Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st February 1828.
Reference Number: 18280221
Reference Number: f18280221-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS, MAYOR.

THIRD SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 21st of FEBRUARY, 1828, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY STOKES,(Successor to J. BOOTH) No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1828.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Stephen Gazelee , Knt.; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Vaughan , Knt.; one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer: Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Thomas Watkins ,

Robert F. Wade ,

George Whiteley ,

John Mayor ,

John Gray ,

John Tabor ,

Thomas Crocksal

Wm. Boucher ,

Henry Fisher ,

Daniel Cox ,

Richard Surridge

Martin Alies .

Second

Joseph Blake ,

John Pember ,

Robert Strahan ,

Wm. Chambers ,

James Castle ,

John Murdock ,

Thomas Duggan ,

Robert Millburn ,

George Frampton ,

Neil McKenzie ,

Edward Tucker ,

George Westley .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Joseph Gilks ,

Rob. P. Condonne

Thomas Champ ,

Edward Dillert ,

George Cape ,

Thomas Cormack

Wm. Cubit ,

Wm. Chandley ,

Thomas Groves ,

Wm. Doney ,

Wm. Doyle ,

James Martin .

Second

James Limebeer ,

T. W. LaRoach ,

Thomas Lewis ,

James Latham ,

Samuel Laskey ,

Richard Lacey ,

Benjam. Hasting ,

Edw. Goldsmith ,

John Knight ,

Rich. F. Clayton ,

James Moyes ,

Alex. Morrison .

Third

Staf. Northcoat ,

James Murray ,

Geo. Outhwaite ,

Edward Proctor ,

Abraham Parker ,

John Parden ,

Thomas Parker .

Nichols Jackson ,

Benjamin Pratt ,

David Pinder ,

Thos. Pollett ,

Andrew Peet .

Fourth

Joseph Hallam ,

John Hill ,

John Heldred ,

John Hayward ,

Thomas Hine ,

George Hassall ,

James Haigh ,

James Hall ,

John Horton ,

Edward Hammett

Thomas Howchen

Wm. Holman .

Fifth

Richard Howman

G. Huddlestone ,

Richard Johnson ,

Jonathan Jarry ,

George King ,

John Keates ,

Henry Keech ,

James Ford ,

John Fulford ,

Peter Graham ,

Joseph Greenway

James George .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 21, 1828.

LUCAS, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18280221-1

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

483. JOHN JONES and CORNELIUS SULLIVAN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Julian , at St. James, Clerkenwell, on the 5th of February , and stealing 16 snuff-boxes, value 1l., and 1 cigar-tube, value 3d. , his property.

WILLIAM JONES . I lodge at No. 9, Little Warner-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell - Mr. John Julian keeps the house; I pay my rent to him. On the 5th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening (as near as I can guess.) I saw the prisoner Jones, and another with him, near the house; when I first saw them I was at the corner of the house: I cannot say who the other was - he was very much like Sullivan, but I cannot be certain of him; I saw them standing at Julian's shop window, with a knife or something, trying to get the putty away from the glass; when they saw me they went away: they returned in five or ten minutes - I was then in my little shop, at the corner of the house; I heard them break the glass: I looked as close as I could to the window, and saw Jones take the snuff-boxes out of the window, and tuck them into his bosom, with his left-hand; the other one was standing by his side: Jones put down a piece of glass, which they had broken, and then they ran away; I followed Jones, and never lost sight of him - he ran into Baker's-row; I followed, and saw him in Baker's-row - the other ran straight up Great Warner-street - (the house is at the corner of Little Warner-street;) Sullivan joined Jones in Baker's-row, and another one.

Q. If Sullivan was the same person, how did he get from Great Warner-street to Baker's-row? A. There was time for him to come round; I followed all three into Coppice-row, till I saw Bowden, the constable; I told him to come with me, for they had broken a window and taken the boxes out; we followed, and took the prisoners - the other had gone away; we did not see which way he went. I told them what we took them for - Jones denied it, and said the boxes were his own; Bowden found them all upon him; he took nine from his bosom when we took him: Sullivan said he had got nothing about him, and knew nothing about it; I had not lost sight of Jones from the time he took the boxes till he was taken.

Prisoner JONES. Q. Could you keep sight of me all the way? A. Yes, I did; it was about half-past six o'clock - it was dark; there were lights in the street, and a lamp lighted in the shop - I could see his features.

WILLIAM BOWDEN . I am a constable of St. John, Clerkenwell. On the 5th of February I met the witness in Coppice-row, and took the prisoners in Crawford-passage; the prisoner Jones was just before the witness when I first met him; I never lost sight of him - we secured them; I found nine snuff-boxes in the prisoner Jones' bosom, and seven in his pocket; he said he had got nothing till I found them on him; I did not find the seven in his pocket till I got to the office; he said nothing after I found them- I have them here, and produce them: I found nothing on Sullivan: it was about half-past six o'clock. I found no cigar-tubes.

JOHN JULIAN . I rent this house. I was not at home till ten minutes after this occurred; I then found the window broken, and eighteen or twenty boxes missing, with several cigar-tubes; these boxes correspond with what I have left; they are part of what I lost; I had left home at one o'clock, and saw them safe then; they are worth 1l., and the cigar-tubes 3d.

WILLIAM RAVEN . I am a messenger at Hatton-garden office. I was in the office when the prisoners were brought in; I searched them, and found one box in Jones' cap, and six in his trousers, and a cigar-tube in his waistcoat pocket.

JOHN JULIAN. These boxes are mine; I cannot speak to the segar-tube. When I left home I left my wife waiting for a person to mind the shop.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

SULLIVAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-2

Before Mr. Baron Vanghan.

484. THOMAS RUDGLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Hitchiner , on the King's highway, on the 8th of February, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 crown, 2 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , his property.

GEORGE HITCHINER. I live in Ebden's-buildings, Hornsey, On the 8th of February, about ten minutes to ten o'clock at night, I was coming from Kentish-town to the Grand Junction-road , by the Archway, having got an engagement to work that day; the prisoner came up and asked how far I was going - I was in the road; I said I was going home to Hornsey: he accompanied me as far as the toll-gate, and about two hundred and fifty yards be

yond it, he asked me to give him the price of a pint of beer - I said I had not got the money. I knew him before, but was not particularly acquainted with him; I knew him six months ago. I walked about half a mile with him on this night - it was neither light nor dark; there was no moon: when I said I had no money he gave me a blow on the temple, with his fist; I fell from the blow, and he rifled my pockets; another person, who I could not identify, was with him; he came from the hedge, or the ditch, after I was struck - I had not seen him before that; I hallooed Murder! several times, and told him to save my life - they told me to hush; they both filled my month with gravel and dirt; they ran away and left me, after the prisoner had rifled my pocket of my purse - I cannot tell whether he searched more than one pocket, for I was struggling at the time. I only had a halfpenny left; it was a silk purse, and contained a crown-piece, two half-crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence; I had not looked at my purse after I left Osnaburgh-street, which is half a mile off; they both kicked me about the ribs, five or six times, after they got my purse, and then left me; I was perfectly sober. I knew the prisoner before, and have not the least doubt of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it by his clothes that you know him? A. No, by his speech. I told the watchman and turnpike-man what his clothes were, and told the officer I knew him by his clothes as well as his dress. I had drank part of four glasses of gin and water with three people, at a house in Osnaburgh-street - Mr. Elliott's foreman was one of them; I do not know the others, or the sign of the house; I was never there before - I went there to engage with the foreman to work; I had nothing else that day except half a pint of porter at Holloway. I went to the house in Osnaburgh-street about half-past six o'clock, and left at half-past eight; I paid the reckoning, which was 2s.; I treated the foreman and the other men; I was attacked two or three hundred yards from the toll-bar; the bell of the toll-bar rang while I was being robbed; I was quite close under the bell at the time when I gave the alarm; it rang for six or seven minutes; I could see the prisoner's face as he walked by the lamps, when he first joined me - the lamps are below the toll-bar.

COURT. Q. Are you sure you saw his person? A. Yes; I had light for more than three hundred yards, and he has worked with me, on the same premises in Duvall's-lane, but we were not acquainted - I knew his voice; he had a snuff-coloured coat, a light waistcoat, and dark trousers. I came to the turnpike, and gave an alarm directly; I then went to the watch-house, and when I returned to the place I saw two officers, as I was looking for my hat, which I had lost in the scuffle - I mentioned it to them. The prisoner was taken about two o'clock in the morning.

RICHARD DEACON . I am keeper of Kentish-town watch-house. On the 8th of February, about twenty minutes past ten o'clock at night, the prosecutor came to the watch-house - his right side was all over mud, and a little sprinkle of blood just under his eye; he appeared to have been ill-used, and seemed agitated. I did not perceive that he was in liquor. I sent two watchmen with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the watch-house near the tollgate? A. No, it may be a quarter of a mile from it; I heard no bell ring; I was in doors. The toll-bar bell is rather large; it is an alarm-bell; I never heard it ring in my life; I know nothing of it being out of order: it was a darkish night - I should think too dark to distinguish a snuff-coloured coat; I do not think the moon was up.

THOMAS WALLIS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 8th of February, about five minutes past eleven o'clock. I was in the Junction-road, and heard of this robbery - I saw the prosecutor at Kentish-town; about five minutes past eleven - he appeared to have been much ill-used; he had no hat on - he said he had been knocked down and robbed, about 200 or 250 yards off the toll-gate, and said what he had been robbed of: in consequence of the description he gave me, I went, with Prendergrass, by his direction to a public-house in Duvall's-lane, to be informed who the party were; Prendergrass got information there - and about half-past one o'clock we took the prisoner, out of bed, up stairs in Pullen's-gardens; he was undressed - this is about three quarters of a mile from where the robbery was committed, if you go across the fields; Prendergrass took him down stairs to Hitchiner, who identified him as the man who had robbed him; Prendergrass brought him up stairs again, and asked where he was at ten o'clock - he said he had been at home, playing at cards with his wife, and he was going to bed at that time.

Cross-examined Q. Was the prosecutor asked "Is this the man who robbed you?" A. Yes, he had not spoken in the prosecutor's presence then; he was dressed - I heard Hitchiner say he was the man; I was on the stairs - if the prisoner had spoken loud, I should have heard him; I was about twelve yards from them: it is about three quarters of a mile across the fields to the Junction-road, where the robbery was committed; it may be a mile and a quarter the road way - there are paths across the field.

COURT. Q. You say the prisoner had not spoken - had the prosecutor given any reason for knowing him? A. Only his dress; he told me before he saw him, that he had a snuff-coloured coat, with bright buttons; a light waistcoat and dark trousers; and that he had worked with him at Mr. Phillip's; I found the snuff-coloured coat in the room, he also described the other man - one was taken who corresponded in dress, but he could not swear to him.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am inspector of the Bow-street patrol. I saw the prosecutor about twenty minutes past eleven, in the Junction-road, about one hundred yards from the toll-bar, in company with Wallis - he was very dirty, and a little blood issuing from his cheek; I thought at first that he had been drinking in the early part of the evening - but he was perfectly collected.

Q. What made you think he had been drinking? A. By his appearance, but whether it was the effect of the blow or his flurry, I cannot say; I asked if he had been drinking in the early part of the evening - he said, "No, but I have been ill-used, and am much agitated;" he appeared so - he described two men to me, and said, if I went to the Henley Arms public-house, Duvall's-lane, and described them, the landlord could tell me the man's name, and where he could be found; he told me he had a dark coat, but did not mention the colour, or what buttons; I went with him to the Henley Arms - he gave the landlord a description, and I learnt the prisoner's name; I went to Pullen's-gar

dens, Holloway, and found the prisoner on the first floor - I first asked where he was at ten o'clock that night; he said in bed - I asked if he had been out early in the evening, he said Yes, for a few errands; I then told him to dress - I brought him down stairs to the prosecutor, who was waiting outside; the light was then nearly the same as it was at ten o'clock - the prosecutor was walking away; I called him back, and said, "do you know this man;" he said,"That is the man who knocked me down, and robbed me"- I then gave him into the custody of Wallis, while I went after another man.

Cross-examined. Q. You thought he had been drinking in the early part of the evening? A. I thought so, he said he had only had part of four glasses of gin and water; he said he knew the man, by seeing him from time to time in Duvall's-lane, but did not say anything about the man's dress or speech; he did not tell me he had worked with him, but that while he worked in Duvall's-lane, he knew where he worked; I think the prisoner said he had been out for coals and bread.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home at the time of the robbery.

JOHN TAPLEY . I am a coal-merchant, and live at Holloway; the prisoner lives adjoining my premises. On Friday night the 8th of February, he was in my house at nine o'clock, or a few minutes after; he came for coals, wood, and candles - he waited there about five minutes - he took my measure to his own house, with the coals - I saw him turn down the court by my shed, to go to his own house.

COURT. Q. I suppose you have no difficulty in swearing to the evening? A. I am certain it was on the 8th of February, for I heard next morning that he was taken; his wife brought the measure back in about a quarter of an hour - I live about a mile and a half from this toll-bar.

ANN WARNER . I am married and live opposite the prisoner; my door fronts his room window; I saw him pass my door about nine o'clock on the evening in question, with coals - he went up to his room; he cannot pass my door without my seeing him - I did not see him come out again; but about twenty minutes or a quarter to ten o'clock, I saw him speaking to James Dye, a neighbour, as I passed his door from the mangler's - I bid him good night, as he stood at his door without his hat - he bid me good night and said he was going to bed; he shut the door.

COURT. Q. Had you any particular reason for noticing the hour? A. Yes: I have a clock in my house - I was folding and starching my linen, and was not in bed till after twelve o'clock; my lodger was out at work - I was waiting for her to come home, and about ten minutes to ten, I fastened my door - I took particular notice of the clock when I went to the mangler's for my things - that was between a quarter of an hour and twenty minutes to ten o'clock - I immediately went out to the mangler's.

JAMES DYE . I am a labourer, and do porter's work; I have known the prisoner twelve years - I remember the night he was taken up; (I heard of it next morning) - I spoke to him about ten minutes past nine that night, when he was carrying coals by, and just after the chapel clock struck three quarters past nine; I stood talking to him at his street door; I saw Warner coming from the mangler's, with some clothes in a basket - she spoke to us.

COURT. Q. Do you live next door to him? A. No nearly opposite - I am not related to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-3

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

485. JOHN MASSEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harriet Williams , on the 21st of January, and stealing four silver spoons, value 10s. , the goods of William Williams .

The goods being the property of Miss Harriet Williams, and not William Williams, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280221-4

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

486. CHARLES WESTBURY and JAMES WICKS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Cleere , on the 14th of January , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, and stealing 1 clock, value 5l.; 10 spoons, value 25s.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 2 pinafores, value 1s., and 2 shirts, value 1s. , his property.

JAMES LEDGER . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 14th of January, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Rose-street, Long-acre, and observed the two prisoners coming up Rose-street, towards Long-acre; Westbury had a bundle; Wicks had nothing that I perceived; they were walking together in company - I crossed over, and asked Westbury what he had got in the bundle - what it contained; he said it contained some dirty linen - I asked where he fetched it from; he said from his sister's in Rochester-row, Westminster; I asked what he was going to do with it; he said to take it to get washed; I then took them to a public-house, and asked him before I opened the bundle, if the linen was marked - he said No; I then examined it, and found it was marked - here it is: here are 2 pinafores, one marked A. C., 3, the other E. C.; 2 boy's shirts, marked J. C. 3 and 4, and 2 black frocks, not marked; I then searched Wicks, and in his waistcoat pocket found 10 silver spoons not marked, 6 are plain fiddle-heads and 4 double threaded - I have had the property ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Wicks give an account of the spoons? A. He said a man gave him half a crown to carry them, but did not say where to.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was with Ledger, and assisted in taking the prisoners; I found in Westbury's pocket, a small penknife, with the point broken; I have had it ever since - I found on him the duplicate of a handkerchief, pawned in his own name - I saw ten silver spoons found in Wick's fob.

JOHN CLEERE. I live at No. 6, Earl-street, in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, Westminster . On Monday the 14th of January, I lost a clock, 10 teaspoons and some children's clothes; I found them all at Bow-street - except the clock, the property produced is mine. I left home early in the morning, returned at seven o'clock in the evening, and found a pane of glass broken in my front kitchen window, by which means they must have unfastened the sash, by introducing a hand; the window was shut when I saw it - it was perfectly secure, and not broken when I left it in the morning.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you go out in the morning? A. About a quarter to eleven o'clock; I left my wife in the house but nobody else - we keep no servant - the window was not open when I returned; it must have been opened to get the property, unless they were let in at

the door; I found the door quite secure - the lock has a spring bolt; we occasionally have a char-woman.

COURT. Q. They could have shut the window after getting out? A. Yes, but I presume they went out at the door; I found some dirt within the window; as if somebody had got in there.

ALICE CLEERE . I am the prosecutor's wife; I went out on this day at half-past four o'clock - I was the last person in the house, and left it perfectly secure: the kitchen window was not broken then - nobody had any business in the house besides me and my husband; I did not return all night myself - I had seen all the property and the spoons in the house in the course of the morning; I shut the door after me, and am sure the spring caught - I know all this property to be ours - I marked the linen myself, and know the spoons.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know the spoons? A. I swear to four, by the pattern; one of the others by a small dent, and the others being exactly like it, I presume they are mine - that is one of the fiddle headed ones.

Q. When you shut the door, how were you to open it again? A. With a key; it is a common key - I left nobody in the house.

Q. Might not the char-woman have called in your absence? A. She could not have got in.

COURT. Q. Did you expect her that day? A. No; she lives in Wilton-street.

WESTBURY'S Defence. I and Wicks were going up St. Martin's-lane, a man came up and asked us to help him carry a bundle, as he had another, and he would give us something - I asked, how far it was to go; he said to Long-acre; he told us to go up Rose-street, and keep before him, when this gentleman detained us - we looked round for the man, and he was gone.

WICK'S Defence. When I was taken, I looked round for the man who gave them to me to carry; the officer found the spoons on me - I was going to give them to him, but he said "don't put your hand in your pocket;" he said at the office, that we said, we had them from our sister - we never said so.

One witness gave the prisoner Wicks a good character.

WESTBURY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

WICKS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18280221-5

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

487. JONAS WELCH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Doggett , on the 29th of January , and stealing 2 watches, value 3l.; 1 coat, value 20s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; 3 shifts, value 15s; 2 aprons, value 1s., and 1 spoon, value 2s. , his property.

HARRIET DOGGETT . I am the wife of John Doggett - we live in Huntsworth-mews, Dorset-square; we have one room there over a stable, and pay 2s. 6d, a week for it- Mr. Peters is the landlord - his gig is kept there, but no horse: the stable and all belong to us - we keep the key of it, and go through it to get to our own room: Peters has a key of the stable also, and kept a cart there - my husband does not take care of them; Peters lives in Upper Park-place - we do not use the stable. On the 29th of January, at ten minutes to two o'clock, I left home, and left nobody there - I locked the room door and put the key into my pocket, then came down stairs into the stable, locked the stable door, and put that key into my pocket; there is a door at the foot of the stairs that has no lock: in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, Richard Peters fetched me from Mrs. Simmond's - I went home, and found the stable door lock wrenched clean off, and hanging to the door; I found my room door broken open - I missed two silver watches, and a silver spoon out of a little mug on the mantelpiece; I had seen them safe when I went out - I have not found any of my things; the prisoner lodged with us when we lived at No. 1, in the mews; I had seen him on the Thursday before, going up the mews - I opened my window, and said, "Jonas, have you any work?" he said No; I said, I had a new clock, and asked him up to see it - he came up; the watches were on the mantel-piece then.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The prisoner is a carpenter? A. Yes, I know nothing about his character, he behaved well while with us.

JAMES DOGGETT . I am the prosecutor's brother. On the 29th of January, at six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner going up Huntsworth-mews - he was about thirty yards from the stable door, and had passed the door; I overtook him, and said, "Jonas, have you any work?" he said, only a job or two on his own account; he asked if my brother's wife was at Peters, at work, (she often works there) - I said, I thought she was working at No. 7, Edward-street, which is just at the back of the stable; he asked again, if she was not at Peters' - I said, she was not; he said, I am pretty sure she is, for I think I saw her about dinner time - I said, she was at Edward-street when I went home to dinner - I wished him good night, and left him in Park-place, at the corner of Edward-street - I went home to No. 7, Edward-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not his master's workshop in the mews? A. Yes, Mr. King is master of the shop where he had a little job; he said he had been working there six or eight weeks - I understand he was then doing a little job in King's shop; he had a basket which lapped over the handles, not a carpenter's basket exactly.

HARRIET CATES . I live at No. 6, Huntsworth-mews, Dorset-square - my husband is a coachman. On the 29th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise as if somebody were trying my door to make me hear, as I have no knocker; my dog barked - I got up, looked out, and saw the prisoner coming from Doggett's stable; he looked up at my window, saw me, and immediately put his basket down, and stopped under my window as if for a necessary purpose; my room is over the stable - I shut my window and saw no more; there was a little boy passing on the opposite side of the way - the prisoner was between my door and Doggett's.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know King's workshop in the mews? A. Yes; he was more than thirty yards from there: there are three or four stables and coach-houses between us and the workshop - when I saw him he was coming towards King's workshop.

COURT. Q. Is King's workshop on the other side of Doggett's? A. My house is between Doggett's and the workshop.

JAMES DOGGETT re-examined. He had passed King's workshop and Doggett's when I saw him; if he were there half an hour afterwards he must have gone back.

WILLIAM PAIN . I am an excavator, and live in Boston-

place, Dorset-square, within one hundred and fifty yards of this mews. On Tuesday, the 29th of January, I went with the prisoner from Dorset-square into the Strand; we returned, and got back as near five o'clock as possible - I left him in Upper Park-place - he said he was going up to King's, to receive some wages which he owed him for work; King lives in Upper Park-place, but his shop is in the mews; he crossed over to the Gloucester Arms public-house, Upper Park-place - I said I was going to the Portman Arms public-house; he said, "Stop a minute and I will go with you;" he went over towards King's - he was forty or fifty yards from King's house; I waited a minute or so - he did not return; I went on to the Portman Arms, in Melton-street; he came there in about three quarters of an hour or an hour; I stood at the bar, drinking part of a pot of half-and-half, with three friends: as the prisoner went out he came to the bar; there was a drop in the pot, which stood on the bar - I asked him to take it- he said No, he wanted to go home; he drank it, and wished us good night, saying he was going home. I believe he had a basket in his hand; this might be six o'clock or a little after - I saw no more of him.

EDWARD ACRES . I am a watchman in Mary-le-bone. I was on duty in the mews; when I went round at seven o'clock, I found Doggett's stable door broken open; I went up with Peters' son, whom I fetched, and found the room door broken open, and a parcel of women's clothes about the floor.

THOMAS PEIRCE . I live at No. 24, Lisson-street, Mary-le-bone, and am a bricklayer. I have known the prisoner about two years - I saw him on the 29th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, at Mrs. Collins', the Portman Arms, Dorset-square - I was at breakfast there; he came in, and took up the paper - I sat opposite him: he called me over, and said, "Will you go with me to break open Doggett's house to-night?" I said No, I would not, and went and sat down in my place; he called me again, and asked if I should be there by six o'clock - I said perhaps I might, as I used the house; I said I was generally there: he pulled a screw-driver out of his side pocket, and said, "I have got the tools that will do it;" I took the screw-driver in my hand, and looked at it - I gave it him again, and he put it into his pocket - that is all that passed. I noticed the screw-driver - it was rusty nearly all the way up - I should know it again; he did not ask me to rob Mr. Morse - it was Doggett's name that he mentioned; Mrs. Doggett was once Mrs. Morse. I went there again about three o'clock in the afternoon, and about six, as I was having some beer with my brother Charles, he came in, and passed Pain at the bar; he came to the tap-room door, and beckoned me out - I shook my head, and would not go out; I remained there till about five minutes to eight o'clock - I did not expect to see him there.

Q. Did it not occur to you to give notice to Mr. Doggett, or to any Magistrate? A. I was in danger of my life, for he has a great character as a fighting-man.

Cross-examined. Q. Give us a better description of the screw-driver? A. It was not very rusty - I noticed nothing more particular in it; I had it about two minutes in my hand: there was nobody else in the tap-room. I am generally at the Portman Arms when I am out of work; my brother lives near there, and gives me a little; the potboy was in and out of the room in the morning, when he asked me to go and break the house open. I was once taken up on suspicion of something; I was never in custody but once, except for making a noise in the streets; I was never charged with stealing a great coat: I was taken up about four sovereigns by a young man; I have heard my mother has paid him so much a week to make it up - she never told me so herself. I have been out of work about eighteen months - I have worked for Mr. Phillips, a builder in Regent's-park, about three weeks; that was just before the hard frost set in.

Q. When did you first think of telling this story? A. On the Saturday after the Tuesday it was committed - I told the Magistrate of it because I wished to tell the truth - I told Mrs. Doggett of it the morning after the prisoner was taken, on the Wednesday, about one o'clock; I did not hear of the robbery till about twelve - Gibbs was in the public-house, and asked if he did not see me in Tottenham-court-road last night, going to a dog fight - I said No.

Q. Did you say a word about the prisoner before you were charged with it? A. No. Mrs. Doggett is sometimes called Morse, but I mentioned the name of Doggett to the Magistrate.

COURT. Q. Where did you see Gibbs? A. He came to the Portman Arms next morning; he did not take me into custody; he said, "I want you to come down to the office - your mother and Mrs. Doggett are there;" I went with him - I did not know the robbery was done till then; he said Mrs. Doggett suspected me; my brother William works at St. Katharine's Docks - I have not seen him for six weeks - my brother Charles also works there; I saw my brother William about a week before the robbery, but not since.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long has your brother William been working at the Docks? A. I do not know - Charles was paving some stables at the back of the mews at the time the robbery was committed.

CHARLES PEIRCE . I am Thomas Peirce's brother, and live at No. 9, Huntsworth-mews - I have lived there two years and nine months. I have worked at St. Katharine's Docks about nine days: my brother William went to work there a week or ten days before me - we both work there now - we came home together last night - he lives in Sovereign-street, Edgware-road.

Q. When were you, William, and Thomas together last? A. I do not know - it is a good while ago; we do not take heed of him. I have known the prisoner about two years and a half - on the evening after his first examination I went up to see if it was true that he was in custody, and as he was coming out to the van, I said, "Jonas, I am afraid you are betrayed" - he said, "Betrayed! what do you mean? I do not think I am, without your brother William has come against me;" I said, "Mrs. Morse has offered my brother Thomas a sum of money to speak the truth;" he then got into the van, and I saw him no more of him.

Cross-examined. Q. How much had Mrs. Morse offered? A. I do not know; I heard she had offered money - she told me so herself, in her own room; I do not know how much it was: I was at work just at the back of these

stables; my brother Thomas used to come to me to relieve him - whenever I had a pint of beer he was welcome to part of it, let his character he what it would; I give him a drop of beer if he wants it, but I do not keep his company; it is not my place to expose him - he has certainly been bad, but he has suffered the law for it.

COURT. Q. Were you at the Portman Arms on the 29th of January? A. I was there in the evening, and sat with my back to the door, and my brother sat facing the door: I did not see Jonas come in myself; my brother Thomas was at work in the Regent's-park last summer, for six or seven weeks - it was about the beginning of the summer; he was not at work in the winter.

THOMAS SMITH . I am servant at the Portman Arms. On the 29th of January, in the morning, I saw the prisoner there, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I do not recollect seeing Thomas Peirce there.

JAMES GIBBS . I am a constable. I heard of this robbery about half-past nine o'clock at night; I went next morning, before day-light, to the prisoner's house in Princes-street, Lisson-grove, with Doggett - when the shop was open I went up to the second floor room, and knocked at the door; he was in bed, and asked who was there - I said my name was Gibbs; he dressed, and let me in; I said he was suspected of robbing Mrs. Doggett last night; he said, "I am innocent, Mr. Gibbs - I will go with you any where - you are welcome to search the place;" I did so, but found nothing; I asked if he had any tools - he said, "I have a few down in the wash-house, where I keep my work bench;" he took me down, and in a small basket there was a large screw-driver - he said, "That is all the tools I have." I took him to the office, then examined the stable door, and found a very small space had been worked out with a similar tool to this, but I do not mean to say the mark tallied; the lock had been forced off, but was then mended; any screw-driver might have done it; the prisoner told me, going along, that he could account for where he had been that evening. I afterwards received private information that Thomas Peirce knew something of the robbery, and took him at the Portman Arms; he walked down with me, and his mother - he was not in custody; I took him into custody on the day of the second examination; he has been in custody ever since, to give evidence.

Cross-examined. Q. When you first went to him, did you charge him with the robbery? A. No; I said I wanted him to go down to his mother; I did not tell him he was suspected till Saturday. The lock of the room was inside - it could not be forced off; the bolt was wrenched back.

Prisoner. I have witnesses to call in my Defence.

WILLIAM KING . I live in Upper Park-place, Dorset-square, and have a workshop in Huntsworth-mews. I have known the prisoner two years - he worked for me the summer before last, and this winter, for about ten weeks; he often worked at my shop; I owed him 10d.: on the 29th of January, he came to my house about ten minutes or a quarter past six o'clock, and stopped and talked at my door for a quarter of an hour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-6

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

488. WILLIAM MUSTOW was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Kelly , on the 28th of January , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 3 caps, value 2s. 6d. , his property.

THOMAS KELLY. I am an umbrella-maker , and live at Hampstead. On the 28th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, I stopped at the Black Horse public-house, George-street, St. Giles' , for some refreshment; I had a bundle tied in a handkerchief, with three woman's caps in it; I saw the prisoner sitting down there - I am certain of him; I was not in his company: I remained there about three quarters of an hour, and drank three or four pints of beer. I came out to go home about nine o'clock, and when I had got into the middle of the street, about twenty yards from the door, the prisoner came behind me, struck me in the back of the neck with his fist, and knocked me down; he must have followed me out; I saw him drag the bundle out of my hand - I kept it; when I was down he forced it from me, and ran away; I saw him by the light of the lamps, and am certain of him; I sung out Watch! the watchman came up, followed, and brought him back in about half an hour; I am sure he is the man. I had bought the caps, and was taking them home to my wife; he only knocked me down on my knees - I got up directly.

JOHN MURPHY . I am a watchman. I was on duty on the 28th of January, at nine o'clock, and heard Kelly sing out for a watchman; I went up, and he complained to me- I saw nobody run from him; I saw a good many people running after a person - I followed, but did not get up to them. In consequence of information I took the prisoner into custody; the prosecutor had not described him to me, but the publican had - I met him going into the Cock public-house, George-street, in about half an hour, and took him: I heard him tell the prosecutor at the first examination, that he and his mother would make it up to him, if he did not prosecute him; I did not hear him say any thing about returning the property. I have known him nearly two years - the prosecutor had made no offer to him.

THOMAS KELLY re-examined. Q. When I was at the office I said nothing to induce him to offer to settle it; his mother, who stood by me, said if I would not prosecute, they would get me my bundle, and pay me for my time; the prisoner heard that.

Prisoner's Defence. I left work, and went to the Cock, to have some beer, and this gentleman took me; I did not know what it was about till morning, when the prosecutor said if my mother would give him 10s. he would make it up.

MARGARET CALLAN . I have known Kelly eight years - he came to me about six o'clock, and we drank nine quarterns of gin, to our ownselves; this was on Monday week - I do not know the day of the month; I cannot read - we were together from six to eleven o'clock that night, at a public-house in George-street, kept by Kennedy; we drank nine quarterns of gin, and, to the best of my opinion, six quarts of beer, between us two - he had no more money, and asked me to go out and sell the caps for half-a-crown - I went out, and could only get 1s. 6d.; I returned, and gave them to him - he went out, and was so drunk he could hardly walk; I went to the pastry-cook's, to wait for some pies, and as I returned I saw two watchmen

dragging Kelly to the watch-house, and hitting him, he was so drunk; that was at a quarter-past eleven o'clock; I did not leave him from six o'clock till eleven, except to sell the caps; it was about three weeks ago: he returned after being at the watch-house, and stopped in the same house till twelve o'clock.

ANN LEONARD . I saw this man dragged to the watch-house, very drunk; I had come out to look for my husband, who was drinking; it was last Monday three weeks; two watchmen were lodging him at St. Giles' watch-house - they struck him several times: it was after eleven o'clock. I know nothing of the prisoner, except from his living in the neighbourhood.

JOHN MURPHY re-examined. The prosecutor appeared quite sober.

THOMAS KELLY . I left the public-house about eleven o'clock - I have not seen the landlord since.

- MUSTOW. I am the prisoner's mother. I was at the office, and asked Mr. Kelly what property he had lost; he said it was of no great consequence, but at last said three caps - I asked the value; he said, "I don't want to lose my day's work - if you will give me 10s. before he goes in, it shall be settled;" I said I had not ten farthings, but if he would come with me to Mr. Kennedy, I thought he would pay it; he said he did not know him; the watchman said I had better go and get it myself; I said I was afraid he would be brought in before I returned - he said he would not, but in ten minutes he was taken in- nothing was said about the bundle being returned.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-7

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

489. FRANK BURGESS was indicted for embezzling 866l. 18s. 5d., which he had received on account of Robert Williams and others, his masters .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-8

490. MARY KIRWAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 silk gown, value 12s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 lace cap, value 3s., and 1 lace collar, value 3s., the goods of Maria Clark ; and 1 lace cap, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Beningfield .

SAMUEL BENINGFIELD. I am an auctioneer , and live in Hart-street, Mark-lane . The prisoner was found in my house while I was out - I know nothing more.

MARIA CLARK. I live at Mr. Beningfield's - the street door is generally open in the day time. On the 5th of February, about twelve o'clock in the morning, I left my things safe on the third floor, and about one o'clock I found the prisoner, who was a stranger, in the two pair of stairs back room; I asked how she came there - she said she had got leave from a young lady, who was down at the door talking to a gentleman - she had nothing in her hands - I found the articles stated in the indictment in a handkerchief, which did not belong to the house; they were in the wardrobe by her - she denied ever having touched them; I am the only person who had care of the house; the cap belongs to Mrs. Beningfield; she had moved that out of the front bed-room; she still denied having touched them; I brought her down to the kitchen, and Mr. Beningfield sent for an officer, who took her.

JOSEPH HUNT . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner; she denied all knowledge of the property: I asked what business she had up there - she said she went up for a certain purpose.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-9

491. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 1 coat, value 4l. , the goods of Merlin Ladd .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Richard Ladd .

MERLIN LADD. I am a widow , and live at No. 19, Jewry Street, Aldgate . On the 2nd of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner knocked at the door, and asked my servant if I had a bed-room and sitting room to let for a single gentleman. I came down, and saw him in the passage - he asked if I had an apartment to let; I asked him into the parlour, and asked if it was wanted for any length of time; he said it was for a gentleman who had come from the country, and was at the Saracen's Head, Aldgate - that it might be for a month, more or less. This coat laid on the parlour sofa - I said I could not give him an answer till Monday - this was on Saturday; he left the room before me; I showed him out at the front door, and shut the door after him - he returned in five minutes, and knocked at the door - the servant came up to me to give me notice, and when I came down he was gone; I missed the coat, which was on the sofa when I let him out the first time - he was taken within five minutes, and brought back to the house, with it; I know it to be my son Richard's, coat.

RICHARD LADD. This coat is mine - I was at home when the prisoner was brought back with it.

MARY GODFREY . I am servant to Mrs. Ladd; on the 2nd of February the prisoner knocked at the door - I let him in; he asked if we had a bed and sitting-room for a single gentleman: my mistress came down and talked with him, and when he went away the coat was on the front parlour sofa; he came again in five minutes - I went up to call my mistress - when I came down he was gone, and had left the door open - the coat was missing; before I had time to shut the door, Mr. Henson brought the prisoner up with it on his arm.

WILLIAM HENSON . I am a boot-maker, and live opposite Mrs. Ladd. On the 2nd of February I saw the prisoner go into her house, and in a minute he came out with the coat under his arm - I stopped him with it.

W. PLAISTOW, JUN. I received him in charge with the coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to say, that extreme distress urged me to the act. I have a wife and four children, and was out of a situation - it is the first time I was ever in trouble.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280221-10

492. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 42 lbs. weight of stone blue, value 3l. 3s , the goods of Charles David Zetterquist and another.

CHARLES DAVID ZETTERQUIST. I am a blue maker , in partnership with my father; our manufactory is at the

back of the premises in Collingwood-street, Blackfriars-road. On the 1st of February, about five o'clock, I sent Johnson, our servant, with a quantity of brown paper parcels, to deliver at several places in the City - the two which are stolen are worth three guineas.

MICHAEL JOHNSON . I am the prosecutors' servant. On the 1st of February I had several parcels in a truck to deliver in the City, and near the end of Tower-street, Wing came up and asked if I had given any body a lift - I said I had not; he then asked if I had lost any thing, and on looking at the back of the truck I missed two parcels of stone blue, weighing 14 lbs. and 28 lbs: I left the truck in care of a gentleman, and followed Wing, and saw the prisoner in Fenchurch-street, walking with another young man, who had the parcels tied in a blue apron - that person escaped; the prisoner ran away directly he saw me come up - they both ran away - Wing pursued; I lost sight of the prisoner for about two minutes - he was stopped near the end of Seething-lane: I took the parcels out of the hand of the other man to see if they were mine, and he ran off; the prisoner was in that man's company - he said he had not taken them; the man also left his apron in my hand - it was not tied round him; the parcels were directed to the places I was to deliver them.

JOSEPH WING . I am a waterman and lighterman, and live in Prince's court, Lambeth. On the 1st of February, about a quarter past six o'clock, I saw the last witness at the narrow end of Lower Thames-street , dragging a truck - I saw the prisoner take one brown paper parcel out of the truck - he was alone then; I did not see the other taken: I followed the prisoner to the end of Rood-lane - he looked at me, and suspecting he had robbed the truck, I went and told Johnson, who missed two parcels; I bade him follow me, and just before I got to the top of Rood-lane I caught sight of the prisoner, with another young man - this was about two minutes after the parcel was taken from the truck; the other had then got the property - I told Johnson that was not the man who took it, but the prisoner was; the other man delivered the property to Johnson and walked away - I went after the prisoner, who ran away, and a gentleman caught him in turning the corner into Leadenhall-market, and he was secured.

JOHN JUDD . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house, with the property, which I have had ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came out in the evening to take a walk - I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran, seeing other people running, and was stopped. I was taken to the watch-house half an hour before the charge was given; Wing and Johnson went out twice and consulted together, and at last gave the charge.

JOSEPH WING re-examined. I stated the case at the watch-house, but Johnson hesitated about giving the charge, as it might be troublesome to his master.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-11

493. DANIEL SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 pair of stockings, value 11d. , the goods of Moses Charles Bidmead .

EDMUND MAGAHAN . I am servant to Moses Charles Bidmead - he is a hosier , and lives on Holborn-hill . On Saturday night, the 26th of January, about ten o'clock, I was serving in the shop - the prisoner came up to the door, and, with a sudden snatch, took down a pair of lamb's-wool stockings, which were secured by pins two or three feet inside the door - he stepped inside to get them; I immediately pursued, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped; I saw him throw them into the middle of the road - I picked them up and gave them to Slate.

WILLIAM GRANGER . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, and throw a pair of stockings into the road; Magahan was pursuing him - I laid hold of him without losing sight of him.

JAMES SLATE . The prisoner and stockings were delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Some labourers were going to the pay-table at the Horse Shoe public-house, in Fetter-lane, and they were helping me home, being intoxicated. I wanted to overtake one of them, who was before me on the hill - I ran, and this man called Stop thief! I fell down and lost my hat - I fell again, and the watchman picked me up, and in ten minutes the prosecutor came up, and gave charge of me.

JAMES SLATE. He was sober.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280221-12

494. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , at St. Ethelburga, 1 gelding, price 20l.; 1 chaise, value 20l., and 1 set of chaise harness, value 5l. , the property of John Charles Burrow .

JOHN CHARLES BURROW. I am a medical man , and live in Bishopsgate without. On Saturday the 9th of February, at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was visiting a patient at Cambridge Heath - I left my horse and gig at the door, without any body to take care of it; when I had been in the house about five minutes, I saw a man get into the gig and drive away - I ran after him, but he got away with it; the gig was worth 20l., and was drawn by a gelding, worth 20l.: I found the gelding, chaise, and harness the next day at the Four Swans in Bishopsgate-street, and saw the prisoner in custody at Guildhall on the Monday.

GEORGE LONG . I am ostler at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate-street. On Saturday, the 9th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought in this gelding, chaise, and harness, dreadfully splashed, and told me to take them in; I asked if they were to shop all night - he said Yes; he claimed them as his own: Mr. Burrow came between five and six o'clock the next afternoon, and claimed them - the prisoner was taken away from the inn on Sunday morning, by Sheppard, before Mr. Burrow came, a Mr. Bennett having claimed the chaise as Mr. Burrow's: the prisoner had stopped at the house all night, and in the morning, till he was taken; I heard him say, he saw the chaise standing, and got in and drove it away.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner - he did not deny taking the horse and chaise, but said he did not mean to sell it; he told me he was a shoemaker, and a native of Warwickshire - that he had been living with his brother, a farmer, but did not seem to know the town; he said he had no residence in London - I did not find a farthing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I think it is hard that I have not somebody to explain the case more plainly; my brother promised me every assistance, but I do not see any friend present; I did not steal the gig.

GEORGE LONG re-examined. He told me he had come a long journey, and wanted the horse taken particular care of, and to give it plenty of corn; he desired it might be ready for him at ten o'clock in the morning.

JOHN CLARKE . I am the prisoner's brother, and live at Chesnut-wood, near Warwick - I am a farmer. My brother had been with me about fourteen months, and left me about three weeks last Saturday, of his own accord; he did not say what he was going to do, or where he was going; when he came home to me he was insane, and I took care of him till the 23d of December, 1826, when I went out, and when I came back I was informed he had half murdered the man I had left in care of him; he has never been right in his head since.

JOSEPH ESSEX . I live at Noel, in Warwickshire. I have known the prisoner two years - he did not always appear in his right senses: I believe him to be harmless when in his right mind.

NOT GUILTY, being Insane .

Reference Number: t18280221-13

495. HYAM PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 1st of February , of a certain evil-disposed person, one 5l. promissory note, the property of Mark Oliver Iron , the said note having then lately before been feloniously stolen, (to wit,) on the same day, the prisoner wellknowing the same to have been stolen, against the statute .

MARK OLIVER IRON. I am an upholsterer , and live at Ipswich, in Suffolk. On the 1st of February I was in Newgate-street, going to the Four Swans, in Bishopsgate-street; I had taken more wine than agreed with me - I was not particularly drunk; I was intoxicated I know - I had been drinking at an Inn in the Haymarket, where I had dined; I do not know what time I came away. I came on to Fleet-market, and got in company with a female, close by the market; she asked me to treat her with a glass of wine; I went into the wine-vaults, and gave her a glass - finding I had no change I took out my pocketbook; I then had seven 5l. notes, of Mills', of Hadley Bank, safe; I had taken the numbers down on the Tuesday before - they were Nos. 70, 636, 327, 816, 1351, 1443, and 4128; the landlord said he would not trouble me to change, but told me to take care and put my pocketbook into my pocket; I did so, and went on to Newgate-street; a person stopped me in Newgate-street, and pulled me about - my pocket-book and its contents were taken - I missed it before I got out of Newgate-street - this was on a Friday. About half-past nine o'clock next morning, the 1st of February, I saw one of the notes - I lost it on Thursday night, the 31st of January, after twelve o'clock, I mean - I saw it at the coach-office of the Four Swans; I had stated when I got to the inn that I had been robbed, and in the morning I went to Messrs. Hankey's, where they were payable, and stopped the payment of them, just as they began business; at half-past nine o'clock that morning I found the prisoner in custody in the coach-office, with the note No. 327; he said he had taken it of a person for a watch that morning - I did not hear him say where. The Hadley coach puts up at the Four Swans. I have not found any other note.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever go by the name of Hevens? A. No. I recollect perfectly well having my pocket-book and notes that night; I had dined at the John O'Groat, in the Haymarket; I went there about six o'clock; I did not particularly notice at what time I came away: I went straight down the Strand to Fleet-market, and stopped no where; the landlord was in my company part of the time at the John O'Groat - I have known him some years; I paid my bill, but cannot recollect how much it was; I drank nothing but Port - I think there were about three pints among three of us: there was some brandy and water at dinner - I drank very little of that; there was 1s. worth between me and a man who went in with me; I had fallen over some lemon-peel as I went in, and gave him a glass for assisting me; I had no other spirits - this was before dinner; I did not speak to anybody, to the best of my knowledge, till I got to Fleet-market, where a woman spoke to me; I do not recollect going to any house with any female; I will not swear positively whether I did or not; I swear I did not give the notes to anybody. I had been about two days in London; I am not in the habit of walking out at night. I was not so drunk as not to know what I was about; I did not take my pocket-book out to pay for my dinner, as I had a sovereign and some silver in my purse. I know it was about twelve o'clock when I was in Newgate-street, as I heard the watchman call the hour; I will swear I did not drop my pocket-book, for I buttoned it in my pocket; the landlord saw the notes in it.

WILLIAM SHORTER . I am book-keeper at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate; Mr. Iron had slept there for two or three nights before he was robbed; I lodge there, and when I came down at seven o'clock in the morning I heard from the servant that he had lost some country notes; I knew he had come by our Ipswich coach, and Hadley notes are commonly circulated there; our house is about four minutes' walk from Messrs. Hankey's. I went to breakfast at eight o'clock, returned to the office as the clock struck nine, and had not been there many minutes before the prisoner came in and presented me this 5l. Hadley Bank note - he was quite a stranger to me; he asked me to give him cash for it, saying he would allow me a shilling in the pound if I would do so; I said No, I knew nothing about the Hadley Bank; seeing it was payable in London was the reason I would not give change for it: he pressed me to change it - I told him he might go to the banker's, it was near enough - he said he would rather allow me the poundage, which he was in the habit of doing on country notes, at coach-offices, and he wished me to have it to get something by it - that he did not want to trouble himself to go the banker's. I thought of Mr. Iron's robbery, and said if he would wait a few minutes that I might make inquiry, I would; I went out at the back door, called Boots, and sent him to Hankey's, to change the note; when I returned to the office the prisoner asked if I had sent to the banker's - I said No, I had sent to a private friend in Bishopsgate-street, who had come from Hadley; he then said, "I will step up to the fishmonger's a little above here, and return in five minutes;" Boots and the prisoner came into the office together - Boots turned round against the counter, as a signal, and I detained the prisoner, told him the note was stolen, and that a gentle

man at our house had lost some - he then told the porter and me that we might as well let him go; he did not ask for his note to be returned; I refused, telling him I must clear myself, and give an account how I came by it; I sent for an officer, who took him; Boots left the note at Hankey's - I had not noticed the number, nor mark it; I only know it was a 5l. Hadley note. I saw it again at the Mansion-house, in the possession of Messrs. Hankey's clerk- the prosecutor saw it there.

Cross-examined. Q. You put no mark on it? A. No, nor did Boots, in my presence; I saw it at the Mansion-house about twelve o'clock that day. No Hadley coach comes to our house; the Colchester coach puts up there - it is about four miles from there. I had not seen Irons that morning.

Q. How do you know it was the same note as you saw afterwards? A. I noticed the back of it before I gave it to Boots - there was some small writing on it: I have no hesitation in swearing to it; I noticed a small letter M, for Mr.; I noticed it in order to know it again - I do not know what words were on it; I was busy, and did not notice it so particularly as I might have done; a mark on it would do as well for me to recollect it by as the writing would: I am satisfied it is the same note; I recollect the small writing on the back of it.

JOHN STONE . I am Boots at the Four Swans. On the 1st of February, a little after nine o'clock in the morning, Shorter gave me a 5l. Hadley note, in the prisoner's presence, but he whispered to me to take it to Hankey's - I took the same note to Messrs. Hankey's directly - I left it with one of the clerks; I returned to the Four Swans, and before I got there I saw the prisoner withing a short distance of the inn - he asked me in the street if all was right - I told him Yes, all was right, and if he would come to the office I would give him his change; he then came into the office: I told him I had an order from the banker's to detain him, as the note was a stolen one, and I must detain him till he could give some account of it - he gave no account then: I left him in the custody of the book-keeper while I sent for an officer - I told him I was going for an officer - he said nothing to that; I did not return to the office till he was in custody; he gave no account in my hearing. I saw the note produced at the Mansion-house by the officer, I think - not by the clerk to whom I gave it.

Cross-examined. Q. It was in the officer's possession at the Mansion-house? A. Yes; I did not see the clerk there - I do not think I should know him again if I saw him. I made no mark on the note. I never saw the prisoner before. I saw Mr. Irons the night before, between twelve and one o'clock, nearer to twelve, when he came home; he was rather in liquor, but had his wits about him.

JEREMIAH HERBERT . I am a constable of the City. I was fetched to the Four Swans, to take the prisoner in charge; they told me, in his hearing, that a gentleman who lodged there had been robbed of some 5l. country notes; Shorter said the prisoner had presented one to him - that he had sent Boots to the banker's, and it turned out to be one the gentleman had been robbed of, according to the number. I told the prisoner I must take him before the Lord Mayor, and he must explain - I did so; Messrs. Hankey's clerk appeared there, and produced the note; it was given to me when the prisoner was committed; by Mr. Brown, the marshal; I put a mark on it - it is the same note as I received from Mr. Brown, in the presence of the Lord Mayor, and of the prisoner; it is the one he was accused of having received: I produce it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the clerk here? A. No.

MR. IRON. This note is No. 327, and is one of the seven notes I had in my pocket-book; I received it from the Hadley Bank myself, the day before I came to town.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the others Hadley notes? A. All of them; they had been in circulation before: I cannot say whether there was writing on all of them.

WILLIAM SHORTER . I believe this to be the note I had from the prisoner; here is the small writing on the back of it.

Prisoner's Defence. Shorter knows I gave an account of it, and Mr. Cope, the marshal, knows it: I gave an account to every body about it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-14

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

496. WILLIAM FORBES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , at St. Martin in the Fields, 3 snuff-boxes, value 10l.; 10 watches, value 50l.; 12 watch-chains, value 12l.; 2 watch-guards, value 5s.; 28 watch-keys, value 5l.; 17 rings, value 10s.; 6 swivels, value 3s., and 4 watch-cases, value 20s., the goods of Antoine Vieyres , in the dwelling-house of Alexander Lindsay .

ANTOINE VIEYRES. I am a native of France, and carry on business as a watch-maker, at No. 28, Coventry-street, Haymarket - I believe it is in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields; Alexander Lindsay keeps the house; I lodge with him, and have a shop on the ground floor. On Saturday, the 9th of February, I went out about twenty minutes past nine o'clock in the evening, leaving my shop secure; I left my wife and two daughters in the shop, and when I returned I found the officers there, taking an account of the goods, and the prisoner in custody; I had left the show-glass on the counter; the value of all the property in it is about 70l. or 80l.

JOSEPH WORMALD . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 9th of February, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I was on duty in Coventry-street; I heard a scream from a female voice - I stopped, and saw the prosecutrix coming out of the shop, holding her hands up; I saw the prisoner running out of the shop door, with the show-glass in his hand, and the prosecutrix after him: I crossed over, and when I got within about five yards of the prisoner, I saw him throw the show-glass down on the pavement, six or eight yards from the house; Billings, my partner, pursued him, while I picked it up - he was taken about forty yards off; he got out of my sight, but I am positive he is the man: we went to the shop, and the prosecutor came home - the glass contained the articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN HENRY BILLINGS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty in Coventry-street with Wormald, and saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's shop, with a show-glass in his hand; he immediately turned to the right and ran with it - an alarm was given; I cried Stop thief! and followed him, and after running six or eight yards, I

saw him throw the show-glass down; it was afterwards picked up: I took him immediately, without losing sight of him - the house is in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields.

JOSEPH WORMALD re-examined. The prosecutor's house is next door but one to the end of Oxenden-street, and next door to a wine-merchant's.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I am by trade a glazier , and arrived in London from Edinburgh, two years ago; I went to work with Mr. Morley, in Tottenham-court-road, with whom I had constant employ; four months after which, I went to Mr. Smith of Regent's-park, I worked for him six months; with Mr. Wilson, a builder at Clapham, three months; with Mr. Bird of Kensington, six months; I went from there to Mr. Armstrong, of Sheerness, with him I worked four months, I left him on the 20th of December, since which time I have been out of employ; I have since then lodged with a countryman of my own, named Hamilton. The night on which the robbery was committed. I went to Ellis and Son, in the neighbourhood of Lombard-street, (having been informed they were in want of men), who desired me to call on the Monday; I made an appointment with the person who told me to call on Ellis and Son, to meet him at nine o'clock; being behind my time, I was running home, when the officers took me into custody, and took me to St. Ann's watch-house, where they kept me a quarter of an hour, before either of them would give the charge.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18280221-15

497. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of George Holding .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280221-16

Before Mr. Justice Bailey.

498. WILLIAM JONES was again indicted, for the wilful murder of Betty Jeffs , widow .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and LAW, conducted the prosecution.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am the son of the deceased, Betty Jeffs - she was a widow.

JOHN LETT , ESQ. I am proprietor of the house No. 11, Montague-place, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury ; I left the house in the care of the deceased, Betty Jeffs - she was the only person who had the charge of it; she had been in my service ever since 1810 - I had seen her on Monday afternoon, the 31st of December, soon after three o'clock; I did not see her again, till the evening of the Tuesday, when I found her a corpse - she was laying in the room below stairs.

Cross-examined by MR. COLERIDGE. Q. Did you know the members of her family? A. I cannot say that I did know them personally; I understood she had a son, named John: I had been informed by her, that he had taken sums of money at various times, which distressed her very much; I have given her money, which I understood she requested in consequence of the demands of her son - it was money I had to save for her; I understood he was in distress, and wanted money.

COURT. Q. You supplied her with money belonging to herself? A. Yes, money she had left in my hands; she requested it in consequence of his being in want; the only particular sum I recollect was two or three years ago: I never supplied her with money on any other occasion, except for the purposes of my house, and I gave her her wages; I understand her son has come to the house, but I never saw him. When she requested this money I represented to her the impropriety of parting with what might be of use to her in old age, without proper caution; it was only on one occasion that I spoke to her about it - it was in consequence of only one application, I think.

Q. How long had she been in care of the house alone on this occasion? A. I left the house for good in September, 1825, and went to live in Surrey, and from that time to the 31st of December last, she was constantly in care of the house; it is a large house, and has a great many rooms: I was there the evening after this took place, in consequence of information being sent to me; I had left a great many articles in the house, in her care - I am not aware of any plate being there; I really cannot say what was left there. I understand there were some spoons - there was an inventory of the things.

PAUL DENT . I am in the employ of Messrs. Robinson, upholdsters, of Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. - On the 1st of January I was directed by them to go to No. 11, Montague-place (I had been there before) - I went about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 1st of January; I rang the bell, but could not get admission; the shutters were shut: I then went through Mr. Sergeant Bosanquet's house, No. 12, and went to the back area with Alexander Bonnick (who is Mr. Robinson's porter), and Mr. Justice Holroyd's butler - I dropped down the back area of No. 11, and opened the back kitchen window, the shutters of which were put to, but not fastened; I got in, and then opened the front door to Mr. Justice Holroyd's butler(Hawkins) - he came in, and we all three proceeded up stairs; we examined every room in the house, but found nobody; the bed had not been used: there was only one bed prepared to sleep in - that had not been used; I turned it down myself - it was getting dark; a candlestick was produced, with a candle in it, on the drawing-room stairs - I sent Bonnick to get a light from the next house - we then proceeded down stairs, Bonnick going first with the light; we went into a little room in the front, which I understand is called the servant's hall - it looks into the front area, and has only one window; Bonnick saw the deceased laying on the floor - I took the candle out of his hand, and saw the body laying about four feet from the window; the head was nearest to the window, and further from the fire than the feet - she laid rather on her right side - her right arm was under her, and her other hand was clenched; her feet were planted straight on the floor, as if she had been standing on them, and her knees up; her throat was cut - she was dead; there was a great quantity of blood on the floor, in one particular part of the room; I do not think the body had been moved since the throat had been cut; the blood appeared to have flown from the wound; the blood was on the right side of the body, inclining to the fire-place: I observed a razor-case and a pair of scissors on the floor, near the body; the razor-case was on the right side, the same side as the blood, but it was not in the blood: I observed her left-hand pocket was outside her clothes - I

cannot say whether it was turned inside out; I did not examine to see if anything was in it.

Cross-examined. Q. The scissors were on the floor? A. Yes; the razor-case laid on the right side, near the fire, perhaps two feet from the body, from that to three feet - it did not lay in the blood; the greatest part of the blood was congealed at that time. I lifted up her left-hand to see if I could observe any sharp instrument about her; I believe it was the left-hand - it was the one that was uppermost - I moved nothing else in the room; I observed a little work-box on the table, with thread and cotton in it, and things - part of them were thrown on the floor; I did not observe any paper; I looked at the table, but did not particularly notice it; there were two or three chairs in the room - one stood on one side of the table, and another on the other, as near as I can tell, as if two people had been sitting in them. I left the things exactly as I found them; this was the last room we went into - we had been into every room up stairs, I believe - I think we went into eight or nine, with the drawing-rooms; there might be six bed-rooms - we did not observe anything out of order in the bed-rooms the first time, as we did not notice, but after going to Bow-street we went up with the officers, and then observed it - this might be an hour after; I had left Bonnick and a gentleman's servant, who was going by, in charge of the house; when I returned with the officers to search, I believe there was something disturbed in each room; the drawers in the front bed-room, which were unlocked, were open - no locks were forced, to my knowledge; I found at least ten or twelve drawers open, I think- there did not appear to be things taken out of them, but the things were rifled over.

Q. Were any cupboards in this room forced open? A. There was a closet between the front and back room - there was a wardrobe in the front room - I do not think that was forced open; the things in it had been rifled about- the things in the drawers consisted principally of gloves, gaiters, and wearing-apparel; in the cupboard between the front and back bed room, there were two or three boxes, with ladies' feathers - the boxes had been opened in some, and part of the feathers taken out, and laid on the floor - I know there was one chest of drawers in the back bed-room - the things in that were not carried away, but they were disturbed; they appeared to have been looked over. I believe in all the bed-rooms there were drawers open, and things turned over; there was a chest of drawers in the room in which the bed was made; I do not think they had been locked - there were gloves and things in them; I was not very particular myself in looking the things over, for I went to Mr. Lett's, at Dulwich, and left the officers there. It must have taken a good while to go over the drawers in all the rooms; there were several drawers open down in the back kitchen; there was a large press in the back kitchen - that appeared to have been rifled over; that was the room we first entered: I did not observe any food on the table; the fire was out, and there were two ridges of wood to light it with; I did not observe whether it had burnt out, but I think it had been scratched out. I saw nothing of a silver or plated mustard-pot, nor a spoon.

MR. LAW. Q. Your attention was not particularly called to the state of the rooms when you first went up stairs? A. No; I was looking for the deceased, not at the state of the rooms.

COURT. Q. Were the scissors bloody or not? A. I did not observe; they were perhaps six or seven inches long from handle to point; I saw no scissor-case: I should think it would take half an hour to put the drawers in the state I found them. I think the deceased had been sitting at work at the table.

ALEXANDER BONNICK . I am in Mr. Robinson's employ. On the 1st of January I went with Dent to Mr. Lett's house - it was a little before four o'clock; Dent rang the bell: we went through the next house; Mr. Justice Holroyd's servant was on the leads, and a woman of the house No. 10; we got in at the back kitchen, went over the rooms up stairs, and came down; we at last all went into the room, and found the deceased laying on her right side, in the servant's hall; it was the body of Betty Jeffs - I knew her by working at the house; her legs were crooked a little - one hand was under her body; her left hand was rather bent. I found a razor-sheath close to the gore of blood, within fourteen or fifteen inches of the body; it was free from the blood where it lay - it was just away from the blood; the snuffers laid on the floor; an ale-house pewter pot laid just at her back, on its side, as if it had been thrown down - I cannot say whether any beer was in it: a pair of common scissors, about eight inches long, laid close to the body. I touched nothing; I believe Dent took up the razor-case, but laid it down in the same place again; the drawers in the different rooms were all open when we came to examine them - they were all drawn out; we waited till Salmon and Fergusson came before we examined them; Dent and Mr. Justice Holroyd's servant went for the officers; nothing was touched or moved from the time they left till the officers came, and took possession of the premises. There was a chair on each side of the table in the room the deceased laid in, as if two persons had been sitting together.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you aware that you should be called as a witness to speak to the state of the house? A. No - I recollect every thing very well; the razor-case was free from blood, to the best of my knowledge - I think I saw Dent lift it up, and I said, "Let every thing lay as it is;" I am sure he put it down in the same place again. I think one person could not have done all that was done in the rooms under an hour, to pull out all the drawers, and look at the things; the drawers in the back kitchen were opened, and there was a silver mustard-pot, I think, standing on the dresser. It might have taken less than an hour to do all this - I cannot say: we were not ten minutes going over the house; we passed through from room to room; there was a work-box on the table, and things strewed about - I saw no paper there myself.

COURT. Q. Were the scissors bloody? A. I cannot say.

THOMAS BAPTIST HAWKINS . I was sent to Mr. Robinson's, and to the Public-office, for assistance; I had been let into the house by Dent and Bonnick. On going into the room where the deceased lay I saw a razor-case laying between her right shoulder and the window, about two feet from the body - it was apart from the blood; it was the first thing I observed; this was before I went to

the office; I think it could not have been moved by any one when I first saw it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the blood standing or flowing at all? A. It was in a thick clotted state, from the body to the fire-place; I saw the blood again afterwards - it covered the same space of ground. I did not see Dent lift the razor-case - I do not think anybody touched it till I went for Salmon; I heard Bonnick say, "Let every thing remain as it is;" he was very much alarmed on entering the room, and went back again; I should think he made that observation in less than five minutes after we entered the room; it was just before we left the room; I did not notice Dent lift the razor-case - he might do it without my observing it, but I do not think it was touched, till it was touched by Salmon; Dent informed me that he picked up the scissors, but I did not see him do so - I did not notice them at all on the floor - I saw some scissors on the table, but whether he had picked them up I cannot say; I observed nothing particular on them.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable of St. Giles', and live at the watch-house. On the 1st of January I was sent for to No. 11, Montague-place - I got there a little after six o'clock; I proceeded to examine the rooms in the house very particularly, with Gardener, Mr. Robinson, and Dent; I found Salmon and Gardener there - I went into the kitchen, and saw the dead body laying on its right side; I saw the lower part of a razor sheath on her right side - I lifted it up, and Salmon desired me to put it down- I placed it in the same situation as it was: Salmon did not take it up that night; he locked the door, and took the key himself, leaving the razor-case there, that the Coroner's Jury might see every thing just as it was; there was a quart pot near her head. I went through every room in the house - I saw some drawers open, and in a wash-hand-stand drawer on the first floor was several things disturbed; I found a glove in that drawer laying on the top of the other things, with a mark of fresh blood on it - the drawer was open; in a little drawer next to that, was part of a newspaper, which I produce - that is also stained with blood, which appeared fresh; I then went into the passage, to go to the back second floor room - there I saw some band-boxes disturbed, and some ladies' feathers out on the floor - that was in the passage, between the back and front rooms; I went to the second floor back room, and there saw a bundle; at that time I did not perceive any marks of blood on it, it being candle-light. After the rooms were all locked up, I left every thing exactly as when I first went into them, and I took possession of the keys till the Inquest, which was held on Thursday, the 3rd of January; a candle had been brought before I arrived. On the day of the Inquest I went up to the second floor front and back rooms, while the Jury were there; I produced the keys - the doors were opened in my presence, and I made some further observations, which I omitted to give in evidence; on searching the hand-boxes which had contained the feathers, there were several stains of blood, both on the feathers and on the papers which contained them; they were enclosed in separate papers, which are stained with blood, and some linen which was in the boxes had blood on it, which appeared fresh.

Q. What do you mean by fresh? A. It appeared the same sort of blood as was on the glove; Mr. Robinson took possession of the keys after the Inquest. I went, in consequence of information, on Tuesday, the 8th of January, with Salmon and Gardener, to No. 35, Mitre-street, to look for a person named Jones; I did not find him there: in the course of our search there, we stated what we had come about; we went into the first floor back room, which was not then occupied; I saw Salmon take a shirt-collar off the bed, and in a table-drawer I found a razor, which I produce, exactly in the state in which I found it; there is one or two small notches made in it, and the edge appears to me turned; there is a stain or two on the blade, but of what it is impossible for me to say. I found a new umbrella in that room; there was no razor in the room besides the one produced - we searched every place; there was no sheath, nor part of a sheath there: we did not leave a single place unsearched. I continued some time searching after Jones, and found him on Sunday, the 13th of January, in the City Compter; he went there by the name of William Edwards; when he was brought out he came towards me - I asked what his name was; he said Edwards; I said, "Your name is Jones" - he said No, it was not, and then he said, "Yes it is," immediately after denying it. I laid hold of his left hand, looked at his left thumb, in consequence of something, and found he had got a cut on his left thumb, near the nail; I asked how long it had been done - he said five or six weeks; I looked at it again, and told him I thought it had not been done so long, for it appeared to me to be a fresh cut - I thought it had not been done so many weeks; I asked how he did it - he told me in cutting some wood with a knife: I then examined his clothes - he had a blue frock-coat on; he took off his coat, and said, "You see in what a situation I am in - I have not a shirt to my back;" I asked what he had done with his shirt - he said he had pawned it at Turner's, in Brydges-street, Strand, on the Thursday preceeding; I inquired, and found that was the case: his coat appeared to me to have been sponged, and that very recently; both the sleeves, inside and out, appeared to have been sponged between the hand and elbows, ten or twelve inches up from the wrist, and it appeared to have been sponged in the front, outside; he said the person he borrowed it of had sponged it - I think he said it was Mrs. Williams' son: he was left in possession of the coat till the examination on last Monday week - he had it on at every examination but that one; we left him at the Compter: I examined his trousers, but they were too dirty to notice anything - he had a waistcoat on, but it was candle light, and I could not observe anything. We fetched him to Bow-street on the Monday, and Salmon and I took him to the House of Correction on Monday, the 28th of January; he had undergone several examinations then; I examined the coloured waistcoat he had got on, and in the right-hand pocket I perceived a stain, but what it is I cannot say - I brought the waistcoat away with me, and have had it ever since - I produce it; the stain is outside the pocket. Here is the band-box of feathers; there is a stain on this piece of paper. (Seven of the papers of feathers, on being examined, were spotted with blood.)

MR. JOHN VICKERY . I am governor of the House of Correction. The prisoner was in my custody; when he left the prison at his last examination the coat was left with one of the prisoner's in the Infirmary, where he had been;

I saw him every time he went up to the office, and have no doubt of it being his coat.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. This is the coat I saw the prisoner wear, I am certain.

Cross-examined. Q. In the early part of the business, I believe, you suspected somebody else? A. I did - it was Knight; he was examined: it might be three or four days after that, that suspicion fell on the prisoner; I commenced search after him three or four days after the murder; the first lodging I searched was in MItre-street - I did not at that time examine the inside of the handle of the razor; here is a dot and sort of streak on the blade, and if you took inside the handle you will find something of the same - it is just at the commencement of the blade; the spot looked to me as if the razor had been wiped; it appears to me that the handle has been washed - there is a stain inside: the impression on my mind is, that the handle has been washed inside; I cannot say whether the blade has been washed: washing and rubbing it would get a stain out - if it was washed carefully with soap and water it might be got off, I suppose: you will find a corresponding stain inside the handle - there is a something, what it is I cannot say; I have not broken the handle open - I have examined it very particularly; it was compared at Bow-street with some other razors. The stains of blood on the papers of feathers appeared the same as that on the glove.

Q. Is there anything by which you draw that conclusion, except from finding them in the same house? A. Nothing. I think suspicion fell on the prisoner the same evening as the Jury sat - it was on Thursday or Friday.

Q. How soon did your suspicions amount to a strong opinion? A. On the Tuesday; I beg pardon, we were in search of him previous to going to his lodgings; my suspicions were stronger on the 8th, before we went to Mitre-street: I had not then seen the razor, nor coat, waistcoat, or trowsers; nor had I seen the prisoner: In every thing I have done since, I have acted under that strong impression, of his guilt; that caused us to make more particular search after him. I pulled the cut in his thumb open, and in my judgment it had not been done above six or seven days - that was my firm opinion. I never said I made a remark on his waistcoat on first seeing him; I said it appeared to have been washed - but I made no remark respecting anything on it; it appeared clean, as if it had been washed within a few days - the stain is on the band of the pocket. I cannot say the trousers had not been sponged; one part of them appeared cleaner than the other; I think I have said they had been sponged, but I would not swear they had; I never swore so; he had a pair of boots on, with hardly any sole to them; the knees of his trousers were cleaner than the rest - the bottom was very muddy; I asked where he had been living, he told me at No. 35, Mitre-street, without hesitation; I asked who he had lived with - he said, a girl named Charlotte Bury; I think he said he had lived in Wootton-street; I found that correct; I think he mentioned Windmill-court to me - we found he had lived there: I have ascertained that he has passed by the name of Edwards for months; I have understood he had a reason for concealing his name - Charlotte Bury has been in my care at the watch-house.

Q. Did not you deny the prisoner's attorney access to her? A. When Mr. Hanson called there one evening, Mrs. Furzeman would not let him see her, but I left word, if Mr. Butler called, he was to see her; I had been desired to let no one see her.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When he said he lived in Mitre-street, did you know that before? A. Certainly; he did not know that I knew it; when I found blood on the glove I put it into my pocket, and wrapped it up; I produced it before the Coroner, and saw the marked papers there: I compared the blood on the glove with that on the papers - they appeared the same marks, and of the same standing: my suspicion of the prisoner made no impression on me, except to make me vigilant and particular in every circumstance I could collect; Knight was examined twice before the Magistrate, and then discharged.

COURT. Q. You examined all the drawers? A. I did; every drawer had been disturbed - I found no locks broken - I should think it would not take a person more than fourteen or fifteen minutes, or from that to twenty minutes.

MR. LETT re-examined. This glove belonged to my son who is abroad; he left about the 8th of November; I had not seen the glove after he left - I know nothing about the feathers, and other articles myself; none of the members of my family have resided in the house since September, 1825; my son has occasionally been there; my daughters have not been there; Mrs. Lett was there repeatedly in the day time, but never slept there.

WILLIAM SALMON . I was directed to go to No. 11, Montague-place on the 1st of January; I saw the pair of scissors; I took them up - saw nothing on them, and put them down again; if there had been blood on them, I should have seen it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see any thing else on the ground? A. I saw a quart pot laying behind the deceased, and the lower part of a razor-sheath very near the body, about two feet from it - it laid partly in the blood, which was congealed. I took up the case - it was bloody; I laid it down again in the same place, I am quite positive, and it remained in the same situation till the Coroner sat; I then took it up, and washed it.

Q. Did you wash it all over? A. I merely took a wet cloth, and wiped the blood off - there is no blood on it now; I found no difficulty in getting it off. I saw a candlestick on the second stair in the hall, going up stairs, and a small piece of candle in it; I did not notice any blood on it then, but when the Inquest sat, I observed a few spots of blood on it, outside; I do not think it is here; I washed the razor-case, as it was so bloody - I did not think proper to wrap it up in the blood; I left the candlestick in the house - it was made use of. I remained in the house two nights and two days - I cannot recollect in whose possession the candlestick was left; there was a small bit of paper on the table, with some writing on it - I gave it to Mr. Lett; I was present when Mr. Plumb, the surgeon, came; after the Inquest had sat, I saw five or six keys taken from the deceased's pocket, also a thimble, and 5 1/2d.; I did not see the keys tried to any locks; I should have said that a sovereign fell from her person when she was turned about; I have had possession of the razor-case ever since - it is a black one - I produce it; I took it into my possession when the Inquest sat, and washed it almost immediately after: I took it up as soon as the Inquest left the body - it was before my examination at Bow-street.

MR. LAW. Q. Was you at the Compter with Furzeman? A. Yes; I produce the shirt-collar, which I got off the bed on the first floor back room, in Mitre-street; and have had it ever since; I saw Furzeman find the razor; the collar is exactly in the same state as when I found it.

MR. COLERIDGE. Q. Did the handle of the razor appear to have been washed? A. I did not notice; the shirt-collar was on the bed, which was unmade; a person might make that mark on it by shaving with a notched razor.

COURT. Q. You went all over the house? A. After the Inquest sat, not before; the drawers appeared much confused; I should think it would take a man at least half an hour to look them all over by himself.

JAMES COOPER . I am servant to Mr. Lett. I knew the deceased, and knew she had a plain silver watch, and two silver table-spoons; I have not seen them since her death - I think I saw her with her watch within a month of her death- she wore it regularly; I had not seen the spoons so lately.

Cross-examined. Q. What makes you say you saw the watch a month before? A. She had observed to me that it did not go regularly; the spoons were marked "B. J." as well as I can recollect. I told Mr. Lett and Mr. Halls what the mark was; the watch had a paper of Mr. Allen's, watchmaker, Red Lion-passage; I informed Mr. Halls of that.

MR. LETT. I am not aware of any of my property being missing; examination has been made to ascertain that.

MR. SAMUEL PLUMBE . I am a surgeon, and live in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury. On the evening of the 1st of January, about six o'clock, I was sent for to No. 11, Montague-place, and saw the body laying in the small room below; she was laying on her back, with her head turned to the right side; I examined a cut in her neck; it extended from the back of her neck towards the front, and separated the whole of the large vessels, and the hemorrhage from those vessels, I have no doubt, caused her death; the windpipe was divided - I should think it not such a wound as a person could have inflicted on herself; her countenance had a strong expression of horror upon it - her eyes were open, and her hands hard clenched. I made no further observations, except on the lower part of her dress, which was pulled up above her knees, or nearly so; when I made a subsequent examination before the Coroner, I saw marks of apparently the knuckles of some person on the left collar-bone; there had been a great loss of blood; there appeared to be a mark of dirt on her left cheek - I thought it was occasioned by the outer edge of the sole of a dirty shoe; her neck handkerchief was thrust into the wound, by apparently the toe of the shoe - it was dirty, similar to the cheek - it was the same coloured dirt; I observed a slight finger-mark of blood on each thigh, also a single drop of blood on the left thigh; the wound in the throat, nor the blood flowing from it, could have occasioned either of these spots.

COURT. Q. Would it be possible for the blood from the throat to occasion either of those marks? A. I think it impossible; her thighs were covered with the clothes, but not the legs; I was obliged to move her clothes to ascertain if there were any marks; there was no appearance of the blood having trickled down internally, nor externally; I could not judge within a few hours how long she had been dead - it might have been twenty-four hours - the body was cold and stiff; the wound had not touched the spine, I am sure.

Q. Then if it was done with a razor, it had touched no bone? A. It had touched no bone, but had divided the cartilage - I think that would have turned the edge of a razor, so as to render it unfit for use as a razor; I could not tell which hand the knockle mark was of. I saw the prisoner at his first examination at Bow-street, and at the second, which was about the 21st. I saw his left thumb had been cut, but could not judge how long it had been done - it is difficult to say; if I had seen it a week after it had been done, I might be able to say whether it had been done a week or a fortnight, but not to be positive - I think I could not be deceived as to four or five weeks; I should have formed an opinion that it might have been done perhaps three weeks, or a month, when I saw it - I think I examined it at the request of the prisoner's solicitor, Mr. Butler. There was a little blood on the back of both the deceased's hands - it appeared to be the marks of another bloody hand.

Q. Would cutting through these vessels produce an immediate gush of blood? A. It would, and that was likely to produce a considerable quantity of blood on the hands of the person by whom it was done: in my opinion, the cut was made from the right to the left.

MR. LETT. I saw the deceased almost every week; latterly one of her arms was rather feeble, but I will not be positive which.

MR. PLUMRE. I did not peceive any cut on the deceased's hands.

Q. Look at this razor; would cutting through the windpipe produce such an effect as that on the edge? A. I should hardly think it would, to such an extent as this; it appears to me farther that, as I shut the razor, it comes in contact with the handle, and that might produce all the appearances on the edge - I think it possible and probable that it might produce the whole effect on the edge of this razor. The deceased had long sleeves on - I did not discover any blood upon them.

WILLIAM SALMON re-examined by MR. COLERIDGE. I saw the prisoner's thumb examined at the Compter - it appeared to me to be recently done; I do not recollect making any remark of its festering - I said at Bow-street that it appeared to be in a festering state.

RICHARD GARDENER . I am an officer, and accompanied Salmon to Montague-place; I went with Furzeman to the House of Correction twice, and saw the prisoner; I also went to Mitre-street.

GEORGE JAMES ROBINSON. I am an upholdster. I had had taken an inventory of the fixtures and furniture in Mr. Lett's house, but not of the spoons, nor any thing of that nature; I have been there when Mr. Lett was at lunch, and have seen some spoons and table-forks - that was three months ago; this cloth (looking at it), I have no doubt, is one I found in Mr. Lett's house, two or three days after the Inquest sat, when I examined the premises; I took it out because there were two marks of blood upon it, and gave it to Edmeads - it was not in the room where the body was found, but on the same floor; there were several articles which I did not put in my inventory.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Had you any thing to do with spoons or plate in your inventory? A. No; Mr. Lett had not moved all his furniture; I am not aware that any of his property was missing - my inventory was

only of the fixtures and the planned furniture, not of what was in the drawers; there was considerable property of Mr. Lett's in the house, which might have been carried away.

JAMES EDMEADS . I was left in care of Mr. Lett's house after the murder. I found an apron in the kitchen drawer, and gave it to Salmon - (looking at it) - this is it; I found it on the 6th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I had the care of these papers of feathers till they were brought here to-day - they are now in the same state as when I first had them, which was on the 6th of January - Furzeman gave them into my care.

GEORGE GARDENER . I am pot-boy at the Gower Arms public-house, Gower-street. I knew Mrs. Jeffs. On the last night in the year I was in Montague-place, about nine o'clock, and saw Mrs. Jeffs at Mr. Lett's door, talking to a man with a blue coat and white apron on - I was on the other side of the way; she called me over, and asked for a pint of beer, which I gave her in a quart pot - she generally had half a pint, but she had had none for three weeks or a fortnight; the man was in the hall, on the mat - they seemed talking together as I was crossing the road; when I delivered the beer to her I went away, and left them there - they did not shut the door while I staid; I afterwards saw the quart pot, when master brought it home - not before.

Cross-examined. Q. You are sure this was about nine o'clock? A. It might be a little after, but not much I know; I went out a little before nine with my beer - I did not see the man's face; the moon was nearly full, and there is a gas-light facing the door - I am certain he had a white apron on.

Q. Did you see his front, or his back? A. His front, but did not see his face; I do not know how he was dressed below his apron - I am sure he had a blue coat.

COURT. Q. What sized man was he? A. A middling size; I cannot form any judgment whether it was the prisoner or not; he had not got a frock coat on - it was a tail coat.

Q. Was it made so as to come forward over his hips? A. It was cut round here - it did not hang over his knees- it was buttoned over his apron.

Q. Was it such a coat as a groom wears, or such as a gentleman wears? A. Such as a gentleman wears.

ELIZABETH EVANS . I am laundress to the family of Mr. Sergeant Bosanquet . I was at his house on this night, at half-past nine, or nearly twenty minutes to ten o'clock; as I was going off in the cart, I fell, and at the time I fell, I heard a dreadful scream; I could not tell where it came from - my horse went on - its head was towards Bedford-square, it passed Mr. Lett's house as it went on; the scream sounded to me to come from Russell-square way; I think we had passed No. 11, when I heard the scream, and were about No. 10.

Cross-examined. Q. No. 11, is on the Bedford-square side? A. I had got to No. 10; No. 11, was behind me; I heard the scream as I fell - I did not hear it repeated; I went before the Magistrate to state this, when I was sent for, about a fortnight ago: the scream was on Monday night, the 31st of December; William Cracknel was with me - we went on immediately, without stopping, for he said it was some boy, and I thought myself that it was an improper female screaming.

Q. You both thought it was in the street then? A. Yes, I did not look round to see from whence it came.

WILLIAM CRACKNEL . On the 31st of December I was in the cart with Evans. I recollect starting from Mr. Sergeant Bosanquet's door, about twenty minutes before ten, as near as possible; the horse went on of its own accord - Evans fell back on the seat, and at that moment I heard a dreadful scream - it appeared to come from the south side of the street; we had then got not quite past No. 10 - if we had, that was the outside: I looked round, but could see no one about; the voice seemed to come quite from the house, just opposite the side of the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. You thought the dreadful scream was a boy in the street? A. I said so: I thought so then, but not afterwards: when Evans said "Lord have mercy me, what's that?" I said "Oh! it is only some boy in the street" - I thought no more about it that night; Evans said she thought it was a bad woman; I do not know that she told me so then - she has since.

JAMES HARMAN . I am a watchman of Montague-place. On the night of the 31st of December, when I went to call half-past ten o'clock; I was coming down on the left hand side of the way, and when by No. 24, which is opposite No. 11, I saw a man and woman talking to Mrs. Jeffs, outside the door; she had the door half-way open in her right hand, and a candlestick in her left - I heard them bid her good night, and she bid them good night; they went down the street, and turned to the left, towards Bedford-square, I went on towards Russell-square, and saw Mrs. Jeffs shut the door; it was on a Monday night; I am a regular watchman there, but was not there the first night in the year; we come to the watch-house at half-past seven, and are on our beats before eight, and call the hour every half hour after; the man had a blue coat on - I did not observe any apron.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the length of your beat? A. From the end of Montague-street, to No. 1, Montague-place, and there is a mews I have to go down - if I walk quick I can go round my beat in ten minutes - but it generally takes a quarter of an hour: when I began to call half-past ten, I saw nobody near the house: I was coming back when I saw them - it might be nearly a quarter to eleven; my box is in the rails of Russell-square. I have known Mrs. Jeffs for some years; she held a candle in her hand. it was moonlight - almost as light as day; I am certain I saw the man and woman talking to her.

JOHN KNIGHT re-examined. I know the prisoner - his name is William Jones; he once lodged with me; he came in Whitsun-week, when I was out of town: I first saw him the week after Whitsuntide; I then lived in Anderson's-place, Cornwall-road, Stamford-street, Surrey - he left in July; while he lived with me, I moved to No. 32, Cursitor-street, where I now live; I knew of his moving afterwards to Mr. Duncombe's; I had known him some years before he lodged with me - he was on intimate terms with the whole of my family; I was in the habit of visiting my mother, and I believe she has seen the prisoner at my house- she was in the habit of coming there - I cannot speak of their having been at my house together; I have called with the prisoner at Montague-place; the last time was the beginning of July last: I have called there two or three times with him - we went into the house - the prisoner had been making up some books for Mr. Robinson the vestry-clerk.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you able to speak of any time that your mother and the prisoner were in company together, before he came to lodge with you? A. He saw

my mother at Anderson's place, before we moved, before Whitsuntide - I have seen them in company together there - I have only seen him once since he went to Mr. Duncombe's; that was in Leather-lane.

CHARLES EDGAR KNIGHT . I am the son of John Knight. The prisoner went with me once to see my grandmother, in Montague-place - my sister Eliza went there to tea - and he went with me to take her; that was about July; and he went once with my father, after they went to Mr. Robinson's.

Q. When you went with your sister, did the prisoner go into the house? A. Yes; he staid about half an hour; he was sitting in the library with us - he did not go down stairs - I saw my grandmother on the 30th of December last, in good health and spirits.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he stay to tea when he went with your sister? A. No; he sat up stairs in the library- he was asked to stop tea, but did not.

THOMAS HALLS , ESQ. I am a magistrate of Bow-street. The prisoner was examined before me several times on this charge; I, myself, took his examination down on the 14th of January, when he was first brought before me. The paper I hold in my hand contains my own note, in my own hand-writing, of the examination I then took. No threat, promise, menace, or inducement whatever, were held out to him; on the contrary I cautioned him.

MR. COLERIDGE. Q. Was that paper, after you took it, read over to him? A. It was, by myself. It is not signed by him; he was repeatedly examined by me - my clerk did not take a note of his examination; I took it myself.

Q. Did not you, at his last examination, read over to him, a paper, purporting to be his examination? A. I had read over to him a verbatim copy of the paper I now hold in my hand; that was on Monday week; the copy was made in my presence, and afterward examined by myself, immediately after I wrote the examination; it was only his own statement; nothing more was read to him. I asked him to sign it at his last examination, and he declined; he said there were many inaccuracries in it - I asked if he would sign it subject to that remark; he declined signing it at all; and said though he had made that statement, there were several inaccuracies in it, which he declined explaining to me; he said he preferred giving the explanation to Mr. Butler, his solicitor, to be made use of at his trial.

Q. In conducting this examination, did you take down the very words he said? A. I did - I left him to tell his own story in such parts as related to times and places, where he said he had been, occasionally putting questions to him; I suffered him to tell his own story in all material parts; I only put questions to him when I thought it necessary, to lead his attention to the particular subject.

Q. Have the goodness to tell us, as well as you can, the very words in which he declined to sign the statement? A. I said, "This statement having been read over to you, will you sign it?" He said, "I decline signing it;" in the first instance he seemed preparing to sign it; Mr. Butler, his solicitor, then said, "Jones, if you sign that paper, understand you take it on your own responsibility;" he then said, "I decline signing it:" he had said there were inaccuracies in it before Mr. Butler spoke to him. I have returned to the Court the copy of what I hold in my hand; it is signed by myself, as the examination.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he explain what sort of inaccuracies he had to complain of? A. He refused to give any explanation, but admitted the statement was what he had made at the time - he said, "I have made such a statement, but it contains several inaccuracies;" I had taken it correct: he did not complain of my taking it inaccurately, when it was read over to him - I read it to him, in the first instance, on the 14th, when I took it, and asked if it was correct - he said it was correct; it was again read to him on last Monday week, and he refused to sign it. (Looking at the examinations returned to the Court) this is the paper read over to him on Monday week - it is a copy of what I took from him.(The examination was here read, as follows:)

JAN. 14, 1828. - "It was about a fortnight ago that I first went to lodge at No. 35, Mitre-street, near the Cobourg Theatre, at the house of a person named Stapleton - I cannot precisely recollect the day; I did not take the lodgings myself, but rather think it was on a Friday, the last Friday in the year; the lodgings were taken by a female named Charlotte, whom I have lately lived with - I do not know her real name, but she usually goes by the name of Charlotte Bury - I have lived with her about seven or eight months, and saw her last on Saturday last, in the forenoon, about eleven o'clock, at a house in White Lion-passage, and I was to have met her in the evening again, at the top of Shire-lane; I first became acquainted with her accidentally in Fleet-street, she being at that time a girl upon the town. On the Monday evening, the 31st of December last, I went to the Adelphi Theatre, rather earlier than half-past seven - I went alone - I went into the gallery and paid 1s. for admittance; I saw part of Nelson, and the Married Batchelor, and the Pantomime - I went straight from home in Mitre-street, and went out with the intention of going; I went out quite alone and left Charlotte at home - she was alone when I left her; I came over Blackfriars-bridge and along Fleet-street to the Strand, and did not stop any where in my way till I got to the Theatre, nor did I meet any person I knew. I am not now quite sure I left Charlotte at home - she may have gone out before me, but I am quite sure she did not leave the house with me, for I remember I went out with the intention of going to the Adelphi by myself; I had I think not above 2s. in my pocket at the time I went to the Adelphi - I did not see any one I knew particularly at the Theatre - I did not expect it, as I so seldom go into the gallery, I staid through the whole of the performance, and did not go out at all - I think it was a little before twelve o'clock when I came out, and I went home by myself over Blackfriars-bridge again; I think I called in at the public-house next door to the Theatre, and had a glass of something, but am not positive of this. I think the landlord let me in at home - it was either him or his wife: upon recollection, I may possibly have gone home that night with Charlotte, as I was much used to meet her and go home with her - generally about Fleet-street, but I am sure I went out alone. I have no doubt the money I had about me was Charlotte's money; Charlotte paid the first week's lodging in Mitre-street; she paid it with her own money; she paid part on the Thursday, I think, and part on the Friday, the day when the week expired; I saw her go down stairs to pay it both times - I think she paid 4s. the first time, and 1s. remaining on the Friday, and she paid 1s. deposit on taking the lodging - all this was her own money, I am sure of this, for I have not given her any money lately, not for some weeks past. I do not think I have borrowed any money of any person since I have lodged in Mitre-street; I have had a

few shillings at a time since I have been there, of my own money, by selling one or two pawnbroker's tickets, at different times, about 3s. or 4s.; it was during the first week of our being in Mitre-street that I speak of; I sold the tickets to strangers, in public-houses - one was for a pair of Wellington boots, another for a pair of trousers and a handkerchief, and several other things together, and, I think, a coat, all in one ticket; I think I got 27s. or 28s. for the tickets altogether; the boots were pledged at Cameron's, in the Strand, for 7s., as were also the coat and trousers, for 1l. I cut my thumb about five or six weeks ago, or perhaps more - I cut it, splitting some wood, with a sharp knife, against my breast; it was in Wootten-street, where we lived before we went to Mitre-street; I rather think Charlotte was present when I cut it - it was in the forenoon, lateish, in our own room - I was cutting the wood to light the fire; it was with a case-knife belonging to the house - it was a long time healing; I applied nothing to it but a bit of rag at first, but soon left it off - I have worn nothing upon it since I have been in Mitre-street. I now recollect it was tied round with some tape, which was in our table drawer in Wootten-street, the landlady's table; Charlotte gave me the tape - perhaps it might have been in the table in Mitre-street, and my thumb might have been cut in Mitre-street. I was at the Olympic Theatre on Tuesday, the 1st of January, instant, with Charlotte, either on the Tuesday or the Wednesday, I rather think the former; the piece was Casco Bay, and Touch and Take, and the Pantomime; we went into the gallery - I paid 2s. for the two: it was my own money, out of that I had got by selling the tickets, which I believe she understood I borrowed, for I told her I had borrowed some of a friend. We went from our own lodgings over Waterloo-bridge, and went to the Adelphi first, for I had told her I had been there the night before, and she wished to see the same pieces, but we were told the house was full, and then we went to the Olympic. I was at home all the day on the Tuesday. I have got an umbrella, which is in Mitre-street - I bought it in the Westminster-road, just over Westminster-bridge, on the right-hand side, at a shop which I perfectly recollect, a small shop; I gave 4s. 6d. for it; I bought it during the first week while we were in Mitre-street, but do not recollect the precise day, about Tuesday or Wednesday - I believe a woman served me with it; it was a new one, I believe, when I bought it, it being outside for sale. I have seen the late Mrs. Jeffs twice - once in the presence of Mr. Knight, her son, and once in the presence of Mr. Knight's daughter - his eldest daughter, Mary; the last was in the front parlour in Montague-place; I went to meet them there, and my own sister was there at the time; this was when I met the daughter Mary there: at that time the daughter Mary was boarding and lodging with my mother; this was before I went to Mr. Duncombe's - it was before this that I went with Mr. Knight to see Mrs. Jeffs; I went with him about something concerning a situation - some writing in a counting-house that Mrs. Jeffs had obtained for her son; I was in the parlour with Mrs. Jeffs both times; I have not seen Mrs. Jeffs since I was there with the daughter Mary: I do not know whether my sister has since seen her; my sister's name is Georgiana - she is unmarried, and she lives in King-street, Bloomsbury, with my mother. I lodged myself with Knight a short time before he left the house over the water, in Anderson's-place, Cornwall-road, and a short time after he came to live in Cursitor-street, a few week's altogether - I cannot say how many. I saw Mrs. Jeffs once also at Mr. Knight's, in Cornwall-road - she did not stop there for any long time. I recollect that Knight pledged a picture in Holborn, in High Holborn, above the upper Turnstile - it was a landscape, in a frame, about three or four feet in length, and about a foot wide, I should think. The coat I have on I borrowed - it is not my own; I borrowed it of a Mrs. Williams, who was our landlady in Wootten-street; this was while we were with her, some weeks back. I pledged my own coat before I went to Mitre-street - it was a black coat, and is amongst the tickets in the possession of the officer. The shirt-collar now produced by Salmon, the officer, is mine; I do not know when I wore it last, or how it came bloody.

Taken before me, the 14th day of January, 1828,

THOMAS HALLS .

This was read over to the prisoner again on the 11th of February, 1828, who declined signing it, before me, THOMAS HALLS.

ELIZA WILLIAMS . I live at No. 4, Valentine-row, Gray's-street, near the Cobourg Theatre - I formerly lived in Windmill-street, and afterwards in Wootten-street, in the same neighbourhood; a young woman lived with me, who went by the name of Charlotte Edwards - she first lived with me in Wootten-street - she had one room furnished, for which she paid 10s. a week; the prisoner Jones lived with her - he also went by the name of Edwards: she took the lodging, but he came with her, and occupied it; they lived together as man and wife - they did not say whether they were married. They lived with me from the 29th of October till the 29th of December; I then moved - they also lived with me at No. 1, Windmill-street; we had two rooms, and lived together there; I paid 5s. a week myself- they paid nothing, they were in poor circumstances. I knew Charlotte used to go out of an evening; I have heard her say so, in his presence. I have three daughters - the eldest (Mary Ann) is fourteen years old; when the prisoner left me they went to live in Mitre-street - I think it was No. 35; they had a back room on the first floor; Stapleton kept the house - I used to visit them. I used to lend the prisoner razors when he lived with me in Wootten-street, and I lent him one when he lived in Mitre-street; I had four razors, two with black handles, and two tortoiseshell - the two black handled ones had a double case - one of the tortoiseshell had a single case, and the other had no case; I lent him a tortoiseshell one in a black case, with a top to it, for I have the two black handled ones now - I think I should know the razor-case again, and the razor too; (looking at the razor) I think this is something like the one I lent him - there is no mark on it - I only know it by its general appearance; I think I should know the case by its general appearance - there was no mark on it; it was a black case, and the upper part of the lower case was red - (looking at it) I believe this to be the case - it is something like it, if it is not it - I cannot swear to it; I lent him the razor and case on the 30th of December; my daughter Mary Ann carried them to him - they have never been returned to me; I saw him twice on the 30th of December, first at his own lodging, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning - he was then in bed with Charlotte, and said he wished I would send the razor up, and that I would lend him a silk neck handkerchief; he said he wanted the razor that was in the single case; Charlotte, who was in bed, asked me, in his presence, if I would let my little girl go and borrow a shilling or a sixpence for her, saying she had no fire, nor any victuals - I let my girl go to borrow a sixpence, and was there when she returned - she did not succeed; I afterwards sent the razor and handkerchief as desired; he, Charlotte, and my girl came home together, about five o'clock in the evening; they stopped about half an hour or less, and said they were go

ing into the City, I believe, but am not positive; they were not in the habit of going out of an evening while they were at my house, for the prisoner had no coat - if he wanted a coat he used to send to a person named Sells to borrow one - it was a largish drab coat, I think; I afterwards lent him a dark blue coat, which was given to my son - (looking at the coat produced) I rather think this is it - yes it is, for there is my work in the back seams.

Q. Did you see the prisoner and Charlotte again on the 31st? A. Yes, in the morning; I went to their lodgings - I cannot be certain whether they were up; the prisoner said nothing about money then: I did not stop many minutes, and did not see them after on that day - I think my little girl went there. On the 1st of January I went to their lodgings in Mitre-street; they were both up - he was cleaning himself. and said he was going out to meet a friend who had promised to lend him some money; I wished him a happy new year, and he wished me the same - Charlotte said nothing to that; she said he was going to get a trifle of money: he was not in the habit of going out in the day time; he said he had seen a friend last night, and was going to that friend to lend him a little money, and if he succeeded Charlotte should give me a trifle. On the morning of the 2d, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I went to his lodging in Mitre-street - he was in bed; I asked how he was, and how Charlotte was; he said she was gone out, and said he had been to my house the night before; I said I found he had, for he had left me 2s., which my daughter had given me; when Charlotte came in she said she had been to get the newspaper, and could not get it, and said, "I suppose you won't believe it, but I have;" he said it was a lie: she then said, "If you want it, get up and get it yourself;" he did not say for what purpose he wanted it - they asked if I could get a newspaper - I asked what paper they wanted, and said, "Sunday's?" they said No, to-day's, if they could get it; they both hastily said that; they both pressed me to stay breakfast that morning, and while at breakfast they had words; Charlotte told me, in his hearing, that when she came home on the Tuesday, he was laying on the bed, crying - that she asked what it was about, and he said he had heard his father was dead - he said an intimate friend of his father's had told him so; they did not breakfast together, in consequence of having words; the prisoner had no coat on while he was at breakfast; I believe his coat laid in the chair, and a little while after breakfast it fell off the chair, and made a great rustling - Jones looked very anxiously at it - it sounded as if silver money was in it; a quartern and a half of gin was sent for - I fetched it; Jones produced the money for it - Charlotte would have none of it: I did not stop above three minutes after I fetched it. I did not go there again till Saturday, the 5th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock - nothing particular passed - I went again on Sunday, the 6th, and told him I understood the Bow-street officers were after a person of the name of Jones, and they said it was Mrs. Williams' lodger - (I had heard him say before that his name was Jones, but I did not believe it.)

Q. Tell us particularly every thing you said to him? - A. As well as I can recollect, I said I thought it was him, and Charlotte said he had committed no murder; I had said it was a charge of murder - Charlotte said, "Oh! he has not committed any murder - it is his friends who have sent after him;" Jones said nothing about the murder - he said he knew how it was - that his friends had sent the Bow-street officers after him; Charlotte said, "Well, Bill, you know you must go home now - you know your friends are in search of you:" I said, William Nicholas (my son) wanted his coat - he said, "You cannot have it now, till such time as I have been home to my friends, and set all things right," and so I left the coat with him; he said they did not wish me to stop - I said I did not want to stop: they desired me to be careful how I went out, that no one should watch me home; I believe I said I should be careful of that for my own sake; he said I was not to tell any one where he lived, and he was not to tell any one where I lived. I saw no more of him after that day till he was in custody - he did not tell me where his friends lived: I have heard him say he had a mother and brother, and, I think, sisters. The coat had been cleaned all over before I lent it to him; my son lives with a doctor - the coat was cleaned, as the person who gave it to him wore it when brewing, and it was stiff with sweet-wort; it was cleaned all over. I never took the razor out of the case after he himself had put it in at my house.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner came to lodge with you in October? A. I think it was then; he went by the name of Edwards then - he did not often go out of an evening: they were both strangers to me before. While he lived with me in Wootten-street he used to be at home all day, and seldom went out; I do not remember his going out before I lent him the blue coat, not half a dozen times, as he had no coat to wear; he said nothing more about the newspaper than I have mentioned, while I was there - nothing passed about it at breakfast. When he lived with me in Wootten-street I believe he sent for a paper once or twice, on a Sunday; I do not know how he employed himself - I was seldom in his apartment. I understood from him that his parents were respectable; he could read and write - I lent him a book or two. I had taken the coat in at the back and side seams, after it was cleaned - I cannot say how long ago that was; it was stiff with sweet-wort; my son cleaned it with a piece of blue cloth and water: it was his practice to sit in the house without a coat, as he had none to put on, and after I lent him one he used to sit at home without it; I observed nothing particular about his clothes on New-year's day - I did not particularly notice them. My son lives with Mr. Guest, over Blackfriars-bridge. My husband died on the 12th of January, 1827 - the razors belonged to him.

Q. While the prisoner lived with you, had you received directions to deny him to any one? A. Not from him; Charlotte has told me to deny her if anybody came, and said then that would deny them both - she said that in his hearing. I never heard him say at that time that there were reasons for his keeping out of the way.

COURT. Q. Look at the coat now, and tell us if you can say anything has been done to it since you lent it to him? A. I cannot say that I particularly noticed that; it is not in the same state now as when I lent it him - it is dirty: I cannot say whether it has been sponged at all; I never looked inside the sleeves.

MARY ANN WILLIAMS . I am fourteen years old. My mother sent me to the prisoner with a razor, in a case, and

a silk handkerchief, on a Sunday - I do not know on what Sunday - it was after Christmas, and before Newyear's-day; that was the only time I ever carried one - I gave it into his own hand - he was in bed, and Charlotte was up in the room; it was about four or five o'clock in the evening; it was a black-coloured case - I had often seen it and looked at it - I think I should know the case again - I did not know the razor - I saw the case before the Magistrate, and had seen it before - it was my father's(looking at it) - I believe this is it; I think it is, because it is very much like it in the shape and colour - there is no mark by which I know it; two or three parts of it are uneven; I had not observed whether my father's case was even or not; the part the top went over was red, and so is this; I often had my father's razor-case in my hand - I did not particularly notice it when I carried it to Jones; I had seen it about before; I believe this is the same razor-case, but I will not be certain.

Cross-examined. Q. Why this razor was a play-thing of yours, I suppose? A. No, not often; my mother never gave it me to play with - I had it in my hands when I went to get it for my father to shave; he had been dead twelve months - I have not often seen it since then; I know it by no particular mark - the colour is black - it is very much like my father's razor; I had seen it the morning I took it to Mitre-street, and on Saturday night; I took it there about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon - it was candle-light; I did not look at it as I took it there.

MR. LAW. Q. Had you seen the razor that belonged to your father? A. Yes, I think he had such a razor as the one produced.

MARY PARKER . I am twenty-one years old. I have gone by the name of Charlotte for the last two years - I never went by that name till I left my home; I have been acquainted with the prisoner for five months before he was taken up; I lived in the same lodging with him over the water, by the Cobourg Theatre; I lodged with him at Mrs. Williams' about two months, in Wootten-street; we then went to Windmill-court, and lived together, then she moved separately, and we moved; Jones lived with me all that time: he went by the name of Edwards - I used to be called Charlotte Edwards. On the 31st of December I went out, about seven o'clock in the evening, with Jones - we came over Blackfriars'-bridge; I parted with him in Bridge-street, about Bride-lane; we had neither hurried there, nor walked slow; he met me again about half-past twelve the same night, in Fleet-street; it was my practice to meet him there about eleven or twelve o'clock every night; I met him that night about Poppin's-court, a few yards from Fleet-market, on that side of the way - he came in a direction from the Strand - I had no money when we went out that evening, and I do not think he had any; he did not say where he was going; when I met him he told me he had been with a friend - that he had been with a young man, a friend, and had borrowed some money of him - he said it was 2s. or 3s.; he did not say where he met him, or where he had been with him; I had got no money then - a young woman was with me when I met him - we went with him to a wine-vaults, in Poppin's-court, and had some gin - he paid 6d. for it; we then went home; we got home about one o'clock; I think a female lodger up-stairs let us in; we lived then in Mitre-street, at Mrs. Stapleton's.

Q. The following morning would be Tuesday (Newyear's-day) - do you remember any thing happening then? A. Mr. Jones got up; he had breakfast, and went out about eleven o'clock - he returned a little after three in the afternoon with some more money - he said he had been to borrow it of a friend - he did not tell me how much he had - he gave me 5s. - I got some of my wearing apparel out of pledge by his direction, with 3s.

Q. Before he went out that morning did any thing happen? A. As we were sitting at breakfast he said he had cut his thumb - that was on New-year's-morning - he said he had cut it in cutting bread and butter - it was cut up by the nail; I looked at it - it was a deep cut, and looked very red, as if fresh done; he held it against his handkerchief, and asked me for some rag; I told him I had none, and he wrapped his handkerchief round it; it bled again in the afternoon, and he wrapped some white tape round it, which I afterwards put on a dress. which I afterwards pawned, and it was produced before the Magistrate; he did not dine at home that day - we went out that evening, and called in Wootten-street, at Mrs. Mills' - he sent her for some gin, and produced some silver to pay for it - I cannot say how much, for Mrs. Williams and I were talking together - the gin came to 6d. - we then went over Waterloo-bridge, to the Adelphi theatre, which was so full we could not get in, and we went to the Olympic; he had said he should like me to go to the Adelphi to see a play called Nelson - I had wished before to see it, and he wanted to take me there that night, but we could not get in; he said nothing more about it that night, but that he thought it was a good thing; we went to the Olympic, and when we came out we went into the Strand, and had some supper in a court there; he paid for every thing - I had no money - the theatre cost 2s., and the supper 1s. 4d. - after supper we met a friend in Fleet-street, and went to the same winevanlts, and had some gin again - we got home at one o'clock- it struck one as we were in the New-cut. Next morning I washed some things belonging to us both - there was a shirt of his, a collar, and the handkerchief which he held his thumb against, a waistcoat, and a pair of braces (looking at the waistcoat produced) - this is the one I washed; I did not observe any thing particular on it; I was in the habit of putting things in quick, into a little pan - I put the shirt and waistcoat in together, and observed no stain on them, except a stain on the shirt sleeve, which I had observed him make myself, with pickled cabbage; it was about here (pointing three or four inches below the elbow.)

Q. This was on Wednesday morning, the 2d of January? A. Yes, that I washed; I had been out on the Tuesday afternoon, a little after three o'clock, and when I returned, a little after four, found him lying on the bed, on his back, crying - I asked what was the matter; he said he had heard bad news since he had been out - that his father was dead and buried on the Wednesday before; I asked who the friend was who told him of it; he said nobody that I knew; he did not say where his friend lived; Mrs. Williams came on Wednesday morning, and breakfasted with Mr. Jones; I had none myself - I had asked Mrs. Williams to come to the fire - she said No; I was offended, and had no breakfast - I had been out before she came, and she opened the door to me when I returned - this was about eleven o'clock; Jones had sent me to get a newspaper.

Q. What newspaper was it to be? A. Any but Sunday's, I believe; I did not get him one; he was displeased at that, and words passed between us, which was partly the cause of my taking offence. On Sunday morning Mrs. Williams came, and said something about people being after him; we remained at our lodging till that evening - I then went out first, and Mr. Jones came after me; I did not tell the people we were going away; Stapleton's little girl went out into the street to see if any one was watching after Jones - he knew that - this was before I went out - Stapleton did not know but I was going to return that night - I went on as far as the Surrey Theatre; Jones overtook me in about ten minutes; that is about as far from Mitre-street as Fleet-market is from the end of Wych-street; he left me; I walked about some time - he met me again, and I went with him to sleep at a house in the City - it was a house for the reception of women; Jones went out in the morning - I met him again on Monday night; he and I were together all that night in the streets, and on Wednesday night: I saw him on Saturday morning - he promised to meet me that night, but never came; I waited; a young man came, and I was taken up; Mrs. Williams used to come and see us after we left her house; she lent him a coat and handkerchief; it was a coat her son's master had given him; she lent him a razor; I did not see any case to it in Mitre-street, but I saw one in Wootten-street; the way I noticed the case was this - she took them up-stairs to him, and asked him to sharpen them, and told him to choose which he liked from them; they all went away together in Windmill-court, and at night he wanted a razor, and could not find one in the bustle of moving, and this was sent to him by the little girl; I was dressing when it was brought, and did not notice whether it came in a case; I do not recollect seeing the case any where but in Wootten-street; a case was shown to me at Bow-street; I recollected it again, by its being rather freckled and dark, and turned up a little at the small end of it; I thought I knew it again, and that it was the same I had seen in Wootten-street; Jones used to shave with the razor; I never knew him do any thing else with it (looking at the razor produced) - this is the one he had in Mitre-street; there were two alike.

Q. Now look at the case, is it the case you saw before, at Wootton-street? A. By what I can recollect, Sir, Yes; I do not know it by any particular mark, but by its being freckled here (pointing to the narrow end); we stopped at home all day on the last Sunday in the year; we had no money to buy the necessaries of life.

Cross-examined by MR. COLERIDGE. Q. When you first became acquainted with the prisoner, did he go by the name of Edwards or Jones? A. Jones; we did not take the name of Edwards till we went to live in Wootten-street - we have always been called Edwards since; I heard him say there was a reason why he should go by a false name; he used to go out in the day-time at first, but not often, when we lived in Wootten-street.

Q. When you met him the last night in the year, how do you know it was after twelve o'clock? A. Because the wine-vaults we went to were shut up; I do not think the bells were ringing when I first met him, but I do not know; I think I heard St. Bride's bells when I was going home, over Blackfriars'-bridge; that was after I had been into the wine-vaults; I believe they begin to ring at twelve o'clock.

Q. Was there any thing particular in Jones' manner when you met him? A. No; he seemed more cheerful than he had on other nights; I perceived no hurry or agitation in his manner; there was a light in the wine-vaults; he had no bandage round his had there; I saw nothing particular about his clothes; I saw him pull them off when he went to bed; I noticed nothing remarkable about them; nor in the morning - there was nothing about his hands; there was no stain at all till I saw his thumb at breakfast-time, when he said he cut it; I saw no spots of blood; as we sat at breakfast he was cutting bread and butter - he put down the loaf, and I saw his thumb directly; he had had the handkerchief before, but I saw his thumb quite red, as if it had been bleeding.

COURT. Q. Did he say when he had cut his thumb? - A. Cutting the bread and butter at that time; he wiped it with his handkerchief - it seemed as if it had been bleeding.

MR. COLERIDGE. Q. Did you see him sponge his coat that day? A. No; he put it on to go out, after brushing it down with a shoe-brush - it had been sponged, but not by him - Mrs. Williams had sponged it for her son, before she lent it to him.

Q. On New-year's night he wished you to go and see the performance at the theatre; what made him wish you to go? A. I had heard it was a good thing; he mentioned to me on the Thursday or Friday afterwards, that he had been there on the Monday night, and said he had seen Nelson and some Pantomime, and mentioned Mr. Yates, Mr. Watson, and several other persons, who were in it; the shirt and waistcoat which he wore, were what he had worn on the 31st; I washed twice a week, sometimes but once - that was my general day for washing; he was often in the habit of sending me for the newspaper while I lived with him.

Q. When he sent you on this day, did he tell you to get any particular paper? A. No; over the water they lend out newspapers at so much an hour, and he said, "Try and get a paper if you can, in the same way as they used to lend them in Wootten-street, for I must have something to read:" this was the first time he sent for one at that lodging, for we only went there on Friday, and had no money to spare before: as I could not get a paper, I got him a novel that day, at the corner of New-street, facing the Cobourg theatre; he read it all - it was not returned till the Saturday night; I have been kept at Mr. Furzeman's since, and nobody from Jones has been to see me; Mr. Williams and Mr. Henson came up the other evening - I did not know they came from him; Mrs. Furzeman and the servant-girl were present all the time - I think it was on Tuesday evening they came; Mr. Williams lives in the Old Bailey - he used to keep the Globe tavern; that is the way I knew him; Jones' friends are very respectable, from what I have heard him say; I remember hearing about the murder, and saying his friends had sent the officers after him; Mrs. Williams came up and said, "William, I have got bad news to tell you;" she said the Bow-street officers were after him: I said, "What for?" she said, they said Oh, they could break into any house for murder; I said, "No, he has done no murder - it is his friends after him:" I then said to him,"For God's sake go home, and stop them from sending after you;" he said he would go home, because we did not want Mrs. Williams to know any body was after him; I know

Mrs. Mills - I remember telling her about getting my things out of pawn, and what money he got for me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever see this umbrella before? A. Yes, in Mitre-street; Mr. Jones brought it there on Tuesday afternoon, the 1st of January; when he told me he had been to see the Pantomime, he said he was treated by the young man who lent him the money.

Q. Did he say whether he went with the young man or alone? A. No; I supposed he went with him, as he said he was treated - he did not say whether he waited till it was over; he told me who acted, and said the scenes were beautiful; it was half past twelve o'clock when I met him, for the wine-vaults were shut; the female knocked, and we got in.

Q. In the course of that week, when he came home with more money than usual, did you pay for your lodging? A. Yes; I paid 3s. on the Tuesday afternoon when he came home, and 2s. on Friday. I had paid 1s. earnest when we went, as I had borrowed 2s. 6d. of Mrs. Williams; Jones gave me the 3s. to pay, and I pawned my frock for the 2s.

COURT. Q. Had you observed his thumb before he said he had cut it? A. No; I did not see him cut it; but while he was cutting bread he put down the loaf, and said he had cut it. I cannot be sure whether he did cut it then or not; it was red - I did not see blood come from it at that time, for he had it some time to the handkerchief; he put his thumb against the handkerchief, as soon as ever he said he had cut it, and, after some time, he shewed it to me, and I saw it was red; there was no mark in the bed as if it had been bleeding in the night.

SUSANNAH STAPLETON . I live at No. 35, Mitre-street. The prisoner first came to lodge with me, on the 26th of December; the witness, Charlotte, took the lodging. On Monday evening, the 31st of December, I heard them go out together, as usual, between six and seven o'clock; I did not see them go out, but heard the feet of two persons; they left their candle on the stairs, as usual. I was in bed when they returned; my husband let them in - I think it was a little before two o'clock; it might be half-past one. Charlotte paid me 3s. on the Tuesday, and 2s. on Friday; she had paid 1s. when they took the room - it was let at 6s. a week. I saw the prisoner between twelve and one o'clock, on the 1st of January; he had and umbrella. On Sunday, the 6th of January, between four and five in the afternoon, Mills called and enquired for Mr. and Mrs. Jones; I knew nobody by that name, and said there was nobody in the house of that name. I heard a voice on the landing-place; I could not tell whose voice, but Charlotte came down; she wished me to send my little girl to look out to see if any one was standing round the street. I did so; she was to go from the top of the street to the bottom. Jones was at home at the time; he could not hear the conversation between me and Charlotte; I should think, Charlotte went away in about and hour. The child was sent out a second time by Charlotte's desire, and she wished me to look out also. Jones went away about ten minutes after Charlotte; when he came down, he asked if I would do him the same favour: Charlotte had asked me to look out the same for him. I said I would; the favor was to look out for him, and I did; I went to the door and said there was no one there but my neighbours: he told me not to speak so loud - before that he asked if Mrs. Edwards was gone out. I said Yes; I told him she was gone up towards the Crown public-house. I saw nothing more of either of them, till they were in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. While they lived with you, was it their practice to go out of an evening? A. Yes; they used to come home between eleven and twelve o'clock; I do not think I was in bed above one night when they came home; I was sitting up with sick children.

MR. LAW. Q. Were they ever so late as on the night of the 31st of December? A. No; they usually came home about eleven o'clock - between eleven and twelve.

COURT. Q. Did you hear them come home on the night of the 31st of December? A. I heard them knock at the door; we had a sick child; I was sitting up in bed with a child I have ill.

JAMES STAPLETON . I am husband of the last witness. On New-year's morning the prisoner came home with Charlotte at two o'clock by my clock; he usually came home at twelve, and always together; they lived with us by the name of Edwards; he told me he had been to spend the evening with some friends; I think he said, we have been spending the evening; he did not say where he had been.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the habit of letting them in? A. I let them in three times, and had to get out of bed; they generally came home after my hours. There was nothing remarkable in his manner, more than on any other night. I had a light in my hand - I observed nothing about his clothes. I did not see him next morning, as I go out at half past nine.

MR. LAW. Q. Did he notice the day of the year when he came in? A. He wished me a happy new year.

COURT. Q. Did you observe any thing about either of his hands? A. No.

MARGARET MILLS . I live at No. 31, Wootten-street. On Wednesday, the 2d of January, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, Charlotte and Jones called on me; they said they were going to the theatre, to see something about Lord Nelson performed; they asked me to have something to drink. I said No; I had rather not; upon that the prisoner threw a crown piece down on the table; my daughter fetched a quartern and a half of gin with it, and gave the prisoner the change. Charlotte said, "What a had job it has been for me, on account of pledging my friend's coat; he went out yesterday and got me 2l.

Q. Who did she mean? A. Jones, the prisoner, had got her 2l. and she said, I have got this gown, and this shawl. out of pledge, and paid my rent. I asked what rent it was. she said 6s. a-week, and she paid it before it came due, for fear she should not have it again. I called at Stapleton's, in Mitre-street, on Sunday, the 6th, about five o'clock, and asked if Mr. Jones lived there - I had heard his name was Jones, but nothing farther. Mrs. Stapleton called out, and asked if there was such a person there. I described Charlotte, and she said no such person lived there. I called again afterward, and they were gone.

Cross-examined. Q. When she said what a bad thing it was that she had pawned his coat, did she say any thing more? A. She said she had pawned it for 10s. to pay the washer-woman's bill.

Q. Did she not say, "for he is not able to go out among his friends?" A. She did. I only saw 5s. produced.

ALICE HANDLEY . I live in Bridge-row, Lambeth, and keep a shop. I sold the umbrella produced, to the prisoner, on New-year's day, for 5s. 6d.

JAMES DUNCOMBE . I am an attorney, and live in Clement's Inn. The prisoner was in my employ, as clerk, in July last. I know his hand-writing (looking at three letters.) This letter, marked A, is his writing; it begins,"My dear Charlotte;" this one, marked B, I believe to be his writing, from some part of it; it is not written in his usual hand, and I am not so positive of it; it is a feigned hand - I cannot he positive of any part of it, but I have a belief of its being his - the words, "Jones is not the murderer," is like his - I have a belief that there is a great similarity, and the name "Goodman" is his writing, but is not his usual character; it appears to be a disguised hand - I have a fixed belief of it being his writing. This third letter marked C, I can speak to from his signature - the second is not signed. I wish to be understood as not speaking decidedly to the second letter.

Cross-examined. Q. I presume there is a considerable difference in the hand-writing? A. Certainly; some parts of the second letter, are so like his, that I believe it to be his, and no doubt it is all written by the same person. I believe it to be feigned, because some parts are not like his. I do not swear it is his writing.

Q. If you had received that letter in the ordinary way, should you have acted on it as Jones's letter? A. Certainly not.

The letter, Marked A, was here read, as follows:-

"MY DEAR CHARLOTTE, Giltspur-street.

"I embrace this opportunity of letting you know my situation, by a person who has offered to call for me. All I have to beg of you is, not to let a single soul know of it but yourself. I shall go up to the Hall to-morrow; I don't let a single soul know; if you come ask for Wm. Edwards."

MR. PLUMBE re-examined. I saw the state in which the deceased's body lay; in my judgment she could not have come by her death by her own hands.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I feel confident of your attention and favourable consideration of the few words I have now to address to you. If now, for the first time, you learned the charge against me, my situation would be one sufficiently alarming - but how much more frightful is it in consequence of the spreading throughout the country of details which have excited universal indignation; I will mention only one instance of the misrepresentation with which my name has been associated; at the very time when the bill against me was before the Grand Jury, a man was engaged near the Sessions-house, proclaiming with a horn the infamous story that I had made a full confession of this murder, and had committed suicide in the House of Correction. I might complain also of the way in which every little circumstance has been turned to my prejudice, but that I am willing to believe that a desire for justice was a part of the actuating motive - and am firmly convinced you will lay aside every thing said out of Court. From the first moment when this charge was brought against me, I have denied it; would that I could with equal truth declare myself guiltless of all other offence, but I feel that I am obliged to make my own misconduct a part of my defence - whatever may have been my errors, however, the slightest thought of murder never crossed my mind. I owe it to an aged mother and other friends, whose minds have already bled too much for me, to declare that I am guiltless of this charge. Thrown amidst the temptations of the town at an early age, my life was wild and dissolute - dissipation led to crime, and at the time when the offence with which I am now charged was committed, I had not only other charges to fear, but knew that a charge of forgery had been made against me, and thus it was that I fled at the approach of the officers. With regard to my examination before the Magistrates, I beg to say that many questions were put to me; I admit, however, that I did make a statement before the Magistrate, but it is not true; and thus, in order to avoid suspicion of one crime, I was obliged to confess to others. One of the presumptions against me is, that I was intimately acquainted with the unfortunate deceased; I solemnly declare, however, that I saw Mrs. Jeffs but four times in my life: the first time I saw her was at the house of her son, Mr. Knight, in Anderson's-place, Cornwall-road - the second time was at his house in Cursitor-street, when she told me she had invited Mr. Knight's daughter and my sister to take tea with her, and she asked me to accompany them; the third time I saw Mrs. Jeffs was when I accompanied Knight's son and his sister to the house in Montague-place: the last time I called with Knight alone, and believe he alone went into the house. I never saw Mrs. Jeffs after the month of July last; Knight and I went together to Montague-place, when he went into the house, I believe, to ask for money - I saw her upon that occasion, which was some time in last July, and I never saw her after. I took the name of Edwards to avoid detection, knowing that I had unfortunately rendered myself liable to the law, in consequence of what I had done at Mr. Duncombe's; under such circumstances, I should have been more than insane to have gone to Montague-place, where most likely I should have been refused admittance. As to my dress, and the circumstances of suspicion attached to the coat, I am enabled, on the clearest proofs, to answer that part of the charge. Mrs. Williams has a son employed by a surgeon who resides in Blackfriars-road; that gentleman gave him a coat which was damaged, and the stains upon which were said to be occasioned by blood - in my distress I borrowed this coat, and unfortunately for me, the very worst construction was put upon a circumstance purely accidental; in the same way the blood upon the shirt-collar was made use of as a proof against me, and the waistcoat was said also to be stained with blood; as to the stain upon the collar, what becomes of it when it is proved in evidence that I cut my thumb, and tied it with tape, which is marked with blood? So little did the circumstance of cutting my thumb occupy my thoughts, that when I was questioned about it by the officers, I totally forgot how or when I did it, and said it was done cutting wood. With respect to the razor-sheath, I beg leave, my Lord and Gentlemen, to draw your particular attention - I trust you will examine this part of the evidence carefully, and say if any one could swear to a razor-sheath, of which there are hundreds, of a similar make and description, sold daily in the metropolis; it is a common razor-sheath, and has nothing whatever about it to mark as peculiar: with respect to the edge of it being notched, I can answer it - one day, when

I was alone in Mitre-street, sitting in a state of melancholy, quite unconscious of what I did, I cut the razor-sheath bit by bit, with the razor, and flung them into the fire. I am most anxious to satisfy you as to where I was on the evening of the 31st of December - Mary Parker and I left home that night, and proceeded together to Blackfriars-bridge; I went to the gallery of the Adelphi Theatre in the Strand, and remained there till the performances were over - I then joined her in Poppin's-court, soon after twelve o'clock; the bells of St. Bride's were then ringing what they call the new year in. It has been said if I was at the Theatre I could prove the fact, but it was impossible for me to do so, situated as I then was. It is not pretended that I am a hardened murderer, and if not, is it likely I could be cheerful as usual, and have supported a falsehood by bringing Mary Parker to the Theatre? My possession of money, soon after the commission of the offence of which I am accused, is another charge against me - I am here obliged to remind you of my own delinquencies; I had by a criminal act obtained a supply for my pressing wants; and here, Gentlemen, I must do justice to the unhappy woman who lived with me, by declaring that she was totally unacquainted with many of my offences, and that I carefully concealed them from her. - There is one point I cannot pass unnoticed, I mean the letters said to be written by me in prison - the first letter I wrote - the second I know nothing about, and the third was written under these circumstances: - Mr. Vickery came to me in prison, and asked if I knew a Mr. Morris, who I understood had called at the prison; I recollected a person of that name, at the White Lion public-house, Wych-street, and under that impression I wrote the third letter. Gentlemen, without another remark, I leave my fate in your hands, under the impression that you will throw aside any prejudice that may have been excited in your minds against me. The man who is dishonest may not be cruel; the thief may shrink from the crime of murder, and I can with truth declare that this has always been the state of my mind; no propensity to cruelty, or desire to commit violence on any human being, ever entered my mind among the many evils I have committed. I do solemnly declare before God, that I am innocent of the crime of which I am now accused.

JOHN SELLS. The prisoner and Charlotte came to lodge with me about the middle of August, and left the middle of October; they were nine weeks with me, and then went to Mrs. Williams'; while with me he had a newspaper nearly every morning, and was always anxious about it; my daughter generally fetched it for him.

BARNARD GUEST . I am a chemist, and have a shop in Blackfriars-road. Nicholas Halford was in my employ; I gave him a blue frock-coat, which I had left off wearing some time, but my servant wore it when he brewed; it was stained with wort all over when I gave it to the boy - I am not aware of any other stains, but possibly there might be, for when I am in London I dissolve camphor myself; it was most likely stained with muriatic acid, used with spirits of wine in dissolving camphor, but I have so many coats which I use on that occasion, I cannot say whether this was one, but it frequently happens to my coats; the wort would make it feel very stiff and clammy, but it is easily washed out with soap and water; I have no doubt this is the coat - I can perceive, from the feel of it, that saccharum matter is now in the cloth.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long ago did your servant wear it to brew in? A. It has been worn in March and October, for the last two or three years: we did not brew last year till near Christmas, I think - he wore it then; I gave it to Halford within a few days of Christmas: saccharum matter does not stain - it gives it a clammy feel; muriatic acid stains: I cannot see any such marks on it now; camphorated muriatic acid would take out the colour entirely.

NICHOLAS HALFORD . I am Mrs. Williams' son, and live with Mr. Guest; he gave me a coat - there was no spots on it, to my knowledge, only beer; I sponged it all over about a fortnight before I lent it to the prisoner; I used a great deal of water, and rubbed it with a piece of blue cloth all over, all about the skirts and sleeves.

MR. LAW. Q. You rubbed it all over? A. Yes; I lent it to him about two months ago - I had had it a fortnight or three weeks.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-17

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

499. SAMUEL WEEDON and HENRY GODFREY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frederick Tootell , on the 12th of February , at Edgware, and stealing therein 160 lbs weight of bacon, value 5l.; 130 lbs weight of cheese, value 5l.; 20lbs weight of tea, value 9l.; 25 lbs weight of figs, value 1l.: 170 lbs weight of sugar. value 7l.; 3 lbs weight of tobacco, value 12s.; 30 lbs weight of butter, value 1l.; 8 lbs. weight of shot, value 4s.; 10 lbs. weight of mutton, value 6s.; 1 knife, value 5s.; 1 sovereign, and 30 shillings , the property of the said Frederick Tootell.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK TOOTELL. I am a grocer , and live at Edgware . On Wednesday morning, the 13th of February, at seven o'clock, I was called by my apprentice, and in consequence of what he told me, I got up, and examined my premises; I went to my shop, and found it in a very confused state; I found the warehouse window had been broken open - the warehouse leads from the shop; it is under the same roof as the dwelling-house: I found the warehouse shutter broken open - it appeared to have been broken by a centre-bit; the window was open - it is a window that slides back; anybody who broke the shutter open, could push it back: I found the warehouse in a confused state - the things all laying about; I missed two sides of bacon, three Cheshire cheeses and some loaves of sugar, out of the shop: the till was broken open, and a sovereign, about 30s. in silver, and 4s. in copper taken out - they were there overnight, and the till locked; the till and money were gone - I missed a drum of figs from the shop window, and two loaves of show sugar; I missed from the warehouse some curd-soap, some sugar, half a tub of butter, and two new sacks; and from the shop, two pair of scissors, a bacon-knife, and a quantity of shot: the sacks were marked"F. Tootell, Edgware;" I missed a leg of mutton from the cellar adjoining the warehouse: I do not know whether the apprentice's things were in the shop; I also missed some

harley-sugar, and 3 lbs. or 4 lbs. of tobacco. On the afternoon of the 13th of February, I went with the constable to search Weedon's house at Finchley, and found nearly a side of bacon laying on the floor, which I identified as my property - he was not at home, but his wife and children were: I knew the bacon by having myself cut a piece out of the shoulder a month previous: I had seen it in the shop the evening before, between five and six o'clock; on looking up the chimney, I found a loaf of sugar with my private mark on it, made by my apprentice: I left the constable to search further, and saw him find some figs in a box, in the same room; the drum was not found - he found some barley-sugar in the same box, and a piece of Dutch cheese in another box - there was some tea in a cannister, on the mantel-piece; I went out, and in three or four minutes saw Weedon coming towards his house - I secured him, and gave him to the constable.

COURT. Q. Did you go to bed last, at night? A. Yes, and am quite sure the window was fast. The piece which I cut from the side of bacon, was sold before the robbery.

CHARLES GREIG . I am apprentice to Mr. Tootell. On the 13th of February, I got up about seven o'clock in the morning, went into the shop, and found it in the state I have heard my master describe, I alarmed him. I had a blue coat and hat hanging in the warehouse, the night before - there was an oil-skin cover to it; the hat and coat were missing; I missed two sides of bacon, which I had seen hanging in the shop the night before: I had not noticed a piece being cut off the shoulder; I found the warehouse - shutter broken off at the corner, and the window open - the warehouse and shop are under the same roof - any one who broke the shutter could push the window back with his hand; the shutter appeared to have been bored with a centre-bit and then broken off. There was snow on the ground, and I traced footsteps from the house up the garden to the summer-house; at the corner of the garden there appeared footsteps of three or four persons - they were quite visible. I found a quantity of sugar laying in the path, and some in a tub by the side of it, in the path. I found a Japan tea cannister empty, in the summer-house - it was in the shop the night before; there were two cakes of curd-soap in the summer-house - I cannot identify them, but we had curd-soap in the shop. I then traced the footsteps up the field adjoining the garden, up to another summer-house at the end of the field, and in that summer-house, I found my blue cloth coat, laying on the floor - there is a sort of cellar under the summer-house; I got down there and found half a tub of butter, with a little green bag over it, sticking to it, without any string - that bag did not belong to master; I had seen the half tub of butter in the warehouse the night before. I traced the footsteps down as far as Brook-lane, which is in the road from Finchley, towards Edgware; some paper was shewn to me in master's shop after Weedon was apprehended, which I can be certain was in the shop window the night before, I had enclosed a show loaf of sugar in it, there was a mark of my own making on it; some Dutch cheese was shewn to me, which I can swear was in the shop the night before.

THOMAS HAILEY . I am constable of Edgeware, which is five miles from Finchley. On the 13th of February I accompanied Mr. Tootell to Weedon's house, on Finchleycommon; I found the bacon in the bed-room up stairs, laying on the floor, by the window, in four pieces; there was a loaf of sugar up the chimney - Mr. Tootell pulled it down; I took it from him - it had a paper round it; there was some figs, and some harley-sugar in a box; and, in another box, some linen and Dutch cheese, which I showed Mr. Tootell; he went on the road, and in three minutes took Weedon, and delivered him to me.

JAMES TOW. I am constable of Hendon. I accompanied two other officers to search the house of Waters, at East Barnet. I found some barley-sugar and tea in a handkerchief at his house - there appears about a quarter of a pound; I afterwards apprehended Waters - he made a communication, and in consequence of what he said, I searched the house of Godfrey on Finchley-common, and found some tea there, in a cannister, on the chimney-piece - it is mixed tea - there is about a quarter of a pound; I found some chisels and a net there; he is a labourer, not a carpenter.

GEORGE WATERS (a prisoner). I know both the prisoners; I saw them both on a Tuesday night - I do not know the day of the month - it was a snowy night; I went to see them at Weedon's house - his wife and children were there; Godfrey went with me to Weedon's house, and another person went with us - it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; Weedon said, "Will you go and take a walk?" Godfrey said he did not care; then said Weedon,"We will walk over to Edgware if you like:" we all four went, and got to Edgware about seven o'clock; we went into a barn, and laid down - that was a little after seven; I do not know the prosecutor's premises - if I was taken there now, I should not know them again; we staid in the barn till about a quarter past twelve o'clock, when all four got up and went out - we went across the fields (before that the other man and Weedon quarrelled); we were going to a shoe-shop at first, but we did not - we went to a grocer's shop, as Weedon took us to the wrong door (there was some hay in the barn - Picton took that); Picton and Godfrey got the shutter open, and got in - I do not know what they opened it with; Weedon and I staid in the privy at the time - I do not know whether Godfrey had any thing in his hand; Picton had a centre-bit; I did not see the shutter broken - I heard them at work at it; they got in between the top of the bar - Picton and Godfrey got in; they went into the shop, and put some moist sugar out to us; Weedon stood with me; then he put out some butter, tea, cheese, and bacon, and then they brought some figs and loaf sugar; and then they brought the till out, with 1s. 6d. in halfpence in it.

Q. When the things were got out, what became of Picton and Godfrey? A. They came out; they put the things up, and went home.

Q. Which way did you go? A. Across the fields; the house was broken into behind, in the garden; we went round the garden-path, and returned the same way; there was a little bit of a place at the top of the garden, and we put all the things down there as we got them out - we left some moist sugar there; that is all I know: we went down the field; there is a summer-house at the end of the field; we put half a tub of butter there, and threw a blue coat in at the window of the summer-house - I do not know where the butter was put; Weedon put that in; Weedon put a little

green bag in his frock-pocket, when he first went out - I should know it again; we all went home.

COURT. Q. Did you go home the same way? A. Yes, the same way as we came; Weedon went to his house, and we went down to Godfrey's; Picton brought a leg of mutton out to the window, and gave it to me; I took it up the garden with the rest of the things; we eat it when we got home - we dined off it - it was dressed at Godfrey's house on Finchley-common; Weedon came down to Godfrey's house, and fetched some barley-sugar, and a little tea from there - we had taken it there; Weedon carried the bacon and other things to his house himself, when he went home at first; and the other things were carried to Godfrey's -(looking at the bag) that is the bag Weedon had in his pocket; Picton, I, and Godfrey, went to Godfrey's house - Weedon went to his own house.

JURY. Q. When did you turn evidence? A. I told this before the Justice the first time I was there; I wished to save my own neck.

Prisoner WEEDON. Q. Do you say that bag is mine; I have got one just like it? A. I will take my oath that is the bag he put into his pocket when he came out.

WEEDON'S Defence. I did not break into the house, nor tell him to go to Edgware; the bag which I have got, is at home now.

GODFREY'S Defence. That man said he would swear to any thing to get any body off; he said he would take an oath for any thing, to screen any body. I was at work on the road to Finchley; some things were found in my house; he said he would take this oath that he found them in the road. I am innocent - I was at home, and in bed at the time.

GEORGE WATERS . I never said I would take a false oath to screen any body, or any such thing.

JURY. Q. You say the things were taken to Godfrey's? A. Weedon took a side of bacon, and a loaf of sugar, to his own house - it was about a quarter-past five o'clock in the morning; I do not remember his taking any thing else; the other things went to Godfrey's - only one loaf of sugar was brought to Godfrey's - that remained there; I was never in trouble before in my life - I never quarrelled with Godfrey.

Prisoner GODFREY. He took me before Dr. Owen, for striking him; if I had been guilty, I could have gone away - I heard of it, but went home, and went to bed, after Weedon was taken; I was not taken till Monday last.

WEEDON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

GODFREY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18280221-18

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

500. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 1 coat, value 5l.10s.; 1 tippet, value 1l.; 1 spencer, value 2s.; 1 veil, value 10s.; 1 collar, value 6d.; 1box, value 10s.; 2 corks, value 1s.; 2 bottles, value 1s.; 2 candlesticks, value 16s.; 1 table-cloth. value 5s.; 1 napkin, value 1s.; 2 pieces of lace, value 6d.; 22 spoons, value 4l. 4s.; 1 silver caster-top, value 1s.; 1 bunch of seals, value 6d., and 2 tops of ink-stands, value 6d., the goods of Oliver Oxley , in his dwelling-house .

OLIVER OXLEY. I am a picture-dealer , and live in Long-acre . On the 22d of June, between five and six o'clock in the morning, the watchman rang at my bell; I was asleep - it awoke me; I looked out of the window - the people said there were thieves in the house; I got up, went down, and let the watchman in at the door; I found my house in great disorder; the things in the rooms on the first floor were tossed about - every thing ransacked and disturbed; the drawing-room window was wide open; I went to the watch-house, and saw a great coat which was my property, and various other things stated in the indictment; I examined my house, and found they had raised a bar from the back area, got into the area, and proceeded up stairs - they had taken down an aitch-bone of beef, and regaled themselves with that and a bottle of wine which was up stairs, and had not been tapped in the morning.

FREDERICK BLACKWELL . I am constable of St. Martin's parish. On the 22d of January, about ten minutes to six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought into the watch-house by three watchmen, but such was the confusion at the time, I cannot say who - I searched him, and found a latch-key in his pocket, and found a pair of small scissors - about ten minutes after he was given into my custody, a great coat was produced on the arm of one of the watchman, (I think Jackson,) in the pocket of it I found two candlesticks, a black lace veil, and a lady's fur tippet - some silver spons and things were brought in by a watchman; I produce the things found since, which the watchman brought in; I found this china-box in his pocket; while I was searching him, I perceived something fall, and picked up this phospherous bottle - it came down the chimney - he threw it up, I suppose, but I did not see him.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. A key and pair of scissors are all you found on his person? A. I believe so, but in the confusion, I cannot say whether I found anything else.

JAMES BULL . I am a watchman, my box stands in Mr. Oxley's doorway. On the 22d of January, about twenty minutes to six o'clock, I heard some glass break inside his house; I directly came out of my box, and went to the private door in Banbury-court, to see if it was fast - I found it fast - I then went to the rear of the house, and found nothing particular out of its place: I began to put my box away, and as I moved it, a man came out at the private door, and walked up the passage, I said, "Here, I want to speak to you," - that was not the prisoner - I ran to the door, which was left ajar, pulled it too, sprang my rattle, and hallooed, Stop thief! he ran as hard as he could into Hart-street, and turned to the right; I lost sight of him in a second; I stood with the door in my hand, and sprang my rattle, till another watchman came up; another person came and took my place; I went to the front and alarmed Mr. Oxley, and while I was gone the person was taken; I searched the house all over, and found a hat which fitted the prisoner at Bow-street; there was a handkerchief in it - they have been in my possession ever since.

Q. You have no doubt that the man who came out at the door heard the cry? A. Certainly - that man had time to throw things away; he ran down Hart-street - I heard the spoons thrown down.

THOMAS LEWIS . I am a watchman. I was on this spot, and heard a rattle spring about a quarter or twenty minutes to six o'clock; I ran towards the cry, and saw a man come down off the leads adjoining Mr. Oxley's door; the leads

are in Long-acre, in front of the house; the man ran down Long-acre, and turned up St. Martin's-lane; I followed him up the lane - he turned the corner into Castle-street; when I got round the corner, I saw him down on the ground - Jackson had taken him; this great coat was half on and half off, and when we got him on his feet it came off - Jackson took it off his arm; we took him down St. Martin's-lane, to the watch-house, and as we took him along, several things dropped from him: I held him while Jackson picked them up; there was a saucepan, a box, and three skeleton-keys - they were all taken to the watch-house; he had no hat on - I left him at the watch-house, and returned to Oxley's house.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is Castle-street from Mr. Oxley's house? A. I suppose four or five hundred yards; he turned two corners before he got to Castle-street - I lost sight of him for a moment, while he turned the corner - he was still running when I turned the corner; he had no hat on when he came off the leads.

THOMAS JACKSON . I am a watchman; my box is in Castle-street, at the bottom of Mercer-street. On the 22d of January, at ten minutes to six o'clock in the morning, I heard a rattle spring, and soon after it sprang again as if a man was running and springing it; I proceeded along Castle-street - the prisoner came along St. Martin's-lane into Castle-street - I knocked him down, and while he laid on his back Lewis came up - I secured him; he had a great coat on, which he slipped down as far as his elbows, and when we got him up, I took it off his arm; Lewis had got him in custody - we took him to the watch-house with the great coat; when we got him up, there was a china-box on the ground, and in Little St. Martin's-lane he dropped a silver spoon and in Great St. Martin's-lane three skeleton-keys - I picked them up, and he dropped the cork of a decanter and a piece of metal - he had no hat on.

Cross-examined. Q. The great coat was very loose on him? A. He slipped it down to his elbows when I knocked him down; it was on his back before - he offered no resistance to me.

WILLIAM BOND . I am conductor of the patrol, and live near Mr. Oxley's. I heard a rattle spring, got up, went to his house, and Mrs. Oxley gave me a piece of iron; I was at Bow-street when the prisoner was examined; this hat and handkerchief were produced - he had a handkerchief similar to it round his neck; I tried the hat on him, and it fitted.

MR. OXLEY. This is my great coat; it has never been worn, and cost me 5l. 10s.; the candlesticks had been in use the night before, and are worth 16s.; this is an old family spoon - this is my enamelled snuff-box - here is the top of my pepper-castor; the value of all the property is at least 8l., and a great deal more; I had seen most of them the night before; they committed most horrid indecencies in the place; I lost some spoons, some of which were brought back from Hart-street; I lost ten tea, and I mustard-spoon - the mustard, two tea, and a table-spoon have been brought back.

Cross-examined. Q. The spoons were not found in the direction the prisoner ran? A. They were found at the back of the house.

MRS. MARIA ANN OXLEY . I was in bed at the time of the robbery; this is my tippet, and is new; I gave 2l. for it a week before the robbery; here is a collar which I know, and a child's spencer, and my black veil - I had seen them all the evening before.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to know how long Mr. Oxley has had possession of the things since they were taken.

FREDERICK BLACKWELL re-examined. Every thing has been in my possession, except the tippet, candlesticks, and gloves, which Sir Richard Birnie said Mrs. Oxley might have, after marking them; she has returned them to me.

MRS. OXLEY. They are the same things.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-19

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

501. JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 4 candlesticks, value 8l., the goods of James Bernard Dew , in his dwelling-house .

MRS. SARAH DEW . I am the wife of James Bernard Dew. We live in Claremont-terrace. Pentonville . On the 4th of February I saw the prisoner in our fore-court, going out at the gate; I saw some candlesticks under his apron; I alarmed Collins, the servant; she ran out, and in about twenty minutes he was brought back with these four canclesticks, which are worth 8l.; they were very lately bought, and we gave that for them; I had seen them in the kitchen half an hour before.

SARAH COLLINS . I am servant to Mr. Dew. My mistress alarmed me; I missed the candlesticks off the kitchen dresser; my mistress said it was a short man, and directed me which way he was gone; I ran out immediately, and met Harris, who stopped the prisoner, and I saw him (the prisoner) in possession of the candlesticks; I had brought them down stairs half an hour before; they are new, and have not been cleaned yet.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I saw the prisoner some time before this happened, crying hare-skins; Collins afterwards alarmed me - I went and came up with him in Amwell-street, a quarter of a mile from this house, with the candlesticks in this bag, over his shoulder; I brought him back, and gave him to Beckley - he was walking very leisurely.

WILLIAM BECKLEY . On the 4th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was by the Belvidere public-house, and saw a mob; Harris was holding the prisoner - I took him in charge, and found a jemmy on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-20

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

502. JAMES WILSON and JOHN WHITFIELD were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Dyson , on the 14th of February , and stealing 2 files, value 2d. , the goods of Thomas Craven.

JOSEPH DYSON. I live in City-gardens, Islington , and am a cabinet-maker . On the 14th of February, about two o'clock in the morning, I heard my ground floor windowsash pushed up, and then heard a rumbling noise below, I got up, flung the first floor window open, looked down and saw one of the ground floor shutters standing back a

little - it was open: I called the watchman five or six times, and then one of these prisoners rushed to the window, shoved the shutters more open, and jumped out of the window - the other immediately followed - I called the watchman to look to the back of the house, but the prisoners went along the front, down Macclesfield-street - one of them had a light-coloured great coat on; the watchmen brought them back in about a minute and half - they had not got four doors from the house; I did not exactly see him lay hold of them - I saw him meet them; I never lost sight of them, and am positive he brought back the same men as jumped out of the window; my parlour is on the right-hand side of the passage, and the kitchen on the other; when I came down, the parlour and kitchen shutters were both open - they were shut at ten o'clock, when I went to bed; Craven lodged there; I rent the house; they must have got in at the parlour shutters, which were fastened at half-past nine o'clock; I cannot say how they opened them - I heard the window pushed up three or four minutes before I saw them jump out - they were taken only four houses off, but there is an entrance to a street between the houses: I saw the shutters closed at half-past nine o'clock, and they must have been bolted, because they spring back if they are not; I did not look at the fastening - I cannot say whether the window was shut when I went to bed, but I heard it pushed up - I do not know who shut the shutters at night.

JOSEPH ALDRIDGE . I am a watchman. On the 14th of February, about two o'clock in the morning, I was at the end of Macclesfield-street, and heard Dyson cry, Watch! I ran towards the sound - heard the cry repeated, and as I approached near the window, I saw two men coming along, and saw something drop from them; but what I could not exactly perceive - I thought it looked like papers - the wind blew some of them towards the curb. I took the prisoners. Dyson called out that thieves had broken into his house, and that one had a light coat on. I said I had got them - I took them back to his house; he was leaning out of his window, and said, "Those are the men - I can swear to them." They heard that - some Islington watchmen came to my assistance, and I left them in their charge, while I returned to where I stopped them, and picked up some papers. We took the prisoners to the watch-house. I returned to my beat. Sheldrake called me; we went and searched the spot where I had taken them. I looked about with my lantern, and picked up a small book; and on the threshold of a door, No. 24, Macclesfield-street, I found a file; this was about one hundred yards from the house, and on the window-cill I found part of another file; I gave them to the officer. When I first saw the prisoners, they were walking; but when I got nearer to them, they stopped, and the papers dropped from them - they said they had done nothing - there is a gas-light nearly opposite to where I took them, and one within a few yards of the prosecutor's house; there are three between the spot and the prosecutor's house, which would enable him to see any body who jumped out of window. I could not see which of them dropped the papers; but it was one of them, I am certain.

THOMAS CRAVEN . I am a pocket-book-maker. I lodged in Dyson's parlour up to the 11th of February, and then moved to Macelesfield-street. I left on a shelf, in a closet there, an account book, some papers, a file, and part of another.

HENRY SHELDRAKE . I am headboro' of St. Luke. On the 14th of February, a little after two o'clock in the morning, the prisoners were brought to the watch-house, charged with breaking into Dyson's house. I found a knife on Wilson. I went out - the watchman shewed me the spot where he had taken them, and opposite No. 24, Macclesfield-street I found a small account-book; there was a file on the cill of the door, and another on the windowcill - I produce them.

THOMAS CRAVEN . This book contains an account, kept between an ironmonger and me. I remember leaving this broken file very well; I had taken away the useful part of it, and it fits this. I believe the other to be mine; I used it for a particular purpose, which took away the edge. I left them both in the closet with the book.

JOSEPH DYSON . I lost nothing of my own. I examined the closet after Craven left, and saw a book similar to this, and the large file. I think that was on the 12th; there was nothing else in the parlour - the watch-house is nearly half a mile from where the papers were found.

The prisoners put in a written Defence, as follows: - "On the 14th of February we went to visit a relative in Ball's-pond-road, and on returning to our residence in the neighbourhood of Old-street, when we came through City gardens, the watchman took hold of us, and charged us with robbing the prosecutor's premises; feling ourselves innocent we surrendered willingly - at our examination the prosecutor said he saw us both come out of the parlour window, which he thought must have been left open, the shutters having only been closed the night before. We boldly denying his assertion, and being taken some distance from the spot, we trust will prove our innocence.

WILSON - GUILTY. Aged 21.

WHITFIELD - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-21

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

503. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas William Perry , on the 21st of January , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , his property.

THOMAS WILLIAM PERRY. I live in Playhouse-yard, Whitecross-street. On the 21st of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I went to the Lion and Lamb public-house, Golden-lane, Barbican , with Costar, who lodges with me; he called for a quartern and a half of gin, and gave me a glass; the prisoner was there standing against the bar; he hit me twice in the face with a bag which he had in his hand; I had given him no provocation - he then said, "You b - gg - r, if you don't like that" - and gave me a blow in the face, which knocked my head through one pane of glass, and my elbow through another; it knocked me down; he then took my handkerchief off my neck - I saw it in his hand; I don't know what he did with it - it was a red one with white spots; he whistled, and five or six more came out of the back place. I was knocked down; directly I got up some of those men knocked me down - I was kicked outside the door, into the kennel. Costar was served in the same way, I believe - I was taken home. I could not go home without assistance. I was kicked when on the ground - there were six or seven,

all on me at once. I was bruised about the body, and struck on my nose, which bled. I have not seen my handkerchief since.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. By whom were you taken home? A. My wife, and two or three men; an officer took my companion home; we did not go home together; I saw no officer. I was never at this public-house, above twice in my life. The landlord said, "D-n the window! never mind the window; I have got plenty of money to pay for more." I am sure two panes of glass were broken; I had no hat on. The prisoner was not very sober, nor very drunk - I never spoke to him before, but I had seen him going backward and forward to the Lion and Lamb - he was taken in Playhouse-yard. I had no doctor, but was obliged to stop at home two days from work - I had no money about me - the prisoner was not so drunk as not to know what he was about; he was very violent - I made no resistance. I did not see Costar interfere - I did not fight at all. I would give 6d. for the handkerchief. The landlord is not here; he was in the bar when I was knocked against the window.

CHARLES COSTAR . I lodge with Perry. I went with him to the Lion and Lamb, and called for a quartern of gin; the prisoner was at the bar; and while I was drinking, he threw his bag in Perry's face, and struck him with it in the face. Perry said, "Don't do that, Bill, for I know you." He then struck him a violent blow with his fist; his head went through one square of glass, and his elbow through another - he fell, and the prisoner took the handkerchief off his neck; he whistled, and five or six came came out; we were both knocked down, and kicked about - I got up and was knocked down again. I was hustled and dragged out into Golden-lane; then some of them got round me, and some round Perry; they knocked us down, and kicked us while we were down. I saw the prisoner take Perry's handkerchief off; but could not see who he gave it to - it was passed to some of the men: the landlord was present - he is not here.

Q. No money was taken from the prosecutor? A. He lost some money; he could not say who took it; and I lost 3s. from my right-hand trousers' pocket; but whether I was robbed of it, or lost it in the fall, I cannot say. I did not see any attempt to rifle Perry's pockets, or to rob either of us of money; the prisoner took Perry's handkerchief off directly he fell. I swear I saw him give it to some one; but who, I cannot say; and within three or four minutes, we were hustled into the street; they moved Perry down a court. I was beat so, the officer was obliged to take me away; I could not get on my legs.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner live in Playhouse-yard? A. He lived at the back of a house, right opposite Perry's, on the second floor; but he was not to be found in the neighbourhood, till the night he was taken. I have not indicted the prisoner. I attempted to lift Perry up, but these men came out of the room, and knocked me down; the landlord came, and opened the door, while they dragged us out.

COURT. Q. Did the landlord interfere to prevent this? A. Oh, no; I consider him as bad as the prisoner - he stood there and saw it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you tell the officer who took you home, what had happened? A. Yes; I told him I lost 3s., but could not say I was robbed of it - I don't say I was robbed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-22

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

504. ELEANOR BRYANT and MARY RYAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Locker , in the King's highway, on the 10th of February , at St. Mary-le-bone, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 cloak, value 8s. , her property.

ELIZABETH LOCKER. I am single , and now live at No. 37. Earl-street, On the 10th of February, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was standing with my back against a butcher's door in the Edgware-road; the two prisoners came up, and asked why I stood there - I told them I had had a few words with the person I lodged with, and did not feel inclined to go home; they asked me to go home and sleep with them that night; I told them I would not go, for I thought they had got some persons behind them - there were two men behind them: they said the men were nothing to them - that they were going to sleep together, and I should be welcome to sleep with them; I was glad to embrace the opportunity, and walked with them up Edgware-road, along Earl-street, till I came to a street where there is a public-house, called the Champion, at the corner; we went by that public-house a great distance, to a place where there were very few lamps, and a very bad light: I asked how much farther they had to go - they told me to the further end of that street, which one of them pointed to; I began to feel timid, and said I would not go any farther: I was going to cross the street, when I was pushed into a great place that was dug for a sewer, and one of them laid hold of my cloak - I hallooed out, "Pray don't take my cloak;" they dragged it till the ribbon gave way which fastened it round my waist, and the other ribbon which tied it round my neck, and got it off; I held on with both my hands as long as I was able, and one of them beat my wrist; my hands were beat till they were all colours; Ryan laid hold of my cloak, and it was Bryant who beat my hands; they got my cloak - I followed them down the street as fast as I could, calling Stop thief! no person came to my assistance; I lost sight of them, and did not see them any more that night. On the Tuesday following I saw Thompson, the officer, bring Ryan to High-street Office, and on the Wednesday I saw Bryant at the office - I had never seen them before, to my knowledge; I was about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour with them, and can swear to them - I took particular notice of them, as I thought it was kind for them to offer to take me home to sleep, being a stranger. I had had some words with the woman I lodge with, and did not like to go in; the woman keeps a dairy - I lodge about one hundred yards from the butcher's shop, and go out washing. I had gone round to the pawnbroker's on the Tuesday, to search for my cloak, and found it at Fairlam's; I then told Thompson, the officer, of it, and he knew the persons I described to him.

RICHARD FAIRLAM . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 59, Lisson-grove. The prisoner Ryan pawned this cloak on Monday evening, the 11th of February, for 2s., in the name of Mary Ryan; I have seen her before at the shop - it is worth 3s.

Prisoner RYAN. Q. Did I pawn it? A. Yes; I

knew her before - she gave her address in Nightingale-street; my boy was in the shop, but I received it from her, and am certain of her; I lent her the money on it. The prosecutrix came on Tuesday, and asked if I had such a one; I produced it.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On Tuesday morning about ten o'clock, the prosecutrix came to me; she complained of being robbed, described the girls, and said the cloak was pawned in the name of Ryan; I went to No. 10, Nightingale-street, and found Ryan in the first floor back room; I said, "Poll, I want you;" I knew her before - she asked what for; I said for a robbery; she asked if it was for a man or woman - I said a woman; the answer she made was,"B-gg-r you;" she was going to state something, but I said it was a serious charge againest her, and if she said anything further I should be obliged to state it in evidence against her. As I took her to the office we passed Fairlam's shop - I stopped there to tell him to come to the office, and as soon as she saw me stop, she said, "I see what has done me, pledging it in my own name;" I cautioned her again not to say anything, and took her to the office. The prosecutrix described Bryant; I informed another officer, having occasion to go out myself - I afterwards went with him, and directed him to a house in Exeter-street, Lisson-grove, where he found her, and brought her out to me; I knew them both before - they are women of the town: I did not know the prosecutrix.

ELIZABETH LOCKER re-examined. This is my cloak; I described the marks on it before I saw it - two of the atraps are not stitched, and I put pins in it; I bought it in November, 1826.

Prisoner BRYANT. Q. Do you mean to say that I struck you? A. Yes, you beat me over my wrists, and over my hand; I am sure she is the person.

BRYANT's Defence. I and Ryan were walking up the road about ten o'clock on Sunday night, and saw her standing against the door, very much intoxicated, with three or four boys round her; we told her to come away from them - we came along; she stopped at a public-house, said she would give us somthing to drink, and pulled out a bad halfpenny, and said she was sorry that would get nothing; I told her to go home - she said she had no where to go; I gave Ryan the key to go home with her, as I was not going directly myself; she would make me go with her, and as I turned up Exeter-street, as it was very dark, I said I would not go that way, but she would go that way; I said the other street was nearest- we came to a place where there was a plank; I stood while they both went across, and saw her fall; I cannot say whether Ryan knocked her down or not; I heard her halloo, and she said she was pinching her - I heard her say she was in a fit; I saw her hitting her with the key; she said, "Don't take my cloak;" I saw her take the cloak and run away - I ran after her; she was out of my sight in a moment; I did not know she meant to rob her. When I came back the prosecutrix was gone, and when I got home I found Ryan in bed; I asked what she had done with the cloak - she made no answer; in the morning, when I got up, I saw it under the bed, and said, "Here is the cloak;" she said Yes; it was all over mud, and she asked me to brush it - I would not. I went home to my sister's and told her of it, but she advised me to say nothing of it; I returned at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon - she was out, and the cloak was gone - I went out again, and found her at home at tea when I returned; I asked her what she had done with the cloak - she said it was nothing to me - that she should have to answer for it. I went next day to my sister's, and she told me to say nothing about it; the officer came next day; I told Ryan I would tell the truth before the Magistrate, and she said it I did it would be worse for me, and told me to keep my own counsel.

RYAN's Defence. What she has said is a wicked falsehood; we met the prosecutrix, and went down Edgware-road; she agreed as well as me to take her down that place, and I could bring witnesses to prove she herself look the money that was lent on the cloak, and took it down to a young man who is in Clerkenwell; I did pawn it certainly - she brushed it; she knew more about it than I did, and never left me a moment; she is as much in it as I am - I only had enough of the money to get my tea with.

BRYANT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

RYAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Both recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of their youth .

Reference Number: t18280221-23

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

505. GEORGE GLOVER and JOHN WRIGHT were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Warner , on the 5th of January , and stealing 1 coat, value 25s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 22s.; 2 waistcoats, value 18s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 9s.; 1 shawl, value 8s. and 1 feather, value 3s. , his property.

RICHARD SKILLERN . I am conductor of the Bow-street patrol. On the 5th of January, about a quarter to eight o'clock at night, I and Wilson met the prisoners coming down Quaker-street, Spitalfields, in company together, each had a bundle in his hand; I took Glover - Wright directly threw down his bundle and ran away; Wilson ran after him - I picked up Wright's bundle and asked Glover how he came by those bundles; he said they were clothes belonging to his father; that he had been to his aunt's in Long-alley, who gave them to him for his father, who had left them there; I asked what Wright was, who had run away - he said he was his brother; I asked what made him run away if they were his father's clothes; he said he was so timid, he always ran away. I had never seen him in custody before - Wilson returned without taking him; I took Glover to a public-house, and found in his hat a shaw I and some feathers, which he said were his mother's; I took him to the watch-house, and then went and took Wright at his father's.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you tell Glover that what he said would be used against him? A. No. nor did I either threaten or promise him - he said he lived with his father.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer, and was with Skillern. I could not overtake Wright; Glover informed us where to find him - we went that night, and took him at his father's; I asked if he was the boy who ran away - he at first said he was not, and then that he was.

WILLIAM WARNER. I live in Horse Shoe-alley . On the 5th of January my wife brought me my tea, and said several people had been there, inquiring after different names - that she went out, and found the door open when she returned; I went home with her about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and found the door half open - I missed this property, which I know was safe the day before, in the box; the property in both bundles is mine. I cannot say whether the house was fastened.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the value of the property? A. My things are worth about 4l. 10s. - the waistcoat is worth 12s. - it is quite new; the breeches 10s., the coat 12s., and here is another waistcoat, worth 5s., but they cost me 6l. 10s. I was married at St. Luke's about seven weeks before the prisoner was taken - my wife's maiden name was Merrott.

MATILDA WARNER . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went out at a quarter to six o'clock - these things were there then; I left nobody in the house - I shut the door, and took my husband his tea; I did not lock it - the windows in my room were shut: I had to come back for my work - the clock struck six when I was in Liverpool-street, coming home; I found the street door open - I am certain I had shut it; it goes on a latch; I did not go in, but went for my husband, who was working at the livery-stables; I waited till he was paid - he went into the house before me; we found the box pulled from under the bed: there are lodgers in the house - we only rent one room; an old lady lives up stairs - I cannot say whether she was at home. I value my things at 9s.

Cross-examined. Q. You were married seven weeks ago, were you? A. Yes.

GLOVER's Defence. I had been from my master's to my aunt's at the same house as these people live in - my aunt rents it; a man who stood at the door gave me two bundles, told me to take them and wait at the top of Longalley, as my father and him were going to sea - I waited a long time, nobody came, and I returned to the house; nobody was there - I went to my mother; she said she thought they were not got honestly, and told me to take them back; the officer took me as I was returning -Wright, being frightened, ran off.

WRIGHT's Defence. I met Glover, who asked me to carry one bundle back to Long-alley, when the officers met us; not knowing anything of the property I flung it down, ran home, and told the prisoner's mother that he was taken.

MARY ANN TAYLOR . On the 5th of January I was at my aunt's (Mrs. Glover) - Wright works in the shop; I was talking to him from six o'clock till a quarter to seven, when the robbery was committed; I did not see him after seven: Warner's house is a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes' walk; I had not seen Glover after three - the clock struck seven before I left.

GLOVER - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

WRIGHT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-24

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

506. JOSEPH LEFEVERE and HENRY FREEMAN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Bennett , on the 1st of February , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and stealing therein 2 packs of playing cards, value 1s. his property.

ELIZABETH BENNETT . I am the wife of James Bennett - we live at No. 11, Hackney-road-crescent, in the parish of Bethnal-green , and keep a stationer's shop . On the 1st of February, about one o'clock in the day, I was in the parlour adjoining the shop; there is a glass door between the shop and parlour; I saw Freeman at the window, with his hand through a square of glass, and two packs of cards in his hand - they had lain near the window - he was in the street - I ran out; he took his hand out of the window, and was going away - I caught him - Lefevere was with him; I told him I had seen him take the things out of my window - he said he had not got them, and pointing to Lefevere, said he had got them; I took hold of Freeman, and brought him back to the shop; Lefevere dropped the cards when Freeman pointed to him, and said he had got them; I saw him drop them down at his side - I had seen Freeman give some of them to him before I got up; Lintoul brought Lefevere back to the shop - there was nobody near them that I saw; they took two packs of cards; a young man, who is not here, picked the cards up, and brought them in; I saw Freeman's hand in the window, and he appeared to have the cards - the glass had been cut two or three months before, and the window robbed, but my husband had puttied it up quite firm before this happened; it was quite firm and strong before they came to the window - they must have forced it through - he forced one piece of glass out inside from the other piece; I sent for an officer who took them - the cards are worth 1s. - when Freeman's hand was in the window, Lefevere was a very little way off, and could see him take them.

CHARLES RINTOUL . I live with Mr. Clements, in the Hackney Road, nearly opposite the prosecutor's. I was standing at my master's door on the 1st of February, and saw Freeman's hand through the window taking the cards out, I did not see him give them to Lefevere - they were both together at the window - I had not seen the window before; Lefevere then walked away - another young man who stood at the door with me, ran over and picked up the cards - I did not see how they came on the ground - I secured Lefevere, and took him back to the shop.

RICHARD RILEY . I am headborough of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green; the prosecutor's house is in that parish - I was fetched from my own house to take the prisoners, who were in the shop; I received two packs of cards from Mrs. Bennett, I believe - I have had them ever since, and never saw the prisoners before - their parents state that they are very industrious boys.

MRS. BENNETT. These cards are our's - we only had these two packs in the window - I know them by the manner they are tied up; I saw them safe that morning, and saw Freeman take them out - I am quite certain the window was fast before; I have often seen the prisoners about the window.

Two witnesses deposed to the good character of Lefevere, and one to that of Freeman.

LEFEVERE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

FREEMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury, on account of their youth and character .

Reference Number: t18280221-25

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

507. THOMAS WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 5s. the goods of Samuel Lingford , from his person .

SAMUEL LINGFORD. I am a hosier , and live in Dyer's-court, Aldermanbury. On the 6th of August, about one o'clock in the day, I was going over London-bridge to the Borough; I was on the bridge, and had a handkerchief in my outside coat pocket - I felt it going, turned round and saw the prisoner and another behind me - I was certain one of them had my handkerchief, as I had used it a few minutes before - I left them walk on a few paces, and saw a bulk under the prisoner's coat on the left side; I went before him, collared him, lifted up his coat, and took the handkerchief from between his coat and waistcoat - the other ran away - I took the prisoner to the Town-hall - I seized him on the bridge, and took the handkerchief from him on the bridge.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Have you never said that this occurred in the Borough? A. Never to my knowlege; I took him to the Town-hall, as some gentlemen said it was the nearest place - I know he was in company with the other - they were walking together - he said he had found the handkerchief - I did not see him take it; I saw him and the other close behind me - they passed me - the prisoner attempted to run away when I collared him - there was nobody between him and me.

THOMAS KINSEY . I am a constable of the Borough. On the 6th of August Mr. Lingford gave the prisoner into my charge, with the handkerchief, which I have had ever since - Mr. Lingford said it happened at the foot of the bridge, which he thought was in the Borough.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .(See Note at the end of this Report.)

Reference Number: t18280221-26

508. THOMAS ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , four 10l., and two 5l. Bank notes, the property of Edward Darby , from his person .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD DARBY. I live at Hopworthy, near Tiverton, Devonshire. I was in town in January, and sold a quantity of butter; I received four 10l., and two 5l. Bank notes from Mr. Edwards, of Crawford-street, on the afternoon of the 10th of January; I took no account of the numbers, but I believe Edwards did; I had no other Bank notes in my possession; I met a man having the appearance of a farmer, just about Holborn-bridge, at the end of Fleet-market- he began a conversation with me; I only went a few yards with him; I met him again after that, by accident, as far as I knew - I had made no appointment; I met him somewhere about the church, coming up to the Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street; he joined in conversation with me again - he proposed to go out of town by the same coach with me; we went and drank some brandy and water at an inn near the New Post-office, in Newgate-street, and while we were drinking there the prisoner came in, and appeared to me to be rather tipsy; when he came in he asked the farmer and I if we had seen a lady in the inn - we said No; he said he had been with a lady overnight, and meant to make her his wife on Monday next, and said he had an old uncle who always said he would never give him more than 1s., and now he was dead, and had left him all that he was worth, which would be 350l. a-year, besides a great deal of ready cash - that he had come to London, and drawn 450l. of it; he pulled out both coin and papers, which appeared to be Bank of England notes and sovereigns; he kept flourishing them about - I persuaded him to put them into his pocket a good many times, and the farmer persuaded him also, quite as much as I did; the prisoner said he had got plenty of money, and would lend 50l. to any man who would give him stamped paper for it - he did not mind that; this continued for about half an hour, and then the farmer and I left the room; the farmer told him he did not know the value of money, or the getting of it, and he had better put it into his pocket; it did not appear that the farmer and him were acquainted; the prisoner said he lived a hundred miles from town.

Q. Well, you and the farmer left the room? A. Yes; the prisoner said he would go with us - I was going to the Spread Eagle, Gracechurch-street; I did not know the way, never having been there in my life; I was going to book my place by the Company's coach to Bristol; the prisoner knew where I was going, and said he would go with me, and pay my fare to Bristol. I told him I did not want any body to pay my fare; when we got out, we passed a street between the Castle and Falcon and the New Post Office, and went into a narrow street, as the farmer said it was the nearest way to the Spread Eagle; we went on a good way up several turnings; the farmer wanted to go into another house, to speak to somebody; we all three went in - it was a public-house; the farmer called for brandy and water, which the servant-girl brought; the farmer walked down stairs soon after he came into the house, leaving the prisoner and I together; we sat there for two or three minutes - he then returned, sat down, and drank with us; the farmer then took out some chalk from his pocket, and made a mark on the table - the prisoner at that time had his money in his pocket - he did not explain what he meant by the chalk mark; the farmer then took some papers out of his pocket, which I understood to be bills, and threw them into a hat which stood on the table; the prisoner directly did the same - he threw them into the same hat; then the farmer put a halfpenny under his hand, and said to the prisoner."What will you have, man or woman?" the prisoner spoke, but what he said I do not know - they did that several times, and the prisoner said, "You are gentlemen I see - I dare say you are gentlemen; you are men of property;" (meaning both of us) the farmer said, "Yes, I an Esquire, and this gentleman is an Esquire too;" he repeated that many times, and then the farmer said, "Why don't you show that you are a man of property? take out your money, and let him see that you are a man of property too:" I did not take it out for a good bit - he repeated that several times - the prisoner said nothing then; I at last wanted change for a 5l. note, and took my money out of my watch-pocket - I had it all in a roll, and before I had power to speak, the farmer turned his hand, snatched the money off the table, and said, "You have winned - the money is your's," and threw the money into the hat; the prisoner took up the hat, and both of them ran away instantly - it was done in a second; I had laid no wager, or bet whatever, nor had I any intention of betting - I had not spoken a

word about it at all; the farmer was nearest to the door, and ran out first, I think - the prisoner was making his way out as fast as possible; I ran and jumped after him, and caught hold of his coat-flap, as he was going down stairs - he dragged me down the stairs, but I held him fast; I caught hold of his collar with my right hand, and his coattail with the left - he made his way through a passage out into the street as fast as he could, I still holding him; two lusty young men then came up, and asked what was the matter; I told them that rogue had robbed me of 50l.; they said, "You come on with us, and we will make him give you every farthing of your money:" I said, "Why not give me my money here, without going any further?" they then said they should go into some private house, and not do it in the public street; I went on some distance, still keeping hold of the prisoner - they wished me once to let him go, that he should not be made a spectacle of; I refused, and they went into a house - they wanted me to go up stairs; I refused at first, but I did not know what to do, and I did go up four or five stairs; when we were up, one of the men went and opened a chamber door, and the room was hung with clothes on lines; I said I would not go in there, for they had brought me into a bad house, and I believed they were a set of thieves altogether; my speaking pretty loud, a woman came out from between the wet linen, and, as soon as they saw her, one of them pulled the chamber door fast; I rushed back from the door, pulling the prisoner with me - I was not shut into the room; when the door was fastened the prisoner said, "I will give you your money;" I was then in the passage - it was rather darkish there; he put his hand into his pocket, and put a roll of paper into my left hand; I said, "This is not my bills;" I knew my own paper by the colour - it was whiter than that was; I said, "I will not have these, give me my own bills - I want none of your's;" one of the other two immediately went behind me, made a wrench at my hand, and tore it away from the prisoner's collar; the prisoner instantly ran down stairs as fast as he could; the other man on the side of me, took me round the legs, and threw me down on the floor, one of them on each side of me; and, as I laid on the floor, I heard the street door shut too, hard; I got on my legs again as fast as I could, and ran down stairs; I opened the door very quick, looked to the right, and saw the prisoner running as fast as he could, forty or fifty yards off - I ran as fast as I could, and rather gained ground on him at first, but at last I was exhausted, and obliged to give up; I cried "A thief!" a man named Payne then came up, and said he was an officer; I told him that was the rogue who had robbed me, and pointed to him - he was in sight; I saw him in custody in about an hour and a half; Payne went and shewed him to me - I said he was the man; I never saw the farmer afterwards, nor the two men who pretended to be my friends - I lost them as they ran down stairs; I gave Payne the papers which were left in my hands; my notes were produced to me - I had no mark on them, and did not know the numbers, but they were rolled up exactly as mine were, and were the same amounts, four of 10l., and two of 5l.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How old are you? A. Fifty. I have lived thirty years where I do now. I have been to town twice before this time; I was here about two years before. I have been up three times in about seven years. I stop at the Castle and Falcon. I am a farmer, and sell butter to people in town. I don't deal in tobacco - I use it sometimes - I may buy two ounces when a friend comes in; I do not deal in spirits - I live thirty miles from the sea-coast; I send my butter to town. I had come up on the Tuesday, and was going back on this night (Friday) - I had not dined, and was quite sober; it might be between twelve and one o'clock in the afternoon - I breakfasted about twelve: I saw him in custody just between light and dark - between four and five. I suppose I was an hour and a half, or better, in their company; I cannot speak to half an hour; I suppose it was about two o'clock when this happened - it was on the 11th of January.

Q. Did you not say you would not prosecute him, if you got back your money? A. I don't know; I might be asked the question, but I have not done it. I did not say, I would not prosecute - they offered me money to make it up, but I would not take it. I cannot recollect saying I would not prosecute if I got my money - I was so flurried.

Q. You have a perfect recollection of all that passed? A. Not all; for I was much hurried when the business took place; the farmer said he lived down Bristol way. I never said I produced my money at the first public-house. I persuaded the prisoner to take care of his money there; I did not toss up, nor call out, "man or woman" - I had not a halfpenny in my hand - I had only a few shillings, and a sovereign besides the 50l. I do not recollect saying, if I got my money and expences, I would not prosecute - money was offered me - I don't know what I said about it. I was in a coach with one of the officers. I don't know what I said there, I was so much hurried; it was the next day - I was more hurried then, than when it happened; considering now I had risked my life with thieves; a woman was in the coach with the officer; they said she was the prisoner's sister; and there was a man in the coach; this was before we went before the Magistrate. I believe I rode a little way with them after the examination, as I was going the same way; they took me where they were going; I don't know where it was - I was never in the place before - I believe they drove to this gaol. Only the officer and the prisoner were in the coach with me then.

Q. When you were in the coach with the officer, the woman and man, did you say, you did not believe the young man in custody was the man who had given you any notes; but it was the farmer? A. No; I never said such a word; for the prisoner gave me them himself. I did not say, I was an old fool for tossing with a strange man, nor any thing like it - not a word of the sort came from my lips; nor did I say, I did not believe he intended to rob me, or that the flash notes were his, or any thing like it; for I did think he intended to rob me. I did not say, I tossed for a glass of brandy and water, which led to further betting, and I at last tossed for 50l.; or that I was afraid the farmer would cheat the young man - I said nothing like it. I said no such thing in the coach, or any where - I only said, they had been offering me money to make it up - I said nothing of the sort, at any time, to my recollection. Payne was in the coach with me; he had run after the prisoner, and returned, saying he had got him;

and brought me back my money; that was half or three quarters of an hour after I pointed him out.

Q. How came you on the coach with the woman? A. She asked me to go down in the coach, and I went; I went alone with her from Guildhall to her house, and as I came back the officer and a man were in the coach; I believe the house the wet clothes were in is a public-house.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had no notes but what you received for the butter? A. No; I never was concerned in smuggling - or dealt in contraband goods; I farm land of about 400l. a year; this is the third time I have been in London; I know very few streets in London, for I do not stop above two or three days; I was never in town till four or five years ago.

COURT. Q. Have you seen the farmer and the two others since? A. No: The farmer told me where he lived - but I forget where; it was somwhere about fifty miles from town on the Bristol-road - I should know him again.

WILLIAM BECK . I am a City officer. On the 11th of January, I did not see the prosecutor, but heard a cry of Stop thief! about half-past two o'clock as I was coming up London-wall, and just at the corner of Cripplegate-buildings, I saw the prisoner turn the corner of Hart-street - I pursued him, and in turning the corner of Monk well-street I lost sight of him; my son followed faster than me: he turned into Foster-lane, and then into Maiden-lane, into the warehouse of Mr. Nicholls; I saw my son standing at Nicholl's door - he said the man was in there; I looked, and saw him talking to young Mr. Nicholls, and I saw him go into the back warehouse: I left my son at the door, and went to Payne, whom I saw come out of a public-house door, with the prosecutor; I took him to Nicholl's warehouse - the prisoner was there, sitting in the back office; we both said, "You are the man we want;" I immediately saw him put his hand into his right-hand pocket, and heard something drop from him - we took him up from his seat; I pulled the chair away on which he sat, and took up some paper, screwed up, which, upon opening, was four 10l. and two 5l. notes - I have had them ever since; he was taken to the Compter: I turned to Darby, and asked what property he had lost - he said four 10l. and two 5l. notes; he had not seen them then.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in a coach with the prisoner and Darby at any time? A. Yes; we took him to Newgate, when he was committed, and I went in the coach from the Compter to Guildhall; another officer, the prisoner, and his sister were in the coach; the prosecutor was not in the coach then, but he was as we came to Newgate - that is the only time I was in a coach with Darby: some questions were put to Darby, but I told him he had better hold his tongue; he said something in answer to the questions, but what I do not know: I believe he said he was an old fool for losing his money - I heard him say nothing about having tossed for it. I heard him say at another time, that somebody got him in conversation, and got him to drink brandy and water; that was not in the prisoner's presence.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Crawford-street, Mary-le-bone. I deal with Darby for butter; I paid him 50l. in January, for butter, on a Thursday - I think it was on the 10th; I should know the notes again, as I put my initials on them, and know the names of the persons I received them from - (looking at the notes produced) every one of these are the notes I paid him.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 11th of January I was in my house in Grub-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and saw Darby after I came out, and saw the prisoner run past the place - Darby and several others were running after him, but he was ahead of all; Darby came up in Silver-street - I said, "have you lost anything?" he seemed exhausted, and said he had been robbed; I said I would go after the party: I received information, and went to Mr. Nicholl's counting-house, and saw Beck pick up a parcel of notes, containing four of 10l. and two of 5l. - I was searching the prisoner at the time he dropped them. I found two 5l. Bank of England notes, and a country note on him; they have since been delivered up- I found a letter on him, some bills, and a card of his direction, "Robinson, cooper, &c., No. 5, Goswell-street, Clerkenwell" - I found his wife lived there. The prosecutor gave me these flash notes after the prisoner was in custody - I found a letter on the prisoner.

These flash notes being read, were headed "Bank of Elegance," and engaging to cut hair, &c. in a superior stile, or forfeit 50l., and were in the exact form of a Bank of England note. The letter found on the prisoner, was dated Liverpool, the 5th of January, desiring the prisoner to come to Liverpool with witnesses to prove an alibi in a case to be tried there; but it not relating to the matter in question, was not fully read.

MR. BRODRICK to WILLIAM PAYNE. Q. Were you in the coach with Darby and the prisoner? A. I was in a coach when I took the prisoner out of the Compter - Darby was not with me.

Q. Were you not in a coach at any time with the prosecutor and prisoner? A. No, neither going to the Alderman nor coming to Newgate; I was not in the coach after I came to Guildhall - I was on the coach-box coming to Newgate; the other officer was in the coach: the country note found on the prisoner was for 1l. - I found no sovereign nor silver on him; there were three bills of exchange, at three month's date, all over-due.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280221-27

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25.

Middlesex Jury, (Half Foreigners)

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

509. ANDREW POWELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Truss , on the King's highway, on the 1st of February , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 4s.; 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 brooch, value 4s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 4 sovereigns, and 18 shillings , his property.

JOHN TRUSS. I have been in a gentleman's service - I lived with Mr. Lightenhouse thirty-two years - he is now dead. On Friday, the 1st of February, I was out of place - I went to Mile-end, and in returning, in Whitechapel-road, almost opposite the London Hospital , between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, and

am confident of his person - I was an entire stranger in town, and asked him the way to Bedford-square, Tottenham-court-road; he said he would show me the way; he went across the road, and I followed him, and there he hit me in the stomach, and knocked me down, just by the London Hospital, as soon as he got by the wall; as soon as we got to the wall he gave me a blow in the stomach with his fist - it knocked me down; I fell against the curb by the palisades; it made me insensible, so that I did not know where I was: the fall occasioned by the blow cut my nose all down, and injured me very much - my shoulders and arms were very bad; I was obliged to lay in bed for some days - I could not get my clothes on; I am not well yet - my shoulder is not well; I cannot do anything: I was quite unsensed - two boys came up to my assistance; they took me away: I stood bleeding for a long while. and when I came to myself I found two boys with me, who are here; the man had run away - he was not taken for above a week after; I am sure the prisoner is the man, I lost my hat, my watch, seals, handkerchief, gold brooch, a pair of spectacles, four sovereigns, eighteen shillings, and, I think, a sixpence; my watch was taken from my fob, my money from my pocket, my hat off my head, and my handkerchief off my neck - I have found none of them; I am confident the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. How long have you been out of place? A. About a month; Mr. Lighten-house lived in Essex: I was lodging in Kepple-mews Bedford-square - I came to see a friend there till I could get a place; I went to Whitechapel to see a man who had come from the same place as me, with a friend, who left me, and I came down the road: I got there about one o'clock - I went from Kepple-mews; I went round by Mourfields - a person showed me the way there: I met the prisoner as I returned - it had not struck seven o'clock, I am sure; it was before seven; it might be a quarter before.

Q. Was it not after seven? A. It was not - it was dark; the lamps were lighted.

Q. Where had you been spending the day? A. I had been walking about with this man, as his business lay, to get his load for his waggon, he being a waggoner - I went about with him: I dined with him at the Red Lion public-house, Whitechapel, but went to no other public-house - we might have three pots of beer between us and some other men - I drank very little, and was quite sober. I was so hurt by the fall, I could not get up immediately - I cut my nose and my face; when I got up the prisoner was standing there; he did not run away immediately - he wanted me to fight him for 5s. when I got up, and he would have pulled my clothes off if it had not been for the boys who came up to assist me; I said I did not want to fight, for it was a thing I never did - I wanted to know the way home.

Q. Did you lay hold of the prisoner? A. No, I had not strength to do it; the boys came and took hold of me, and he struck one of them in the face very hard, because he came to my assistance.

Q. All three of you did not manage to keep him? A. We had not strength to hold him; the boys hallooed Stop thief! the watchman was not on his beat - it was too early: I did not pursue the prisoner - he was off in an instant; he had neither shoes nor stockings on, and appeared like a begger; his trousers were torn; I cannot exactly say the colour of them: he had a blue jacket and a cap on - I swear to him by his face; the lamps were lighted. The boys led me into Whitechapel, up the road - a woman came and told the boys to take care of me, because that man would rob me very likely; she went away, and who she was I cannot say.

COURT. Q. The man was a perfect stranger to you? A. Entirely. Nothing was said about fighting before I was knocked down; I understand he offered to fight me before I came to my senses, and I heard him say it after I had rather revived: a woman told the boys to take care of me, for very likely he would rob me.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street, and have been there fifteen months; I have been an officer above five years. I have known the prisoner about Whitechapel between two and three years - he is an Italian, and goes about begging; he can speak English, and understands it as well as I do; I have heard him converse in English - he talks broken English, nut understands it perfectly well.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you apprehend him? A. I did not apprehend him; Partridge, who is not here, took him; I was at the office when he was brought there: I cannot say what money was found on him.

Q. Well, Sir, as you know the prisoner, I ask, did you ever hear of his being charged with any theft? A. I certainly have - as you ask me I must answer.

MARY LANGLEY . I am servant to Mrs. Evans, of Whitechapel-road. On Friday, the 1st of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, and saw the prosecutor go up to him, and heard him say to him, "Can you tell me the nearest way to Tottenham-court-road, Bedford-square?" I had seen the prisoner a great many times before in the road; I knew him perfectly well, as a beggar - they went across to the wall - I was going to take a pair of shoes home, and when I came back I saw the prosecutor all over blood, in the road, and heard the beggar had robbed him.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Mrs. Evans of any business? A. She keeps a shoemaker's shop in Whitechapel-road. I was quite close to the prosecutor.

Q. Did you suppose, from the prisoner's conduct, that he had any bad intention? A. Yes, I believed so - I did not raise any cry; I followed them as far as the London Hospital; I said to Mrs. Evans' son, who was with me,"We will watch him as far as we can - I think he is going to take his watch away;" it was not very dark, nor not very light.

GEORGE EVANS . I am ten years old - (the witness being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath). On Friday night, the 1st of February, between six and seven o'clock, I was with Langley, and live with my father and mother in Whitechapel-road, I know the prisoner perfectly well - I have seen him a great many times, he is a beggar - I saw the prosecutor and him together - I saw them just by Whitechapel work-house - I and Langley were buying a penny-worth of apples - I saw the prosecutor come one way, and the beggar the other; the prosecutor said, "Can you tell me the way to Bedford-square, Tottenham-court-road?" he said, "Come here,

my friend, I will shew you the way;" he spoke English very well - he took him across the road, just by the side of the London-hospital; then Mary said to me, "Jem, I think the beggar will thieve the man's watch;" he went across the road, and went towards Bedford-square, Commercial-road; I did not see him do any thing to him - we watched them, then left them, and went to deliver some shoes, and as I came by, I saw Monk leading the prosecutor home, all over blood, and his nose was cut.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see the prisoner do any thing to the prosecutor? No; he told me he was robbed.

WILLIAM MONK . I am apprentice to a cooper - I live at Stratford, and work at Bow. I was going on an errand for my master, and saw the prisoner up by the corner of the hospital - I do not recollect ever seeing him before, but I am sure he is the man; I was going by and saw him and the prosecutor up in a corner - I went up to them, and the prosecutor was bleeding at the nose, and was all over mud; he was then leaning against the wall, to support himself; the prisoner was close to him - I saw the watch-ribbon in the prisoner's hand, and am sure he had the watch in his hand; I went to take the prosecutor away, and the prisoner struck me across the face, and asked what business I had with him - he struck me with his fist, and nearly knocked me down; the prosecutor had not complained of being robbed at that moment - I told him I would lead the man away, and when he found I would not leave him, he ran away, and when to fight the prosecutor, and finding I would not go away, he ran off as quick as he could, Mrs. Evans saw him one day, and pointed him out.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not get up to the prosecutor till after he was robbed? A. No - I saw the ribbon and seals in the prisoner's hand, and he had the watch in his hand: he struck me across the face; the prosecutor was leaning against the wall - a woman came up and told me to take care of the man - the prisoner made away from us three, and ran; he had on a kind of work-house trousers, speckled, a jacket of the same colour, a kind of Scotch cap, and no shoes or stockings. I am a cooper, and am eighteen years old next June - I was going to Tyler's pork-shop to fetch some soveloys.

Q. Was the prosecutor tipsy? A. No; he did not appear very tipsy - he was very weak from the fall - he might have been drinking.

COURT. Q. He was all over blood and leaning against the wall? A. Yes; I saw a shuffling in the Court, and went to look, and only judge of his being tipsy by his staggering; that might be from the blow - I heard him speak when we asked where he was going - I do not think he was tipsy.

GEORGE WALFORD . I live with my father, an auctioneer at Bow. On the night in question, I was in Whitechapel-road - I came up with Monk, and saw the prosecutor bleeding and leaning on the palisades; I had no reason to suppose him tipsy - he was staggering from the blow - the prisoner was close to him - I am sure he is the man; I went up and said I would see the prosecutor safe, as far as I went; the prisoner asked what business I had there - I saw him push the prosecutor, and ask him to fight - this was after he was bleeding; the prisoner struck Monk on the face; I saw the ribbon and three seals, and I believe from the appearance, the watch was inside his hand: it was a dark red ribbon; he was going across Baker's-row, and there we lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner wanted to fight the prosecutor? A. Yes; for 5s. - he struck Monk on the cheek; he was about three minutes wanting to fight; he did not attempt to run away while he was wanting to fight; I saw the seals, and believe from his hand being clenched, the watch was in it.

Q. How could you distinguish three seals in the dark? A. There was a gas lamp there, and he held his hand down, and the seals hung out quite plain; I was pretty close to him, and saw them, but did not see the watch, his hand being closed; I did not lay hold of him; there was only Monk and a woman who came up there - it was not Langley, but a woman of the town: I don't live in the neighbourhood - I am seldom at Mile-end; I don't know whether any patrols go that road; there was no watchman up that side; I left the prosecutor just after seven o'clock about ten minutes after; I never saw the prosecutor before; nobody laid hold of the prisoner that I saw; we cried, Stop thief! two or three times, but there was nobody on that side, it is very seldom anybody is there; I led the prosecutor as far as the Bell foundry, then Mrs. Evans took him in and cleaned him I believe; the prisoner had on a pair of speckled trousers, and a jacket something of the same colour, it was between a brown and a blue.

The prisoner, who represented himself as unable to speak English, had the evidence communicated to him by an interpreter, through whom he made the following defence: -

"I wish to be sent home to my house; I have never done any wrong to anybody." - Mr. J, Alley, his counsel, called

HANNAH RANKIN . The prisoner has lodged in my house for the last nine or ten years. On the first of this month he came in about four o'clock in the afternoon, and did not go out again; he brought a red-herring in, roasted it by the fire, and went up to his bed-room with a bason of bot water, about five, and remained there; I went up about six to put some clean sheets on the bed; he was then on his knees, at prayer - I saw him; he backoned to me to shut the door after me; he was not out of the house all night; I went up about seven o'clock; he was then in bed; I did not see him afterwards till eight in the morning, and he did not come down stairs - he could not come down without coming through my room; I remained in the house all night; if he had come down after seven I must have known it, for I remained in my room; three other persons slept in the prisoner's room; he is a very honest, steady man, and was never out of bed after between six and seven o'clock at night; I never heard of his being charged with any theft - I never heard him speak a word of English in my life; he wore a pea-jacket, which he wears now - he made it himself, about four years ago - I never saw him in any other; I never saw him wear a cap in my life - he lodged with me till he was taken up, on the 12th.

COURT. Q. You have not told us your occupation, and where you live? A. At No. 8, Essex-street, Whitechapel - my husband works in the West India Docks, when he has any thing to do; he was at home that night, but did not come in till after the prisoner; the prisoner is an Italian - I never understood a word he said, except "Madam;" he used to talk to me by signs.

Q. He has lived nine or ten years with you, and understands nothing of the English language? A. Nothing; when he wants any thing he speaks by signs to me; I never heard him say a word of English but "Madam."

Q. What occupation is he? A. He walks about among the Jews, and they give him a few halfpence; I never saw him work; good people who know him, give him a trifle; my house is very near half a mile from the London Hospital.

Q. Is he not a beggar? A. He goes on; he cannot speak English to ask for any thing - if any body gives him a halfpenny he receives it; he puts his hand to his hat; he is a beggar, but not a thief; he never wears stockings or shoes - he is never out later than between four and five o'clock all the year long; he pays me 4d. every night for his lodging; he lives on a bason of hot water, a bit of bread, and sometimes a herring; I remember Friday night, the 1st of February, very well - I went to the police office about this, but the officer would not let me in; I did not say I was come to prove he was at home.

Q. Perhaps you can tell where he begs generally? A. He generally goes among the Jews in Petticoat-lane; I never knew him beg by the London Hospital - I do not know that to be his beat; I have no other Italian beggars at my house; I may have twelve lodgers at present - I can lodge sixteen; I sleep in the bottom room - he lodges in the top room, up two stories high; my front door is always fastened between ten and eleven o'clock at night - it is open till then; they must come through my room to go out; I did not go out that evening; I went up stairs at six o'clock, and he was on his knees at prayer - I see him at prayer every night before he goes to bed - he was on his knees; I am not up there every night, but on this night in particular, I went up to put on the sheets - I have seen him at prayers scores of times.

Q. What makes you remember this night so well? A. Because I paid some money to my landlord, about three o'clock that afternoon, that makes me remember the day of the month; he did not come in in a hurry - it was a little after four o'clock, I am certain; he has never been later than between four and five all the nine years he has lived with me.

RICHARD BALL . I lodge in Mrs. Rankin's house, in Essex-street; I have lodged there for the last six weeks. On the 1st of February I was very ill in my bed; the prisoner came to bed at half-past five o'clock, and went to prayers; I remained there all night - he came to bed at half-past five, and was not out of bed till half-past seven next morning - I swear that positively; I am sure he did not go out of the room.

COURT to HANNAH RANKIN. Q. Did the prisoner go up to bed when he came home? A. When he had eat what he brought in - that was a bason of hot water, and a herring; he eat that in my room below - he was there between half and three-quarters of an hour, I suppose.

COURT to RICHARD BALL. Q. What is your occupation? A. I am a labourer; I work by the water-side - I have no regular work, but a day's work now and then; I worked for Mr. Hacket, in the Minories, about two years, as a labouring man; I get my bread as I can by the waterside - I never beg.

Q. Can you tell us who you have worked for by the water-side, within the last six months? A. No. I never talked to the prisoner - he cannot speak a word of English - I never heard him speak English; I make signs to him; I had gone to bed in the day time, and did not get up till morning - I was in bed when he came home; I have no watch - I judge of the time; it could not have been about seven o'clock, for it was not dark; the lamps were not lighted - I did not see any; I was in bed - it was half-past five, as near as I can guess; it was quite light; I never saw the prisoner begging about - I never heard him say he begged; I cannot understand a word he says; I knew he was a beggar, but never inquired where he begged; Mrs. Rankin told me he was a beggar. I did not attend at Lambeth-street Office - I was never called upon; I still lodge there; I have not talked this matter over with Rankin at all, I am certain - I have come to prove the truth; she asked me to come here to speak the truth about the prisoner; I had no further conversation with her, than she asking me to come here, and state the case, and prove he was in his bed - I had no further conversation with her: I swear he was at home at half-past five o'clock, on the 1st of February, and in my room; and that he never went out of it - it was quite light at half-past five; he brought no candle up; the landlady came up at six o'clock, to put a pair of sheets on a bed - he had said his prayers before she came up, and gone to bed.

JAMES CARTY . I lodge at the same house as the prisoner, in Essex-street; I have slept in the same room with him since November last, but not in the same bed. I saw him on the evening of the 1st of February, in the room, when I came home from work, between five and six o'clock; I went up to my bed-room to put some things there, and he was in the room, on his knees, saying his prayers, by the bed-side; I saw him in bed afterwards, when I went to bed, and left him there at seven o'clock in the morning; in the evening, when I was in the room, he slipped off his knees, and was going to bed; I was in the room a little after eight o'clock, and he was in bed then - he could not have gone out in the night without passing my bed, which is close to the door, which will only partly open on account of my bed being near it.

COURT. Q. What trade are you? A. A labouring man; I have worked latterly for Mr. Page, of Mile-end, but am not in regular work - I porter about; the prisoner gets his living by charity; I do not know where he begs - it would take a very few minutes to run from the London Hospital to Mrs. Rankin's; I did not go to bed when I first came home; I have no place to sit; I have no watch - it was dark between six and seven o'clock; when I came in first, between five and six, he was in his room - it was not quite dark then; he was then at prayers, on his knees.

Q. Then at what hour did he go to bed? A. It was then between six and seven o'clock; when I last came down from the room, I saw him slipping into bed.

Q. Who was in bed when he was saying his prayers? - A. Nobody but me; he talks a good deal in the night.

Q. Well, but when he was on his knees at prayers, he was out of bed? A. Yes; I was not at Lambeth-street Office - I have come here to speak the truth; Mrs. Rankin asked me to come; I have not talked this matter over with her, further than saying I would come; I was to come in consequence of sleeping in the same room as him - she said

nothing to me about the 1st of February, nor asked me about the hour; we did not talk it over further than when I came home, she said he was taken; I did not hear of the robbery till he was taken; Mrs. Rankin never asked me to go to Lambeth-street - I did not go there; she asked me to come here a few days after the prisoner was taken - I never knew him out of bed after six o'clock; when he was taken I asked what it was for, and they said for a robbery, but I did not go to the office - I had no business with it; Mrs. Rankin said the robbery was done on Friday, the 1st of February; I do not recollect her mentioning the hour - I learnt the hour by hearing a man, at the Rose and Crown public-house, Essex-street, read the newspaper; to the best of my knowledge, I never talked with Mrs. Rankin about the hour: I went out between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I always leave him in bed - I never knew him wear any thing but the jacket he has on now; he wears neither shoes nor stockings.

Q. Do you know any other man who goes without shoes and stockings? A. I have seen a man very much like the prisoner, but in a different dress, in a blue jacket and Scotch cap, and a very dark complexion - I believe that man had shoes and stockings on, but he resembled the prisoner very much, and put me in mind of him - he resembled him in features; I believe he is rather taller; I never drank with that man; I never talked with the prisoner - I cannot understand him.

HENRY EDWARDS . I live at No. 14, Tooksbury-place, Whitechapel. On the 1st of February, I saw the prisoner at No. 8, Essex-street - it might be from a quarter-past four to five o'clock: that is his usual time for going to bed.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. A labourer in the East India Company's employ; I am only a letterman there, subject to be discharged when the work is short - I have been there four or five years, but have been out of work seven or eight weeks.

Q. What had you to do in Essex-street? A. I occasionally go up there to see my mother, Mrs. Rankin, who keeps the house; she has been married twice; I fill up my leisure time by writing shop-fronts and boards - I had to do a board for Mr. Batty, and came down about it; the prisoner came and knocked at my mother's door, as was customary, and was told to enter - he never comes in without being told; the door is seldom open - the lodgers all knock; a person could go out without my mother knowing it, but not after being in bed; I did not attend at Lambeth-street, but several persons did - I was prompted through justice and humanity to come here; I heard of his being taken, on the Monday or Tuesday before he was committed; he might have been examined twice; but no person knew the charge till it was gone through - I did not hear of it till he was fully committed - I heard he was in charge, but did not know it was for a robbery.

Q. Why did not justice and humanity prompt you to attend the office? A. I was not acquainted with the full particulars, till he was committed; and I considered it useless to state what I knew, till the trial. I was never in a Court of Justice before. I never heard the prisoner speak a word of English in all my life - I have seen boys teaze him, and I have pushed him about. I wish to state that he is rather weak in intellect; for I have heard foreigners who lodged in the house say, he talks all manner of nonsense. My mother's lodgers are poor, working people; there may be others who beg. I have spoken to my mother respecting this, since he has been in confinement - I may have talked to her, on Saturday, respecting him. I was not much acquainted with the circumstance. I read the account in the newspapers; that is all I recollect about it. I have been here every day, and have no doubt but I have spoken every day respecting the trial; but we have not rehearsed the matter; we might say something respecting it. I did not see the prisoner go up to bed. I left the house a little before five o'clock. I have seen a man who bears a strict resemblance to him; his dress is something like his; but much better. I don't know where the prisoner generally walks; he goes to different places.

Q. Don't you know his beat is about the London Hospital? A. I have as often seen him come other ways. I endeavour to shun him, for he always kisses my hand in the street. He don't constantly go to one place - I never saw him at the London Hospital - he may go there; I should think it is about five minutes walk from my mother's. I have seen him wear a pair of shoes down at heel; but he told a person, who understands him, that they hurt his feet.

EDWARD HODGE . I live in Essex-street. I have known the prisoner six or seven years; he bore a very good character - he is a good, pious, upright man. I am an annotto manufacturer - I never heard him speak a word of English; I have frequently seen him praying at his bed-side for an hour together. I sleep in the same room with him - I don't know how he lives - it may be by charity.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I live in Essex-street, almost opposite Mrs. Rankin's. I have known the prisoner upwards of eight years - he bore a very good character.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. A cabinet-maker. I kept an eating-house, and he used to come there - he used to go about, and receive any thing which people chose to give him; but he did not ask for anything - I always understood he was a beggar - he never wore stockings; he always paid me for what he had.

JOHN KIDDEY . I live in Essex-street, Whitechapel, and have known the prisoner for years - I believe he is a beggar, but an inoffensive man - I never heard him speak a word of English.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. I keep a chandler's shop. I came here by Mrs. Rankin's desire - I only know him as a beggar; I have seen him in the Whitechapel-road, and believe that is his beat - I only know him as a beggar.

MARY SCOWS . I live in Essex-street, Whitechapel. I have known the prisoner above eight years - I never heard any thing against him - he got his living by selling matches, and receiving a halfpenny now and then. I am a straw bonnet-maker. He touches his hat to people as they pass. I have talked to Mrs. Rankin about this - I never heard him speak a word of English - I only know him as a beggar.

- TIMMERMIN. I live at No. 5, Essex-street. I have known the prisoner three years, by his coming to my shop - he always pointed to what he wanted; I could never understand a word he said - he never laid out above 1d. at a time. I am a green-grocer - he used to buy a herring now and then.

MARTHA HOPPETT . I live at No. 9, Essex-street, with

my husband; we lodged at Mrs. Rankin's for five or six months. I never knew the prisoner out, after between four and five o'clock - he would come home with a red herring, roast it at the fire, and return God thanks for what he had taken, and then go to bed - I never heard him speak English.

Q. How did you know he prayed? A. He knelt on his knees - I have been in his room after he has been in bed, and I have seen him on his knees at the foot of the bed, when I have gone in at times for things that have been wanting. My husband is a broker - I work for Mrs. Rankin at times - he is sometimes on his knees for half an hour or more; I have left the room and gone up again, and found him still on his knees - I never saw him beg. Mrs. Rankin did not ask me to come here - I have not talked the business over with her; we spoke about the robbery when I first heard of it. I remember the night of the 1st of February, because the landlord's son was ill.

Q. Do you mean Edwards? A. Yes; he came there between four and five o'clock - I don't know when he went away; the prisoner came in between four and five, with a red herring, which he roasted before the fire - he offered the landlady some in his language - she did not take it.

Four other witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.

JOHN NORRIS re-examined. I have known the prisoner nearly three years as a beggar about Whitechapel-road, the Commercial-road, and Stepney. I have heard him converse in English; and, on the day he was at our office, Mrs. Rankin stood outside the yard for a quarter of an hour, and talked to him in English - there are six respectable witnesses in Court who can prove he speaks English - he understands it, and answers it perfectly - I swear that he understands English and talks it.

SARAH EVANS . I am the mother of the witness, James Evans, and the mistress of Mary Langley. On the morning the prisoner was taken into custody, I called him to me just before he was taken; he came to my door - I called him to me and offered him a pair of shoes, in order to have him taken, having understood he had committed a robbery, and having myself seen the prosecutor bleeding; I offered him a pair of my husbands shoes - he spoke broken English, and said, "Shoes too small." I offered him some bread - he took a piece which was not stale, and he threw one piece into the road, saying, "Too tale."

JOHN NORRIS re-examined. I heard him in conversation with Rankin for ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour - they spoke English. I opened the door, and remarked that he had a blue jacket on under that coat, and at the second examination, I remarked that he had shoes and stockings on - he then said to this woman, "Here, take those," and began to pull them off, but I stopt him from doing it - it is well known to all the officers that he talks English.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any reward for taking vagrants? A. Not the least.

MR. J. ALLEY to MRS. EVANS. Q. You said you knew he had robbed the prosecutor? A. I had heard so, and gave information at the office, in consequence of the description the servant and my son had given me - I believed him to be the man, from their description; I had seen the prosecutor bleeding, and his waistcoat and clothes all undone.

HANNAH RANKIN re-examined. I was at the office, but no further conversation passed between me and the prisoner, except that he called Madam, and I went to the door to him - that was all; he called Madam four or five times.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, being a poor foreigner .

Reference Number: t18280221-28

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

510. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Samuel Corkwell .

THOMAS BOWDEN . I am a sawyer, and live at Chelsea. I and Samuel Corkwell were employed for Mr. Leicester: we were at work in the Five-fields, Chelsea ; the deceased was the pitman . On the morning of the 8th of November , about ten o'clock, the prisoner came and asked the deceased for a chalk-line and oil-bottle - Corkwell told him he should not have them till he had done with them; he did not say who sent him for them - he went away without them; Mr. Leicester afterwards came; the prisoner had said, as he went away, that he would send his master - Corkwell said if his master came he should not have them, and when Mr. Leicester came he had words with Corkwell- the prisoner came again, after dinner, for a candle; Corkwell asked what he went and told his master such a story for, and the prisoner called him a bad word - the deceased said if he said so again, he would come out of the pit, and give him a clout, or a smack on the head; the prisoner repeated the word - Corkwell then got out of the pit, and went towards him; the prisoner took up an adze, and said he should just come with the adze, if he came near him - Corkwell went up to him; the prisoner had the adze in his hand, and said he would split his skull if he came near him; Corkwell got up to him just as the adze was coming down- he took it from him, and pushed him away; there was a chisel about a yard from the prisoner; he picked it up, and threw it at Corkwell; it stuck in his thigh; Corkwell took it out with his own hand, and said, "I am a dead man! what will become of my wife and children!" that is all I heard him say; he fainted directly with the loss of blood; two surgeons came - they stopped the blood, and sent him to St. George's-hospital; the prisoner went away; I never saw him till he was taken up a second time - I do not think he stopped a minute after he threw the chisel; the deceased never attempted to strike him - he only took hold of the adze with one hand, and pushed him away with the other; he did not attempt to strike him at all; I never heard them quarrel before - I have been a good deal with them; Corkwell said, "The next time you go to tell your master that lie about me, I shall give you a smack of the head;" the prisoner said no more to him than I have mentioned.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When the deceased said he had told his master a lie, he was in the pit? A. Yes; the prisoner was twelve or fourteen feet from him- he took the adze up as the deceased was getting out of the pit; the prisoner did not call him any name before the deceased told him he had told his master a lie.

Q. Did not he throw a wooden weight at the prisoner? A. No; nothing of the kind, I am sure of that.

JOHN TRIMMING . I saw Bowden and the deceased at work; the prisoner came up from his master, and said he wanted some tool - Corkwell said he should not have them- he said he would go and tell his master - he went away;

this was about eleven o'clock in the morning; I was there between two and three in the afternoon, and Corkwell then said to the prisoner, "If ever you go and tell your master such a lie of me, I will clout your head;" James said, "So you did," and called him an ill name; Corkwell said, if he called him that name again, he would get out of the pit and clout his head; he did so, and Corkwell got out of the pit; James took up an adze, and threatened if he came to him he would cleave his skull; Corkwell went up to him, and as he was in the act of striking at him, he took the adze from him, and pushed or struck him - I do not know which; James went towards a piece of timber, very near, and took up a chisel, which I produce; he threw it at Corkwell, and it stuck in his thigh; the deceased fell down with it in his thigh - I took him up, and set him on a piece of timber; the prisoner staid about a minute or two, and then went away - I went for the doctor.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the deceased a full-grown man? A. Yes; he was much stronger than the prisoner; the deceased gave the first push or blow - he came three or four yards towards the prisoner; the prisoner used no offensive language till he told him he had been telling lies; I was there when Leicester came; the adze and chisel were both laying about.

JAMES LEICESTER . The deceased worked for me. I sent the prisoner to the deceased for some tools, and in consequence of the answer he brought, I went myself; the deceased said the lad had brought me a false message - that he said no such words, and Bowden agreed with him; I said, "Well, I would have what I came for," and took the oil, which the men had taken while I was at breakfast; the deceased said the prisoner had spoken wrong, and he would chastise him for it; I said, if he could do without it, it would be better, for I never lifted my hand against the boy, and I thought he might do without it, and if he did, he should cut that job, and do no more for me.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner been in your service? A. From the 10th of September - he is about sixteen years old - he behaved quite as well as I could wish.

COURT. Q. Was he a good-humoured lad? A. Yes, always, when I was present; when I was away they used to find fault with him; he was in Tothill-fields part of the time the deceased was alive; I bailed him out.

THOMAS TATUM . I am a surgeon. I saw the deceased on the 8th of November; he had lost a great deal of blood, and was very faint from the wound in his thigh, which I examined; the chisel produced was likely to cause such a wound; he recovered a little, but never properly; he died on the 21st of January, in St. George's-hospital; the wound was between two and three inches deep; the wound, and the absecess formed from it, occasioned his death.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not abscesses formed in the region of the stomach? A. None at all.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-29

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

511. DANIEL ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Robinson .

MARY ROBINSON . I am the widow of the deceased, William Robinson - the prisoner is our son. I live in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials. My husband was a shoemaker ; my son lodged with us, and is a coach-smith . On the 2d of January my husband had been out all day, drinking - he was very much intoxicated; he went to bed about ten o'clock; my son and grand-daughter slept in the same room as us; she is not the prisoner's daughter - he is single; I helped to undress my husband, and put him to bed- he was seventy-two years old; I was not undressed myself; the prisoner was also very drunk; Mrs. Coray had helped to undress him, and was getting him to bed; he could not undress himself; he got into bed, and as he was shifting his shirt, one of the wrist-bands stuck, and he tore it; my husband said, "That is right, tear it all to pieces;" the prisoner replied, "I would not mind tearing yours;" my husband jumped out of bed, and said to him, "Come on," and put himself in a fighting attitude; my son got out of bed, naked as he was; their beds were so near each other we can scarcely pass between them - they began fighting; I held my husband back as well as I could; my husband struck the first blow, I must say; he did not advance to strike - they did not move, but were in the small space between the beds; my son had used no bad language- my husband said, with a bitter oath, "Let me get at the shovel, and I will cut his head open;" he got the shovel, and stood with it in his hand; I was trying to get it from him; he struck me, and gave me a black eye, which was bad for three weeks, because I endeavoured to restrain his violence; my son was at the door, where we keep a washhand bason; he threw the bason towards his father, to knock the shovel out of his hand - it bounced against the marble mantel-shelf, broke, and cut his father's arm in three places; I am confident he did it to knock the shovel out of his hand, for he was very fond of his father; but his father was a desperate temper, when in liquor; it struck the mantel-piece first, and bounded; my husband's arm was naked - his shirt was off; he took it off to fight, I suppose, for he went to bed with it on; the pieces of the bason cut his lip and his left arm in three places, below the elbow; my son only threw it once; the arm bled a great deal; we sent for a doctor, who had no dressings with him, and said we had better take him to the hospital - he walked to the hospital the same night; my husband persevered with the shovel very much, after the blow - he tried to strike my son, and said he would do it, and then he sat down, and smoked his pipe.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did not your son visit your husband, and pay him every attention? A. Yes, and showed sincere sorrow; he cried bitterly, and said, "I wish it was my arm instead of my father's;" as we went to the hospital my husband said, "Don't cry, Mary - my arm is not hurt much" - he lived sixteen days.

ELIZABETH CORAY . I was in the house when the prisoner came home; he was very tipsy, and so was his father- the father was just getting into bed when the prisoner came in; I helped the prisoner to undress - I got every thing off but his shirt, and left him to change that; I then went down - I was fetched up in about two minutes- the basin had then been thrown; I saw the father take up the shovel again: he wanted to get at the prisoner, and said he would split his skull open, but his wife kept hold of his arm; the son showed no bad temper in my

presence: they got him out of the room, to keep him from his father, who was a desperate temper.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the son show any disposition to get in to hurt his father? A. No.

MR. CHARLES STANFORD HALFORD . I am house-surgeon of Middlesex-hospital. The deceased came there about one o'clock in the morning of the 3d of January - he had two or three wounds in the arm, one at the elbow-joint - it was a cut about three inches long: he had lost a good deal of blood, but it had stopped then - he could not see: he lived till the 18th, and died in consequence of those wounds; there was a suppuration and tendency to mortification; no pieces of the bason were in the arm - the suppuration arose from the injury done to the elbow-joint; I have not the slightest doubt of the wounds causing his death.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they such wounds as must necessarily have been made with a bason - might it not be by his raging about with the shovel? A. I should think they were done with some cutting instrument - he might hurt himself with the shovel, but I should think that not so likely.

COURT. Q. What did the wounds appear to you like? A. I should have said they were inflicted by a knife or some cutting instrument; I should not think they were done with a fire-shovel - I think it more likely to have been produced by the broken bason than a shovel: there were three wounds - the one in front was the worst. A consultation was held as to whether amputation should be performed.

The prisoner put in a written defence, regretting the cause of the accident - stating himself to have been intoxicated, and that his father, who was also intoxicated, challenged him to fight, and threatened to split his skull, and seeing his life in danger, he endeavoured to disarm him of the shovel, he had no idea of inflicting any personal injury, but acted in self-defence, his life being in danger. The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-30

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

512. JOHN SMITH and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Best , in the King's highway, on the 10th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4d., and 4 shillings , his property.

SAMUEL BEST. I live at College-house, Bethnal-green, and am a printer . On Sunday morning, the 10th of February, about half-past one o'clock, I was passing opposite the London Apprentice public-house, Old-street-road - I was suddenly surrounded by six men, of whom the prisoners were two; they took off my hat by force, and I was immediately tripped up, or thrown down, but before that I had taken hold of the two prisoners, and kept hold of them; I called Watch! they were hustling me while I was down - the watchman came immediately, within two minutes, from a court opposite, and I gave charge - the first who came up, I believe, took hold of Williams first, but eventually took Smith to the watch-house; another watchman came up, and took William; I went to the watch-house, and there found I had lost my hat, and four shillings from my waistcoat pocket: I could not see who took my hat off my head, but I am certain the two prisoners were active in it; my hat was forcibly taken off before I was tripped up. I had some more money in my right waistcoat pocket, but the four shillings were taken from the left; the whole six hustled me when I was down - I cannot swear whether my money was taken out or dropped out: they all ran away when the watchman came up- the prisoners struggled to get loose, but I kept hold of them - the watchman came up so soon, the others had no time to get them away from me. My hat was picked up a short distance off, by the watchman, who asked if it was mine - I said it was not, as it was dark, but at the watch-house I immediately recognised it, and a silk handkerchief which was in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time in the evening was this? A. Half-past one o'clock in the morning; I had not left work till late - I was quite sober - I had only drank about three pints of beer; they came behind me.

Q. Was any force used when your hat was taken off? A. It was suddenly snatched off: I was in the road, close to the pavement - they said nothing to me - I had no acquaintance with them: it was not a lark. The watchman came up in half a minute.

COURT. Q. After you were tripped up, what did they do? A. They surrounded me, and were in the act of hustling me.

THOMAS RYECRAFT . I am a watchman. I was close to this spot about half-past one o'clock in the morning, in Old-street-road; I heard the prosecutor call out Watch! he was all over dirt and sludge; he had hold of the prisoners - he was standing up then: he said he had been robbed; I took hold of Williams, sprung my rattle, and another watchman came up; I took them to the watch-house; I did not see the others; they were gone round the corner - I was in Old-street-road. It was a dark night; I saw nobody but the prisoners; Best appeared quite sober, and so did the prisoners; Smith struck at Best twice in the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Is this your beat? A. Yes; I was within thirty yards of the spot; I had called the half hour five or ten minutes before. There are gas-lamps in the street.

SAMUEL BEST re-examined. The prisoner Smith struck me twice in the watch-house, but I did not wish to mention that.

JOSEPH LLOYD . I was the second watchman who came up. I heard the rattle spring when I was in Hoxton-square, three or four hundred yards from the spot; I saw nobody but the two prisoners; I found Williams and Best both without their hats; I looked round, and five or six yards off I found a hat; Williams said it was not his, and the prosecutor said the same; there was a handkerchief in it - I do not think Best saw the handkerchief: he said at the watch-house that he had lost a hat and handkerchief, and claimed it, and said he had lost about 4s. - he appeared in liquor a little, but not at all insensible. The prisoners appeared perfectly sober.

Cross-examined. Q. How far off is your beat? A. It comes within about thirty yards of the spot.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a headborough. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house about a quarter to two o'clock; the prosecutor claimed the hat and handkerchief, and a glove was in it.

WILLIAMS' Defence. I was going home to Crabtree-row, Hackney-road; as I turned round by the alms-houses the prosecutor laid hold of my neckcloth, and said, "Here is one of them;" Lloyd came by - I asked him to lay hold of me, or the prosecutor would choke me; he did so, and I asked for my hat, which had fallen off - he could not find it.

SMITH's Defence. I was coming home with Williams; we had been drinking, and were pretty merry - I might have run against the prosecutor, but not with intent to rob him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-31

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

513. GEORGE WYETH was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Bailey , in the King's highway, on the 8th of January at Isleworth, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 20s.; 1 hat-box, value 1s., and 1 bag, value 6d. , his property.

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BAILEY. I am a farmer and live at Bristol; I lived there twenty years, and was a woollen-draper there - I got into difficulties there in consequence of bad debts, and came to town on the 25th of December, in search of a situation: I set out to return to Bristol on Tuesday evening the 8th of January about seven o'clock; I took my little trunk to an Inn in the Old Bailey: I had my best hat in a hand-box and carried it in a canvass bag; I started from London at that time - I recollect arriving at Isleworth-corner, I suppose it was then about a quarter past ten, or it might be ten minutes later; when I got to Isleworth-corner I hesitated whether I should take the left road or not, I leaned on a post to rest myself, there was a gas-light right opposite me, and in two minutes I saw a female followed by three persons, they were in conversation together; the prisoner, without saying a word in any way, rushed towards me with a horrrid oath, and struck me a violent blow - the post saved me from falling into the ditch; he then snatched the bag out of my hand, with the box and hat in it, and ran away: a man, named Steers, instantly came up, (he was not a moment) and asked me, which way he went, as if he was a friend, come to assist me; I pointed to him as well as I could speak and he (Steers) immediately snatched my hat off my head - there was a night-cap in it - he took it off with his hand; he used no violence to me; he then followed the prisoner, and from the effects of the blow I fell into the ditch; my mouth bled severely. When I recovered, I went on and found I was in the Hounslow road - I called at the first house, and desired a lodging for the night; I said I had been ill used - this house was about five hundred yards off - they refused me assistance; I called at another house, and the gentleman sent me to the turnpike - I sat there all night by the fire.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time of night was this? A. It might be ten minutes later than half-past ten o'clock: I do not think it that it was eleven; I had no time piece - I cannot say how far I was from London; I have ascertained since that the place is called Isleworth-corner; I walked all the way from town - I set off about seven o'clock from No. 69, Old Bailey - I was as collected as I am now; I had taken nothing but what was necessary to support my spirits in travelling - I have no recollection of meeting anybody on the road.

Q. Had you told anybody you were going to put your bundle into a waggon, and walk by the side of it? A. I had not; I did not ask anybody to go and drink with me- I did not throw my bundle at anybody's head: this happened on Tuesday - I saw the prisoner again on the Sunday night, at the Queen's Head public-house, at Heston, in the care of an officer.

Q. Did you not say of one of the men that you should know him again, if you saw him in the same clothes as he had on that night? A. I said I would describe the clothes he had on that night, but I should know his person in any clothes; I did not say I should know him by his clothes - I knew him by his face; it was a fair evening, not moonlight - there was a gas-light on the opposite side of the road: I do not suppose half a minute elapsed from the time the prisoner took my bundle, till the other took my hat off - I had received the blow before the second man came up, but had not fallen into the ditch; I fell into the ditch about two minutes after I received the blow; I might have had two or three glasses of beer on my road, but did not sit down in any house - I cannot state what were the public-houses I called at. I was in London about three months ago; I have been in London three times since I have been in Bristol; the first time was a week before his present Majesty was crowned - I staid about a week then, and a fortnight the second time - which was when this happened, and this is the third time. I am a native of Wales, and never lived in London; I might have called at three public-houses before I was knocked down - I know the Half Moon public-house at Brentford; I will not swear that I did not call there, but I do not recollect it - I think I called at a house at Brentford, but did not look at the sign, that might be about ten o'clock or a quarter past; according to what I can judge, I suppose the Half Moon is about half a mile from where I was robbed - it might be twelve o'clock when I was taken into a house; after I was robbed, I was loitering about, and did not know what to do or where to go, as I had been refused quarters at two or three houses - I did not see any watchman or patrol; I was much fatigued and alarmed.

MR. QUIN. Q. Will you swear you were perfectly sober? A. Yes; I have not a doubt of the prisoner's person; I never expressed a doubt about it; I was robbed about a quarter or half a mile from the Half Moon public-house I suppose; I suffered very much from the blow I received at the time; I suppose I stopped ten minutes at each house trying to get admittance; I called at two houses, and then at Mr. Chapman's.

COURT. Q. Did you complain there of your ill treatment? A. Yes; they did not like to receive me; their's is a private house; I am quite sure that three men were in conversation together, and the prisoner was one of them, he separated from the rest, and came up to me.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a market gardener, and live at Brentford-end, Isleworth; my house is about four hundred yards from Isleworth-lane. On the 8th of January, about 11 o'clock at night (I suppose), the prosecutor came to me;

I sent him to the turnpike, and in the morning I went to the turnpike; I afterwards went to the corner and saw a place where there had evidently been a scuffling, and in the ditch was a night-cap, which I produce: the prosecutor seemed in a dreadfully agitated state when he knocked at my door; he held up a handkerchief saturated with blood; I opened my window; he begged of me for God's sake to admit him, saying he had been robbed, and was bleeding; he held up his handkerchief, which he had been holding to his mouth, and I saw the blood on it.

Q. Did he appear sober? A. He stated his case clearly to me, and stated where it had happened; there was nothing to induce me to suppose he was not sober; I directed him to the turnpike, and he went there immediately.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. A little after eleven o'clock; I was in bed, and only looked out of the window; I did not come down stairs; it was a very sharp frost, and a clear star-light night, with a cold easterly wind; he might be a quarter of an hour there; he begged of me earnestly to let him in; I asked why he had not gone to the public-house, nearly opposite; he said he had tried there; I directed him to the turnpike; he had no hat on his head.

JOHN BAILEY . This is my night-cap - I know it by the darn, and a little hole in it - I have had it some time.

WILLIAM WEATHERLY . I keep the Half-moon public-house, at Brentford, which is nearly a quarter of mile from Isleworth-corner. The prisoner was at my house on the night of the robbery, in company with others - I think he came in about twenty minutes before nine o'clock; he came in with William Steers and others - I can swear to Steers. There was no woman in their company - there was one at the bar; she went out - I suppose there were four or five of them in company. I think they left my house about a quarter before ten, together - I cannot say how many of them exactly - the woman had gone out about an hour before that.

Cross-examined. Do you know the prosecutor? A. I know him since this happened - he was not at my house on that night to my knowledge.

Q. You say other people were in company with the prisoner; did they come in together, or about the same time? A. Several came in together - I was not in the tap-room myself; I expect they were in company together; they did not all go out together - I cannot say whether any one went out with the prisoner - it was a market-day, and a great many people came to my house; the prisoner went away, about a quarter before ten o'clock.

COURT. Q. You have no recollection of the prosecutor having been there that night? A. No; I cannot say; I am quite sure that Steers came in with the prisoner and the others - if they did not, they were not a quarter of a minute apart - I suppose they knew one another, for they seemed to be jovial together.

ROBERT TILL . I keep the Angle public-house, near Brentford; my house is about five hundred yards from the corner of Isleworth-lane. On the 8th of January, the prisoner came to my house, about ten minutes before ten o'clock at night - there were five of them in company; four besides himself - they were all men - they went away between twenty and twenty-five minutes after ten - they all went out, one after the other.

Q. Did they drink together? A. Three of them came in first, and called for a pot of beer, and before I had drawn it, the other two came in - that was Steers and the prisoner; they came in together, and when they went away, they turned to the left, towards Isleworth-corner - my house is on this side of Sion-gate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the three men who came in first? A. One of them was Alexander and his brother - I do not know the third. They all five drank together - and handed the pots to each other; they only had two pots - I had never seen the prisoner before.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. I conveyed the prisoner to London from Heston.

JOHN FINALL COOK . I apprehended the prisoner. I was before the Magistrate when he was brought there; the prosecutor swore to him - he said Wyeth was the man who knocked him down - he said that of himself; it was not suggested to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he make any remark about his clothes? A. I think he said he had a jacket on, but my hearing is bad. I did not hear him say, he should know him better if he had the same clothes on as he had that night - he described his person to me. I took up four men and one woman - the prosecutor could not identify those. I am the high constable. I took the other men before the prosecutor swore to the prisoner and Steers. I took Steers and Wyeth on the Monday morning - they were all before the Magistrate at the same time.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent - I leave the rest to my counsel.

JOHN WAVIN . I live at Hounslow. I remember the night of the 8th of January - I saw the prisoner that night between ten and eleven o'clock at the Cricketers public-house, at Hounslow; it might he ten minutes or a quarter to eleven - that house is upwards of two miles from where the robbery was committed; William Steers was in his company there; they staid there till eleven o'clock - the house was not shut up at eleven that night, but the landlord would not draw any more beer, and wished the company to disperse; they staid in the house till eleven, Wyeth lives at Hounslow.

COURT. Q. How late did you stay in the house? A. All night; they did not shut up at eleven o'clock, because the Bishop's waggons were coming that night; the house was open till four.

WILLIAM SHERWILL . I live at the Cricketers at Hounslow; but do not sleep in the house. I saw Wyeth come in there between ten and eleven o'clock on the night of the 8th of January; it was nearer half-past ten than eleven; it was about twenty minutes to eleven; he staid some time, but left before me; I left after eleven.

COURT. Q. How many persons might there be in the house when Steers and the prisoner came in? A. I suppose seven or eight - one Ponder, was there.

JOHN THOMAS . I live at Brentford. On the night of the 8th of January I saw the prosecutor, about a quarter to eleven o'clock - I should know him again if I saw him; that is the man (looking at him); he has not got the same top coat on now. I saw him at a quarter to eleven o'clock, or from that to ten minutes, opposite New Brentford church; I was coming from Isleworth, over the bridge, and he was coming towards the bridge; he had a

bundle, (it appeared to me a double bundle), thrown over his shoulder, with something in the form of a hat in front; he ran up against me, and pushed me off the pavement. I said, "Halloo, my friend, what are you up to now;" he said, "I am going home." I said, "That is a strange way, to run against me in that manner;" he said, "Don't you like it?" I said, there was plenty of room for him to go by - he said he had been waiting a long time for a waggon to go by, for him to throw his bundle into, and said, "I have been in company with some cursed girls, and lost all my money except 2 1/2d., and that I will spend if you like." I said, if that was all he had got, he had better keep it; he swung his bundle at me - it went off in his hands; he was not able to stoop to pick it up. I took it up - put it over his shoulder, and left him, and before I got to Brentford Church-yard, where I live, the church clock struck eleven; I have no doubt at all but he was intoxicated; I have seen him since in the same way, intoxicated, between the Half Moon, and the lane leading into Sion-fields, within the last ten days.

MR. QUIN. Q. How do you get your living? A. As a witness for informations.

Q. What do you get for your information to day? A. Why, my expences being paid, eating and drinking; and I rode up in a cart with a woman who is a witness for the prisoner - she is not a witness, but came to protect her daughter, who is to speak on his behalf; I am what is termed a common informer - I have been so two years; I do not altogether get my living by it; I have been at work as well, at haymaking, and coal-heaving, or any thing to get a living for my family; I never failed in any information.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have laboured at haymaking, and so on? A. Yes, in an honest way, and I have given informations in an honest way.

ANN CLARK . I live at Heston; my mother brought me to town this morning. I was at Mr. Trimmer's, at Heston, when the prisoner was to be examined; I heard some conversation between Mr. Cook and another man - (looking at the prosecutor) - I believe that is the man; he said he did not think he could swear to both of them; Cook said,"Poh, poh! you swear hard and fast against them both;" I was in the passage at this time, and they were on the stairs, at Mr. Trimmer's - it was in the school-room; I belong to the school - a good many of the girls were there; the school-room is near the church; the prisoner are examined there.

JOHN FINALL COOK . I did not see this girl before the Magistrate, nor do I believe she was there; I understand she has accused me of having said something, but I could not hear her.

COURT. She says the prosecutor was talking to you, and said he did not think he could swear to both the men; that you said, "Poh, poh! swear hard and fast against both" Witness. So help me God, it is the greatest falsehood that ever was uttered - it is most shocking! I know the prisoner's solicitor is acquainted with all the thieves in the place; I say it is false - I will do my duty as an honest man at the risk of my life; I never in my life said such a thing- the prosecutor identified them both; he said the prisoner had an immense large fist, and he should know him in a moment - he went into the room, and saw him sitting there; he came out, and said, "That is the man;" (that was Wyeth.)

I was told this girl was coming forward; I know her family are very bad, and think she will swear any thing she is dictated to by the party.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever hear her examined as a witness? A. No; I speak from the reprobacy of the family.

MR. CLARK. I am an attorney, and clerk to the Magistrate for the division of New Brentford. I know John Thomas, and would not believe him on his oath.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you entertained that opinion? A. Within six months. His informations have been received, perhaps, half-a-dozen times, upon his oath, but the Magistrates will not convict on his testimony; I have an order from the Magistrates not to receive informations from him.

COURT. Q. Has he so conducted himself before the Magistrates, as to lead you to say you would not believe him on his oath? A. Most certainly I would not.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18280221-32

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

514. WILLIAM STEERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Bailey , in the King's highway, on the 8th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 2s. , his property.

JOHN BAILEY. On the 8th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I started from London, and arrived at Isleworth-corner , about half-past ten, or a few minutes later; I rested myself on a hand-post there, being much fatigued; I saw four men and a woman coming towards me; the prisoner made the fourth man - the woman was in conversation with them: Wyeth separated from the rest, rushed forward, and struck me a terrible blow in the mouth, the effects of which I feel at this time; he snatched my bag which contained a new hat and hand-box, and went away with the woman and two of the men; the prisoner was with the four - he instantly stepped up under colour to aid me; he asked which way did they run; I spoke as well as I could, and pointed; he snatched my hat off my head, and took the same direction as the others - I swear I was sober - it was a clear night, but no moon was up; I positively swear he is the man - I saw him again on the Monday following before the Magistrate, and swore to him; I went to some houses, but they would not receive me; I went to Chapman, who sent me to the turnpike.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I think you said these people overtook you? A. They followed me - I arrived at the post before them, and was resting on it, with my face turned towards them - my face was turned to the way I had come from, and I saw them coming up; the prisoner was within ten yards of me when Wyeth attacked me- Wyeth came forward, and left all the rest.

Q. After he had quite left you, the prisoner came up? A. Instantly: Wyeth followed the other two and the woman, and the prisoner came up instantly, as if he intended to assist me - he snatched my hat, and took the same direction as the rest; he did nothing else.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer, and conveyed Wyeth and the prisoner to prison; as they were going along, Steers said to Wyeth, "This fellow has sworn false, and if he swears up yonder (meaning here), he will top us- he said this b - l - y foolish thing - "

Prisoner's Defence. I am brought here to be sold by Mr. Cook; he is bribed to do it.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing from the person only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280221-33

515. WILLIAM MITCHELL and GEORGE MITCHELL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wilson , on the 28th of January , at St. George, Bloomsbury, and stealing therein 2 sheets, value 8s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 18d.; 2 remnants of linen, value 6s.; 2 table-cloths, value 10s.; 10 knives, value 3s.; 6 forks, value 2s.; 21 books, value 16s.; 2 razors, value 2s.; 1 cannister, value 18d.; 1 candlestick, value 2s.; 8 ounces weight of black lead, value 1s.; 1 bed-winch, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 4s.; 1 cigar-tube, value 1s.; 1 tobacco-stopper, value 6d.; 1 wafer-stamp, value 6d., and 1 scent-bottle, value 18d. , his property.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WILSON. I live at No. 40, Marchmont-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury ; I rent the house, and live there.

ELIZABETH ARCHER . I am servant to Mr. Wilson. On Monday night, the 28th of January, my master went to bed before me; I saw all the places perfectly safe; my master keeps a potatoe-warehouse; I was called up about half-past two o'clock, to make my master a cup of warm tea, as he was taken dangerously ill; I went into a lodger's room to get a light, and then came down stairs; I opened the parlour door, and saw the back parlour window open; also the cupboard and the shop doors open, and the shop shutter was down - that shutter opens inside; I ran up directly, and alarmed my master - I did not assist in searching the premises myself; I found a pair of stockings under the parlour grate - they were both lying together, wet and dirty, as if they had been pulled off the feet; I found the victuals on the table, which I had put away before I went to bed; the roast-beef was on the table, that is, the hones were - none of the beef was left; I had heard a rustling in the parlour while I was knocking at the lodger's door for a light- it was a noise as if a person was moving about; the window of that parlour was open - it looks into the yard; you go through there to the shop - I do not know the prisoner.

COURT. Q. You left the parlour window shut down? A. Yes; the catch was not fastened, but it was shut close down; I found the cupboard door open, and the shop shutter; they must have come in at the parlour window, and then into the shop, as the shutter opens inside.

GODFREY DUMMESET . I am servant at the Three Cranes public-house, Queen-street, Cheapside. The prisoners came in together there about half-past nine o'clock in the morning of the 29th of January; I did not see them bring anything in, but William came to the bar, and said,"Landlord, have the goodness to take care of this bag for me" - he said he had come out of the country, and wanted me to take care of the bag till he came back, which would be in about an hour and a half; they left it there, and did not return till about half-past ten o'clock at night - they came together, called for a pint of beer, and sat some time in the bar - they then moved into the tap-room, and I heard them at high words, but what passed I do not know- I was sitting in the bar; George came up and said,"Landlord, don't deliver that bag up, for it is stolen property;" Reece, the patrol, was in the tap-room - I delivered it to him; he said as it was stolen property, he insisted upon taking them to the watch-house - he took the bag, and the prisoners followed him; they were both rather intoxicated, and were taken into custody at the watch-house.

THOMAS REECE . I am a patrol. I heard what passed, and took the bag in charge; the prisoners followed me to the watch-house - I had the bag on my shoulder - I detained them at the watch-house, and gave the bag to Statham, the officer; neither of them objected to go to the watch-house; George told me where he lived - I found every thing he said correct.

RICHARD GEORGE STATHAM . I am a constable of the night, and received the prisoners in charge with the bag; I was not in the watch-house when they first came in: I asked their names - William said his name was John Wilson, that he came from Yorkshire, and had come that day from East Barnet, and brought the bag with him. I found the bag contained sheets and other things; I searched, and found on him 11s. in silver, and 2s. 5d. in copper; and on George I found 5s. 6d. in silver, a cigartube, a wafer-seal, a scent-bottle, a tobacco-stopper, and a knife; George said the other man was his brother, and that his name was Mitchell, but denied all knowledge of the bag.

Prisoner GEORGE MITCHELL. Q. Did not I tell you my brother gave me the things found in my pocket? A. Yes.

JOHN WILSON . (Examining the property in the bag) This pair of sheets is mine - here are also two table-cloths, twenty-one books, two pillow-cases, a candlestick, and a tea-cannister, which are mine; the cigar-tube and other things found on George Mitchell are mine - I cannot swear to the knife; they were all in my house the night I was robbed: I found my account-books thrown into my cistern, and all my receipts for money paid were torn up, and thrown about; some fifth was left behind. The prisoner William was once in my service, and left about twelve months ago - he has two club-feet; the robbery appeared to me to have been done by a man who knew the way of the house - the servant gave me a pair of stockings found in the house; (looking at them) - they appear to belong to a very short foot, and that raised my suspicious; I found the prisoners in custody.

Prisoner WILLIAM MITCHELL. Q. Is there any difference in those stockings from common ones? A. They appear to have been worn by a man having a short thick foot; not that they have been made on purpose, but they have been worn with such a foot.

Prisoner GEORGE MITCHELL. Q. Do you claim every thing there? A. All but the knife and stockings; here are a pair of razors, which I have not examined yet - one is mine, but the other is not.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. The stockings produced have been in my possession till the present time.

WILLIAM MITCHELL's Defence. I came from the country, where I had been hawking china; a friend wrote to say I had a brother laying dead; I came to town on Monday, and found he had been dead some time - I was to re

turn to my master in Yorkshire that day fortnight; I stopped with a friend in Clerkenwell all day, till near ten o'clock, and then went to get lodgings at a friend's in Tottenham-court-road - they were gone to bed; I at last got lodgings at a court in the New-road: I got up in the morning, and went to see my brother, and just by the new church I saw some things laying, which I picked up and put into my pocket - I then went further, and found this bag - I took it up and went to my brother, and after breakfast I was taking it to a friend, to know what to do with them - a shirt came out, and I saw it looked like stolen property. I went part of the way to Billingsgate with my brother, who was going to get some fish; and in Queen-street I said, "I won't take the bag all the way - I will leave it in this public-house till we come back;" he could not buy any fish that day, and we stopped and had some beer, and went to a public-house; we stopped there almost all day, till evening - I was very much in liquor: we called at this public-house for the parcel; he was more drunk than I was; I did not know what I did: we fell out about family affairs, and hinted about the bag being stolen; the officer, being in the house, took the bag up - we followed him; I had no objection, as I knew myself innocent.

GEORGE MITCHELL's Defence. My brother gave me the things that were in my pocket - I did not know what they were for; I was rather in liquor: I said I would keep them in remembrance of him. We fell out at the public-house - he said I was a rogue; I said I did not know I was more one than him, and perhaps the things in the bag were stolen - I said it out of aggravation: the officer came to the bar, and said, "Do you say they are stolen?" I said, "They are likely enough to be - I can't say:" he said, "Then I shall take charge of the bag and the person it belongs to:" he took my brother, and said, I must go to the watch-house, but he should not want me to stop.

JOHN WILSON re-examined. I think there must have been more than one person in the house, as one man could not get up to the back window himself: it is nearly ten feet from the yard, and one man must have been lifted up to the cistern, which is twelve feet from the ground - he could not get up to it alone: some of the things are marked J. E. W.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner William a good character.

W. MITCHELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

G. MITCHELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18280221-34

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

516. THOMAS LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Vincent , on the 26th of January , at St. Mary, Islington, and stealing therein 1 tea-caddy, value 6d. , his property.

SAMUEL LANE . I live in Henry-place, White Conduitfields, Islington, and am a carman. On Saturday, the 26th of January, about a quarter-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw three young chaps loitering about, and being suspicious characters I watched them; I saw them go into Poulteny-terrace, open a window, and get into a house belonging to Mr. Vincent: I ran towards the house, after seeing one of them get in; one of them jumped out, and all three ran away - I cannot say whether more than one had got in: I followed, and caught the prisoner about two hundred yards from the house, without losing sight of him; I saw him throw this tea-caddy down: I had seen the window pushed up.

Q. You saw one of them open it? A. I saw it go up. The other two got away. I gave the prisoner in charge of Essex, with the caddy.

JAMES ESSEX . I am a watchman. Lane gave the prisoner in my charge, with the caddy - I took him back to the house where the robbery was committed; I found the window open, and a square of glass broken where the catch was - it was Mr. Vincent's house; there was nobody in the room at that time. I knocked at the door, and the caddy was claimed. I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and delivered the caddy up there.

THOMAS GRAFTON . I am a constable of the parish of St. Mary, Islington - Poulteny-terrace is in that parish. I received the prisoner in charge with the caddy; it has been in my possession ever since.

THOMAS VINCENT . I live at No. 23, Poulteny-terrace, White Conduit-fields, in the parish of Islington : I am clerk to a gentleman who lives in Skinner-street, Snowhill. On the 26th of January I went out about eight o'clock in the morning, leaving a man and his wife in care of my house and my little boy; I fastened the window down myself before I went out; I returned about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and found a pane of glass broken exactly opposite the catch - a hand could then be put through to open the window; it was not open then. I know this caddy by the contents of it, which are a few articles of medicine; it is not worth above 6d., being very old. I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for work; two boys rushed by me, and dropped this caddy; this man laid hold of me, and said he had been looking for me three quarters of an hour - I asked what he had been looking for me for.

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE . I am the prisoner's sister, and live with my father and mother, at No. 4, Baker's-place, Clerkenwell-close; my father is a working-silversmith, and has six children; the prisoner is the eldest, and used to work with my father, but he lately went polishing, as my father had no work; he lived at home, and was never our late at night.

JOHN LAWRENCE . I am the prisoner's father; he always kept good hours, and was a dutiful child, and the only dutiful one I have got, except the last witness; I never knew him in trouble.

SAMUEL LANE re-examined. I am sure the prisoner is one of the three; I never lost sight of him: I cannot say whether he is the one who went into the house, but he is one of the three; I saw him throw away the caddy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth and believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18280221-35

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

517. WILLIAM JOHNS, alias WILLIAM JONES , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Webb , at St. Pancras, on the 14th of January , and stealing therein 24 pence and 24 halfpence , her property.

ANN WEBB. I live at No. 64, Cromer Street, Gray's Inn-road, in the Parish of St. Pancras . On the 14th of January, I went out about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, leaving my till locked; I locked my shop door, and then locked the parlour door outside. I rent the house, I left two female lodgers up stairs. I returned at twelve o'clock and found the parlour door ajar - I am certain I had locked it, and I had the key in my pocket: I pulled it open, and saw the prisoner standing in the parlour with his right hand resting on my drawers, and his face towards the door. I said "O, it is you is it, I must stop you:" I I knew him before by sight, but not by name - I shut the parlour door too, but he burst the door from me, and I collared him; he kicked my legs till he kicked the skin off: I called Stop thief! and held him for about two minutes; he then pushed me down the kitchen stairs a step or two- I lost my hold and he got away: the neighbours all saw him run away, but nobody stopped him. I recovered myself in a few minutes and followed him to the bottom of the street; he turned down Swinton-street: he was not taken then, but for another offence. I found my till open, which was in my shop, and the halfpence were gone out of it which I had counted in the morning - I keep a chandler's shop; there were about 3s. in pence, halfpence, and farthings: the till was open, but the lock not injured, nor was the shop door lock injured. I missed nothing but the copper - I locked the till the last thing before I went out, and put the key into my pocket: I had put the silver out of it into a drawer in the parlour - I found that safe. The shop door was locked inside, and the parlour door too - none of the drawers were broken; the parlour door was forced open, but there were no marks of injury on it: the shop door was not broken - If I had had the presence of mind, I could have locked him in the parlour. I knew him before, he once before opened my parlour door and looked in at me as I sat there - I cannot be mistaken in his person. I understand he is a bricklayer or slater.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you see me at the shop door when you came in? A. No - you were in the parlour: he did not speak a word to me that I heard.

Q. Did you not say that you would serve me directly? A. No - you did not ask to be served with anything.

JOSEPH FRYER . I am a Bow-street officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Mrs. Bagster's, in Long-acre, on the 29th of January, on a charge of stealing a hat from her house: I afterwards heard of this robbery, and had him brought up, and the prosecutrix indentified him.

Prisoner's Defence. When she laid hold of me she said you have robbed me. I said what do you mean; she immediately collared me and said I must stop: I said I would not, for I was no thief: she scuffled and fell down, I walked out, and ran away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18280221-36

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

518. JAMES BENN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 32 lbs. of lead, value 3s. the goods of Henry Scambler , and fixed to a certain building of his, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for ripping and cutting the said lead with intent to steal it.

HENRY SCAMBLER. I live in Bishopsgate-street Without.

On the 24th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening I came home, and the officer gave me information. The building in question is in Half Moon-street, Bishopsgate , and belongs to me: the lead covered some stabling there. I went next morning, examined the stabling, and found a large piece of lead cut off the gutter, and moved a little distance from where it had been fixed: the prisoner is a perfect stranger to me - I found him in custody. I keep livery stables.

HENRY MERRETT . I am a trunk-maker, my premises adjoin Mr. Scambler's. On the 24th of January, a little after six o'clock, I was alarmed by my dog barking; he was fastened up to a place: I went backwards and saw the prisoner on a parapet of Mr. Scambler's stables, fifteen or sixteen feet from the ground: it was rather dark, I called to him, seeing him in a stooping position: he made no answer, but went further on to hide himself. I said if he did not come down I would fetch him; he then came scrambling down the tiles, I called to my son, and he was secured, as he dropped from the tiles; his arm was entangled in his coat, so that he could not extricate himself. We secured him, and found nothing on him; we sent for a constable and gave him in charge: I got a ladder, went on the stable with a light, and found a quantity of lead cut from the main gutter, and rolled up in 3 pieces; it weighed 32lbs.; the edges appeared bright - it could not have been cut many minutes, for the boards under it were quite dry. He begged to be let go, and said he had been told by somebody to go there, and get lead as he was out of work, and if I would let him go, he would tell the truth.

JOSEPH GREEN . I am apprentice to Mr. Merrett, I went on the tiles with him, and saw the lead cut in the state he had described.

EDWARD PRATT . I am a constable, the prisoner was delivered into my charge, with the lead just fresh cut; I suppose it was cut with a knife and then torn off, but I found no knife upon him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-37

519. ELLEN MADDEN and ANN COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 7 half-crowns , the monies of John Conolly .

JOHN CONOLLY. I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 9th of January I lodged in Merlin's-rents, Shoe-lane , on the second floor. I had received my pension, on Monday, the 7th of January, which was four sovereigns and 6s. 6 1/2d. On Wednesday, the 9th of January, I was in my room - my wife was laying on the bed - I was sitting on the bed-side; the prisoner came into the room at eleven o'clock that morning - I had frequently seen them before; one lived next door, the other was frequently with her; my wife asked what business they had there; one of them said she lived next door; my wife told them to go to their own apartments; I saw a drop of liquor on the table, and to get them out of the place, I gave each of them a drop; one of them told my wife she would go when she thought proper; I then turned them out of the room, and saw them going down stairs; my money was in my pocket. I saw them again between five and six o'clock that evening; they brought a man in with them, and forced the door - the

fellow whom they brought in with them, sat down on the bed-side, where I was sitting, and put his hand round my waist - one woman stood by the fire-place; I found the man's hand coming from my jacket-pocket, and finding something was going on wrong, I got up, and insisted on their leaving the place, and then the candle was put out, by Madden; I was immediately struck, and knocked down on my back, by the man; my pocket had seven half-crowns in it, and when I got up the half-crowns were gone, and some small silver beside; I said to my wife, that they were murderers - she called out, Robbery and Murder! one of the girls ran away, with the man who knocked me down; I secured the other, which was Madden, and kept her till the street-keeper came, and I gave her to him - she is the woman who put the candle out; she was taken to the watch-house; I staid there till a street-keeper brought Collins in, which was in less than half an hour; I described her person to him - I knew her well before; I have not seen the man since; I should know him if I saw him; I never got my money back.

SARAH CONOLLY . I am the wife of John Conolly. I had seen Collins before - she lived next door; I did not know Madden before. On the day of the robbery, between half-past ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoners walked into my room - I asked what business they had there - they said they lived next door; I told them to go out - I was ill, having a bad cold; my husband turned them out, and between six and seven o'clock in the evening they came again, with a man; they burst the door right open; they blew the candle out, and knocked my husband down - he has never been well since; the man turned my husband's pocket out, and took every farthing he had got; my husband laid hold of Madden, who blew out the candle, and the other two got away - I am certain Collins was with her.

MARY ANN ELLIS . I live next door to Conolly. I know Collins; she lived next door, on the other side; I came down stairs at the time, there was a bustle inside the door; I saw Collins come out of Conolly's room, and a man with her; they burst the door open - Collins came out first, and the man followed her; I kept them in sight while I sent for a street-keeper; I brought Madden out of the room, and gave her to an officer - I gave the officer information, and Collins was taken in half an hour.

SAMUEL HEINSON . I am the street-keeper. I received information against Madden - Collins was brought to the watch-house about ten minutes after I got there; Conolly spoke to them both; I have been looking for the man ever since - I found no money on them, except a few halfpence.

Collins put in a written defence, declaring she had never been in the house, and knew nothing whatever of the charge.

JURY to JOHN CONOLLY. Q. At the time of the robbery were you in liquor? A. No; I was quite sensible - I might have drank a little, but had my sense perfectly.

SARAH CONOLLY. I was perfectly sober - I might have had a little beer - I was very poorly.

MADDEN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280221-38

520. CHARLES SIMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 bar of mixed metal, value 25s. , the goods of William Turner and others, his masters.

MR. JOHN TURNER . I am in partnership with William Turner and another. We are gold and silver refiners , and live at No. 48, Barbican. The prisoner had been two or three years in our employ, and slept in the counting-house, as a guard to the property. I can only identify the property.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable of the Mansion-house. On the 11th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was waiting opposite Mr. Turner's premises, on the watch, and saw the prisoner turn off the step of the door, with a paper parcel across his left arm - he turned up Princes-street, but was not out of my sight; I followed him across Bridgewater-square, down Fan-street and Goswell-street; he turned down Allen-street, and knocked at No. 40 - a boy opened the door - he said something to the boy, I could not hear what; I then went up and touched the bundle, and asked him what he had got there; he said, "Lead, for Peter, the burnisher;" I asked where he brought it from; he said, "From myself;" I said, "From yourself?" he said, "Yes, he is my brother-in-law, and we travel the country, Brentford, Isleworth, and all those places, and buy up all sorts of metal;" I said, "How came this piece here, then?" he said it was left at the White Horse public-house, Fan-street, opposite his house, the night before, or opposite where he lived - that he took it home, and had brought it from home; I said,"That story won't do for me; I have followed you from Princes-street, myself," which he denied; I took him to the Compter, and informed Mr. Turner; the metal has had a piece cut off it, to be assayed.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he carrying it quite openly? A. Except the paper being round it - he gave this account very readily - he called it lead, and I could not tell it from lead myself.

MR. TURNER. On the 11th of January, about 12 o'clock, this bar of metal was produced to me, we have a great many more - it is coarse metal, with a very small portion of silver in it - it is the refuse from refining silver; the prisoner was not allowed to collect metal; he was never absent from our business - he could not have been travelling; this is not likely to be found any where but at a refiner's; it is worth 24s. or 25s. - there is no refiner nearer to us than Foster-lane; I never knew the prisoner in possession of any bar: there may be probably twenty bars of one sort; they are not always so poor as this one.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any particular mark on it? A. No; I could have sworn to it any where, for here is the ingot it was cast in - it is not an uncommon size; I could not ascertain the quality without its being assayed - it has been assayed at Johnson's, in Foster-lane, but not in my presence; I can tell, from its appearance, and from cutting it, that it is not pure lead - it is mixed metal, composed of lead, silver, and, I dare say, a portion of copper; I know that from the assay master.

COURT. Q. Can you say that it is mixed metal, of your own knowledge? A. It is; I have been forty years in the business, and have no doubt of it, though I cannot tell of what it is composed, except from the report of the assay master.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-39

521. ELIZABETH LEACH was indicted for stealing,

on the 29th of January , 1 pillow, value 2s. , the goods of John Bradbury .

ELIZA BRADBURY . I am the wife of John Bradbury. We live in Gough-street, Gray's-inn-lane . The prisoner came to lodge with us on the 26th of January, and left on the 2d of February; a man lived with her as her husband all the time; she said he was clerk to an engraver; they left without paying their rent, and I have not seen the man since; I had my suspicions as she took the key - I opened the door with another key, in three or four hours, and the sheets, pillows, bolster, and blanket were gone; I found the pillow in pawn, last week, and am certain it is mine.

JOHN MARTIN HAIGH . I am servant to Mr. Brown, a pawnbroker, of Fetter-lane. On the 29th of January the prisoner pawned this pillow, in the name of Ann Clark - I have frequently seen her before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN HOLLAND . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge, and found the duplicate of the pillow on her.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18280221-40

522. ELIZABETH LEACH was again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 pillow, value 5s., and 1 bolster, value 10s. , the goods of John Bradbury .

ELIZA BRADBURY . I am the wife of John Bradbury. The prisoner and a man lodged with us - they left, and I missed a pillow and blanket, which I found in pawn.

GEORGE HIGHAM . I am servant to Mr. Cottrell, a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned these things at our shop, at separate times, but on the same day.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280221-41

523. ROBERT RATCLIFFE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 5 bolts of osier rods, value 10s. the goods of George May and another; and JOSEPH WALDRON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

EDWARD SHACKEL . I am warehouse and book-keeper at the Swan inn, Holborn-bridge. I am agent to George May , a carrier , who is in partnership with Mr. Helyer. Their men brought thirty-two bundles of osier rods to the inn, and pitched them in Fleet-market. I received information on Saturday, the 17th of January - went up the yard, and found our guard holding the prisoner, Ratcliffe; the rods were in a liquor-shop - Waldron was in the liquor-shop, very tipsy; there were two bundles of rods there; the landlady said, in the presence of both the prisoners, that Ratcliffe had brought in one bundle; Waldron immediately claimed them as his property. I asked Waldron where he got them from - he appeared to have his senses about him - he said he had bought them; I said, "as an honest man, you will tell me who of." He said no, he would be d-d if he would. I said if not, he must go to the Compter. I took him in charge; when the officer came, he told me he had bought them of his brother over night, and he had three other bolts at home.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are they bundles or bolts? A. Bolt is the phrase the trade gives them; one of the witnesses tells me they are bolts - I know nothing of the trade myself. The prisoners were both drunk; but I do not conceive them so tipsy as not to know what they were saying; the officer said, we had better not take them before the Alderman till they were sober. Waldron acknowledged, in my hearing, when he was sober, that he had bought them of Ratcliffe, and paid him 9s.; Ratcliffe said he had only given him 6s. - that was taken down at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not Waldron so tipsy that you would not have put him on his oath? A. I believe he knew right from wrong - I would have put him upon his oath, if necessary; he was not insensibly drunk - he answered me like a man - I believe he was capable of answering any question.

GEORGE BESSANT . I am in the employ of George May, and his partner. I brought some osier rods from them - some call them bolts and some bundles. I brought thirty-two bundles from Twyford to London, and pitched them at the top of Fleet-market, about five o'clock in the morning - the waggoner put me trustee over them. Shackel sent for me down the yard, and when I returned five bundles were gone; this was about eleven o'clock. I saw two bundles found in the gin-shop in about twenty minutes - both the prisoners were there; I know them to be the bundles - they generally sell for 2s. a bundle. While I was minding them, Waldron came up and asked Ratcliffe to sell him some; this was in my hearing, at the corner of Fleet-market. I told him he must not sell them, for they were not his; that I was trustee over them - I told him they were neither his nor mine to sell - that was about nine o'clock - Ratcliffe was standing by me at the time; I had been talking to him; they both went away together - I saw them again before the rods were taken, and left Ratcliffe to mind them while I went down the yard; when I returned, five bundles were gone - we found three at Waldron's house, in Plumbtree-court, about twelve o'clock- I am certain they are part of what I brought to town; I saw no other in the market that day. When I went to Ratcliffe about it, he told me he had sold them, and would give me 1s. not to say any thing about it; that it made no odds to me, as it would be the waggoner's loss.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If a man gave 10s. for them, it would be a fair price? A. Yes; I put Ratcliffe in care of them, openly, in the market; he knew they were not his to sell.

Q. If he were offered a fair price for them, you would not think it wrong in him to sell them? A. No. I know the bundles, by having tied one up just before; it had come apart - they were found before they had time to untie them; they were just as I had left them. Waldron was sober when he asked Ratcliffe to sell them; he was drunk when he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What day of the month was this? A. The 19th of January - I had seen Ratcliffe in the yard before; but never employed him - I saw him about three times a week for the last nine weeks; but never had any conversation with him; I have drank with him when the waggoner gave us a drop of beer; I never drank purl with him; I was told to pitch the rods in the market, for the man who belonged to them was coming to sell them there; and when he did come, he

sold them for 2s. a bundle - I never told Ratcliffe the price, for I did not know it till afterwards. I call them bundles of rods - that is the proper name; some call them bolts, and some bundles - I should call them bundles - some call them bundles of bolts.

COURT. Q. Are they osiers? A. No; nothing but withes - I cannot tell whether they are called osiers in the trade.

EDWARD SHACKEL . I am agent to the proprietor. I have heard them called bolts of rods, and bundles of rods; we call them osiers; I went to Waldron's house on the 19th, immediately on coming from the Compter; it is in Plumbtree-court, Holborn-bridge; we there found one bundle entire, and two cut open; Bushnell was making baskets of them - it is the third house on the right-hand side from Holborn-bridge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear it is not the fifth house? A. I cannot say; I will say it is the third or fourth. I have lived at the inn twenty-two years, and these things frequently come up; they are bundles or bolts, and I should call them osiers in London; but I may be mistaken.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What is the meaning of the word "Bolt?" A. It is a bundle bound up in a certain number of inches; I heard Bushnell say that; I have frequently heard them called bolts - nobody ever heard of a "bundle of bolts."

WILLIAM BUSHNELL . I am a watchman and basket-maker; I make baskets of osiers, and these are osiers - when they are tied together, the trade call them bolts - this is not a bolt now, but I have no doubt it was, when it was sent up - it is not the regular size now - we reckon forty-two inches round a bolt. Shackel and Bessant found me at No. 3, Plumtree-court, between twelve and one o'clock on the 19th of January; there was a bundle of stuff there, and part of another that I was making baskets of; I was in the market-house that morning, and went to get a glass of liquor: Waldron asked if I had anything to do, I said No; he asked if I would make him half a dozen of baskets called "No. 5, longs;" I said I would- he told me not to deceive him, but go home and make them for he must get them in by six o'clock that night, he told me to finish three of No. 3, (two of which were began) and send them home, as they were paid for, for he had had the money for half a dozen; I went home for my knife, and then went to Waldron's lodgings in Plumbtree-court, and in about two hours Bessant and Shackel came and claimed the rods I was working on - I had not seen Ratcliffe at all; when I first got to the room there was no small stuff to make the baskets with: I went to Waldron, at Wood's house a little after ten o'clock and brought a bundle from there, and another from Scruton's, the Key public-house in Fleet-market, by Waldron's directions - I have frequently bought four or five bolts with him, and left them at public-houses; he came to his lodgings about a quarter-past eleven to see how I was getting on - he was very drunk and tumbled out of the chair; I saw no more of him till he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There was no concealment about it? A. No; the stuff was in a public-house where forty or fifty of the market people are constantly coming - he did not tell me to conceal them: I passed by where they were taken from; he has often told me to do things directly - I think 2s. are more than they are worth.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Whatever quantity were tied up together, would they be properly called a bundle? A. Some people call them bundles and some bolts.

COURT. Q. Did Waldron tell you where they came from? A. No, I did not ask him.

SAMUEL HEINSON . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoners, between twelve and one o'clock, at Scuton's gin-shop, for stealing this property; I asked Ratcliffe how he came by them - he said, "I have stolen them" and Waldron said "I have bought them" - that is all.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did they know you were a constable? A. Yes, both of them. I said"You must tell me where you got them, for I am going to take you to the Compter" he told me he had stolen them, before I asked him; I afterwards said "You must tell me where you stole them from;" he was not sober - I did not say, what he said would be given in evidence against him; I never said I would transport Ratcliffe, or that I would do all in my power to get him transported, I must be a jackass to say so - how could I get him transported? I had never seen him before - I have had half a glass of gin tonight, and that is all, so help me God - I never said I would get him transported - I should be a rascal if I did say so.

RATCLIFFE's Defence. The guard of the waggon ordered me to sell them and I gave him part of the money, and was to give him the rest in the morning: if I had intended to steal them, I should not have taken them into the public-house.

GEORGE BESSANT. I never gave him orders to dispose of them.

WALDRON's Defence. I bought them and gave a fair price for them.

THOMAS ODELL . I am Scruton's son-in-law and have charge of the house; the prisoners brought the rods in -Waldron asked me to let them be there till the man fetched them - I saw him pay for them - I cannot say how much - there was no secrecy about it.

RATCLIFFE - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

WALDRON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-42

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

524. JOHN MAXFIELD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Giles , on the 12th of February , and stealing 1 piece of carpet, value 3s., and 1 quilt, value 2s. , his property.

JEMIMA GILES . I am the daughter of Richard Giles, who lives in Chamber-street, Whitechapel . On the 12th of February, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, I went up from the kitchen, to shut the street door, which I had heard was open; I had come in about ten minutes before, and had shut it, but there are lodgers in the house - as I came up the stairs, I looked through a casement window, and saw the prisoner, who was a perfect stranger, with

some articles, which he dropped on the staircase; I shut the door, and called for a light: I went to the prisoner, and found these articles, which had been in the garret, and are my father's property - I had seen them safe that day; the prisoner was taken in the house: I asked what he wanted, and he said he wanted a lodging.

ELIZABETH HAMILTON . I am servant to Mr. Giles. I heard Miss Giles give the alarm - I went up with a light, and saw the prisoner at the foot of the stairs, with the bedclothes behind him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH DALTON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-43

525. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 2 coats, value 3l. 6s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 30s.; 4 waistcoats, value 10s.; 1 jacket, value 4s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 8s.; 3 shirts, value 15s.; 5 handkerchiefs, value 3s., and 1 half-crown, the property of Jonas Gorton , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Feam .

JONAS GORTON. I am a labourer , and live at my brother's, in Green-street, Bethnal-green. I first saw the prisoner on the night of the 10th of July, in Norton-falgate, with a person named Humby, a baker, whom I knew very well; we went into a public-house in Shoreditch - I staid with them about half an hour, and then went to the watchhouse, freely, with my two bundles, for security; they came in there afterwards - I had left a situation at a wholesale grocers, in High-street, Mary-le-bone, the day before. On the morning of the 11th we went from the watch-house together, with the night constable, to the Ship public-house in Shoreditch, staid there about three quarters of an hour, and then the prisoner, Humby, and myself went to Mr. Fearn's, the Blue Last public-house, in the Curtain-road ; we staid there till about nine o'clock - I left my parcel, containing the articles stated in the indictment, on the taproom table, while I went to the bar, and the prisoner took my bundle, and walked off with it; I did not follow him, for knowing Humby, I had no suspicion; Humby staid with me till the prisoner got about as far as Shoreditch, and then ran away; I have not seen my property since, nor did I see the prisoner for more than six months.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Humby was an acquaintance of your's? A. I knew him by sight; I do not know that the prisoner was in the service of a respectable baker at the time he was taken.

JOSEPH NEWSOM . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at a public-house on the 21st of January - I said I wanted him for a robbery; he said he was innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-44

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

526. JOHN PAUL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Corcoran , on the 6th of February , and stealing therein 1 dial, value 6l.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 7s.; 3 decanters, value 9s.; 2 gallons of brandy, value 2l., and 30 shillings , his property.

JOHANNA CORCORAN . I am the wife of Peter Corcoran, who keeps the Crispin public-house, in Grub-street, St. Luke's . On the 5th of February I went to bed about twelve o'clock, leaving the house all secure. I was alarmed in the morning, at half-past seven o'clock, or near eight, by a servant and a lodger: I found the dial was gone from the middle room, where they had made an entrance by the side window: the bar was broken open, and I missed the property stated in the indictment. When I went to bed the bar was locked and bolted - they took a shutter down from the middle room window, and made an entrance; the shutter had been fastened by a screw, which was removed. My lodger is not here. I have not seen any of my property since, except this silk handkerchief.

FREDERICK GEORGE TASHMAN . I lodged at Mr. Corcoran's. About a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, I heard of the robbery; I know nothing of the transaction myself, but Connelly and I met the prisoner on Wednesday morning, the 6th of February, about half-past nine o'clock, in Maidenhead-court, Moor-lane, not a quarter of a mile from Mr. Corcoran's; we laid hold of him, and he asked what we were going to do with him - I said I was going to take him to Bunhill-row watch-house - he said, "What for? I am no thief!" I said I did not say he was, but it was on suspicion of breaking into the Crispin; he tried to get away - his hat fell off, and this handkerchief fell out of it; I took them up, and put them on his head again; his hat fell off again in Honeysuckle-court, with the handkerchief in it; Jennings then took it up, and put the hat on his head, but kept the handkerchief; we then took him to the watch-house: I had seen him before several times - he used to go about with baked potatoes; I do not know that I had seen him at Corcoran's for perhaps a month.

MARK JENNINGS . I am a bricklayer's labourer. I was going down Moor-lane on the 6th of February, between nine and ten o'clock, and saw the prisoner in custody of Connelly and Tashman; I saw his hat fall off, and a handkerchief in it; Neile took it up, and gave it to Tashman, who put them on his head - they were bringing him along when he dropped his hat again - I took up the handkerchief then, and kept it until I gave it to Mrs. Corcoran, which was the same day.

FRANCIS NEILE . On the 6th of February I saw the prisoner in the custody of Tashman and Connelly; I saw his hat and handkerchief fall off - I picked them up, and gave them to Tashman, who put the hat on his head, with the same handkerchief in it, which was in it when it fell - I saw the corner hanging out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. A boot-maker. I am sure I had not this handkerchief myself at any time. I belong to a society of shoe-makers; and have the care of their books; I never was accused of burning the books to conceal the accounts; the prisoner's father is not a member of that society.

PHILIP CONNELLY . I took this man into custody - I saw his hat fall off, and the handkerchief in it; Neile took it up, and put the same handkerchief into the hat again.

JOHN BEE . I am an officer. I received this handkerchief from Corcoran.

JOHANNA CORCORAN . I know this handkerchief to be mine, by a particular mark on the selvage, and a cut which I gave it myself; I had aired it the night before, and laid it on top of the pair of sheets, on the locker of my bar.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you buy the whole piece of

those handkerchiefs? A. No, only this one; I have no initials on it - Tashman and the servant were both up before me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a handkerchief in my hat, but not that one - and I have persons here who can prove that I was in bed that night.

CHARLES PAUL . I am the prisoner's father, and am a shoe-maker; my son does not work with me - he is a labourer, and gets his living as he can; he lives in my house. On Tuesday night, the 5th of February, he went to the play, and came home between twelve and one o'clock- he had his supper with us, and asked his mother to mend his trousers - when he had had his supper he went to bed, and did not get up till a little after seven the next morning, when I called him myself - he is always in the habit of sleeping at home.

COURT. Q. Where do you live? A. At No. 14, Crown-court, Grub-street, near the prosecutor's; I have two sons and one daughter: the prisoner slept in the garret - no one else slept there; one of my children is in service and the other is an infant. I do not know who had been to the play with him that night; there had been two or three of them together: he had some bread and cheese and porter for his supper when he came home; he went to bed first, then I went, and my wife last. There are three rooms in the house - I sleep below stairs: there is a lodger in the first floor. The street door opens into a passage, not into the lower room; my son might have come down stairs, passed my room door, and gone out, but when I called him in the morning he was in bed.

SARAH PAUL . I am the prisoner's mother. On the 5th of February, he came home near upon ten o'clock, and asked me to mend his trousers; he had some Irish-stew for supper, and nothing else - he had nothing to drink but water; he went to bed first, my husband next, and I went up stairs after he was in bed, to fetch his trousers; he went out about seven o'clock the next morning: we sleep in the bottom room, and he in the top; there are but three rooms in the house; the street door is locked at night, and I keep the key in my possession; he could not have gone out without coming into my room for it - he is always in the habit of sleeping at home; he goes about selling baked potatoes, and doing any jobs he can get.

COURT. Q. How old is he? A. Seventeen; his father got up first the next morning, to take up his trousers, which I had mended the night before, for he had nothing to put on. I know it was on the 5th of February, because he was taken up the next day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-45

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

527. WILLIAM HOWARD, alias JOSHUA BELL , was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Mullay , a subject of our Lord the King, on the 12th of February , at St. George the Martyr, and with a certain sharp instrument striking and cutting him in and upon the left hand with intent to rob him, against the statute, &c.

SECOND, THIRD, AND FOURTH COUNTS, stating his intent to be to kill and murder him, to disable him, or do him some grevious bodily harm.

FIFTH COUNT, stating his intent to be to resist and prevent his lawful apprehension and detainer.

SIXTH COUNT, for feloniously assaulting the said William Mullay, with intent to rob him, and his goods, chattels, and monies from his person, and against his will.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MULLAY. I was in London in January last; and on one day in the beginning of this month, I put an advertisement in the paper; and on the 8th I received a letter, in consequence of which I called on the prisoner, and had some conversation with him. I produced the letter to him; he did not state from whom that letter came, but seemed to know what I came about. I was desirous of procuring some situation, but had not mentioned that it was to be under government: I had provided myself with a sum of money as a premium for it. The place I went to was No. 36, Red Lion-square ; I was shown to a room on the top floor, behind the projection of the building: I had to go up stairs as if I was going to the leads of the house, I then turned off down some other stairs, through a narrow passage, two or three feet wide, which brought me into a room, not more than nine feet square; there is a window in it, and a fire-place which projects; there was a table and two chairs: I got there, I think, about three o'clock on Friday, the 8th of February, and staid there until about four o'clock. He told me he had a friend, who was a man of consequence, and had a great deal of influence, though he had run through a large fortune, and through him he could procure me some employment, and as a beginning of the business, I was to lodge 300l. in a banker's hands in my own name, and to call on him the following day, or on the Monday, to lodge the money, I went the following day and told him I had not brought the money, and told him I thought Monday might do as well. We had some further conversation on the business, and I said I did not care, or it was of no consequence to me if I were to lodge more money. It was then agreed that I should, on the Monday, lodge 450l. On the Monday I called about two o'clock, and told him I had changed my mind, and I would only lodge 300l.: he then observed that his employer would think I was going back from my agreement, and think that he had not acted in a proper manner. On that day I saw a long bladed knife, with a buckhorn handle, which laid open upon the shelf; I cannot say whether it was a clasp knife, as I did not take it in my hand - when the prisoner made these observations, I told him I was always a man of my word, or words to that effect; and I would lodge the 450l. in the course of the day, and to prove it, I showed him 400l. He then made me write a note to a Mr. Owen, which was the first time I had heard the name of "Owen" mentioned; in it I mentioned that I would lodge the 450l., and Howard and I were to call on him at one o'clock the following day, which would be Tuesday: I was to call on the prisoner at half-past twelve o'clock, and go with him to Owen's: we parted about five o'clock. On the next day I went about half-past twelve o'clock, and had upwards of 500l. in two pockets - I had three 100l. Bank notes, two of 50l., a Bank post-bill for 98l., and some sovereigns. At this interview, Howard told me that Mr. Owen had to go to 'Change, and could

not be at home at one o'clock, but he would call at Howard's at two o'clock, and he begged me to wait till he came, which I consented to do: he made some observations about my being cold; he put some coals on the fire, and put the poker into it; it remained there some time, when it fell out; he put it in again; it remained some time, and I took it out again myself - he put it into the fire again, and observed to me that it would make the fire burn. After some time, it fell out on the hearth-rug and burnt it, and he did not afterwards put it in. I observed in the room a trap bat, which I had not seen before; he had it a good deal in his hand, and said he purchased it to beat, or to keep the cat out of his room - the conversation afterwards turned on various subjects; two o'clock came, Mr. Owen did not appear, but Howard appeared to be every moment expecting him: he did not remain in the room all the time, but went in and out a great deal - as well as I can recollect he walked up and down almost all the time: I told him I wanted to be at home before five o'clock, as I lived at Chelsea, and was going out to dinner. About two o'clock he began to get very agitated, and complained a great deal of Mr. Owen's conduct: I remained till half-past three o'clock, and then told him I could stay no longer, and he proposed that there should be a new appointment made to meet Mr. Owen, and it was agreed that I should call on Howard at ten o'clock, or as soon after as I could, on the following day: this was to be communicated to Owen by a note, which I wrote; when I had done, I showed it to Howard, who said that I ought to have made it a good deal sharper, or words to that effect; and, after a few observations he sat down and wrote one for me to copy - this note is not here, but here is a part of my copy of it: the note he wrote was a long one, and in that he stated that we should call at ten o'clock at Owen's; I said "How can we go to Owen's at ten o'clock, when I am to be here at ten o'clock" - he replied"You are peevish;" I said "on some occasions I might be so." I sat down and commenced the copy of the note, and had nearly finished it, when I saw my hat (which had hung on a nail behind me) in Howard's hand, and he put it either on a chair at the other corner of the room, or threw it on the floor; he immediately came back again behind me, as I was leaning down to write, and hit me at the top of the head with the bat - it immediately occured to me that he intended to murder, and rob me; I got up, he came more in front of me, and hit me with the bat on my forehead - it bled immediately over my face, so much so as to dim my sight with the blood: I immediately closed upon him and threw him; he fell, I think sideways, for his left hand was stretched out, and I observed in it a knife, which appeared to me to be the one I had previously seen; I laid hold of it by the blade: he had fallen about three or four feet from the fire-place, and while I had hold of the knife with one hand, I stretched out the other and got hold of the poker, with which I gave him some blows on the head: he had all this time hold of the handle of the knife, and, by holding the blade, my hand began to be cut: I then threw the poker out of my hand to lay hold of the blade with my right hand, my left being cut - in doing that he got up: we were still struggling, but I did not fall at all; he still had hold of the handle of the knife, and I had only hold of the blade; when he first began on me, I cried "Murder," and he told me in the course of the struggle, it was no use to bawl or cry, as he had help at hand, or words to that effect, and on one or two occasions, he called "John, John" - when we were up, I got hold of the bat, and gave him some blows with it in front of his head, but I let go of the bat, as my whole attention was on the knife, and in a short time I broke the blade off near the handle, and held it in my own hand for perhaps a minute or two, thinking it might be of some service to defend myself, but I found I could not use the blade, and I threw it on the floor. I cannot well say how the prisoner held the handle of the knife, but he held it firmly, and I could not get, but broke it - the knife was in motion when I broke it; I had then nothing in my hand to defend myself, I threw him again, and began to kick him with my heel: about that time there were people at the door; I heard them speak, but the door was locked - he had passed in and out frequently; he had not locked it every time, nor do I know when he had locked it - I did not observe whether I found the door locked on my former visits, but on one occasion (I think on the Monday) I told him to shut the door, which was open, and it appeared to me to have no other means of fastening, but by turning the key. When the people came to the door, I thought they came to help Howard, and he asked me to let him get up, and said he would tell me all about it; I did so, but still held him: he appeared greatly agitated or exhausted, I cannot tell which, and said to me "Will you promise me one thing?" or words to that effect: I asked him what it was; he did not reply for some time, and I asked him again - he then said, "Will you say it was a quarrel?" and, under the idea that he had help outside the door, I promised him I would. We then went and unlocked the door, and I saw the landlord of the house, or the man who keeps the shop; and a painter, whom I had seen in the house, going backwards and forwards, and two other persons; I then felt at ease as to any danger, and came out of the room, and said that Howard had made an attempt to murder me; some one then came down stairs with me, and I showed my money to the first person I spoke to, to the constable, and to the surgeon. When I went into that room I had a ring on my finger, and, when I came out, I found myself without it; I have seen it since, and I have seen a bat and a knife similar to those I saw in the room. My wounds were dressed, and I was sent home.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you been from Ireland? A. About three months: I had been in England frequently before, and had advertised for some employment, but I do not think I had advertised for a public situation; I had advertised for a mercantile one about four times; not more. The prisoner said I was peevish, and occasionally I am so, if I see a person do an absurd thing; but, if I thought a fraud was about to be practised on me, or I were to be made the dupe of another person, that would not be likely to rouse my peevish feelings. I can state, on my oath, that I was not peevish on that occasion: and the prisoner had no reason for making that observation. My note will show that I did not consider that Mr. Owen was ill treating me, nor did I think that Howard was; I did not consider that the delay was extraordinary. The lodging, into which I went, was in a very obscure situation; there was a pillar and claw table and two chairs in the room: there might be other things, but the

room was very scantily furnished - but the furniture was very clean. The whole sum I was to give was something between 500l. and 800l. It did not strike me that this was rather an extraordinary place to go to for the purpose of seeing an influential person or his agent - Howard said I was to meet him there. The only thing that struck me was, that it was a very quiet place, and a curious one; the passage to it is about three feet wide. I think the first time I showed the prisoner the money I had in my pocket, was on the Monday; I did not show him any on the Tuesday, and I cannot exactly tell whether any conversation took place between me and him respecting money on Tuesday: the first conversation respecting the banker's was on the Monday, and on the Tuesday he was making an observation on Mr. Owen's going with me to the banker's, and he was consulting me to know whether he would be wanted to go, he said if I chose he would go: he did not ask me any questions that morning to induce me to show him the money; my going to any banker's, was to depend on whether Mr. Owen came. I think I got there on the Tuesday, at half-past twelve o'clock, and, when I came out of the room it was about four o'clock. I never described the bat as a cricket bat: there had been some coals put on the fire before he put the poket in: I did not state before the magistrate that after he put the poker in the fire, I, myself, drew it out twice; or that he put it in twice, and that I drew it out as often: he put it in three times and I drew it out once - I am quite positive that I did not on that Tuesday drink anything with him; on the Monday I drank some gin and water, which he asked me to do, as I appeared wet: I think I was not wet on the Tuesday; there might be a splash on me. I do not mean to state that his saying I was cold, and putting the poker into the fire, was a circumstance calculated to alarm me; in fact, it did not alarm me - I have never said it did. I was the only person in the room with him; when the poker fell from the fire the second time and burnt the hearth-rug he took it into his hand and put it under the ashes, or by the side of the fire-place; very circumstance, with reference to it, was of an ordinary nature, till I took hold of it: I did not on the two previous days take particular notice of the room and its appendages. The bat and the knife might have been there on the Friday and Saturday, but I did not see them till the Monday. I was writing when I saw my hat in the prisoner's hand, but I did not see him take it down, as it was behind me; it might have fallen. It is a very small room; if he had intended to rob me, he might have stuck me to the heart with the knife. I did not, at the last meeting, express great indignation at Owen for not coming, and never said it was all a "humbug." Howard was making some observations on him for not coming, but I never joined, for up to the time I was attacked, I considered the transaction bona fide.

Q. Now, Sir, upon the oath you have taken, and recollecting your back was to the prisoner when you were first struck, was it not a blow with the fist? A. No! that I will swear - it was a very severe blow, but I was not stunned- when I turned round, the prisoner had the bat in his right hand; he appears to be a weaker man than I - I threw him twice, and the only difficulty I had in any part of the transaction was, to get the knife; he had the knife in his left hand; I could hold the knife and reach the poker, with which I gave him, perhaps, three blows with a good deal of force on the head; I cannot well tell whether the knife continued in his left hand, but I had it occasionally in both hands, and always by the blade; the first time I saw it in his hand was the moment he fell - he did not fall near the shelf, where I had seen it lay - that I will swear; he had the bat in his right hand when he fell - he did not fall from a blow - I threw him; I had not the poker in my hand at the time he fell; when the persons were at the door, he did not add that he would give me satisfaction when and where I liked; he did not state that he bought the bat as a present to his landlord's child that I remember, though I will not swear he did not; a black cat did come into the room, and he used the bat to drive it out - I will not swear that he did not say at the time, that the bat had been bought for a different ball than so black a one and it would answer the purpose as well as any thing else - he might have said so, but I have no knowledge of it; he might have sat down with me, but I swear that the greater part of the time he was walking about - he appeared agitated and irritated, and accounted for it by the absence of Owen; as well as I can remember, I stated before the Magistrate that, in the course of struggle, he called, "John John;" I am almost positive that I did; I cannot call to my mind whe ther any one said at the door that they would burst it open, if it were not opened - it might have been said; I have not examined the premises since; I cried Murder! loudly, but I do not know whether it was heard at the next house - I do not know whether I could have overpowered the prisoner; I admit that I broke the knife before I threw him for the last time; I cannot tell how long a time elapsed between my going out of the room and securing the prisoner, for I was below stairs - I cannot tell whether he was left alone; I did not mind whether I saw any persons in the house when I went to meet him on the Tuesday; when he asked me to say it was a quarrel, I promised to do so, under the supposition that his friends were at hand; I do not think that, in the agitation of the moment, I could have been mistaken, as to the expressions he used in respect of help; I cannot say which of the two were most wounded; there was some conversation about bills, but the 450l. was bona fide to be left.

MR. LAW. Q. A surgeon attended you? A. Yes, and I showed him the state I was in; I was not wounded in any respect when I went there.

CHARLES FREDERICK CHEESE . I live at No, 36, Red Lion-square; the prisoner lodged in the house, and occupied two attics, I believe - I think he had entered on his fourth week. On the day of this transaction, I went up stairs, about four o'clock, upon hearing the cry of Murder! I returned and procured the poker, and, in my passage up again, I asked a painter to go up with me, which he did; I went to the door of the prisoner's apartment, where I heard a scuffling; I knocked, and demanded the cause of it - a dead silence ensued for a few moments, when I heard a half-suppressed voice pronounce the words, "Will you premise -?" I then demanded admittance more loudly than before; some one from within desired me to retire, saying it was only a quarrel, and all settled; I said I should like two voices to tell me that it was settled; the assertion was then repeated, by the same voice, that all was settled, but, on my

asserting that I had persons with me who would not be satisfied without admittance, the door was immediately unlocked- I opened the door, and took the prosecutor down stairs to a back kitchen, or rather scullery; he said he had 500l. about him, but I did not see him produce it from his pocket. Cooke, the constable, took the prisoner into custody; when he was taken, I heard him express that, which would lead us to conclude that they had only been quarrelling, he said he thought it unfair that the prosecutor's individual evidence should be received in preference to his own, and they ought to have been allowed to fight it out fair - I do not recollect that the prosecutor made any complaint in his presence about what had happened; the prisoner and prosecutor were both wounded, and the prosecutor was bleeding copiously - I recollect the prisoner saying that the circumstance of the door being locked was against him, but he endeavoured to explain it, by saying that there was no other fastening to the door, and the lock being inside, he had locked it to prevent the inconvenience of sitting in a draught - he had locked it; he stated that he had been accused of assaulting the prosecutor, but made no direct reply; I have a ring, which I received from a little boy, who is now in Court.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he say that circumstances were against him; or that they appeared against him? A. That they were against him, and he accounted for it by stating that the door was locked, but that that was the only way of fastening it; I stated at the door that I would not be put off with the reply which I had heard; and, to the best of my judgment, it was the same voice said, "It is only a quarrel," as said, "Will you promise?" there was no contradiction made by any other voice, though I had explained the object of my coming - the prisoner all along stated that it had been a quarrel; I do not remember that any thing was said to me by any one when the door was first opened; I took hold of the prosecutor's hand, and took him down stairs; in going down, I asked what it was about, and he said the man had attempted to murder him - he never assented to the representation of the prisoner, that it was a quarrel; he told but one story from beginning to end; to the best of my belief, the prisoner was left alone up stairs - he was apprehended in about half an hour, but he could not well have escaped, as there were persons at the door, and on the stairs.

JURY. Q. Why did you take the prosecutor to the kitchen in preference to any other part of the house? A. Because I generally occupy the kitchen for my family, and knowing that his wounds wanted washing I took him there.

EDWARD COOKE . I am a constable, and live at No. 33, Red Lion-square; I was sent for between three and four o'clock, and the prosecutor gave me the prisoner in charge; I went into the sitting-room, occupied by the prisoner, where I found this bat - I saw a poker there, and the glass of the window was broken; I searched the prisoner, and found on him 5d. in halfpence; I went into his bed-room, and found a hat, a cap, a waistcoat, two old shirts, two or three pairs of stockings, and a few collars; I saw the door which leads to the leads of the house, and found marks of blood on it - that door fastens with two bolts; I did not find any knife in the room, but I told the prisoner what the prosecutor had said about a knife, and his answer was, that he wished he had thrown away every d - d thing that was bloody; I found the papers produced under the grate, in the prisoner's bed-room, not in the sitting room; I found another paper folded up, on the table, in the sitting-room; I looked for the knife on the roofs of the houses that day, but could not find it for the snow; I went again the next day, and found the handle on the roof of No. 34, and the blade on the roof of No. 38; this is the knife - it is what is called a Spanish knife.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was any body with you when you took the prisoner? A. Yes, Mr. Izard- I took him about four o'clock in the afternoon, as near as I can tell; I believe no one had hold of him - he was up in his room; and, as I was informed by some one that he had a dagger, I went home and provided myself with a cutlass, and went back and took him.

MR. LAW. Q. Have you examined the knife? A. Yes; it is sharp on both sides - I saw the prosecutor had two wounds on his head, and his clothes were very bloody.

JOSEPH BARBER . I am a chemist, and live at No.7, Orange-street, Red Lion-square. I was applied to for the prosecutor, on the day of the transaction; I found he had a wound on the top of his head, another over his right eye, and his hands were severely cut; the wound on the top of his head was of a triangular form, and there was a slight crack on the top of the skull - it was such a wound as might have been inflicted by this bat, and I should think it was done by this round part of it - it was done by a blunt instrument; the wound on the eye was a contused wound, done apparently with the edge of the bat: the cuts on the hand had been evidently produced by clasping some sharp instrument - they were just at the bend of the fingers in the left hand, and the outside of the thumb of the right hand was cut also; the wounds were such, that a person grasping a blade might have received. I dressed the prisoner's wounds afterwards - they were on the back part of his head, and appeared to be caused by a fall; I said to him, "How came you in such an affray as this?" he said, "It was merely a quarrel - he called my friend a humbug." I saw the prosecutor's money - there was nearly 500l.

COURT. Q. Should you think the wounds on the prosecutor's hand were inflicted by his endeavouring to wrest the knife from the prisoner? A. I should think they were.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were all the wounds on the prisoner such as you suppose were occasioned by a fall? A. Yes, except one cut on his hand, and a blow on the side of his head; I bound up the prosecutor's wounds with proper bandages; the wound over the eye was the worst; I do not think there was any danger from either of the wounds - the wounds on the top of the head might have been dangerous had it been inflicted with a heavier instrument; the wound on the back of the prisoner's head was from a severe blow, but it did not present to me an appearance of having received three or four blows with a poker; I, however, do not consider myself competent to decide that.

MR. LAW. Q. Suppose a person to have hold of a cutting instrument in his left hand, might he not, by that means, have been disabled, in some measure, from using his right hand? A. Yes.

JAMES DAVIS . I am a surgeon. I examined the prosecutor's wounds - they were on a part of the head where

they might have been dangerous - the wound over the eye bled very much; they were such as I would attribute rather to this bat than to a pugilistic contest.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Has it ever been in your experience to examine a person who has been in a pugilistic contest? A. Yes, and I have found bleeding wounds from blows on the head in that case; I do not consider that the prosecutor's life was ever in danger.

COURT. Q. Was the wound on the back of the head a contused wound? A. Yes; the wound over the eye was an incised wound - it was a cleaner cut than the other - I should think it might have been inflicted with the edge of this bat; there are different sorts of wounds, what we call lacerated, contused, and incised wounds, and some partaking of the nature of two of these wounds; if I were speaking as a surgeon, I should denominate the wound over the forehead as an incised wound; there was very little contusion in that wound, from there being more integuments over the eye; I should call it an incised wound, produced by some sharper instrument than that which inflicted the other wound; or from the edge of that instrument; the blunt part could not have made such a wound; there was no swelling accompanying the wound on the eye, and very little discolouration; I saw the prosecutor the same evening, and am still in attendance on him.

JOSEPH STEPHENS . I found this ring in the front kitchen, on the Friday following - I do not know whether Mr. Mullay had been washing there or not.

The prisoner, in an exceedingly long address to the Court, stated that Owen and himself, being in had circumstances, had determined to answer the prosecutor's advertisement, and persuade him to lodge a sum of money in a banker's hands in the joint names of Owen and the prosecutor's; conceiving that Owen could then make the banker's a house of reference, and by that means to obtain goods on credit to a considerable amount; that he was appointed to conduct the negotiation. He then entered into a minute detail of his several interviews with Mr. Mullay, who was willing to deposit the sum; that on the day in question, Mr. Mullay called for the purpose of meeting Owen, who did not fulfil his engagement; that he had only placed the poker in the fire for the purpose of making it burn brighter: Mr. Mullay began to express his disappointment at Owen not coming, and he advised his writing a note; that he had bought the bat, to present to his landlady's child, in return for her attention to him when ill. Mr. Mullay at last displayed much anger at Owen's not arriving, and stated that he was humbugged; and the prisoner, feeling irritated at such language, struck him in the face with his fist; Mr. Mullay then seized the poker, and the prisoner the bat, when a scuffle ensued, and both were alternately on the ground: in the scuffle a knife was knocked off the mantel-shelf, and the prisoner, fearing Mr. Mullay might seize it, took it up himself; the prosecutor gave him several violent blows on the head and body with the poker, and, supposing the prisoner might use the knife to defend himself, called Murder! during the scuffle the prisoner succeeded in breaking the knife against the wainscoat, and put both blade and handle into his pocket. The alarm having brought the neighbours up, the prisoner observed to the prosecutor that it was necessary an explanation should be given, as he had called murder; to which he assented, and the prisoner opened the door, and the prosecutor stated to the persons assembled that they had been quarrelling. He declared the only object he had was, to have the money deposited at the banker's, in order to make them his house of reference; and appealed to the Court, whether it was possible he could expect to overcome a person of the prosecutor's strength; that he had only acted in self-defence; and concluded by solemnly appealing to the Almighty for the truth of his statement.

GUILTY (on the last count.) Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280221-46

Second London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

528. DANIEL McCARTHY , EDWARD KING , and JOHN LEE were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 mare, price 5l.; 1 spring-cart, value 12l.; 1 set of harness, value 25s., and 2000 bundles of wood, value 4l. , the goods of Edward Dann .

EDWARD DANN. I work at the Commercial Docks, Rotherhithe. On the 10th of January I hired the cart and mare, to bring a load of fire-wood to town; I employed McCarthy for the day - I was to allow him part of the profit for selling the wood - I had known him about a month - he was with me in Thames-street, Rotherhithe, when the cart was loaded; I came to town with him, to take the money for the wood; I placed the cart at the corner of New-street, Shoe-lane; McCarthy ran away for a quarter of an hour, leaving me in the cart; he came back, saying he had got an order for four hundred bundles of wood, at a private house, and was to have 1l. for it; but first of all, I was to have one hundred and fifty in a basket to take down a court, as he said I could not take the horse down there - I went away, to deliver two hundred bundles, leaving him in care of the cart; when I returned, the horse and cart were gone - I found the mare and cart within half a mile of my house, at Rotherhithe, but the wood was gone- nobody was with the horse; I had not seen the other prisoners all day - I knew King before, but not Lee.

CHARLES PENNY . I am a timber-dealer. On the 10th of January I saw McCarthy in the watch-house, which is opposite my house - I went to him and told him he had better make a confession; I afterwards heard him and King talking together - they did not know I was present - McCarthy said to King, "What are you here for?" he said, "You know;" McCarthy said, "I do not;" he said,"Oh, yes, you do; if you had not stated what you knew about the wood, yesterday I should not have been here; if you had not said what you did to Penny - I will get you transported, if I can."

EDWARD HAMPTON . I was at the Six Bells public-house, on the evening of the 9th of January - McCarthy said to Lee, "Never mind how much you spend to-night, we are going to get a cheap load to-morrow, and that will pay for all we spend.

WILLIAM WHITAKER . I live in Fleet-market. McCarthy called there, on Monday morning, and asked if I wanted any wood - he called again in the evening, with Mrs. Thompson; I said I was busy, and they had better go to my other house, in Blackfriars-road - they were to have left five hundred bundles there, but only left four hundred- I had paid them for five hundred; they called with some more on Thursday - McCarthy and Lee were present then.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-47

529. JOHN HENRY RAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 14lbs. of tea, value 5l. 19s. , the goods of Charles Cawthorne and another, his masters.

MR. CHARLES CAWTHORNE. I am a tea-dealer , and live on Dowgate-hill. I have one partner. The prisoner had

been fourteen or fifteen months in our employ, as porter . On the 24th of January I sent him to Friar-street, Blackfriars-road, with 14 lbs. of tea - he never returned; I received this letter on Monday, which I believe to be his hand-writing - (read).

"DEAR SIRS, Monday Morning.

"I have this moment taken up my pen to write these few lines to know what your pleasure is concerning me; for my conduct deserves great punishment; but the dread of leaving my poor mother, when she gets past labouring for her bread, and it being my duty to assist her in her distress, and last hours compels me to make this supplication to pray of you, if I confess to you where I took the tea, on Thursday, that you will have compassion on me this time; for I do not ask you to employ me again, for if I am at liberty, and please God to raise me up a friend, I should, to the atmost of my power, try to make you amends as soon as I possibly could; for the dread also of being confined in a place where the worst characters are, might soon be the cause of my death; for I am sure to be made the sport of those who could hear. I am afflicted it is true; but I am sure I could never be sent out of the country, for my hearing is gone, and I could not hear any evidence against me; so I beg of you, that if you have any compassion left for me, you will never hear the like of me again. I pray your forgiveness for the sake of my dear father, whose awful death you are well acquainted with. Pray forgive me! for God's sake, do - for the sake of my being the only friend that my dear mother and sister have to reside with them; and I pray God blessing on your heads, and may you live to see me yet become a useful member of society: for I promise this time, once for all, by God's blessing I will never enter the cursed ale-house again; and will ever pray for you, is the penitent and humble prayer of the unfortunate, disobedient and unfaithful servant,

"J. H. RAVER."

"I would beg of you not to name my conduct to nobody no more, as you will yet see me be a honest man. Pray take my word for it. Amen."J. RAVEN."

MR. EDWARD TWIGGE . I am in partnership with Mr. Cawthorne. This tea was sent to my house - I never received it.

BENJAMIN ALDRED . I took the prisoner in charge - he told me he had sold the tea to a Jew for 32s., and he was sure his master could not punish him, for no Jury would punish him, as he was deaf; he said he would point the Jew out to me - I went to a house he described, but found no Jew there.

The prisoner being deaf, had the evidence communicated to him in writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say so - I said I could not be sent out of the country - I cannot say any thing, I am so afflicted.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-48

530. CHARLES ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 pair boots, value 20s. , the goods of Charles Wilford and another.

ELIZABETH MESSENGER . I live with my son, Charles Wilford, who keeps a shoemaker's-shop , in Gracechurch-street . On the 5th of January, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner walked into the shop, and stood looking at the play-bills several minutes; I was serving in the ladies' shop - I came out and asked his business - he nodded, and said he would speak to my son, who was serving a customer, and then attended to him; he said he had come from Captain Allen (whose ship lay at Cox's Quay) to be measured for a strong pair of boots - he said the captain, who was his father, had bought shoes of us before, and so had he; my son said he had some ready made to fit him - he said he should be glad of them, as the ship sailed on Tuesday; my son showed him a pair - he took a piece of string from his pocket, and said he wanted a pair that length, for his mate, and if the man went with him, with some of that size, he would pay for both; he put on the new boots, and left his old ones to be mended; our porter went with him to fit his mate, and to bring the money back; my son said he did not know Captain Allen.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am porter to Mr. Wilford. I went with the prisoner to receive the money for the boots he had on, and to try some on the mate; I was ordered not to leave them without the money; when we got to Cox's Quay, the prisoner said, "Wait here, till I see if my father is on board;" he went on board a vessel, looked about, and hallooed - he then returned, and said his father was not on board, but if I would go into the vessel, he would see if he was at the public-house - I waited on board about five minutes, then began to suspect, and found he had absconded with the boots - he was apprehended last Thursday week.

JOHN VINN . I am an officer. I was in the shop when the prisoner came and requested a pair of boots for himself, a pair for the mate, and a pair for his father, Captain Allen, and that a bill should be made out for the whole, and he would send the money back.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, for a like offence, by another prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18280221-49

531. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 eye-glasses, value 2l. 6s. , the goods of Joseph Weatherley .

JOSEPH WEATHERLEY. I am a jeweller , and live in the Poultry . On the evening of the 15th of January, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to see an eye-glass - I showed him several - he said none would suit him, and went out; next day, about three o'clock, he came again, and looked at more; after giving me a great deal of trouble, I saw one in his hand, and in a minute I missed it - he said none would suit him, and was going out; I said I must detain him, as I missed one; he said he had not got it, and why should I detain him; I sent for an officer, who found that and another on him.

JAMES GLOVER . I was sent for, and found the glasses in the prisoner's waistcoat-pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280221-50

532. JOHN WAITE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 canvas bag, value 6d.; 21 lbs. of tea, value 8l.; 7 lbs. of black pepper, value 10s. 6d.; 2 lbs. of nutmegs, value 16s.; 1 wooden tub, value 6d., and 63 lbs. of butter, value 3l., the goods of Nicholas Brown and another, his masters .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

URIAH GREEN . I am book-keeper to Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington, proprietors of the Castle and Falcon inn, Aldersgate-street . The prisoner was their warehouseman . On Tuesday, the 15th of January, I received two chests and a bag, directed to "J. Wapple, Isle of Wight;" the prisoner weighed them, for the purpose of loading them in the Portsmouth waggon. On the Sunday I received information, from Portsmouth, that the bag had not arrived - I found the bag, on Sunday, at the house of Mr. Williams, two doors from the inn - it was then packed in a basket. On Wednesday, the 16th of January, a firkin of butter arrived from the West of England, and that was found at Williams'.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was one White employed in your yard? A. There is a man named White. The prisoner occasionally received flats of butter from his friends in the country - I understand his friends are respectable. I once lent him 2l.

THEODOSIUS WILLIAMS . I keep the New Post-office coffee-house, St. Martin's-le-grand. I have known the prisoner some months, as using my lower room. I knew he was servant at the Castle and Falcon; he called on me on Saturday, the 19th of January, and asked if I would purchase a tub of Dorset butter, and as the guards of coaches, occasionally bring up such things, I said I had no objection; he said he would send it in - it was sent in the evening, and being in a basket with straw over it, it excited my suspicion. I sent to the principal clerk in the yard, and found they missed a tub - I gave it up, and that led to further enquiry about a flat which my servant will speak about.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you ever bought butter of him before? A. I bought a flat of him, but do not recollect buying more; I will not swear I have not. I never heard any thing about that flat afterward- I only know him as a customer at my house.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am clerk to Joseph North of Great Portland-street. On Monday, I was informed a tub of butter had been offered for sale to William's - I went to Williams, and in the room below, I saw the tub in question, which I identified as being consigned to Mr. North from Dorset - I had not seen it before; but the brand mark corresponded with the invoice which I have here; it came by post - I know it to be the writing of the person who sent it; I have corresponded with him, and acted upon his letters.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you answer letters? A. No; my employer - he is a Quaker.

JOHN COOK . I am waiter to Mr. Williams. I only know that a flat, containing ginger, tea, pepper, and nutmegs, was brought to our house by Whorrod - I did not know the contents till it was at Guildhall - the prisoner breakfasted at our house - I saw a tub of butter there, but do not know who brought it. When the prisoner came to breakfast, he said, "Has a parcel been left here for me?" I said, Yes; and fetched this flat to him. He said, "It is all right - I will call for it by and by." I took it to where I had fetched it from, and saw the same flat produced at Guildhall in five or six days; and then saw the contents.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say the prisoner saw it? A. He looked at it, and said, it was all right.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where was it in your house? A. In a cup-board where we keep our bread; nobody called about it afterward, that I know of - it was brought on Wednesday the 16th; it was tied up. I saw it daily till Saturday in the same state; but do not recollect seeing it after that - I believe there was a card on it.

SAMUEL WARREN . I am warehouseman to Watson and Co. of Budge-row. I packed up in a bag 14 lbs. of ginger; 7 lbs. of hyson tea; 7 lbs. of pepper, and 2 lbs. of nutmegs, and sent them to the Castle and Falcon on the 15th of Jauary, directed to Newport, Isle of Wight - the articles are worth 9l. 7s. I saw it again at Guildhall; the direction card was then taken off, and the goods were out of the bag.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. On the the 19th of January, I was fetched to the Castle and Falcon; the prisoner was given into my charge, with Whorrod, for felony. Whorrod said he did take the flat to Williams, and also a tub of butter at Waite's request; and Waite said he did tell him to take them there; but did not mean any harm, that he had borrowed 17s. from another clerk in the yard, and left it in pledge with Williams, for money he had borrowed to pay him.

URIAH GREEN re-examined. The prisoner had no authority to take any thing away.

Prisoner's Defence. I weighed the bag of tea, and two chests, and assisted in loading the waggon. I left the waggon in the yard when I went home. I did not know of the arrival of the tub of butter.

JOHN COOK re-examined. The flat I saw at Guildhall is the same as I shewed the prisoner, and which he said was all right. GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-51

533. SAMUEL HASSAM, alias SILVER , was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Montgommery Holland , on the 20th of January , at St. Bennett. Gracechurch, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 chain, value 2s. 6d.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 1 key, value 10s. and 1 ring, value 10s. , his property.

JOHN MONTGOMMERY HOLLAND. I have been a gentleman's servant , and am now waiting to go to a situation. I was out of place on the 20th of January. I have been living at the City of London Tavern, since I have been a gentleman's servant - I left there the beginning of the summer, and since that I have been at home with my father at Bury St. Edmunds - he is a bookbinder. On the 20th of January, about one o'clock at night, I was in Fenchurch-street ; I had been to see my sister at Lambeth, and was going home to Bell-court, Fenchurch-street - I was sober; I had been drinking, but was not by any means tipsy - I was going home, and two or three fellows came behind me and knocked me down; they partly held me down, while one robbed me of my watch.

Q. How were you knocked down? A. I received a blow behind my head quite suddenly - I could not tell whether it was from a fist or what - it knocked me completely down; the blow was on the back part of my skull; and when I was down, I received a blow on the forehead; I could not tell what it was from - I resisted as much as I could, and recovered my feet; I can swear there were two men about me; but there might be three - while I was down my watch, chain, seal, and ring were taken from my fob;

I felt them drawn out by the man while I was down - I struggled and got up - one ran one way, and one another; there might be a third man - I followed the prisoner, who was one of them - I called "Watch!" and "Stop thief!" and pursued the prisoner - I am confident he is one of the men who assisted in robbing me; I cannot say whether he is the man who struck me - but he is one who robbed me. I was not above ten or twenty yards from him when I got up - I kept him in sight all the way, till the watchman took him; I swear he is one of the men - when he was taken, I asked if he knew any thing of it. He said he was the man who took my watch from me.

Q. Why did you ask if he knew any thing of it? A. I mean, I asked if he had got my watch, hoping to get it again. He said No; he had not got it, but he was the man who took it from me, and gave it to his companion, John Francis - I have not recovered it.

GEORGE MUNRO . I am an officer of the ward. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I searched him but found no watch - he said, he had been to the Cobourg Theatre. I said, "Now you want your friends - where are they? "he said he went with three young women. I said, "Where do they live? I will send for them; "he said they lived at Aldgate; and when I said I would send for them, he seemed much agitated. The prosecutor said,"Give me my watch." I said I had searched him, and he had not got it. The prisoner said he should have the watch by twelve o'clock to-morrow. I said, "You have not got it."He said, "I'll tell you all about it: a man named John Francis has got it, and if you go to Bishopsgate Church-yard you will be sure to meet him." I went with the prosecutor, but did not meet him - I went at two o'clock to Savage-court, where John Francis lived, but could not find him.

Prisoner. He promised me what he would do, if I could get the watch. I said, I happened to know the young man who was in the custody of another watchman - they let him go, and took me. Witness. That is not true.

ANTHONY MAC DONALL . I am a watchman. I was in Gracechurch-street; at the end of Fenchurch-street, I heard a cry of "Stop thief!" and saw the prisoner running - he was the first person running, and ran against me. I prepared myself for him; and when he saw me get close to him, he crossed - I followed him; he turned round to me; put his head down, and his hand out to touch me in the breast - I caught hold of him, and asked what was the matter - he said it was nothing but a fight - I took him up to the crowd, and they said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. It is false - I stopped directly he took me; he said, "What is the matter?" I said "There was a cry of Stop thief! and I think there is a fight or robbery - now take me to the mob, and see if I am the man;" he took me to the mob, and delivered me to another watchman; they had the young man in custody - he went away. I am a Jew - it is our holidays, and my friends are at the Synagogue. The prosecutor was quite intoxicated; he fell down twice, and was obliged to lay hold of the officer's arm; he told the Lord Mayor he was intoxicated, but just as he was saying so the Lord Mayor was inquiring for the watchman, and it was not put down in the deposition.

PROSECUTOR. It is false; I did not fall down at all - I was not intoxicated.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18280221-52

534. ROBERT HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Gaven , from his person .

WILLIAM GAVEN. I live at No. 15, Welbeck-street. - On the 16th of February, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Holborn , and perceived somebody press against my shoulder, and my coat pocket lifted up; I turned, and saw the prisoner close at my shoulder; I said, "You are a thief! "he ran away; I pursued, calling Stop thief! he turned up a court - a man came down, and stopped him: I overtook him, and gave him in charge of an officer. I found my handkerchief on the ground, close to where I felt it taken: a man, who followed me, picked it up while I pursued; the prisoner begged of me to forgive him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Holborn; two boys pushed by the gentleman; he turned, and called Stop thief! I turned up Union-court, and was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-53

535. WILLIAM WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 3 deal boards, value 6s. , the goods of Henry Peto and another.

ISAAC WRIGHT . I am foreman to Henry Peto and another, builders , of Little Britian . On the 6th of February I saw the prisoner going out at the gate with three deal boards on his shoulder - he had got outside the gate; he was a stranger, and had no business there. I asked where he was going with them - he said, "I am going to a job in Smithfield; "I said we had no job there; he said Mr. Bingley, who is our foreman, sent him for them, and said,"If you won't believe me, go and ask him - he has just gone into the counting-house;" I went, and Mr. Bingley had not been there; I saw the prisoner walking away - I ran and brought him back.

JOHN BINGLEY . I am Mr. Peto's foreman. I do not know the prisoner, and never sent him for any boards.

JOHN HARRISON . I received him in charge with the boards.

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-54

536. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 10 printed bound books, value 10s. , the goods of Theodosius Williams .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing forty prints, value 2s., his property.

THEODOSIUS WILLIAMS. I keep the New Post-office coffee-house, St. Martin's-le-grand . The prisoner frequented my lower room; a cheesemonger sent me information; I missed about sixty volumes of prints and magazines, which I send into the lower room when they get soiled; suspicion fell on the prisoner, and some prints or plates out of those magazines were found on him; they were contained in ten volumes, all of which are missing.

THOMAS TURNER . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner at Mr. William's, on the 16th of February; I found forty-six prints in his hat, and two in his coat pocket- they are all stamped with Mr. Williams' name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading extreme poperty in extenuation of his offence.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280221-55

537. THOMAS BREWER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Peter Mellish , from his person .

PETER MELLISH. I am a dyer , and live in Berner's-street. On the 24th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was in Long-lane - I did not feel my handkerchief taken; the officer told me of it - I then missed it: it was safe ten minutes before. The prisoner was taken about ten yards from me, and my handkerchief produced by another man.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am an officer of Aldersgate Ward. I saw the prisoner in company with two more; I saw the prisoner pass Mr. Mellish, put his hand to his pocket, and, with his two fingers, draw the handkerchief out, and give it to a man who stood by him, with a boy - that man put it up his sleeve. I told Mr. Mellish, who felt and missed it- he followed me; I said, "These are the two - one on the left, and the one on the right has got your handkerchief, and that is the boy who picked your pocket; if you will take him I will take the other;" I went over to the man, and found the handkerchief up his sleeve: I advised the prosecutor to lay hold of the boy (the prisoner) who had picked his pocket, but he seemed flurried, and I gave him the man to hold while I pursued the prisoner, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. MELLISH. I let them both go, for I was surprised to see so respectable a man with it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-56

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

538. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster, 1 gelding, price 14l.; 1 chaise, value 10l., and 1 set of harness, value 4l. , the property of Joseph Eastwood .

JOSEPH EASTWOOD. I am a livery-stable keeper , and carry on business in Crown-street, Westminster; I let out horses and chaises. On Saturday, the 2d of February, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner applied to me for a horse and chaise, to go to Hounslow; I saw him myself - he himself wrote down "Clark, Medway-street, Horseferry-road," as where the horse and chaise were to be taken; I gave the direction up at Bow-street, and have not seen it since; my brother was present: I asked 14s. for the day - he said it was too much, and he paid my brother 13s. before he got into it; he was to return at seven o'clock that evening; I am sure he said it was to go to Hounslow, and I made out the ticket accordingly. He did not return the horse and chaise. We went to Bow-street, and found him there, in Brown's custody, that evening - I am sure he is the man; he was quite a stranger - I never saw him before. The horse was worth 14l.

WILLIAM EASTWOOD . I am the prosecutor's brother, and assist in his business. On Saturday, the 2d of February, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and hired a horse and chaise; I was to take it to No. 30, Medway-street, Horseferry-road , for him; he said his name was Clark - that he was going to fetch a lady from Hounslow, and would return between seven and eight o'clock; I took the horse and chaise to Medway-street; there was a bar, which prevented my getting up to No. 30- I left it at the bar, went and knocked at No. 30; he answered the door himself - he gave me a sovereign, and I gave him 7s. - he got into the chaise, and rode off; I have since inquired at No. 30, Medway-street, and find he did not live there, but only visited. I am certain he said his name was Clark. I saw the same horse and gig at Bow-street that evening.

EDWARD POWELL . I am a green-grocer, and live on Highgate-hill. On Saturday, the 2d of February, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the Red Lion public-house, Highgate, and bought this horse of him there; I did not buy the chaise; he asked 50s. for the horse; I said was that the lowest - he said I might have it for two guineas, and I gave him that sum; I asked his name - he said Mr. Clark; he then said, "Here is the set of harness you may buy;" I said I did not want it, but asked what he wanted for it - he said he would take 10s.; I suspected he had come by it improperly - I took him to Bow-street; the same horse was taken there; I sent for Brown; Eastwood came and claimed it - the prisoner was quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I drove up to the door; he said,"Do you want to sell your horse?" I said, in a joke,"What do you mean to give me for it?" he said 2l., and, being rather in liquor, I took the 2l.; he then said, "What will you take for the harness?" I said 10s. - he offered me 5s.; I have friends, but did not wish to let them know of it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18280221-57

539. FRANCIS ARTHUR ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , at St. George, Hanover - square, 14 sovereigns, and one 5l. Bank note, the property of Basil George Wood , in his dwelling-house, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of George Coates .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence, his bearing a good character, and having been seduced by others to commit the offence.

Reference Number: t18280221-58

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

540. ALEXANDER EPHRAIM SHORTER, alias THOMAS SHORTER was indicted for that he, on the 18th of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, the tenor of which is as follows:- (setting it forth No. 25,827, 5l., dated 14th of June, 1826, signed G. Gaudin), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to he forged, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, like the first and second, only stating the intent to be to defraud John Andrews .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

RICE OWERS . I conduct the business at the Britannia public-house, Gray's Inn-lane-road, for John Andrews, the landlord. On Tuesday, the 15th of January, about half-past nine o'clock, Mr. Smith, Jun. came for half a pint of rum, and a pot of half and half; he tendered me a 5l. note - I gave him charge; I looked at the note - it appeared rather oily, which I made an observation on at the time: I asked him whose it was, and where he got it, and in consequence of what he said, I wrote on it."Richard Smith, Britannia-street, 15th of January, 1828." On the 18th, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at my house with Smith, Jun. - I cannot exactly say at what time; they had a pint of ale in the tap-room, and after drinking it, the prisoner came to the bar, and asked me the price of gin by the gallon - he ordered seven quarts, as that would not require a permit; I asked if he wanted any rum - he said Yes, I might send him a couple of bottles; he put me down a card, with "Lewis, No. 57, Lancaster-street, Burton-crescent on it;" the gin was to go the following day, which was Saturday, about eleven o'clock, as he said the hay-cart was coming; and the rum was to go on the Monday following; he said I might send that to Smith's, as Smith was going to work for him there, or I might send it to Lancaster-street if I thought proper - he gave me a 5l. note; I gave him 3l. 17s. in change, and asked him his address; he gave me No. 57, Lancester-street, Burton-crescent, and gave me the name of Mr. Shorter; I wrote that name and address on the note - this is it (looking at it) - he stood quite close to me at the time I wrote that; I gave him the change - he went into the tap-room, and, I think, drank one glass of ale, and then went out immediately - this was on Friday. After he was gone I looked at the note I had received from him - I had still in my possession the note I received on the 15th; I had put that into a bag - I compared them together, suspecting the other, and in consequence of the observation I made on them, I put on my hat, and went to Mr. Smith's, in Britannia-street; young Smith came out with me, and we went to Burton-crescent; we called at a public-house in Lancaster-street - we could gain no intelligence there, but in consequence of what young Smith told me, I procured Gower, an officer - I called for Mr. Hambrook, a publican, to inquire the sign of a house; we then went in a direction for the Henley Arms public-house, in the Hornsey-road, and about twenty yards before we got to the Henley Arms we overtook the prisoner - Smith, senior, was in his company; they both went into the Henley Arms together - Hambrook followed them- the officer went in, then I, and then Smith, junior. I called the prisoner out of the parlour, and went up stairs with him; I said, "Mr. Shorter, I think this is a bad 5l. note you have given me;" he said, "If it is I will change it for you;" I said I was very much obliged to him - he put his hand into his pocket, and could not find five sovereigns - he pulled out 3l. 18s.; I returned him 1s., saying I only wanted 3l. 17s., and that would settle the 5l. note, not having sent the spirits; I gave him the 5l. note back, saying that settled the 5l.: I then told him I had a 5l. note which I took on the Tuesday previous, of Mr. Smith, which I suspected to he bad; I then called up Smith, senior, and said to him, in the prisoner's presence, "Mr. Smith, this is a 5l. note I took of your son on Tuesday - it is a had one, and perhaps Mr. Shorter will change it; the prisoner could not find money to change it, and he called to another person named Smith to lend him four sovereigns - Smith came up, and said he had not got four sovereigns - the prisoner was searched by a constable the moment after, and I saw two 5l. notes produced from his great coat pocket, and the one I had returned him was found in his waistcoat pocket, where he had put it. I gave the second 5l. note which I had received from Smith's son, to Mr. Smith.

Prisoner. Q. Do you remember my calling on the 16th, and your coming in and lighting the fire? A. I cannot swear to that - I recollect lighting the fire one day, but cannot say when - the prisoner was there then; that was after I received the note from young Smith, and before I received the one from the prisoner; young Smith was with him - I cannot say how long they were there: my house is two doors from Smith's. I sat down and drank with them.

Q. Did you not tell me you had the best gin 1s. lower than anybody else, if I wanted any for the country? A. No.

Q. Did not say I should be that way in a few days, and would give you an order? A. He never mentioned a word of the kind; he called on the 18th - he came to the bar, and spoke to me first about the gin; I did not speak a word to him about it.

Q. I told you I was going down to Sam Smith's, at Hornsey, the Archway House public-house? A. He did not tell me a word about that.

RICHARD SMITH . I am the son of William Smith , a carpenter; we live near the Britannia in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 15th of January the prisoner came to my father's about three o'clock in the afternoon - I cannot say I did not know him; but it was between seven and eight years since I had seen him - my father and him went out together - I saw him again that evening between nine and ten o'clock - it was a snowy night - my father was gone to bed; my mother let the prisoner in; he said he wanted to see my father; my mother said he was gone to bed; he said he must see him, and went up stairs to him - he was sitting by the fire in my father's room wet. I was up there - I heard him say he must see my father - he said he was wet, and must have something to drink - he told me to get half a pint of rum, and a pot of half and half - he gave me a 5l. note to pay for it; I went to the Britannia, and gave Owers the 5l. note I had received from him; he gave me 4l. 18s. 7 1/2d. in change, and enquired where I had received the note - I told him, then returned; gave Shorter the change, and told him Mr. Owers, at the Britannia, looked at the note, and said it looked rather oily, and that Owers said he should not put his name on it, but mine - Shorter said that was all right; it made no difference whose name was put to it - he asked us to get him a lodging for the night - I went to Owers, but could not get him a bed there - he did not stay at our house that night; he came again on Wednesday, the 16th - nothing passed about any note then - he came again on the 18th, and asked my father to go out with him; my father said he must go and be shaved first; and while he was gone, Shorter asked me to go to the Britannia and have a pint of ale. I accompanied him there, and had the ale - while we sat drinking there, he went out of the tap-room;' he was gone some minutes

I got up and went to the door to see where he was - I opened the tap-room door, and saw him at the bar with some papers or cards in his hand, talking to Owers; he came into the tap-room after that, and drank a glass of ale I did not see any money pass between him and Owers - he took a drop of ale, and went out directly - I went out also, and instead of going to our house, he was going down the street; I said, I dare say my father was at home - he then turned, and went to my father's house; my father and he went out together - Owers came to our house in about ten minutes (this was about two o'clock), and in consequence of what passed, we went to Lancaster-street - we did not find the prisoner there; we got Gower, the constable, and went to Hambrook's; we then went to Hornsey-road - I saw him proceeding up to the Henley Arms - I followed, and was not present when he was called up stairs - I waited in the parlour, and went up just after they had searched him - he was then in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not first give you half-a-crown to fetch the gin, before I gave you the 5l. note, and I believe your sister went to fetch it? A. No; we had no gin before you went up to my father - my sister was not sent out that night.

Q. Did not I say I should go and sleep just by the turnpike? A. No; not a word of the sort, I did not persuade him a not to sleep there - he asked me to go and get him a lodging - we got him one at last; I went there with him - when we got there, he said he did not like to sleep at strange lodgings by himself, and I should stop with him - I did so - I cannot say how long we were at the Britannia on the 16th.

COURT. Q. During that time, was any thing said about gin? A. We were drinking gin and water - he told Owers he could not get such gin as that, down in his country, and a few words passed between them, but I did not pay much attention to what they said.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Owers fetch me three different samples of rum, brandy, and gin? A. No; he did not.

Q. When you came and said you had got me a bed, I said I had no money, and must send for something to drink, and must change a 5l. note? A. Not a word of the sort was mentioned.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am the father of the last witness. On the 15th of January, I saw the prisoner at our house about four o'clock, when I came home - I went with him to the Britannia, and had part of a glass of gin and water with him, and went to Lancaster-street, and had some beer; he said he wanted me to do a job in Lancester-street. On the 18th, he came again - I went with him to the Henley Arms; he was taken into custody there - I had known him about fifteen years; but had not seen him for five or seven years before the 15th.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I was going to Sam Smith's? A. He said something on the 18th, about wanting to see Sam Smith who used to keep the Bluecoat-boy public-house - he promised me to be on the premises in Lancaster-street, where I was to do the work, by four o'clock - I heard nothing about his returning to my house to tea.

Q. When the landlord came and said it was a forged note, did I not tell you I knew where I took them? A. He said he could make them all right - he knew where he had taken them. Hambrook went down stairs with the notes in his hand, to fetch a pen and ink to mark them - that was the two found in his coat pocket, and the one found in his waistcoat - I did not say, "They won't change them, will they?"

COURT. Q. You saw him at four o'clock on the 15th, did he come to your house that night when you were in bed? A. yes, between nine and ten; he might stay there an hour; I was present when the gin was brought, and saw my son give him the change, which was 4l. 18s. 7 1/2d.; I did not see him give my son the note.

JOSEPH HARTWELL GOWER . I am a constable of St. Pancras. On the 18th of January at the request of Owers I accompanied him to the Henley Arms and apprehended the prisoner; I searched him, found two 5l. notes in his coat pocket, and one 5l. note in his waistcoat pocket: I gave the two to Hambrook to mark for me; he took possession of them - he returned with them, and pen and ink; I afterwards gave him the third note which I found in the prisoner's waistcoat pocket; he marked that in my presence and returned me the three notes: I marked them myself afterwards, and gave them up at the office; (looking at three notes) these are the same.

Prisoner. Q. Were not the two notes in a pocket-book in my pocket? A. No, they were among some pieces of paper rumpled together, as if they had been squeezed in a hand; there was paper with them, but they were not folded in paper; there was nothing in his great coat pocket but the paper and notes.

GEORGE HAMBROOK . I keep the Prince of Brunswick public-house, Islington. On the 18th I accompanied the witnesses to the Henley Arms - I received from Gower the two notes produced, from the prisoner's coat pocket; I called for pen and ink - there was none in the room; I went down to get it, returned with it, and marked them; Gower then gave me another which I marked with a different mark - (looking at them) these two were produced from his coat pocket, and this one from his waistcoat; I took them down and dried them by the fire, and then returned them to Gower.

Prisoner. Q. Was not my pocket-book in my great coat pocket? A. I saw no pocket-book taken from his right hand coat pocket, where the notes were; his left hand pocket was searched while I was down stairs; I heard him say he knew where he took the notes.

JOSEPH HARTWELL GOWER re-examined. I found a pocket-book in his under coat pocket.

THOMAS FIELD . I am a porter at Apothecaries-hall, and live at No. 13, Cobourg-street, Spa-fields. (Looking at a 5l. note, No. 20,725) I received this note from the prisoner on the 10th of January; he owed me some money which I had lent him four years ago: he called on me several times from the week before Christmas up to the 10th of January - I did not call on him to pay the debt; he came a little after five o'clock in the afternoon of the 10th of January; I was at tea, and asked him to take a cup - he asked what it was he owed me; I said I did not recollect the amount, and had no time to spare to go to see what it was, as I must be at the hall by six o'clock; he gave me this note; I went to Matthewson's and got change; he asked what it was - I said about 2l. 7s. or 8s.; he said "Well, take 2l. 10s., that will cover the debt" I said "Yes it will, and above it" he said "Well, give me the remainder" - which I did: he promised to call next day and we were to

put it to rights, and see what it was, but he never called again - I know this to be the note, by two names on the back," Ephraim Shorter, "and "John Goal, Tems-street;" knowit by that, and am certain it is the note.

JOHN PLOWMAN . I keep the Feathers public-house, High Timber-street. On Saturday evening, the 5th of January, the prisoner came to my house (I had known him about twelve months as an occasional customer); he went away on Sunday morning - his bill came to 15s. 10d., including a former score; he tendered me a 5l. note on Sunday morning- (looking at one, No. 25,826) - this is it; I wrote on it,"Shorter from Chobham;" I always knew him by the name of Chobham before, but he told me to write "Shorter from Chobham" on it; I paid the note away next day.

JOHN NORTHEY . I keep the Woolpack public-house, Gravel-lane, Southwark; I know the prisoner - (looking at a 5l. note, No. 27971) - this is endorsed with my name and address; I received it from the prisoner, on the 15th of October, 1827, for a score of 1s. 7 1/2d., which had been run six months antecedent; I gave him the change, and marked the note myself "Chandler, 15th of October, John Northey." I wrote Chandler, having forgotten his name - I put on it the name of a person he was in the habit of meeting at my house - I am certain it is the note I received from him.

Prisoner. You have taken notes before of me, and never heard any thing wrong. Witness. Never in my life.

MARY WOODRUFF. I am the Wife of Richard Woodruff, who keeps the Union public-house, Camberwell. On a Sunday in September the prisoner came to our house - I had known him about three years before; he owed me 6s. 8d., and said if I would change him a note, he would pay me the score - he gave me a 5l. note; I gave him change, and wrote on it, in his presence, "Mrs. S." and wrote "Shorter" on it - (looking at a note, No. 28,775) - this is the note.

JOHN JONES . I keep the Duke of Wellington public-house, Bishopsgate without. I know the prisoner - (looking at a 10l. note, No. 7,971) - I received this note from him in September last; I am not certain of the date - it was from the 24th to the 28th; he came and called for a glass of gin and water, and asked if could change him a 10l. note; I said I could; he took it out of his pocket-book; I wrote on it, "Shorter," with my initials, in his presence.

JAMES DREW . I keep the King's Arms public-house, at Old Brentford, Middlesex. On Tuesday, the 11th of September, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to my house - I had known him about twelve months; while he was there my attention was called to him by my wife; a 5l. note was changed for him, in my presence - I gave him the whole change myself, and was going to write a name on the note, but the prisoner said his name was on it - he said he had written it on the back; this is it - (looking at one, No. 56,731) - I pointed out the name to him; he said, I did not know he lived at Hammersmith; he said he did not live there, but had a person carrying on a shop there, and he was to be found there; he had ran a score of 7s. or 8s. that day, which he paid me out of the change; I think he said the shop was a potatoe warehouse; I tried to find him there afterwards, but could not; they said he had been there, but was gone.

Prisoner. Q. Had I not used your house a great many years before you came there? A. I never heard anything against you.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am an inspector of Bank notes. (looking at the note uttered to Owers on the 18th of January,) This is forged in every respect, paper, plate, and signature; the one uttered to Owers on the 15th is also forged in every respect, and from the same plate, and is of a similar description; the two found in the prisoner's pocket are also forged, in all respects, and from the same plate; that uttered to Plowman is forged, in every respect, and from the same plate; so is that uttered to Northey, and from the same plate; also those uttered to Woodruff and Drew - they are forged in every respect, and all from one plate; the 10l. note uttered to Field is forged in every respect, paper, plate, and signature; and the one uttered to Jones - they are both from one plate, I have no doubt; they are coarse imitations, but would pass in ordinary circulation; the one uttered, on the 15th, to Owers, has a thick, greasy appearance, and so has the other one - it arises partly from the quality of the paper, and partly from an attempt to make a water-mark.

JURY. Q. Were the genuine notes corresponding with these, in circulation when these were passed? A. I cannot tell; I could not be mistaken about any of them.

GEORGE GAUDIN . I am cashier at the Bank of England, and was so on the 14th of June, 1826, when this note is dated: I was authorized to sign 5l. notes, but this one is not signed by me.

WILLIAM SMITH re-examined. I went with him to a house in Lancaster-street; when we got there, he said there was nobody there - it was dusk; we did not go in - it was a private house; I was to fit it up as a corn-chandler's and potatoe warehouse for him, but I did not go in.

The Note, No. 25,827, was here read.

Prisoner's Defence. I believe the chief part of the notes came from Captain Peppet and William Shottey , of Gravesend; his private house is there, but he lived then in Manor-place, Walworth: I delivered him a cargo of tiles out of a French ship; also sixty loads of clover and meadow hay, and some bricks, from Burton-on-the Humber: when we balanced accounts, there was 175l. coming to me - I was paid in these notes: I was paid the chief part in notes, and William Oxley (I being no scholar) used to do my writing for me; when I went I took him with me there to make up the running account between us for twelve months, and a person named Salley was there with him. Oxley made the initials on all these notes - he is now a rider to a person at Bristol, in the wool trade. I sent down for him last Friday afternoon, when I found where he was: my uncle and friends went down, and have not returned - I am informed he is out, and expected back on Monday night, and, if he does return, he will come here by the first coach. I am not sure that he took them from him, because I do not know the names on the back of the notes. I expect him by every coach. I never should have paid them away if I had known them to be forged, but I am sure I took the chief part of them of Salley; I also took 60l. from Tucker, a cow-keeper, and some from Mr. Boddis, a timber-merchant, in the New Kent-road. Oxley generally put initials on the notes whenever I took them - I am waiting for him to bring the

accounts up, which he took down with him. I have been expecting to become a bankrupt, and have been keeping the money back - because I endorsed a bill, they threatened to strike a docket against me, and I thought to meet the bill by the first day of the Term in January, and saved some notes for that purpose. Plenty of people in the neighbourhood knew I delivered the goods; there was 41,000 tiles. [After his Lordship had summed up the case, the prisoner added] The reason I did not bring the people I had the notes from is, because I thought it not necessary till I brought the witness to prove I did take them from them: I dare say if the names on the notes were read over to me, I should recollect who I took them from - from June, 1816, to 1827, I turned 15,000l. or 16,000l. As to Smith's 4l., the landlord said, "Give me 3l. 16s." before he gave me back the note, and I did not think of offering him another note. I was going to the Archway House public-house to buy a stock of hay, and meant to give the 10l. as earnest. I took an outer shed of Mrs. Lewis, in Lancaster-street - her husband was coming home out of Whitecross-street Prison, and was then to assign me over the lease of the cow-house. I kept the house at Hammersmith about two months, and, finding it did not answer, gave it up - I let it for 1l. more than I gave for it. I should not have came unprepared with witnesses, but being no scholar, I can not tell what names are on the back of the notes.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 50.

Reference Number: t18280221-59

First London Jury - before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

540. CHARLES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously uttering, on the 15th of January , a certain bill of exchange, for 170l. drawn by Henry Neale, upon Mr. William Jackson, of Dock-head, the said bill having a forged acceptance thereon, with intent to defraud Henry Ladbroke and others .

MESSRS. BRODRICK and LAW, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence. The prisoner was only thirteen years of age.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-60

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

541. ANNA MYERS was indicted for feloniously forging an acceptance to a certain bill of exchange, drawn by Anna Myers on Messrs. Walker, Parker, and Co., leadmerchants, Thames-street, for 488l. 2s. 2d., with intent to defraud Jonas Levy .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MESSRS. BRODRICK and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JONAS LEVY. I live in Bevis-marks, St. Mary-axe, and am a watch and clock maker - I know the prisoner and her son Daniel; I have had transactions with them in trade; In the early part of September, I received this bill from her son Daniel - I had some discussion with him about it, and went with him to the house of Walker, Parker, and Co., Thames-street: I had no personal communication with the members of that firm, nor in writing; I saw Mr. Parker, but not to speak to him: I then went with Daniel to the prisoner's house, in Cutler-street, Houndsditch; I went to the warehouse, which is in Cutler-street - it is in the City. I was then in possession of the bill I now hold in my hand: I had it is my hand, and said to the prisoner "Mrs. Myers, your son has brought me this hill to be discounted, it is drawn by yourself on Walker, Parker, and Co., for 488l. 2s. 2d.; is this correct" - she answered

"Perfectly so; we sold them a lot of pig-lead for it, and if you wish to be further satisfied, Daniel will throw open the book and show it to you;" Daniel opened a book on a desk, which was placed against the window: it was a common waste book, with only a brown paper cover; he turned over to July, and there I saw an entry between Parker and Co. and Mrs. Myers.

MR. SERGEANT ANDREWS , on behalf of the prisoner, here admitted a notice to preduce her books, and tendered four.

Witness. Neither of those are the book - it was made out of a quire of paper, and merely a waste book; I saw an entry, dated the 28th of July, to the amount of 488l. 2s. 2d., for so many cwts. of pig lead - it corresponded in date and amount with the bill; I said, "I am quite satisfied;" I took Daniel home with me, and gave him a bill on the same parties, for 397l. 3s. 4d., due the next day, and the balance, 82l. 16s. 2d. I think, after deducting the legal interest, 8l. - I was induced to take the bill, from the representation of Mrs. Myers, and her alone - I would not have discounted it, but from her representation.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT ANDREWS. Q. Have you been many years in business? A. Since 1814 - I first commenced in the wholesale way, as a manufacturer; I keep no shop now - it is a private house; I do not carry on any other business; a great portion of my business is in bills - I give credit, and take bills - I occasionally discount - Messrs. Curtis and Co. are my bankers.

Q. What part of the day were you at Mrs. Myers'? A. In the fore part of the day - it was before dinner, certainly- when I first went up to the warehouse, there was a boy there, and Daniel told him to go - I should think it was about twelve o'clock that I was there; Daniel said to the boy, "You may go down," and he went down before the business began; Mrs. Myers does not live at the warehouse, but I believe it communicates with her house - I was never in the warehouse before; I do not know the boy's name; I most likely should know him again, if I saw him - I suppose he was not more than nine or ten years old; I produced the bill open, in my hand; Mrs. Myers did not take it in her hand - she had no spectacles on; I said, "Mrs. Myers, your son has brought me this bill to be discounted, drawn by yourself, on Walker, Parker, and Co. for 488l. 2s. 2d. is it correct?" she answered, "Perfectly so - we sold them a lot of pig lead for it: if you wish to be further satisfied, Daniel shall show you the book," and it was shown - I said I was fully satisfied; I took Daniel over to my house, and gave him the money; the book was laying on the desk in the same room - it laid outside - I had no occasion to notice whether it was on the desk when I went into the room.

Q. Are you quite sure it was not fetched from a distant place, by the boy? A. Certainly not - the book might contain more than a quire of paper, but I should suppose not; I saw no writing on it; Mrs. Myers stood by it - I do not know whether she looked into it; I went from Parker and Co's. to her; Daniel Myers asked for Mr. Parker - his name was sent into Mr. Parker's private room, and Mr.

Parker came out - I have seen Mr. Parker since, and it was him - Mrs. Myers was taken up about four months after - I found her at the Mansion-house, on a Thursday, I think; she was remanded till Monday; I cannot say whether she went there of her own accord.

Q. Did she tell you before you saw her there, that if there was any suspicion, she would be there to make her defence to it? A. She never said so to me, nor in my presence; Mr. Charles Isaacs attended at Mr. Gates', and said Mrs. Myers would be ready to make her appearance whenever it was necessary; Mr. Gates told me of that on that morning; Mr. Elias Isaacs attended there, as my friend, not as my solicitor; Mr. Gates attended as solicitor; when a remark was made about a Jew witness, Mr. Isaacs interfered, in a manner that was creditable; I always considered Mrs. Myers a woman of substance; I should think her brother, Mr. Joseph, is a respectable and substantial man.

MR. BRODRICK here declined proceeding further in the case.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-61

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

542. EDWARD BARRY was indicted for that he, on the 7th of December , at St. George, Bloomsbury, being in the dwelling-house of John Ross , did steal therein 16 silver spoons, value 3l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 5 sovereigns, 20 half-sovereigns, 8 half-crowns, 20 shillings, three 5l. Bank notes, and 1 order, for payment of and value 8l.14s., the property of the said John Ross; and afterwards,(to wit) about two o'clock in the night of the same day, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house, to get out of the same, against the statute ; and JOHN MURRAY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 22d of January, at All Saints, Poplar, the said order for payment of, and value 8l.14s., knowing it to have been stolen; against the statute .

JOHN ROSS. I keep the Red Lion public-house, Little Guildford-street, Russell-square, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . The prisoner, Barry, often slept in my house- my former wife was his sister. On the morning stated in the indictment, the 7th of December, I missed 43l. in sovereigns and Bank notes, also a cheque for 8l. 14s., and sixteen silver spoons; my money was kept in a large box, in the front room, first floor; I had buried my wife that day - I used to sleep in that room, but did not wish till it was cleaned; I had seen Barry that day, at the house; when I returned from my wife's funeral, about half-past one o'clock, he was in the room where the box was, and I thought he seemed in grief - he went up stairs, to the top-room of the house, and I did not see him afterwards, till he was apprehended; my box was locked - I found, about half-past one or two in the morning, that it was brought down stairs from the first floor into the back yard, and broken open; the watchman called me up at that hour - I found my tap-room window let down; I was the last person up at night; every thing was secure when I went to bed, the doors and windows - the windows bolt, they have no bars; the watchman had come in at the tap-room window, and came up to my bed-room, and alarmed me; I got up, and found the box in the yard, and the cash which was in it taken out, also the silver spoons; I observed no marks of violence in any part of the house - the box had been broken open with a poker - the lock had been started - suspicion fell on the prisoner, as he never came to the house after.

Q. Who slept in your house that night? A. My maid and man-servant, and two children, the eldest of whom is thirteen years old; I found the servants still in bed, at the top of the house, and the children were in bed.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You do not know where Barry was when you found the box in the yard? A. No, I do not know who took it down there.

COURT. Q. When was the last time you saw him in the house? A. Half-past one o'clock in the day, when I returned from the funeral; I saw him going up stairs at that time; I thought he went up to go to bed, as he had been sitting up the previous night with me.

MARY RONAN . The prisoner, Barry, lodged with me, at No. 5, Well-street, Blackwall, Poplar; he lodged with me one night, about three weeks before Christmas, and came back again after Christmas; I cannot tell on what day of the month he first lodged with me - it was only one night, and he came back about three weeks after he left - that was about a fortnight after Christmas; he had a bundle in his hand; he paid me 23s. for the fortnight he had lodged with me; he said he could not give me any more money at that time; he went away, came back again, said he had no money, and gave me a cheque (looking at a cheque of 8l. 14s., produced by F. Fagan) - I cannot read, but this is very much like it; I showed it on Monday morning, the day after Barry gave it to me, to the prisoner, Murray, who is a pawnbroker - I showed it him to tell me what it was; he said it was out of date, and offered me 5s. for it; I do not know whether he was aware that I could not read; he told me the amount of it; I did not agree to take the 5s.; he said if he was to cash it for me, would I take half; I considered a little - I wanted money, and next morning I agreed to that - he gave me four sovereigns and 7s., and the day Mr. Ross came to me about it, Murray sent me the remainder by a man - that was after Barry was taken - he knew the enquiry was going on.

Q. Were you to have received any further money from him? A. No; I had agreed to take the 4l. 7s. - I have not had the cheque since; I did not see Barry afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. He lodged with you one night, then left, and returned a fortnight after Christmas? A. Yes - he owed me 30s. for board and lodging - 10s. for a bed, and 10s. for the time he was with me before; I gave him no change for the cheque - he told me the value was 8l. 14s., and said he had no money.

COURT. Q. Did he lodge it with you as security, or were you to pay him the balance? A. He said it was as good as money to me, in case he should leave, and go to sea, if he got a ship.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You took the cheque to a pawnbroker's shop, kept by Miss Wood, I believe? A. Yes; Murray is her shopman - there was nobody present when I gave him the cheque; there was nobody opposite to me - I cannot say nobody was in the shop.

Q. Did you not represent to Murray that you had received it from a lodger who was a very honest man? A. I never named such a thing to him - I said I received it from a lodger; I did not say he owed me 30s., but showed it to him - he offered me 5s. - I said I would not give it him for that; I said I got it from a lodger, but said nothing about his being honest.

Q. Now, did not you tell Mr. Ross, after, that you found

the cheque in a cook-shop? A. When he first asked me the question; I said so, as I was afraid I could not find Barry, but I went to Gravesend and found him; I did not say when I found it, or where, except that it was at a cook-shop.

Q. Was not Murray over and over again, requested by you to give cash for it, before he consented? A. Never; he did not say he would give me half, and the rest when he had ascertained that it was good; I did not send a woman for the rest of the money - her name was not McCarthy; I never sent her to say I wanted the other part of the money to go to Gravesend, to apprehend the person who gave it to me.

SUSAN WOOD . I am the wife of Timothy Wood , a corn-dealer, of Poplar. On the 21st of January the prisoner Murray brought me this cheque to change; I looked at it, and it being a late date, I told him I did not think it would he paid at the banker's - he said if it was not I was to return it to him again, and he would return the money, and he put his name on it; it was dated the 22d of November: I gave him the cash for it - my husband paid it away the same day.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You live in the immediate neighbourhood of his employer's? A. Yes; he came to me almost every day for change - he put his name on it without hesitation, before I paid the money; he said he would do it before I asked him; he knew I knew where to find him; it was between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning: he gave me no caution about it, but said if it was returned he knew who he took it of.

TIMOTHY WOOD . My wife delivered me this cheque(looking at it) - I paid it away in the Corn Market, on the 21st of January.

JOHN COOPER . I am clerk to Messrs. Carries and Co. I paid this cheque on the 22d of January - it came through the clearing, from Messrs. Curtis and Co.'s.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an officer, and apprehended Barry - I told him about the cheque, but desired him to make no communication to me that might be injurious to him; he said he found the cheque in the street, near Poplar.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where did you get the cheque from? A. From the prosecutor - he gave it to me to-day. I never showed it to Barry.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe you went to the shop Murray lives at? A. Yes; he said he had received the cheque from the woman, and had only given her half the amount.

JOHN ROSS. This is the cheque I lost - Mr. Reed's name is to it; I received it from him - it was in my box on the 7th of December. I have found nothing else.

BARRY'S Defence. I found the cheque in the street, put it into my pocket, and kept it about a week; I was told it was of no use, and gave it to this woman, when I was going on board ship.

WILLIAM WOOD OGLIVY . I am in the employ of Miss Wood, the pawnbroker, and was in the shop when Roman came - she was in the habit of pawning goods at our shop; we both knew her: Murray is apprentice there; she came on the 18th, 19th, or 20th of January, and asked Murray if he would change her a cheque - he looked at it, and told her it was an old date, and asked where she got it - she said she had it from a lodger, who was an honest man, and it was for 30s.; she pressed Murray very much to give her cash for it; and, I believe, said he might get it changed where he was known, very likely; he went to Wood's, the corn-dealer's, and got change; she had gone away, and returned in about half an hour, and asked if he had got it changed - he said Yes, and he would let her have half of it, and keep the other half till further notice, till he found whether it was good or not.

Q. After that, did he give her any money? A. He put the other half into a drawer, till further notice. Mr. Ross called about it on the 5th of February, and when he was gone Ronan came in and asked Murray to let her have the remainder of her money; he asked her what for, and told her the prosecutor had been there; she said she wanted it to defray her expenses to Gravesend, for the purposes of Justice, to get the man apprehended; she did not mention his name - he asked what she had done with the first 4l. 7s. - she said she had given it to her father, to pay his expenses to Ireland - he sent her the other money.

Q. When she first came, did Murray offer her 5s.? A. No, he offered her nothing for it; I was by his side, and must have heard him if he had; he said nothing about what he would give for it.

THOMAS SAINT . I am the watchman. I found the window open, and the chest in the back yard; the house was all safe at half-past one o'clock, when I passed; I gave the alarm when I found it open. I think the robbery must have been committed by two persons, as the box was heavy.

Five witnesses gave Barry a good character.

BARRY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

MURRAY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-62

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

543. GEORGE DARNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 pencil-case, value 8s. , the goods of Joshua Butler .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-63

544. GEORGE SKINNER was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD BUCKLE . I am a smith and brass-founder , and live in Sea Coal-lane; the prisoner was in my employ as clerk ; he collected money for me, which he should enter in a book when he came home; he never accounted to me for 2l. 9s. received from Mr. Ward, who is a customer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long has he been in your employ? A. Three years. I was a witness here once when I was a constable, and only once - I was never a prosecutor before.

Q. Were you ever in a Court in any other capacity? A. I am not bound to answer that; I am not ashamed of it - I was prosecuted for some Government stores, which I had in my possession; I was not acquitted - I was in prison twelve months. My wife has not had the care of my books for the last twelve months - she used before that to make out receipts, and receive money from the prisoner; I ordered him to pay his money to me, and no one else - there are the books for him to enter it; he kept the books himself; he was my confidential clerk; I cannot write - I

can read a little; my order to him was to enter all monies he received, and whenever he paid me money I gave him the book to enter it. I do not keep a marine-store shop; I have a crucible hot in the day, and at night, if I have orders from the trade - if I am busy.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long is it since you were confined? A. Fourteen years, and you were my Counsel- I have carried on business at this house ever since; I am certain he never gave me this money. A crucible is necessary in my trade - I have never been censured about that. The prisoner never pretended to enter this amount.

JAMES BATCHELOR . I am clerk to Buckle, and produce his books: here is an order entered from Messrs. Ward, on the 8th of August; the goods were delivered that day to them, in Water-street, Whitefriars - this entry is in Mr. Buckle's son's writing; the amount is not put against them. Here is the cash book - it is not entered there: there is no entry of 2l. 9s. received from Mr. Ward: all this page is in his writing; it extends to the 29th of September: there is no entry at all of any money received from Ward; all the entries are in his writing, except one of the 11th of August - I do not know whose writing this is. Mr. Buckle keeps the book, and, when the money comes in, he gives the prisoner the book to enter it: the order-book lays on the desk, and the entries are made by whoever is present, but the cash-book is kept by the prisoner, as confidential clerk.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not other people enter in it as well as him? A. I have done so; I do not know that any body else has ever made an entry in it - I am Buckle's son-in-law: the entries on one side of the book is of monies paid away. When Skinner is absent, other people enter that: I have made entries since I have been home, since October; I see no writing in it besides mine and Skinner's - it is always kept locked up in the safe: I do not know what happened before October, except from the book: the prosecutor's son occasionally entered goods that went out: he was there in August: there is no other persons hand-writing in the cash-book.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whose hand-writing is the side on which monies received are entered? A. That is all the prisoners, except one entry in August.

MR. HARBUT JOHN WARD . I am one of the firm of Ward and Co., of Water-street, Bridgewell-precinct: I received some goods from Buckle in August, and on the 1st of September, the prisoner applied for payment; I was behind my desk, and gave my clerk 2l. 13s. 1d., which was 4s. 1d. more than I ought to have paid; I saw him take it round, and hand it to the prisoner; he gave me a receipt, which I produce; I believe it to be his writing - the bill is made out by him. Mr. Buckle afterwards sent in a bill, and it was charged 1d. a pound less.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner give that receipt into your hand? A. He gave it to my clerk or me, I cannot swear which, but think I saw him hand it to my clerk. I swear I saw him receive the money; I saw him writing, and the receipt came round to me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was anybody but yourself and clerk in the counting-house when the prisoner received the money? A. No; my clerk was not out of my sight before I had the receipt in my possession: I have no doubt of its being his writing. - (Receipt read.) I had not dealt with Mr. Buckle for anything but these goods at this time.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there a glass petition round your desk? A. No - it has open rails; my clerk is not here: I must have spoken to the prisoner myself - I heard him say he came from Mr. Buckle for the amount of the bill.

ROBERT MACKLIN . I am an officer; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on suspicion of embezzling money: I do not recollect his master making him any promise.

RICHARD BUCKLE. When I found he had received a good deal of my property, I took him and gave him in charge - he said nothing to me.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you say nothing to him? A. I might tell him I was sorry for him; I had offered to be bound for him before I found this out, if he could get a situation; my son does not live with me; I do not know where he lives; he is twenty-three years old; he never made entries in the cash-book. I have no intercourse with him now; I do not know whether he is married - we have had words.

JAMES BATCHELOR . This bill and receipt are in the prisoner's hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever make a mistake? A. I certainly have - I never omitted to enter money received.

Prisoner's Defence. The cause of my present situation is the extraordinary manner in which my employer conducts' his business: he received money from me often, and immediately ordered me into the warehouse to pack up goods, before he allowed me to enter it. I had immense business on my hands and have forgotten to enter it, having all the goods to enter which had been sent out during my absence; and thinking he was not in the habit of examining the books, I have omitted to enter it till it has escaped my memory. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-64

545. GEORGE SKINNER was again indicted for a like offence .

RICHARD BUCKLE . On the 10th of November the prisoner was in my employ; he never gave me an account of 13l. 15s. received from Frost and Co., who dealt with me - they owed me a few shillings more than that sum.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Mr. Dodson? A. Yes; he is here - this money was taken in November; my son left me about October; he worked in my shop, and occasionally made entries in the journal when the clerk has been out; he never entered in the cash-book, for I kept that locked up for the last six months - I may have left it out occasionally.

Q. Have you not, in several instances, received money from the prisoner, and then sent him into the factory, before he had time to make entries? A. Never, on my oath - I always said, directly I received money, "George, be sure you enter it:" I always allowed him time to enter it. My son was my journeyman.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If you did leave your books about, could an entry be taken out that was once made? A. No; if it was entered it would appear: my son had left me when this was received; the prisoner left in January, and never told me of this sum, nor paid it to me: I sent my son-in-law for the money after it was paid.

JAMES BATCHELOR . Here is no entry in the cash-book of 13l. 15s. 6d. being received from Frost: the only entry on the 10th of November is 2s. received from Mr. Richards; that is in the prisoner's writing: there is no entry of this sum at all - the highest sum in this page is 25l. received from Mr. Wood, on the 17th of November: twelve of the entries here are my writing: I received no money of Frost's account - the prisoner never told me he had received it.

Cross-examined. Q. Look at this page, whose writing is that? A. One line I do not know about; here is one by myself; the rest is the prisoner's: here is one entry of Mrs. Buckle's, but that is money paid - the book is kept locked up; she never enters money received - if she receives money, she tells me, and I enter it. I know there have been quarrels between Buckle and his wife.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were the quarrels because that she had received money and not brought it to account? A. I believe the principal quarrel was because the books were not properly looked after - there is no entry of here of money received for six months past - the book was occasionally left out.

COURT. Q. Have you ever heard Mr. and Mrs. Buckle quarrel about her receiving money, and not entering it? A. No; it was, that neither she nor the son had properly looked after the books; as he was unable to do it himself.

JAMES FROST . My father dealt with Buckle. I produce a bill and receipt for goods delivered and paid for- I paid the prisoner the money on the 10th of November, 1827 - it was 13l. 15s. 6d.; I paid it into his own hands, and he wrote this receipt (read.) Another bill was sent in for the same goods, in January, after the prisoner had left.

Prisoner's Defence. I can only say, I have been frequently teazed by Mrs. Buckle to give her money, and she has promised to account for it to her husband - they were always quarrelling.

JOHN BUCKLE. I am the prosecutor's son. I left my father's house about three weeks or a month before Christmas - the prisoner had a great deal to do when he was there; he was not always busy - my father has, at times received money from him, and sent him into the factory before he had time to enter it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When was that? A. I cannot state any particular time; I never knew the prisoner keep money back. I left my father in October - it is less than twelve months ago that this has happened; it was more than once - I cannot say how often.

Q. Was he not, in October, discharged from the factory, and employed at 5s. a day to collect debts? A. Not to my knowledge; I left in October.

JAMES BATCHELOR . This bill and receipt is in the prisoner's hand-writing.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-65

546. SAMUEL WILLIAMS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. RYLAND conducted the prosecution.

MR. JEREMIAH EVANS . I am a furnishing ironmonger ; I have a place of business on Fish-street-hill, and another in Finsbury-place; the prisoner entered my service in July, as a groom at my country-house; I afterwards employed him as an in-door porter, and afterwards, at Finsbury-place, as an out-door porter ; it was his duty to take out goods, and receive money for them, which he should give to Peach, my managing man; in consequence of some circumstances which transpired, Mr. Kingdon showed me a bill and receipt, which are in the prisoner's hand-writing; the goods had been sent to Mr. Kingdon on the 11th of January - I never received 12s. from the prisoner for those goods.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it his general duty to take out goods, and receive money for them? A. He has done so frequently since, and I believe before, and paid it in - it was certainly his duty; he was sent home with goods, with a bill and receipt; he was not to enter what he received, but to bring it to Peach, who entered it; when I changed his employ, it was because he was unfit for a groom.

CHARLES PEACH . In January last, I managed Mr. Evans' business in Finsbury-place; the prisoner was the out-door porter. On the 11th of January I sent him with a lamp-shade, and iron-heater, to Mr. Kingdon; they came to 12s.; I saw him on his return - he brought back some candlesticks to be repaired; they were returned on the 15th, by him, and a bill of the whole, (which was 13s. 6d.) made out, as he had not paid me the 12s.; and, on his return, he said Mr. Kingdon would want some other things; that he would send, and look them out, and pay altogether - he has never brought this money to account.

Cross-examined. Q. How long after this did he stay in Mr. Evans' service? A. Till the 30th of January - he was then taken in charge; I do not know what wages he had; our premises are in the City, in Finsbury-place South - he was paid at Fish-street-hill.

Q. Do you know whether he took money this in advance, intending to allow it when he was paid? A. That I cannot say; I believe he was paid every Saturday night; the 11th of January was on a Friday; I saw him take out the lampshade.

WILLIAM KINGDON . My family dealt with Mr. Evans; I myself ordered a lamp-shade there, and the servant, at the same time, ordered an iron-heater; the shade was brought on the 10th - I cannot swear to the individual who brought them; I did not like the shape, and requested the person to bring another next morning, which he did - I cannot say whether the same person came, but I paid the person who brought it 12s., and took a bill and receipt; the person wrote the receipt in my presence.

JAMES BREES . I was in Mr. Kingdon's employ, and was present when the prisoner brought the goods - I was in the room when he brought the shade for the lamp, and the iron-heater; I did not see the receipt wrote - I saw my master pull out his purse, and give him some money, but what I cannot say - the prisoner is the man.

MR. EVANS. I know this receipt to be in the prisoner's hand-writing; I have no doubt of it. - (receipt read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have to say I paid the 13s. 6d., and Mr. Peach has owned it at the Mansion-house. The day I was taken up, I sent 13s. 6d. by a young woman to the shop in Finsbury-place, and she brought me a bill and receipt for it.

CHARLES PEACH . A woman came on the 1st of February, the day after he was taken up; she said she had come from Mr. Kingdon's, who had lost the bill, and I was to make a

fresh one; she paid the money; I was not then aware that the prisoner had received it before.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-66

SEVENTH DAY. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

547. HENRY DAWKIN and WILLIAM TOWELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Haycock , on the 17th of January , and stealing 2 bunches of matches, value 4d., and 4 boxes, value 1s. 6d. , his property.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am an officer; I am not related to the prosecutor; he lives in Plumbers-row, City-road. On the 17th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I was opposite his house, and saw the prisoners in company, looking in at the window and door, and then come back again - there was another a little distance from them; I saw them both particularly engaged at one end of the window, as if they were cutting the glass; I saw Towell as if in the act of taking something from the window, and giving it to Dawkins; they turned, and went towards Plumbers-street- I went into the shop, then followed and took them at the corner of Plumbers-street - I had a good deal of trouble with Towell, and gave Dawkins to another to hold while I secured him; Dawkins escaped from that person; I called Stop thief! and Brown brought him back in two or three minutes; I found a knife on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not take another boy that night? A. Yes; one Blizard - that was quite in a different part of the evening; I took him for having a bundle till he could account for it - it turned out that he was innocent: he has been transported before, and I wanted to know if he had his legal discharge. I was about twenty-five yards from the prosecutor's shop - the lamps were all lighted; the knife found on Dawkins had putty on it - it has now crumbled off; and the point has been ground in a particular way; they were three or four minutes at the window.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I was accidentally on the spot, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw Dawkins running: I secured him - he immediately threw something from his hand, which turned out to be two phosphorus boxes; I saw a little girl pick them up.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he running when any thing dropped from him? A. He was running towards me; the girl is not here - there was too much confusion for me to take her name.

GEORGE KITCHING . I am shopman to George Haycock, a chymist , of Plumbers-row . The officer came in, and said we had been robbed; I looked and saw part of a pane of glass taken out - it was broken before, but the piece was not out in the morning: I missed several things from the window, but cannot swear to these boxes - we missed several of this sort.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not thousands of that description about? A. Yes; I have no mark on them - the glass might have been broken by a person passing; the prisoner's parents have sent a glazier to mend the glass.

COURT. Q. Was that after you had given evidence at the office? A. No; before, I believe; but will not swear it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-67

548. GEORGE STRACHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 gelding, price 7l.; 1 saddle, value 1l.; 1 bridle, value 2s., and 1 piece of carpet, value 1s. , the property of James Pool .

JAMES POOL. I am a philosophical instrument-merchant . On the 30th of January, I went to No. 59, York-street, City-road , between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I twisted my horse's bridle round the nob of the rail, by the door; I did not fasten it, nor tell any body to mind it.

Q. If it had lifted its head up, it would have been loose? A. It was a quiet horse; I was absent about twenty minutes; I then found it loose, and standing about twenty yards off; I cannot say whether it had got loose, but the bridle was entangled round its fore-feet.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you not believe the prisoner was taking it to the Green-yard? - A. It probably might be the case - I have every reason to think so.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an officer. I saw the horse at the rails - I was standing in Mr. Rees' shop; I received information, went out, and saw the prisoner and a sailor in conversation; I went and stood in a door-way, which was dark- the sailor left the prisoner, and went along Bartholomew-terrace into York-street, then came back to the prisoner, and both went into Cross-street, and returned: the prisoner crossed over towards the horse; some persons came by; he came back, and, in a minute or two, went towards the horse again; the third time he went, he appeared to be stooping under the horse's neck, but whether he untied it or not I cannot say; the door opened, and two ladies came out; he left the door, and went to a baker's-shop window; I went to Mr. Briggs, and in five minutes a cart came by, which darkened the window, and I saw him take the horse from the door-way where it stood - he led it about thirty yards, and just as he stooped down to extricate the bridle or something, I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you been with the prosecutor to persuade him to prosecute? A. I never persuaded him - I have called on him four or five times; he was not an acquaintance of mine, but I called when I was going his way - I had no motive in calling; he said, "If you come my way, look in."

Q. Did you not say in one Petit's presence, when the prosecutor expressed his conviction of the prisoner's innocence, "If you don't prosecute, I will?" A. I did; there were some letters on the prosecutor's table; he said they gave him such a character, he had altered his mind; I said if the table was full of gold, I should not alter mine; that I should speak the truth, and if he did not prosecute, I should, to save my recognizance: I do not say he loosened the horse; he stopped, but whether to disentangle the feet I cannot say - it was in the dark.

JOHN BRIGGS . I am a grocer. Taylor came into my shop; I saw the horse at the door - a person came in, and said something; Taylor went out; he returned; I saw the prisoner and another pass two or three times - a cart passed - I went out, and, at the corner of Rabere-street, saw Tay

lor and the prisoner struggling - how the horse got there I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-68

Before Mr. Recorder,

549. EDWARD JOHN NICHOLS and JOHN SELDON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Smith , about seven o'clock in the night of the 11th of January , at St. George, with intent to steal therein .

JOSEPH SMITH. I live at No. 9, James-street, Cannon-street-road, in the parish of St. George, in the East . I rent the whole house, and am a carpenter , and repair furniture - my house door is generally kept open in the daytime, while I am at work, because the house smokes. On Friday, the 11th of January, my wife and I had occasion to go into the Commercial-road. The house only consists of two rooms - we have no servant - I locked the street door myself, between six and seven o'clock and we went out - it was dark then; in about five minutes, when we got to Grove-street, my wife wanted to return for a sixpence, which she had left behind; we returned - I put the key into the door to unlock it, and it was fastened inside - I said there were thieves in the house, and gave an alarm immediately; I held the handle of the door, and the door was pulled inside, to open it - I still held it, and heard persons going up stairs; the window up stairs was thrown open, and out jumped one person - I laid hold of him; that was Nichols; and then the other prisoner dropped down - I laid hold of him - it was the two prisoners; I am quite certain of them - I held them for about a minute, then both broke away from my hold; but I did not loose sight of Nichols - I can safely swear they are both the men who dropped from the window; there were two gas-lights; I could see them plainly, and am certain of them both - I lost sight of Seldon; we went down to the watch-house to give charge of Nichols, and then Seldon was brought in; that was in about ten minutes - I spoke to him with certainly. I went back to my house; found the up-stairs window open, and the table moved into the middle of the room - I did not perceive any thing else - I never saw either of the prisoners before to my knowledge.

Q. Was all day-light gone at the time the matter happened? A. It was between six and seven o'clock - it was very foggy - day-light had gone; it could not be daylight; but I could see them by the gas-light, as clear as I can see your Lordship.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know it was between six and seven o'clock? A. It was just as the watchman came on - he comes on at six.

Q. Supposing the lamps were away, was there not a glimmering of day-light? A. It is a very dark street.

Q. If a man was in a wide open place, was there not sufficient light to distinguish his face? A. Quite sufficient. I caught hold of both the men; the second jumped out in about a minute after the other, and he got away in about a minute; they were twisting and struggling with me - I was not frightened; for I had been robbed twelve months before, and wanted to know who the thieves were; I am fifty-five years old - it might be nearly a quarter of an hour before Seldon was brought to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you speak of the time you were robbed; or when you went out with your wife? A. When we went out. Nichols struggled and got away, but I never lost sight of him; he was taken in the same street, about one hundred yards off - I pursued him, and a man, who is not here, stopped him; he delivered him to the watchman, who is here; my street is about three hundred yards long - there were a good many people about; it is a populous little street - three or four persons pursued with me.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure it was after six o'clock? A. Yes: I went out after six, and returned in five minutes - I did not go into any street or place where there were no lamps lighted.

HESTHER SMITH . I am the prosecutor's wife. I left the house with him between six and seven o'clock, leaving every thing safe and fast - the street door was locked; we returned in five or six minutes, and found the door fastened inside - my husband called out, and I saw the two men come from the up-stairs window; the gas-light nearly opposite gave a good light; I could see them perfectly well; the prisoners are the persons; the watchman was on his beat at the time; Seldon got out of my sight, but I ran in the road and kept Nichols in sight till he was stopped. When we were at the watch-house, Seldon was brought in, in five or ten minutes - I could not be certain of him, but my husband swore to him - I saw his face, and was certain they were the two men; I recollected his features, and was certain of him - I found our window wide open, and the table moved into the middle of the room.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not at first say you could not be certain of them; but your husband swore to them? A. If I did it was a mistake; for I knew them both to be the men; it is not my husband's swearing to them that makes me certain - I could not say so much of one as the other, as he was close by me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you run with your husband? A. I ran by myself - I was about four yards from Nichols - there were people about, but I saw him stopped; there are but two windows to our house; one up-stairs, and one down - there are none behind; there is a back door which I bolted myself before I went out, about five o'clock; there are two back doors, one is up stairs; they were both bolted - the one up stairs had not been unfastened for three or four days - I swear I bolted the one down stairs; there is no other way out behind - my husband shut the shutters - I shut the up stairs window myself; but it was not fastened; it had not been open since the morning; I saw it shut about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before; when I went up to put on my bonnet - I saw the lower window just before I went out, and saw my husband fasten the shutter.

MICHAEL JAMES . I am a watchman. The prosecutor's house adjoins my beat - I come on my beat about six o'clock, or a few minutes before, and in about twenty minutes or half an hour I heard an alarm - it was between six and seven o'clock; I ran up immediately, and saw a crowd of people; there was a cry of "Murder! Watch! and Thieves!" a great many people were collected, and Nichols was in hold of somebody - I cannot exactly say who, for there was a great crowd - the prosecutor and his wife were there, and desired me to take him to the watch-

house; saying their house had been broken into - they gave him in charge - Seldon was brought in in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes charged with being one of the party who broke into the house - Mrs. Smith was there; I am not certain whether her husband was - Nichols wished very much for his hat; I had taken him without a hat; it was found afterwards; but not in my presence - he wished me very much to let him go, saying that he was a coppersmith and brazier, and out of work - he said nothing to the charge; I did not wait to hear what passed about Seldon - Smith and his wife gave charge of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I thought you did not see Mr. Smith at the watch-house? A. Not at first, from the number of people - they both gave charge; I heard Nichols given in charge; but paid no attention to what passed about Seldon - Smith was there to give him in charge; but I did not hear him do it; he was detained at the watch-house on the charge - charge was given; but I paid little attention to it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know where Nichols was apprehended? A. It might be sixty or seventy yards from the house - it was in the same street, near a chandler's-shop, nearly opposite the shop; I took him from a person who held him; I do not suppose Smith was a yard from him; Mrs. Smith came to the watch-house five or six minutes before her husband - the watch-house is not a quarter of a mile from the spot; Mr. Smith followed us to the watch-house; I do not know who the man was who stopped Nichols, there was such a crowd; Smith's wife ordered me to take him: whether the man who stopped him followed us to the watch-house, I cannot say.

GEORGE PITMAN . I am a watchman of St. George's in the East. My beat is in Cable-street, about three hundred yards from James-street. On the 11th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the corner of Grove-street, and heard a call of Stop thief! and saw Seldon running up, without his hat; Thomas, the watchman, was running behind him, springing his rattle - he ran into my arms; I delivered him up to Thomas, who took him - I went away, and did not see Smith or his wife.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not go to the watch-house? A. No, I stopped him about two hundred yards from the watch-house - we go on our beats at six o'clock - it was soon after I went on my beat, but not immediately; it might be half an hour or twenty minutes past six; we do not call the hour till ten, but patrol.

JACOB THOMAS . I am a watchman. On the 11th of January I heard a call of Stop thief! I saw Pitman, and saw the prisoner, Seldon - I pursued him; I first saw him just coming out of Upper Grove-street - he had no hat on; as I heard a call of Stop thief! I pursued him, and saw Pitman stop him - he delivered him to me; I brought him back to where I heard the cry, and took him to the watch-house; Smith and his wife were there, and said he was the other man who had been in the house; he said nothing to the charge; Nichols was in custody before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you stay there all the time? A. I came away after giving charge; I cannot say what he might have said afterwards; Smith did not appear frightened - both he and his wife said Seldon was the man; there were not many people in the watch-house - a good many who had followed us were outside - I had been on my beat about a quarter of an hour.

COURT. Q. Are you certain it was after six o'clock? A. I am; I came on my beat at six - it was a quarter of an hour after that.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I was constable of the night. I found the prisoners at the watch-house, and searched them, but found nothing on them; two hats were brought in by Mrs. Smith, and the prisoners claimed them.

HESTHER SMITH . These hats were picked up by a man, and delivered to me, close at my own door; I did not see them picked up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is that man here? A. No, he was a stranger; I was standing at my door, and he gave them to me.

NICHOLS' Defence. I was turning down James-street, heard a cry of Stop thief! saw persons running, and ran myself; the watchman took hold of me - I said I did not know what was the matter - I was never in my fellow-prisoner's company.

SELDON'S Defence. I had been to my friends, near James-street, to spend the evening, and about six o'clock, being inclined for a pot of beer, I went out to fetch it; a young man threw a snow-ball at me - I turned round, and he struck me; several other persons came up and ill used me - I ran from them, and passed the watchman, at the bottom of the street - he took me - as to owning the hat, I could not do it; it was not mine; I had left mine at the house in Malden-street, where I spent the evening.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . The two hats laid on the table when I came in; it being a cold night, I took them in to the prisoners, and said, "Young men, are these your hats?" they separated them, and each took one - I said,"Why did you jump out of the window?" they said,"Why we were glad to do it to get out of trouble."

Prisoner SELDON. He put the hats on the bench, and said, "It being a cold night, you had better put them on, and deny it when you come to the office."

WILLIAM SUMMERS. They each took one hat.

Two witnesses gave Nichols a good character.

NICHOLS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

SELDON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18280221-69

550. JOHN NASH was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with feloniously killing and slaying John Martin .

JOHN MARTIN. I am the father of the deceased. My son, John, would be twelve years old in March - he lived with me, and was taken ill on the 26th of December, he kept getting worse till the 23d of January, when he died; he had a doctor, and was admitted into the Northern Dispensary, New-road; the prisoner and him were play-fellows - they had not quarrelled - seven or eight days before his death, he said, "Oh! mother, that turnpike-boy! what he has given me will kill me;" I have no doubt he thought himself in a dying state; he said he had given him some kind of black stuff, in some tea; he did not say how he came to take it; whether it was of his own will, or by persuasion; the prisoner is older than him.

REBECCA MARTIN . I am the deceased's mother. Seven or eight days before his death he said, "Oh! mother, that

turnpike-boy gave me some black stuff in my tea, and it was so bitter!" he used often, in his agony, to call out about the boy - he would take it willingly, no doubt, as the boy often gave him tea; I said, "John, what did you take it for?" he said he made him take it; that was when he was extremely ill; he did not say whether it was in lark, or what; he said his hands were tied, but whether he meant at that time, I cannot say; he was so very insensible, we could hardly get any thing out of him; he said the turnpike-boy tied his hands.

MR. GARRETT DILLON . I am a surgeon, and live in Fitzroy-square. I was sent for to attend the deceased on the 18th of January; he was received into the Infirmary, at St. Pancras; he was labouring under the effects of mercury - his mouth was much ulcerated and swollen; I have no doubt he had taken mercury; he said he got something in some tea, from the turnpike-boy, the day after Christmas-day - he considered himself in great danger then - I opened his body after death; the stomach was slightly inflamed; the large intestines were inflamed all over, and there were small ulcers - that might arise from other causes than taking mercury; I attribute his death partly to that and the mouth being slutted.

Q. Can you say his death necessarily arose from taking mercury? A. Decidedly not; the same appearances might arise from other causes; he had taken mercury, no doubt, but I cannot say that occasioned his death.

EDWARD CLARK . I am sixteen years old. I do not know whether the prisoner gave Martin any thing; he kept him one night to drink tea with him, and next morning he told me he had been playing tricks with Martin, and put some salt into his tea.

MARY SHARPE . I went to the prisoner, from Martin's mother - he sent 1s. to her, and said he would allow him 6d. a-day, to keep him from the workhouse, but so help him God, he never gave him any thing to hurt him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-70

551. ANN EVANS was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with killing and slaying her new-born infant .

RICHARD ROSEA . I am a surgeon, and live in Crawford-street. I did not know the prisoner before this happened - I was sent for, and found her in bed, and have no doubt she had very recently been delivered of a child - the child was found in a gutter, within ten yards of her bed; there was a bruise on the right side of its head, which might be occasioned by a fall, and I think it was so, from its peculiar situation; it was not moved till I fetched it away; she might have been taken in labour suddenly, and the child fall from her in the street, and that would account for the bruise; I examined the body afterwards, and cannot be certain it was born alive - I cannot say the vital spark was not extinct when it was born - children are often born in a state that requires a medical man; it appeared an eight months' child.

SARAH PYWELL . I live in Dorset-square. The prisoner lived in the same house; she told me she was single; I was not present when she was delivered - the child was found on Wednesday morning; I saw her every day - I had seen her about two hours before the child was found; she appeared to be pregnant, and had complained all the evening of being ill, and in the morning I told her I would fetch a medical man; she did not desire that, but said she thought she should get better, and did not want one - she was delivered on Monday - I did not see the child till Wednesday - she was not out on Monday, that I am aware of; she was out on Sunday afternoon, and in the kitchen on Tuesday - I never saw her with any baby linen, but I did not examine her boxes.

ANN PYWELL . I lived in the same house with the prisoner. I never saw the child; I suspected the prisoner was pregnant; I never examined her boxes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-71

552. JOHN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 2 silver candlesticks, value 6l.; 1 table-cloth, value 1l.; 1 tea-tray, value 5s., and 1 knife, value 6d., the goods of the Duke of St. Albans , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods and dwelling-house of the Duchess of St. Albans .

CHARLES BRADSHAW . I am page to the Duke and Dutchess of St. Albans. On the 14th of January, about one o'clock in the morning, we returned from Covent-garden Theatre, in a coach, which the prisoner drove, as he owns it; when he let me out of the coach I rang the bell - the porter immediately came to the door, and the housemaid handed out of the coach a parcel, containing the articles stated in the indictment - I handed it to Webb, the porter, who put it on a mat in the first hall of the dwelling-house, No. 1, Stratton-street .

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you lived with her Grace? A. Ten years; this equipage always goes to the Theatre with her; I never left any thing in a coach. I do not know Gray, a coachman. A napkin was once left in a coach, and brought back some months ago. The tray and silver candlesticks were in a table-cloth, with two pieces of wax-candle, and a knife; there were two other parcels in the coach, with tea things and refreshments; the coachman could not tell what was in them.

COURT. Q. Did you leave these things in the coach? A. No - the housemaid handed the parcel out to me, and I gave it to the porter, who (I am certain) put it within the hall; they were not missed till the morning. I saw them at Marlborough-street-office on the Tuesday after.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. About what time in the morning were they missed? A. About half-past ten o'clock; it was before Schofield came: the other parcels were taken down to the housekeeper's room. I went to Covent-garden to see if I could find the link-man, to see if he knew the coachman - I did not go to the office; we suspected the coachman had taken it.

ELIZA FAUCET . I am servant to the Dutchess. The page and I came from the Theatre in a coach; I did not observe the coachman's person. I gave the cloth, containing the tray and candlesticks, first out of the coach, to the page, who gave it to Webb, the porter - when I went in I saw it in the outer hall; I took another parcel out: the page and porter took out a basket which was too heavy for me. I am certain all three parcels were placed within the house. The coachman took his fare, and drove away.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you were much enter

tained at the Theatre? A. Not much - I had seen the play before; it was late, and I went to bed soon after I came in- the plate was always taken down stairs by one of the servants; I took one parcel down, and the page another - I left the other standing in the hall, and left the porter fastening the door, and thought he would bring it down when he came.

Q. If you left him fastening the hall, how could any body get it? A. The hall is divided - I left the page and porter standing there; the coachman went as soon as he had his money - I do not say the parcel was there when I went down; I passed it when I first came in, and did not see it afterwards; it was missed in the morning by the under-butler; we immediately suspected it was stolen, and sent to Covent-garden, to ascertain the number of the coach, intending to send to the Police-office. I never left anything in a coach - a napkin was once left, but not by me - it was brought back.

COURT. Q. Were these things left in the coach? A. No.

JOHN WARD . I am under-butler to the Duke. I was at home when the coach came, but not in the hall. I missed the things in the morning, when arranging my plate.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose duty was it to take care of them in your absence? A. Anybody about the house would bring them down; it being late at night they are generally put into the housekeeper's room - she locks them up till morning.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a watchman. About half-past two o'clock in the morning I stopped the prisoner in Warren-street, Tottenham-court-road, with all this property, tied in a table-cloth; he was near the mews where he keeps his coach; I asked what he had got - he said, only a candlestick - he distinctly said, "A candlestick;" I felt the bundle, and as it contained more than one, I took him to the watch-house; in the way there he offered three or four times to give me the things to let him go - he halted several times, and at one of those times a candlestick fell on the ground; he begged me hard to let him go, and take the property, When he got to the watch-house he said he found them in his coach, but did not say who they belonged to; he said nothing about that before - I at first asked where he got them from, and he said he could not tell; he never told me who they belonged to.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not know he was in Thurston's service? A. No - Thurston has lived there eight or nine years; I do not know him to be a respectable man. I have since heard that the prisoner lives in Warren-street; I believe Warren-street is nearer to Stratton-street than the stables are; I think he must pass his own house to go from Stratton-street to the stables. I expect no reward in this case.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was present when the prisoner was brought to the office with this property. I gave information at Stratton-street, and the servants came and claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. What enabled you to find the owner? A. The name of Coutts was on the table-cloth; I had not spoken to the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I left the house I went to the Portland-road, watered my horses, and stopped there some time; when I got to my stables I found these things in my coach - I produced them immediately to my fellow-servant. I passed my own door before I got to the stable, and could have left them there if I intended to steal them.

CHARLES GRAY . I am a hackney-coachman, and live in Summer-street, Back-hill. I have several times driven her Grace's establishment from the Theatre; I once had some property left in my coach, and sent my son with it next morning.

JAMES SMITH . I drive a coach for Mr. Thurston, and live in Southampton-place. On the 14th of January, at night, the prisoner and I came home together to the yard; I went into the stable - he brought these things in, and showed them to me; he said they were left in his coach, and he should take them home in the morning.

COURT. Q. He of course told you where he meant to return them to? A. No; he showed me the candlesticks, and said he had brought some people from the play; I did not ask where he had stopped last.

CHARLES BRADSHAW re-examined. I asked the porter to change me a half-crown, and gave the prisoner 2s.; while the porter was giving me change our backs were to the door, and during that time the parcel might have been taken; I did not see the prisoner in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-72

553. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Maynard , on the 28th of January , and stealing therein 6 sheets, value 40s.; 3 pillow-cases, value 4s.; 3 pin-cloths, value 1s.; 3 nightgowns, value 6s.; 2 night-caps, value 1s. 6d.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 8s.; 6 neckcloths, value 6s.; 2 napkins, value 3s.; 11 towels, value 11s.; 3 pairs of stocks, value 18d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 2 habit-shirts, value 10s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 5 shirts, value 17s.; 2 tablecloths, value 12s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of stays, value 5s.; 1 pocket, value 5s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 3s.; 2 pairs of gloves, value 2s., and 2 shifts, value 7s. , his property; and JOHN PALMER and JAMES LIVERSEDGE were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen : against the Statute.

NICHOLAS CHUBB . I am a serjeant of the Coldstream Guards; Mr. Thomas Maynard is batallion serjeant of the regiment, and lives in Vincent-square, Westminster . Taylor and Palmer were stationed in the barracks in St. James' Park, and left there about a quarter to four o'clock in the afternoon of the 8th of January, and should have been in at nine o'clock; they never returned - I did not see them again till the 31st, when they were in custody. On the evening of the 29th, when I was in search of them I saw Liversedge; and on the evening of the 30th I was with some officers, and saw Liversedge again, at his father's house, in Golden-lane; he denied all knowledge of the other prisoners, but after being questioned he acknowledged that he had seen some bundles of linen in their possession, and that they had asked him where they might dispose of it, and where they could get coloured clothes - he denied knowing anything else.

ALICE CHUBB . I am the wife of the last witness, and wash for Mr. Maynard, at the Recruit-house, in St. James' Park. On the 28th of January, about four o'clock, Taylor

came and asked me if there was not some linen to be fetched from Mr. Maynard's - I said there was; he asked if he should go for it - I said he might, as my man was poorly - he shut the door, and went away; I never saw him again till he was apprehended. The linen was never brought to me.

ANN GOWERLY . I am fourteen years old, and live with Mr. Maynard. On the 28th of January, between four and five o'clock, Taylor came for the things; he was alone - I did not see them delivered to him. I found the articles stated in the indictment at Worship-street afterwards, and knew them.

ROBERT BENSLEY . I am servant to Mr. Maynard. On the 28th of January, between four and five o'clock, Gowerly delivered the linen to me; I gave it to Taylor, who came for it - it was tied in a bag, and put into a basket.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I belong to the Coldstream Guards - Palmer and Taylor belong to my regiment. On Monday evening, about a quarter to five o'clock, I saw Taylor going towards the barracks in St. James' Park, with a white basket; Palmer was with him, and had a green bag on his shoulder - it was bulky.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 28th of January, a little after six o'clock in the evening, I saw Taylor and Palmer at the Lion and Lamb public-house, Golden-lane, St. Luke's; Brown was with me - there was a basket on the tap-room table, with a large green bag in it, quite full, and tied up at the mouth; there might be a small bundle under it in the basket; we asked what they had there - they said linen, which they were going to take to Hoxton, to be washed; they produced a washing-book, dated the 28th of January, with the articles entered, and supposing their story correct I told them to drink their beer as soon as they could, and get out, for it was a very bad house; Liversedge was not with them. - On Wednesday evening, the 30th, Waters, I, Hanley, and Chubb, saw Liversedge, and asked if he had seen the soldiers on the Monday evening, and if they had bundles with them; he said he had seen them, but they had no bundles - but on questioning him farther he admitted that they had bundles.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the evening of the 30th I went to Liversedge's house with Eagles, and asked if he had got any of the bundle, or had pawned any of the clothes - he denied all knowledge of it. We left him, and in two hours, as I went home, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw Palmer and Taylor, in Kingsland-road, quarrelling with some people; I went over - they asked where they could get a lodging; I said I would find them one; Taylor had a small bundle - I took them into a public-house, and said I suspected them to be the soldiers who had robbed Serjeant Chubb - they denied it; I took the bundle, and in it I found a green bag, four pairs of socks, a pair of stockings, six towels, a pair of drawers, a pair of child's trousers, two bed-gowns, and two pairs of gloves, which were afterwards claimed by the prosecutor's servant. I took them in charge; Taylor then gave me six duplicates, relating to the property, from his pocket; I put them into the watch-house, and went immediately to Liversedge's house, in Hot-water-court, St. Luke's - I found him at home, and told him I had taken the two soldiers - that I knew he had some of the things, and should take him; he then acknowledged pawning two shirts and other things, for 14s., near Cripplegate church, but he could not tell the name; I went and got the things from there, and they were also claimed. I found 9s. on him, which he voluntarily said was part of the money he had pawned them for, and said he had given the soldiers the duplicate.

EDWARD STORR . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves, of Redcross-street. I have two sheets, two table-cloths, a pair of stays, and a handkerchief, pawned for 14s., by Liversedge, on the 29th of January, in the name of John Jones, Old-street.

HENRY THOMAS . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, of Sparrow-corner, Minories. I have two handkerchiefs, pawned on the 30th of January, for 3s., in the name of John Mann, Minories; by Palmer, I believe; he said they were his own - that he and a comrade were going to have a spree. The duplicate I gave him is one of those produced by Waters.

EDWARD CHILD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of sheets, pawned on the 29th of January, for 10s. in the name of Maynard, No. 24, Edmond's-place; I believe Liversedge to be the man - the duplicate I gave him is in Waters' possession.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Taylor put in a written defence, stating that he considered he had only committed a breach of trust - and that he had got Liversedge to pledge the property, without his knowing how it was obtained.

LIVERSEDGE's Defence. The two soldiers came to my house when I was out - I met them as I returned home; I went and drank with them, and they asked me to pawn the things - I said the shops were shut up: they said they were going to sleep at the Red Lion public-house, and asked me to come down in the morning, which I did, and pawned the articles, but did not know they were stolen.

TAYLOR - GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

PALMER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

LIVERSEDGE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-73

554. WILLIAM CLIFFORD and JOHN WHATTON were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 chaise, value 5l., and 1 gelding, price 7l. the property of Charles Andrew Nosotti .

JOSEPH GARBANATI . On the 21st of February I spent the evening at Mr. Nosotti's, in great Windmill-street ; he lent me his horse and chaise to go home to Kentish-cottage; I sent my son to bring it to the door at eleven o'clock at night; he came in and said it was ready - I went out, and it was gone: it was brought back almost directly - I heard a cry of Thieves! ran, and Clifford was given into my charge.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Had you seen the horse and chaise in the street? A. No; I found it in Archer-street, after the alarm. Clifford's mother has since been to me, and said it was only a lark; but I never said I did not believe they meant to steal it, or anything to that effect, when she said it was only a lark - I said, "Well, he has done it only for a lark," as she said he was a respectable young man; but, when I went before the magistrate,

I found he was a different sort of a man - I never said I did not wish to prosecute.

Cross-examined by Mr. QUIN. Q. Are you on familiar terms with the prosecutor? A. He is my son-in-law - his Christian name is Charles Andrew: I found the gig at the corner of Archer-street and Windmill-street.

PETER GARBANATI . I fetched the house and chaise to Mr. Nosotti's door; I went in to tell my father it was there, leaving nobody in care of it - I came out in about ten minutes, and it was gone; I ran to the top of Archer-street and Rupert-street, where a crowd was round it - Clifford was half in and half out of the chaise; Mr. Yates was dragging him out: I did not see Whatton there - they are both strangers.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. How far off did you find it? A. About two hundred yards - it was between eleven and twelve o'clock: I took the gig back; I turned it round myself - Clifford did not turn it round; Mr. Yates had got him out before that; somebody in the crowd held the horse's head till I came up - I heard nothing about a frolic: Yates asked for assistance, but none of the crowd would help him.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Did you fasten the horse up. A. No; it staid there - it never runs away.

HENRY YATES . I live in Windmill-street, near Nosotti - his house is at the corner of Archer-street: I was coming home about eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoners watching about Windmill and Archer streets; they came back, and, all in a minute, I saw Clifford get into the chaise - Whatton was on the same side of the way: Clifford drove the chaise away; I ran and stopped it in Rupert-street, about one hundred yards off - I called to him, and asked what he was going to do with it; I pulled him down: Whatton came up and said it was only done out of a lark - I told him to go away, or I should take him to the watch-house: I pulled Clifford out and gave him in charge; he said he meant to drive it a little way, and it was done out of lark.

Cross-examined by Mr. J. ALLEY. Q. Was the horse going on when Clifford got in? A. I cannot say; it might - I am sure he got in; it might be his intention to stop it if it was going on - I cannot say.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Were you not an officer once? A. Yes; two years ago: I was not discharged for misconduct - Whatton did not come up till I stopped Clifford: he surrendered himself voluntarily.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-74

555. MATTHEW WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 2 guns, value 3l. 15s., and two cases, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Parkes .

BENJAMIN PARKES . I am a broker , and live at Turnham-green ; on the 19th of January, about one o'clock, these guns, in cases, were on a table outside my door - mine is an open shop: I saw the prisoner and Henry Jones (who has been tried in the other Court) come by my premises; I was out in the street, and went in, not suspecting them, but, in ten minutes, the guns were gone. I found them, in about an hour, at the Hand and Flower-public-house, which is about two miles and a half nearer London than my house.

Cross-examined by Mr. A. PHILLIPS. Q. The guns were outside the door? A. Yes; it is a very public throughfare.

BENJAMIN MATTHEWS . I live at Turnham-green, two doors from Parkes; I saw his guns safe about eleven o'clock in the morning, and about one, as I was returning from Hammersmith, I met the prisoner and Jones, each carrying a gun in a case - I heard of Parkes' loss in about ten minutes, and went after them a little way, but did not find them.

Cross-examined. Q. How did you know they were the same guns? A. I have often seen them laying there, and I had taken them for my brother to look at, a few days before; Webb was looking at the stock of the gun. One case was a particularly old one, and made of cloth.

THOMAS PIPPER . I am watchman at the Duke of Devonshire's premises; I met the prisoner on Hummersmith-terrace, about half-past one, with both these guns; they were in cases - Webb was with him; I then went to the Feathers public-house, at Chiswick, and met Parkes inquiring about his guns; I then went in pursuit, and saw the prisoner running across Arlington New-road; he was alone then: I followed, and took him in the new buildings, at the bottom of Notting-hill, concealed in the kitchen of a shell of a house; I said, "You are the young man I want, you have stolen some guns from Turnham-green;" he said he would come back quietly with me, but when we got out of the building, he ran about one hundred yards - I secured him; he had not got the guns then - Parkes had got Jones in custody, with them, at the Hand and Flower I am certain the prisoner is the man I met walking with them.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they in cases? A. Yes; I took particular notice of the cases, and knew them again to be the same.

JAMES PEARSON . I live at Chiswick, and saw the prisoner at the water-side there; Jones, who has been tried, had the two guns in his possession; the prisoner had a drab box-coat over his shoulder: Parkes came by in ten minutes, and made inquiry; we went in pursuit, and found Webb down in the shell of a house - I found the guns at the Hand and Flower, still in the cases.

MARY ANN CLARK . I keep the Hand and Flower; the guns were found in my house; Jones escaped out the back way: I went into the tap-room and found the two guns; I delivered them to Parkes when he returned with the prisoner in custody.

BENJAMIN MATTHEWS . Q. I believe these guns to be the same - I know the cases.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? A. No; I looked him earnestly in the face, thinking Parkes had sold him the guns.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES RYAN . I am pot-boy at the Hand and Flower public-house. Webb came in there with a great coat on his arm, and called for a pot of beer, and when I took it to him, Jones sat at the same table, with the guns by his side - when they went away, the great coat and guns were left behind - I went out with some beer, and when I returned, the prisoners were gone; the great coat and guns were in the bar; Mistress gave them to Parkes.

DAVID DAVIE . I am an officer. I found the prisoners in the cage; this prisoner escaped in Baldwin's Gardens, and was re-taken last night.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Jones; he asked me to carry a gun for him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-75

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

556. JOHN SULLIVAN and GEORGE HOLYETT were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 2 silver mugs, value 10l.; 3 silver spoons, value 2l., and 1 pair of silver tongs, value 6s. the goods of John Henry Taylor in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HENRY TAYLOR. I live in Great Queen-street, Westminster . On the 9th of February, I left home about ten o'clock in the morning; and on returning between twelve and one, the articles stated in the indictment were missing from my kitchen.

CATHERINE SMITH . I am Mr. Taylor's servant; on the 9th of February, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw all the plate safe on the kitchen dresser; I left for ten minutes, and on my return it was gone - I know nothing of the prisoners.

JOHN WARREN . I am a Bow-street patrol. Sinclair gave me information, and described the prisoners to me; I found Sullivan at his own house, in Little Queen-street, Westminster, on the Monday morning after the robbery, between seven and eight o'clock; he said he knew nothing of it; I asked where the clothes were which he wore on Friday, having seen him myself in the dress which Sinclair had described; he said, "What odds does that make; I have got the same jacket on now;" I said, "You have got on new trousers, waistcoat, and shoes;" Woodbury and I took Holyett.

EDWARD ALLEN . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 8th of February, the night before the robbery, I saw both the prisoners coming out of Duck-lane; I knew them before, and hearing Sullivan say to Holyett, "This way, come along." There was nobody by, and I took them to a public-house and searched them; but finding nothing on them, I let them go. Sullivan had on a cap without a lining, and blue trousers; I cannot say whether the cap he was apprehended in is the same.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I am an officer. On the Thursday after the robbery, I went with Warren to take Holyett, and under his bed, I found this cap; Warren found a duplicate by the fire-place with Sullivan's name on it - it does not relate to this property. Here is the new trousers which Sullivan had on; I had brought his old clothes from his lodging on the Sunday.

WILLIAM SINCLAIR . I am a baker. On Saturday, the 19th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw Holyett standing outside Mr. Taylor's area in Great Queen-street; and saw some person hand something through the rails to him; the first thing he received, he put into his hat - he received several articles, and kept them in his hand - he ran away; I then saw Sullivan come over the rails - he ran off in the same direction; suspecting there had been a robbery, I knocked at Mr. Taylor's door; and told the servant to go to Queen-square, and send for the officers; the goods have not been found.

HOLYETT's Defence. The baker swore to my clothes at the office, and said he could not swear to my features; he first swore I had blue trousers and then black; I was at work at the time, and had a fustian jacket and corduroy trousers.

WILLIAM SINCLAIR. I never expressed a doubt about him - I noticed his features.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY. Aged 14.

HOLYETT - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-76

557. THOMAS BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 pot of cocoa-paste, value 2s. the goods of Thomas Gandy .

CHARLES HAWKER. I am apprentice to Thomas Gandy, of Lower-street, Islington , a grocer . On the evening of the 16th of February, I was behind the counter; Cane alarmed me, and I missed a pot of cocoa-paste from the door; I went out and caught the prisoner, who was running; but did not find it on him.

ROBERT CANE . I am errand boy to Mr. Gandy. About eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner come to the door, and take a pot of cocoa-paste; I called Hawker, who ran out and took him - I am certain he is the boy.

THOMAS BATES . I saw the prisoner in Hawker's custody, and found the pot of paste about twenty yards down Windsor-street; I cannot say the prisoner dropped it; it was not between the shop, and where he was taken.

CHARLES HAWKER . I took him in Windsor-street.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-77

558. MARY BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 29 yards of printed cotton, value 22s. the goods of William Davis .

HENRY CUTTER . I am shopman to Mr. Davis, linen-draper of Chiswell-street . On the 25th of February, the prisoner came in and bought something, which she paid for - I saw her take a piece of print from several others, and hide it in a handkerchief - I followed her out - she turned the corner of the next house into a pawnbroker's, door-way; I was immediately behind her, and she dropped it at her feet - I did not see it fall - I charged her with it: she appeared confused, and gave no answer.

JAMES HAYWARD . I am shopman to Mr. Davis. I served the prisoner with muslin, and shewed her some prints - she bought a yard at 1s. 6d.; she was afterwards brought back, and this cotton produced - it was a piece I had shewn her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-78

559. RICHARD BAXENDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 70 lbs. weight of lead, value 11s. the goods of Thomas Waters , and fixed to a certain building of his .

THOMAS WATERS. I occupy a cow-house, behind my house at Holloway ; I missed this lead from the roof on Sunday morning, having seen it safe the night before.

JAMES CULLERN . I am servant to Mr. Phillips, who lives next door to Mr. Waters. On the 24th of February, at eight o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner in the hands of Snelling, and picked up some lead which he dropped - I gave it to the officer.

JOHN MORGAN . I am supervisor of the watch. I took the prisoner in charge. Cullern and Snelling gave me some lead which I applied to the roof of the cow-

house - it matched exactly, and was the same kind of lead as the rest.

HENRY SNELLING . I am servant to Mr. Waters. About eight o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner at the hay-stack; he looked round the corner, saw me, and ran off - I ran and caught him - he dropped a bit of lead from under his arm; I picked it up, and laid it down again, and caught him - he was a stranger; Cullum picked it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the field; a young man in a fustian jacket dropped a piece of lead - I was picking it up, and the witness took me.

HENRY SNELLING. There was a young man near the place - he ran away; they were close together; but when they saw me, they parted and ran off - I ran and caught the prisoner who dropped the lead from under his arm.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-79

560. MARY ANN HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 bonnet, value 2s.; 1 veil, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 2s.; 8 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 25s., and 1 cap, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Yarrow , her master .

THOMAS YARROW. The prisoner came into my service last Saturday afternoon, and, before I was up on Sunday morning, she had decamped; the property stated in the indictment was missing, part of which was in her room on Saturday night; I saw the bonnet upon the drawers, at six o'clock on Saturday morning, myself.

JAMES WOODMAN . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Piccadilly. On Monday evening I and a constable went with the prosecutor to a house in Wardour-street, Soho, to a second floor - the constable went first; the prisoner came out of the front room; the constable said, "Does Mary Ann Hale live here?" she said, "My name is Mary Ann Hale;" there was a person in the back room ill - the bonnet was there; another woman went in to fetch it; the prisoner went into the room once, and wished to go again, but the officer would not let her - the other woman brought us out the bonnet, and a pair of shoes; the prisoner at first said she had never seen Mr. Yarrow, and had never been near his house.

ELIAS BALL . I took her in charge, and have the bonnet and shoes, which I received from a woman in the room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am not guilty of taking the sheets.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-80

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

562. JAMES SANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 3 balls of silk-twist, value 7s. , the goods of Walter Bentley .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-81

563. JOSEPH CALVERT was indicted for stealing. on the 14th of February , 1 dish, value 3d., and 3lb weight of fish, value 5s. , the goods of Moses Jacobs .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-82

564. ELIZABETH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 gown, value 6s.; 2 petticoats, value 5s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Edward Hunt .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-83

565. STEPHEN COTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 pelisse, value 12s. , the goods of Louisa Cohen , spinster .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-84

566. DANIEL NOWLAND and WILLIAM BATES were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of William Sadd .

NOWLAND pleaded GUILTY . Aged 10.

Whipped and Discharged.

BATES pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-85

567. CHARLES HAHN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 5 ounces weight of silver-filings, value 15s., the goods of Edmund Taylor , his master .

EDMUND TAYLOR. I am a gold and silver spectacle-maker ; and live in White Horse-yard, Drury-lane; the prisoner was in my employ; in working the silver they make filings, which they ought to pick up, and deposit in a can, on the opposite side of the shop; there were three men, three apprentices, the prisoner, and I, working in the shop. On the 15th of January I was informed that some silver-filings were in a paper, in the corner of his skin, where he worked; I went there and found those filings, but he had drawn away the paper, and was pushing his skin up with his knee, as if to prevent my seeing them; I asked where the filings were; he said it was the first time, and he hoped I would look over it - I cannot swear to particular filings, but I am sure these were not his making, as he works pearl or tortoiseshell with them, and there are no appearances of that among these; besides, here are more filings than he would make in a month - he could earn 5s. a day.

JOHN MOUNTFORD . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the 15th of January I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner with the can in his hand; there were two other men and four lads in the shop - the prisoner was taking it from his skin to where it usually stands; he went to his work, and I went to work next to him; in about three quarters of an hour I heard a rustling of paper in his skin;

I looked round, but said nothing; in a few minutes I heard it again - I looked round, and asked him what he had got; he said it was the first time, and told me to say nothing: I told Mr. Taylor there was something wrong - he came and found the filings in his skin; but before he came the prisoner had pulled away the paper, and thrown it away - I did not speak to him when I saw him with the can, as I did not know but he might want it to sweep some filings into it, though that is generally done on Saturday night - these are exactly the same sort of filings as are in the can.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, having a good character .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-86

568. JOHN ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 bag, value 1s., and 2 cwt. of sugar, there were value 5l. , the goods of John Dale .

JOHN DALE. I am a master carman . On the 4th of January, I received an order from Mr. Henry Smith to get twenty-four bags of sugar from the West India Docks; I sent my man with a cart for them, and when he came home but twenty-three bags.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. About half-past five o'clock in the evening of the 4th of January, I stopped the prisoner in Goulstone-street, Whitechapel, with this bag full of sugar on his shoulder; I asked where he was going; he said to a grocer's-shop round the corner, and a man at the end had given him 6d. to carry it; I said he must go with me to that man; as we went back he dropped the sugar, and said he would carry it no further: I took him to the end of the street - there was no man there; I again asked who he got it from, and he asked if I had not met a man just before him, carrying a hat; I said I had: he then said that man had employed him, and he was to have 6d. for it, and that he had helped him out of the cart with it - that man was then gone.

ROBERT SKILLERN . I came up just afterwards, and saw the prisoner, and Tyrrell standing by him; I told him to take the prisoner, and I took charge of the sugar - this is the bag it was in; the sugar was given up to Mr. Smith, by the Magistrate's order.

THOMAS SMITH . I was employed by Mr. Dale to go to the docks, and receive the sugar; I do not know how many bags I received - I did not count them; I drove along Whitechapel - I cannot say what time I was there, but I think I got over to Tooley-street soon after half-past five o'clock; we are sometimes stopped in our journey - it rained very fast - the bags were covered over; I did not take much notice of them.

HENRY FENNEY . I am a delivery-foreman at the West India Docks. I delivered to Thomas Smith, on the 4th of January, about half-past four o'clock, twenty-four bags of Mauritius sugar, in bags of this description - they were marked "S. and W. C. M.," numbers from 217 to 240; we have a great number of such bags in our warehouse; there appears to be the remains of an ink-mark on this bag, but it was a very wet day indeed - I believe this to be one of the bags.

HENRY SMITH . I am the proprietor of the sugar. I gave the order for its being fetched: I had bought the lot No. 195, which was twenty-four bags; I was at my warehouse when the cart came, and the man brought but twenty-three bags instead of twenty-four; there were no ink-marks on them then, for the sugar destroys the ink-marks on a wet day; we weighed the twenty-three bags, and found 2 cwt. deficient; we cannot compare the sugars, for they are of different shades - there is nothing beyond the number and weight that we can judge by.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of a house, when a man asked me to carry this load of sugar to a grocer's-shop at the bottom of the street; he went on first with my hat; the officer came and stopped me, and told me to carry it back - I could not carry it back very well, and I put it down.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-87

569. MARY BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 shirt, value 12s. , the goods of Dinah Rogers , widow .

AMY RALPH . The prisoner and I both work for Dinah Rogers, who lives in Marsham-street, Westminster; she is a needle-woman . This shirt is one which we had to alter for a lady - it was safe about the middle of the day, on the 17th of January.

SARAH ROBINSON . The prisoner brought this shirt to me on the 17th of January, and I bought it of her for 2s. 6d. - I gave the same shirt to Ballard.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am the officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; she was very reluctant to go with me, and said it was her first offence; she was receiving parochial relief at the time.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-88

570. DAVID DIGBY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 10 live tame fowls, price 10s. , the property of William Taylor .

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I deal in live poultry . On the 11th of January I had some in two hampers, across an ass's back, at the Red Lion public-house, at Paddington; while I was in the house the ass went on - I received information, and went after it to the Yorkshire Stingo public-house; on going along I met a boy with a fowl, whom I detained; when I came up to the ass, there were ten fowls missing from the hampers - I have not seen any more of them since; I believe the fowl that the boy had was one of mine, but I had only had them about an hour.

SAMUEL BIRD . I keep the Yorkshire Stingo public-house. On the 11th of January, I saw the ass with two baskets of fowls - I saw some persons round it, and the prisoner took some fowls from the baskets, but I do not know what he did with them, for I was busy. I knew him well, and knew the ass was not his - I did not state in my examination at the office that the prosecutor was by him at the time.

SARAH WELLER . I am bar-maid at the Yorkshire Stingo. I saw the prisoner take two fowls out of the basket - he gave them to two men - the prosecutor came up just afterwards.

JAMES BOUND . I live in Stingo-lane. On the 11th of January, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked if I wanted any fowls. I said No. He went away, and soon

afterwards I found some fowls had been stolen - I looked out and saw the ass, and a number of persons standing there.

GEORGE PRINGLE . I was standing at the corner of Stingo-lane. I saw a man named Ambrose, who gave me a fowl - I did not see any thing of the prisoner - the prosecutor, soon after, came up and took the fowl from me.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I received information, and took the prisoner; the next morning a person named Hunt gave this fowl to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out the next morning, and was taken by the officer. The prosecutor has received a a sovereign, and compounded felony: this fowl which is here produced, was in the possession of Ambrose.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I have not received any money, nor made it up with him in any way.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-89

570. THOMAS BOLTON FENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January 1 bronze lamp, value 1l. 18s., the goods of Henry Davis , his master .

HENRY DAVIS. I live at No. 90, in the Quadrant, Regent-street, and am in the glass and lamp trade . I hired the prisoner about eleven months ago to take care of one of my shops. About two or three months ago, I went into Mr. Bullock's auction-rooms, and saw two lamps which I knew; here is one of them - I can swear it is mine; I think it had been on my premises the week before, but I cannot state on what day; I gave charge of the prisoner for stealing this lamp, and he said "For God's sake have mercy on my family."

EDWARD BULLOCK . I believe this lamp was sold at one of my sales; it had been brought by a young woman about twenty years of age, who I believe is the prisoner's daughter; it was brought in the name of Loveland; the same person had brought a lamp and an ink-stand in April last, and a few days afterwards she brought this letter: she stated that her father was a manufacturer of these articles,

HENRY DAVIS . I can swear that this note is the and writing of the prisoner. - (read)

MR. BULLOCK. Sir:- Please to settle with the bearer for the bronze lamp and ink-stand, if sold."G. LOVELAND."

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at his master's house, and afterwards apprehended his daughter; I heard Mr. Davis tell him that he had taken some lamps to Mr. Bullock's; he did not say whether he had or not: as I took him along he said he was sorry for what he had done.

MR. JOHN HARRISON . I live in Green-street, Grosvenor-square - I bought this lamp at Mr. Bullock's sale.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-90

571. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of George Thomas Palmer , from his person .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE THOMAS PALMER, ESQ. I am a barrister , practising in the Court of Chancery. On the 6th of February I was going home in the evening, and, at the end of Hand-court I felt something pull my pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner near me - he ran away, I pursued and caught him, and accused him of having my handkerchief - he denied it; I took off his hat and found in it four silk handkerchiefs, but neither of them were mine; I then recollected that I had seen him drop something at the door of a fruit-shop; I went back and found my handkerchief there.

JAMES WILKINSON . I am a constable. On Wednesday evening the 6th of February I heard an alarm in Hand-court; I went out of my door and saw the prosecutor with the prisoner; he said he had seen him drop something - we went, and found this handkerchief at the step of the door, which the prosecutor claims. Here are the other four handkerchiefs which were found in his hat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of that handkerchief - the other's were my own

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280221-91

572. DANIEL DENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 1 dress, value 23s.; 1 dress body, value 2s. 8 1/2d.; 21 yards of cloth, value 28s.; 1 yard of Irish linen, value 5s., and 1 shirt, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Frewin Jenkins .

CHARLES JENKINS . I am the father of Thomas Frewin Jenkins; I heard him say he had lost some property, but it has never been found: my son did live at No. 8, Great Castle-street, Oxford-street, but he is now gone to Mexico.

EDWARD GRIFFITHS . I am porter to Halling and Co. of Cockspur-street; they are silk-mercers and haberdashers. On the 3d of December I had some goods to deliver to different persons, and had one parcel to deliver to Dr. Jenkins in Great Castle-street: it had been delivered to me by a clerk, named Terry - I do not know what was in it; I was looking about for Dr. Jenkins', when the prisoner (who was a stranger) came up to me; I told him who I wanted; he then went and showed me the house - I knocked at the door, and he came and stood by the door; I left the parcel at the house - the young woman said it was all right, and there was a parcel to go back; I said I would call for it as I returned; the prisoner heard that and said "You'd better call for it as you come back, 'tis not worth while to carry it with you;" I called as I came back and it was gone - I am quite sure he is the man.

SOPHIA JANE BANBURY . I did live at No. 8, Castle-street in the employ of Mr. Clark; Dr. Jenkins lived there - The prisoner came to the door with the porter: the porter said he would call for the things when he came back - which he did: but before that, the prisoner had been, and I gave him the parcel - it contained a Swiss dress, cloth for six shirts, and some Irish linen - it was the property of Mr. Jenkins.

Prisoner. Q. What did I say to you? A. You asked for the things that were to go back to Waterloo-house, and I gave them you - I swear you are the man.

DAVID HERRING . I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoner on the 1st of February - he was then in Waterloo-house; the porter had met him in Spring-gardens, and taken him there. GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-92

573. JOHN HACKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 1 umbrella, value 8s. , the goods of Francis Harrison .

PHILIP HARRISON . I am the brother of Francis Harrison, who keeps a shop in Tottenham-court-road . Some umbrellas were standing at his door, in the morning, and when I took them in at night, one was missing; I know this to be my brother's; It has my writing on it.

JOHN MURPHY . I am a watchman. The prisoner passed me in Church-street, St. Giles', with this umbrella, about half-past nine o'clock at night, on the 22d of January; I asked what he had got, and told him to stop, but he ran the faster - I caught him, and he told me a man of the name of Keith gave it him to carry; I went to that man, but he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a boy pursued by a gentleman, and the boy threw this umbrella down - I took it up, and called to the gentleman, but he did not hear me; I was running because I had no shoes on, and was collared by this watchman.

JOHN MURPHY. It was a very dirty day, but the umbrella was quite clean. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-93

574. NICHOLAS BINKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Seamour .

THOMAS SEAMOUR. On the 19th of January I was going down Whitechapel-road , about one o'clock, with a coat in front of my cart; I saw the prisoner following, about one hundred yards, I then looked back, missed the coat, and he was gone; I did not know him before, but I know he is the person.

FRANCIS KEYS . I saw the prisoner and two other persons following the prosecutor's cart; I saw the prisoner go and take the coat, and run away with it; I pursued, and took him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and saw it laying in the road. GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-94

575. JOHN KENNEY , STEPHEN BROAD , and JAMES BUTLER , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 2 live tame rabbits, price 8s., and 1 live tame fowl, price 2s. , the property of James Pearce .

ELIZABETH ANN PEARCE . I am the wife of James Pearce - he is a gas-lighter ; we live in Blandford-mews - we kept one fowl, which I left safe at five o'clock, on the 3d of February, and at eight it was gone; the prisoners all live in the neighbourhood; I also lost two rabbits, which I got the next day from where they had been sold; the fowl was found in Dorset-street, by my son; they had wrung the neck of it, but not effectually.

RICHARD HOPKINS . I live in Crown-street, and deal in poultry. Two rabbits were sold to me by a respectable looking young man, but I cannot swear it was either of the prisoners; I sold the other rabbit again, but this one was not sold; the next morning one of the prisoners came and pointed out this rabbit to the officer - it is a very common sort of rabbit.

RICHARD DONALD . On Sunday, the 3d of February, I saw the prisoners in East-street, near where the prosecutor lives; Broad and Butler went down the Mews, and Kenney was at the end of it; Butler seemed to have something under his coat, but I could not tell what.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where do you live? A. With my father, in Blandford-mews - he is a smith, and I work with him.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I am the son of the prosecutor. This fowl and the rabbits were my father's; I met the three prisoners together, about nine o'clock at night, on the 3d of February, going towards St. Giles' church.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not seen other rabbits of this colour? A. No, except the young ones which this one had.

WILLIAM BARRON . I am an officer. I took Broad and Butler; I made no promise or threat to them, but Butler said they were all three together, and that Broad pulled out one rabbit, and he the other; he did not say who pulled out the fowl - he said they took them to Crown-street, and Broad sold them because he was the most decently dressed - I took this rabbit from the shop in Crown-street; he said the neck of the fowl was wrung, and it had been thrown into a shutter-box but when they went to get it, it was gone.

KENNEY'S Defence. I never saw the fowl; Mr. Pearce has known us ten years, and if he had seen us in St. Giles' he would have spoken to us - I never said anything about them, but Hopkins said that they had been sold for 3s.

MRS. PEARCE. Kenney told me they had sold the rabbits for 3s., and had cheated him of 6d.; I said if he would tell me the truth, I would depend upon his parents to make up my loss; he denied it at first.

WILLIAM PEARCE . Broad came to me on the Monday, and I asked if he had stolen the rabbits and fowl; he denied it; but in about a quarter of an hour he told me they had taken them, and he took me to the shop where they sold them.

Butler received a good character, and his master engaged to take him again into his employ.

KENNEY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days .

BROAD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Seven Days .

BUTLER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-95

576. JOSEPH MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 2 pewter pots, value 3s., the goods of Nicholas Winton ; 1 pewter pot, value 1s., the goods of John Gurney ; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. , the goods of Charles Temple .

WILLIAM LOVETT . I am servant to Mr. Nicholas Winton, a publican ; these two pots are his - he lives in Euston-square.

JOHN GURNEY. I am a publican ; this pint pot is mine - I live in Charlton-street.

CHARLES TEMPLE. I am a publican , in Charlton-street, Somers-town - this quart pot is mine.

SAMUEL KENNEWELL . I saw the prisoner in Seymour-crescent, on the 19th of January, with a quart pot in his hand; I followed him, and opposite Euston-grove I saw him cover it with an apron; he then went into a retired place, and put it in his waistcoat - I told Mr. Hall, we followed him, and found all these pots upon him.

JOHN HALL . Kennewell spoke to me, we went and

took the prisoner - these pots were all found on him - one in his apron, and another under his apron; I believe, in the flap of his small-clothes - they were all concealed.

WILLIAM JAMIESON . I am a constable, and was sent for - I took the prisoner, and produce the pots.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out to look for work; I was coming home, and saw these pots - three on the side of the pavement, and one laying down, near the road - I took them up, and saw who they belonged to - I thought it would be as well to take them to the owners.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-96

577. JANE MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 pillow, value 2s.; 2 gowns, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Ann Stephens .

ANN STEPHENS. The prisoner lodged with me and slept with me: on the 26th of January, 1 missed this pillow, a handkerchief, and two gowns; I went after her and took her to the pawnbroker's: she owned that she took them.

GABRIEL BURROWS . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned the pillow with me on the 1st of February; the prosecutrix afterwards came with her, and she said she had stolen them.

GEORGE WILLIAM DEAN . I live with Mr. Price, a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned a handkerchief and two gowns with me, on the 23d, 24th, and 26th of January.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I met the prosecutrix with the prisoner; I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and I found on her this order for admission into the poor-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 60.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-97

578. JOHN PICTON and HENRY MILLER were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 2 bushels of oats, value 5s. the goods of John Easthope , Esq.

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

SILAS WILLIAMS . I am coachman to John Easthope, Esq.; he is a Member of Parliament , and lives at Finchley ; the prisoners have been in his service since last harvest, as labourers and carmen : I keep the key of the granary; the boy missed it and told me; I looked and it was gone - we watched in the coach-house, which is about seven yards off the granary, and, about four o'clock on Sunday morning, the 27th of January, I saw Miller come into the granary, and Picton after him; they went to a bin, where I had been the night before, and smoothed the oats over; they got a sack and put about two bushels into it; I ran up, but Westwood had got in before me; Miller jumped up and ran out, and Picton after him; Picton fell down, but he got up and ran away in a moment - I am quite certain the sack had not been there the night before; it was very wet, and could not have got wet in the granary: I went, in about half an hour, with a constable, and took the two prisoners at their own houses; they said they had not been near the place, and had not seen one another since the night before, when they had a pint of beer together.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was this? A. Between four and five o'clock in the morning; the moon was just gone down, but there was light enough for us to see them, and we heard their voices before we saw them; they were about three yards from me; I told them to stand, or I would fire upon them - I had a gun in my hand, and a pistol in my pocket: I could see them in the granary; I could not see them at the bin, nor did I see them put the corn in the sack - when I went to take them, they came down and opened the door; one of them had the charge of his own horses, and could feed them when he pleased at the stable, which is about half a mile from the granary.

VINCENT WESTWOOD . I am stable-boy to Mr. Easthope; I watched with Williams on the night of the 26th of January; I saw the oats safe that night; I watched till four or five o'clock in the morning, and saw Miller come into the yard; he tried the granary door; the dog barked; he cought hold of the dog and gave it to Picton, who led him to the bottom of the steps and fed him: they then went into the granary; I went up to the granary first, but they both got out, and ran away as fast as they could - I found the wet sack in the granary, which had not been there the night before.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from the granary? A. About seven yards; we were in the coach-house - I saw Piston standing there; Miller stood before him; but I cannot say I saw them filling the sack.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a constable; I went and took the prisoners at their own houses; they denied it, and said they had not seen each other since the night before.

ANDREW DINGWALL . I am carter to Mr. Easthope; I feed the horses at his farm: the prisoners had nothing to do with the granary - there was corn in the bin at the stable.

Cross-examined. Q. But if there had not been corn in the stables, you would get it at the granary? A. Yes.

PICTON'S Defence. I got it for my master's horses.

PICTON - GUILTY . Aged 34.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-98

579. MARY WHITNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 10 yards of printed cotton, value 8s. , the goods of Ellen Philpot .

RICHARD HEARTWELL . I am in the service of Ellen Philpot, a widow , who keeps a linen-draper's shop , at the corner of Great Turnstile, Holborn . On the 12th of February, I saw this cotton at the door when I went out at half past two o'clock; I returned about four o'clock; the officer was then in the shop with it - this is the cotton; it has our shop mark on it; it had been hanging by the side of the door.

JOHN BOSTON . I watched the prisoner and four other persons for some time; I saw her leave the prosecutrix's door very quickly; I followed her to Bedford-row, where I stopped her, and took this cotton from under her shawl - she did not go into the shop, but two women, who were with her did: the prisoner and a man stood at the window - when she ran off, they went down Holborn, and were taken by an officer, but they were let go.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two women, who spoke to me, and I went with them to buy a piece of cotton; I

stood at the window, but did not go in; they came out and gave me this cotton, and told me to take it to a man on the other side of the way; I went there, but he was gone: I then went into Bedford-row.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-99

580. CHARLES SWINDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 4 loaves of bread, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of Benjamin Wilkinson .

BENJAMIN WILKINSON. I am a baker , and live in Essex-street, Hoxton ; on the 19th of January, at half past twelve o'clock, I was coming up stairs, and Codlin asked me if I had given a parcel to any one, I said No; he then shewed me the prisoner; I pursued and brought him back, with four loaves of bread - when he came back, he said, he did not take them, but another person had taken it, who had ran away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not he say he had not been in your shop at all? A. Yes.

WILLIAM CODLIN . I was in Essex-street, and saw the prisoner near the prosecutor's shop; I saw a lad come out of the shop with a parcel, which he gave the prisoner, who walked away with it; I went and told the prosecutor, who went and took him with the parcel - the prisoner had been walking up and down for a few minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner taken? A. Yes; he was not running, but walking towards Hoxton; he did not go into the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-100

581. MARK WELCH and BAXTER STANTON were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 9 yards of stuff, value 16s.; 1 yard of silk, value 3s., and 2 yards of calico, value 1s. , the goods of Ann McCarthy .

ANN McCARTHY. I live as nurse in a family. I had the property stated in the indictment in a brown paper parcel; in my hand, on the evening of the 22d of January. I was in Orchard-street, Oxford-street ; I was knocked down, and the parcel was snatched out of my hand by two soldiers , but I do not know their persons; I gave an alarm, but I have never got my property since. I followed the soldiers, and one of them went into the barracks in Portman-street; I asked the sentinel if he knew the man who had just gone in - he said Yes, it was Stanton; I went into the guard-room, and told the serjeant; he told me to come again the next morning, and he sent some men after Welch, whose person I described, as having spoken to him just before, when I had inquired of him my way to Baker-street. I went to the barracks again the next morning, and the two prisoners were produced by the colonel.

Prisoner WELCH. Q. Where did you see me? A. At the corner of Orchard-street; I asked you the way to Baker-street, and you directed me; there was another soldier with him, whose person I did not notice.

JOSEPH MIDDLETON . On the 22d of January I was standing at the corner of Portman-street, about five minutes past six o'clock, and saw the two prisoners in company with each other; they passed me, and went on towards Orchard-street.

JAMES MANGAY . I was the sentinel at the barrack gate that evening; Stanton came in from ten to twenty minutes past six o'clock - the prosecutrix came up, and asked me if I knew the man who had just come in - I said Yes; she said she had been knocked down and robbed; I told her to go and tell the serjeant of the guard: no one had come in but Stanton.

WELCH'S Defence. This woman cannot swear that she saw me after she asked me the way to Baker-street; I am very well acquainted with the place where she says she was knocked down, and there are two or three turnings about there. I had been with two of our men from ten minutes past six o'clock till half-past; I had seen Stanton about six o'clock, when I parted with him, and he was going to his own barracks; about half-past six o'clock I saw two men and a corporal, who told me they were come to look for me, as there had been a crowd about the barrack gate, and my name had been mentioned - I said I would go with them, as I had not been absent from any duty.

JOHN COPAS . I am a drummer in the second batallion of the Coldstream Guards - Welch belongs to the same company: I met him on the 22d of January, about a quarter-past six o'clock, in Orchard-street, about three doors up from Oxford-street; I did not see Stanton at all.

EDWARD EWING . I am in the same batallion. On the evening of the 22d of January, I came out of the barracks at ten minutes or a quarter past six o'clock, and saw Welch at the corner of Portman-street, about fifty yards from the barrack gate; he had nothing with him at that time; I went up to the barracks soon afterwards, saw a crowd, and heard that two of our soldiers had been robbing a woman- I went out again in about five minutes, and met Welch: I told him his name had been mentioned: he said he had missed no duty, and did not know what it should be mentioned for; I told him what I had heard, and he said, so held him God he had not seen any soldiers or women that night.

STANTON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

WELCH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-101

582. WILLIAM SEWELL was indicted for stealing on the 9th of February , 3 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 6 shillings, the monies of Frederick Leonard , from his person .

FREDERICK LEONARD. On the night of the 9th of February I lost my money from my comforter, which was tied round my neck; it was taken by the prisoner, when I was asleep - I had known him before; we slept side by side each other, at the Refuge for the Houseless, at Wapping .

JOSEPH ALLEN . I am the superintendant of the Refuge for the Houseless Poor, at Wapping. The prosecutor applied to me, and said he had lost three sovereigns, a half-sovereign, and six shillings; I had one hundred and ninety men there: I ordered the watchman to bring me the two men who had slept near the prosecutor, and I found this money on the prisoner - he said at first that he had no money about him; I desired him to strip - he pulled off his jacket, and I found two shillings in the lining of it - he said he did not know how they got there; I took his shirt, and found four shillings tied up in that, and then he said he could give an account of it; I searched further, and found three sovereigns and a half sewed up in the wristbands of his shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own money, which had been sent me by my friends.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280221-102

583. ROBERT DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of John Goodere , from his person .

JOHN GOODERE. On the 4th of February I was on the top gallery stairs of Covent-garden Theatre ; the prisoner was on my right hand side - I had my head turned to the left, and when I turned to the right again I saw the prisoner draw his hand hastily from my right-hand pocket; I turned my head to the left again, and again felt something at my right-hand pocket; I then missed my money, and charged the prisoner with having it - he pulled out two shillings, a sixpence, and some halfpence, and said that was all the money he had got; his hand shook so that he dropped the sixpence; there was a great pressure on my left hand, but none on my right; I had two shillings, and two sixpences more, and some copper in my left-hand pocket.

JAMES HACKWELL . I was the officer on duty that night, and they called me up; I took the prisoner, and found two shillings and some half-pence in his right-hand pocket; the prosecutor stated that the prisoner had dropped the sixpence - the house was not half full.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the Theatre, and the stairs were all full; I went up, and there was a great pressure at the top; the prosecutor turned round, and said"I have lost half-a-crown, and you must be the person who took it;" I said, "I have two shillings and some halfpence, that's all;" what he thought was a sixpence was a button - a woman took it up, and showed it to the Magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-103

585. WILLIAM BENWELL was indicted for embezzlement .

JOSEPH DAKIN . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner was in my service - he was to receive money for me, and to pay it me when he came home, or before the end of the day; there is an accountbook, in which he entered what he received, but that is not here.

ANN FREEMAN . I am servant to Captain Simmons - he is a customer to Mr. Dakin; I paid the prisoner the weekly bills, and he has receipted them; here is one for 3s. 4 1/2d., another 3s. 6 1/2d., and another 4s. 8 1/2d.; I paid them all to the prisoner - the last date is the 22d of December.

COURT to JOSEPH DAKIN. Q. Did the prisoner ever pay you any of these bills? A. No. On the 29th I sent another servant to Captain Simmons, and I told the prisoner he had brought back word that Captain Simmons did not owe me a farthing - he said he had received them, but had lost a sovereign, and did not like to tell me; that the sovereign was one of his own, and he had kept the sovereign which he had received from the customer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you charged him with receiving this money from Captain Simmons, did he not admit that he had received it? A. Yes; I owed him about a fortnight's wages: I have since had the money from his mother.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and asked if he knew what his master accused him of - he said Yes; I said, "Then, you understand you are charged with receiving 1l. 3s. 6d.;" he said Yes; I searched him, and found a sovereign, which he said he had just got from his mother; his master said, "You have not been out;" he said, "Yes, I went out while you was out:" he then said he had kept the money back in consequence of having lost a sovereign of his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of taking money for Mr. Dakin; Mrs. Freeman did not always pay me weekly - sometimes it went two or three weeks, when I received part; I did not give it my master till I received the whole. I lost a sovereign, and went and asked my mother to lend me one - she had not got one, and I did not like to say anything till I got it. The day my master found it out, I had been and got a sovereign of my mother, and just as I came back, my master got the officer and took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-104

585. WILLIAM BENWELL was again indicted for a similar offence .

JOSEPH DAKIN . The prisoner was in my employ; he never paid me any money from Captain Simmons in the month of January - I sent to him for money by another person, and then named it to the prisoner, who admitted receiving it, but said he had lost a sovereign.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Captain Simmons cease to be a customer of yours? A. Yes, and then I sent to him for the money.

ANN FREEMAN . I paid these three bills to the prisoner - there is one for 3s. 7 1/2d., one 4s. 1 1/2d., and one for 4s. 4d.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear that two of these might not have been paid together? A. I cannot recollect - they are weekly bills.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to my mother and got a sovereign, for the one which I had lost; the moment I came back my master followed me in with the officer, and said,"That's the young man;" he searched me, and found the sovereign on me.

COURT to Mr. DAKIN. Q. When did you last pay him any wages? A. About the 10th of January - I paid him four sovereigns.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-105

586. THOMAS GADBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 bag, value 1/2d.; 4 sovereigns, 3 half-sovereigns, 3 shillings, and 5 sixpences , the property of Robert Gadbury ; and JOSEPH WAKE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute .

ROBERT GADBURY. I am a watchman , and live in Bethnal-green ; I am the father of the prisoner Thomas Gadbury. On the 15th of January I went to bed in the afternoon, as usual, and had the money stated, in a bag in my pocket, which I meant to take out with me at night; my wife awoke me, and asked if I had paid away the money; I said No: I got up, and my money and purse were gone - my son was then gone out; Wake returned home to his mother in a day or two - he lives just by me, and when I asked him about it, he admitted that he had received one sovereign and five shillings from my son.

RACHAEL GADBURY . I am the prisoner Gadbury's mother. On the 15th of January my husband went to sleep

- my son came in, and complained of his head-aching; he had another lad with him, named Bransom; they were both in the room when my husband was asleep - I afterwards went to look in my husband's pocket, and the money was gone; I shook him, and told him of it; my daughter afterwards got the bag and 5s. back, which she gave to me.

MARY GADBURY . I am the prisoner's sister. I went into the fields, and found my brother - I asked him what had become of the money; he gave me 5s. and this bag, and said he had spent the rest, and had given the other boy 25s.; he told me that Tom Bransom had taken it out of his father's pocket, and given it to him at the Flower Pot public-house.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner on the Friday after the Tuesday on which the robbery was committed; I said, "You are a pretty son to rob your father - what have you done with the money?" he said he had spent it, and been to Gravesend; Wake was present, and said that he had received 1l. 5s. of it; Gadbury had before that said he had taken it out of his father's pocket - that Wake had been to Gravesend - they had bought themselves some clothes, had been to the Theatre, and had then been sleeping at a public-house at Wapping.

WAKE'S Defence (written). Joseph Wake confesseth, as follows: That he was at marbles (in the field) with Thomas Gadbury, when Thomas Bransom came up, and took us to Hart's-lane, and shewed us a small black bag, when Thomas Gadbury said, "That's my father's bag," from which Thomas Bransom took 25s., and gave the bag to Thomas Gadbury, who gave me (Joseph Wake) 25s. out of it, and kept the remainder I and Thomas Bransom proposed going together to the play.

GADBURY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

WAKE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-106

587. BENJAMIN CURTIS was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

PHILIP GARDNER . I am the parish-clerk of Easham, in the County of Oxford, and have been so since 1795. I produce a copy from the register of marriages in that church, made in my presence; I do not recollect where the parties came from, but I know they lodged at one William Kean 's, in the parish of Easham. (Reads) - "J. Chirrington, of this parish, batchelor, and Martha Watson , of this parish, spinster, were married in this church, by banns, the 29th of May, 1800, by me, John Simmons - witness, Philip Gardner ."

CHARLOTTE KEAN . I lived at Easham, in Oxfordshire, in the year 1800 - the prisoner came to lodge at my house - he said his name was John Chirrington ; I remember a person named Martha Watson - the prisoner was married to her, and they came to lodge at my house for about four months after the 29th of May, 1800; he went to his labour after he was married, and she remained at home - she went by the name of Martha Chirrington .

Prisoner. It was my brother. Witness. No - his brother never came to my house; that is the person who married Martha Watson I am sure; she is still living; I saw her this morning.

SARAH BROWN . I know the prisoner very well; he came to lodge in my house, at No. 11, Leicester-street, about seventeen or eighteen years ago - he lived in my house about six months, more or less: he had his wife with him, and one little girl. I have not the least doubt that he is the man.

SARAH ROWLEY . I live as cook in a family. I became acquainted with the prisoner the latter end of October, 1823; he then lived in Millbank-street, Westminster, and kept a cook's-shop - I was married to him on the 29th of December, following, at Mary-le-bone church: I have heard him say his father's name was John Chirrington Curtis. I heard in about two or three months that he was married, and I told him that I had heard of it from two or three friends - sometimes he would say he was not married, and sometimes he said he had been, but his wife was dead - he once told me he had a letter, telling of his wife's death; I asked him to let me see it, but he never did.

JOHN WEALE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Hart-street, on the 22d of January; I went down to Easham, which is within six miles of Oxford - I saw this register taken from the book - it is a correct copy.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-107

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

588. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , in the sixth year of his present Majesty's reign, 4 live tame fowls, price 6s., and 9 chickens, price 2s. , the property of Arthur Gordon .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-108

589. JOHN RUDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of George Briggs .

GEORGE BRIGGS. I am a shoemaker , and live in Mileend-road . On the 29th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and two elder lads came in; they asked if I had a pair of shoes that would fit the prisoner - I tried one pair on him which fitted; one of the others then said he would have a pair - I was getting another pair out of the window; and the prisoner took up this pair of shoes, and ran off with them - the other two went away directly; I went out, and caught the prisoner within a short distance - the eldest boy seemed to be about seventeen years of age, and acted as a kind of master over the prisoner.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-109

590. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 shawl, value 4s. 9d. the goods of Thomas Cranstoun .

JANE CRANSTOUN . I am the wife of Thomas Cranstoun; he lives at the corner of Wilson-street, Finsbury . On the 18th of January, near ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came alone to our shop, and asked the price of two handkerchiefs which were laying in the window - I said 2s. 6d. each; he asked if I would keep them till the next night; which would be Saturday - I said I did not know but we might; he went away, and I asked a person who was there to look to the shop while I went up stairs - before I got to the top, she called, and said a boy had opened the shop door, and taken a shawl off the line in the window - I ran out and saw the watchman at the door - my husband

came up with the prisoner and the shawl - I am certain he is the same boy who had been in the shop before; this shawl is my husband's.

THOMAS CRANSTOUN. I was returning home on the evening of Friday, the 18th of January, and as I came near my shop, which is at the corner, and well lighted, I saw the prisoner and two other boys about my window; the prisoner seemed to have something that he was doubling up - I am not certain whether he received it from any of the other boys; but I seized him and another; the other got away - I secured the prisoner with this shawl, which I am certain is mine - it has my ticket on it.

JOHN DIXON . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-110

591. JOHN BETEST was indicted, for stealing on the 12th of January , 1 live pig, price 17s. , the property of Thomas Tovey .

THOMAS TOVEY. I am a pig-dealer , and live at Earl's-court, South-row . On the 12th of January I had six pigs in a stye in my yard - I fastened them up with a cord at six o'clock in the evening, and about eight o'clock, I missed two, and the door was open - I made enquiries, and found one of them in the street that night - I found the other at Mr. Strickland's, at Chelsea, on the 20th of January - his house is more than a mile from mine.

JAMES STRICKLAND . I am serjeant of the night, at Mary-le-bone. The prisoner is my son-in-law. On the 13th of January I came off duty about half-past eight, or a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, and found he had brought home the pig the night before - I asked where he got it - he said he bought it with the wages that his master owed him, and he had still 1s. or 2s. due to him - he had been living with Mr. King for seven or eight months - the pig remained there or was running about the street, and on the 20th, the prosecutor and the officers came and took it away.

JOHN KING . The prisoner worked for me; but I never had a pig to sell him.

CHARLES HAYWARD HUGHES . The prosecutor applied to me, and I went to Strickland's, where I found the pig in the privy - I asked the prosecutor if he could swear to it; he said he could by the marks, and the ring in the nose. - I took it away and have had it ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the fields and saw two pigs - I drove them out and one ran away - I drove the other home, and told my father I had bought it, or he would not have kept it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280221-111

592. DIANA BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 3 lbs. weight of cheese, value 2s. the goods of William Axford .

CAROLINE AXFORD. I am the wife of William Axford; we keep a chandler's shop in St. Georges, Bloomsbury . On the 17th of January, I was in the parlour - some one said, "Run out! there is a woman taking a piece of cheese;" my mother ran out first, as I had my child - when I got to the door, my mother had taken the cheese from the prisoner.

JANE ROW . I am the prosecutrix's mother. I ran after the prisoner, and took this cheese from her apron - I did not see her take it.

MARY HILVERS . I saw the prisoner go into the shop, and take the cheese.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am a destitute and friendless widow.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-112

593. JEREMIAH CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 crow-bar, value 3s. the goods of Thomas Holmes .

THOMAS HOLMES. I live in St. Georges in the East . I had the stones up in my kitchen to repair the drain - the prisoner was there as a labourer . On the 21st of January, I was out at work all day, and when I returned home, about a quarter before six o'clock in the evening, I was informed the crow-bar was missing. I went to Mr. Haynes, the prisoner's master, and he was taken the next morning - I had seen the crow-bar the day before - it has never been seen since.

MARY HOLMES . I am the prosecutor's wife; I was at home - the bricklayer was at work then; the prisoner, and, I think, another labourer came there in the course of the day; that was the first day the prisoner had been there - I saw the crow-bar safe under the stairs, when the men were gone to tea - the prisoner returned about half past five o'clock, and took the crow-bar - I saw him come up the stairs with it - I did not stop him, as I was not certain that my husband had not given him leave to take it.

ROBERT MILLS . I was working as bricklayer at that house, on the 2d of January - the prisoner was a labourer there; we left about half-past five, and the crow-bar was safe; the prisoner saw it as well us.

Prisoner's Defence. I never knew any thing about it; I went in and brought out a shovel.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-113

594. TIMOTHY CLARIDGE was indicted for stealing on the 31st of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. the goods of George Jobson .

ELIZA SALTMER . I am sister-in-law to George Jobson; he is a linen-draper and shoe-maker , and lives in Cleveland-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 31st of January, there was a pane of glass broken; a lad put his hand in, and took out a pair of shoes - I did not see his face, and cannot say who it was.

FREDERICK SALTMER . I live at Mr. Jobson's. I was in the back parlour; my sister told me a person had taken the shoes; I ran out, and saw the prisoner and another - the prisoner was walking - I saw him throw this pair of shoes down in the mud.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the other person running? A. No; it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening - it was not very dark - the other lad was less than the prisoner - he was walking by his side - he walked from him first, and then ran; when I got out, the prisoner was within thirty or forty yards of the shop; I did not lose sight of him.

HENRY HOWARD . I am the officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the shoes laying under the window - I took them up, and put them into my apron; when I saw the man coming after me I ran.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 8 Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-114

595. THOMAS DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 medicine-chest, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of Charles Algernon Smith and another.

CHARLES EDWARDS . I am in the service of Mr. Charles Algernon Smith and his partner, chemists and druggists , of Gower-street, North . On the 31st of January I was taking down the shutters, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the morning; I had taken them down on one side, and passing the shop-door to go to the other side, I saw the prisoner in the shop, with a medicine-chest under his right arm, which had stood on the counter; he asked me if there was any body in the shop he could speak to - I said, Yes, I could speak to him; he was then turning round, as if to go out - I asked what he was going to do with the chest; he said, only to look at it; he never saw such a thing before; I called my master, who took him to the watch-house.

CHARLES ALGERNON SMITH. I was called down, and took the prisoner to the watch-house - this is my chest - it cost me 5l., but there are a pair of scales and weights belonging to it; it is now worth about 4l. 10s. - the prisoner's father lives just behind our house.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-115

596. JOSEPH GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 3 hats, value 30s. , the goods of George Smith .

JOHN THORN . I am a fruiterer and green-grocer, and live in Percival-street . Mr. Smith is a hatter . On the 19th of January the prisoner came in, and wished to leave two umbrellas for me to take care of; I had some suspicion of him, and watched him - I saw him go into Mr. Smith's shop, and come out again with three hats; I watched him a little way further, and saw him go up Seward-street - I then went to the shop, but there was no one there; at length a person came down, and said no hats had gone out of the house, to her knowledge; I then pursued the prisoner, and took him with these hats, which he said he had bought that morning.

SARAH SMITH . I am the daughter of George Smith. On the 19th of January Mr. Thorn came and asked if we missed any hats; I first said No, but I looked round, and missed three - one from the window, and two from the pegs- I had been out to a neighbour's, with two caps; I left no one in the shop - there was a woman up stairs; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN DAVIS . I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I found on him a number of duplicates, and this day-book, which they supposed, at the office, is an account of goods that have been stolen, and how they have been disposed of; the prisoner said this was a d-d blundering business - I produce the hats.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man in the shop gave them to me, and told me to take them to Hackney-road - I was to have 1s. for it. GUILTY - Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-116

597. RICHARD HARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 45 lbs. weight of bacon, value 20s. , the goods of John Palin .

WALTER EVILEIGH VERCO . I am an officer of Bethnal-green - I know Mr. Palin's shop; he is a cheesemonger , in Brunswick-street, Hackney-road . One day in January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another person near the shop, walking about, and looking over different persons' palings and back yards; I watched them - I soon after heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running across the field, with this side of bacon on his shoulder; he threw it down - I pursued, and took him.

JOHN PALIN. I keep the shop. This is my bacon; I had hung it on the side of the door, but I was out at the time; it weighs 45 lbs.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-117

598. JAMES PASCOE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 cloak, value 10s. , the goods of John Mills .

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . On the 23d of January I was in New Compton-street, about six o'clock in the evening - I saw the prisoner and another following a truck, which went up Wardour-street; one of them put his hand into it, but I did not see them take any thing - they went on to Oxford-street, and went to a cart, but I did not see them take any thing from that; they went on to Regent-street, and went to a truck, but I did not see them take any thing from that - they went into Air-street , where there was a gentleman's chaise, and a boy standing at the head of the horse; the prisoner passed it several times: I then saw him go and take the cloak from the back of it - the other one followed him to a back street, where he called, "Jem! Jem!" and the prisoner came up with the cloak on his arm - they ran on towards Dean-street, where they tied the cloak up, and the other took it; I and Phillips ran on to get a-head of them; I took hold of the other, who had this bundle - he threw it at me, and got away - I saw Phillips had hold of the prisoner, who seemed to be going to strike him; I knocked the prisoner down, and secured him - I found these three keys on him.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear I was the person who took the cloak? A. Yes; it was dark, and I lost sight of him for about ten minutes.

JESSE PHILLIPS . I was with Whittingham; I did not see the prisoner take the cloak, but I saw his companion; I said, "Let us keep to him, and we shall find the other;" he went into a dark street, and whistled, and called, "Jem!" and the prisoner came up, with the cloak on his arm.

JOHN MILLS. I am a medical man . I left my gig, on the evening in question, in the care of a boy; this cloak was in it - when I returned it was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to see a sister, who was on a dying bed - when I came to the corner of Dean-street, a young man passed me with a bundle - the witness took me - the other was not pursued.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-118

599. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 dead fowls, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Pettifer .

HENRY PETTIFER. I live in High Holborn , and am a cheesemonger . On Saturday morning, the 26th of January, I stood in my shop, and saw two fowls fall out of my window; I went out, and saw one on the ground; I went to the corner of Queen-street and saw the prisoner going down there, about thirty yards down; I pursued, and took him with the other fowl in his apron; he said he found it on the ground - the fowls were dead, and could not have gone without some one touching them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280221-119

600. MARIA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 leg of mutton, value 4s. 2 1/2d., 15 shillings, and 9 1/2d. in copper monies , the property of William Merrett .

WILLIAM MERRETT. I am a butcher , and live in Bowyer's-court, Tottenham-court-road. Between eight and nine o'clock on Sunday morning, the 20th of January, the prisoner came and asked the price of a leg of mutton; I said 7d. per lb.; she offered 6 1/2d., and I told my boy to weigh it; he said it was seven pounds and three quarters, which came to 4s. 2 1/2d.: she told me to sent it to Great Russel-street, with change for a sovereign; I put it into the boy's basket, and sent him with the change, but he was not to part with the meat or the change till he got the sovereign: he returned in about five minutes, and gave me a sovereign, which was a bad one, and said I was to send two pounds of beef suet: I went to the house the prisoner had described, but there was no such person known there: I then took my stick and went down to St. Giles's, where I saw the prisoner; I said I wanted her - she said she had never seen me or ordered any meat; this was within a quarter of an hour after she had been at my shop.

WILLIAM SMITH . I live with Mr. Merrett; I was at home when the prisoner came and bought the leg of mutton; I did not know her before, but I am sure she is the person: I took the meat, and the 15s. 9 1/2d. to Mr. Harwood's, in Great Russel-street, as she had directed, but I was ordered not to leave them without the sovereign - when I got there, I saw the prisoner standing at the door, but a man came up to me, a few yards from the door, and asked if that was for Mr. Harwood; I said Yes; he said,"Give it me, and the change, and run back for two pounds of beef suet:" he took the mutton and change, and gave me the sovereign, which I took to my master - the prisoner was at Mr. Harwood's door, about two doors off, at the time - the prisoner and my master had both desired me to leave it at Mr. Harwood's.

JANE GOODACRE . I live at Mr. Harwood's, No. 21, Great Russel-street; I know nothing of the prisoner, but Mr. Merrett came to our house on that Sunday morning to know if there had been any order about a leg of mutton - I said No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I only came out of the country on the Friday before I was taken - Mr. Merrett came and asked if I had been to his shop, I said No; he took me into a shop and asked what I had got in my apron, and he found a piece of bacon, and some tea and sugar.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-120

601. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 pistol, value 10s., and 4 dozens of counters, value 1s. , the goods of James Alfred Hawkins .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-121

602. MARY MACPHERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 2 aprons, value 2s. 6d., and 1 umbrella, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Jackson .

JOHN JACKSON. I am a stone-mason , and live in York-street, Westminster . On the 12th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I heard a footstep, opened my door, and saw the prisoner, who had got halfway up the stairs; I asked what she wanted, she said a man named Davis; I said no such person lived there, and she went away. On the day following I was talking to a man at my door and saw her again; she passed me and went up stairs; I asked what she wanted, she said Davis; and the day following, my son missed two aprons and an umbrella, which had been on the landing of the first flight of stairs - these are the aprons: the umbrella was a green silk one.

HENRY DALY . I am an officer; the prosecutor gave me information; I went with him and found the prisoner in bed; she appeared to be out of her mind, and said she knew nothing about the things, but her son said, "You know you stole them, and my trousers too" - I took her to the watch-house; and she said there was a shop where she sold things sometimes, and perhaps they might be there - I went there and got these aprons.

MARY JAMIESON . I keep a clothes shop in York-street; I bought these two aprons and a dirty green silk umbrella of the prisoner on the 12th of February - I bought the umbrella for 8d., and sold it for 10d.; she brought that about eleven o'clock in the morning, and the aprons about four o'clock in the afternoon - I put them at my door directly.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them out of the prosecutor's passage, and was under the necessity of taking them. Mrs. Jamieson gave me but 6d. for the umbrella, and 4d. for the aprons. The officer said if I would tell him where they were I should not be hurt; I took him to the shop, and he said "Who is to pay me for my time;" I said, "If you will wait till my husband comes home he will pay you:" he found I had no money and took me back to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-122

603. MARY POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 shift, value 3s. , the goods of Simon Moy .

MARY MOY . I am the wife of Simon Moy, and live in Theobald-street, Chelsea ; the prisoner lives at the back of my house - my shift was hanging in the yard, which goes to her place, about eleven o'clock on the 8th of February; I missed it in about two hours - I have seen it at a pawnbroker's.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . I am shopman to Mr. Perkins, a pawnbroker, King's-road, Chelsea - I have a shift, which was pawned by the prisoner on the 8th of February.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She told me if I would go with her to the house she would forgive me.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-123

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

604. JANE FAIRCLOUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 purse, value 6d.; 7 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of Anne Best .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 61.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-124

605. DAVID MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 axe, value 2s., the goods of William Arnold : 1 adze, value 2s., the goods of William Mason , and 1 foot-square, value 4s. , the goods of John Tacey .

WILLIAM ARNOLD. I am a carpenter , and was working at the St. Katharine Docks . I left my tools there about five o'clock, on the 21st of January, and the next morning I missed this axe.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the prisoner working on the same premises? A. Yes; he had a great many tools there - he might put a tool or two of other people's amongst his own; he was working near me; I left my tools on the top of a building.

WILLIAM MASON . I was working at the docks; I left my tools in another person's basket, and amongst the rest was this adze.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had he tools of his own there? A. Yes; he has lent me tools - the tools may have got mixed.

WILLIAM BOND . On Tuesday, the 22d of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner near Drury-lane, with a basket at his back; I took him into the Constitution public-house, and asked what he had got; he said, "Planes;" I said, "Here is something else;" and, while I stooped down to open the basket, he ran off, and was taken by two men.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say tools? A. He might say tools; he afterwards said planes and tools.

JOHN HUGHES . I was with Bond. I asked the prisoner what he had got; he said, "Some planes;" and he might say other tools; I asked where he brought them from, and he said they were his own; we went to ascertain what he had got; he sat down the basket, and ran away, from the corner of Prince's-street to Drury-lane, where I caught him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You recollect than he did say tools? A. He said, "I have got some planes and other tools;" I asked where he was working, but he refused to tell.

COURT. Q. Did he refuse to tell you where he worked? A. He said he came from Tower-hill, but would not tell me where he had been at work.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I removed my lodging that night, and brought the principal part of my tools from the building. I did not know there were any but my own.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-125

606. JAMES NASH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 whip, value 3s. , the goods of William Burnell .

WILLIAM BURNELL. I lost a whip on the 26th of January, out of my cart, between Saville-row and Albion-place - it was taken while I was in a house; I found it in about twenty minutes, in St. James'-square, in the prisoner's possession.

GEORGE HAYES . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge, and saw the prosecutor take this whip from him; he said he bought it for 1s. 4d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a young man tendering this whip for sale to a carman, who said he did not want it; I said I would give him 1s.; he then said he would take 1s. 3d., which I gave him. I had been moving some goods with Mr. Collins, of Somer's-town, and broke his whip.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-126

607. HENRY ROBBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 till, value 2s.; 30 penny-pieces, and 60 halfpence , the property of John Roberts .

JOHN ROBERTS. I am a baker , and live in Tottenham-place . On the 4th of February, about half-past nine o'clock, I went into my parlour, and soon after I heard a noise in my shop; I went into the shop immediately, shut the shop door, and locked it; I turned towards the counter, and saw the prisoner's head just above the counter; he got up, and came part of the way round the counter: I secured him - my till was taken out, but had not been carried away; I had shut it too just before I went into the parlour.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-127

608. WILLIAM STONE and JAMES SUTHMER were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 night-gown, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 1 quartern of flour, value 8d.; 3 caps, value 1s. 6d., and 1 frill, value 6d. , the goods of Patrick Newman .

ELEANOR NEWMAN . I am the wife of Patrick Newman. I had this property in a bundle, on the 26th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock, and was going down Fish-street-hill; I saw the two prisoners - one was behind me, the other before me; Stone stooped down, and picked up a ring; I cried, "Halves!" he said, "Did you see me pick up the ring?" I said Yes; he said, "You shall have it for 2s.:" I said, "I don't know the value of it, but I will give you 1s. 6d.," Suthmer then came up, and said, "I saw you pick it up;" he said, "I will stand a drop of gin for you." I went on with them to the Minories , and took a shawl out of my bundle to pawn it; to give them 1s. 6d.; they said, "We will go, and have a pint of beer in that house:" I said, "Take my bundle in with you, while I go into the pawnbroker's;" they took the bundle, and ran away - it contained all the articles stated in the indictment.

JAMES LAVER . I was at work, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I came down a ladder, and saw the prisoners running; I pursued, and saw them stopped; Stone had the bundle - it was delivered to me; I assisted in taking them to the office.(Property produced and sworn to.)

STONE'S Defence. I picked up a ring; the prosecutrix came up, and said she had a right to have half; I said at

first I had picked up nothing; but she said she saw me pick it up, and tap two ladies on the shoulder; she afterwards said she would leave the bundle with me till she returned with the money; and, finding she did not come with the ring or the money, we went off with the bundle.

SUTHMER'S Defence. I was going along, and this lady tapped me on the shoulder, and said, "That young man has picked up a ring;" I said, "Why don't you have some of it;" she said "Shall I cry halves?" I said, "As you like;" she said to him, "You have picked up a ring;" he said, Yes; I said, "I am entitled to a part of it:" he said, "I will give you a drop of gin for your's;" that is all I know.

STONE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

SUTHMER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-128

609. ELIZABETH STARBUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 2 brushes, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 shoe-horn, value 3d.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 2 caps, value 1s.; 3 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 1 skirt of a gown, value 1s. 6d.; 1 towel, value 4d.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 1 piece of calico, value 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 night-gown, value 2s., and 1 muff, value 5s. , the goods of Elizabeth Wade .

ELIZABETH WADE. I am single , and live in William-street, Hampstead-road ; the prisoner has lodged with me about ten months; the articles stated were in the drawers, in my bed-room; I missed them on the 15th of January, when the prisoner had been gone out about three quarters of an hour; I expected she would come back, but she did not - I did not find where she was till the 18th.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES DOHERTY . I produce these articles, which I got at No. 20, Union-court, Holborn; the prisoner and her mother were there; I found the articles in a bag, behind the bedstead; I charged the prisoner with taking them, and, a few minutes before I locked her up, she requested me to beg the prosecutrix not to lock her up, and to be as lenient as possible.

THOMAS EARLE . I live where the prosecutrix does. On the 15th of January last, I was going home, and the prisoner walked with me up the New-road; I saw a bit of gown hanging out of her muff, but I did not know she was leaving the prosecutrix; when I went home I stated what I had seen, and these articles were missed.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason I left the prosecutrix was, because she used me so ill; she is nothing more than myself, a common prostitute; and when I have not been able to walk, she has driven me out in the pouring rain, and took every farthing I got. I wished to leave her, and to return to my mother, and reform my life.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-129

610. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 9lbs. weight of sugar, value 6s. , the goods of James Rawlins .

SARAH RAWLINS . I am the wife of James Rawlins, who is in the second regiment of Life Guards . I keep a chandler's-shop in Park-street, Camden-town . On the 20th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I had just stepped down stairs, and my little boy, who was in the shop, called me; I ran up, and missed the loaf of sugar, which I had seen about an hour before; I went to the door, and told the watchman; the prisoner was followed, and taken; I saw the sugar at the office the next day - here is my husband's name written on the paper.

JOHN DEAN . I was going along, and saw the prisoner come out of the shop, with a white parcel under his arm - he passed the watchman, and went down Grove-street; the witness called for the watchman; I pursued the prisoner, and saw him walking along; I went towards him, and he set off running: I pursued him about a quarter of a mile, as far as Johnson-street, Somer's-town; I took hold of him, and said, "I want that loaf of sugar;" I took it from him, and gave it to the constable - I am confident he is the man; I saw his face and person distinctly - the street is lighted with gas.

EDWARD QUAIFE . I am the constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-130

611. RICHARD WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 8 pieces of leather, value 3s. , the goods of Alfred Rymer .

THOMAS WILBURN . I am shopman to Alfred Rymer, he is a currier . On the 26th of January, about a quarter before eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop to buy some leather, as he was accustomed to do; when he had been in the shop a few minutes, I saw him adjusting his waistcoat, which gave me some suspicion - he then looked out some pieces of leather, and took them to the scale - as he moved I saw that my suspicions were right, and accused him of it - he took out these pieces of leather, and said he intended to pay for them - my master came down and he was taken into custody - he then said he did it through distress.

HENRY WARDELL . I am an officer, and took him in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-131

612. HANNAH WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 mat, value 5s. , the goods of William Philip Molyneux , Earl of Sefton , in that part of Great Britain and Ireland called Ireland .

There being no proof of the prosecutor's names, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280221-132

613. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 2 spoons, value 1l. , the goods of William Wilson .

WILLIAM WILSON. I am a plumber . On the 31st of January the prisoner came to my house, to look at an apartment. I was in my back shop; my servant called me, and the prisoner took an opportunity of going down into the kitchen - the servant told me he had gone out - I ran out, and took him about one hundred, or one hundred and fifty yards off - he gave me these spoons out of his pocket - they are mine.

CECILIA HANNAH POPE . I am in the service of Mr. Wilson. I let the prisoner in, and he asked to look at the first floor, which was to let - I showed it him - I went to call my master - when I came back he was coming up the kitchen stairs; I heard the spoons rattle - the prisoner then

went out; I told my master, who pursued him, and brought him back with the spoons.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 68.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his age .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-133

614. GEORGE KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 50lbs. weight of lead, value 8s., belonging to John Fisher , and fixed to a certain building of his: against the Statute .

THOMAS JOHN FISHER . I am the son of John Fisher, who lives at Fulham . On the evening of the 1st of February I heard a noise at the top of the house, and a piece of lead fell from the roof; I went out, and saw the prisoner jump down from the roof - he got away - it was a moonlight night, and I knew his person before - I did not see the lead that night, but I had heard it fall.

HENRY PARKES . I am a bricklayer. I heard the lead had been taken from the house, and I found some lead in the garden, on the Saturday morning - I took it into the house, and gave it to Mrs. Fisher.

HENRY SAUNDERS . I am a watchman. I heard of the robbery, and took the prisoner a few nights afterwards.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a constable. I produce the lead - I have not matched it, because the house has been repaired since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-134

615. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Neighbour , on the 29th of January , with intent to rob him, and his goods, chattels, and monies, from his person, and against his will, to steal; against the Statute .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously assaulting, with intent to rob.

THOMAS NEIGHBOUR. I am a wine-merchant . About half-past seven o'clock on the evening of the 29th of January, I was on my way home to Pentonville, and by the dead wall, at the back of the Merlin's Cave public-house, I was struck violently by the prisoner, and my watch was nearly pulled out of my pocket; if he had not taken hold of my small-clothes likewise, he would have got it; he ran by me - I pursued, and did not lose sight of him for two seconds, till he was taken - the light shone full in his face, and I am quite certain of his person.

Prisoner. There was a young woman in the street, and it was a very narrow road. Witness. I had just noticed the young woman before he came up - the road was wide enough for three carriages to go along.

COURT. Q. From the mode of the attack, do you entertain any doubt that he meant to rob you of your watch? A. No - I felt for my watch, and it was nearly gone out of my pocket - the seals were hanging down quite low.

WILLIAM JEFFS . I was going by, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I pursued the prisoner, who was running, and saw him stopped, without losing sight of him; the prosecutor came up behind me - I heard the sound of a blow, and saw the prisoner separate himself from the prosecutor; I had a bundle under my arm, and was going to my home; in Margaret-street; if I had not had the bundle I should have caught him.

THOMAS GREEN . I was taking out beer, between seven and eight o'clock. I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner passed me, and I pursued him to the bottom of Margaret-place, where he fell down; the prosecutor and the witness came up to him - there was no one running before the prisoner.

ROBERT WOLLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - I was near the spot, and heard the cry of Stop thief!

Prisoner's Defence. I ran against the gentleman, but with no intention of robbing him; he was gaping after a young woman - I was coming down the hill, and could not stop myself; I said, "I beg your pardon," and ran on - I then heard a cry of Stop him! but no thief attached to it; I ran on, because I knew I had committed an assault, by running against him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-135

616. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 6 table-cloths, value 2l.; 1 apron, value 2s.; 1 spencer, value 2s.; 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 swordscabbard, value 5s.; 1 breast-plate, value 2l., and 2 labels value 1l., the goods of John Briggs , his master, and his dwelling-house .

JOHN BRIGGS. I live in Montague-street, Montague-square . The prisoner was in my service - I gave him warning to quit on the 13th of February, in consequence of his staying out without permission, the night before; he had only been in my service four days - I intended to have supplied myself with another servant, and to have got rid of him - these articles are all my property; I do not know what the value of this breast-plate is - it is silver, and so are these labels - I do not know whether any one article is worth 40s. - I saw some of them taken from a bundle, and this label was taken from his pocket.

HENRY FREED . I am a constable. Colonel Briggs came for me between five and six o'clock that day, and gave charge of a servant whom he said he wanted to to get out of his house - I went to his house, and when I got in, the maid-servant had hold of the prisoner at the top of the kitchen stairs, and said he was stealing the tablecloths - I took charge of him, and found his own clothes, and these articles tied up in a bundle - I took off his hat, and this sword-scabbard fell out of it - I found this label in his trousers pocket - he had his livery trousers and waistcoat on - I had them pulled off, and he took 2s. out of the trousers pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated - it was not my intention to take the things from the house - I had asked my master's leave to go out the night before, and I would not leave till he had paid me my month's wages.

COLONEL BRIGGS. He asked me to go out till eight o'clock, and I sat up till nearly twelve, and he did not come; I had refused to pay him a month's wages because he had been out all night, and was in a state of intoxication; the next day I wished to get rid of him - I had paid him 6s. 4d. for his wages for five days: he brought me a written character, and referred to a Mr. Robinson of Oxford, to whom I wrote; but had no answer for near a fortnight - I saw a Mr. Farley with whose father he had lived many years before.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only , and not being a servant. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-136

617. STEPHEN RALLEY was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. CHURCHILL conducted the prosecution.

MARY KING . I am the wife of David King ; we deal with Mr. Walter, a cheesemonger . I received goods from him in July last by the prisoner - I paid him 14s. 1d., and three sums of 5s. each in July - he put the receipts on the bills, but did not sign his name; this is his writing.

THEOPHILUS WALTER . The prisoner was my servant ; he was to go round with his horse and cart, and sell goods, and bring home the money - he never accounted to me for 14s. 1d., nor for three sums of 5s. each, in July last from Mr. King - he has been with me about twelve months, and had about 26s. a week, with board and lodging.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-137

618. ELIZA MORRIS , JAMES COOPER , and JOHN HARDING were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 watchkey, value 3s., and 1 ring, value 2s., the goods of Michael Dibley , from his person .

MICHAEL DIBLEY. I went to the Three Crowns public-house, East-road, City-road , on the 10th of February, about eight o'clock at night - I went into the bar to have half a pint of ale - I found it cold, and went into the taproom; there were seven or eight people there; in a few minutes, Morris came in; she complained of being very cold, and asked if any one would treat her - as no one else offered, I offered her a drop of gin, or any thing else; she preferred a drop of brandy - it came in, and she drank it; she then came and sat on my right-hand side, and, in about twenty minutes, a friend came in, and we had a pot of ale; Morris was sitting on myright-hand; she took part of the ale - my friend was cold, and we had a quartern of rum, and then another pot of ale - when that was nearly gone, my friend went away; the prisoner had some of that, and when it was out, she enquired for more; I said I would not have more as it got late, and I pulled out my watch; she asked to look at it, and said it was a pretty watch; she took it from my hand, and I saw no more of it - in about five minutes I enquired for it; but nobody seemed to know anything about it; the prisoner then said she had given it me back again; I sat still some time, and then, as I could not get it, I went to the bar to send for an officer, but I heard the watchman, and I went to call him; the prisoner Cooper came out, and said something to me, which I can not recollect; but I said to him in return, "I suppose you are one of her bullies," and he gave me a blow on the nose - Morris then came to the door, I took hold of her, and we both fell - I gave charge of her and Cooper; I asked Morris for the watch - she denied it strongly - I saw my watch at the office, the next day.

Prisoner COOPER. Q. Did you see me in company with Morris? A. Not to my recollection.

GEORGE SHEEN . I am a watchman. At half-past ten o'clock I was going by and saw the prosecutor at the bar, talking to Mrs. Hewitt - her husband was out of town: he was saying "I want an officer" - I walked on a few yards and called my brother watchman; the prosecutor then came running out and calling Watch! Morris came out; the prosecutor fell upon her, and two or three more upon them. I went up and saw Cooper strike the prosecutor; he struck him again slightly - I rushed in between them and took Cooper, and my brother watchman took Mooris - they were taken to the watch-house, but nothing was found on them.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober? A. He was a little fresh; but he was so much agitated he did not know what he did.

FRIEND ALEXANDER . I am a watchman. I assisted in taking the prisoners to the watch-house; when I came up the prosecutor and Morris were scuffling together; the prosecutor said he had been robbed of his watch and this person had robbed him - Cooper stood by, and told him not to hurt the girl; the prosecutor said he did not want to speak to him, he supposed him to be one of the bullies.

GEORGE WILLIAM BENNETT . On the morning of Monday, the 11th of February, I was in the back parlour of that public-house, and saw Cooper and Morris there in custody; Harding was there, but not in custody - I heard two females come and ask Stocks, the officer, if the watch was restored, whether they would stop the prosecution; he sent them to the prosecutor - I did not hear the answer, but, shortly after, I saw the two females come to the house again - Harding went out to them; Stocks then came to me, and said the watch was brought back. I went into the passage, and there I saw the three prisoners in custody, and heard Harding say he would a bl - y sight sooner be lagged than he would split, meaning he would be transported rather than tell of the transaction.

THOMAS STOCKS . I am an officer. I was in the parlour with the prisoners the next morning, when the two females came, and spoke to me as this witness has stated.

SUSAN BROWN . I was in the public-house on the Monday morning, and saw the three prisoners there; I saw something pass under the table from Harding to Cooper; I could not see what it was, but it was like a watch.

JOHN KETT . I am a soldier. I was in the Three Crowns, on the 10th of February; I saw Dibley and Morris sitting on the right side of him; I saw the prosecutor produce the watch and she asked to look at it; she had the watch, and he had the seals for some time; she then took it in her hand, and they sat about half an hour - I then saw her pass it to a young man, who is not here, and he passed it to Harding, who shoved it into his bosom, and went out of doors; the prosecutor then went to the bar for an officer; I went to go out, and saw they were kicking up a row - I would not interfere with it. I went back and sat down again - I wanted to tell the officer of it, but could not get at him.

HARDING'S Defence. I was not in the tap-room at the time the robbery was done.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

HARDING - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

COOPER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-138

619. WILLIAM HARRISON GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 watch, value 8l., and 2 gold seals, value 20s., the goods of Mary Mitchell , from her person .

MARY MITCHELL. I am single ; I was in Leicester-square about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock at night, on the 5th of February; I had my watch at my sash: the prisoner came behind me and caught at my neck-chain and broke it; I turned round and he snatched my watch; I caught him by the neck - he knocked me down and ran away; I screamed Watch! and he was taken by the watchman in my presence: I have never seen the watch since. There was no one else there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you sure you were alone? A. Yes; there was no one in the square but the prisoner - this was near Cranbourn-alley. I had been at the ltalian Opera - he was stopped by the watchman at the end of Lisle-street; nothing was found on him. I did not see him from the time I was pushed down till the watchman took him; I went to the watch-house that night and got locked up as well as he. There was no charge against me - I never struck him.

FRANCIS INGLISS . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Leicester-street, and heard the prosecutrix cry Stop thief! I went to the place; the prisoner was running, and she was following him, saying "He has got my property" - I stopped him; she said "It is in his hand;" I looked into his hand, but found nothing; I took him to the watch-house, and found nothing on him but three sixpences.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not wish to be searched on the spot? A. No; I did attempt to search him in the street, because I saw his hand near his pockets - not two minutes elapsed before I took him; I did not see him thrown anything away.

COURT. Q. Did the prosecutrix appear sober? A. Yes: she complained of her neck-chain being broken; she was detained because the prisoner accused her of striking him, and we have some cases where the persons do not appear. I have seen her in the street before, but not that evening.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the square and saw a young woman whom I had known two years ago; I spoke to her - the prosecutrix came up and asked if I would give her anything to drink; I said "Where can I get it;" she said "Further on;" I objected, and wished to go home - I turned to go home, and the prosecutrix struck me several times and knocked my hat off: I did not with to make any disturbance in the street and ran off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-139

620. JAMES HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 watch, value 5l. 15s., the goods of Thomas Dorman , from his person .

THOMAS DORMAN. I am a stone-mason . I was coming down Whitechapel on the 2d of February, at a quarter before twelve o'clock at night; the prisoner, who was a stranger, met me, and said, "How do you do?" he asked if I came from Sheerness - he talked some time, and wished me to have something to drink; I said No, I had money of my own, and I would not have any of his: another man came up, who seemed to know him, and then the prisoner wanted to see me home; I said I could go home myself - I then found the prisoner's hand in my pocket; I said,"Take your hand out;" they then both ran up against me; the prisoner took my watch, and gave it to the other man, who ran off; I held the prisoner till the watchman came up.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Then you had hold of him? A. Yes, by the coat; I do not know whether he had hold of my arm - I was a little intoxicated, but not much; I had been drinking two or three pints of porter, and about a quartern of rum; the prisoner and I did not walk arm-in-arm - he walked with me five or six yards, and not further; he was going my way: he put his hand into my left waistcoat pocket - I lost 15s. I believe he is the man who took my watch; I told the Magistrate I had lost 15s. - it was all in shillings; I had wrapped it up in a piece of paper, and put it into my pocket in the public-house, a little after eleven o'clock. I said nothing about the 15s. till I got the watch-house; it was not more than two minutes from his putting his hand in my pocket till the second coming up and taking my watch; I said, "Let go of my pocket - let my money alone." I took hold of him directly he took the watch, but he had handed it to the other - the watchman came up in about half a minute - the other ran away, up George-yard.

COURT. Q. Why did not you tell the watchman you had been robbed of 15s.? A. I was so agitated that I did not mention it.

THOMAS YEARLEY . I am a watchman. About a quarter before twelve o'clock I heard the cry of Stop thief! I went up, and saw the prisoner inclining rather to lead and protect the prosecutor, who had been drinking, but I considered him capable of knowing what he was about; he gave a clear account. I took them to the watch-house, and found 3s. on the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. You say he was capable of giving a clear account? A. Yes - he was intoxicated, but did not require assistance to go along; he could stand and walk; they were standing still, with the prisoner's hand at the prosecutor's back. I was standing three or four yards from George-yard when I heard Watch! called - they were not in my sight; that is a very crowded part of Whitechapel: no man could have walked along Whitechapel, and not meet more than ten or eleven persons; I should think he would meet as many hundreds; he did not say a word about any money being taken from him until he got to the watch-house.

COURT. Q. What did he say there? A. He said the prisoner had robbed him of a watch and 15s. in silver; that he attacked his pockets, and he said, "Let my pockets alone;" the prisoner said, "Never mind, it will be all right;" the prosecutor had not hold of the prisoner, the prisoner had hold of him.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the prosecutor crying, and the night constable said, "You are foolish, you do'nt know what you are about; what are you crying for?" A. Yes, those words were uttered,

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-140

624. HENRY GERRARD and JOHN OSBORNE were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Mark McCormack , from his person .

OSBORNE pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARK McCORMACK. I was walking down St. Giles's . on the 27th January, about half-past six o'clock, or a quarter before seven in the evening. I felt something at

my pocket; I turned round, and saw Osborne and the prisoner close together in the road. I laid hold of them both, and delivered them to the officer; the handkerchief was thrown down, and my wife took it up.

ELIZABETH McCORMACK . I am the prosecutor's wife; I was walking with him, he suddenly! left my arm, and I saw him take hold of the prisoner and another boy in the road; I saw the prisoner throw the handkerchief down in the street: it is my husband's property.

WILLIAM SUTTIE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and produce the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GERRARD'S Defence. I was walking by, and there were two boys at the gentleman's pocket; they took the handkerchief and gave it to me - I threw it down again, and the gentleman came and took me.

GERRARD - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-141

622. RICHARD CLARK and WILLIAM NEALE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. the goods of Peter Tyler , from his person .

PETER TYLER. On the 28th of January, I was near Argyle-street, in Oxford-street ; I did not feel my handkerchief taken, but an officer came and asked me if I had lost anything - I felt, and my handkerchief was gone: he said"I will show you the person who took it;" he seized these two boys, and from one of them he took my handkerchief.

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in Oxford-street; there was a crowd, and I saw Clark take this handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket: the prosecutor came out of the crowd; I went and told him of it, and brought him back to the crowd: the two prisoner's came out of the crowd; I took Neale, Roberts took Clark, and took the handkerchief from his breeches. I did not see Neale do any thing, but he was with Clark.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Betraun: I took the handkerchief from Clark's trowsers: the prisoners had been together for some time.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARK'S Defence. I went up and saw a crowd; I saw this handkerchief laying on the ground, and took it up; the officer came up and said, "What have you got there?" and I gave it him.

NEALE's Defence. I was not with this boy, but I came up, and he said "I have picked up a handkerchief: he was going to show it me when the officer took us.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

NEALE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-142

263. SARAH JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 8s., and 1 watch-key, value 2s., the goods of Henry Clark , from his person .

HENRY CLARK. I am a carpenter . On the 28th of January, at half-past ten o'clock in the evening I was standing at Tattersal's gateway , talking with the prisoner; there was no one else near me. I detected her hand in my pocket, taking my money, and then I missed my watch: a person came up at the time, who saw her put the watch into my coat-pocket; I gave her in charge.

JOHN MEALAUPHY . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner, for robbing him of his watch and 15s.; she said she had only 2s. 6d., but there was more money found on her, and she dropped some in Grosvenor-place; the prosecutor had been drinking, but knew what he was doing.

SAMUEL VORLEY . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought in, and the prosecutor charged her with stealing his watch; he gave me this watch, and said it was the one he had been robbed of, and a young man had seen her put it into his pocket; he said he had been robbed of 15s., I took the prisoner into another room to search her; she said, "I might and be d - d;" 4s. 6d. fell from her as she took off part of her clothes.

JAMES ISHERWOOD . I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner together as I was passing by; the prosecutor was calling watch! and I saw the prisoner pull him on one side, and put the watch into his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor came and asked me where I was going; I said to Westminster; he asked to bear me company home, which I declined: he came to me again as I was crossing the Green Park; he gave me a shilling, and asked if he should see me across the Green Park; I said I would go another way; he then asked me to have something to drink, which we had; we then went and had some rum, and I went with him as far as Tattersal's-mews; he asked me to go down the mews with him, and said there was a house at the bottom where we could have something to drink; in going down he accused me of having robbed him of his watch; I said, "I am sure I have not got it." Two or three persons came up: I sat down and turned out my money into my lap; I had seen the prosecutor put something into his coat pocket; I do'nt know what it was.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-143

624. JOHN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 set of harness, value 25s. , the goods of Frankhouse Smith Shortland .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM SHORTLAND . I am son of Mr. Shortland who lives at Staines . I went out on the 10th of January with the horse and cart; I returned about four o'clock in the afternoon - I put the horse up and hung the harness on a nail in the stable; I left the stable secure at seven o'clock: next morning I went at a quarter before seven and the the door was open, the padluck hanging by the staple, and the harness gone; it was a snowy morning, but there had been no snow for a week before; I afterwards saw some of the harness at the Angel and Crown public-house at Staines in possession of Layton - I know the prisoner perfectly well, he lives on Staines-moor with his sister-in-law.

FRANKHOUSE SMITH SHORTLAND. I am father of William Shortland. I saw him come home on the 10th of January and put up the horse and harness - I afterwards saw part of the harness in possession of the officer - this is part of it, which I can swear to.

JAMES REYNOLDS . I live at Haddon, in the parish of Belfont; I deal in pigs, cows, fruit and other things; I knew the prisoner before, but never spoke to him above three times - he came one snowy morning and brought some harness to me; I think it is about five or six weeks ago - I had not observed any other snowy morning about

that time - he came into the yard before I was up; and called Reynolds, and hit the window with his whip; I got up, put on some of my clothes and came down to him: he said "I have got some of harness" I opened the stable door and he put it in; he said he brought it from Thomas Dexter , who lives on Staines-moor; I have seen Dexter and him together - I did not see the harness then, but he said they were very much in distress and asked me to give him half a guinea for it; I said I would not, he might take it away: he then said would I give him 7s.; I said "I shall give you nothing at all;" he then said "Give me 3s. that will do to buy something for dinner;" I said "I shall give you nothing." I fastened the door and went up stairs to go to bed again; I saw the prisoner get up into his cart again and drive off - there was another person in the cart, but I do not know who; I came down again in about an hour, and found the harness in the stable - it had been put in after I went up stairs; part of it was in a sack, and part had come out of the sack; Layton, who I did not know before came to my house some time afterwards; I was not at home, but came in while he was there - he said "I have come on an unpleasant business, about this harness;" he took it away and I went before the Magistrate; the prisoner and Dexter were committed; I had used the saddle of this harness for I had a resolute horse in my cart, which broke a part of my harness and the shaft of the cart, and the next morning I sent my boy to harness the horse, and he put the saddle of this harness upon him.

JAMES APPLEBY . I am servant to Mr. Reynolds. I recollect the prisoner coming to my master's one morning with a sack, with harness in it.

GEORGE LAYTON . I am a constable of Staines. I went to Reynold's house a fortnight ago last Monday; I found this harness there - Reynolds gave me every information.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If Reynolds is capable of swearing that, he is capable of taking a man's life away; I do not know him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-144

625. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 board, value 2s., and 1 brush, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Blake .

GEORGE BLAKE. I am a plumber and glazier ; I lost a board and a brush on the 14th of January from the top of a house in Hope-street, Hackney-road , where I was at work; the prisoner came up the ladder while I was at work there, and asked why I did not give him the job which I was doing; I said it was so very trifling - it was not worth his while; soon after I missed the board and the brush - I saw the board in about half an hour.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you lend me the brush? A. No, I did not.

CHARLES GORDON . I am a carpenter. On the 14th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was at the corner of the street, and saw the prosecutor and his apprentice on the top of the house; I then saw the prisoner on the ladder for about two minutes - he came down and took up a board from the foot of the ladder, put it under his coat and ran away; in about ten minutes Franks came to me and asked if I had seen any one take the board; I said Yes, and he ran towards Bethnal-green-road.

ISAAC FRANKS . I went and asked Gordon if he had seen any one take the board; he said Yes, and by his direction, I went after the prisoner, and found him in a house - I said "Mr. Smith this is my master's board;" he said"Not that I know of, I found it at the foot of the ladder."

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am a constable. I produce the board and brush; I found the brush in a cupboard in the prisoner's front room - he gave no account of how he came by it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-145

626. GEORGE DUNCAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 4 printed books, value 25s., and 3 pieces of printed music, value 7s. , the goods of George Hughes .

GEORGE HUGHES. I live in Compton-street, Brunswick-square . On the 4th of February the prisoner came into my shop, and wanted to look at some Bibles; I showed him some about 12s. a piece, and he said had I any which would come to about 16s. or a guines, as he wanted to make presents of them to his sisters, the Misses Le Bretons of No. 15, Russell-square, and he asked if I could send any person with them; I put these articles in a bag, and sent my little lad with them; I went out soon after and saw them at a distance, and either the prisoner or the child were taking the books out of the bag; some persons then intervened and I lost sight of them - I went round another street and met the prisoner with the books; I said to him"Where is the child?' he said "I have sent him home to say I shall be there in half an hour; and I was going back to get one of these changed for a blue one;" I said it was very strange conduct, he put his hand to his pocket and said "If you doubt my respectability here is my card;" but he did not give it me - he then said "Well, the transaction shall stand as it does, and we will go back to the house;" we went towards the house, but when he got there he would not go in, but told me to go in with the child, and they would pay for what books they chose - I refused and sent for the beadle.

Prisoner. Q. Did I say they were for Miss Le Breton or for Miss Duncan at Mr. Le Breton's? A. You said for your sisters Misses Le Bretons; you wished me and the child to go in, or for you and the child to go in, while the other stood at the corner of Woburn-place.

GEORGE LEWIS HUGHES . I am son of George Hughes. I went with the prisoner to Bedford-place; he said "You go to my house, and tell them I shall be at home in half an hour, I will just go and shew these to a friend:" he took the books out of the bag and gave me the bag.

THE REV. PHILIP LE BRETON . I am a Clergyman. I live at No. 15, Russell-square: I know nothing of the prisoner - no Miss Duncan lives at my house.

Prisoner's Defence. I came out to take a walk, and unfortunately passed the prosecutor's shop; I went in and asked the price of some books - I asked if he would mind sending them for Miss Duncan at Mr. Le Breton' to look at, and when I got on to Tavistock-square, I asked the lad to give me the books as I thought I would take them to

my mother's to look at, and if she did not choose to buy one, I thought I could get back before the lad did; I certainly did wrong in giving a false address; soon after I left the lad, I met the prosecutor - I told him the books would not do, and asked him to change them; he said he thought it was a swindling transaction; I then went towards Mr. Le Breton's, but did not like to go in because I knew I had done wrong; he sent for the beadle - I did not like to be taken, and ran away; my uncle has written to Mr. Barrett to say that if I am acquitted he will take me a voyage to China with him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280221-146

627. PHILIP NEWMAN and DAVID NOBLE were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 2 decanter-stands, value 6s.; 1 set of castors, value 30s., and 1 picture-frame, value 3s. , the goods of William Sewell .

ROBERT DENT . I am a gardener, and live at Stamfordgrove ; Mr. Sewell is a gentleman living there. On the 4th of February I saw the two prisoners go into his gate, and in about ten minutes I saw them return; Newman appeared to have something under his coat - I have seen him frequently before, but do not recollect Noble. They then came down Stamford-grove - I thought all was not right, and went into Mr. Sewell's; from what I heard there I went in pursuit, and when I got within fifty or a hundred yards of them, I saw there was a person, who had just left them, at the end of Stamford-grove, and was going in another direction - I still pursued: they saw I was running, and Noble threw this bundle of wood from his hat: I then lost sight of them for about an hour.

WILLIAM PICKETT . I am a street-keeper. I heard the cry of Stop thief! about half-past two o'clock; I saw some women running, and I followed them - I asked them which way the thief had gone; they told me to go after one who had gone across the Bird-cage-field, which I did - I saw two men running in the field before me, and in pursuing them I saw this bundle in a blue woollen apron - I took it up, and it was this property; it laid by the side of the hedge, near where the men had run, and I think one of them was one of the prisoners.

RUTH SHELLEY . I am in the service of William Sewell - he lives in Stamford-grove; these articles are his property: they had been on the mantel-piece in the dining-room; I did not see them taken, but about half-past two o'clock the witness came and told us something was gone, and I missed them.

EMMA DENT . I am the wife of Robert Dent. I saw the prisoners go four times into Mr. Sewell's, and the fifth time I saw Noble go into the house with a bundle of wood - he came out with a large dark bundle, which he gave to the other, and they walked off; my husband went to Mr. Sewell's, and then pursued the prisoners; I never lost sight of them till they got out of the grove; and at the end of the grove I saw a third man, but I did not see him take anything from them - he took to the left hand, a roac across the Bird-cage-fields, and they took to the right.

ROBERT ASHBY . I am a gardener. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and followed the prisoners, who were running together; I saw another person running towards Newington, from the Bird-cage-field: the two prisoners crossed the stile, and I followed them; I caught Noble first, and then Newman. I had not seen them speak to any man.

HENRY BROMLEY . I found this hat, with this handkerchief and bundle of wood in it, on a wall in the Bird-cagefield.

Prisoner NOBLE. Q. How could you do that; I was running along the private-carriage road? A. I was going across, and saw it.

THOMAS ATKINS . I am a constable. I took the two prisoners, and produce the property.

NEWMAN'S Defence. I had not been there at all - they never saw me; I had been round Hackney with potatoes.

NOBLE'S Defence. We were going down the private-carriage road; there were other persons running across the Bird-cage-field; I dropped my hat, but there was no wood in it; I saw Mrs. Dent at her window, either washing or looking over some dirty linen.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Twelve Months .

NOBLE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-147

528. CHARLES LITTLEJOHN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 4 spoons, value 2l. , the goods of Alexander William Browne .

ELIZABETH BROWNE . I am the wife of Alexander William Browne - he is drum-major of the first regiment of the Tower-hamlet militia; we live in Shacklewell-road . I went out between five and six o'clock in the evening of the 12th of January, and left my spoons safe on the sideboard in the front parlour; I returned at twenty minutes before six o'clock, and met the prisoner coming from the parlour; I heard some noise, went to the side-board, and missed the spoons; I went out, but could not see him- I went over to his mother.

SUSANNAH BROWNE . I am the prosecutor's daughter. The prisoner came to our house that evening, took a chair, and sat down by the fire, in the room where the spoons were - I did not see him take anything, but I went to open the door for my mother; I saw them just before - he said he came to see if his mother had been there; he got up, and went away just as my mother came in.

PHILIP PARISH . I am a patrol. I took up the prisoner on the 30th of January; I told him it was for a robbery at Shacklewell; he pretended at first not to know anything about it; I said it was a place where five spoons were stolen - he said, "Oh, at Browne's, there were but four spoons."

WILLIAM MORGAN . I received the prisoner from Parish - I said it was about five spoons; he said there were but four; I asked him for the duplicate - he said they were not pawned, but he gave them to a person to sell, and his share of the money was 1l. 5s.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-148

629. MARTHA LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 silver spoon, value 10s. , the goods of Edward Littledale .

ELIZABETH COE . I am servant to Mr. Edward Littledale. The prisoner called at-his chambers on the 20th of January - I asked her to sit down in the hall; she waited

about twenty minutes; Mr. Littledale then spoke to her and when she was gone I missed a silver spoon from the breakfast table; I suspected the prisoner, as no one else had been in the place, and I told Mr. Littledale of it. The constable brought the spoon in a day or two afterwards, to know if it was Mr. Littledale's.

WILLIAM SMYTH . I live at No. 36, Monmouth-street. On the 20th of January the prisoner came to my shop, and finding the door a little ajar, she came in, and offered this spoon for 3s.; 1 detained her, and took her and the spoon to the watch-house; she said it was her own spoon, and her father's crest on it.

WILLIAM CAMPBELL . I received the prisoner at the watch-house; she said it was her own, and that was the family crest of her father.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-149

630. WILLIAM GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing' on the 8th of January , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 watch-chain' value 8d.; part of a watch-key, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 hat, value 10s. , the goods of Richard Godwin .

RICHARD GODWIN. I am a carman , and live in Chapel-street, Hackney-road . On the 7th of January I went home in the evening, and went to bed about half-past ten o'clock; I might fall asleep about eleven o'clock. When I went to bed, the landlord, the landlady, an apprentice-boy, the prisoner (who lodged in the house), and a woman were in the room, but the females went out while I went to bed; I put my watch face downwards on the pressbedstead, and my hat was in the room; the next morning I missed them; my land lady asked what I had done with my watch - I said I had left it on the top of the bedstead; I have never got them since; the prisoner left his own hat in the room - he absconded that night, and was not seen till he was taken up.

JAMES VIGO . I am an apprentice - I lodged in that house, and slept with the prisoner. On the night of the 7th of January my master had a female visitor, and we sat in the prosecutor's room; about half-past ten o'clock my master said to me, "You may go to bed," but I did not - I was cleaning up the work-shop; at eleven o'clock my master and his daughter came up to go to bed; I saw the watch on the bedstead with the face downwards; the prisoner was in the room - the prosecutor was in bed, and appearedto be asleep; I took my shirt down stairs to air it, and went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock; my mistress heard the street door go, she went down and missed the watch - the prisoner was then gone - he had lodged there about a month.

ANN TARNER . I am the landlady of the house. A friend came to see me that night, and I went home with her after Godwin went to bed; I went out about ten minutes to eleven o'clock, returned in about twenty minutes, and knocked at the door - my little girl let me in; I said,"Why did not the apprentice let me in?" I went to the apprentice's room, and asked him where the prisoner was; he said he believed he was in Godwin's room; I went there, and found him asleep; I touched him, and said,"Are you not going to bed?" he got up, and I thought went into the yard - I then went up stairs - in about two minutes I heard the street door go; I went down, and missed the prisoner and the watch.

EDWARD SOUTHWOOD . I took up the prisoner on the 7th of February; I could not find him before. As I was taking him to Worship-street, I asked him what he had done with the watch; he said, "If there were not a second indictment coming against me, you might know something about it; but you shan't know anything now."

Prisoner's Defence. I left my lodging certainly that night, but I did not take the property; I was not very well pleased with my landlord and landlady's behaviour - I went to Gravesend, and got a note to go on board a ship, and when I came to London again I was taken in Kingsland-road.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-150

631. MARGARET FURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 hat, value 2s.; 1 brush, value 1s.; 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 blanket, value 2s., and 1 set of fireirons, value 3s. , the goods of Peter Wilson .

PETER WILSON. I live in Bennett's-court, George-street, Bethnal-green . I had hired the prisoner to look after my place and my children, as I had no wife. On the 15th of January I missed a hat and a brush; I then missed the other articles - I charged the prisoner with taking them - she at first denied it, but at last said she took them.

LUKE SPENCER . I am a shoemaker. Here is a hat and a sheet, which the prisoner brought into the tap-room of the Ship public-house, for sale; she brought the hat first - she said the hat was her son's, and he was dead; I went with her to pawn them, and they would not take the hat in - I took the hat to a friend, and told him it was a poor old woman's, whose son was dead, and he gave her 2s. for it.

BENJAMIN NASH . I have a hat and a brush, which I bought of Spencer, whom I have known for twelve years.

LUCY TOBIAS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet here, which I took in pawn from Spencer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave the articles to this man to get out some leather which he had pawned for 4s., and he said he would make a pair of shoes in five or six hours; I said I could not leave the place till I got them; he said I should have them by six o'clock, as he could draw 5s. of his master.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-151

632. JAMES CHARLES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 8 yards of flannel, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Teasdale .

THOMAS TEASDALE. I keep a carpet warehouse in Chiswell-street , and deal in flannel. On the 7th of February I left home about six o'clock in the evening, and returned about ten; I then heard that a piece of flannel, which I had seen safe in my shop when I went out, had been stolen - it had been about one foot and a half within the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ABRAHAM HAM . On the 7th of February I was in Chiswell-street, and saw the prisoner and another person looking at the goods in the prosecutor's shop - they went

on, and stood talking; they returned - the other person stooped down, and took the flannel, which he gave to the prisoner, who put it into this bag; I crossed, and took the prisoner by the collar; he dropped the flannel, and I took him back.

DAVID McCRAY . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found 25s. 6d. on him, in different pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Chiswell-street, and met a person with the flannel - he gave it to me, and the man crossed over and took me. I know nothing of the man who stole the flannel.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-152

633. THOMAS CRAWFORD and SAMUEL MASON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Kelly .

JAMES HACK . I was going down Slater-street, Bethnal-green , about a quarter-past seven o'clock on the evening of the 29th of January - as I passed a little shop, I saw two boys looking in at the window, and another was laying under the window of the next house - I thought they were going to cut the glass, I went and looked over their shoulders; I saw Mason in the shop, and a girl was showing him some articles, and I saw he was filling his pockets; Crawford, who was outside, tapped at the window; I took him into the shop, and made Mason put down the articles which he had in his pockets; I then made him open his coat, and there I found these shoes.

JAMES MANNING . I live with Mr. John Kelly, at No. 28, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields. These shoes are my master's; they were safe about two o'clock on the 29th of January, and I missed them about half-past three o'clock.

Prisoner MASON. I had them given to me.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

CRAWFORD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-153

634. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for bigamy .

RICHARD RUSSELL . I know the prisoner; I was present when he was married on the 27th of October, 1817, to Catherine Duffy , at St. George, Hanover-square; she was alive last Saturday week.

PHILLIP WEBSTER . I apprehended the prisoner on a warrant for bigamy - I asked him if he could deny it; he said he could not. I hold in my hand the two certificates of marriage. (read).

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where did you get them? A. I got one from Elizabeth Ann Fawdon , the last wife, and I believe she had the other - I have compared them with the originals - they are correct.

ELIZABETH ANN FAWDON. I was married to the prisoner, on the 5th of August last.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known him? A. Two years - we heard he was a married man; I, and my mother went and enquired, and the next day his wife came, and said she was his landlady for ten years; she knew he had been married, but did not know that he was married now; I had a great many presents, and some cash, but all in a proper way - my mother washed for a Mr. Ward for seventeen years.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-154

635. ELLEN COCKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 coat, value 4s., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s., the goods of Martin McGraary , and 1 cloak, value 4s., and 2 flat-irons, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Hogan .

MARTIN McGRAARY. I lodge in Duck-lane, Westminster . The prisoner lodged in the same house; I saw her on the Tuesday, and on the 17th I got a job, and did not come home till the Saturday night - I then missed a coat, a waistcoat, some shoes, stockings, and handkerchiefs; my landlady also lost some articles.

MARY HOGAN. The prisoner lodged in my house. I lost a cloak, some flat irons, and other articles.

WILLIAM LEES . I am an officer. I went to apprehend the prisoner, and, on entering her room, at No. 7, Gardner-street, I found this cloak, which Hogan's husband claimed, and a duplicate of a pair of boots.

THOMAS PRYCE JONES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat and waiscoat, which were pawned by the prisoner on the 17th of January.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18280221-155

536. JOHN FOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 fixture, (i.e.) 1 window-sash, value 5s., belonging to John Harmer , and fixed to a building of his ; against the Statute.

EDWARD WELCH . I know Mr. John Harmer's house; it is in the parish of St. Luke ; I collect the rent of that and the next house for him. On the night of the 12th of January I was sent for, and found this sash in possession of the watchman - I have fitted it to the frame; it matches exactly.

JOHN McLANE . I am a watchman. Between twelve and one o'clock in the morning of the 12th of January, I saw the prisoner with the sash in his hand; he was two or or three turnings from the house - he turned up a court, where there was no thoroughfare; I sprang my rattle, but could get no assistance - I went up and took him with the sash; he made a twist, and got from me in Cherry-tree-alley - but he dropped his hat, which I took to the watch-house with the sash - he was taken on the Saturday night following.

JOSEPH SIMONS . My brother watchman gave me a description of the man; I knew the prisoner by his description, and took him on the Saturday night.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my custody, and the sash also.

Prisoner's Defence. He swore to me, because the hat fitted me, and there might be forty hats that would fit me.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-156

637. ELIZA HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 2 pillows, value 2s.; 3 pillow-cases, value 3s.; 5 sheets, value 10s.; 14 towels, value 5s; 5 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 5 night-caps, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value, 1s.; 1 rule, value 6d.; 1 pen-knife, value 6d.; 1 pair of scissors and 1 comb, value 3d. , the goods of Benjamin Smythson .

ELIZABETH SMYTHSON . I am the wife of Benjamin Smythson; he keeps a tavern in Catherine-street . The prisoner lived with me, and left me about a month since - I missed many articles while she was with me, but they were attributed to other persons - we parted on the best of terms - I afterwards missed other things - I knew where she was gone, and I found the articles stated, which are my husband's, three weeks ago, yesterday, at her lodging in Little James's-street; I told her, circumstances had arisen which excited my suspicion, and if she had nothing of mine she could not object to let me see her boxes; she was much confused, and said she had not the key; I said I would send for an officer; she then opened a box, where I found a number of articles, and another trunk was full of my property - she wished me to take them, and said, she intended to return them on the morrow.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you kept this tavern? A. About three years; some single gentlemen lodge there - no other persons. We took it of Mr. Ireland; my husband is a theatrical agent, and our house is mostly frequented by theatrical persons; there was a pair of tongs and a shovel found which I said were mine - the prisoner said they were Mr. Ireland's; I said she might as well say so of all the other articles; she is married, and I have often seen her husband there - he has frequently stopped all night, and gone from the house before we were up; my husband's name is Benjamin Christian Smythson.

PATRICK MURRAY . I am a patrol. I went to take up the prisoner, and produce part of the property.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I produce part of the property.

GEORGE SMYTHSON . I went with my mother, and we got the prisoner to let us search her boxes; we found this property there.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them with my own money.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-157

638. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 11 shillings, and 7 penny-pieces , the monies of George Johnson .

GEORGE JOHNSON. I am a broker , and live in Bartholomew-terrace. The prisoner's mother lodged at my brother's, and has occasionally worked for me; on the 9th of January I gave him a duplicate, and 11s. 7d. to go and get a coat out of pawn; while I was giving it to him; he said what a thing honesty was; it was not every one who would like to trust another with so much money; he went away, and never returned for three weeks; I went and asked him for the money, and he said some boys had persuaded him to spend it, and the duplicate he had given away; he said he did not care what became of him, so long as he was not flogged.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280221-158

639. CHARLES ROOTSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 42 lbs. weight of tobacco, value 7l. , the goods of George Rogers , his master.

GEORGE ROGERS. I am a tobacconist , and live in St. Giles's. The prisoner was in my employ; it was a part of his duty to deliver goods - he had 42 lbs. of tobacco, and 17 lbs. of snuff to deliver to customers at Kensington, and other places - he went away, and I heard no more of him for three weeks - on the day after Christmas, I received this letter, which is his writing: -

"SIR, December 26th, 1827.

I write this to inform you, that I met with a young man on Monday last, when I was going to deliver your goods; I had unfortunately drank rather too freely, and was not aware of the time being so late, I sat down to take rest and fell asleep; when I awoke, my bag was gone, and I did not like to return; but I hope you will forgive, GEORGE ROOTSEY."

JOHN MERIDITH . I am clerk to the prosecutor. I sent the prisoner out with several parcels, in a bag, to deliver to different persons.

Prisoner's Defence. I got into a public-house, at Knights-bridge, and was afraid to return home.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-159

640. CATHERINE RAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 watch, value 2l.; 8 sovereigns, and 5 shillings, the property of Alexander Copland , from his person .

ALEXANDER COPLAND. On Saturday, the 26th of January, I met the prisoner, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, in St. Giles' - I went to a public-house with her, and had something to drink; she then asked me to go to an acquaintance of her's, which I did; we went into a room, and went to bed, but I did not pull my clothes off; I am certain I had my watch and money when I went into the room, and there was no other person in the room but us, but I did not see her take them - she said she was ill, and went down stairs, and the instant she was gone, another woman came into the room - I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my watch and money - I asked that woman if she could tell where the prisoner was gone; she said No - I went out of the room, and saw a respectable man, who took me to the beadle; I described her, and he knew her very well - she was taken the day after - I found her, and gave charge of her - I am quite sure she is the person; we were not in the room an hour altogether.

MAURICE NICHOLAS . I saw the prosecutor about five o'clock that afternoon - he said he had been robbed of his watch and money, and gave me a description of the prisoner; I knew her, and searched for her all that afternoon, but could not find her till the next day, when we all met opposite Meux's brewhouse - the prosecutor charged her with robbing him - she said she did not know him.

GEORGE SUTHERLAND . I am an officer. On the 28th of January I was at Mary-le-bone office; I saw the prisoner there; the prosecutor came in, and I heard the prisoner say to another girl, "My God! what am I to do!" the other girl said, "What have you to do, but to deny it, and if you speak out, you will get but two or three weeks of it;" the prisoner said, "I can't deny it, what shall I say about the sovereign?" she said, "Say he gave it you for a shilling."

MAURICE NICHOLAS. There was nothing found on her, but the next day she sent a sovereign, which she said had been sent her; she was very desirous to see Mrs. Copland. and said she would tell her all about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man at all.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-160

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

640. MALBY COTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 19 tin plates, value 3s.; 2 hammers, value 4s.; 2 pinchers, value 2s.; 1 soldering-iron, value 6d., and 2 pieces of solder, value 6d. , the goods of William Howard and William Quincey , the younger.

WILLIAM QUINCEY, JUN. I am a tin-plate-worker , in partnership with William Howard - the prisoner worked for us. On the 30th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening; he was leaving work - he had passed by me, but I believe had not got out; I called him back into the counting-house, to reprimand him for leaving some work unfinished - I saw something under his coat; I asked what it was - he said, "Nothing;" I said I would fetch an officer, and he produced these tin-plates, which are mine - he gave me a card of his address.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. How long has he been in your service? A. Two or three years - he has a wife and family - he did not appear intoxicated.

EDWARD WATSON . I am porter to the prosecutor. I went into the counting-house, and saw the prisoner produce these plates.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - these tin-plates were found on him, and this other property I found at his lodging.

BENJAMIN SOUTHCOMBE . I am a tin-plate-worker. I went with the officer to the prisoner's lodging, where we found these articles - we found it by the card he left at the counting-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280221-161

641. CHARLES JOBBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1826, 1 pair of scissors, value 6d.; 4 yards of lace, value 10s.; 1 box, value 10s., and 20 sovereigns, value 20l. , the property of William Bucknall .

JANE BUCKNALL . I am the wife of William Bucknall, who is a servant , and we live in Hampton-place, Piccadilly. On the 24th of January, 1826, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was moving from Edgeware-road to King-street; I took a hackney-coach, and put two trunks and a band-box into it; I put this writing-desk into one of the trunks; I could not get the key out of the trunk again; the prisoner was the driver, I believe, but cannot swear to him; he put my trunks into the coach - only one man was then with the coach; as we went along he stopped at the corner of Cork-street, and took up a man, named Crane, who has been tried and convicted; the key was left in the trunk - I was in the coach, and was driven to King-street; my trunks were taken out, and I carried them into the house - I saw one trunk a little open - I opened the lid, and the desk was gone; Crane took the things out of the coach - the coachman, I think, stood by the side of his horses; I paid the fare, and took the number, which, I think, was 78l - I offered 5l. reward to the waterman, at the corner of Cork-street, to discover the desk; Crane was taken, and convicted - I cannot positively swear to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Crane only took your luggage out? A. Yes; the coachman stood at his horses' heads, holding them - he staid there, and I paid him; I went into the coach immediately after the boxes were put in; the prisoner was a long time fixing the boxes in the coach - Crane did not put them in - it was dark; the coachman was at the head of his horses all the time they were being taken out.

COURT. Q. Who loaded the coach? A. Nobody but the coachman; Crane was not there then; the box or desk contained the property mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner is much the same size as the man.

BARNARD CODEN . I am a clothes-dealer. Two young men came to my house, about two years ago - I cannot say the date - it was between nine and ten o'clock at night; I cannot say whether the prisoner was one; they brought a desk to sell - I said it would not suit, and I would not buy it; I did not notice the box, and cannot say whether this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. You remembered the other man? Yes, Crane; I cannot say which of them offered the box.

BENJAMIN ALEXANDER . I am a salesman, and live in Westminster-road. The prisoner and Crane came to Cohen's with a box, about two years ago; I was present; I believe the box produced to be the same; Cohen said it would not suit him - they both offered it for sale; it was not open - they both went away - I am certain of the prisoner's person - it was about nine o'clock in the evening.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say, on Crane's trial, that you knew the other man? A. I did, I am certain; I do not recollect saying it was Crane and another person; I swear I did not - I did not say so, to my knowledge.

Q. Did you not also swear, on that occasion, that Crane opened the box, and offered to sell it? A. I never mentioned it, or any thing of the kind; I am almost sure I did not say so; I am positive - I am almost sure of it.

Q. Did you not just now see me send for the Session's paper? A. Yes.

Q. Why are you less sure now than when I sent for the paper? A. I am not more sure than I was before - I am positive I did not say so; I am almost positive of it; I did not say on the former trial, that Crane opened the box; I almost sure of that, but it is now two years ago, and I cannot bring my mind to a recollection of it.

WILLIAM PURCHER . I keep the Red Lion public-house, Marsh-gate. In January, 1826, this box, to the best of my belief, was brought to my house, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, by Crane; he was alone, I think; he offered it for sale for two guineas, but I declined buying it; I think the words I used were, "I am afraid it is not all right," and to the best of my recollection, he replied, "Oh! it is all right, it was a find, eight miles off;" I declined buying it, and when business was over, I and my wife turned the contents out, to see if we could find the owner; Crane called next morning, and took it away - I was not up then.

HENRY WILLIAM FOWLER . I am a waterman, at the Red Lion, Marsh-gate. The prisoner presented to me a pair of scissors, one day in January, about two years ago; he said, "Here is a pair of scissors will do for your wife;" and he asked me to have something to drink: I gave the same scissors to the officer - it was about nine o'clock in the evening, or half-past.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner about three o'clock on Sunday, the 4th of Fe

bruary - I was waiting for him, and on the coach coming into the yard, I followed it up, and said, "Jobbins, come down, I want to speak to you;" he came down, and I said,"Is your name Jobbins," he said Yes; I said, "You must go with me;" he said, "For what?" I said, "For that concern you was concerned in with Crane;" he said it was not him - I said it was - he said, "No, it was my brother" - I asked his brother's name - he said Charles, and that his was William; I called a person to look at him, who said he was the man - as I took him along he said he had gone by the name of Charles, but that was not his name, and that he was with Crane, but he did not have the money - that the Jew had the money, and the Jew broke the box open when he was in the shop with Crane; I said, "The Jew denies it - why did you go away? I could not find you; and you left your dog behind you;" he said he had been living down the Commercial-road, and had lately come back to Westminster - I had been looking for him for two years, and heard he was about for the last six weeks, but did not know where to find the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. How have you been looking for him? A. Making inquiries for him every time I went over Westminster-bridge - I asked if Jobbins was about. I questioned him to see if he was the person.

COURT. Q. How long have you been an officer? A. Two years; and I was a constable two years.

HENRY WILLIAM FOWLER re-examined. I had known Crane about twenty years, and the prisoner about three years; he drove a coach - Crane drove the coach that night; I saw him and the prisoner together on the evening the scissors were given to me. Crane was a night coachman.

JURY. Q. What time do the night coachmen come on? A. About five or six o'clock.(Box and scissors produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Crane gave me the scissors at the Marsh-gate; I gave them to the waterman and went home.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-162

642. SAMUEL BEAKS and GEORGE CHAPMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d. of February , 10 live tame fowls, price 20s., and 1 thermometer, value 1s. , the property of John King .

HENRY HUBBARD . I am a carpenter, and live at Beckenham. On the 2d of February, I was coming from Hanworth, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, when I saw the two prisoners standing still, in company together, in a cross-road that leads to Hounslow; they saw my dog, and I said, "It is only Henry Hubbard." I knew them both before; Chapman lived at Twickenham, and Beaks used to live at Hampton. Beaks said to Chapman, "Find the jemmy." Chapman said, "You find it," and he found it by the ditch - I said, "Let me look at it." which they did, and I asked what the round end was for; they said, "For staple work." I then went on to Mr. Simmons's, and gave information: we went and laid wait for them about seven or eight yards from Mr. King's - they came up, passed, and walked on. We heard a crash, similar to a door being opened - I said, "I think they have got in." We then went and fetched two more men from a little distance - we waited there till about half-past three o'clock, and then saw the prisoners come out with some wet linen, ten fowls, and this thermometer: they were together, and had the property on their shoulders - we went afterwards and saw they had opened a door to get into the hen-house.

JOHN SIMMONS . I am a constable of Twickenham. Hubbard gave me information, I went and laid wait with him; I did not see the prisoners go into the house, but they came out at the back, and threw the bundles over the pails - I jumped out of the hedge and followed them: Beaks was stopped by an officer in about an hour; I am quite sure they are the men. I examined the premises, and found they had broken open the door of the out-house - the crow-har was found on Beaks.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I was one of the persons who laid in wait; what the witness has stated is true.

EDWARD FISHER . I heard the cry of Stop thief! about four o'clock on Monday morning - I saw Beaks come along the road without his hat; I took him, and found this crow-bar and these twenty one keys on him - some of them are skeleton keys.

JOHN KING . I keep the house, which was broken open. I lost ten fowls, and this thermometer from my green-house, it is marked, "J. Young, Hampton." The hen-house was broken open, but the green-house was not locked: they opened a gate to get into the garden. I saw the fowls before the magistrates, but they have not been kept.

BEAKS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CHAPMAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoners, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18280221-163

643. JAMES BEAN and WILLIAM CARDINELL were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 6 fowls, price 8s., and 3 geese, price 12s. , the property of Henry Comley ; and ELIZABETH ASHTON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

HENRY COMLEY. I am a farmer , and live at Chingford . On the 20th of January, I had some fowls in an out-house and some in a barn; the out-house was not locked, but the door they came in at, or went out at, was broken. I went to bed about ten o'clock on the Saturday night; I heard the cocks crow at three o'clock - I awoke my wife, and said "The wind rises." The carter came in the morning to do his horse, and he said the fowls were stolen - I got up as soon as I could, and missed six fowls and three geese; I went down into the yard and saw footsteps: I went and inquired at the public-house and saw the constable, he said they were the same footsteps as had been about almost every Saturday night. I followed the prisoners up to London, where I found an officer, and asked him where Lambeth-street Office was - I went with him to some alley; I lost the officer there, but he came to a public-house with the prisoners, and showed me a part of my fowls, which I knew by some private marks on them. I know Cardinell by the name of Ridley - he has lived at Chingford: I have seen Bean about once, but never spoke to him, and did not know where he lived.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know Cardinell's parents? A. No. My son Edward was at home and in bed when the fowls were stolen - I do not know what time he went to bed: I went to bed first; I do not sleep in the same room; I saw him go up stairs to bed; he was called up by the servant in the morning - I heard the fowls at three o'clock, and they were safe at

ten o'clock - I did not lock them up. I dare say I had twenty fowls; I did not count them that night, but I saw them all safe on the roost. I was awake and heard the clock strike three, within a few minutes after I heard the fowls.

COURT. Q. What day in the week did you lose your fowls? A. On Monday, and I saw them before twelve o'clock on the same day at the office.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer. I received information from the prosecutor, and I went with his son, who said he could identify the persons - I went to several houses where I knew Cardinell had lived, I found where he was, and went to the house; I went up stairs, and found him and Bean in bed, and Ashton drawing a fowl - I saw a chest, and asked where the key was; Cardinell gave it me, and I took four fowls and two ducks out of it - I took them to the office, and went back and found one fowl in a saucepan, boiling on the fire. In consequence of something that Comley's son said to Bean, he told me that if I went to a turnip field, near Comley's, I should find three geese on the right hand side, under a hedge, I went and found them - I showed the fowls and geese to Comley; he swore positively to them, by some private marks on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the marks pointed out to you by Comley? A. I do not know - he swore he knew them by a private mark. I have got the fowls' feet at home, but did not bring them here - I first met the prosecutor's son near the office, at Lambeth-street; he appeared to know Bean and Cardinell. When he got into the room, he told them they were the last persons he should have suspected of such a thing, when he had been feeding them; there were preparations for dinner; the prisoners did not tell me that young Comley was coming to dine with them. Young Comley told Bean he would speak to his father to do something for him, to get him off, if he would tell where the geese were: the prisoners did not say Comley opened the barn door, and pointed out the fowls and geese, in the middle of the night - Comley said to them, "I did not think you would have done what you have, after what I gave you to eat and drink last night." I knew nothing of young Comley till he came to me. I have seen Cardinell about the Commercial-road with dogs - I do not know his family.

EDMUND COMLEY. I am the prosecutor's son. The fowls were safe on Saturday night, and on the following morning we missed them. I know the male prisoners. I had been to Woodford the day before, and as I returned between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I met Bean and Cardinell, between the Bull public-house and the swing-gate - Cardinell came behind me and struck me; he rubbed his hands and said,"Have you not got a bit of pork, or a bit of bacon to give us; I have not had a bit of grub all day." I said"Well, come to the King's Head public-house;" he said he would not - he would go to the Bull; I took Bean into the King's Head, he followed, and we had a pot of beer - one Morris came in; they went out - I said to the publican, "I won't to go home with them." I shut the door and hatched it - Cardinell shoved it open again; we then all went on - Cardinell said "Where are old Ash's geese;" I said "They are not here;" we went on; they broke off the top of a gate; I got over the gate to get away, as I was afraid my father would hear it. Cardinell asked me to lend him a fishing-net which I had - we went and dragged a brook which runs up to the river Lea. Cardinell hid the net; he then wanted to fight me; I went on with Morris, who put the gate up: I went home, and knocked; my father came down, and made a noise at me for being out late - I looked at the clock, and it wanted twenty-five minutes to two. I heard the cocks crow several times distinctly, and next morning the fowls were gone. I saw some footsteps of Cardinell's in the dung I can swear; I put a gate over it to keep it, and I found a bit of ran there which I had seen on Bean's hand; I then told my father we would go to London.

Cross-examined. Q. Your father did not go to bed at ten o'clock? A. I do not know; he generally does; Ashton's geese generally feed in our field, but were fetched away about seven o'clock in the evening; the prisoners were often at Chingford, and Bean has been at my father's house - I met them in Bull-lane; I took them to a public-house, because they said they were starving - one of them said, "Shall I go and kill one of Newton's sheep?" I said No: and that was why I got my net. I parted with them in Cock Tyler's-lane; I did not go home immediately, as I thought they were going to break down our gate, and I watched with Morris. Cardinell said, "My aunt is very ill, if you can give us a fowl I shall be obliged to you?" I said,"I won't, for I won't get into any row or piece of work." I have given him the clothes off my back, when his father-in-law turned him out of doors.

Q. Did not you go with them to your father's house that night? A. No; we were in the lanes; I went into the cow-house, and got my net; we have a dog called Ranger - I said nothing about him that night - I did not notice him till I went home; I did tell the prisoners not to make a noise, as my father would hear, as they kicked up a row - I did not say I would get rid of Morris, and tell them to stand behind the gate till I returned; nor did I tell them to cook the fowls, and I would come and dine with them.

CARDINELL - GUILTY . Aged 25.

BEAN - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

ASHTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280221-164

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

644. THOMAS COLLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 jigger, value 1s. 6d.; 1 fore-part iron, value 1s. 6d.; 1 brack, value 1s. 8d., and 1 instep-leather, value 5s. , the goods of William Wilkins .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-165

645. WILLIAM FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 gown, value 6s.; 1 shawl, value 3s., and 1 towel, value 1s. , the goods of Margaret Flynn .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280221-166

646. PETER SUMMERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 wheelbarrow, value 12s. , the goods of Joseph Leader .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged. 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280221-167

647. RICHARD MARCH was indicted for that he, on the 12th of September , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously, did accuse George Daniel Wilson of a crime punishble by law with transportation, (i. e.) with feloniously stealing from the person of the said Richard March a 10l. Bank note, his property, with intent to extort from the said George Daniel Wilson the sum of 10l., his monies; against the Statute .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

PETER HARDY , ESQ. I am a Magistrate of the County of Middlesex. The prisoner came to me on the evening of the 12th of September, to make a complaint against the present prosecutor; he charged him with having stolen a 10l. note out of his pocket, at a public-house in Enfield; I understood it was on the 11th (the day before). I asked him where he got the 10l. note; he said from the auctioneer at Mr. Cook's sale, and it had been in his left hand breeches-pocket (there had been a sale a Mr. Cook's just before); I asked if he knew the number; he said he had it on a bit of paper at home, and that the auctioneer had it also in his book; I remanded the prosecutor till next morning, and then took this deposition from the prisoner - I had known him before very well - he is a labouring man, a little dealer in horses, cows, and such things; in this deposition, the nex day, he states that he had the money for a cow which he had sold. In consequence of finding that a 10l. note had not been paid to the prisoner, I discharged the prosecutor; this is his deposition - (read.)

"The loose 10l. note I received on Tuesday last of a person I don't know, for a cow which I sold for 12l. 14s. I put the whole of this money loose into my pocket; this was in the afternoon."

GEORGE DANIEL WILSON . I am a shoemaker, and live with my father, at Enfield. In September last I saw the prisoner in a public-house at Enfield, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening; I did not rob him of a 10l. note, nor take a 10l. note from him; he did not say any thing to me that night, nor make any charge against me; but about eight o'clock the next morning he sent for me; I asked what he wanted; he said, nothing, but to sit down and drink with him; about three o'clock that afternoon, he asked me to give him that piece of paper I took from him - I had not taken any thing from him of any sort of kind; he said I had taken a 10l. not from him; I told him I had not; some words ensued - he sent for a constable, and gave charge of me: I was taken to Mr. Hardy's. He said if I would give him 5l., he would pay half the expences, if I would pay the rest, and spend half a sovereign; I did not accede to that, and was kept in custody all night; next morning I was discharged: this proposal was made after I was in custody. I am a shoemaker; I am twenty-three years of age, and knew the prisoner; we always lived neighbours together; I never had any words or quarrel with him before - it was on Tuesday night, the 11th of September, that I was in the public-house with him, and on the morning of the 12th he sent for me; I sat down, and drank with him; he said nothing to me about the note then, but at three o'clock in the afternoon he sent for me again, and said I had taken a piece of paper.

GEORGE DANIEL WILSON , SEN. I am the prosecutor's father. I met the prisoner on Wednesday evening, the 12th of September, after my son was in custody - I met him accidentally in the road, and he told me my son was in the watch-house: I said, "For what?" he said for robbing him of a 10l. note the night before; but he said he did not wish to hurt him, and if I would pay him a 10l. note he would make it up, if I would pay the expences, and spend 5s. - he did not say the 10l. note, but a 10l. note; he afterwards said he supposed I had not 10l. to give him, if I would give him 5l., he would take the other by instalments, but he still proposed that I should pay the expences, and spend 5s.: the next morning we we went to the Magistrate's - he still proposed to make it up, but I would not.

COURT. Q. What were the words he used? A. He said we had better make it up, and I said, "No, I will not;" I am sure he used that expression - the talk about making it up all came from him; I had never had any dispute with him, nor had my son, to my knowledge - I do not think that I ever saw him with a 10l. note in my life.

GEORGE MEAD . I am a constable of Enfield. I took up the prosecutor, on the prisoner's charge for stealing a 10l. note.

CHARLES GREY . I am servant to Mr. Goats, a butcher, of Enfield. One Wednesday in September last, I saw the prisoner at the door of the Fallow Buck public-house, at Enfield; I saw him and another offering to sell a cow to two gentlemen in a chaise-cart, in the road, at the door - I saw them pay for it, it was in sovereigns, half sovereigns, and silver; the cow was sold for 12l. 14s. - I am accustomed to the sale of cattle; the gentleman gave the prisoner a shilling over, which he was to give to the drover, and he was to give him another shilling himself; this was a day or two before the prosecutor was taken up.

GEORGE FIELD . I was present at the sale of the cow - it was all paid for in sovereigns, half sovereigns, and silver; there was no 10l. note at all.

MARTIN NANGLE . I bought the cow of the prisoner, and paid him for it in sovereigns, half sovereigns, and silver - I am quite sure I did not pay him any 10l. note.

The prisoner put in a long written defence, stating that he had been paid for the cow in coin, but had a 10l. note in his pocket which the prosecutor had seen; that as they were drinking at the Rose and Crown public-house, the prosecutor had put his hand into his pocket, and on drawing it out, the prisoner saw his 10l. note in his hand, which he demanded, and the prosecutor refused to deliver it up then, but promised to return it presently; the prisoner suffered him to leave the house with it, as they were on friendly terms; that he called on him next morning for it, and the prosecutor promised to return it if he would go and drink at the Rose and Crown, where they went; but after many excuses, as the prosecutor did not return it, he sent for a constable, and gave him in charge.

COURT to PROSECUTOR. Q. Were you at any time in any public-house with him when you asked him to show you his money? A. No, nor did he ever show me any money; he never accused me of putting my hand into his breeches pocket, and taking out his money - we were only in one public-house that day, which was the Rose and Crown.

GUILTY - Aged 50.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280221-168

648. JOHN MUNROE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 28 balls of cotton, value 3s. , the goods of Jonathan Orme .

JONATHAN ORME. I am a haberdasher , and live in Little

Russel-street, Covent-garden . On the 12th of February, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in for the purpose of begging charity; I had given him a waistcoat, a pair of trousers, a hat, and a shilling, three weeks before; I was engaged in serving a customer; he walked down the shop, and stood before the fire; while I was at the top of the shop I saw him walk up hastily, and he said he would call again as I was busy; I said I would attend to him directly, and asked what he wanted; he began to tell me a long tale of his distresses, and I saw under his lame arm a parcel, which I knew was my own; I took hold of him, and asked what it was; he said it was some thread and needles which he mended his clothes with - he did not wish me to see it, but I took hold of it, and it was my own.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ALDERSON . I was sent for, and took the prisoner - he took his arm out of the sling, and struck me twice in the breast; he then ran away, but was taken in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280221-169

649. WILLIAM RIDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 coach-glass, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Pearson .

WILLIAM WARD . I am hostler to Mr. Thomas Pearson. He lost a coach-glass from the door of the coach-house, in his yard, on the 16th of January - I had seen it in the coach the same evening; I know nothing of the prisoner.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am beadle of St. Mary-le-bone. On the 17th of January, about two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in Mortimer-street, with this glass under his arm; I stopped him, and asked where he got it; he said from a coach in a yard, opposite the Middlesex-hospital, and he was going to sell it; I said, "I suppose you stole it;" he said, "Yes, I did;" I said, "Why did you take it?" He said, "Because I was in distress."(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280221-170

650. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 cream-jug, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Roberts Thelluson , Esq.

JOHN BURRELL . I am in the service of Thomas Roberts Thelluson. Esq., of Glocester-place . I lost a cream