoner among them; he ran off, and I pursued. The beads have not been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-95

1171. WILLIAM PRITCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Charles Woodcock , from his person .

CHARLES WOODCOCK. I am a groom and valet , and live in Little Marlborough-street. I lost my handkerchief from my coat pocket at the corner of Sackville-street, Piccadilly , between five and six o'clock in the evening of Friday last; I did not feel it taken, but the officer asked if I had lost anything: I felt, and missed my handkerchief - I saw the officer take it from under the prisoner's apron; he was then about two yards from me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN IBBERSON . I am an officer. I was passing Piccadilly, and saw the prosecutor looking at the caricature shop; the prisoner was close behind him - he attempted to pick his pocket two or three times, but failed; at last he got the handkerchief, and put it under his apron; I took him, and spoke to the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-96

1172. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 necklace, value 5s., the goods of Benjamin Allen , from the person of Sarah Ann Mills , spinster .

SUSANNAH ALLEN . I am the wife of Benjamin Allen; we live in Cornwall-street ; Sarah Ann Mills is under my care. On the 13th of April she had a necklace on of five rows of beads; she was playing near my house at seven o'clock that evening - she came in in half an hour without the necklace; I made inquiries, but could not find it. I knew nothing of the prisoner till I saw him at the watch-house, and the necklace - it had been clasped round her neck - and was broken off, not unclasped.

MARTHA BENSTED . I live facing Cornwall-street. I saw Sarah Ann Mills with the necklace on, as I was sitting at my window, and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger to me, come up to her - he sent another child away who was with her; he then took little Sarah's beads off her neck, and before I could get down stairs he was gone; I ran to the watchman and told him, and in a quarter of an hour I saw the prisoner again; I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What part of the house were you in? A. At the one pair of stairs window; it was not dark - I was not further than the width of this Court from them; I went down directly, but the child had turned the corner, and I did not see her.

WILLIAM INCH . I am a watchman. Benstead gave me the information, and I went after the prisoner - I saw him go into his mother's house; I then went and found the prosecutrix. I went to the prisoner's mother's, and knocked at the door - they denied him, but I opened the window-shutter, and saw him going to bed; it was then about half-past seven o'clock; I went in, and took him; he said he had been in bed by six o'clock; I said it was not that when he passed me - I took him to Benstead - she said that was the man: in going along he gave

me these beads, but I do not recollect that he said anything.

MRS. ALLEN. These are the beads.

Cross-examined. Q. But you do not know that they were what was on the child's neck? A. Yes, I do; I had laid them on the copper about a month ago - the fire was lighted, and it has turned the colour of them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-97

1173. EDWARD BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Sampson the elder , from the person of John Sampson the younger .

JOSEPH ROGERS . I know John Sampson the younger; he is the son of John Sampson, who lives in Crabtree-row. On the 22d of May I was by Cold-harbour-street , and saw little Sampson sitting on the threshold of a door: the prisoner pulled the last boot off his foot, and pulled him on the ground; he put the boots into his hat, and ran away; I gave the alarm, and he was followed, and taken at the bottom of Cambridge-street with the boots in his hat.

WILLIAM SAPSWORTH . I was standing at my front window, and saw the child sitting on the threshold of a door with nothing on its feet; it occurred to me that its boots or shoes had been stolen: I went out, and saw this lad - he told me what had happened; I pursued, and took the prisoner about one hundred yards from the child - I found the boots in his hat.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

JOHN SAMPSON, Senior. I am the father of John Sampson. I believe these to be his boots.

WILLIAM SMITH . I made these boots for Mr. Sampson.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw these boots in the road; I took them up, and asked several people if they had lost them - they said No; I put them into my hat - this gentleman took me; I said I had found them, and gave him them from my hat.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-98

1174. SARAH BRADON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 crown, 3 half-crowns, 4 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 5 1/2d. in copper, the monies of Michael Callaghan , from his person .

MICHAEL CALLAGHAN. I am a labourer , and live in King's-head-court, Broadway, Westminster. Last Saturday night week I met the prisoner in the Broadway; I have known her this ten months, and have been with her before at her room in Orchard-street ; I went home with her, and we went to bed about twelve o'clock; I had received my wages from Mr. Hunt - I had one crown, three half-crowns, four shillings, and one sixpence in silver, and five-pence halfpenny in copper - when I went to bed, I put it into my stocking, and went to bed with my stockings on; before I went to bed I fastened the door, by putting the poker through the staple, so that no one could have got in; I had taken a little, but was not drunk - I awoke a little after five o'clock, and the prisoner was gone - the stocking was turned off my leg, and the money taken away; the door was closed too, but the poker was taken out - I dressed, and went to a public-house to see for the prisoner, but could not find her; I then went to Charing Cross, and found her at the Canteen between eight and nine o'clock, and gave charge of her for robbing me; she heard me make the charge, but said nothing - the constable took her out, and asked if she had robbed me; she denied it, but at Bow-street she owned it; all the money was found upon her - except the crown piece; I had agreed to give her two shillings.

WILLIAM OXLEY . I am a constable. I was sent for and went to the Canteen at Charing Cross - the prosecutor stated what money the prisoner had robbed him of; I took her out, and asked her if she had robbed him - she denied it; but on searching her I found three half-crowns, four shillings, one sixpence, and four-pence-halfpenny, and two knives; I found the prosecutor and her making it up the next day; I parted them, and took her in to Sir Richard Birnie - I heard her say she had taken the money from him, but not so much by one shilling as he had stated.

Prisoner's Defence. When he saw me the next morning he said he only wanted his money - there were only five shillings short, and he said he would give me till Saturday night to make it good; I had a deal more money than I took of him, as I had been with several more persons.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-99

1175. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Leggett , from his person .

JOHN LEGGETT. I am out of a situation ; I did live with a chemist at Marlborough, in Wiltshire. On the 17th of May I was coming up the City-road , at a quarter-past six o'clock in the evening - I heard some one call "Stop, Sir!" I looked round, and saw the officer with the prisoner and my handkerchief in his hand, which had been in my coat-pocket; he was about two yards from me.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 17th of May, I saw the prisoner in company with another person, close to this gentleman; they went away quickly - I saw the prisoner putting something under his waistcoat; I took him, and drew this handkerchief from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the gentleman at all; the officer took me, but could find nothing; he took me back, and saw this handkerchief in the road.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-100

1176. HENRY HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of David Lowe , from his person .

DAVID LOWE. I am a servant to the Speaker of the House of Commons . On the 23d of May I was in Duke-street, St. James's-square , at ten minutes after eight o'clock in the evening - I saw a crowd of persons; I went up and found a horse had fallen down, and was dying in the street - I left the crowd and felt my pocket; I missed my handkerchief - the prisoner was just by me; I took him and he dropped it; he had some marks on his face, which seem to have got well since; but from what recollection I have of him, he is the boy; I have enquired

after his father and mother, according to the direction he gave me, at No. 9, Carnaby-market, but could not find them - this is the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I came to see what was the matter, and this gentleman came up to me and said, "You have got my handkerchief;" I said I had not; he took me by the throat and almost choked me - I never had the handkerchief.

GUILTY. Aged 11. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280529-101

1177. JOHN SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 2 sovereigns, 48 half-crowns, 30 shillings, and 20 sixpences, the monies of Newman Francis Robinson McGowran , from his person .

NEWMAN FRANCIS ROBINSON McGOWRAN. I am a general-dealer and live in Tavistock-row, Covent-garden - the prisoner was in my employ and served behind my counter . On the 11th of March, I sent him with two sovereigns and 8l. in silver to a customer at the Piazza coffee-house - he was to leave it with any one in the bar, but he went away and I saw no more of him; I expected him to have returned in about three minutes - I did not see him again till the 22d of April, when I found him by the direction of a lad who went to the same charity-school with him. When he was apprehended he said he was guilty - he hung down his head and said he took it, I believe.

DANIEL RIERDON . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 22d of April, I went with the prosecutor to the Coach and Horses public-house, in St. Martin's-lane; I found the prisoner in a back room with two others - I took him into the tap-room, and he said "It is all right, I am guilty of it"- I said "What have you done with the money?" he said he had bought some clothes, and pawned them and sold the duplicates, and another boy helped him to spend the money.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-102

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, MAY 30.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1178. SARAH WATERS & MARY ANN WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April, 1 set of bed-furniture, value 1l.; 1 carpet, value 8s.; 3 flat-irons, value 4s.; 1 quilt, value 2s.; 1 pillow, value 5s.; 1 bolster, value 12s.; 5 lbs. weight of feathers, value 1l., and 1 linen, value 1s., the goods of John Morcraft - also for stealing, on the 21st of April, 2 pillows, value 12s.; 1 bolster, value 14s.; 3 blankets, value 1l.; 2 sheets, value 6s.; 30 lbs. weight of feathers, value 3l., and 1 bed-tick, value 3s., the goods of John Hutchings .

To which indictments

WATERS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILLIAMS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-103

1179. JOHN PYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 pair of trousers, value 13s. , the goods of Lawrence Kennedy .

LAWRENCE KENNEDY. I am a pawnbroker , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 15th of April, these trousers hung inside my door; about 2 o'clock in the afternoon I was standing in the back part of my shop, and saw the prisoner come and pull them down - he was gathering them up; I went out, he threw them down and ran away - a man pursued and stopped him about four doors from my house; I am certain of his person - when I got to the door he was walking with his hands in his pockets; he had a straw hat on - there was another lad standing at my window, whom I suspect to be a confederate, but he had not a straw hat on.

JOHN MIDDLEDITCH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and bring the trousers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the trousers and the wind blew them down.

PROSECUTOR. I saw him jerk them down, and he broke the hook to get them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280529-104

1181. JOHN FRANKHAM , SAMUEL HALLS and JAMES SQUIRES were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , a certain fixture, that is to say, a copper, value 5s., the goods of Henry Howlett , and fixed to a certain building of his ; against the Statute.

SARAH HOWLETT . I am the wife of Henry Howlett - we live at Chelsea . I saw our copper fixed safe in our wash-house at eleven o'clock at night, on the 14th of April; my daughter went down about twelve - she came up again, and said it was broken down and taken away - I went and found it so; the wash-house door, which goes into the garden, was not locked; the copper was shown to me again at Queen-square - I have no doubt it was mine; it was fitted to the place, and corresponded exactly; the prisoners were not employed about the premises.

EDWARD WARMAN . I am a cooper. On the morning of the 15th of April, about five o'clock, I saw the three prisoners in the garden ground of Mr. Oakham - I told them they had better be off; I walked on about twenty yards - two of them disappeared, and I saw the third, which was Halls, putting something under the hedge; I looked, and perceived it was a copper - I went to him, and said I should take him; I called to a man who was passing, but he would not come - I jumped over the hedge to take the copper; Halls got away - I did not pursue him because I had some goods of my own, which I was afraid of losing; I took the copper home, and soon after I met the prosecutor's son and told him of it - he said, "If it is my mother's copper there is a little hole stopped up with putty" - which is the case.

STEPHEN BROWN . On the morning in question I was in the Fulham-road, about one hundred yards from the new church - I saw Squires and Frankham going from the church, and Halls running up the garden; I then saw Warman at the bottom of the garden.

JOSEPH SMITHERS . - I am a patrol. I took up the three prisoners in consequence of information.(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANKHAM's Defence. I was not there, and know nothing about it.

HALLS' Defence. I was going by the garden and saw something - I went and saw it was a copper; the witness came running, and said, "Here comes Mr. Oakham" - I said, "I dare say it is his," and I had better put it back again; he said, "No, give it me;" I gave it him, and he said, "I will have you taken up" - I then ran away.

SQUIRE's Defence. I was going to work; I was rather late and went fast.

FRANKHAM - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HALL - GUILTY . Aged 16.

SQUIRES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-105

1182. ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 12 shoe-soles, value 1s. 11d. , the goods of William Woolf Fink .

WILLIAM WOOLF FINK. I am a leather-seller , and live in Bethnal-green ; the prisoner was a customer. On the 18th of April, she came to my shop between eleven and twelve o'clock; she went to a bin of leather, as she generally did, to look out the soles: she stooped down - I had some suspicion; I watched her, and saw her put some soles under her shawl, and then take up some more; at last she brought four soles to the counter, and asked what they came to; I said they were marked, and they came to 8 1/2d. - I said, "What are you going to do with the others?" she said, "I have no more;" I said, "What, have you not some under your shawl?" I put my hand to open her shawl, and she took out these soles, put them down, and began to beg for mercy.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. She had dealt with you some time? A. Yes; it was customary for persons to go the bin to look at the leather - I am sure she did not say she had other soles, and offer to pay for them.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I went to the shop, and found the prisoner; I searched her, and found 6s. 2d. on her; in going along she admitted it, and said if I would let her go, and say she ran away, her husband would give me a sovereign - while in the shop she said she would never do so any more.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-106

1183. PHILIP HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of Robert Irish .

ROBERT IRISH. On the 10th of May I sent the prisoner with this coat in a parcel, to take to Piccadilly, for my uncle's coachman to take to Egham; I have known him these three years - he has had an honest character.

HORATIO ELLIS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this coat of the prisoner on the 10th of May.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS PERRING . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first crime I ever did.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-107

1184. WILLIAM HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of James Richards .

WILLIAM TURNER . I keep a coffee-shop, near Grosvenor-square . On the 25th of May, at a quarter-past nine o'clock at night, I was shutting up my shop; I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Richards' coach-house with this coat under his arm - he ran towards Oxford-street; I pursued, and took him back to the coachman, who owned the coat; I never had my eyes off him.

JAMES ADAMS . I am coachman to Mr. James Richards. Turner brought the prisoner and this coat back to me - it belongs to my master; I had seen it not three minutes before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY SPICER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who asked me to take this coat to Green-street, Edgeware-road, and he would give me 1s.; the witness came and took me: what the witness states about my coming out of the coach-house is false; if he was at the bar himself, it would not be the first time.

WILLIAM TURNER. I never was at any bar in my life, but his mother has been to the livery-stable and said I was tried here.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-108

1185. ELIZABETH KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 apron, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Elizabeth Keemer .

ELIZABETH KEEMER. I am the wife of John Keemer ; this was his apron.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-109

1186. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Joseph Punter .

JOSEPH PUNTER. On the 21st of April I left my horse and gig at the door of the Queen's Head and Artichoke public-house, Albany-street ; I came out in about three minutes, and found another person who was with the prisoner; he had the coat on his shoulder - they were about one hundred yards from the gig; I went out with the whip - the prisoner saw me; he told the other, and away they ran - the other dropped the coat; a young man picked it up - the landlord caught the prisoner in a cellar.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did you see the prisoner meddle with the coat at all? A. He had hold of part of it while it was on the other man's shoulder; I am certain he is the person who was with the other.

LEONARD BALDRY . I am the publican. The prosecutor said, he had lost his coat - I followed him out, and ran in another direction; and found the prisoner in a cellar of a house, in Osnaburg-street, about a quarter of a mile from the place where I first saw the person running.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he was not running when you took him? A. No; I cannot say he is the man who took the coat - I did not see his face; but from his stature and clothes, I judge him to be the man I first saw running; I told him I wanted him to come back to the public-house where he had taken the coat - he said, he had not.

THOMAS REEVES . I took charge of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking about and was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-110

1187. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 2 reams of paper, value 2l. , the goods of John Mason .

JOHN MASON. I am agent to the Methodist Conference , and have the care of their stationery; I had paper of this description - it was kept in a cellar, under the warehouse, which was locked at night, but not in the day time; there is a private entrance to the cellar - I did not miss any paper; there is a large quantity there - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN TREVOR HANKEY . I am clerk to Mr. Mason. On Friday last, I was in the warehouse; I saw the prisoner coming out of the cellar with a bundle in a bag - I opened the warehouse-door, and asked, what he had got; he made no reply - I followed him to the street, and when he got about six yards from the outer gate, he threw down the bag with its contents, and ran off; I pursued and brought him back - I did not lose sight of him; I brought him and the paper back to the office.

WILLIAM KINGATE . I am employed at Mr. Mason's; as I came up from the cellar I met the prisoner going down with an empty bag - I asked what he wanted; he asked where the privy was - I said, it was not there; but I showed him where it was, and he went into it - this was about ten minutes before he was taken.

JAMES HANLEY . I took the prisoner; this is the bag and the paper which were delivered to me; I found on the prisoner some loose pieces of paper, of John Wesley's Journal.

Prisoner. That is not the bundle which I had.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280529-111

1188. MARY LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Emanuel .

ELIZABETH HAIGH . I live in Cartwright-street, Aldgate . On the 9th of May I hung some gowns in the court, by my house; one of them belonged to Mr. Emanuel, for whom I wash; I missed that one about three o'clock - I have known the prisoner for nineteen years; I had seen her about the place that day - I did not see her again till the Saturday morning: I said to her, I have lost a gown - she said, I might do my worst; I did not see her take it - I afterwards saw it on Mrs. Emanuel.

JOSEPH EMANUEL. I am a salesman ; this gown is my wife's - it was delivered to Haigh to wash; it came to my house in a parcel, on the Monday after the Saturday on which the prisoner was taken.

SARAH SOLOMAN . On Friday morning the 9th of May the prisoner and another person passed my door, while I was sitting there; the other person asked me if I would purchase a gown - I said, it was not exactly in my way, but I would look at it; my house leads down to Rag

Fair - she asked 2s. 6d. for it; I gave her 2s., and on the Saturday evening an officer and three women came to my house, and said it was stolen.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on Saturday, the 10th of May - I said it was for stealing a gown; she said at the watch-house the next day, that it was not her; but a person named McCarthy had taken it, put it in her pocket-hole, and taken it up stairs.

ELEANOR DANIELS . I washed the gown on the night it was missed; it was a very good one, but is now much damaged - I saw the prisoner in the court just about the time it was taken, and again in half an hour afterwards; there were not many people about.

Prisoner's Defence. McCarthy asked me to go up to her place; she said, she had an old gown which she wanted to sell - I went with her to sell it; I then heard it was stolen - this woman came and asked if I knew anything about it; I said, No, I had not stolen it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-112

1189. THOMASINA NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 1 blanket, value 5s.; 1 counterpane, value 4s.; 1 sheet, value 4s.; 1 flat-iron, value 1s., and 1 pillow, value 4s. , the goods of Caleb Cooper .

JANE COOPER . I am the wife of Caleb Cooper - we live in Clerkenwell . The prisoner hired a ready-furnished room of me six or seven weeks ago; she left for two nights and while she was gone I missed these articles from her room.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. This blanket was pawned at my house, but I do not know by whom.

JOHN WHITAKER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet and a flat-iron - I took the sheet in of the prisoner, on the 11th of April; I am certain of her person.

CHARLES DOMETT . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a counterpane and pillow pawned with me, by the prisoner, on the 17th of April and 10th of May.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I took the prisoner; she gave me these duplicates.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutrix had engaged to give her time to return the property, which she had pawned to pay her rent.

MRS. COOPER. She gave me a name as security, which I did not like, and I let her be a few days to try to get them out.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18280529-113

1190. THOMAS PILKINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 saddle, value 1l. , the goods of James Waters .

JOHN HOWES . I am servant to Mr. James Waters. I saw his saddle safe at half-past six o'clock in the morning of the 25th of April, and at half-past one it was gone; the prisoner was in the habit of bringing cattle to my master's slaughter-house.

JOHN YOUNG . I am a chimney-sweeper. On the 25th of April I saw the prisoner coming down our mews with a stick under his arm, between breakfast and dinner time - he went into Mr. Waters' stable, and came out with the saddle under his left arm; I did not know but he had borrowed it; he knew me, and I knew him.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you? A. I was against my master's door, watching you; I saw you open the stable door and go in; you left the door open when you came out; I went into my master's place, and watched you out of the mews, towards Davies-street.

JOHN FATTEN . I am apprentice to Mr. Hicks - he is a sweep. I saw the prisoner go down the mews with the stick under his arm, and come back with the saddle.

JOHN STEWART . I took up the prisoner; he said he knew nothing about it. The saddle has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I got very tipsy the night before, and went home to bed at nine o'clock - I did not get up till three o'clock that afternoon.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-114

1191. JAMES NEAL , GEORGE DONALD McFARLANE , CHARLES McFARLANE , LAWRENCE LYNCH , HENRY BRADY , MICHAEL KENNEDY , and BARNABUS ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 16 bottles, value 2s.; 12 quarts of wine, value 25s., and 4 pieces of coral, value 1s. , the goods of Andrew Talbot .

GEORGE BIDDLECOMBE . I am chief mate of the Belzoni, East Indiaman, lately from Calcutta - she was lying at Blackwall . On the 18th of April, at six o'clock in the morning, a boat came alongside, and brought all the prisoners except Allen; they came on board to heave ballast ; Allen is captain of another lighter; they got on board, and went into the hold to heave ballast into the lighter - the two McFarlanes were in the lighter; I went into the hold at eight o'clock, and saw some cases of wine safe, and a cask of coral - I did not see Allen till about eleven o'clock- I then went on shore, and at half-past one I was sent for - I went on board, and found thirteen empty bottles with the necks broken off, and all strewed about the ship, and some coral in the lighter and some in the ship; the second and third mates, and a Custom-house officer were on board. I gave charge of the prisoners; the wine belonged to Andrew Talbot, the captain .

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Then they were persons who are allowed to work at ballast? A. Yes - I believe they are employed by the Trinity-house; I left the ship at eleven o'clock; and returned at half-past one; I know the steward gave them two bottles of wine before I left the ship; I ordered it myself; the steward is not here to-day - the ship is gone dowN; it was a disagreeable kind of employ, and they have beer allowed them, but no spirits.

COURT. Q. Had the steward authority to give them any more? A. No; there were thirteen bottles strewed about- one bottle was found on Allen, and the two bottles which were given them were found in the cabin.

FRANCIS MASON . I am third mate of the Belzoni. I went down into the hold between one and two o'clock, and saw Allen sitting there with a jacket on; I went on deck; he came up with his jacket off, and something rolled up in it; he said, "It is hot work down there;" I saw the appearance of a bottle rolled up in the jacket, and said, "What is that?" he said nothing: I took it from him, and it was a bottle of wine; he told me to say nothing about it; I

went down into the hold, and found half the lid of the wine case was taken off, and a great many bottles missing; I looked about, and found thirteen bottles with the necks broken off; I went on deck, and sent for the Police-officer - I found one piece of coral in the bed-place in the lighter.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the other men in the barge when Allen came up? A. Yes, in the hold and in the barge; Allen does not belong to their party.

JOSEPH WHITMORE . I am an officer of Customs. I was on board the Belzoni about one o'clock; I was informed the case had been broken open; I went down immediately, and found two bottles broken and a small quantity of wine in them; I took them up to the case, and found the corks corresponded with those that remained; there were five dozens in the case then. My duty was to attend the ballast, to see that nothing illegal was concealed; I took the bottle of wine from Allen; I would not suffer it to leave the ship.

THOMAS GRAY . I am an officer. I went on board on the 18th of April; I found fifteen empty bottles, with the necks broken off, one full one, and four pieces of coral rock- I asked the prisoners if they had drank any wine; they said No, not in the ship, nor in the lighter; I found these two pieces of coral in the lighter fire-place, and this in the ash-pan; the McFarlanes were in the lighter, as trimmers of it - they denied all knowledge of it; I took Allen in Blackwall-reach - I do not know that he was connected with the others.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take Allen at that time? A. No; I saw him afterwards on the river - he gave me his address, and I went and took him at five o'clock in the evening.

JURY to FRANCIS MASON. Q. Were you on board the vessel all the time? A. Yes; a stranger might have come on board and I not have seen them; Lynch, Brady, and Allen were intoxicated, which might have arisen from their taking a large portion of the wine, allowed by the first mate.

NEAL - GUILTY . Aged 35.

G. D. McFARLANE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

C. McFARLANE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

LYNCH - GUILTY . Aged 45.

BRADY - GUILTY . Aged 50.

KENNEDY - GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

ALLEN - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Reference Number: t18280529-115

1192. CHARLES RIVERS and HENRY PAYNE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 1 axletree, value 7s. , the goods of James Brasier .

JAMES BRASIER. I live at Battle-bridge. I have some premises in Bagnigge-wells-road ; I lost an axletree from there on the 21st of April. A boy came and told me it was gone: I went and missed it - I had seen it the night before; I met Rivers with it on his shoulder about twenty minutes after - I watched him down Turnmill-street with it, and at the corner of Greenhill's-rents he met a man with a cart - he put it into the cart, and they went on with it; I got a constable, and gave them into custody. Payne was by the side of Rivers - I do not think I said anything to them; Rivers had been in my employ two years, and had a good character.

THOMAS ASHLEY . I had been carrying some sheep that morning, and was going for some more; the two prisoners came up to me at the corner of Greenhill's-rents between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and asked if I knew of an iron shop - I said, "I knew there were some shops of that description, but I was not going that way;" the prosecutor came up and took them.

THOMAS HANDLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoners, and found this axletree in Ashley's cart - they did not say anything, and had not a farthing about them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RIVERS' Defence. I met Payne with the axletree; he asked me to carry it for him, which I did.

PAYNES' Defence. I saw the axletree in the road; I took it up, and met Rivers; I asked him to carry it for me, and I would give him sixpence - I was in distress.

RIVERS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

PAYNE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-116

1193. WILLIAM SLAUGHTER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 10 cwt. of cast-iron, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Want and John Richardson ; and WILLIAM CHRISTMAS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS WANT. I am in partnership with John Richardson - we are brickmakers and builders ; we lost this iron - it is our's.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you tell when this was on your premises? A. I have lost 104 metals since February, but I cannot tell when I lost any particular quantity.

Prisoner SLAUGHTER. Q. Is it your's, or is it not? A. Yes; I know this piece by its being a particular sort, which was made on purpose to cross the roads - they would not let me use any other, because the carts should not be shaken; I had twenty-eight yards of it, and these three yards were found at Christmas's house.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is there any mark on it? A. No; but we have more like it - it is of a particular shape - no other persons use such as this for a rail-way; I had the mould cast for this at Mr. Fowler's, and he never cast such for anybody else.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I was employed to take up this rail-way in March last; Slaughter applied to me to let him have the iron, but I refused to sell it him - there was some of it afterwards missing.

Cross-examined. Q. Slaughter applied to you to buy some metal? A. Yes; he goes about to collect small quantities of metal, and sell it to the dealers; I know nothing of any particular piece of metal.

WILLIAM READ . I went with Mr. Want to Christmas' premises at Hounslow, where I found 10 1/2 cwt. of this sort of metal; he was not at home - but I saw him afterwards, and asked where he got it; he said he had it of a man with one hand, and he believed his name was

Slaughter - nothing was said about it when they were both together.

Cross-examined. Q. You know nothing of Slaughter but what you heard from Christmas? A. No; I took him in the country - Christmas was summoned as a witness at Bow-street - he came, and was committed on Monday last; when I went to his house, Mrs. Christmas shewed me the iron; there was a great deal of broken iron about, and some of these pieces were whole; I believe these pieces are sold as old iron when they are broken: Hounslow is about six miles from the prosecutors premises - Christmas said he had given 3s. a cwt. for it.

JOHN WELCH . I am a servant at Hillingdon. I saw Slaughter with some iron like this in his cart, crossing a field about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's - he was coming towards the road leading to London; I went and took hold of his donkey; he begged and prayed for us to let him go: we told him we would take the iron back to where he got it - he said he had nine pieces from the wharf, and two from Mr. Rodney's gateway; he gave no account of buying it - we took him into custody.

MR. WANT. Mr. Rodney is a farmer; I put some iron on his premises for safety.

MR. ADOLPHUS to JOHN WELCH. Q. Then Slaughter never had time to go to Hounslow with this iron? A. No. There were five pieces.

Prisoner SLAUGHTER. Two persons came up; one caught hold of the donkey's head, and the other loaded the iron into the cart - they said they knew where it came from.

JOHN WELCH. Yes; we brought back the cart, and put some iron in, which we found in a ditch; I was thirsty, and went to have a draught of water, and there I saw it; and he having some in his cart, I thought it was all of one parcel.

SLAUGHTER - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

CHRISTMAS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-117

1194. ANGUS SHAW and ROBERT ROSS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 2 brass lamps, value 28s. , the goods of Thomas Daman .

JAMES TERRY . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre. On the 17th of May I saw the two prisoners, with another person, at the top of Cow-cross, at near eight o'clock- Ross had two lamps, wrapped up in a cloth; I watched them for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then took Ross and the other man to the watch-house. Ross said he had formerly kept a shop, and that the lamps came from there, and the brackets were left in the window - the other man who was with them was discharged. I saw Shaw go into a shop, as if to ask if they would purchase such things.

Prisoner SHAW. It was the other man - he has confessed it since.

COURT to JAMES TERRY. Q. Then why did you take the other man? A. Because they spoke together, and Shaw was gone then.

RICHARD MILLEN . I am a constable. I took up Shaw on the 18th; I took the lamps to the house on the 17th, and they fitted exactly in the place where they had been. Shaw was in liquor; and when I got him to the watch-house he acknowledged that he was with Ross, but said he knew nothing about the lamps.

FRANCIS SIBBALD . I kept the Lamb public-house , and left it on he 16th of May - Mr. Daman succeeded me. There were two lamps of this description in a cupboard, but I cannot swear to them.

THOMAS DAMAN. I succeeded to the public-house; I believe there were lamps in the cupboard, but I had not seen them.

RICHARD MILLEN . I looked into the cupboard, and found this burner, which appears to fit this lamp exactly, and in the bar I found this bracket, which seems to fit one of them.

GEORGE GRAYSTON . I am a broker, and valued the goods; there were globe lamps of this description in the house - but I cannot swear to these; I took the inventory about twelve months ago, and again on the 5th of May - there were then two lamps lying in a dark cupboard; but I did not notice them.

SHAW'S Defence. I never saw nor handled them; I was away when they were taken, and on the road home, I was told that Ross and Anderson were taken into custody; some persons persuaded me to go away, because there was an officer after me - I said, I had never seen them, and I stopped till the officer came and took me; Anderson was the man as he has said himself, who went and asked the question, which the watchman says was me.

ROSS' Defence. Anderson told me he had two lamps which he brought from Scotland; he told me to hold them while he went into the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-118

1195. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 gown, value 1l. , the goods of Mary Herbert .

MARY HERBERT. On the 16th of May, at seven o'clock in the evening I lost a gown out of my parlour: I had seen it safe at four o'clock, when I placed it on the back of the chair; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN PEARSON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gown pawned on the 16th of May, between four and five o'clock by the prisoner, I believe - I gave a duplicate with it; he came the day following, and had more money on it - but I did not see him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-119

1196. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 2 loaves of bread, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Fenney .

JAMES FENNEY. I am a baker , and live in Spitalfields ; I have seen the prisoner. On the 24th of April I saw two loaves at the office very much like mine; but I could not swear to them - I was in bed at the time they were taken, which was between ten and eleven o'clock on Thursday night.

ANN RICHARDS . I live in Wheeler-street, facing Mr. Fenney'sOn the evening of the 24th of April I saw a boy bring two loaves down the steps; I followed him, and cried, Stop thief! the watchman stopped him - I could not see his face; it was dark, and the boy turned down a court - I turned down and took up the bread;

the watchman took the boy in a court; but he ran after him from the place where we both saw him.

WILLIAM BADDENS . I am a watchman. I was calling ten o'clock - Richards cried, "Stop him! Stop him! he has taken two loaves of bread," I saw the prisoner turning into Popes' Head-court - he went into a house; I stopped at the door, and he came to me; I saw no other boy there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was playing at whoop, and there were a good many other boys there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-120

1197. MARY WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 1 mahogany table, value 5s. , the goods of Frederick Lewis .

FREDERICK LEWIS. I am an oil and colour-man . On the 21st of May, I lost a mahogany table from my staircase; I saw the prisoner take it about two o'clock; I saw her going out of my door - I followed her, and took her back; she said, a woman gave it her; I had seen her once before - I saw nobody else there.

WILLIAM DODD . I took the prisoner into custody; she said a woman gave it to her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman met me near Covent Garden; she had a bundle, and told me to go with her - she gave me the table, and said, she would give me 2d. - I was not in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-121

1198. THOMAS TYRRELL and JOHN FURY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 1 pair of boots, value 5s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s. , the goods of Jane Tyrrell , widow .

JANE TYRRELL. I am a widow; Thomas Tyrrell is my son. On the 7th of April, I came home in the evening, and found my room open, and these things gone; I had seen them safe in the morning when I went out; I do not know who took them - my son lived with me, but did not come home to sleep that night; he came next day - I told him of it; he made no answer - he is as honest a good little boy as ever lived, and I beg and pray you will give him me back; if I part with him, I shall not live long - he did not tell me he had got somebody to pawn these things; I told the Magistrate I heard the officer ask him at Hatton Garden, and he said he got Fury to pawn them.

WILLIAM CREE . I am a pawnbroker. Fury pawned these boots with me in the name of Tyrrell.

Tyrrell put in a written defence, stating, that Fury had induced him to commit the offence.

TYRRELL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined one shilling and discharged .

FURY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-122

1199. ELIZABETH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 2 pillows, value 2s.; 2 pillowcases, value 1s.; 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 counterpane, value 4s.; 2 sheets, value 3s., and 1 flat-iron, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Pullen .

JOSEPH PULLEN. The prisoner lodged with me from the 28th of February, until the 14th of May; I went to her room that day and knocked at the door - but could not get in; I got a key, opened the door, and missed these articles - the duplicates were left in a bag in the room.

GEORGE SMITH . I was sent for, and found the prisoner; she gave up the key of the room - but had nothing else.

JOHN PROBERTS . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned five of these articles at our house at different times.

RICHARD LAW . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket pawned for 1s., by some woman; I do not know who - but this duplicate found in the prisoner's room, was the one I gave for it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them through distress, and intended to get them out.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-123

1200. MARY WILSON alias DOBIE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 1 table-cloth, value 3s. , the goods of William Sparrow .

SARAH SPARROW . I am the wife of William Sparrow. On the 6th of May, I met the prisoner, who was a stranger; I had a bundle and a basket - she asked if I would allow her to carry the bundle; I said Yes - I gave her the bundle and we went to my room in East Smithfield ; she asked me for a drink of water, and while I went to get it, I think she took the cloth from the back of a chair; it was there when she came in - I missed it in about ten minutes, when my husband came in to dinner; I had not seen her take it, but I saw her hand move under her shawl.

Prisoner. I was coming from my work and she was buying a whole lot of old things in Rosemary-lane; she gave 10s. for them, and tied them up in her apron - I said to her "That is a heavy load for you to carry, where do you live? if it is in my road, I will take it for you;" she said she would thank me, and we went to the house: she opened the door - I went into the room; she opened the things and washed them all while I sat there - I said "If you please, give me a cup of water;" she turned to get it, and I never moved off the chair till I came out: whether the cloth was on the chair or not, I do not know - she begged me to come again, and in about half an hour I was taken by her in Rosemary-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-124

1201. FREDERICK YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 30 feet of brass moulding, value 15s. , the goods of Samuel Foxall .

SAMUEL FOXALL. I am a brass-founder , and live in Noble-street - the prisoner was in my employ for six weeks. On the 25th of April he took out three lengths of moulding, which came to 9s, - he brought the money back for it; the officer brought me some pieces of moulding, which correspond with some I have by me.

ROBERT NEAL . I live in Long-alley and deal in marine-stores. On the 25th of April the prisoner brought some brass to me; I asked him where it came from - he said from Mr. Brown of Cumberland-street; I went there but found no such person - I found a man there, but

his name was not Brown; I asked if he sent him with the brass - he said No; I afterwards understood he was his father, but he did not say so - I gave the brass to the officer.

JAMES HANLEY . I produce the brass.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-125

1203. RICHARD ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 1 gown, value 2s. the goods of Ann Brame , spinster .

ANN BRAME. I am single, and in the service of Mr. Beatson, of Kentish-town . On the evening of the 23d of April some things hung out on the lines in the yard, and, among the rest, my gown; they were left out all night, and in the morning my gown was gone.

JOHN ELLIOTT . I was at work at the back of these premises, and found this gown concealed under some bricks; I took it up, and found where it was lost from; I know nothing of the prisoner - it was about two hundred yards from the prosecutrix's master's premises.

SAMUEL DODSON . Elliott found this gown on my premises, as he was making the head of a sewer at the back of Mr. Beatson's - we afterwards found another bundle tied up; I saw the prisoner at near eight o'clock the same evening - he came and removed the bricks which had been covered over the gown; I went to him, and he tried to get into a gentleman's garden - I said he must come with me, and took him to the watch-house; he was known by the watch-house-keeper; he said to me, "Is there anything amiss?" - that was almost all he said; there was no one with him.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you see that there were two others with me? A. No, not in that field - there were in the other field.

GEORGE BROWN . I have a gown, which I received from Dodson with the prisoner in charge; I told Dobson to wait for whoever came to the bricks.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a robbery committed some nights before, as they told me, but I know nothing about it; it is very hard that I should be brought here because I happened to be crossing the field to get a job of work - I was to meet a person who was to tell me of one.

GEORGE BROWN. There is no foot-way across these fields. GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-126

1204. HENRY BARNETT and JOHN NORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 axe, value 2s. , the goods of James Blewitt .

JAMES BLEWITT. On the 17th of May I had been working with my axe in Austin-street, Bethnal-green ; I went away, and locked up the house at eight o'clock in the evening - I did not go till after breakfast the next morning, and then it was gone; I know nothing of the prisoners.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am a constable. On the 17th of May I stopped the two prisoners and another person; I saw Norris give Barnett this axe, and then he gave it him again - I took them into custody, but the third boy was discharged at the office; I did not see him do any thing: I asked what they were going to do with the axe - Norris said, to sell it for his father; I said I would go and see where his father lived - in going along he said he got it under a cart.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I was with West: I took Barnett- he said he knew nothing about it; Norris then said"You told me to go into the cellar and take it out, and give it you, and you took it."

BARNETT's Defence. I was going to work, and met this lad, who asked me to take a walk; he said, "I have found an axe, and got it under a cart" - I said."Let me look at it;" the officer took us.

NORRIS's Defence. I found it in a dust yard, and put it under a cart till I came back.

BARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

NORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-127

1205. HENDRICK BREMEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of John Dalton .

JOHN DALTON. I lost these things from my room on the 16th of May, when my wife's boy came to dress himself; the prisoner had slept in the room where they were; the officer and I went to Rosemary-lane, where we found the prisoner, but he would not tell us anything about the things - we found a card on him, which led us to a vessel in the river, where we found this property tied up in this handkerchief, which is the prisoner's; when he was at the office he said he had paid for these things, but he had not.

Prisoner. When this gentleman met me in Rosemary-lane he made me sign a bill for 2l. 10s., for the time I had been in the house - the clothes were lent to me. Witness. No - there was no writing between us.

THOMAS OBORNE . I apprehended the prisoner, and found on him a card, with the name of Burrows; I made inquiries, and found these articles on board a vessel.

Prisoner. I put the things together, and meant to return them - my tools are at his house.

JOHN FREDERICK MEYER . I was interpreter to the prisoner at the office, on the 19th of May, and the Magistrate told me to ask whether he had paid the prosecutor for any board or lodging; he said, No; the Magistrate then told me to ask if these clothes were Dalton's, and he said Yes, and he asked how much he had to pay for them- he put his hand into his pocket and said, "Will 1l. 14s. pay it?"; the Magistrate made me take out the clothes again, and ask if he had paid for them, and told him if he could not pay it with money he must be tried.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor's wife and daughter lent me the clothes - I was not to pay for them, but I wanted to pay 14s. for my lodging for two days; he said he would have the money for a whole week - I left my tools and a jacket of my own at his house.

PROSECUTOR. Yes, they are there now.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-128

1206. THOMAS BAKER and JOHN ABBOT were

indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 iron boiler, value 12s. , the goods of Henry Fricker .

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . On the 25th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Church-street, Bethnal-green, and saw the two prisoners carrying this boiler; I asked what they were about - they said they brought it from Hackney, and then said they picked it up in Bishop Bonner's-field - I believe one of them said the other had employed him, but I do not know which; I took hold of Baker, and before the other officer could take Abbot he darted off - Baker said he was very glad he was taken, and he hoped he should get transported, he should have a home then; I saw Abbot afterwards and he made another escape - I took him at last on the 5th of May, by the side of the canal.

HENRY FRICKER. I am a patent colour manufacturer . The officer called on me - I looked and missed this boiler and another; I know this is mine.

JAMES GLIBBERY . I was with West; what he has stated is correct.

SAMUEL MAYNE POWELL . I assisted in taking Abbot.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

ABBOT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-129

1207. JOHN ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 63 yards of kerseymere, value 11l. , the goods of John Fryer, the elder .

JOHN FRYER, JUN . I am the son of John Fryer - he is a clothier and lives at Trowbridge. I carried some kerseymere to Mr. John Bailey , at Seven-dials, on the morning of the 17th of May. About two o'clock that day the prisoner came into a public-house, near Aldgate, where I was, and asked to look at some drab kerseymere - I showed him some, and told him it was 4s. a yard; he said he would not give more than 3s. 6d. - I said I had a piece at Mr. Bailey's, and asked if he would look at it- he said he did not mind; we went to a public-house near the Seven-dials; I went to Mr. Bailey's and fetched the kerseymere - he looked at it, and we agreed for him to have it at 3s. 6d. a yard; he then took a cheque out of his pocket - I looked at it and said I did not like it, and asked him if he would go with me to Mr. Bailey's; he said he would; I took the cheque, and asked him again to go to Mr. Bailey's - he said he had paid it in cash, and that was enough; I asked if I could get it cashed - he said it was too late that night; he drew the cheque in my presence; there were sixty-three yards of the kerseymere, and it came to 11l. 0d. 6d.; on Monday, the 19th, I took the cheque to the bankers, and they said there were no effects - I gave the same cheque to the officer; I left the kerseymere with the prisoner and Mr. Oxley at the public-house - I found the prisoner again on the Monday, in a court near Aldgate, in bed; I had got the direction where he lived from a public-house - this is the cheque.

This was a cheque on Messrs. Glyns for 11l. 6d. signed John Atkinson.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What time did you first see the prisoner? A. Between two and three o'clock - I was in the public-house when he came in; I knew Oxley before this - Carpenter, a friend of mine, was there; I do not know that he and Oxley were acquainted together; Oxley went to find him to buy the kerseymere - there was a good deal of bargaining between us; it was at my request that the prisoner went to look at the kerseymere - a bill was made and a receipt given for the money; Oxley made the bill at the prisoner's request - I did not say I was no scholar; Oxley had a ready reckoner in his pocket, and made the bill from that - it was about 10 o'clock at night; I do not know the sign of the public-house - I am told the prisoner is very respectably connected; Oxley is in Whitecross-street prison; I had no difficulty in finding Atkinson - he was tipsy; I do not know whether the cheque was filled up by Oxley's desire.

WILLIAM FIGGINS . I am a carpenter and joiner. On Monday week Fryer came to my house as I know his father; he told me what had happened, and I went and inquired for Atkinson - we found him in bed; I asked him him for the cloth - he said, "Every one of you out of my room, or I will blow your brains out;" he was then taken.

ALBION CARPENTER . I was at the public-house with the prisoner and Fryer - it is in White Lion-street, Sevendials ; Atkinson agreed to give us 3s. 6d. a yard for the kerseymere - we wanted 4s.; he took his pocket-book out and took out this cheque, and wrote part of it; we said, "It is of no use to write more, we don't like cheques" he said, "I always give cheques - I never carry money about with me;" we wanted him to go to Mr. Bailey's with us to see if the cheque was good, but when we got the cheque he declined going with us; we then went home to our lodgings - we are not in the habit of giving credit to strangers.

OWEN THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am clerk to Sir Richard Carr Glyn and Co. I know nothing of the prisoner, nor any person of his name.

WILLIAM WHITAKER . I am an officer. I found the kerseymere in pawn in St. Martin's-lane, in the name of Oxley.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly should not have been induced to purchase this, but through Mr. Oxley, who is their salesman; he stated that they had two cuds of kerseymere, which he thought would answer my purpose; I said I had no cash, but I knew he had a banker's bill for 20l., and asked if they would take that; he said they would not- I said, "Very likely they would take a bill of a month from me;" he said they would not; I said, "Very well, I can't become a customer;" this was before we left the Carthusian Arms public-house; we then went to the Yorkshire Grey public-house, near the Seven-dials, and I remained there while they went and fetched the kerseymere; the cheque was given, and the money would have been ready by twelve o'clock on the Monday, but I was ill; and they came like lions or tigers, and dragged me out of my bed; if I had acted according to my own feelings, I would have knocked the whole three of them down, but I went quietly to Guildhall with them.

COURT to FRYER. Q. Was Oxley your father's agent? A. Yes, he was so about six weeks ago.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-130

1208. SARAH COCKBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 sovereign , the money of Michael Forrest .

MICHAEL FORREST. I met the prisoner in Oxford-street , on the 1st of April; she asked me to give her a pint of beer - we went into a public-house, and ordered some beer; I took one penny out of my right-hand waistcoat pocket; I put it on the table, and said I had not halfpence enough to pay for the beer: the landlord said, "If you call for beer, I expect you to pay for it, or I will take it back again;" I then took out a sovereign, laid it on the table, and said,"Take for it;" the prisoner took up the sovereign, and was making off with it; I said, "What are you going to do with that sovereign?" she said, "I have seen no sovereign; I seized her, and pulled her down - she got up, and got out; I followed her, and pulled her down again; I took her into the house, and the officer came and took her.

THOMAS TEIRNEY . I was at the public-house with two friends; the prosecutor and prisoner came in - they sat in the next box to me, and called for a pint of porter; he put down a penny-piece; they stood some time, and the landlord was going to take the beer back; the prosecutor then put down a sovereign, and said, "Take the price of the beer out of that;" the prisoner took it up, and made towards the door; the prosecutor pursued her, and they had a scuffle outside the bar; she got up, and made into the street - he pursued her, and brought her back.

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I took the prisoner; I searched her, but found no sovereign on her; she said she had had the sovereign, but had not got it, nor would she tell me who had got it - it has not been found; the prosecutor seemed sober.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had met her in St. Giles', and taken her to a public-house, where he changed a half-sovereign to pay for some beer and rum, and got intoxicated; he then took her to another house; and because she would not remain with him, he charged her with this offence.

MICHAEL FORREST . I went to no other house, and did not change a half-sovereign.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-131

1209. JAMES CONNOLLY , RICHARD BRYAN , and JOHN KENNELLY were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 waistcoat, value 12s.; 1 pair of wooden shoes, value 3s.; 1 leather shoe, value 1s.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 5 keys, value 2s. , the goods of George Lipscomb .

GEORGE LIPSCOMB. I am a groom . On the 18th of April I missed these articles - they had been hanging upon a nail in the stable, in Moor-lane, St. Martin's-lane ; I missed them a few minutes before six o'clock in the morning - I had seen the hat, shoes, and keys the night before, between six and seven o'clock, and the waistcoat I believe was there, but I did not notice it - I knew the prisoners well.

JAMES WALLIS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a waistcoat pawned on the 17th of April, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, by a man or a boy, in the name of Daniel Halliday, No. 3, Peter-street.

WILLIAM LEMON . I produce a pair of wooden shoes, which I found on Bryan, at nine o'clock that morning; I found this hat at Kennelly's father's house - these keys I found at St. Martin's watch-house, and this duplicate was given to me by a boy.

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

CONNOLLY - NOT GUILTY .

KENNELLY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-132

1210. JOSEPH CHARLES WILCOX and PHILIP SAMUEL GORNALL were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 4 dwts. of gold, value 10s., the goods of John Grandin , their master .

WILCOX pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13.

GORNALL pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-133

1211. JOSEPH CHARLES WILCOX and PHILIP SAMUEL GORNALL were again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 cwt. of copper, value 10l., the goods of John Grandin , their master ; and JAMES WHITAKER was indicted for feloniously receiving the aforesaid goods, he well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

JOHN GRANDIN. I am a goldsmith , and live in Frith-street ; Wilcox and Gornall were in my employ. I was told I had lost some copper, and missed from 90 lbs. to 100 lbs. from a basket in my lower shop, to which the two boys had access - I have not seen it since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had these boys been in your employ? A. About twelve months; they were intrusted to carry gold to the flatting-mills; I thought Wilcox a very good boy, but had no thought of taking him an apprentice.

JOSEPH DAY . I manage the prosecutor's business. I was out on Tuesday morning, the 20th of May, and on my return one of the men told me a quantity of copper was gone; I looked, and missed 90 lbs. or better; Gornall was then out, but Wilcox was in the shop - he was sent out, and when Gornall returned I taxed him with it; he at first denied it, but afterwards confessed it; I told him he had better confess, as it was the only method to induce the prosecutor to be kind to him; when Wilcox returned I said the same to him, and they then said the copper had been sold to Whitaker, in Church-street; I went there, but there was no copper there - Whitaker acknowledged he had bought copper of them to the amount of 20 lbs. or better, but said he had sold it to a person who came round to purchase metal of him, and he was not acquainted with the name or residence of that person.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know, except from the boys, that there was any copper lost? A. From what the man told me.

WILLIAM BALL . I took Gornall in Lazarus' shop, Broad-street, St. Giles'; I went to Whitaker's, and asked him if he knew these boys; he said Yes; I said, "I believe you have had some dealings with them - you have bought copper of them;" he said he had: I asked if he had any on the premises; he said No, it was taken by a man who was a collector, and he never kept any on the premises.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-134

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1212. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 1 candlestick, value 5s. , the goods of James Flintoft and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to James Flintoft only.

ABSALOM MATTHEWS . I am door-keeper of Hind-street chapel, Manchester-square . I saw the prisoner there on the evening of the 6th of May; about twenty minutes before seven o'clock, I heard a noise on that side of the chapel - I went there, and saw the candlestick was gone; the prisoner had his hand behind him, and appeared in agitation - I shut the door, and sent for a constable; he was taken, and the candlestick was found under his coat; he was quite a stranger.

JAMES FLINTOFT. I am one of the Trustees of the chapel ; the property is under my care, as steward - this is one of the candlesticks belonging to the chapel.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-135

1213. JOHN ADAMS and MARIA, HIS WIFE , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 4 caps, value 18d.; 2 bed-gowns, value 18d.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 1 gown, value 7s.; 1 pair of boots, value 9s.; 1 shawl, value 1s., and 1 work-bag, value 1s. , the goods of William Charge .

SUSANNAH CHARGE . I am the wife of William Charge, a labourer , who lives at Millbank. About the end of March I lost all these articles, in a bundle, from the Ship public-house, in the Vauxhall-road ; I came out of the country, and was waiting there for my husband: I had occasion to go into the yard, and left the bundle in the tap-room - I came in in five minutes, and it was gone; I did not see either of the prisoners there; I had left an umbrella with them, but that was safe. I met the female prisoner with my gown on on the 17th of May; she had my boots on her feet; I followed her, and told her the gown was mine - she said it was not; I said it was - that I bought it and made it myself: it was rather too small, and there was a little tear on each shoulder.

MARY MUIRE . I live next door to the prisoner. On the 17th of May, just before twelve o'clock, I saw the male prisoner go out with a bundle; I do not know what was in it.

WILLIAM LEES . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 17th of May, at eleven o'clock, the prosecutrix came to me, and said she had met a woman with her gown on her back; I went to her room, and found this gown on her back, and these boots on her feet; the prosecutrix owned the gown, and said she had every reason to believe the boots were hers; the prisoner said they were the boots that came in the bundle, and she bought them of a person named Jones, and was to pay 5s. for it, but never had paid it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-136

1214. RICHARD BUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 1 plane, value 4d.; 4 hammers, value 1s.; 1 spoke-shave, value 6d.; 1 trowel, value 6d.; 1 key-hole saw, value 4d.; 4 chisels, value 1s.; 1 pair of pinchers, value 3d.; 4 gimblets, value 4d.; 5 awls, value 5d.; 4 files, value 2d., and 1 chopper, value 4d. , the goods of Thomas Hems .

JAMES MIDDLETON . I live in White's-gardens, Bethnal-green-road. On the 30th of April, at half-past five o'clock in the morning, I received some information from my wife, and saw the prisoner carrying these things in a basket, on his shoulder; I followed him about one hundred yards - he dropped them, and ran away; I took them to my house; I knew the prisoner well - his father lives next door to me.

THOMAS COOPER . I am an officer. I produce the property, and took the prisoner.

THOMAS HEMS. I am a carpenter . These tools are mine; I left them in a locker of an unfinished house, and saw them safe at ten o'clock the night before they were taken: I know the prisoner as a neighbour; his father is an elder in the India-house.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-137

1215. MARY CHESTER , CATHERINE MACK , and MARY SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 4 shawls, value 38s., and 7 handkerchiefs, value 23s., the goods of Joseph Atettee , from his person .

JOSEPH ATETTE (through an interpreter). I am a Frenchman. I have been five months in England: I go about selling handkerchiefs and shawls . On the 6th or 7th of May I was in some street; I do not know the name of it: a woman, who is not here, spoke to me; I went to a house and sold her a shawl for 11s.; I did not see either of these women.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I met the prosecutor in Wentworth-street , with a little girl - she spoke to me, and I went to several houses, and found Chester, whom the prosecutor pointed out, but nothing was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-138

1216. MARY EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 21 yards of huckaback, value 20s. , the goods of John Morgan .

MARY MORGAN . I am the wife of John Morgan - he keeps an eating-house in Panton-street . On Saturday last a gentleman who dined at our house, told me he saw a person go up stairs and come down again; I sent my servant out after the prisoner, and she brought her back with this piece of huckaback, which had been in my second floor room.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a shopman to Messrs. Sewell and Cross. I sold this piece of huckaback to Mr. Morgan on the 15th of May; I know it perfectly well - it has our private mark on it.

MARIA RAYSON . I am servant to Mrs. Morgan. I went after the prisoner; she was about three doors off: I brought her back and saw this piece of huckaback under her shawl - I asked where she had been; she said to inquire for a person.

FREDERICK BLACKWELL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and produce the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she was intoxicated, and perfectly ignorant of what had occurred.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-139

1217. ELEANOR DALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 6 lbs. weight of bacon, value 4s. , the goods of Michael Bowles and James Marks .

JAMES MARKS. I am in partnership with Michael

Bowles, of Brewer-street, St. Pancras . On the 3d of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into our shop while I was at our stall-board; I have seen her before - she went and took up a piece of bacon, and came out with it under her cloak; I went and took her; she dropped it on my toes, and said, "I have not got your bacon;" I took it up.

RICHARD COOPER . I took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I offered to pay for it - I did not intend to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor. - Confined 6 Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280529-140

1218. JOHN WILLIAM CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 1 truck, value 50s. , the goods of William Holman .

WILLIAM HOLMAN. I am a baker , and live in Tower-street; the prisoner works at the water-side - I have seen him before. On Thursday, the 10th of April, I lent him my truck, which he said he wanted to hire; I rather objected to it, but I let him have it - he said it was for an hour or two, and he was to pay me 3d. an hour for it; he said I had lent him a truck before, but I have no recollection of it; I let it about four o'clock in the afternoon, and expected it back the same evening; I never saw him again till he was apprehended on the following Monday; he said he had left it at the door of some public-house, and it was stolen while he was drinking; we afterwards found he had sold it.

THOMAS REES . I sell poultry about the street. I bought a truck of the prisoner on the 10th of April, to the best of my knowledge; I think it was on a Thursday evening, but I had met him before that in Cannon-street-road; he came up to me, and said, "Rees, I have got an old truck I will sell you," and on the Thursday he brought it to me, and I bought it of him - he asked 1l. for it, and I gave him 13s.; I never bought a truck before, but I have bought carts; I bought it in an open fair way, and kept it in the street; I afterwards met the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, and he said to me, "Rees, have you made away with the truck;" I said, "I don't sell turkies;" he said, "No, the truck;" I said, "What do you mean? I bought it of you, and have the receipt for it which you wrote at my house;" he said, "I was pulled up at Lambeth-street for it;" I said I bought it fairly. I serve shops with poultry - my name is on my door, and has been so for these thirty years.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. I found the truck at this witness' house; he came to fetch me to take it - this is the receipt (read.)

Prisoner. He gave me 14s. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-141

1219. NATHAN PROSSER was indicted for bigamy .

DINAH BLAIR. My husband is a shoemaker; we live in Snow's-fields. The prisoner is my brother. I was present when he was married twelve or thirteen years ago; I was brides-maid; it was at some church in London-wall - I do not know what: I saw them married, but I cannot say whether I signed the register. His wife's name was Maria Marshall ; they lived together as man and wife afterwards, and had three or four children; the prisoner is something of a writer in the docks - his wife had lived with her father, who was employed in the docks.

THOMAS SHILAWELL . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I have the certificates of the first and second marriages - this is the certificate of the first marriage. I compared it with the original register, which was produced at our office by the Reverend Mr. Mathias, the rector of Whitechapel; I received this copy from Jane Ireland, and was desired to keep it.

JANE IRELAND . I gave these two copies of marriage registers to the witness. I got this first from St. Alphage, London-wall, from the Reverend Mr. Watts, and the second at Shoreditch; I examined them both with the original books.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did anybody go with you? A. Yes, my mother; I saw the book, and heard it read - I saw Mr. Watts sign this, and so did my mother.

COURT. Q. Did you look at the original book at all? A. Yes, and this is a copy of it; I read the book - it appeared to me a true copy.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you do when you got to St. Alphage? A. I asked Mr. Watts if there had been such a marriage; he searched the book, and found it. I asked him to let me have the certificate - he said not under a five shilling stamp; I then asked him for a copy of it, and he gave it me, and told my mother to step up, and he witness to his hand-writing; I then went to Lambeth-street, and the book was taken there.

COURT. Q. Did you read the book? A. Yes, and saw the minister sign the certificate - it agreed with the book. I was married to the prisoner on the 27th of February, 1825 , at Shoreditch church ; I had known him about six months - he represented himself as a widower. We lived together till June 1826; he then turned me and the baby out, and put a distress warrant into his own house.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What were you? A. Housemaid at Mr. Sharp's, where I had lived for two years. I had no property; I never left him - he deserted me; I was obliged to pawn the linen to live upon.

Q. On your oath did you not, in the first year, dispose of everything but the bedstead, bureau, and two blankets? A. I did not. He gave his mother two room's-full of furniture; he allowed me one pound a week for about nine months, and I had him, his niece, daughter, and mother to keep out of that. I knew his mother before; he had a child by his first wife, and one by me, which is seven months old.

MARTHA IRELAND . I went with my daughter to get the copy of the certificate at St. Alphage, London-wall; I cannot read - but my daughter can, and she read it.

DINAH BLAIR. They were married in London-wall, and he was regularly married.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know what year it was? A. No, nor the clergyman's name.

SARAH MARCHANT . The prisoner's first wife is my aunt; I saw her alive on the 13th of April last, at my house.

Cross-examined. Q. Where do you live? A. In Upper Chapman-street; I am a widow, and am a strawbonnet maker

Prisoner's Defence. She knew I was married at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-142

1220. CHARLES BINGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 cloak, value 1l. the goods of John Reeve .

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am an officer. I met the prisoner with this bundle on the 16th of May; I followed him to Ironmonger-row, St. Lukes - I asked what he had got; he said if I went a few doors farther he would show me - he went on to a passage, where there was a woman, and he called out to her by name "Is not this yours;" I cautioned her not to say that it was, if she did not know it- she said "My God no, Charles what have you been doing?" I went into the room, opened the bundle, and found the cloak - he sent me to one place with it, but it was not right - I then found the owner.

JOHN REEVE. I live on Snow-hill. This cloak was taken from my stable in Aldersgate-street - I had left it there.

SAMUEL PATRICK . I am an ostler. I left this cloak at Mr. Reeve's stables; I saw it safe about half-past ten o'clock on the 16th of April, and missed it about three o'clock; I have seen the prisoner in the yard - he came to speak to one of the grooms.

Prisoner. He has reason to know me: he has more right to be here than I have - I was going down the yard, and met a person I had some knowledge of; he asked me to carry the cloak for him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-143

1221. ELIZABETH MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 pair of pantaloons, value 1s.; 1 coat, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 frock, value 1d.; 2 petticoats, value 6d.; 1 pair of stays, value 2s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d., and part of a cheese, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Cotton .

SARAH COTTON . I am the wife of Richard Cotton, a shoe-maker ; we live in Hartshorn-court, Golden-lane . At half-past nine o'clock at night, on the 29th of April, I was going to my bed-room up one pair of stairs; the bedroom was open, and the cream cheese which had been near the door, was gone - I called my husband; he went down and sat down; but I went up again and called to Mr. Underwood, my lodger; they were in bed, but he came down and knocked against the prisoner; he said, Halloo! and brought her down; she had been on the second pair of stairs; I knew her by living in the court - but she had no right in my house; all the property stated was wrapped up in a parcel together, and was on the second staircase; it had been in my bed-room before - I had seen it all safe at half-past eight o'clock.

RICHARD COTTON. My wife called me, and I saw the room as she has stated; my lodger found the prisoner on the stairs, and this property was tied up in a bundle.

EDWARD UNDERWOOD . I lodge in this house. I was called, and came down, and found the prisoner on the second pair of stairs, and this bundle by her side; I brought her down, and the officer was sent for - she did not say anything; there are no lodgers in the house but me and my wife.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl, and had been out of a lodging for a week; the door was open - I went up, and fell asleep - the man came down, kicked against me, and awoke me; they had been by me twice.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-144

1222. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 17s. , the goods of Edmund Beasley .

EDMUND BEASLEY. I am a linen-draper , and live in Great Chapel-street, Westminster . On Tuesday last, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was brought into the shop with this piece of print, which had hung over an iron-rail, inside the door-post.

GEORGE BARBER . I keep a ready-made clothes warehouse. About seven o'clock on Tuesday evening I was next door but one to Beasley's house, and saw the prisoner reach up his arm, and take this cotton - he rolled it up, and ran down the street; I pursued and took him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-145

1223. MICHAEL MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 3 bridles, value 12s.; 1 martingale, value 1s.; 1 pair of stirrup-irons, value 18d., and 1 key, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN. I am a nurseryman , and live in the Hampstead-road . I lost these things from my chaise-house, adjoining my stable; I saw them safe on the 15th of April - the stable was locked, and the key in it; it opens into a yard, which opens into my nursery-ground - I missed these things at six o'clock in the evening of the 16th, and saw them in about a fortnight afterwards; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in Highgate, on the 16th of April; I was sent for to the Crown public-house, about six o'clock in the evening - I found him in the tap-room with a bag by his side, and this property in it.

SAMUEL COLLINS . I saw the prisoner on the 16th of April; he came into the back premises of Mr. Hughes of Highgate with a bag, and took some of our property; I took him to the tap-room of the Old Crown public-house, and sent for the officer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-146

1224. HENRY MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , 80 lbs. weight of lead, value 15s , the goods of Edward Latter .

ROBERT RAWNSLEY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner at half-past twelve o'clock at night in Grafton-

street, Tottenham-court-road, with this lead on his right shoulder; I asked where he got it - he said from St. Paul's Church-yard; I said he had a very heavy load; he said Yes, and he was going to Mr. Redpaths; I said he must go to the watch-house - he stopped a minute, and there was another watchman coming up; he threw the lead against my legs and ran away; I pursued him - he knocked a man down in Tottenham-court-road; I pursued him close and took him; I found where the lead came from; it had been left in the New Inn, Tottenhamcourt-road.

EDWARD LATTER. I am a plumber and live at Brixton. I bought this lead on the 13th of May at Mr. Garland's, in Tottenham-court-road; I was carrying it away on the day in question, in a cart, and it broke down opposite the New Inn , about five o'clock in the evening - I left it at the New Inn, and when I came the next morning it was gone.

WILLIAM GRUBB . I keep the New Inn. The prosecutor left some lead with me on the Tuesday afternoon; I saw it safe on the Wednesday - there were 81 lbs. weight of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking the whole of the afternoon at the New Inn, and became quite intoxicated, and was obliged to lie down upon one of the benches, where I feel asleep; I did not leave the house till I was put out by the landlord at half-past eleven o'clock - I was proceeding along Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-spuare, when a stranger asked me to help him up with a load which he had; he said that he had carried it all the way from St. Pauls, and if I would carry it the remainder of the way he would give me sixpence - as the person to whom he said he was going lived near, and was well-known to me, I consented, and had but just taken it up, when a watchman came up to us, and the stranger immediately ran away; seeing him run I suspected something wrong, and, ran away too, when I was pursued by the watchman, and taken into custody.

WILLIAM GRUBB. He had been at my house all the afternoon. The lead was in a small yard which parts the kitchen from a room; I knew him before; he was there almost every day; I cannot say whether I turned him out that night or no - If I had turned him out with the lead on his shoulder I must have seen it; I have frequently turned him out at the closing hour at night: the lead was in my custody to take care of; I shut up at half-past eleven o'clock precisely - there might be thirty or forty turned out that night.

COURT to ROBERT RAWNSLEY. Q. Are you sure it was half-past twelve when you saw him? A. Yes; I was calling the half-hour; it was about two hundred yards from the New Inn.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-147

1225. JOSEPH GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Day .

THOMAS DAY. I am a shoe-maker , and live in Swan-street, Shoreditch . The prisoner worked with me as journeyman , and lodged with me on the 21st of May; I missed my trousers from a box in my bed-room - I never gave him permission to pawn any of my things.

AMBROSE BRADLEY . I am a pawnborker, and live in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields. These trousers were pawned by the prisoner on the 21st of May for 2s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor - Confined 7 Days .

Reference Number: t18280529-148

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, MAY 31.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1226. SAMUEL MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 watch-chain, value 5s.; 2 seals, value 2s.; 2 watch-keys, value 2s.; 2 spoons, value 7s., and 1 sixpence , the property of William Fry .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-149

1227. JOHN BOND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 3 dead fowls, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Reynolds .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM AVERY . I am a gardener. I was employed to watch a stable by Mr. Charles Reynolds' foreman - there was a mare and a foal there; it required my attention the whole of the night of the 10th of May; I went out that night about a quarter-past twelve o'clock - I know the time, because I heard the clock strike; I saw John Bond at the hen-house door - I was within five yards of him; I had known him for a year and a half before - I could not be mistaken in his person; he had a white hen in his hand- I saw him throw the hen down, with two more, at the door; the door was put too, locked, and the key taken out; I said, "John, is that you?" he went round the yard; I met him again, and said, "John, I see it is you - you have no occasion to run; Mr. Reynolds is coming;" he got out at the gate, and shut it against me; Reynolds came in at another gate, and I met him; I told him what I had seen, and I stopped at the place to watch; I found three fowls at the hen-house door, quite warm, recently killed; Reynolds went with me to the hen-house door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why did you not seize him? A. Because I knew him, and he ran away - I told the Magistrate that I knew him by his face and dress too.

MR. BARRY. Q. Had you a lantern? A. Yes, and used it; I am certain it was him; I told master who it was directly I met him at the wicket gate.

CHARLES REYNOLDS. I am a farmer , and live at Staines . Avery was employed on the night of the 10th at my stable. where I had a mare and a foal; I was out that night, and returned about a quarter past twelve o'clock, as near as I can tell; I have known the prisoner for years; as I approached my premises, I heard my farm gate slam too - I approached the gate, and heard Avery say, "John, you may run - I know you," and he was approaching towards me with his light; I said, "Who went out at the gate?" he said, "A man;" I said, "Do you know him?" he said"I do;" I do not know that he told me who it was, and I do not know that I asked him; he took me to the hen-

house, and I saw three fowls lying dead, they were warm, and the necks bloody. On the Sunday I was out, and I believe on Monday the prisoner was taken - he lives within three hundred yards of me; he got to his own house in two or three minutes, I have no doubt, from my gate.

Cross-examined. Q. When did Avery tell you who it was? A. On the Sunday morning, at breakfast time; he called out, "John Bond, don't run," that night, to the best of my judgement - I think he said Bond; I am not certain about it: I did not ask who he meant; I was out on Sunday, and could not go after him. I thought Avery was talking to himself.

Q. Do you mean to say he was talking to himself? A. I suppose he was - I judge so; the constable who took him is not here; it was rather a dark night.

COURT. You said before the Magistrate, that Avery said it was a man whom he knew, and told you that it was John Bond.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-150

1228. ELLEN FRASER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 muslin collar, value 6s.; 6 pairs of gloves, value 6s.; 5 shawls, value 5l.; 1 yard of silk, value 4s.; 20 yards of cotton, value 30s.; 9 yards of stuff, value 12s., and 5 yards of calico, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Bates , her master .

THOMAS BATES. I am a linen-draper , and live in Mary-le-bone . The prisoner had been a year and two months in my service; I did not miss any particular article - she was under warning to quit on the 12th of May, and on that day I went into her bed-room; I saw a box which she brought when she came into my service - it was unlocked; I opened it, and found a muslin collar; I went down stairs and called her into the dining room - I asked if any of my young men had sold it her, if any one had given it her, or how she came by it; she denied having it; I then said I would search all the boxes- I went up to her box and found the collar; I found six pairs of gloves, and several other articles which I have not mentioned; we then had information that a box had been removed during some alterations - I spoke to her, and she said there had been an old box removed, but there was nothing in it; I found the box at Mr. Gribble's house, with some shawls, prints and other things in it of mine, with my mark on them - the prisoner was then in custody; the value of all the things is 9l. or 10l.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you go into her bed-room in consequence of some suspicion? A. Yes - I had a brother living with me some time before; I have since heard she has miscarried, in consequence of a connexion in my premises - I never went into her bed-room, except once, when she was ill, out of humanity; my brother lived in the house for two or three weeks while she was there; he did not often come to my house, for we had a dispute - it was nothing about her; she said she took the gloves from my dining-room, and the collar from my parlour, not that my brother gave them to her.

MARY AVIS . I am the wife of Thomas Avis - we live in Barlow-street; I am a mantua-maker. On the 12th of May the prisoner brought two dresses for me to make, and a silk shawl and several other articles for me to look at, which she said she had been buying; she left them, saying she was going on an errand, and on her return she would call for them; she did not call; I went to Mr. Bates and asked if she was in trouble - they said Yes; I brought Mr. Bates and the officer to my room, and gave them the things.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he did not come to you till you went there? A. No.

JANE GRIBBLE . I am the wife of James Gribble ; he is a sawyer. The prisoner came and asked me if I knew any one who took in lodgers; she said she was going to leave her situation, and should like to have a week or a few days before she went to another - she said she had taken away a box, and did not like it to go back again, and she brought it to my house; she went, and ordered a trunk, which was to come to my house, and she left me the money to pay for it - when it came she emptied the things out of the old box, and put them into the new one; there were some clean things of her own but nothing of Mr. Bates'. I never saw her bring any other articles there. I heard of her being taken up, and went and told Mr. Bates that I had a box, but I did not see her bring anything to put into it.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known her? A. Ever since she lived with Mr. Bates - she has brought things to wash for me.

ELIZABETH GRIBBLE . I am daughter of Jane Gribble. The prisoner came one day when my mother was out with some things in her lap - I did not see what she did with them; I went and took my brother to school; when I returned she was locking her box, and the bundle was gone; the old box came to our house first, and the new one on the Saturday - she told my mother that she had ordered a new box, and to pay 8s. for it; I saw her take the books and things out of the old box to put into the new one; there was a key to the new box and she had it; Mr. Bates and the officer came and took it away.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. I took this box from Gribbles' lodging; it was locked, and I have kept this key which was found in the prisoner's room; this parcel I found at Avis', and this in her room at Mr. Bates'.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-151

1129. JAMES HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 55 books, value 10l., the goods of Peter Wright , his master ; and MARK NORDEN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

PETER WRIGHT. I am a bookseller , and live in High-street, St. Giles's ; Holmes was in my service. In consequence of suspicion I went to Norden's shop, in Longacre, on the 9th of May - I found a great number of books there; he was not at home; I desired that he might be sent to me when he came home, and in about an hour and a half or two hours he came - I told him I had seen a number of books on his shelves which belonged to me; he said he knew the man very well whom he bought them of; that he was a very respectable man, and he could produce him at any time; he said he had seen him within an hour - I had some conversation with him, and pointed

out Holmes to him, and asked if that was the person who sold them to him; he said No, he was not - he knew the person he bought them of, that he bought them for a fair price, and had given money for them; I asked, "How many sets of the Miseries of Human Life do you calculate you have had?" - he said he supposed about eighteen copies; I said, "Are you sure you have not had twenty? because in my warehouse they are all tied up in ten, twenty, or thirty" - he said, "I might have had twenty;" I asked what he gave, but he would not tell me - he said he gave a fair price, and bought them of a man whom he undertook to produce; he then went home, and in about two hours a person came and asked for a book, which I thought I could lay my hand on in a moment; I went and could not find it; I then called Holmes, and said,"Jem, where are the Conversations on Chemistry?" he said he had seen them very lately in that place - I said,"I am very sorry to accuse you, but I think you have been robbing me;" I continued to press him on his being so cruel - "Me, Sir, (said he) I have too good a place to rob you;" I spoke to him some time, and told him it would be better to confess.

Q. Had the book been found before? A. Yes; he said he had employed another person to go with them; and he stood at Mr. Norden's door, while the other went in and sold them - I saw Norden the same evening in custody; I told him what the boy had stated; he said he had bought twenty copies of the Miseries, and said he would bring the person he had bought them of, but he has not brought him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you known Holmes? A. Two years, and placed unbounded confidence in him; I have trusted him with 100l. and found him just and true - I went to Norden again in the evening, and took him in his own shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is Norden's an open shop? A. Yes; the books lie in front for sale; it is common for people to send books round for sale when they are overstocked; I believe every bookseller has done it; we change them for books or money; the Miseries of Human Life was published twenty years ago; my son has no interest in the books - when I first went to Norden's I saw his wife; I told her the books were mine; I went again in the evening; he and the books still remained there - I think he said the man he bought them of kept a shop in Long-acre; books are often bought at sales and distributed through the trade; he did not mention the man's name; I offered a reward for the apprehension of a man in consequence of what Holmes told me; there were marks in the books, but they are rubbed off; the Miseries of Human Life were in quires at my house, but are now in boards; he was offering them at 6s.; I never sold them under 9s. 6d.; they were published at 14s.; here are several which I can swear to.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am the prosecutor's son-in-law. On the 9th of May I went to Norden's after my father; I found these books there, and several others, which I did not bring away; when Norden was at my father's I heard what passed; I went with the officer to his shop, and brought him away and the books.

JOHN POINTER . I am a bookseller. I purchased a copy of the Miseries of Human Life of Norden for 7s. five or six weeks ago; he came to me in about a fortnight and said he had six copies he would sell me for 6s. a copy; they were bound, and I bought this one copy of him; they are the same edition.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You are Mr. Wright's son-in-law? A. Yes; I suppose Norden knew me by sight as I did him; he did not ask what my father charged for them; I told him I could not get them at Wright's for less than 9s.; I believe half of the booksellers would be glad to sell off at a third of the publishing price.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I went to Norden's, and brought the books away.

WILLIAM PRICE . I apprehended Holmes; I found a key on him, which opened a box at his lodging, in which I found some books.

The prisoner Norden handed in a long written Defence, stating that he had purchased several books of a man who gave his name as Watson, of Vere-street, and represented himself as an Agent; that he had always acted openly, and as books were now selling at a great sacrifice he did not suspect anything from the price - that he had acted incautiously, but not criminally.

JUDITH SIMONS . I was at Norden's shop when a man came with a brown paper parcel, and offered the Miseries of Human Life for sale; Norden said, "If you will take half books and half money, I will give you 3l. for the lot;" I do not know how many there were, but think I heard something about 5s. or 6s. a copy; he asked if he was in the trade; he said Yes, and was selling them on commission for a bookseller - he looked a respectable man and had the appearance of a bookseller; Norden gave him 30s. and he selected books himself; there was no concealment.

COURT. Q. Did he mention his name? A. Yes; but I do not recollect it; he said he lived in Vere-street, Claremarket.

- CLARK . I am an extensive second-hand bookseller, in Paternoster-row. The publishing price of books is no criterion at all now. for some works; the Miseries of Human Life are published at 10s. 6d.; I would not give 3s. 6d. a copy for it, it is not a saleable work. I had an order for a copy and bought it for 6s. in Holborn - I know Norden, but have not dealt much with him, he sells too dear; he goes by the name of the honest Jew in the trade.

- BUMPUS . I am a bookseller, and have an extensive connexion; I occasionally value stocks of books. I should value the two volumes of Miseries of Human Life at 4s. 7d., but at some places they have a good sale; I bought several hundred copies of the first volume at 1s. each, at a sale, when it was first published; I should think 6s. too much for a man to give.

- BRYANT . I am a bookseller, and live in Wardour-street. I value the Miseries of Human Life at 2s. 6d. or 3s. a book, in boards; the prisoner deals largely in books.

- TOMKINS . I am a bookbinder. I have known Norden five or six years, and sold him a great many books- I deal in second-hand books, and have sold him a great many at less than the publishing price; I sold him several of this edition of the Miseries of Human Life; I kept a

book shop for seven years in White Horse-yard - when I left business he bought my stock, and gave me nearly 100l. for it.

COURT. Q. Did you sell him copies of the Miseries of Human Life? A. I believe I did, as he bought my stock - I have sold a superior edition to this at 7s.

HOLMES - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

NORDEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-152

1230. MARY ANN MATHER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 Bible, value 4s.; 2 frocks, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 2s., and 1 flat-iron, value 6d. , the goods of Mary Yeomans .

MARY YEOMANS. The prisoner came to lodge at my house in Maidenhead-court, Shadwell , the beginning of May; I missed the articles stated - these are them; I accused her of taking them - she said she knew nothing about them.

GEORGE HOBSON . I bought this Bible of the prisoner on Saturday, the 10th of May, for 2s.

HENRY GARDNER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a shawl, pawned by the prisoner, on the 10th of May.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a frock and petticoat, pawned with me on the 8th of May, by a woman, in the name of Ann Mather.

JOHN RALPH LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a frock and handkerchief, pawned by some woman; I cannot say who.

THOMAS SIZER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a flat-iron, pawned by some woman, in the name of Ann Thomas.

GEORGE DEVERELL . I am a beadle. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 11th of May; I asked her where the duplicates were; she denied having any, and endeavoured to put them into her bosom; I took hold of her, and found found seven duplicates of these things.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-153

1231. THOMAS MATHER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 9d., and 1 cap, value 6d. , the goods of Charlotte Thorp .

CHARLOTTE THORP. I am single . I lost a cap, two aprons, and a shift, in January last, from a line; I saw them safe at six o'clock in the evening, and missed them at six in the morning; the prisoner used to go by the house every evening.

JOSEPH SAWYER . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner on the 16th of April, at his house, which is the horse-patrol station, near Cranford; I found these articles in his house; he said they belonged to his wife, and were marked in her maiden name, which was Charlotte Thompson; I know her name is Charlotte.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he did not know how the linen came to his house, but seeing it there he concluded it to be his wife's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-154

1232. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 1 pair of trousers, value 16s. , the goods of Henry Abrahams .

HENRY ABRAHAMS. I am a salesman , and live in Newcastle-street, Strand . Between the 26th of August and the 1st or 2d of September, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for a pair of trousers; I showed him thirty or forty pairs - none of which he approved of; he said, "I want a very good pair;" I went and borrowed some; he said they would not do; he at last left me a shilling earnest on a pair which he had looked at at first, and went away; the moment he was gone I missed a pair which I had borrowed; there was no other person in the shop, and no customer for two or three hours.

Prisoner. He said his two sons were there, and he brought up his son to identify me. Witness. My sons were in and out - I did bring one of my sons to identify him.

COURT. Q. Then I take it for granted, you had some doubts about the man? A. None in the least; I said my son was in the shop, passing and repassing; but I am certain he was the man; I know it was about that time, because in July I sent for my son from America, and in August he arrived, and was at home; I had never seen the prisoner before.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I took the prisoner - I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 13th of August I was taken up for an assault, and went out by proclamation; I was then detained for another assault, and had six weeks in the House of Correction. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-155

1233. WILLIAM WATTS was again indicted for stealing, 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Daniel Angel .

DANIEL ANGEL. I am a tailor and salesman . The prisoner came to my shop on Christmas-eve last , and inquired for a new pair of trousers; I said I had none by me - he told me to go and get a pair, and get a shilling in the way of trade; I went and borrowed some in the Strand; when I brought them he said he would rather have a second-hand pair; I put them away, and showed him a second-hand pair; he bargained for a pair of them. and threw down 2s. 6d., as a deposit; I told him to put his name or some private mark on them; he smiled, and said, "I am only going across the road, and will call again;" he seemed to go rather hastily, and the first glance I gave at the shelf I missed a pair of trousers - I ran after him, but lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever see him before? A. No. I was fetched to Bow-street, and recognised him immediately; he had the same dress on as he had at the time - he stood at the door while I went to borrow them; my wife was in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-156

1234. ARTHUR STEDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 1 umbrella, value 4s. , the goods of Francis Moore .

EDWARD WILSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Francis Moore, an umbrella-maker , of St. Martin's-court . I missed an umbrella from the door on the 3d of May; I did not see it taken - it hung just at the door; a person passing by could take it - it was tied with a string; a woman told us it was gone: I went out, and found it on

the prisoner, who was at the farther end of the court - he said he found it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner with the umbrella, and took it from under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in St. Martin's-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-157

1235. FELIX SLEVIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 shawl, value 7s. , goods of Eliza Francis , widow .

ELIZA FRANCIS. I am a widow. On the 29th of April the prisoner was my lodger; I had seen the shawl in the closet a few hours before it was missed - I found it at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES MOODY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl, pawned by the prisoner, on the 29th of April.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known him before? A. No; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - the shutters were closed, but there was plenty of light from the gas.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I was fetched by a person named Hill, and took the prisoner in Arthur-street; I brought him to the Turk's Head public-house, and there he saw the prosecutrix; he at first denied knowing her, but afterwards he told me if I would let him go he would give me a guinea and redeem the shawl.

ELIZA FRANCIS. I know the shawl, for it has never been out of the paper - it is new; I have no mark on it, but the corner of the paper is torn off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-158

1236. WILLIAM SMITH and JOHN JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 set of chaise-harness, value 5l.; 2 pairs of traces, value 12s., and 3 hames, value 8s. , the goods of John Vickery Broughton .

WILLIAM ARNOLD . I live at Harlesdon-green, on the Harrow-road; I work for Mr. Pipe, a farmer. About nine o'clock, on the 13th of April, I was making a hedge- I went to work after breakfast, and saw the two prisoners on the dung-hill; I did not know them before, but they are the men; I went nearly close to them, and saw each of them take a basket on his shoulder, and go away; I had left my tools there, and I thought they had taken them - but they had taken the harness out of a hole there; my master came across the field, and told me to go after them; I did not, but they came back soon after, and with the same two baskets; my master then told me to follow them, and he would come on a horse; I went after them- I lost sight of Smith, basket and all, but I took Johnson, and found in his basket two pairs and a half of hames, a collar, and two pairs of traces; my master asked where he got it; he said the other man gave him half-a-crown to help him; we took him to the Plough public-house at Kensall-green, and there the harness was owned by Mr. Broughton.

HENRY CROOT . I am servant to Mr. John Vickery Broughton; this is his harness; I saw it safely locked up in the stables at one o'clock on Sunday morning; I missed it at seven o'clock; the lock of the stable was broken off, and the horses were loose; the harness was brought to the public-house.

WILLIAM PIPE . Arnold is in my service; I pursued the two prisoners; I saw Smith turn out of the road, and I pursued him - he threw down this basket in a field by the side of the towing-path; we took both baskets and both men - Johnson did not run, but Smith did.

JAMES HABGOOD . I am a milkman, and live at Kensall-green. I was called to assist, and found the prisoners in custody.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoners, and produce the property.

The prisoners jointly put in a written defence, stating that they had gone to the dung-hill on Sunday for worms to angle with, and found the harness, which they agreed to fetch on the Monday, and dispose of.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 40.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-159

1237. MARY ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 1 bed, value 15s.; 1 counterpane, value 8s.; 2 blankets, value 4s.; 1 bolster, value 4s., 1 candlestick, value 1s.; 2 pillows, value 2s.; 1 tray, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 chair, value 5s., and 1 teapot, value 1s. , the goods of James Coldridge .

JAMES COLDRIDGE. I let a lodging to the prisoner in October last; she remained twenty-eight weeks, and owed me 7l. 7s. for rent - I put an execution into the room, and then missed these articles.

FRANCIS PARKER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pillow pawned by the prisoner on the 6th of November, and a candlestick on the 4th of December.

MARY ANN WHITE . I bought this tea-pot of the prisoner in December last.

JOHN BUTTON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pillow, two sheets, and a tea-tray - I cannot say who pawned them.

WILLIAM CRUSH . I am a pawnbroker; I have a counterpane pawned by the prisoner on the 5th of November, and two blankets in October.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; she gave up these duplicates on the second examination.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor's wife knew of the first article I pawned; she allowed me to take the sheets to pawn, and she had a pair of boots out of the money - I have never pawned an article but she has known of it; she desired me not to pawn them in her name - she lent me a large hand-basket to take out the flock of the bed, and I sold it for 1/2d. a pound; I was in arrears with her, and I wished to oblige her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-160

1238. JOHN PATTERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 1 saw, value 6s., the goods of Andrew Dodds , and 1 saw, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Hallett .

ANDREW DODDS. On the 30th of April I was at work at a new house in Cumberland-market, Regent's-park . I left my saw in the upper room while I went down in the kitchen to dine; a young man called me in in about half an hour, and said a stranger was gone out of the

building - I ran up stairs and missed two saws; I went out and found the prisoner in custody with them.

THOMAS HALLETT. I worked at this house, and left my saw while I went to dine; I was returning about a quarter before one o'clock - I saw Anstey about the building; in a few minutes I saw him run, and cry, Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running and buttoning up his coat - he was stopped, and I saw my partner's saw taken from him, and mine was by his side.

FRANCIS WARWICK . I took the prisoner - he fell on his knees and begged for mercy.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-161

1239. ISAAC PICKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 2 shirts, value 4s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d., and one worsted-comforter, value 6d. , the goods of Josiah Willougby .

JOSIAH WILLOUGBY. I was mate of the barge, called the Beak . On the 23d of March I went on shore; I returned in the morning, and missed the things - I found the prisoner on the wharf on the 24th of May, with my shirt on.

CHARLES COLLINS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt, pawned by a girl on the 19th of May, and a waistcoat, pawned by the prisoner on the 22d of April.

JAMES WAYLING . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found these stockings on his legs; his wife followed me to the office; I found the duplicate of the waistcoat and shirt on her - I have known the prisoner four years - he is foreman to Mr. Wynn.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-162

1240. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s. , the goods of William Arden .

CATHERINE ARDEN . I am the wife of William Arden. I lost this handkerchief out of my room on the 23d of May; I had put it into a basket for a gentleman whom I wash for, about ten minutes before the prisoner came in - I have known him about two months.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I went and took the prisoner - he told me the handkerchief was at an old clothes shop, in Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square - I found it there; the prisoner is my brother-in-law; I never knew him guilty of such a thing before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work and starving - I sold the handkerchief, but did not mean to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-163

1241. CATHERINE PARSONS and REBECCA HALL were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 stock, value 8s.; 1 plane, value 4s.; 1 saw, value 2s; 1 hagging-iron, value 2s.; 2 punches, value 1s.; 1 chisel, value 6d.; 1 pair of punches, value 6d.; 1 rule, value 6d., and 1 knife, value 2s., the goods of John Cotter ; 4 shaves, value 8s., and 1 stock, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Madell ; and HONORA CATON and WILLIAM WHITE were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN COTTER. I am a cooper , and live in Upper East Smithfield ; I have a workshop adjoining my house. On the 19th of May, at half-past eight o'clock. I left all these tools in the shop; next morning, at six o'clock, I found the place open, and the tools gone; I had information, and found them at White's, that day, in a basket; White came in; I asked him the price of two shaves - he said 6d. each, and I gave it him; I said I had not enough money, but would deposit 6d. for the two, and send my wife down; I got an officer, and we went to the place; a woman came into the shop, and wanted to take them away; I said they were mine, that my place was broken open, and they were stolen; White then threw them out of the basket into the street; he said he had given 2s. for them, and then that he had lent 2s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he was not present when they were left? A No, not to me; Parsons is not the woman who came to take them away - she (Parsons) is my sister-in-law; I went to White's about five o'clock in the afternoon - I have no daughter, except one who is a year and a half old.

THOMAS MADELL. I was working with Cotter, and lost four shaves and a stock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JANE SMITH . I live in Crown-court, Rosemary-lane. On the night of the 19th of May, between nine and ten o'clock, Parsons brought me some tools; I said I was certain they were her brother's; she said, "No, so help me God, they are not;" I insisted on her taking them away; Hall came with her, and brought some of them; I lent them an apron, and they took them away.

JAMES WAYLING . I went to Caton's house, White's-yard, Rosemary-lane - she was out; I sent for her, and said, "Where are the tools which Parsons and Hall brought here?" she said, "God knows, it is so long ago since I saw either of them, I don't know; there are no tools here - you are welcome to see:" she opened the place; I looked - there was nothing; I went on to the next court, and found Hall: I said, "Where are the tools you and Parsons took from her brother-in-law last night?" in consequence of what she said I went to Caton's again, and said, "You told me a lie:" she said, "I did; Parsons had taken the things away just before you came in;" she said to Hall, who was with me, "It is all through you and Kitty;" Hall said she and Parsons went to the place; that Parsons took down the bar of the shutters, and gave the tools out to her: I went to White's, and saw the tools; he said he had bought them of Cotter's daughter for 2s. and then that he lent 2s. on them - I brought them away, and told him to come to me; on Saturday Parsons came to the office; I said, "Don't you know I have been looking for you?" she said, she had heard of it, and that she had been to the races; I said I wanted her for taking her brother's tools; she said, "Who gave you information of that?" I would not tell her; she said, "Stand clear of the nobs of the candlesticks; I know who told you, and I will make them fly."

PARSON'S Defence. Smith offered me 5s. for them; I wanted 10s.: Hall said we could get more for them - she is in the habit of buying stolen goods; I asked White to let

me leave the things, saying I was in distress for rent, and to deny me.

PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

HALL - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

CATON - NOT GUILTY .

WHITE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-164

1242. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 1 pair of trousers, value 20s. , the goods of William Delabertauche .

ELIZABETH DELABERTAUCHE . I am the wife of William Delabertauche. I gave my boy a pair of trousers to take home, on the 3d of May; I had repaired them; I have not seen them since.

WILLIAM DELAGERTAUCHE, JUN . My mother gave me the trousers to carry home: I was going along, and met the prisoner, who said he would give me 3d. to go on an errand - he took me to Charing-cross , shewed me a gentleman's house, and told me to go there for two bags, one with pencils in it, and to come to him at the Ship public-house; he gave me 1d., and was to give me 2d. when I returned; I left the trousers with him, and when I came back he was gone.

JAMES BOYER . On the 3d of May, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the Ship, Charing-cross, with this lad, who had a bundle in a blue handkerchief.

WILLIAM DELABERTAUCHE. I went with my son, on Thursday, the 8th, and found the prisoner in a public-house- my son said that was the man; I took hold of him, and brought him out - he was nearly rescued from me, but I took him to the watch-house: a lady came up, and said he had stolen them, but she did not know whether they were pawned or sold.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-165

1243. JOHN SHENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 lock, value 6d.; 5 lbs. weight of nails, value 18d., and 1 gimblet, value 1d., the goods of William Dodsley ; and 1 chisel, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Mears .

WILLIAM DODSLEY. I am a builder . On the 16th of May, about eight o'clock in the evening, I left this property at a building in South Conduit-street, Bethnal-green-road , and missed them next morning.

THOMAS MEARS. I work at this building, and lost a chisel.

JOHN ROBERT HARRIS . I took the prisoner on the 16th of May, at four o'clock in the morning, with these tools in his side-pocket, and the nails in his hat.

GEORGE ANDREWS . I saw the prisoner coming out of this building, at a quarter-past four o'clock in the morning, with another man - I am certain of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ; a young man asked me to come and take these things for him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-166

1244. JAMES RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 chisel, value 1s., and 1 bevel, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James Paxton .

JAMES PAXTON. I am a wheelwright , and live in Grafton-court, Mary-le-bone . On the 20th of January and 11th of February I lost a bevel and chisel from my shop; the prisoner worked for me at times, and had leave to work for himself in my shop - I charged him with it; he denied it - but when he was taken up, he said, they were at Mr. Ross', Paddington-street.

THOMAS HARVEY . I live with Mr. Ross, a pawnbroker. On the 11th of February the prisoner pawned these tools.

Prisoner. I did not mean to steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-167

1245. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 1 farrier's-iron, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Palmer .

JOSEPH PALMER. I am a farrier , and live at Hammersmith . I lost this iron; the prisoner was in my shop about the time.

WILLIAM BOLTON . I live at Hammersmith, and deal in marine-stores; Palmer took a piece of iron from my shop, which the prisoner had brought about three weeks before, and said, he found it in some dung in the yard.

GEORGE WEELER . I work for Palmer, and made this iron for him; I missed it about the time the prisoner was in the shop.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. I had a warrant to apprehend the prisoner; I saw him on Friday - he promised to meet me on the Monday, which he did, and said, he found the iron on the dung-hill.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it among the dung.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-168

1246. JOHN MORGAN and HENRY MORGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 1 1/2 bushels of oats, value 5s., and 1 horse-cloth, value 5s. , the goods of Edward Kelly .

EDWARD KELLY. I keep the Duke of York public-house, at Paddington . On the 21st of May I was going into the country, and ordered the watchman to call me at half-past three o'clock; I told my man to have my chaise ready - I went down at four o'clock; the watchman told me something had been taken away - I went down to the wharf; I found one boat drawn back farther than the others - I went on board and found this horse-cloth, with part of my name burnt out; I found these oats in a sack in the barge - which I had put into the granary the night before; I have brought part from the bulk to compare with them - I found these picklock keys, some skeleton keys, and this wrenching-iron in the boat; my doors were not broken open; I found the two prisoners in the cabin of the boat - they said, they bought the oats from Mr. Meredith; I said, they had come from my granary.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you try any of the keys to your lock? A. No; the prisoners are father and son - the father was sitting on the sack of oats, and the son laying with his head on the horsecloth - the father is rather paralytic on one side.

COURT. Q. What did you say to the prisoners? A. I told them to come out of the barge; they made some resistance, but came.

JOHN ELLIS . I am a watchman. I went to call Kelly about ten minutes past three o'clock, and saw a sack fall from Kelly's loft; one person threw it out, and another caught it - I thought they were Kelly's servants, and did not notice them much; when I returned they were gone - I went with Kelly to the boat; his evidence is correct; I found the sack and the oats in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Morgan sitting on the same sack as was thrown down? A. It was one of the same size and colour, and had about the same quantity in it; the stable is about sixty yards from the wharf.

THOMAS DUGGAN . I saw the watchman and Kelly coming out of the gate with the sack and the prisoner John; I went to the boat and found Henry with his clothes on; we desired him to come out - he said, he would not leave the boat; we brought him out - this horse-cloth laid under his bed.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it under his head? A. Part of it.

THOMAS MEREDITH . I am a corn-dealer. I have sold no corn to either of the prisoners for a month past, but some of my people may have done so.

Cross-examined. Q. Have they bought of you occasionally? A. Yes; these are black oats; I had none such on my premises.

PETER HOLT . About four o'clock in the morning, Kelly gave two persons in charge; I found they had permission from the ostler to sleep in the stable, and dismissed them - Kelly came again soon after with John Morgan, and the corn; Henry was then brought in with these keys - John Morgan said, he had bought the corn of Meredith, the morning before, and given 4s. 6d. a bushel for it; none of the keys opened the door - there was one nearly opened it; that was broken - I did not try them.

EDWARD KELLY. The sack is not mine, but the horse-cloth is; I have lost thirteen, and a great deal of harness - I do not know when I had seen the cloth safe.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear you had seen it within a month? A. No; I saw some in the stable the night before - I found a padlock in the cabin, and this broken key nearly opens it; the broken part was found in Henry's pocket - I lost a padlock and key like this, about six months ago; I cannot swear it was mine.

JOHN MORGAN's Defence. I bought the horse-cloth at Brentford; and have had it this twelve months.

JOHN MORGAN - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY MORGAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-169

1247. THOMAS SHADRACK MUSTOW was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 trowel, value 18d. , the goods of Phillip Connor .

PHILLIP CONNOR I am a bricklayer . On the 17th of May, at half-past seven o'clock at night, I left my trowel in a house in Austin-street, Shoreditch ; I missed it next morning.

CHARLES PADDON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of May, about eleven o'clock, this trowel was pawned by a boy; I do not know whether it was the prisoner.

SAMUEL POWELL . I live in Bethnal-green. I went to Nichol-street, on the 21st of May, and took the prisoner - he said, a boy gave him the trowel to pawn in Shoreditch - I forgot to mention this to the Magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-170

1248. SOPHIA MENDOZA was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 1 tea-pot, value 5s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 3s.; 7 chimney ornaments, value 7s.; 1 basin, value 3s.; 2 spoons, value 1s.; 1 rummer-glass, value 2s., and 1 pair of boots, value 3s. , the goods of John Williams .

MARTHA WILLIAMS . I am the wife of John Williams; we live at Stepney . On the 19th of April my little girl fell down in the mud; the prisoner and another woman came into my house with her, because I should not beat her; they left in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and I missed these articles; I had been dusting them about five minutes before they came - the duplicates of four images, a tea-caddy and a rummer were found on her.

Prisoner. She was very drunk, and gave me the things to pawn.

Witness. I did not - I did not tell the magistrate that Mrs. Harding had robbed me; I never allowed her to take them; they left while I was gone into the yard.

THOMAS BROWN . I apprehended the prisoner the same evening; I found these two spoons in her pocket; she dropped a china basin from under her arm - it broke; here are the pieces - I found three duplicates on her in the name of Shepherd, but the pawnbroker has left the Court: the other woman was taken, but nothing found on her - neither she nor the prosecutrix were in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the things to pawn.

MARTHA WILLIAMS. I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-171

1249. ALFRED LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 4 felt shells, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Robinson Williams and Thomas Waller .

RICHARD CARTER . I am a Thames Police-officer. On the 16th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, with a bundle in a red handkerchief; I asked what it was - he said some felt shells belonging to his master; I said I should go with him and see - I took him about thirty yards - he burst out crying; another who was with him ran away; I took him to the office.

JAMES HOGG . I am a surveyor of the Police. Carter brought the prisoner to me - he said he got the shells from Mr. Williams at Hackney, where he had been to get eighteen dozens for his master; that he had taken these for Mr. Williams, besides the eighteen dozens, and left them at another house while he took his master's home - he was not going towards his master's when he was stopped.

JOHN ORFORD . I am in the employ of Thomas Robinson Williams and Thomas Waller, felt shell makers , of Hackney ; the prisoner had fetched a gross and a half

from his master - I cannot say whether these are part of them or not; we sometimes make a mistake, and put thirteen in a dozen.

JAMES WATMAN PHILPOTT . The prisoner is my servant - I sent him for the shells; I counted them next morning - they were correct.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you not sometimes had more than your number? A. Yes, and sometimes five or six short.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-172

1250. EDWARD LEWIS and GEORGE COOPER were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 8 planes, value 16s.; 4 locks, value 30s.; 1 saw, value 2s., and 1 axe, value 2s. , the goods of William Pearson .

WILLIAM PEARSON. I am a carpenter . On the 22d of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I left my tools at a building in Regent's-park ; I went between six and seven o'clock in the morning - they were gone; I know nothing of the prisoners.

CHARLES BENNIS . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoners on the 23d of May, at half-past two o'clock in the morning, in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's; Lewis had got a basket; when he saw me, he ran back - I suspected he had stolen goods in it, and followed him; I lost sight of him as he turned the corner; and when I saw him again, he was giving the basket to Cooper - I knew Lewis before, and am certain of him; I took Cooper, and found these tools in the basket; Lewis made his escape, but I met him afterwards in Broad-street, and I took him; the prosecutor described the tools before he saw them.

LEWIS's Defence. This young man met me, and asked if I could find him a lodging - I said he could get one in Bainbridge-street, where his things would be safe; I went along with the things, and met the watchman - I gave him the things back.

COOPERS' Defence. This man knew nothing about it.

LEWIS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-173

1251. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 2 blankets, value 7s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 bolster, value 3s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 1 quilt, value 1s.; and 1 candlestick, value 1s. , the goods of James Priddle .

ELIZABETH PRIDDLE . I am the wife of James Priddle. The prisoner lodged with us, and left; I missed these articles, which had been let to her with the room.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found two duplicates on her for some of the things.

GEORGE SHEPHERD . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned all these articles with me at different times, previous to the 29th of April.

Prisoner. I offered them money to take them out; I had not left the house; I was gone to a doctor's.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-174

1252. THOMAS HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 1 weather-glass, value 50s. , the goods of Thomas Mash .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I live with Thomas Mash, an upholdster . On the evening of the 24th of April, about eight o'clock, I was returning home with Wray, and saw the prisoner running with a weather glass within ten yards of our door; I pursued - two gentlemen took him near Soho-square, and I brought him back with the glass, which is master's; I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lay hold of somebody else? A. No.

HENRY WRAY . I was with Williams, and saw the prisoner unhook the glass and run up St. Ann's-court; I am certain of him; I pursued; he dropped the glass; I took it up, and brought him back with it.

THOMAS GOOK . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They caught somebody else; somebody said it was me, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-175

Fifth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1253. JOHN HOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 4 seals, value 6s. ; the goods of Henry Browlow Thomas Heath .

CHARLES BASSETT . I am servant to Henry Brownlow Thomas Heath, a perfumer , of Edgware-road . On the 18th of May I saw the prisoner come to our window, press his hand against a blacking paper, which was pasted in the window; he put his hand through the paper, took our four gilt seals and ran away - I pursued and took him about one hundred yards off; he threw them down just before I got up; I picked them up, seized him, and gave him in charge.

FRANCIS BRADBURY . I took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-176

1254. ISABELLA GRAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th May , 2 sheets, value 2s., and 1 quilt, value 3s. , the goods of Hugh Parsons .

MARY COTTER . I am the wife of John Cotter ; I live with my father, Hugh Parsons - I have the care of some ready-furnished lodgings of his in Blue-anchor yard, Whitechapel . The prisoner and a person named Harris hired a lodging; the sheets and quilt were let with the room - they remained there from December till the 15th of May; I then locked them out of the room, in consequence of the bad behaviour of the man; they got in at the window and the man threw all the things out of the window; I went there - he was so violent I gave charge of him: he was imprisoned for a month. The prisoner gave up the duplicates of these things, and was committed for trial; they owed me 16s. or 17s.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in East Smithfield. I have a quilt pawned for 1s. by a lad in the name of John Ball, for Isabella Graves.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cable-street. I have a sheet and patchwork quilt, pawned for 8d. by a boy; this is the duplicate I gave.

JAMES WAYLING . I took the prisoner; she gave me these duplicates, and said she had sent a boy to pawn these things.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-177

1255. EDWARD GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 10s.; and one key, value 3s. ; the goods of Charles Eady .

SARAH KARING . I live in Little St. Andrew-street , and am servant to Charles Eady, a silversmith . The prisoner lodged in the house; the watch hung in the secondfloor front room on the morning of the 14th of April - at half-past ten o'clock, the prisoner was in the next room; I went out, returned in five minutes and it was gone, and the prisoner also - there are several lodgers in the house; the street door is open sometimes.

THOMAS NICHOLS . I am a pawnbroker and live in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 14th of April, in the afternoon, this watch was pawned by a man in the name of Green; I believe it was the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I never saw it; because I am out of work- they accuse me of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-178

1256. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , 2 pairs of salt-holders, value 4s.; 3 shifts, value 5s.; 1 chopper, value 1s.; 1 plane, value 18d.; 1 cramp, value 5s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 1 fender, value 18d.; 1 flat iron, value 4d., and 15s. , the property of Thomas Griffiths .

THOMAS GRIFFITHS. I live in Whitmore-row, Hoxton , and am a carpenter ; the prisoner is my son, and worked at a coachmaker's - he lived with me when he pleased; he sometimes slept at home when he could not get money to spend - I missed all these articles at the end of March or the beginning of April; I never allowed him to pawn my things.

THOMAS BROOK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. I have a shift pawned in the name of John Jones, and believe the prisoner to be the man - here is the affidavit of the duplicate.

ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS . I am the prisoner's mother. I questioned him about the things - he gave me some of the duplicates, and some I found in his pockets.

JOSEPH WALKER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of silk stockings pawned in the name of John Jones - I do not know who by, but this is the duplicate I gave.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am a pawnbroker and have two shifts pawned for 2s. 6d. - I do not know by whom, but this is the duplicate I gave.

JAMES LEACH . I have a pair of salts pawned at our shop - here is the duplicate I gave for them.

WILLIAM CLARK . I have a cramp and chopper pawned with me, I cannot say who by - here is my duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave my mother the duplicates - my father promised to get them out.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-179

1257. WILLIAM FRASER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of William Jackman .

JAMES KENALEY . I was in Mr. William Jackman's shop on the 19th of May, at seven o'clock in the evening; he is a boot and shoe-maker in Oxford-street ; the prisoner came and took a pair of boots, and ran away - I pursued and saw him taken - I took the boots out of his hand - they had been two feet within the door.

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I took the prisoner in charge.

The prisoner pleaded poverty, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Strongly recommeded to mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280529-180

1258. ISABELLA EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 2 shirts, value 4s.; 2 waistcoats, value 2s., and 1 bonnet, value 2s , the goods of Joseph Sanderson .

JOSEPH SANDERSON. I am a tailor , and live in Bond-street . The prisoner was two or three months in my service, and left on the 5th of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, of her own accord - I missed this property from my bed-room; it was safe half an hour before - I owed her a trifle of wages.

JAMES HOWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Conduit-street. I have two shirts pawned on the 5th of April, by the prisoner, in the name of I. Edwards, for J. Sanderson.

HERBERT JOHN CLARK . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Wardour-street - I have a waistcoat pawned by a woman.

PHILIP RILEY . I apprehended the prisoner last Saturday on another charge.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-181

1259. MARY DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 trunk, value 10s. , the goods of William Bowden .

WILLIAM RAVEN . I am a messenger to Hatton-garden Police-office. On the 27th of May, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take this trunk up at Mr. Bowden's door; she took it a little way, brought it back and set it down again; walked a few yards, returned, took it up and carried it about two hundred yards - I then went and took her; she said she had bought it and given 18d. for it.

WILLIAM BOWDEN. I am a broker and live in Clerkenwell-green . This is my trunk; the prisoner had not bought it or enquired about it.

Prisoner. I bought it of a woman in the street for 6s.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280529-182

1260. THOMAS DEXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Leonard Clare Matthews and John Matthews .

LEONARD CLARE MATTHEWS. I am in partnership with John Matthews - we are pawnbrokers , and live in Whitecross-street . On the 2d of May, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; I knew him before; I was serving - he asked for a pair of shoes, which my man showed him; I left the shop; my man called me, and said Dexter had gone out with a pair of shoes; I knew his address, from an article which he had pawned that day, and sent to his house; he sent word back that he had not got them - I sent again, and he returned with my man; I told him he had got the shoes and had better give them up - he denied it; I went round the counter and took them out of his coat pocket - he then said he did not

know he had them; but he meant to have bought a pair.

Prisoner. Q. Have I ever given you a wrong name or address? A. No; I did say if you would produce them I should be satisfied; I said at the office that I did not think you knew you had taken them or you would not have denied it so often.

THOMAS BEESON . I live with Messrs. Matthews. On the 2d of May the prisoner came and asked for a pair of shoes; I showed him some - I was rather busy; a person at the door inquired the price of something; I went round, returned in about five minutes and forgot that Dexter had been for a pair of shoes - but in a short time I recollected it and missed them; I told Mr. Matthews; he sent me to No. 5, Denmark-court; I found the prisoner sitting up stairs, and said, "You have taken the shoes away, what did you do it for?" he said, "Shoes - I have taken no shoes;" I said I would fetch an officer; he still denied it, and said, "Do'nt you recollect hanging them up in the place you took them from?" I said, No; he mentioned one or two circumstances, and at last I did believe that I had hung them up; I went home and searched the shop, but they were not there - Mr. Matthews sent me back; I went and met him at the end of Playhouse-yard, and said, "Where are you going?" he said, "I am coming to tell you where the shoes are;" I said, "I will save you the trouble - I will not let you go till I get an officer;" I took him to the shop; he was there about five minutes denying that he had the shoes - Mr. Matthews came round and took them out of his pocket; I believe he did not know what he was about, or he would not have acted so; he was sober.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any concealment? A. No; but no man could sit down with shoes in his pocket without knowing it.

Q. Was not my coat off when you came? A. No.

CHARLES RICHARDSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, with the shoes.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated, that he had redeemed a pair of shoes at the prosecutor's in the morning; that he got intoxicated, and was unable to account for the shoes in question being in his possession.

LEONARD CLARE MATTHEWS. He had redeemed a pair of shoes that day.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-183

1261. ELIZABETH DISNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 28 yards of cotton, value 28s. , the goods of Isaac Thomas Welchman .

URIAH JOYCE . I am in the employ of Isaac Thomas Welchman, a linen-draper , of Battle-bridge . On the 23d of April a person came in and said a woman had taken a piece of print from the door - I followed the prisoner some distance, and brought her back with it under her cloak.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM COLTON . I am an officer, and took her.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and stated that she was intoxicated at the time the offence was committed.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-184

1262. ANN CONNOTTY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 blanket, value 6s. , the goods of Mary Stevens , widow .

MARY STEVENS. I live in Wapping . The prisoner and her husband rented a room of mine, over my skittle-ground, and were in the habit of coming up my passage. On the 5th of February I missed this blanket.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in East Smithfield. On the 5th of February the prisoner pawned this blanket(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pawn that - it was one of my own. GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Two Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18280529-185

1263. LEWIS BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 table, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Lang .

RICHARD LANG. I am a carpenter , and live in White Lion-street, Norton-folgate . On the 2d of May, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was returning up Blossom-street, opposite my own house, and saw the prisoner come out of my door with this table; it is a private house; I went up, and asked where he was going with it, and whose it was - he said it was no ones; I said it was mine - he dropped it, and ran off; I pursued, and took him. My door is sometimes on the latch - the table stood on the first floor landing.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to help him move: if he had gone into the door he would have seen him.

PROSECUTOR. I saw no man.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-186

1264. CHARLES BROWN and THOMAS COOMBS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , 3 iron trivets, value 5s. , the goods of George Beaston Thompson .

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am a street-keeper. On the 14th of May I was in Berners-street, and saw the prisoners,(who are dustmen ,) with their cart, at the door of No. 67, taking out dust; I saw three iron trivets on the top of the dust, and asked Brown if he brought such things as that out with dust; he was bringing out the dust - he could not bring them out without seeing them; he said he knew nothing about them, they did not come out of that house; he went in - Coombs came out, and I asked where he got them - he said it was no business of mine; I said it was, that I was an officer; and took him in charge; another officer took Brown the same day - it was at half-past ten o'clock in the morning.

JAMES LATIMER . I am a porter, in the employ of George Beaston Thompson, an ironmonger , of Oxford-street . The prisoners came together at half-past six o'clock in the morning, and took away the dust; these trivets were on a shelf opposite the dust-hole - I missed some, but we have so many - I believe them to be ours.

THOMAS PERRING . I was with Hawkins, and took Coombs to the watch-house; he said he got them from No. 67, Berners-street; Brown was then gone on with the cart- I went and took him in Newman-street; he said he got them from No. 70, Berners-street; I went there, but it was not true - I asked if he had taken dust from anywhere else; he showed me the prosecutor's, and said he took them

out of a place near the dust-hole, put them into the basket, and Coombs carried them out.

COOMB's Defence. I did not see them in the dust.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 39.

COOMBS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280529-187

1265. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 pencil-case, value 3s., and 7s. 6d., the property of George Best , from his person .

GEORGE BEST. I am waiter at the Woolpack tavern, St. Peter's-alley, Cornhill, but having a bad hand I left, and was at my mother's in Duke-street, Union-street. On the 10th of May, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was coming down George-yard, Whitechapel , on my way home; the prisoner laid hold of my arm three different times, as I wished to shun her; she asked me to go home with her - I said No, I was in a hurry, and did not want to be detained: I got to the end of George-yard, and saw a mob; I turned down a court - she came to me again, pushed me in at a door; and from nine to fifteen of them dragged me in, shut the door, knocked me down, and took away everything I had; they took it forcibly out of my pockets; the door opened into a room; I do not know who shut it - I am quite positive she is one of them, and she took my money out of my waistcoat pocket - I had 7s. 6d. there. I got up as soon as I could, and got out at the door- I went to the patrol, and we took her in about half an hour, going into a pawnbroker's in High-street, Whitechapel; I could not find any of the others.

THOMAS YEARLEY . I am a patrol. A few minutes before eight o'clock on the 10th of May, Best applied to me- we found the prisoner in about half an hour, going into a pawnbroker's; I found 6d. in copper on her, but nothing else; Best persisted in her being the girl; he was perfectly sober - he pointed her out to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in Whitechapel; he asked where I was going; he followed me to the house, and gave me 6d.; they wanted another 6d. for the room - he would not give it, and went out.

GEORGE BEST. I did not go with her, or give her anything.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280529-188

1266. JAMES SEARLE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 4 sovereigns, 1 half-crown, 3 shillings, 3 sixpences, and 1 purse, value 1d. the property of Andrew Brown , from his person .

ANDREW BROWN. I am a master tailor ; I live at No. 37, Worship-street. On the evening of the 28th of April I went to the Flower Pot public-house, in Bishopsgate-street, about ten or half-past ten o'clock, with a friend, and saw the prisoner standing at the bar; I am in the habit of going to that house sometimes - my friend is not here; he is driver of a Hackney stage; I went in to treat him - we had three pints of ale and a glass of Scotch whiskey; I took four sovereigns and a half from a purse in my pocket, and changed the half sovereign to pay - I put the change and the sovereigns into my left-hand trousers pocket again; we were there about three quarters of an hour, but did not sit down; my friend got on his stage, and I went towards home - the prisoner followed me; he stood at my right hand in the house, and saw me take out my money; I was not drunk, but had taken more than usual - we had no conversation; it struck eleven o'clock when I got to the end of Worship-street , within a few yards of my own door; I saw him sometimes behind me and sometimes at my side - I was rising to get on the high curb of the pavement, my foot slipped, and I fell; the prisoner pretended to help me up - he put his hand into my pocket, took out the four sovereigns and the silver; I am quite certain he is the man - the watchman was coming towards me, and said, "Mr. Brown, is that you?" I said, Yes; he said to the prisoner,"I think, young man, you will be wanted;" the prisoner then ran, the watchman followed, and sprung his rattle; the first watchman in Shoreditch met him, and brought him back in a very few minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not meet him on Fish-street-hill? A. I never saw him there; I had been to Dock-head on business; I was in the Tailors Arms public-house at Shad Thames - I had a pint of half-and-half and a glass of gin and water; I was in no other public-house; I cut my purse open at the Flower Pot because it was in a knot, and I could not open it - I had no other money: I did not fall down before; I was not insensibly drunk - I did not speak to the prisoner, nor he to me: I did not give him my money to keep.

STEPHEN RENO . I am the watchman. I saw the prosecutor sitting down, and the prisoner sitting on his left-hand side, with his hand in Mr. Brown's trouser's pocket; Mrs. Brown came out of her door - I asked her if he had any money, she said, Yes; the prisoner was going away - I said, "You had better stop, we shall want you;" he then ran - I pursued, and sprung my rattle; Meadows stopped him; I came up; he kneeled down, gave his arm a fling, and I heard something sound like money; I looked down, and took up two sovereigns and half a crown close to him; I took him to the watch-house with difficulty, for some of his gang tried to trip us up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did your brother watchman see him throw the money away? A. Yes; the prisoner was sober, Brown was very drunk; he looked as if he had sat down of his own accord; I did not stop to lift him up, as I ran after the prisoner; I think he was not sober enough to know what he did - he was just able to walk.

ELEAZER MEADOWS . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running: I stopped him in Shoreditch.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Brown? A. No; I did not notice the money picked up, nor hear it fall - I was at the corner of King's Head-court; I did not notice that he stooped - I was sober, and so was Reno.

STEPHEN RENO. I have the money here; I told the watch-house-keeper I had got it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you sober? A. Yes; I had drank nothing but water.

JURY. Q. you saw the prisoner's hand in Brown's pocket? A. Yes, in his left-hand trousers pocket; he was about three yards off when Mrs. Brown came out - I thought at first he was Brown's friend; I was hardly a

yard from him when he was stopped - he ran above one hundred yards, and kept dodging us.

ELEAZER MEADOWS. Reno was about the length of this Court off when I took the prisoner.

COURT. Q. How far had the prisoner ran from Brown's door when he was taken? A. Rather more than the length of this Court; Reno was not above a yard off when I took the prisoner.

JOHN CLAYTON . I am the watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought in, with the money which Reno said he had picked up by the side of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280529-189

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JUNE 2.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1267. JOHN MULFORD and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Edward Joseph Weld , from his person .

EDWARD JOSEPH WELD. On the 10th of May, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was returning from Drury-lane Theatre, and just as I entered the Arcade, Regent-street, I missed my handkerchief, which I had safe when I was going to the Theatre; I remarked to a friend that I had lost it; I was going on, when the officer came, and told me he had seen it taken - he went and took the two prisoners; the handkerchief has not been found - I had not seen the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had not seen the handkerchief for some hours? A. No: it was a yellow silk one, and had my initials on it.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. On the 10th of May, about twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoners in company in Coventry-street; I followed them, and saw them make several attempts at this gentleman's pocket, both there and up Titchhourne-street; and when they got under the Quadrant, I saw Mulford take the handkerchief from the pocket, while Smith was close to him; I went and told the gentleman, who gave me his address: I then went up to the prisoners, who were in company, following another gentleman - I spoke to a gentleman, and said, "I want your assistance;" I then rushed forward, and took them - there were a great many people, as the Theatre was just over; I found one handkerchief on Smith, and another round his leg; he said his leg had a wound in it; I found one handkerchief round Mulford's neck.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance were you? A. Just across the road, opposite them; I spoke to the gentleman before I seized them - I cannot say how many persons I have prosecuted; Phillips saw it also - I lodge with him- he keeps a china-shop in Great Queen-street; he is not an officer; I cannot say how many cases he has prosecuted- he seldom asks for his expences; I do not recollect whether I prosecuted a man named Banks last Session.

Q. Then a person named Banks was not discharged by proclamation last Session? A. No, not to my recollection- I took no money from a person of that name, nor from his relatives, not to prosecute; I took no money from anybody not to prosecute - I defy you to prove it; I do not recollect the name at any time.

COURT. Q. Were you bound over to prosecute any person last Session, who was discharged by proclamation? A. I did not; I will not swear it, but I believe I had but one case last Session which was thrown out - that was a foreigner, and I was not called before the Grand Jury.

Q. Why did you not send Phillips after the gentleman? A. He wishes to decline anything till he comes here.

JESSE PHILLIPS . I was coming through Coventry-street with Whittingham - he said "There are two chaps over the way," they followed this gentleman along Tichbourne-street into Regent-street , and when they got a few yards beyond Air-street they took the handkerchief, and turned down Air-street - Whittingham crossed over and told the prosecutor - Whittingham said "Let them go, they don't seem to think there is anybody after them; I will go and speak to the gentleman, we will then get the assistance of a watchman and take them" - I did nothing; there was no watchman about - I did not see the colour of the handkerchief; I had not time to go before the magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you go out with Whittingham? A. For the purpose of detecting offenders - I go out now and then with him; I crossed the road with him; I did not call Mr. Weld, I did not want to interfere.

Q. How often have you been here with Whittingham? A. When he cannot do without me I come - the Magistrate generally sends for me; I never passed as an officer, nor carry a staff; I swear I did not take a staff out that night -Whittingham told me not to go after them, as we could take them both when we had assistance; I believe I had my expences once last Session - I do not think I have been in above two or three cases with Whittingham; I do not think I had my expences in above two or three cases - I have prosecuted many a score of persons without having my expences, but not with Whittingham - I will not swear I have not prosecuted in forty cases - when I get my expences I generally give them to the officers.

Q. Will you swear you have not prosecuted a dozen cases in conjunction with Whittingham? A. Yes, I think I can safely swear that - I was here last Session; I was robbed myself, and Whittingham was the officer - I was here once or twice the Session before last; Whittingham was the officer in them - I think I first came here with him six months ago - I only go out for amusement, I do not remember the name of Banks.

COURT. Q. What property was lost the last time Whittingham was a witness? A. A servant of mine concealed my goods about him, I had my expences for that; I have been here often, I watch thieves - I have not had my expences nine times out of ten.

Prisoner MULFORD. When Phillips came up he put a staff over our heads and seized me by the throat - I never saw the handkerchief.

MR. PHILLIPS to WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM. Q. Upon your oath has not Phillips, when in your company, carried a staff, and acted as a constable? A. When I see him with me I sometimes give him my staff to hold; I have at times given him my staff; he had not one that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-190

1268. JOHN BRIDGEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 crown, 4 half-crowns, and 10 shillings , the monies of James Hedges Keen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HEDGES KEEN. I am a baker , and live in Henry-street, Hampstead - the prisoner dealt at my shop for some time. On the 28th of April, I did not give him authority to go to my shop to get any money.

HENRY SLADE . I am shopman to Mr. Keen. On the 28th of April the prisoner came to master's shop in a hackney-coach, and stopped at the opposite shop, which is also master's; Huntsman (master's nephew) came over to me, with him, and told me to give him 1l. 5s.; I gave him one crown, four half-crowns, and 10s. - it was Mr. Keen's money.

EDMUND HUNTSMAN . I am the prosecutor's nephew. On the 28th of April the prisoner came and asked me for 25s.; I thought it was all right, as my uncle had gone out with him on business - Slade gave him the money from the till; the prisoner was in a coach and drove off with it - when he came, he said "Make haste, run over the way, and tell Henry to give me 25s.," which I did.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I had a warrant to take the prisoner; he was intoxicated, and said he would not be searched - he gave up 2l., and threatened to bring actions against us all; there was a crown-piece, seven half-crowns, and other silver, among the money he gave me.

JAMES HEDGES KEEN re-examined. I had lent the prisoner money several times; he was repairing Mr. Yates' house, and was to pay me when he received the money - instead of which, he brought me a letter to read for him; it was addressed to him, and stated that his Lordship would give his decision in some case on the 28th of April, and wishing to see him about a bond: he came to me again on the 27th and persuaded me to go with him, and on the 28th said I should receive my money; I went with him and his boy to Lyons' Inn, to Mr. Dix's office - he came out in a few minutes and said "Come along;" we went to Boswellcourt and got some refreshment - he told us to wait there while he got a lobster, but he did not return: he talked about receiving 128,000l. - I do not believe he had any law-suit.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to borrow the 25s. of Slade. GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-191

1269. MARIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 coat, value 10s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of John Wilcox .

JOHN WILCOX. On the 28th of April my coat and handkerchief were tied together in a box in my lodging: about seven o'clock in the morning I went out, leaving the door open; I returned in about five minutes, and met the prisoner coming out with the coat in her lap, and the handkerchief in her hand - I gave her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-192

1270. WILLIAM ROSE and JOHN BARRETT were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a man whose name is unknown ; from his person .

JESSEE PHILLIPS . On Saturday night, the 26th of April. I was in Coventry-street with Whittingham, and saw the two prisoners following two gentlemen who were arm-in-arm; they made several attempts at their pockets, and at last Rose took a silk handkerchief out of one gentleman's pocket, and gave it to Barrett - they turned back towards Leicester-square; I went to the gentleman and asked if he had lost his handkerchief - he said, he had; we turned back; Whittingham and I took held of the two prisoners - they made some resistance, and threw the handkerchief down an area; while Whittingham was getting the handcuffs out. Barrett struck him on the shoulder and ran away; the watchman came up - I gave charge of Rose: we ran after Barrett - we got the handkerchief from the area afterwards; the gentleman came back, but there were twenty or thirty thieves about - he went away, and did not tell us his name.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons were there altogether? A. Perhaps one hundred; they tried to trip Whittingham up - the watchman is not here; I had a staff in my hand that night - I do not often have it; the gentleman said, his handkerchief was partly red and partly a flesh colour.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . Here is the handkerchief which Barrett threw down into the area; I did not see him take it - I had hold of him when he threw it down; I saw Rose's hand in the gentleman's pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is the gentleman? A. There was a number of thieves surrounded him, and fairly frightened him away; I did not hear all that the gentleman said - I did not hear him say what colour the handkerchief was; I sometimes carry two staffs - I believe I have given Phillips a staff to hold while I have been tying the thieves; he has had it in his hand before - I cannot say whether it was often.

ROSE's Defence. I was returning home; they came and took us.

BARRETT's Defence. One of them collared me and struck me - I tried to get away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-193

1271. MATTHEW BERRY and JOHN WHITE were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 120 lbs. of lead, value 15s., the goods of Joseph Marsh , and fixed to a building .

BERRY pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOSEPH MARSH. I have two cottages and a shed at Fulham ; this lead was taken from a gutter which runs between two cottages - I saw it safe a day or two before the 13th of April, when I missed it, about eleven o'clock in the morning, when I went there; about two yards of it was gone.

BENJAMIN MARSH . I am the prosecutor's son. I have compared this lead with what remains; it has been cut and hacked about, but I think it is the same; it is the same thickness - between nine and ten o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoners with each a basket on his back; I ran and took Berry with some of the lead in his basket - I then ran after White, he threw down his basket and ran away; I took it up - I had seen him before, and am quite sure of him.

JOSEPH EAST . I am a labourer; I live in the cottage this lead was taken from. I was walking in the field

between nine and ten o'clock; I saw Benjamin Marsh, and while we were talking, the prisoners came by - Marsh jumped over the gate and took Berry with some lead; White threw his down and got away.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I came up; East was holding Berry - I took him to the watch-house; then got a warrant against White, and at eight o'clock on Sunday night, the 20th, he came home, and I took him: I had been after him several times - I have compared this lead with that which remains, it appears to be the same in every respect; White said, he had found it, and was going to give himself up to me.

GEORGE LANGSTON . I found one piece of lead in the shed.

WHITE's Defence. I was going to Paddington and saw Berry, who asked me to carry part of the lead.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

MATTHEW BERRY was again indicted for breaking and entering a building within the curtilege of the dwelling-house of Richard Hodges Monday , and stealing therein 1 copper, value £2. affixed to the said building . The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Both transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-194

1272. ELIZABETH CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 reticule, value 6d.; 1 necklace, value 6d.; 1 comb, value 2d., and 1 knife, value 3d., the goods of George Edward Gallwey her master ; and MARY CARROLL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen , against the Statute.

GEORGE EDWARD GALLWEY. I am a wine-merchant . The prisoner Elizabeth was in my service for nine weeks; I missed several articles - I called at Bow-street, and went to Mary Carroll's house, and saw the officer find a necklace, reticule, and pen-knife, which are mine; she said, her daughter had brought them home with her - I told Elizabeth she had better tell the truth; nothing was found on her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you not often out travelling? A. Yes; my wife is not here - I cannot say that she did not give her the things.

WILLIAM CORNWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and have a shirt pawned by some woman on the 7th of April.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am an officer, and found the things at Mary Carroll's; the necklace was in her bosom.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-195

1273. JAMES HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 3 handkerchiefs, value 15s., the goods of James Harper , his master .

JAMES HARPER. I am a hat-maker , and live in Berners-street ; the prisoner was in my employ - I missed some handkerchiefs from a drawer, and charged him with it; he denied it - I gave him in charge, and in his pocket were found a duplicate of some handkerchiefs; he came to me with a good character.

JOHN KELLICK . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker. I have four handkerchiefs pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer, and found the duplicates on him.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that the prosecutor had been robbed by his son; he received a good character.

MR. HARPER. My son did take one handkerchief and a swivel. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-196

1274. JOHN MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 9 lbs. weight of silk, value 10l., the goods of William Dickinson , his master .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DICKINSON. I am a silk-mercer and have a dye-house in the City-road - the prisoner was in my service. On the 1st of May, I missed 7lbs. 6ozs. of thread silk, from the dye-house; it was offered at my own warehouse in the City next day for sale - this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What silk do you call it? A. Twist silk; there is no private mark on it - I have no partner.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. On Saturday the 3rd of May I was fetched to Mr. Dickinson's warehouse - Bamber was offering this silk for sale; I detained him, and from what he said, I went to Pitkin's, who went with us to the dye-house and took the prisoner - I told him I suspected him of stealing some silk; he denied it - I told him he had been seen to take a parcel out of the stable; he said the boy Roe had seen him put it into the stable - Roe said the prisoner had asked him for the key, and taken a bundle out, but he had not seen him put it in; the stable is under the dye-house - there is a loft over it; I asked the prisoner what he had done with the bundle which he took out; he said it was only some shirts he had to wash - that he had taken it to a butcher whose wife washed for him; I then told him the silk had been found - he made no reply; his master said "How could you think of robbing me. when I have taken you from a state of starvation?" he was dreadfully agitated, and said "I am starving now sir."

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. I was present on the 2d of May with Martin and Pitkin; In consequence of what I heard, I apprehended Richard Demnan - I took this handkerchief from Bamber; I did not see the prisoner.

JOSEPH ROE . I am servant to Mr. Horton, who has a stable under Mr. Dickinson's dye-house, which is a sort of a loft over the stable; there is a hole, by which you can go front the stable into the loft, and a ladder outside, which goes up to the loft door; on the Thursday, there was silk of all kinds in the loft, and on Friday morning, while I was at breakfast, the prisoner came and asked me for the key of the stable; I asked what he wanted it for - he did not say, but said he would not keep it a minute; I went and unlocked the door - he went behind the door and took up a bundle in a blue handkerchief; he put it inside his coat, and went into the yard directly - I had been in the stable from six till eight o'clock that morning, but had not seen the bundle there then; Mr. Dickinson's men go to breakfast at eight o'clock - I went at the same time and locked the stable door; the bundle was by the side of a truss of hay, just under the hole which leads to the loft - when he came from breakfast, I asked him what was in the bundle; he said two shirts and two pairs of stockings, which he took to a man at the corner to be washed.

FRANCIS THOMPSON . I am in Mr. Dickinson's employ, at his warehouse in Lad-lane. On Saturday, the 2d of May, I came into the warehouse while Bamber was offering this silk for sale.

JOHN BAMBER . I offered this bundle of silk for sale - it was given to me by Mr. Gilbert, my employer.

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am a silk-manufacturer and live at No. 23, Fort-street, Spitalfields. On the Friday evening

Pitkin came to my house to dispose of this silk; he said it was for a person in distress, who had a bill to pay on the following day - I gave it to Bamber; I afterwards sent for Pitkin, and he very readily went for me to the warehouse where Bamber was detained.

JOHN HEMSHAW . I am in the employ of Mr. Dickinson. This silk is my manufacture, to the best of my belief; the dye-house is a loft over the stable; I missed the silk from there about eleven o'clock in the afternoon - it had been there several days; there is a hole from the loft into the stable; Moss was employed on the premises for several weeks.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not very east to swear to silk? A. No; but I believe it to be mine - there is not much of this made in London.

GEORGE PHILLIPS. I am ostler to Mr. Dickinson. On this Friday Moss was loading a cart of rubbish with me; I saw him go for Roe, and go into the stable - he came out with a bundle; and in the evening I noticed some silk, similar to this in his hat - it is here; I asked what he was going to do with it; he said he was going round to two or three places with it for Mr. Dickinson.

MR. DICKINSON. I never sent him out with the silk.

THOMAS PITKIN . I am a silk manufacturer. I employed Gilbert to sell this silk; I received it from the prisoner that day - I did not know whether he was a master or what; he said he had some silk which came from a gentleman in the country, and asked if I knew anybody who could dispose of it - he gave me about 8lbs., I took it to Gilbert.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot swear this is the silk? A. No. I believe it to be the same; it was exactly these colours - I am not in the habit of selling silk for strangers; I had known him about nine days, but never sold anything for him before; he asked if I knew who would buy it - I expected to have about 6d. in the pound commission, which is usual. I have been in custody ever since: I did not ask where he lived - he came to my house, into my kitchen; my wife was not present - I did not expect him to come; I had never been at Mr. Dickinson's dye-house, and was never in custody before: he was to come in the evening for the money; I asked Gilbert to sell it for me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was the silk you took to Gilbert the same as the prisoner brought you? A. Yes - I was taken up for receiving it.

ROBERT TYRRELL. I received this parcel of silk from Pitkin's brother.

WILLIAM GILBERT. Pitkin brought me both these parcels of silk.

JOHN PITKIN . I am Thomas Pitkin's brother. Mr. Gilbert sent for me, and said there was a parcel of silk of my brother's, and asked me to take it to him; I took it to his house, and gave it to his wife; it remained there two or three days - Tyrrell was with me, and got it again.

- PITKIN. I am wife of Thomas Pitkin. I delivered the silk back to the officer, which John Pitkin gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any silks in your own house? A. Yes, a variety of colours, but not the same as this; I did not see Moss.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-197

1275. EDWARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 1 piece of handkerchiefs, containing 5 handkerchiefs, value 18s. , the goods of John Graham .

JOHN HOTSON . I am servant to Mr. John Graham, who lives at No. 294, High Holborn ; the prisoner was in his employ. On Monday evening, the 26th of May, a piece of Bandana was found in his trunk, in his presence - he opened the trunk himself; there was a general search, in consequence of a piece of linen being missed - he said he bought the handkerchiefs of Mr. Davis, in Chiswell-street, two years ago, but the price he could not recollect; he has been there two or three months.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many servants has your master? A. Twelve or fourteen; two or three slept in the prisoner's room; I am certain his box was locked - he said on the Wednesday that a friend, named Thompson, wished to buy some handkerchiefs, and he had put these apart to shew him, but he never said so before; Mr. Graham sent him away that night, as we were not certain we should be able to identify the property, but we afterwards found one of the shopmen could identify it.

COURT. Q. What was done with the property? A. We kept it there - the prisoner was to call next day for his salary.

JOHN TYE . I am in Mr. Graham's employ, and know these handkerchiefs - I sold two off this piece last Saturday week; I took particular notice how I cut it - I had a pair of scissors which would not cut well, and they made a particular mark, and it was missing on the Monday - I can swear this is the same piece.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the mark? A. It is notched - there is no shop mark on it; I was not asked about it till after the prisoner was gone.

JOSEPH PRIEST . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; he said he took the handkerchiefs to shew a friend.

Prisoners' Defence. I met Thompson on the Sunday previous - he asked me to bring him some handkerchiefs to look at - I selected this, and when I went up in the morning to dress. I put it into my box, thinking they would be sold while I was out; there was afterwards an inquiry about them - I told Mr. Graham I intended to shew them to Thompson - neither of the witnesses saw them taken from my box.

JOHN HOTSON. I saw the box unlocked, and the handkerchiefs taken out of it.

WILLIAM HART THOMPSON . I fell in with the prisoner on the Sunday after the fall of the Brunswick Theatre - I went into a public-house with his brother, and he was there; his brother pulled out a handkerchief -the priprisoner said, "If you or my brother wish to purchase handkerchiefs, I can let you have them cheap;" his brother said, nonsense; I said I would look at some.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-198

1276. WILLIAM BARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 gown, value 10s. the goods of Sarah Munro .

SARAH MUNRO. I take in washing , and live in Little Earl-street , up two pair of stairs; on Tuesday last I saw the prisoner going up stairs - he came down and went away - I went up and missed my gown, which had hung on the landing-place five minutes before - I found it on the ground.

HARRIET BARTON . I lodge in this house: I saw the prisoner at Munro's room door with the gown in his hand; he laid it down on the floor on seeing me; I told Mrs. Munro.

PHILIP RILEY . I am an officer - I took the prisoner; he appeared to have been drinking, but I thought it was affectation; he gave no account of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking all day; I do not recollect going up to the place.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-199

1277. THOMAS SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 5lbs. of brass, value 5s. the goods of George Cottam and Samuel Hallen , his masters .

SAMUEL LLOYD . The prisoner was in the employ of George Cottam and Samuel Hallen; I have the care of their premises - they are agricultural implement makers . On the 20th of May, I sent him to Mr. Burys' for some wire; I told him to fetch some paper to put it into - he went into the store-room - I thought him a long time - I went to look, and saw his hand in his trousers pocket - I followed him out some distance, went up and said, "Tom, you are wanted;" he came back, and went up to Mr. Cottam; I said, "Tom, you have been doing wrong:" he turned round and said, "Don't;" I said "It is too late;" Mr. Cottam came round and took this parcel of brass from him; he gave no account of it.

JOHN WYATT . On the 20th of May I was on the premises - the prisoner ran out; I followed him - he fell down, and another piece of brass fell from him; I brought him back.

HENRY STOWELL . I took the prisoner; he said he should not have taken it, but a woman who deals in marine-stores had persuaded him. GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-200

1278. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 hammer, value 1s., and 1 pair of reins, value 2s. , the goods of Mary Hussey .

JAMES SMITH . I am a gardener, and live at Hillingdon. On the 10th of May I saw the prisoner close to Lady Mary Hussey's farm, with some reins hanging under his coat; I ordered him into the yard - he said he would not come, and ran away; I followed, and collared him; he had nothing then; we found this hammer close to his heels, and he had thrown the reins over into the rick-yard.

JAMES BOST . I pursued the prisoner, and saw him throw the reins over into the rick-yard - I went and got them out; I had seen them in the stable about two o'clock.

FRANCIS WEEDON . I am an officer, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the hammer, but never had the reins.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-201

1279. THOMAS MORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 2 salt-stands, value 3s. , the goods of Jessee Phillips .

JESSEE PHILLIPS. On the 29th of May I saw the prisoner put his hand round my door-post, and take these salts out of the window, put them under his apron, and walk away; I was at dinner in the back room.

Prisoner. I took them to look at, and put them down again. Witness. He put them into my hand when I took him; he had walked away about two yards - he stood at the window for a minute.

JOHN GROOM . I took the prisoner in charge; he resisted, and said he meant to purchase the salts, but he had not got a farthing about him; Phillips said he had stepped into the shop and taken them; and that he took them from his apron.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-202

1280. THOMAS CROSSLEY and WILLIAM ASTON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 1 cap, value 6s., and 1 band, value 5s., the goods of William Hobson , from the person of Thomas Hobson .

THOMAS HOBSON. I am the son of William Hobson, and am nine years old. On the 17th of April I was at the corner of Nelson-street, City-road ; Aston came up and took my cap off; he ran down a court - Crossley took hold of me, and turned me round at the time, while he ran away - they had followed me from Bath-street.

JAMES LUFF . I was at this child's house - he came home crying, and said his cap was stolen; he described the person and dress of the person who took it; I went with him, and he pointed out Aston, who ran away directly.

JAMES TAYLOR . On the 18th of April, in the afternoon, I was at Islington, and saw Crossley with four others: I followed them to Clerkenwell-green, and then fetched Hobson - he pointed him out, and said he was certain of him; I brought him to a lamp-post, and told him to look well at him: I had Crossley and another boy; he looked at them both, and said that was not the boy, but Crossley was; I took him to the watch-house. On the 1st of May I saw Aston with three others, in St. John-street-road - there was a crowd looking at Jack in the Green, and I saw Aston untying a handkerchief from a child's neck: I could not take him then, but watched him, and in the afternoon I took Hobson there, and he pointed him out.

WILLIAM JOHN OTHEN . I was in the yard at Worship-street when Crossley was locked up; a girl came and called to him - she asked how he got on - he said he thought he should go to the start (meaning Newgate), and told her to go and tell the pieman to come down to him; in a few minutes the girl came and said he was come; he told her to tell him to say he was with him till nine o'clock.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I saw Crossley with a pieman at nine o'clock; he spoke to me - I returned in ten minutes, and they were-gone.

WILLIAM BUTTON . I am a biscuit-baker and pieman. Crossley came to me at the end of Mutton-hill, and spoke

to me, that night; I left him there about a quarter-past nine o'clock.

CROSSLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

ASTON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-203

1281. ANN CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 seal, value 30s.; 1 ring, value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 10s, and 1 watch-ribbon, value 6d., the goods of John Bagley , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-204

1282. SARAH HANCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 shawl, value 15s., the goods of Arabella Lucas , from her person .

ARABELLA LUCAS. I am a widow . On the 16th of May I was at a public-house in Gray's Inn-lane - I threw off my shawl when I went in; I missed it, and said to the prisoner, who sat there, "Have you seen my shawl?" she said No.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where had you come from? A. From Deptford; I was fatigued, and went there for refreshment; I had been to no other public-house - I had a glass of ale and a biscuit; I was perfectly collected: I was low, as I had just heard of a gentleman's death. I had not met the prisoner in the street; I had no victuals with me; I went to the Bell and Crown, and slept there that night, as the officers took me there; I was not drunk. I am an officer's widow, and have a pension. I had been to look for a situation; I complained of being tired; the prisoner said, "I am a colonel's widow - you can go an sleep with me at Clerkenwell, and go to Deptford to-morrow;" I said I would think of it; I cannot swear whether I had any gin and peppermint - I never drink gin and cloves.

WILLIAM WINTER . I keep the Fox public-house, Gray's Inn-lane . On the 16th of May, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prosecutrix came in, alone; I saw her talking to the prisoner in the house - she called for a glass of ale, and then said she had lost a shawl; the prisoner had then gone to the back part of the house - I told her I had seen no shawl on her; but the prisoner was charged with it, and it was found secreted under her clothes - I took it from her, and gave it to the constable.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they not both very gay? - A. They were both drunk; the prisoner behaved very ill, and would not leave the place; the prosecutrix drank a glass of gin and cloves.

WILLIAM WILSON. I took the prisoner in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-205

1283. WILLIAM RUSSELL and ELIZABETH, HIS WIFE , were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 2 pewter pots, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Stevenson Perrin ; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Mainwaring .

WILLIAM STEVENSON PERRIN. I keep the Woodman public-house, at Kingsland . These two pots are mine.

RICHARD MAINWARING. I keep the Cock and Castle public-house, at Kingsland . This pot is mine.

THOMAS THOMAS . I am a patrol. On the 4th of May I was at Dalston, and saw the prisoners together, about four o'clock in the morning; the woman had a small basket - she escaped; I pursued the man, and as I took him towards the watch-house he ran away; I followed, and re-took him at Newington-green: he took this pint pot, in a handkerchief, from his person, and threw it away - it belongs to Mainwaring.

WILLIAM BREWER . I pursued and took the woman; I found these two pots on her.

WILLIAM RUSSELL'S Defence. My wife saw the basket hanging on a rail.

W. RUSSELL - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months .

E. RUSSELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-206

1284. ANN DODKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 2 pillow-cases, value 6d.; 2 gown skirts, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 6 pieces of calico, value 6d.; 1 pair of sleeves, value 3d.; 6 pieces of diaper, value 6d., and 6 pieces of trimming, value 1s. , the goods of John Kighley .

ELIZABETH KIGHLEY . I am the wife of John Kighley - we live at Hackney . The prisoner was in my service; I had lost a number of articles, and said I should like to examine her box; she opened it, and I found these articles in it; I told her she had accused others of taking things - she said these articles laid about; I said I did not know what to do about it till my husband came home; she went out, and left the door open; I did not see her again for ten days - I had not missed these things - they belonged to my husband's first wife, and are of trifling value - I should never have used them.

The prisoner, in a written Defence, stated that she had taken the stockings by mistake for her own, and that she considered the other things of no value.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-207

1285. RICHARD HENRY COFFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 9d. , the goods of Thomas Spencer .

THOMAS SPENCER. On Tuesday last I lost a pair of shoes from my window at Hoxton ; these are them.

ROBERT ATKINS . I live near Spencer. On Tuesday evening about seven o'clock I saw the prisoner pass his window; pushing a pair of shoes under his coat; I went and told him he had a pair of shoes; he made no answer, but walked on - I went and told Spencer Dickenson followed him.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I pursued with Atkins, and found these shoes in the prisoner's pocket.

WILLIAM HALE . I am a constable. I took the shoes from his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them for 2s.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280529-208

1286. MARY TILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 32 yards of ribbon, value 16s. , the goods of William Parker .

JAMES LAWRENCE . I am shopman to Wilson and Parker; this ribbon was their property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-209

1287. JOSEPH SPENCER was indicted for stealing,

on the 26th of April , 21lbs. weight of tea, value 8l. , the goods of Richard Hillhouse .

ROBERT JONES . I am warehouseman to Richard Hillhouse. I delivered this tea to Jenkins on the 26th of April, to go to Shefnell, about four o'clock; and in about ten minutes he brought the prisoner in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Is the tea here? A. No; it is gone into the country; I packed it up; there were 21lbs.

GEORGE JENKINS . I am a carman. I put the tea into my waggon; the prisoner went up and took it out of the waggon, while I was in the shop; I stopped him with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he sober? A. He appeared to he drunk; I am told he has a wife and six children - I asked what he was going to do with it, he said, to have something to drink.

Prisoner. I had been drinking; I kicked against this bundle and took it up.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280529-210

1288. SAMUEL PULLING was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 5 pairs of shoes, value 16s., and 2 pairs of boots, value 5s. , the goods of James Lloyd .

JAMES LLOYD. I am a shoemaker , and live in Coventry-street . The prisoner was my shopman for about five months; I found these shoes and boots at Tinson and Fewkes', who work for me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Mrs. Lloyd here? A. No; I never allowed the prisoner to send goods out without my knowledge; I spoke to him about it, and he said he had sent out four pairs, but here are seven pairs; he never took out goods which were not ordered; my wife served in the shop; she is ill.

COURT. Q. How came he to mention about sending them out? A. In consequence of what was told me I found them packed into a hamper, and directed to Mr. Culver; the direction was in the prisoners' writing.

JAMES FAUX . I am errand-boy to Mr. Lloyd. I was sweeping out the shop about half-past eight in the morning and saw the prisoner put some Blucher boots and shoes into the basket; he tied the direction on and sent me with it to Tinsons' near Charing-cross; he told me to tell him he had no time to go to market with it, and it was to remain there till a note came from him; I delivered it to Tinson.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your master in the habit of sending out goods? A. Not unless they were ordered.

JOSEPH FEWKES . I called at Tinsons' while Faux was there, with the boots and shoes in a basket; I do not know the prisoner; I asked Faux if Mr. Lloyd was present when he came out; he said No; the same goods were delivered to the officer.

WILLIAM TINSON . Faux brought me this basket; I went to Lloyd's and saw the prisoner; he said, "Let that basket remain there, and let nobody have it till you have a note from me; he said it was a parcel to go to the country.

- SMITH . The property was given into my possession at Bow-street.

Prisoner's Defence. He promised me five per cent. commission for selling; I told Mrs. Lloyd I had to send these out.

MR. LLOYD. He once brought a man named Morris, to whom I sold some; I then said I would in future allow him five per cent., but he has sold none since.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280529-211

1289. JOHN ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously putting off to Robert Sheriman , 20 false and counterfeit shillings, at a lower value than the same did by denomination import ; against the Statute.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT SHERIMAN. I have known the prisoner about a year and a half; in consequence of information given by me to the Mint, I was placed under the direction of Limbrick, the officer. On the 8th of May I saw the prisoner and again on the 15th, and told him I should see him in a day or two; I saw him again on the 27th, but before that I met Limbrick, Kirby, Reynolds, Lloyd and Isaacs; I was searched by Limbrick, for the purpose of seeing whether I had anything about me, but I had not - Limbrick then gave me four marked shillings, and half-a-crown and sixpence which were not marked. I went with them to the prisoner's house, in Cobb's-yard, Petticoat-lane : I got there about one o'clock; Isaacs and Reynolds followed me there; I saw the prisoner opposite his door - I went into the house; he did not come in for a few minutes after me; he lives with his mother, his sister, and another brother, who is foolish - when he came in he asked me what I wanted; I said, "A score of bobs."(meaning counterfeit coin;) he went to the privy, which is close to the door of the house; it is out of the room, but you can stand in the room and reach it; he came in with a small dirty canvas bag; he sat down, untied it, and gave me out a score of counterfeit shillings; they were all separate, but wrapped up in paper - I gave him the four marked shillings which I had from Limbrick; there were a great many other papers in the bag; I then asked him if he could not let me have a half-sovereign cheaper than he did before, which was for 3s. 6d,; he said he could not. I stepped to the door, gave a signal to Reynolds and Isaacs, who came in - the prisoner's sister and his foolish brother were in the house; they made great resistance; when the officers let go of the sister, she made a rush, picked up something which I thought was the bag, and ran to the privy; I had not observed where the prisoner had put the bag - Reynolds rushed after her, and caught her arm as it was down the privy; the twenty counterfeit shillings were found on me; the sister came to me and asked if I had any shofle about me, if I had to put it away.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Who employed you? A. I spoke to Mr. Powell, and he sent for Limbrick; I was never in custody - my wife is in custody at Chelmsford, charged with passing bad money; I sell sweetmeats - I was a gentleman's servant about six years ago; I never did a job of this kind before; Limbrick gave me the marked money at the Crown tavern, on Clerkenwell-green, about twelve o'clock on that day; I went straight to Cobb's yard - I have received nothing for this, nor been promised anything - I expect to be paid for my trouble.

JAMES ISAACS . - I am a saddler, and live in Saffron-hill. On the 27th of May I accompanied Sheriman to the Crown, saw him searched by Limbrick, who gave him four marked shillings, one half crown, and one shilling not marked; I kept him in sight all the way till he entered the public-house; he came to the door in about five or seven minutes, and gave us a signal - I and Reynolds rushed in; the prisoner's brother was knocked down - his sister ran into the privy.

Cross-examined. Q. What stock have you? A. I worked at the business; I am not a Jew - my father is a watch-house keeper; I assist him, and do little jobs - I never had a job of this kind before.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I accompanied Isaacs, on the 27th of May, to Cobb's yard; when a signal was given, I ran to the house, and seized the prisoner by the left hand - his sister ran to the privy; I went and seized hold of her hand, but found nothing.

JOHN LIMBRICK . Sheriman was employed by me to buy these things of the prisoner; I gave him four marked shillings, one half crown, and a sixpence not marked; I had searched him. but found nothing else about him - I went to the public-house a little after one o'clock; he was then in custody; I searched the privy next day - I let Kirby down with a rope, and he found these two bags, one within the other; the inner one contains seven half sovereigns, one hundred and fifteen shillings, and eighty half crowns; Sheriman produced twenty bad shillings to me directly I took hold of the prisoner, and said, in the prisoner's presence, that he had them from him - I saw Lloyd take these four marked shillings from the prisoner's pocket - Sheriman had described the bag to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Were you not informed that the prisoner's sister had put her hand down the privy? A. Yes, at the office - I did not know it till then; the privy is surrounded by a brick wall.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I was with Limbrick on the 27th; I went next day and got this bag from the privy, about ten o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the door of the house locked? A. Yes; the woman at the next house had the key.

ANDREW LLOYD . I produce the four marked shillings which I got from the prisoner's left hand trousers pocket.

JOHN LIMBRICK . These are what I marked.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of coin. These twenty shillings are all counterfeit; they are in separate papers, being so slightly covered with silver - eighteen are from one die, and two from another; there are some from both dies in the bag - they are all bad half crowns and half sovereigns.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Are they fit for circulation? A. They are not what is called"rubbed down;" they now represent money just come from the Mint; the persons who pass them generally rub them down - thousands have been passed in this state.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-212

1290. LEAH ABRAHAMS was indicted for a like offence .

ROBERT SHERIMAN . On the 12th of May , I met John Limbrick at the Crown tavern, at a quarter to three o'clock; Isaacs was there - I was searched, and received four shillings; I went to Cobb's-yard, Petticoat-lane , to Abraham's house; knocked at the door - the prisoner opened it; I asked her if Yankee was at home, meaning her brother; she said, No, could not she do; I said,"Yes, I want a score of bobs;" she went to the privy, brought out a bag - gave me out a score; I gave her the four shillings which I had received from Limbrick, and took the bobs to his house that evening; I think there were twelve or fourteen score more in the bag - I think it was the same bag as was produced in the last case.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Was anybody else present? A. No. Isaacs followed me there, and saw me come out - the things in the bag were in paper; they were parcels of the same size as mine.

JAMES ISAACS . I followed Sheriman to the prisoner's house, saw him go in, and waited five or six minutes till he came out; on the 27th I saw the prisoner taken.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you with Sheriman? A. From three to five o'clock, when he saw Limbrick - he could not have got the coin from anybody else.

JOHN LIMBRICK . On the 12th of May I searched Sheriman, and gave him four marked shillings; he gave me a score of bad shillings - the same day I searched both him and Isaacs, and found nothing on them but this counterfeit money.

ROBERT SHERIMAN. I was at the house again on the 27th; I saw the prisoner snatch up something, and go to the privy.

JURY. Q. Where did your wife get the money she is in custody about? A. I got it for her from Abrahams; she was tried on the 10th of March.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I went on the 27th, and found these bags in the privy.

MR. REYNOLDS. On the 27th of May I was at the house, and saw the prisoner run to the privy, and seized her with her hand down the privy.

JOHN FIELD . These shillings are all counterfeit, and all of one die - they are of the same die as some in the bag.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-213

1291. GEORGE SMITH , JOHN ROBINS , and HENRY ARMSTRONG , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 scarf, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Corderoy .

ELIZABETH CORDEROY . I am the wife of Thomas Corderoy, a dyer , of Battle-bridge . On the 28th of May, about six o'clock, I locked the shop-door, and went down stairs; I came up in a few minutes, and found Smith and Robins in the shop, at the counter - I had left the key outside the door, which opens into the passage; one of them asked me what I would dye a pair of trousers for; I told them, and they left; I then missed a scarf off the counter - I had seen it safe when I went away; I went to the door, pursued them, and brought them back.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am an officer. I was fetched, and took Robins and Smith; I tied them together; Smith cried, and said he had given the scarf to a boy named Turner; he took me to Somers'-town to Turner, who said he had given it to Armstrong - we went to him, and he gave it up.

SMITH'S Defence. Turner unlocked the door - not me.

The prisoners received a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 11.

ROBINS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

ARMSTRONG - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-214

1292. SIMEON ODWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 ass, price 20s. , the property of William Oxley .

The prosecutor did not appear NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-215

1293. MATTHIAS ISAAC LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 24 penny-pieces , the monies of William Wilson .

WILLIAM WILSON. I keep a rag-shop in Back-lane, St. George's in the East . On the 22d of May I saw the prisoner behind my counter - he must have crept in upon his hands and knees; he had taken the till out, and placed it on a bag on the floor; I went to him - he said a person had thrown in his cap, and he came to fetch it; I had left the till safe five minutes before - it contained copper.

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy threw my cap in; I saw the till on the floor.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-216

1294. HENRY INWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 12 pairs of stockings, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Everingham .

JAMES QUIN . On the 29th of May I was in Oxford-street , and saw the prisoner and another boy at Mr. Everingham's shop, standing near a roll of flannel; I saw the prisoner take these stockings off a roll of flannel, roll them in his apron, and run down Berwick-street; I ran in, and gave information; two young men ran out, but could not find him; I afterwards saw the same two lads in Regent-street - the prisoner had the stockings in his apron; I took hold of him - the other got away; the prisoner dropped the stockings, and said, "I did not take them."

JOHN EVERINGHAM . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Everingham. I went out, but could see no boys - these stockings are my master's property.

GUILTY . Aged 9.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18280529-217

1295. CHARLES TOSANTE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 26 yards of linen, value 3l.; 11 yards of ribbon, value 8s.; 10 yards of silk, value 45s., and 44 buttons, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Edwards , his master .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS EDWARDS. I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Mary-le-bone ; the prisoner was in my employ about five months, and left about the 20th of February - I had no suspicion of him; I ordered him to take stock of the Irish linens in November - there was a piece among them, which I have since seen - it is marked "No. 60, M. G. W." in my own writing; I received information in May last, and went to Susannah Bowen, who shewed me part of that piece of linen; I did not know of any of it being sold; she also shewed me some grosde de Naples, some ribbon, and pearl buttons; the prisoner had no authority to dispose of my goods on his own account, nor on commission, neither for me nor anybody else - I never knew of his selling goods to Bowen; there is an account in my stock-book of some of the linen being sold.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He left you on the 20th? A. Yes; he went out on pleasure I understood - he returned on the Monday, and said his absence was caused by illness; I said I should not take him again, and he went away; I saw him again a few days after at his lodgings, No. 27, London-terrace, Hackney-road; I did not say I was sorry I could not take him again - I have a person named Balding in my employ - he is here; I never knew of my servants selling goods to each other - he proposed to take the stock in November.

Mr. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever authorize them to sell to each other? A. I authorized Balding to sell the prisoner twenty-four yards of gros de Naples, but nothing else - it has not been paid for; here is the stock-book - this piece is entered as cut, and not to be put with whole pieces.

COURT. Q. Was the stock taken by him or you? A. By him; it was only of the Irish linen; I saw this Irish entered in the book, and might see the piece - it was marked when it came in, which was not twelve months ago; I had no other of that mark; the book is in the prisoner's handwriting - he states it to be on hand in November.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you quite sure you never authorized him to dispose of this linen? A. Yes.

SUSANNAH BOWEN . I am the wife of Thomas Bowen , and live at No. 27, London-terrace. I am a dress-maker. About this time last year I made up some millinery for the prisoner, and in February last he came with some - I worked for him till then; he said he lived with Mr. Edwards, and that in July Mr. Edwards was going to take him into partnership; that he had a large sum coming to him, and that Mr. Edwards had a warehouse in Cheapside, and allowed him part of it, and two days in a week to sell by commission: he brought me patterns of different articles to purchase; I gave him an order on the 10th of February for a whole piece of Irish, which I received; I cut part of it up, and the other is in possession of the officer - it was marked "No. 60, M. G. W." I also ordered ten yards of gros de Naples; he brought some gauze ribbons, and pearl buttons, which I had not ordered.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you always given the same account of this transaction? A. Yes; I told the Magistrate that he said he was allowed to sell on commission; here is"No. 6" on the Irish - the letters are on the paper it was in.

HENRY STOWEL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Cold Arbour-street, Hackney, on the 15th of May; he denied the charge; I said, "You recollect the linen and things you sold Mrs. Bowen?" he said, "I did; they were Mr. Edward's once, but I bought them of him."

MR. EDWARDS. I believe this to be my linen: this mark on it is my writing - the other goods are mine: I never authorized him to sell any of them - here is a remnant which matches the silk.

Prisoner's Defence. This Irish was not his; I was in the habit of purchasing goods from two hawkers for four or five years, and serving my friends in the country - I had the linen from one of the hawkers: but I cannot ascertain in what part of the country he is now in.

THOMAS BALDING . I am servant to Mr. Edwards. I sold the prisoner a piece of silk of Mr. Edwards'; it was this piece of gros de Naples; I cut it from this piece - he had not paid for it; I was told to cut it off, and I did.

COURT. Q. When was this? A. I do not recollect the month; I cut him twenty-four yards, and entered it in a book - master told me to let him have it; I am his apprentice.

MRS. BOWEN. I bought twenty-four yards of black-silk of him, besides this ten yards; I made up all the twenty-four yards - this is not part of it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18280529-218

1296. WILLIAM MURTAGH and ROBERT HAYWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 36 harness ornaments, value 30s.; 48 harness buckles, value 1l.; 18 swivels. value 15s., and 1 snaffle, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Kearley and Joseph Leonard Kearley .

THOMAS ORPWOOD . I am servant to Thomas Kearley and Joseph Leonard Kearley, of Long-acre , army contractors ; the prisoners were their apprentice s. On Friday, about eleven o'clock, Martin came and said, he had found three parcels in the water-closet; I told him to put them back and watch the place - about one o'clock I went up stairs; the prisoners came from the privy and went up stairs for their coats, to go to dinner - I went out; they came out - I told them to walk back; I found in Murtagh's pocket, this bundle of swivels, and several other articles; and on Hayward, this bundle of ornaments, and in his hat these other articles.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had they been in your service? A. Some time; their friends are respectable - I asked why they took them; they said, they had a little money to make up.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am the gate-keeper. I found these two parcels in the water-closet, with another, which we have not found.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners received a good character.

MURTAGH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HAYWARD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to mercy - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-219

1297. MARGARET HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of Charles Paul .

CHARLES PAUL. I lodge in King's Head-buildings, Westminster ; the prisoner lodged on the same floor - I lost this coat from my box.

HANNAH SYMMONS . I keep the house; Paul is my brother - I saw him put his coat in the box; the prisoner lodged there for two months - I have lent her things of mine to pawn when she was in distress.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, a pawnbroker, of Jermyn-street; the prisoner pawned this coat on the 26th of May. Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into his room; he gave me a sovereign to go and redeem some things - I would not give him his change until Monday, as he was in liquor; I did not see his coat.

CHARLES PAUL. I never authorised her to pawn anything.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280529-220

1298. MARY HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 veil, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Franklin , her master .

ELIZABETH ANN FRANKLIN . I am the wife of Thomas Franklin, of Oxford-street : the prisoner was about a month in our service - she left on the 23d of May, and on the Sunday after, I missed this veil from my bed-room drawers - I never allowed her to take it; it is lace, and cost five guineas.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer, and searched the prisoner's lodgings, No. 2. New-road, near Sloane-street; I told her what I came for; she said, the veil was in her box - I found it there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280529-221

1299. WILLIAM GLEESON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 1 lantern, value 2s.; 4 keys, value 1s., and a pair of gloves, value 4d. , the goods of Patrick MacNamara .

PATRICK MACNAMARA. I am a private watchman of Euston-square . On the 25th of May at night I left my lantern in my box, while I went to look about the premises; I also left my gloves and keys there - when I returned they were all gone; I saw the prisoner getting over the pailings with the lantern in his hand - I asked what he took them for; he said, it was a lark, and I said, I would take him to the watch-house: he ran away - Campbell stopped him; the keys were found about four yards from my box - I had seen the prisoner before, but he was no friend of mine.

JOHN CAMPBELL . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Gower-street - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and took the prisoner; the gloves were found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the lantern and called Mike, thinking a friend of mine was there, who used to watch there, the gloves fell down; I thought they were my own, and took them up.

PROSECUTOR. The prisoner was once a watchman; I came in his place; he was only a few yards from my box.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-222

1300. MARIA WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 1 sovereign; 1 half-crown, and 3 shillings, the monies of John Stevens , from his person .

The Prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-223

1301. WILLIAM DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 9lbs. of lead, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Maria Murray , widow , and fixed to a building .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Bradley Shuttleworth .

RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE . I am a constable of Kingston-on-Thames. On the 10th of May. I had information, and caused the prisoner to be apprehended in Kingston; he was routed out of a public-house with another man, who ran away - I asked where he had sold the lead; he said, he had sold it at Smith's, a dealer in marine stores - I got some lead from Smith; I afterwards fitted the lead to the green-house of Mrs. Murray, at Hampton-court - the prisoner said, he had it from one Rainscome to sell for him that he gave him the money.

FRANCIS SMITH . I am a dealer in marine-stores, at Kingston. On the 10th of May, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I bought 29lbs. of lead of the prisoner, and gave it up to the officer; I asked where he got it - he said he went out collecting materials; I paid him 1 1/2d. a lb. - I made no farther enquiry.

RICHARD LONG . I am gardener to Mr. John Bradley Shuttleworth. Maria Murray lives on the premises - I missed this lead from the green-house in the morning of the 10th; I have seen it compared, and believe it to be the same.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280529-224

1302. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 14 pairs of shoes, value 45s. , the goods of Francis Homan .

FRANCIS HOMAN. I am a shoe-manufacturer , and live in Shoreditch : the prisoner was my porter and groom - I did not miss this property.

ISAAC NONMUS . I am traveller to Mr. Homan. I found five duplicates in the stable, on two different occasions, among the horses' litter: nobody but the prisoner worked there - I gave the duplicates to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there a table-beer cellar by the side of the stable? A. Yes; other persons have access to it; the stable-door is open all day.

JOSEPH HAMMOND . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; I found a