Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th January 1828.
Reference Number: 18280110
Reference Number: f18280110-1

SESSIONS' PAPER

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS, MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 10th of JANUARY, 1828, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1828.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Alexander , Knt., Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Allan Park , Knt.; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt.; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Ansley , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; and John Garratt , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Crowder , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Wm. H. Gosling ,

Edward Coomb ,

Paul Ashmore ,

Thomas Wade ,

John Harbon ,

Thomas Clarence ,

John Hawk ,

John Marsh ,

Charles Wiggins ,

Joseph Waugh ,

Wm. Wardle ,

Wm. Carpenter .

Second

Henry Edmonds ,

Robert Osmond ,

Edward Drake ,

John Sharpe ,

Thomas J. Jordan ,

George Machin ,

Henry Monk ,

John Barr ,

Charles Sparks ,

H. Prichard , Jun.

Robert Glover ,

Charles Green ,

Third

Richard Faucett ,

Thomas Reynolds

James Guildford ,

Wm. Bell ,

John Davis ,

Giles Silverside ,

Joseph Phelp ,

James Smith ,

John Parker ,

Peter Baldry ,

Sidney Pontifex ,

Benjamin Wall .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Hen. A. Holland ,

Robert Jones ,

Daniel Harris ,

Samuel Hawkins ,

Walter Harvey ,

James Hammond ,

Samuel Hickson ,

John N. Gibbons ,

James Hawker ,

John Hoitt ,

James Haikes ,

Matthew Jackson .

Second

W. Hetherington ,

George Jones ,

Mat. W. Johnson ,

Fred. B. Jervis ,

Wm. Kensit ,

John Head ,

Wm. A. Hutton ,

Michael Healey ,

John Herbert ,

James Halls ,

Thomas Kendrick

Henry Jeffrey .

Third

Wm. Hall ,

Wm. Howell ,

James Hill ,

Rob. Hutchinson ,

Richard Higgins ,

John Henderson ,

John Hull ,

James Kerr ,

John Hickler ,

Edward Hough ,

John Harris ,

Wm. Hutchins .

Fourth

Thos. Armstrong ,

Thos. Goodwin ,

Peter Gill ,

Thomas Griffin ,

Thomas Gooding ,

Henry Hanks ,

Thos. Handley ,

John Hone ,

John Harris ,

Frederick Hatley ,

Charles Hall ,

Wm. Hewitt .

Fifth

Edward Jefford ,

James Jobson ,

Matthew Hanson ,

James Hales ,

Wm. Fossett ,

Wm. Jones ,

Walter Hudson ,

Samuel Jackson ,

George Head ,

John Jordan ,

Lauret Holmes ,

Wm. Haynes .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 10, 1828.

LUCAS, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18280110-1

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

257. DANIEL McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , in the dwelling-house of Luke Addington and William Cobbett , at St. Martin in the Fields, 26 yards of cloth, value 20l. , their property.

DANIEL FOWLER . I am porter to Luke Addington and William Cobbett, woollen-drapers , who live in St. Martin's-lane, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields ; I live in the house, and sleep there. On the 19th of December, at a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was in the shop, and heard the door go; I looked round, and saw the prisoner, who is a stranger, go from the counter, with two pieces of cloth under his arm - he was going from behind the counter when I first saw him. It is a large shop; I had shut the door two minutes before, and gone out of sight- he ran out of the door, and I after him; he carried the cloth to the top of May's-buildings, about seventy yards from the shop, and dropped it there; I only lost sight of him for a moment or two, while he turned the corner, into Bedfordbury; I called Stop thief! and saw him stopped - I am certain he is the man: Mr. Myers picked up the cloth, and brought it back - I have a sample of each piece here; the whole is worth 20l. - it is my masters' property.

WILLIAM LEMON . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge with the property.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth, and believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18280110-2

Before Mr. Justice Park.

258. JAMES MARTIN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anthony Le Rivere , on the 23d of December , and stealing 4 coats, value 4l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 30s.; 3 waistcoats, value 20s.; 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 1s.; 1 pelisse, value 2l.; 2 pairs of boots, value 15s.; 1 cap, value 5s.; 3 pairs of shoes, value 4s.; 1 violin and bow, value 3l.; 1 flageolet, value 20s.; 4 spoons, value 5s.; 1 brooch, value 2s.; 1 pair of scissors and pen-knife, value 2s.; 5 sovereigns, and 3s. 6d. in monies numbered , his property.

The evidence given in this case was precisely the same as is detailed in the report of the prisoner's trial in the New Court, on the fourth day of the Session, when he was convicted of receiving the articles stated in this indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-3

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

259. HENRY SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of November , at St. Pancras, in the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Clements , 1 watch, value 15l.; 1 pair of gold snaps, value 18l.; 3 bracelets, value 3l.; 12 silver forks, value 9l.; 15 silver spoons, value 9l.; 1 pelisse, value 20l.; 3 dresses, value 12l.; 16 pairs of silk stockings, value 6l.; and 11 shifts, value 6l. , her property.

MARY ANN CLEMENTS. My real name is Clements, but I have assumed the name of Kelly for about five years. I live at No. 2, Bath-place, New-road, Mary-le-bone, in the parish of St. Pancras - my tax papers are headed St. Pancras; nobody but myself rents the house. On the 31st of October I went out, and did not sleep at home that night; I slept at No. 16, Duke-street, Portland-place. I had left my house about five o'clock in the evening - every thing was perfectly safe when I went out; I went to my house next day, at one o'clock; I called for some cloaks, but did not go into the house - I remained at the gate. I called again at half-past three - I merely went for some clothes of my own and of the lady's with whom I was with in Duke-street; I did not go into the house - Aldridge, my servant, delivered them to me; I dined out. A friend came to me at No. 16, Duke-street, to tell me my house was robbed - I went there a few minutes after five o'clock, and found four or five officers in the dining-room; I found my wardrobe stripped, and the plate out of the dining-room gone; my wardrobe had not been locked - there was nothing left in it but an old pair of stockings; and some white dresses were left in a drawer. I missed a gold watch, worth 15l.; a pair of gold bracelets, worth eighteen guineas, four silk dresses, worth 16l.; a velvet pelisse, worth 21l.; twelve or thirteen shifts and about sixteen pairs of silk stockings; I also missed six silver dinner forks, which cost 21s. each; six desert forks; and eight table-spoons, worth 5l. or 6l. from the sideboard cupboard, in the dining-room; I had left the keys with my servant, and desired her to lock it - it was all my property. Some places had been unlocked, but not forced open. I suppose the property to be worth 130l. or 140l. altogether. but cannot be certain of the exact value. I did not tell the Magistrate that my wardrobe was forced - (looking at her deposition) I signed this - it says so here, but I never said it - it must be a mistake.

MARY ANN GREEN . On a Wednesday evening, late in October, I went to Burchett's lodgings; I do not know the day, or whether it was in October or November - I saw

Isabella Aldridge there - she is Mrs. Kelly's servant; I knew her by that name: I went home with her to her mistress' house, and staid there all night, and in the morning went with her to Tottenham Court-road, to buy some gall to clean the parlour carpet - this was on Thursday morning - we both returned to the house, and a person sent to say she wished to speak to Aldridge; she went out, leaving me in the house; and about half-past twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner in the New-road - I was then with Aldridge - she asked him to come into the house, and he went in; Aldridge told him she was going to have a treat, a preserved damson pudding for her dinner - he said he was very fond of that: she told him she was going to meet her mistress in the afternoon, and could not stay to eat any of it, but if he would call in the course of the afternoon he should have some; the prisoner left the house, after eating a herring and a roll. Aldridge then went out, and I was left alone in the house - the prisoner came again in about half an hour; it was then about half-past two o'clock, I think; he knocked at the door, and I let him in; he came down to the kitchen; I told him the pudding was not done; he stood in the kitchen, looked round, and asked me if I could not get him a silver spoon - I asked him what for; he said to pledge for a trifle of money, for he was very much distressed; I asked where he thought I could get a silver spoon from, and said he would get me into disgrace, and the servant too; he then went up stairs: I went up with him, to let him out at the street door; as he went along the passage the parlour door was open - he went into the parlour, looked on the sideboard and about; I begged of him not to touch any thing that was there; the sideboard cupboard door stood a little open, and he took out a basket of plate: I begged of him not to do any thing of the kind; I saw him take the basket out, and saw there was silver in it, but do not know what kind of plate it was; he told me to keep all silent, and it would be all for the best; he told me to remain in the passage, and that if any one came not to open the door, and said he would have a good sweep; he went up stairs, and came down in about five minutes afterwards, with two bundles, and went out of the house. I never saw him any more till he came to the prison; when he went out he told me when the servant came in, to clap my hands together, and say, "Oh! Bella, I am sure there are thieves in the house, for there is such a noise up stairs;" the servant came in in about ten minutes after he went out, and directly after she came in the prisoner came up, and knocked at the door; the servant was very much frightened, and told him her mistress' wardrobe was stripped.

Q. Had you told her what he mentioned when she came in? A. Yes; I said, "Oh! Bella, there is such a noise up stairs - I am sure there are thieves in the house." She went up stairs directly.

Q. Did she come down before be came to the door? A. No; he knocked at the door directly she came in - she came down directly, and told him her mistress' wardrobe was stripped; he told her to keep all silent, and to go for an officer; she went, and one came - she asked him where to go for an officer - he told her to go to Benson's butter-shop, at the corner of the New-road; she went, and the prisoner went away before the officer came; I never saw him again till he came to Clerkenwell prison, where I was taken on suspicion of being concerned in this. When I saw him there he begged of me to keep my own counsel. I have known the prisoner ten years - he was a shoemaker. I used to go out to work, as I could get it, but have no regular place of service.

Q. Had the prisoner employment at this time? A. Yes- I used to see him every day; I cannot mention the date on which this happened, but I remember Mrs. Kelly coming in a chaise about two o'clock on the Thursday - the prisoner was in the house at that time; Mrs. Kelly did not come in: the prisoner was in the kitchen, and went to hide himself, because she should not see him, and I went with him, as I did not wish to be seen - I do not know what Mrs. Kelly came for - she did not come again till after the robbery, to my knowledge; I do not know of any dress being taken to her.

Q. What did the prisoner do with the basket of plate? A. He put it into his pockets, I believe; he carried two bundles out, but I did not see what was in them.

ISABELLA ALDRIDGE. I was servant to Mrs. Kelly in October last; I remember seeing Green at Burchett's lodgings; I think it was on the last day of October - she went home, and slept with me that night; Mrs. Kelly did not sleep at home that night - it was on the Wednesday that she went out. I have known the prisoner about a twelvemonth - I did not see him on the Thursday till two o'clock; I saw him then in the New-road - Green called him, and asked him to come in - he came into Mrs. Kelly's house; he came down stairs; I had got some damsons, and told him I was going to have a damson pudding for dinner- he said it was what he was very fond of, and he should like some; I said if he could stop he might have some - he said he could not stop; I asked if he could come in the afternoon - he said No, he had got some work to do, and could not leave work till about eight o'clock in the evening- he had a herring, and part of a roll which was left at breakfast - he ate that, and then went out; I did not see him again till after the robbery: I had gone out to No. 16, Duke-street, where my mistress was, about half an hour after he left - I was to have taken her a dress and a pair of shoes - I forgot to take the shoes; she sent me home for them, and when I got there Green said she heard a noise in the house, and that I had left the door open.

Q. Well, but did your mistress come to the house in a gig? A. Yes; she came to the house about one o'clock, and about three; both times were before the robbery; I first heard of the robbery when I came home for the shoes, that was about five o'clock; I opened the door with a key, and called Green; she came up stairs from the kitchen, after I had called three times, and told me she had heard a dreadful noise in the house - that I had left the street door open, and she thought some one was in the house then. I had not left the door open.

Q. Did you go up stairs? A. Yes, and found the wardrobe almost stripped of all the clothes; I came down again, and when I came down the prisoner was at the door.

Q. Did you look at the sideboard? A. No - I did not go into the parlour. I told him the wardrobe was stripped, and asked him what I should do; he told me to go and fetch an officer; I asked him where - he told me to go to the butter-shop at the corner of the New-road; I went, and they told me where to go and get one; Benson keeps the butter-shop - he did not mention Benson's name; I was to ask them where there was an officer. I left the prisoner in the

house; he told me he would stop till I came back, but he went away while I was gone; he told me to keep all quiet, and not to say that he had been to the house; I said No, I would not - I hoped God would strike me dead if I did, if he would stop till I got back, and he said he would.

Q. How came you to say you would not tell any body? A. Because he did not seem satisfied that I would not say he had been. and I thought if I said that he would stop till I came back, and if I did not say so he might go away; Green was by my side, and told me not to say she had been in the house; I said I wished her to stop with me, and she did stop.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of November, at Clerkenwell prison; he came there to see Mary Ann Green - he said his name was Williams - I told him I knew it was Sutton, and he must come with me. As I took him to the office I told him I took him on suspicion of Mrs. Kelly's robbery - he said he was innocent - that he knew nothing of it, and was never in the house in his life, no farther than walking to and fro. I took him before Sir George Farrant - at his first examination he denied it, the same as he had to me; what he said was not then taken down: he was brought up a second time - I had no conversation with him; no threat nor promise was held out to him by any body; what he said was in the presence of the Magistrate, who took it down; it was read over to him, and he signed it; Sir George Farrant also signed it, and I witnessed it; I saw him sign his name - this is his statement (looking at it,) and this is Sir George Farrant's signature to it - here is my signature - the prisoner made no objection to signing it; (read) "I now acknowledge that I did take the property, as mentioned by Green, and gave the two bundles to a man named William Smith, who waited for them near Mrs. Kelly's house, but I never saw Smith afterwards, nor received any of the money the things might produce, - Henry Sutton."

MRS. CLEMENTS. I have not found any of my property.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Thursday that the robbery was committed I was to have met Green at two o'clock, to give her part of my earnings, to help maintain her; when I got to the bottom of Brook-street she told me to come that way - I was not inclined to go, but the servant beckoned to me to come in; I objected - I was asked to come in several times - I at last went in, and took part of a herring and roll; I then said I must go, as I had been ill for two months, and should lose my work if I did not attend to it; I went to the corner of the New-road. I had a subscription made for me while I was ill, and Smith had subscribed for me; I met him, and asked him to go and take part of a pint of porter - we went to a public-house, and had a pint of beer, and afterwards sixpenny-worth of rum; he asked how the young woman was who nursed me when I was ill- I told him she was at the prosecutrix's house, and I was to have something to eat there, and what money I had I would spend on him, for his kindness - I stopped there with him for half an hour, and in our conversation he said I was to blame if I did not get some property from the house, and could I not do it - I said No, but after awhile he overpowered me; I went in, and brought the property.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing him to have been induced to commit the offence by Smith .

Reference Number: t18280110-4

Before Mr. Baron Alexander.

260. JOHN HILT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 mare, price 24l. , the property of George Mash .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN MASH . I am the brother of George Mash - he had a black mare, marked with a blaze down the nose, a star on the forehead, and a white fetlock joint on the near hind foot - it was about fifteen hands high; I saw her safe on Sunday, the 14th of October, and missed her on the 17th- she was recovered on the 11th of November. I know the prisoner - I had seen him several times about the marsh in October.

GEORGE MASH. In October last my black mare was turned out in Hackney-marsh - I do not know when she was safe last. I saw the prisoner on Monday morning, the 15th of October, with Newman, who was tried here; they were near the marsh, and going towards the marsh, or towards Old Ford, which way they pleased. I went to Romford fair, and when I came home on Wednesday the mare was missing - I found her at Mr. Batten's, at Brickwall, on Friday, the 2d of November; she was afterwards delivered to me, and is the same mare I lost from the marsh.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it on a foggy morning that you saw them near the marsh? A. No.

THOMAS JILTHRO . I am waiter at the White Hart public-house, Temple-mills, which joins Hackney-marsh - there is a road through my master's yard to the marsh. I know the prisoner very well - I saw him on Saturday, the 13th of October, with Newman and Holden, on the marsh; Newman was tried last Session. I saw them again on Monday morning, the 15th, at six o'clock; they were all three coming from the marsh, with two black horses; Newman rode one - it was a mare about fifteen hands high, with a white blaze down the nose, a white star on the forchead, and the hind fetlock white - I saw it afterwards in possession of Mr. Mash; the prisoner was riding a black horse or mare, I do not know which; Holden opened the gate for them to pass through, and afterwards shut it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Hilt live near the marsh? A. Yes, he lives at the White Lion public-house, Hackneywick, which joins the marsh.

JOSEPH BATTEN . I am an Inn-keeper and farmer, and live at Brickwall, Hatfield, Herts. On the 18th of October, between two and three o'clock, two black mares were brought to me by Newman and another person, whom I am told was Holden; I was here last Session, when Jilthro identified Newman at the bar; I afterwards delivered to Mash the mare described by Jilthro, and the other to Mr. Starkey's servant.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any body with Holden and Newman? A. Not that I saw - I never saw the prisoner in possession of either of the horses; Holden seemed to exercise a mastership over them.

WILLIAM COWLING . I am constable of the night of Hackney. In consequence of information I looked after the prisoner, who lived in the neighbourhood of Hackneybay; he had left for a month, at least, after the robbery; I looked for him there, and at many other places, and at last found him at Paddington, on Sunday, the 16th of December, and found on him this bill, offering a reward for his own apprehension; I found him in bed at eight o'clock

in the morning; he said, "I suppose I must get up;" I said, "You need not hurry:" he laid for half a minute, being rather surprised. I said he must go with us, and before he left the room handcuffed him; he said he would go quietly, and that he was surprised at being found there; he said he wondered how I came to know he was there. I did not either threaten or promise him any thing; he said,"I went on the marsh with Newman and the other, to catch the horses - that is all I know about it."

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you had spoken to him about the horses? A. Yes; I did not ask how he came on the marsh - I am not certain whether he said Holden had employed him to catch the horses - he might have said so; I told him not to commit himself before me: he said he helped to catch them, and that was all he did.

CHARLES L -. I am a horse-patrol, and live in John-street, Homerton. I was employed to look after Hilt and some others. I went with Cowling - his statement is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. Holden came to me on the 15th of October, in the morning, and asked me to go and help him to catch two horses in the marsh; having nothing particular to do I went - I asked why he wanted to go so soon; he said he had brought them from the fair, and expected the marsh-driver might impound them, as they were not marked; I got off my mare when I had rode about fifty yards, and Newman went away with the horses - I went on with Holden to Lea-bridge-road, stopped with him two or three hours, and did not see him afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-5

261. JOHN HILT was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 mare, price 8l. , the property of Anthony Starkey .

MR. BARRY declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-6

262. MARY ANN RUSH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , in the dwelling-house of Robert Rush , 4 gowns, value 50s.; 1 pelisse, value 50s.; 2 shawls, value 25s.; 1 bonnet, value 20s.; 1 book, value 9s.; 1 spencer, value 12s.; 2 petticoats, value 6s.; 2 ribbons, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s., and 1 apron, value 1s. , the goods of Susannah Rush .

SUSANNAH RUSH. The prisoner is my sister. She came to our house, to stop, the latter end of November; on the 11th of December, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, having received information that the house was robbed, I went home, and missed the articles stated in the indictment - they are worth between 8l. and 9l. - I had seen them all safe that morning, in my box, except the pelisse, which hung in the bed-room, where the box was - I saw that safe; I did not see the prisoner again till the 14th, when she was at Queen-square Office; she then had one of my gowns on, also my Leghorn bonnet and shawl; my only motive in appearing against her is to keep her out of the streets - she has been that way for six years.

JOSEPH SLYFIELD . On the 14th of December I met the prisoner, and gave her in charge.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge, at a lodging-house, No. 5, Duck-lane, Westminster. Slyfield sent for me there; she was standing in the passage. I asked what room she occupied; she took me up stairs, showed me her room, and in a drawer there I found a duplicate; the prosecutrix claimed the clothes she had on: after her examination, I was taking her to Tothill-fields, and asked her what had become of a pelisse and Prayer-book - I did not threaten nor promise her any thing; she walked on, and in about five minutes said they were at Mr. Well's, a pawnbroker, at High-street, Kensington, and that the duplicates were all destroyed. I went to the prosecutrix's house, in Leader-street, Chelsea, and took her with me to Well's; they there produced three gowns, a Prayer-book, and one or two more articles.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and have a shawl pawned in the name of Caroline Green, but I cannot say who she was; I gave her one of the duplicates produced.

THOMAS NEATE . I am a servant to Mr. Wells, of Kensington - he is a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned a pelisse for 16s. 6d., and on the 12th of December a Prayer-book for 3s., also two gowns and a spencer for 8s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court, seeing my friends have no mercy for me.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-7

Before Mr. Justice Park.

263. WILLIAM ALLKIN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Cobb , at St. Mary-le-bone, on the 1st of January , and stealing 2 decanters, value 3l., and 2 stoppers, value 2s. , his property.

GEORGE COBB. I live at No. 114, High-street, St. Mary-le-bone , and rent the house; I am a glass and china man , and keep an open shop. On the 1st of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in my shop; my dog went to the door, and began barking; I then went to the shop door - it rained very hard; I saw the prisoner standing against my private door, close by the shop window; I asked what he did there; he said he was standing out of the wet; I told him he was welcome; he had a basket in his hand with oranges, as if he was selling them. I went in, and in about half an hour, as the dog kept barking about the door, I went to look again, and saw the prisoner standing by the private door, but took no notice of him; I then went down into the warehouse, which is under the shop, and Mrs. Cobb knocked for me - it was then almost eight o'clock; I came up immediately, went towards the street door, and saw the prisoner taking a decanter out through a square of glass, which had been cut; as soon as he saw me coming he left the decanter half in and half out of the window, and ran away directly; I pursued him, crying Stop thief! a gentleman stopped him at the corner of Bulstrode-street - I had not lost sight of him once; I took him to the watch-house; the window was perfectly whole at four o'clock; I had been in the shop all the rest of the evening; I never heard nor saw it broken till then - it was a half circle cut out, and appeared to have been done with some instrument; a decanter could be taken through.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did you lose? A. A decanter and two stoppers were taken clean out, and one decanter was left hanging in the window; my wife is not here - she knocked for me to come up.

Q. What did she say? A. She said she saw a suspicious

person walking backward and forward before the door repeatedly; that he had been to the shop door twice offering oranges to sell, and, suspecting him, she had knocked me up; I went into the parlour, and asked what she wanted, and when she told me this, I immediately went along the shop, as I have said; she said the person had been there the best part of an hour, while I had been in the warehouse; I did not see the prisoner cut the glass, but I saw him drawing the decanter out through the hole; my wife saw him next morning at the watch-house, and said he was the man, but I knew him myself; I never lost sight of him - I had seen him at six, and at half-past six o'clock, against the private door; I did not see the first decanter taken out, nor did my wife, for she was in the parlour - she was in and out of the shop, as I could hear her walking about.

COURT. Q. I understood you to say, your wife said he had twice come to the door to offer her oranges? A. Yes; I am quite sure I saw the same man stopped whom I had seen endeavouring to get the decanter out.

CHARLES SAUNDERS . I am a watchman. On the 1st of January I heard a cry of Stop thief! and found the prisoner in custody of Mr. Cobb, who gave him into my charge; he had no basket then; I took him one street from the shop - I had seen him myself an hour before, walking about Cobb's window with oranges - I am sure he is the same man; I found 8s. 5d. on him - I should know the basket again - I saw it produced before the Magistrate at the office.

Cross-examined. Q. About what time did you see him with the oranges? A. Seven o'clock; Mr. Cobb's house is on my beat; I was only by there once, and noticed him as being a stranger; there were three or four oranges in the basket - I can swear to the basket - there were not many people about at seven o'clock - I will swear there was no one but him that I saw; I did not see Mrs. Cobb at the shop window.

ELIZABETH WALDRON . I live at Mr. Brown's, next door to Cobb's. On the 1st of January, about eight o'clock at night, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I went down stairs, and saw a basket on the step of our own door, which is the space of a shop window from Cobb's door; there was a decanter and two stoppers in the basket, with some oranges; I took it in to Mrs. Cobb - I saw it there again the next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you noticed the shop about an hour before? A. No; I had not been out - I was in doors all the time.

Q. Did Mrs. Cobb tell you she had seen several suspicious persons about the window? A. Yes; and she said a man came in with oranges, and he was a very suspicious fellow; that she told him she wanted none, and she heard a noise, and knocked for Mr. Cobb to come up - I believe she did say there were several suspicious persons about the window.

GEORGE COBB . Here is the basket, with the decanter, stoppers, and oranges in it; when the window was broken, a person could not reach the decanter without putting his hand in.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the shop, going to my lodgings. I saw several persons running; I ran after them a great way; the prosecutor came and laid hold of me, saying I had broken his window, and at the watch-house he said I attempted to break it, and steal a decanter. Next day the constable of the night asked the watchman if he had any charge to make against me; he said he had not, but when before the Magistrate, the watchman said he had seen me walking before Cobb's shop. When Cobb came he said a little girl had brought the basket in with the decanter and stoppers, and it must be the one I had stolen.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18280110-8

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

264. ROBERT RYAN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charlotte Taylor , at St. Paul, Shadwell, on the 24th of December , and stealing 1 gown, value 5s. , her property.

CHARLOTTE TAYLOR. I live at No. 1, Sun Tavern-gardens, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell , and rent the house; nobody but me occupies it. On the 24th of December, about one o'clock, I went out, I locked the street door; there is no back door; all the windows were fastened - I left nobody in the house - I returned in about ten minutes, unlocked the door with the key, and saw dirty foot marks inside the house, which were not there when I went out - I have one room down stairs, and one up - I saw dirty foot marks on the stairs - I went up into my bed-room, and saw the prisoner standing by the side of my bed, with my gown in his hand, which I had left hanging on the foot of the bed; he was at the head of the bed with it; the lid of a box in my room had been opened, and a looking-glass moved off the top of it, and put on a chair - I had never seen the prisoner before - I am sure he is the man - I screamed, "Oh! my God, here is a thief!" I ran down stairs, and tried to shut the street door, but could not - I held the door with my hand, to keep him in, but he seized me by the throat, struck me on the breast, and with the blow and a kick, which he gave me on the legs, I fell out of the door into the yard; as soon as I could get my breath I called Stop thief! and Cundle, my next door neighbour, ran after him - I went with Cundle afterwards to the watch-house, saw the prisoner there, and knew him again - I swear he is the man; my gown is certainly worth 5s.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me with the gown in my possession? A. It was in his hand - I swore so at the office.

JOHN CUNDLE . I live next door to Taylor. On the 24th of December, about half-past one o'clock, I had returned from the Police-office, and had not been in my house long, before I was alarmed with the cry of Stop thief! and Murder! - I instantly ran out, without my hat, and pursued the prisoner down to Market-hill; he was running before me. I did not know him before; Walker and Scott endeavoured to stop him at the bottom of the hill; he slipped on one side. I pursued him the back way, through the Three Compasses public-house, and lost sight of him for two or three minutes - I got sight of him again, and sang out to some watermen to stop him, but they did not - I pursued him into Dean-street, cried Stop thief! and one of them stopped him - I came up and collared him; he then said, "Don't stop me, it is only a lark, a piece of fun;" he wished to get from me - I, with great difficulty, got him to the watch-house, and gave him in charge - Deverell, the

night-beadle, came and searched him, and found on him the duplicate of a waistcoat; two skeleton-keys were produced - I got them off the bar of the Three Compasses - Mrs. Dean, the mistress of the house was there; nobody gave them to me - I went with Deverell to Mrs. Taylor's house; he applied one of the keys to her street door, which it opened very easily; he locked it, and unlocked it again.

Prisoner. Q. You swore to the Magistrate, that you lost sight of me for twenty minutes, and the Magistrate said, "See what a long time one minute is?" A. I did not, nor did the Magistrate say so to me.

JOHN SCOTT . On the 24th of December, between one and two o'clock, I was near Griffin-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! turned round, and saw the prisoner running towards me - Walker was with me, and as the prisoner advanced, he had something in his hand, which he seemed anxious to get rid of, and when he got within three yards of me, I observed the handles of two keys; he turned up a passage. I, being lame, desired Walker to pursue.

JOHN WALKER . On the 24th of December, between one and two o'clock, I heard the cry of Stop thief! in Griffin-street; the prisoner was running towards me - I put my hands out to stop him; he turned up into the Three Compasses - I went after him, and saw him drop two keys - I picked them up, and gave them to Mrs. Dean, the landlady, desiring her to give them to nobody but a watchman or officer - I should know the keys again.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear you saw me drop the keys, and pick them up, for a lad at the office swore he saw me drop them, and picked them up? A. On my oath, I saw him drop them, and picked them up myself; no lad picked them up - I saw no lad, and heard nobody else say they had picked them up.

GEORGE DEVERELL . I am beadle of Shadwell. The prosecutrix's house is in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, about two o'clock, by the three witnesses - Taylor charged him with entering her dwelling-house; he said, "How could you say it was me? you before said it was a man with a red handkerchief;" she said, "You are the person" - I searched him, and only found an old duplicate of a waistcoat on him - I asked where he lived; he said he did not choose to tell me, that his friends were respectable, and he did not wish it to come to their ears - Cundle delivered me two skeleton-keys, which I tried to Taylor's street door; one of them opened it very easy, and the other would not open it; it is a spring lock, and locks itself; if a person went into the house, they could fasten the door without using the key again; here is the gown which Taylor gave me - I have had it ever since.

CHARLOTTE TAYLOR. This gown is mine, and is the one I saw in the prisoner's hand - I know it by the make; the lock fastens inside, without a key, but requires a key to open it outside - I opened the door with a key.

JOHN WALKER . The keys produced by Cundle are the same that I picked up, and which the prisoner dropped.

JOHN SCOTT . I only saw the two keys in the prisoner's hand, and cannot identify them; there was nobody but Walker within forty yards of him, when he turned up the passage.

Prisoner. I throw myself entirely on the mercy of the Court, as my friends do not know my trial is come on today.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix, having an aged mother .

Reference Number: t18280110-9

Before Mr. Baron Alexander.

265. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Phillip Whitehead , at St. Mary-le-bone, on the 14th of December , and stealing 2 lbs. weight of tea, value 10s., and 1 cannister, value 1s. , his property.

SARAH WHITEHEAD . I am the wife of Philip Whitehead, who rents a house in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On Friday, the 14th of December, between five and six o'clock, I served a customer, and closed the shop door, and sat down in the parlour behind the shop; the door was on the latch - I am certain it was latched - I left all the cannisters safe on the shelves, about two yards from the shop door - I heard the door slam about half-past five o'clock - I immediately went into the shop, and missed a cannister - I saw nothing more, till I heard the prisoner was in the officer's hands - I had not been out of the room after leaving the cannister safe - I had been from the shop about ten minutes - on the afternoon following Webster, the officer, brought me the cannister it contained about 2 1/2 lbs. of 6s. black tea. I am certain of the cannister.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer of High-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 14th of December, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Stingo-lane, within two hundred yards of the prosecutor's house; he was running sharpish, with this cannister under the flap of his coat, but I could not see what it was at first - I said, "Halloo! what have you got here?" he stopped, and said, Oil - I said, "Nonsense, you cannot have oil;" he said, "Yes, it is" - I said, "What, in a cannister? I must look at it" - I took it out of his arm, looked at it, and said, "Why, it is tea;" he said, "I don't know what it is, a man gave it to me at the corner of Seymour-place" - I took him to the office, and found nothing but two keys on him.

SARAH WHITEHEAD . I am certain this is the cannister I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me at the corner of Seymour-place, and asked me to carry it to the top of Stingo-lane for him, saying he would treat me with a pint of half and half.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18280110-10

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

266. JOSEPH JONES was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Sarah Langley .

SARAH JONES . I am the prisoner's daughter, and am eleven years old. The deceased was my mother, and lived in the same house with my father, in Church-entry, Blackfriars , on the second floor. On the day but one, before Christmas day, my father came home between twelve and one o'clock, with some soup, which was not to be cooked till Monday; my mother was tipsy, and my father told her she was tipsy; she b - gg - d his eyes, and said she was not; my father emptied the soup out of the

saucepan, and was washing the saucepan; my mother threw a fork at him, and knocked his hat off; he had done nothing to her, but told her she was tipsy; my father then threw the saucepan (which was in his hand) at her, and cut her across her eye; it hit her on the forehead; she was pretty near him; the saucepan cut her forehead, and a good deal of blood came from the wound; she was very bad, and desired me to lay the bed down, which I did; she laid on the bed; she got worse, and about ten o'clock, the next morning, she got up, and went to clean a room; she came back about one o'clock - I went and fetched her- she complained of her head then; my father went out directly after he had his dinner; she did not complain of her head till after he was gone; he had dined, but did not leave the house till she came home; she had two glasses of gin before she came home - I saw her drink them; she was accustomed to drink spirits; she had her head washed the night this happened, but had no assistance till Christmas night, when my father sent for a doctor; she would have nothing before that; she was taken to the Hospital on the 26th, and died there on the Friday following; there had been no quarrelling between them before this happened.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Your mother was tipsy when he complained of her? A. Yes; she used very bad words; he told her he had brought her some soup home; he said she ought to be ashamed of herself for getting drunk; she directly threw the fork at him, and he threw the saucepan at her; they had lived on affectionate terms; he offered to get her assistance, but she refused; she seemed very cheerful, when she went to work next day; she said she had one glass of gin, before the two which I saw her take; my father was very unhappy about the accident, and could not sleep night nor day; he cried very much; she had been out on Christmas eve, to buy things for the dinner; the doctor bled her, and my father went home with him for a bottle of stuff.

HENRY COX . I am a surgeon and apothecary, and live in Broadway, Blackfriars. On Christmas day, two or three messages were sent to my house, while I was out - I went to see the deceased - I found her sitting in a chair, quite insensible: a wound in her forehead was covered with sticking plaister; there was blood round the edge of the plaister - I bled, and did what I thought best for her. I knew she was addicted to drink; a violent blow on the head of a drunken person might produce very serious consequences, which might not happen if sober.

Cross-examined. Q. From the external appearances of the injury, it did not appear very severe? A. I did not take the plaister off; she went to the Hospital next day; it is very probable, that had she not been drinking, she might have recovered.

JOHN NORMAN WEEKS . I am surgeon of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. I saw the deceased there; there was a wound on her forehead, about an inch and a half long; it penetrated to the bone; it might have been inflicted by a saucepan; she appeared in danger, and died on the Friday. I opened the head; there was a slight fracture of the scull, and the membrane of the brain was inflamed; the injury, no doubt, occasioned her death; if she had been temperate, death might not have ensued.

JOHN HOPKINS . I am the father of the deceased. She was married to Langley, and afterwards took the name of Sarah Jones, as she lived with the prisoner.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-11

267. GEORGE JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 10 combs, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Brock and another.

THOMAS BROCK. I am a perfumer , and live in Leadenhall-street . These combs were inclosed in a glass-case in my window, on the 17th December - I was not at home when they were taken - I found the prisoner in custody with them at the Mansion-house that day - I have no doubt of their being mine, but have no private mark on them. I am in partnership with my mother; the prisoner was a stranger.

BENJAMIN FIGGINS . I am an officer. I was sent for on the 17th of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and took the prisoner into custody, at Mr. Brock's shop - I found nothing on him but a ragged pocket handkerchief; some combs laid on the floor, and some on the counter - Lauder charged him with taking them; he said nothing to it; he had no money at all.

JAMES LAUDER . I am apprentice to Mr. Brock. On the 17th of December, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, I went out to beat the mat in front of the house, leaving the door shut, but not latched, and nobody in the shop - I returned in a minute or two, and found the prisoner alone in the shop, in the act of putting his hat on. I had left some combs in the window, which was shut - I found the glass case open; and the combs were in his hat; he asked for some rouge, when I went in; I shut the door, and said he should have some in a minute - I secured him, and sent for a constable; he tried to get away, but I kept him in the shop; the combs were taken to the Mansion-house with him - I found several outside the case, and he had ten in his hat; he said nothing to the charge; these are the combs - I gave them to Figgins.

Prisoner. I throw myself entirely on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280110-12

268. HUMPHREY PODD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 5 shillings and 7 sixpences , the monies of Thomas Coleman his master.

MR. THOMAS COLEMAN. I am a wholesale warehouseman , and live in Watling-street. The prisoner was about nine months in my employ, as porter and assistant in the warehouse ; he was entrusted to keep the petty cash; on the 31st of December, 1 gave him 1l. 13s. 6d., to pay the general postman's account - I told him I particularly wished to balance my accounts that day, it being the end of the year- I gave him a sovereign, five shillings, two half-crowns, and seven sixpences - I gave him the exact money, that he should have no difficulty in paying it. On the 1st of January I asked if he had paid the postman; he said he had not, but would pay him in the evening, when he came to collect the letters - I asked him on the morning of the 2d,

if he had paid it; he said he had - I asked for the account; he said he had examined it, and it was right, but he had mislaid it, and would ask the postman for another - I asked two or three different days for it; he said he had not got it; the letters are copied into a book every morning, when they come; on the 4th, I met the postman myself, in the evening, and asked if the money he had received was correct, and, in consequence of what he said on the day before yesterday, I said to the prisoner, "I don't like your not having this account," and taxed him with it, in consequence of a circumstance which occurred; the postman came in at that time, and said, "I have called for the postage account, Sir" - I immediately turned round to the prisoner, and said, "Why, it is not a moment ago, that you told me that account was paid, is it paid or not?" he said, "Sir, it is not" - I asked for the money; he said he had spent it; his wages were low; his father was anxious I should take him - I said, if he behaved well he should not want for encouragement; he had board and lodging, and 8l. a year, and was to be advanced according to his behaviour - I gave him some clothes; he wanted for nothing; he had received what was due to him.

THOMAS LLOYD . I am a postman; 1l. 13s. 6d. was due to me from Mr. Coleman; the prisoner usually paid the account; he paid me no part of this.

Prisoner. I have only been committed here to-day, and am unable to bring my friends.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-13

269. ELIZABETH LAW and CHARLOTTE NICHOLLS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 half-crown, 6 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of John Panton , from his person .

JOHN PANTON. I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Star-yard, Chancery-lane. On Sunday, the 16th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Golden-lane - I had been drinking, but was not intoxicated at all. I and a friend called in at the Britannia public-house (where I had never been before) and had something to drink; I had six shillings, a half-crown, and a sixpence. I left the house with that money in my left-hand breeches pocket, having paid two sixpences at the house; we were not there above half an hour; I left my companion in the house, and came out alone. I got about one hundred yards, to the corner of Brackley-street, Golden-lane; I was there knocked down by a man, by a blow in my mouth; there were four women with that man; the prisoners were two of them; Nicholls held me fast while Law took my money out of my pocket; I could swear to the man if I was to see him; Law had been in the house where I was drinking, and I knew her directly I saw her in the street; I had a gas-light over my head, and am certain of them both I got up, and pursued both the prisoners, but did not call out, as my mouth was full of blood, from the effects of the blow - I could not call out much. I did not lose sight of either of them, till they got into a house, and the door was shut - I understood the house to be the back part of the Salmon and Ball public-house; I felt very ill, and did not get them secured - I went home, and next morning I went to find them out; I went into Cripplegate without, and got Wetherall; we went to the Britannia; there was no one there that I knew, but as we came out, we turned ourselves round, and Law was coming up the street, in company with another woman - I gave her into Wetherall's charge - I had no doubt whatever of her. In the evening of the same day I went, with Wetherall and Atterwell, to the spot where they got into the house; I knew the house, and went in: we found Nicholls on the stairs of that house - I was positive of her directly; I swear to her now, and did so before the Magistrate. My money was not marked; I believe no money was found on them. I sometimes work for myself, and sometimes for other people; I lodge in the second floor, and have a wife and four children.

Prisoner LAW. Q. Had you not been drinking with me for above an hour? A. My friend and I went in - there was certainly some liquor drank between us, and the prisoner helped herself, but without my permission; my friend certainly knew the house, but I was never in it before.

COURT. Q. Did any familiarities pass between you, or did you invite her to join your company when you went out? A. By no means, nor did I intend any thing of the sort; she took the liquor without my consent.

JOHN WETHERALL . I am a constable of Cripplegate without. On Monday, the 17th, Panton complained to me of having been robbed on the previous night - I went with him to endeavour to find the party, about one o'clock in the afternoon; he described the persons to me before. I accompanied him to Golden-lane - we went into the Britannia- they were not there; soon after we came out I stood talking at the door with him - I looked down the lane, and saw two females coming up; I told him to look down, and he said Law was the woman who took the money out of his pocket; I asked if he was positive - he said he could swear to her; I took her, and locked her up - he knew nothing of the other woman. Brackley-street is all in the City - he met me at six o'clock, at the Britannia; Atterwell, he, and I went to the back of the Salmon and Ball yard; Panton pointed to the door - we went in; Atterwell waited at the bottom of the stairs; as I went up the first flight of stairs I heard somebody running up the second flight; the room door was open, and Law's daughter was there - and on the second flight of stairs I found Nicholls; Panton had not described her, but said he should know her if he saw her - the moment I took her down to him he said she was the person who held him while he was robbed. He spoke to her with certainty, and said he could swear it; he said, "You are the person who held me;" she denied it, and said he was mistaken.

JOHN ATTERWELL . I went to this house with Wetherall. When Nicholls was brought down, Panton said, that was the woman who held his arm; I asked him about it several times, saying it was a serious charge - he said, over and over again, she was the woman who held his arms. No money was found on her.

Prisoner NICHOLLS. Q. Did he not say I had been to the public-house with him, and I insisted upon being taken there, and the landlord said I was not there? A. I think something of the sort was said, but he denied it afterwards.

JOHN PANTON . I never stated she was with me; I said the other was with me.

LAW's Defence. On the very same evening I came out,

and told Nicholls to mind my child and my place, while I went to the Britannia, as a man owed me a shilling, who used the house; I staid an hour - Mr. Panton came in, and called for a pot of beer; he said, "You seem very cold - will you have a pot of porter with me?" - I said I had no objection, and drank with him. He sent for a quartern and a half of gin, and I drank a glass; in ten minutes he called for another quartern and a half - he seemed intoxicated then- I had another glass with him; and in a quarter of an hour he called for another quartern and a half, which his friend and him drank; I objected to drink more, having been ill; I got up, and bade them good night: he wished me to have more beer. As I came out he said, "Have you got a place you can take me home to?" I said I had, but it was a good way off, near Bunhill-row; he said he did not mind. I took him home, and Nicholls, who was at my house, showed us a light, and went out of the room; I said, "How much money will you give me?" he said "I have only 1s. 6d. - I shall send for a quartern and a half of gin, and give you the 1s.;" he sent me for the gin; I got it from the Salmon and Ball, and brought it up stairs; Nicholls waited at the door, and I fetched it; we all three had a glass: she went away to her room with my child; in a little time the woman of the house fetched her over, and said there were words between me and the man; Nicholls came over - he said he was robbed of half-a-crown and 3s., because I would not let him lay on my bed; I said he might search my place; I had no money but the 1s. which he gave me: he tried to snatch it out of my hand- I said, "Don't ill-use me, send for an officer, and give charge of me;" Nicholls said, "Don't commit violence on the woman," and the woman who lived down stairs said,"Don't hurt her." I went to the door; he wrenched the shilling out of my hand, and said, "I will serve you out tomorrow;" he went out, and I was so agitated that Nicholls said, "Don't go out again to-night;" I went out next morning; I was hardly able to walk, and the officer took me. As to my being in Brackley-street, I deny it; I did not think him capable of swearing what he has.

NICHOLL's Defence. I was not outside the door till half-past ten o'clock. I told the officers if they would go to a public-house in Angel-street, they would find that I had been there with a young man. I have written to the prosecutor, to say if he would go to the young man he could prove I was in his company from half-past three o'clock. I never saw the prosecutor till he came into Law's room.

JOHN WETHERALL re-examined. Q. When you took Law, did she give this account of the transaction? A. No- she said something similar to it to the Alderman, on the 18th.

JURY to JOHN PANTON. Q. Did you leave the public-house before Law, or after? A. She left before me, I suppose ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I did not observe any man go out with her. I am certain the man who knocked me down was not in the room where I was. I cannot say whether any other woman was there with Law.

COURT. Q. Did you know your way home from the Britannia? A. Yes; but I went from the public-house, to call on a friend who lived in Whitecross-street - I was in the way to Whitecross-street.

JOHN WETHERALL. The corner of Brackley-street was in his way to Whitecross-street.

LAW - GUILTY . Aged 32.

NICHOLLS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280110-14

270. JULIA ANN COX was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 2 sovereigns, 3 shillings, 15 halfpence, and 5 farthings, the monies of Robert Kiberd , from his person .

ROBERT KIBERD. I am a journeyman hatter , and lodge in Acorn-court, Whitechapel. On the 29th of December I had been paying some money away, and had three sovereigns and 6s. or 7s. in silver and copper left - I am certain I had three sovereigns; I was going home, and met the prisoner in Houndsditch, a little after seven o'clock in the evening; she came up, and asked where I was going- she was alone, and had a basket in her hand; she came up, and said, "Won't you give me a glass?" I said I had no objection, and went with her to the Salisbury Arms public-house, Camomile-street ; we had five glasses of rum and water, and I had had one glass of rum and water at the Bull public-house, before I met her, and had a glass of rum in the morning; one or two young men in the tap-room had a little of the five glasses - I did not know them; I paid for it all - it did not get into my head - I was quite sensible; the prisoner went into the back yard for something, leaving her basket on the table. I went out into the street shortly after, and, as it had been raining, I slipped off the curb, and was quite stupified with the fall, but not with liquor - I could drink five glasses myself; the witness Green and another young man took me up; I was taken into the tap-room; the prisoner came in, and sat down by my side; I finished the small drop that was left in the glass; she drank with me; she wanted me to go in a hackney coach with her, but I would not; some time after that, I was asked what money I ought to have; I said three sovereigns; the young men examined my pockets, by desire of the constable, who was sent for, but I cannot give evidence of what happened after the fall, for the blow had quite stupified me; I do not know whether I felt in my pockets; the liquor might have a little effect on me - the young men charged the prisoner with having my money, but I did not, for I did not feel her take it; the landlord sent two men home with me, and I did not see her searched; when I got home I only had a farthing - the sovereigns had been in my left hand trousers pocket; the silver and halfpence in my left waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask me where I was going? A. No, she asked me.

THOMAS KENES . I have been a master fishmonger, and now buy fish to send into the country. On the 29th of December I went into the Salisbury Arms public-house, and found the prosecutor and prisoner there; they appeared acquainted; the prosecutor seemed very much intoxicated when I got in, and he had some liquor with the prisoner after I got in; she handed the liquor to several people, which he made no objection to; the prisoner went out backwards; she came in again, and accused somebody of taking money out of her basket; she went backwards again in a few minutes; the prosecutor then went out at the front door - he walked out very well; he was brought in between five and

ten minutes afterwards, hardly sensible, by a person who is here; the prisoner then came in, and said, "Who has been and cut his head? you have killed the man;" he had fallen down, and his head was bleeding very much; she said,"My dear, who has been and cut your head?" she laid down on the top of him, as he sat on the settle; a young man, named Rowden, called to me, saying, "Tom, she is picking his pocket;" I do not know whether she heard that. I looked and saw one of her hands in his waistcoat pocket, and the other in his trousers pocket. I told Green she was robbing the man; he directly looked at her, and we saw her take her hands out of his pockets, and drop money into her basket; she had no money there before, as I had examined her basket, on her saying some one had taken her money, and there was nothing but a handkerchief in it; I set the basket on the table, and called Willis, the landlord; he examined the basket in my presence, and there were two sovereigns, three shillings, 7 1/2d., and 1/2d. in it; she said she would have the money, and that it belonged to her; the constable was sent for, and she was secured; we went to the prosecutor's house, and fetched his wife, as the prisoner said he was her sister's husband; the wife said, in her presence, at the watch-house, that she never saw her before; we searched the prosecutor's pockets, and found only one farthing in them.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a stage-master. I was at the public-house, and saw them drinking rum and water together; the prosecutor wanted to go out once or twice, but the prisoner would not let him - she kept saying she would tell her dear sister, his wife, how he had served her; she wanted the boy of the house to fetch a coach; I saw her hands in his pockets; I saw her take them out, and drop the money into the basket, Kenes took it away, and the landlord counted the money into my hand; I saw the prosecutor's wife at the watch-house, and she said she had never seen the prisoner before, and her son said he had never seen her.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am a constable of the night, The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by a watchman; she said she was the prosecutor's wife's sister. The wife came, and denied all knowledge of her; I asked her why she had said so; she said she was ashamed to be seen drinking with a man, and not own him as a relation. I found 3s. 9 1/2d. in her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I had 5s. 6d. in my pocket. We had three glasses of rum and water in Houndsditch, and three more at this house; I paid for one; two young women came in, and drank with him; he fell down, and was lifted up; I knew nothing about the money till half an hour after I was in the watch-house; they had put me out of the public-house, but I said I did not wish to leave him there in such company, for the landlord was heading one party which was playing at cards. If my hands were in his pockets, many more must have seen them. When I came in, he was bleeding; I was cleaning the blood off, but never touched his pockets; they put me out, and said I had nothing to do with him; I said he was a freind of mine, as he told me he had lived five years where I was born; I got some vinegar for him to get him sober. I am a poor distressed woman, with a fatherless child. If I were to die this minute, I know nothing about the money; his wife was told he had lost 8l., and gave charge of me, thinking all that money was gone.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-15

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 11.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

271. EDWARD BULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , in the dwelling-house of Jonathan Tibbs , 1 table, value 10s.; 2 tea-chests, value 7s.; 1 bed, value 3l.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 5 blankets, value 20s.; 1 counterpane, value 7s.; 1 carpet, value 3s.; 1 rug, value 1s.; 1 set of bed furniture, value 10s.; 1 fender, value 2s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 1s.; 1 cloak, value 2s.; 1 tea-tray, value 2s.; 1 table-cover, value 1s.; 2 waistcoats, value 6d.; 2 pans, value 4d.; 1 pair of bellows, value 1s.; 3 spoons, value 3d.; 1 shawl, value 1s.; 1 pepper-box, value 6d.; 2 sheets, value 10s.; 5 table-cloths, value 20s.; 1 looking-glass, value 10s., and 3 jugs, value 2s. , the goods of John Sandy .

ELIZABETH SANDY . I am the wife of John Sandy, who is a servant in a gentleman's family. I lodge on the second floor at No. 12, Bear-yard, Lincoln's Inn-fields, in the parish of St. Clement Danes - Jonathan Tibbs keeps the house; the prisoner lodged there, and slept in the front garret. On the 21st of August I left town; I locked my door, and left all these articles safe; I did not return till the 12th of October - I unlocked my room door, and found my room nearly empty; all these articles were gone; they are worth about 10l. The prisoner still continued at the house; he left some few days after I returned. I asked if he knew any thing of it - he said he did not - that he was up and down ten times a day; I told him I thought those who were up and down ten times a day had robbed my room - and after this conversation he left the lodging; I do not know where he went to lodge. I applied at Bow-street, and was present on the 31st of December, when a search-warrant was executed at No. 3, Adam-street West, in a second floor room, and a great part of my property was found there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many lodgers were in the house? A. I do not know; I lodged there nearly two years - there might be five or six, but I cannot say; three or four rooms were unoccupied before I left town. I had given the key to my husband, who left town a fortnight after me. The prisoner left within a fortnight of my return; I called the landlord up the first night of my return, and complained of my loss; I believe the prisoner did not remain a fortnight after that - I will swear he was not there a month; there was nothing about the articles to enable a person who bought them, to know they were mine: he did not visit my room - I had not twenty words with him before I left town. I applied to the Magistrate after this conversation, and the prisoner returned a day or two after he left, and was detained by the officer, and denied knowing any thing of it. The officer said I could not have a warrant unless I swore I suspected the property to be in any part of the house, and a warrant was not granted till I found where he lodged; he was at home when we found the property.

GEORGE ALDERSON . I am a Bow-street officer. The

prosecutrix applied for a search-warrant about the 29th of December; I know nothing of her first application: a warrant was granted on the Monday morning - I accompanied her to No. 3, Adam-street West, Portman-square; I found the prisoner and his wife in the second floor back room; I asked if his name was Bullen - he said it was: I said I had a warrant to search his premises, and told my brother officer to call up Sandy; she looked round the room, and claimed the bed curtains, the bed, bolster, pillows, looking-glass, table, fire-irons, fender, carpet, rug, china, and a variety of furniture; he began to cry, and said he was ruined, and that he should destroy himself. I took him into custody, and took the property to the office.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he had purchased the articles? A. No; he said he had taken them away, and if I would let him go he would make good all he had broken in removing them. I did not mention this before, because I was not asked.

Q. Are you not sworn to tell the whole truth? A. Yes, but an officer is often stopped for saying too much. I know nothing of his having eight children - I saw one child in the room.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY . I am an officer, and went with Alderson to the prisoner's lodging; his wife cried, and he told her it was through distress he had done it; I found some duplicates of the table-cloths, in a portmanteau, wrapped in a letter, in his room; I went to Dry's, in St. Martin's-lane, and Muncaster's, on Snow-hill, and got the table-cloths.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take him to the pawnbrokers? A. No - they saw him at the office, and said a woman had pawned them. I hear he has two children in Devonshire, and that his wife has six.

JONATHAN TIBBS . I am landlord of the house. The prisoner lodged in the garret; I tried the key of his room to the prosecutrix's door, and it opened it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find any other key to fit it? A. No - I tried every key in the house; I had supplied him with the key - he remained in the house till the 25th of October.

ELIZABETH SANDY . These are my table-cloths - I was present when all the property was found, and am certain it is my husband's. No one article is worth 5l. of itself; two or three together might be worth 5l.; the table-cloths are marked J. E. S. The bed is worth 3l.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-16

Before Mr. Justice Park.

272. ANTHONY BERNARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Dale , at St. George, Hanover-square , 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 5 sovereigns, and five 5l. Bank notes , the property of Francis Joseph Laine , against the statute.

FRANCIS JOSEPH LAINE. I live on my own property. - I arrived in town from Paris on the 2d of January, and reside at the Gloucester hotel, which is kept by Mr. Thomas Dale; I do not know what parish it is in. I had arrived in London before, on the 20th of October, and was at that hotel in October and November last, and saw the prisoner there then, until the 13th of November; he was a lodger there like myself; I am a native of France, and formed an acquaintance with him, as being a countryman. We met in the coffee-room. I was very unwell in November, and on the 13th, in the morning, I kept to my room - the prisoner visited me in my room; he was in the habit of doing so; he visited me in my room several times when I was in bed; I had a pocket-book, containing four 5l. notes and sundry papers, and I had a purse, containing between 6l. and 7l.; on the 13th of November my pocket-book was on a dressing-table, and the purse on a chest of drawers in my bed-room - I had occasion to leave my room for a few minutes, about ten o'clock that morning; I was not then dressed; I did not leave the prisoner in the room, but he had been there two or three times that morning, to see me; the door has a spring, and shuts by itself. I missed my pocket-book and purse about seven or eight minutes after I came back to the room, as I was dressing - I instantly went down stairs, and gave notice to the landlord; the prisoner was not then in the house; I did not see him again till he was before the Magistrate, at Marlborough-street. I went to France on the 15th, returned on the 2d of January, and have seen my pocket-book and a 5l. note before the Magistrate; I had not marked my note, but I had the number of it. Here is a memorandum which I made the day I lost them, in order to stop the notes; the numbers are 16,642 to 16,645, inclusive; I received them from Mr. Salt not long before I lost them.

THOMAS EWEN . I know the prisoner. I am waiter at the Gate-house hotel, Highgate. The prisoner came there on a Friday, about the the middle of November; I do not know the day of the month; he came there about four o'clock in the afternoon, to the best of my remembrance: he remained there that night, and for about a week; he paid every day for every thing, as he had it, till about the Wednesday; and on the Monday he asked for change for a 5l. note, which he gave me; I took it to Ann Rogers, my mistress, who gave me the change, and I gave it to him; there were four sovereigns and some silver. On the Thursday evening he was in the coffee-room below stairs; it came on a snow, and was very cold; he complained of its being very cold, much more so than in Paris; he pulled a paper out of a pocket-book, and said it was a small bit of paper, but it was worth 800l. - I saw the pocket-book; he then said he wanted to go to London, to get some money from Stevenson's, the bankers, to pay his bill and go to Paris, as it was so cold, he could not stay in town any longer, and should go next day. Some time after that he asked if I ever went to town - I said very seldom; he asked if I would go for him, as it was so cold, to get some money from Stevenson's, the bankers - I said, to oblige him, I would go; he went into the coffee-room, called for a sheet of writing paper; he wrote a letter, and put the piece of paper into it, after reading the letter to me; he said his name was Laine. I believe the letter was written in English - our conversation was in English; I cannot speak French. I took the letter to Messrs. Stevenson and Salt's, of Lombard-street, and in consequence of what passed between me and Mr. Salt, I went to the Mansion-house with him, by his desire, and answered what questions I was asked; I went with Mr. Salt immediately afterwards, to Mr. Dale's, the Gloucester coffee-house; Goddard, the of

ficer, and Mrs. Dale, went with me to Highgate; the prisoner had then been gone some time. On the following Sunday evening I had information where he was, and went with Fitch, the constable, and took him, at the Bull and Mouth public-house, Kentish-town. I have the pocket-book here which he produced - he gave it to me that evening, with the letter, to bring the money back in; I have had it ever since.

ANN ROGERS . I manage the business at the Gate-house, at Highgate, for my brother. I remember the prisoner being there; Ewen brought me a 5l. note to pay a small bill: I had no other note by me whatever - I put it into my purse, kept it there from Monday till Tuesday, and then gave it to my niece. I am sure I had no other note.

HARRIET ROGERS . My aunt gave me a 5l. note in November last; I paid it to Miss Atkins, the butcher's daughter; I am certain I paid her the same note.

ANN ATKINS . I received a 5l. note on the 21st of November, from Harriet Rogers, in payment of a bill; I placed it in the cash-drawer, which was locked in a desk- there was no other 5l. note in the drawer. I locked the desk, took the key out, and gave it to my father.

SAMUEL ATKINS . I am a butcher. On the evening of the 21st of November, my daughter gave me the key of the desk; I looked in the cash-drawer that evening; I had opened the desk perhaps twenty times, but always locked it again. I found a 5l. note in the drawer; there was no other 5l. note there and I had put none there. I sent the same note (on the Thursday) to Mr. Chapman, by my nephew, James Atkins. I had not marked it - I sent a 10l. note with it, but I had no other 5l. note.

JAMES ATKINS . I am the last witness' nephew; he gave me a 5l. and a 10l. note, with some coin, to take to Chapman; I delivered the same notes to Brown, Chapman's gardener; I took no other 5l. note.

HENRY BROWN . I am gardener to Mr. Chapman. - On the 22d of November James Atkins gave me a 5l. and a 10l. note, nine sovereigns, and some silver - I gave the same notes to Mr. Chapman that evening; I did not alter them at all.

THORY CHAPMAN . I received these notes from Brown- I paid the 5l. note on the following day, to Messrs. Willis and Co., of Lombard-street, my bankers - I think I delivered the money to Mr. Tomkins, Jun.

SAMUEL TOMKINS , JUN. I am clerk to Messrs. Willis and Co. I received 22l. 2s. from Mr. Chapman, on the 23d of November - I do not know the particulars of the notes - we paid them into the Bank. I laid the note I received down on a desk, and it was entered by my father, who is a partner in the house; we usually write the name of the person on the notes, but it was already written on this, and I did not write it.

MR. SAMUEL TOMKINS . I am partner in the house of Messrs. Willis and Co. I cannot charge my memory with this transaction, but here is the book in which I entered it at the time; I have entered on the 23d of November, 22l. 2s., in the name of Chapman; it consisted of a 5l. note, No. 16,644, dated the 18th of September, 1827, and a 10l. note; it went to the Bank next day, with other notes.

WATKIN JONES . I am a clerk at the Bank of England, and produce a 5l. note, No. 16,644, dated the 18th of September, 1827; it was paid into the Bank on the 24th of November, from Messrs, Willis and Co.; I have a memorandum, which I took from the book; the entry was not my writing; I do not know whose hand-writing it was. - I know nothing of its coming from Messrs. Willis', except from the entry.

ROBERT HOARE . I am clerk to Messrs. Stevenson and Salt. I know Mr. Laine; here is an entry, in my writing, of my having paid him, on the 10th of November, four 5l. notes, No. 16,642 to 16,645, inclusive; I gave the notes to Mr. John Salt.

JOHN SALT . I am a clerk in the house. Mr. Hoare delivered me these four notes; I put them on the desk, and saw Mr. Laine take them up. I remember Ewen coming on the 23d of November; he delivered a letter to one of our clerks, who is not present. I have got the letter and the enclosure which was in it; I opened the letter, and went with him to the Mansion-house; my father afterwards went with him to Mr. Dale's.

THOMAS EWEN . The prisoner read the letter over to me before he sealed it; this is the letter - it has my seal on it, which I lent him, to seal it with, and this is the paper which was in it; I swear I saw him write it, and he read it over to me in English - he speaks English very well.

The letter in question, which was written in the French language, was here read, and translated in substance as follows:-

"Highgate, 22d of November, 1827.

"Messrs. Stevenson and Salt, Bankers, London.

"I beg of you to remit by bearer, to me, a bill of exchange for 700l., and 100l. in bank notes, against this, which I now send you. I have more need for money than I thought I should. You will oblige, very much, your devoted servant.

"J. LAINE."

"I believe I shall be able to go away to-morrow, or the day after, on a journey. Send to Batts' hotel."

The order inclosed in the letter was for the payment of 800l., to Mr. Joseph Laine, on account of Messrs. Rothschild, through Messrs. Stevenson and Co.

MR. LAINE. This letter is not my hand-writing, nor my signature; this paper was in my pocket-book when it was taken - it is a memorandum for 800l.; it would have been available to me, but to nobody else, unless they had forged my name. Messrs. Stevenson and Salt are my bankers, and know my signature; this is my pocket-book- there is my writing in it; here is a ticket for perpetual entrance to the Virginia Museum, which I had in it.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I know the Gloucester hotel is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square; Thomas Dale is the landlord - he has no other name.

The whole of the evidence was communicated to the prisoner by an interpreter, through whom he stated as follows - I wish to know in what place I gave the witness that letter, and what I gave it him to read for. I have been five months in England, and two months of the time confined to my bed, and in that time it was impossible I could read a letter in English. I wish to know what I should write the letter for, and why I should sign it Laine. The evidence is not true.

THOMAS EWEN. He read the letter to me in English; he did not give it me to read; he told me the purport of it.

WATKIN JONES. We never issue two notes of the same number and date. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, as being a foreigner, might be ignorant of the English law, and the penalties of the French law not being so severe .

Reference Number: t18280110-17

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

273. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , in the dwelling-house of William Hollett , 78 half-crowns, 1 crown, 1 bag, value 3d.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s., and 1 pair of buckles, value 2s. , the property of John Dixey .

JOHN DIXEY. The prisoner lodged in the same house, and slept in the same bed with me, for four or five weeks. I left town on Monday, the 24th of December, about two o'clock, leaving a box in my room, which contained seventy-eight half-crowns, and a crown piece, in a bag - I had a black silk handkerchief, a pair of shoes and buckles in the room - I left my box locked - I returned on Wednesday, the 26th, about half-past five o'clock; I found my box broken open, and the nails lying about; it is in the same state now; my money was all gone, and the rest of the things.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where are your lodgings? A. At No. 93, East-street, Manchester-square . There were other lodgers, but not in that room; it is a lodging-house - I took the key of the box with me, but not the key of the room - I always locked the room when I went out to work, and left the key with the landlady, for whoever came in first; the house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone.

WILLIAM KENDALL . I am a servant, and lodge at No. 93, East-street, Mary-le-bone. I rent two rooms there, and let the back one to Dixey and the prisoner - I took my rooms of William Hollett, who rents the house, and occupies part of it - I heard of Dixey leaving on the 24th; and a little before eleven o'clock, on the night of Christmas day, in consequence of what my wife said, I went into their room, and found Dixey's box shut and locked, but the hasp was broken off - I tried to open it; it came open at once - I did not examine what was in it; the prisoner was not in the house - I then left in quest of him, and found him at the end of East-street, coming across from Blandford-street - I immediately gave him in charge of a watchman, on suspicion of breaking open this trunk - I did not either threaten or promise him any thing, nor did any body else; on our way to the watch-house, he said, "Oh! dear me, it is all over with me now, I shall be hung" - I immediately said, "Then, Jones, it is you that has broken open the box;" he said it was; we then took him to the watch-house; he was searched; some half-crowns were found on him, and also a bag, and a black silk handkerchief; the shoes were found on his feet.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the landlord's name? A. I do not know how to spell it - I believe it is Hollett; he is not here; the constable told me his name was William - I do not know it myself; what the prisoner said was quite voluntary.

CORDELIA WALTER . I am the wife of Edward Walter; he keeps a chandler's shop in Mary-le-bone-lane. On Christmas night, from half-past ten, to half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner at my door; he came into my shop, and was quite tipsy; he said he had got plenty of money, and wanted us to have something to drink, but we did not; he told my husband he had plenty of money, and would lend him a sovereign, if he wanted it; my husband said, "Well you can," and with that he threw down some silver on the counter; my husband counted out 5l. all in half-crowns, except one crown-piece; he told him he would take care of it, till the morning when he should have it again, as he was so much in liquor - I said, "Jones, where have you got all this money from?" he said he had been doing some work for Harris, the Jew, and he had paid him - I gave the money up at Mary-le-bone Office to the Magistrate; there was no bag with it; we rolled it up in paper.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him long? A. Between two and three years, merely by his painting and glazing for us; we thought him harmless and inoffensive.

WILLIAM BAKER . I keep the Boar's Head public-house, Blandford-street, Portman-square. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to my house for the last three or four weeks - I saw him there about five o'clock in the evening of Christmas day; a person called me - I called the prisoner to me, and said, I understood he was throwing about half-crowns in a careless manner, and I thought he had better give them to me to take care of; he gave me sixteen half-crowns, and said, "Now, that is all that I have got, and I want to treat my friends in Mary-le-bone-lane." I think he said something about 1l. or 2l. which he had not spent; he was very tipsy indeed, and I said he should have nothing more at my house that night - I do not know that he had any thing at my house; he said, "Will you let me have a bottle of wine to carry to my friends in Mary-lebone-lane" - I said he was not able to carry it; he asked me to send it, and I sent my pot-boy with a bottle of wine, and a bottle of rum.

Cross-examined. Q. What became of the money? A. It is in my hands; the wine and rum is not paid for; they sent for two bottles of wine afterwards; this was at five o'clock, and he certainly was not sober then.

GEORGE DALE . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. I went to Mr. Hollett's, a few days ago, to enquire his name, and he told me it was William - I did not know him before. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, between eleven and twelve o'clock on Christmas night, by Kendall, the watchman - I found on him twelve half-crowns, one shilling, two sixpences, and about 3d. in copper, a black silk handkerchief on his neck, and a canvas bag, which I produce; he was tipsy; the 5l. worth of silver was given to me at the office by Walter, by order of the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not acquainted with Hollett? A. No; he did not tell me his name in the prisoner's presence - I believe he is in health; the money found, amounts to 8l. 12s.

JOHN DIXEY. This is my bag; it is sewn up at the bottom - I have had it three years; my name is on the handkerchief - I have lodged at Hollett's house seven weeks. I know he goes by the name of William; the house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone.

Cross-examined. Q. Is he called Hollett or Mr. Hollett? A. I do not know - I do not speak to him once a week - I never heard what name he was called by - I never lent the prisoner a handkerchief; he once took one from my room, without my leave, and returned it.

COURT. Q. You never heard Hollett called William? A. No - I say his name is William, because the constable says so.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-18

Before Mr. Justice Park.

274. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Hicks , on the 3d of January , with a certain sharp instrument, striking and cutting her in and upon her left breast, with intent to kill and murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable, or to do her some grievous bodily harm.

ELIZABETH HICKS. I live in King-street, Wapping . The prisoner lodged in the same house, in a lower room; last Thursday he came into Mary Lyon's room, where I was, and said, "Are you here, Mrs. Hicks?" he seemed angry; I turned about, and said, "I am, Brown;" he asked if I knew any thing of his quartern loaf, butter and sugar - I said, "I know nothing about it, but wait till your wife comes, and you may get some intelligence of it;" he said,"You lie, you b - y thief, my wife was not there;" he did not charge any body with taking his loaf; we told him to be easy, till his wife came in; and that she was in the room at the time, taking out a bundle of clothes, as she was afraid he would pawn them; he went away, and I went down stairs directly, to get a jug of water up, and had occasion to pass his room door, which was open - I heard him, as he was going into his room, swear by the Holy Father, that he would stick me; when I came opposite his door he came out towards me, but I did not see him coming, till he ran a knife into my left breast - I only staggered - Mary Lyons was with me - I went out to a doctor - I was able to walk there; there was not much blood from the wound. The prisoner had called me down into his room that morning, before this happened, and treated me with gin - Lyons was not there then; we first had a quartern; he drank none of that; he went out for another quartern, and had some of that - I paid nothing for the gin - I never drank with him before; it was between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - I never quarrelled with him; he stabbbed me between two and three; he was very drunk - I was not drunk - I did not attempt to strike him - I took no sugar nor butter of his.

Prisoner. Q. Were you in my room, or out of it at the time? A. Out of it - I was on the stairs; he was never at variance with me. I never knew him behave ill to any body.

MARY LYONS . I live in this house. Hicks came into my room with a pipe in her hand, and a bit of paper; she said something to me about being idle; she was going to the fire to light her pipe; Brown came in, and said, "Are you here, Mrs. Hicks?" she said Yes; he said, "Have you seen any thing of my loaf?" she said, "No; your wife has been in here, and, perhaps, she has taken it;" he said, "You lie, you thief; my wife has not been here:" I said, "Yes, your wife has, and brought a bag of clothes in her hand, and told Mrs. Hicks she was afraid you would pawn them;" he said,"You lie - you are a parcel of thieves." I said, "Brown, don't come here to give me any of your insolence; if you are drunk, behave yourself, or I will throw you down head foremost." He went down stairs; there are only five stairs from my room to his; Hicks followed him down, and said,"Brown, look about for your loaf, may be you may find it; or have patience till your wife comes in." He then walked back into his room; she stood on the landing-place, and I on the first stair; he walked about, and went to his workstool (he is a shoemaker); he took the knife off the stool, ran towards her, and said, "By God, you thief, I will stab you;" she slid round, and the knife came against her breast; when he struck her with the knife, she ran upon him, and said, "You villain, will you murder me;" he had struck her with the knife before she ran upon him.

Q. Did he strike her breast? A. Yes; he ran against her, and stuck her in the breast with the knife, and then she ran in after him into his room; as he ran in he dropped the knife by his working stool; I picked it up, and delivered it to one of the officers; there was blood came from the wound- I went for an officer.

Prisoner. Q. How can you say I lifted the knife to that woman? A. I would not swear it if you had not done so; I never lifted my hand on him.

JAMES BOLAS . I am an officer. I was called in, and went to the prisoner's room, which Lyons showed me: I found the door fastened; I knocked, but could not get it open; I forced it open, and found the prisoner there; Lyons gave me a knife, which I have had ever since - it was bloody, and her hand was bloody; the prisoner was intoxicated.

Prisoner. Q. How can you say the door was fastened, when there is no key to it; it opens hard, but was not fastened? A. It was fastened; I cannot say how.

JOHN CHATWOOD . I am an apothecary; the prosecutrix was brought to me by Lyons; I live about two hundred yards from them; there was a simple incision on the upper part of the left breast, which I closed with adhesive plaister- it was about three quarters of an inch long; the knife produced might have caused such a wound; I did not ascertain its depth - it was not bleeding then, but there had been blood from it.

MARY LYONS . We went to this gentleman in a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes.

JOHN ADAMS . I am an officer. I assisted in taking the prisoner; when I got him down stairs, I asked what made him use such violence; I did not threaten or promise him any thing; he said his reason was, because he had lost his bread, butter, tea, and sugar; that she was coming down stairs, and he was coming out of his door, with a knife in his hand, but he thought he was hitting her with the handle of it, thinking he had the point in his hand; he said he had struck her on the breast.

Prisoner. Part of the knife went into my hand, as well as on her breast. - Witness. He did not show me his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in his Majesty's service twenty-one years, and was knocked down for dead in an engagement in 1794: I afterwards fell down the hold of the Sultan, and am quite deranged if I take the least liquor. As to this affair, I am as great a stranger to it, as if I had never seen the light - it is their own faults; they knew my failing, and might have kept away from me, and my gin too; I found myself pennyless; my wife denies taking any thing: these two were together, and robbed me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-19

Before Mr. Baron Alexander.

275. NICHOLAS HENIGAN was indicted for feloniously shooting at Robert Taylor , a subject of our Lord the King, with a loaded pistol, on the 17th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent to kill and murder him, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

ROBERT TAYLOR. On the 17th of December, about ten minutes after twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was standing outside my door, which is No. 49, Newman-street, Oxford-street . I was in the shop at the time; I had been out, and returned home; I was standing at the side of my counter, and Mr. Hone, a neighbour, was standing in the shop with me; seeing the prisoner standing outside, I said, "Walk in, Mr. Henigan." - "Yes, I will," said he; when my neighbour was gone, I said to him, "What is your business with me this morning?" (he had come into the shop) he said, "Special;" he was in the shop, standing at my side, at the exterior side of the counter; and when he said,"Special," I felt myself struck on the side of my cheek - I did not know what it was that struck me; he then said,"That is my business." I put my hand to the side of my face; I found myself very much stunned, and saw like a flash of fire when I was struck; the blood trickled down my cheek; I then went towards the back part of the shop as well as I was able - I found myself in very great agitation; some of my neighbours shortly came in, and two persons took me from the shop into the adjoining parlour, and put me into a chair. Mrs. Taylor, as soon as she could, said, "Fetch assistance for my husband - he must have a doctor directly;" the prisoner was then gone: after I was struck, as soon as I could open my eyes a little, I saw a pistol lying on the floor, in the shop, about two feet from my feet.

Q. How far was it from where the prisoner had stood? - A. About the same distance, or rather more, nearer towards the shop door. I have known the prisoner for many years; there had been a variety of disputes between us at different times, about the meaning of the articles of a benefit society, which we both belong to.

Q. What happened on the last occasion? A. About eighteen months ago, a member, named John Wright, had got the situation of beadle of St. George, Bloomsbury; the prisoner considered he had no right to belong to the society any longer, and I considered he was just as good a member as before, he not having broken the articles; the prisoner brought the question before the club - it was put to the club whether he should continue a member, and decided by a show of hands that he should continue; the prisoner then summoned me to Bow-street, before Mr. Halls; I being president of the club, the prisoner said I ought to exclude him; Mr. Halls decided that. I was right in not excluding him; the prisoner expressed himself strongly dissatisfied with me on that occasion, and in a variety of instances; he brought forward a written protest on one occasion, but he took that away the same night, as the president would not receive it.

JEMIMA TAYLOR . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 17th of December, about five or ten minutes after eleven o'clock, Mr. Henigan came to the shop; I was at the back of the shop; he either stamped with his foot, or knocked with the umbrella that was in his hand - he was at the door, which was open. I went forward immediately; he asked me if Mr. Taylor was within;" I said, "No, he is not - did you wish to see him?" he said, "Yes; tell him my name is Henigan - I will call again." I said, "Very well, Sir; he will be in, in the course of half an hour." He went away, and in about twenty minutes my husband came in; I was behind the counter when the prisoner came again, which was in about an hour; my husband was at the exterior of the counter, talking to Mr. Hone; I heard my husband say,"Walk in, Sir - walk in, Mr. Henigan;" he said, "Yes, I will," and immediately walked in; he passed my husband, and went a little backward in the shop, towards the window - Hone was then standing in the door way of the shop - he went away in five or ten minutes after Henigan came in; as Hone went out of the shop door, I turned from behind the counter, to go into the parlour, behind the shop, and, as I turned, I heard my husband say, "Well, Henigan, what is your business with me this morning?" I heard no answer from Henigan, but instantly heard the report of a pistol.

Q. Was it very loud? A. Very loud; I turned round, and saw the smoke ascend towards the ceiling - my husband stood with his hands to his face, leaning towards the counter - his side was to the counter, leaning on it; he endeavoured to call out, but could not - he generally calls me mother; he said, "Mo - mo -

"twice, but could not get the rest out. I was very much frightened, and could not immediately go round the counter, but did as soon as I could; finding my husband could not speak, I ran up to Mr. Henigan (not thinking it was him), and said, "Oh, Sir, what is the matter?" he said, "I have done it - there it is; I came on purpose." I looked down, and saw a pistol lying on the floor, and, in my agitation, I said, "Good God! Sir, what has induced you to do this? What has he done? Why did you do it? Will he die? will he die?" I do not know what his answer was, but I think it was No; in my hurry I picked up the pistol, and went to my husband; I gave the pistol to Mr. Feldwick, who came in.

THOMAS PATTEN . I am a parish constable. I was going by Mr. Taylor's, and was attracted by a crowd at the door; I went in, and found Mr. Taylor had been wounded- the blood was running down his face; I saw the prisoner there in custody of Feldwick, who had gone in before me, and had hold of him; I asked Feldwick what had been done; he said the prisoner had shot Mr. Taylor - he must have heard that; I then asked the prisoner how he came to do it; he said it was an old grudge; that he was willing to go any where with me, but he should answer me no other questions; I did not hear him say any thing more - I believe he said something to Charles Wright, as I was walking behind them, going to Mary-le-bone Office.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. I never saw him before.

Q. You do not know whether his manner was as usual, or whether it was wild and extravagant? A. As I could judge, the only expression of his countenance was personal sorrow; the prosecutor did not go with me to the office - I saw him there on the Wednesday - it happened on Monday; I only know Taylor as a neighbour - I do not belong to the United Britons.

Q. Are you sure he said it was for an old grudge? A. I am certain, from the best consideration I have given it, that that expression was from him; I am certain he made me that answer, because I could not have heard it from any one else; I swear I did hear it.

Q. Was any thing said about Mr. or Mrs. Taylor when he said it was an old grudge? A. He mentioned neither of their names.

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. On Monday, the 17th of December, I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody; I found him in custody of two others, in the shop; as I was taking him to the office I looked at him, and asked how he came to do it; I made him neither threat nor promise; he said he should answer the Magistrate when he got there; I asked him no other question then, but when we got nearly to the office, (I had been looking at him for some time, and he asked what I was looking at) - I said it was a pity for a man of his years to do such a thing as that; he said a man that was born to be hung must be hung, and it could not be helped: some further conversation passed, when we got close up to the office - I almost forget what, for I have fallen from a two pair of stairs window since, and forget a good deal that passed; he said there was no ball in the pistol - that he had only fired with wadding and powder; he said he knew he had forfeited his life, but there was no ball in the pistol - he had only fired it with powder and wadding; this was in going to the office: when I got to the office, I found a ball in his waistcoat pocket; I recollect the conversation perfectly well, and swear to it. On searching him I found the visiting-committee book of the club, and a tin case, a comb, a knife, and the bullet, which was tried to the pistol, and fitted exactly; he had an umbrella.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you the bullet here? - A. I was taking something out of my pocket in the other Court this morning, and have unfortunately lost it; but I tried it - it was a perfectly new bullet, and had never been fired - he told Mr. Rawlinson, the Magistrate, that he had had it cast on purpose to shoot Mr. Taylor.

Q. Do you mean that he used that expression? A. That is what he said in the office; I believe it was taken down in writing; I never saw him before.

Q. Did he appear to you to be a man of sound understanding? A. Perfectly so; he was perfectly collected.

EDWARD FELDWICK . I lodge at No. 48, Upper Rathbone-place. I am a cobler, and have a stall under Taylor's window. On the 17th of December I heard the report of a pistol; I got out of my stall; went into Taylor's shop, and there saw Mrs. Taylor picking up a pistol from the floor - she gave it to me - I have had it ever since, and produce it- it is a new pistol - I saw Mr. Taylor in the shop, holding the prisoner; the blood was running down his face, and his eye was very black.

Q. He was holding the prisoner, was he? A. Yes; Mr. Taylor said, "This man has been and tried to blow out my brains" - the prisoner must have heard that; I asked Taylor, who had tried to blow out his brains; he said,"This man," (the prisoner;) I immediately seized and held him till Patten came; Wright afterwards came - he and I took him to Mary-le-bone Office - I saw the tin-case and book found on him.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you knew nothing of him before? A. No; when I came in Taylor was holding him by the collar.

LAWRENCE WRAGLE BROWN . I am a surgeon, and saw Mr. Taylor about ten minutes after the accident happened; his right cheek was scorched, there was a small portion of the skin grazed, and a slight inflammation of the eye on that side - I suppose that inflammation to have been occasioned by the explosion having taken place so near - there was some little congealed blood on the cheek, and a few grains of powder in the skin, about an inch from the wound, I think.

Cross-examined. Q. How often did you attend him? A. Three or four days - it might be a day or two more - it was less than a week - he was then perfectly cured.

Q. Might not the skin have been grazed by the muzzle or cock of the pistol striking against his cheek? A. I should rather think it might be occasioned by that - it was nothing more than a skin wound; I live in Berner-street.

ROBERT TAYLOR re-examined. No ball was found in my shop.

Q. In the position in which the prisoner and you stood when the pistol was fired, if there had been a ball, and it missed you, would it have struck on a wall, or gone out of the shop? A. It would have struck on the wall; no search has been made to see if a ball had struck there - no ball has been found, nor has search been made for one.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the wall papered, or what, where the ball must have struck? A. There is paper on it - I have not looked for any mark on the paper, but if there had been one no doubt I should have observed it - my wife sweeps the shop - she has never produced any ball or shot to me.

Q. Is this paper your hand-writing? A. (Looking at it) A friend wrote it for me - I have signed it; the body of it is not my writing - it was written by my direction, about two hours after the accident.

Q. How lately had there been any difference between you and the prisoner? A. On the 3d of December - I had not seen him after the 3d - this happened a fortnight afterwards - I continued on the books of the society for a fortnight all but three days, in consequence of this accident.

The paper produced was here read, as follows:- I, Robert Taylor, being a member of the United Britons' Benefit Society, declare on the funds of the same, being confined from a wound received from Nicholas Henigan, by a pistol, at half-past eleven o'clock. ROBERT TAYLOR.

Prisoner's Defence. I am accused of having acted with a malicious and felonious intent to disfigure or inflict bodily injury on the prosecutor, Robert Taylor. The malicious and felonious intent I solemnly disclaim: it is this that constitutes, in my humble opinion, the essence of my imputed offence: it is this, Gentlemen, to which I pray your attention: if this intent be not found, which I trust I shall be able completely to disprove, I humbly submit that I shall be entitled to your verdict. That malice or felonious intention I solemnly disclaim, as I hope for mercy at a superior tribunal. I never thought or dreamt of injuring the person of the prosecutor; the slight scratch on his face was purely accidental and unpremeditated, never intended or thought of as a possible occurrence. It must be perfectly clear to you, from the evidence, that no injury was contemplated to his life; and it must, I submit, be equally evident that no serious injury whatever to his person could have been intended. The alarm occasioned to Mrs. Taylor certainly never entered my thoughts either at the moment or before, or after, and I most humbly ask her pardon,

and hope that no serious consequences may follow. My only object, in my attack, if it can be so named, on Mr. Taylor, was to afford a lesson to him and to others, how dangerous it might possibley prove, wantonly to trifle and sport with men's characters in such serious matters; much more from malice or revenge of real or supposed injuries, to invent or circulate atrocious calumnies. I see here some gentlemen of the highest respectability, who attend for the purpose of speaking to my character, who have known me, some of them from fifteen to thirty years; and I think I may say, with confidence, that not one of them, from their knowledge of me, could ever have imagined that I ever could be capable of acting as it is said I have now done, from motives of malice or revenge. Those members of the benefit society to which the prosecutor and defendant in this case both have belonged for seventeen years, will also, I have no doubt, in their minds acquit me of such motives. Gentlemen, after calling a few witnesses in explanation of circumstances deducted from the evidences produced against me, and a few others relating to matters, perhaps, of small advantage to me, and hoping your kind attention, I shall leave my case with confidence in your hands.

Eight witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 60. Upon the third Count.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of character, and the Prosecutor conceiving he did not mean to take his life .

Reference Number: t18280110-20

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

276. MATTHEW GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , at St. Sepulchre, 1 gelding, price 40l. , the property of Thomas Whisler .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WHISLER. I am a farmer , and live at Wiganhall, St. Mary Magdalen, Norfolk , within seven miles of Lynn. I went to Lynn market on the 4th of December, and returned between twelve and one o'clock at night, on the gelding, which was afterwards stolen; it was worth 40l. - my servant boy took the gelding, and put it into the stable - I was alarmed between four and five o'clock in the morning, by my man, who informed me it was gone - I went immediately in pursuit, without going into the stable- three of us went different ways - I returned two days after, without finding it - I had information about a fortnight afterwards, and came to town, and saw my gelding in Henderson's stables; I am certain it is mine - it is over at the New Inn now, and is the one I lost.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You knew it again? A. Yes; it is a dark brown, and I knew it by some white hairs under the saddle.

COURT. Q. How long had you had it? A. Three years - I cannot be mistaken in it - I have known the prisoner ever since he was a child - he lived about half a mile from me.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. I understand, up to the time this occurred, he bore a very good character? A. Very good - I had employed him at harvest work, and he gave me satisfaction.

ALEXANDER HENDERSON . I am a veterinary surgeon, and live in Park-lane. I know the prisoner - I saw him on Friday the 7th of December, at Smithfield-market, and bought a horse of him that day, in the market - I paid him twelve sovereigns for it; it was afterwards claimed by Whisler; the same horse is now over at the New Inn.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you would not have bought it, if you had entertained any suspicion? A. No; it was openly sold - I agreed for the price in the open market - I took him up the yard, and desired the ostler to bring a light, and I should see to pay him - I asked him whose horse it was; he said his own - I asked where he came from; he said it became his own, by the death of his father; he had a crape hat-band on, and I considered his story correct; he gave me the name of William Thompson, living at Totten-hill, near Lynn. I put it down at the time.

Q. Might he not have referred you to Thompson, as the person from whom the horse came? A. I am certain he said that was his name.

COURT. Q. What time of the day did you complete the bargain with him? A. About half-past four o'clock.

THOMAS WHISLER re-examined. My house is ninety-four or ninety-six miles from London.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am principal officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of December, at the Northampton Arms public-house, Goswell-road; ten sovereigns were given to me before the Magistrate, at Bow-street; they were produced by Butterick.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear him say any thing about Thompson? A. No.

EDMUND BUTTERICK . I deal in china, glass, and Staffordshire ware, and live in Goswell-road, opposite the Northampton Arms. I have known the prisoner from a child. On the 8th of December, when I came home, about eight o'clock in the evening, I found him at my house; I said, "How came you so far from home?" he said, "I was out of employ," and so I thought he had come to town, to look for employ; he slept at my house that night, and I saw him again on Sunday morning, the 9th; he breakfasted with me, and some little time afterwards, while I was dressing myself, he said, "I am not left without money; I can raise eleven sovereigns, and some silver;" I said, "I am happy to hear it: you have not left home in poverty?" he said, No; he left eleven sovereigns with me to keep for him; and afterwards, in consequence of a message, I went and saw him in Newgate - I held out no threat nor promise whatever to him - I said, "Matthew, I am very sorry to see you in this case;" he looked at me, and was fit to cry; I said, "I suppose some evil person has led you into this;" he said there has, and named William Thompson of Totten-hill; he said William Thompson broke the stable door open, and took the horse out, and gave him directions to bring it to London, and what house to come to.

Q. Did he say where he was at the time? A. No; he said Thompson broke the stable open, and put the saddle and bridle on the horse, and told him which way to come.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known him? A. Twelve or fourteen years - I know his friends; they are very respectable, for their situation in life; he always bore the best of character.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his good character .

Reference Number: t18280110-21

277. JAMES DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Gutter , from his person .

WILLIAM GUTTER. I am a carpenter , and live in Charlotte-street, Old-street. On the 6th of January, about ten minutes before eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Long-lane , and felt a person's hand in my outside coat pocket; this induced me to turn round, and I found the prisoner at my pocket; he had my handkerchief out - I laid hold of him, close by me; he never got from me; there were three others in his company. I saw him give my handkerchief to one of them.

Q. Should you know either of them? A. Yes - I am quite certain I should; it was a silk handkerchief, and worth 2s. 6d.; his companions went off; he was never out of my sight, till I gave him in charge of the watchman - I saw the handkerchief in his hand - I had used it two minutes before - I am certain his hand was in my pocket.

WILLIAM GLOVER . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre- I was going my rounds, when Gutter gave the prisoner into my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Long-lane, and crossing to Smithfield, a gentleman crossed, and said,"You have got my handkerchief" - I said I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280110-22

278. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Salter , on the King's highway, on the 2d of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 seals, value 2l. 12s.; 1 watch-key, value 10s., and 1 split-ring, value 8s. , his property.

CHARLES SALTER. I am a master tailor , and live at No. 62l, Berwick-street, Oxford-street. On the 2d of January, a few minutes after two o'clock in the morning; (I had been spending the evening with some friends - I was not intoxicated, but had been drinking) - I was in Fleet-street, at the top of Bouverie-street, going towards Whitechapel .

Q. How came you to go that way? A. I had been home, found myself locked out, and did not know where to go - I was walking about the streets - I spent the evening in Frith-street, Soho; just at the top of Bouverie-street, I, received a blow from a fist, on the side of my head, which brought me to the ground - I had not observed any body near me. When I was brought to the ground, a man stood over me, and was pulling at my watch ribbon - I saw but one man; he pulled three times, and each time, the pull lifted my body from the ground, and after pulling me up three times, the bow of the watch broke, with the violence of the pull; he struck my head against the stones each time, and the last time it quite took away my senses; the man got away - I was not able to distinguish who he was; I lay senseless on the ground; I found the prisoner in the watch-house that night. when I came to my senses. I saw my two seals at Guildhall next day, and have not the least doubt of them - they are chased, and have an impression on them; part of the ribbon remained on them - it was the same ribbon as was attached to my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you been out all day? A. No; I left home in the middle of the day; I had been on business part of the time; I left my friend's house, in Frith-street, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I had no supper. I went down to Covent-garden after that, and saw two women under the Piazzas; one was a woman of the town; the other professed not to be so; they overtook me in Bow-street, about half-past eleven o'clock; I walked with one of them down to Wych-street- I was sober, and swear I had my seals safe then.

Q. What did you do with yourself after that? A. I cannot say, for I received a blow in Wych-street, from two men, which took away my senses - I was sober then; I stood talking with the woman. I did not apply to the watchman, for I thought they did it out of a lark, as they ran off.

Q. Did not you tell the Magistrate it was a tall man who stood over you? A. He appeared taller than the prisoner; I cannot tell what happened after I received the blow in Wych-street; I drank part of a glass of brandy and water at one house with the women, and gin and water at another; the blow I received at the top of Bouverie-street restored my senses; I was not intoxicated, but the blow I received in Wych-street took away my senses. I said at the watch-house, that I had lost my watch, but I had not then discovered that it was left.

JOHN GRIMWOOD . I am a watchman of Whitefriars. About ten minutes after two o'clock, I was sitting in my box, in Silver-street, about ten yards from Bouverie-street - I heard two people scuffling at the corner of Bouverie-street and Fleet-street; I did not go up to them, but in a minute or two I saw the prisoner run by my box, and at the end of Silver-street he turned to the right, into Lombard-street, to get into Fleet-street again; I am sure it was him; I saw him turn to the right again, towards Bouverie-street: I then ran back into Silver-street, and came up with him at the corner of Bouverie-street, meeting him; when I came up I saw the prosecutor lying senseless on the ground; the prisoner was two or three yards from him; when he saw me and another watchman coming up, he calling Watch! and insisted on our taking the prosecutor in charge, for assaulting him; and about a minute after the prosecutor seemed to come to himself a little; he got up, and said to the prisoner, "You rascal, you have robbed me of my watch and seals;" he gave him in charge for the robbery, and the prisoner charged him with the assault - they were both taken to the watch-house; the prosecutor appeared to have all his senses knocked out of him: he had several blows on his head, and his coat was covered with mud. When the prisoner ran by me there was not another soul near, and when I followed him round I saw nobody but him, except the watchman and prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. You heard a scuffle, but did not go up? A. No - I did not think any thing of it at the time; the prisoner made a circuit, and came round within three yards of the spot where the prosecutor lay; the prosecutor came to himself; but then his senses appeared to leave him again - he did not properly come to himself till he came to the watch-house. He said at the watch-house that the man who stood over him was taller than the prisoner - the prisoner insisted on the prosecutor being searched; the prosecutor certainly said that the man was

taller, but when he came to himself he contradicted that; when he had been about five minutes in the watch-house he said he had lost his watch.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a watchman - my beat extends from Lombard-court, round to the back door of the Bolt-in-Tun, Fleet-street. I was going towards Bouverie-street, from Lombard-court; a woman was calling,"Watchman, here is a man using a gentleman dreadfully ill;" I ran to the spot as fast as I could, and about ten yards down Bouverie-street I saw the prisoner leaving the prosecutor, who was down on the ground; he ran up to me, and gave charge of the prosecutor for insulting him in the street. I saw no one else in Bouverie-street, nor near; I never saw the street so clear: when he was telling me to take the charge, the prosecutor recovered, and got up; he ran up to the prisoner, who was about ten yards off, and said, "Charge! I will give charge of you, you rascal - you have robbed me;" he did not say what of, at that time; Grimwood came up, and said, "Take hold of him, and we will take them botl, to the watch-house;" on our way there the prosecutor put his hand up, and said,"Oh! my God; I would not have had such a blow for 5l." He every now and then looked round to the other man, saying, "Take care of him - don't let him go;" when we got to the watch-house, the constable of the night sent me on my duty, and I did not hear what passed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you your watchman's dress on? A. Yes. The prisoner ran from the prosecutor to me, and gave charge of him; I was going my rounds; he could see I was a watchman - I had my stick.

Q. Did not both appear to be in anger with one another? A. Why we separated them; I took hold of the prosecutor - he appeared in a stupid state, not altogether sensible: we walked to the watch-house, which is about one hundred and fifty yards; I kept hold of him, for he appeared not able to walk, and the prisoner had given him in charge; I could not tell who was right - he appeared stupid - I cannot tell whether it was from liquor or injury; he walked steady: a tipsy man generally cannot walk - he did not tell me what kind of a man had robbed him, or what he had been robbed of; he seemed stupid, and out of breath.

ROBERT SAUNDERS . I am a watchman - my beat is from Water-lane to Lombard-court. I was in the watch-house when the parties were brought there, and heard the watchmen state there was charge for charge; I went to sleep, and paid no attention to it; I awoke, and heard the Whitefriars' watchman state, that he saw the prisoner run down from Bouveric-street, along Silver-street, round to Bouverie-street again; and when I went out on duty, I went and found the seals laying against the step of the door of Carlile's printing-office, in Bouverie-street; there is a strong shade thrown across the door-way, by the gas; they were fastened with a red ribbon: there were two gold seals, a key, and a ring; I took them to the watch-house - the prosecutor was then gone, and the prisoner had been taken to the Compter. The prosecutor claimed them before the Magistrate, in the prisoner's presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it two o'clock in the morning? A. Yes; we are on duty four hours, and then sleep for two hours.

JAMES GARRETT . I was constable of the night. On the 2d of January, between two and three o'clock in the morning, the prisoner and prosecutor were brought to the watch-house; the prisoner said, "Here is charge for charge;" the prosecutor said he had been knocked down and robbed of a watch and seals; Grimwood then stated that he saw the prisoner come up, and go through Silver-street, round Lombard-street, into Fleet-street again. Nothing was found on the prisoner - but after the watch was relieved, Saunders came, and delivered me the seals, with the ring and key attached to a ribbon; the prosecutor had then gone home, and the prisoner was at the Compter. I had searched the prosecutor, and found his watch in his fob, broken at the bow. The prisoner said he was innocent, and said, "I don't think the gentleman has got a watch," and when he was going to the Compter be begged I would search the prosecutor, and see if he had, which I did; it was broken at the bow, where the ribbon fastens, and must have been done with considerable violence. The prosecutor did not know I had the seals till I produced them before the Magistrate - he then said they were the seals he had been robbed of.

Cross-examined. Q. He told you he had been robbed of his watch also? A. Yes; the prisoner said there was charge for charge when he came in, but he made no charge against the prosecutor; when the prosecutor first came in he seemed much confused; he said he thought a tall man had robbed him: he had an opportunity of seeing the prisoner at that time - he did not say it was a taller man; he accused the prisoner of it - the prisoner said, "Now, Sir, look at me - I am short, and am an innocent man; let me go about my business." The prosecutor appeared very stupid, as if he was bewildered.

COURT. Q. What did the prosecutor say in answer to that? A. He said, from the blows he had received, he could not swear positively to the prisoner; he did not say how the man was dressed.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

WILLIAM GARLING . I am waterman at the coach-stand in Bridge-street. On the night of the 2d of January I saw the prisoner at the White Bear public-house, Bride-lane; it was nearly one o'clock when I first saw him - the last time was within a few minutes of two, as near as I can guess.

Q. Had it gone half-past one o'clock? A. Yes. I saw him at supper there; when the house was shut up he came out of the door - I bade him good night; he went up Bride-lane, towards Fleet-street, and I went to the coach-stand; I left him in Bride-lane; I have known him fifteen or sixteen years - I cannot say what character he bore; I have not come about that.

COURT. Q. What time would it take to walk from the White Bear to Bouverie-street? A. It is no great distance - I dare say I might walk it in two minutes; I know it was nearly two o'clock, because I could hear St. Bride's clock strike; it had not struck, but it only wanted a few minutes, for the house shuts up at two; it was more than half-past one, for it was one when I saw him at supper in the house; St. Bride's clock struck two just as I got to the top of Bride-lane, in Bridge-street - that was not more than three minutes after I left him - I live in Blackfriars'-road.

JURY to CHARLES SALTER. Q. You had received a blow in Wych-street, and had no motive in going to Bou

verie-street? A. No; I did not know which way I was going.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-23

279. JAMES TOOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Alexander Wilson .

ALEXANDER WILSON. I live on Holborn-hill , and am a shoemaker . On the 21st of December. about eight o'clock, the prisoner, who is apprentice to one of my workmen, brought his master's work home; after taking the work from him, he asked if I had any work for his mistress, who is a shoe-binder - I said I had some for his master, which I would give him; I went into the wareroom below, to get it, and when I returned I missed a pair of shoes off the floor; I had had them in my hand a very few minutes before - there was a servant in the shop, but he was cleaning the window, and had his back to the prisoner; I desired the prisoner to turn the work which I had given him out of his bag, and let me count it again; he had two bags, and in the second bag I found this pair of shoes, which had not been bound - he said he thought they were to be bound; he was at my shop three or four times a week- I called one of my men, to see what I had discovered, and then gave him in charge; the shoes are worth 2s. 6d.

GEORGE CORBY . I am a constable, and received him in charge; he said he had not had the shoes in his bag - Mr. Wilson said he had.

Prisoner's Defence. I brought my master and mistress' work, and laid it on the counter; I threw down mistress' bag; I gave him master's bag, and asked if there was any work for mistress - he said she had got work: I took up the bag, and this pair of shoes was under it, but not in it.

MR. WILSON. I am positive they were in his bag, at the bottom of it; he had two bags, one containing his master's work, and the other his mistress', I believe.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, his former master having engaged to take him into his employ .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-24

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 12.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

280. JOHN HAND, alias STONEY , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wright , on the 22d of December, and stealing 3 boxes, value 4s. 9d. , his property.

LOUISA WRIGHT . I am the wife of John Wright - we live in Little James-street, Westminster , and keep a snuff-shop . On the 22d of December, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I dusted my boxes, and put them in the window; I went to clean the lamp, and found the boxes disturbed, and on examining I found the window broken, and three snuff-boxes taken out; I believe the glass was cut before, but they had cut the putty, and taken the piece quite out - it must have been cut out. I had not noticed the prisoner near the house. I have since seen a box in the officer's possession, which I thought was mine - my house is next to the Infirmary.

CHARLES BROWN . I live with my father, who is a shoe-maker, in Orchard-street, Westminster. I have known the prisoner about four years; I saw him one Saturday, between three and four o'clock, in Birdcage-walk, with two snuff-boxes - one was brown, mounted with silver, and the other was pewter; he told me he had got them out of a broken window, next door to the Infirmary: he did not mention anybody's name; I was not there.

Prisoner. Q. Had you not been with me all day, till about four o'clock? A. I was not; it was on the Saturday before Christmas that he told me of this.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge on the 24th of December - I found nothing on him but a knife.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-25

281. ANN GILMORE was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Edward Payne , on the King's highway, on the 8th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch-key, value 1d., 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 12 halfpence , his property.

GEORGE EDWARD PAYNE. I am fourteen years old in March. I live as under waiter to William Thorogood, at Bagnigge Wells tea-gardens. I sleep at my mother's in Wilson-place, Gray's Inn-lane. On Saturday night, the 8th of December, my master paid me two shillings, a sixpence, and sixpence in halfpence, for my wages - I was going home about a quarter before twelve o'clock at night, and had it in my breeches pocket; when I got into the fields, which I had to cross, I saw the prisoner sitting on some stones, and another woman higher up, about two yards, by a gate - I knew the prisoner by sight before, having saw her five or six times in the neighbourhood, and am quite sure she is the person; she came up to me, and asked whether I had got any money - I said I had not; she said, "If you do not give us the money, I will throw you into the ditch;" we were about twenty yards from the Fleet-ditch - I still denied having my money; the other woman came up, and said, "If you don't give us the money, we will throw you into the ditch;" they both said so; the other woman seized hold of me round the waist, while the prisoner took my money out of my pocket; it was against my will; she held me fast; when they had got the money, they threw me down with great violence on the path, and said if I hallooed, they would throw me into the ditch; they ran to Bagnigge-wells-road , and left me - I got up, and went straight home to my mother - I told my master on the following morning; the prisoner was taken up on Monday night, about a quarter-past seven o'clock - I knew her well, for I had seen her five times before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was a quarter to twelve o'clock, when you left your master's house? A. Yes; the fields were about one hundred yards from the house; it was about twelve, when it was all over - I told my master; she had a kind of light spotted gown on- I am as certain of that as I am of her person.

WILLIAM THROROGOOD . My father keeps the Bagnigge Wells. The prosecutor was waiter there. I paid him, about a quarter-past eleven o'clock, two shillings, a sixpence, and 6d. in copper - I do not know what time he left; this field was his nearest way home; he described the woman to me next morning, and stated what had oc

curred - I went down immediately, met Roberts, the officer, and described her to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you she had a light gown on? A. He did.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, on Monday evening, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, from Thorogood's description - I took her on the spot where the robbery was committed; the prosecutor was with me; he said the prisoner was the woman, but the other was not the one who was with her - I found two halfpence, some duplicates, and two purses on her.

Cross-examined. Q. What kind of a night was the night of the robbery? A. I think rather light; it was about the first quarter of the moon.

COURT. Q. Did she say anything? A. When I took her, she said it was not her, it was another one; and as I took her to the watch-house, she said she had a half-crown given to her that night by a baker, and 6d. by a gentleman: that she left it on the bank where I took her - I went next morning, and found it.

GEORGE EDWARD PAYNE . I was about two minutes walking from my master's house; it was all over by twelve o'clock - I heard the clock strike just as they both ran away.

Witnesses for the Defence.

MARY MORAN . I am a laundress, and lived in the same house with the prisoner, on the 8th of December; she came home that night, at half-past eleven o'clock, and had a reddish cotton gown on; it was rather light; it was a light red flowered gown, more pink than red - I am sure she was at home at half-past eleven o'clock - I know Samuel Hood; he had an opportunity of seeing her that night.

COURT. Q. Do you let lodgings? A. No; the prisoner rents a room in the same house as me - I looked at the clock when she came in, and it was half-past eleven o'clock - I do not always look at the clock, but I happened to look at it then; she was always early; she lives with a man who is a pensioner; he supports her as far as is in his power; she was at home at eleven o'clock the night before - I did not look at the clock, but I heard the watchman cry the hour; my house is in West-street; you can walk to these fields in ten minutes, or less; she has different coloured gowns; she wore a red flowered one that night; she wore one rather darker two nights before - I cannot tell how she gets her living; she keeps company with no one but the man she lives with.

SAMUEL HOOD . I am a salesman, of Fleet-market, and have known the prisoner three years - I lodge in the same house with her. On the 8th of December I saw her at home before a quarter-past eleven o'clock, by that and half-past.

Q. Where did you see her at half-past eleven o'clock? A. Undressed in her room, sitting in her chair, ready for bed - she had had her supper; she had her shawl over her shoulders; she had the same gown on as I had seen her with in the morning.

Q. Then what part of her was undressed? A. Her stays were loose - she had a light gown on - I did not look so close as to tell the colour; I am sure it was half-past eleven o'clock, for I had to close the door for the night, as the landlord was ill in bed; I inquired if every body was in.

COURT. Q. What time did you come home? A. At a quarter-past eleven o'clock; I remember it, as I was done very soon at market; I had a glass of liquor, and came home; she was undressed when I came home, all loose, ready to slip off her things, and her shawl was over her neck.

Q. How came you to know she had a light gown on? A. She has a red gown - she had a light one on this night, not the red one - I cannot tell what time she came home on the Thursday or the Wednesday; she is an unfortunate girl - her door being open that night, I made bold to go in, which makes me remember it.

JURY. Q. What makes you so exact to the time? A. Because I got home so soon, and gave my wife my money; I always look at my clock, which is in my room; the prisoner was at home before me, and had had her supper; she could not have come home at half-past eleven o'clock, for I got home at a quarter-past, and she was then undressed.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you hear the watchman crying the hour? A. He cried half-past after I got home.

- HOOD. I am the wife of the last witness; I will take my oath the prisoner was at home, in her own room, at half-past eleven o'clock, on the night of the 8th of December, because I had just come from market, and my husband at the same time; my husband had to lock up the house, as the landlord was ill; the prisoner came home at half-past eleven o'clock, rather sooner than later.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-26

Before Mr. Baron Alexander.

282. CHARLES MELFORD and WILLIAM MELFORD were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Pring , on the 9th of December , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing 7 sovereigns, 4 half-sovereigns, 4 crowns. 24 half-crowns, 20 shillings, 8 sixpences, 1 spoon, value 5s., and 1 watch, value 4l. , his property.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously assaulting, on the same day, at the same parish, Mary, the wife of the said John Pring, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, the said monies and goods, the property of the said John Pring.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MARY PRING . I am the wife of John Pring, a cheesemonger , who resides at No. 9, Plummer's-row, City-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, Middlesex . On Sunday morning, the 9th of December. I was at home alone - we had a servant named Richard Moss at that time; my husband went out at church-time, and Moss went out about eleven o'clock; my husband went out first - I was left alone in the house - after Moss had been gone about half an hour, I was up stairs in my bed-room, over my parlour; a ring came at the shop bell; I went down to the shop door, opened it, and found the prisoner, Charles Melford, at the door; he said he wanted a piece of good Cheshire cheese, for Mr. Law, the surgeon: Mr. Law is a customer of ours - Moss knew that - I said, "We don't serve on Sunday, but I don't wish to disoblige Mr. Law;" Charles Melford walked into the shop; he passed me, and walked into the shop; the prisoner, William Melford, walked in after; I had not seen him before; when William was a little way in the shop, I said "I have not any

one to send;" William Melford said "We must take it then, I suppose," or words to that effect; the shop door, when I went behind the counter, was shut, but I do not recollect who shut it - I observed that it was shut; when I got behind the counter I pulled a piece of Cheshire cheese from the shelf behind the counter, and, as I put it on the counter, I observed the prisoner Charles Melford coming round the counter after me; the prisoner William Melford stood opposite to me, on the other side the counter, and presented a pistol near my face.

Q. As William stood opposite to you, did you observe any thing particular in his countenance? A. Yes; I observed a piece of his nose was gone; Charles touched me lightly on the left arm, and presented a pistol at the side of my head; they each had a pistol; the prisoner William said, "It is your money we want - if you make the least noise, you are a dead woman;" I was alarmed, but perfectly collected; I said, "Good God!" and I think it was William who said, "Don't be frightened - we won't hurt you, but we must have your money;" I stood a little, hesitating, and the prisoner Charles said, "Come, come, show us where the money is;" I walked from behind the counter, and said, "If you will stop here, I will fetch it;" Charles said "No;" I then went up stairs, followed by the prisoner Charles; he was close behind me; I went into my bed-room, and when I got there, Charles Melford said,"Where is your cash-box, and where is your plate?" I said I had neither; I then went into a small room, over the shop - it communicates with the bed-room; he followed me into that small room; I unlocked the top drawer of a chest of drawers which stood there, and pulled a purse out of the drawer, containing 5l. 4s. all in silver, and gave it to him; he said, "What is that?" I said silver, and gave it to him - it consisted of crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences - I think there were a good many half-crowns, but am not certain of their number; I then pulled out a purse, containing 9l. in sovereigns and half-sovereigns, and gave that to him; he said that was very little - he thought there was more; I said I had no more; we came down stairs both together, to the parlour door - there is a cupboard in the parlour, and when I came to the parlour door, the prisoner William Melford was turning from the cupboard; I said to him, "You have taken my husband's silver spoon - it is a family relic - pray give it to me;" the prisoner William said, "What spoon?" and gave it me; one of them gave me back the purses, but I am not certain which it was; my husband had a watch, which he put in the cupboard when he went to church; I missed that watch when they were gone.

Q. What happened afterwards? A. I stood in the parlour; the prisoner William stood on the mat, at the parlour door; he pulled a cord out of his pocket, and said, "We must tie you;" I said, "For God's sake don't tie me; pray don't tie me - I cannot do anything - I won't move;" he said, "If you move for a quarter of an hour, we have plenty outside." I was not tied. Before they went away, I heard one say to the other that the money was very little; they went away, and shut the door after them - they banged it to, hard; I stopped in doors till my husband came from church, and soon afterwards missed the watch from the cupboard.

Q. You have stated you were alarmed by the production of the pistols, were you in a state to make accurate observation on what passed? A. Yes, as much as I am now; Charles Melford had a white handkerchief on his neck, and a blue coat, with metal buttons; the other had on a large drab great coat.

Q. How long, in your judgment, were the prisoners in your house? A. A very short time - about eight minutes, I suppose. On the next day (Monday) I was standing in our shop, and the prisoner Charles walked into the shop - I had previously described his person and dress to Hanley; Hanley followed him into the shop - he was with him; I lifted up my hands, and said, "That is the man that robbed me."

Q. Did you at that time see Hanley? A. I saw the prisoner first; I had not caught sight of Hanley before I made that exclamation. I had previously been to see several persons who were pointed out to me by the officers - there were a dozen or more; I told the officer neither of those were the persons who robbed me. I saw the prisoner William, I think, on the Wednesday week after - he was produced to me at Worship-street, in custody; I knew him directly.

Q. Now, this is a most serious charge, affecting their lives, have you a belief of their being the men, or are you certain of them? A. I am certain they are both the same men.

Q. Are you certain from a recollection of their persons, or what? A. It is the impression their countenances made upon me altogether at the time of the robbery.

Q. You have mentioned the observation occurred twice, about their being but little money, had you more money in the house the previous week? A. I think we had hardly ever so little - we had more the Sunday preceding. Moss was employed in the shop, and could see what we took.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. About what o'clock was this? A. Between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning - it was Charles who went up stairs; we went into a small room on the first floor, over the shop; I opened the top drawer of a chest - that occupied a very short time; I have said they might be in the house altogether about eight minutes; the stairs are very short, the bed-room very small, and the other room is close to it - it could not take many minutes; I had to open the drawer, but my keys were in my pocket ready - it might take about five minutes; William was not up stairs at all; I saw him when he came in at the door, and spoke to me about the cheese; I took particular notice of him; I did not count the money - I was as firm as I am at present; I was frightened, but quite collected - I was not much agitated - I was as much agitated at the rope as at the pistols.

Q. You were agitated at both? A. Yes, of course, it made an impression on me, as I saw my life was in danger; but they told me they would not hurt me if I gave them the money; they did not commit any violence on me; one of them told me not to be alarmed; and they returned the spoon when I said I wished it.

Q. Has not somebody been taken up for William, who had the same defect in his countenance? A. I know nothing of who has been taken; I did not see any other person taken up; I have not a doubt of their persons; our shop shutters were all up - the shop was not so light as when opened, but it was a very fine bright day, and there was light enough to read the smallest print; there is a light from the back room - that is a borrowed light: the shop door was closed, but I do not know who closed it - that is the front door.

Q. When they were in the shop, your means of seeing them was by a borrowed light from the back? A. No; there is a good light over the door - it is a regular fan-light, but has no glass in it - it is merely irons, to let the air into the shop - it is as wide as the door, and the usual height - that, and the borrowed light from behind, was the only light I had.

MR. LAW. Q. Was it light enough for you to make accurate observation? A. It was - it was quite light enough to do any thing.

JURY. Q. Have you a private door? A. No.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. I and Garton saw Mrs. Pring, at her house, on Sunday evening, the 9th of December; she described to us very particularly the persons of two young men; she also described their dress, and the particulars of the robbery; we went to the King's Arms public-house, in Charles-street, on that Sunday night, in consequence of her description, and sent for her, as there were about seventeen persons there; we desired them to put their hats on, but she did not know either of them. Next morning, about ten o'clock, I went to No. 24, Henrietta-street, Hackney-road, and saw the prisoner Charles Melford there; I told him, I suspected, from the description which had been given me, that he had been at a robbery the preceding day, and he must go with me to the City-road; we went there, and I saw Mr. and Mrs. Pring in the shop; I desired Charles Melford to walk in before me; he did so, and almost instantly that he went in, Mrs. Pring lifted up her hands, and exclaimed, "That is one of the men who robbed me;" I took him to the office, and also Moss, the servant, who was afterwards discharged. Charles Melford had a light coloured great coat on, when I took him; and when I took him to the shop, he had not a blue coat on then; I returned with Wilmot, the parish officer, to the house in Henrietta-street, where I had taken him, and, in a back bed-room, in a box, near the foot of the bed, I found two small bottles of gunpowder, six pistol bullets, and six pistol flints, and, on the mantle-piece, I found two other bullets, in the frame of a time-piece; I found a pistol bullet mould in another box, in the same room, and in the same room I found two masks; there was a box on the landing-place, near the door; I could not procure the key of that; a woman, who said she was Melfords' mother, was with me when I made the search; I broke the box open, and found this pistol, which was loaded with small shot, and primed - I have drawn the charge - the box in which it was, was about one yard from the room door; I found a blue coat hanging on the door of the room, and Charles Melford owned that coat - there was a white neck handkerchief in the pocket of it; there were several letters in the room, directed to William Melford, and one to Charles Melford; the blue coat was delivered to Charles, and I will not be certain whether the one William has on now is the same or not. On Monday, the 17th of December, in consequence of information, I went, with two other officers, to the Olive Branch public-house, in the Maze, in the Borough, and apprehended William Melford; he also had a light great coat on then. Mrs. Pring gave me this spoon.

Cross-examined. Q. Charles claimed the coat at once? A. Yes; he said it was his; he knew I was an officer - I had apprehended him two days before; Mrs. Pring had been in a room with seventeen men, on the night of the robbery, and she knew I was an officer then.

Q. Were you near enough to hear her exclaim, "That is one of the persons who robbed me?" A. Yes; I was about three yards from her; Charles Melford stood between us.

Q. You are a tall man - she was near enough to see you at the time? A. She might, or she might not have seen me - there was no door or bulk to intercept her view; when she exclaimed that he was one of them, Mr. Pring was angry, and took up a knife; I stepped between them, and said, "You must not burt the man." I know a man named Tibbs - I cannot, from my own knowledge, say whether a person was taken for William Melford - I do not believe that Tibbs is here to day.

MR. LAW. Q. Were the prisoners the only persons you presented to Mrs. Pring, except those at the public-house? A. There were no others. I apprehended the prisoners in consequence of her description; I cannot say whether Mrs. Pring had seen me at the time she made the exclamation - I saw her change countenance directly he went in.

GEORGE WILMOT . I am a headborough of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. I accompanied Hanley to search the house in Henrietta-street, after Charles was apprehended; the things produced were all found, in my presence in a back room up stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any thing found that Mrs. Pring claimed? A. Not to my knowledge; I found two pistol keys in the box.

THOMAS GARTON . I assisted Hanley in apprehending William Melford, at the Olive Branch, in the Maze, Borough; we had two other officers ready; there are two doors to the house; I stationed Brown at one door; William Melford was dressed in a light drab coat - I was ordered by the Magistrate to return it to him, as he complained of being cold.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether a man was taken up, who was mistaken for William Melford? A. I do not know it.

JAMES BROWN . I assisted in apprehending William Melford.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a green-grocer, and live at No. 25, Henrietta-street, Hackney-road. I have seen the prisoners going in and out of their mother's house, No. 24, Henrietta-street, constantly, for ten or eleven weeks past.

SARAH HAYES . I keep a coffee-shop, in Grub-street, Cripplegate, which is about half a mile from Mr. Pring's; Richard Moss' sister lodged there; Moss was in Mr. Pring's service. On Sunday, the 9th of December, I let Moss in, and while he was there, a young man, in a drab coat, came- this was near upon half-past twelve o'clock, I think - my little boy opened the door to him; I could not hear what passed between them, but I asked the person myself who he wanted; he said, "I want Richard, your lodger;" I told him he was in the second floor, back room; the prisoner Charles Melford appears to be that man.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. Never in my life; Moss' sister was my lodger - this was about half-past twelve o'clock, as near as I can guess; I was in the parlour - the stairs are close to the parlour door- I went to the door to him.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am the son of Sarah Hayes. On Sunday, the 9th of December, there was a ring at the bell, and a young man, dressed in a drab coat, asked me if Richard was at home; I said I did not know, and told him

to go to the second floor back room; my mother met him at the foot of the stairs.

COURT. Q. Did Richard live there? A. No; Moss' sister lived there; Richard was in the habit of coming there- the prisoner Charles is the gentleman who came - I have a clear recollection of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. No: I saw him again at Worship-street; he was about two minutes in my sight - he had his hat on.

WILLIAM WREN . I am a brass and iron-founder, and lodge on the same floor with Moss' sister. On Sunday, the 9th of December, I went to Gerrard's Hall (where a coach was going from), to keep a place for Moss' sister; when the horses where put to; I returned from the inn, and, about half way from Cheapside, I met Moss, his sister, and another person with them, who I believe to be Charles Melford - they were carrying the sister's trunk - this was near about ten minutes to two o'clock.

ROBERT CATON . I am a porter at Gerrard's Hall. On Sunday, the 9th of December, I remember a woman going by the coach; the prisoner Charles Melford came with her- I am certain he is the man; there was another person with them.

ALFRED HOMER . I am the son of John Homer, who keeps the Ship and Shovel public-house, in the Borough. I know William Melford - I saw him one day in December - I cannot say what day; I remember hearing of the robbery, and remember William being taken; I saw him with three or four sovereigns in his purse, about five days before he was taken; my father got him to change two sovereigns for him, and he had three besides those; he gave my father the change, all in half-crowns; my mother was present.

MARY HOMER . I am the wife of John Homer, who keeps the Ship and Shovel. I saw William Melford at our house, a few days before he was apprehended; he gave my husband 2l. all in half-crowns, in change for two sovereigns.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you as near as your son to see what he had? A. No. I was going to send to the Borough for change, and William Melford said he could accommodate us with 2l. to prevent our sending out.

CHARLES MELFORD's Defence. I am innocent.

WILLIAM MELFORD's Defence. I was at home at the time the robbery was committed, and Charles was with Moss at the time.

CHAS. MELFORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

WM. MELFORD - GUILTY - DEATH Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18280110-27

Before Mr. Justice Park.

283. WILLIAM GODFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , at Feltham, 1 mare, price 6l. , the property of Henry Brumbridge ; and GEORGE STAPLES was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, the said mare, he well-knowing it to have been stolen, against the statute .

MESSRS. LAW and QUIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM RANCE . I am a labourer, in the employ of Henry Brumbridge, of Feltham . On Sunday afternoon, the 23d of December, about half-past four o'clock, I put his grey mare into the straw-yard, and locked the gate; on the following morning, about seven o'clock, I went to the yard, and found the gate taken off the hooks, and the mare gone.

WILLIAM FISHER . I am a labourer, and live at Feltham. On Thursday, the 20th of December, I was at work, within two hundred yards of Brumbridge's strawyard, and saw Godfrey there; he asked me whose horses those were that were then in the meadow, which is nearly a quarter of a mile from the straw-yard - I said they were Mr. Brumbridge's; he said they were very poor, and asked where they stopped at night, or where they slept - I told him in the straw-yard - (I do not work for the prosecutor); he asked where the best horses, or the cart horses were kept, I do not know which - I told him they stopped at Mr. Brumbridge's house, where he lived; he asked if there was not a watchman in the place - I said, Yes, and he asked where the watch-box was - I said there was none; he asked where the watchman stopped - I said he walked up and down the street - I call the village a street; he said he was coming through about four o'clock, the other morning, and heard the watchman cry out, and it frightened him; he came to me next day, about the same time, at the same place, and while he stood by me, he saw the horses fetched up into the yard; he said nothing. I did not see him again till he was in custody.

JOHN LUSH . I overtook the prisoner Godfrey, on Sunday, the 23d of December, about ten minutes before seven o'clock in the morning, about half a mile from Feltham, as I was going to Brentford; he had a bundle of hay tied up in a cord, or a halter; he said he was going to Colnbrook; he was coming towards Hounslow, from Feltham; if he came from Feltham, he could have gone a nearer way to Colnbrook; in the course of our conversation, he said he had come by a meadow belonging to Brumbridge, and there were three or four horses there of Mr. Brumbridge's, and nothing for them to eat, any more than there was in the road, pointing down to the road.

HENRY BRUMBRIDGE . I am a farmer , and live at Feltham. On Sunday, the 23d of December, I had four or five horses, in a meadow; there was a gray mare among them; they are put in the straw-yard at night, and the gate is locked; my son went to the straw-yard in the morning, and gave me information, before I was up - I did not go to the yard myself, but came directly to Smithfield, and from there to Cow-cross - I got no intelligence of it that day; it was nearly fourteen hands and a half high, and was cheap at 6l. - I left my address at several slaughter-houses, and on the Friday following, on my way to town, I fell in with a young man on the coach, who was going to town to look after a horse; we agreed to go together; we found a horse in Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross, which that young man claimed; the name of Staples was mentioned there, and from information, which I got, I directed Davis and Bradley to meet me at the King's Head public-house, at Smithfield - I went there that afternoon, and found Davis and Staples in conversation together, about a roan horse, claimed by the young man - Davis then said, I had lost a grey mare; the marks of it were described to Staples, and he said, "I had that mare on Monday morning, and I killed her at Shepherd's-bush, (where he lived), and sent her dead to Watt's in Sharp's-alley" - I did not go to Watts' myself; he said he bought her of William Godfrey; he did not mention Brier's name to me, but I went to Brier's, in Castle-street, Saffron-hill; in consequence of what one White said, some

legs of horses were pointed out to me - I selected two, which I was certain were two legs of my grey mare - Beldom, the farrier, who had shod them, also saw them. I have no doubt of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Staples said instantly, that he had had that mare; A. Yes - I should not have known it if he had not told me; he said he had it from Godfrey and sold it to Watts, who is a horse-slaughterer, or something.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many legs were there at this place? A. I suppose sixty in that beap; there might be a hundred or two in all, but most of them were cart horses; there were a great many grey legs - I only looked for the two fore-legs of mine, as there was no mark on the hind ones; the legs had no shoes on.

MR. LAW. Q. Describe the marks? A. One foot was over-shot at the joint; it was a very bad foot; both the fore-feet were fired, and they corresponded in colour.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am a City officer. The prosecutor came to me in Smithfield, on the 24th of December; Bradley, another officer, was with me - I saw the prosecutor again in Smithfield, on the Friday, and saw Staples there, and after he had told me about another horse - I asked if he had ever bought another of Godfrey, whom he had mentioned; he said, Yes; it was a grey mare, a cripple, and that he had given 15s. for it; that he had brought it to Sharp's-alley, and sold it to Watts.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did he not tell you every thing candidly and accurately, to lead to a discovery? A. He did.

MR. QUIN. Q. Did he say any thing about expecting another horse? A. Yes; he said if I would go to Shepherd's-bush, he was sure the man could be taken into custody, as he had promised to bring him a blind horse there; and he would take him himself, if there was nobody else - I went to Staples' house, at Shepherd's-bush that evening(Friday the 28th); he said, "Oh! you are come - I expected some of you - I hope he may come to-morrow, according to his promise;" he said, if I slept at the White Horse public-house, he would detain him, if he came, and send for me - I asked if he had a book, in which he kept the name of the parties, as he had told me that he kept one; instead of producing the book; he gave me this bit of paper (reads), "I have received of Mr. Staples, the sum of 15s. Wm. Godfrey." I slept at the White Horse, and next morning, about eight o'clock, his little boy came running, and said Godfrey was there - I went immediately to Staples' stable, and found Godfrey there - I said, "Oh! this is the man;" "Yes," said Staples, "this is the man" - I said to Godfrey, "This is a bad job;" he said, "Yes, it is," and said he was very sorry for what had happened - I said, "You must go to town with me" - Staples went with us, as far as the White Horse - I took Godfrey to town by the coach, begging Staples to follow me, which he did; on my way to town, I asked Godfrey what he got for each of the horses - I did not threaten or promise him any thing; he instantly told me 15s. for each - I took him to the Compter, then to Guildhall, and from there to Bow-street - Staples attended at Guildhall, as a witness, voluntarily; he was there before me, and with us to Bow-street- I have since that been to Staples' premises - I found two horses in the first stable, and two or three men there- I found some carts which are used to carry dead horses to town.

THOMAS PARMENTER . I work at Watts' yard, and did so on the 24th of December - Mr. Staples' boy brought a gray mare, dead, there; it was cut up and boiled; the legs, feet and skin were sent to Brier's in Castle-street; we send all our skins and feet there.

WILLIAM BRIER . On the Friday after Christmas day, Mr. Brumbridge, and another person called on me. I produced to them some horses' feet - Brumbridge claimed two - I do not know whether they were afterwards shown to Beldom - I had received them from Watts, to the best of my belief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There were two hundred feet there? A. Yes; there were mixed with others - I have them from various persons, but this lot came from Watts'.

Q. Do not you throw them about? A. Yes; but there were none lying near that lot; the whole two hundred came from Watts' to the best of my belief - I was present when they were unloaded, but not when they came in.

MR. LAW. Q. Were they unloaded from Watts's cart? A. No, from my own cart - I had sent for them.

JAMES BRADLEY . I have brought two horses feet from Brier's - I picked them out of a lot, in the presence of Brier and Brumbridge.

ROBERT BELDOM . I am a farrier, and was in the habit of shoeing the prosecutor's horses - I used to shoe his grey mare, and can swear positively that these are the legs of the grey mare.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are the shoes on? A. No - if I saw them any where I should know them.

JAMES BRUMBRIDGE re-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you many other horses? A. Yes, and some much more valuable than this.

MR. LAW. Q. Had you a blind horse? A. Yes; a valuable one.

Prisoner GODFREY. Staples said he should put the trial off till Monday, and so I have sent my friends away.

GODFREY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

STAPLES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-28

284. WILLIAM GODFREY was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , at Ashford, 1 gelding, price 5l. , the property of Charles Frederick De Coetlogon and GEORGE STAPLES for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

No evidence being offered, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280110-29

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

285. DAVID DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Rebecca Clutterbuck , on the King's highway, on the 15th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 umbrella, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 3s., and 1 half-sovereign , her property.

REBECCA CLUTTERBUCK. On the 15th of December, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner overtook me in Whitechapel-road, and asked where I was going; I said, "No matter;" he asked if I would take any thing to drink; I said No, I did not want to drink with a stranger; I had never seen him before; I am sure

of his person; he said, "You shall have something to drink, for old acquaintance sake," as he knew my brothers - I said I would not have any thing, and did not; when I came to Turner-street, he put his arms round my waist, and forced me against the White Hart public-house; he called for a glass of liquor, and brought it out to the door- I was walking on - he came to me with it, and asked where I was going; I said home; I did not taste his liquor; when I came to Henry-street, he said he would see me home; I said I did not wish for his company, for I did not know him, and in Sydney-street he wanted to snatch the handkerchief from my hand, and because I did not give it up, he gave me a blow on the left side of the head, which sent me senseless to the ground; the handkerchief was in my hand, with half a sovereign in it; he did not get it before he gave me the blow; he ran off; I remained there till I came to myself; I then called for the watchman, as I missed my shawl, umbrella, and a half-sovereign, which had been in the corner of my handkerchief - the handkerchief was not gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. A servant at No. 18, Sydney-street, Commercial-road; I was not in service at the time; I had been to Mr. Abbott's, of James-street, Oxford-street; I had not left my father's house till four o'clock in the afternoon; I had drank nothing but a glass of wine, which I had with my former mistress; I had no spirits; I do not know a man named Clements; I did not speak to several young men after this happened; I do not know Anster; I did not say I had been robbed of my shoes.

Q. Then nobody could have said, "God bless me! you have got your shoes on your feet?" A. No, they said nothing of the kind; I spoke of the robbery next day to my father, but not to any female friend; I spoke to Elizabeth Thomas about it on the Sunday - I had never seen her before the night I went to her.

Q. Did you tell her you had been out, and got drunk, but where you had been, or with whom you were, you could not tell? A. I did not, nor any thing of the kind; I did not say I was found lying on the step of a door, in Sydney-street; I said the prisoner gave me a blow there, which knocked me down; I did not say I could not swear who had robbed me, nor did I say no violence had been used to me; I know Thomas Murrell, but never spoke to him about it - he lives in the neighbourhood - I have known him three or four years, as my father lived in the neighbourhood; I had not been at home all that time; I accused nobody else of robbing me; I did not show the watchman any mark of violence.

WILLIAM KAVANAH . I am a watchman. On Saturday night, the 15th of December, at a quarter-past eleven o'clock, as I went my rounds, I found the prosecutrix sitting on a step in Sydney-street; I asked what she was doing there; she said she had been robbed of her shawl and umbrella, and the young man had gone round the corner; I got her up with the assistance of another person who came by; she seemed very stupid - I cannot say whether from intoxication, or what - she did not smell of liquor; I took her as far as Bedford-square, Commercial-road, intending to take her to the watch-house; she then got perfectly collected, and said she had been to the other end of the town for her character, and was going to live at No. 18, Sydney-street - this was about ten minutes after I first saw her; she said she lived in Lady Lake's-grove, and I took her home; she said she should know the man who had robbed her again, but did not describe him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not a young man listening to part of your conversation, and helping you? A. Yes; I called his attention to her - he only stopped three or four minutes; he did not say he had seen her before that evening, and she had no shawl on; he was not a young man - he was rather elderly; he lives at No. 7, Henry-street; she said something about her shoes, which I could not make out - I understood her to say "shawl;" the young man remarked something about her shoes being on her feet - I never said she appeared quite drunk; I know Hale - I never told him so - he lives three doors from my box; I never talked with him on the subject; I did not ask what kind of a person had robbed her; she did not complain to me of any violence being used to her; she said never mind- she believed she had near a sovereign left - all she minded was the umbrella, as it was borrowed; I took her to the light - she examined her handkerchief, but did not unfold it - she felt satisfied that her money was safe; when she got home she fell into hysterics; it was found afterwards that 6s. remained in her handkerchief - the handkerchief was in her hand when I went up to her; she did not mention losing her money that night.

JAMES SHIELDS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw the prosecutrix the day after the robbery; she described the person to me, and on Wednesday morning I took the prisoner, from her description; I asked where he was on Saturday night; he said at home.

Witnesses for the Defence.

JOHN ANSTER . I am a clerk to a gentleman in the City. I saw the prosecutrix on this night; I did not come up at the request of the watchman, but I gave her into his charge; I saw her lying down at a door in Sydney-street, and seeing her genteelly dressed, I stooped down, and shook her three or four times - while I was so doing, this watchman came up; I said, "Here is a decent person lying here, you had better take her to the watch-house;" he assisted me to take her up - as we went along, I asked her name - all I could get out of her was "Clutterbuck;" she pronounced that name three times, not very plain; she said she had lost her shoes; I looked down, and said, "You have got them on;" she said she had lost her shawl; she said nothing about her umbrella, nor complained of violence having been used; I went with her as far as my house, No. 7, Henry-street - we might be five or ten minutes going there- it was I that called the watchman's attention to her; I saw the watchman again on Friday night last; he said, "I have got into a pretty trouble" - that his brother watchman had told him she had accused him of taking her shawl; she appeared quite in liquor on the night in question.

COURT. Q. In what way did she appear stupid? A. She appeared stupid, and could not walk straight; she did not tell me she had received a blow; not knowing that she had been knocked down, I concluded that she was in liquor; I did not smell any liquor.

Q. Supposing she had been knocked down, would it have appeared the same as if she was stupid from liquor? A. It might if she had been knocked down a minute before - if I had heard she had been knocked down, I should

have looked for the blow; I should have attributed her appearance more to liquor, because she staggered.

JURY. Q. Might not her receiving a blow have deprived her of her recollection? A. I should think a violent blow might.

CHARLES CLEMENTS . I am a pot-boy at the Rising Sun public-house, near Sydney-street. On the 15th of December I was going through Sydney-street, with my beer, about a quarter-past ten o'clock, and saw the prosecutrix lying on a step - I shook her, and asked her to get up; she made no reply, and I left her; I saw her again in about half an hour in the same place - she did not appear sober; I am certain of the time, as I was going home for beer, it could not be eleven o'clock.

COURT. Q. She gave you no answer - what makes you say she did not appear sober? A. She smelt of liquor - I smelt her - I did not put my face near her mouth - she smelt of rum - I merely passed by.

ELIZABETH THOMAS . My husband is a patten and clogmaker. We live in Russel-street, Bedford-square. I know the prosecutrix by sight; on the Sunday after this robbery she told me she had been out and got drunk, and did not know where she had been, or what she had done, till she was found on a step in Sydney-street, by a watchman and gentleman - that she could not tell who robbed her, and that no violence had been used to her.

COURT. Q. Were you acquainted with her at all before this Sunday? A. No; she came to my house, to ask me to let her have a pair of pattens; I live about a quarter of a mile from her father's; she began the conversation herself- I looked at her, and asked if she had been ill-used - she said she had not; I never saw the prisoner before to day, to my knowledge; his brother has called at my house, to find some gentleman, who picked her up, and I then told him about it; Anster lives near me.

THOMAS MURRELL . I am a blacksmith. I know the prosecutrix, as a neighbour; I have known her nine or ten months - she was occasionally at service; she told me she had got tipsy on the Saturday night, and lost a sovereign, an umbrella, and a shawl, but could not tell how; I asked if she knew who it was - she said No, she was drunk; she said nothing about any violence being used. I never had any quarrel with her.

COURT. Q. How came you to have this conversation? A. I was going on an errand, and met her by her own door, and she spoke to me; we were not acquainted, but I have spoken to her before; she did not say she could describe the person; she said she had lost these things, but did not say a word about being robbed; she said she was drunk, and did not know who took them; she spoke to me of her own accord - I mentioned it on the Wednesday, about one o'clock, as I was going to the public-house for beer, as I heard a young man had been taken up for it. I know the prisoner by sight, but never had any connection with him; I do not know what he is.

JAMES SHIELDS re-examined. I took the prisoner about half-past nine o'clock on Wednesday morning.

MATTHEW HALE . I know the watchman who has been examined: he told me the prosecutrix was very much intoxicated, that he could not awake her, or make any sense of her, for a long time.

COURT. Q. When did he tell you this? A. The night after he found her - he was at my door, at ten o'clock at night, as I was shutting up; I have two shutters down on Sundays; he said she appeared to him to be intoxicated. I never saw the prisoner before to-day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-30

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

286. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Anthony Robinson , on the 13th of December , with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously striking and cutting him, in and upon the head and left shoulder, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable him, or to do him some grievous bodily harm.

ANTHONY ROBINSON. I have been employed by different gentlemen for the last sixteen years, to stow ships - the prisoner worked with me on the 10th of December, for about four hours; he came to me on the 13th, and asked if I had any thing for him to do - I said not at present, but perhaps in a little time he might go to work: he said,"D-n you, it is a pity such a fellow as you should be allowed to come into the docks to work, much more to employ others - I will take your life - I will disable you from taking work, or giving orders;" I looked round, not thinking he was going to strike me; a mate spoke to me - I turned, and saw the prisoner had got a shovel; he struck me on the head with it, and then on the shoulder: he struck me different blows, till Phillips took the shovel from him - he struck me in different places, two or three times - I believe one blow was on the head, but I was rather out of my senses. Phillips took the shovel from him; he then started and ran - I was taken to a doctor.

Q. Before this happened, did he ask you for any tobacco? A. Yes, and I gave him some: he asked me for 1s. 4d. which I owed him; I told him I could not pay him till Saturday, when I should draw money from the ship; I pay all the men on Saturday - this was Thursday, and he had done the work on Monday; I cannot say whether he struck me more than once on the head, as the first or second blow took away my senses.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate, I struck you first on the shoulder? A. No - I am certain the first blow was on the head, for it stunned me a good deal, and I think the second was on the head.

COURT. Q. Your deposition states the first blow to have been on the shoulder? A. I said on the head.

THOMAS SIDNEY . I live in Albion-place, St. George's in the East, and am a labourer. On the 10th of December I was at work on board the vessel - and on the Thursday I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner coming along the docks; the prisoner was wrangling about 1s. 4d., which he owed him; they came on board the ship together - the prisoner asked if he was going to pay him; the prosecutor left the ship, and went on board the Juno; he returned in about five minutes - the prisoner was standing on the main hatchway of the Bencooley, swearing; and a man whom the prosecutor asked to go to work, said Knight might go in his stead; Knight said he would not go till he got what was owing to him, and immediately said to the prosecutor,"Do you mean to pay what you owe me? if you don't, I will have your life; I will disable you from work, or giving orders;" Robinson said he had no money, but would pay him on the Saturday; he then asked for a bit of to

bacco - Robinson said he had none but what he had paid for, but gave him a piece to put into his mouth; the prisoner said, "If you would pay me, I should have no occasion to ask for tobacco - if you do not pay me now, d-n vou, I will have your life;" he flew forward, and looking round, took up this shovel in his hand, and made two blows at Robinson; they fell on the left arm, and knocked his cap off; he made two more blows at the head, one of which struck his head, and the other failed; Phillips wrenched the shovel out of his hand - I collared him, and we had a struggle on the deck; I threw him down; he got from me, and ran ashore; the mate, seeing the blood, told me to run after him, which I did, and took him in Lower Hermitage-street, and gave him in charge.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I was present. I first heard the prisoner ask Robinson for a chew of tobacco - he then said if he would pay him he need not ask for any; he then said,"I will be d-d if you don't pay me, I will either break your arm or else your head, so that you can neither work nor give orders;" he went forward towards the cook's house, picked up the shovel, and struck him over the shoulder, and then on the forehead; he struck him with the edge of the shovel; I saw Sidney run after him, and he was secured; I ran to take the shovel from him, but he dropped it before I could well get hold of it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see the prosecutor launch me from him, with his two hands? A. No - I did not see him shove him at all; I was not there at the time, if it happened - I just came up when the blow was struck.

THOMAS SIDNEY . He did not shove him.

GEORGE BETSON . I am a surgeon, and live at Wapping. I examined the prosecutor's head on Thursday, the 13th of December - there was a division of the scalp at the top of the head; it was about a quarter of an inch deep, and one inch and a half long; such a blow might have fractured the scull - it was an incised wound, and appeared to be made with the handle of the shovel; there was also a contusion on the shoulder. I attended him three weeks before he got well.

Prisoner. Q. Was he hindered from his employment during the three weeks? A. No, only for the last two or three days, in consequence of indisposition; he went regularly to business at first.

JAMES WHITE . I am a Thames Police officer. I received the prisoner in charge - he said he was very sorry he had injured the man, but he did it in the best of passion; I got this shovel from the Bencooley.

The prisoner, in his Defence, stated that he had been three days without food, and, being much distressed, he had urged the prosecutor to pay him; the prosecutor was coming to press upon him - that he had kept him off with the shovel, - and was exceedingly sorry for what had happened.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-31

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

287. BALTASAR SALDOS was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain order, for payment of money, as follows:- Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, & Co., London, 13th of November, 1827, - pay Mr. Smith, or bearer, the sum of 110l., C. Fothergill," with intent to defraud Lewis Lloyd and others .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud Charles Fothergill .

MESSRS. BRODRICK and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

OWEN O'NEAL . I attend the Paddington stages, which stand in Princes-street. On the 14th of December, about a quarter-past four o'clock, I was going to see what was booked for the stage, and as I came out of Founders' Hall-court I saw the prisoner; he asked if I wanted a job - I said Yes: he asked if I ever got a cheque changed - I said Yes: he asked if I would go and change one for him- I said I would. He had a cheque in his hand, and asked what o'clock it was - I said, about four: he stood about a minute, and then said, "Come along;" he walked a little way out of the court with me - he was in the court all this time; he came as far as the court next before you come to Tokenhouse-yard - he there gave me the cheque; I asked what I was to get for it - he said, two notes, and that he would wait up the court; I ran into the banking-house, and presented the cheque; the gentleman came out with me - I ran on before the gentleman, to Founders' Hall-court, where he said he would be; I did not find him there; I then went into the middle of the road, and saw him up the next gate-way - I went up to him, and said,"Sir, you have given me a wrong cheque;" he made a dash away from me directly, but I caught hold of him by the collar, and held him till the gentleman came up; I am sure he is the person from whom I received the cheque.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know him before? A. I never saw him before; when he darted from me, the gate was shut, and I shoved him right up against it; he shoved right away from me; he had told me he would be up the court, and I thought he meant Founders' Hall-court; he spoke plain English to me - I did not take him for a foreigner; the cheque was stopped at the banking-house - I did not get the money.

JAMES WOOD . I am cashier to Messrs. Lewis Lloyd and others - there are four partners; Mr. Charles Fothergill, of the Stock Exchange, keeps cash at our house; we have no other customer of the name of Fothergill, whose Christian name begins with the letter C. On the 14th of December the last witness presented a cheque to me, which I marked- this is it; I saw at once that it was nothing like Mr. Fothergill's hand-writing - I did not pay it; I said nothing to the lad myself; Mr. Gallatly, another cashier, was just behind me, and I showed it to him; he was of the same opinion, and went out with the boy.

GEORGE GALLATLY . I am cashier to Messrs. Jones and Lloyd; Wood showed me the cheque; I went round the counter, to the boy, sent him out, and followed him to the court next beyond Founders' Hall-court, and when opposite the court, in the road, I saw him lift his hand, and go into the court: I instantly saw the prisoner dart out of the court, the boy holding him by the collar; our porter, being nearer than me, seized him; I was about twelve yards off; we took him to the banking-house: I sent for Mr. Brown, the marshall, whom I saw find a number of papers on him; the cheque is not Mr. Fothergill's handwriting, nor any thing like it.

JAMES WOOD . This cheque is not Mr. Fothergill's writing - he has kept cash with us about two years; I see a

good many of his drafts. When the cheque was presented it was as clean as it is now.

MR. NEVILLE BROWN. I am a City marshall. An officer was sent for to the Mansion-house, and I went to the banking-house, about a quarter to five o'clock; I searched the prisoner, and found several papers on him, one of which I produce; he was then asked how he became possessed of the cheque, which was either in Mr. Gates'(the solicitor) hand, or lying on the desk; he said he had picked it up, I think, in Bartholomew-lane; he was asked in what part of the lane; he said, in the court leading to the Stock Exchange, near the center of the court - it was a damp mizling evening, and the streets were very dirty.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say in what form he had picked it up? A. No - he made no remark about the paper; his answer was directed to the cheque, and nothing else; he said he picked it up about four o'clock - it is a paved court, but I should think it could not be clean, as so many persons pass up and down it - it is not a covered court.

JOHN ROBSON . I am a stock-broker. I know the handwriting of Mr. Charles Fothergill, of the Stock Exchange - this cheque is not his hand-writing, to the best of my belief.

The cheque was here put in and read, also the paper found on the prisoner, which was as follows: - "Mr. Saldos to N. Nathan, - to two weeks' rent, from the 21st of November to the 5th of December, for shop and furnished room, 1l. 16s." On the back of this bill was the name of C. Fothergill, written three times, and the name of Fothergill once without the letter C.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I stand charged with uttering as true a bill, signed C. Fothergill, for 110l. Upon the 13th of December, being in the City, on business, and passing through Bartholomew-court, I found the instrument alluded to, enclosed in a paper, with the name of Fothergill written on it; in consequence of my being a foreigner, and not acquainted with the laws of this country, I considered I was fully entitled to the same, and, without consulting any friend, or giving it a moment's consideration, I employed a messenger to present it for payment, not entertaining the most distant idea of its being a forgery: the event of that step has unfortunately placed me in the situation I now stand before you. I am a native of Spain, and have been in this country only three years, and during that period have been in the employment of two most respectable firms in London, in the silk trade, independent of which I am in the receipt of 35l. per annum, as a Spanish Refugee, and therefore there could be no possible inducement for me to commit such an offence; by such a step I should deprive myself of every thing which is most valuable and dear to men, namely, my character, which will appear, by witnesses; and I entreat you to lay aside all prejudice against me: I beg to call your attention to these various circumstances, and trust, after the most serious consideration, you will come to such a conclusion as will restore me to liberty and my friends.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-32

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 14.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

288. THOMAS COLLISON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Cuff , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, about six o'clock in the night of the 17th of December , with intent to steal therein .

JOSEPH CUFF. I am a gentleman , and live at No. 7, Ebenezer-terrace, Whitechapel-road, in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechapel . On the 17th of December, rather before six o'clock in the evening - (it was quite dark; the lamps had been lit a long while;) in consequence of suspicion that an attempt would be made on my house, I was on the watch, having seen some men lurking about my house the day before, in the day time; I am not able to say who the persons were. I was on the watch in the parlour, just by the side of the parlour door, which concealed me from view; I am quite sure the street door was shut and latched, in the usual way; no one could have entered from the outside without a key: I heard a trifling noise at the door- it was repeated, and I was satisfied the lock was being picked; the noise was as if a key had been put into the lock - after an interval of two minutes, I distinctly heard the instrument taken out of the lock - I was about eight feet from the door; in about two minutes the same noise was repeated again - there was a cessation for a moment or two, as I could hear a person going by; and the very instant that person had passed, a person on the step of my door began to be moving again, with his heels and feet on the step, shuffling about; the second attempt did not succeed, and the key was taken out again: it commenced again in a few minutes - something was put into the lock, and the door was opened about an inch, as I could see the light from the street; the door was then again pulled back, close, but not relatched: they then went away for about three minutes - I heard footsteps go away, but could not say whether it was more than one person: in two or three minutes I saw two men come into the house - I allowed the prisoner, who was the foremost, to come within two feet of me - I then gave him a violent blow on the head, and instantly laid hold of him; I ran him back, against the other man, and shoved that man out, still holding the prisoner: I shut the door, keeping him inside- I beat him; he did not strike me, but I used violence to him, for, being in the dark, I did not know what subject I had before me: I hallooed out, "I have got him," and requested them to go backwards, to alarm the neighbourhood; the maid-servant came up with a light, and when I found it was a man I could manage, I ceased to use more violence. I kept him there till I thought an officer was outside to receive him. He said, "For God's sake, let me go," and desired me not to beat him; I forgot to state that directly the door was shut a man wanted to come in to assist me, but I said he should not come in: we opened the door, took him out, and, not seeing an officer, I pinned him up against the wall, and then removed him to a public-house; a crow-bar was kicked out of my house in the scuffle: there was a phosphorus-box and matches, and a picklock-key, which opens the door, picked up, close at the door; I found a match inside the passage of the house,

and compared it with the matches in the phosphorus-box- it appeared to be one of that description: it is the same sort of box as is sold at chemist's.

Prisoner. He asked me, when we got into the public-house, what I did there; I told him I looked at the door, and could find no name, no knocker, nor bell, and I was inquiring after Mr. Earl, my master; there was nothing but a brass knob to the door.

MR. CUFF. There is a knocker to my door. I was on the alert, and if there had been a knock, I must certainly have heard it.

ELIZABETH MANTON . I am servant to Mr. Cuff. I heard a noise in the passage; I went up with a light, and found my master holding the prisoner. If there had been a knock at the door I must have heard it; there is a knocker. A dark-lantern was picked up and given to me.

THOMAS SANDERS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner. This phosphorus-box has been in my possession ever since. I searched the prisoner, and found a knife and 8s. 6d. on him; this crow-bar, dark-lantern, and key, were brought to me at the door; I tried the key to the prosecutor's door, and it opens it; there appears to have been one match taken out of the bundle.

MR. CUFF. These are the things that were found. I found only one match in the passage.

JURY. Q. Could the door be opened without a key? A. It could not - it is a common lock, and requires the street door key to open it without.

Prisoner's Defence. He says he heard a noise at the door - that it was unlocked, and shoved open about an inch: as it was dark in the passage, I do not see how he could see it was shoved open about an inch. I went there to inquire after my master. If I had had those implements would they not have been found in the house? and if I had thrown them away, should I not have been seen? they were not brought forward for a quarter of an hour.

One witness, who had known the prisoner three months, gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18280110-33

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

289. THOMAS FLOODGATE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Ward , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, on the 28th of November , and stealing 1 pelisse, value 1l.; 1 scarf, value 6s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 2s.; 2 gowns, value 8s.; 1 spencer, value 2s.; 2 brooches, value 20s.; 1 pin, value 6s.; 1 ear-ring, value 1s.; 2 watch-keys, value 1s.; 1 thimble, value 6d.; 1 half-crown; 1 piece of silver coin, called a 3d. piece; 1 scent-bottle, value 1s., and 1 comb, value 1s., the goods of Elizabeth Ward ; and 1 pelisse, value 8s.; 1 gown, value 8s.; 1 shawl, value 1l., and 1 pin, value 3s., the goods of Mary Ann Ward ; 1 bonnet, value 12s., and 1 scent-box, value 4d., the goods of George Valle ; 1 bonnet, value 12s., and 1 brooch, value 15s., the goods of Mary Richards , and 1 shawl, value 35s. , the goods of Ann Buckthorp .

ELIZABETH WARD . I am the daughter of William Ward, who lives in Wellington-row, Bethnal-green; he has a house No. 9, Plummer's-street, City-road . I and my sister live there; my father lived there for my years, but he does not now; it is still his house, and we reside there; there are six rooms in it - I and my sister occupy one; my father lets out the rest. On the 28th of November I went out between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - I double locked our room door, and put the key into my pocket; I returned a little before nine, and I found some people standing at the street door; they said the house had been broken open - I went up stairs, and found our room door wide open; the boxes had been broken open, and emptied - I missed a black silk pelisse, a black silk gown, a Norwich crape gown, a silk scarf, a cotton spencer, two yards and a half of new linen, a new pair of shoes, a Queen Anne's half-crown, two brooches, a gold pin, two broken gold watch-keys, a silver 2d. and 3d. piece, a copper 2d. piece, a metal seal, a silver thimble, a pair of sugartongs, and one ear-ring. I had seen them all safe on the Sunday, and had worn some of them - I left them all safely locked up in the box, on this day, which was Wednesday.

MARY ANN WARD. My sister and I live in this house, which is my father's; it is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the 28th of November, I went out about ten o'clock in the morning, leaving my sister at home; I returned at near ten o'clock at night - I found some people standing at the door - I went up stairs, and found the room door wide open; the boxes were broken open, and several articles of apparel gone - I lost a cloth pelisse, worth 8s., and a stuff-gown, value 8s., from one box, and from another, a China crape shawl, worth 20s., one yard and three quarters of gros de Naples, worth 5s., and two half sovereigns, (which were in a pocket-book, at the corner of my box), a pair of shoes, nearly new, worth 3s., a gold pin, worth 3s., a silver thimble, worth 6d., and part of a pack of cards, which have been found - I know them by the nine of spades being dirty - I saw the officer examine all the doors; all the doors had been broken open; there was no appearance of violence on our room door, but the lock had been opened; the street door had marks where it had been forced.

MARY VALLE . I am the wife of George Valle , and live at No. 44, Butler's-building's. On the 28th of November, we lived in the front and back parlour at No. 9, Plummer's-street - I went out between eight and nine o'clock that morning - I locked both my room doors, and took the keys in my pocket - I returned a few minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, and found my rooms broken open; the wood had been broken away, and the door wrenched open; it appeared to have been done by a chisel, which was found in the house, and fitted the marks - I lost a Leghorn bonnet, trimmed with white ribbons, worth 12s., a lace-collar, worth 2s., half a silk handkerchief, worth 1s., three pictures, two of which were framed, and hung over the fire, two silver knives, a pair of steel snuffers, and a tobacco-box off the chimney-piece, two brushes, two fans, and a silver thimble.

MARY RICHARDS . On the 28th of November I lodged in the same room as Valle - I went out between eight and nine o'clock with her - I returned with her at night, and missed a bonnet of my own, worth 12s., a brooch, worth 15s., part of my ear-ring, which I have seen since, and a lace-collar.

ANN BUCKTHORP . On the 28th of November, I lived in the first floor front room, No. 9, Plummer's-street - I went out about five o'clock in the afternoon - I left my

drawers and door locked - I locked them myself, and, as I had a lodger, who might come home before me, I left the key of my room, and the key of the street door, at a neighbour's, a few doors off - I had the key of my drawers in my pocket - I had left the street door fast - I tried it, to see that it was fast; it was not locked, but only shut on the latch; we have each a latch-key, to let ourselves in - I returned about eight o'clock, and found the street door wide open - I went in as far as the parlour door, and finding that open, I knocked and called to know who was at home; nobody answered me - I was afraid to go up stairs - I stood at the door till somebody came by; I got a neighbour to go in with me in about a quarter of an hour; he came with me, took a candle, and went in - I saw the rooms below all in a litter - I went up stairs, found my door open, and my drawers broken open - I missed a Norwich crape gown, a Norwich crape frock of my daughter's, a silk pelisse, and a new silk shawl. I have seen the shawl since.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am a headborough of St. Luke, Old-street. The house in question is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On Wednesday evening, the 28th of November, a few minutes after seven o'clock, I was in Featherstone-street, about four hundred yards from this house - I saw the prisoner with a bundle in his hand; his hat appeared very heavy on his head - I knew him before - I went up and asked what he had in the bundle; he said two bonnets, which belonged to his sister, which he was to get cleaned - I said that might be, but I must see them - I took him to a public-house, examined the bundle, and found there were two bonnets - I then searched him, and found a quantity of trinkets, which I produce; he claimed the handkerchief the bonnets were tied in - I found on him two gold pins, a silver paste-brooch, a Queen Anne's half-crown, a silver 3d. piece, a copper 2d. piece, a scent-box, a diamond brooch, two scent-bottles, part of two watch-keys, a silver thimble, a small comb, a pen-knife, a large hoop ear-ring, and part of another, a small seal, a necklace of beads, a small chain, a small pearl brooch, and part of a pack of cards, the skirt of a green gown, a purple spencer, the body of a plaid silk gown, and a phosphorus-box - they were all in his pocket; and in his hat, was a silk shawl, and a China crape shawl; on going from the house, where I searched him, to the office; he told me to take the swag, and let him go, for he was sure, if he went to the office that night, the people would come against him - I asked why he should think so; he said because he had not been out of the house many minutes - I said I knew him to be a thief, and should take him to the office I did so, and then went round, and found about nine o'clock that evening, this house had been broken open - I examined the street door, and found it had been entered by force - I examined the room doors; the parlours had been opened apparently by the same instrument as the street door - I compared a chisel, which was found on the premises, and it exactly fitted; the chisel was broken: part of it was found near the front room, first floor, door-post, and the other part sticking in the back room door of the first floor; it fitted the marks on the doors, and the broken part of it fitted the marks in Buckthorp's drawers; about seven boxes were broken open in various rooms, and the remainder of the property strewed about.

ELIZABETH WHITWORTH . I called at Miss Ward's about seven o'clock in the evening of the 28th of November, some young man answered the door; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not.

JOHN BEE . I am an officer. I went to the house about nine o'clock, and found the doors all broken open; I went up stairs, took the chisel, examined the first floor doors; and in the door-post of the back-room, I found the remainder of the chisel.

MARY ANN WARD . Here is my shawl, which was in the box - also a gold pin, with an amber stone, a small penknife, and a small piece of chain, which are mine.

ELIZABETH WARD . Here are several of my things - a silver 3d. piece, and a copper 2d. piece - I had had them six or seven years - some of this apparel is mine.

MARY VALLE . Here is my scent-box, and one of the bonnets is mine - I know it by a mark behind.

ANN BUCKTHORP . This is the shawl which I lost.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18280110-34

Before Mr. Justice Park.

290. JOHN CASTLE was indicted for feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully, on the 9th of December , setting fire to a certain house, of and belonging to John Hems , with intent to injure him .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to defraud John Hems.

THIRD COUNT, setting fire to a certain house, stating his intent to be to injure John Rogers and others.

FOURTH COUNT, stating his intent to be to defraud John Rogers and others.

JEREMIAH ALLPORT . On Sunday, the 9th of December, I was dining with Mr. Smith, at No. 230, Shoreditch , next door to the house of Mr. Rowley, who is a baker; between six and seven o'clock in the evening, we perceived a great deal of smoke in the front room, second floor - we had done dinner - we had a fire, but this smoke did not come from the chimney; I and Mr. Smith went into different rooms, and found every thing safe - we returned back to the room; the smoke still continued - we smelt the skirting-board on the side next to Rowley's house, and smelt a smell similar to rags burning - we continued in the room some time longer, till between eight and nine o'clock, when Mr. Smith went out for a watchman - about nine the watchman came - he also smelt the skirting-board, and smelt fire; he went to the watch-house, and brought Friend, the constable of the night - Smith went with the watchman, and knocked at Rowley's door; I was not with them - about ten o'clock I went to the house myself with Mr. Smith - they knocked and kicked at Rowley's door, and in a minute and a half or two minutes, a person came to the door, and answered them from inside - he did not open the door - it is a sash door - he unscrewed the shutter - the patrol pulled the shutter down outside - there was some conversation with the prisoner, who was in the house - we discovered no one else - the patrol and the prisoner together broke the glass of the door - he said he could not open it, for the foreman had gone out, and locked him in - the patrol got in at the broken sash, and opened the door - I did not notice whether the door was locked, but the patrol opened it immediately, without violence; we said there was a fire on the premises, and asked the

prisoner for a candle - two or three gas-lights were burning in the shop; when we said there was a fire, he said he did not know, he was asleep in the bake-house behind, and knew nothing of any fire - he brought the candle - I followed the patrol up stairs with it; the prisoner, I believe, staid in the shop below; I saw a fire under the top stair, on the first flight - it was under the landing - there was a hole of about nine inches long, in the riser of the stair, and in that hole I perceived a red fire - part of the joists of the floor were on fire - also the top of the stair and the riser - there appeared about eighteen inches of red fire - it was not in a flame - I called out, "Here is the fire, bring some water;" I went to the bottom of the stairs, and saw the prisoner coming forward, in about half a minute or so, with a pail of water in his hand - the watchman took it from him, carried it up, and threw it on the fire - there was more water thrown on it - I believe the prisoner brought two pails - the watchman brought up an iron crow, and began to open the place; when the fire was extinguished, I examined the hole, and found in it some rags and pieces of wood, which appeared to have been burnt at the ends, and some of the rags were burnt - I should have stated, that when I first saw the fire, there was a bundle of rags laid on the top of the stairs, on the outside, strewed along the top of the stairs - I saw a basket after the fire was out - it was near the fire - there were some rags and paper in the basket - I had not put it there - I saw a bunch of matches in the hole, after the fire was out; a fireman, named May, came while I was there, and another named Franklin, when the fire was out; the prisoner staid in the shop below, walking backwards and forwards - I returned to Mr. Smith's a little after twelve o'clock - I did not see Rowley all that time.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The first smoke you observed was about six o'clock in the afternoon? A. Between six and seven; there was not so much then as afterwards, but it was enough to make us search the house - Smith went to the house before me, but could not get in - I went about ten o'clock - the fire must have begun about six - it is a very crowded neighbourhood - a fire breaking out at that time would have collected a number of people - the prisoner broke the sash as soon as he could - he fetched the water.

THOMAS SMITH . After smelling this fire in my house, I went out about half-past nine o'clock, having perceived the smell first between six and seven - I had not got the watchman when I first went out - I knocked at the door several times, and kicked; I could see through the shutters that the gas was burning - I remained at the door a minute and a half or two minutes, knocking - I could not get in, and called a constable from the opposite side; I took the watchman into my house - he smelt the skirtingboard - I then sent for the constable of the night - it was nearly an hour after my first going, that I went to the door with them - I have heard Mr. Allport's statement about the door being opened - I waited till it was opened, and did not go in directly - the prisoner said it was locked, but he had not got the key, and could not open it; Mr. Roberts, the next door neighbour, had gone to the door, knocked at it, and told him to open it, for there was a fire - a voice inside said, "I can't, and I shan't - I don't know who you are;" I said, "Mention your name, Mr. Roberts, he will know it better than mine;" he did so, and the prisoner said he could not open it, and he should not; that it was locked - I said I would go and get a crow-bar, and break it open, for there was a fire - the shutter was afterwards taken down by the patrol; I did not go in directly myself; I sent for an engine, and when I went in I met the prisoner in a little room, and went with him to where they get the water from - he had a pail in his hand, and said there was no cistern, which was true - he put the pail under the water-cock; I went up stairs, and saw where the fire had been - it was then put out - the water had been taken up - I saw the riser of the stair was broken - a man was using the crow-bar - in the hole were several pieces of wood, part of them burnt - the parts not burnt appeared to be fresh split; some of them were long pieces; and there was a bundle of matches, with a little sulphur on one end, the other end was burnt; I saw some rags in a basket, but no wood in it; I do not recollect seeing any rags out of the basket - there were two pieces of cotton, something like the wick of a candle in the hole with the matches - the matches were tied together - there were five or six: when I went down stairs, after this, I saw the prisoner sitting on a flour-bin - Everiss came in at that time, and said to the prisoner, "There was likely to have been a pretty job;" I could not exactly understand what answer Castle made - he said, "There had," or something; I then thought proper to give Castle and Everiss, who is Rowley's foreman, in charge - they were afterwards allowed to go at large for the night; when the prisoner was getting the water I asked the reason why he did not open the door - he said he was not going to let a parcel of thieves in - I said they were neighbours, and not thieves - I then asked if he did not know there was a fire up stairs - he said, "No, I never was up stairs in my life;" I asked who had been up stairs; he said the last that were up, were the apprentice and foreman, and that they went out between five and six o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. You say you knocked at the door, do you mean with the knocker? A. No; I thumped with my hands, and kicked - I do not know whether the patrol who came was sober - I had never seen the prisoner before; I had seen Everiss before; I once had an occasion to send for Rowley about a wall, and Everiss came in; some of the houses there are very old - the wall is only nine inches thick; I do not know whether it is called a party-wall; I know nothing of the prisoner having any ill-will towards me; I understand Rowley had another shop in the London-road - I cannot say whether he knew who was at the door, when he said he would not open it.

BENJAMIN JONES . I am a patrol of the district. On Sunday, the 9th of December, I just came up at the time the mob was at the door - I was quite sober; I broke the sash of the door, and got in; there was no glass in the sash, only frames; I had heard the prisoner say the door was locked, that he had not got the key, and could not open it; when I got in, I saw the door was not locked; I looked at both bolts, and found the bottom bolt bolted; I opened it directly - there was a brilliant light from the gas in the shop; a person could see it was not locked; I asked him for a candle; he said he had none; Mr. Roberts, of next door, said, "I will fetch one," and went to his house for it; whether the prisoner brought one before he returned I cannot say; when the light was brought I said,

"Go back to the bake-house, and see if any fire is there;" the prisoner said, "There is no fire backwards; I have just come from the bake-house:" I said, "Then let us go up stairs;" he did not go up with me - he said nothing - he did not seem as if he knew the way up; I told him to follow me; I opened the sitting-room door, on the ground floor, but he did not come up at that time; when I got up, I said, "Here is the fire - don't be alarmed;" somebody said a pail of water would put it out; I afterwards saw the prisoner in the shop, and heard him say to somebody, that Jones (meaning me) had said he had unbolted the door; I replied, "I did say so;" I do not recollect his saying any thing particular to that; I think he said No.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner assisted to break the frame in the door? A. That I cannot say, but he unscrewed the shutter inside; the staircase door leads from the private room - you go from the shop to the bakehouse, without going through the private room - the private room is on one side, and there is a kind of passage leading from the bakehouse on the other; the staircase is so concealed that a man might be there some time, and know nothing of the stairs; he did not misdirect us at all; I went into the bakehouse afterwards - the sponge was set; I do not know whether there was a fire in the oven; the bolt that was fastened was within a very few inches of the floor - he might have kicked it in the hurry, and fastened it, without his knowledge.

COURT. Q. The lock was higher up? A. Yes; the light would show that the bolt of the lock was not in the staple - it was not even on the single catch; I understood from him that he had set his sponge, and fallen asleep on the board - he had his coat on.

JOHN BURNESS . I am a watchman. I went up stairs, and saw the top board of the landing burnt through, and about one foot from the place I saw a bundle of rags tied up together - it was about half as much as I could put into my hat; I saw the basket; there was nothing in it; I called for water, but got no answer at first; I do not know whether the door, at the foot of the stairs, was shut; as the water was not brought, I went down, and saw the prisoner in the shop, and a great many gentlemen talking to him - I said I wanted water; he instantly got a pail, put it under the cock, and turned the water on.

MATTHEW FRANKLIN . I am a fireman. I went to this house, on hearing of the fire; I have heard the hole in the stairs described. I saw the basket the rags were in; when I saw it, there were some small pieces of wood; I sent for Rowley, who came about one o'clock; I said nothing to him in the prisoner's presence. Everiss came in soon after I was there; I saw the matches in the hole, with a very little sulphur on them - the wood appeared to be fresh.

Cross-examined. Q. You went into the bakehouse, did you not? A. Yes, and left the prisoner there with one of my men, to go on and make his bread; I saw some sacks there, which appeared as if somebody had been lying on them; he said he had been lying there; I observed the patrol that night - he was not quite sober - he was in liquor; I did not notice the lock of the street door, but I noticed that the door sticked very much - it was as much as one person could do to open it; I know that, by opening it repeatedly to let persons in.

COURT. Q. Did you observe whether there was any fire in the oven? A. They had not lit the fire; if there had been, it could not have communicated to the staircase; after I released the prisoner, he went on with his regular work.

BENJAMIN MAY . I am a fireman. The fire was out when I came; I saw the matches and things; I put my arm farther under the hole, and pulled out two pieces of cotton, about a foot long - it was clean; I pulled out a bit of greasy newspaper, and some bits of wood, some of which were nearly a foot long, and apparently burnt - it might have been two or three hours in a smothering state without burning into a flame; one of the joists that went under the passage was very much burnt - the fire was not close to Smith's house; I cannot say whether it would emit a smoke into his house; I went for Rowley to the London-road, where he had a shop - it was half-past one o'clock before we got back to Shoreditch.

WILLIAM EVERISS . I am Rowley's foreman, and am twenty-six years old; I was at the house on the 9th of December; I know the prisoner, by his working there only a fortnight; he was not a regular servant, but only put in by a man who was ill for a short time; Rowley did not hire him; I was at the shop from ten o'clock in the morning, as we have dinners to cook; I staid there till about five o'clock; Henry Briggs, who is an apprentice at the other shop, was there that afternoon; he is Mr. Rowley's brother-in-law; Briggs spent the evening with me; he came about four o'clock, and we went away together - I have lived about two years and a half with Rowley: Briggs went up stairs with me to put the remainder of my things on, as I had been lying down; I believe the prisoner was then asleep in the bake-house; I sleep in the house, and a little girl slept there - she is Mr. Rowley's sister; I did not sleep there on Saturday night, as I had been to a club-supper; the little girl and the apprentice slept there.

Q. You went up stairs with this apprentice to put your things on; is your room on the first or second floor? A. The first floor back-room; I took a candle with me; I did not remain there a quarter of an hour; I brought the candle down; I observed nothing on the stairs; the rags which were found had been kicking about the floor for a week or two, loose, not in the basket; I never touched them; I did not perceive any hole in the riser of the staircase - if there had been such a hole, I must have seen it; I put the candle out, and left it on the parlour-table when I went out; I suppose I remained down stairs for a quarter of an hour, or more before I went out; we were talking in the parlour, and were going to have tea; but, finding none in the house, I proposed to go to the coffee-shop; there was a fire in the parlour; we left the gas burning in the shop - I saw the prisoner in the bake-house when I went out, and spoke to him - he was reading a book; I asked if he was going out - he said he was going to lay down; he had a candle; he would lay on the boards, where he generally lays every evening, till eleven o'clock, which is working time; I slammed the door after me, and left it on the spring-lock - I did not lock it - I could not bolt it outside; I think I tried it to see if it had fastened, but will not be positive; the door generally stuck so that if it was not slammed very hard, the lock would not catch; there was no hook to fasten the spring back; I returned about twenty minutes after eleven o'clock; I had not been

near the house from the time I left it - I went from Shoreditch to Bishopsgate, stopped there till past nine o'clock, and went from there over to the Borough; we bake sixteen or eighteen sacks a week at the house in Shoreditch; our returns were between 40l. and 50l. a week, on an average; I generally settled with master on Monday; I had settled with him on the Tuesday, and had all the money in the house which was taken after that; it was better than 27l.; that money was in the cash-box, in my box; I found, when I returned, that the keys were in the box, but I did not know I had left them there; I usually lock it; I did not go to the box till after two o'clock in the morning; I did not look for the money till nine next morning - when Mr. Rowley called; the money was then gone - I had not taken it; I did not know the prisoner till he came to work at the house - some furniture had been moved to the house in the London-road - he had moved sufficient to make the house comfortable - two beds were left there - the apprentice had slept in my bed the night before, and the girl in the other, which is a story higher - Rowley's sister was there when I came on Sunday morning; Castle never slept there - he left on Saturday afternoon, as soon as he had done work; I did not leave till nine o'clock in the evening: when I went out, I took the key of the door in my great-coat pocket; but am sure I did not lock the door; I never use the key when I go out.

Cross-examined. Q. You had no acquaintance with the prisoner till he came into Rowley's service? A. No; I received the money from the customers - I never told him where I put it; I do not believe he knew whether I locked it up, or paid it to my master; I do not think he was ever up stairs - he had no communication with the house; the passage runs on the other side of the little room - a person might go down the shop, and not see the stair-case; there is no lock to the stair-case door; it is in the little room; we always sit in that room when we are not serving: the prisoner never comes into the shop, except to bring the bread and bakings; he is not a man that made himself officious at all; I am not related to Rowley; the apprentice is his wife's brother; he slept in my bed on the Saturday, and might have seen the rags.

Q. Had all the best of the furniture been moved? A. No; there were some very nice mahogany chairs in the first floor front room, which they occasionally used on Sunday, when they had friends; all the best beds were moved - only one table was moved, I believe; and that was from the little parlour - I left a middling fire burning in the little room when I went out - it was near five o'clock; we went to the coffee-shop, had tea, and staid there some time; the apprentice looked at the paper, and it wanted five minutes to six o'clock when we came out; I told the prisoner I was going out, and should return about the old time - he knew I had returned about eleven o'clock the Sunday before; he knew I must have the key to let myself in - he knew I let myself in; I did not miss the money till the following morning; the house was full of people when I came home; I did not go into the bed-room - they only showed me the stairs, and took me off to the watch-house; there were people all the way up stairs - I will not be positive whether any were in my bed-room - I saw several in the shop and little room, and on the top of the stairs; my bed-room door was open, and people close to it, on the landing; I never saw the prisoner and Rowley speak together.

COURT. Q. Had Rowley a key of the premises, so that he could come in while the prisoner was asleep? A. There was no key but what I had; Rowley was himself committed for trial.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How soon after the fire was the prisoner examined at the office? A. About eleven or twelve o'clock on the Monday - I was examined at the same time; I was examined three times, and discharged at the fourth; we did not inquire the prisoner's character when he came.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-35

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

291. MICHAEL ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Strange , at Enfield, on the 23d of November , and stealing 2 coats, value 20s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 2 pairs of boots, value 3s.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 1 pair of spurs, value 10s., the goods of the said John Strange; 2 pairs of shoes, value 5s: 1 pair of boots, value 5s., and 12 yards of calico, value 5s. , the goods of Mary Davis .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN STRANGE. I live at Enfield, in the parish of St. Andrew - it is commonly called Enfield - I rent the house; the prisoner's brother has been my coachman for eleven or twelve years - the prisoner occasionally came to see him, and I have allowed him to sleep with his brother at my house. On the morning of the 24th of November my man called me up; I went down stairs, and found a piece cut out of one of the pannels of the door, by a centrebit: a hole was made large enough for a hand to be put through and unbolt the door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the name of the parish? A. I have heard it called St. Andrew's, but it is more commonly called Enfield parish. I have no second Christian name.

MR. HENRY SAWYER . I am vestry-clerk of Enfield parish - it was formerly called St. Andrew, as that name is in some of the old writings - we always call it Enfield, in indictments, deeds, and parish matters; we have a parochial act for enclosing the chase - it is called the parish of Enfield in that act.

Cross-examined. Q. When was it called St. Andrew? A. Anciently; I find that name in the old writings. I have been vestry-clerk forty years - it has always been called Enfield parish in my time.

JAMES ANDREWS . I am Mr. Strange's coachman, and have been so many years. On the 23d of November, I believe I was the last person up - I saw all the fastenings complete - I remember fastening the scullery door with two bolts at the top, two at the bottom, and a bar across the middle; this was about half-past ten o'clock. I was the first person down stairs in the morning, and found the door quite open: there was a round piece of wood cut quite out by some instrument - an arm could then be put in to undo the bolts: I missed two livery coats, a livery waistcoat, two pairs of boots, and a hat, belonging to me; the prisoner is my brother, I am sorry to say - he had been in the house, and slept there, some years ago; he has not called on me there for twelve months I think; I have seen some of the things, and know them again.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a cabinet-maker, and live at No. 52, Shoreditch. On Saturday morning, the 24th of November, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the Angel and Crown public-house, Tabernacle-square - I never saw him before; he had a bundle, two coats, and a hat-box: he was dressed in stone-blue livery, and plush breeches; there was a drab coat, boots, shoes, and a drinking born in the bundle - I did not see the hat-box opened; I bought two coats of him - they were besides the one that was in the bundle; I did not buy that one: one coat was a kind of drab great coat, with false capes, and appeared like a servant's coat; it had plain buttons, I believe: the other was a close drab coat, with lace on it, and livery buttons; I also bought a pair of top-boots, and two pairs of women's shoes. I gave 20s. for the whole lot - I sold the two coats to Mr. Folkard, a pawnbroker, of Sun-street, for 24s. I have the boots and shoes here. I saw "Strange, Enfield," written on the hat-box.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose your attention was taken up with looking at the things? A. I looked at the prisoner; I might not be a quarter of an hour buying the coats - he had a hat, I cannot say whether it was on, but he was in the house all day.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Although you were only a quarter of an hour dealing, how long were you in his company? A. I was in the house from half-past nine o'clock till five in the evening: he was there all the time, and I left him there - Mr. Holmes was there.

WILLIAM FOLKARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate. I bought two coats of Lewis for 24s., on the 24th of November, about three or four o'clock, I think; inquiry was made about them on the Wednesday following. I knew Lewis before well, and produce the things I bought of him.

JAMES ANDREWS . This is my livery coat, and this my great coat - I have no doubt of them: my master's crest is on the buttons of one coat; these boots are what I wore, and were lost that night.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known your brother all his life? A. Yes: his character has been very good, for what I know, till the present circumstance; the coats were given me by my master: if I left his service I should only be entitled to take away one - I was to wear them in his service.

MARY DAVIS . I am servant to Mr. Strange. These women's shoes look like mine; I lost a new pair, and a pair which had been worn - Saltmarsh made them - I also lost a pair of boots.

HENRY SALTMARSH . I am a shoemaker. I should not like to swear to these shoes being my make.

JOSEPH LEE . I am a porter. I lodged in the same house with the prisoner on the 23d of November - I bought a drab coat, a sort of yellow waistcoat, and a pair of topboots of him, on the Monday after the robbery; I sold them to a Jew in the street. I think the prisoner did not sleep at home on the night of the 23d, but am not sure.

Cross-examined. Q. What day did the robbery happen? A. I do not know, but I know by the time I went to the office, that it was the Monday after the robbery.

ELIZABETH REED . In November last the prisoner lodged with me. I remember the night the robbery was said to be committed - he did not come home that night, for we did not go to bed till near one o'clock; he was not at home then; I did not see him till the Sunday morning: I make the beds myself - his bed had been lain in - I went up at nine o'clock in the morning, and saw some clothes lying in the room; I went in, and made the bed. I found a spur on the floor, and another between the sheet and blanket; an orange coloured waistcoat laid on the table, and in a chair was a piece of new calico - there was a dirty shirt on the floor. I went into the other room, and saw him - I knocked at the door for a broom - he came to the door: he had a drab coat on; he usually wore a blue livery: there was a blue livery coat on a chair in his room - this was on Sunday morning. I do not think he went out all that day, but he might have gone out: he went out on the Monday, but, having a private door, I do not always know who goes out; his apartment was afterwards searched, and nothing found, but in the next room where Lee lives, a shirt, some stockings, and handkerchiefs were found.

Cross-examined. Q. When you went into the room in the morning you found him there? A. Yes, on the Sunday morning - the bed appeared to have been lain in, but whether for an hour, or how long. I could not tell; he did not sleep at home at all on the Friday night, and he was not at home on the Saturday night, between twelve and one o'clock, when we went to bed.

JOHN MEAD . I am constable of Enfield. In consequence of the prosecutor being robbed, I went in search, and on the 6th of December I saw the prisoner at the Swan public-house, Southampton-court, near Russel-square; I told him his brother thought it very strange he did not come to see him, knowing he was very ill: he said he had not an opportunity. I then said I wanted him on suspicion of a robbery at Enfield - he asked where - I said, at Mr. Strange's, where his brother was: he said he knew nothing at all about it - that he was never at Enfield, and was willing to go to the office; I asked where he lodged - he said he had no lodging. I took him to Worship-street - I asked him again next morning, where he lodged - he said at a baker's-shop in Phoenix-street, Somer's-town, but he could not tell the No. - I went to a baker's-shop, at No. 8, kept by Mr. Reed, whose wife has been examined; I searched the lodgings there, and found some handkerchiefs, stockings, and shirts, and some calico - the corners of the handkerchiefs are cut off. The things were in Joseph Lee's room - I produce them.

JAMES ANDREWS . These shirts, stockings, and handkerchiefs appear mine, but I have let my brother have a shirt or two at times, and cannot say these are not those.

MARY DAVIS . I lost twelve yards and a half of calico; I cannot say whether this is part of it.

CHARLES THOMPSON . I am a broker and cabinet-maker, and live at No. 53, Wilsted-street, Somer's-town. About the end of November I had the stock of a centre-bit in my shop; it is an open shop - the prisoner came in on a Tuesday or Wednesday, and asked if it was for sale: I said No - that I used it in my business, but I had no objection to lend it him - he said, what would I charge? I said, "If you will tell me where you live, I will bring it;" he said, at No. 8, Woburn-place, but he came back and said, "Perhaps master will not like its being brought there - I will leave you the value of it;" I said, "Very well:" he came again on Friday, the 21st or 22d, left 3s. as security for it, and took

it away; I think I saw a centre-bit in his hand when he came for the stock. On the Monday I went out, and found it there when I came home; I found it was broken - I inquired at No. 8, Woburn-place, but could not find him there.

Cross-examined. Q. This was about the 21st or 22d - might it be on a Saturday? A. No, I am certain it was not.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I produce a pannel which I cut out of Mr. Strange's door - it appears to have been bored with a centre-bit.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18280110-36

Before Mr. Justice Park.

292. JOHN HALLETT and WILLIAM LEDGERWOOD were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hitchcock , on the 4th of December , and stealing 15 live tame fowls, price 37s.; 20 lbs. of pork, value 12s., and 2 lbs. of butter, value 1s. 6d. , his property.

JOHN HITCHCOCK. I live at Brook-green, in the parish of Fulham - I am a milk-man, and keep fowls . On Tuesday. the 4th of December, before four o'clock in the morning, the tiles were taken off my stable, and fifteen live fowls taken away, three legs of pork, and two pounds of butter were taken from the dairy; I had been into the stable at half-past twelve o'clock at night - every thing was safe then - the stable communicates with the dwelling-house without going into the air - a door opens out of the dwelling-house into the stable, and another door opens out of the stable into the dairy, without going into the air at all - I saw one of my fowls in the officer's hands in the evening - it was dead then.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you take your horses through the dwelling-house into the stable? A. No - there is another door - the dairy-door opens into the stable also; I was in the stable at half-past twelve o'clock, holding the candle to my son, while he fastened the doors, as the team had just come in - the fowls were then in the loft, at roost.

COURT. Q. Are you sure you saw your son fasten the doors? A. Yes - I found the dairy-door open, and the stable-door, which leads into the yard - they had been unbolted inside.

SOPHIA JENNINGS . I keep a chandler's-shop in Ship-lane, Hammersmith. The prisoner Ledgerwood came to my shop about ten o'clock, one Tuesday, with a leg of pork in a blue handkerchief; I knew him before - he asked me to weigh it - it was 12 lbs. all but an ounce - he said he bought it of a man who told him it weighed 9 lbs. - he wanted to sell it for 8 1/2d. per pound, but did not ask me to buy it.

Cross-examined. Q. How far do you live from Hitchcock? A. About a quarter of a mile - mine is an open shop - he did not say the pork was too large for his family.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a sawyer, and live in Ship-lane, Hammersmith. The prisoner Hallett sometimes assisted me to wash my father's craft. On the 4th of December, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, Edgson, the officer, got into my boat, and ordered me, in the King's name, to row him on board the Jubilee barge, which I did; it belongs to White; I found a fowl in the cabin - neither of the prisoners were there.

EDWARD EDGSON . Jones rowed me on board the Jubilee - I had a search-warrant - I found a dead fowl there, which Hitchcock claimed - there was nobody on board - I found the two prisoners, and four more, at the Windsor Castle public-house, in the evening - Hitchcock gave them in charge.

DAVID DAVIS . I was with Edgson when the prisoners were apprehended - I had no conversation with them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-37

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

293. HENRY NICHOLLS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Goodey and Robert Humphrey , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, on the 27th of December , and stealing 1 picture, value 8s.; 2 glass salts, value 2s., and 3 images, value 6d. , the goods of the said Robert Humphrey.

ROBERT HUMPHREY. I and my father-in-law, John Goodey, rent the house, No. 8, Foster-street, in the parish of Bethnal-green - we both live there, and pay the expences jointly. On Thursday evening, the 27th of December, about seven o'clock, I went out, having locked the door and fastened the shutters - the back door was also fastened - I left nobody in the house - I went with my wife to No. 12, in the same street, and in about a quarter of an hour my wife went to the house, expecting her father home - I heard the cry of Thieves! I ran out towards the door, and saw the prisoner come out of our door, and run away - I pursued him immediately, and never lost sight of him - I am positive he is the man; he ran down the street, towards where I was coming up; I saw him taken, and am positive he is the man who ran out of the house; his hat fell off as he ran by the door which I came out of - a neighbour picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from the house when he ran out? A. Four doors off - it was not very dark - it was about seven o'clock; there was an oil-lamp near the house; he turned no corner; the property taken was mine, and not my father-in-law's; I am sure it is Bethnal-green parish.

MARY ANN HUMPHREY . On Thursday, the 27th of December, I and my husband went to a neighbour's house; and about a quarter past seven o'clock I returned to look at the fire; as I was putting the key to the door, it flew open, and three men rushed out - the prisoner was the first- I caught hold of him, and am sure he is the man; I had hold of him; he struck me three times on the side of my head, and got away; my husband heard me cry Murder! Thieves! and came towards the house; the prisoner ran towards the bottom of the street; the other men ran another way; I am certain of the prisoner's person; there was a light in the house, from a candle which they had lighted; when I went in I missed a picture, a pair of salts, three images, and the tops of two vinegar-cruets; I had seen them safe before I went out; the tea-caddy was broken open, and a few papers, which had been in it, were strewed about the table; I had locked the caddy; I have not found the property.

Cross-examined. Q. Your impression was, that three men ran out? A. Yes - the prisoner was the first; there is an oil-lamp about five doors from the house; my husband was in a neighbour's house, four doors off.

JOSHUA FLACK . On Thursday evening, the 27th of December, about five minutes past seven o'clock, I was wash

ing myself at my coal-shed door, which is at No. 24, fifty or sixty yards from this house; I saw the prisoner and another one pass by my place, and look very conspicuously about: they went about twenty yards, and then returned; I looked at them; they turned up the street; I watched them to the middle of the street, and went to see that all my doors and windows were safe, and in eight or ten minutes I heard a cry in the street; I ran out, and saw the prisoner running eight or ten yards before any others; I told him, if he moved another inch I would knock his brains out; I collared him; he made no resistance; I told him it was of no use; he said what had he done; nine or ten people came up, and said he was the man who had run out of the house; I had seen him pass my door twice, and knew him again.

Cross-examined. Q. Where he came from you could not say? A. Not the exact place - I did not see him come out of the door; he had no hat on when I stopped him.

THOMAS PEARCE . I am a constable, and received him in charge, at Mr. Humphrey's house; I searched him, and found twelve shillings, in silver, two knives, and a pencil-case, on him, but none of the property; his hat was lying on the floor; he asked for it; I asked if it was his, and he said Yes.

ROBERT HUMPHREY . His hat had fallen off in the street when I followed him; a neighbour picked it up, and threw it into the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running up the street; seeing several others run; a man caught hold of me, and knocked my hat off.

The Court ruled the parish to be sufficiently proved, there being but one parish of Bethnal-green.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18280110-38

Before Mr. Justice Park.

294. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Peter Culpin , on the King's highway, on the 26th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 5l. , his property.

PETER CULPIN. I am a labourer . On Wednesday, the 26th of December, about a quarter to three o'clock, I was standing in Peter-street, Soho ; I did not see the prisoner till I felt my watch go; a young man, named George Clines , had just come up to me, and made a blow at me; before that I stood about twenty yards off, from a crowd of people, and saw Clines knock down my brother-in-law, Mike Morland , with his fist; I came up, and said it was a shame for a young man, like him, to knock an old man down; he told me he would serve me so; he pulled off his coat and hat, and came towards me; he made a blow at me; I laid held of him, and brought him down on his knees; the prisoner came behind me, and laid hold of me across the middle; he put me down on my knees; I was down on the pavement, and could not see whether any body came to help him; my head laid on the foot-way, on the stones - I felt the prisoner putting his hand round towards my watch, and thought he meant to take it; I just shifted my head up, over my right shoulder, to see who it was, and it was the prisoner; when I looked up, his jaw-bone laid on my cheek - I saw his face as well as I do now - I have known him from a child; when he had forced the watch out of my fob he left me; I suppose my watch was gold, for when I went to pawn it, it was described in the duplicate as gold; there was an old ribbon and plain key attached to it; I was on the ground for about two minutes after he left me; I could not get up, as I was pressed down by others - when I did get up, I could not see him; my coat was torn into two pieces - I know the prisoner's mother.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long has the watch been in the family? A. About twelve months; I got it from my brother, who is not here - he made me a present of it - he is a marine - I will swear it was not a silver watch - I did not know where the prisoner lived at the time of the robbery - I knew where he was employed - I do not know whether he surrendered to this charge or not; I saw him at the office; I charged nobody else with the robbery - I went to Marlborough-street next morning, and in the afternoon I went out, expecting to see some of the young men; one of them came up, and gave me a violent blow, and knocked me down - I went to Marlborough-street next morning, and asked for a warrant against the party, for an assault - I accused nobody else of stealing my watch; I know a man named Barnes - he is outside; I did not accuse him of stealing the watch; I asked for his name to be included in the warrant which I asked for.

Q. Did you afterwards, for money, or any thing else, withdraw the charge against Barnes? A. Never; there were a good many people present at the quarrel.

Q. Did you, after the quarrel was over, pull out your watch and chain, and show it to any body? A. Never in my life - I could not.

Q. Then you did not, on doing that, say you would swear a robbery against Clines and the prisoner? A. I never expressed such words, or any thing like them; I know Lavell - I did not say so to him; he told my wife he would swear that I showed him the watch after I was robbed - I heard that, and went to him, and said if he had the face to tell me that he had seen the watch in my possession after the robbery, I would quit it; I was sure he never saw it - by quitting it, I meant I should think nothing of him if he said so.

Q. Did not Lavell walk home with you after the row? A. No; he came stripped to my door, with the gang to see if he could ill-use me; he did walk about a yard or two home with me - the robbery was committed about sixty yards from my house; I do not know what the prisoner is- he professes to be a labourer; when I knew him he was hod-boy in the neighbourhood.

COURT. Q. You say Lavell came to your door stripped? A. He did - there was a lot of them with him, about eight or nine, I suppose.

ALEXANDER BEECH . I am a constable of St. James, Westminster. Peter-street is at the top of Berwick-street, Soho. On Friday, the 28th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was at Queen-square, and saw the prisoner nearly opposite the back entrance of the office - I had been in search of him all day on Thursday, in the neighbourhood of Peter-street, but I did not find his mother's house; I asked if his name was Mitchell; he said it was; I asked if he had come to give himself up; he said,"No, I have come to hear about the watch;" I had not told him about any watch; I took him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. He came into the midst of all the officers himself? A. Exactly so; I happened to be at

Marlborough-street when the prosecutor applied for a warrant; the Magistrate said there was no occasion for one, and then he came to me about it.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor says my jaw-bone laid on his cheek, and if so, how could he see my face?

PATRICK LAVELL . I have known the prosecutor about six years in London; I was present in this row, on the 26th of December; the first I saw of it was when I came up in the street - there was a mob, and when I got up I saw them striking each other; I saw the prosecutor strike Clines - after the row was over, Culpin, being a particular friend of mine, I took him by the arm, and pressed him to come along home, and he did - and he certainly said that he would swear a robbery against Clines; I asked him what they had robbed him of; he said, "My coat is torn, and I believe my watch must be broken" - he, at the same time, took hold of his watch, and took it out of his pocket; I am quite certain I saw him produce it after the row - I parted from him within a few yards of his own door, and did not see him again till about seven o'clock that night, when I saw him come up, and strike Mitchell in the street, and Mitchell's hat fell off; the prosecutor ran away.

COURT. Q. How far did you go with him towards his own house? A. From the place where the row was - it was about two minutes' walk; but he stopped in the way, saying, he would swear vengeance against these parties.

Q. On your oath, was not Mitchell in that row? A. Yes, he was there; I did not see the prosecutor down on his knees; he was not down when I saw him, nor was any body upon him.

Q. Where were you at seven o'clock, when you saw him come up and strike Mitchell? A. Very near where the first row was - there are gas-lights in the street.

Q. Did you go to the prosecutor's house that evening, with your coat off? A. No, I did not - nor did I go to his house in company with any man that evening.

JURY. Q. Was the prosecutor in liquor? A. He seemed tipsy - I do not know whether he was drunk.

PETER CULPIN . I was as sober as I am now - the officer saw me.

ALEXANDER BEECH . I saw him at half-past two o'clock - he was sober then.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-39

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

295. CHARLES MELFORD , WILLIAM MELFORD , and JEREMIAH SULLIVAN were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Norbury , on the 11th of November , at St. Michael, Cornhill, and stealing 6 tea-spoons, value 20s.; 1 fish-knife, value 24s.; 1 cream-ewer, value 14s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 12s.; 6 table-cloths, value 6s.; 1 pencil-case, value 6d.; 1 tooth-picker, value 6d.; 1 stone seal, set in gold, value 25s.; 1 sugar-basin, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 teapot, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 sovereign; 3 half-sovereigns; 1 half-guinea; 1 crown; 2 half-crowns; 5 shillings; 10 sixpences; 48 penny pieces, and 24 half-pence , her property.

SECOND COUNT, for stealing, on the same day, at the same parish, in the dwelling-house of the said Mary Ann Norbury, the said goods, one Henry Tibbs being therein, and putting him in fear.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and QUIN conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN NORBURY. I keep a shell-fish shop at No. 5, Birchin-lane, in the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill , and am a widow . On Sunday morning, the 11th of November, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I went out; I locked my bed-room and sitting-room doors; I went to my father's, and in consequence of information, I returned home about a quarter-past six o'clock; I found my sitting-room door forced, and the closets in the room likewise; my bed-room door was also forced, and the drawers and the press - the closet-door was taken off its hinges, and stood in another part of the room; I missed six silver tea-spoons, a silver fish-knife, worth 24s.; a metal tea-pot, a stone seal, set in gold, worth 25s.; a pencil-case, the sugar-tongs, which were worth 12s., and other things; I missed about 5l. in money - there was a sovereign, three half-sovereigns, a half-guinea, and the rest in silver, making 5l. together; I also missed a pocket-handkerchief - I had seen the spoons lying on the table when I went out, and some in the closet - I must have seen all the things safe in the course of the week, because they laid loose in my drawers; I had left Sarah Blackgrove , my female servant, and Henry Tibbs , my man, in the house; I had given Blackgrove leave to go out; I afterwards missed a cream-ewer, a china sugar-basin, worth 5s., and six table-cloths; I also missed some copper money - it must have been halfpence and penny pieces; I pay the rent and taxes of the house; a person named William Melford lived with me about two years and a half ago- I recollect the name, but not the person - I can only say a William Melford lived in my service - whether it was the prisoner or not, I cannot say; he left me two years and a half ago.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do not you know that that William Melford was another person? A. The prisoner William does not appear like the same person; I have not the least recollection of him; I rent the whole house; I do not know when my maid-servant went out - she returned about half-past eight o'clock; I have no Christian name besides Mary Ann; I had seen three of the spoons on the table that day, and three in the closet; I do not know how many tea-spoons I had - I may have two dozen; I am sure the spoons I lost are the same I saw that day - they have my initials on them.

SARAH BLACKGROVE. On the 11th of December I was in the service of Mrs. Norbury; she gave me leave to go out - I went out at a quarter before twelve o'clock, and returned at a quarter-past eight; I left the plate and every thing safe, and when I came back it was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been in all the rooms that day? A. Yes I had, to dust them; I left Tibbs at home - no one had been in the house before I went out; I had been in my own room; if any one came while I was up there, I could not tell; my mistress went out a quarter before eleven o'clock, and I a quarter before twelve.

COURT. Q. While you were there, did you hear any knock at the door, or ring at the bell? A. No.

MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure you went into all the rooms? A. Yes; my mistress locked them, but I went into them; we both came out together; she locked the doors after me.

HENRY TIBBS. I was in the service of Mrs. Norbury

on the 11th of November; she went out between eleven and twelve o'clock that day, leaving me and the servant in the house; the servant afterwards went out, leaving me alone; no one, except the milk-woman, came to the house from that time till half-past five o'clock; about half-past five I heard a kind of rustling at the shop door (the shop door is a street door); I went up stairs from the kitchen, opened the door, and the prisoner Charles Melford stood at the door; he asked if I would let him have a few oysters; I said Yes: he came in; I shut the door after him, and went behind the counter to serve him.

COURT. Q. Is it a spring lock, so that any body could come in without your assistance? A. Yes. He asked me how Mrs. Norbury did - I said she was quite well; he said, "I suppose she is at her father's, at dinner. to-day;" I said, Yes; I then opened some oysters for him; he said he had some more friends outside, who would take some; when he had eaten three or four, he went and opened the door, and spoke to somebody, but what he said I do not know - the prisoner William Melford then came in; his face was as it is now, without any disguise; he ate one oyster, and said he did not like them: one of them said, "You do not open them fast enough;" there were only two persons in the shop then; he asked if I had not got any body to help me - I said No; I am not certain which that was; one must have heard whatever the other said: he then asked if there was nobody in the house but me - I said, No, there was not; one of them went out - I am not certain which; he brought in a third man, who was Sullivan; I am certain of his person - (pointing him out;) one of them asked if he would not take any oysters - he said he would not, or No, I am not certain which; they then asked him if he would have a bottle of ginger-beer - he said No: Charles Melford then said, "That will do - that is enough," and asked what there was to pay; I said 8d. - he gave me half-a-crown: I said I had no change, and asked if he had no smaller change; he took up the half-crown, and put down a shilling; I said if he would give me the halfpence I would give him a sixpence - he asked William Melford if he had any - he said No: I gave Charles 6d., and said I would trust him for the 2d.

Q. At this time did William Melford do any thing? A. He shut the door, and locked it; he then pulled a pistol out of his trousers pocket, I think, but am not certain which pocket it came from; it was a small pistol - he presented it to me across the counter, and said, "Do not you say a word - I won't hurt you;" Charles then said, "We don't want any thing of you - we only want your master's money;" he (Charles) pulled a sword out of his stick; and Sullivan pulled a pistol out of his pocket; one of them asked me to come down stairs: they asked me to show them where my mistress' money was - I said I did not know any more than a stranger that was never in the house - one of them asked me to go down stairs; I said No; one of them said, "Go round, and lay hold of him by the collar;" I do not know which that was.

COURT. Q. Were you quite free from alarm, with two pistols and a sword presented to you? A. I was quite collected.

MR. QUIN. Q. Well, what happened? A. Charles Melford came round the counter - he laid hold of me by the collar, and desired me to come down stairs, and at the same time put the sword against my breast, saying, if I did not come down he would run me through - I said I did not care if he did: one of the other men said to him,"Never mind, go down yourself;" Charles let me go, and went down stairs into the kitchen without me - he returned almost directly, and brought up a lighted candle; it was there, lighted, before.

Q. While he was gone down stairs you were in the shop - what passed? A. Sullivan was holding the pistol across the counter to me at the time, I being behind the counter; when Charles Melford returned up stairs, William said to Sullivan, "If he makes the least noise, blow his brains out directly;" that frightened me - Charles and William Melford then went up stairs, and I saw no more of William afterwards. Sullivan stood at the same place, holding the pistol across the counter, directed towards me, and he (Sullivan) said if I squeeked, or made the least noise, he would have me down directly; while they were up stairs I heard them breaking open doors and places: they remained up stairs about a quarter of an hour, as near as I can judge, and at the end of that time Charles Melford came down, and asked me for another candle - I gave him one out of the cupboard at the back of the shop - I do not know which of them lighted it; he went up stairs again with the candle, Sullivan still remaining below - I then heard them come down stairs, to the first floor; the first noise I had heard was higher up: I heard them say something about the kitchen, but what I do not know. Charles Melford then came down stairs a second time - William remained above: Charles said, "Follow me," and Sullivan said, "Go on," and he followed me; I went half way down the stairs, and saw Charles Melford take something out of his coat pocket - he was at the bottom of the stairs - I did not care to go any further down then, and I stood still; Charles then said, "Come on - we won't hurt you;" I then went down to the bottom of the stairs; Charles then took a cord, and tied my hands behind my back, and tied the cord, at the same time, round my body - he had another string, and fastened my legs with it - he then dared me never to know either of them, if I saw them again; he said, "Mind, you never know us again if you ever meet us in the street;" they then went up stairs, and I saw no more of them; they left the street door ajar. I gave an alarm, and got assistance; when I got up stairs I found the things all thrown about the rooms - I got up stairs by cutting the cords, in about two minutes; I got across the kitchen, got a knife, and cut them; when I got up stairs I found the things thrown about the rooms, and the doors broken open.

Q. Do you recollect going to the Saracen's Head at any time? A. Yes, the day after, or two or three days after - I think it was the next day; a person passed me, who attracted my attention, and I charged him with this - I believed it to be William Melford, and I gave him in charge - he was not the man, but I took it to be him; there was something the matter with his nose, which induced me to take him for the man.

Q. That having been the case, do you still swear positively or not to William? A. Yes; I am quite sure of him. I went to Worship-street five or six weeks afterwards, and the prisoner Charles Melford was shown to me by Hanley - he was under examination; I was not in the office two minutes before; I said he was the man. I have left

Mrs. Norbury's since, in consequence of the robbery - I believe I was partly suspected of it, because I did not fasten the door.

Cross-examined. Q. Part of the cause was your having left the door unfastened? A. Yes; the suspicion was mostly through my leaving the door unfastened. I had been in her service about twelve months; before that I lived with the persons whom I now live with, Messrs. Stapleton and Biddle, fishmongers, Holborn-hill. I should think the prisoners were in the house about half an hour; we have gas-lights in the shop, and they were burning; the shop shutters were up, and the door was shut and locked. I gave the cord which I was fastened with, to Mr. Smith, the beadle of the parish.

Q. What made you fix on the man at the Saracen's Head? A. By his looking very hard at me, and having lost his nose, but I did not swear to that man; I said I could not swear to him - that was before the Lord Mayor.

Q. After that man was discharged, did you not still say you believed he was the man? A. I said I still thought he was the man, but could not swear to him; it was proved before the Lord Mayor, that that man had been discharged from the hospital the day before; I saw Charles five or six weeks after that, and said I knew him before I was in the room two minutes - I have always said that.

Q. Are you sure it was not twenty minutes or half an hour? A. I mentioned it in twenty minutes, or half an hour also; I mentioned it in two minutes as well; I saw him in a private room, not in the Justice-room; he stood against a table - another person, named Moss, stood by his side - Moss was a person taken on suspicion of a robbery in the City-road; he had no connexion with this case; he is a shortish person, and looks a little like a Jew.

COURT. Q. How long after you saw the man you suspected at the Saracen's Head, did you see the prisoner William Melford? A. About five weeks - I was quite certain of him. I saw Sullivan the day after Christmas day; he was at Worship-street - he was taken after the Melfords were committed; I was quite certain of him. I speak with certainly to his being one of the three.

GEORGE WILMOT . I am headborough of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and live at Hoxton. I was at the Police-office when Charles Melford was under examination; I saw Tibbs come into the room - he said Charles was the man as soon as he came into the room - he looked round, and said,"That is one of the men."

Cross-examined. Q. What part of the room had you brought the witness to? A. He had just come in at the door; Charles Melford stood on his right hand - he and another person stood somewhat apart from the other, but very little - the other was a short man.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a green-grocer, and live at No. 25, Henrietta-street, Hackney-road. I know the prisoners William and Charles Melford; they lived next door to me at No. 24 - they had lived there for ten or eleven weeks; I have seen them go in and out of the house frequently; their mother lived there.

Cross-examined. Q. Whether they lived there or not you cannot tell? A. I have seen them go in at night, and come out in the morning.

EDMUND GODDARD . I am in the the employ of Mr. Rowley, ham and beef merchant, of Whitechapel. I have known the prisoner William Melford about five years; I knew him in the service of Mrs. Norbury, of Birchin-lane; the appearance of his face has been altered since he left her service; I called on him on two different occasions while he lived with her, once on a Sunday, to borrow a coat, and again on another occasion.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to swear positively to the identity of William? A. I do; I cannot swear to his countenance, but to his person generally; he is the man.

Q. Is it not, that you only believe he is the person? A. I know him to be the same person, from his general appearance, but I cannot speak to his countenance, as I have not seen him for two years previous to his being taken, and his countenance has been altered since I last saw him - his nose is altered.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say you do not know his countenance, but know him generally - do you know his voice? A. Yes - his voice is not altered, and I know his build, and the structure of his person - I have no doubt whatever of his being the same man; nothing is altered except his nose.

JAMES HANLEY . I am a Police-officer of Worship-street. I apprehended the prisoner Charles Melford, on the 10th of December, at No. 24, Henrietta-street, Hackney-road; there was a woman in the house, whom I heard him call mother, and a young woman, whom I am not certain, that he called sister, in the house, but he spoke of her afterwards to me as being his sister; after taking him to Worship-street, I returned again with Wilmot, to assist in searching the house; there are two sleeping rooms; the mother and sister sleep in the front, and I understood from the mother, that Charles and William slept in the back, but that was not said in their hearing; there are two rooms below, but no bed-room, except the two up stairs - I found hanging on the door of the back bed-room, a blue coat, which Charles Melford owned - I also found in a box near the foot of the bed, in that room, six pistol bullets, two small vials of gunpowder, and several flints, and, on the mantel-piece, were two other pistol bullets in a watch-stand - in another box, I found this bullet-mould, which fits the bullets, and in the same box I found two masks, which I did not take away at the time, but have them here now; there was a box on the landing-place, within a yard of the room door; I could not get the key of it, and broke it open with a chisel - I found a large loaded pistol at the top of that box - I have drawn the charge; it was loaded with small shot, and primed; in the same box I found a cut glass creamewer, wrapped in brown paper - I did not bring that away at first, but am certain it is the same - I saw Wilmot find two pistol keys; he took them up in the room, and showed them to me - I believe he took them from one of the boxes - I found nothing more that day - I produced these things at the Police-office; only Charles was in custody then - I produced these things before him - I do not recollect whether I had any conversation with him, expect before the Magistrate; the mother was present when I found them - I apprehended him before ten o'clock in the morning - I went back and found the things about eleven; the bed was unmade - I did not notice whether one or two persons had slept in it - I apprehended William on Monday the 17th, at the Olive Branch public-house, Maze, Borough.

Q. Did you ask William Melford where he lived? A.

We took him for another affair - Mrs. Norbury's robbery was mentioned to him, but not particularly; he said nothing particular about it - I went on the 18th, to the house in Henrietta-street, with Garton and Brown, and in a cupboard in the back room, ground-floor, I found this sword stick; it is a sword for thrusting; it was in the room under that in which I found the things in the box, and up stairs, in the back room, where I had searched before, I found the duplicate of a fish-knife, pawned for 18s., at Lawton's, No. 151, Bishopsgate-street - I went there with that duplicate, and the fish-knife was produced to me; there was a screw-driver, which I produced; Garton has that; we found a tooth-pick in William's pocket, when we took him, and Brown found a pencil-case. On Christmas day, between five and six o'clock, I went in company with my brother officer to the Ship and Shovel public-house, in a court behind Guy's Hospital - I went up stairs, and found the prisoner Sullivan lying on a bed, with his clothes on; he was lying outside - I told him to get up, that I might look at him; he had a different coat on to what he wears now; he got off the bed - I told him I was a Police-officer, and from his description, I suspected he had been concerned in a robbery, and asked him how he got his bread; he said,"Not in that way, master" - I asked him, "What way then?" he said he had been a licensed hawker - I asked him to show me his goods; he said he had no goods, they had been stolen from him - I asked him to show me his box; he said he had no box - I asked how long he had known Bill Melford, and whether Bill had not slept in that room with him about a week ago; he said Yes, he had a short time before, and that he got acquainted with him in Guy's Hospital - I looked near the head of his bed, and found a bawker's bag, with "Jeremiah Sullivan, licensed hawker" on it; the landlady was in the room, and said, in his hearing, that it belonged to him - I took these cords out of that bag; they are what are called nettles, I believe; they belong to a hammock I believe; he said so, and I found a sort of ring with them - I found a duplicate on him, which does not relate to this business, and half a crown in money - I found a small pistol flint in the bag, a common flint - I asked what he did with those cords; he said they belonged to his hammock, when he was in the Preventive Service - I took him to the watch-house. I should have stated, that I put these cords into his hat, and he took them to the watch-house. I found them in his hat afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Charles was taken first? A. Yes - I went to the mother's house three or four times, in order to take William - I found some things the first time; the mother knew I found them. William was not then in custody.

Q. When you went the second time, you found other things? A. I found all the articles, except the duplicate and sword-stick at the first search, but did not bring them all away.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of Worship-street. I accompanied Hanley to the Olive Branch, and took William Melford; I searched him, and found four duplicates in the fob of his trousers pocket - I produce them - three of them relate to this robbery; one is from Harris, and two from Martin; the other was a duplicate for a pair of spectacles, pawned for 5s. I went to No. 24, Henrietta-street, the day after I took William, and, on searching the boxes in the back room, up stairs, I found this silver pencil-case. I went to Mrs. Norbury's, in Birchin-lane, and examined her premises - I think it was on the 18th - Garton was with me, and he had a screw-driver, which I saw found at Henrietta-street, in the same room; I applied that screw-driver myself to two room doors, three closet doors, and a chest of drawers, all of which had been forced; I compared it with the impressions made on the wood, and it corresponded exactly with all of them.

THOMAS GARTON . I went to No. 24, Henrietta-street; Hanley found a screw-driver, and delivered it into my hands - I was present when it was fitted to the drawers and doors in Birchin-lane - it fitted them exactly.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 245, Tooley-street, Borough. I produce six tea-spoons, pawned on the 8th of December, in the name of Matthew Newton, No. 4, Maze-pond - (looking at a duplicate produced by Hanley) - this is the duplicate I gave for those spoons; I gave it to the party who pawned them - here is the counterpart; I did not write the duplicate myself - my wife did, but I took them in - I do not know the person who pawned them.

DAVID TRAIL . On the 1st of December I was assistant to Mr. Martin (looking at a duplicate produced by Hanley); I gave this duplicate, on the 1st of December, to a person who pawned a pair of silver sugar-tongs, in the name of Samuel Jones, No. 8, Union-street, for 8s. I believe the prisoner Charles Melford to be the man who pawned them - I did not know him before.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am the son of Mr. Harris, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Hackney-road (looking at a duplicate). I gave this duplicate, on the 1st of December, for six table-cloths, which were pawned in the name of Sarah Smith, Elizabeth-street, by a woman, for 3s. - they are worth 5s.

JAMES WHISKARD . I am an assistant to Mr. Lawton's pawnbroker, No. 151, Bishopsgate-street. I gave this duplicate (looking at one), on the 26th of November, for this fish-knife, which was pawned in the name of John Smith, by the prisoner Charles Melford - I am quite certain of his person; I asked him if it was his own property; he said Yes, to be sure it was - whose did I suppose it was; he gave me his name and address, "John Smith, No. 14, Brunswick-street."

Cross-examined. That was seven weeks ago nearly? - A. Yes; I am certain of his person - I advanced 18s. on it.

COURT. Q. The duplicate appears to describe the person pawning as a housekeeper? A. Yes; he said he was a housekeeper, so I gave him a duplicate with the letter H. on it.

JAMES BROWN re-examined. I produce a rope, which I received from Tibbs.

HENRY TIBBS. That is the rope which my hands and feet were bound with.

GEORGE WILMOT re-examined. I have worked as a rope-maker on board ship, though I am not a rope-maker; this is a sort of rope called nettles - it is used to tie up hammocks with; this is a particularly fine one, and is termed a three-yarn nettle.

Q. Now, look at those pieces found in Sullivan's bag - are they the same in every particular? A. This piece is not - it is a two-yarn nettle, nor is this piece, but this one is exactly the same kind of stuff; these nettles are generally

used for slinging a hammock; one piece, I swear, is the same manufacture as that produced by Tibbs - it is very fine, unusually fine.

Cross-examined. Q. The first piece is cut clean at the ends? A. Yes.

Q. Why did you untwist the piece you compared? A. To ascertain the quality of the yarn - the rest are coarser, and quite different,

COURT. Q. Is there any particular yarn in the composition of these two that you say tally? A. Yes; it is particularly fine yarn, which is not common.

Prisoner SULLIVAN. Q. Is there hardly a sailor in London without such ropes as those? A. No; not one in five hundred has rope of this quality to his hammock - it is considerably uncommon; it is particularly fine, very choice - I do not mean to say there is none of this sort, but it is uncommon.

MARY HOMER . I keep the Ship and Shovel public-house. I know all the prisoners; Sullivan lodged with me for four months, up to the time he was taken up; the other prisoners very frequently visited him.

Q. Did they visit him before, or near the 11th of December? A. Yes; William Melford slept with Sullivan on the 11th of December - that was the first night he slept with him; they visited him often.

Prisoner SULLIVAN. Q. Did you see me more with the Melfords than other men? A. The Melfords were more acquainted with him than with any other person.

MRS. NORBURY. This fish-slice is mine, and these six silver tea-spoons have my initials on them; the six table-cloths are mine - they are not marked, but I gave the officer one, which was cut from the same piece - they are of a particular shape and make; they are made small, narrow, and long, for the tables in my business - they correspond in pattern with what I have at home; I know this glass cream-jug; I have a sugar-basin corresponding with it; the sugar-tongs are mine, and have my initials on them(M. A. N.) - the spoons are marked the same. I know this pencil-case - it is an old one, which I have had for years - it was in a box, with the seal, which is not found; nothing more of mine is here - I am certain they were safe in the house before the robbery; I had used the spoons the day before.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you compared the spoons with those you have? A. I have.

CHARLES MELFORD's Defence. I know nothing about the robbery.

SULLIVAN's Defence. I am innocent.

JURY to HENRY TIBBS. Q. You have said you were fastened hand and foot - how did you get liberated in two minutes? A. I was at the bottom of the stairs; my hands were fastened with a cord, and tied round my body, but I managed to get my hands out. I noticed Sullivan's voice - his voice to-day corresponds exactly; Sullivan might be twenty-five minutes, or half an hour, with me; while they were going over the house, he was holding the pistols across the counter; we were face to face - I was under no alarm at first.

COURT. Q. These persons' lives are concerned in this charge; can you, on your oath, conscientiously and seriously, before God, declare you are certain of each of the three prisoners? A. I am certain of all of them; I should know the coat Sullivan had on if it was produced.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I have the coat which I took off Sullivan's back when he was apprehended; Tibbs identified it at the office, as the coat Sullivan wore at the time of the robbery; he said it was a brown coat, with a velvet collar, and he identified him among twenty people.

HENRY TIBBS. I believe this to be the same coat.

MARY HOMER. It was the 11th of December that Sullivan slept with William Melford.

CHAS. MELFORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

WM. MELFORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

See page 143.

Reference Number: t18280110-40

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 15.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

296. RICHARD JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Muckleston , at St. Pancras, on the 6th of January , and stealing 13 spoons, value 5l.; 1 pair of silver tongs, value 5s.; 3 dozen of knives and forks, value 1l., and 1 bottle of wine, value 4s., the goods of the said Joseph Muckleston; and 3 dresses, value 3l.; 1 cloak, value 15s.; 1 scarf, value 8s.; 2 pockets, value 1s.; 1 bonnet, value 1l.; 1 pair of gloves, value 2s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 10s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 12s.; 1 umbrella, value 8s.; 1 brooch, value 6s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 5s.; 2 caps, value 6s.; 1 collar, value 6d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 15s.; 20 yards of silk, value 50s.; 5 yards of ribbon, value 4s. and 1 bodkin and tweezers, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Drury , spinster .

ELIZABETH DRURY. I am servant to Mr. Joseph Muckleston, who lives at No. 2, Euston-street, Euston-square, in the parish of St. Pancras . On Sunday, the 6th of January I went out at ten o'clock in the morning, leaving the house empty; the family were in the country - I had the care of the house - I spoke to my next door neighbour, Gayer, to have an eye to the house - I left every place perfectly secure, and the street door double locked; the windows were all down and fastened; the area door was also secure - I returned before two o'clock; I found the house open, and five of the neighbours there; I went into the parlour, and found two cupboards, with the locks broken open, and every thing else in confusion; the things which they had not taken were all packed up, ready to be taken away; there were three dresses of my own, which had been brought down stairs, and packed up, one cloak, two silk handkerchiefs, one pair of gloves, a scarf, a pair of bracelets, and a gauze handkerchief of mine; and there was of master's property, four table, four desert, and four tea spoons, a pair of sugar-tongs, and three dozen of knives and forks; the silver spoons were all quite gone - the other things were tied up in a bundle, ready to be taken away; a silver mustard-spoon was afterwards found; twenty yards of silk had been taken out of the house, and five yards of black ribbon, two pairs of black silk stockings, two lace caps, which have been found, and there was a Leghorn bonnet; a bottle of wine was taken out of the parlour cupboard - I went up stairs, and found the house rifled; the value of all the property was 19l. or 20l. I found the front door open when I came home.

MARY GAYER . I live servant at the next door to Mr.

Muckleston. On Sunday morning, the 6th of January, Drury requested me to have an eye to the house, as she was going out - I heard a knock at Mr. Muckleston's door, about eleven o'clock - I went into our area, to answer it, as I can see Mr. Muckleston's door - I saw a young man there, a stranger; it was not the prisoner; he asked me if Mrs. Turner lived there - I told him No, that Mrs. Drury live there; he then asked me if that was Drummond-street - I told him No, he must go to the bottom of the street, and turn to the right and left - I went in, and did not see him go away; in about half an hour, a gentleman, who was in my master's parlour, called me, and said he had seen two men coming from this house - I was up stairs - I immediately came down, opened the street door, and saw three men walking and talking - I called Stop thief! they were four doors off, walking slowly away together - I called Stop thief! Stop thief! I ran after them, and they ran before me; they ran up Coburg-street, two on the left hand side, and one on the right; one of them turned down a cow-yard - I followed that man; he ran into the cow-house - I went into the cow-house, but could not see him there - Hawkins went into the cow-house, and soon after brought the prisoner out of it; this bottle of wine was given to me out of the cow-house, by Seabrook; when the prisoner was brought out, he appeared to be the same man as I was pursuing - I am sure of him - I have not a doubt of him.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I keep an eating-house. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and followed the prisoner, who had just turned the corner - I followed him into the cow-house - I went to the bottom of the cow-house, and could not see him at first; it was light - I went back, and asked a man, if a man had not gone in; he said Yes; there is but one door, and I was certain he could not have got out - I then went to the end of the cow-house, and found the prisoner under a truss of hay - I pulled the hay off him, and told him to get up; he laid there - I said he must get up, and pulled him up; he made no resistance - I brought him out, and the last witness immediately said he was the man - I had him taken to the watch-house, and the officer, Clark, found on him some skeleton-keys and other things.

JAMES SEABROOK . I live with the owner of this cow-house. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner brought out of the cow-house - I went in afterwards, and found a bottle of wine, an umbrella, and some silk under the hay, and a pair of silver spectacles.

JOSEPH CLARK . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge, on Sunday morning. a little after twelve o'clock, and in his coat pocket I found fourteen skeleton-keys, a silk handkerchief, two pairs of black silk stockings, a collar, and some skeins of silk in his hat.

THOMAS BUCKERIDGE . I am a street-keeper. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and pursued a person as far as Camden-town, and lost him - I went to the house, and saw it was all in confusion - Seabrook gave me the wine, the silk, and spectacles; a skeleton-key was picked up, which opens Mr. Muckleston's door.

ELIZABETH DRURY . There was a bottle of wine taken away; this silk, and the spectacles are mine; all this property belongs to the house.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 47.

Reference Number: t18280110-41

297. THOMAS O'BRIEN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , in the dwelling-house of Michael Murphy , 1 glove, value 2d.; 100 sovereigns, and 9 shillings , his property.

ELLEN CARNEY MURPHY . I am the wife of Michael Murphy, who rents the house, No. 82, Three Tun-alley, between Goulston-street and Petticoat-lane, Whitechapel ; we keep a lodging-house ; the prisoner lodged in the first-floor - I lost my money on boxing-night - I saw it safe half an hour before he took it; I had it in my bosom nearly all the day - I carried it about with me; it was in a yellow glove - I went to the Lying-inn Hospital, with my niece, and returned between one and two o'clock in the day, and between eight and nine o'clock I had it in my cupboard; the glove contained one hundred sovereigns, and nine shillings; I had been saving it up for the last seven years, since I have been in London - I locked the cupboard, and had the key in my pocket; the prisoner was not in the room then; he had lodged nearly three years with us, and is a combmaker; he has often seen me put money into the cupboard, which is in the first floor room; there was a deal of people in our kitchen that night, and the prisoner was one of them - I went up stairs between eight and nine o'clock,(which was about half an hour after I had put it there,) as I heard O'Brien at my cupboard, with a knife in his hand, opening it - I followed him up stairs from the kitchen when I heard him opening it.

Q. How did you hear him opening the cupboard? A. I heard him with a knife opening it - I went up, and he had the cupboard door open, and the glove of money in his hand - I cried out, that I was robbed; there was nobody else in the room - I am sure the glove was in his hand; he beat me with his fist, and I went down into the kitchen; he gave me a blow in the eye with his fist, and struck me with the handle of the knife - I had a black eye - he went out of the room, down into the kitchen, where there were a great many people - I accused him there, before my husband, of taking the money, and my husband beat me, because I had never told him what money I had; he did not know I had so much.

Q. What became of the prisoner? A. I was almost fainting, and asked for a drop of water, and as my daughter gave me the water, he ran out; he kept going on with the quarrelling; he said he would have another man, who had been two years in my house, and would stand in his blood between that and the morning; I do not know how long he remained in the kitchen - I do not know which way he ran, only he followed the other man (Richard Farrell,) who lodged with us; he was obliged to run away for his life.

Q. Did you ever go and tell a Police-officer of this? A. I was going after him two days after the robbery, to get him taken up to Lambeth-street - I went there, but was crowded away, and they would not let me say any thing - I went to the office, on the Friday; he has not returned to our house since, only that night, when he came like a madman, and said he would have that man's life; he had not given us warning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Now, on your oath, did not the prisoner, himself, complain at the office first against both of you, for assaulting him? A. My husband and him went there first, with one another; that was two days after the robbery; they charged each other

with an assault - I went after them, to get him taken up, when I heard he was there.

Q. Now, on your solemn oath, did you at the office say a single word about a robbery, when the charge of assault was preferred by your husband? A. When I went there I did - I went there, and was crowded out, and turned away - I then went to Worship-street; they said at Lambeth-street, that there was nothing for me there, and turned me away, and I then went to Worship-street.

Q. After O'Brien robbed you, did he take the sovereigns down stairs to the kitchen with him? A. That I do not know, because he knocked me down, and beat me; he was in the house when my husband beat me; he struck my husband with the knife, before he went out - I do not know how many men were in the kitchen at that time - I cannot say whether there were five, six, or seven.

Q. What is the reason that you remained for two days without going to the office, about the one hundred sovereigns? A. I followed him there, when I heard he was there - I did not complain of it before, as I was waiting to get him taken up - I never wanted the prisoner to marry my daughter; he followed me on Christmas night to my bed - I never told his brother, that if he did not marry my daughter, I would make him suffer - my husband used to give me his earnings; but before I was robbed, he did not bring me to account; he knew I had some money - I never counted it before any body; a woman who lodged in the house, has seen me with ten and forty sovereigns on Mr. Benjamin's table; she is at my house now; my daughter has seen me with a good deal of money; the prisoner wanted to have my daughter - I often missed money out of my cupboard - I once missed two sovereigns, and told my husband of that.

Q. Was the prisoner in the kitchen when you told your husband he had robbed you? A. Yes; and I said he had got all the money I had in the world; he went down into the kitchen directly, before I did; I did not see the money there; the people in the kitchen were my lodgers.

Q. Did any body demand that the prisoner should be searched? A. They saw my husband beat me after going to Lambeth-street; I went three days running to the Priest, and after that went to Worship-street; the prisoner was taken for quarrelling; he was set at liberty - but that was not in my case; when I mentioned the robbery, I was pushed outside; I was at the office on a second occasion, with my husband - he was going to mention about the robbery with me.

MICHAEL MURPHY. This is my dwelling-house. On boxing-night I had been to bed, and I came down to the kitchen between seven and eight o'clock; I lighted the prisoner three times up stairs that night, to get him to bed; he was up stairs when my wife went up; she and he came down together; I cannot say who was first; she said she was robbed, but did not say of what, or by whom, at that time - but called for a drink of water; she said soon after that O'Brien was the person; I knew she could not be without money, but did not know what she had, whether it was 1l., 100l., or 200l.; when she said she was robbed, I gave her a slap in the mouth, for fear of a row being in the house - I believe the prisoner remained there about an hour after; he went out after another man, to a public-house; he had kicked up a row; I went to bed, and was forced to get up again; I found him in the kitchen; he went away in about half an hour; he never returned to lodge at the house; he had given no notice to quit; he paid weekly - this was the middle of his week; I went to Lambeth-street for an indictment against him for a row, for he had stabbed me with a knife before he went out; I went there a day before my wife; I did not complain of a robbery, for she did not tell me what sum she had lost till the next day; I never inquired the sum; my wife went to the office to get an indictment against him for robbing her; I offered, on the Friday, to tell the Magistrate of the robbery, but did not mention it; I mentioned it on Saturday to Norris, the officer; he told me there was nothing to be got there; we went to Worship-street afterwards, and got a warrant, for Vann to apprehend him.

Cross-examined. Q. On your solemn oath, did he not go the office to get a warrant against you for an assault? A. Yes; he got his warrant after I got mine - the Magistrate dismissed both charges, that was on Friday; he heard us both - I said nothing to him about the robbery - my wife told me that it was one hundred sovereigns, about ten or eleven o'clock on the Friday; my wife came to the office about twelve o'clock, but the officer would not let her in - he told her she would get no warrant; I swear that: it was Norris - she did not go to Worship-street till the Wednesday following - I went myself to the Lord Mayor, and they told me I should get no warrant there.

COURT. Q. When did you go to the Lord Mayor? A. On Saturday; I made the first complaint at Lambeth-street; my wife did not tell me the amount of the money till after I left the office on Friday; the Magistrate only looked at both of us, and said he would not hear the warrants.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not the prisoner complain that you was detaining his box, with forty-seven sovereigns in it, and the Magistrate sent an officer for you to give it up? A. No; the officer told me to give it up; he told the officer it contained valuable property.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer of Worship-street. On Wednesday, the 2d of January, a complaint was made at our office, by this woman, of having been robbed of one hundred sovereigns and nine shillings; she told me it was in a man's yellow glove; I was sent, with Hanley, the officer, to where the prisoner was at work, near Cock-lane- we found him comb-cutting - this was the same afternoon - the prosecutrix pointed him out - we told him we took him for robbing her of one hundred sovereigns and nine shillings; he said it was false, that he knew nothing at all about it; I asked where he lived; he said in Rose-alley, Bishopsgate-street, and described the house; he said his box was there, and had forty-nine sovereigns in it, in a silk purse; he gave me the key of his box, and said he had come there to lodge on the Saturday before; I went there, and opened the box, in the landlord's presence, and brought the sovereigns away - by that time Norris had been fetched to our office - Mr. Bennet heard Norris state about the warrants, and sent the prisoner to Lambeth-street; the Magistrate there said he had no information of a robbery, and sent him back to Worship-street; I was asked by the prosecutrix to go and look at her cupboard; there were three beds in the room where she said the prisoner slept, and the cupboard was at the head of the bed which she said was his.

Cross-examined. Q. He gave you the number of the house, told you what money he had, and every thing? A. He did.

MARGARET MURPHY . I am the prosecutrix's daughter, and live at home; the prisoner was in the kitchen on the evening of boxing-day; he went up stairs, and I heard my mother say she was robbed; she asked for a drink of water, which I gave her, as she was fainting; I had been out, and had only just come in then; O'Brien was up stairs when she was fainting; I left my mother in the kitchen, went up stairs to the first-floor room, where the cupboard was, and found O'Brien there alone; he gave me the candle to hold him a light; I said No, I had something else to do; I then turned round, and he was turning over his box, and counting some money into his pocket-book, out of some parcel or other, but what it was I cannot tell; he was counting it out of a purse - I do not know what colour it was; I turned away, and went down stairs - it was sovereigns - I do not know how many, there were a good many.

Cross-examined. Q. After your mother had complained of being robbed, he asked you to hold the candle while he told the money? A. Yes; I know nothing about wanting him for a husband, except what I have heard my mother say - she said she was talking to him something about marrying me.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer, and went with Vann. I saw the prisoner at work - the Magistrate's clerk bound me over to attend here - I know nothing more - we found the prisoner at work, and he was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he the slightest hesitation in telling you where he lived, and about the purse? A. Not the least.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I was bound over, by the direction of Mr. Twyford, to attend on behalf of the prisoner; when he was apprehended he wished me to come to Worship-street - I went, and found the people who had taken him were the same who had the warrants against him.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been an officer? A. Five years - on the Thursday after boxing-day I saw O'Brien at the office, but do not recollect seeing Murphy there that day, but I know he was there, as both the assault warrants were granted on that day - Mr. Wyatt, the Magistrate, heard them both at full length - Mrs. Murphy was outside - I took her into the office about three o'clock- not a word was said to the officers or the Magistrate about a robbery then - both warrants were discharged, and I heard nothing further till I was fetched to Worship-street, on the Wednesday.

Q. Then is it true that she told you of the robbery on Friday, and you turned her out of the office? A. Quite the reverse; I took her before the Magistrate - she was not turned out, but after she heard the warrants were discharged, she said, "I will have a warrant for him myself now;" I said she had better go about her business - she had said nothing before that; I took her in before the Magistrate, and told him that she wanted a warrant, he said,"Send her out about her business."

COURT. Q. From whom did you first hear of a robbery? A. From the prisoner's brother, who fetched me to Worship-street on the Wednesday - I understand the woman did come to the office drunk, on Friday evening, and mention a robbery to Lee and another officer.

PROSECUTRIX. This is not my purse.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it Norris who turned you out of the office? A. They all turned me out - I was going in, and was turned out; I told Norris I had a complaint to make; I went to the door, and was routed out.

Prisoner's Defence. Why should this woman borrow 1l. of me, and several trifling sums, if she had all this money?

JOHN O'BRIEN . I am the prisoner's brother - we are comb-makers. I called at his lodgings ten days before Christmas, and saw him with forty-eight sovereigns in his box.

WILLIAM O'BRIEN . I am the prisoner's brother. I have often seen the prosecutrix. About a fortnight before Christmas, she told me she would make my brother suffer for not marrying her daughter - I told her he had money, as he had lodged with me twelve months ago, for four months, and then gave me thirty-five sovereigns to keep for him.

MR. PHILLIPS to the PROSECUTRIX. Q. Did you ever tell any person you had not lost any money? A. Never; I never told Ellen Herold so; I do not know her - I never told her, or any one, so.

ELLEN HEROLD . I have known the prosecutrix twelve months - she was at the public-house with me at the time the prisoner's brother died in her house, she drank in my company, and I was at her house at the wake and the funeral; last Saturday week she told me she had lost no money, and had nothing to lose.

COURT. Q. Where was it she told you this? A. I saw her in Goulston-street - she came up; I said, "Mrs. Murphy, how do you do? you have had a fine row at your house; is it true that you lost all this money?" she said,"My dear, I had nothing to lose, but there was great injury done to my things, and they won't make me a recompense; I have got him safe enough, and am determined to keep him there till he makes me a recompense;" the prisoner's sister lodged with me, and I told her of this - my husband is a labourer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-42

Before Mr. Recorder.

298. JAMES TOMLINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , at St. Mary, Islington, 1 cow, price 17l., and 1 calf, price 20s. , the property of William Smeeton .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

JESSE SMEETON . I am a cattle-dealer , and live at Sibberthorp, in Northamptonshire. I came to town with some cattle on the 4th of January, and brought them to market to sell - I brought eighteen beasts - I sold seventeen on the 4th, as I thought, but sent only fifteen of them away - the three remained, which were two cows, with each a calf, and one in calf. On the evening of the 4th of January I was at the Lock and Key public-house, Smithfield, and saw the prisoner there - he sent for me out of the room - I went out to him into the bar - I knew him before - I had had one transaction with him before, and only one; I had sold him a cow and calf at Barnet-fair, on the 4th of September - he had not money enough to pay for them - I said I could not let them go without the money - he said if I would keep them till Thursday, he would bring the money to Laycook's, at Islington, and they were delivered to him on the Thursday, from Laycock's shed, at Islington.

Q. Well, how did your conversation begin with him at Smithfield? A. He asked if I had any thing left - I said I had one left, and two more, which I had sold, but the man had not fetched them, and if he did not come for them by eight o'clock the next morning, I would sell them - he asked where I should be at eight o'clock - I said at the Grapes public-house, which was next door; I asked him to come and breakfast with me; he said he would, by eight o'clock, without fail - this was about five in the evening - nothing further was said that night; he wished me goodnight, and I wished him the same.

Q. Was there any inquiry about the beasts? state all the conversation that passed that night? A. He asked whether they had calved; I said two had calved, and one had not; nothing further passed at all; I am quite sure that is all the conversation we had.

Q. Was any thing said about what was to be given for the cows, or what he wanted? A. No price was mentioned; he did not ask the price, nor did I set any price, nor did he say he should wish to bargain for them; he only asked what I had, and that is all that passed; I waited for him on the following morning, till half-past nine o'clock - he did not come - I sold one of the cows that day to Mr. Howard, of Queen-street, Seven-dials, for eighteen guineas, and I had to send the other two to Mr. Styles; I went to Laycock's that day, and took two men to take the two cows to Mr. Styles, and one to Howard; Styles lives in Upper Gower-mews, Bedford-square; I stated at the office about making this sale to Howard and Styles; when I got to Laycock's I found one of the cows and calf was not there - they were worth 18l.; it was a red roan cow, a kind of strawberry-colour; the cows and calves were all the sole property of William Smeeton, my father; I have no share in the business; I was going to leave town that day, but stopped to find the prisoner; it was Saturday; I had told the prisoner I should leave town that day - I am sure of that - I saw the cow again last Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has your father no partner? A. No; I do business for my father - he does not pay me; I have no share at all in the business; I had seen the prisoner but once before; he paid me for that transaction, but not all at once.

Q. Is it not usual in your business, when a dealer wishes to buy a beast, that he takes it, and it is left to the salesman afterwards to settle the price? A. Yes, sometimes, but it must be a gentleman whom we know well - it is very seldom done. I have known Mr. Styles twelve months: I am certain none of my brothers are in partnership with my father.

Q. Although you have only had one transaction with the prisoner, has he not several times bid money for cattle? A. Never.

MR. QUIN. Q. Was there ever such a bargain between you and the prisoner, as for him to take cattle, and you to fix the price afterwards? A. Never.

COURT. Q. Would you have allowed him to take any of your cattle without a regular bargain, and the money being paid? A. No.

THOMAS GEORGE . I am servant to Mr. Laycock, of Islington, who keeps places for housing and foddering cattle. I know the prisoner; he came to me on Saturday morning, the 5th of January, about eleven o'clock, in the lairs at Islington, and asked me if Mr. Smeeton had not got three cows there - I said Yes, and showed them to him - he said, "Those are the two cows which I have bought," pointing to a cow and calf, and one that was in calf - he said he had bought them of Smeeton, and said, "This old devil here, he wanted to shove upon me, but I would not buy it;" (meaning the third cow, which was older than the others) he said, "I did not know this cow was so lame, for I sold it last night to a gentleman for 21l." - that was a cow in calf; he did not say who he had sold it to - he told me he had bought the cows for 37l., and paid for them - he said he was to meet Mr. Smeeton, and breakfast with him, at the Grapes, but had not seen him: that was all the conversation I had with him. He waited at our place for Mr. Smeeton for an hour, and then said he would wait no longer - he said the other cow was lame; I said if he took it away he would ruin it, and he had better leave it there, and I would dress it; he said if I would, he would satisfy me for it, and would fetch it on the Thursday; he said he was going to take the cow and call to Wandsworth, but did not say who to: he had come to our place before, about Barnet fair time, for a cow which he had bought at Barnet, of Smeeton: he fetched it away from our place. He drove the cow and calf away - I went part of the way with him - it was a strawberry colour.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you in Mr. Laycock's employ? A. I look after his cattle. The prisoner said he lived at Wandsworth-common - I knew his name before - I should have given him the other cow if he had chosen, but he left it behind, and for that reason I had no suspicion; I suppose the one left behind was worth about 17l. - this was on Saturday: he came after two more cows on the Monday following - I saw him myself; he knew that I knew Smeeton; it was about twelve o'clock when he drove away the cow and calf. I understand he has been a dealer in cattle; I am not the foreman - I am under the foreman. I went to Battersea-bridge, to the prisoner's father's house, with the officer, on the Saturday on which he had the cow away, and he came to our yard on the following Monday; I told his father he had got a wrong cow; I did not state that it was an officer who was with me; he told me he was to meet Smeeton at the Grapes, but said he had not seen him.

MR. QUIN. Q. Do you mean to say he said he had not seen Smeeton, or that you yourself say so? A. He said he had not seen Smeeton on the Saturday - I believed, from what he said, that he had purchased the cows.

NORMAN HUGHES . I am a cow-dealer, and live at the Bull public-house, at Holloway. On the 5th of January, as near one o'clock as possible, I was in Bridge-street, Blackfriars', and saw the prisoner driving a cow and calf; whether he asked me to buy it, or I asked him to sell it, I cannot say, but he asked me eighteen guineas for it - I bid him 15l. for the cow and calf; I asked how he came by her, and he said he had her from Cambridgeshire, or something to that effect; I looked at the cow more steady, and saw it was one I had seen exposed for sale on the Thursday before, at Mr. Laycock's lairs; I then went away, declining to buy it, in consequence of suspicions; he had offered it to me at 18l. I walked away, being determined not to purchase it, and told him his story was an untruth; I have seen the cow and calf since, and am quite

certain they are the same as he offered to me; I saw them yesterday morning, at Mr. Laycock's lair; I saw them on the evening after he offered them to me, at Mr. Lewis', in the Borough, and was sure they were the same - it was a strawberry cow, of a Lincolnshire breed.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he driving towards Wandsworth? A. He was going towards the bridge; I am sure he said they came from Cambridgeshire. I did not know him before.

MR. QUIN. Q. Are you well acquainted with the breed of cows? A. Yes.

JURY. Q. Was Laycock's man with him in Bridge-street? A. No.

THOMAS GEORGE . I only came as far as the Rainbow public-house, in the Back-road, Islington, with him.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am a cow-keeper, and live in White-street, Borough. On Saturday, the 5th of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at my premises; he said he had a cow and calf in the street, and if I was a buyer he would sell them to me worth the money; I asked him to bring them into the yard, for me to examine; he did so; I asked where he brought them from - he said they came from Smithfield that day - that he had turned his back a little, and the man took the cow away, for that money, as far as Blackfriars - that he and another ran after her, and brought her back, and he had lost the sale of her for the day; he took her to the Ram yard, Smithfield, and locked her up all night - he said he would sell her worth the money, as he wanted the money to go to a fair in the country; he asked 16l. for it; I offered him 14l., which he took. I paid him for them, and gave them up next day to the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. The cow stood in the street? A. Yes.

ROBERT KINNS . I am foreman to Mr. Laycock. I know the prisoner by sight. On Monday, the 7th of January, I saw him at Laycock's yard, about five o'clock in the afternoon - he asked for his two cows - I am sure he asked for two; he did not show me which two he meant; I told him he had none there - he said he had two, which he had bought of Mr. Smeeton (the strawberry cow and the calf had then been brought back by the officer;) I spoke to Mr. Laycock, and the prisoner was taken into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to his father's house? A. No.

THOMAS COPE. I am a constable of Islington. On Monday, the 7th, I received the prisoner in charge at Mr. Laycock's; he told me he had paid Smeeton 37l. for the cows, and that the cows and calf were at Wandsworth. I had fetched the cow and calf from Lewis', and they were at Laycock's when I apprehended him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to his father and mother's house? A. I did; I went to different houses, and found where he lodged; no offer was made to give up the prosecution for 18l.

Prisoner's Defence. I had an interview with Mr. Smeeton on Friday afternoon - I asked if he had any cows to suit me; before that I had been at a public-house, and seen Smeeton's man, who said his master was at the Lock and Key, and that they had turned three cows out of the market; I went there, saw Smeeton, and had a glass of something with him; he asked me to breakfast with him next morning; I said I would, and intended going, but the morning was so very wet and snowey, I was not there till after half-past nine o'clock. I asked the young woman in the bar if he was there; she said he was gone, and I asked where he was going; she said he said he was going into the country; I asked if he was likely to be at Laycock's; she said, "Most likely;" I went and inquired if he had been there; they sent me to the foreman's house; I went and asked if Smeeton had been there; a young woman said No, and told me to go into the lairs, and inquire for George, which I did, and asked if Smeeton was there; I said I expected to meet him there about some cows; I waited there an hour and a quarter; he never came; as we were dealers together, and he had left the price to other people, I thought he would do the same with me; and so he would if he had not been pressed to bring this charge; seeing one was lame, I left her there, and promised to give George 3s. for dressing her, he having told me to say nothing to the foreman about it - I was a perfect stranger to George; I waited a long time, and then said I would take one away; he said,"I dare say it is all right;" I said, "You may depend upon it, it is," and when Smeeton came, he should have put the price on them, and I would have paid him. In Bridge-street I met this man, who calls himself a dealer, but he only goes about to look after cows for other people; he asked me to give him some gin; I said I would not; he said, "Where did you bring that from?" I said, "Out of the country,' for I was not going to satisfy him - he never came out into the road at all to me; I was going to take it to Johnson's, of Kent-street, to show him, but Mr. Lewis' man came out, and said, "That cow would suit my master;" I said if he liked to look at it he should: I went into the yard, and told Lewis I had a cow to sell; I sold it to him for 14l., and referred him to Johnson, of Kent-street; he went there before he paid me, and got the best of referrences. This cow is valued at eighteen guineas - it is not worth the money. On Monday I went to Islington, to see if George had dressed the cow as he had promised; these people had been at my father's house on the Sunday, and a man said if my mother would give him 18l. they would say no more about it. I went to Mr. Laycock's foreman's house on Monday, and asked if he was at home; they said No; I called out George, but he did not answer; this gentleman came; I said I came to look at the cows I bought of Smeeton; he said, "You have none here;" I said, "I have two, which I bought of Smeeton;" he left me, and this man came up; we went to a public-house, and had some brandy and water together; this gentleman came in, and the constable said he had a charge of felony against me, for stealing the cows; I said I would go any where, but as to my mentioning a price I never did: I asked George if they were worth 37l., but never said I gave that for them. The Magistrate would not have committed me if he had not been pressed. Is it likely, if I wanted to steal the cows, that I should go to Laycock's? I intended to pay him the money this week, when he came up to London. I have sold 40l. worth of cattle at a time, and nobody can say I owe them 1s.; the time being short, and my friends living in the country, they are not here. I intended to pay Mr. Smeeton honestly for them; I had no conversation with the

man in Bridge-street; I never went out of the road, and he and the drover stood on the pavement; would a guilty man have gone to Laycock's on the Monday, as I did? my friends went yesterday to the Grapes, to ask the young woman to come and prove that I had been there, and asked for Mr. Smeeton, but they said she should not come, and that she should know nothing about it; I sent her a subpoena, but believe she is not here.

WILLIAM LEWIS. He did refer me to Johnson.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH .

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth and good character .

Reference Number: t18280110-43

Third London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

299. JOHN LANTAFF DARNEY was indicted for that he, on the 12th of December , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain bill of exchange , which is as follows; -£49. 7s. 6d. London, October 8th, 1827.

Two months after date, pay to me or my order, the sum of 49l. 7s. 6d., for value received. JOHN RUMBEET.

To Mr. P. Lazarus, Maiden-lane, Wood-street. with intent to defraud John Rumbeet , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, that he, on the same day, at the same parish, having in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange (setting it out as before). afterwards, on the same day, and at the same parish, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, upon the back of the said bill, a certain indorsement of the said last mentioned bill of exchange, which is as follows: - "John Rumbeet," with intent to defraud the said John Rumbeet, against the statute.

THIRD COUNT. that he, on the same day, and at the same parish, having in his custody and possession, a certain false, forged, and counterfeit bill of exchange (setting it out as before), on the back of which was contained a certain indorsement of the said last mentioned forged bill of exchange, uiz."John Rumbeet," and on which said last mentioned forged bill of exchange, on the same day, at the same parish, was contained a certain acceptance of the said last mentioned bill of exchange, as follows: - "Accepted payable at Messrs. Rogers, Towgood, and Co.'s, Philip Lazarus," feloniously did utter and publish, as true, the said last mentioned false, forged and counterfeit bill of exchange, with intent to defraud the said John Rumbeet, he(the said John Lantaff Darney) well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited, against the statute.

FOURTH COUNT, that he, on the same day, at the same parish, having in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange (setting it out as before), afterwards, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did make, forge, and counterfeit, upon the said bill, an acceptance of the same (setting it out as before), afterwards, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did make, forge, and counterfeit, upon the said bill, an acceptance of the same (setting it out as before), with intent to defraud Philip Lazarus , against the statute.

FIFTH COUNT, the same as the fourth, only stating the intention to be to defraud Samuel Rogers and others, his partners.

SIXTH COUNT, that he, on the same day, at the same parish, having in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange (setting it out as before), on the back of which was contained a certain indorsement (setting it out as before), and on which was contained a certain false, forged, and counterfeit acceptance of the said last mentioned bill (setting it out as before), on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did utter and publish, as true, with intent to defraud the said Philip Lazarus, he well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeit, against the statute.

SEVENTH COUNT, like the sixth, only stating the intent to be to defraud the said Samuel Rogers and others, his partners.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18280110-44

300. JOHN LANTAFF DARNEY was again indicted for that he, on the 12th of December , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money , as follows: - London, 11th of November, 1827.

Messrs. Rogers, Towgood, and Co., pay Mr. Darney, No. 303. or bearer, Six Pounds. PHILIP LAZARUS.£6.

with intent to defraud Philip Lazarus , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, that he, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did utter and publish, as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeit order, for payment of money(setting it out as before), with a like intent, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeit, against the statute.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the first and second, only stating the intent to be to defraud Samuel Rogers and others, his partners.

FIFTH AND SIXTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the intent to be to defraud William Game .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18280110-45

301. GEORGE WILLIAM BOWDEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Smith , on the 27th of December , with a certain sharp instrument, and stabbing him in and upon his left cheek, the back of his head, and his chin, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable, or to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MESSRS. QUIN and BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SMITH. I am a seaman . On the 26th of December I was on board the Albion, of Woodbridge, which laid in the Thames. I left the Albion about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, to carry a parcel, and at eleven I went into the Coopers' Arms public-house, Thames-street, to get a cast-off in some boat, to return to the Albion; I left the Coopers' Arms, for that purpose, about half-past two o'clock in the morning; I went to Tower-stairs ; Captain Ford's son and I had left the Coopers' Arms together; I stopped on the way a short time, for a necessary purpose, and Captain Ford's son went on; I was alone; when I got to the river I saw a barge laying dry on the gravel; I heard a row in the barge, and went up to its side; I sprang up to look over the barge, but said nothing; my hat was directly taken off my head; I was sure it did not fall off; I caught Bowden by the collar; he was the nearest person to me when my hat was pulled from my head; I caught hold of him expressly to get my hat again; I was dragged into the barge by means of his struggling to get away from me; I was hit by two or three persons after I was pulled in; I had done nothing but seize Bowden by the collar; I fell down into some water in the barge; I kept hold of

Bowden; I got up again, and asked for my hat; Bowden said, "I have not got your hat;" we scuffled together, and I received something of a wound in my head; I was still holding him; he struck me with his fist, and I struck him with my right hand; he struck first; I received a wound on the back part of my head, and on my chin; I felt very little of the wound on the chin; I thought it was a blow, but it turned out a severe wound; Mr. Ford came into the barge, and the persons in the barge all ran away; just as Ford came I received a wound in my cheek; this was not quite a quarter of an hour after my hat was pulled off - the other men were in the barge when I received the first two cuts, but had left when I received the third; there was nobody in the barge then but the prisoner, me, and Ford, who was coming down to the end of the barge where we were, and Ford's son was in the barge; Captain Ford came to me and Bowden, and took us both to the watch-house; we were both laying down in the barge at that time; I had discovered the blood flowing from me then, and felt it on my cheek; I still held the prisoner; I was examined by a surgeon, at the watch-house, and my wounds dressed - my clothes, which are here, were cut down the breast in two or three different places - I was taken to the hospital, and am not discharged yet.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you drinking at the Coopers' Arms from eleven o'clock till two? A. No - I was quite sober; Ford's son was not sober - I do not know how the Captain was; I had not been drinking with him - his son fetched me to the Coopers' Arms about eleven o'clock; the Captain was in another room - I was drinking with the son - he did not appear very drunk - he was a little fresh, I and another man drank 4d. worth of gin and water, and part of two pots of beer among three of us - there was a row in the barge - I went to see what it was - I did not know who was in the row - I now understand Mr. Ford's son was in it - I did not know he was on board when I went - the side of the barge is not very high - I was looking over it - I did not spring up - I might have lifted myself up.

Q. At the time you were there was not the prisoner engaged in fighting with young Ford? A. He was not engaged, for he took my hat off - I did not know Ford was on board then - Captain Ford came on board in a quarter of an hour after I got there - I did not exactly see Bowden's hand take my hat off, but there was nobody there but him, and it was dark in that part of the barge; Bowden was nearest to me - whether he was in the scuffle or not I cannot tell: I seized him by the collar, and was dragged into the barge.

Q. You would not have been dragged in if you had let go of Bowden? A. No, but if I had let go I should have lost my hat.

Q. He struggled with you, and after being thrown down on him, blows passed between you? A. Yes, and we were down together again, and I felt I was wounded; the scuffle was done with when I felt I was wounded - it was going on when I felt the first wound, and afterwards; Captain Ford was in the barge when I received the third wound; I do not know where young Ford was - I do not know that I struck the prisoner above once or twice - I will swear I did not strike him ten times - I held him with my left hand, and kept several blows from me with my right; I got the skin chipped off my fingers with stopping his blows; I do not exactly know where I hit him - it might be in the face.

Q. Did you hear old Ford say, "Fair play, let me see how my son will fight?" A. No. I went before the Lord Mayor on the Wednesday week following, by myself - I was not able to go before - the prisoner was there when I made my deposition - I was not there when Ford was examined. I never heard the prisoner say, "Oh! Lord, am I to be killed in this manner?" I am quite sure he did not say so.

COURT. Q. You had hold of him all the time? A. Yes; if he had said that, it must be so that nobody could hear him.

MR. BARRY. Q. Was it so dark in the barge that you could not see the persons who were struggling? A. They were not near enough for me to tell who they were - Ford did not take me into custody - he said I must come to the watch-house.

CHARLES FORD . My father is commander of a vessel. On the 26th of December, about two o'clock, I went from the Coopers' Arms, with Smith, to go on board our vessel; Smith was sober; I was about half-sens-over; I heard a noise in the barge as I was going down the stairs; I had left Smith behind - he stopped on the stairs for a necessary purpose; I went into the barge to see what was the matter, and as soon as I got in, four or five of them knocked me down; this was inside the barge - when I got up I saw my father come into the barge; I said, "Is that you, father?" he said, Yes; some of them jumped out of the barge - I jumped out, and went to the boat; I cannot say how many persons were in the barge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If you were not sober, how could you tell whether Smith was so? A. I am certain he was sober - I was neither drunk nor sober; I did not fight any body on board the barge - I struck nobody, I am quite certain.

Q. Was it light enough for you to see your father? A. Yes - I cast my eye up, and saw him; there was not sufficient light to see from one end of the barge to the other - I could see my father, because he came close to me.

Q. Did you see any body else in the barge? A. I saw those who had hold of me - they struck me down, and held me down.

Q. You never struck anybody yourself? A. I do not know that - I did not strike anybody - I went to the Coopers' Arms about eight o'clock, and had part of four or five pots of beer - I stopped there till my father came, except going out now and then, about ten, to look at the boat - I returned and left for good about two - I had nothing but beer - Smith drank with me part of the time - I did not see him drink with anybody else - I paid for some of the drink - I did not see him pay for any; he had no gin and water in my company; he was not with me till eleven o'clock - I went out between eleven and two - I did not bear my father call for fair play in the barge - he could not have done so while I was in the barge without my hearing him; when the man pulled me to the bottom of the barge I got up again - I never struck him - I collared him - I tried to get away. I went to the barge to see what was the matter.

MR. QUIN. Q. Was there something going on there

before? A. There was scuffling; I was sober enough to know what I was doing; I did nothing before other persons touched me - I could see the persons who held me, but not to know them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you use the word "scuffling," do you mean they were contending together, or merely moving about with a little noise? A. No - they did not fight - there was a lark - I cannot say whether the persons on board were men or boys.

JOHN FORD . I am master of the ship Commerce. I left the Coopers' Arms between one and two o'clock on the morning of the 27th of December; I had seen the prosecutor there that evening; I went to the Tower-stairs, to go on board my ship; Captain Allen and I walked down together. I found a barge in the causeway; I went down to my boat before I noticed any thing in the barge; my little boy, being in the boat, said there was a noise in the barge, and I went there; I did not hear the noise till I got there - I heard no cries, but a kind of hustling noise; I tried to get into the barge - I got one leg in first, and got in at last; I first observed two or three people had got hold of my son; as I was getting over the barge he said, "Is that you, father?" I said Yes, and with that all ran out of the barge; my son ran after them. Bowden and Smith were then left in the barge with me - we were the only persons left; I went to take hold of them - they were struggling together, standing up; Bowden with his back against the barge, and Smith before him; I took hold of them, and said I should take them to the watch-house.

Q. When you said that, did you know what had happened? A. No, I only saw the blood running from Smith's cheek; I took them to the watch-house; I saw Smith's cheek and chin bleeding very much - his clothes were very bloody, all the way down to his feet.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you been drinking in company with Smith all the evening? No; there were several masters of vessels in the same parlour - I was not with Smith - I was quite sober when I came out- I had been there from eight o'clock; I had dined there - it was near eight when we had done dinner - it might be five when we began dinner - I did not take particular notice; I was as sober as I am now; Smith and my son went down to the barge first - they were not in my sight - it was a day or two past the full moon, but it was foggy; I did not know Smith was on board the barge until after I got in; my boat was fifteen or sixteen yards off. I was struck by somebody on getting into the barge.

Q. Did you cry out, "Fair play - let me see how my son will fight?" A. I did not, nor any thing of the kind; nothing of the sort was said in my hearing - four of them had got hold of my son - I could not tell whether they were men or boys. I live at Ipswich. I did not hear the prisoner speak till I got hold of him.

Q. Smith had hold of him, and had got him up by the side? A. Yes; I could not see whether they were striking - they were both standing there; I could see the blood run. Captain Allen had gone on board his own vessel; when I got hold of the prisoner, Smith said, "Will you lend me a hand to hold this man;" I heard Bowden say nothing further, than that he would go with me to the watch-house. I went to the Mansion-house about it that morning; I was brought into the prisoner's presence this day week; the Lord Mayor said my son ought to have been there.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a constable of Tower Ward. On the night of the 26th of December Ford brought the prisoner and prosecutor to the watch-house, about a quarter-past three o'clock; the prosecutor was completely covered with blood - he said he was cut down in the barge at Tower-stairs: I asked who cut him; he pointed to the prisoner, and said that was the man who cut him, he could take his oath of it; the prisoner's hands were completely covered with blood. I sent for Mr. Hunter, the surgeon, of Mincing-lane; here are the clothes the prosecutor had on.

COURT. Q. Did the cut on the prosecutor's cheek appear deep? A. It was deep, so that I could almost put my hand into the gash, the lower part of the cheek was so fallen down; the cut on the chin was trifling, and there were several wounds on the back of the head; they appeared to have been made by a sharp instrument; his jacket is cut in two or three places on the breast; it has not been in my possession ever since: but I believe it to be in the same state as when it was brought to the watch-house; there were cuts on the jacket, but I did not take particular notice of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether the cuts had been there for a month you cannot tell? A. I cannot; the front of his jacket was nearly covered with blood; I suppose that was from his face.

ROBERT FRASER . I am a watchman of the Tower Ward. I was desired to go on board this barge; I perceived nothing there but water, straw, and blood; there was a great deal of blood on the near side of the barge; I went into a lug-boat on the off-side - it was moored along and fastened to the barge; I found in that boat a razor, shut, and covered with blood; I took it to the watch-house, and delivered it to Thompson.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you find a hat? A. Another watchman did, on the near-side of the barge, outside, I understand; he is not here.

JAMES SMITH . My hat has not been returned to me - I have not seen it since.

JOHN THOMPSON . I produce the razor; Smith came to the watch-house without a hat; no hat was brought to the watch-house.

JOHN FORD . Smith had not hat on when he was struggling with the prisoner.

MR. JOHN HUNTER. I am a surgeon, of Mincing-lane. On the morning of the 27th I was fetched to the watch-house, and saw Smith; he had a wound across his left cheek, about four inches in extent, between the ear and nose - another on the back of his head, and a small wound on the chin; the wound on the cheek was deep - it had not penetrated into the mouth - it was a wide gaping wound; the one on the cheek was a slight small angular one; that on the back of the head was about three inches in extent - it had cut through the hair, but was not so deep as the other; I did not much notice his clothes; I asked if he was hurt in any other part; he said not - and I ordered him to be sent to the Hospital in a coach.

FRANCIS WARD . I am a dresser of St. Thomas' Hospital. Smith was brought there on the morning of the 27th of December; his wounds had then been dressed; I

moved the bandage round his head, saw part of the cut on his cheek, and the wound on the head; that on the cheek was a good deep one, such as a razor would have inflicted - it was done by some very sharp instrument.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a beadle of the Tower Ward. This barge laid in the parish of Allhallows, Barking.

Prisoner's Defence. I only stood in my own defence.

JAMES LLOYD . I am stoker of the York steam-boat, trading from Gravesend to London. I was at the Tower wharf on the night in question; I know the prisoner; he was at the wharf that night, ready to carry the poultry out of the Ostend steam-boat, up to Leadenhall-market; I cannot say whether he was sober; I was not long in the boat - the Ostend did not arrive; and he went on board this barge with more of them; I did not hear them making any noise; I saw Smith and young Mr. Ford come down to the water side; they were intoxicated with liquor - they came there together; I followed them - one of the lads was whistling at the barge, and Ford said to the man who has been cut, "There is somebody on board the barge;" he said, "D - n me, we will go and have a lark;" Ford immediately went into the barge, and when he went in there was a bit of a scuffle; whether they were playing or fighting I cannot say; Smith immediately went into the barge - then the scuffle increased more - whether it was fighting or play I cannot say; I heard nobody cry out that he had lost his hat.

Q. Did you see Ford's father come down? A. While the other two were in the barge, in about a second, I observed a shortish man come down - how he got into the barge I cannot say, but I observed him in the barge in a short time; I saw him do nothing, but I heard a person cry, "Let him have fair play - I will see whether my son can fight;" I cannot say who said that (I did not see old Ford go into the barge, but I saw him in it); this was said loud enough for any body to hear; there was then a general scuffle altogether; two sea-faring men came on the quay, and entered into the barge, and the scuffle increased still more, and I observed three lads come running up the stairs.

Q. You mean lads who were in the barge with the prisoner at first? A. Yes; nobody ran after them; I heard the prisoner cry out, "Oh! Lord, am I to be killed?" that was after his companions left the barge - I went down to the barge's gunwale to make peace, but directly I put my hands on the barge, I was struck a violent blow over the eye - I could not see who struck me; I was knocked down and stunned; I got up, put my hand over my eye, and walked home; I afterwards went to Mr. Hobler; my eye was blood-shot with the blow then - it was not black.

MR. QUIN. Q. Where had you been that evening? A. I was at work down there, at the steam-boat; I had not been in the barge; I had been home to get my meals; I live at No. 2, Blue Anchor-yard, Whitechapel; I was quite sober - I had drank nothing; I was sitting on the waterman's-seat, on the beach, when I first saw Ford and Smith - it is about sixty yards from the river; I had been watching there about an hour, for the arrival of the Ostend boat; they came from Billingsgate way; I saw them come round the post of the plying-place - they were about ten yards from me; I followed them down close, because they were intoxicated; I saw that when they came close to me.

Q. What induced you to suppose they were intoxicated? A. Because they were reeling about, one up against the other.

Q. How came you to follow them? A. I did not know but they might be going to look for the watchman of the boats; I went to help them, finding him cut - I did not speak to them; I was about two yards from them - they passed quite close - when I went to the barge's gunwale, I saw some one on board the barge; I could see persons all up in one corner, there was Bowden, Cannon, Murgatary, and Kibble on board; I saw them all there; I knew the prisoner before, and knew his voice; I should not know the two sea-faring men if I saw them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were Cannon and the others taken before the Lord Mayor? A. Yes, and discharged - I am sure both Ford and the prosecutor were drunk - I saw Smith put his two hands on the gunwale of the barge, and raise his body up, and support his body on his right knee.

Q. Did any person pull him, or seize him, to compel him to go on board the barge at all? A. No; young Ford jumped up on the gunwale, but how he managed to get in, I cannot say.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say, they were both equally drunk? A. Yes; they reeled about like drunken men; they were reeling up against one another, both of them - I could see no difference in them - I was eight steps from the barge, when they got into it - I did not see Smith brought out of the barge - I went away directly I was struck.

MR. HUNTER re-examined. The prosecutor did not appear to me to be intoxicated; if he had been so an hour or two before, I certainly must have observed it; he was reeling about with pain; if I was asked whether he was drunk, I should have said he was not; he did not appear so to me; the intoxication would rather be lessened by the loss of blood. I saw no signs of intoxication.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time in the morning were you called to him? A. The clock struck three, while I was out; he had lost a great deal of blood - I merely looked at his eyes with a candle - I did not smell his breath.

FRANCIS WARD re-examined. He did not appear to me to have been intoxicated shortly before - I saw him again in the morning; there was no fever, which I should certainly think would have come on, if he had been intoxicated.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you a surgeon? A. I am a student in surgery. I have practised for myself; if he had been intoxicated, I should certainly have seen symptoms of it - I first saw him about five o'clock; if a man was in an extreme state of intoxication, he could not have answered me in the correct manner he did - I never knew or read of extreme agitation or suffering bringing a man too in five minutes: fever would certainly have followed the wound if he had been intoxicated.

JOHN BEALS FORD . I am the regular watchman of Tower-stairs, and have been so seventeen years, by working for the Newcastle trade. I remember the night this occurence took place - I know the prisoner perfectly well; he and some of his companions, were waiting for the Liverpool steam-packet, to take the poultry out of it to the market.

Q. Did you that night see Smith and Ford? A. I cannot speak to their persons, but I saw two or three come down, and I was glad to get out of their way, they were kicking up such a riot - I saw them go on board the barge; they had no business there; while they were on board I heard the prisoner call out for help - I heard him say,"Oh! Lord, am I to be killed?" and he said, "What have I done, that I am to be beat in this manner?" there were then three persons beating him on board the barge - I have known the prisoner six or seven years - I do not believe a person can give him a bad character; there might be five or six persons on board the barge.

COURT. Q. You knew them all? A. I knew them; there was Cannon, Murgatary, Bowden, one Bull, and Kibble; they were the prisoner's companions, and were waiting for the steam-boat; but two of them act as watermen.

Q. They must have seen this as well as you? A. They had gone into the barge to sleep - I was not in the barge; I was sitting on the plumber's steps when they passed me; it was a dark morning - I should not know the persons who passed me - I was not eight yards from them; hearing the name of Ford called, I went down to see if I was called; I am sure there were three persons beating the prisoner at the time I left: either two or three went down to the steps; I do not know which; they passed me, but in the riotous way they went by, I was glad to get them past me, because it was not the first time I have been insulted and ill-used at these steps. I did not notice whether there were more than three - I am certain they could not be sober, because they came down in a riotous drunken manner; they were not sober, I am certain.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go before the Lord Mayor? A. Yes, four times; three of his companions were taken before the Lord Mayor.

BENJAMIN PAYNE . I am an occasional night-watchman at the Tower-stairs. On the morning this took place, I saw the prisoner and his companions on board the barge; they said they would go there and turn in for a little while.

Q. Did you hear any thing of the scuffle? A. I was in my watch-box, at the corner of Tower-stairs - I heard a noise, but having sprained my wrist, I was laying down; I heard the cry of "Ford" a number of times, and I thought it was the last witness who was called, or I should have gone out - I went out, and the first thing I saw was, a number of people jumping out of the craft in every direction - I said, "It is a pity, but the police were here, to take charge of you all" - I went to the Tower-dock, and could get no assistance - I then returned, heard a cry of Murder! and different things - I then went and got a light in my lantern - I went to the barge's gunwale, which was as high as my mouth - I locked over, and in the afterpart, was a good deal of straw; a person came to me all in a gore of blood, and said, "For God's sake call the watch; take the man some where, that he may have something done to him;" they had got this poor unfortunate prisoner, and said they would go to the watch-house; he said he would go with them; a tall man, the man who was cut, and another man, stood on the left of me in the barge; they went away altogether to the watch-house, and in a few minutes an officer and patrol came down, and they could find nothing in the barge.

Q. Had the prisoner, and the rest, been quiet and peaceable in the barge? A. They had turned in to sleep there - I have known the prisoner three or four years; he bore a peaceable sober character.

COURT. Q. You saw three persons in the barge, one of whom had been cut - did you follow them to the watch-house? A. No - I saw them come out of the barge.

Q. Could you observe any thing in their conduct, to cause you to believe they were in a great state of intoxication at that time? A. My Lord, they certainly must have been, or they never would have gone over the barge to go to the water - I will not swear they were drunk.

Q. If they had been reeling about, must you not have observed it? A. No. I should think such a circumstance as that would have brought any man to his senses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-46

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

302. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on 21st of December , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Daniel Stone .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-47

303. SAMUEL DREW was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 2 show-glasses, value 10s., and 1 lb. weight of biscuits, value 1s. 4d. , the goods of George Ullmer .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-48

304. FRANCIS CURRY was indicted for embezzling 1l. 10s., the monies of John Guest , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-49

305. THOMAS LONGLAND HACK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 29 brass knobs, value 5s.; 12 door handles, value 4s.; 7 bells, value 5s.; 2 bolts, value 1s.; 2 finger-plates, value 2s.; 4 bell-pull rings, value 1s.; 1 lock, value 2s.; 14 striking-plates, value 5s.; 6 door keys, value 1s., and 40 door escutcheons, value 4s., the goods of William Kingdon , and fixed to a certain building of his .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-50

306. ROBERT SANSOM was indicted for stealing, 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of William Bates .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-51

307. JAMES WATERS was indicted for steal

ing, 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Oliver Mason .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-52

308. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 8 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of William Couchman and William Hodges .

WILLIAM HODGES. I am in partnership with William Couchman - we are linen-drapers , and live in Tothill-street . On the 13th of December I received information from my young man, and missed these handkerchiefs, which I had seen the day before - they have our shopmark on them.

SAMUEL WARD . I am in the employ of the prosecutors. I was taking down the shutters, at a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning of the 13th of December - the prisoner came into the shop, and asked if we sold black silk cravats; I said we did not sell till nine o'clock; he said, what should he do, he wanted one directly - I said I would see if I could find one; while I was looking for one, Miss Fielder came down, and asked if she should attend to him while I took down the shutters; I went to take them down; she called me, and said the prisoner wanted some cravats, with crimson borders - I gave her some, and went to take down the remainder of the shutters; another customer came in - I went to the other counter to serve them - Miss Fielder then told me she saw the prisoner take some handkerchiefs and go away; I pursued, and told him I believed he had something which did not belong to him - he came back; I saw him take these handkerchiefs from his hat, and put into the window.

SUSANNAH FIELDER . I came down, and was serving the prisoner; I was cutting off a handkerchief for him, which came to 5s., when I saw him take his hat off, take some handkerchiefs from the window, and put them into it; he turned round, threw down half-a-crown, and said,"Put the handkerchief by, and I will call again for it;" he went out - I called Ward to pursue him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If I had been guilty I should not have come back again.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-53

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

309. DAVID SANNEBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 2 books, value 5s. , the goods of John Poynton .

JOHN POYNTON. I am a bookseller , and live in Russel-court, Drury-lane . These two books were fourteen or fifteen inches within my door, on the 10th of December; I saw the prisoner come and take them, and run from my premises - he dropped them about six yards from my door - I pursued him about two hunded yards, and took him.

MATTHEW GLOVER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner from Mr. Poynton - I found two other books on him, which do not belong to Mr. Poynton.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress, and throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-54

310. MARGARET ROWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 1 spoon, value 7s., and 1 knife, value 5s. , the goods of Barnaby Dunn .

BARNABY DUNN. I live in the Haymarket . The prisoner came to assist my servant on Christmas day; I had known her for about nine months, by visiting her master. About twelve o'clock at night, when she was gone, we missed a table-spoon, a desert-spoon, and a silver handled knife; I sent a person for her the next day - she came, and denied any knowledge of them; I told her, if she would give up the property there should be no more come of it: she was searched, but I was not present - the desertspoon and knife were produced, but she said she knew nothing of the other spoon; I did not believe it, and gave charge of her. The other spoon was found in my coat pocket a day or two afterwards.

THOMAS KNIGHT . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found this knife under her arm, and this spoon in her petticoat; she said she found them among some broken victuals, and was ashamed to bring them back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress gave me some broken victuals; the next morning I found the knife and spoon among it; I should have taken them home, but I had a drop of drink, and could not; and about five o'clock I was sent for.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280110-55

311. THOMAS TAYLOR and ABRAHAM DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November, 1 fork, value 4s. 6d.; 1 spade, value 3s. 6d., and 1 saw, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of Ebenezer Benham .

EBENEZER BENHAM. I am an ironmonger , and live at Uxbridge . This fork, spade, and saw were in a tool-house, attached to a small cottage, where I reside; I had seen them safe on the 27th of November, and they were missed the first thing next morning, when the gardener came to work; I made inquiries at a small broker's-shop, and directed them to stop them if they should be brought there. About twelve o'clock that day, a woman, named Stokes, came and gave me information, but she is not to be found. This trial was put off last Session, in consequence of her absence, but we cannot find her.

JOHN FARRANT . I am an officer. I heard of the robbery, and took the prisoners into custody on the 28th of November, and found the things at the broker's-shop; I made the prisoners no threat nor promise. I had previously taken Catherine Stokes into custody, and when before the Magistrate I heard her state, in the presence of both the prisoners, that they had given them to her to sell, and she had sold them to Ebers - they heard that, and said what she stated was true; I am confident they said so: when I went to take them they asked what I wanted them for; I said I would tell them presently. I asked them how they came in possession of the tools which they had directed Stokes to sell; Taylor said he had had them a length of time, and had worked with them in the brick fields - Stokes charged them both with it, and Davis said he knew nothing about them; this was before they went to the Magistrate, but when there, they both stated that what

Stokes said was true. These are the tools. Stokes is a women of the town. The prisoners live about three quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's.

CHARLES COTTRELL . I am servant to the prosecutor. I know these tools to be his; I had worked with this spade the day before; I locked them up in the tool-house in the evening - the door was not open in the morning.

COURT to the PROSECUTOR. Q. How did they get into the tool-house? A. I have no doubt but they got over the door; there is a space through which a boy, or perhaps a man, might get - we saw a footmark on the padlock of the door.

DAVIS' Defence. I had nothing to do with the tools. - I met that woman between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, going with them.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 26.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-56

312. HANNAH RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 4 brushes, value 2s. , the goods of William Nelson .

GEORGE VALENTINE LEONARD . I am a clerk. On the 24th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in Broad-street, Golden-square, near Mr. Nelson's, an oil and colour-man; I saw the prisoner go and take some brushes from a nail at his door; they were inside, but near the door - she brought them as far as the window, where I met her, and took her back; she threw them over the iron rails.

ELIAS BALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the brushes.

WILLIAM NELSON. I keep the shop , and know these brushes to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I came up to buy one of the brushes, and the witness said I wanted to take them - I had the money in my pocket. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-57

313. JOSEPH PAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 1 shift, value 3s.; 6 ozs. weight of tea, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 half-sovereign , the property of Ralph Sherriff .

ANN SHERRIFF . I am a servant at No. 16, Sloane-street. On the 4th of December I was out of place, having a bad shoulder. I was out all day, in search of a situation; I was returning about half-past ten o'clock at night, to my lodging near the old church Chelsea - I had a bundle, with all the articles stated in it. I met the prisoner in Pimlico ; he crossed over to me, and asked if I would accept of his company - he said he was a watchman, and asked if he should see me home; I believed him, and accepted of his service; he offered to carry my bundle, which I gave him; he being a watchman, and a respectable looking man, as he was very civil, I asked if he would have any thing to drink - he said he would take a glass of rum, and I went to the Shakespear's Arms: I went to the bar, and ordered a glass of rum and water; the prisoner passed me, and went into the tap-room - he put my bundle on the table. When we had had the rum and water, he went home with me, and gave me the bundle at my house, and I missed these articles, which I am certain were in the bundle when I gave it him; there was a large pillow in it, so that it appeared as large as when I gave it him. When he was apprehended, as we were going before the Magistrate, he offered to pay me for every thing that was lost.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you not rather tipsy? A. No; I was putting my pattens on, and stooping to tie them - a watchman, named Davis, came up to me, but he did not assist me home; I was quite sober: it was a very wet night. I drank nothing whatever myself. I did not tell the prisoner I had been robbed the night before.

JAMES SELBY . I am a constable of St. George, Hanover-square. The prosecutrix came to the watch-house on Friday, the 7th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, and gave information; the prisoner was one of our early-watchmen ; I sent the beadle of the night for him - he was on duty. I told him what she had stated, and asked if he had been at the Shakespear's Head with her; he said he had never seen her before - she said,"You know you are the man - if you will give me the the things, I will forgive you;" he said, "I cannot give you what I never had - I never saw you before;" she said, "You did, and if the landlord was here he would know you;" I sent for him; I showed the prisoner to him - he said he was the man. The prisoner then said he took the shoes, but nothing else, and that he had pawned them at Jones', Tothill-street - I asked what he had done with the duplicate; he said, "Made away with it." I went to his house, and saw a woman, who gave me the duplicate of the shoes, and a small quantity of tea.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. He has been a watchman about two months, and before that was in the guards.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street, Westminster. I have a pair of shoes, pawned on the 5th of December, by a woman, in the name of Charlotte Pain.

ANN SHERRIFF. These are my shoes, and I believe the tea to be mine.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-58

314. ELEANOR LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 half-sovereign, and 1 shilling, the monies of John Behenna , from his person .

JOHN BEHENNA . I am a coachmaker , and live in Riding-house-lane, Mary-le-bone. On the 18th of December, as the watchman was calling one o'clock, I was in St. Martin's-court, and met the prisoner; I had been out with a few friends; she accosted me, and asked me for drink; I gave her some gin - she was a stranger: I walked a little way with her; she put her arm round me, put her hand into my right hand trousers pocket, and said, "I will see whether you have got any money or no;" I had said nothing to her about money - I had a half-sovereign and a shilling in my pocket then; I immediately called the watchman - she stood there; the watchman came over: I said she had robbed me of a half-sovereign and a shilling; she said she had no money at all, but it was found on her.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON CARR . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - she denied having any money; I took her into a room,

and searched her - she took off her bonnet and shawl, and then said she had 2s. about her; she took out of her bosom this half-sovereign, two shillings, a sixpence, and a small book.

JAMES HOWARTH . I am a watchman. The prosecutor called me: I took the prisoner to the watch-house: the prosecutor said he could swear he had half a sovereign and one shilling, if not two. The prisoner said she had no money; but a little while after she said she had two shillings. The money was found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived with Lady Hawley; a gentleman spoke to me; I told him I knew him by living near Sir H. Hawley's country house: he gave me a sovereign - the prosecutor was tipsy; I had several shillings left.

PROSECUTOR. I was not tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-59

315. FRANCIS BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 2 seals, value 5l.; 1 watch-key, value 10s., and 1 ring, value 20s., the goods of Joseph Dermer , from his person .

JOSEPH DERMER. I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Little Newport-street. On the 7th of December, at a quarter-past twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from under the Piazza in Covent-garden , going home; I had just got from under the Piazza, and was by the second arch: a man made a snatch at my watch; the hair-chain was separated from the watch; he got the seals - he ran away; I pursued the prisoner, who was about three yards from me; I saw no other person running; he turned down the passage of the market, facing the church, and then turned again towards King-street, where I caught him. I offered a reward, and my chain and seals were found the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You do not mean to say this man took them? A. No; he is the man I pursued; I saw nobody else in the market - there were people under the Piazza - I did not lose sight of him: I did not see him do any thing. I was about a yard and a half from him.

PATIENCE WHITE . I keep a stall opposite the church in Covent-garden-market. About half-past twelve o'clock on Saturday, the 8th of December, I was moving my baskets, and found this chain and seals.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not several people been about there? A. Oh. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the play, and was running home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-60

316. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 2 books, value 3s. , the goods of Brownlow John Waight .

BROWNLOW JOHN WAIGHT. I am a bookseller , and live in High Holborn . On the 22d of December the prisoner brought in two books to sell; a bookseller had just before brought in fifteen books, which laid on the counter- I would not purchase the prisoner's books; I then missed two of the fifteen: I went round the counter, and told him he had taken them - he ran out of the shop; I followed, calling Stop thief! he was taken, and dropped them - I found them on the ground close by him.

GERARD DE CUSTER . I am an officer. I took him and the books.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280110-61

317. THOMAS NORTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 dressing-case, value 15s. , the goods of William Stiles .

WILLIAM STILES. I live in Tottenham-court-road, and am a silversmith ; I sell dressing-cases. On the 27th of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I heard something, went out, and missed one from within a few feet of the door; a few days afterwards I found the prisoner in custody with it. I think I have seen him before, but know nothing of him.

WILLIAM BERRY . I am a patrol. On the evening of the 27th of December, a gentleman gave me information; I went, and saw three men in Bow-yard, and took the prisoner, with the case in his possession.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing St. Giles', and found the case in the middle of the road.

WILLIAM BERRY. It was quite clean, and new.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-62

318. BENTON MINCHIN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 9 yards of crape, value 12s; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6s.; 3 yards of ribbon, value 3s.; 2 pairs of gloves, value 3s.; 7 yards of linen, value 8s., and 1 yard of calico, value 1s., the goods of William Smark , from the person of Jeremiah Spring .

WILLIAM SMARK. I am a linen-draper , and live in Queen's-buildings, Brompton. On the 18th of December the prisoner came to the shop, and selected the goods stated in the indictment, which came to 2l. 5s. 7d.; he requested me to give my boy the change for 3l. to bring with the goods, and he would return three sovereigns by the boy - he did not give his address; the boy was to take the goods with him - he was an entire stranger to me, and was to pay ready money; I told my boy, in his presence, not to part with them without the money; the boy returned in an hour and a half without goods or money; I have not recovered them, nor received the money.

JEREMIAH SPRING. I am shop boy to the prosecutor. The prisoner came to the shop; my master gave me these articles to take with him; I was to receive three sovereigns, and not leave them without; the prisoner took me to the Admiral Keppel public-house; I followed him into the parlour; he asked me to give him the change, and he would bring me the three sovereigns; I said I would not; I put the parcel on the table, and was resting my hand on it - he took it up, and said he would go and shew it to the young woman; he went by the bar, out at the back door, and shut it; I went out, opened the door in a minute or two, and saw a young woman; I asked where the young man was; she said she had not seen him. I did not see him again till he was apprehended - I am quite sure he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the prosecutor I had not got the money, and if I could not get it, I would send them back,

I did not see a person whom I expected at the house, and asked the boy to take them back, but he said he would leave them - they were quite pressed upon me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-63

319. JOHN IRISH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 bundle of paper, value 30s. , the goods of Abraham Lamert .

GEORGE HUBBARD . I am a watchman. I was on duty on the 15th of December; at half-past nine o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Fashion-street, and followed him to Red Lion-street, Spitalfields; he had a bundle in a green baize; I asked what he had got; he said paper, and was going to a printer's, in Paternoster-row, and had brought it from Spitalfields, I took him to the watch-house; when we got to the door he shoved back, and said, "Stop, I will give you something to drink to let me go;" I took him in, and asked where he got it; he said a young man gave it to him to make a shilling or two of, he being in distress.

THOMAS HART . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and said he had got the paper from No. 10, Church-street, Spitalfields; that Mr. Gray gave it to him to get a few shillings.

MOSES SIMMONS . I am an inspector of the watch. I asked the prisoner who Gray was; he said a little man, who went out with bills; I went to the prisoner's house, and found this jacket, which I know belongs to Gray; he is a man who carries bills about for Lamert.

ABRAHAM LAMERT. I live at No. 10, Church-street, Spitafields, and am a medical man . This bundle of paper is mine - I had seen it in a little room, adjoining my shop, a few minutes before it was taken; I had employed Gray some time - he absconded immediately after this; I believe he stole it, and the prisoner received it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-64

320. WILLIAM HODSDON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 pair of boots, value 7s. , the goods of William Jackman .

JOHN GOSLING . I am a dairyman, and live opposite Mr. Jackman's. I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner with another lad; the prisoner loosened the boots from what they hung on; the other caught them, and they went away together down Denmark-street; I pursued, and took the prisoner - the other got off with the boots - they had been trying to get them for ten minutes.

JOSEPH BLAKE . I am in the employ of William Jackman, of High-street, St. Giles' . The prisoner was brought back to the shop; we then missed the boots, and have not found them.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-65

321. MARY BRANAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 3s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of Jane Frazer Mactavish .

JANE FRAZER MACTAVISH. I live with my brother, an upholsterer, in Great Titchfield-street ; the prisoner was servant to a lodger; I missed a pair of ear-rings from my work-box in the parlour - she had no business there - it was not locked at night; I afterwards saw them in her ears- I asked to look at them, and said they were mine; she said she had bought them some time before, in Whitecross-street; I said she had better tell me where she got them; she would not, and next morning I gave them to my brother, who took them to a jeweller that had mended them - I then sent for an officer, who found this pair of stockings of mine in her trunk.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she wear them openly? A. Yes; she did not say she had found them on the stairs - she did not object to show them to me.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am a constable. I found these stockings at the bottom of the prisoner's box; she said she did not know how they came there; the prosecutrix's name is on them at full length.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the box locked? A. No; it has no lock.

WILLIAM EDDINGTON . I am a jeweller, and live in North Audley-street. I repaired this ear-ring for the prosecutrix, about a week before the 19th of December; I am positive of it - the pair are worth about 3s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-66

322. ALFRED HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 9 basins, value 1s. 2d.; 7 dishes, value 3s.; 15 jugs, value 3s.; 2 mustard-pots, value 3d.; 4 salts, value 4d.; 1 chamber-pot, value 5d., and 1 basket, value 1s. , the goods of Walter Barnden .

WALTER BARNDEN. I am a licensed-hawker . I was in Hoxton Old-town on the 2d of January, about half-past four o'clock; I went into a house, and when I came out my basket was gone. Biddell afterwards produced it - the prisoner could not have carried it himself.

THOMAS BIDDELL . I was with Barnden when the basket was taken. I went and found it at Baker's house, opposite the Haberdashers' Arms - I did not see the prisoner with it.

WILLIAM BAKER . I heard the basket was taken; I went and saw the prisoner and another lad carrying it, about a mile from where it to my house - the other lad got away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy asked me to give him a lift up with the basket, which I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-67

323. THOMAS GURLING was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 ham, value 7s. , the goods of George Joseph Sanders .

GEORGE JOSEPH SANDERS. I am a painter and glazier , and live in Portland-street, Berwick-street . I had a ham in my shop on the 24th of December; I was in a neighbour's shop that evening, and saw the prisoner go to my window; he went away, returned, and then took my ham; I followed him, and he dropped it - I secured him; I have seen him about the streets with another man, selling greens.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had to meet a young man at the corner of Wardour-street; the prosecutor called Stop thief! I ran with others, and was taken.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-68

324. JAMES DAY was indicted for stealing, on the

26th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Garratt .

JOHN RICHARD CARTER . I am an apprentice to George Garratt, shoemaker and haberdasher , of Jermyn-street . On the 26th of December, about one o'clock, the prisoner came and took this pair of shoes off a wire at the door: I went after him, and took him with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280110-69

325. MARY ANN BIRCHETT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 3 silver spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Mary Ann Clements .

MARY ANN CLEMENTS. I am single , and live at No. 2, Bath-place, New-road . The prisoner came to see my servant; I had forbidden her the house several times, and have since dismissed the servant; I lost three silver spoons.

ISABELLA ALDRIDGE . I lived with the prosecutrix. The prisoner was an acquaintance of mine, and came to see me several times about October; I did not miss the spoons till mistress told me of them; the prisoner had been there two days before.

GEORGE WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in London-street, Fitzroy-square. I have a spoon, pawned on the 1st of November, by the prisoner, in the name of Ann King.

CHARLES SUTTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Clarence-market, Regent's-park. I have two spoons, pawned on the 25th of October, by the prisoner, in the name of King.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years . (See page 123.)

Reference Number: t18280110-70

326. JAMES AVERY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 cask, value 7s. , the goods of Oliver Thomas Joseph Stocken .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Joseph Jermain .

MR. CHURCHILL conducted the prosecution.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I am a Bow-street dismounted patrol. On the 10th of December, about twenty minutes to twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner at Walhamgreen - on seeing me, he crossed from the gas-light to a dark part of the road; I and Young crossed over to him, and saw that he had a cask on his shoulder; he said he picked it up against Garden-row, and was taking it to his own home; we said he must go with us; he then said he had picked it up near the two mile-stone, and was going to lay it on the bridge; we took it to Mr. Stocken's brew-house, and it was claimed; he said he did not think we should take him for so trifling a thing, if he had any thing of more value he should have planted it till morning, and then got it; he was about three-quarters of a mile from Stocken's, and about two hundred yards from Mr. Jermain's.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I was with Smith; his evidence is correct.

SARAH JERMAIN . I am the wife of Joseph Jermain, and live in Prospect-place, Walham-green . I had two of Mr. Stocken's casks; one was taken out of my garden on the 10th of December; it was safe that afternoon; my garden is walled round.

GEORGE LITTLEBOY . I live in Garden-row, and can see Mr. Jermain's premises from my house. On the night of the 10th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock, I heard a noise, I got up, and saw a person hanging on the fence, coming out of his garden; it was dark; his dress appeared lightish - he said, "Is that you, George?" I said Yes; I know the prisoner, but it was too dark to see him: I could not speak to his voice.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . He had a smock-frock on.

OLIVER THOMAS JOSEPH STOCKEN . This cask is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it by the two-and-a-half mile stone, and was taking it to the bridge to be owned.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-71

327. CALEB BROOKES and PETER MAHONEY were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 2 baskets of coals, value 2s. , the goods of William Cook and John Fergusson .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a lighterman. I was at the lower end of the City-canal, Blackwall , near the prosecutor's premises, on the 29th of December, just after dark; I saw Mahoney walking near the bridge, at a little distance from the warehouse; I saw a barrow, which appeared to be concealed, and in a short time I saw Brookes come out of the premises with a sack; Mahoney then came out with a large piece of coal; I followed, and saw them put the sack into the barrow, and Mahoney put the coal near the sack; he saw me, and said, "Is that you, Mr. Davis?" I said Yes; he said, "I have been getting coals;" he lived at a public-house near, and Brookes is in the prosecutors' employ; I asked Brookes if his master allowed him to sell coals at that time of night; he said, "No; but I hope you will say nothing about it;" I said, "You had better go and see your master;" Mahoney then wheeled the coals away towards his master's house; I walked a little way with Brookes; he said Mahoney had given him 1s. for the coals; he then said he had not locked the shed, and must go back; I walked home, and soon afterwards Mr. Fergusson gave charge of Mahoney.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Are you in Mr. Fergusson's employ? A. Yes, sometimes; I suppose there were about two bushels of coals in the sack; I know Spratley - he was taken up; Brookes bore a good character - he was considered an idiot; persons used to push him about, and ill use him; Mahoney was in the service of Spratley, who is a publican; he is now in prison, I believe.

JOHN FERGUSSON. I am in partnership with Mr. Cook - Brookes was in our service at the coal-warehouse; I also keep the Gun tavern; I never allow Brookes to send coals out; he appeared rather an idiot, and might not know what he was doing.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you believe he might be persuaded to do wrong, by artful persons? A. Yes; at times he was very bad.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-72

328. MARY BUNKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 2 pairs of gloves, value 2s., and 1 cap, value 1s. , the goods of Griffith Humphreys .

GRIFFITH HUMPHREYS. I am a haberdasher , and live in Oxford-street . On the 24th of December the prisoner

came and looked at some net, and while my shopman was showing it to her, I saw her trying to get a card of net into her apron; I then said, "You seem to have a design on that net, let me see what you have in your apron;" I found in her apron a pair of stockings, and under her arm two pairs of gloves, and under her other arm this lace-cap, which are all mine; she had bought one pair of stockings, which I also found on her; I talked of sending for a constable; she said, "For God's sake, do not, for the sake of my children."

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. How do you know the articles? A. The cap has one of my tickets on it; they were all on the counter; it was half-past ten o'clock at night; I thought she smelt of liquor.

GEORGE DALE . I received her in charge with the goods.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had two pairs of gloves, and one pair of stockings in my lap, with some bacon and currants.

MARY HOLLINGWORTH . The prisoner is related to me; she was at my house on Christmas-eve; she had a glass of wine and a glass of spirits; I think she had eaough to affect her; I live in Crown-court, and keep a shoe-shop; she bears an excellent character.

ELIZABETH BUNKER . I am the prisoner's second-cousm: she had some ale and gin at my house that night; she was much affected, and could not carry her child home.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Strongly recommended to Mercy - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-73

329. ELIZA CASHMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 19 yards of printed cotton, value 23s. , the goods of Richard Taylor .

ERNEST EDWARDS . I am in the employ of Richard Taylor, a linen-draper , of Greek-street. Soho . On the 5th of January, the prisoner came with another person, and asked for some calico and print, which I sold to the other person, to the amount of 19s. 10d.; while I was doing up the parcel. I saw something bulky under the prisoner's shoulder - I went round the counter, and asked what she had got; she said Nothing; but I found this print under her shawl - I believe she said it had fallen down into her lap, but it was pinned unto her shawl.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BOWERS . I am an officer, and received her in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with the other woman; the young man caught hold of my bosom in a very indecent manner, and the goods fell down - I had not touched it.

ERNEST EDWARDS. It is false.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-74

330. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 book, value 5s. , the goods of William Baynes , and John Baynes .

JAMES JEFFREY . I am a Thames Police-officer. I met the prisoner on Sunday, the 10th of December, in Shadwell High-street, with a small parcel under his arm - I called to him, and asked what it was; he said an old French book - I asked where he got it; he said from Brewer's-quay; he said if I would let him go, he would come to me to-morrow - I again asked where he got it; he said he bought it of a man in Rosemary-lane for 1s. - I went to Chester-quay, and found a case had been broken and a book taken out.

WILLIAM BAYNES. I am in partnership with John Baynes; we live in Paternoster-row; we collect works on the Continent ; this book is our property; it has my mark on it, of what it cost in Dutch money, at Amsterdam, where it was bought; it was at the Custom-house-quay, near Brewer's-quay .

DANIEL FISH . I am a Custom-house officer. A chest of books (No. 14), belonging to Messrs. Baynes, laid at Chester-quay, near the Custom-house; the cases were nailed down - I found one case broken, and some missing - I have seen the prisoner on the quay, working as a labourer.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Rosemary-lane. who offerred me the book for 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-75

331. BENJAMIN STERNE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 20 ozs. weight of cochineal, value 12s. , the goods of George Smith and others, his masters.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS varying the manner of stating the charge.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES CRUMPTON . I am a constable of the Thames Police, and was on duty at the West India Docks . On Saturday, the 22d of December, as the labourers were going out, I stopped the prisoner as he was going out of the Import Dock-gate, and found half an ounce of cochineal in his waistcoat pocket; he said it had fallen into his pocket, as he was working on cochineal, at No. 11, warehouse - I took him to the office, and found 9 ozs. more in his neckcloth; he said he had taken that from the warehouse, and in his trousers and coat pockets, we found 4 ozs. more.

JOHN FOY . I am principal Police-officer, at the West India Docks. On the 22d of December, the prisoner was garbling cochineal, at the warehouse, No. 11; he was brought to my office, and I saw the property found, as decribed; it is the property of the West India Cock Company; he said he lived at No. 6, Maidmen's-row, in Bow Common-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. RYLAND. Q. He gave his address without hesitation? A. Yes; no promise or threat was held out to him; he has worked at the docks some years.

MR. CLARK. I am a clerk to the West India Dock Company. George Smith is a partner; there are other partners; the prisoner was servant there.

FRANCIS FAIRBAIRNS . I am a constable of the Thames Police. I went to No. 6, Maidmen's-row, by Foy's direction, and found 12 ozs. of cochineal in a china-bason in the kitchen cupboard.

DANIEL SPILLER . I am delivery foreman of the warehouse, No. 11, in the docks; the prisoner was employed there under me, on the 22d of December; cochineal is worth 12s. a pound, without the duty.

Cross-examined. Q. Has he not borne a good character? A. Yes; he has been there thirteen years.

Prisoner's Defence. That found in my house was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-76

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

332. WILLIAM GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 4 live tame rabbits, price 4s. , the property of Francis Jackson .

The rabbits being the property of Charles Jackson, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280110-77

333. JOHN ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 1 live tame duck, price 2s. , the property of James Lamprey .

THOMAS CLARKE . I am a wire-worker. On the 3d of January, about twenty minutes to two o'clock, I heard Mrs. Lamprey (my neighbour), say she had lost a duck and fowl - I went to my door, and then went into the City-road, and saw the prisoner near the Angel public-house, at the corner of Tabernacle-walK, with the duck under his arm; he was a stranger; he crossed into Old-street; I followed him thirty yards, then tapped him on his shoulder; he turned round, and said, "If you will take the duck, and let me go, I will give you something to drink?" I took him towards the watch-house, met an officer, and gave charge of him; here is the duck.

JAMES LAMPREY. I know this duck to be mine, by the marks on its wings; it was safe on my premises about one o'clock.

THOMAS EARLE . I am a constable, and received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to hold it for him, and while he was gone, this witness came.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-78

334. HANNAH WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 6 lbs. weight of bacon, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of William Alderton .

WILLIAM ALDERTON. I am the son of Mrs. Alderton, who is a widow. This bacon is her property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-79

345. CHARLOTTE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of Charles Fox , from his person .

THOMAS STEVENS . I am a patrol of St. Giles'. On the 10th of December, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner running very hard, and the prosecutor pursuing her; when he got near her, he called Stop thief! I followed, and against a house, which she passed, I heard something strike - I saw the prosecutor was likely to take her, and turned to that spot, and found this watch on the pavement; the prosecutor secured her in two or three seconds; there was nobody within fifty or sixty yards of the place.

CHARLES FOX. This is my watch. On the night in question I was with the prisoner - I had been to a house with her, and as we came out, I missed my watch - I was not quite sober - I said to a companion, "I have lost my watch;" the prisoner directly ran away - I had left all safe in the house, and had not undressed - I followed her, saw the patrol in High-street, and called Stop thief! she then threw something away - I heard it fall, and took her about thirty yards further; there was nobody in the room with us.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-80

336. WILLIAM ANWILL and MARIA HANNINGTON were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 hat, value 10s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 4s., the goods of Thomas, Parker , from his person .

THOMAS PARKER. I am a labourer . On the evening of the 23d of December, I was at the Plough public-house, in Oxford-street , and got drunk; I do not know how I got home, but in the morning I found myself in bed, at No. 47, Green-street, where I live, and missed my hat and shoes.

JOHN DAVIES . I am a bricklayer. I was at the Plough with Parker - I was not quite sober, but knew what I was doing; I saw the female prisoner come in, and in about half an hour I carried Parker on my back to Green-street, Grosvenor-square - Hannington followed us, and An will overtook us - they followed us in company, and as we went along, Parker's hat fell off - Hannington took it up, and said she would carry it; when I got to Parker's house I put him down on the step; Hannington had the hat then- I rang the bell - Parker's wife came to the door, and seemed much frightened - I went in to speak to her, and on returning, the prisoners were gone, and the prosecutor's hat, and the shoes from his feet.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you sober? A. I was better than the prosecutor - he could not move hand or foot - it was after eleven o'clock - it might be half-past - we had been to two other public-houses, and had a pot of half-and-half at one house - I drank nothing but gin - I knew what I was doing - I might have two or three glasses of gin; I will not swear it was not six or eight.

PETER MATES . I am a watchman. On the night of the 23d of December, at half-past eleven o'clock, I was in Green-street, and saw the prisoners, the witness, and Parker - they passed me to go to No. 47 - Parker's wife came, and told me of the robbery at twelve - I went up and saw the prisoners near her door - as soon as they saw me they ran off as fast as they could - I saw nothing in their hands - another watchman followed with me - we turned into Norfolk-street, and I heard a hat fall, about twelve yards from me, but close to them, as they ran - we secured them, and the beadle found the hat in the area.

Cross-examined. Q. Who dropped it you do not know? A. No - when they passed me I asked where they were going; Davies said, to a house in Green-street - he had been drinking, but was not drunk - he had not been drinking much - the female prisoner had his hat and Parker's also; I offered to go with them, but Hannington said,"No, watchman, the man who is carrying him is my husband."

Prisoner HANNINGTON. He said, "This is a fine game, one drunken man carrying another!" and they both fell

down. Witness. That was before I saw them; I heard something round the corner: I looked, and they were both on the ground - I only saw Parker on the ground - he was so helpless he could do nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not swear they were both on the ground? A. Yes, they were.

COURT. Q. Were both the prisoners near the area? A. Yes - it joins Green-street.

JAMES DEAN . I am a watchman. About twelve o'clock at night I was calling the hour. Mates called to me,"Stop that party - they are the two I want;" I pursued the prisoners, and caught Anwill at the corner of Norfolk-street, about thirty yards from where the hat was dropped.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Mates tell you who let the hat fall? A. No - I will not swear as to what I had drank on that night.

COURT. Q. Did they both run? A. Yes; I received this shoe next morning from a female servant - I went with the beadle, and got the hat out of the area.

THOMAS PARKER . This is my hat and shoe.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear you had them on when you left the house? A. No - I cannot swear what I had on; I had been about an hour, or an hour and half with Davies - he paid for what we had.

JOHN DAVIES . I do not know what I paid - I fell down with the weight of Parker - he had his shoes on when I carried him.

COURT. Q. Where is the place? A. Nearly opposite Bond-street; he had his shoes on when I put him down at the door; Hannington had my hat and his, and when I put him down I asked her for my hat, which she gave me - I left Parker in the care of his wife, and went to look for the prisoners, but could not find them - Parker's wife had gone down stairs, and left him at the door with the prisoners; I went down to her, came up, and the prisoners were gone with the hat and shoes - I went to look for them.

ANWILL's Defence. I was going home, and the watchman stopped me - I know nothing about it.

HANNINGTON's Defence. I gave up the two hats to Davies, at the door - there were three or four more people there.

- SAYERS. My husband is a sadler - we live at No. 7, Thomas-street, Grosvenor-square. Anwill was at my house on Sunday evening, the 23d of December, from three o'clock in the afternoon till a quarter or twenty minutes past eleven at night - he is a plasterer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-81

337. THOMAS KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Richard Hill Sandys , from his person .

RICHARD HILL SANDYS. On the 23d of December I was in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields , a little after four o'clock in the afternoon; I felt a pull at my pocket, and on turning round, saw the prisoner next me; he ran away - I followed, and he was stopped near Drury-lane, without my losing sight of him; and as we returned, a person pointed to the handkerchief, which laid near a step, thirty or forty yards from where it was taken, and in the way he had run.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there not a great many other boys about? A. There was another boy with him - I did not see him do any thing - I gave him in charge, because I suspected him.

THOMAS CRACKSFORD . I was in Green-street, saw the prisoner running, and several persons after him - I pursued, and stopped him - as I followed I saw him take a handkerchief from his bosom, and throw it on the step of a door - I still pursued, and took him back to the spot.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you lose sight of him? A. No.

CHARLES COOKE . I am an officer of Bow-street. The prisoner was brought to the office with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran - there were forty or fifty boys about.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly recommended to mercy, on account of his good character . - Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-82

338. ANDREW JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 copper, value 20s., the goods of Christopher Charles Foster , and fixed to a certain building .

CHRISTOPHER CHARLES FOSTER. I rent a house, No. 29, Watney-street, St. George's in the East , but did not live there on the 13th of December: it was my house, but unoccupied; I had left a copper there the beginning of May - I had seen it safe about two months ago, in the back kitchen.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I am a clerk at the West India Docks. On the morning of the 13th of December I was standing at my door, which is the next house to this, at a quarter to seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner come out with a copper - a woman was with him - I ran after him, and said, "Halloo, you thief!" he threw the copper at me, and ran off - I struck him with a boot which I had in my hand, and pursued - I overtook him, and knocked him down - the woman came up - he got up - I still pursued, and took him again: I saw the copper compared with the place - it fitted exactly.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge. This bunch of skeleton-keys was picked up on the spot where the prisoner was knocked down - one of them has a little blood on it; the prisoner was bleeding at the mouth.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not come out of the house.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-83

339. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT LAXTON . I am a brewer , and live in George-street, Portman-square. The prisoner was foreman of a dray , and was to receive money for me - when he booked his beer, in the evening, it was his duty to book the money likewise, which he had received; Wood, who keeps an eating-house, in Blandford-street, owed me some money - the prisoner accounted to me for monies received on the 20th of November, but not for any from Mr. Wood - I have the book here, which is kept by my clerk - the entries are made in it from the prisoner's account; he comes

and states what he has received, and we put it down; here is no account of the receipt of 5s. from Mr. Wood, on the 20th of November.

THOMAS BRYAN . I am clerk to Mr. Laxton. This entry is my writing - I took it from the verbal account of the prisoner; here is no entry of 5s. from Mr. Wood - the prisoner never afterwards came to me, and said he had omitted it; he paid 6l. 6s. on the 20th of November.

MR. ADOLPHUS to MR. LAXTON. Q. When did you part with the prisoner? A. On the 16th of December, I think it was; and he had never accounted to me for the 5s. received from Mr. Wood.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any partner? A. No. The prisoner has been in my service about three years; there are not a great variety of accounts between us; his receipts were not in general more than 4l. or 5l. in a day - I understand he has three children.

COURT. Q. What did he receive a-week? A. I think under 30s., but his place, altogether, was worth not less than 2l. a-week.

JAMES WOOD . I keep an eating-house in Blandford-street. I paid 5s. to the prisoner, on the 20th of November, for his master; I have the receipt, which he sent in by my servant.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it you, or your servant, who paid him? A. I sent the money out by my servant, who is not here.

COURT. Q. Did you see the servant give him the money? A. Yes: he brought the receipt in, and I gave him the money - I saw him pay it - I had a good view of it from my parlour, which has a glass door - this is the receipt - it is the prisoner's writing - I have often seen him write - (read).

Prisoner's Defence. I have often taken from 10l. to 12l. a-day, and I have no book; I give it in by word-of-mouth, and might book it to somebody else; this is the only way I can account for it; I have bad boys to book it several times, and they have often left off to go and draw beer while they were about it.

JURY to THOMAS BRYAN . Q. How many items did the prisoner book that day? A. About forty.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-84

340. JOHN SCOTT was again indicted for a like offence .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT LAXTON . The prisoner was in my employ - these entries of the 22d of November are in the handwriting of my clerk.

THOMAS BRYAN . On the 22d of November the prisoner gave me an account of what he had received: I am sure I took down every sum he mentioned - I went over the accounts with him, and ascertained the sum to be received, which was 2l. 7s. - here is no mention of a sum of 9s. received from Mr. Green, of Drummond-street; he mentioned a cask of beer going to Mr. Green, but not about any money received from him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many items were entered that day? A. About twenty-four; he said he delivered a cask of beer to Mr. Green, which came to 4s. 6d.; he has accounted for 6l. 6s. received on one day - it is not true that he never received more than 4l. or 5l. in a day - there are, on several days, a great number of items accounted for by him - he accounted when he came home, which was generally from six o'clock to eight in the evening; here is a figure of 4, which means a quarter cask.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many of these items, on the 22d of November, have money against them? A. Three only - I think 4l. a-day is above the average of what he has received; Mr. Green had had beer without money before; if the money was paid, it would be carried into the next column.

COURT. Q. What does the prisoner account to you from? A. He has read from a list, but generally from memory.

MR. LAXTON. He has never accounted to me for this 9s - I found it out about the 19th of December.

Cross-examined. Q. How much might he receive a a day? A. I meant to say from 4l. to 6l. - if I said less it was not intentional; there is seldom more than ten items of money received.

GEORGE GREEN . I am a green-grocer, and live in Drummond-street, Hampstead-road. I dealt with Mr. Laxton, and on the 22d of November, either I or my wife wife paid the prisoner 9s. - I have the receipt, and know it is his writing (reads) - I do not know what beer I took that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you dealt with Laxton before? A. Yes, for some time; about three years; Mr. Laxton came to me about it; the prisoner has called on me for the last eighteen months. I got the receipt off my file.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no book, but gave my account in from memory.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280110-85

341. JAMES MOSS , WILLIAM ROBERTS , and WILLIAM WALTERS , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 copper, value 10s., the goods of John Short , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN SHORT. I am the owner of a building, No. 29, Salisbury-street, Lisson-grove, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone ; I let it to Harwood; there was a copper set in the wash-house.

WILLIAM HARWOOD . I lived in the house. On the morning of the 20th of December I saw the copper right in its place; I do not know whether it was taken on the 20th, 21st, or 22d, but on the morning of the 22d my daughter went into the wash-house, and it was gone; I have seen it since, at Mary-le-bone Office: it has not been fitted, but we measured it, and it is exactly the size; I have no doubt it is the same - it had been used a day or two before, and left in a dirty state. The prisoner must have got over the wall - there is no lock to the door.

PHILIP WEBSTER . On the 21st of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was with Gibbs, and saw the three prisoners coming down Lisson-grove; I had seen them at ten the night before, at a public-house - I crossed over to them, and Moss had this copper - I collared him; we took them all to the office. I asked how they got it; Moss said, "I suppose it to have been a plant of some other parties; we found it at the back of

Mr. Hinton's:" I said, "Then you were altogether;" he said Yes. The copper was in a black bag.

JAMES GIBBS . I was with Webster. I took Roberts and Walters; Roberts' hands were a little black, with mortar; Walters' were black, but not so black as Roberts' - some duplicates were found on Roberts.

MOSS' Defence. I was coming by the back of Mr. Hinton's house, and found the bag; I went on, and met the other lads.

ROBERTS' Defence. I was walking with Walters - we met Moss, who said he had picked up an old copper, and was going to sell it.

WALTERS' Defence. We were not at any public-house the night before.

JAMES GIBBS . They were all at the Champion public-house.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I saw Moss and Roberts there.

MOSS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

WALTERS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-86

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 11.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

342. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , 1 pair of boots, value 7s. , the goods of William Spring .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280110-87

343. ANDREW SWAINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 stove, value 5s., and 1 copper, value 10s., the goods of William Wills , and fixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM WILLS. I was the tenant of a building in the parish of Shoreditch - there was a copper fixed in the back kitchen; I saw it safe on the 19th of December, about the middle of the day - I had removed my furniture to another house. Mr. Smith, the landlord, lives within four doors of the house.

JOHN WILSON . I am a carman. I was sent by Mr. Wills to that house, on the 20th of December, about five minutes before six o'clock in the morning; I found the bolt of the lock was undone - I called the watchman to bring a light, and I found a stove against the front door; I went in, and tried the back door, which was safe; I came into the front parlour: I then went up stairs, and found the prisoner concealed in a back room - I caught hold of him; he said he was employed by the landlord to take down the fixtures - I gave charge of him, and ran up stairs, but saw no more persons there; I did not go into the back kitchen, but went and alarmed Mr. Wills, who came and found the stove and the copper taken out of their places. At the watch-house I observed that the prisoner was all over dirt and mortar.

COURT to WILLIAM WILLS. Q. Did you see the stove? A. Yes - it had been fixed in the parlour; that and the copper had both been fixed in with brick work, and the brick work was torn down.

HUMPHREY PEARSON . I am the watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought in about six o'clock that morning, and I found this screw-driver on him.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am an officer. I was applied to by Wilson, who took me to the house, and I brought away this stove, which I found standing in the room.

Prisoner's Defence. A man met me the evening before, and told me to come to him at No. 20, (I forget the name of the street, but it is facing the Haberdashers' Arms public-house), and help him move to Whitecross-street, and he would give me 1s. 6d. or 2s.; he told me to go at six o'clock; I went, and knocked twice; a man opened the door: he said, "Mind you do not fall over the stove which stands there;" he led me up the stairs, and said he would go and look for a man and woman, and he should scarcely be three minutes; the witness came directly after - I was on the landing-place, and said a man was moving some things, and was gone to see for some persons; the man had given the screw-driver into my hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-88

344. JANE ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 2 pewter pots, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Brown Underwood ; and 1 pewter pot, value 10d. , the goods of Edward Hughes .

EDWARD HUGHES. I keep the Nelson's Head public-house, Upper Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 29th of December Mundy brought the prisoner to my house, with this pot, which is mine.

THOMAS ANTHONY . I am in the service of Mr. Bennet. On the 29th of December a stranger came and asked me if I knew whether the prisoner lived at any public-house; I said No: he said, "She has got two pots;" I went after her, and found two pots belonging to Mr. Underwood; I took her to his house, and his servant found on her another pot.

THOMAS MUNDY . I am servant to Samuel Brown Underwood, who keeps the Ship public-house, Mary-le-bone-street. I saw the prisoner with these two pots of my master's, which Anthony had taken from her; I asked her if she had any more on her - she said No, but afterwards produced this, belonging to Hughes.

THOMAS GIBBS . I am an officer, and took her in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-89

345. JOHN FLEGG was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 4 lbs. of cheese, value 3s. , the goods of Jacob Townsend .

JAMES LILES . I am a bricklayer. On the 10th of December I was sitting at Townsend's window; a woman gave me information - I ran out, and saw the prisoner and another running, about five yards off; I overtook the prisoner, and threw him down - the other, who got away, threw this piece of cheese to the prisoner; it fell between his hands into the kennel, and I took it up.

SARAH TOWNSEND . I am the wife of Jacob Townsend - we keep a chandler's-shop in John's-row, Waterloo-street, St. Luke's. About ten minutes past nine o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour, and saw a man run out with the cheese; I told Liles, and followed him out: I saw the cheese in the kennel - I know it by having cut a piece off this corner.

THOMAS DONMAN . I am a watchman. I went up found the prisoner, and took him to the watch-house.

JOHN BEAVIS . I am constable of the night. The prosecutrix brought the cheese to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home, and was near the prosecutor's shop; two men came out, ran by me, and knocked me down.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-90

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

346. MARY REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 3 cravats, value 2s. 9d., and 1 handkerchief, value 9d. , the goods of Charles Gully .

CHARLES GULLY. I am a hawker . I was at the Crown public-house, Shadwell , on the 19th of December - the prisoner, who was a stranger, came in after me - I had my box, and a bundle on it, containing cravats and handkerchiefs - the prisoner spoke to me, and drank out of my pot, without asking me; a friend came in - I got up to go to the bar to speak to him, and saw the prisoner take this handkerchief out of my bundle; she was going to put it into her pocket - I went and took it from her; I then took my box and bundle to go away, and when I had got a quarter of a mile, I thought I would examine, and missed three cravats and a handkerchief - I went back and found the prisoner there; she got up to run backwards - I said,"Give me my cravats and handkerchief, or I will get an officer:" she laughed at me; she had got one of the cravats on; I had her detained, and got an officer.

WILLIAM MANSFIELD . I am waiter at the Crown. The prosecutor came and had a pint of beer; the prisoner then came in, and after the prosecutor left, I saw her with three cravats in her hand; she offered them to me for sale - Gully returned, and on seeing him she ran backwards.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found these cravats and handkerchief on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. After he was gone, some young men were throwing these cravats about, and said, "Here is one for you, old woman;" I put it on.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-91

347. JAMES RUMSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 2 yards of floor-cloth, value 6s. , the goods of William Mace .

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. On the 29th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner with this oil-cloth; I asked where he was going with it; he said to Mr. Burnet, in Petticoat-lane, and had brought it from Mr. Mace's, in Whitechapel, for whom he had been employed about a mouth; I asked where he lived himself; he said he did know - I held him while my brother officer ran to Mace's - it was not above five minutes' walk; I have inquired, and find the prisoner has no friends, and is actually lost for want.

WILLIAM MACE , JUN. I am the son of William Mace, floor-cloth-maker, Whitechapel. This is my father's cloth - it was taken from the door - I know nothing of the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280110-92

348. WILLIAM TANNER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 clock, value 40s. , the goods of Jonathan Butcher .

JONATHAN BUTCHER. I keep the Porcupine public-hoose, Castle-street, Leicester-square . This clock was fastened to the wall in my back parlour; I lost it on the 31st of December - I had seen it that day; I saw the prisoner there about eight o'clock in the evening, and missed the clock about an hour and a half afterwards - I had been writing in a private room; I came out, and met Barnwall at my tap-room door; he gave me information - I went into the parlour; the prisoner was standing in the middle of the room, in an agitated state; the clock was then down - I said, "Where is the clock?" there was nobody in the parlour but him; I found it tied in a handkerchief, behind the parlour door, on a bench - it had been screwed or nailed - I found a quantity of dirt on the floor under where it was fixed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many people were in the tap-room? A. There might be twenty - I did not know the prisoner - I found him standing some distance from the door.

FRANCIS BARNWALL . I was in the tap-room on this evening, and about half-past nine o'clock I saw, through the glass partition, the two arms of a man taking down the clock - I went and asked Butcher if he had authorised any one to take it down - I could not see who it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear there were two arms? A. Yes; I could not see his face; I told Butcher in about five minutes - several other people saw it - I went into the parlour about two minutes after Butcher; the prisoner was then sitting down, reading the newspaper - I did not see him standing.

HARRIET LINDSEY . I am servant to Mr. Butcher. The prisoner came into the parlour - a lady and gentleman had been there before him; I went into the parlour with master - nobody was there but the prisoner; the lady and gentleman had been gone three-quarters of an hour, and during that time the prisoner was there alone; the handkerchief the clock was tied in does not belong to master; I had been attending to business during this; I saw the clock safe after the lady and gentleman left - I went into the room several times, to look at the fire; the prisoner was sitting, reading the newspaper - when I went in with master, the clock was tied up, and hid behind the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not left my master three hours before - I went there to look at the paper - a man and woman came in and went away, and in half an hour the landlord came in, and said I had stolen the clock; I said it was impossible, for I had no means of taking it down - I said I had been out for a particular purpose, and when I returned, a man, who had been in the parlour, was going out.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-93

349. WILLIAM TUTTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , a pair of boots, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., and 11 books, value 10s. , the goods of William Reynolds .

WILLIAM REYNOLDS. I am a carpenter , and lodge in George-street, Lisson-grove . I went out at half-past five o'clock in the morning of the 15th of December, leaving this property in my room; I returned in the evening, and missed it - the boots had been at my bed-side, and the other things in my box; the prisoner had slept with me for four nights; I had left him in bed in the morning; I found him in an hour and a half, in a public-house, and said, "I want you;" he made no answer; I gave him in charge - he then said he knew nothing of them.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a servant at the Duke of York public-house. I bought this pair of boots of the prisoner, for 5s., on Tuesday evening the 15th of December.(Boots produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man came and sold the boots to the witness - it was not me.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280110-94

350. JAMES LYNAM and WILLIAM FRIEND were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 5 stockings, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of Ursula Grady .

URSULA GRADY. I am a laundress , and live at Highgate . On Thursday, the 29th of November, I had fourteen stockings hanging to dry in my yard, which is inclosed by a brick wall - I left them out till near eight o'clock in the evening, when I missed five; on the Saturday week a neighbour brought them to me - he is not here; I have known Lynam about nine months - he lives near me.

JOHN KEEFE . I was at the Rose and Crown public-house one evening, between seven and eight o'clock, about ten days before I saw the prosecutrix; I saw Lynam, and bought two pairs of stockings of him, for 6d., but did not buy the other stocking; Friend was in the tap-room, and Friend took them out of his bosom; Lynam received the money.

THOMAS FITCH . I am a constable. I heard of this robbery, and apprehended both the prisoners.

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am a constable of Hornsey. I was with Fitch.

THOMAS TRANFIELD . I received information, and went to Keefe; he told me who he got the stockings from, and gave them to me; I showed them to the prosecutrix, who claimed them.

LYNAM's Defence. I met Friend in the street - he asked if I knew who would buy some stockings; I went to the public-house, and Keefe bought them.

FRIEND's Defence. I picked them up in the road from Holloway,

LYNAM - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

FRIEND - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-95

351. DANIEL MENEY and JOHN CONNOR were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Robert Armstrong , from his person .

ROBERT ARMSTRONG. I am a sailor , and belong to a Shields vessel. On the 1st of January, I had been at a public-house - I then went into a cook-shop - I came out, and stood at the door - Meney came and shoved against me - I did not see Connor at that moment - I knew neither of them - I was told my handkerchief was gone, and missed it directly after - I have not got it again. I am sure I had it at the cook-shop.

THOMAS FORD . I am a shipwright, and live in Lukeshaw-alley. I was at the cook shop, and saw the prosecutor there; the prisoners came in for some pudding; there was none for them - I knew them before by sight - I saw Meney take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Connor; they went away together. I immediately told the prosecutor.

Prisoner MENEY. Q. Were was I? A. You had been sitting in the house, till you got up and went to the door - I was attending at the eating-house that evening; there was a third person with you - I could not take you at the moment; the prosecutor ran after you.

GEORGE TURNBUL . I was coming down Ratcliff-highway, at twelve o'clock at night, on the 1st of January. Meney asked if I was going on board a ship; he stood some time with me, and then ran away - I missed 5s. directly, and ran and took him.

THOMAS BIRD . I took Connor in charge. He begged me not to take him, and said he had done nothing, and would give me any thing to let him go.

MENEY's Defence. I had been at work. I went into the cook-shop, when I came out of the play; they had nothing for me, and as I came out, this sailor thought I knew him - I was going on, and a sailor came up, and knocked me down. I was taken to the watch-house, and my money taken from me.

CONNOR's Defence. I was going home, and was taken.

MENEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

CONNOR - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against Meney.

Reference Number: t18280110-96

352. WILLIAM NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 watch, value 30s.; 2 seals, value 5s.; 1 chain, value 2s., and a key, value 6d., the goods of John Fergusson , from his person .

JOHN FERGUSSON. I am a carpenter , and live in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove . On the 24th of December was at the King's Arms public-house - I came to the door about twelve o'clock at night; the door was shut against me - I tried to get in again; the prisoner came up to the door, and wanted to go in also - I did not know him before; they would not open the door - I said I should go - I turned round, and the prisoner snatched my watch out of my fob, and ran away - I pursued him to the Quadrant, about one hundred yards, and never lost sight of him - I called Stop thief! and the watchman stopped him - I ran with such force, that I fell over him; they took us both to the watch-house. The patrol found my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time did you go the public-house? A. About seven o'clock - I was eating and drinking there - I was not turned out; they wanted to get us out - I had not paid my score - I was quite sober - I drank nothing but ale - I could not have drank two quarts - I was not so sober as if I had drank nothing - I was not even what is called fresh; we were both on the ground when the watchman came up - I might be a little fresh - I cannot tell whether the prisoner was drunk.

JOSEPH NAGGS . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutor running after the prisoner, calling "Stop that man, he has stolen my watch" - I jumped out into the road, and crossed to the prisoner - he fell, and the prosecutor fell over him; the prosecutor was collected, or he could not have run so fast; the prisoner appeared drunk, when he was taken up, but he ran well; the watch was brought to the watch-house; it happened near the Quadrant, in Regent-street.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is that from the King's Arms? A. I suppose about one hundred yards; the prisoner seemed drunk at the watch-house; the prosecutor did not appear so in the least; the prisoner had a bottle of gin in his pocket.

LUKE NIXON . I am a patrol. I was at the watch-house. The prosecutor had been drinking, but had his faculties about him - I went to the Quadrant, and found this watch, with the glass broken, within three or four yards of where I was told they had fallen.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to my brother; we drank - I got intoxicated - I do not know what happened, till I found myself in the watch-house next morning.

ROBERT NELSON . I am the prisoner's brother. I had been drinking with him on Christmas eve, at the Bricklayer's Arms public-house, South Molton-street - I got a little fresh; the landlord said he must put us out; my brother bought a pint of gin, in a quart bottle, and I took another - I parted with him in Regent-street.

WILLIAM TAGWELL . I am foreman to Mr. Jesse, a brass-founder. I was at the King's Arms from seven till nine o'clock, and left the prisoner there quite intoxicated.

COURT. Q. What made you notice him? A. There was a little dispute with him, and some more of his own trade; the room was full of people - I did not see him stand up - he could walk very well. I have seen him before.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-97

353. WILLIAM CAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 3th of September , 1 stove, value 7s. , the goods of Moss Woolf .

MOSS WOOLF. I am a broker , and live in Sandy's-row. I occasionally employed the prisoner as a porter - I bought a stove at a sale in Hoxton, and told him to carry it home; I saw no more of him or the stove - I did not see him again till last Friday week.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you not met him at sales since? A. No - I believe he was sober - I did not tell him he was drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him I had some other things to carry first; he said I was drunk - I went to a public-house, and he told another porter to take it, if I could not - I awoke next morning, and found I had been asleep in Hoxton-square.

MOSS WOOLF re-examined. I gave the stove into his hands. I did not see it on his shoulder.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-98

354. WILLIAM CAREY was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 hearth-rug, value 15s., and 5 cushions, value 10s. , the goods of Isaac Isaacs .

ISAAC ISAACS. I am a broker , and have known the prisoner about twelve months. I often gave him jobs. On the 27th of September I bought a rug and five cushions, at Camden-town - I met the prisoner on the stairs; he said,"Shall I take charge of your property" - I said, "Yes; take them into your possession till the sale is over" - and when I came down, he and the goods were gone - I thought he was gone home with them. I saw him about five weeks after, at another sale; he ran away, and I did did not see again till he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. I suspect you have been listening to the last trial? A. Not particularly - I did not tell him to sell them - I gave the things into his hands, and afterwards saw him sitting on them, smoking a pipe; he was taken at a sale in Baker-street, Portman-square - I did not see him take the things away - I did not hang them on the rails, or tell him to sell them. I believe he said something about selling them - I told him not.

JOHN CURTIS . I am a porter. I was at work at this sale, and saw the prisoner with these goods; I said, "Have you got a job?" he said, "Yes - I am going to take these home, when the sale is over."

RICHARD HARTLY WALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-99

355. SAMUEL HASELDINE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 12 dozens of buttons, value 1s. 4d., and 1 skein of silk, value 1 1/2d. , the goods of George Boulton Paynton , and Thomas Harrison .

HENRY CARTER . I am assistant to Messrs. George Boulton Paynton, and Thomas Harrison, haberdashers , of Oxford-street . On the 29th of December the prisoner came in as a customer; we were all engaged - I was sorting a drawer of buttons; the prisoner came up to the drawer, and let a bundle fall from under his arm, into the drawer; in taking it up again, I saw him take out a gross of buttons; he then said it was very cold, and put his hand, with the buttons, into his coat pocket; a young man came and told me of it - I told him to inform Mr. Harrison, which he did.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had he bought any thing? A. Not then; he did afterwards; the buttons are worth 1s. 4d.; he did not appear at all in liquor; I believe he is a very respectable man - I told him to come into the small room, and then charged him with it; he made no resistance.

THOMAS HARRISON. I was in our parlour; a young man told me of this circumstance; I went out - one of our men served the prisoner with cloth to the amount of 11s.; he was taken into the parlour, and the buttons were found. I have inquired, and find he bore a most excellent character; he had frequently dealt at our shop - they were found in the cloth which he had bought, not in his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-100

340. THOMAS THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on

the 14th of December , 2 boxes, value 2s., and 185 squares of glass, value 7l. , the goods of John Baker .

JOHN BAKER. I am a carrier . On the 14th of December I loaded my cart at Mr. Fenton's, in West Smithfield; I left there about half-past three o'clock - I had two boxes, which contained one hundred and eighty-five squares of glass, and in Union-street, Spitalfields , I missed them - I had seen them safe ten minutes before; two officers came soon after, and gave me information; I had not seen the prisoner.

ROBERT TYRRELL . On the 14th of December, about five o'clock, I and McWilliams were on duty in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields; and officer came and told us a man had lost two handkerchiefs; we went to Baker, who described the boxes; we then went to Petticoat-lane, and waited about some time; the prisoner, and two others, came out of a house - the prisoner had this box on his shoulder; I took him, and McWilliams followed the others, but they got away; the prisoner said a man had given him the box to carry.

JOHN McWILLIAMS . I was with Tyrrell, whose evidence is correct. I pursued the other two, but they escaped.

Prisoner. I pointed the man out directly.

ROBERT TYRRELL . He did so, and I pursued the man, but could not get him.

CHARLES POND . I am a carpenter. I made this box, and another like it, for Mr. Fenton.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man asked me to carry it for 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-101

357. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 2 chisels, value 2s.; 1 plane, value 5s., and 1 gouge, value 1s., the goods of John Richards ; and 1 plane, value 5s.; 1 chisel, value 1s.; and 1 spoke-shave, value 1s. , the goods of William Jones .

JOSEPH WHITEHEAD . I am a watchman. On the 23d of December, at half-past eight o'clock at night, I met the prisoner going up Francis-street, from Torrington-square; he seemed bulky; I asked what he had got; he said some carpenters' tools. I said "You do not look like a carpenter;" he said I had better take him to the watch-house, which I did.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a carpenter . This plane is mine. I left it in a building in Torrington-square on Saturday night; the door was locked, but on Monday morning it was broken open; I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM JONES. I am a carpenter . I was at work at the same house with Richards; this plane, spoke-shave, and chisels, are mine; I had left them safe on Saturday night, about six o'clock.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-102

358. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 portmanteau, value 1l.; 1 bag, value 10s.; 4 shirts, value 1l.; 3 cravats, value 5s.; 3 shirt-collars, value 3s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 14s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1l.; 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 1 pair of gaiters, value 3s.; 2 turkies, value 10s.; and 2 tongues, value 5s. , the goods of George Osmond .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Sarah Ann Mountain .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and RYLAND conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE OSMOND. I am a currier . On the 8th of December I left Coventry by the Tally-ho, Birmingham coach, which passes through Coventry; I had a portmanteau, a carpet-bag, and two baskets, which contained the articles stated in the indictment. I sat on the box with the coachman; when we came to Hadley , the coachman put the reins into my hands, and got down; I immediately heard a cry of Stop thief! and in two or three minutes I saw the guard coming to the coach, with my portmanteau and carpet bag - my baskets were gone, and were not found till a day or two afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What kind of a night was this? A. There were no stars - it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening; it was pretty dark - the moon was not up; I had seen nobody about the coach; I think I heard the guard get down, but I cannot swear that.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you speak of the time exactly, or only guess it? A. I only guess - I think it was about that time.

JOHN WALTON . I am guard of the Tally-ho, Birmingham coach. On the 8th of December Mr. Osmond was a passenger - I put his portmanteau, baskets, and carpet-bag into the boot at Coventry; we got to Hadley a few minutes past six o'clock; the boot fastens with an iron bar, which crosses and clasps on a staple under my seat - there is a key-hole in the boot; soon after six o'clock I heard a noise, turned my head, and saw the boot-door open, and the prisoner turning from behind, and running away from the coach; when I first saw him, he jumped from behind the hind-boot, and ran away; I jumped from the coach, and hallooed Stop thief! I am sure he is the man; I pursued him five or ten yards, and then saw the portmanteau drop from him - I picked it up, and ran on a little further, with it under my arm, two or three yards, and there laid this carpet-bag; there was nobody before the prisoner who could have dropped them; I continued to call Stop thief! Tearle came running behind me, with a lantern in his hand - he passed me, and pursued; I pursued a little way, and then turned back with the portmanteau and bag, as they were heavy - they were what the prosecutor had given me; I saw the same baskets next day; the prisoner was brought back - I put him on the coach, and brought him to London; I asked what he had been doing that day; he said he had been shooting over Mr. Byng's grounds; I asked where his gun or dog were, and if he had a certificate; he said, Oh! many men went shooting without a certificate - that he had left his dog with Hawkins, a small farmer, and his gun with a friend; I brought him to town, and gave him in charge.

COURT. Q. While you were pursuing, was there no other person before him? A. Not that I saw - if there had been, I must have seen them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Does your boot fasten by a bolt or lock? A. There are both, but it was not locked; it was not very dark - there was no moon nor

stars visible; if a person had been far off the prisoner, I could not have seen him; I said at the office it was a man like the prisoner, in a long coat, but not that I did not know who it was; I went to Hawkins to enquire about the dog; the prisoner might be two or three yards off when the portmanteau dropped - I was almost near enough to catch hold of him - I will swear he was not ten yards from me; I saw it was a portmanteau when I came up; I turned back, and two men came up with the prisoner in less than five minutes; Hawkins is not here; the baskets were found behind a sand-heap by the road side.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Did you find any dog at Hawkins? A. No, none had been left there; he must have dropped the portmanteau.

COURT. Q. Whatever was dropped, did you pay most attention to that or the man? A. I looked at both - I did not lose sight of the man.

WILLIAM TEARLE . I am a schoolmaster, and live at Hadley. On the evening of the 8th of December, about six o'clock, I was crossing the road - I heard a coach coming, and hurried over to clear the fore-wheels; I afterwards found it was the Tally-ho; I first heard an expression of regret, as if a man had lost something, or somebody, and let him go; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran behind the coach to see what was the matter, and saw the guard pick up the portmanteau - I passed him in pursuit of a man, who I saw running as fast as he could; I stumbled against something, but did not fall; I put my lantern down, and it was the carpet bag - in doing this I lost sight of the man; I still ran on, and listened to hear if he was running along the road, but he was not - I then crossed the road, and saw Testing and a carpenter with the prisoner; Testing had hold of the prisoner - I thought him the man I had pursued; I held the light up to him, and found he was exactly the size of the man who was running before me; I had been within about two yards of him - I could look over his shoulder, and I judged him to be the man; I took hold of him, and called to the coachman to stop; I picked up this piece of a leather strap, and behind a sand-bank, about seventy yards behind where the coach stopped, I saw two baskets found, on the left side of the road - there is a ditch and a hedge between the bank and the road; the strap was opposite the sand-heap, and has a broken buckle to it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far is the sand-bank from where you first saw the prisoner? A. About thirty yards - I lost sight of him just about that place; I was from two to four yards from him; I did not see him threw any thing away - It was a dark night; my eye was fixed on him; the baskets were nearly full - I could throw one of them twenty yards myself; I had my lantern, but that was not on account of the darkness of the night.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Were you crossing the road when you ran out of the way of the coach? A. Yes.

MORRIS TESTING . I am an exciseman, and live at Hadley. On the 8th of December I heard a cry of Stop thief! and came to my door; I saw the coach standing at a little distance, and a light near it - I presently saw some persons running together towards me; I observed one person with a dark coat on - he crossed straight towards me, where there was a deal of mud and stuff - he seemed to me to be in the centre; some others went straight on; there was one on the left went up a lane, I opened my little gate, and saw the prisoner running, and Hickmott after him; Hickmott said, "I see nobody else on the road, and I shall stop you;" he was near my house then; I went up, and saw the prisoner in his hands; Hickmott was induced to let him go, as he said, "Yonder he goes - stop him, stop him!" there was nobody else to stop.

COURT. Q. Had he been crying out before that? A. Immediately he saw Hickmott close to him he called out, but not before, for he had passed me before Hickmott came up.

MR. RYLAND. Q. From the time you came out, did you see any body running in the same direction as the prisoner? A. No; when Hickmott let him go, he ran as hard as he could for about ninety yards; I pursued; Hickmott ran and took him again; and, as we brought him back, we met Mr. Tearle with a light - I am certain he is the person Hickmott had taken before; I did not lose sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. This was a lightish night, was it not? A. Middling; I could see pretty well - if a man had been within twenty yards of me, I could have seen him; if he had thrown away the basket I should have seen him - I think there was nobody ahead of the prisoner, when he crossed towards me; there were some persons before him, and some behind when he crossed; I cannot tell how many; there might be three; I saw the prisoner come across to the dirty place, where nobody would go unless they were forced - nobody was stopped but the prisoner.

JOHN HICKMOTT . I am a carpenter, and live at Hadley. On the 8th of December I was coming out of my house; the coach had just passed; I stopped for about two minutes, and then heard them halloo out, Stop thief! I made my way towards the coach three or four road, then saw the prisoner running as hard as he could towards me, and I stopped him; Testing came up, but nobody else; directly I caught hold of the prisoner, he called out, "Stop him! Stop him! I am not the man." I let him go, and ran by the side of him; I collared him again, and he again said he was not the man; Testing came up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If any body had taken you, you would have said you was not the man? A. Yes; I caught him because he was the first man - there was nobody coming along but him - I could see across the road - I could see twenty yards; if a man had been thirty yards before him, I could not have seen him - it was a kind of a foggy night, rather darkish - if he had thrown the basket away while I was pursuing, I must have seen him - I was sober.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am a labourer, and live at Hadley. I picked up these two baskets, between six and seven o'clock that evening, behind a bank. I saw the coach standing in the road; the baskets were, I suppose, between forty and fifty yards behind it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Would they weigh I cwt. together? A. I think they may - it was a dark night, and rather mizzled with rain.

GEORGE CORNWALL . I live at Hadley, with my parents. On the 8th of December I saw the coach, and next morning I found a key on the road side, about five or six yards from where I had seen the coach.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not rather

dark? A. Yes; foggy and rainy; I could see a man ten yards off, not much further.

WILLIAM LINNINGTON . I live at Bentley-heath. On Sunday morning, the 9th, I was at Hadley, and found this chisel in the road, opposite the watering-trough of the Two Brewers public-house.

ROBERT KENNEDY . I am a labourer, and live at Hadley. I saw the coach standing in the road, and next morning picked up a key, about thirty yards from where the coach stood.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it not a public-road? A. Yes.

ELIZABETH COLLIS . I live with my uncle, at the Windmill public-house, at Hadley. The prisoner, and two other persons, came there with a horse and chaise-cart, about half-past three o'clock on Saturday, the 8th of December; they dined, and went out about half-past five o'clock, leaving two coats and a cloak behind them, with the horse and cart; the prisoner was brought in a little after six, by the witnesses; the other two came about ten minutes after the prisoner had been taken away, and paid their reckoning, which was 8s. 10d.; they took away the horse and cart - they had not gun nor dog - they came as if from London.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you seen either of them before? A. No; I did not tell the guard I had seen him before - they knew the horse and cart were there - I did not mention it.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRAL . I am a City officer, and received the prisoner in charge on the 8th of December; I found on him nine sovereigns, 2s. 6d., a silver watch, a 5l. Bank-note, a 5l. country-note, and a 5l. note stamped "Forged."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not keep all this money? A. No; I gave Mr. Walton the sovereigns and silver.

JOHN WALTON . One of the keys produced fits the bolt of the boot - I have not tried it, but it is such a key as I use, and I have no doubt it would open it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the baskets safe that night? A. Yes, about four o'clock, at Redburn; I forget whether they were tied together - the portmanteau might weigh 30 lbs. or 40 lbs. - I do not believe he carried them all, but that they were thrown out of the boot one at a time - one man could carry them all.

MR. OSMOND. The bag, baskets, and portmanteau contained the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Could you, looking at a man four yards from you, see him throw these baskets away? A. Yes, I should think so.

Prisoner's Defence. I started early that morning by the coach, and had been shooting the whole day; I have been at the public-house before, and the landlord has lent me a pointer dog which he keeps.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-103

358. THOMAS LAURENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 sheet, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Batchelor .

ELIZABETH BROOKER . I live in Windmill-street , with Richard Batchelor, a publican . The prisoner slept there on the 29th of December - another man slept in the same room: about a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner got up, and asked me to let him out; he went away, and in a few minutes I missed the sheet; I ran and caught him, about a quarter of a mile off; he produced the sheet from under his smock-frock, and said he did it out of a joke.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. The man who slept with me said,"We will have a bit of a romance, if you will take this sheet, we will give it back at breakfast time."

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280110-104

359. JOHN POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Yelf .

HENRY YELF. I am a shoemaker , and live in Whitecross-street; the prisoner and his father worked for me. On the morning of 12th of December the prisoner came with a bag; I was getting some work for him, and, while my back was turned, I heard something behind me; I took his bag, and found these boots in it, which had been in my window; he cried, and said he hoped I would forgive him. I have known him for nine months; his mother was ill in bed, and they have two or three children almost naked.

JOHN BROWN . I took him in charge; he said he was very sorry. I went to his house, and there was every appearance of distress.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined 7 Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-105

360. JOHN WAITE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 5 lbs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of John Winter .

MARK FRANCIS . On the 24th of December I saw the prisoner go on the railing of Mr. Winter's shop, in High-street, Mary-le-bone , and take the two pieces of bacon off the board outside the window. I gave an alarm, and he was pursued.

DAVID BYATT . I am shopman to John Winter. Francis gave me information; I was busy, and could not go out; the prisoner was brought back, with this bacon, which is my master's.

JAMES SADLER . Francis came into the shop, and gave information: I went out, and he pointed out the prisoner; I and the watchman took him.

WILLIAM WILCOX . I am a watchman, and took the prisoner with the bacon - he was quite tipsy.

Prisoner. I had no knowledge of what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-106

361. SARAH WALPOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 11 plates, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Turner .

ROBERT COMB . I am servant to Charles Turner, who keeps a Staffordshire warehouse , in Oxford-street . Last Saturday evening I received information; I went out, and saw the prisoner loitering about; she went up to the shop, and took eleven plates, put them under her shawl, and was walking away; I took her back.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer, and lodge at Turner's. I took the prisoner in charge; she said she did it through distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-107

362. TIMOTHY COSTLY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 powder-flask, value 1s., and 1 gun, value 12s., the goods of Benjamin George French Philpot ; 1 blanket, value 2s., the goods of Ann Philpot ; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Holloway .

SAMUEL EVANS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 20th of December, about eight o'clock, I met the prisoner near Turnham-green, with two bundles on his shoulder; I asked what he had got; he said he did not know: another lad, who was with him, ran away. I took the prisoner, and found these articles in the bundle, and a duck, which had just been killed; he was about a mile from the prosecutors'.

BENJAMIN GEORGE FRENCH PHILPOT. I live on Acton-green . I know this property - the shoes and trousers are my servant's; the rest is mine; I have seen the prisoner about; the property was taken from my harness-room - I was in town at the time.

HENRY HOLLOWAY. I am servant to Mr. Philpot. My shoes and trousers were safe in the harness-room that evening. They broke open a window, which looks into a lane, to get in.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-108

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

363. WILLIAM BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 7 iron bolts, value 14s.; 7 iron nuts, value 6s., and 7 iron washers, value 2s. , the goods of Edmund Morris , Esq.

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

JAMES TERRY . I am a patrol. On Christmas-day, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner near an iron-shop door; I watched, and saw him go away - he returned in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, with a bag - I then went and took him; I asked what he had got - he said nothing but a little old iron, which he wanted to sell - I took these bolts from him.

RICHARD MILLER . I am a headborough, and live in Cowcross-street. I took the prisoner with the bag; he said it was old iron, and afterwards said he bought it by the road side, and then said it came back by Chenies' waggon, from Hertfordshire: after his examination he said he bought it of Jack Sheppard, for half a crown and three pints of beer.

CHARLES RANCE . I am gardener to Edmund Morris, of Chorley-wood, near Rickmansworth . There were between five and six cwt. of bolts and nuts in his barn - they have been reduced, by being taken away, to about one cwt. When the prisoner was stopped I missed several more; I cannot say when they were taken: the prisoner lodges with his brother, in one of Mr. Morris' houses, about half a mile from Mr. Morris'. I cannot swear when I had seen them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at 2s. 6d. a cwt., and said I would pay the difference if it came to any more.

CHARLES RANCE . I know Jack Sheppard - he lives near Mr. Morris.

JACK SHEPPARD . I am a labourer. I sold this iron to the prisoner, for 2s. 6d. and three pints of beer.

MR. QUIN. Q. How long is it since you have worked? A. Eight months; I have been kept by the parish, and I belong to a club - I have 3s. 6d. a-week from the parish, for my wife and two children, and 9s. a-week from the club. I found the iron in a ditch at the back of my father's garden, in Solesbridge-lane, laying there loose; I put them into a sack, and sold them to the prisoner, about a yard from where I found them; he brought the sack, and I put them in; I had found them a week before I sold them - I do not know how many there were. I found them one morning; I told nobody of it: the ditch is near a lane. I have known Bull five or six years. I was attending the Grand Jury, as I was subpoenaed, but I was not called - I did not take the subpoena; I said I did not know what it meant, and threw it out. I was at Clerkenwell - I saw Mr. Rance at Chorley-wood - I do not recollect what passed between us.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-109

364. DANIEL KIMBERLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 2 razors, value 2s.; 2 cravats, value 1s., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s. , the goods of Apollon Grimal , his master.

APOLLON GRIMAL. I am an importer of foreign silks , and live in Brewer-street . The prisoner has been ten months in my employ. On the 7th of January I was going to dismiss the prisoner, and he had a waistcoat on, which I recognized as mine - that gave me some suspicion; I went to his trunk, in his bed-room, and found the other things in it; it was not locked: he at first denied it, but when I sent for an officer, he said he did not know who put them there - I said his name was stamped on the cravats - he then said he had done wrong.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said to his master, "They are yours - I know I have done very wrong - and the waistcoat I have on is yours."

Prisoner's Defence. They might be put into my box by mistake; I did not intend to take, but I have worn them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-110

365. WILLIAM SHAW and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Nicholas Scott , from his person .

NICHOLAS SCOTT. On the 26th of December, at night, I was in Warren-street, Tottenham-court-road - my neck handkerchief was not tied, but hung loosely round my neck - Davis came up, snatched it off my neck, and gave it to Shaw; one ran towards Tottenham-court-road, and the other towards Hertford-street; I followed, took Davis, and gave him to the watchman; I had been drinking, but was not drunk. I had been in a public-house, and three of us had a glass of rum and water.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I was at the watch-house; Scott brought Davis in - I thought Scott rather the worse for liquor, but I was not acquainted with his manner - he said Davis had taken his handkerchief, and had given it to another man, whom he should know; Davis said he knew nothing about it: I took Davis to High-street next day, and there he said that Stoney (meaning Shaw) had got it; I took Shaw next day - Scott said he was the person. - Scott did not stagger, but he talked a broken sort of French - he said afterwards that when he got a drop he talked in that way - he is a native of France.

Two witnesses gave Davis a good character.

SHAW - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-111

366. THOMAS ABEL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 5 handkerchiefs, value 7s. 6d.; 26 skeins of silk, value 3s.; 12 laces, value 2d., and 1 gross of shirt-buttons, value 7d. , the goods of William Rotherham and John Hill Grinsall .

WILLIAM ROTHERHAM. I am in partnership with John Hill Grinsall - we are linen-drapers , and live in Shoreditch . On the 11th of December, between four and five o'clock, Butt gave me information; the prisoner was then in the shop, purchasing some articles; I staid two or three minutes, till he paid for what he had bought - I then put my hand into his breeches pocket, and pulled out about twenty-six skeins of sewing-silk; I sent for an officer, who found in his coat pocket five silk handkerchiefs, the buttons, and laces, which are ours; he said nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know him before? A. He had been a customer six or seven times; he did not say it was his intention to pay for them; I did not ask if he had not put some articles into his pocket, off the counter: nobody else spoke to him; the things he bought came to 4s. 6d.; he gave me half a sovereign - his change was given to him at Worship-street.

AMELIA BUTT . I was in this shop. I saw the prisoner come in, and saw him squeeze his hand full of silk, and put it into his trousers pocket - it was in a drawer which had been brought to him.

HENRY LARA . I am a watchman. I was called, and found the laces on the prisoner.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer, and produce the laces and buttons which I took from the prisoner - the prosecutor gave me the silk; the prisoner said he had taken them by mistake.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 71.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280110-112

367. MARY KING was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 half-crown, the money of John Holland , from his person .

JOHN HOLLAND. On the 8th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was in Chiswell-street , on the pavement - the prisoner came up, and took a half-crown out of my waistcoat pocket; I caught hold of her hand, and took it out; I had walked with her for two or three minutes: I told her if she would not return it to me I would charge the watch with her - she said she had taken none, and abused me; I then called the watchman, and gave charge of her. I was quite sober. I told the watchman she had taken a half-crown, but I meant 2s. 6d. - it was found on her.

WILLIAM CAUET . I am a watchman. I was called, and went up; the prosecutor said he had been robbed of half a crown; he was perfectly sober: the prisoner said nothing; I took her to the watch-house; 6s. 8d. was found on her.

JOHN COMPTON . I was constable of the night. The prosecutor said he had lost half a crown; I found six shillings and a sixpence on her; I then asked him if his money was a half-crown; he said No, two shillings and sixpence - that he had three shillings and sixpence, and she took two shillings and sixpence - he was quite sober.

THOMAS BROAD . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge for robbing him of half a crown.

Prisoner's Defence. Cauet is no better than he should be; his wife was transported. The prosecutor was very drunk, and reeled against me; he said he had just come from a wake. The watchmen will do anything for a bribe.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-113

368. GEORGE PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 cask, value 5s., and 9 gallons of ale, value 18s. , the goods of Robert Laxton , his master.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT LAXTON. I am a brewer , and live in George-street, Portman-square. The prisoner was my drayman . I ordered him to take out no ale without orders from the counting-house - he took out what beer he wanted. On the 15th of December we asked what orders there were for ale - he said, "Three casks," and we had an order for four - on the 15th we told him to put the seven casks on; we watched, and saw him put on four - we asked how many he had got - he said, "Three;" we told him to put on the other four, which he did; he then put the table-beer casks all over the ale, and went out; I went, and my clerk counted the ale, in my presence - there were eight casks deficient; we had counted them the night before - there were then thirty-six; one dray had taken out a cask, and there were twenty-seven left - Molero dealt with us for table-ale, but never for this sort; I knew of no ale going to him that day - when the prisoner came home I stood by while the clerk entered his account; I then said,"Have you made out your seven casks of ale all right?" he said, Yes - I said, "How many?" he said, "Seven;" this was on Saturday, and on Monday we found where the ale had been taken to.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Is your business pretty extensive? A. Not particularly so; he was nearly three years in my employ; we open the doors about eight o'clock - the prisoner loaded about a quarter-past eight - I was then mounted on the top of the brewery, about forty feet high, and could see all over the yard; the clerk booked the seven casks in his load-book; we took the book out, and compared it with the casks - I have been robbed by two or three men.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Could you count eight casks where you were? A. Yes.

THOMAS BRYAN . I am clerk to Mr. Laxton. On the night of the 14th I counted the ale - there were thirty-six nine-gallon casks, and early in the morning I counted the same number - the prisoner said he wanted three casks - we added four more - I watched, with Mr. Laxton, and saw the prisoner put on four casks; I came down, and asked how many he had put on - he said, "Three;" I told him of four more, which he put on - I asked if he had the ale - he said,"Yes, seven casks;" he placed it in the middle of the dray, and then put the table-beer round it; he did not say he was going to take any to Mr. Molero - I afterwards saw a cask of Mr. Laxton's there - we sell them to the trade for 18s. - when he came home he accounted for only seven casks; here is a cask of beer, at 4s. 6d., entered in his book that day, to Mr. Molero.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not other men who take out beer? A. Another dray went out that day; another man went with the prisoner; all the ale casks were marked.

FRANCIS MOLERO . I keep a chandler's-shop, in Lower George-street, Chelsea. I have taken beer of Mr. Laxton for three years and a half - I took ale occasionally, and paid 11s. for it to the prisoner; I ordered a cask of good ale on the 8th, and on the 15th the prisoner brought me a cask of small beer, and one of ale; I paid 12s. for the ale, and 4s. 6d. for the small beer; he gave me this receipt - I had had one cask of ale before, and ordered one of the same quality; I was called on, and Webster took the same cask away, in Bryan's presence, on the following Tuesday.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not said, at the office, that the cask found at your house was brought by a man named Good? A. No; the prisoner delivered both casks - I did not say I had sold the cask delivered by the prisoner; I said I had made a present of a cask which I had before, similar to this - the Magistrate might say I should have been prosecuted; I was never told that my giving evidence here might save me - I have had beer from a man named Good.

THOMAS BRYAN . This receipt is the prisoner's writing.

JAMES GIBBS . I went to Molero's and brought away this cask of ale.(Cask produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Molero never had that cask from me; he said he made a present of the cask which I left him, and afterwards said he had sold it.

FRANCIS MOLERO. I did not.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-114

369. SARAH MOSELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 1 petticoat, value 2s. 6d.; 1 purse, value 6d., and 1 pair of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of John Simmons , her master.

JOHN SIMMONS. I am a paper-hanger , and live in Guildford-place, Spa-fields . The prisoner lived with me, and on the 3d of January she left, after lighting the fire - she had received her wages on the 31st of December; these articles were on a table at twelve o'clock the night before - I and my wife had been out, and when we came home she took off her cap and gloves, and left them on the table - in the morning they were gone - we missed the prisoner and property when I came down to breakfast.

HARRIET SIMMONS . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 2d of January I came home late, and left my things on the table - next morning the prisoner went away - my petticoat hung in the room - my purse was taken from my work-box; I took her without a character - she was only a fortnight with me - I hired her by the week.

FREDERICK CHESTERMAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker. I produce this petticoat, which was pawned by the prisoner, on the 4th of January.

WILLIAM DODD . I am a patrol. The prisoner was brought to Bow-street, on Saturday, the 5th - I found three duplicates on her - one for the petticoat, and another for the cap - these gloves and purse were found on her - she gave no account of them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-115

370. AARON COHEN was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 13th of December , 1 ton weight of lead, value 7l., the goods of Francis James Graham , which had been stolen by an evil-disposed person, he well knowing it to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Henry Winch .

FRANCIS JAMES GRAHAM. I lost some lead from the roof of a castle cottage, at Heston , on the night of the 12th of December - I had seen it there three or four days before: I received information, and saw it at Hatton-garden - I had it compared with the roof - it matched completely - I compared some, and measured the rest - it all corresponded.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who did it belong to? A. The cottage belongs to me - Mr. Winch is the tenant.

HENRY WINCH. I was tenant of this cottage. I was on the roof on the 12th, in the day-time; it was all safe then, and next morning it was stripped of the lead.

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . I am a constable. On the 13th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning. I was in Turnmill-street, and saw a quantity of lead - there were about three pieces in a cart, three on the pavement, and, I think, three in the prisoner's shop; I crossed over, and asked the prisoner if he had bought that lead - he said what business was it of mine - I said I was an officer, and would know - he then said he had bought it of two men; I asked if he had a bill and receipt; he went into the room, and began writing on the mantel-piece - he called me in, and said, "That is the person I bought it of, Mr. Thomas, of Walham-green - I have bought things of him before;" I said, "Where is the bill?" he then took down a file - I said they were old bills - he went out, and brought in a piece of paper - I said that would not do, I should take the lead and him too; his wife began crying, and hanging about him, and he said, "Here is a sovereign, go on;" I said, "I shall take it away," and said,"If you bought this honestly, you will go with me, and see if we can find the man;" we went to several places,

and in St. John-street saw two men with lead in a cart - the prisoner went up to them. and said, "Do you know the man who drove the grey pony, who brought some lead to my house this morning?" they said No, and ran away; I left Cohen, pursued, and took one of them - I then went home to the prisoner, and said, "I don't think I have done right in letting you go - I must take you;" he said he hoped not, on account of the situation of his wife; I said I would take his word, and he met me at the office - he told me there, he had bought the lead in the street, for 7l., and here is a book, which he produced as his entry-book.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you live near him? A. Yes, and have known him all his life; his wife was pregnant - I knew him and let him go; he came to me at half-past ten o'clock in the morning, and we went to the office together; there is an officer and patrol live opposite his house; I have inquired at Walham-green, and find a man, named Cheeseman, answering the description of the man whom he said he bought it of, is out of the way.

COURT. Q. Did he not say he bought it of Thomas? A. Yes, and that he had bought a still of him before; the paper he gave me says, "Thomas, bought of Cohen," which made me think it was not right; I fitted the lead - it corresponded.

ABRAHAM HAMER . I was sent for to assist in taking away the lead.

RICHARD MILLEN . On the 13th Terry, who lodges with me, came and said some lead was unloading at Cohen's; I went and stood at my door, talking to Terry - there were two men with the cart, and one stood at the head of the grey pony - there was one respectable looking man in the shop, and I saw some money, as if it was being paid for - the men went away; I thought it was all right, and went about my business.

JAMES TERRY . About a quarter to eight o'clock I saw the cart and grey pony; the lead was thrown out of the cart; I went down and told Millen.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) On the morning stated, two men came openly with the lead, and asked me to buy it; I agreed for the price; they threw it down on the pavement; had I been aware it was stolen I should not have exposed it.

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT re-examined. Part of the lead was in Emanuel's cart, who is Cohen's next door neighbour; it was not in the cart which had brought it - they were, apparently, loading it into Emanuel's cart, to go away again - there was no concealment.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-116

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 12.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

371. JOHN REDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 2 pewter-pots, value 2s. , the goods of Jeremiah Dismon .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-117

372. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 500lbs. of lead, value 50s., the goods of Francis James Graham , and fixed to a certain building of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Henry Winch , and fixed to a certain building of his. (See page 193.)

HENRY WINCH. I rent a cottage at Heston , of Mr. Graham: the lead was all safe on the roof on the 12th, and on the morning of the 13th nearly the whole was removed - it had been drawn out, and partly cut; I saw it afterwards in the possession of Vincent, but did not see it fitted.

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . While Cohen and I were going to find the men who had sold him some lead, we saw this lead, in a cart, at Bowyer's door, in Ray-street; the prisoner and another man were unloading it; we went up to them, the prisoner ran off in one direction, and the other in another; I followed the prisoner, and in a quarter of a mile he was taken by Attwater; he said to every one he met, "It is not me, it is the man behind;" when I came up and took him, I found these pinchers in his pocket, and in the cart we found the lead, this crow-bar, and bludgeon - I compared the lead to the building - it fitted exactly, and here are marks of the pinchers on it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did you or Cohen say in the hearing of the men, before they ran away? A. Cohen asked if they knew who the man was who drove the grey pony, as he had bought part of the lead which I had stopped; this was a portion of the same lead; the tail-board was down - it was then about nine o'clock - the name of "William Brown, Fulham, Middlesex," was on the cart; the prisoner said at the watch-house, "The truth is, I owe my landlord a little money, and have got my brother-in-law's name on the cart, for fear of its being taken from me" - and that the cart had been hired of him by the other man; I went down, and got Brown up; he said he knew nothing of his name being on the cart; I found there had been a man, named Cheeseman, at Walham-green, answering Cohen's description of Thomas - he has absconded.

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I was going along Ray-street, and saw a cart go to Bowyer's door - the prisoner was driving; I saw it for two or three minutes before it came to the door - it appeared a heavy load; I was going on business to Clerkenwell-green; I returned in about a quarter of an hour; Vincent then asked me to assist in taking the prisoner, which I did; he was very unwilling to be searched at the lock-up place, and these pinchers were found on him, and in the cart we found this crow-bar and bludgeon.

FRANCIS JAMES GRAHAM . I am owner of the cottage at Heston; there is the mark of a crow-bar on the top of the cottage and on this piece of lead; this crow-bar seems to fit the marks.

DAVID ATTWATER . I was in Bath-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and collared him - Vincent was pursuing him: he struck at me to knock me down.

JOHN BOWYER . On the 13th of December the prisoner came with a cart to my house, about nine o'clock in the morning - he came to the door, and asked if I would purchase lead; I asked where he got it, and what lead it was; he said it was some rubbish he had bought at Fulham; I said if he got it honestly, I would give him 13s. a hundred weight for it; I looked at it, and said if he would show me a bill and receipt, I would buy it; he brought a piece in; I thought it was not right, and sent for a constable.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the lead concealed? A. No, it was quite open; there was another person with him, but I did not see his face.

ABRAHAM HAMER . I am a constable. Bowyer sent for me; but the officers got there before me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent - a man came to me the night before, and asked me to let him have a cart, which I agreed to; I got up, and harnessed the horse - he came and took it - he came back, and asked if I would go to town with him; I said Yes; we got to Ray-street - he there told me to go in, and ask if they would buy the lead - the man said, "Turn the horse round, as the people can see it all the way up the street;" he turned it himself; Bowyer said, "Why, the devil, did you not put it into sacks? make haste in with it, and throw it backwards;" he moved the rags to put it there; the officers came, and I certainly did attempt to run, being frightened.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-118

373. JAMES WHITE and DENNIS CALLARN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 60 lbs. weight of lead, value 12s., the goods of Joseph Thomas Fulham , their master .

JAMES FOGG . I am a constable of the Thames Police. On the 12th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners turn out of Whitechapel into Petticoat-lane - one had a bag, and the other something heavy in a leather apron; I went up to Callarn, and asked what he had got; he said tools - White was close by, and he also said tools; I felt, and said, "It is lead, where did you get it?" White then said, "I am master, that is my man - it is some lead I have been working with at Mr. Duff's, at Poplar, and am taking it home;" I took them into a public-house, and then before a Magistrate; Callarn there said he worked for Mr. Fulham, at Clerkenwell, and that White was the journeyman and he labourer; White had about forty pounds of lead, and Callarn twenty-eight.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. In what way were they carrying it? A. On their shoulders; White afterwards said he lived in Golden-lane, and mentioned several persons whom he knew there; he said, at the office, that he was not a master - and I did not go to Golden-lane; it is not sheet-lead, but lumps.

JOHN HAINES . I am foreman to Joseph Thomas Fulham, a smith, who lives at Clerkenwell; the prisoners were in his employ. On the 12th of December I saw this lead at the Thames Police-office, and know it by marks on it, corresponding with marks of the chisel, and with another piece, which I have brought; the prisoners wished for more lead for their work at Mr. Duff's iron-railing - I gave them 2 cwt. - it was in their care; I told Callarn to fetch it from the cellar - I think it was on the 8th; it was lead of this description.

Cross-examined. Q. Point out the marks? A. Here is the mark where it has been broken with a chisel - other people may use a chisel, but this fits our chisel; I know this lead from the corresponding pieces, which I produce; I know it from the chisel marks, and from its substance and quality, being the same as some left behind.

JAMES DUFF . I live at Poplar. The prisoner were employed by Mr. Fulham, to fasten some railings of mine with lead; I did not notice the lead - they had a place in my yard to put it into. The officer came to me the day after they were taken, and the lead in the tool-house appeared diminished in quantity.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot be positive any was gone? A. It was my opinion that some was.

JOHN BENNETT . I was with Fogg; we were standing at the end of Petticoat-lane; the prisoners came by with each a load; we followed, and asked what they had got; they said tools: Fogg said it felt like lead - White said "We have brought it from Poplar, where we have been fitting up iron-rails," and that they were going to Golden-lane - we took them to a public-house; White said he had been working at Duff's, and the other was his man, and had been with him about six months; Fogg asked where he got it - he at first said he bought it at an old iron-shop. I stated that to the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the man give his address? A. One took out his pocket-book to give Fogg his address - whether he did so I do not know.

COURT. Q. Were they going towards Golden-lane? A. Yes, but Brick-lane would have been their nearest way from Poplar.

JOHN HAINES . They should have left the lead at Mr. Duff's, if they did not want it, as there was a good deal more work to do; Callarn was in the service before I came - I have been there six months.

CALLARN's Defence. Haines neither saw the lead weighed, nor cut it; I weighed it, and when he came out I told him there was 2 1/2 cwt.

WHITE's Defence. I said I was going to take it to my master. and that I lived at No. 10, Harper-street, Golden-lane; I asked if he knew Tweedy, the officer, as I thought he would.

WHITE - GUILTY. Aged 41.

CALLARN - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-119

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

374. JAMES JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 3 handkerchiefs, value 7s. 6d., and 1 pair of boots, value 3s. , the goods of William Sheldrake ; and MARY SEXLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving 3 handkerchiefs, part of the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM SHELDRAKE. I lodge in the Curtain-road , on the first floor - I am in the employ of Mr. Neal, a corn-chandler, of Shoreditch. On the 18th of December I missed this property from my room; I found one handkerchief on the 4th of January, at Sexley's. where Joyce lodged; he had lodged in my room - his father is my brother-in-law; I missed some coats and trousers at the same time - he had the boots on: he slept with me the night before I missed the things; he was gone, and had left the key with the woman down stairs. I never saw Sexley till the 4th of January; we waited till she came in - she lives at the corner of Angel-court, Glass-house-yard: the officer said we had come about some property which I had lost; she keeps a lodging-house - she said she knew nothing about them: she opened a chest, and there I found this handkerchief; I said Joyee had stolen it; she said it was

her husband's - that he died at sea about four years ago, and left it her. She was taken into custody. I know it by one corner, which is a little unsewed.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long had Joyce lodged with you? A. Only about a fortnight.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am a shoemaker. On the 4th of January I met Joyce on Tower-hill, and asked if he would go with me to Sheldrake's; he said he would - he came as far as Houndsditch, and then said if I would go to his lodging in Blue Anchor-yard we could take the things; I said, "No, I will go to Sheldrake's:" I took him to Neal's, where Sheldrake works, and then we sent for an officer; we then went to Sexley's, and found the handkerchief in a chest, with twenty-seven duplicates: he had these boots on when I took him.

JAMES HILL . I am an officer, and went to Sexley's - I told her I came to look for things which Sheldrake had lost; she said she knew nothing of them; she opened the chest at my desire, and we saw some handkerchiefs; she said, "They were all my husband's, who died about four years ago;" the prosecutor claimed this one.

GEORGE GROVES . I am an officer, and took the boots off the prisoner's feet.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker. These two handkerchiefs were pawned at my shop, on the 18th of December, by a woman - I cannot say by whom.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOYCE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks .

SEXLEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-120

375. ANN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 2 seals, value 1s., and 2 keys, value 1s., the goods of Richard Bury , from his person .

RICHARD BURY. I keep a chandler-shop , in St. George's-row, Chelsea, and am married. On the 2d of January I was going home at a quarter-past three o'clock in the afternoon - I met the prisoner in the street; she was quite a stranger: I had a large parcel of paper - she said she was going to Chelsea, and would help me to carry it; she carried it as far as the Bag of Nails public-house, Charing-cross; I said I was going to Smith's, a pawnbroker: she said she knew him well; we went into the Bag of Nails, and called for some rum; I had no money, and said to her,"Take my watch, and leave it at the bar for a shilling" - the pot-boy said he would lend me a shilling, and she gave me the watch back; we went on to Mr. Smith's, and left the paper: he gave me 1s. 6d. - we then went on to the Cheshire Cheese public-house, and afterwards went into the Three Compasses public-house; they would not let us have any liquor there; I laid my head down on the table, and she once or twice rather thumped me; I put up my hand, and said, "Go along - you are not my wife," and I think she was taking my watch then - it was in my fob; she particularly wanted to see me home before that, but then she went out. I was half-and-half; she did not wish me good night; I missed my watch when I got home.

Prisoner. Q. Where did I first meet you? A. In Jermyn-street - I did not give her the watch to pawn.

WILLIAM BLAY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in King's-road. On the 2d of January the prisoner pawned this watch, in the name of Ann Shepherd - I knew her before.

JAMES COVINGTON . I was sent for, and apprehended her; she said she supposed it was for Bury's watch, which he had given her to pawn - that she had given him 25s. and the duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. We went to several houses; he gave me the watch at the Cheshire Cheese, to pawn, and I took him the money; he fell asleep at the Compasses; I told him if he was going to sleep I should leave him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-121

376. JOHN SURMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 21 candles, value 1s. 8d., the goods of Nicholas Charrington and John Charrington , his masters .

GEORGE EARL . I am cashier to Nicholas and John Charrington, brewers . The prisoner was a labourer of theirs for three years, at 18s. a-week; Mr. Tibbs makes our candles. In consequence of information I sent for the prisoner into the counting-house, and accused him of concealing candles - he denied it; I sent for an officer - we went to his house, and between the bed and mattress found twenty-five candles, tied in a string - there is one red wick mixed with the white ones, by which I can swear to them.

MORGAN TATE . I am a tunman at the brewery. On the 12th of December, a few minutes before eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner near the door, stuffing his jacket with candles - he went down the steps, and dropped two; I told Mr. Earl in about a quarter of an hour.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I took the prisoner in charge, and found the candles under the bed.

JOSEPH TIBBS . I am a tallow-chandler. I make this particular description of candles for the prosecutors, and for nobody else.

The prisoner begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-122

377. WILLIAM SAWGOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 stove, value 4s. , the goods of John Sawgood .

JOHN SAWGOOD. The prisoner is my son. I live at Union-place, Land of Promise, Hoxton Old-town . On the 20th of December, about half-past five o'clock, I went down to the wash-house, and missed a stove - I had seen it safe on the Sunday - I went out, and found it at a locksmith's, at the corner of Ivy-lane, Hoxton - I saw my son afterwards, and told him what he had done; he said I should have it in a few days, but next morning I went to Worship-street; my son has lived away from me for three months. I never gave him leave to sell or pawn my things.

NATHANIEL HIND . I am a locksmith. I bought this stove of the prisoner, for 3s. 9d. - I had seen him before, passing in the street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had no work to do. I asked my father to give me 1s.; he told me to go thieving for it; he would not give me a bit of victuals.

JOHN SAWGOOD . That is not true.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-123

378. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 watch, value 3l.; 5 boots, value 10s.; 1 pair of clogs, value 1s.; 1 umbrella, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 watch-key, value 3s.; 1 seal, value 4s., and 1 piece of ribbon, value 1d., the goods of Robert Scullard , from his person .

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I am an officer. I was on duty with Roberts, on the night of the 2d of January, about a quarter to five o'clock in the afternoon; we saw the prisoner in Oxford-street, with two others, about his own size; they were in company; we watched them some time, and saw them following carts and waggons; we followed them down St. Giles' to near King-street, where there was a dray; the prisoner bent down under it; he came away, and went on to the corner of King-street , and there met the prosecutor; the others were just by; the prisoner went up to the prosecutor, who was intoxicated, talked to him a few minutes, he took him by the arm, and walked up one street and down another; they at last came to Red Lion-square, the others still following; the prisoner took him round the square, took a bundle from under his arm, and put it under his own; they went on to Guildford-street, and there the prisoner took an umbrella from the prosecutor; they went on to some buildings - I saw the prisoner put the prosecutor behind a clump of bricks - the other two were at the corner of Well-street, fifty or sixty yards from him - I saw a bit of a scuffle between the prisoner and the prosecutor, behind the bricks; one of the others ran past us, and asked if that was the way to Clerkenwell - I said Yes; he asked if it was very muddy - I said No: the other then ran by; we then ran over, and found the prosecutor; he had his back against some bricks at first; the prisoner then put him against the railings of an unfinished house, as if he wanted to push him over the bar - I collared the prisoner with both hands - I saw him put his hand into his own left side jacket pocket; he took out this watch, handed it to the prosecutor, and said, "Here is your watch"- he then up with his fist, struck me several times in the face, and endeavoured to trip me up - I threw him down, and called for assistance; Catchpole came and assisted me to take him to the watch-house - Roberts brought the prosecutor - I asked if he had got his watch; he said No; I said "Feel," and he found it in his left hand breeches pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. You saw the prisoner give it to him? A. Yes - I only found 7d. on the prisoner - I had seen him put the bundle and umbrella against the bricks, before he put the prosecutor against the bar; he did not appear to be taking care of him.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Betraun. I produce the umbrella and bundle, which I took from behind the Bricks; Betraun's evidence is correct - I saw the prisoner strike him several times.

ROBERT SCULLARD. I am a shoemaker , and live in Primrose-street. I had been drinking, and was much the worse for liquor - I had a bundle, an umbrella, and watch, and was coming from Piccadilly; the prisoner met me, and spoke to me; I do not know what he said - I do not remember his being taken; this is my bundle, watch, and umbrella.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you meet him? A. I think about a quarter past five o'clock - I remember him perfectly - I do not remember saying I had not got my watch - I drank nothing after I met the prisoner - I remember his face well - I might give him the watch.

JAMES CATCHPOLE . I am a gentleman's coachman. I heard a noise, and found the officer holding the prisoner; they appeared to be struggling, and were both out of breath - I assisted, and as soon as I collared the prisoner, he asked the officer to show his authority, which I believe he did; he said at the watch-house, that if the officer would swear he had the watch, he would swear any thing, and denied having had it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you understand by that, that he denied having had it? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Hampstead, and met this gentleman in Holborn; he ran against me - I said,"My friend, you are rather intoxicated;" he asked me to see him as far as I was going; he took his own road; he dropped his bundle - I took it up, and placed it towards his arms; he said carry it for me: he dropped his umbrella - I took that up - I left him in Gray's Inn-lane, and the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280110-124

379. GEORGE PRIVET was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 chisel, value 6d.; 5 files, value 2s.; 1 turning-tool, value 6d.; 2 mandrils, value 1s. 6d.; 1 die, value 1s. 6d.; 5 heaters, value 1s.; 1 punch, value 6d.; 1 bolt, value 6d., and 1 piece of middle spindle, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Bradford , his master.

JOHN BRADFORD. I am an ironmonger . The prisoner was my labourer . On the 13th of December I missed this property, and found it at Oyler's in Suffolk-street, Pentonville - I spoke to the prisoner about it; he denied all knowledge of it - I always found him honest before, and beg to recommend him.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH OYLER . I deal in marine-stores, in Suffolk-street, Pentonville; my husband is in the country; the prisoner sold us this property at different times, within two months. I did not ask where he lived.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-125

380. SARAH MINERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 cap, value 2s. , the goods of John Brickell , and William Mills .

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am in the service of John Brickell, and William Mills, pawnbrokers of Tottenham-court-road . On the 28th of December, the prisoner came to the door - I saw her go up, snatch this cap down from the door-post, and put it under her cloak; another woman, who was in the shop, then went out, took hold of her arm, and they went on - I followed, and brought the prisoner back, with the cap under her cloak.

THOMAS FRAMPTON . I am an officer, and took her in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman came out of the shop, and gave me the cap - I did not take it down; she said,

"Will you buy it?" I said No; she said she would go into the shop, and see the value of it; the witness came out, and said I should pay for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-126

381. WILLIAM BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , two 20l., four 10l., and two 5l. Bank notes, and one 10l. promissory note, the property of John William Edwards , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAM EDWARDS. I am a wine-merchant , and live in Wigmore-street. On the 16th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, I took a hackney-coach in Holborn, and desired to be driven to Conduit-street; I had been dining with some friends in the City, and had drank a good deal of wine; I saw my property secure a short time before I got into the coach, and had no reason to believe I had lost it when I did get in; I had two 20l., four 10l., and two 5l. Bank notes, and one 10l. country note - I have since heard the prisoner is a hackney-coachman ; I do not know whether he drove me, nor do I know the number; my notes were folded together in my waistcoat pocket; I was put down in Conduit-street, but did not miss them for half an hour or an hour - it was possible for them to have dropped from my pocket in the coach, for I fell asleep there. I obtained the number of some of the notes at my banker's; I have since seen a 20l. note, No. 4056, and two 10l. notes - I do not know the dates of them. I believe I did not tell the coachman to go to any house in Conduit-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. So, as far as you are able to tell, if the notes had fallen from your pocket, the man would not have known where to bring them? A. No. I did not advertize them.

EDWARD M'DONALD . I am clerk to the prosecutor. I got a cheque changed, and paid him some notes, but I cannot swear when it was - it was in the week of the 16th November. I received 50l. at Scotts, the bankers, and gave my master the produce, I believe; but I sometimes give it to the cashier.

Cross-examined. Q. You have no recollection of the particular time, or the notes? A. No.

JAMES TYSON . I am clerk to Sir Clande Scott and Co. Mr. Edwards cashes with us. On the 16th of November I paid a cheque of his for 50l., in one 20l., two 10l., two 5l., and entered the numbers in my book.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you your book here? A. No; here is a copy of the entry - I cannot say who I paid it to.

COURT. Q. Is that memorandum in your hand-writing? A. Yes; the 20l. note was No. 4,056, dated the 19th of October, and, I presume, 1827; but we do not take the year, unless it is an old note.

RICHARD SPARROW . I am a shoemaker, and live at Oxford. I have known the prisoner many years - he is a native of that place; I understand he is a hackney-coachman. I was at the Boar's Head public-house, in Oxford on the 22d or 23d of November; the prisoner came in with another man, and said he had just come off the coach; he asked the landlady to change him a 20l. note, and she said she could not, but perhaps I would go to the Bank and get it changed, which I did, and gave him the change - I do not know that I saw him afterwards.

JOHN PARSONS . I am a clerk at the Oxford Bank. On the 21st of November I gave Sparrow change for a 20l. note - I gave him three 5l. notes of our own firm, and five sovereigns; I believe we paid the note to Mr. Smith, a builder, at Oxford; I do not know the number, but I wrote the name of Sparrow on the back of it - I did not write that name on any other note about that time.

Cross-examined. Q. The circumstance would not have been in your recollection except by reference to your book? A. No; my book is not here.

COURT. Q. When were you first applied to about it? A. About Christmas-day, I think - I could not speak to it without referring to the book; I am not certain the note was paid to Smith.

WATKIN JONES . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I produce a 20l. note - I cannot tell when it was paid in.

JOHN PARSONS . This is the note I received from Sparrow - his name is on it, with the date - I can swear to it without referring to my book, by the writing on it.

JOHN ASH . The prisoner came to my shop about seven or eight weeks ago, about November, with a little man - they bought two coats, two hats, and two waistcoats, and the prisoner gave me a 10l. Bank note - I do not know the number - I gave it to Adams to change; I did not write on it - I often change notes with him; I gave the prisoner 5l. in change - he backed the note himself.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a publican. I changed a 10l. note for Ash; a person who came with him wrote his name on the note - I believe it to be the prisoner; I paid the note to Messrs. Whitbread's clerk, and understand it has been lost.

SUSAN PACKHAM . I wash for the prisoner - he is a hackney-coachman; I do not know his number - he drives for a hackneyman. About five weeks ago he paid me a 10l. note for a bill - I changed it at a linen-draper's shop. in High-street - there is nobody here from there.

THOMAS HAYDEN . I am a hackney-coachman. The prisoner is the same; he asked me to give him change for a note - I think he said it was a 5l.; I do not know when it was.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Packham's room; on the 19th of December I said, "Is Brooks here?" he said "Yes." I said I wanted him for stealing 100l. from a gentleman - he said he knew nothing about it; the Magistrate asked what he had to say; he said he did not take the gentleman up in Holborn, but at the corner of Bond-street, and took him to Holborn, that he found some of the notes at the bottom of the coach, and that it was 55l. or 65l. - I think 55l. I had not mentioned Mr. Edwards' name to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was what he said taken down? A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-127

382. GEORGE MAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 coat, value 40s. , the goods of William Elcomb .

WILLIAM ELCOMB. I am servant at a public-house. On the 15th of December the prisoner came and asked me to lend him a great coat for a gentleman to wear, at Knightsbridge, and said I should have it next day - I lent it to him; he did not return it.

Cross-examined by MR. RYLAND. Q. How long have you known him? A. Two years - we were intimate; he asked me to lend him a sovereign; I borrowed 10s. and lent him - that was a separate transaction. He did not ask me to lend him the coat to pawn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-128

383. HENRY FRANKLIN and JAMES WILLIAM COOPER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 silver tea-spoon, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Green .

RICHARD GREEN. I keep the King's Arms public-house, at Uxbridge . Franklin's mother has scoured our pots for twelve years - he came to the house to fetch and return them. I received this spoon from Attwell on the 29th of December - Franklin had been at my house the day before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know any thing of Cooper? A. No.

WILLIAM ATTWELL . I am a silversmith, and live at Uxbridge. This bowl of a spoon was brought to me by Cooper, on Friday evening, the 28th of December - I bought it for 1s. 5d.; I asked where he got it; I knew he lived somewhere in the town; the bowl is not worn out - it weighs about 6 dwts.; Franklin brought the other part about two hours after; I told him it looked suspicious, for I had bought the bowl, and would not buy that: I then went over to Green's, in consequence of information, and the prisoners were taken a few days after.

Cross-examined. Q. If a boy like Cooper had brought you a whole spoon, would you buy it? A. It depends on whether he told me a plausible story - he said he had found it on Brown's dung-hill; we often hear of such things; I asked where he lived, and where his father worked; I found I knew his father by sight, and believed he had found it.

JOHN FARRANT . I am a constable. I took the prisoners: Franklin said he found the spoons in some stuff which his mother washed the pots in; I said he must have known it was Green's, as it had his name on it; he said he could not read, but he signed his examination before the Magistrate. Cooper told the Magistrate Franklin gave him the bowl, and he had found it.

FRANKLIN's Defence. I found it.

FRANKLIN - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

COOPER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-129

384. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 82 yards of silk, value 16l. 10s., the goods of Richard Burton , from the person of Thomas Woodrow , the younger .

THOMAS WOODROW, JUN. I live with my father, Thomas Woodrow, a shoemaker, of Grub-street. On the 1st of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was carrying a parcel for Richard Burton, my master, a silk manufacturer , of No. 110, Wood-street, to Mr. Pratt's, at the corner of Kingsland-road; I think there were eighty-two yards of silk in it - when I got to Tabernacle-walk , it was snatched from under my arm; I turned round, and saw two men - they ran down a narrow passage; I cannot say whether the prisoner was one - they came behind me; I pursued a little way down the passage, where the prisoner stopped me, and kept pushing me back, with his back, while the other escaped; I cried Stop thief! and Murder! the other got away - the prisoner kept me back for two or three minutes; he then walked down the passage till I got to the end, and I by his side, and there were two men.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. How broad is this place? A. It is narrow - two people cannot pass at the entrance of the court, but afterwards I could have passed him, if he had not pushed me back; he walked on when the other had escaped; Windmill-street and Tabernacle-walk both lead into one, and some people call it all Windmill-street.

JOHN HARMAN . I am a watchman, and work at a cow-yard in Tabernacle-walk. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and Murder! I ran towards the spot, and saw this boy, who had hold of the prisoner's arm; he begged of me to take him, as he had been robbed of his master's property, and he had prevented his going after them. I took him into a public-house, and got an officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he make any resistance? A. Not that I saw; there were one or two people about - I do not think he could have got from the boy; there is room for two people to pass in the passage - it is narrow just at the entrance.

BENJAMIN FOSTER . I live in Paradise-street. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and Murder! I ran out, and saw this lad holding the prisoner; he said another man had stolen a roll of silk, and he had prevented his pursuing him - I know the passage - it is narrow at each end, but wider in the middle.

GEORGE JAMES COLES . I live with Mr. Richard Burton. On the 1st of December this lad was sent with eighty-two yards of silk to Mr. Pratt, an undertaker, in Kingsland-road.

JOHN MEACHAM . I am a silk manufacturer. On Saturday evening, the 1st of December, about half-past six o'clock, I was going home, and saw the prisoner and two other men walking; I followed them three hundred yards at least; when they got near the Tabernacle, they made a sudden start, and almost immediately I heard a cry of Stop thief! and Murder! I crossed over, and went down a passage leading into Windmill-street; at the end I saw this boy holding the prisoner; he said, "For God's sake stop him, for he has robbed me;" and then said, "He stopped me from going after the thief."

Cross-examined. Q. What distance were you from them? A. A very little way.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and went down the passage; the lad caught hold of me, and said I had robbed him; and when the gentleman came up, he said I had stopped him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-130

385. ANDREW MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 2 sheets, value 6s.; 1 blanket, value 3s., and 1 pillow, value 6d. , the goods of John Daley .

MARY DALEY . I am the wife of John Daley; we live in Steward's-rents, Drury-lane . The prisoner hired a second floor room, furnished, on the 28th of November, and left on the 4th of December; he took the key; he had not paid any rent - he is married; his wife came there with

him; he said he belonged to the Excise-office - I missed these things.

WILLIAM DUTTON TOWNSEND . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Russell-street. On the 1st of December a sheet was pawned, and another on the 3d of December, in the name of Ann Murray, by a woman.

JOHN DALEY . I rent this house; when the prisoner was taken, he said his wife had taken the key, and gone to service, but the key was found on him; the duplicates were left in the room - his wife was there after the 1st of December.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-131

386. DAVID McKELVIN and THOMAS HOLMES were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 tablecloth, value 15s.; 2 decanters, value 10s.; 1 fork, value 5s.; 1 piece of carpet, value 1s., and 24 candles, value 2s., the goods of Henry Richmond , Esq. , their master .

MR. RYLAND conducted the prosecution.

HENRY RICHMOND, ESQ. I reside at Stamford-hill . Holmes was my butler and footman , and had been with me about three weeks; all the plate, linen, and glass were under his immediate charge. On the 1st of January I went out, about six o'clock, to dine with my son-in-law; I returned about eleven that night - I had left the house in charge of the servants; McKelvin was not in my service - I never saw him. Holmes had not authority to have visitors - it was generally known that I objected to it; on the 2d of January I saw my property at Worship-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you expressly prohibited Holmes from having visitors? A. I do not know that I had for bidden him particularly - I have heard there had been carousing in my house all day; I saw no appearance of it that night; I went into Holmes' bed-room at two o'clock in the morning (and my son took a pistol), having heard McKelvin was taken. I believe the candles to be mine - my name is on the paper they are wrapped in; I can swear to the decanter by the pattern - I miss one like it; the table-cloth has my name on it; I have a knife which matches the fork.

THOMAS MONAHAN . I am gardener to Mr. Richmond. On the 1st of January McKelvin and another man came to the house, about half-past two o'clock in the day - I never saw him before; they came to see Holmes, and dined there: I first saw them in the butler's pantry - I had seen a man there once before, but did not see his face; they staid all the evening, and brought some liquor to the house - I was quite sober; the other man appeared to be ill in the evening, and laid down in the pantry - he had a sort of fit; we thought he might take part of my bed, and he slept with me till the morning. I saw McKelvin at the house as late as twelve o'clock, or between eleven and twelve - he was in the pantry with Holmes and the other man; I did not see him go out, but I saw Holmes go towards the door, and when he came back, he said he had been to let McKelvin out.

Cross-examined. Q. What became of the man who was ill? A. He remained there - there were only those two and the servants, the cook and two housemaids; I had one glass of rum and water, and one glass of gin - no more; we dined about half-past two o'clock; I went out to a chemist's with the other man, returned about five o'clock, and in the evening we had the liquor - nothing was drank but what they brought - there might be two pints of gin and rum; I heard no appointment to meet again after that day; the meat and drink was thrown over the table-cloth.

Q. Did you not hear Holmes tell McKelvin his master would be angry, and he must take the cloth to be washed, and bring it again? A. Not a word of the sort; I went to bed, and did not know what had happened till the next morning.

MR. RICHMOND re-examined. When I returned home the housemaid opened the door; Holmes came up to me, and took my hat; he did not appear intoxicated.

WILLIAM BAXTER . I was groom to Mr. Richmond. I first saw Mckelvin about a fortnight before the 1st of January; he came and inquired for Holmes; I took his horse into the stable; he saw Holmes, and went into his pantry; I did not see him go away; on the 1st of January I went out with Holmes about twelve o'clock, and paid a bill - we had two glasses of elder wine - we came into the Birdcage public-house, and there had two glasses of rum; I did not go home till about three o'clock in the afternoon; I was drunk, and went to lay in the stable; I did not see McKelvin; Monahan came by while we were at the Birdcage.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Monahan have some rum? A. Yes, and ale; he was not drunk.

JOHN FRANKLIN . I am a watchman. I was calling past twelve o'clock on the 1st of January, and saw Holmes let McKelvin out of Mr. Richmond's house; he had a parcel in his right hand, and went towards town; I cannot say whether it was a basket; I am quite sure of his person - there is a gas-light opposite the gates; I saw him plainly - I never saw him before.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you venture to swear to him? A. Yes.

PETER WOODLEY . I am a watchman of Hackney. I I was on duty in Vittoria-place, which is in the road to town; I met McKelvin, between twelve and one o'clock, with a basket; I asked what he had got; he said, "You shall see;" I took him to the watch-house, and of the basket was this piece of carpet, and in it I found a silver-mounted fork, two dozens of candles, a table-cloth, and a decanter in each of his coat pockets, and the two stoppers in his waistcoat pocket.

JOHN CHAMBERS . I am a night-constable. I was at the watch-house; McKelvin was brought in, and these things found - he said the decanters were his own, and the table-cloth he was going to get washed; I asked his name - he said he would tell the Magistrate; the paper the candles are in, has "Richmond, Esq." on it.(Property produced and sworn to)

HOLMES' Defence. I gave this man the cloth to get washed, and the decanters to bring some liquor in on Sunday, as my time expired on the Monday following, and I wished to pay my footing; I have lived with Mr. Alderman Wood

McKELVIN - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

HOLMES - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Reference Number: t18280110-132

487. THOMAS HOLMES was again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 table-cloth, value 10s.; 1

knife, value 2s.; 1 fork, value 3s.; 19 pearl counters, value 3s., and 1 plate, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Richmond , Esq. , his master.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES LAMPET . I am an officer. I went, by Mr. Richmond's desire, into Holmes' room; Mr. Richmond, Jun. opened the prisoner's box, and in it were the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined. Q. When was this? A. About two o'clock on the morning of the 2d of January - Mr. Richmond, Jun. had a pistol - I went there to inform them McKelvin was taken.

MR. JOHN RICHMOND . I am the prosecutor's son. I went into Holmes' room, and found these things in the prisoner's box.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the prisoner's room before the officer came? A. No - I did not present the pistol at the prisoner.

HENRY RICHMOND, ESQ. Holmes was in my service. I know this knife and fork - they belonged to my father-in-law - I know the plate as one of a set - the counters are such as we use - the value of the whole may be about 2l.

Prisoner's Defence. It was usual to put things into my box, as I have no drawers.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-133

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

388. MARTIN MOORE , JAMES HAINES , CHARLES KING , and JOHN BREWER , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 8s., and 1 chain, value 2d. , the goods of Samuel Faint .

SAMUEL FAINT. I keep a chandler's-shop in Portland-town . I saw my watch safe in the parlour behind my shop, about two hours before I missed it - it was taken while I was out - I found it at the office next day.

MARY MALE . I had the care of Faint's shop. On the evening of the 12th of December Moore and Haines came in with some coals, and asked for some plums; they let a halfpenny fall - it rolled into the parlour - they said they could not find it; I said, "Never mind, I will give you another for it - I shall find it to-morrow, when I am cleaning" - I said so two or three times; they again said they could not see it - they pretended to look a third time, and said they saw it; I turned my head to get a pair of scales, and then they asked if I would not give them something for bringing the coals; I reached to the window, and got them two brandy-balls - they went out - a neighbour came in and gave an alarm - I missed the watch from the parlour; nobody but them had been in the place; I saw it when I left the parlour to speak to them.

SAMUEL BREWER . My father is a cabinet-maker, and lives in St. John's-wood. I was sent to Faint's shop by my mother, between four and five o'clock in the evening, and as I returned I met the four prisoners coming round the corner - I said to Moore."When will you pay my mother that 3d." - he said, "You must go round to my mother;" I said, "Very well;" they then all whispered together - I saw Haines and Moore go into the shop; Haines asked for some plums, and Moore knocked the halfpenny out of his hand - it rolled towards the parlour; King and Brewer were against some rails just by - I did not wait till they came out; I heard Brewer say, before they came out, that he would snatch the plums out of Haines' hand.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What did Moore owe the money for? A. For his clothes; I never quarrelled with him about it.

GEORGE GRAHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Bailey, pawnbroker, of Adam's-row. I have a silver watch, two seals, and a key, pawned by the prisoner King, on the 12th of December, about seven o'clock; he said it belonged to his brother, James Brewer, No. 7, Boston-street, and gave his own name as Charles Brewer.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen him before? A. No; I am certain of him - I saw him in custody next day - I lent him 1l.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a watchman. I received information about twelve o'clock that night. I took up all the prisoners in Park-road; Haines and Brewer denied their names.

HUMPHREY ROBERTS . I am serjeant of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house; I found 12s. 6d. in all on them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

HAINES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

BREWER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-134

389. JOHN BEEKLEY and ABRAHAM ATKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 2 sovereigns and 1 half sovereign, the monies of George Hammond , from his person .

GEORGE HAMMOND. On the 27th of November I was at the Red Lion public-house, at Finchley , and had two sovereigns and a half in my purse, in my right-hand breeches pocket; I was asleep; the prisoners and I had been drinking together; they have been gentlemen's servants, and had good characters; I was there from half-past nine o'clock to half-past ten - when I awoke the money was gone, but the purse was then in my coat pocket; my breeches pocket was turned inside out; I gave the purse to the landlady, but made no complaint, for I did not exactly know about it; I went next morning, and asked the landlady about it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Then you were not certain about it? A. Not till the morning - I was not sober.

CATHERINE COLWELL . I am landlady of the Red Lion Hammond was at my house, and fell asleep; I saw the two prisoners with him; I saw Beekley draw his left hand from Hammond's right-hand pocket, and put both his hands into his own breeches pocket; Atkins was then out of doors; I called the ostler, who awoke Hammond - Atkins then came and wanted to knock me down, saying he would not have Hammond disturbed - Hammond had before that laid his purse on the table, and I saw two sovereigns and a half in it - I put it back into his pocket - I would not let him have any more drink, and be produced his purse, to shew me he had got money.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you keep your eye on Beekley? A. Yes, except when I went to call in the ostler -

the money could not drop out of the purse; Hammond was tipsy, and fell asleep - the prisoners were not drunk.

WILLIAM POULTER . I am ostler at the Red Lion. My mistress came to the door, and told me to awake Hammond, as Beekley had his hand in his pocket; I went in and shook him; Atkins came and said, "What are you doing? I know him better than you - let him alone;" I said I would awake him; he abused my mistress, and struck at her; I stepped before her, and received the blow - I awoke Hammond - his pocket was turned inside out - he missed his purse, but found it, empty, in his coat pocket - I did not detain the prisoners; they said they would come next morning, and set all right - he said, "Very well" - but they did not.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Hammond drunk? A. Yes, rather; but he got up in his cart, and drove home afterwards.

JAMES FROST . I am an officer, and took the prisoners about a fortnight afterwards, at their mother's houses - they said they thought it was only a joke.

BEEKLEY's Defence. My hand was not in his pocket - I shook him by the collar, to awake him, to go home.

ATKINS' Defence. The ostler knew I was drunk - he led me out.

WILLIAM POULTER . Atkins was sick, and I led him out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-135

390. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 8 yards of velvet, value 4l.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 6d.; 1 walking-stick, value 1s., and 3 lbs. weight of plums, value 2s. , the goods of James Sample .

JAMES SAMPLE. I am a silk-weaver , and live at Bethnal-green . The prisoner was in my employ, helping my apprentice to work a loom, on the 9th of December; my own work was on another loom, in the same room; there were about eight yards and a half of velvet; on Sunday night, the 9th of December, I went to bed about half-past ten o'clock, and left the prisoner up - my wife told him to fasten the back door - he said he would - we had fastened the front - I was awoke about four in the morning, by my child, who had the small-pox; I struck a light, and feeling wind, I went into the next room, and missed the prisoner from his bed - Hindmarsh, my apprentice, was there asleep - I awoke him - I then went into my work-shop, and missed the velvet from my loom; a box there was broken open; the stockings and other things were taken out - they were safe on Sunday.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HINDMARSH . I am apprentice to Mr. Sample. On the 9th of December, at night, the prisoner told me, if he were to cut the velvet out of the loom, it would not be my master who could punish him, but the person belonging to the velvet; after I was in bed, he came and put two plums into my month, and gave me two apples - I saw him take a table-cloth from our room; he put a walking-stick against the door; he went up into the shop, came down, and came to bed with his clothes on, and about a quarter to four o'clock he took his hat and the stick, and went away; my master came into the room in about a quarter of an hour.

CHARLES LEWIS . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner on Monday morning, the 10th of December, about a quarter-past four o'clock, in the Back-road, Islington with these articles, which I produce.

THOMAS GRAFTON . I am a constable of the night, and have the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress - the parish would not relieve me; the prosecutor agreed to find me in victuals if I worked there; he did not give me victuals enough, and no money - it was starvation that drove me to it; I earned for him 3s. or 4s. a-day, and what he gave me would not cost 4d.

JAMES SAMPLE. He owed me above 4l. - he begged me to let him work for his victuals.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-136

391. JAMES MUNRO was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 ham, value 5s. , the goods of John Deas Thompson .

WILLIAM ODIAN . I am servant to Mr. John Deas Thompson, of Somerset-place , a commissioner of the Navy board . On the 8th of January I saw the prisoner shutting our larder door; I ran up the steps, and asked if he had got any thing - he said No, but I found this ham under his smock-frock; he owned that he had taken it: I did not know we had one there, and cannot identify it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-137

392. WILLIAM LAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 13 lbs. of bacon, value 6s. , the goods of John Toms .

JOHN TOMS. I am a cheesemonger , and live at Shadwell . On the 5th of January a watchman came in, and I missed a piece of bacon from the top of some cheeses at the door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner in King David-lane, near the prosecutor's shop, with this bacon under his arm - he was in liquor; I believe he is a hard-working man.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had been sober it would not have happened; my wife gave the prosecutor 1s.

JOHN TOMS. She put it on my lap, but I would not take it up.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 52.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280110-138

393. MOSES JULION was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 purse, value 1d.; 2 half-crowns, 26 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of James Pilgrim , from his person .

JAMES PILGRIM. Between twelve and one o'clock in the day, of the 13th of November, this money was in a purse in my waistcoat pocket; I was in my stable in Whitechapel ; the prisoner was in my employ - I put my waistcoat on the corn-bin; I saw it again in about five minutes: I had gone up to the loft for some hay for the horses, and bolted the door before I went up; while I was up there I heard the door unbolted - I looked out of window, and saw the prisoner running away: I came down stairs, felt in my pocket, and the purse and money were gone. I went

after the prisoner, but did not see him again till I met him on the 22d, and took him to Lambeth-street; I said I had been waiting for him some time; he said, "I heard you wanted to see me;" he said he was innocent.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more about the money than you do; there were two more boys in the stable - he asked me to go into the loft - I would not, and he turned me out of the stable; he went up, and was asleep there for two hours; I waited for him in the yard all that time.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-139

394. JOSEPH DAVIS, alias THOMAS BROWN , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , part of a watch chain, value 30s.; 3 seals, value 3l.; 1 ring, value 10s., and 1 watch-key, value 10s., the goods of John Gibbs , from his person .

JOHN GIBBS. On the 26th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Earl-street, Lisson-grove ; I saw the prisoner come up and snatch at my chain and seals - the chain broke; I collared him directly; he got from me - I followed, and he was taken; he got part of the chain.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Were there many people about? A. There was a crowd, but I was some distance from it.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am an officer. I was called to assist in taking the prisoner; he was then in the Champion public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you handcuff him? A. Yes- I generally do so, especially when I knew there were above forty thieves round; he escaped from me.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. The prisoner ran away with the handcuffs on, and in two or three days I found him; he immediately said, "I know nothing about the seals and chain."

PHILIP WEBSTER . I was with Stowell when we went up to the prisoner; I said, "What have you done with the cuffs?" he replied, "So help me God, Webster, I know nothing about the seals and chain."

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it. I was standing there, and the gentleman gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-140

395. MARGARET DOWNES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 2 frocks, value 2s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., and 1 shift, value 1s. , the goods of John Coleman .

BRIDGET COLEMAN . I am the wife of John Coleman. On the 29th of December, I came into my room, and saw the prisoner there, about half-past six o'clock; I did not know her; I looked about, and missed my things - I asked if she took them; she said No; I asked her again - she still said No - I said if she would tell me where they were I would give her 6d.; she would not, but afterwards said she had taken them down; my little girl at last found them in the yard; I had seen them safe about two o'clock.

GRIFFITH JONES . I am an officer, and received her in charge - she begged for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 10.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-141

396. WILLIAM CRISP and PETER ANDREWS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 4 lbs. weight of pork, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Darvill .

GEORGE WINDSOR . I am a watchman. On Saturday, the 5th of January, I saw the prisoners close to Richard Darvill's shop - he is a cheesemonger ; I saw Crisp take something from the window; Andrews was close to him at the time: they went away - I followed, and overtook them about twenty yards off; I found Crisp putting this hand of pork up between Andrews' short jacket; I found some biscuits on Andrews.

CRISP's Defence. I was going along, and declare to Almighty God I did nothing.

ANDREWS' Defence. Crisp gave me nothing.

CRISP - GUILTY . Aged 50.

ANDREWS - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-142

397. JOHN CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 coat, value 12s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 1l., and 4 handkerchiefs, value 9s. , the goods of James Boyce .

JAMES BOYCE . I was waiter at the White Bear public-house, Kingsland-road ; I missed these articles on the 5th of December; they were in a bundle on a shelf, in the ostler's premises - I saw them on the 10th, at the watch-house.

RICHARD HATCH . I am a watchman. I had information of this robbery about the 5th of December - I took the prisoner afterwards.

HENRY FREAKS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. I have a coat, pawned in the name of Crane - I do not know the person.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am a headborough. I received information, and told Hatch to apprehend the prisoner - he was brought to me, and gave up this handkerchief; he said the coat was pawned in Old-street - I went there, and found it.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am ostler at the White Bear. The prosecutor's bundle was safe in my stable on Sunday morning, the 2d; the prisoner lived just by, and is a ginger beer maker - he came to me on the 1st of December; it rained hard, and I let him sleep in the stable; he asked me to let him sleep there again, which I agreed to; I saw no more of him till the 10th.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-143

398. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 1 watch, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Bryant .

THOMAS BRYANT. On the 11th of December I went out, and left my watch in my room in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles' , and when I returned it was gone. The prisoner lodged with me - I had given the watch to my wife, at twelve o'clock, to put into the room; she went out with me - we returned about four o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DOYLE . I was on duty in Tottenham-court-road, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner

running, and persons pursuing him; I took hold of him, and he took this watch out of his waistcoat pocket.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280110-144

399. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 5s., and 2 keys, value 2d. , the goods of John Marks .

JOHN MARKS. I was on board a vessel in the river on the 20th of December; I saw my watch safe at nine o'clock in the morning, and missed it in about two hours: I had gone on board the next vessel; the prisoner was on board my vessel, and had been a voyage.

WILLIAM PARKE . About five o'clock in the evening of the 20th of December, the prisoner came and asked if I had lost a watch - I said No, but I knew who had; he said it was at a pawnbroker's - I asked where - he said he would not tell me: I detained him, and sent for an officer.

JAMES GRIMSHAW . I am servant to Mr. Kennedy, a pawnbroker; this watch was brought by the prisoner, to be pawned, but Marks had given us information; the prisoner said he bought it in May last; I gave him Mr. Mark's address, and sent him to him.

BENJAMIN BLABEY . I took the prisoner in charge - he asked if I was the owner of the watch - I said No; he said he would not go to the ship with me, and I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. I was very drunk, and know nothing about it.

JAMES GRIMSHAW . I did not think him drunk, but more out of his mind.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-145

400. ANN BLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 shawl, value 6s. , the goods of Enoch Daniel .

MARGARET DANIEL . I am the wife of Enoch Daniel. On the 4th of January I went home with my daughter to Old Pye-street, Westminster ; I was wet, and hung my shawl to dry; my daughter was taken ill - I was attending to her, and the prisoner came into the room; she said she wanted a lodging, and that the lady of the house knew her- I said she could not speak to her now; she then sat down: my daughter came too - I said I should go home; I turned round, and the prisoner and my shawl were gone.

ROBERT MARKS . I am a pawnbroker. This shawl was pawned by the prisoner, on the 4th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening.

EDWARD WRIGHT . I am an officer. I received information, and took the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280110-146

401. SAMUEL BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 2 saws, value 5s.; 1 knife, value 2s.; 1 plane, value 2s., and 1 chisel, value 2s. , the goods of James Hobbs .

JAMES HOBBS. I am a barge-builder . On the 24th of November this property was locked in the cabin of my barge: when I came to work next morning the cabin was broken open, and the things gone. The prisoner is a fisherman, and lives close by where the barge laid; this knife and saw are mine; the rest are not found.

HENRY ROGERS . I am a cooper, but on the 2d of December I was collecting pots for my father, who is a publican; I saw the prisoner, and bought this saw of him, for 6d.

JOSEPH DICKENSON . I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of December; I found this knife in his room; he said he bought the things at the Cannon public-house, at Brentford.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a dominomaker there, who said he was in distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-147

402. JOHN DOWNES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 piece of mahogany, value 6s. , the goods of Jane Harris , and John Harris .

CHARLES HOARE . I am in the employ of John and Jane Harris, of Earl-street, Finsbury, timber-merchants . On the 29th of December, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner come into the yard, and take this mahogany; he walked out with it - I went and took him.

BENJAMIN WEBB . Hoare called me; I took up the mahogany.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am an officer, and took him in charge; he said he was taking it to look at.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I wanted a bit of wood, and, as it was dark under the gateway, I brought it into the street, to look at the grain of it.

CHARLES HOARE . He had got about twenty yards from the premises.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-148

403. JOHN HANCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 ribbon, value 3d.; 1 key, value 3d., and 1 ring, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Sewell .

ROBERT SEWELL. I live at Ealing ; the prisoner worked on a farm with me, for about four months - I left my watch in a drawer in my bed-room, at four o'clock, in the afternoon of Sunday, the 16th of December, and did not miss it till Tuesday - I have not found it - I charged the prisoner with taking it; he denied it.

JAMES BODYMEAD . The prisoner went up stairs, on the 16th of the December - I went up in about four minutes, and saw him in the prosecutor's room; the candle was on the drawers; the drawer was open, and he had the watch in his hand, looking at it - I said nothing, but went to bed. On Wednesday, when it was missing, I mentioned this; the prisoner continued to live there.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I apprehended the prisoner; he denied the charge. It is a lone house.

Prisoner's Defence. Bodymead went up stairs with me - he took the watch and looked at it - I said, "What are you doing? he said, "Looking at the watch: this glass is broken" - I said, "You had better let it alone;" he put it down, and the servant came up, and said, "What are you doing?" he said Nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-149

404. DANIEL MACLANE , FREDERICK BOWIL ,

STEWART MACDONALD , and JOHN GINNERLY were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 dead fowl, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Hunt .

THOMAS HUNT. I keep a poulterer's-shop , in Hungerford-street . I lost a fowl on the forenoon of the 8th of January - I had seen it safe about five minutes before - I did not see it taken, but I received information - I have no doubt the fowl was mine; it was plucked.

THOMAS JARVIS . I live next door to Mr. Hunt. Last Tuesday I saw the four prisoners running from his shop, and the feet of the fowl was projecting from the breast of Macdonald - I pursued, and took him with it, about fifty yards off - I think the others are the boys.

THOMAS SHIELD . I am an officer. I took Macdonald; and at the corner of Southampton-street, Jarvis pointed out the other prisoners, and I took them.

MACDONALD's Defence. They gave me the fowl, and I ran away with it.

MACDONALD - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

GINNERLY - NOT GUILTY .

BOWIL - NOT GUILTY .

MACLANE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-150

405. WILLIAM McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 cart-wheel, value 10s. , the goods of William Quin .

WILLIAM QUIN. I am a green-grocer . On the 28th of December, I lost my cart-wheel.

JAMES DUNN . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner in Short's-gardens, about fifty yards from Quin's, with this wheel, on the 28th of December, about five o'clock in the morning; he said he brought it from Creeves', in Drury-lane. I found Quin's out.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to wheel it to Tottenham-court-road, where I was to find a broken cart.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-151

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 14.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

406. JAMES HOBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 3 live tame ducks, price 5s., and 11 live tame fowls, price 14s. , the property of Joseph Fletcher .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BARRETT. I am gardener to Mr. Joseph Fletcher, of Bruce-grove, Tottenham . On the 8th of January eleven fowls and three ducks were lost from his premises - I saw them safe on the 7th, about eight or nine o'clock in the morning; they were then all alive - I saw them all the next day, in the hands of the officer; some of them were then dead - I am quite sure they are my master's.

DAVID RICHARDS . I am a watchman, in the Lower-road, Islington. I apprehended the prisoner a little after six o'clock, on Tuesday morning, with a bag on his shoulder - I asked what he had got; he said some ducks and fowls, which he was going to Newgate-market to sell - I asked where he had brought them from; he said from Winchmore-hill, and he left there at three o'clock - I asked if he had been stopped by any person; he said No - I asked if he came along the road; he said No, across the fields; he said at the watch-house, that he believed there were six fowls in the bag - I asked if he dealt in poultry; he said Yes.

THOMAS GRAFTON . I am the night constable. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house; he had five dead fowls, tied by the neck, and a sack on his shoulder; there were three ducks in one end of the sack, and six fowls in the other; he said he got them from Waltham; here are the live fowls; the dead ones appeared to have been lately killed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-152

407. RICHARD MARTIN , WILLIAM REYNOLDS , and JAMES HARDING were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 ream of paper, value 15s. , the goods of William Davies .

WILLIAM DAVIES. I am a stationer , and live in St. John-street, Smithfield. I know nothing of the prisoners - I lost some paper from my shop, on the 15th of December - I did not see it taken, but I had seen it about half an hour before - I did not miss it till Waddington brought it in - I had cut it, and am certain it was mine; it had been about two yards within the shop.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. I was coming down St. John-street, Smithfield , on the 15th of December, and saw the three prisoners together, for about a quarter of an hour; they passed and repassed several times - I saw them go to Davies' shop - Reynolds went in, and brought out this paper; the others were looking in at the window at the time - I caught hold of Reynolds, with the paper - Martin passed by, and ran away - I lost Harding - I took Martin next day, and Harding on the 17th.

Prisoner MARTIN. Q. Did not you tell the Magistrate, that a respectable person saw us, and would come forward? A. Yes; but he says he should not know the party.(Property produced and sworn to.)

REYNOLDS' Defence. Neither of the others were engaged with me. I beg for mercy.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARTIN - NOT GUILTY .

HARDING - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-153

408. OWEN DONAGHUE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 50 lbs. weight of lead, value 8s. , the goods of George Cottam , and Samuel Allen , his masters.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LINCOLN . I am an officer. On the 22d of December, about half-past five o'clock, the prisoner passed me in the Strand, behind the new church - I asked what he had got in his apron; he said lead, which he was going to take home to his employers, who lived in Cornwall-road, on the other side of the water - I took him to a public-house, and sent an officer to his master; he then said he must go into the yard - I suspected something, put my

hands on his side, and felt two more small pieces of lead were on each side; here is 52 lbs. altogether.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Which way was he going? A. Towards Fleet-street; he should have gone over Waterloo-bridge, which would save a mile and a half; he said he came from St. James'-park.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer, and was with Lincoln; his statement is true.

EDWARD ALLEN . I am in the employment of Samuel Allen and George Cottam, of Cornwall-road. I believe this lead to be theirs, as it fits this ladle in which it was melted; the prisoner was in their employment for a year and a half.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he not a good character? A. Yes, and was industrious; he has a wife and child.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-154

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

409. BIGLEY HERMITAGE was indicted for that he, on the 7th of January , at Ealing, alias Zealing, did break and enter a certain building, being within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of James Fletcher , and occupied therewith, but not being part thereof, and stealing therein 48 lbs. weight of mutton, value 20s. , the goods of the said James Fletcher.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS FLETCHER . I am the nephew of James Fletcher, butcher, of Old Brentford, in the parish of Ealing . On the night of Monday, the 7th of January, I killed seven South Down wether sheep - I dressed them, and hung them in the slaughter-house, adjoining the house; I saw them safe about six o'clock in the evening, and at half-past seven next morning I missed two; I have since seen part of a neck and loin of mutton, and know it to be my dressing; it was part of the two carcases lost - I got a search-warrant - I was not present when the search was made.

JOSEPH DICKINSON . I am a constable. I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's father's house, about half-past ten o'clock, on Tuesday morning, the 8th of January - the prisoner lived there; I knocked at the door - no one came - I then lifted up the latch, and went in; I called Mrs. Hermitage; she came about half way down stairs; I then went up, and found a sheep's head laying in a chair, in the first floor room; I then called the prosecutor's son, John, up, and we went into the attic together, and there found a quantity of mutton, cut in pieces; there was a whole carcase cut into pieces, and tied in a coarse cloth; we took it away; I went down, and told the mother and father I must secure them; I took the prisoner at the Little King's Arms public-house, Old Brentford; I said, "You are the man I want;" he said, "For what?" I said, "You will see;" I took him to the cage, and Mr. John Fletcher came up; I then said to the prisoner, "Mr. Fletcher lost two carcases of mutton last night, and I have found one carcase in your house;" the prisoner then said he found it, and I think he said near Drum-lane.

COURT. Q. How far is his house from Mr. Fletcher's? A. Four or five hundred yards.

JOHN FLETCHER . I am the prosecutor's son. Ten sheep had been killed the night before; part of them by Thomas Fletcher, but he dressed them all; they hung in the slaughter-house, which joins the back part of the dwelling-house, and is occupied by my father; it has no internal communication with the dwelling-house; we lost two sheep, worth about 4l.

COURT. Q. Must this have been done in the night? A. Yes; I believe between eleven and twelve o'clock; there are two side doors, which were locked by Thomas Fletcher - they were not opened, but a lattice window, which fastens with a bar, was broken.

HANNAH HERMITAGE . I am the prisoner's mother: about seven o'clock on the 7th of January, he had tea, and went out - he said he was going to work, but I went to the public-house after him, between eight and nine o'clock, and found him smoking; I asked him to come home; he would not - he brought the sheep in about twelve o'clock, and said he had picked it up in the King's highway - he took it up stairs, as I have dogs and cats down stairs - it was in a cloth; I believe it was cut.

JOHN BENNETT . I am a watchman. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night I saw the prisoner at the Little King's Arms, about fifty yards from the prosecutor's premises.

THOMAS FLETCHER . Here are marks on the shoulder and loin of mutton, which I made - every butcher has his own mark; I am sure they are part of the sheep I dressed - they are not cut up in a butcher-like way.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the mutton, with a cloth, a saw, and knife.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280110-155

410. WILLIAM HAYDON and JOHN HAYDON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 30 tiles, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Farrar Steadman .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable of Enfield. On the morning of the 20th of December, between three and four o'clock, I was on duty, with Cufley, at the bottom of Enfield town; we were leaning against the rails of the Newriver, and heard somebody walking along very heavy; we remained there till the prisoners came out of the gate of Mr. Steadman's premises, which join the river; we went up, and met them; William had got a lot of tiles on his shoulder, in a sack, and John had a quantity on his head - I asked what they had got; William said, "It is only a few tiles, John - pray let me go, and it shall be kept a secret;" I said, "Where did you get them?" he said from the buildings; I think there were nineteen tiles in the sack, and eleven on John's head; I have known them all their lives; I detained them, and at their premises found about eighty more tiles; they told the Magistrate they found them; there is an out-house building on the premises; I traced foot-marks from the gate they came out of to the building.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you sure he said it should be kept a secret? A. He did.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I was with Mead; his statement is correct; I took John.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure he desired it to be kept secret? A. Yes.

JOSEPH ELLIS . I am gardener to James Farrar Steadman. On the morning in question I missed some tiles from

the end of a cart-house; I afterwards saw them at the office, and believe them to be master's; they matched in every particular.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are not many tiles of this description made? A. Certainly.

WILLIAM HAYDON - GUILTY . Aged 51.

JOHN HAYDON - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-156

411. JOB GOODE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 200 lbs. of annatto, value 30l. , the goods of Joseph Botcherby , his master.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH BOTCHERRY. I am a dyer and annatto manufacturer . I bought the annatto business in August, 1825; I took the prisoner as a foreman ; there was a written agreement between us - it is not stamped; he continued in my employ, and lived in Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel; he afterwards removed to King's-row, Bethnal-green, and then to Globe-lane, Mile End; and at Raycroft's house, two hundred and fifty yards from his premises, this cask of annatto was found. In consequence of suspicion, I directed persons to watch the prisoner. He never gave me to understand that any annatto had been moved to his lodgings - he had no authority to remove it. I and an officer went to his house in Globe-lane, and from there to Raycroft's, and under the stairs we found a cask of annatto - it is above 2 cwt.; some of my manufacture is marked "Joseph Botcherby, extra superfine;" some only "extra superfine;" the name of Goode was never inserted on any made at my house; some of that in the cask is marked"W. and a star H., superfine;" some not marked. I had the prisoner taken - he was at work at my house at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The prisoner had been a manufacturer? A. Yes; annatto is a vegetable substance; I believe he did business for himself before he came to me; he had travelled for another manufacturer, and from that I expected some connexion; my goods were never sold in his name.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-157

412. JAMES MARTIN was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 24th of December , 2 coats, value 1l.; 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 1s.; 1 violin and bow, value 3l.; 1 flageolet, value 1l.; 1 brooch, value 2s.; and 1 pair of scissors, with 2 penknives and a sheath, value 1s., the goods of Anthony Le Riviere , which had lately before been stolen, he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

ANTHONY LE RIVIERE. I am a dancing-master , and live in Marsham-street, Westminster. Between the 23d and 24th of December I lost this property; at six o'clock in the morning I received information, went down, and missed all the articles stated, and a great deal more besides, from two rooms. I went to the officers, and we found part of it; my back-kitchen window had been broken open and two holes made in it, and the bar removed; I went to bed about eleven o'clock at night. The property is worth 25l. at least.

JEMIMA LE REVIERE . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I was up last, and went to bed after eleven o'clock, leaving all the property safe.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I am an officer. On the 24th of December the prosecutor applied to me - I went to his house, and found the back window open; two holes were bored through the shutter by a centre-bit. I went with Pace to the prisoner's house in Old Pye-street, which is five or six minutes' walk from the prosecutor's house - he was sitting at breakfast - it was about ten o'clock; Pace called him into the shop - I came in with them; he is a lock-smith and bell-hanger, and keeps a little shop; I turned round, and saw this violin in an old box without a lid - it was not a violin-box; I said, "Where did you get this violin?" he made no answer, but seemed very much confused; I took it out of the box, and under it found this flageolet; I said, "Martin, where did you get these things? I am quite convinced you know of the robbery, for these are the things;" he said, "They might be;" I said, "Where are the rest of the things?" he said he had got no more - I am sure he said so; I said I should search the place, and in turning round I saw a coat lay - I took it up, and said,"This comes from the robbery;" he said, "I dare say it may;" I said, "Have you any more?" and am sure he said No; we then opened the drawers in the parlour behind the shop - Pace took a blue coat out, and said, "This is one of the coats;" Martin said it was; Pace took a boy's jacket from the same drawer, and said it belonged to the robbery; he said it did; we asked if he had any thing more - he said No, it was all he had; Pace had asked him at first if he knew of a robbery in Marsham-street, but he had not time to answer before I put my hand on the violin. Pace afterwards found a small box in the bureau, with trinkets in it. As we were taking him to the office he said, "I will tell you where the two men are who I had them of; if you will go to my old house in the two-pair front room, you will find a man named Harford," and another name which I forget. We went, and found a bat in that room, but no men; but on inquiry I found one of the men lived in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Did you not go to the prisoner's house for some other person? A. I went to see for a person for whom I had a warrant; I did not know it was necessary to state that; the prisoner's windows were open, but the door shut and fastened; there was no way of going into the shop but through the parlour, the door of which is down a passage; no person could see the things without going near the box; what the prisoner said was voluntarily.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer: I went with Woodbury - his evidence is correct; I found the property, and at the other house an old hat; the box contained a quantity of trinkets; I tied it up, and took it to the office - the prosecutor claimed two buckles or brooches only; the rest were returned.

ANTHONY LE REVIERE. This is my flageolet and violin; the coat is mine, the hat my son's, and the jacket my little boy's; I have had these brooches twenty years; I could pick the violin out from five hundred - here are some marks on the back; I broke a pot of honey in the coat pocket, and here is the mark of it.

WILLIAM LE REVIERE . This is my hat, and was stolen that night.

Prisoner's Defence. I keep the house, and have several lodgers - one of whom is a young man I told the officers

of; he has lived in my house since May last; I pressed him for the rent, and he said, if he could not give me any money on Wednesday morning, he would give me some of his clothes and other things; and when he and another man brought them to me, I thought they were his own.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years . (See page 123.)

Reference Number: t18280110-158

413. JOHN BULL was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Thomas Smith .

WILLIAM DAY . I am a waiter at the Six Bells public-house, Chelsea. On Christmasday, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in the street, lying on the curb for nearly an hour - I did not know him before; between nine and ten o'clock I saw Smith go up, and take hold of him by the collar; he asked his name; he said it was Davies, but a lad said it was Bull. Smith said,"You must go along with me;" Bull then got up, and went a few yards with him; I saw a scuffle began by Bull, who tried to pull himself away from Smith, who held him by the collar; Smith fell down, in the struggle, on his hands and knees, with great violence. Bull ran away as hard as he could. Anderson ran after him; Smith got up, and went after Anderson; in about half an hour I picked up a large key in the road, and gave it to Smith when he called next morning; Smith was intoxicated, but he was capable of walking - he staggered a little; no blows passed between them, or I must have seen them - I was within a yard of Smith - he had something in his hand, but I could not see what; he did not say "Here is a warrant," nor any thing of that kind.

Q. Then there was nothing to shew Bull why he took him? A. No.

DAVID ANDERSON . I was apprentice to Smith. I know Bull by sight. On the morning of Christmas-day master came home, and Williams, the milkman, came in, and said,"Make haste, or Bull will be gone;" master went out to look after him, but he was gone; he came in, and said Williams had given young Bull in charge; I was coming home in the evening, and saw Bull sitting on the curb; I went and told my master, who came with me - he was still sitting there; master asked his name; he said Davies or Rees, I do not know which; I said it was Bull; my master collared him, and asked him to give an account of himself - my master was a parish constable - he had no staff in his hand, nor any warrant; they went on together two or three yards, and Bull struggled to get away; master fell on his hands and knees, and Bull ran away; I followed, calling Stop thief! but soon returned to my master; he went to Dr. Daley's, who said he could not do any thing to him, but said he had better go to the hospital; my master lived about a fortnight after. No blows passed between them - master was a little in liquor.

THOMAS GASKELL . I am a surgeon, and live at Chelsea. I saw Smith a little before ten in the evening of Christmas-day; he shewed me his left hand, which was dislocated in the last joint of the thumb, and had a bruise on the back part of it; I succeeded in reducing the dislocation - it was produced by a fall, in my opinion; it went on well for eight days, and that evening unfavourable symptoms came on, and on the afternoon of the 10th he died, from a locked jaw, produced by the bruises on his hand.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I desired Smith to take charge of the prisoner, for stealing a pair of boots and a great coat; he had run away round the corner.

JOHN HARRIS . I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner remains in custody, on the charge of stealing the coat and boots.

Reference Number: t18280110-159

414. THOMAS NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , at Hanworth, 1 gelding, price 12l. , the property of Thomas Twyford .

THOMAS TWYFORD. I am a farmer , and live at Harworth, in Middlesex , about ten miles from Uxbridge, but they are not in the same main road; it is across cross-roads. On Monday, the 7th of January, I had a bay gelding in my stable - I saw it safe between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and about half-past eleven that night I was informed it was missing; the prisoner is a labourer, and lives near me, in the same village; I have only been there three quarters of a year - he worked about there - the last work he did was for a neighbour, close by my premises. I saw my gelding again, and am certain of it - the prisoner was not in my employ.

JAMES WOOLMAN . I am a plough-boy, and had the care of this bay gelding; I racked him up at seven o'clock in the evening of the 7th of January - I tied him to the manger with a halter, and shut the door - it shuts with a latch; the horse could not open it; the stable opens into a farm-yard, and the yard gate was shut that evening; I did not miss the gelding till six o'clock the next morning - I saw it again afterwards, and knew it to be the same; the halter was also taken - the prisoner lived near my master.

HENRY WICKERS . I live with Mr. Twyford. I went into the stable about eleven o'clock at night, and missed the gelding - I had been out with the cart.

JOHN MARLING . I am a veterinary surgeon, and live at Uxbridge. On the morning of the 8th of January, at three o'clock, I was near the village of Cowley, with a friend; I had been to attend a sick horse. Cowley, I believe, is about nine mile from Hanworth, but I was never there - it is between Hanworth and Uxbridge. I saw the prisoner walking in the road - he passed by me; there was a gelding about forty yards from him - it was following him - he could see us before he came up to us, for twenty yards or more - the horse was following him; I took hold of the horse, overtook the prisoner, and asked if he knew any thing of the horse; he declared he had never seen it - there was no person whatever there but him. I asked where he was going: he said he was going home to Feltham (that is about a mile from Hanworth); he was going as if to Hanworth; I shewed the same horse to Twyford and his servants - they claimed it.

MR. TWYFORD. The horse the witness showed me was mine, and the halter likewise.

Prisoner. I was never in the road - I was walking on the footpath.

JOHN MARLING . Yes, he was in the road when I first saw him; he came into the path.

JOHN BAILEY GRANGE . I was with Marling, and saw the prisoner coming towards us - he was by the side of the road, not on the foot-path; when he saw us he came into the path, and we passed him; the horse was following him- there was no other person there; if there had been, I

must have seen them; we went after him - he said he was going to Feltham; I saw the Magistrate sign this deposition - it was read over to the prisoner; he gave the name of Davidson before the Magistrate - (read)

"Thomas Davidson voluntarily says, he has been out of work for a fortnight; he was walking about the country to get work - he left Thame yesterday at three o'clock, and was proceeding home to Feltham; walked all the way, went to Harrow, Watford, and Hertfordshire - applied at the farm-houses in the neighbourhood - came through Uxbridge at two o'clock this morning, and did not see the horse; worked last for Mr. Sherborne, of Bedfont, for five or six weeks, before that with Mr. Grace, of Hanwell, for six or seven months; his mother, Mary Davidson, lives at Feltham."

Taken before me, this 8th of January, 1828, T. J. CLARKE.

JAMES WOOLMAN re-examined. I had seen the prisoner at Hanworth, at four o'clock, the day before.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18280110-160

415. HENRY OLDFIELD and HENRY EDWARD GEDDES were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 jacket, value 3s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Stephens .

WILLIAM BATES . I live with my father and mother, in St. Andrew-street, Seven Dials, and sell onions in the street. On the 13th of December, a little after seven o'clock, I was near Stephens' shop, in Church-passage, St. Giles' . I knew the prisoner before; Oldfield lives in Crown-street. I saw Oldfield run towards me, with the clothes in his hand - Geddes was with him; the jacket and trousers were buttoned together; they were only a few yards from the shop; Oldfield gave them to Geddes, and when they had ran further, Oldfield took them again, and put them under his coat; they offered them to me, but I would not take them; they ran down Monmouth-street, into a coach-yard; the officer came and took us all three.

Prisoner GEDDES. Q. Did you not stand at the end of the street, on purpose to take them? A. No.

ELIZABETH STEPHENS . I am the wife of Richard Stephens; this jacket and trousers were taken from our shop - the officers brought them next day.

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I am an officer. I was standing at the corner of Monmouth-street, and saw Bates and Oldfield together - Geddes was a little before them; I saw something under Oldfield's coat; we followed them to a yard, and secured them all: I saw Holdfield drop the jacket and trousers - they were about one hundred and twenty yards from the shop, and all appeared together.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Bertaun; his evidence is correct. OLDFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

GEDDES - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-161

416. ANDREW RYAN and CORNELIUS MAHONEY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 24lbs. weight of raisins, value 30s., and 1 box, value 6d. , the goods of David Levy and John Salmon .

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in Oxford-street, about six o'clock in the evening of the 7th of January, and saw the prisoners, in company with another, who is not here; I watched them, and saw the one who is not here go on the right-hand side of the street with Ryan, and Mahoney on the left, by himself: they were following a covered cart - they walked a considerable distance, then turned back, joined together, and went to Rathbone-place, and down to Tottenham-court-road; they there divided again - Mahoney walked on the left side, Ryan and the other on the right - I followed them till they came near Whitfield's chapel, then Ryan and the other crossed, and all joined together - Ryan then left them, and went up behind Levy and Salmon's cart - the other two were walking on the pavement, six or seven steps from the cart - it was a large cart, with one horse - Ryan climbed up at the back of the cart, leaned part of his body into the cart, under the tarpauling that was over it, and brought out this box on his shoulder - he came over to the side where I was, with it on his shoulder; the others were on the other side - I took out my staff, and caught hold of him - he threw the box on my hand, and broke my hold of him - I struck at him with my staff - he ran off, and I after him, about seventy or seventy-two paces - I did not lose sight of him; I called Stop thief! seized him again, took him into a grocer's shop, and secured him - Mahoney was taken the same night, after I had been to Marlborough-street - I knew them well before.

Q. How long might this occupy, from the time you first saw them? A. About an hour - I can safely say they were in company.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Mahoney touch the cart? A. He did not - he was on the curb - I know Birchell, an officer - I did not tell him I did not know Mahoney; I went into a public-house, with four other officers afterwards; I did not ask Mahoney his name there - he was brought down stairs at the public-house by one of the night officers.

JESSE PHILLIPS . I was with Whittingham, and saw what he has stated. I saw Ryan take the box out of the cart; I knew the parties before; the others were on the opposite side, near the cart, and seemed to be looking out, to see if anybody was watching them.

Cross-examined by MR. A. PHILLIPS. Q. It was dark? A. Yes; I believe Mahoney crossed the cart, and looked in once - that was some time before the box was taken - he was about six yards from the cart then; I deal in earthenware, and live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields.

JAMES NASH. I was driving Messrs. David Levy and John Salmon's cart; they live in Oxford-street; there was a good tarpauling over the cart, and it was tied securely up - this box was near the tail - I missed it in Tottenham-court-road, where my attention was called to it - it contains raisins.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MAHONEY's Defence. When the officer came into the room where I was, he did not know me - he had said before, that he would swear to me a mile off - I am innocent.

RYAN's Defence. Mahoney was not with me.

RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

MAHONEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-162

417. MARY SWAIN and ROBERT LAWSON were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of John Watson .

SUSAN WATSON . I am the wife of John Watson. I am a laundress, and live in Conduit-street, Pentonville . Swain was my servant - I missed a shirt on the 22d of December.

THOMAS CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in

Exmouth-street. This shirt was pawned with me, by Lawson, on the 31st of December - he said it was his own, and that his wife was outside; I told him to fetch her; Swain came in and said, "All is right;" she then turned out immediately.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am an officer, and took them in charge. (Property produced and sworn to.)

SWAIN - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

LAWSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-163

418. WILLIAM SANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Richard Richards .

GEORGE SKELTON . I am a street-keeper. On the 9th of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Keppel-street, about three hundred yards from Torrington-square, and stopped the prisoner, with a coat under his arm; I asked how he had got it - he said he had begged it - as we went along, we met two female servants coming from Torrington-square - the prisoner then bolted across the road - I ran and secured him.

MR. RICHARD RICHARDS. I live in the Borough, but on the 9th of January I was at a friend's, in Torrington-square . I left my coat on my horse, at the door: it was taken while I was in the house, and in about five minutes the prisoner was in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-164

419. CONSTANT STECK was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 ink-stand, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Jonas .

JOHN PEDDER . I am an upholsterer. I was at a sale in Great Marlborough-street , on the 1st of January - I saw the prisoner take this ink-stand off a side-board behind the auctioneer - he put both his hands behind him, took it off privately, and put it into his waistcoat pocket; he walked quickly out of the room - I followed, and told a porter; I assisted in apprehending him.

ROBERT GARDINER . I was employed at the sale, and found the prisoner on the stairs, with the ink-stand in his waistcoat pocket, and his umbrella over it.

JOSEPH JONAS. I am a broker . This is my ink-stand - I had several articles there on sale; I have no mark on it - there was no other ink-stand there; Caife and Dawson were the auctioneers; I had bought it two months before; there is no lot-mark on it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, which, among much extraneous matter, contained the following statement: - On the day in question, I was passing along Marlborough-street, and went into the auction-room, where I saw the ink-stand on the table, and was looking at it, when a gentleman, close by me, said he had given 4s. for it, and I should have it for 1s. more - I paid 5s. for it, and took it away, in the presence of several people - I had scarcely proceeded towards the door, when the porter in the room stopped me;" and concluded by stating, that he was a foreigner, in comfortable circumstances, and could have no inducement to take an article of such a trifling value. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-165

420. CAROLINE TARRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 chair, value 3s. , the goods of John Davis .

LOUISA DAVIS . I am the wife of John Davis, and live in Belton-street, Short's-gardens . On the 8th of January we received information, went out, and took the prisoner about a hundred yards off, with this chair, which had been taken from outside our door; we are brokers - she said she had bought it - I was in the parlour - she could not have bought it.

JOHN GREEN . I took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded extreme poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-166

421. WILLIAM BURT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 130 lbs. weight of lead, value 24s., the goods of Thomas Nias , and fixed to a certain building of his .

GEORGE WILMOT . I live at No. 134, Hoxton-town. On Sunday morning, the 23d of December, I was returning from the watch-house, as I am a headborough, and when I got to my own door I saw the prisoner and another man, the other had gone by with a bag on his shoulder, which appeared heavy, and the prisoner crossed over with something on his head - I followed him about a hundred and fifty yards, and asked what he had got - he said, "A piece of lead;" it was then on his shoulder, with the corner of his jacket pulled over it - I called to a man to stop the other, but he dropped the bag and got away - I compared the lead with a house of Mr. Nias', near the Rosemary Branch public-house, and it matched exactly - the nails went into the same holes - there were three dormers stripped - he was about five hundred yards from the house.

JOHN BLISSETT . I live at Hoxton. I saw a man carrying this bag of lead, and the prisoner with a piece on his shoulder; I assisted in taking him to the watch-house with it.

CHARLES STOUT . I am a plumber. I went with the officer, and compared this lead with Mr. Thomas Nias' house - it appeared to have been fixed there - the nails are now in it; I had put it down, and know the houses to be his - he has three houses there - the lead weighs about 130 lbs.

JOHN FEARY . I am a watchman, and assisted in taking the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my father's house about ten minutes to six o'clock, to go into the country - I saw this lead on the pavement, and took it up - there was no one with me.

GEORGE WILMOT. I am positive they were in company - the prisoner had about 30lbs.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-167

422. JOSEPH KIRBY and ROBERT MAYES were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 bridle, value 1s.; 1 screw-top, value 6d.; 1 drill, value 1d.; 1 punch, value 1d.; 7 files, value 3s., and 12 bolts, value 2s. , the goods of William Thomas Brownutt and Thomas Powell .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Lewis Leslie .

WILLIAM THOMAS BROWNUTT. I am a coach-maker , and am joint executor with Thomas Powell, to my father.

Mr. Lewis Leslie is an auctioneer , and was employed to sell property for me.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am under porter to Mr. Leslie. The property of Brownutt and Powell was in his possession for sale - it was in Mr. Brownutt's shop - the prisoners were in Leslie's employ, as porters - on the 11th of January we had been sent in to prepare the sale, but Mr. Brownutt was still in possession - it was to be sold on his premises; Mr. Brownutt suspected one of the prisoners had taken something.

MR. BROWNUTT re-examined. I sent for Mayes back, took him into the counting-house, and accused him of taking property - he was searched, and the files and bolts were found on him - Kirby had been out - he was searched when he came in, but had nothing; he promised to show where he had hid some bolts and things in the snow.

CHRISTMAS GRAHAM . I heard Kirby say it was a bad job; I said it was - he said if I would go with him he would show me where the articles were: I went with him- he showed these bolts, under some snow, in Blackfriars'-road; I brought them back. I work for Mr. Brownutt, and know the articles.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I was fetched, and from information, I went to some stables, kept by Holmes, in Leicester-street, Regent-street, and in a box I found this bridle, screw-top, and punch.

KIRBY's Defence. I did it through distress.

KIRBY - GUILTY . Aged 35.

MAYES - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-168

423. JOHN KENNEDY and WILLIAM THOMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Redhead , from his person .

WILLIAM REDHEAD. I am a ship-agent . I was in the Strand between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and had a handkerchief in my coat pocket; I did not see any person near me, or feel it taken, till the officer came and gave me information; I then saw two persons in custody; I do not know who they were.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure you had your handkerchief? A. I had when I came out.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. I was in the Strand on Sunday, the 23d of December, and saw the prisoners following the prosecutor, nearly opposite Water-street; they were in company - I crossed over, saw them try his pocket, and when opposite Waterloo-bridge they tried very hard, and opposite Southampton-street Kennedy succeeded in getting the handkerchief from his pocket - I saw him take it: Thompson was close behind, looking out- they crossed the street, towards us; I took them, and found the handkerchief in Kennedy's coat pocket; Phillips, who was with me, went and told the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. You say "They" tried, who was that? A. Kennedy - I might say "They;" I did not see Thompson touch the pocket.

JESSEE PHILLIPS . I was with Whittingham, and saw the prisoners following Mr. Redhead and a lady; they attempted his pocket several times, and tried very hard by Waterloo-bridge; Thompson kept looking out, and closed up to the other, and near Southampton-street Kennedy took the handkerchief; Thompson was close behind, hiding what he did; I believe he took it from the right-hand pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. You say "They tried very hard?" A. Yes, and I say so again; Thompson did not put his hand to the pocket, but he closed up, and put his hand quite close. I often parade the streets to take such rascals; I get nothing for it.

JURY. Q. What are you, an independant gentleman? A. No; I am a hardwareman.

WILLIAM REDHEAD. I have every reason to think this is my handkerchief; there is no mark on it.

KENNEDY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-169

424. JAMES KENCH was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM BURY . I am a milkman , and live at Nottinghill. The prisoner was nine or ten weeks in my employ, and received small bills for me, which he should pay me when he came home; Farr is servant to Mr. Hollet, a customer.

MARY ANN FARR . I live with Mr. Hollet, of Bath-place, Kensington. On the 24th of December I paid the prisoner 3s. on his master's account, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I often paid him the score.

WILLIAM BURY. I saw him about five o'clock that evening, and asked if he had taken Hollet's bill, and others, and if Hollet's was paid - he said, "No, it is not, but I should think it would not be long before they do pay;" he gave me some other names that day; my book is not here. I found 11s., not accounted for, received at this house.

Prisoner. Master owed me money, and refused to pay me, and I used this.

WILLIAM BURY. I always paid him when he asked; there is 14s. or 15s. due to him; I had him apprehended about nine days after.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18280110-170

425. JAMES HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 50 quires of paper, value 15s. , the goods of Richard Birkett .

RICHARD BIRKETT. I am a stationer , and live in Norton-folgate . I know the prisoner. On the 29th of December I saw him and another person watching our window - I sent some persons to watch him, and soon after the prisoner was brought in with fifty quires of paper, which I had seen safe about two minutes before.

JOHN WESTON . I am a paper-hanger. On the 29th of December I was directed to watch; I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Birkett's shop, and take a quantity of paper on his shoulder; I stopped him with it.

JAMES TOVEY . I saw the prisoner take the paper from the shop.

JAMES TYRRELL . I am an officer. I received this paper from Weston.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on your mercy.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280110-171

426. JOHN McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 fixture, (i.e.) 1 copper, value 10s., belonging to Henry Clark , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JANE CLARK . I am the wife of Henry Clark - he lives in Wild-court . I saw the copper safe in one corner of the kitchen, at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon of the 28th of December, and missed it at half-past seven next morning.

JAMES ROBERTS . On the morning of the 29th of December, about seven o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in the Minories, with this copper on his head; I asked where he got it; he said from a street in Blackfriars'-road, from a person named Lloyd, and was taking it to Young, on Towerhill; I took him to the watch-house; he there said he brought it from his sister, who lodged at No. 2, Wild-court; I went there, and found it had been taken from there, and his sister lodged there.

JANE CLARK . I know this copper by the marks on it; a dinner was boiled in it on Christmas-day, and it has not been cleaned since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-172

477. FRANCES HARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 purse, value 1s., and 2 sovereigns, the property of Hugh Hughes , from his person .

HUGH HUGHES. I am an attorney . About two o'clock in the morning of the 6th of January, I was in a house in a court in Great Wild-street , with the prisoner; I was with her half an hour or more; I gave her a few shillings, and had the purse and two sovereigns in my hand, while I was in the house; I afterwards missed it, and took hold of her- she denied it - she got away, and I called the watchman. I had been drinking a great deal; there was no one in the room but us.

WILLIAM BENSON . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm just after calling two o'clock; I stopped the prisoner in the street, and took her back to the house; I asked her about Mr. Hughes' money - she at first denied it, but when I threatened to take her to the watch-house, she shook her bosom, and a sovereign fell out.

CHARLES MAYHEW . I am a watchman. I was called, and assisted in taking the prisoner; I saw her throw this purse away, about one hundred yards from the house where she had been with the gentleman; when we got back to the house I saw her shake a sovereign from her bosom, and this other sovereign was found on the bed; she said, as the sovereigns were given up, she hoped the gentleman would not persevere in it, but he said she should go to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman agreed to give me 10s., and I was going to get change when the watchman stopped me; I can only account for the other being on my bed, by supposing it must have fallen from the prosecutor's pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-173

428. WILLIAM WOODWILL was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

SUSAN BROCKWILL . I am single. On the 11th or 12th of December I owed Mr. Vernon 4s. 10 1/2d. for beer, which I paid to the prisoner for him, and he gave me this bill, and receipted it in my presence.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was that all you owed his master? A. No. I had paid the prisoner a great many times; I have sometimes paid him a part of my account, to give his master; he never told me he was liable for the whole account.

CHARLOTTE VERNON . I am the wife of William Vernon - he keeps the Robin Hood and Little John public-house , at Hoxton. The prisoner was our pot-boy : I gave him this bill to deliver to Miss Brockwill; he never brought the money to me.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he been in your service? A. About two months; he has received a great many accounts for us, but I never knew him to pay the whole of an account when he had received but a part of it.

WILLIAM VERNON . The prisoner never paid me this bill from Miss Brockwill; it was his duty to pay my wife every day, when he came home, after the dinner, and after the supper beer; he may have received 9s. or 10s. in a day.

JURY to CHARLOTTE VERNON. Q. How did you know this money had been received? A. I told a person that when their bill was paid I would give them a Christmas-box; they said they owed me nothing; I then made inquiries, and found this out.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18280110-174

429. MARY SHERBIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 gown, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 5s.; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 bonnet, value 2s., the goods of John Edgecombe , her master .

JOHN EDGECOMBE. I am a carpenter , and live in Essex-street, Whitechapel . The prisoner was in my service. When I came home on the 10th of December my wife, who was ill in bed, told me the prisoner had begged to go out to buy a ribbon - she did not return: the next day I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and went to her mother, but the prisoner was not found till the 1st of January, and on the 2d her mother brought her to my house, with this shawl and bonnet, which are mine; the prisoner said she had pawned the coat at Mr. Aaron's, in Whitechapel, and wished to know if I would take her again - I inquired at the pawnbroker's, but the coat had been redeemed a night or two after it was pawned, and has not been found.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I have had this shawl and bonnet ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18280110-175

430. THOMAS BREWER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 pair of boots, value 14s. , the goods of James Pearcy .

JAMES PEARCY. I keep a boot and shoe-shop , in St. John-street . Between one and two o'clock on the 10th of January I saw the prisoner come and put his arm, and half his body, into my shop; I ran out of my room, and pursued

him: I found him in my father's custody, with these boots, which are my property.

RICHARD PEARCY . I saw the prisoner put his hand, and part of his body, over the half door of my son's shop, and come away with these boots; I took them from him in the street.

JAMES NEWTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the boots.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-176

431. JOHN FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 3 lbs. weight of pork, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Taylor .

HENRY TAYLOR. I keep a pork-shop , in Union-street, Bishopsgate. I lost my pork on the 5th of January - I did not see it taken, but my man called out, that he had got a thief - I went to the door, and saw him with the prisoner; the pork was at his feet.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am in the employ of Mr. Henry Taylor. On the 5th of January, I was standing by the window, and saw the prisoner in the shop, with his apron up - I missed him suddenly, and in about an hour, I saw him there again - I fell back, and saw him take two pieces of pork, which he put into his apron, and went out - I ran, and collared him - his apron dropped, and the pork fell.

JAMES FRANCIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and three children- I hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280110-177

432. SAMUEL PEARCE and JOHN BULLOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 35 feet of leathern pipe, value 10s. , the goods of the parishioners of St. Dunstan in the West, in the Ward of Farringdon Without, in the City of London .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Thomas Shepherd and James West .

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . I am a constable. On the 22d of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner Bullock came to me, and said he had a lot of old pipe to sell - I told him to bring it, and in about half an hour Pearce came and brought it - I thought it was not right, and I went to a fireman, and told him to look into the engine-house; he did so, and missed a roll of pipe, and a piece of brass to it - I said I had stopped Pearce on suspicion - Pearce said Bullock had employed him to sell it, and he was to have 1s. - another officer took Bullock - Bullock said he thought I bought things on the cross, and that made him bring it to me. I am a boot and shoemaker.

THOMAS STAPLES . I am in the service of Robert Ware, an engine-master. On Friday morning, the 21st of December, the pipes were all right in the engine-house of St. Dunstan in the West, and on the 22d, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I missed a roll of pipe - the lock of the engine-house had been forced off.

Prisoner PEARCE. Q. What makes you think this is the pipe you lost? A. It has five tongues to it, which no other of our pipes had, and here are thirty-five feet which is just the length of the piece lost.

JOHN DAVIS . I went to the Angel public-house, in Fleet-market, on the 22d of December, where I found Bullock asleep; in his hat I found this brass-top, which appears to have been cut from this pipe.

ROBERT WARE . I am keeper of St. Dunstan's engine-house. The engine belongs to the parish - I believe this pipe to have been taken from there. I have seen it many times.

PEARCE's Defence. I went down Petticoat-lane, to buy some old shoes, and translate them - I met a man with this piece of pipe, and another small piece - I bought this large piece of him for 10s. I went along Long-lane, the next day, where I met Bullock, who asked if I had any shoes. (I had once sold him a pair) - I said I had not; as I had bought this pipe, he said he thought he could tell me of a man who would buy it; he went to Vincent's, and came and told me he would buy it - I went there, and he was not at home - I waited for him, and when he came in, I said, "I have brought the leather the young man spoke to you about."

BULLOCK's Defence. I met this young man - I asked him if he had a pair of shoes; he said No, he had laid out all his money for this pipe, and asked if I knew a man who would buy it - I said I thought I did - I went to Vincent, who said he would buy it - I told Pearce to take it, and he gave me that small piece to mend the heel of my shoe.

Pearce received a good character.

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

BULLOCK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-178

433. THOMAS WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 21 lbs. weight of lead, value 2s., the goods of the St. Katherine Dock Company , and fixed to a building of theirs .

THOMAS FOGG . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner walking down Rosemary-lane, on the 7th of January, with a bag - I went up to him, and asked what he had got, he said, Nothing - I took hold of it, and found it was lead; he then said he found it close to St. Katherine Docks. I took it to my brother, who found where it came from.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. I received the prisoner, and this lead from my brother - I went and found it had come from the gutter of a house, which is to be pulled down.

WILLIAM SITGROVE . I am in the employ of the St. Katherine Dock Company. I have fitted this lead on the top of a house, belonging to them - it fits exactly.

THOMAS COULSBY . I know the prisoner has slept in the stable of the house from whence the lead was taken; it belongs to the Dock Company.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards Sun-yard - I saw a bag, and took it up, and what should it be but lead.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-179

434. FRANCES BLUNDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2 sheets, value 5s.; 2 pillows, value 2s., and 1 gown, value 2s. , the goods of John Brown .

MARY BROWN . I am the wife of John Brown. The prisoner and her husband lodged at my house for some months - I missed these articles at different times; the pri

soner was taken to the watch-house, on the 13th of December, for riotous behaviour in the street; her husband first said he knew nothing about the things, but he afterwards gave me the duplicates, and acknowledged that he knew they were pawned.

Prisoner. We had lived there seven months; she missed these things two months ago, and told my husband, if he would give up the duplicates, she would take the money by 1s. or 2s. a week. Witness. That is not true.

WILLIAM CRUSH . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Somer's-town. I produce two pillows, and two sheets, pawned by the prisoner, in September, October and December last.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am shopman to Griffiths, a pawnbroker. I have a gown, pawned by the prisoner on the 13th of December.

ABRAHAM LORIMER . I am an officer. When the prisoner was brought to the watch-house I sent for her husband; he said she had pawned these things unknown to him; she said he did know of it, or something to that effect.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and Mrs. Brown took the tickets from my husband, and said she would take the money as we could give it her, and she promised to give me work, till I could pay her.

MARY BROWN. About a week before the 13th of December, she did acknowledge she had done something wrong, and I made the agreement, that if she would do no more wrong, I would forgive her.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-180

435. THOMAS PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 3 lbs. weight of pork, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Turk .

THOMAS TURK. I keep a pork-shop in the Broadway, Westminster . I lost a piece of loin of pork on the 8th of January; I saw three persons come into my shop, and my man served one, who immediately ran out with the other two; I went into the shop, and my man was gone, but he soon returned with the one who had bought the article; he said he could tell the man who took the piece of pork; I detained him, and took him to Queen-square, and the next day Warren said he could find the prisoner, and he went and brought the prisoner and the pork - this is it - it was missing from my shop.

RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN . I am shopman to the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner come to his shop with two others - I was turning my back to get a piece of paper, and saw the prisoner take a piece of pork from a hook, and run out - I pursued, but could not take him; but I took the one who had bought a saveloy; he was taken to the office, and gave an account to the officer of the man who took the pork; I am certain the prisoner is the person who took it.

JOHN WARREN . I saw a lad, named Ryan, brought to Queen-square; he described the prisoner to me, and I went and found him in a public-house; Chamberlain did not describe the prisoner; I took him from Ryan's description - the prisoner told me the pork was at a sweep's house; I went and found it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-181

436. MARGARET McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 5 handkerchiefs, value 15s. , the goods of Daniel Hamel .

DANIEL HAMEL. I am a licensed-hawker . About a fortnight or three weeks before I went to the Magistrate, I was in a public-house, in Wapping , one Saturday evening, I do not know the sign; I got rather fresh, and went to the bar for another pint of beer - the landlady would not let me have it; I said I would, and she gave me in charge - I left my parcel there, with my handkerchiefs in it; I returned on Tuesday morning, and then missed five handkerchiefs from my parcel; I have seen three since which are very like mine, but I cannot be positive to them - to the best of my belief these are three of them; there were four in one piece, and one separate; they are new, and have no mark on them; the prisoner was servant at this public-house.

DOROTHY IRELAND . I keep the Crown and Dolphin public-house, in Cannon-street. I saw the prosecutor there that Saturday night - he was troublesome, and I sent him to the watch-house; he left his pack in the care of the prisoner, who was my servant - she has been five or six months with me; she was afterwards charged with taking the handkerchiefs, and said she knew nothing about them; I found a duplicate under her bed, and one in an old hatbox in her room.

HENRY HAWKINS . I am a pawnbroker. I received these two handkerchiefs from a person, whom I have no doubt was the prisoner, on the 29th of December; this is the duplicate I gave of them.

HENRY WADE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a handkerchief, which was taken in by my employer - this is the duplicate he gave of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-182

437. PHILIP JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 fixture (i.e.) 1 window-sash, value 20s., belonging to James Wing , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JAMES WING. I have an unfinished house in Shoreditch parish; I had been there on Monday morning, the 24th of December, and this sash was safe; I had nailed it in - the watchman came in the evening, and gave me information.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner about nine o'clock at night, on the 24th of December, in the North-road, with this sash, about four or five hundred yards from the house it was taken from; I asked where he got it - he said he was going to take it to a Mr. Palmer's, I think, but at last he told me he had taken it from a house near the Ivy-house public-house; I took him to the watch-house, and went and found the house - the back parlour sash was gone - it had been nailed in with three nails, two at top, and one at bottom.

WILLIAM LATHAM . I am an officer of Shoreditch. I was sent for to the watch-house, and found the prisoner and this sash there; I asked where he got it; he said from a house opposite James-street; I went next morning, and the bottom sash was gone; this sash had been nailed into the frame; the nails there have been drawn out.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-183

438. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on

the 21st of December , 1 goose, value 6s. , the goods of William Palmer .

WILLIAM PALMER I am a cheesemonger and poulterer , and live in Dean-street, Oxford-street . I lost a goose on Friday, the 21st of December, just after dark - I was sitting at tea - I looked to my window, and saw a hand - I got up directly - before I got to the door, a boy came in, and said I had lost a goose - I ran out, and took the prisoner with it, about one hundred yards from my shop- I know it to be mine by a mark on the bill; it was plucked.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - I found not a farthing on him; he pleaded distress, and said he had had nothing for two days.

Prisoner. I took it from mere want.

GUILTY. Aged 60.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-184

439. MARY HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of John Brickell .

JOHN BRICKELL. I am a pawnbroker . I lost a pair of boots, between the 22d and 26th of December; these are them - I know nothing of the prisoner.

GEORGE MELLISH GRAHAM . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to my shop between four and five o'clock in the afternoon of the 26th of December, and brought these boots - she said she had bought them for 4s.; I suspected they might be the prosecutor's, and took them there - he identified them; the prisoner brought a ticket to redeem an article that was pledged at our house; I have known her some time; she had an excellent character.

WILLIAM HEATH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - she said she had bought them in the course of the afternoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them for 4s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-185

440. WILLIAM FENNER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 pail, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Woodman .

JOHN WOODMAN. I live at Ruishlip, near Uxbridge , and am a farmer . I lost some geese from my farm on the 5th of January; I got a search-warrant, and went to the prisoner's house, where I found this pail, which I had lost from my premises; I had not seen it for about six weeks; the prisoner said he found it; he had not worked for me; I know the pail by putting a fresh elm bottom to it myself.

EDWARD SWEENY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it as I was going home from Uxbridge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-186

441. MATTHEW LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 26 yards of linen, value 15s. , the goods of Owen McParland .

The article being cotton, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280110-187

442. SARAH SPAWFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 2 pieces of printed cotton, containing 34 yards, value 44s. , the goods of John Brown .

JOSEPH SAVILLE . I live with Mr. John Brown, a linendraper , of Tottenham-court-road . On the 9th of January I saw the prisoner take this cotton from the lobby of our door; she undid her pelisse, and was going to put the print under it - the officer came up, and she dropped it; it had been tied to a chair in the passage.

JAMES WARREN . I am an officer. I was at the shop, and saw the prisoner there; a little before four o'clock; she was looking at some prints; I saw one piece on the ground; I went three or four yards off and watched; she was pulling one, as if to get it from the chair, which she did - she then went to the shop door, and came out in about two seconds - she then took up the print, and turned her back to me, but appeared, by the motion of her arms, to be putting it into her pelisse; I went up, but when I got up, it was lying on the chair.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). I passed the prosecutor's door, where I saw some prints exposed for sale - I stepped to look at them, and another woman (a stranger) did the same - one of them fell off the chair on the ground, I picked it up, and placed it on the chair, and I solemnly declare that I have no further knowledge of the charge. I unfortunately was in liquor at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-188

443. CHARLES BREWHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , two baskets, value 5s. , the goods of John Bishop .

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am a headborough. I know Mr. Bishop's shop in Chiswell-street . On Thursday last, a little after five o'clock, I, and another officer, saw the prisoner, and several others, near the shop - the prisoner went up to the shop, took hold of a basket in his hand, and tried to lift it from a hook - he tried three times, and the fourth time he got down a basket and a shallow; we took him four or five yards of with this basket - the shallow he had dropped.

GEORGE WILLIAM BENNETT . I was with Haylock, and saw what he has stated; the prisoner had got about five yards from the end of the window, and the door was at the other end of the window.

JOHN BISHOP. I am a basket and toy-maker . These baskets were brought into my shop - I could not swear to them; I had two such baskets hanging up in the morning, when I went out - I returned in the evening, and found fault with my boy for not having taken them down; the officer then came and brought them in - I believe they are what were hung up in the morning, and they were so hung that one would fall in taking them down.

WILLIAM BISHOP . I live with John Bishop. I saw the two officers with the prisoner; I looked to see if two baskets, which had been at the door, were safe, and they were gone - I had seen them safe five or ten minutes before.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Whitecross-street, and on looking at one of these baskets, the other fell down - I was going to pick it up, and the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-189

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 15.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

444. HENRY GARLICK was indicted for stealing, on

the 11th of January , 5 glass dishes, value 40s. , the goods of Christopher Frederick Warman .

MARTHA WARMAN . I am the wife of Christopher Frederick Warman - he keeps a glass and china shop , No. 21, High-street, Islington . I went out between twelve and one o'clock on the 11th of January for about five minutes, and when I returned I met the prisoner between my shop and the next neighbour's with these five glass-dishes in his hand - I went into the shop, called my brother, and asked if he had sold them; he said No; I sent him after the prisoner; I looked into the shop, and missed these five dishes, which I had seen safe half an hour before.

EDWARD JACKSON . I am the brother of Martha Warman. I went and took the prisoner about four hundred yards off, with these dishes - I had lost sight of him, and he got behind a coach, but I am certain of his person; I took him in about five minutes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-190

445. MARIA ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 half-sovereign, and three half-crowns, the monies of Robert Marshall , from his person .

EVAN THOMAS . I am a watchman. About eleven o'clock at night on the 18th of December the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge, at the corner of Union-street, High-street, Shadwell; he said she had robbed him of three half-crowns and half a sovereign; she said she knew nothing about it - she afterwards said, "I have three half-crowns of the man's property, and that you know, Marshall;" he said "Yes, and you have my half-sovereign as well;" they were both in liquor; a man named Harris, who is not here, said he saw her take it - she said she did not; the half-sovereign and three half-crowns were found on her by the officer; the prosecutor is gone to sea, I believe, and Harris cannot be found.

SAMUEL OLIVER . I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in; I was going to search her; she said she would take out what she had, but she had nothing but what belonged to herself; she pulled out some silver and halfpence, but I said that would not do; she then pulled out a bit of paper, and the half-sovereign in it - she said she had it of Marshall, and meant to give it him again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking with the man at the public-house, and he called for a glass of gin and water; he had no change - he took out the half-sovereign; I took it to give change; I had 18s. 3 1/2d. in my pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-191

446. LOUISA WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 6 sovereigns and 2 half-sovereigns, the monies of William Johnson , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280110-192

447. ELIZABETH BROWN and MARGARET DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 18 sovereigns, and 1 guinea, the monies of William Salt , from his person .

MR. WILLIAM SALT. I was on my way to Canonbury-square, and met Brown in Long-lane , a little after twelve o'clock at night, on the 9th of January; she walked sometimes before and sometimes behind - Davis had been in my company some time - I stood talking with Brown a few minutes, under an archway: I dropped my stick, and in stooping to pick it up, it is very likely my purse might have fallen out of my pocket; I had taken it out of my breeches pocket a short time before, and put into my waistcoat pocket - to the best of my knowledge there were nineteen sovereigns and one guinea in it; when I missed it, I gave notice to the watchman; I cannot swear whether I dropped it or not - I think I must; I was rather intoxicated.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had Davis left you then? A. Yes; she had nothing to do with it.

Prisoner BROWN. He had to do with me under, the gateway, and dropped the purse; I took it up, and ran home with it. Witness. Upon my oath, I did not.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a watchman. On the 9th of January Mr. Salt gave me information; I knew the prisoners, and about half-past two o'clock I took Brown, going up to her own house; I followed her, and she said, "Watchman, it is all right, you shall have part - don't make a noise;" I said, "Very well, come in, and we will talk about it;" I went in, and in a corner of her shawl I found seven sovereigns, one guinea, and some memorandums; Davis was apprehended between five and six o'clock in the evening, in Cow-cross, and 3l. 16s. 6d. found on her.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I assisted in taking Davis; I have brought the money here.

SAMUEL YATES . I am a watchman. I went with Hooper, and took Brown.

WILLIAM SALT . These memorandums are mine, and were in the purse with my money.

BROWN'S Defence. I looked at what was in the purse, and I dropped some of them near the door where I live; I told Davis to wait at the corner of the street, but she was gone.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-193

448. TIMOTHY COCKRANE and JOHN PHIPPS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Isaac Francis Stone , from his person .

ISAAC FRANCIS STONE. Last Friday night, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was in the upper-gallery at Drury-lane Theatre . I missed my handkerchief, and said to a person who sat next to me, "Some one has taken my handkerchief; I rested very quietly, but in a few minutes the officer came, and asked if I had lost any thing; I said a handkerchief; he said, "This party has got it." I know nothing of the prisoners.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS CURRANT . I am an officer. I was in the gallery, and saw the prisoners; I watched them for above an hour, and saw Cockrane shoving something into his pocket, and Phipps extending his arms to keep the people back - one of his arms was on Cockrane's shoulder at the time; I heard of the prosecutor's loss, and took the prisoners; I found this handkerchief, which Cockrane was concealing, and another handkerchief on his person.

PHIPPS' Defence. I was not near him; I saw nothing of what was going on; I know no more of it than a child.

COCKRANE'S Defence. I found the handkerchief on the stairs, and can prove it. I went out to get a pint of beer; a gentleman's servant had got into my seat; I was trying to get my place, and the officer took me; I had sang out several times "Who has lost a handkerchief?"

JOHN BRIAN . I live at No. 1, Tabernacle-square, and am a brick-maker. I do not know either of the prisoners; I was at Drury-lane last Friday night - I was the second behind Cockrane, and saw him stoop and pick up the handkerchief from between his legs, on the stairs, going up; he called out several times "Who has lost a handkerchief?" and waved it over his head; he then went into the place - I saw no more of it; this was about nine o'clock.

Q. Did you go in? A. No? the house was full, and I went home.

Q. How came you to notice the prisoner? A. From the circumstance of his picking up the handkerchief; I was not present when he was charged with stealing it - he was intoxicated.

WILLIAM FARRELL . I am a cork-cutter, and live in Adam and Eve-court. I was in a cook-shop, in Middlerow, St. Giles', that evening; Cockrane came in, and had a basin of soup - he was much intoxicated; there was another young man in the box, having soup; he asked Cockrane to buy some duplicates, and said one was for a coat.

ISAAC FRANCIS STONE. Cockrane did not appear drunk; I had a bad cold, and used my handkerchief several times in the gallery.

THOMAS CURRANT. I think he had been drinking; he was rather saucy.

COCKRANE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

PHIPPS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

There was another indictment against Cockrane, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18280110-194

449. SARAH MELSOM and WILLIAM LARDON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 3 sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Jennings , from his person .

THOMAS JENNINGS. I am a pensioner . On the 8th of January, about half-past three or four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the King's Arms public-house, Wapping ; I had three sovereigns and my pension-ticket in my waistcoat pocket; I went into the house with Melsom, and when there, she put her arms round me, and took it out of my pocket. I gave an alarm: the persons in the house came, and took the ticket from her - I had been drinking; Lardon was sitting close by her at the time - my ticket was returned to me, but it is not here.

PETER NOTCHER . I was in the tap-room. I saw the prosecutor and prisoners there; the woman was fondling round him - they called him father: Lardon kissed him, and called him his dear father. I told the landlord my suspicions, and he sent for an officer; I took the ticket from Melsom's hand, and gave it to the prosecutor; she said her father's hat had dropped off, and it fell out.

THOMAS BAKER . I am landlord of the King Arms. Last Tuesday I saw the prisoners and prosecutor in my tap-room; they seemed to make a great deal of the old man - there was another woman in company with them; she brought a sovereign to the bar to change; I stopped it, and said I should ascertain where it came from; she then went away - I kept the sovereign, and sent for an officer. Notcher took the ticket from Melsom's hand, and returned it to the prosecutor. The prosecutor gave no alarm, to my knowledge; they came to the house together - the other woman was with them; they were not there above half an hour; the other woman left before the officer came.

THOMAS JENNINGS re-examined. I saw Melsom take the ticket and money from me, and gave an alarm directly; I sent the sovereign to the bar to change - that was before I was robbed; I then wrapped the other three in my ticket again; I then found Melsom's hand in my pocket - I am sure it was her hand; I have not got them again; I believe the prisoners were not searched - the other woman had slipped away.

THOMAS OBORNE. I am an officer. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house; nothing was found on them; I asked Melsom how she came by the pension-ticket; she said it fell out of his hat.

MELSOM'S Defence. The prosecutor met me, and asked me to shew him Tower-hill; he forced me into the public-house; the other prisoner came in, but I did not not know him.

LARDON'S Defence. I went into this house with a woman, and fell asleep - I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-195

450. WILLIAM ELSBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 1 pair of boots, value 8s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of James Hewitt .

JAMES HEWITT. I am a private in the 2d battalion of the 1st regiment of Grenadier Guards . On the 9th of January I lost these boots from my bed-room, at my quarters, the Prince's Head public-house, Backingham-street : they were delivered to me on the Tuesday; I put them on a from when I went to bed, and in the morning they were gone; I cannot swear to them - the prisoner lodged there, and slept in the same room; I asked him in the morning about them; he said he knew nothing about them.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me, if I told you where they were, you would not do any thing? A. No; I said to him afterwards, "If you do know any thing of them, tell me;" he then said he had taken and pawned them, and lost the ticket, but could make an affidavit, and get them; he came back, and said the pawnbroker would give them up for the money without an affidavit; I went to the shop, and saw them.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a pawnbroker. I took these boots in of the prisoner, on the 8th of January.

JOSEPH MULFORD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal them; I denied it at first, because two other men were in the room; when they were gone I said I would get them out; I went with him to the pawnbroker's.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280110-196

451. JOHN BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the

6th of December . 30lbs. weight of cheese, value 24s. , the goods of Isaac Watts Spencer .

MARTHA SPENCER . I am the wife of Isaac Watts Spencer, who keeps a chandler's-shop ; a piece of cheese was taken off our counter, which I had seen safe half an hour before; I was in the parlour, and saw a person go out at the door- I ran to the door, and saw a person going down the street, with the cheese; I called Stop thief! he threw the cheese down, which a neighbour took up; he then ran away; I did not particularly notice the person, and cannot identify him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say the person had a green coat on? A. No; a young woman told me so; I did not say so - a neighbour brought in the cheese, and put it on the counter - here it is; Gibbs took it to the watch-house.

EDMUND SEAL . I was in a shop, in Carnaby-street, on the 6th of December, a little after five o'clock; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and saw the prisoner running, with the cheese, which he threw down, and ran off; I pursued him up two or three streets, and saw him stopped in Broad-street; I am certain of his person - I only lost sight of him in turning the corners; I was not fifteen yards off when he was stopped.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office, that you saw me come out of the shop? A. I did not.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I heard an alarm, ran out, and came up with the prisoner; he struck me, and got away; I came up with him again in Poland-street; he took up a pair of milk-yokes, and swore he would smash the first person who came near him; I ran up, and seized one arm; another person took hold of the other.

THOMAS DAMET . I live with Mr. Downs, a publican. I was collecting pots in Broad-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and others after him; I stopped him - he got away, and ran into Poland-street; he took a yoke from a milkman's shoulders, and said he would smash the first man who came near him; he struck me several times.

WILLIAM NADAULD . I was at the watch-house; I produce the cheese, which was brought in by Gibbs.

Prisoner. I certainly did take hold of the yoke.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-197

452. ELIZABETH BURRS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 quartern of flour, value 9d., and 2 loaves of bread, value 1s., the goods of Sumner Elsden ; 1 brush, value 2s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of John Elsden .

JOHN ELSDEN. I am foreman to my brother, Sumner Elsden, a baker . On the 9th of December the prisoner was his servant . In consequence of suspicion Latham, the officer, searched her boxes, and found my hat-brush and gloves, which I had seen about three weeks before, in my box up stairs.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you ever dress in that room? A. Yes, and my brother-in-law also dressed there; her box was brought into our room to be examined; my brother has a nephew in the house.

SUMNER ELSDEN. The prisoner was three weeks in my service, but slept at her home. On Sunday night, the 9th of December, I counted six bags of flour in the shop, and soon after I missed one; I sent the prisoner up stairs, and went and looked in the kitchen, and in the head of the cradle I found this bag of flour and two loaves, tied in a tablecloth; I brought them into the shop, and when the prisoner came down stairs from her mistress, I said, "Betsey, what a shocking thing it is for you to rob me in this way," and showed her the things, she said she hoped I would forgive her; there was a young woman there who came to see her, but I did not know that before: she bears a good character, and her friends are respectable.

WILLIAM LATHAM . I am an officer. I was sent for and took the key of the prisoner's box from her pocket, and found this brush and gloves in her box.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she present? A. No. I found some money of her own there.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280110-198

453. JOHN CLARE and JAMES BEAN were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 50 books, value 40s. , the goods of Alexander Clough .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

CATHERINE CAMERON . I am neice to Alexander Clough, a bookseller , of Widegate-alley, Bishopsgate-street . On the 4th of January, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was in the shop - Bean came in, and said he had come for the books my uncle had told him to fetch that afternoon or evening; I said I did not know what they were; he went away, and came again in half an hour, saying he had met my uncle in Lemon-street, and paid him 2l. 10s. - I said I would not give up any books till I saw my uncle; he said he must have them; I said I would not let them go - he then took eight white and two brown paper parcels off the shelf, and went away - he had brought another person with him the second time, who stood just inside the door - it was not Clare; Bean took them off the shelf, gave him some to carry, and both went away together.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in Wentworth-street on the evening of the 4th of January, about half-past nine o'clock, and saw the prisoners there; Clare had a bundle - Bean was three or four yards behind him; I took hold of Clare, and saw Bean go across the street; Newsom took him, and brought him into the public-house; I then asked Clare if that was the person who gave him the bundle; he said Yes: Bean said he knew nothing about him, or the bundle either.

JOSEPH NEWSOM . I was with Skillern, and took Bean; I found these two books on him - he said he had found them in Petticoat-lane; he afterwards said he gave Clare the other books to carry, and Clare said so to.

JOHN McWILLIAMS . I was with the officers; Bean at first denied it, but afterwards said he picked up the two books, and gave the bundles to Clare to carry.

JAMES TYRRELL . I am an officer, and saw the prisoners - I took this bundle from Clare's right hand, near the Cross Keys public-house, Wentworth-street; some more books have since been found over a wall, a door or two from where Clare was taken; Clare at first said he had picked them up - I am sure of that.

ROSAMOND BEDWELL . I live next door to the Cross Keys, in Wentworth-street. I found a parcel of books in

my yard on the night in question, and gave them to Barrs, the officer.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. These are the books Bedwell gave me.

ALEXANDER CLOUGH . These are all my books.

BEAN'S Defence. I took Mr. Clough home the evening before, and he told me to call next night; I wished him good night; he went in, but came out again, and beckoned me in; a young man was there with a light; Clough was intoxicated, and beckoned me in: he took indecent liberties with me, and told me I might sleep with him, but I told him I was not far from home; I went home.

THOMAS DAY . I know Mr. Clough came home the evening before alone - just after he came in there was a knock - I came down to the door, and saw a person like Bean; Mr. Clough spoke to him - I advised him not to go out again that night; no indecent liberties were taken.

ALEXANDER CLOUGH . I was intoxicated the night before. I recollect Bean perfectly - and something of a person seeing me home, but as to improper intercourse, either in language or action, I most solemnly deny. I never saw him in the street, and received money from him for books.

Four witnesses gave Bean a good character.

BEAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

CLARE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280110-199

454. MARGARET HALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 bed, value 10s.; 1 blanket, value 1s. 6d., and 1 saucepan, value 10d. , the goods of Robert Seals .

JAMES THAWLEY . I had the care of a house belonging to Robert Seals; the prisoner occupied a room in that house, and paid 7d. a night for it; on the 7th of January she spoke to my wife, and went out: when I came home I went into the room, and missed these articles - I went and found the prisoner, who told me she had sold the saucepan to a woman in Essex-street, for 8d. - I went to that woman, who gave up the saucepan, and she swore at Lambeth-street office that the prisoner sold it to her; I have not found any thing else. When I took the prisoner she said, if I would make no piece of work she would pay me for the things on Saturday night - she said she had had a drop of beer, and sold the bed and blanket, but could not tell where.

ROBERT SEALS. Thawley had the care of the house for me; I have been ill some time: he brought the prisoner to my room; she went on her knees, and said she would pay for the things.

Prisoner's Defence. The place is open front and back - when I came out I saw several persons on the stairs; it is in Catherine Wheel-alley , a very low neighbourhood; this man wants to extort money from me, thinking my sister is in good circumstances; my husband went into the country on the Monday before this happened. There was no blanket in the room - it was only two horse-cloths, and the whole of the things were not worth 3s.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280110-200

455. MARY ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 umbrella, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Weeks .

FRANCES JOHNSTONE . I am the daughter of Mr. Thomas Weeks. I was in his shop on the 7th of January, and saw the prisoner come and take the umbrella from the middle of the shop; she put it under her cloak, and got as far as the door with it - I took hold of her, and called my father; - she had come in with oranges.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; she had only two oranges.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in with half a dozen oranges, and this umbrella laid against my feet: I took it up, and the lady said I was going to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280110-201

456. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 key, value 2d.; 1 knife, value 2d.; 1 handkerchief, value 8d.; 3 half-crowns, and 2 shillings , the property of Edward Hill .

EDWARD HILL. I am a baker . On the evening of the 7th of January I met the prisoner in Cow-cross; I went with her, and had some porter at a public-house; we then went to Red Lion-alley - I felt her hand in my pocket; I put my hand on her, and I saw my money in her hand; there were three half-crowns, two shillings, a handkerchief, a knife, and a key; I had not given her any of them.

HENRY BARTLETT . I saw the prosecutor and prisoner in Red Lion-alley; I heard him say, "Give me my money," and she replied, with an oath, that she had no money - he had taken the