Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th December 1827.
Reference Number: 18271206
Reference Number: f18271206-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS , MAYOR.

FIRST SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 6th of DECEMBER, 1827, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1827.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt.; one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt.; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Chrisptopher Smith , Esq.; and Robert Waithman , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq.; Recorder of the said City; John Key , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Hall ,

John Donne ,

John Adamson ,

Wm. Lock ,

Wm. Mitchell ,

Abel S. Chappel ,

Robert Ash ,

Chas. Covington ,

Robt. Wm Keath ,

Jonathan Stratton

Wm. Twinch ,

Peter H. Abbott .

Second

James Guy ,

Peter Peel ,

Geo. A. Martin ,

Thomas Lee ,

Robert Harris ,

John Thomas ,

Benjam. Johnson ,

John Smith ,

John Banfield ,

David Wilson ,

James Williams ,

Joseph Proctor .

Third

John Prentice ,

John Luke ,

Thomas Pool ,

Benjamin Rose ,

John Mitchison ,

John Coppock ,

John Haynes ,

John Long ,

Henry Hall ,

John Serjeant ,

John Donne ,

Wm. Twitch .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Daniel Homeyer ,

Francis Heath ,

Wm. Hislop ,

Job Hopkins ,

Wm. Horn ,

George Hill ,

Joseph Hicks ,

Isaac Henderson ,

George Hickman ,

Wm. Jobson ,

Jerem. S. Jordan ,

Thomas Jordan .

Second

Wm. Jarvis ,

John Jefferson ,

Chs. Wm. Jarratt ,

Wm. Ince ,

Francis Jones ,

Samuel Hardy ,

Joshua Hopkins ,

Wm. Jury ,

James King ,

Wm. King ,

James Kennedy ,

Edward Knowles .

Third

Wm. Mottram ,

James Marchant ,

David Mansford ,

John Lee ,

John Lee ,

Wm. Lee ,

John Maxfield ,

Charles Marks ,

Joseph Middleton ,

Robert Mills ,

Wm. Millard ,

Thomas Mosses .

Fourth

Charles Garrett ,

Edward Garland .

Michl. Gunstone ,

Wm. Graves ,

Chs. Greenwood ,

Wm. Green ,

Thos. Greenham ,

George Girvin ,

Griffith Giddins ,

Christo. Golding ,

Wm. Gribble ,

Geo. Goodcheap .

Fifth

Daniel Harris ,

Wm. Hatch ,

George Harver ,

Wm. John Harris ,

Wm. Hallet ,

Wm. Hammond ,

James Hall ,

James Harris ,

Thomas Horton ,

Wm. Hewit ,

Geo. Henderson ,

Daniel Herbert .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 6, 1827.

LUCAS, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18271206-1

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Luscomb , on the 29th of October , at St. George, Hanover-square, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 umbrella, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 glove, value 6d.; 4 sovereigns, and 4 shillings , his property.

RICHARD LUSCOMB. I am a servant , but am at present out of a situation. On the 29th of October, at near eight o'clock at night, I was coming from Hyde Park-corner to Grosvenor-gate, in a direction to my own home: I was in the Park - it was a moon-light evening; I met a man at the crossing where the road comes out, near the bason in Hyde Park - he was a stranger to me: I was picking my way over the cart road, which was then in a very bad state, and the man said."You had better come this way - it is a better crossing; I said, "Thank you, that is not my road"- he said, "You had better come;" I said, "No, that is not my road, and I shall not go that way;" he was close by me; he replied, "D - n you, you shall," caught hold of my arm, and seized my umbrella, which I had in my hand, and wrenched it from me, by force.

Q. Did you make any resistance at the time? A. I did not at the moment, for I was struck with astonishment; he ran across the Park, in a direction for the Serpentine-river, with my umbrella - he had nothing else at that time: I followed him - he ran up by the side of the Serpentine-river, a little beyond the Humane Society's house, and then across the road, and across the grass, among the trees. I followed him to the spot, and as soon as he arrived there he made a sudden stop; I seized my umbrella, and wanted to wrench it from him - he wrenched it also, and broke the handle of it off; he then said he should not let me off in this way, and knocked me down with his fist, and for the moment I was senseless. As soon as I got up I found my clothes literally stripped open, and both my trousers pockets turned inside out - both my waistcoat and trousers were opened. I had had a brown silk purse, with four sovereigns and four shillings in silver in one of my trousers pockets; as soon as I found my pockets turned out I found every thing I had possessed was gone; I had a key of my trunk in my pocket - that was gone; and my pocket handkerchief - I had one glove on my hand at the time, and the other in my hand - that was gone, but the one on my hand remained; I saw the prisoner standing at a little distance from me, and made towards him - he held the umbrella up against me, saying if I attempted to come another step that way he would beat my brains out with the umbrella, and if I did not return the same way as I had come, he would certainly murder me; I was rather frightened at the time, and did not proceed further after him, but saw him go in the direction of Cumberland-gate, round the ring.

Q. Did he walk or run? A. He walked away - and as soon as I saw him going away I made the best of my way between the barracks and the green, and succeeded in arriving at Cumberland-gate before he got up; I told the gate-keeper what had happened, and begged him to come out and shut the gate.

Q. Did the gate-keeper assist you? A. No - I ran to the gate, and shut it myself; I turned my head round, hearing footsteps behind me, and saw it was the man who had robbed me, coming up; I then charged him with the theft, and told him he was the man - he denied it; I said,"You are the man, you know it - you have robbed me of four sovereigns - you have robbed me of my all;" with that he shoved me from him, and ran off back again into the park, towards Kensington-gardens, among the trees; two soldiers came up, and hearing the cry of Stop thief! they ran off, and followed him, and succeeded in taking him - another person came up, and, seeing the exhausted state I was in, came to my assistance - I had fallen down.

Q. You say two soldiers took him? A. They did - I was then in a very exhausted state, and had fallen down near the gate, and the witness who came up had seen the umbrella drop between me and the prisoner at the gate.

Q. What, had you a struggle at the gate? A. Yes - I seized him, and charged him with the theft, and he shoved me from him; the umbrella fell from him; he had it in his possession at the time I seized him - it was taken to the watch-house by one of the officers, I believe, but I cannot be certain who carried it, I was so confused; the prisoner was brought back by the soldiers, and taken to the watch-house; one of the witnesses brought my glove to the office.

Q. Had you seen the person who robbed you before that night, to your knowledge? A. No - I am certain he is the man; I had a clear view of his countenance, for it was moon-light: there are no lamps near that place. I accompunied the soldiers and the prisoner to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. You are a servant out of place? A. Yes - I had been out of place about three days when this happened; it was rather before eight o'clock when I got into Hyde Park; I went from

Hyde Park-corner gate, in a direction for Grosvenor-gate; I had not been at home that evening - I had left home about twelve o'clock in the day - I had been with a neice of mine to school, and then to deliver a message to a friend of mine, who lives near Finsbury-square - I remained with him the remaining part of the day.

Q. Are you quite sure, when you went to see the friend, that you had the money in your pocket? A. I had, and I had my hand in my pocket before I entered the Park gate- I am quite certain I had the money when I entered the Park; I first met the prisoner near the bason, in the road which leads from the gravel-pits: I swear I did not speak to him before he spoke to me.

Q. Where did you live when you were in place, before this happened? A. With Mr. James Carrick Moore .

Q. Did you ask the prisoner which way he was going? A. I did not.

Q. Did you walk in the Park for pleasure, or amusement? A. No; the reason I was going there was that, I had owed a person some money, and was going down to Cadogan-place, to pay it - the person I was going to was Samuel Taylor , who lives at No. 79, Cadogan-place, Sloane-street, with the sister of the gentleman I had lived with; I had borrowed some money of him.

Q. Were you not as high up the Park as the magazine? A. I was afterwards - I had followed the prisoner there, after he took my umbrella.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about the bridge at the end of the Serpentine-river? did you say you were going there on business, and ask if he was going? A. I did not.

Q. He snatched the umbrella from you then, turned upon you, and stunned you? A. He did stun me.

Q. Were you so insensible as not to know who took the sovereigns? A. He is the man who took my umbrella; I was insensible, but there was nobody else near me; and, as he took the umbrella, I have no doubt he is the man who took the money.

Q. What business had you to go up so high in the Park? A. I came through Piccadilly, and, having walked so far, felt myself rather tired, and having promised my wife to return home early, I thought I would defer what I intended to do; the prisoner arrived at the gate two minutes after me.

Q. Then he followed you there instead of running away? A. He arrived there after me, but he did not go the same way as me; I was not astonished to see him arrive there, as I saw the way he was going - he could have run another way; he came to the gate in a different direction to that I did; I have reason to think he thought I was gone in another direction.

Q. When you got to the gate were several people assembled? A. No, but when I gave an alarm there was - it was not said, in my hearing, that I was making a sham of being robbed, and that I was not robbed.

Q. Had you the umbrella in your hand as you went out of Cumberland gate? A. I cannot say, as I was in a very exhausted state; I do not believe that I had it in my hand then - I will not swear it, but I do not think it possible; I will swear it did not drop from my hand - I swear I had not got it in my hand when I arrived at the gate, for when the prisoner came up he had it in his hand; it certainly did not fall from my hand, because I had not got it. I went with the prisoner to the watch-house; we were pretty near together - I was not at his side; the watchman and soldiers took him along; I did not see him throw any thing away; I have no knowledge of his throwing any gold or silver away.

Q. You met some friend, I believe, as you were going to the watch-house? A. No - a total stranger to me acted as a friend, and went with me to the watch-house, and afterwards to the office - he did not represent himself as a night officer.

Q. At the watch-house did you say to the prisoner,"Why did you hurt me? I did not wish to hurt you?" A. No; I said, "You wanted to take the umbrella from me - why did you wish to injure me? I have never done you an injury;" I might have said that also at the watch-house; I had some dirt on my clothes when I arrived at Cumberland-gate; I do not know that any body made an observation about that - they might - I cannot say.

Q. Did you say at the watch-house, that he had forced you against a clump of trees when he robbed you? A. I said he shoved me against a tree when he took my umbrella.

Q. Do you swear you did not make proposals to him, which caused him to be very angry? A. No, I made no proposals to him; he charged me at the watch-house with making proposals which are quite against my nature, and which hurt my feelings; I had not got the umbrella when I arrived at the gate, but whether it was afterwards given to me I cannot swear.

COURT. Q. After you had lost your money, you say the prisoner walked off towards Cumberland-gate: what direction did you take to get there before him? A. I ran down between the trees, and crossed a little wooden bridge- we went in different directions; I ran as fast as I possibly could; he came up to the gate about two minutes after me, as near as I can recollect, and the umbrella was then in his hand; as soon as I saw it was him I seized him by the collar, and he dropped it on the ground; that was while I was scuffling with him.

Q. What reason have you to believe you had the money in your pocket before you entered the Park? A. I was going to pay the money, and I then put my hand into my pocket; I felt the money in my purse, and buttoned up my pocket; I am quite sure I had the purse, with some money in it, in my pocket then, and I had not met a single person from that time till I met the prisoner.

Q. You were knocked down, and made insensible - your pockets turned out, and money gone, and you saw the prisoner standing a little distance from you? A. Yes - he might not be above a yard from me. I concluded he was waiting to see which way I was going.

MARK WELCH . I belong to the Coldstream Guards. - About eight o'clock on the night of the 29th of October, I was at Cumberland-gate, and heard the cry of Murder! Robbery! and Stop thief! which came from the gate, close to where I was standing; I turned into the gate, and ran into the Park; I looked to my right, and saw a man running along by the side of the wall, among the trees - I pursued him - Charles Bruce, a fellow-soldier, was with me; several other people followed him - I gained ground on him- he looked back, and turned to the left; when he saw me gaining ground on him he turned, and said, "Who are you

following?" I collared him, and said, "If you attempt to stir I will knock you down;" he said, "Let me sit down a minute:" he had his waistcoat and trousers unbuttoned - he sat down for about a quarter of a minute - he got up, and Charles Bristow* came up to me.*This name is printed Bruce, by mistake, in the preceding page,

Q. What reason did he give for wishing to sit down? - A. He gave no reason. The prosecutor came up, and said he was the villain who had taken his property - he said,"That was the man."

Q. What did the prisoner say? A. He looked very indifferent indeed, but said nothing; several people wanted to lay hold of him; I said, "If you want to take him I will have nothing to do with him; they let go of him, and I took him- he is the man. I went into the Park on the following morning, and found the prosecutor about twenty yards inside the gate, at a place where the prisoner ran down - Bristow was there, and he picked up a silk handkerchief; I picked up a leather glove and a penny piece - I gave the prosecutor the glove; I found that glove about two yards to the right of where the prisoner had ran the night before; when I found the glove the prosecutor might be about three yards from it. When I first saw him in the Park he was about fifty yards from that place; it was about half-past six o'clock in the morning; I had left the barracks about a quarter-past six.

Q. You did not see the prosecutor go into the Park the next morning, but found him there? A. No, I found him there; whether he had been to the spot where I found the glove I cannot say.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where had you been that evening? A. I was taking a walk - I belong to Portman-street barracks. I was standing outside Cumberland-gate, with Bristow, talking to two girls; I heard the cry, it proceeded from a very little way inside the gate; I did not particularly notice what sort of a night it was; I could very well see the prisoner running down by the trees.

Q. Which trees are you speaking of? A. Towards Kensington-gardens; when I first noticed the prisoner he was about thirty yards in front of me - several people were pursuing him; I did not see the prosecutor, not to discern him; I got up to the prisoner in not more than five minutes- he appeared quite out of breath; he had no umbrella then.

Q. Were you near enough to see any thing fall from him, or thrown from him, if it had? A. I did not see it; I was not near enough to him to see it: I was not above thirty yards from him when I pursued him, but I do not say I was no further from him all the time - I had him in sight all the time.

Q. How soon after you seized him did you see the prosecutor? A. I might say, in about three minutes - he came up to me; Bristow was the first who came up, and the prosecutor next. The prisoner was not out of my hands till I delivered him to a constable; I did not see him throw any thing away, nor did I search him - he might have dropped a thing carelessly without my seeing him; he was in a most exhausted state, as if he had run three or four miles; the prosecutor was very much flurried, as if the prisoner had knocked him about - he was in a flurried and agitated state- I parted with him in Oxford-street, when I gave the prisoner to a watchman. I did not appoint to meet him in the Park the next morning; I went there to see if the prisoner had thrown any thing away, as the watchman had told us nothing was found on him; we told the watchman we would come up in the morning, and see if he had thrown any thing away.

Q. Did the prosecutor describe to you what property he had lost at the time? A. Yes, and told us the road the prisoner had taken.

Q. Was it as light when you left the prosecutor as when you were in pursuit of the prisoner? A. Yes.

Q. Then could he not have found any thing if it was dropped as well that night as in the morning? A. No; there are a parcel of leaves strewed about; they would not cover a handkerchief, but it was brown, the same color as the leaves.

Q. For what you know, the prosecutor might have been in the Park all night? A. He might; Bristow found the handkerchief: the prosecutor was six or seven yards from him.

CHARLES BRISTOW . I am in the same regiment as Welch. I was at Cumberland-gate about eight o'clock on the night in question - I heard a man screaming out Murder! in the Park; I and Welch ran into the Park as hard as we could- the prosecutor said, "Stop the robber!" I at that time saw a man running near Cumberland-gate, among the trees, near the wall, towards Kensington-gardens; we pursued, and Welch seized him; I might be ten or twelve paces behind Welch; when I got up the prisoner was sitting down, as if he were going to ease himself; we brought him up to the watch-house; on the following morning, between six and seven o'clock, I accompained Welch to the Park, and saw the prosecutor there, looking about for the money; we went in the direction we had followed the prisoner, and I picked up a silk handkerchief, which the prosecutor owned- I gave it to him; I picked it up on the place where the prisoner sat down; I saw Welch pick up one glove and a penny piece, thirty or forty yards from the handkerchief, in the direction the prisoner had run; he gave the glove to the prosecutor; I had left the prisoner in the custody of the watchman the night before - I saw him next morning at the office - he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. What sort of a night was this? A. A very moon-light night.

Q. Did you see any other persons running? A. Only Welch and me; we passed by the prosecutor, and overtook the prisoner; we did not go to the watch-house, but gave him into the hands of the watchman at Cumberland-gate; I did not observe his clothes being dirty; the prosecutor's clothes were dirty, as if he had been thrown down; I saw the umbrella in the prosecutor's hand when we brought the prisoner back.

ABRAHAM BROWN . I live at No. 9, King-street, Golden-square, and am a tailor and draper. On the night of the 29th of October I and my wife were coming across the Park; I think the clock might have struck eight about five minutes before; we had spent the evening at Pimlico; I walked across the Park, for the benefit of the air, having been confined all day - when we got to Cumberland-gate I heard the prosecutor exclaim, "For God's sake, shut the gate - I have been robbed, and in danger of my life;" he did not wait for the gate being shut, but lifted up the bolt to do it himself, and seeing the prisoner coming up to him, he exclaimed, "This is the villain,

or rascal, who has robbed me," and immediately seized him - a scuffle then took place, and the prisoner released himself from the attempted grasp of the prosecutor, and, having on a long great coat, the prosecutor laid hold of the tail of his coat, with a sudden jerk, and I saw an umbrella and hat fall on the ground, from which the umbrella fell I cannot tell, not to be certain.

Q. What was the result of the jerk? A. The prosecutor fell, and the prisoner ran off towards the barracks, alongside the wall; I was anxious to follow him, and did so, about forty yards, but my wife wished me not - the prosecutor exclaimed, after he got up, "For God's sake, stop him;" several persons ran after him: I did not observe any soldiers then; I remained by the gate, and the prisoner was brought back by two soldiers and the prosecutor - I am sure he is the same man I saw scuffling with the prosecutor; I saw him handed over to the patrol; I did not hear him say any thing then; I said to the prosecutor, in the prisoner's presence, as we were going to the watch-house, "You seem much exhausted, you had better take my arm," which he did - when we got to the watch-house the prisoner said, "You villain, will you take my life?" Luscomb at that time was so much exhausted he was scarcely able to give the charge; the prisoner continued to worry him, and I desired he should have some water, which having been given him he then gave the charge. The prisoner said he would give him all the money he had lost to let him go; the prosecutor said he did not want money, but justice; after that, he said, "I will give you 10l. or 20l. or 30l. if you will let me go - I can easily raise it - I have nothing to do but to send for it.

Q. Was that said publicly or privately? A. Publicly, before the constable of the night; the prosecutor said he did not want any of his money, and when he observed,"Would you take my life," he replied, "You would take my life - I want nothing but justice;" the prisoner came before the Magistrate next morning in a different coat - he had observed, when they were about to strip him, that he had nothing about him but a penny and a halfpenny, but they were not found; I saw him searched, but he was not thoroughly searched - his shoes were not taken off; he had a loose great coat on that night, and I believe I have seen that great coat on a companion of his just now, who wanted to draw the soldiers on one side; he appeared next morning in a blue straight coat.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you happen to know whether the prisoner was allowed to go at large that night? A. I saw him locked up, and I believe he was kept in custody.

Q. You say, in a scuffle between the prosecutor and the prisoner, an umbrella and hat fell to the ground? A. Yes- that was the first time I had observed the umbrella.

Q. Are you able to say whether the prosecutor had that umbrella in his hand before he fell? A. I cannot - I did not see it in the prisoner's possession.

RICHARD LUSCOMB . I have not got the glove and handkerchief; I was desired to leave them at the watch-house, and have not seen them since.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer of High-street, Mary-le-bone. I was at the office at the time this charge was given - what passed was taken down in writing.

Q. Did you overhear any conversation between the prosecutor and prisoner at the time they were waiting? A. No. Brown was at the office.

Q. Did you overhear any conversation between them in the office? A. Not as I can safely swear - I was on duty there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You happened to be the officer on duty there - did you remain in the Magistrate's room while he was examined? A. Yes, but it not being a case of my own, I did not take notice of it.

Q. If any thing had been said, loud enough for every body to have heard it, you would have heard it? A. Yes; Webster was the officer at the second examination, and the glove and umbrella were handed to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, but that I am innocent of robbery, or any thing of the kind; he knew I had not robbed him - he had been using very bad expressions towards me, and he means, by accusing me, to save himself, by taking me up, and charging me with a highway-robbery: he ran to the gate when I ran after him, and he was stopped by two soldiers, and whatever he said to them they let him go; I came up, and he knocked me down, and he collared me when I came up to the gate.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18271206-2

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

2. THOMAS LISNAY was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Turney , on the King's highway, on the 6th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 seals, value 2l. , his property.

WILLIAM TURNEY. I am waiter at the Blue Boar Inn. Aldgate. On the 5th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was crossing Red Lion-street, Whitechapel , and saw the prisoner and three others behind him; he extended his hand, and said, "My hearty, how are you?" not knowing him, I retreated on one side, not wishing to shake hands with him; he then darted at my watchseals, which hung below my waistcoat, and with a sudden jerk broke the chain - my fob was twisted, which prevented the watch coming out; I saw he was coming to take it, and put my hand to my fob before he got the seals away; I could not get hold of the seals, because he had hold of them - he got the three gold seals, and about one link of the chain; he ran into the road, and I after him calling Stop thief! he turned down Red Lion-street, and I after him; I asked him for the seals as he was going away; he did not run as if he was trying to escape - he ran straggling about the road, with his arm extended; I could have got before him, but was afraid; I called out, and the watchman came to my assistance; he returned up Red Lion-street into the road again; I then attempted to lay hold of him, and the watchman secured him; I did not see what became of the seals - I had never seen him before, but am certain he is the man - I distinctly saw him under the gas-lamp - he had a pipe in his mouth; I saw him next morning at the office, and knew him there - he had a black eye, and before he took my seals I saw his black eye, when I looked to see if I knew him, upon his saying"How do you do my hearty?" I also knew him by his dress, and the handkerchief which he had on under an old velveteen jacket; I knew his person, because I went to the watch-house with him when he was locked up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What kept you out so late? A. Our porter was out, and I had been with a note; there were some fire-works being let off over the Tenter-ground - there were no other persons about where I was robbed - he was smoking his pipe when he came up, and it was in his hand when he was taken - he had it in his mouth when he caught hold of the chain.

Q. He did not run as if to escape - were there any persons before him? A. No; he afterwards turned back, and came right towards me; I said at the watch-house, that I did not know what to make of it, as he did not seem to run as if to escape, and he offered no resistance; when I took hold of him he was going to strike me, but he did not - he seemed against going to the watch-house, because he said it was not him who robbed me - he said it was the other gentlemen behind him, whom he did not know, but they he passed before it was taken; my Christian names are William Julius.

COURT. Q. Does any body ever call you Julius? A. No; my friends tell me that is my name, but I never saw my register - I never sign that name, and am never called any thing but William; when I was young my friends told me my name was Julius.

JOSEPH BREN . I am a watchman. On the 5th of November I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running across Whitechapel from Red Lion-street, towards Castle-street - he was running; I stopped him; he said"You may search me, I have no property;" I took him to the watch-house; nothing was found on him; I came back to my beat, and in about three quarters of an hour I found the seals, and one link of the chain, in the kennel, about four doors up Red Lion-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see three other men? A. No; I saw several sky-rockets going up behind the houses.

JOHN DUNGATE . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house between twelve and one o'clock by Bren; he was kept there all night; these seals and part of the chain were delivered to me by Bren - I have had them ever since.

WILLIAM TURNEY . They are my seals.

Cross-examined. Q. What became of the other men? A. They had passed me before the seals were broken from the chain.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-3

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

3. JOHN TAFT was indicted for beastiality .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-4

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

4. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Susan Simmons , spinster , on the 29th of November , and stealing 2 handkerchiefs, value 11s. , the goods of Isaac Simpson .

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am a day patrol of Bow-street. I know Mr. Simpson's shop, in the Strand . On the 2d of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at Simpson's window - when I first came up he was standing pushing his belly close against the window; I had seen him before - I came by him quite sharp, and heard the glass rattling - I crossed over the street, came back on the other side, and stood in a dark doorway; he remained at the window two or three minutes, and then went away - shortly after I went over, and saw the window was cut; this was about a quarter-past six o'clock; he returned in ten or fifteen minutes; I remained there till twenty minutes before nine, and saw him come to the window at least twenty times, but could not see whether he took any thing out, till twenty minutes before nine, when I contrived to be on his left-hand side, where there was a gas-light; I then saw his left-hand go inside the window, and draw these two handkerchief out, and put them into his right-hand coat pocket; I immediately went across, and seized him; his hand was all over blood, and his little finger cut; he said he had nothing about him, but I took the handkerchiefs out of his pocket; I took him into the shop - I found nothing else on him, but an old coat; Mr. Simpson gave me this piece of glass next morning - it was shoved inside the window. When I took him he said if he had two sovereigns to give me it would be all right, and I should let him go.

ISAAC SIMPSON . I am a hosier , and rent this shop, in the Strand; Susan Simmons occupies the house, and has lived there for twenty-one years - she is executrix to her father, who has been dead about two months; she is above age - there is a son, who is not of age. I also occupy the second and third floors; she lives in the first floor - there is a private door at the back of the house - she generally goes in that way, but on a week-day occasionally passes through the shop; her brother has a situation in Covent-garden, and sometimes sleeps there, and sometimes at home- I did not observe any thing till about a quarter before nine o'clock, when the officer brought the prisoner in, and said he had been robbing the window - he produced these two handkerchiefs which are mine: I had seen them in the window not an hour before, and did not then observe that the window was broken - I had cleaned it in the morning - it was then whole; I took this piece of broken glass out, and gave to the officer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-5

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

5. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , at St. Pancras, in the dwelling-house of Samuel Vines , to whom he was a servant, 1 purse, value 1s., and 1 Bank-note for payment of and value 40l., the property of the said Samuel Vines , against the statute.

MR. SAMUEL VINES. I am a Solicitor , and live at No. 47, Upper Gower-street in the parish of St. Pancras . The prisoner came into my service as footman on the 18th of August last, and went away on the 15th of October; I had left town on the 16th of September, leaving him at home, also a cook, who had been with us about a year and three quarters - they were the only two persons we left in the house; my family went with me; before I left town in the morning, I arranged my money, and left behind me a 40l. Bank-note in a silk purse; I put it at the back of a drawer in the secretaire, so that the drawer would not shut close; I left the secretaire locked; the note was not in the drawer, but behind it; I had the number and date of the note, and had placed my initials on the top of it in

front; I had often seen the note, as I had received it on the 22d of June, and whenever I arranged my money I saw it. I returned to town on Monday, the 1st of October; I was leaving town again on Wednesday, the 3d of October, and had no occasion to go to my money till that morning; I then went to where I had deposited my note, and the purse and note were gone. I inquired of the prisoner, in an indifferent sort of way, if he had seen my purse about; he said he had not, and would inquire of the cook; he certainly left the room in a hurried manner; I heard no more of it - he did not tell me whether he had or had not inquired of the cook; I left town in an hour, and sent notice to the Bank to stop payment; I came back on the 10th, but left again, and came back on the 14th; the prisoner still remained in my service; I had collected from him that he was extremely anxious to leave my service, and on Monday, the 15th of October, I told him I understood so, and said I was not obliged to give him any notice or money, and that he had better leave that afternoon; I paid him 5l. odd as wages in the evening, and he left.

Q. When you told him you understood he was anxious to leave, what he did he say? A. He said nothing - he did not at all express a wish to remain; I advertised the note, and have seen it since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not advertise it as a note supposed to be lost, and not as having been stolen? A. I headed my advertisement with the word, "Lost" - I have a stable at the back of my house- I was about purchasing a horse.

Q. Had you not been in the habit of riding it up and down the mews? A. Not in the mews certainly; I have here a memorandum of all the Bank-notes I have had in my possession, and accounting for how I have disposed of them - it was given to me by the person who gave me the note.

COURT. Q. You had better put that away; you have said your initials were on the note, shall you know it by them? A. No; they are now torn off - there is a tear in the place where my initials were, but I know the number and date myself.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you advertised it, did you suppose it had been stolen? A. I do not wish to answer that question, because I am afraid to do so.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Oh! answer me? A. I tell you honestly, I suspected the prisoner from the first, but if I had put "Lost or stolen" at the head of my advertisement, the note would not have been circulated, I think.

Q. How many notes had you had for the three weeks, or month preceding? A. I think about seven, but only one 40l. - I have a wife, but no children; the secretaire is in my private room; the prisoner came to my service from the Rev. Mr. Young, one of the masters of Eton school - I had a written character; it was not an excellent character, but I took him; he said he had a sister, and on Mrs. Vines going to that sister; she appeared respectable, and we took him before the written character came, as the sister said she would be accountable for any thing; he told me he had lived with Lord Mansfield; he came to me on the 18th of August, and left on the 15th of October - I missed the note on the 3d - I had not been in town more than three or four days altogether - I advertised the note on the 16th, the day after he left - I have a partner, but this note was paid to me by a gentleman at the bar, who is my tenant; it is my private property.

COURT. Q. You say you know the number of the note, did you put it down yourself? A. I did, and I have it in my pocket - I did that on the 26th of August - I received it on the 22d of June, took it home, and had no occasion to look over my money, till the 26th of August, when I put down the numbers, dates and amounts of all my notes - I have the paper here now (looking at it); it was the only 40l. note I had - I have taken no other since; it was dated the 5th of May, 1827, No. 15261 - I received it from Mr. Crupton's clerk.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you leave any other note behind you? A. None, of any description, sort, or kind.

Q. Why, look at this paper - here is under, the words,"Left in town" this 40l. note, and several other notes? A. I was possessed of these several notes on the 26th of August - when I came to town from time to time - I took out certain notes, I have crossed off all but this 40l. note, which was the only one I left in town, on the 16th of September - I had spent the rest at Brighton, and wanted the 40l. when I came to town.

JOHN MORRIS . I am a servant. I am at present out of place - I have been acquainted with the prisoner from a boy - I met him in Bond-street, on the 10th of November; we walked together along Piccadilly, as far as the Park; we came back again, and he asked me to change him a 40l. note, which he said he had picked up in Chenies-mews, which is near Bedford-square; he told me he came honestly by it, that he picked it up in Cheniesmews - I changed it at Mr. Howis, an oilman in Piccadilly, whom I have known for some years - I got thirty sovereigns, and two 5l. notes for it - I did not notice the number of the note, but I noticed a piece torn off the top of it - I do not recollect noticing any thing else - I gave him the money, and he lent me 20l. of it; he partly offered to lend it to me, and I said I should be obliged to him - I gave him the money at a public-house in Vine-street; he said he would lend me 20l. of it.

Q. How came he to offer that? A. I told him I was in want of a little money, but not before he offered it me; he offered it me, and I accepted it - I have always given the same account of this - I know nothing more.

Cross-examined. Q. You say you always told the same account of it; is that perfectly true? A. Yes.

Q. On your oath, did you not say you got it from a gentleman at the Clarendon Hotel? A. Never.

Q. Did you in the first instance tell the Magistrate you got the note from the prisoner? A. I did not - I did not tell him I got it from any body else - I said I got it from a gentleman; the prisoner's family are all respectable - I said the gentleman lived at No. 109, Great Titchfield-street - I did not give any other address.

Q. Was it not for the purpose of concealing the person you had it from, that you said it was a gentleman? A. No it was not - I meant to give the prisoner's name, and I did - I meant the prisoner when I said the gentleman.

Q. How long had you known him in service; when you described him as a gentleman, had he not been many years in service? A. Yes - I knew him as a footman, and in other capacities - I considered him as a gentleman - I had always found him correct and upright - I have

been in the House of Correction, for want of bail, since this transaction - I have come from there to day - I was sent there to give forty-eight hours' notice of bail to appear here, but I did not care for bail, as the Sessions were so near; it was eight or ten days ago.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate, or any body that you took the note from a gentleman, who was waiting at the Clarendon Hotel? A. I did not - I mentioned the Clarendon Hotel, as I am in the habit of calling there every morning, and I mentioned the hotel to Howis, but did not say I took it from a gentleman there - I do not recollect the Magistrate saying he did not believe my account - I do not think he said any thing of the kind.

COURT. Q. You changed the note at Howis'? A. Yes - I asked him to cash me the note, and had a long conversation with him, and he has since said, that I mentioned Lord Henley's name, but I did not mention any such name; he did not ask where I got the note - I told him I was expecting a situation to go out of town with a gentleman at the Clarendon Hotel.

MR. VINES re-examined. I found my secretaire still locked.

STEPHEN HOWIS . I am an oilman, and live in Piccadilly. I have no knowledge of Morris, except from his living in different services - I knew his person, and what places he had lived in; he came to me with a 40l. note, about the 8th or 10th of November - I do not know the day; he came from ten to eleven o'clock in the day; he came and asked for change for my Lord Henley; he said we served my Lord Henley.

Q. Did he introduce himself in that way? A. No; he asked for change for a 40l. note - I hesitated, and said, "I do not know you;" he then said, "I serve Lord Henley;" that was in order to remove my scruples - Lord Henley's father had been a customer at our shop.

Q. Did you ask him where Lord Henley was, or did he tell you? A. He said he was at the Clarendon Hotel; that he had come from Ireland, on account of the death of the Hon. Sir William Wynn, his brother; I hesitated again, and looked at his appearance, which was that of a nobleman's upper servant, and then asked him for the note; I inspected it, and saw it was without any writing, or any thing on the back - I thought it had very probably been received from a banker, and from those circumstances gave him change; he stated other families which he had lived in before, and whom we were connected with in business, which strengthened my idea that he lived with Lord Henley; he mentioned Mrs. Trail, the widow of Henry Trail; he observed, that he was brought up on Mr. Trail's estate - I asked his name, and wrote it on the note; he gave me the name of Morris; he observed his lordship was going to trave which induced me to change the note - I paid it into Messrs. Drummonds, with our general account, and should know it again.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he mentioned Lord Henley's name so frequently, that you had no doubt he was telling you the truth? A. Yes - I understood him clearly to say, that he was going to travel with Lord Henley, as his servant - I am certain he mentioned his lordship's name, and Mr. Wynn's.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Friday, the 23d of November, in Great Titchfield-street - I took him to the office, and asked if he knew a person of the name of Morris - I asked him the question several times; he repeatedly said, he did not; this was not before the Magistrate - I asked if he knew any thing respecting a 40l. note, and if he had not given a person named Morris a note, of that description; he said No - I had not said it would be better or worse for him to say any thing; the chief constable then said, "Young man, do you mean to say you don't know a person named Morris?" he said he did not, but there was a Welshman named John, who was bred up in the same village with him - I asked if he had not given that John a 40l. note to change; he said he had not; he was examined by the Magistrate, and sent to the watch-house till the following day, and on our way to the watch-house, he himself began the conversation, and said,"The reason I would not know Morris was, because I had heard that day that he had been taken into custody" - Morris was at the office, but he had not seen him; on the following day I was present at his examination - the clerk wrote down what he said, and I attested it; no inducement whatever was held out to him; the Magistrate said,"Now, prisoner, you need not say any thing without you like, you are not bound to say any thing;" he said the truth was the truth, and began to make a statement - the clerk was called in, and took it down, and on the Tuesday following I saw him sign it; here it is (looking at it); this is his signature.

Cross-examined. Q. Why were you not content with one denial from him, without asking him the same question over and over? A. Because I knew he had not told me true; I thought it right, to further the ends of justice.

Q. Do you examine every man in this way? A. If I found any thing intricate, I probably should. I would not try to get a confession by any unfair means.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England, and produce a 40l. note, No. 15261, dated the 5th of May, 1827, which was paid into the Bank by Messrs. Grotes, the bankers.

STEPHEN HOWIS. I know this note - the name of Morris has been taken out at the Bank, but the first part of the M and of the s remain - I have no doubt of its being the note I received from Morris; when I paid it into Messrs. Drummonds the name was complete - the name has been partly stamped out since - I sent it to Messrs. Drummonds by a relation.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there even the M to be seen on it? A. Here is the beginning of the M - it might be taken for the first part of an A. I made no memorandum on it, except writing the name; we always write on notes who we take them from, either the nobleman or the servant.

GEORGE DYER. I know the note was paid in by Messrs. Grotes, by referring to our books; the bankers leave their parcels of notes, and write on the outside who they are from; I have written "Grote" on this note; I copied that from the book; we punch out the sum, and tear off the corner, to cancel it. Any writing at the back would be taken off if it covered the sum.

Cross-examined. Q. What is done with the bits cut out? A. I believe they are kept till there is a large quantity, and then burnt; the book from which I copied this is still at the Bank.

MR. VINES. I put my initials on the note exactly at the place where it is torn; this is the note which was taken out of my secretaire - I know it because I so often saw it, and have the date and number.

The confession made by the prisoner was here read.

MIDDLESEX. - The voluntary statement of ROBERT WILLIAMS. - Who says, "That in the first week of October last, opposite No. 50, in the mews, at the back of Upper Gower-street, I picked up a 40l. Bank of England note, and at the same time my master was riding on horseback up and down the mews; it was about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon - I told no person that day what I had found, nor did I mention it to any body, until I met John Morris, in Bond-street, last Saturday fortnight, when I told him that I had picked up a 40l. note in the mews, and asked him if he could get it changed; he said that he could, at Mr. Howis' in Piccadilly; we then walked together into Hyde Park, where I put the note into his hand, and told him to take it, and if he got it changed, he should have half; we then went into Piccadilly, and I waited outside, while he went into the shop of Mr. Howis, and he soon afterwards came out, with the change in his hand, and said, "Come along with me Bob, I have got twenty-five sovereigns or thirty (I cannot recollect which), and two 5l. notes", and we went together to a public-house near there, and he gave me two 5l. Bank of England notes, and ten sovereigns, and the same day I changed one of notes, at a public-house in Great Titchfield-street, and the other I changed two or three days afterwards, at a linen-draper's in Oxford-street - I wrote Morris's name on them, after I received them.

(Signed) ROBERT WILLIAMS."

Taken before me, this 27th day of November, 1827.

(Signed) J. E. CONANT.

Witnessed by me, (Signed) THOS. CLEMENTS.

The prisoner made no Defence. One witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his former good character .

Reference Number: t18271206-6

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

6. JOHN CROW was indicted for embezzling the sum of 1300l. and 300l., which he had received on account of Sir William Pratt Call , Bart. , and others, his masters .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-7

7. JAMES HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 6 glass tumblers, value 12s. , the goods of James Randell and others, his masters.

MR. JOHN HOWELL. I am in partnership with James Randell and others - we are malt-factors, coal-merchants, and wharfingers , at Queenhithe . The prisoner was occasionally employed by us, and on the 6th of November he was employed to pass down one hundred sacks of flour into a barge; I had suspicion, and discovered that a crate of glass and other things were broken open in our warehouse; I had not seen the crate before the discovery - I saw it opened about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and, on examining it, missed some articles; the prisoner was then gone. I sent for an officer, with whom I went to his brother's lodging; we found him and his brother together, and five cut-glass tumblers on the drawers before them - they were very handsome tumblers; I asked whose property they were - neither of them could tell me; they said they knew nothing about them; nobody else was in the room. The prisoner's brother said, if I waited a few minutes his wife would be in, and might be able to tell me about them - the wife came in, and said, in the prisoner's hearing, that she had been out all the morning, and the tumblers were not there when she went out - that she had been in at five o'clock, and they were not there then, and she knew nothing of them. I then gave charge of the prisoner, and the officer took the tumblers - they matched exactly with those in the crate, and we found them in a piece of red cloth, of the same sort as those in the crate were wrapped in; they are worth about 2s. each; we have employed him repeatedly; he did job work at times - he might earn 7s. or 8s. a day.

RICHARD GRANGE . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. On the 6th of November the prisoner was employed, with three more, to ship some flour - he only carried one sack, and lurked about the warehouse, which made me suspect him, but I saw nothing done; I saw him in that part of warehouse where the crate was deposited, and when I went to lock up, about half-past seven o'clock, I found a broken tumbler wrapped in a piece of red baize; I directly went to the crate, and found it had been broken open; I had seen it in a perfect state at three o'clock that afternoon- I directly went to Mr. Frazer, to make inquires, and reported my inquires to the prosecutors: the goods in the crate were in red baize.

WILLIAM LOCKTON . I am a porter, and occasionally work for the prosecutors. On the afternoon this happened I was up stairs, landing flour, and after we had done I came to the top of the ladder where these men were at work; I staid there a few minutes, talking to one of our own men, who was letting the flour down on those men's backs, for them to carry, and while there I heard glass fall- at this time those men were at the bottom of the ladder; I cannot say whether the prisoner was there, as it was dark in that place; we took no further notice of it, thinking it might be a bottle - but in about ten minutes I came down stairs, stood a few minutes, and saw the prisoner coming from that part of the warehouse where the crate of glass was - he said he had carried a sack of flour, and he would settle, meaning that he was tired; I said nothing about the glass, not knowing of the robbery till the next morning.

JAMES TERRY . I am a bargeman, and was at Mr. Randell's when they were working the flour - I stood at the bottom of the ladder - the prisoner came by me, and dropped the glass by my side; I said, "What is that?" and picked it up; it was in a red cover, and sounded like glass- I thought it was a bottle, and put it down again, not knowing what it was, being between light and dark; he dropped it inside the warehouse, by the side of the ladder, and went out.

WILLIAM FRAZER . I am a baker. The prisoner's brother lodges in my house - I saw the prisoner come out and in at his brother's apartments once or twice that evening.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I was desired to take the prisoner into custody. I found five tumblers on the drawers - Mr. Howell asked how they came by them; they both said they did not know how they came there; Mrs. Holloway came in, and declared, in their presence, that they were not there when she went out; I went back to the warehouse, and discovered another glass broken there, in the same sort of red baize, and the packages in the crate

were in the same sort of baize; I have no doubt of its being the same; it is broken, but the bottom matches.

MR. CRESWELL to MR. HOWELL. Q. Was one Walker in the lodging as well as the prisoner's brother? A. Nobody else was there; there may be such a man as Walker an occasional porter. The prisoner appeared to have been in liquor.

JURY. Q. Did you know the contents of the crate? - A. Not before this happened; we have had an invoice since, and these six tumblers are the only things missing.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271206-8

8. SILAS BRITON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 snuff-box, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Greenfield , from his person .

THOMAS GREENFIELD. I am a Solicitor , of Clifford's Inn. On the 9th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was near the top of Bridge-street, Blackfriars , in the crowd; I had put my snuff-box into my pocket five minutes before; I put my hand into my pocket to take it out, and found it was gone - I have no recollection of seeing the prisoner near me; I saw it again on the following Tuesday, at Guildhall - the prisoner was then in custody; there was a great crowd; I was endeavouring to get out of it.

JOHN HARRIS . I have belonged to the Police many years, but am now suspended, having met with an accident. On the 9th of November I was standing about thirty yards from the end of Fleet-market, when the Lord Mayour's procession was going by; the prisoner rushed by me, to two of his companions, and I heard him say to them, "I have done it;" they directly, in a whispering manner, said,"Get out of the crowd;" I followed him out of the crowd, laid hold of him at the end of the market, and said, "What have you done, young chap?" I put my hand into his side pocket, and took out this snuff-box, and then took out a pair of scissars - he said, "You have no right to take the scissars, they really do belong to me;" I did not see Mr. Greenfield till the Tuesday - a friend of his, who knew the box, happened to be in the office, and Mr. Greenfield came and claimed it. The prisoner told me, as I was going to the Compter, that he had picked it up in the kennel on the bridge; it was quite clean; his companious disappeared the moment I laid hold of him.

MR. GREENFIELD. I am quite certain this is my box; it was in my outside coat pocket, and could not have fallen out; I was not on the bridge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming over Blackfriars'-bridge, and saw the box in the kennel - I picked it up, wiped it with my handkerchief, and put it into my breast pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-9

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

9. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 coat, value 7s. , the goods of James Baker .

JAMES BAKER. I am waiter to Mr. Marsham, a publican, of Aldgate . On the morning of the 1st of December my coat was in the back place, where I had been at work - I had seen the prisoner in the tap-room two minutes before I missed it; I was going into the back place, and saw the coat dragging into the privy - I waited there, and the prisoner came out of the privy, with it on his back - he went to the side street door, and was going out - he was quite a stranger; I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, "Young man, you have got my coat;" he made no answer. I took him into the tap-room, and made him pull it off.

CHARLES BANFIELD . I am an officer, and took him in charge, with the coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a long way from home - I do not belong to London.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-10

10. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 wooden box, value 6d., and 8 ozs. of segars, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Edward Brown .

ANN BROWN . I am the wife of Edward Brown - he is a dealer in tobacco and snuff , and lives in Fore-street, Cripplegate . On the 13th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the second room from the shop; I had occasion to go into the parlour, which is the middle room - I turned my head to the shop, and saw the prisoner standing at the corner of the counter; I asked what he wanted - he instantly ran out; I missed a box of segars off the end of the counter, and ran after him, calling Stop thief! he was brought back, and the box was brought into the shop - I am certain he is the man.

ALEXANDER BUCKLER . I was coming along Fore-street - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running; I followed him: I was very near to him, and heard him say, "Bl - y thieves, or rogues - I will catch them;" he ran on, and was taken; when he was stopped I saw him throw from his left-hand pocket one segar, which I picked up, and gave to the officer; there was nobody running before him when he used those expressions.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. I was coming down Fore-street, and saw a crowd round Mr. Brown's shop - I went in, and the prisoner was delivered into my charge - I found twelve segars in his coat pocket, and some duplicates; Mr. Brown gave me the box, which had been picked up, and brought back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-11

11. THOMAS ROLLS, alias RHODES , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 2 pillows, value 2s. 6d., and 2 pillow-cases, value 6d. , the goods of Jonathan Snow .

JONATHAN SNOW. I live in Halfmoon-alley, Bishopsgate-street , and am a weaver . On the 17th of November, between eight and nine o'clock, I was sitting by the fire with my wife; the prisoner came into the room, and asked how I did, and how my son was - he was a total stranger to me, but I thought he might be an acquaintance of my son's; he went away soon after; my attention was

afterwards directed to my pillows, which I missed, with the cases.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a labourer. I was standing at my master's door, in Halfmoon-street, which is two doors from Snow's; between eight and nine o'clock on this evening; I saw the prisoner go in without a bundle, and come out in about ten minutes with one; Gregory went and took him with the property.

Prisoner. Q. Did I go further from the door than opposite it? A. Yes, you went along on the right hand side, and was taken on the left.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am an officer. On the 17th of November, between eight and nine o'clock, Smith told me he thought the prisoner had stolen a bundle; I went up Halfmoon-alley about one hundred yards, and took him leaning against a door-way, with these pillows in front of him; he said he only did it out of a joke.

Prisoner. He said he would give me a lift, and do every thing for me that lay in his power. - Witness. I said no such thing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to get measured for a pair of shoes, and was informed the person who was to make them lived up there; when I found my mistake, knowing Mr. Snow, and having drank with him at the public-house opposite, I went in, and asked him if he would have something to drink; he gave me a bottle, and as I was going to fetch some liquor, I kicked against the pillows in the passage. I have a wife and family, and nobody can feel more than I do my unfortunate situation.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-12

12. THOMAS BECKENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 8 ozs. of pot-metal, value 4d., and 7 ozs. of copper, value 3d. , the goods of John Warner and Robert Warner , his masters.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

PETER THOMAS PARKER . I was in the employ of Messrs. Warners, brass-founders , of Jewin-crescent, Cripplegate. On the 1st of November, Handly, the foreman, directed me to place myself in a stack of pipes, in the old metal shop, so that I was concealed; about ten minutes before nine o'clock, when the men were gone to breakfast, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, pick some metal off the ground, and put it into his bosom - there was not much - he did not take all that was there; he walked out; I came from my hiding place, and informed Handly, who went into the counting-house; I afterwards saw the prisoner come into the shop to his work.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long have you lived with your employers? A. Nearly three years; Handly put me in the lead; I looked through the crevices - it was old pot-metal, and other metal; there was a great quantity there - my masters' names are John and Robert.

JOHN HANDLY . I am a clerk to John and Robert Warner, and have been so nearly sixteen years. On the 1st of November I placed Parker in a coil of pipe, so as to see who entered the shop; he afterwards made a communication to me, and I stopped the prisoner, who was down the yard, at the back of the premises - he merely went down the yard and returned; I said he had something about him which did not belong to him; he said, "I have;" I requested to see it, and he himself pulled it from his bosom - it was five pieces of metal of the same descripiton as that in our warehouse - it was given to the officer by Messrs. Warners; I believe it to be their's.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he been in your master's employ? A. Eight or nine months - they would not have employed him if his character had been bad; we have one hundred and forty men.

JOHN BARNES . I produce the metal.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

The prisoner received a good character, and was strongly recommended to mercy .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-13

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.,

13. ANN PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 9 sovereigns, the monies of Mary Davis , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Harrison .

MARY DAVIS. I live in the dwelling-house of Samuel Harrison, of Brompton-crescent, Kensington ; the prisoner was Mr. Harrison's servant ; my sovereigns were in a purse, locked in a trunk, which was in the pantry which I occupied; I had seen them safe on the 7th of November, and missed them on the 15th; the prisoner was still in the house - she had lived there for two months; she waited on me and had access to the pantry; I mentioned my loss first to the housemaid.

Q. What led you first to suspect the prisoner? A. She slept in the same bed with me, and on the morning of the 15th I found my pocket, which contained the keys of my trunk, was moved from my pillow, where I had put it the night before; the keys were still in the pocket; I went down stairs to my trunk, counted my money, and missed nine sovereigns; I have found none of them. Ballard, the housemaid, came, and I told her; I then told Mrs. Harrison; when I spoke to the prisoner about it, she said she had not moved my pocket; I know she had no money on the 1st of November, for she borrowed 3s. 6d. of me, and on the 7th she told me she did not know when she could pay me, for she had no money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you had forty sovereigns? A. Thirty-eight.

ELIZABETH BALLARD . I am the housemaid. On the 15th of November Davis told me she had lost nine sovereigns; the prisoner asked me to cut out a cap on the 10th, and I cut it out; on the 12th she asked me to trim her a bonnet; I never saw any money in her possession; the cap was made of - of a yard of net which she said was 9d. a yard, and there were four yards of lace at 1s. 2d.; she had a new cloak worth 18s., and a new gown worth about 8s.; she said she had paid for them; I know she had borrowed 3s. 6d. of Davis.

MARY LUCY HARRISON . I am mistress of the house; it is in Kensington parish; the cook told me of this, on the morning of the 15th - I accused the prisoner of stealing the nine sovereigns; she said she knew nothing of them - I sent for Davis, and accused her before her; she

still denied it - I searched her boxes, in her presence, and found a gauze and two silk handkerchiefs, four yards of ribbon, a cloak, a handsome Leghorn bonnet, handsomely trimmed with ribbon, a handsome lace cap, and a swansdown tipped for the neck; she had gone out under the idea of going after a situation, on the 12th, and then brought home the bonnet - I did not see it then, but I saw it the next day.

Q. She might have had the other things before? A. They had not been worn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-14

14. MARY COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 reticule, value 1s.; 1 watch, value 8l.; 1 pocket-book, value 2s., and 27 shillings, the property of Joseph Henry Brown , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Brown .

MRS. HENRIETTA BROWN . I am the wife of Joseph Henry Brown; he is a corn and coal-merchant , and lives in Alsop's-buildings, Mary-le-bone. On Thursday, the 18th of October, I went into the shop of Joseph Brown, in Regent-street , to purchase some articles - I laid my reticule, containing this property, on the counter - I went about a yard from it, and stopped a few minutes to look at some ribbon, and on returning to find my reticule, it was gone - I had not noticed the prisoner in the shop; the shop was searched, but it was not found; the watch was afterwards found at a pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw nobody of her description in the shop? A. Not to notice them.

WILLIAM BIRKETT . I am shopman to Mr. Norman, of Princes-street, Soho; he is a pawnbroker; the prisoner came to our shop on the evening of the 18th of October, with this watch; she said she came from her mistress, who was a milliner, and had some money to make up, and her husband was in the country; we took the watch in pawn.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know her before? A. Perfectly well.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

HENRIETTA BROWN. This is my husband's watch, and was in my reticule; it is worth 8l.; the shopkeeper is not related to me; he said his name was Joseph; that is all I know.

Several witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-15

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

15. THOMAS DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 gelding, price 36l.; 1 saddle, value 3l. 10s.; 1 bridle, value 12s., and 1 martingale, value 10s. , the property of Richard Peck .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD PECK. I am a corn-dealer , and live at Old Ford. On the 18th of July, between one and two o'clock, I went to the Jolly Sailors public-house, at Shadwell , on a bay gelding - I got off my gelding, and first gave it in charge of a little boy, but a person named Watson came up and offered his services to hold it, and, it being a spirited animal, I gave it into his charge - I went into the Jolly Sailors, and in five minutes an alarm was given - I came out, and my horse was gone - I ran in pursuit, and saw part of my horse in the dust; a person was galloping away on it, but I could not see who he was - I found it in the custody of Mr. Barber, the governor of Gosport gaol, on the 19th of October; it was worth thirty-five guineas; there was a saddle, a bridle, and martingale also with it - Watson was apprehended in Charles-street, Ratcliff-highway, about six weeks afterwards; he was tried here in September.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you know where the prisoner was apprehended? A. No; he was not taken on my charge - I first saw him on the 16th of October, in Winchester gaol - I went to the Jolly Sailors, on business, and do not think - I was there more than five minutes.

CHARLES SCOTT . I am a butcher. On the 18th of July I was in Charles-street, St. George's, (which is a little way from the Jolly Sailors), about one, or it might be two o'clock - I passed the Jolly Sailors, and saw Watson, whom I knew, holding a bay, or a brown horse there - I went to buy some wood for a pig-stye - I came up Charles-street, back again, and saw a horse, and a person on it, about twenty yards off - I was told his name was Dean - I think it was the prisoner; he looks to me to be the same person.

Q. Did you know Dean before? A. Yes; the prisoner is the person; when first I saw the horse, it was about twenty yards from me, coming past me - I spoke to the person who was on it, and I took him to be this Dean - I said, "There you are, Thomas," or something of that; he looked back, and said, "There you are, Charley," or something of that; he rode away towards Chapman-street, and I came on; he was trotting; this was a few minutes after I had seen Watson holding the horse - I had seen Dean two or three times before, or it might be more, I cannot exactly say - I may have seen him several times - I have seen him in company with Watson - I cannot saw how many times.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect whether you have seen him more than once with Watson? A. I have - I cannot tell when - I cannot say how long I have known Dean; it is a good while ago.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you remember being examined here on a former trial? A. Yes; the prisoner is the person I saw on the horse in Charles-street - I know he was acquainted with Watson - I have seen them together.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What are you? A. A journeyman butcher. I know it was the 18th of July, for I was at the dock on the 16th and 17th - I believe it was about one or two o'clock. I know I had dined. I will not swear it was not three or four o'clock. Charles-street is not far from the Jolly Sailors public-house - it is the second coach turning on the right - it is not half a quarter of a mile. I was going to a shop in the back road, which is about thirty yards from Charles-street. I was a-head of the person on the horse at first, and he passed me. I turned down Martha-street, and he turned another way; he was in Charles-street, coming in a direction from the Jolly Sailors. I was returning with the wood. I did not

come by the Jolly Sailors in my way back, but did as I went - I was shifting my wood on my shoulder - the horse was trotting - it was walking at first; when I first saw it, it was about twenty yards from me - it went very slow, between a walk and a trot; while I was shifting the wood I saw the horse coming up, my back was towards him till he passed me, and he was then trotting fast - he passed me as I was going to turn the corner - it did not vanish in a minute. I said "There you are Thomas" - he said "There you are Charley." I cannot swear to what he said, but I understood it was that. I have not seen the prisoner since that till to-day - I am sure he is the person now I come to look at him - it was a long while ago, and I could not swear to him till I looked at him. I have since been living with my brother-in-law, as a butcher - I work as a butcher when I can get it to do.

RICHARD PECK re-examined. Q. Where was it that you saw part of the horse in the dust? A. Close to the Jolly Sailors - he was cantering - that was immediately after I lost it, before he got into Charles-street. I do not know Charles-street, but I think I turned down two or three street before I saw it - the streets run in a crooked direction, and there was a great mob after the horse - the Jolly Sailors is in Back-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say, that as soon as you came out of the house you saw a dust, and part of the horse galloping off? A. I did not see it till I went down two or three streets. I went down several turnings, but being in a hurry, I could not tell whether it was two or three streets - the streets are very short there. I do not know the name of any of them. I saw a dust, and caught a glimpse of the horse.

WILLIAM DIGHT . I live in Back-lane, Shadwell, and am an egg-merchant - I am in business with my mother. On the 18th of July I was standing at my door, which is three or four doors from the Jolly Sailors, on the same side of the way. I saw Mr. Peck ride down to the Jolly Sailors, and stop with a bay horse - he went into the house, leaving his horse at the door with a young man whom I saw here last Sessions - he was called Watson - he brought the horse opposite my mother's door; another young man came up - the one who was holding it said, "Get up;" he got up and rode up the street, opposite my mother's door, towards the Commercial-road; he afterwards made a tarning round, and went towards Charles-street. I cannot say whether the prisoner is the person. I did not notice him to know him.

Cross-examined. Q. You stood at your mother's door? A. Yes - he turned round one street, and then I saw him no more. I do not mean that he turned back, but he passed two or three streets before he came to this turning - there is a street directly opposite my mother's door, and up that street are five or six streets crossways - I saw him pass two or three streets before he turned down one; that would lead towards the Commercial-road, and towards Charles-street.

JOSEPH BLUNDEN . I am a farmer, and live at Brockhurst, within two miles of Gosport. I know Cutt's stables at Brockhurst. I went there in the month of August, about seven or eight o'clock in the morning - I do not recollect what I went there for; a man named Hitchcock came there about half an hour after I got there - he is not here to-day - I saw the prisoner there - I think he was there when I first went, but I am not curtain of that. I saw some horses there. Mr. Barber took a horse away with him.

Q. Did you, in August, see the horse there, which Barber afterwards took away? A. Yes - I think it was the same, it was a bay horse - it was shown out for sale that morning, I do not recollect by whom. Cutts had two or three men there - the prisoner was there; the man called Cutts goes by the name of Brown; the prisoner was there looking after the horses the same as other men about the premises. I do not think Cutts was up when I first went there. Hitchcock asked some people in the yard about a horse, but I do not recollect which or whether the prisoner was by; one of the men said Hitchcock could not see the horse till Brown was up. I cannot say whether that was the prisoner. I have said I thought it was the prisoner who said so, but I cannot recollect which man said so. Cutts was called up - I cannot say who it was that called him up.

WILLIAM BARBER . I am Governor of the Bridewell at Gosport. I know Brown's stables at Brockhurst - he is called Cutts; in consequence of what I heard, I went to those stables on 17th of October - I had seen Mr. Peck's horse before I went there, but did not know it was his till afterwards. I brought a bay horse away from there - I delivered the horse to Mr. Peck.

RICHARD PECK . That was the horse I lost in July.

JURY to CHARLES SCOTT . Q. Can you say the horse you saw the prisoner on, was the same as has been identifield? A. I never saw the horse before, nor since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-16

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

16. WILLIAM CUTTS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of October , 1 gelding, price 36l. 15s., the property of Richard Peck , which had been lately before stolen by an evil disposed person, he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

RICHARD PECK. I live at Old Ford. On the 18th of July I went into the Jolly Sailors public-house, Back-street, Shadwell, leaving my gelding in charge of Watson; I came out in about five minutes, in consequence of an alarm; the horse and Watson were gone; I went in search, but could not find it; on the 19th of October I found it in possession of Mr. Barber, the Governor of Gosport gaol - it was a bay gelding, worth thirty-five guineas; I lost the saddle and harness with it.

WILLIAM BARBER . I am Governor of Gosport Bridewell. On the 17th of October, in consequence of information, I went to the prisoner's premises at Brockhurst, in the parish of Alverstoke; I knew him by the name of William Brown, but not by the name of Cutts - he is a horse-dealer ; I went to his stables between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; I saw several horses there; I inquired for the prisoner; I think he was not up when I first got there; he came to me in a short time; I told him I wanted to speak to him, and asked him where the little bay horse was; he said it was in the stall of the stable; I told him I had seen it already, and it was so much improved, I scarcely know it; I had seen it in his possession a fortnight before; the prisoner had shown it to me for a friend of mine, who wanted one; I do not recollect whether he made any reply to my observation;

I then said, "Mr. Brown, you are wanted, and the little bay horse;" he then said, "Oh, Mr. Barber, I am in trouble - I have long been wishing to see you; I am sorry I ever acknowledged that lad (or boy), to be my brother;" he knew me before; I do not recollect that he called the boy by any name, but I knew who he meant; I said, I must take him into custody, and the horse; he said he was willing to go with me; he asked my permission to go up stairs to shift himself - he had his slippers on, and his night-shirt; he called to his father to bring his boots; I allowed him to go up stairs; I remained in the parlour; I left my son in the room, and went to the stable; I called Stroud, the constable, whom I had taken with me, but he had not made his appearance; I found Stroud, and returned to the parlour; I had not been absent above two or three minutes; I showed Stroud the horse in the stable, and before we got back to the parlour, in consequence of what Stroud said, I looked at the corner of a building, adjacent to the stable, and caught a glimpse of a man in a dark coat; I returned to the parlour - the prisoner was not there, nor in the house; I procceded towards some fields, in the direction I had caught the glimpse of the man; I looked about for nearly an hour, and then found the prisoner at the Sun public-house, at Brockhurst, about half a mile from his premises, in the custody of a constable; I took him to the Bridewell, with the gelding, and showed it to Mr. Peck on the following day.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You have been Governor of the Bridewell a considerable time? A. Yes; I had known the prisoner two or three months - he knew I was Governor of the Bridewell - he had shown me the horse about three weeks before - it was not then in so good a condition; when I saw it afterwards it had been well attended to.

Q. It had not been cut in the mane or tail? A. Yes, I am sure it had - the hair of the tail had been cut and combed - it was a switch tail when I first saw it; being cut made a very great alteration in its appearance; I do not mean to say that the fleshy part of the tail was cut - it was a cob tail; I saw several persons at the stable.

Q. Was it not a stable in which any body might put a horse? A. No; he made no secret of showing me the horse; I was frequently there, and had seen it two or three times.

Q. Did not you see different persons about the stable? A. Yes, Mr. Brown's attendants; the horse had been brought to my house with another or two, to be shown to a friend of mine - my son rode it about, and was so delighted with it, that Brown, in conversation, called it my son's horse. My house is nearly two miles from his stable - it joins Gosport gaol.

Q. He said, "Oh, Mr. Brown, I am in trouble" - did he not add, "It is a pity such a thing should have been left with me?" A. I do not recollect it - I wish to mention all he said; I will not say he did not, for he said a great deal to me.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far is his stable from Old Ford? A. About eighty miles; I had no information about it when my son rode it.

JOHN STROUD . I am constable of Gosport. I accompanied Mr. Barber to the prisoner's premises; I was in the road close by the yard - Mr. Barber came out to me in about five minutes, and showed me a bay a horse; I had seen the prisoner go into the house with Mr. Barber, and as I stood at the stable door I saw him make his escape across the yard into the field; I told Mr. Barber, and followed him across three fields; he was running without a hat; I called a man named Fryer to assist me, and about three fields off we came up to him; I stood, and saw Fryer bring him from a hedge; he had slippers on, and no hat - he took me by the arm, and said, "I am beat - I will go with you like a man, Stroud."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see him show the horse to Barber? A. I saw him go to the stable with him; I went into the stable afterwards; I had seen young Mr. Barber trying the horse at Bridewell, about eleven o'clock one day; a great many people were there; I never saw it before.

RICHARD PECK. I received the horse from Barber - it is the one I lost at the time in question; I got it from Barber's stable.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a doubt of its being yours the moment you saw it? A. No; I knew it directly - it was not fatter than when I lost it; the tail had been trimmed; it was cut - it had been cut previous to my losing it, but it had grown long again; when I found it it had been cut shorter than I had ever seen it before; no joints were taken off.

Prisoner's Defence. Dean is the man who brought the horse to my place, which I believe Mr. Blunden knows - he came to my house on the 29th of July, with a horse, and I gave information of it to his father, and he sent to tell me to take care of the horse and his son, for he had a friend arranging the matter with Mr. Peck, which was the cause I kept the horse; I never offered to sell it. I took a cob down to show a friend of Mr. Barber's, and I rode this gelding myself; I never intended to sell the gelding. I never showed it for sale to any individual - it was seen publicly in plenty of places.

JOSEPH BLUNDEN . I am a farmer, and live close by the prisoner. I have seen Dean about the prisoner's premises - I do not know whether he brought the horse there.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-17

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

17. JAMES HERRING was indicted for felouiously assaulting Thomas Mason , on the King's highway, on the 16th of November , at St. Giles in the Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 1s.; 1 key, value 2d., and 1 umbrella, value 10s. , his property.

THOMAS MASON. I am a master painter , and live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital. On Friday, the 16th of November, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I was in High-street, St. Giles ,' going home - I was accosted by two men and a woman; they came before me, and met me; one of them spoke to me - I cannot say which it was, nor what was said - I considered they were addressing me - I said, "Walk about your business," and at the same moment, I was knocked down; it appeared to be done with the fist; it was done by one of the three - I could not tell which - as I was falling I felt my watch go out of my pocket.

Q. As if somebody pulled it out? A. Yes; it was done by one of the three; there were two seals and a key attached to the watch; my umbrella was snatched out of my hand at the same time - I called Watch! the watchman pursued them, and they all three ran away - I pursued immediately I got up, and Murphy, the watchman, had the prisoner in custody, when I got up to him - I saw my watch in one of the watchmen's hands, in about a minute, and am sure it is mine; it is silver, and worth 2l. - I have not found my umbrella - I cannot say whether the prisoner is one of the three persons.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it a dark night? A. It was dull - I saw nobody else about, except one gentleman in a black cloak; the blow knocked me down, but did me no harm; it did not even cut my skin.

CHARLES O'NEIL . I am a watchman of St. Ann's, Soho. On Friday morning, the 16th of November, after I had called half-past one o'clock, I was standing at the end of a court, and heard a rattle spring - I was not above twenty or thirty yards from High-street at the time - I saw the prisoner running; he turned the corner into Crown-street - I am sure it was the prisoner - I saw him stoop behind some bricks; he ran out from behind the bricks immediately, and I told him to stop; he stopped directly, and I laid hold of him; one or two St. Giles' watchmen came up - I asked what he had done; one of them said, he had robbed a gentleman of his watch - I said, "I partly guess where it is, behind the bricks, for I saw him run in behind the bricks and stoop" - I took him towards the bricks, and saw Murphy, the watchman, pick up the watch on the spot I saw him stoop; as I took him to the watch-house I said, "What did you rob the gentleman for?" he said,"It was not me who robbed him, but a woman put the watch into my pocket," and he named the woman.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you took a woman into custody? A. Not me - I did not see a woman in custody - I never lost sight of the prisoner; he turned into the street I was in - I did not see him near the prosecutor - I am sure he is the man who stooped behind the bricks.

JOHN MURPHY . I am a watchman. I was calling the hour, and came up on hearing Mason call Watch! - I had not seen him before he called out; when I got towards the place - I met a young woman named Margaret Harris, who is now in custody; she was not running - I saw a young man with her; he was not running; there was only one young man - I took Harris, and she pointed across the road to the prisoner; he was not the man who was standing with her - I cannot tell who he was - I let her go, and pursued the prisoner - I sprang my rattle, and saw the prisoner running away - Mason was then down on the pavement, and complained of being robbed of his watch.

Q. Did the woman run away? A. No - I do not know what became of her; the man who was with her had an umbrella or stick; I stopped him, and let him go again, as I had nobody to assist me; the prisoner was running on the other side of the street; Harris had pointed him out - I pursued him; he turned into Crown-street; I lost sight of him; and came up to him when O'Neil had him in custody; O'Neil directed me behind the bricks, and I found the watch there - I gave it to Mason, the constable of the night.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see any body touch the prosecutor? A. No; Harris is in custody now, but I do not know where. I saw a man standing with her - he had a stick or umbrella - I did not take hold of him.

Q. You said you let go of the man after having him? - A. I let go of the woman, as she pointed out the prisoner as having taken the watch; she pointed nobody out till she was taken. The prisoner said that woman put the watch into his pocket; I was within three or four yards of the prosecutor when I saw him on the ground; the man and the woman were at a distance from him; I do not know how many yards, it was across the street; the prisoner was further from him than them - they were only two or three yards from him; it was the prisoner who was across the street, rather to the left; we took the woman again at three o'clock in the morning, in consequence of the prisoner saying she put the watch into his pocket; the man and woman were coming on till I stopped them; they were within a yard of each other - I cannot say whether they were in company.

MORRIS LEONARD . I assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house. I took the woman in about an hour and a half after.

THOMAS MASON. I was constable of the night. Murphy delivered the watch to me at the watch-house - I have had it ever since, and now produce it.

THOMAS MASON. (the prosecutor). This is my watch - the number of it is 5093.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken the prosecutor was intoxicated.

PROSECUTOR. I had been drinking, but was not disguised in liquor; I knew very well what I was about.

Cross-examined. Q. You were about half and half? A. Yes.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18271206-18

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

18. JAMES ALEXANDER LAY was indicted for an unnatural crime . NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-19

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

19. HENRY SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Jones , on the 29th of November , at St. Mary, Islington, and stealing 1 wine-strainer, value 10s. , his property.

MARIA JONES . I am the wife of Samuel Jones - we live in Canonbury-lane, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . On the 29th of November I was called from the kitchen by Elizabeth Hudson , and found the prisoner detained.

ELIZABETH HUDSON. I live at Mr. Samuel Jones'; No. 6, Canonbury-lane. On the 29th of November, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was at the second floor front window, and saw the prisoner in the front garden - he asked if I wanted to buy any black-lead pencils; I answered No, and he left the garden; I immediately came down stairs into the front parlour, and observed the window a little way open; the bottom sash was about two inches up - there was not then room for any one to get in; I had seen it about eight or nine o'clock that morning; it was then quite shut. I went from the parlour into the kitchen; the silver wine-strainer was then safe on the parlour side-board; I returned from the kitchen in about

five minutes, and found the sash thrown quite up; a chair was moved from the window, and I saw the prisoner walking from the side-board as I entered the room; I laid hold of him, till Mrs. Jones came to my assistance; she took hold of him, and before I had time to look at the side-board, she took the wine-strainer from his waistcoat pocket; I sent for a constable, and he was secured. I had not observed the window after nine o'clock; it was shut then, for I opened the shutters.

MRS. JONES. I was not in the front parlour, to my knowledge, till Hudson called me up, and I saw her struggling with the prisoner, to hold him; I took hold of him by the collar, and secured him; he struggled a little, to get away, and I observed the wine-strainer under his coat, in his waistcoat pocket, and took it out - it is my husband's, and worth at least 10s. I had not opened the parlour window at all that day.

JAMES PRICE . I am constable of St. Mary, Islington. On the 29th of November I was fetched to Mr. Jones', and found the prisoner in the parlour; I searched him, and found two bundles of pencils in his coat pocket, and outside the window, on the cill, two more bundles; I asked if they belonged to him - he said they did. I found a bag in his hat; Mrs. Jones delivered me the wine-strainer, and said, in his presence, that she took it out of his pocket.

MRS. JONES. This is ours, and what I found on the prisoner; nobody was in the house besides me, Hudson, and a char-woman, who was in the bed-room; she came about seven o'clock, and was there till after the robbery; she was entirely occupied in the bed-room. My husband was not at home.

The prisoner made no Defence.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

The Jury stated it to be their opinion that the prisoner did not open the window in the first instance. Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix, on account of his good character.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18271206-20

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

20. WILLIAM MANEYWEATHERS was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Reference Number: t18271206-21

21. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 printed bound book, value 12s. , the goods of James Webb Southgate .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-22

22. EDWARD WOOD was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Isaac Boddy .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD RICKARDS . I am an umbrella maker, and live in Gun-street, Old Artillery-ground. On the 10th of November, about half-past seven, or a quarter to eight o'clock at night, I was in Bishopsgate-street , and saw a dray going up Union-street, at a moderate pace; the street is not very well lighted; there were not many persons about. I was looking towards Spitalfields-church, and saw a man lying in the road, under the shaft-horse's belly - I was on the near side of the dray, and saw the near-wheel pass over his body; I hallooed out, and ran to pick the man up; I held him there till assistance came - the prisoner drove the dray; I did not see him at that instant; I cannot say he was not on that side the dray: he came to my assistance in a minute; he came as from the fore horse's head: I had not seen him there before; he helped to carry the man to the doctor's; the man sighed as I crossed the road, and he was dead when we got to the doctor's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner came to your assistance the moment you called out? A. Yes, and stopped his dray; he seemed as sorry as a man could be; he could not go slower than he went: the deceased laid across the road; I cannot say whether he was drunk; he laid there as if he was dead, before the wheel passed over him; he might have been dead before the wheel touched him, for what I know; he did not speak after the accident, or show the least signs of life.

MR. BARRY. Q. You had not seen the prisoner before the deceased was under the horse's belly? A. No; he sighed after we took him up.

COURT. Q. Did you meet the dray, or overtake it? A. I met it; I did not see the prisoner at his horse's head, I did not pay attention: if he had been there when I met the dray, I must have seen him; I did not see him come as from the horse's head till after the accident.

DIANA COX . My husband is a silk-weaver; we live in Silver-street; I was at the corner of Union-street, coming up Bishopsgate-street, and saw two drays; I wanted to cross, and stopped for them; I saw a man on the ground, about a yard and a half from the curb - I was on the near side of the horses; the man at first prevented my crossing; the first horse stepped over him without touching him, and, I believe, both horses stepped over him; the prisoner was at the side of his horse when the wheel went over the man; he was near the wheel, where the body lay - he came from across Sun-street - I saw him a minute before the wheel went over the man; he was on the right side of his horses - he had not time to stop them; I had seen the deceased before - his name was Isaac Boddy.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not the dray-horses as quiet as possible? A. They could not go much slower - it was a dark night - the man laid in the road, as if he was dead, before the horses came near him - his bundle laid at a little distance from him; he did not seem to move hand or foot; when the alarm was given, the prisoner ran round, and seemed much agitated - it was a dark rainy night; I must have stepped on the man's legs myself, if I had stepped off the curb.

COURT. Q. Had the horses come quite up to you before you attempted to pass? A. No; they were so near I did not think it safe to pass; the prisoner at that time was coming along by the side of his fore-house - he was nearly as close to me as the fore-horse; I believe he did not see the man - he stopped the horses the moment the alarm was given - he called out, "Whoa!" and caught hold of the horses bridle as soon as ever he saw the body - that was after the mischief was done - he had not time to do it before.

Q. Did he attempt to lay hold of the bridle before the wheel went over the man? A. No; he did not see him; I saw the man before the horse came up, but it was very close to him; I did not call to him to stop - I was speaking to my sister at the time.

MR. THOMAS PORTER . I am a surgeon, and live in Bishopsgate-street; the deceased was brought to my house on the evening in question; he was then dying - his ribs appeared to be fractured on each side; the dray going over him would occasion that; I examined his body a few days afterwards; there were five ribs broken on one side, and six on the other, which must have occasioned his death; he died from laceration of the heart.

MARY ROBINSON . I am the wife of Simeon Robinson, of Spicer-street. On the 10th of November I was in Bishopsgate-street, near the corner of Union-street, and saw two drays; one had passed except the hind-wheel; when I got up I saw something on the ground; my sight being bad, I could not discern whether it was a man or woman - the wheel went over it; I was taken with a violent trembling and giddiness, and was scarcely able to stand - I do not recollect seeing the prisoner, except at the workhouse, where the Inquest was held.

Q. Did you see any man attending the dray that night? A. I saw something white, apparently like the jacket of the drayman, sitting on the shaft, but my eyesight is so very bad.

Q. You have given an account of this before; had he a whip in his hand? A. I saw, as I thought, a man put something out of his hand, but it was very dark; I was much frightened - my sight failed from the giddiness of my head; I was obliged to support myself against the shutters of a linen-draper's shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the dray before it came up? A. Not the first one - it was going very slow.

JAMES KINGSLEY . I keep the Alfred's Head public-house, in Union-street - it is in the City; the deceased was brought into my house on the same night, by a strange man - this was before the accident; he had been rolling in the mud, and was very much in liquor; he had a small dram in my house; I kept him there about three quarters of an hour, to see if he would recover; I told him he had better try and find his way home; I took him to the door, and found he could not proceed; I took him into the room again, and in ten minutes, while I was busy, he went away.

Cross-examined. Q. About what hour was this? A. A little before seven o'clock - he was all over dirt, and asked for a small dram, which I gave him.

Q. He being as drunk as he could be? A. I did not see that he was drunk then; several people were about him; I saw that he was drunk from the manner he came in; he was scarcely able to stand when I took him to the door - it was a very dark night.

JOHN BUTLER . I am a weaver, and live in Thomas-street, Brick-lane; the deceased was my brother-in-law - his name was Isaac Boddy; I saw his body before the Coroner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him the night before the accident happened? A. No.

THOMAS SHELTON , ESQ. I am the Corner who held the inquisition; after the witnesses were examined, the evidence given was read over to the prisoner, who was told he might say any thing or not, as he pleased; I then took from his mouth this voluntary statement - (reads.)

EDWARD WOOD voluntarily saith, "He is drayman to Truman, Hanbury and Co., of Brick-lane. Last Saturday, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock, he was driver of the first of two drays across Bishopsgate-street into Union-street, and he is certain his horses did not knock down the deceased; that he saw the man when the wheel was going on him, but he could not stop the horse before the wheel went over him, and as soon as the wheel was off him, he stopped the horse, went to the deceased, and assisted to take him up; at the time it happened he was on the off-side of his horse, fastening the trace, which had got loose; that a man in Smithfield had asked him to let him ride on the dray, and he got off before the accident happened."

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking alongside my horse, saw the man lying, and stopped my horse in a moment.

JAMES CAMPBELL . I am a gentleman, and live in Well-street, Camberwell. I saw the prisoner at the head of the shaft-horse; he attempted to stop the dray - he was on his right side.

Several witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-23

23. GEORGE WAGER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , six dead ducks, value 8s., and 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Wells .

FRANCES WELLS . I am the wife of Thomas Wells. I buy and sell fish and poultry. On the 9th of November, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I placed six dead ducks on the forms in Billingsgate-market , wrapped in a woollen apron - I left them there, and asked Roach to mind them - I returned in about twenty minutes, and they were gone, apron and all - I had not seen the prisoner near them; they cost me 8s. - I have not seen them since - I think I have some knowledge of the prisoner about the market.

BRIDGET ROACH . I attend Billingsgate. My husband is a porter. On the 9th of November I saw Mrs. Wells with a bundle, tied in a blue apron - I did not know what was in it; she asked me to take care of it; it was left on a board behind my seat - I did not see any thing done with it - I missed it about a minute before she returned - I have not seen it since.

WILLIAM GOWER . I am servant to Mr. Bartlett, who is employed in the market. On the 9th of November I saw the prisoner sitting at the watermen's plying-place - Roach's stall is near there - I saw a bundle near her stall, and called out to ask whose it was, three times - I did not see Roach near; the prisoner said, "Don't knock them about, they are mine" - I have known him some time, as working in the market, and am sure he is the person - I said, "Take it away - I want to put master's board away," and he took it away - I saw there was poultry in it, but cannot say what; a small part of the bundle was opened - Mr. Goldham brought him to master's stand on the 13th, and I said he was the man.

GEORGE TEASDALE . I am a constable. Mr. Goldham gave the prisoner into my custody, for stealing six ducks; he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a sailor's chest to carry to the Pelican-stairs, for 1s. 9d., and was not near Billingsgate.

JURY to ROACH. Q. Had you quitted your stall before you missed the bundle? A. No - I did not hear the

man ask whose it was; the market was all in an uproar; the Lord Mayor had just taken water.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-24

24. JOSEPH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 30 yards of flannel, value 20s. , the goods of Robert Plant .

BENJAMIN PREW . I am in the service of Robert Plant, of No. 32, Aldgate High-street . On the 9th of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, there was a lot of flannels at the door, secured by a chain- I stood behind the counter, and saw the chain move - I ran to the door, and the prisoner had then just got this roll of flannel off, and put it into his basket; there were between thirty and forty yards of it; he was going off with it - I put my hand on his shoulder, and said, "You need not trouble yourself to carry that further, I will take care of it, and you also," and secured him; nobody could have taken it but him - nobody else was near.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge; he said a man asked him to carry the flannel to Aldgate-pump.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the edge of the pavement - a genteel dressed man came up and said, "Carry this to Aldgate-pump, and I will satisfy you."

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271206-25

25. GEORGE HENLEY and JAMES COCHRANE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Henry Ryder , from his person .

WILLIAM HENRY RYDER. I live in Norton-folgate, and am a tailor . On the 5th of November, I was looking at the Lord Mayor's carriage, at Mr. Windus', in Bishopsgate-street ; there were about fifteen people there - I felt myself hustled, and put my hand to my pocket-book, which I found safe, and went on, and in a minute I found my handkerchief was gone - I did not miss it till I got home - I live about two hundred yards from Mr. Windus' - my attention was more particularly directed to my pocket-book when I was hustled - I was not above a minute going to my own house - I know I had my handkerchief safe two minutes before I went up to Windus' - I saw two lads walk away, but I never saw the prisoners' faces, till to night; they were committed before I got before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. SMITH. Q. You did not feel your handkerchief when you felt your pocket-book? A. I felt both my pockets, and thought it was safe; my attention was principally directed to my pocket-book - I think it impossible it could have been taken any where but at Windus' - I was hustled there - I stopped at no other place; no one was near me all the way home; it was between eleven and twelve o'clock - Mr. Windus' house is in the City.

PHILIP PARISH . I am a Bow-street officer. I was in Bishopsgate-street, near Mr. Windus'; my attention was attracted by seeing a party of persons round his shop - I went there, and saw the Lord Mayor's carriage - I did not see Mr. Ryder to know his person; the first I saw was Henley turning up the cuff of his coat, and Cochrane close by him; they looked me full in the face - I did not know them before, nor do I know that they have ever seen me - suspecting them I went a round about way, and came to the house - I went into a public-house directly opposite Mr. Windus', and had a clear view of the prisoners, through the glass of the door - I saw them attempt the pockets of several persons, and the baskets of females; they moved away from the spot several times, and talked together; I saw them both press against a person, whom I suppose to be the prosecutor - I saw Henley draw a handkerchief from that person's pocket, at Mr. Windus' door; he put it under his coat, without putting it into his pocket, and ran off, followed by Cochrane - I crossed the road, got before Henley, seized him round the waist, and took the handkerchief - Cochrane was rather before Henley, and as soon as he saw me take Henley, he turned back - I called Stop him! and he came towards me - I took him into a tobacconist's-shop - Mr. Ryder's name is at full length on the handkerchief in ink - I found him out by the Directory, and he claimed it.

Prisoner HENLEY. Q. Will you swear you saw the handkerchief taken from that gentleman? A. I saw it taken from a gentleman; he had a dark coat on, either black or olive - I could see your countenance for twenty minutes; when I called Stop him! Cochrane stopped directly, and came to me; my partner was with me; we were going to see his son, who is in service, and he went into a sadler's-shop at the time this happened.

Cross-examined by MR. SMITH. Q. Why not tell me you had another officer with you? A. Mr. Hobler did not think it proper to bind him over, as he did not see the transaction - directly I called Stop him! Cochrane turned round, and came to me - Henley was certainly the most active person; they both pressed against the prosecutor; I suppose it to be the prosecutor. I have been an officer for five years.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENLEY's Defence. I was coming up Petticoat-lane, and saw a Jew with some clothes, and the handkerchief; he offered it as a bargain, for 4s. - I said I had but 2s. 6d.; he would not take less than 3s. 6d., which I gave him - I put it into my breast, as another person might; it has now become a fashionable way; I was going along Bishopsgate-street, looking at the carriage; this lad came up, and asked what was the matter; the pressure was so great, I could not get near to see - I pushed into the crowd and saw it was a carriage - I walked on, and the officer came and took me; he called to the prisoner, who was crossing the road, and he came to him.

Cochrane received a good character.

COCHRANE - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

HENLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-26

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

26. WILLIAM QUINN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 1 clock, value 10l., and 2 silver spoons, value 2s., the goods of George Greig , in his dwelling-house .

THE REVEREND GEORGE GREIG. I live in Vincent-square, Westminster . On the 16th of August, about five o'clock in the morning, I came down stairs, opened my parlour window, threw up the sash, and sat there till a little after six. I then rang my servant up, and returned to my bed-room, having awoke my servant; I was alarmed in a quarter of an hour by her screams, and found a person had jumped from the parlour window; on coming down I missed the clock and the spoons.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Greig. I came down at half-past six o'clock, went into the kitchen, opened the shutters, and saw two men fall as from the parlour window. I gave a scream, ran up stairs, and missed the clock off the side-board, and the spoons off the dumb waiter - the window was wide open. I had seen the things safe the evening before.

THOMAS STRINGER . I am a smith. I was passing Mr. Greig's house to go to work, and saw Barnett and Moffit, who have been convicted, lurking about opposite the house. I went to the end of the square, stopped a few minutes, and presently saw Barnett standing outside - he went up the garden - Moffitt was also outside. Barnett received a parcel from the parlour window - a little boy jumped from the window, and all three went off together - I cannot say who the boy was - he had handed the parcel out - it was wrapped in something white. I am sure the prisoner is not one of the three, for two have been convicted, and the other was a smaller boy - there could not be any other boy on that side of the square without my seeing him.

WELCOME COLE . I am a letter-carrier at the Post-office, and live about fifty yards from Mr. Greig. About half-past six o'clock in the morning, I was going down a passage opposite my house, a boy about the prisoner's height passed me - I took no notice of him. Barnett soon after passed me, and pulled his jacket off. I looked round, and Moffitt came up with the clock under his arm - Barnett covered it with his jacket - the prisoner was not one of the three.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended Barnett and Moffitt; the prisoner was in the House of Correction at the time. I took Cole and Cross to see if they knew him, on the 24th of August. Cole said he did not, but Cross identified him - he was in the prison dress.

ROBERT CROSS . I work for my brother-in-law. I was in the Horseferry-road, which is five or ten minutes walk from Mr. Greig's house, and saw the prisoner carrying a clock under his arm - Barnett was with him; they ran down a little court, and Cole after them - I do not know what became of them. I had never seen the prisoner before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-27

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

27. ANN FRANCES CLIFTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a 5l. Bank note , the property of John Holmes .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-28

28. ANN FRANCES CLIFTON was again indicted for secreting and stealing, from and out of a certain letter, a 5l. Bank note, which had come into her possession as a receiver of letters, &c. brought to a certain General Post Receiving-house .

Mr. GURNEY (on the part of the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-29

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

29. NATHANIEL PEPPIATT was indicted for feloniously disposing of, and putting away a certain forged Bank note, for payment of 5l., knowing it to be forged and counterfeit, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

THREE OTHER COUNTS varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH FAULKENER . I live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea, and am a green grocer. I have known the prisoner three or four years as an acquaintance of my son's. On the 10th of October he called with another person, whom I do not know, to sell me some potatoes - they did not show me any sample; the prisoner asked me to give him change for a 5l. note, which he gave me - I gave him five sovereigns, and he wrote on the note of his own accord, in my presence "Nathaniel Peppiatt, Croydon;" they went away. I put the note into my purse, which I kept in my pocket till the 14th, and then gave it to James Dubois, who lives in our row, to pay to Mr. Badcock. Dubois brought it to me again on the 19th, and said it was bad. I returned it to him to keep till I found the prisoner. I told my son if he should meet him in Covent-garden market, not to mention any thing about the note, but to say I wished to see him, and next day, the 20th he came to me,(looking at the note) this is the note he gave me - I know it by the writing on it. I had not other with that writing on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had known him some years? A. Between three and four - he was always on friendly terms with me. I do not know whether he came to my shop in a gig, for I found him there. I could not tell that he had written the word "Croyden" under his name, till I got a gentleman to read it, it was so blotted; but whatever the word was, I am sure nobody but him wrote it. I am sure there was a third word on the note - it was an elderly man who was with him; they said that the man had some potatoes in the country, and was going to have some up. I did not see the prisoner put the sovereigns into the other man's hand; he did not say he was going to establish the prisoner as an agent in town; the prisoner has collected debts, and done other things for me. I have always found him strictly honest.

THOMAS FAULKENER . I am the last witness's son. I have known the prisoner about four years. On the 20th of October, I saw him in Covent-garden-market - he came to me and asked how I did. I told him my mother wanted to speak to him about purchasing some potatoes; he said he would be down in the course of the day; he did not ask what she wanted him about. I had seen him when he passed the note, but not since. I do not know whether he dealt in Covent-garden-market or no - he came that night.

JAMES DUBOIS . I am an appraiser, and live at Chelsea. On the 12th of October I received this note from Mrs. Faulkner, and marked it; this is it (looking at it) - it was afterwards returned to me, as forged; I took it back to her on the 19th; she said at first, that was not

the note; I asked her by what means she knew it was not - she said Peppiatt had wrote his name on the back of it; and after minutely examining it, she found the name written in pale ink, and showed it me; I knew it was what she paid me, for I had written on it, "Mrs. Faulkener, 12th of October, J. D." On the 20th of October, in consequence of information, I accompanied Wicks, the officer, to Mrs. Faulkener's, between six and eight o'clock in the evening; I found the prisoner there, and said to him,"Do you know the note you paid Mrs. Faulkener is forged?" he said, "Is it?" I said, "Yes, from whom did you receive it?" he said, "I received it of Mr. Sully;" I said, "For what?" he said, "For some hay which I sold him;" I asked who Sully was; he said he was a gentleman living at Pimlico: I said, "Does he keep cows or horses, that he should buy hay of you?" he said, "He don't keep cows, but he keeps a horse and gig or two;" I said, "I presume Mr. Sully will have no objection to give you the money for it?" he said, "Oh, No, he will have no objection; if you will jump into my gig I will take you to the house where Sully lives;" the gig was at the door: he eventually drove me and the constable to No. 12, Trellick-terrace, Vauxhall-road; he said, "Here is where Mr. Sully lives; I will get out, and get you the money;" Wicks said, "No, you stop here; Mr. Dubois is quite capable of making the necessary inquiries;" I got out, and gave a double knock at the door, which a female opened, who turned out to be the prisoner's mother; I asked her if Mr. Sully lived there; the prisoner was near enough to hear what passed: she said, "Mr. Sully? Mr. Sully?" with a sort of hesitation; I said, "Yes, does Mr. Sully live here; do you know any thing of Mr. Sully?" she said, "He neither lives here, nor do I know any thing of him:" at that moment my hands were against the doorpost - the prisoner run betwixt my arms, and said, "Yes, Yes - No, No - here, tell Mr. so and so to come; Mr. What-do-you-call-him to come here; here is a forged note come home - for God's sake, give me five sovereigns:" his words "Yes, Yes" were in answer to her saying Sully did not live there; at that moment there was a scream or shout in the house, from two or three women or children, and they said, "Here are the traps - they are after us, by G-d." The prisoner was just within the passage - I had hold of him; he could hear what passed: I heard those words distinctly, in the parlour, the door of which was open; they were repeated half a dozen times. I said to Wicks, "We have our answer," for I was afraid of a rescue - I saw two men, one indistinctly, but the other (who was a man of colour) followed us out of the house.

Q. You said you found the woman was the prisoner's mother? A. Yes, she had lived in Chelsea, not a dozen doors from my house, with her husband and family, about three years ago, and I knew her when the light came, but she opened the door without a light.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then had you known the prisoner during his father's life time? A. Yes - his father was a cow-keeper; I understand he had been dead a few months; the prisoner generally lived with him, I cannot say always; it was a female's voice that said "the traps are after us."

Q. Did you attempt to detain any of the men in the house? A. The prisoner's mother caught hold of him, and attempted to pull him inside; I said, "If you don't let go, you are attemptin a rescue;" she then went into the parlour, and a man of colour came out; I did not go to any constable, to have the persons in the house secured.

Q. Had you been on ill terms, at any time, with the prisoner and his family? A. Upon cautious terms with the whole of them. I am an appraiser and carpenter. I was never interested, in any way, in the sale of bread; I have been living at No. 5, Hospital-row for fifteen or sixteen years; I know Wicks. When Mr. Faulkener died he was in difficulties, and, as a friend, I compounded with his creditors for the widow; I was to receive the monies for the principal creditor, and pay it to him.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET . Q. What do you mean by "cautious" terms? A. The fact is, the father lived by swindling.

WILLIAM WICKS . I am constable of Chelsea, and live in Royal Hospital-row. I was sent for by Mrs. Faulkener on the 20th of October; I went, and found the prisoner there; Mr. Dubois first spoke to him; I also asked him where he got the note; he told me he had taken it from Mr. Sully, in Vauxhall-road, for a load of hay, and if I would get into his gig he would take me to Sully's house; just as we were going to step into the gig; he said, "We don't want Dubois with us;" I said, "Yes, he will go with us:" we all three then got into the gig; the prisoner drove us to No. 12, Trellick-terrace, and said, "This is the house Mr. Sully lives in - I will get out and get the money;" I said, "No, let Mr. Dubois get out, and make the inquiries;" Dubois got out, knocked at the door, and said, "Does Mr. Sully live here?" the prisoner's mother, who opened the door, said,"No, he does not;" Dubois said, "Do you know such a person?" she said, "No, we don't know such a person as Mr. Sully:" the prisoner then jumped out of the gig, without saying a word to me - he ran to the door, and I after him; I caught hold of him, and prevented his going into the house; I saw Mr. Catts, a man of colour, in the passage, and two or three women and children running about the house: the prisoner seemed very much confused, and said,"Oh! Mr. So-and-so, lend me five sovereigns, for there is a bad note come home."

Q. Do you mean that he used the words "So and so?" A. Yes - he seemed much confused, and wanted to get into the house; there was a cry of "The traps are after us, by G-d;" it appeared to be a female voice; the prisoner's mother caught hold of him, and wanted to drag him into the house; I told her he was in my custody, and should not go in; he repeated several times, "Lend me five sovereigns, do, to take this note, or to pay for the note;" I said I had nothing to do with the money, and must take him before a Magistrate; I dragged him from the door - he said,"Don't drag me along - let me go in the chaise again;" I said he could, but Dubois must drive: Dubois got up - I was going to hand the prisoner up, but Catts came out, and said, "Oh, what is this - this here little matter, can't I settle it," and as I was going to get up, he said, "Oh! d-n it, you are not going to run away with my chaise." I then took the prisoner out of the chaise, and suffered Catts to take it away, and I took the prisoner away.

Cross-examined. Q. Who is Catts? A. Not a man of very good character, I believe; I did not know him before - I have seen him since at Queen-square; he was not taken

up about this. The prisoner knew I was a constable - I do not know how long his father has been dead.

GEORGE WATKINS . I am an apothecary, and live at Pimlico; the house, No. 12, Trellick-terrace, belongs to me. On the 20th of October, a man, calling himself, William Peppiatt, was my tenant; he took the house of me on the 1st of September - a man, calling himself Sully, was witness to the agreement drawn up about the house; I know him by sight, but do not know his name to be Sully- here is the agreement; he did not sign his name to it, but was present - I did not know him before; he was called Sully by those who were present; I have seen him several times since; he had no interest in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know whether he lived there or not? A. I have seen him there, and conversed with him; he is about fifty-five years of age - he had not the appearance of a respectable person; the prisoner was not present when the agreement was made; I never saw the man Peppiatt, who took the house, afterwards- I have seen the prisoner's mother there repeatedly; I did not consider Sully as a lodger, but as a friend of their's- I never saw any lodgers there; I never saw the prisoner there.

COURT. Q. Have you got possession of your house again? A. Yes, about ten days after the prisoner was taken; I found it quite abandoned.

DAVID JOHNSON . I am a patrol, and often go up Trellick-terrace, and have seen the prisoner at No. 12 - I saw him there on the morning before he was apprehended, Friday, the 19th of October; I also saw him there on the 7th, 8th, and 10th of October; on the morning of the 8th I saw him coming down stairs, tying his handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. What time in the morning was that? A. Seven o'clock; I have no doubt he slept there of a night - he knew me to be a patrol; he sent for me on the 7th, to take charge of a person who had stolen a cart from him. I never noticed that he seemed to avoid me - I know his mother lived there, and let lodgings.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Do you mean to say you knew she let lodgings? A. No; I know nothing of her letting lodgings - I understood the gentleman to ask whether she lived in lodgings there. I know a woman brought some fire-irons there, as if she was a lodger.

MARY ANN MILES . I live in Buckingham-place, Pimlico. On the 1st of October the prisoner took a lodging at my house - he did not enter till the 10th, and slept there from the 11th to the 26th; a person, who I understood to be his wife, lived there with him; he took my lodgings by the name of Williams, and referred me to No. 12, Trellick-terrace, where he said he had lived three years.

ROBERT THOMAS BENNETT . I have been post-master of Croydon nearly thirty years; I know no Mr. Peppiatt living there; if letters had come by the General Post for such a person I must have known it.

Cross-examined. Q. A person may live there a month and not receive a letter? A. Certainly.

GEORGE BAKER . I live at Croydon, and have been a letter-carrier nearly fourteen years; I know no person of the name of Peppiatt.

JABEZ PACKER . I have been a letter-carrier of Croydon above two years, and never knew a person named Peppiatt.

WILLIAM HENRY STANDON . I live at Croydon, and have been a letter-carrier five years. I know no person named Peppiatt; Packer, Baker, and I are the only letcarriers there.

HENRY GRAVES WAUGH . I have collected the King's taxes of Croydon parish for the last twenty years; I know nothing of the prisoner, and I know no person named Peppiatt.

Cross-examined. Q. How often do you make up your books? A. Once a year, about April; a person coming into a house between April and September might not be entered in the rate-book; many furnished houses are not entered.

JAMES ANDREWS . I have been collector of the Poor-rates at Croydon nearly two years. I know no person named Peppiatt there.

JOHN NASH . I keep the Bell and Crown public-house, Camden-town. I did not know the prisoner before the 20th of October, when he came to my house, in company with a man named Shorter, whom I knew before; they came together, and took refreshment together; Shorter wanted me to take some premises for the prisoner, for a potatoe-warehouse; Shorter asked if I wanted a load of good hay; I made a bargain for a load, but it was never delivered; they lunched there; Shorter produced a 10l. note, and paid me for what they both had; I gave Shorter 9l. 17s. 6d. in change; I gave the note to my wife, who marked it, to the best of my knowledge; I do not recollect seeing her mark it; (looking at one) this is her writing; I took another 10l. note that day, from a Mr. Grant- I received it before I took this one, I think; it was loose in my pocket, for I was very busy that morning.

Q. What did you do with the one you received of Shorter? A. I put it down; I cannot say exactly which of the two notes it was, but I put it down on the desk, and told my wife to mark it - I gave her both at one time, to the best of my knowledge; I do not know whether she marked both: I paid them both away that afternoon, to a cheesemonger, who lives in Tottenham-court-road, in change for silver - this note was afterwards returned, as forged.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say which of the notes you took from Shorter? A. No, not to say with certainly - Shorter talked most: they came in a chaise; I think the prisoner was not in the room when Shorter paid me the note - he went out about the horse.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am an inspector of Bank notes.(Looking at the note uttered to Faulkener) this is forged in every respect - no part is genuine; it purports to be signed George Gaudin - there is a cashier of that name, but it is not his signature.

Cross-examined. Q. Would it pass in the world without suspicion? A. Yes.

GEORGE GAUDIN . I am a cashier at the Bank - there is no other of my name; the signature to this note is not my writing.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that being anxious to obtain a situation, a person named Ephraim Shorter, who represented himself as a dealer in potatoes, had promised to appoint him his agent - that Shorter represented himself to

be in some temporary difficulties, and was fearful of a writ being out against him; he wished to be called by the name of Sully - that he went with him to several places where he thought he could deal for potatoes, and that he had received the note in question from Shorter, and changed it with Mrs. Faulkener,(who knew him well) not suspecting it to be forged.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-30

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

30. GEORGE NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 mare, price 24l. , the property of George Mash .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE MASH . I am a farmer and cow dealer , and live at Homerton, in Middlesex. In October last I was possessed of a black mare, with a blaze on her forehead, a white stripe down her nose, and a white fetlock on her hind leg; she was about fifteen hands high; when I came home from Romford market, on the 16th of October, she was missing from Hackney-marsh , where I have a right of pasturage; I had hand-bills printed, and, on Friday, the 2d of November, I found her at Batten's Brickwall, Hatfield, in Hertfordshire; I think she was worth from 24l. to 30l.

BENJAMIN MASH . I am the brother of the last witness, and act as his servant; he had a black mare, about fifteen hands high, in Hackney-marsh; I saw her safe on Sunday, the 14th of October, and missed her on the Wednesday following; I saw her at home on the 11th of November - I believe my brother brought her home.

THOMAS JILTHRO . I am waiter at the White Hart public-house, Temple-mills, near Hackney-marsh - it joins the marsh; there is a road through our premises to the marsh, and a gate there. On Saturday, the 13th of October, I saw some persons in the marsh - the prisoner was one of them; I had seen him before, and am not mistaken in his person; Hilt, and another person, whom I knew by sight, and now understand to be John Holden, were with him; I knew them all three well; I knew the prisoner by name - they called him Crummy Newman; they had nothing with them, but were all three walking together on the marsh; I saw them all three together again on Monday morning, the 15th, at six o'clock; I saw them pass through master's yard; the prisoner was riding on a black mare, about fifteen hands high, with a white blaze, a white stripe down the nose, and a white fetlock on the off hindfoot; one of the others was riding another horse, and the third one opened the gate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know what has become of Holden? A. No; he did not live in the neighourhood - he was very well dressed - better than the prisoner; I have not seen him since.

JOSEPH BATTEN . I am an innkeeper and farmer, at Brickwall, Hatfield, Herts. On Thursday, the 18th of October, the prisoner Newman, and a person, who I have heard since goes by the name of Holden, came there, between two and three o'clock - they were the only two persons; they brought two mares and a gelding, all black; there was one young mare, fifteen hands high, which Mr. Mash afterwards claimed; Holden brought the two mares into my yard; the prisoner stood by the gelding, outside the gate; I believe he was within hearing; Holden asked me to take the mares in to grass till Saturday morning, when he would call again for them; they stopped to see the mares fed; I think the prisoner went into the stable, but am certain Holden went to see them fed; the prisoner mounted the gelding; Holden went away on foot, a little before the prisoner; Holden was to return on the Saturday; on the Sunday evening, about six o'clock, the prisoner came back alone; he said his master was detained late on Friday night at Smithfield market, and could not come on the Saturday as he proposed, but would come on Monday night, or Tuesday morning; he said he had come to see if the mares were taken care of, or how they were, or something to that effect; I had suspicions then; when they brought the mares to the stable, I asked Holden if the mares were for sale; I cannot say where the prisoner was then; he said he had some thoughts of asking 18l. for the mare, but it was in bad condition; I asked if it was the lowest, and he said he might take a little less; when the prisoner came on Sunday night, I persuaded him to stay all night with me, and, after having some refreshment, I asked him if he thought the mares could be sold; he said Yes; I said, "Your master talked of 18l.; I have a horse or two, and should have no objection to change with him; do you know whether she will go in chains?" he said No; I said, "Well, in the morning we will try her:" while he was having his refreshment, I sent for a constable, and in the morning I took him into custody myself; he was taken before the Magistrate, and discharged (this was on the 22d), as the owner of neither of the mares was there; the prosecutor came on the Friday following, and claimed this mare; she was delivered to him on the 11th of November.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Holden at all? A. I thought I had seen him before, but am not positive; he was dressed more respectably than the prisoner; the prisoner called him his master all through, and I supposed him to be his master, as the prisoner himself gave no orders about the mares.

Q. Was not the prisoner offered 5l. for one of the horses? A. Not by me, nor in my presence, to my knowledge - several persons were present, and had a deal of conversation with him; he might have been offered money for it, without my bearing it - Holden did not come back.

Q. Before the prisoner returned on the Sunday, had you made a noise about the neighbourhood? A. It struck me they were stolen, and I had been to a Magistrate, and I employed men to sit up, in case they should come and take the horses by force - Holden paid for the refreshment - I believe he was paymaster, but I was not the person who received the money.

MR. BARRY. Q. When did you make a stir about the horses? A. On the Saturday.

JOHN GODDARD . I am a Police-officer. I apprehended the prisoner in his father's cottage, in Wick-lane, Hackney, and have endeavoured to find the other persons - I know Holden - I do not think he is a horse-dealer - I took the prisoner on Monday, the 12th of November, I think; I told him it was for felony, and asked what he had done with the horses; he said he took them to Enfield-highway; he said, "My intention was not to steal them - I gave my right name and address - I might have sold them over and over again."

Cross-examined. Q. Now tell us exactly what passed?

A. A good deal of conversation occurred; he said Hilt had accompanied him into one of the green lanes, riding one of the horses; that he then delivered him the other horse, and he took them both to Enfield-highway; that he had been bid money for the horses, but refused to sell them.

Q. Did he not say he had not the least intention of stealing them, and might have sold them over and over again? A. Yes, and that he had given his right name and address to the publican in Enfield-highway.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired.

NOT GUILTY .(See the Fifth Day.)

Reference Number: t18271206-31

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

31. THOMAS CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ann Barrett .

ELIZABETH STEVENSON . I am the wife of William Stevenson , and live in Church-street, Soho. The prisoner and Barrett, the deceased, lived together at No. 5, Baldwin's-gardens, Gray's Inn-lane - Barrett came to my house on the 31st of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon; she had been drinking, but was not intoxicated; she had complained of a violent pain in her left side, for six weeks before; she appeared quite collected, and as usual in health, except the pain in her side; she continued at my house from the 31st of October, till the 9th of November, when she died; she was confined to her bed from the 2d of November - I had medical advice for her; the prisoner came to the house, on the morning after she came, about half-past eight o'clock; she was then in bed; he asked how she was, and seemed very anxious for her to go home; she told him she could not think of going home, because she had no one to attend on her; he wished her to have a nurse, or somebody; she said it was of no use her going home, unless she had money to go with; he said he could not get money till Saturday night; he left, and came every meal-time afterwards - I got Mr. Wade, the doctor, on Friday, the 2d of November; he attended her till her death - I had seen her the day before she came to me, she then complained of a pain in her side, and of the cramp - I had seen quarrels between them for many years.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She complained for six weeks of a violent pain in her side? A. Yes; when she came to my house, she smelled of liquor. and her lips were much darkened from drink; she had been drinking spirits; the prisoner paid her every attention he possibly could, and seemed much distressed about her; he is a working man.

MARY ANN SMITH . I am the wife of John Smith , and live in Baldwin's-gardens . The prisoner and Barrett lived in our attic. On Tuesday night, the 30th of October, between eight and nine o'clock, she came to my room door, and borrowed 1/2d. to buy a candle; she went up stairs, and I heard a man's footsteps go up after her, which I presumed to be the prisoner's; there is a floor between their room and mine - I heard a female voice scream Murder! several times; the last noise was faint, as if the person got weaker - I called to the prisoner not to murder his wife; he answered, "Mind your own business, mistress" - I saw him, and spoke to him, as he went down stairs, and went out of the house; he said, "Mind your own business" - I went up to her room; there was nobody in the house then but her and me - I found her lying on the floor, at the foot of the bed, in a dead faint; her clothes were all undone, and her cap off - I got some vinegar and water, and bathed her face, then fetched some brandy, forced her mouth open, and gave her a little with a tea-spoon - she then revived; I assisted her down to my room, and dressed her; she showed me her marks next day: her face and stomach were violently swollen, and there were black marks on her things and legs; she staid in my room about a quarter of an hour that night, and then went to a friend's house; she returned next morning for a few things, and went away directly.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know where her friend lives? A. In Church-street, Soho; it is a good distance - I only assisted her to the street door - I never quarrelled with the prisoner.

Q. Has he not frequently remonstrated with her for drinking with you? A. Never - I never drank with her in my life; and never spoke to him above twice in my life.

ELIZABETH GRAVELL . I live in Baldwin's-gardens. I saw the deceased at eight o'clock on the 30th of October, in perfect good health; she enjoyed pretty fair health usually - I only know what she told me, and that was in his absence.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she not continually complaining of inflammation in her side? A. No; she was given to drinking.

CHARLOTTE HILL . I live in Baldwin's-gardens, in the top attic of the next house to the prisoner, and could hear what passed in his room - I only knew Barrett by sight. On the 30th of October, I was at home very poorly in bed. I knew her voice, and between eight and nine o'clock I heard her cry Murder! and Oh! I heard her open the window and call Murder! she called Mr. Bigmore twice - the second time her voice was faint. I heard the window shut with force, and she fell. I heard the prisoner say he could not go to work without his wash-brush, and say, with an oath, that he would murder her - this was after the window shut.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know this woman? A. I had known her five months. I never saw her in liquor but once, and that was on a Sunday afternoon.

ROBERT WADE . I am a surgeon, and live in Gerrard-street. I was called in to attend the deceased on the 2d of November, at No. 35, Church-street, Soho - I found her in bed; she complained of a difficulty of breathing, and a pain in her chest - that she had fallen down in a fit, and hurt her left side against a chair or table. I found she had broken a left rib; the skin over the fracture was discoloured; she was then suffering from inflammation of the lungs, which, in spite of the usual means, terminated fatally on the 9th of November - I saw her daily. I examined her body two days after her death; there were two or three bruises on both her legs - the rib was broken in the most favourable manner possible; there were no external appearances to account for her death. I opened the body; the lung on the injured side was very little inflamed, only one rib fractured; there were no appearances on that side to lead me to account for her death, but the right lung was very acutely inflamed; there was no disease on the chest;

the liver and the lining membrane of the stomach, had evidently been suffering from a low degree of inflammation a considerable time - it might have been going on for months, and that of the right lung for a considerable time - these are the appearances we generally find in dram drinkers. I ascribe her death to the inflammation of the right lung; the fracture, in my judgment, had nothing to do with it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-32

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

32. DANIEL McINTOSH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 watch chain, value 30s.; 2 seals, value 2l. 10s.; 1 key, value 10s., and 2 gold rings, value 10s., the goods of George Langdale , from his person .

GEORGE LANGDALE. I am a druggist , and live at Dublin. On the 1st of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the Old Bailey, near Newgate-street - I had not dined, and was perfectly sober; three men came up and jostled me; one of them made a snatch at my seals, which were quite visible; my watch-chain broke - he got the greater part of the chain, and two gold seals, a key, and two gold rings - it was a very sudden pull; they made their escape as fast as they could. I had an opportunity of observing their features, and believe the prisoner to be one of them, and to be the man who snatched the chain, but I will not positively swear to him. I have not seen any of the articles since. I saw the prisoner in custody of two officers within ten minutes.

Q. Had you given any alarm? A. There was no necessity, for there was a crowd about me; I immediately pursued after the three - an officer took the prisoner; I had lost sight of him for ten minutes; I observed a black mark about his eye at the time - it seemed as if he had received a blow in the eye; and when he was taken he had the same mark as the man who snatched my seals.

Prisoner. I had no mark about me. Witness. He had a mark corresponding with the mark I observed on the eye of the man.

JOHN PETERS . I am a tailor and draper, and live in Newgate-street. I was coming out of Green Arbour-square, Old Bailey, and saw the prisoner and another; they ran against the prosecutor, and shoved him against the wall - I saw the prisoner snatch something from him, and pass it to his companion; there was a third man stood near them; the prisoner and the other man ran away, across Green Arbour-square; I was a very few yards from the prisoner, and am positive of him - I did not join in the pursuit; I did not see him again till he was examined before the Magistrate, two days afterwards; he had then a black mark below his left eye. I swear positively to him.

JOHN LAWS . I am a patrol of Farringdon Ward. I was coming up Newgate-street, towards the Old Bailey - a person came up to me, and said a gentleman had been robbed. I saw the prisoner dodging about the carts, from one cart to another, as if he was trying to shun me; he appeared to be concealing himself from me, not crossing the street; Wilmer, my partner, came up - I sent him to the prosecutor, hearing he was in the Old Bailey; we apprehended the prisoner - he had another person in his company, whom I ran after, leaving the prisoner in charge of Wilmer, who had taken him; I saw the prosecutor after he was secured; he said, in the prisoner's hearing,"That is the man who robbed me," and gave him in charge - he had a black eye. The prosecutor came up in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after he was taken.

HEZEKIAH WILMER . I am a patrol. I was at the corner of the Old Bailey; a lad came up, and said a gentleman had been robbed at the corner of Green Arbour-court; I went over to the Star public-house, to the prosecutor, and asked if he should know the persons - I then went to look for them, and saw the prisoner crossing from Giltspur-street up Newgate-street - he was crossing the road from Green Arbour-court; I walked up to him, and said I wanted him - he said, "Very well - I will go with you;" I took him to the Star - the prosecutor said, "That is the man who robbed me - I will swear to him;" the prisoner said nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Cock-lane, on an errand to my sister - the officer came and took me - I said, "What do you want?" they took me to the Star: the prosecutor was leaning on the counter, quite intoxicated - they asked if I was the person, and he shook his head: they took me to the Compter, and found nothing on me.

HEZEKIAH WILMER . The prosecutor was quite sensible.

JOHN PETERS . He did not appear to be intoxicated.

JOHN LAWS . He was not in the least intoxicated.

JURY to JOHN PETERS. Q. Did the prisoner run down Green Arhour-square? A. They ran across it when they snatched the chain; there is a passage into Sea Coal-lane without returning to the Old Bailey; I saw him snatch the seals, and swear he is the man; his left eye was black.

MR. LANGDALE. I am a stranger in town, and cannot say in what direction I pursued; I did not follow more than twenty or thirty yards; I picked up a hat, which I gave a person, whom I then thought was assisting me, but he immediately made a snatch at the remaining part of my chain, and got it. I pursued to the wide part of the Old Bailey; I do not remember now which eye was black - I had not dined, nor drank any thing.

HEZEKIAH WILMER. When I first saw the prisoner he was coming as if from St. Sepulchre's church - he turned at first towards Smithfield, but seeing me crossing he came towards Newgate-street - we asked the prosecutor for a description of the people; I had seen three persons of that description go down the Old Bailey ten minutes before: he said one was dressed like a sailor - the prisoner was so dressed.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-33

33. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Clark .

It appearing from the testimony of the witnesses, that they had only known the deceased by the name of Hugh Clark, and never heard him called William, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18271206-34

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 10.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

34. HENRY WALTON and THOMAS EDWARDS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the

dwelling-house of William Lumley , on the 9th of November , at St. Giles in the Fields, and stealing 3 shirts, value 6s.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 6s.; 3 neck-handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 3 towels, value 3s.; 3 shifts, value 6s.; 2 waistcoats, value 4s., and 1 gown, value 6s. , the goods of George Dedman .

GEORGE DEDMAN. I am servant to Mr. William Lumley, who lives at No. 49, Gower-street, Bedford-square, in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields ; my property was in a box, which was up over master's stables; I sleep over the stables. On the 9th of November I left the stable as the watchman was going past eight o'clock in the evening - all was safe then; I returned about twenty minutes after eight, and found the door bolted inside; I had not left it bolted inside, but had locked it, and taken the key with me, leaving every part of the building safe. I could not get in - I got assistance, forced the door open, and got in - I did not examine the lock afterwards; I am certain I had locked it; we searched the stable, and found nothing- we went into the loft, and found nobody there - but in a sort of cock-loft, over the room in which I live, we found both the prisoners; they were perfect strangers to me, and had no business there - I never saw them before, to my knowledge - we secured them. I looked at my box, which had contained three shirts, six pairs of stockings, three neck-handkerchiefs, three towels, three shifts, two waistcoats, and a gown - they had all been moved out of the box - I found them in a basket in the same room.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Does any body else sleep there besides yourself? A. Only my wife. - The things were in a box in the loft adjoining the room where I sleep. The prisoners were in a cock-loft over my room; my wife is not here - I might not have seen the things for a day or two before: I had been to the box on the Wednesday - this was Friday. I had seen the box every day.

Q. For what you know, the things might have been moved into the basket before? A. I saw the basket the same evening, before I went out - there was some wet linen in it, but none of these things - I will swear there was no dry linen in it; I had seen it ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before I went out - my wife went out with me: there are windows to the place - there is a stable and coach-house door - I had fastened them both about eight o'clock, and fastened all the windows: I am certain none of them were open. I missed the linen directly I found the prisoners there, but did not examine particularly what articles they were till we took the prisoners to the watch-house - nothing was found on them.

CORNELIUS BUCKLEY . I am a watchman. I was sent for, and assisted in breaking open the stable door, which was bolted; I heard somebody in the stable at first - I went up stairs, and found the two prisoners in the cockloft, over the bed-room - they said, "We are here - we will come down - don't ill-use us;" they came down. We found a bunch of picklock-keys left in the loft.

EDWARD SWEENEY . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoners; I saw them scarched, and in Walton's pocket I found a knife and latch-key.

GEORGE DEDMAN . I lost nothing - the clothes were in the basket.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you slept long in this stable? A. Two months. The loft the clothes were in, and the loft I sleep in, are all under the same roof.

EDWARDS' Defence. When I was examined, he said he did not know what was missing - the Magistrate said,"Suppose we say three shirts and three pairs of stockings"- he said Yes.

Two witnesses gave Walton a good character.

WALTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

EDWARDS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18271206-35

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

35. EDWARD KIMPTON was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-36

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hullock.

36. RICHARD RICHARDSON was indicted for that he, on the 10th of November , at Enfield, in and upon Sophia, his wife, a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, &c. did strike and cut the said Sophia in and upon the left side of her head, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her, against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable her.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

JOSEPH SCOTT . I am a labouring man. On the 10th of November I went to bed about my usual time, leaving my wife sitting up, knowing that my daughter, Sophia Richardson , had gone to meet the prisoner, who is her husband - she and her husband occupied a room at my house; I had heard him early in the morning, tell her to meet him at half-past six o'clock in the evening, at the Greyhound at Enfield, which is about a mile and a quarter from our house - she left our house about five o'clock: I saw no more of her till half-past ten, when she was led home by two persons; I did not see the prisoner at all; she was in a most dreadful state, and wounded in the head. I went for a surgeon immediately - she is not completely recovered yet.

SOPHIA RICHARDSON . I am the prisoner's wife. I have been married to him eleven weeks to-day; we lodged at my father's house. On the 10th of November he left home about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, and told me to come over to the Greyhound at Enfield, to meet him, at half-past six in the evening; we had then been married seven weeks, all but two days - I went to the Greyhound exactly at six o'clock; it is about one mile and a quarter from our house; he was not there - I went again a little after seven o'clock, and found him there - I opened the door of the room where he was sitting, and beckoned to him to come out - I waited outside about three quarters of an hour; he then came to me, and asked if I would come in - I said No, and he asked if I wanted to go home - I said Yes, as soon as I could: he said he was not going yet; he went in again - I staid at the door; he came out again in about five minutes, and brought me 5s. - I asked if that was all he had got, as I had had but 3s. 6d. the week before; he said it was - I went to a shop, and got some things which I wanted, then went back to the room, and waited till he was ready, and about three minutes after ten o'clock he got up to go away - after he came out I asked him again if he

had no more money for me; he said No, he had but 1 1/2d. - I said I thought he was very much to blame for spending his money at a public-house, when he knew it was wanted at home; he abused me, and said he had no more for me, and after that he gave me 1s.; we were going through Enfield town at that time; he kept abusing me along the town, and after we came to Mr. Fox's, the corn-chandlers, he gave me another 1s. - I went into the corn-chandler's, bought a quartern loaf, and a peck of coals - I gave him the coals to carry home; he had a round basket, with a handle across it, and his hoe through the handle; it was empty; we went on; he rested just before he came to the fields, and wanted me to go over the fields - I said I should not go that way; there is a path across the fields, up a bye-lane - I refused to go that way, and went along the highway; he stopped against the lane leading to the fields; he followed me along the road, about twenty yards behind me; he overtook me directly afterwards, and when we had got about one mile along the road, he kept calling me very abusive names - I said very little to him - I made him very few answers - I was afraid of him, for he swore at me a great deal - I did not use any threats to him; he was not drunk; he had one pot of beer; he did not appear drunk.

Q. Did he appear to know what he was about? A. Yes; he had been in the public-house, from six till ten o'clock - I was outside - I do not know how long he had been drinking; he was saying, at the Greyhound, that he would go and see a young man, called Jockey James, who was in Chelmsford gaol, and while he was swearing at me on the road, he said, he should soon be where Jockey James was - I did not know James - I only knew there was such a person; after saying that, he abused me again, and said, when he got me home, he would kick me out of doors like a dog - I told him it was at his peril to do that, for there was nothing there belonging to him, and if he did not like me, to leave me, for he had used me ill ever since he had married me; he kept calling me every thing that was bad, and just as we got over the bridge, at Forty-hill, I said, "You good for nothing fellow, you ought to be ashamed to call me such names;" he stopped, and set down the bag of coals off one shoulder, and the basket off the other; I thought he was going to rest, as he had done before, but he drew the hoe deliberately from the handle of the basket, and knocked me down on the bridge; he hit me with the hoe - I do not know whether it was with the back or front of it, but it was with the iron part; he hit me on the head with it; it knocked me down, and took away my senses.

Q. Did he cut your head, or make any wound? A. He cut my head - I had a bonnet on, not the one I have now; he did not say anything - I do not know how long I remained insensible - I am not sensible of his giving me any other blow; when I came a little to myself, I did not know what was the matter with me - I could not believe he had done such a thing - I felt something very warm falling down my face, and thought it was perspiration, but when I came to myself, and found it was blood, I screamed out.

Q. Where was he? A. I do not know - I did not see him - I screamed very violently - I could not speak, but could scream - I heard somebody calling out of a window, but could not answer for some time; my husband then came to the left side of me, as I laid on the ground; he was knocking me with his knee on my arm, and told me to hold my noise - I still screamed, and when I came a little to myself, I pushed him away, and told him to go away, for he should never come near me any more - after that, a woman came to me, with a light, she never spoke, but turned back again when she saw me - I got up, and the person called to me out of window, to know who I was, I answered I was Joseph Scott's daughter; the woman with the light came back, with a man, and they led me home, and when the woman got opposite her house, she went in for a stick, which she walked with; my husband came running up the road, saying, "If any man has a mind to take me, let him take me - I know what I have done" - I do not know what became of him afterwards; he did not go home with me.

Q. When he struck you, you say he took the hoe deliberately out of the basket - did he say any thing before the blow was given? A. No; I had two wounds on my head, in different parts; I should think they had been inflicted by different blows.

Q. You say he abused you all the way - did he threaten to do you any bodily harm? A. No, except that he said he would kick me out of doors; he kept swearing at me, and calling me abusive names; I have been under the surgeon's hands ever since.

JOHN CRANSTON . I am in the employ of the Post-office, at Forty-hill, Enfield; my house is within a very few yards of the bridge. On the 10th of November I went to bed about ten o'clock, or a few minutes after; I was in a very sound sleep, and was disturbed by very severe shrieks, which alarmed my wife first; she got up and that awoke me; I opened my window, which looks directly down to the river - I heard very severe shrieks - I called out, "In the name of God, what is the matter - is there murder going to be committed?" I repeated the question seven or eight times, but nobody replied - the shrieks continued, but I got no reply; I heard a man's voice say, "Don't make such a noise - don't make such a noise:" I then heard a female voice say, "I don't know where I am - I don't know where I am: I wish my mother was here;" and I heard her say,"You have been a cruel husband to me, you have cut me down with the hoe; I am all in a gore of blood, and you have nearly murdered me;" the voice then was quite different to what it is naturally - I could not tell whose voice it was; at that moment I saw a woman come along with a lantern; I begged her to go to the bridge, and see what was the matter; she went to the prosecutrix, and exclaimed,"Oh, my God! I never saw such a sight in my life;" I was without my clothes, and did not go myself.

ELIZABETH PINNICK . I am the wife of Joseph Pinnick; we live at Forty-hill. On the night in question I was sitting up at work, my son being out; I live about one hundred yards from Forty-hill-bridge; I heard violent shrieks, and ran to the door as fast as I could; I thought it was my own boy's voice; I ran with the candle in my hand to see, and heard a voice say, "Assist me, assist me! my poor hands, my poor head! come and assist me, the man has knocked me down:" I ran down to the voice, and heard a voice say, "This is how he has served me - I have been married only six weeks;" the man was standing over her with a stick; I could not see what it was, nor do I know him - I was too much frightened to notice him; the woman

was in a gore of blood, running into her lap; her hand was up to her head; it frightened me, and I ran back; Cranston asked me what was the matter, and I told him; I ran and got James North ; I went back with him; the prosecutrix had got up, and was coming towards us; I took hold of her hands, and led her to the rails; she said she wished to see her mother, and I took her to her mother's house, which is about a quarter of a mile; I did not know the man, and could not swear to him - he did not come into my sight again that night - I did not see him.

JAMES NORTH . I live a very little distance from Fortyhill-bridge; Mary Pinnick knocked at my door; I went with her to the bridge; the prosecutrix was then up, and walking as well as she was able; she was bleeding very violently - I and Pinnick went home with her; I saw no man on the spot - the woman was walking quite alone; I cannot say that I heard any man's voice, I was too much frightened.

JOHN BLAKE . I live with Mr. Astbury, a surgeon, at Enfield. On the night in question, about a quarter-past eleven o'clock, I was fetched to the prosecutrix, at Scott's house; I found an incised wound, three inches in length, on the top of the scull - it was cut to the bone, but had not fractured the bone; there was also a wound about two inches from that - it appeared to have been done by the same instrument, but with a lesser degree of force, and not at the same time; it was an incised wound, but not quite so deep; there was very little difference; there was a bruise on the forehead, which I suppose the stick of the hoe had done.

Q. If the bone had been fractured by the first wound, might it have been attended with more dangerous consequences? A. Not more dangerous than showing the degree of force of the blow; the same members go inside - it was certainly done with an instrument that would effect a cut; it is a contused incised wound, not done with an instrument usually used to cut, but which would cut if force was applied; there was an artery divided, which had bled freely previous to my seeing it; in my judgment, the two wounds were produced by two different blows, and not by the same force; I attended her above a fortnight - I bled her twice, and kept down the inflammation; she is quite well now; if she had not been bled, there would have been an affection of the brain probably.

Q. In what time does that affection of the brain take place? A. A month probably, but we have kept her low, and attend to her now; in my judgment the wounds might have been inflicted by this hoe. (looking at it) I have not seen it before this morning - I do not know where it came from.

JOHN BRISCOE . I am ostler at the Rummers public-house. On Sunday morning, the 11th of November, the prisoner came there between seven and eight o'clock, and asked me to be so good as to take care of this hoe - he gave it me, and asked me to keep it till Monday morning, when he would call for it. I took it from him and locked it up. I gave it to Cuffley the constable that day - this is the same hoe as I received from him. I asked him no question about it - he left a basket with me at the same time, which I also gave Cuffley; he did not come for them, as he was taken on the Sunday.

WILLIAM CUFFLEY . I am constable of Enfield. On Sunday morning, the 11th of November, Briscoe gave me the hoe now produced, and a basket. I gave the basket to Mr. Scott, and it is not here. I apprehended the prisoner at the Rummers on that Sunday morning - the father of the young woman was present. I told him what I took him for - he said he knew nothing at all about it; he said afterwards, quite voluntarily, as I was bringing him to prison, that he was sorry for what he had done, but it could not be helped now.

SOPHIA RICHARDSON . This is the hoe - I know it because the handle was a broom handle of my mother's, which she had had for three years - it was put to the hoe about a week before; he had been using it with potatoes that day in the field - he took it away with him in the morning. I am sure I know the handle, because I have frequently used it - it has been put into a broom at both ends.

JURY. Q. Had you had any quarrel with him in the course of the day before you met? A. He has never used me well since I have been married to him - he was continually abusing me.

Q. Did you not say that he called out, that he was ready to give himself up? A. That was while Mrs. Pinnick was gone into her house.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. - It now becomes my painful task to offer some defence to the serious charge alledged against me - I trust, that when you have seriously considered of my unfortunate situation, that under all the circumstances attending it, I shall be entitled to your pity, rather than rebuke. I kept company with my present wife about three years, and she went to another part of the country for two years; during her absence from keeping my company, she got acquainted with some strange man, who got a child by her, and afterwards left her. After our marriage, which took place about two months past, since which, I was respectably informed, that during my absence in my work, she would encourage strange men, and on the Saturday evening, when this unfortunate transaction took place, we were drinking together at a public-house, by appointment, at the Greyhound, Enfield Town. I gave my wife 8s. and kept the residue of my wages, to pay her mother what I owed her; my wife began abusing me, and both of us being rather intoxicated, a quarrel ensued about the young man by whom she had the child, by which means the blow was given at the moment, for which I solemnly assure you, gentlemen, I am very sorry, and have written to my wife to that effect, and to her father and mother, hoping their forgiveness, and promising that I never will molest her again, and that my wife can live with the man if she pleases, without any fear from me. Gentlemen, this is a brief statement of facts, and the truth of my unfortunate and very distressing case. I therefore most humbly beg leave to throw myself on the mercy of this most Honorable Court, and fervently hope that it will be extended to me, and restore me to liberty.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22. On the third Count.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the great provocation he had received, and their having continually quarrelled since their marriage .

Reference Number: t18271206-37

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

37. THOMAS CHAPMAN, alias DERRICK , and

WILLIAM JOHNSON, alias CARTER , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , at St. Luke, 1 mare, price 10l. , the property of John Jones .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN JONES. I live at Marshfield, in Gloucestershire . On the 5th of October I had a black mare called "Poppet" in my possession. I saw her on the 5th, standing before my own door; she was missing early on the morning of the 6th. I took considerable trouble to find her, but without success. I came to town afterwards, in consequence of a letter, and saw the prisoner Johnson. I saw Chapman at the Police-office, on the 10th of November. I think I have seen him before, but cannot swear to him. I have seen Johnson several times at Marshfield, but always knew him by the name of Carter.

JACOB PHILPOT . On the 5th of October I put Mr. Jones's mare Poppet into the field - I fastened the gate of the field. Jones is a publican and a farmer also. I know Johnson, and saw him that night in Mr. Jones's tap-room - he was having a pot of beer, and had the newspaper - he had a white smock-frock on, grey-stockings, and low tied shoes. I knew him long before - he went by the name of William Carter down there. I came to town afterwards, and saw the mare - it was the same.

TIMOTHY BOND . I am a carrier from Marshfield, and know Johnson - I saw him on the 5th of October, sitting at the King's Arms public-house, which is kept by Jones - he had then got on a smock-frock, grey stockings, and low shoes - that might be between four and five o'clock in the afternoon - I saw him again up in the street, between ten and eleven that night: he then had boots and spurs on, and a light coloured top coat - the front of the coat appeared pushed out on one side, and was buttoned up. I said, "Good night, Carter," and he said,"Good night, Bond." I cannot be mistaken in him, for I have known him for years; I watched him a good way down the lane which leads to Jones' field, where the mare Poppet is kept. I have seen the other prisoner before, but did not see him in Marshfield that day - his name is Thomas Derrick.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long before you saw Johnson at the King's Arms had you seen Chapman? A. I might not have seen him for six months, not to notice him.

Prisoner JOHNSON. Q. What day was it you saw me? A. On the 5th - you were at the King's Arms, and opposite Mrs. Martin's - it was not dark; the moon was full that night.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a blacksmith, and live at Marshfield. On the 5th of October I saw a man, the same height apparently as Thomas Derrick , and the same features - I never saw him before that I know of: I met him in the street, and had an opportunity of observing him - I think he had a blue coat on.

Q. Can you tell whether the man at the bar is the man? A. He is the same features, and he is the man - I saw him first about the middle of the day, and I saw him again sitting on a wicket-gate, which goes into one of Jones' fields, about a quarter-past three o'clock. I saw Derrick at the office in town afterwards, and had not the least doubt of his being the man I saw on the gate.

Cross-examined. Q. Why then do you say it was a man about the same height and features? A. He is the man; I thought I was going to be asked the description of him- he had a black hat on; I know he had a coat, but will not swear what colour it was. I saw him first about the middle of the day; I do not think I ever saw him before.

Q. Was not Chapman shown to you at the office, and you asked "Is not this the man?" A. Yes - I said it was. I have not a doubt of him; I saw him coming twenty yards off, and he passed within a yard of me. I saw him on the gate for five minutes - he got off the gate, and got on again; I went down a field, and when I got to the bottom of it he was still there. I knew Johnson before - I do not know that I saw him that day: I heard they were both taken for this offence. I do not recollect that Derrick was pointed out to me.

COURT. Q. We understood you to say he was pointed out, and you were asked if he was not the man? A. I do not recollect it - I do not know that any one pointed him out; I knew him directly I went in, and said, "This is the man;" I had not the least doubt of him - I really do believe he is the same man.

Q. Do you mean to say you are not quite confident? A. I mean to say that is the man.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was not Chapman brought into the yard and pointed out to you, as the man who was apprehended with Johnson? A. Nothing was said to me, to the best of my knowledge; I knew him as soon as I saw him.

THOMAS WILKINS . I am a coppersmith, and am owner of some stables in Bath-street, St. Luke's. On the 8th of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in company together to my stables - they had each a mare, and wished to leave them there for the night, which they did; they told me to feed the mares- they each unsaddled one; Johnson principally gave the directions - they were both present. I locked the stable door, and asked if I should feed them in the morning - Johnson said No, they would come in time to see them fed, which they did, and stood talking for a little while; Johnson examined the shoes, and asked who was my farrier; I named Blake, and the mares were sent there by Johnson's direction; they went away, and about seven o'clock in the evening they both came again; one of the mares was still at the farrier's - I sent my son for it, telling him to bring a bill; he brought it, and gave Johnson a bill of 8s. - he gave him a sovereign; my son paid the bill, and returned him the change: the mares were fetched from my stable on Thursday, the 11th; Brown, the officer, brought Chapman to the stable that evening, and asked him, in my presence, if the mares belonged to him - he said they did not, they belonged to the other man; Chapman was left there, in Armstrong's custody, and Brown returned in five minutes with Johnson in custody, and asked him if those were his horses or mares - he said No, he had never seen them before; Chapman was present.

Q. The principal, if not all the conversat on which passed with you was with Johnson? A. Yes; I do not know that I exchanged two words with Chapman; I had let part of a stable in the same yard to William Hallam - these mares were in my part of the stable.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 11th of October I went to the stable in Bath-street, and left Armstrong in possession of the two mares - I then went to No. 5, Coleman-street, Bunhill-row, St. Luke's, and apprehended Chapman in the top room of the house - that is Johnson's room; I took him to the stable in Bath-street, left him in Armstrong's custody, and as I returned to No. 5 again I met Johnson, within two doors of the house - I took him also to the stables. - The mares have been in our possession ever since. Armstrong asked them both who the mares belonged to - they were both handcuffed together, and both denied all knowledge whatever of them.

Q. Did the prisoners, in your presence, afterwards say any thing about these mares? A. Yes, about a fortnight afterwards; they were brought before the Magistrate, but no examination was taken - they were merely brought to the bar, and sent back for re-examination; Chapman then said that the black mare, which he had rode to Wilkins' stable, was his own - that he had bought it, and paid for it; nobody had claimed the mares at that time: he said he had bought her of a man, whom he did not name, but I think he did name a place, which I do not recollect. The prosecutor afterwards claimed that mare; it was one of them which I had brought from the stable in Bath-street; it has not been out of our custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at the stable with Wilkins when you had Chapman in hold? A. Yes - I have heard Wilkins examined, and heard him state that Chapman said the horse was Johnson's - he did not say so to me; he might think I was there - I never heard it said. Wilkins was there when I brought Johnson in. Both of them, when I asked, said, "No, we know nothing about them."

Q. Has any reward been offered? A. No; I had seen no bills about them, and I do not know of any reward - I have not been promised any reward if they are convicted; I expect to be paid for my trouble, either by the prosecutor or the Court. I asked Jones, when he first came to town, if there was a reward, and it may have been talked of since - I do not know what reward there is; I have talked to him about being paid for the food of the horses.

Q. Have you not talked to him twenty times about the reward? A. No, nor ten times; I think about 5l. has been named, and I have had the horses to keep all this while.

Q. Now, on your oath, was not your share of the reward to be 5l.? A. No, I cannot tell what it would be till I come to share it among those who have had the trouble - I do not expect more than 5l. from Jones.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who has kept the mares all this time? A. They have been at a livery-stable - I expect I am responsible for their keep. It will make no difference to me whether the prisoners are convicted or not.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do not you know the stable-keeper has been paid? A. I am sure he is not, for the bill will not be given in till after the trial - I expect it to be sent to me - one has been sent some time ago, expecting the horses would be sent home before the trial.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 11th of October I was at Wilkins' stables, and saw both the mares; Brown gave Chapman into my custody, and brought in Johnson: I handcuffed them together. I pointed out the two mares to both of them, and asked them how they came in possesion of those mares; I am sure I asked them both that question - they both denied ever seeing them before: they gave their names as Chapman and Johnson; I searched Johnson, and found on him a small farries's bill, which I put into my pocket, in going to the office, and have lost it. About a fortnight afterwards I was present at the office when they were brought up to be remanded, and told they were committed for another day; there was no examination whatever at that time, as we had not found an owner; no deposition was taken, nor any body sworn - no threat or promise was held out to them; Johnson said he bought his mare of a man at Portsdown fair - Chapman said he bought his of a man, but he did not know his name; those were the two mares of which they had previously denied all knowledge.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was this conversation? A. At the bar, before the Magistrate; the depositions had been taken at a former examination - they were not questioned at all: they came up boldly, and asked for their own property.

Q. Then, having said a fortnight before that they knew nothing about the mares, they came forward voluntarily, and said where they got them from? A. They did - nobody had claimed them then.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did the prisoners know that? A. That I cannot tell, but nobody had appeared against them- they were present at all the examinations, and when the depositions were written down.

THOMAS GARTON . I am principal officer of Worship-street. On the 11th of October I went to No. 5, Coleman-street, Bunhill-row, and found Johnson's wife there, and found a pair of boots and spurs in the top room - I went again the same evening, and in the first-floor room found this great-coat lying in a chair, and this smock-frock on the top of it - I believe that was not Johnson's room, but his wife was in it - on the 9th of November I took Jones to the stables in the Curtain-road - he immediately claimed one of the mares.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you looked at these boots? A. Not particularly - I believe they belonged to Johnson, for he claimed them.

MR. PHILLIPS to THOMAS WILKINS. Q. Did you take sufficient notice of the mares as to know on which each of the prisoners rode? A. Yes; Jones claimed the one which Chapman rode.

Cross-examined. Q. What time of night did they come? A. About eight o'clock - the yard was locked - my son opened the door - he is not here - I went out - I did not see them on the horses, for they led them - Chapman led the one which Mr. Jones claims.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Johnson ride out in the morning? A. I did not see him go out - but I saw him come in - it was not Jones' horse that he rode in.

JOHN JONES . Garton showed me a black mare - it was mine, and the one I had lost.

CHAPMAN'S Defence. I was not within 120 miles of the prosecutor's when the horse was lost.

JOHNSON'S Defence. On Friday, the 5th of October, I was in Smithfield-market, and went off to the fair on the 10th.

SARAH HATCH . I am married - my husband has left me - I live in Broadwall, Blackfriars - the prisoner Chapman came to sleep at my house on Tuesday evening, the 2d

of October - I did not know him before that - he slept at my house every night till the Sunday following.

Q. Is there any thing which enables you to recollect the time from the 2d of October till the Sunday? A. Yes; I had a letter from my friends, concerning my husband - I do not know what the prisoner's occupation was - he never went out till after breakfast - he sometimes breakfasted at ten o'clock; sometimes at eight or nine - he slept at my house every night till the Sunday - ten o'clock at night is the latest hour he ever came home.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where do you now live? A. Down at what's-the-name of the place? Blackfriars, 19, Bear-lane - I have lived there three weeks, with one Mrs. Hunt - I have a room there - the prisoner was the only lodger that I had on the 2d of October - my husband had left me, and I thought I must get a bit of bread somehow - I have since sold my things - my husband has left me five months today - the prisoner is the first lodger I had - he came and asked if he could sleep there - I said he could - I made no inquiry about him - I have a child about four years old - the prisoner went by the name of Thomas Chapman.

Q. When did you hear you were to be examined here to-day? A. I heard nothing of it till Thursday, when a person came and told me he was in prison, that was his father - I had never seen him before; I went to Mr. Isaacs', the lawyer, and told him what my evidence was - I remember the 2d of October by the letter I received - there was nobody in the house but myself and child; the prisoner had what victuals he wanted - he cooked it himself - he sometimes came home to dinner, and sometimes did not - not a soul called on him while he lodged with me; when he left me he said he was going to Weyhill fair; he came back again, and slept at my house on the 10th of October; I am sure it was the 10th; it was Wednesday night; he paid for his lodgings, and left; I did not ask where he was going, nor did he tell me.

Q. How came you to ask him before where he was going? A. I made it my business, as he was in the way of travelling, if he should see my husband to ask him to be so good as to come home - I do not know what part of the country my husband is in.

Q. How was he to know your husband? A. I do not know - he might have seen him before perhaps - I do not know whether he knew him - I said if he should happen to hear his name.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you quite sure he slept at your house on the 10th of October? A. I am.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . He was taken on the 11th.

WILLIAM PROBART . I live at Bristol. I know Chapman - I came to town on Monday, the 1st of October, under the idea of obtaining a situation - I was in Smithfield-market on Friday, the 5th, and saw Chapman at Harry Harmer's, the Plough public-house, Windmill-court - I have known him for the last four or five years; he asked me to drink, and we went to Harmer's together, and drank.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who gave you the drink? A. The girl brought the porter into the room - there were several persons in the room - I have known Chapman under the denomination of a horse-dealer - he kept his cattle at his father's at Bedminster, near Bristol - I cannot say where he lived in town - I did not ask what brought him there; his name is Derrick - I never knew him by the name of Chapman at Bristol - I never heard him called Chapman, to the best of my recollection - I have known him for the last four or five years, seeing him about, and have drank with him - I am not sure whether I told him what I came about - I asked him how he got on - he said pretty fair - I said you look the same as usual, and that was all that passed.

Q. Did you tell him you had come to get a situation? A. I signified such to him - I had been at Marshfield - it is about eleven miles from Bristol - Bedminster is about one mile from Bristol - I am an accountant and collector of debts - I did not get a situation in town - I left, and came up again - the prisoner's father brought me from Bristol, to this trial - I was in London a week - I did not appoint to meet the prisoner again, and did not see him, except that day, Friday, the 5th - I have not seen him since - it was about two o'clock when I met him.

JOHN BISHOP. I am a carrier - I have a horse and cart, and live in Pitfield-street, Hoxton - I know Chapman - I saw him on the 5th of October, at Mr. Harmer's, the Plough, at Smithfield, about three o'clock in the afternoon - he came with me to Smithfield, to buy a horse for me - we bought one of a person named Kimpton, of Highgate, for 4l. 10s. - the prisoner went to look out a good one for me.

Cross-examined. Q. What is Kimpton? A. A horse-dealer - he gave his address at Highgate - the prisoner asked the price of it, and spoke to him about it a good deal - I suppose we were half an hour making the bargain - we had something to drink at Harmer's - nobody but the prisoner was in my company, nor was anybody in his company that I know of.

Q. Did you see the last witness there? A. I did not see him - he might be about; the place was very much crowded; he might speak to him; he was not drinking with him while I was there - I went in about three o'clock- I had met the prisoner in Smithfield about half-past two o'clock, and remained with him till we went to Harmer's.

Q. Are you a carman? A. Yes; I move any goods - it does not make any odds to me.

Q. Have you ever had the misfortune to fall into trouble? A. Yes; I do not think I am obliged to say what.

Q. You are not asked whether you were guilty or not, but what were you accused of? A. I do not think it is my place to say - I do not wish to tell; I was taken up twice.

Q. Will you tell what you were taken up the second time for? A. I do not wish to resolve that question - it was sometime ago; it is about two months.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you certain that on the 5th of October, at half-past two o'clock, you met him in Smithfield? A. Yes; I cannot tell who he might have met before.

COURT. Q. Did you go to Harmer's with him? A. Yes, but I left the house first.

CHAPMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18271206-38

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

38. CHARLES TURNLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of Thomas Downes and others, at St. Alphage, London-wall, on the 1st of No

vember , and stealing 168 lbs. of nutmegs, value 44l.; 28 lbs. of tea, value 6l.; 15 account-books, value 13l. 15s.; 1 tin-box, value 10s.; 2 warrants, for payment of and value 15l. each; 5 other warrants for the delivery of various goods, value 72l.; 1 bill of exchange, value 18l.; 1 bill of exchange, value 6l.; 1 bill of exchange, value 14l. 19s. 9d.; 1 bill of exchange, value 17l. 2s. 11d.; 1 bill of exchange, value 20l., and one 50l. Bank-note , their property.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-39

39. HENRY TOFFTS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Edward Farraway , from his person .

EDWARD FARRAWAY . I live servant to Dr. Clutterbuck, of Bridge-street, Blackfriars. On the 2d of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was by the watch-house on Holborn-hill , coming towards home; I felt a person at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, behind him - I cannot say whether he had any body with him - I collared him, and gave him into custody at the watch-house; he was dressed in a fustian coat - I am certain the handkerchief is nine - I had bought it at Brighton - it had two initials on it.

EDWARD JONES DAVIS . I live with Mr. Witherby, a Solicitor, of Nicholas-lane. I was on Holborn-hill, and saw the prisoner put his hand into Mr. Farraway's pocket, and draw the handkerchief out; there was a great crowd near the watch-house; I could not see whether any body was in his company; Mr. Farraway laid hold of him directly.

SAMUEL HEINSON . I am a constable, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. (written) On the day in question, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing at Mr. Parr's door, waiting for a situation, having paid the necessary fee; there was a mob on the opposite-side; I crossed over, and saw a silk handkerchief lay on the ground - I took it up, and held it in my hand; a person owned it, and I gave it to him directly.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-40

40. SARAH CORNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 2 boxes, value 8s.; 1 gold neck-chain, value 15l.; 1 gold ornament, value 4l.; 1 pair of diamond ear-rings, value 50l.; 2 diamond rings, value 18l.; 2 topaz rings, value 6l. 16s.; 1 gold ring, value 2l. 10s.; 1 shirt-pin, value 4l.; 7 table-spoons, value 7l.; 6 silver forks, value 6l.; 5 knife-handles, value 2l.; 1 pair of epaulets, value 3l. 15s.; 1 silver ornament, value 10s.; 8 silver buttons, value 20s.; 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 comb, set with chrysolite, value 13l. 4s.; 1 silver thimble, value 2s.; 1 silver key, value 2s.; 1 musical snuff-box, value 50s.; 2 topaz stones, value 20s.; 7 silver buckles, value 10s.; 1 silver skimmer, value 13s.; 2 gold crosses, value 18s.; 1 guard-chain, value 5s.; 1 hair neck-chain, value 10s.; 3 ozs. of silver, value 12s.; 1 oz. of gold, value 2l.; 25 doubloons, value 82l. 10s.; 51 dollars, value 10l. 12s. 6d.; 14 other dollars, value 2l. 18s.; 1 gold coin, value 20s.; 13 foreign coins, value 20s., and 30 sovereigns , the property of John Peter Latzou .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

CAROLINE ANN LATZOU . I am the wife of John Peter Latzou; he is a Swede - I am an English woman; we arrived in town on the 11th of October, from the Brazils, and went to lodge at the prisoner's house, No. 36, Edmond's-place, Aldersgate-street ; we took four large trunks there, with a bed and basket; in one of the trunks, was a smaller box, containing all the articles stated in the indictment. On the 13th of October, in consequence of something that took place between my husband and myself, the prisoner came into the room; this property at that time was all spread on the table; the trunks were then all in the front-room; in consequence of what happened that day, I moved the small trunk, containing the property, under the pillow that night; it was locked, but the key was tied to the handle - I continued in the lodgings till the 20th of October - I kept the box under the pillow day and night, till then; we left in consequence of a disturbance with the prisoner - I made the bed myself, and saw the box safe every morning - I saw it under the pillow about half-past seven o'clock on the 20th, when I got up - I and my husband quitted the lodgings about ten minutes before eight o'clock; we took away every thing, except the small trunk, which I forgot, as the prisoner was quarrelling with me; we moved to No. 5, Princes-street, Ratcliff-highway, and ten minutes after I got there, I opened one of the large boxes, and seeing the vacancy in it, I recollected I had not taken the trunk from under the pillow - I returned directly, the prisoner opened the door to me - I said, "Mrs. Cornell, will you give me leave to go up stairs, for I have left my small box here, with all my property?" I got back there within three quarters of an hour, or an hour; she said, "Oh, Ma'am, walk up stairs, there has no one been up, only myself;" she went up with me - I took the pillow off, and saw the vacancy where the box had been, but the box was not there - I said, "Oh, Ma'am, I left my box here, will you please to give me my box again?" she said no one had been up stairs but herself, not even the woman, whom she had sent for to clean the carpet, had been there; but I was a silly woman, and ought to have taken better care of my property; and if it had been her's, she would have taken better care of it - I said, "Be so kind as to give me my property back, for it is all I have;" she said, "Go along, go along - you ought to have taken better care of it" - I went down, and said, "If you don't give it me by good means, I will make you give it me" - I went back, told my husband, and went with him to the Mansion-house; two officers went to search the house, but they went without a warrant; they did search, but found nothing - I went back with my husband to my new lodgings, and there saw the witness Anderson.

Q. When you went to the prisoner's, with the officers, in what state was the bed? A. All tossed over - I had taken off the top-sheet myself, to show her what kind of sheet she had put on, but I had not touched the lower sheet; but on my return, the lower sheet and the pillow were tossed about - I asked Anderson to go to Mrs. Cornell to get my property: he went, but did not succeed - I had the prisoner apprehended that day week - Mrs.

Satchell, a witness, was apprehended with her - I gave this account to the Magistrate - I have not recovered any of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you employ any body to assist in taking away your trunks? A. Yes, the carmen; they are not here; they went straight to my lodgings - I had brought the bed from the Brazils; I did not sleep on it at the prisoner's room: we slept on her bed; my husband and I went to Princes-street together - I did not tell him when I first missed it, as I thought I could get it back without his knowledge.

Q. Perhaps he thought he could get it without your's? A. No, if he had it, I had it - I have been at the Brazils ever since I was a child - I have had two husbands - I have been married a year to the last; my first husband dealt in all the produce of the country - I was a widow eleven months; my second husband came to the Brazils to seek an uncle, and he was engaged as a performer at the Imperial Theatre, and not liking the country, he asked for a licence to travel; he was not a conjuror.

Q. When you have been at words with him, have you not told him he was nothing but a conjuror? A. No.

Q. When you were quarrelling on the 13th, and this property was on the table, was not the dispute that he wanted to have part of the property, and you said "No, it is all mine, you are nothing but a conjuror, and have no right to it? A. No - he wanted three or four hundred dollars to change. I said "Don't change above one hundred," as I expected a great loss from them. I had one in my hand - he squeezed my hand to get it out - I screamed, which brought the prisoner into the room. Mr. and Mrs. Satchell also saw it. I afterwards showed her my jewels; my husband had not a pair of tongs in his hand when he squeezed my hand - he never struck me in his life - he is not able to do that; we had then slept there two nights. Whenever I went out I shut the door, and took the key with me.

Q. Did not the prisoner, or her husband, want you to pay for two weeks lodging, and you wanted to pay for but one? A. She said I had been there nine days, and should pay for two weeks. I said I did not know the rule of the country, and did not like to pay her 16s. for one night; two or three dozen spots of wax had fallen on her carpet, and gave her 2s. to pay a woman to scower it.

Q. Was not an officer called in? A. Yes - Harrison the officer came in, about a quarter of an hour before we left.

Q. Pray was part of the quarrel with your husband, that he could have no part of the property, as he had another wife? A. The quarrel has nothing to do with the robbery. I never heard that he had another wife, and never said so. I had first seen Anderson two or three days after I was in my new lodgings. I did not employ him as a friend, but as a steady man, who would speak to her, and perhaps get my property.

Q. Why not go to a Police-office? A. Because I was a stranger, and did not know much about this country. I could not speak English very well, but being an English woman I have got the language back again since; Anderson speaks English.

Q. You could talk to him? A. Very little - it was through my landlady, who speaks Portuguese - her name is Lloyd - she interpreted. I went before the Lord Mayor the day I was robbed - I spoke very bad English to him - I understood him, and could speak a few words. Two officers went to search the house. I went before the Lord Mayor again on the 20th - I did not speak then. I went to Guildhall on the 27th, I believe, to swear my deposition. Mrs. Satchell and her husband lodged in the prisoner's house - I never charged her with the robbery - she was brought up about it.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. How she was brought before the Magistrate' you do not know? A. No - I received a communication from Anderson on Monday, the 22d - in consequence of that, Satchell was arrested. I do not know whether there were any other lodgers. I only saw the prisoner's husband one night, that was on the 13th.

JOHN PETER LATZOU. I am a Swede. I was at the Brazils about two years and a half, and married my wife there about ten months ago; we arrived in London on the 11th of October, and took lodgings in Edmond's-place; I took four large trunks, a bed, and a basket with me; in one of the large trunks was a little box, with money and my wife's jewels. The prisoner was landlady of the house. On the 13th I had a quarrel with my wife - the money and jewels were then on the table; the prisoner came into the room, then Mr. Satchell, and then Mrs. Satchell; they stood by the table - I counted the money to my wife; Mrs. Cornell took my wife's bracelets off the mantel-piece.

Q. Well, in consequence of what you saw her do with the bracelets, did you suffer the small box to continue in the large one? A. No - after she left the room we placed it under the pillow; Satchell and his wife were also gone when we placed it there; we remained there nine days, and then moved to Princes-street, taking the four large trunks, the basket and bed: when we got there, on my wife going to the trunk, she came and told me, "Oh, my G-d! - we have lost all the money we have!" I have seen none of it since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you were in full dress when you and your wife had the quarrel, on the 13th, or had you any clothes on at all? A. Yes.

Q. Had you not your coat and waistcoat off when Mr. and Mrs. Satchell came up? A. Yes.

Q. Had you not your shirt off? A. I had my clean shirt in my hand; I do not recollect whether I had the tongs in my hand.

Q. Were you not beating your wife with the tongs? A. I do not understand English.

Q. Had you struck your wife with the tongs? A. No, I did not touch her with them; she called out Hoy! she did not call Murder! I swear that. I was not standing over her with the tongs in my hand; I have been engaged in the Paris Theatre, and at the Imperial Theatre, as a mechanic, trying experiments with instruments; I am not a simple performer, and do not use cards and dice - I do not show for the public. I know something to make pleasure in families; I have played at cards with a few friends.

Q. When you were quarrelling, did not your wife say you were a poor conjuror, and had no property when she married you? A. I do not remember it - I did not hear it; I do not know that she said I had a wife before at the Brazils; I do not understand it.

Q. Did not she accuse you of having left a wife behind you at the Brazils? A. No - I swear that. No officer

was called in at that quarrel - that I swear; no officer was called in on the 13th; I did not see Harrison that day - he came into the house on the 20th, the day we left the lodgings - that was by my desire; I had no quarrel with my wife that day; we left the house about a quarter of an hour after he came: I do not know who called the officer in. I went out to fetch two carmen to take my property off, and when I came back Harrison was there - I did not call him in, nor did my wife, to my knowledge. I swear I did not hear Harrison tell the prisoner the sooner she got rid of us the better.

Q. Did you not send Anderson to Mrs. Cornell, to say you and your wife were sorry for the way you had behaved to her? A. No; I sent him to tell her to give the property back - I said nothing about bad conduct.

MRS. LATZOU re-examined. I sent Anderson to the prisoner, to tell her to be so kind as to give my property back, as I had lost all, and, being in a strange country, I had nothing to exist on; I did not send any apology for misconduct.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I am an American, and by trade a bar-pilot, belonging to New Orleans, and lodge at No. 5, Princes-street - I lodge there still; I was cast away, and brought to this country by the brig Havannah, and am now under the Consul's hands. I first saw Mr. and Mrs. Latzou when they came to lodge at No. 5, Princes-street; I saw them the first day they came; I had some conversation with them on Monday, the 22d of October, and went, by their direction, to No. 36, Edmond's-place, Aldersgate-street. I saw the prisoner now at the bar - I took more particular notice of her, as I was sent on a message to her- I asked her if a Mrs. Coleman lived there; she said perhaps she was the person I was looking for, and requested to know my business; I said I was sent with a message from Mr. and Mrs. Latzou; she said, "Oh, I know your business - walk in," and observed that her name was not Coleman, but Cornell; I saw several persons there, apparently females - I did not take particular notice of any, except a young lady, whom I saw up stairs in the second floor, with the prisoner - her name is Satchell: the prisoner desired me to follow her up stairs, and showed me a large room, containing a round table, and a small bed-room, stating they were the rooms which Mr. and Mrs. Latzou had occupied.

Q. Did you tell her what you came for? A. I said I was sent on a message from them; she did not wait to hear the message, but asked me up stairs (after running up), and desired me to search - I said I was not sent for that purpose, but only to know from her if she had found a small box belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Latzou, and whether she would return it or not - I was then standing in the large room, but very near the door of the smaller room; Mrs. Cornell was backwards and forwards; and a little time after, as I stood in the large room, I heard a conversation take place between her and another woman - (as it was a female voice) I could distinguish very well that the prisoner was one of the persons talking; I could not see the other person's face, but it was a woman, by her dress and voice; although they were speaking in a low voice, I heard very plainly every word that passed: they were in the small room; the door was open: I heard the other woman say to the prisoner, "It will be better for you to return the box, for I see plainly it will cause a great deal of trouble, and disgrace upon your family and house." I heard Mrs. Cornell reply, "Oh, it is now gone too far - it cannot be brought back," she then turned her head, and looked over her shoulder at me, as I stood very close, in fact, nearly in the door of the small room, looking at her and the other woman; she then caught the woman by her arm, and said, "But stop a little;" she then came out into the large room, and inquired if I had any former acquaintance with Mr. and Mrs. Latzou; I said I never had seen them till they came to the house where I lodged, but I understood, from their conversation and appearance that they were foreigners, and I did not think it was their intention to remain long in London, or in the country - she then went back into the small room, and in a short time returned with a small net purse in her right hand, laying it on the table - it appeared to contain small gold coins, as if it was sovereigns - she said, "My good man, I will give you fifty sovereigns if you will go and say to Mrs. Latzou that no discovery can be made, nor any evidence produced concerning their property, and persuade them to leave the country, and say no more about it" - I observed to the prisoner now at the bar, that I was a stranger in this country, and was afraid of being led into any trouble or difficulty - she assured me if I would follow her directions, she would stand between me and any trouble or difficulty, observing, that I was a poor man, and fifty sovereigns would be of great service to me - I then said, I was willing to do any thing for her that laid in my power, as a servant, but that I understood from the conversation I had heard between my landlady and Mrs. Latzou, that she was an English woman, born in London, and had an uncle and some very respectable friends or relations in this City - she then desired me to go quickly, and bring the address of this uncle, for she wished to know who and what he was, and she would pay me well for my trouble - I then went home - Mr. and Mrs. Latzou were not there, I inquired of the landlady who their relations were; I brought the direction to Mrs. Cornell's house, and delivered it to her - she received me very kindly - gave me a chair to sit down, &c. and asked me to have any thing to drink - she gave me some drink in the small room below stairs, where I saw the same young lady, sitting at tea, whom I had seen up stairs with the prisoner in the morning, accompanied by a young gentleman - after taking the refreshment, I left the house, Mrs. Cornell having first invited me to stay all night, saying, I could have a bed or any thing else - I said, being under the protection of the Consul, I could not be out at night - this conversation was in the passage; after bidding good evening she came out with me into the court, and gave me a nudge, as if she wished to say something to me in private - I followed her round to the corner of Aldersgate-street; she put two half-crowns into my hand, desiring me not to let any person whatever know what had passed between me and her - neither did she wish any person to know what money she had given me, saying, her husband was a very desperate man, and she did not wish him to know any thing of the circumstance; but for me to go home, and take particular notice what Mr. and Mrs. Latzou were talking about, to find out how they intended to proceed, and return next morning and let her know, that she might know what to do, and I should be well rewarded for my

trouble; I went home, and made every circumstance known, showing the money I had received to the lodgers and to the two injured foreigners; I went next morning and saw the prisoner; she said she could not speak to me then, there were so many sharks about her house she could not go out without being watched - I might go and come again another time, and she should be very glad to see me; I left her house, and did not return till I went with the officer from Guildhall.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. That was the same day, was it not? A. No; I cannot say how long afterwards, I did not make a memorandum of the day; it might have been two or three days after; I never saw the prisoner before I was sent to her; I did not see any body in the room, except Mrs. Satchell.

Q. Was Mrs. Satchell the woman she was talking to in the inner room? A. I did not see the face of the woman, but there were but two women in either room at the time the conversation took place.

Q. She retired to the room to have private conversation with the woman? A. Yes, more to her misfortune; they both spoke loud, for I believe the prisoner is a little deaf; the door was open; she seemed to see me very sharp, and much astonished at finding me there; I did tell her I had come to make an apology for Mrs. Latzou for their behaviour; they did not send me to say so, but I recollect saying it in the course of conversation; I said so before I went up stairs; I do not believe any person saw the purse put down besides myself, for nobody else was in the room; it was in the large room; I suppose she offered me the fifty sovereigns because I had heard the conversation, for she seemed much astonished to find me so near; one room opens into the other.

Q. She talked loud enough for you to hear, and then offered you fifty sovereigns? A. It seemed so; the fact was she wished to bribe me not to say any thing, after finding I had heard the conversation; I refused fifty sovereigns, and took 5s.; I was well aware if I took the fifty sovereigns she would have made an instrument of me; I am under the American Consul's care; under his hands, the gentlemen in his office know me by sight; I do not suppose they know my general character; I never attempted to defraud them; I know Mr. Le Suth; I do not know Mr. Hughes by name; Mr. Lloyd is the landlord of the house where I live; he boards all the men, and clothes them.

JOHN SATCHELL . I lodge at No. 6, John-street, Mileend-road. On the 13th of October I lodged in the prisoner's house, and had been there about three months; I remember Latzou and his wife coming to lodge there; I heard a quarrel the day they went away, and after they were gone I went up into their front room with Mrs. Cornell; I attempted to go into the inner room, but Mrs. Cornell shut the door in my face; this was between a quarter and half an hour after they had left; when she shut the door, she said I had better not go in there, for the place stunk; I mentioned this to my wife, and went out in about twenty minutes; Mrs. Cornell had gone out twice previous to that, and I met her in Newgate-street; she appeared very much flurried, and wished me to call at the Swan Inn, Holborn bridge, to tell her husband she wanted him; she had asked me if I was going by there; I called and left the message.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go up into their room on the 13th, when there was a quarrel? A. Yes - Mrs. Latzou was crying out apparently in pain, and wanting assistance. I went up and burst the door open being the only male in the house. I thought it right to go up - the door was not locked; as I entered, the prosecutor was standing with his back to me - he had neither shirt, coat, nor waistcoat on. I saw nothing in his hands, but there was a great deal of confusion - he might have had something without my observing him; after seeing him in this state, my wife came up - he then retired to the inner room, and came out with a clean shirt on; his wife appeared in great distress - she said he was a conjuror, and had married her for her money - she said that to his face, before the quarrel was settled; she did not positively accuse him of being married, but she said she believed he had other wives, or something to that effect; she did not say that she knew it; she mentioned several times that he had been a conjuror - whether she meant that as a slight, I cannot tell. Mrs. Cornell was flurried, and there was such a disturbance that Harrison, the officer, was sent for.

Q. She said the room had a bad smell - was not part of her complaint, that they had left the room in filth and grease? A. Certainly it was - the grease was in the front room. I never heard any thing said about the back room; they had my wife taken up - she was discharged.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. When there was the quarrel on the 13th, did you see any property on the table? A. I did, a vast quantity that astonished me - dollars and doubloons; in fact a large round table was covered with them nearly. Mrs. Cornell came up after me.

COURT. Q. Was Harrison, the officer, sent for on the 13th, or on the day they left the lodgings? A. On the day they left, not on the 13th.

SARAH SATCHELL . I am the wife of the last witness. I was taken on this charge. I was present on the 13th, when the prosecutor and his wife quarrelled - I went up. I saw silver, gold, and trinkets of different sorts on the table. I was in the room with Mrs. Cornell on the 20th. and remember Anderson coming there. I saw Mrs. Cornell go out with him the second time he came.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. She went out at the same time as him? A. Yes - she came back in about ten minutes, or not so much; it was the prosecutrix's screams that took me up on the 13th - we thought her husband would hurt her - she called Murder! I believe; I think the prosecutor had the tongs in his hand - they talked in their own language a good deal about their property and jewels. I heard her say he wanted to take away her property, and spend it in his own extravagancies; she told him she was not his only wife - that he wished to take all her money from her, and had brought her into a strange land for that purpose. I did not hear her say any thing about her having respectable friends, who would see her righted, or about an uncle in Winchester-street. On the day they left, the prisoner told them they had made the rooms very dirty, and dropped the tallow about the carpet; the woman said "If you say a word about paying for two weeks, when we have been here but nine days, we will stay two weeks, and spoil every piece of furniture;" this was said down stairs - the husband was not present; the prisoner was obliged to call Harrison in. I was present when they

went away. I did not see the prosecutrix pull her bed clothes off.

Q. Do you remember, some time after this an American coming? A. Yes - he said in the passage, that he had come to make an apology for their bad behaviour. I went up stairs at the same time as him and Mrs. Cornell. I was not in the room all the time he was there. I was in the bed-room with Mrs. Cornell - Anderson was in the bed-room also. I could see him there - there was no other woman in the bed-room. Mrs. Sparkes was sitting on the sofa. I was the person Anderson saw in the bed-room with Cornell - she did not address herself to me.

Q. Did you say to her, "You had better give up the box, for it will bring you and your family into trouble?" A. I did not say any thing of the sort, nor did I hear any thing of the kind mentioned; the prisoner did not say"It is gone too far now, it cannot be brought back," nor any thing of the kind - she did not utter a single word tending to show she had any guilty knowledge of the box. I was taken up as accessory to the robbery afterwards, and was bailed. I heard Anderson examined before the Alderman, and said all he had said about me was false; also all that he had said of the prisoner, as far as I had any knowledge of it; he said I was the person with whom the conversation took place in the bed-room - not a word he has stated did take place.

COURT. Q. When Anderson was there, did you hear your husband say any thing in the prisoner's presence about the box? A. I do not recollect hearing him say any thing; the prisoner is rather deaf, and more so sometimes that others. I was not in the room all the time Anderson was there; my husband came in and called me down - I left the prisoner in the room; she never spoke while I was there.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, on the 26th of October, at her house in Edmond's-place - I searched her, she produced a leather and a bead purse, and in the bead-purse, I found this direction (reads)"Mr. De Cavello, merchant, No. 6, Great Winchester-street," which Anderson stated the prisoner had given him 5s. for obtaining - I have not inquired whether such a person lives there.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . This is the direction a young gentleman gave me - I took the name my landlord gave me, and went to the office of a gentleman, who gave me this direction. I gave it to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is Mrs. Satchell the woman who held the conversation in the bed-room which you have spoken of? A. I saw her in the bed-room - I do not say she is the identical person who conversed with the prisoner - I did not see any other person in the bed-room, but I did not take particular notice, till I heard the conversation; I then stepped very close to the door, but had no opportunity of observing the person's face, but I took very particular notice to see if a third person besides myself was in either room, but I could see nobody but the woman the prisoner was conversing with.

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to say, I know nothing whatever of their property.

HANNAH SPARKES . I am acquainted with the prisoner, and was at her house on the 22d of October, when Anderson came; I went up stairs with Mrs. Cornell and him; nobody, to the best of my knowledge, except Mrs. Cornell and him went into the bed-room - I sat on the sofa, and did not see Mrs. Satchell go in.

Q. Did you say, or hear any body else say, "You had better restore the property, or it will bring great disgrace on your house and yourself?" A. Never; nothing of the kind passed, nor was it said the thing had gone too far, and could not be recalled - I was in the large room with Mrs. Cornell and him all the time; no purse of gold was produced.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. You are positive no person went into the bed-room, but him and Mrs. Cornell? A. No - Mrs. Satchell stood against the bed-room door; the sofa is in the front room, close to the bed-room door - I could see into the bed-room as I sat there.

COURT. Q. If any body had said, "You had better return the box, or it will bring you into trouble or disgrace," must you have heard it? A. Even if the door had been shut, I could hear almost every word, but it was open - I swear no such conversation took place.

JULIUS LE SUTH . I hold a situation in the American Consul's office. I know Anderson; I would not believe him on his oath.

COURT. Q. What induces you to say so? A. Because he has told me he was willing to swear to many things, which I knew to be totally false.

JOHN LLOYD . I am employed in the American Consul's office. I think I should believe Anderson on his oath.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-41

41. SARAH CORNELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 pair of bracelets, value 20s. , the goods of John Peter Latzou .

CAROLINE ANN LATZOU . On the day I quarrelled with my husband these bracelets were on the mantel-piece; the prisoner came up between two and three o'clock- I heard my husband say to her, "What have you in your hand?" she said, "What do you mean, I don't understand you?" he said, two or three times, "Give me my wife's bracelets, which you have in your hand;" she said,"What do you mean, what do you say?" and then doubled up a small carpet, shook it three or four times, and let the bracelets fall - I picked them up, and took them; she thought they were diamond bracelets - Mrs Satchell saw them in her hand.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When the officer came, did you say, "She has robbed me of my bracelets? A. No - I made no complaint of it - I staid there nine days - I did not wish to do anything - I did not mention this to the Magistrate.

SARAH SATCHELL . I was present, but did not see the bracelets taken - I saw them in the prisoner's hand; she would not own that she had them in her hand; but as she stooped to take up the rug, which had been folded up, I saw them in her hand; she took hold of the rug, and shook them out - I heard nothing said about her stealing them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did it not appear to you, that she had picked them up? A. No - she sent for the officers herself on the 20th; nobody charged her with stealing the bracelets. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-42

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

42. EDWARD PERDEY was indicted for that he, at the General Delivery of the gaol of the County of Surrey, holden at Guildford, in the said County, on Monday, the 17th of July, in the 7th year of his present Majesty's reign, was in due form of law convicted on a certain indictment, for stealing, on the 3d of July, in the 7th year aforesaid, at St. Mary, Lambeth, 1 sugar-basin, value 2l.; 1 ladle, value 3s.; 2 spoons, value 7s.; 4 bottle-lables, value 4s.; 2 bottle-stands, value 10s.; 2 candlesticks, value 5s.; 1 silver waiter, value 5l., and 4 yards of damask, value 20s., the goods of Richard Salisbury, in his dwelling-house, and was thereupon ordered to be hanged by the neck till he should be dead; and afterwards, at the same Gaol Delivery, his Majesty having been pleased to extend the Royal Mercy to him, on condition of being Transported for Seven Years, he was ordered to be transported accordingly, - and that the said Edward Perdey afterwards, on the 3d of December , in the 8th year of his present Majesty's reign, feloniously was at large without lawful cause, at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, otherwise Stepney , before the expiration of the said term for which he had been so ordered to be transported, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, that at the General Delivery of the Gaol of Surrey, holden at Guildford, on Monday, the 17th of July, in the 7th year of his present Majesty's reign, he was ordered to be Transported for Seven Years, and that the said Edward Perdey afterwards, on the 3d of December, in the 8th year aforesaid, feloniously was at large, at St. Dunstan, Stebouheath, otherwise Stepney, without lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term for which he had been so ordered to be transported, against the statute.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18271206-43

43. JOHN CAVANAH was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Hussey , in the King's highway, on the 30th of November , at St. Giles in the Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 bag, value 3s. 6d., and 1lb. of tea, value 8s. , the goods of the said John Hussey.

JOHN HUSSEY. I am shopman to Messrs. Eagleton and Co., grocers and tea-dealers, of Newgate-street. On Friday, the 30th of November, about ten minutes after eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the neighbourhood of St. Giles' - I had a bag, containing about 1 1/2lb. of tea; there were also several receipts, and a letter of license, in the bag. I was in George-street - I now know that is the name of the street - I asked the prisoner and some others, who were standing together in George-street, the way to Mr. Boyle's, a publican, who I was going to, and who lived in the neighbourhood; on my asking the prisoner the way, he said, if I turned down there, pointing to a turning, that Boyle's was close by; I was going away, and directly I moved the prisoner laid hold of my bag; he took hold of it by the end - I had the string of it twisted round my wrist; he tried to take it from me, and I collared him with my left hand - I then received a blow from one of the men who was with him; I was knocked down with sticks; the other men had sticks, but the prisoner had no stick; I received a blow on the head from a stick, which knocked me down; I still kept the prisoner - I did not let him go - I kept hold of the bag also; we got up together - I still held him, and at last I could not hold him any longer; he took the bag away: I called Watch, and Stop thief! and followed him till he was caught, and never lost sight of him; I do not know what became of the bag - I do not know what he did with it; there were from twelve to twenty men; I suppose I received about one hundred blows altogether, and had my hat cut.

Q. Then there was a good deal of struggling with you and the prisoner, and at last they got the better of you? A. Yes. I never lost sight of him, and swear positively he is the man - here is my hat.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Who has had the hat ever since? A. The officer - I gave it him two or three days afterwards, but I showed it the same night; the officer told me to take care of it - I was not drunk; I had been drinking certainly; I never saw the prisoner before to my knowledge - I knew Boyle before.

Q. Had you not been to his house often before? A. No- about twice in my life; I will swear I have not been there more than three times.

Q. Were you not so drunk that you did not know the way? A. I did not know the neighbourhood - I might not go there above once in four years.

Q. You say you had one hundred blows - did you not have more? A. I might; I did not beat the prisoner - I was obliged to let him go; we caught him just by Boyle's, which is only round the corner, down the next street; I did not lose sight of him in turning the corner - I followed him, calling Stop thief!

Q. Well, but you were surrounded by twelve or twenty men? A. Yes, but they let me go directly he got away: I swear I never lost sight of him from the time I was knocked down till he was secured; I never lost sight of him from the time the bag was taken; I did not see what he did with the bag: I looked at him, and when I caught him he had not got it; I do not know what he did with it.

COURT. Q. Although you had been drinking, had you all your faculties about you? A. I had - I was able to run after him.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in this neighbourhood, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I sprung my rattle - I was in Buckeridge-street, at the end of Lawrence-lane; I came up after it was pretty well all over - I heard the cry of Stop thief! in Lawrence-lane; I made towards the spot, and found the prisoner struggling with Hussey, and a great crowd of people round him; he tore the prisoner's coat very much, and his own coat was torn also; I had seen the prisoner running, but the prosecutor took him before I got up to him - he was the first of those who were running, and was taken by the prosecutor just before I got up; there was a chase before that, and he had escaped from the watchman.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not that before you got up? A. Yes; it was rather a hazey night. The prisoner was not in custody of a watchman when I came up; I did not see him ill-used; he said to me, "See how they have torn my coat;" he had nothing with him.

COURT. Q. Did the prosecutor appear much injured, and his hat cut? A. He had his hat cut, as it is now, and the prisoner's coat was torn.

THOMAS BOYLE . I keep a public-house in Church-street. I did not know that Hussey was coming to me; I was standing five doors from my own house in Church-street, and heard a watchman cry out Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running - he did not pass me; he came and hit me in the left breast, and turned me round; I put my arm out as I turned round, and caught him by the neck: the prosecutor and the watchman took hold of him almost at the same time; he asked me to let him go - he said, "For God's sake, let me go."

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had done nothing? A. No, he did not; I did not see Fagan.

Q. Did he not come up till after the prisoner was taken? A. No - but I understand the prisoner was rescued from the prosecutor; I have known the prosecutor since he was two years old - I do not suppose he had been to my house above three times.

Q. Did he not know your house very well? A. I dare say he did.

GRIFFITH JONES . I am a watchman of St. Giles'. On Friday night, the 30th of November, I was in George-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! several times; I ran up George-street, and met the prisoner coming up Ivy-street into George-street - I struck him with my stick, and told him to stop, for I knew him very well, and certainly would have him; but he ran up the street still - I followed - Boyle was coming up the street, and stopped him; he said, "I have got him;" Hussey came up - he took hold of him on one side, and I on the other; we took him towards the watch-house - he made a sudden pull back, and the mob rescued him from me; I sprung my rattle, and Fagan came up and took him; I knew him before very well.

Cross-examined. Q. How many people were running besides the prisoner? A. There was not one coming down Ivy-street - there were people coming down George-street, as if to meet him, but none were running in the same direction as the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness to call.

JOHN TYSON . I live at No. 68, New Compton-street, Soho, and am a journeyman bricklayer; I am always in employ - I work for Mr. Meux, the porter-brewer; I have been in his employ for six years, and am so now. I have seen the prisoner as I was going up and down the street, in my employ - I only know him by sight; I am not acquainted with him. I am allowed a pot of beer at the Two Brewers public-house, in George-street, every day; and on the 30th of November I saw the prosecutor, as I came out, on my way home, in Buckeridge-street - I first saw him at the bottom of Bainbridge-street; he appeared a little tipsy, from what he said to the beadle; I do not mean to say he was drunk; he went down towards Buckeridge-street, and I was going on my way home. I saw him stand in the middle of the street; he had a bag under his arm; I saw two or three young men by the gas-light, apparently about my own height, behind him.

Q. Could you tell how many young men were behind him? A. Two or three, according to what I could tell; I could not swear to their persons.

Q. Are you able to tell whether the prisoner was one? A. Apparently not, by his height; the three men did not appear much taller than me; he is shorter than me.

Q. What happened to the prosecutor? A. I suppose, by his singing out Stop thief! he lost his bag; I saw nothing done to him, for I stood at the corner, but he cried Stop thief! and they all ran up the street, and there was a flustration - I stood there, and saw them run down again.

Q. Are you able to say whether the prisoner was one of the persons running? A. I would not wish to take a false oath; he was not one of the three young men that I saw.

Q. Then he was not one of those who were behind the prosecutor when he had the bag? A. No.

COURT. Q. You swear distinctly to the prosecutor being there? A. Yes; I do not know his name; he was an entire stranger to me; I could not notice the three young men so as to swear to them; I had never seen them in my life.

Q. There were only three congregated together? A. Two or three.

Q. You say, when there was a cry of Stop thief! they all ran - did only the three men run? A. The street was all in confusion; I cannot tell who the others were: a great crowd joined in the run.

Q. Did you think there was a robbery committed? A. I was so struck I did not think of it. I go to have my pot of beer in George-street every night; I go this time of year a little after six o'clock. I never heard a cry of Stop thief! in George-street before; I was so struck I could not move - I do not know what a rescue is; I know nothing of their getting a man out of custody: I am not often in George-street in the day time. I have seen the prisoner when I came up and down the street, to our shed - I do not know how often I have seen him there, perhaps twice a day; I have frequently seen him in George-street: I neither saw nor heard the prosecutor ask the way to Boyle's.

Q. Did you hear him ask any question? A. No; I saw him speaking to the street-keeper at the bottom of Bainbridge-street.

Q. Where were the three persons? A. This was in Buckeridge-street.

Q. Did you see any persons running? A. When the prosecutor called Stop thief! people came out of their houses; I cannot tell who was running first: I will swear I did not see the prisoner in George-street.

Q. Could he have been there without your seeing him? A. If he had been there he must have been in some house or other, for I am sure, if he had been there I must have known him.

Q. You saw three people in the street, and people come out of their houses - must you not have seen all the persons in the street? A. Yes, two or three behind him.

Q. Will you swear there were not twenty? A. I only saw three behind.

Q. In George-street? A. In Buckeridge-street, where the cry of Stop thief! was.

Q. You have heard where the robbery was? A. It was in Buckeridge-street where I saw the three young men behind him, and he sung out Stop thief! one end of it comes into George-street; I saw no more than three behind him.

Q. Will you swear there was not a mob of ten or twenty persons? A. My Lord, I cannot say, but I saw two or three behind him; I only say, by the gas-light, there were only two or three behind him.

Q. Will you swear, that at the corner of George-street, or where the robbery was done, that the prisoner was not one of them? A. He was not one of the two or three behind him.

Q. Will you swear he was not there? A. I swear I did not see him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is not the Two Brewers Messrs. Meux's house? A. Yes, it is; I do not know that Mr. Meux knows me personally, but the firm do; I work in most of their houses.

Q. Did you distinctly see the two or three persons who were about the prosecutor when he had his bag? A. I saw two or three behind him, but to swear who took it I cannot.

Q. Will you swear the prisoner was, or was not, in George-street? A. I swear I did not see him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18271206-44

Before Mr. Recorder.

44. ROBERT COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 2 tons weight of iron, value 14l., the goods of Alexander Galloway , his master ; and GEORGE DAVIDSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. A. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. RICHARD GALLOWAY. I am the son of Mr. Alexander Galloway, and assist him in his business; the prisoner Davidson was employed by my father as a clerk ; it was part of his duty to receive all materials which came to the premises, weigh them, see that they corresponded with the delivery notes, and enter them in the book; Coleman was our carman ; I have no share in the business - my father has no partner. On the 25th of October, Coleman was employed to fetch some iron from Crawshaw's yard, in Upper Thames-street, and bring it to our manufactory in West-street, Smithfield; in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Llewellyn's premises, the Waterloo Foundry, Cow-cross, near St. John's-street - I believe it is in the City: I saw some Langley-field pig-iron there - it is the same sort of iron as was to be brought from Crawshaw's; we had never sold any of it to Llewellyn, nor any kind of iron; he was not a customer of ours; in consequence of this, I had some conversation with Davidson; I did not hold out either threat or promise to him; I taxed him with having sold to Mr. Llewellyn two tons weight of this Langley-field pig-iron; he admitted it; he said he had sold it to Mr. Llewellyn, and it was in consequence of his being involved in difficult circumstances; that he had sold it for, I think, 6l. a ton - the market price was about 8l.; he said he had received 4l. from Llewellyn on account. Coleman's cart was employed all day, on the 25th of October, in bringing iron from Crawshaw's wharf; I gave him the order myself - it is necessary I should say, that when we have a lot of iron at a wharf, I merely order it to be fetched up till it is all removed; a two-horse cartload would be two tons. or two tons and a half; he had two horses that day; I know Davidson's hand-writing -(looking at a book) - this is his hand-writing; here is an entry of iron, on the 25th of October, from Crawshaw's - it is 19 tons, 7 cwt., 2 qrs., and 12 lbs. - that is the total quantity he has entered as brought on the 24th.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you conversed with Davidson, did you say, "Why, Sir, here is something awkward, and it will be better for you to tell the truth?" A. I do not recollect having said so; I think I can swear I did not; I certainly did not hold him out any inducement - it was quite unnecessary; I say I held him out no promise or threat whatever.

Q. Did you say he was in a bad scrape, and had better tell the truth? A. I really do not think I said any thing af the sort; I will swear to neither one nor the other, but, to the best of my recollection, I did not say it would be better for him.

COURT. Q. Can you tell us all that passed between you? A. The moment the information was communicated to me, and I had made the necessary inquiries, the cart(which was then employed to bring iron from another wharf,) was entering the yard; I called Davidson into the counting-house; I desired him to bring his book, and show me how many loads of iron had been brought into the yard by Coleman that morning; he brought his book, and stated that only two had been brought in; I then asked him whether he meant the one in the yard to be the second or third, and he admitted that to be the second; I then asked him whether he had not given Coleman orders to take a load into St. John's-street, and he admitted that he had; I asked him by whose authority, and he admitted that he had received no instructions from myself, my father, or brothers, to that effect; I then asked him whether he and Coleman had agreed together, why the iron should be left at Dobell's yard, or whether he was to give him any thing.

COURT. Q. This relates to another indictment? A. Yes; he then said he had given him orders to take two tons odd to Dobell's yard, on the previous week, of this Langley-field iron and that he had given Coleman 2l. as a share of the plunder.

Q. Have you told us all you said to him before he told you this? A. Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You said before, that you would not swear you had not said it would be better for him to tell the whole truth - have you still a doubt whether you held him out any inducement? A. I will undertake to swear I held him out no threat or promises previous to the conversation I have now stated.

MR. C. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you undertake to swear that, at any time during the conversation, you did not say something to this effect, that he was in trouble, and it would be better for him to tell all about it? A. I really believe I said nothing of the sort - I swear positively I did not say any thing to that effect, previous to the conversation I have just stated.

Q. Can you tell at what period of the conversation you might have said it? A. I do not admit that it occurred at all; I will not undertake to swear on so trivial a thing, because it might have been said by me, though, to the best of my recollection, I did not say it at all - I will swear I did not say it previous to the conversation I have stated; if I did say it, it must have been after the facts were before him in such a way, that nothing but downright lies would have excused him.

COURT. Q. Can you say that before he said any thing about the entries in his book, you did not say it would be better for him to tell the truth about it? A. I will.

MR. A. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he say any thing of the entries of the quantity brought on the 25th? A. He admitted that two tons had been sold to Llewellyn; I said to him you have ordered Coleman to leave a load of iron at Dobell's yard, by whose authority did you do so; he admitted it was by no authority; I asked if he had not

ordered Coleman to leave two tons odd of Langley-field iron last week; he admitted that he had, and by nobodys authority; and he admitted that the two tons odd formed part of the nineteen tons which he had entered in the book, as having arrived in the yard.

Q. A short time after this, I believe, you saw Coleman? A. Yes; in a minute afterwards, I asked if he had left a load of iron that morning at Dobell's yard; he said he had, and by Mr. Davidson's order: I asked if had received any thing for delivering that iron at Dobell's; he at first said Mr. Davidson had lent him 1l.; I asked if Davidson had not given him the 1l.; he said No, and equivocated very much; he said at last that he had received 2l. from Davidson; I then asked whether he had not delivered, in the previous week, a load of iron at Dobell's - that was the iron in question - he then said he had delivered a load of Langley-field iron on the previous week at Dobell's, and by Davidson's order - I then asked why he had not mentioned it to me that he had delivered it, as he must know there was something wrong in it, and if he had any delivery note from Mr. Davidson - he said No, and that he was going to mention it to me - I asked why he allowed such a length of time to pass without mentioning it, it being upwards of ten days - he did not answer, and the conversation ended.

Q. Was it usual for the carmen to deliver goods before they came to the premises, with or without an order? A. Never without a delivery note and a receipt - we never sent iron out without its being previously weighed, and in two instances this was not weighed, as it was drawn away from the wharf; it should be weighed at the wharf, if taken from there, and if from our place it should be weighed there; Coleman had been our carter eighteen months, or near two years, and understood the business perfectly well.

Cross-examined by MR. C. PHILLIPS. Q. Had not Davidson a superior situation to that of Coleman? A. Certainly.

Q. Why did you ask if he had given him orders, if he had not power to order him? A. If I am engaged I cannot go out to give the carmen orders, and Davidson sometimes did; I did not ask Coleman whether he had delivered iron at Dobell's, but if had not delivered it, it was for him to deny it; he said at once that he had.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When does the iron become your property? A. When it is invoiced to us - it is ours when it is at the wharf; this iron was bought by us from Crawshaw's yard; I believe I was present at the purchase; the party who sold it put the order into my hands, for Crawshaw's to deliver it to us; it was my father's property when it lay at the wharf.

Q. Then had not Davidson a power to direct the carmen to take it away? A. After I had issued orders to that effect; I myself ordered Coleman to bring it all from Crawshaw's to our yard; if contrary directions had been afterwards given, there would have been a written order delivered to the carman.

Q. How long, in the common way of business, would the iron have been removing from the yard? A. That depends upon how we are engaged.

Q. Should you expect to see it there in less than a week or ten days? A. No, if the carts were otherwise employed - if Davidson ordered it elsewhere in that time, the carman had no authority to take it without a written order.

Q. Davidson had power to order him to move it? A. He had the power of seducing the carman; he had the power to order; I do not say he had a right.

WILLIAM COWDERY . I am servant to Mr. Dobell, a publican, of St. John's-street, the corner of Peter's-lane; he has a yard in Peter's-lane, for killing cattle, and stable room, which he lets out; in October I saw a cart load of iron brought to master's yard, by the prisoner Coleman, and shot down - it was Mr. Galloway's cart - I asked Coleman why he brought it there, as there was never any there before; he said a gentleman would be there presently who belonged to it; he put it into the middle part of the yard; it remained there nearly a week; nobody came about it, till Mr. Llewellyn called with his carman, and took it away in a cart.

Cross-examined by MR. C. PHILLIPS. Q. Coleman brought the iron in Mr. Galloway's cart? A. Yes; I saw the name on it; it came about eleven o'clock in the day; every body coming to the yard must have seen it - there was no concealment about it.

ISAAC DOBELL . I keep the Black Bull public-house. St. John's-street, Smithfield, my yard is in Peter's-lane, which is in Middlesex; one morning, about the middle of October, I saw several pigs of iron in the middle of the yard; Davidson and Llewellyn were at my house between seven and eight o'clock on the morning, after I saw the iron there; Llewellyn said, in Davidson presence, that he had been up my yard, and bought some iron; I said I could not think whose iron it was, I could not think who took the liberty of putting it there; Davidson said, "It is my iron - I thought you would have no objection to my putting it there, as you have plenty of room;" I never had iron there before; I have beasts and bacon, and carts kept there.

WILLIAM LLEWELLYN . I live at No. 13, Greenhill's-rents, and am an iron-founder; my foundery is in Cow-cross - I know Davidson - I met him in Cow-cross, on Wednesday, the 31st of October; he said, "Llewellyn, do you want any iron?" I said, "What, do you deal in pig-iron?" he said he had got some pig-iron, which he had taken for a bad debt - I asked where it was; he said,"Up in Dobell's yard" - I said I would go and look at it; he went with me, and pointed it out; it is what we call No. 2 iron, and marked "Langley-field" - I asked what he wanted for it; he said, 6l. a ton - I said, "I have got iron at 6l. a ton, which will answer my purpose, at six months' credit" - I agreed to give him 5l. 10s., and to pay him next week; he asked if I could not give him a part then, as he was very short of money, and was fitting up a shop - I gave him two sovereigns, and on the Saturday following, he called, and I gave him two more - I have used some of the iron - Mr. Galloway has seen what was left.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before you bought it had you this conversation? A. We went straight to the yard.

MR. GALLOWAY. I went to Llewellyn's yard, and saw some Langley-field iron; it was the kind of iron we were removing from Crawshaw's; it corresponded in quality with what we have received.

Coleman put in a written defence, which is stated in the subsequent case, p. 44.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-45

45. WILLIAM CUTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 gelding, price 50l. , the property of James Abraham Richmond .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES ABRAHAM RICHMOND. Near the beginning of April last I sent a dark brown gelding to the marshes in the Isle of Dogs , to feed - I did not see it there myself; it was under the care of Lawrence, the farrier, before it went there; I had all its four legs blistered round - I heard a few days afterwards that it was gone - I had information from Mr. Peck early in November - I then went to Gosport, and saw my mare in the possession of Mr. Alexander, in his stables - I am certain it is mine; there were two more mares there - I had no difficulty whatever in pointing it out - I was certain of it, the moment I got into the stable; in consequence of what Alexander told me, I found the prisoner in custody in town, about Mr. Peck's horses - I made a charge against him at Worship-street; the horse was produced there, and I have seen it this morning in the Court-yard.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you saw it this morning, did you examine it carefully? A. I did- it has three white legs and one black.

Q. Three white legs? A. Part black; the near hindleg and the off-legs are both black - I never advertised it, and do not know of its having been advertised - I never described it at the office - I described it to some friends, who did not know it, in case they should meet such a one - I never described it, in order to have it advertised, and never said that only the near hind-leg was white - I sent it to the Isle of Dogs, on the 6th of April, I think - I mentioned the date at Worship-street - I had had it between one and two years; it was eight or nine years old I suppose - I know Gunn, of Stepney - I did not tell him to advertise it - I had some conversation with him about it, but did not tell him, that only the hind-leg was white - I expected him to make it good, as it was in his care; to the best of my knowledge, I never told him to advertise it - I will swear that I did not tell him - I never saw it advertised, and do not know that it ever was - I call it a brown gelding.

Q. Did you never call it a bay? A. Brown and bay are much alike: many people call a brown horse a bay one. I am a brewer, and keep nine or ten horses.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is Gunn the holder of the marsh in which the gelding was turned? A. He is - I expected him to make the horse good - I left it to himself whether he would advertise it or not, but never told him to do it; he never charged me for an advertisement.

PHILIP LAY . I am a farrier. Richmond's gelding was under my care - I attended it after all the four legswere blistered, for a week or a fortnight in the stable, and then took it myself to Gunn's marsh, which is in Middlesex - I should know the gelding again - I turned it on the marsh on Friday, the 6th of April, and saw it there on the Sunday following - I went on Monday, at nine o'clock, and it was gone - I have seen it twice since, at Worship-street, and in the Court-yard to day. I am sure it is the same gelding.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you worked for Mr. Richmond? A. Two or three years; I did not blister the horse, but attended to it, after it was blistered - I know it was in April, because I set it down in my pocket-book, the evening I turned it out - I turned no other horse out there in April - I call it a bay - I said no thing to Gunn about the legs, nor did I describe it at all to him, or he to me - I talked to him about its being lost - I described it at Worship-street, as a bay horse - I have never seen it advertised; the marsh is not extensive; it is partly fenced, and the other part is divided by the canal.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Could the horse have strayed there? A. No - I saw it this morning, and still think it a light bay; the horse in the yard is the one I turned out.

JURY. Q. Does the marsh lay between the road going to Greenwich? A. It is the one by Limehouse-hole; there is a gravel path by the side of the caual - I know of no other thoroughfare; there are three gates. I never saw them left open.

JOSEPH BLUNDEN . I am a farmer, and live at Brockhurst, near Gospert, in the parish of Alverstoke. I saw the gelding claimed by the prosecutor, about the middle of May - I saw the prisoner drive it in a gig on the road from Farnham to Gosport. I am sure it is the same.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you seen it before? A. Yes, when he drove it up the road; it was not more than two minutes in my sight - I did not notice the colour of its legs - I had seen it before that, in his stable, some few days, I cannot fix the date.

Q. Were you ever in trouble yourself? A. Many times; there are very few men but what are, I believe.

COURT. Q. The counsel means, have you ever been in prison, or in trouble from loss of character? A. I have never been charged with any crime in my life.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you not convicted before a Magistrate of any crime? A. I was convicted for shooting without a certificate, not for poaching.

Q. Were you never charged with any thing else before a Magistrate? A. Let me see - I do not recollect at present, I might by and by perhaps - I was taken before a Magistrate on suspicion of smuggling, but was acquitted - I was not sent to gaol; that was the only time - I was a farmer at Alverstoke a few months ago, where I was born and bred.

Q. Had you any land there? A. I lived with my mother, who held land under Mr. Potter; she has left it four years - I was working as a farmer three months ago, with Mr. Page, who has land at Alverstoke - I do not know how long I have left Brockhurst; it may be six month ago; if I have said three, I meant a few months - I will not swear how long it was - I will not swear it was not nine. I have been doing what I could since.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Are you sure the horse you saw in the prisoner's stable, is the same you afterwards saw in the possession of Alexander? A. It is the same - I assisted Alexander in treating with Mr. Lock for the purchase of it, some time in August; he lives in the same

parish - I was not present when the purchase was completed, but when it was treated for. Cutts was not present.

COURT. Q. When did you see it in the possession of Lock? A. I went to Lock's house about it, but did not see it there. Alexander treated with Lock for it - I think it was in Cutts' stable about that time. I had seen it in his stable about ten times - the same horse is in the yard now.

Q. Had you heard it described as Lock's horse? A. Not particularly this one; some of the horses in Cutts' stable were considered as Lock's; there were six or seven in Cutts' stable; they were all claimed as Lock's at the time Alexander was treating for this, because Cutts was away at the time. I believe he was away at some fair - he lived at the stable - he is a horse-dealer. Lock had many horses in Cuttss' stable, which he said were his own.

Q. Do you mean to say all the horses in Cutts' stable were claimed by Lock? A. When Cutts was away, Lock used to deal about them, but what the understanding between him and Cutts was I do not know. I never heard Lock say the horse now in the yard was his, but it is the one Mr. Alexander and I spoke to Lock about.

RICHARD ALEXANDER . I am a distiller, and live at Brockhurst, about two miles from Gosport; the horse now in the yard was formerly in my possession. I bought one of Lock the beginning of April for 23l.; it did not answer my purpose, and about the 10th of August, the one in the yard was brought to me by the prisoner; but I was changing with Lock, the horse I had of him against this, I saw the prisoner once in the transaction - he is the man who brought the horse to me, and I paid him the balance in money, as he told me, for Lock.

Q. Did he say he received the money for Lock? A. To the best of my recollection, he did - I think I am certain of it. I knew the prisoner before.

Q. Was he concerned in business with Lock? A. There is only the name of "Brown, horse-dealer" on the board, on the house - his name is Brown. Lock lives about three quarters of a mile off - I believe the stables are Brown's. Lock has premises four or five doors off - he has a house, and a little stable belonging to it, for two or three horses; the stable in which this horse was, belongs to Cutts. I told Lock I would not keep the horse I first bought, unless he had something that would suit me better; he then showed me this horse - Cutts was not present; but I had bid Cutts money for the very same horse three or four weeks before, but we could not agree about the price, and he turned the horse out I think: at all events, it was missing for some time.

Q. Did you treat with Cutts as if it was his own? A. Yes. I bid him money for it; they were both together at that time - I now recollect.

Q. You bid the money to Cutts? A. They were both together. I think, when it first came down I spoke to Cutts alone about it. I bought it on the 10th of August - it came down three weeks or a month before that - I then saw it in the hands of Cutts and Lock - they were both present - one of them rode it. I do not know whether they were in partnership - it was no concern of mine. I serve them both with beer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You dealt before this with Lock for a horse? A. Yes; he treated that as his own, and he dealt with this about the same. I know he used to keep some horses at Brown's. I let him some stables myself about a quarter of a year ago, and he still kept them - they would hold seven or eight horses; he was constantly chopping with horses. I should not have hesitated about paying him for it. I considered that I was paying Cutts for Lock; he asked me to let the money alone till after the fair. If I had had an account with Lock, I should have debitted him for the money.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where is Lock now? A. Oh, a great many people want to know that; directly Cutts was apprehended Lock went away; I took no receipt for the money; my man is here, who saw it paid; it is not very often that I do take receipts of these jockies; I paid 11l. in cash, making the horse 34l.

RICHARD HADLEY . I was horse-keeper to the prosecutor, and know the gelding to be his.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say further than that the horse was not mine; I only interfered to take the money, as there was a dispute between them; I carried the money home to him.

MR. RICHMOND. I gave 60l. for the horse.

JURY to RICHARD ALEXANDER . Q. Was Lock indebted to you at the time you purchased the horse? A. He was; I cannot tell which of the two I considered to be master of the stable; Mr. Richmond has said the horse was not worth more than 10l.

MR. RICHMOND. I did say, that at the time I turned him out, as he was blistered, he was not, to appearance, worth more than 10l.; but to me he was worth a great deal.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-46

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

46. GEORGE NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , at St. John, at Hackney, 1 mare, price 8l. , the property of Anthony Starkey .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ANTHONY STARKEY. I am a fishmonger , and live at Hackney. I have a right of pastruage in Hackney-marsh - I had a black mare, which was turned out there; I do not know when she was last safe; the last time I saw her was, I think, about the middle of October; in consequence of information, I sent Crick, my servant, into Herts, the latter end of November; he brought back a mare to me; it was the same as I had in the marsh before, and which I had lost; it was worth 8l. or 10l.

WILLIAM CRICK . I am servant to Mr. Starkey. In October he had a black mare in Hackney-marsh; I missed her from the marsh about the 13th or 14th of October; I bad seen her safe there about a week before she was missed, but am not certain of the day; my master sent me to Brickwall; I found her there, in the possession of Batten, who keeps the Angel; I took her back; I knew her to be master's mare.

THOMAS JILTHRO . I am waiter at the White Hart, Temple-mills, close by Hackney-marsh; there is a road from the marsh throughour yard; on Saturday, the 13th of October, I saw the prisoner at the bar, also Hilt, and Holden - I knew Hilt very well, and knew the prisoner very well, but did not know Holden's name; they were all walking about the marsh together - I have known the prisoner five years, and cannot be mistaken in his person; on

Monday, the 15th of October, at six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner again, with Hilt and another man, who I knew very well by sight; they had a black mare, which the prisoner was riding on - they had two horses - Hilt was riding the other - that was black also, but I could not tell whether that was a horse or a mare; there were only two horses - the third man opened the gate for them - he had no horse - he was going from the marsh.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How near were you to them in the marsh? A. They were close to me - there was nothing to conceal me from them - I was up one-pair of stairs, looking out of a window, which was down - I drew the curtain up, and was close to them - they passed on the road, underneath the window - it was day-light.

COURT. Q. In which direction did they go? A. I could not see after they left master's yard - I am sure it was Monday, the 15th of October.

JOSEPH BATTEN . I am a publican and farmer - I live at Brick wall, in Herts. On Thursday, the 18th of October, the prisoner and another person came to my house, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, and brought two mares and a gelding - the mares were both black - the other man gave me orders about the mares - he told me to turn them to grass till Saturday morning - I believe the prisoner was within hearing - while I was in the stable I asked the other man if he was disposed to sell one of the mares, not the one in question.

Q. When they went away, who mounted the gelding? A. The prisoner - the other went away first, a little before him - they had not paid for the keep of the mares - I called after them to say so, and the other man said he would come on Saturday, and pay it altogeter, but he did not come - on Sunday evening, about six o'clock, the prisoner came, and said his master, being detained late at market on Friday night, could not come down that night, but would come on Monday night or Tuesday morning, but he did not come; I asked the prisoner if he intended to go back that night - he said he thought of doing so. as he had to meet his master the next morning in Smithfield - after he had some refreshment, I asked if he was authorised to sell or exchange the mares; he said, Yes; I told him his master talked about 18l. for the other mare (not for this). but perhaps he might take less, it being out of condition; I asked if he was authorised to sell or exchange either of them - he said he was, or words to that effect; I proposed to try the other mare, (which was claimed by Mr. Mash) the following morning, but on the following morning I told him I suspected they were stolen - I had had an officer there all night; the prisoner had slept in my house that night, in the same room with the officer, and myostler, but I had not told him the man was an officer, and he did not know it. I said to him next morning, in the officer's presence, "I strongly suspect these horses are stolen, and before you leave here, you must go before a Magistrate;" as he had not come for the mares at the time appointed, I thought it my duty to go to the Magistrate, to ask what I was to do - he rather objected to go to the Magistrate; he said, "I never stole a horse in my life, and I am afraid you want to put me in the watch-house;" he said, "My master has got a relation who lives at Dyer's farm, and he will come forward and say the horses are not stolen." The horses were afterwards owned, one by Mr. Mash, and the other by Mr. Starkey; I delivered Mr. Starkey's to his servant. Knowing there was a person of the description he gave me, I let him go, but called him back when he got twenty or thirty yards, and we went before Mr. Faithful, the Magistrate; he took some depositions down in writing. The mares had not then been claimed.

Q. Now, before you went before the Magistrate, did he say any thing to you about where the mares came from? A. I asked him, and he said they came from Brentwood fair, which was held on the Monday, to Royston fair on the Wednesday.

Q. Do you mean that he and his companion came from Brentwood fair? A. He said one mare was bought at Brentwood fair, and the other at Royston; he was discharged by the Magistrate, and did not come back for the mares; neither he, nor any other person came for them - they were left with me, and afterwards claimed by Mash and Mr. Starkey's servant.

Cross-examined. Q. This is the second trial we have had about these mares? A. Yes - he was indicted for stealing the other, and acquitted.

Q. You used the term "Master" - did not Holden, who came with him, appear more respectable dressed than the prisoner? A. He was certainly more respectable than the prisoner, but not very respectable; the prisoner treated him as if he was his master all through.

Q. Did not you consider him as acting as the servant? A. Not exactly so - I asked him about his master, but, from a conversation which took place, I asked him if he was authorised to sell it, thinking he was concerned; they came to the gateway together - Holden came to the stable first.

Q. Did not Holden say one or other of them would come back? A. I think his words were "Take them to grass till Saturday morning, and we will come and take them." The prisoner was within hearing when I asked Holden if he would sell it - I afterwards asked the prisoner if he was authorised to sell it; Holden did not come back: I had been before the Magistrate about the mares, before the prisoner came back, and made it known that I suspected they were stolen.

Q. Did not the prisoner tell you he had been to several fairs, where Holden had chapped and sold horses? A. I think he said he had been with him about three months; he did not say he had been to several fairs - he said he had been with him three months, and his employment was to ride and run horses for him, as well as for other dealers; I remember his saying his father lived at a cottage at Hackney-wick; he said that before the Magistrate, and he was taken up there, I believe, but I was not present.

MR. BARRY. Q. You say, when they first came, the other acted more as master? A. Yes, but my opinion was afterwards changed; I did not make my suspicions public - I only went to the Magistrate.

COURT. Q. Did you tell other people besides the Magistrate, that you thought the horses were stolen? A. I did: he told the Magistrate one mare was bought at Brentwood fair, and the other at Royston - and I believe he said so to me, as we went to the Magistrate.

Q. After he was discharged did he give any other account? A. Not to my knowledge - he left me very soon afterwards.

JOHN VANN. I keep the White Lion public-house, Hackney-wick. I have known the prisoner four years and a half, perfectly well - I know John Holden and John Hilt- Hilt had lived with me twelve months, as ostler, and left me in September; I never knew he was a horse-dealer, and I have only heard that Holden was a horse-dealer; I do not know what business he was. During the time Hilt was in my service he attended to the the tap-room when he had time to spare; Newman and Holden occasionally came in, and they seemed very friendly together; I have seen the prisoner on the road to Hackney-marsh since Hilt left me; I suppose Holden to be about twenty-three or twenty-four years old.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you have seen hundreds on the road to the marsh? A. Yes.

CHARLES LAMPET . I am a horse-patrol, at Hackney, and have been so six months. I know the prisoner, also Holden and Hilt - Holden lived in North-street, Cambridge-heath, and Newman in Wick-lane, about half a mile from Holden - I have seen both of them frequently together with the prisoner; Hilt has been a waiter; he was not a horse-dealer, nor a stable-keeper; I know they were all three acquainted - I have been looking for Newman, Holden, and Hilt, neither of whom I could find. Newman was apprehended by another person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have not been able to find Holden? A. No; he is a thin man - he does not go respectably dressed: he has absconded. The prisoner's father's cottage is in Wick-lane - it was Goddard who took him up: his father has a family.

WILLIAM BOWYER . I live on a small income, at Hitchen, in Herts. I know the prisoner perfectly well; I saw him at Hitchen in October, but I cannot say on what day; it was near the middle, I think, and on a Thursday, to the best of my recollection; he was with a person taller than himself; I followed them into the stables of the Cock public-house, at Hitchen; they had two black mares and a poney; the other man asked me if I would buy one of the mares; the prisoner was in the stable with him, and must have heard it - my answer was, that I did not want a horse of any kind; the taller man pressed me very much to make a chap with him, if I had any horse likely to suit him; I said I had got a poney which I should be glad to part with, and would sell him, but I would not chap - he proposed going to my premises, to look at the poney, which I objected to, and sent for it, but we did not deal; I did not see them leave the town.

Cross-examined. Q. It was the taller man you treated with? A. Certainly.

WILLIAM COWLING . I am watch-house-keeper at Hackney, and know the prisoner, also Holden and Hilt; Holden lived at Cambridge-heath; I never saw any appearance of his being a stable-keeper or horse-dealer. I have known Hilt from a boy.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner as servant to Holden? A. Never; I have seen them all three together, but I look upon one to be as much master as the other.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you spoken to any body since this trial began? A. No, nor has any body spoken to me; I have not spoken to the attorney's clerk - Holden lived with his mother and father; his father has now been dead some weeks, and was something in the hay way, as a middle way between the farmer and buyer; the prisoner lived with his father, in Wick-lane, to the best of my knowledge.

JOHN GODDARD . I am a horse-patrol. I apprehended the prisoner about the 12th of November, at his father's cottage, Wick-lane. I had been looking for him for a week or more, and could not find him. I told him I apprehended him for felony, and asked what he had done with the horses which were stolen out of the marsh; he said he would tell me every thing. I said, "Mind, I don't hold out any promise," and cautioned him; he then said he went in company with Hilt in the green lanes, where be received the two horses, and took them to Enfield-highway - that he gave his right name, and might have sold the horses over and over again if he chose.

COURT. Q. Had you ever asked him what name he went by? A. I knew his name was George Newman, but his nickname was Crummy Newman.

Q. Did he say they rode off the marsh? A. Yes; we had a deal of conversation; he said he was in bed, and was called up, and accompanied Hilt and Holden into the marsh, and helped them to catch the two mares.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell one word of this on the last trial? A. I do not think I did. I expected to have been asked these questions.

Q. Did he not say, if he had any intention of stealing them, he might have sold them? A. He did - I believe. I had been looking for him frequently, past his father's house, and had been to the house and enquired of his mother - I suppose it was; she knew I was an officer very well. I found him at the house afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday, the 15th of October, Holden, my master, came to my father's house at five o'clock in the morning, and asked me to take two horses to the Red Lion public-house, Enfield-high way, and he would give me half a crown; he told me to come towards the White Hart public-house, and when I got there, these two horses were there, and Hilt; he gave me half a crown to pay the turnpike and my expences, and the rest for myself; he told me to take the horses, wait there till he came, and tell the horse-keeper to feed them, and he would pay. Hilt came with me as far as Lee-bridge-road; the ostler asked me whose they were - I said Holden's, my master, of Hackney. On the same evening, Holden came down with another horse, and told me to stop all night with him; next morning he asked me to go to Royston fair, and he would pay me for it; we went on Tuesday night, and on Wednesday he changed one away for a horse. On Thursday he left these horses at Batten's - he paid for every thing; he bought another horse about a mile and a half from Battens', and rode home; he left me that night, and on Friday night sent to me to go to Batten's, and tell him he should not come for them till Monday night, or Tuesday morning, which I did, and was taken before a Magistrate; he gave me 13s. for what I did for him.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

See page 23.

Reference Number: t18271206-47

47. ROBERT COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 5000lbs. of iron, value 14l. 10s., the goods of Alexander Galloway , his master ; and GEORGE DAVIDSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. A. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. RICHARD GALLOWAY. I am the son of Mr. Alexander Galloway, whose factory is in West-street, Smithfield; the prisoner Davidson was our clerk ; it was part of his duty to receive the iron which came into the factory, to see that it corresponded with the invoice, and enter it in a book; Coleman was our carman - it was his duty to fetch iron from the wharf. On the 6th of November he was employed in fetching iron from Messrs. Drew's wharf, Steel-yard, Upper Thames-street, to my father's premises; he brought, on the 6th of November, to my father's premises, two single horse-loads, about 25 cwt. In consequence of the information, which Mr. Carden gave me that day, I went to Mr. Dobell's yard, in St. John's-street, and from the information which I got there, I went to Llewellyn's, in Cow-cross; I then returned to our manufactory, and saw the prisoner Coleman just entering the yard with a load of iron; I called him into my father's office (this was before twelve o'clock) - I did not hold him out any promise or threat whatever; I asked how many loads of iron he had brought that morning from the Steel-yard; he said he had brought in three loads that morning - I knew myself he had brought but two, for I had seen him deliver one load, and he was then bringing another in- he had left the premises about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; he delivered one load about nine, and it was between eleven and twelve when I questioned him.

Q. Was the time taken in the delivery of these two loads more than usual? A. It certainly was considerably longer than he should have been; he said this was the third load; I denied that he had brought in two, previous to the one then in the yard; after hesitating a little, he said the one he had just brought in was only the second; I asked if he had been any where else with any iron that morning from the Steel-yard; he said he had not; I then asked whether he had not taken a load to Mr. Dobell's yard, in St. John's-street; he said Yes, he had; I asked by whose orders; he said by Mr. Davidson's; I asked whether he had received any money from Mr. Davidson for having conveyed any iron that morning by his orders; he said he had received no other money but 2l. - 1l. on the former week, and 1l. on the day before, which was Monday; he did not say what iron he had received it for, but that he had received but 2l. from Davidson: I saw Davidson, and asked him how many loads had been delivered that morning by Coleman; he also said there had been three delivered by him, and that the load then in the yard made the third; I then asked whether he had given Coleman orders to take iron to Dobell's yard; he said he had; I asked if he had given him any money for conveying that iron; he said he had given him 1l. yesterday, but I had stated the two transactions together.

Q. In what way were orders given to your carman? A. When we have a quantity of iron at the wharf, it has happened, that after I have given a written order for the delivery of the whole, that Davidson has given a verbal order for a single load; if iron was to go any where without coming to to the premises, it should be weighed at the wharf, and a delivery and receipt note made out - that is the invariable practice; Davidson said there was no note on this occasion, and Coleman said so also.

Q. Was the authority of Davidson sufficient for the carman to deliver iron? A. Certainly not; I went to Dobell's yard in the afternoon, after this conversation; I also went before the Magistrate at Guildhall, then to the stables of a man named Birmingham, in Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross, and there found a quantity of Madely-wood pig-iron, with that name cast on it; I took it away in our cart - it weighed about 30 cwt. odd; it corresponded in quality with that at the wharf, and had the name on it - I had given the carman a written order for the conveyance of the Madely-wood iron from the wharf; he was to bring the whole to our manufactory, and did bring it there previous to the 6th of November.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have not got the order here? A. No; it was given to him to deliver to Messrs. Drew's; my inquiry about the iron in the former case, was also on the 6th of November; the conversation was kept up some time, and we were separated before it concluded; Coleman was separated from Davidson - I had taken one into another room; the prisoners' situation had not been altered while they were in our employ; the iron in question was the first that I questioned Coleman about; he did not say he had delivered one load by order of Davidson till I asked him the question.

Q. Did he not say he had delivered two at the yard, and one by his order at another place? A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Which of the two transactions took place first? A. This is the first I questioned him about; the other iron was first taken, but it was not discovered till the 6th of November.

JAMES REYNOLDS . I am in the employ of Messrs. Drew and Co., at the Steel-yard. On Tuesday, the 6th of November, I assisted in placing three loads of pig-iron into Mr. Galloway's cart; I do not know the name of the iron- I delivered it to his servant.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have an immense quantity of iron there? A. We had a quantity of iron belonging to Mr. Galloway, but, at that time, had no pigiron but what did belong to him; I delivered the first load to Coleman about eight o'clock, or a little after.

WILLIAM COWDERY . I am servant to Mr. Dobell, of St. John's-street; he has stables in Peter's-lane, and keeps a place for killing cattle. On Tuesday, the 6th of November, I remember Coleman bringing some iron to the yard in a cart, with Mr. Galloway's name on it; he shot it down in the yard; I asked whose iron it was; he said the man would be there presently; it remained there about an hour and a half, and was removed in a cart, which came for it; I do not know the name of the man who fetched it; Davidson was present when it was fetched - he said nothing to me - he spoke to Mr. Carden about it; what he said I do not know - I saw the horse and cart which brought it, and the driver the same day, opposite the Ram Iun, Smithfield, with some iron; Mr. Carden rented premises for drying bacon in Dobell's-yard; I had never seen iron brought to the yard but once before.

ISAAC DOBELL . I keep the Black Bull public-house, St. John's-street. On Tuesday, the 6th of November, about nine o'clock, I was called up, and saw this iron down in the middle of the yard; I did not know who brought it, or or whom it belong to; I immediately ordered Cowderoy to go and inquire who it belonged to, and ordered it immediately to be removed, as it stopped the passage of carts into the yard; Davidson came up to me afterwards, and I quarrelled with him about bringing the iron there; I told him he

might as well take possession of my yard and house at once, as to put iron there without my leave; he said it should be removed.

Cross-examined. Q. There was a great deal of iron there, was there not? A. Only this; the other had been moved about a week or more before; my yard is in Middlesex - I do not know who moved the iron away.

COURT. Q. Was Mr. Carden there? A. Yes, the whole time, because it stopped his cart from coming in; nothing passed between them while I was there.

MR. CARDEN. I am a cheesemonger, and live in Newgate-street - I rent premises in Dobell's-yard. On Tuesday morning, the 6th of November, I saw this iron in the yard; Davidson was talking to Dobell when I first saw him, and after Dobell left, I saw him giving directions to a carman, to convey away some iron, which I had complained of, as being in the way of our carts; I did not know him before. I heard, in the yard, in whose employ he was; I inquired of him what was the value of the iron which was then loading in the cart - he said from 5l. to 6l. a ton; I asked if he was a dealer in iron; he said he was - that the lease of his own premises had expired, and he had engaged Dobell's yard to put his iron in. In consequence of what I saw I went and informed Mr. Galloway.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it Coleman who was removing it? A. No.

ISAAC DOBELL re-examined. I had had no conversawith Davidson about taking my yard; I was angry with him for placing the iron there.

- BIRMINGHAM. I am a jobbing carman, and have a stable in Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross, Middlesex. On Tuesday, the 6th of November, Davidson came to me, as I was waiting for a job, and asked if my horse was engaged; I said, No; he said, "Will you go and move a load of iron for me?" I harnessed my horse, and he took me to Dobell's yard; he walked before me to show me the way - I there found the iron - he told me to back the cart up, and begin to load, which I did; I put it all into the cart, and asked him where I was to go with it; we went over to Greenhill's-rents; I asked where I was going with it; he said, "The lease of my premises is expired, and I will give you 1s. to let it remain in your place;" it was deposited in my place.

MR. R. GALLOWAY. I saw the iron on this man's premises, and moved it by our cart to our manufactory; we had about 30 cwt., and it was the same sort as we had at Drew's.

Cross-examined. Q. Nobody else has that sort of iron, I suppose? A. Oh, Yes; we never sold any; we work it up; it was worth 7l. or 8l. a ton.

ALEXANDER GALLOWAY , ESQ. I am proprietor of the premises in West-street. On the 6th of November Coleman was in my employ, and was sent to fetch iron from the Steel-yard; I recollect seeing him about the middle of the day - I asked him how many loads he had brought that day - he said, "Two" - I said, "Only two?" - he then attempted to hesitate, and at last reluctantly acknowledged it was three - I then asked him if he had delivered those three loads in our yard - he again hesitated, and again reluctanty acknowledged that he had taken one load somewhere else, and, after a good deal of trouble, he acknowledged he had taken it to Dobell's, in St. John's-street - I called Davidson into the counting-house that day, in consequence of a communication from Mr. Carden, relative to some iron - I communicated my suspicions to him, and he acknowledged that he had directed Coleman to take the Madely-wood iron; and subsequently he acknowledged that he had directed him to take two loads of the other iron.

Q. Confine yourself to the Madely-wood iron - did you see Davidson in company with Coleman? A. I did, and he accused Coleman of having received 2l. of him for conveying iron to Dobell's yard - he said he was to give him 1l. a load - Coleman at first denied it, but at last acknowledged that he had paid him 2l.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your son there at the time? A. He was; I was at home this morning, when the last case was tried; I heard of the verdict - I cannot say whether my son was present during the whole of the conversation - I believe he went out once or twice - I am sure he was not present the whole time - I have no partner, and am sole proprietor of the business.

COLEMAN'S Defence (written.) I am unfortunately brought to this bar for an offence of which I can assure you I am perfectly innocent; if I have done wrong to my worthy master, it has been through ignorance, and under the impression that I was bound to obey the commands of George Davidson, clerk and superintendant of Mr. Galloway's manufactery, who was my superior in education and situation; and further I might have lost my situation, which would have brought distress upon my dear wife and family of small children, together with myself. I therefore was obedient to all and every one of his commands. On one occasion I certainly asked him a question, at which he seemed offended, and morosely said, "Did Mr. Galloway order you to obey me or not?" I answered him, Yes! He immediately said, "Then obey. my commands," which I was forced to do, under the pain and penalty of losing my situation. Gentlemen, you will see by this statement, that I had no will of my own, but my will was to obey the commands of my superiors, mine being a menial station in life, in which I was at the command of all my superiors, one of which was Mr. George Davidson; therefore you will please to take my hard case into your serious consideration, as I am no scholar, and not qualified for any higher or better situation; therefore I cannot be so much to blame as might appear, had I not have laid this statement of my injured case before you. - Gentlemen of the Jury, 1 beg leave to thank you for your kind attention, and hope you will consider of this my unfortunate case, and restore me to my disconsolate wife and family of small children, who are wholly dependent on my small efforts for their daily support; and thus I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

Both the prisoners received a good character.

COLEMAN - GUILTY. Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

DAVIDSON - GUILTY. Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Both recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Reference Number: t18271206-48

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

48. THOMAS CHAPMAN, alias DERRICK , and WILLIAM JOHNSON, alias CARTER , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , at St. Luke, 1 mare, price 10l., the property of Thomas Bane .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BANE. I live at Marshfield, near Chippenham, in Gloucestershire - it is one hundred and four miles from town. I had a mare in my possession, which I put into the field myself, about seven o'clock on the evening of the 5th of October - I locked the gate; the field has a fence round it, and the mare could not stray; I went to the field myself about half-past seven o'clock in the morning of the 6th, and it was gone; I found the gate open. By getting over the wall, the latch could be opened inside; a public road runs close by the field: I found her in London, in possession of Garton, the officer, on the 10th of October - I am quite sure it is the mare I had missed; I had had her ever since the 4th of May.

JACOB PHILPOT . I am a labourer, and live at Marshfield. On the evening of the 5th of October I saw Johnson at Marshfield, in Mr. Jones' tap-room; I knew his person before, by seeing him about there, and have no doubt of his being the man; I saw him again on the 17th of November, in London, and knew him; I pointed him out as the person I had seen before.

COURT. Q. How often had you seen him at Marshfield? A. Sometimes once or twice in the course of a year; I never saw him above two or three times before the 5th of October.

Prisoner JOHNSON. Q. How long have you been out of Devizes gaol? A. I never was in Davizes gaol in my life; I was in Horsley gaol, Gloucestershire, for a month, for an assault, for striking a man - I was confined a month.

COURT. Q. Was the charge for an assault, or for taking any thing as well? A. No - it was only for striking him; I was confined a month there, to hard labour; I was tried before a Justice.

Prisoner JOHNSON. Q. Do you know you are on your oath? A. Yes; I am telling nothing but the truth.

TIMOTHY BOND . I am a carrier from Marshfield to Bristol. I know Jones' house at Marshfield - he keeps the King's Arms. I saw Johnson there on the 5th of October; he had a smock-frock on, and grey stockings - I spoke to him, and have no doubt of his being the man: I knew him before, for a year or two; I saw him again between ten and eleven o'clock the same night, in the streets at Marshfield: it was a moon-shiny night - the moon was full; I said, "Good night, Johnson," and he said,"Good night, Bond." I know Mr. Bane's field - he was going towards there; I parted from him about two hundred yards from Bane's field; he goes by the name of William Carter at Marshfield: I said, "Good night, Carter," not Johnson. I know the other prisoner, by seeing him at Bristol-market - I always knew him by the name of Thomas Derrick; Marshfield is twelve miles from Bristol - when I saw Johnson in the street, he had boots and spurs, and a light coloured great coat on, and a little stick in his hand; his coat was buttoned up, and rather swollen out on one side, as if something was under it.

Prisoner JOHNSON. Q. Where did you meet me? A. Just over-right the lane, about half way up the town, opposite Mrs. Martin's, where you turn off to the road.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a blacksmith, and live at Marshfield. I met Chapman in Marshfield streets on the 5th of October - I saw him twice in the course of that day; I did not know him before: I believe he had a blue coat on, but am not certain - he had a close-bodied coat on; I saw him both times about the middle of the day, and had a full opportunity of observing him: I saw him afterwards in London, on the 4th of December.

Prisoner CHAPMAN. Q. Did you speak to me? A. No; I was not two yards from you - I passed by you: I am quite certain of seeing him twice that day - I have not the least doubt of it.

THOMAS WILKINS . I am a coppersmith, and owner of some stables in Bath-street, St. Luke, Middlesex. On Monday evening, the 8th of October, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw both the prisoners (I had never seen them before) - they came to my yard with a black mare each, and requested the mares might stop for the night; I have a board over my gate, as a livery-stable - they took the mares into the stable, and unsaddled them; I asked if I should feed them - they said No, they had not come far since they were fed: they wished them to have a rack of hay; they left the mares with me, and came again for them the next morning, between eight and nine o'clock: I fed them in their presence. Carter asked who did my smith's work, as they wanted shoeing - I said Blake, and they were both shod by Blake, by Carter's direction, and he paid for the shoeing; he gave me a sovereign - my son gave him change - Chapman was present at the time. Johnson rode out on one of the mares while they were in my care; the mares were both taken away from my stable on Thursday, the 11th, by Brown and Armstrong, the officers: I was present. When Brown had brought Chapman into the stable, in custody, Brown asked him, in my presence, if those horses belonged to him - he said, No, they belonged to the other man, meaning Johnson; Chapman was left there, in Armstrong's custody - Brown went out, and in about five minutes brought in Johnson: he was asked, in Chapman's presence, if those horses were his - he said he never saw them before. Both denied their belonging to them. I have no doubt of the prisoner's identity, and of the mares being what they brought.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went, in company with Armstrong, on the 11th of October, to Wilkins' stables, and saw two black mares there: I took possession of them - I left them in Armstrong's care. I then went to No.5, Coleman-street, Bunhill-row, and found Chapman in a room belonging to the prisoner Johnson, at the top of the house: he was the only man there; there was a woman there. I took him to Wilkins' stable, left him with Armstrong, and went back to Coleman-street, and on the way, two or three doors from the house where I took Chapman, I met Johnson, whom I knew before: I took him to the stable, where Chapman was with Armstrong, and when they were both handcuffed together - we asked them if they belonged to those horses, if they knew anything of them, pointing to them: they both said they did not, and denied knowing anything about

them - they were taken to the Police-office; there was no owner appeared for a fortnight and more, and at the end of the fortnight the prisoners each claimed one of the mares - they did not know that no owner had come forward - they stated that they had bought them of a person whom they did not know. The mares were both moved by us to Westall's stables, and were never out of our custody.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer, and was at the stable with Brown - I have heard his evidence. I asked the prisoners about the mares - Brown has told the truth. I asked them both how they came possessed of them, pointing to them - they said they never saw them in their lives - but a fortnight afterwards they both claimed them - we took the mares to Westall's stable.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 11th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I went to Johnson's lodgings, No. 5, Coleman-street, Bunhill-row; I searched the top room, and found this pair of boots and spurs, which I produce. I went again the same evening, about a quarter past eight o'clock, and found this smock-frock and this great coat in the first floor, in the room below Johnson's; a woman, who gave her name as Carter, was in that room, and she was in the top room when I found the boots. On the 9th and 10th of November, I went with Mr. Bane to Westall's stable, in the Curtain-road, and showed him one of the mares, which he claimed - Wilkins saw the same mare.

THOMAS WILKINS . The mare which Bane claimed, and which Garton showed him was one of the mares brought by the prisoner to my stable. I was present when Bane claimed it.

THOMAS BANE. The mare shown to me by Garton at Westall's was mine, and was worth 10l.

CHAPMAN's Defence. My witnesses are not here, but I believe this is the same jury who heard my witnesses before. I was in London from Tuesday the 2d of October till Sunday morning, the 7th, and was in Smithfield market on the Friday, which was stated by my witnesses here last time.

JOHNSON's Defence. Mr. Jones can say he did not see me in his house, and I could not have been there without his observing me - the witnesses have sworn false.

JOHN JONES . I keep the King's Arms public-house at Marshfield. Mr. Bane's field is about half a mile from my house. I know Johnson perfectly well. I did not myself see him in my house on the 5th of October - I am not in the habit of serving in the tap-room; he might easily have been there without my knowledge. I cannot say that I saw him in Marshfield that day.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You knew him before? A. Yes; I had seen him in Marshfield during the week, certainly. I cannot say on what day, but during that week I did see him; the impression on my mind is, that I had seen him there that week, but I am not positive that it was within the week. I have very often seen him in Marshfield - he knew the place well. I am a farmer as well as a publican.

TIMOTHY BOND. It was about five o'clock that I saw him in Jones' tap-room.

CHAPMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

See page 28.

Reference Number: t18271206-49

49. WILLIAM KEEVIN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Frederick Aris Dowley in the King's highway, on the 2d of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch-chain, value 5l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 1 key, value 2s. , his property.

FREDERICK ARIS DOWLEY. I live at Sidbury, in Devonshire - I live on my income. On the 2d of November I was passing up Goswell-street, towards Islington, about six o'clock in the afternoon - the gas-lamps were lighted. I had three ladies in my company - two were walking some distance behind, and one had my left arm - my watch was in my fob; when I came within two or three yards of Bell-alley , I observed the prisoner standing against an iron post in the entrance of the alley; the moment I came level with the alley, he made a spring, and seized my watch-chain; the snatch broke the bow of the watch, and he got the chain; it was done with such force that he drew my fob up; he did it so suddenly, that I could not stop his arm. I immediately pursued after him, and just at the entrance of the alley; several persons surrounded me, and attempted to stop my progress - he ran down the alley. I cleared my way, and ran after him, calling Stop thief! - he had got some yards before I got up to him; there is a thoroughfare from the alley into Golden-lane; but he took a turning to the right, and then into Great Arthur-street. I had lost sight of him in turning the corner, but was certain the same object presented itself to me the moment I turned - it is impossible I could catch sight of any body in turning but the same person, and I say I am quite certain I never lost sight of him; when he got into Great Arthur-street, he fell - there was nobody near enough to him for me to mistake him. I made sure of taking him then, but just as I got up to him, I fell myself - he got up, and I got up and pursued; some of his companions were running behind me at the time, but I outrun them; he ran down Great Arthur-street, turned to the right, then inclined to the right again into what is called Pump-court. I lost sight of him in turning the corner there, and he ran into a house, just as I turned the corner of that court; a voice or two cried out "He is gone into this house." I went into the passage, and a man, apparently a blacksmith, came out and said, "Shall we go up." I said Yes; a woman put her head over the bannisters, and said "There is nobody here that don't belong to the house - I insist upon it you don't search my house without a warrant." I then staid down stairs, and shortly after a man came in and went up stairs - that was not the prisoner; in a short time two persons came down together - I was then watching just outside. I instantly seized the prisoner, who was one of them, and said "This is the villain who has robbed me." I have no doubt whatever of his being the man.

Q. Was the person who offered you his assistance at hand then? A. I do not know - there was a great crowd; the people immediately cried out "That is not him, he belongs to the house; the man who has robbed you has gone round the corner;" they immediately got round and hustled me. I loosed my hold of the prisoner, and he disappeared. I saw him in Clerkenwell prison in about a week. I had returned to Devonshire, and come back again. I was certain he was the man, and have been certain of him from the robbery to the present time.

Q. Setting aside the question, whether he had robbed,

can you be certain he is the man whom you seized coming out of the house? A. I have no doubt of it, and am certain he is the man who robbed me. I had a full opportunity of examining his face. I have not found my property.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were the ladies friends of yours? A. They were; I have not brought them here. I cannot say whether the one who had my arm saw the man who made the snatch - she lives in St. Martin's-le-grand. I was a little alarmed. I let her arm loose, when I pursued the prisoner. I cried out, "I am robbed," or something of that kind; the other persons attacked me after I was robbed. I only lost sight of the prisoner for the instant, as he turned two corners, until he went into the house; my brother has not interfered in the business. It might be nine or ten days after that I went to Clerkenwell; the prisoner was not pointed out to me - there were thirty or forty prisoners; he was not at all distinguished from the rest. I pointed him out immediately - there was no light in the alley.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a special constable of St. Luke's. I heard of this robbery, about two days afterwards - I made inquiry in Goswell-street, and was directed to a person named Buckle, in Arthur-street, from information - I afterwards saw Mrs. Buckle, the landlady of a house in Arthur-street, and about a week afterwards, I and Harrison went to a house in Gravel-walk, Blue Anchor-alley, and found the prisoner in bed with a young woman - I went to search his clothes; Harrison, said, "Billy, I want you;" the prisoner said, "What for?" Harrison told him for a bundle taken in Chiswell-street; he jumped up out of bed, and said, "I know that is a lie - I know what you want me for, it is for a robbery in Goswell-street, for the watchman told me the officers were looking after me;" we then said it was for that; we sent for Buckle; he brought a lad to the watch-house, who said he was the man.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he was told he was wanted for it? A. Yes.

THOMAS HARRISON . I was with Lock - his statement is correct.

THOMAS PEARLE . I am fourteen years old, and live with my mother, at No. 3, Great Arthur-street, Goswell-street. I work for Joseph Emms, who is journeyman to Mr. Townsend, a paper-stainer. I was sitting at tea with my mother, between six and seven o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went to the door, and saw some persons running down Arthur-street - I first of all saw the prisoner being chased - Mr. Dowley was next to him, close behind him, and others were running behind him - I am quite sure of the prisoner - I knw him well before; he ran into a house, at the entrance of Pump-court; the door is under an archway - I believe Mr. Baxter keeps the house; three or four people live in it; Baxter is one; Mr. Dowley went under the archway, and lost sight of him - I said, "He is gone up here," and showed him the house; he went just inside the threshold - I afterwards saw the prisoner come out with another man - Mr. Dowley seized him, and said, "This is the man who has robbed me;" two or three men rushed in between them; Dowley lost his hold, and the prisoner got away - I saw him again on the morning of the Tuesday week afterwards - I knew his name before, and told the officers who it was, and told Mr. Buckle - I saw him when he was taken up, at the watch-house, and cannot be mistaken in him.

Cross-examined. Q. What part of the house were you sitting in? A. The ground floor, in the shop - I was not acquainted with him, only he used to work at Coach-makers' Hall once - I had not spoken to him for five years, but had very often seen him about - I sleep at my mother's every night - I was never in a Court of Justice before.

JAMES SHERMAN . I am fourteen years old, and live with my parents in Great Arthur-street. I work with my father, who is a gas-fitter - I live almost facing Pearle - I was having my tea, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went to the door, and saw the prisoner in Great Arthur-street, running towards our house - I am certain he is the man; the people were all behind him, running after him, and when he came facing the house I ran - I did not notice Mr. Dowley till the prisoner ran into the house - I then stopped Mr. Dowley, and told him he had run into the house (I believe Baxter lives in the house) - I did not see him run in, but I was not a yard from him, and he could not turn the corner; as I heard steps in the house I told Dowley he had run in there - Dowley waited just at the step of the door, and so did I; another man went into the house, and in two or three minutes the prisoner came out with that man - Dowley seized him, and said,"This is the villain who robbed me;" I believe some persons rushed between him and the prisoner - Dowley lost his hold, and the prisoner got away; he turned the corner, and ran towards Bridgewater-gardens - I saw him at Worship-street, about eleven days after, and am sure of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen the man here, who came out with the prisoner? A. No - I had never seen him before; there were a great many people about.

CATHERINE BAXTER . I live with my father, at No. 7, Pump-court, Bridgewater-gardens, on the two pair of stairs. On the day Mr. Dowley was robbed, the prisoner ran into our house - I heard a row in the passage, ran down stairs, and met him coming up; he did not live there - I never saw him in the house before; a short while after, another man in a long coat, who I thought looked like an officer, came up; he collared the prisoner, and said, "This is the man I want;" he went down stairs first, and the prisoner after him (I did not see that man's face); when he went down, he said to Mr. Dowley,"There is no man there" - I saw Mr. Dowley lay hold of the prisoner, and say, "This is the man;" a woman who stood there said, "That is not the man who robbed you; he is gone up the alley" - I should know that woman again; I have known the prisoner a long time, by seeing him about Golden-lane; he wanted to go into the one pair room, but the man who lives there, said, "You shan't come here;" the prisoner at that time was all over mud, as if he had been on the ground; the people rushed between him and Dowley, and he got away.

Cross-examined. Q. How old are you? A. Fifteen years - I have always lived with my father.

JAMES BUCKLE . I live at No. 5, Great Arthur-street; there are two No. 5's. I am a master bricklayer, but serve as constable in my own right. On the evening in question I was standing in Goswell-street, about twenty

yards from Bell-alley, and heard an alarm, that a gentleman had been robbed - I ran down the whole extent of Bell-alley, thinking the thieves were gone that way - I turned into the bottom of Arthur-street, into Pump-court, and found Mr. Dowley surrounded by a number of people; the man had at that moment escaped - I went in pursuit, but without effect - Thompson and I came back, searched the house in Pump-court, but found nothing; we saw the witness Baxter there - Pearle named the prisoner to me, but, with the noise, I understood him to say Keane instead of Keevin, or the prisoner would have been taken before; when he was taken, I took Pearle to the watch-house, and he immediately said the prisoner was the man who the gentleman said had robbed him; the prisoner said, "You know nothing about me."

THOMAS THOMPSON . I know nothing, except what Buckley has stated; the girl described the prisoner to me.

Prisoner's Defence. They are swearing false, every one of them - Mr. Emms, that boy's master, can tell what he said about it.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-50

50. DENNIS RAGEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jeremiah McCarthy , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 sovereigns, and 1 hat, value 12s. , his property.

MR. A. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JEREMIAH McCARTHY. On Sunday evening, the 23d of September, I spent the day with John Harman, in John-street, Whitechapel-road , and about seven o'clock the prisoner and Michael Ragen came into the house - I live myself in New-court, George-yard, and am a sugar-baker - I was out of work; my last place was at Messrs. Severn and Co. - I had left them about six weeks, having been ill, and was just getting well, when this happened - Harman was in the room when the prisoner came in - I knew them before, but did not wish to come across them, if I could help it; they staid there about half an hour then - I bade them good bye; they had insulted a first cousin of mine, who was there.

Q. How many people were in the room? A. Three or four women and four men; about ten persons altogether, besides the prisoner; we had a little to drink - I had drank beer and gin, but not much, because my doctor told me not to drink for a fortnight, or three weeks - I was sober when I left the room, with my cousin; when they insulted my cousin, I asked what they wanted, and who sent for them, and the prisoner made a slap at me, but I was on the other side of the table, and escaped from him; he did not hit me - I did not lift my hand to him - I tried to get away, because I was so weak and low in spirits; we stopped there half an hour after that; we had sat down again, and the dispute was over; I and my cousin came down stairs together; his name is Daniel Hayes; he is not here; we were going home together, till the Ragens pounced between us; he was a little distance before me, about twice the length of this Court; they came across me.

Q. What do you mean by their coming across you? A. The prisoner came before me in the highway; he came sideways, and struck me, and knocked my hat off at one blow; they had knocked my cousin about, before they attacked me, and almost killed him.

Q. Before your cousin was struck, had the Ragens passed you? A. I had not seen them till they came before me, and struck me; they might have passed - I had not seen them strike my cousin; it happened in John-street - Michael's wife came and asked to shake hands with me.

Q. How do you know your cousin was ill-treated? A. There were signs on him, and he told me of it - I had not heard him knocked about; it was not a very dark night; my cousin was out of my sight when I was attacked.

Q. Who came up to you? A. The prisoner; he did not speak a word, till he stopped me, and struck me in the highway - I remained standing - Michael then came up, and kicked me; it was between eight and nine o'clock - I tried to run away, but Dennis ran after me, and collared me; he struck me, and knocked me against the wall, and said, "You b-y rogue, I shall give it you," and said he would have my life; he said nothing about money - I stood against the wall; Michael collared me, and gave me a kick, and brought me on my knees, and while Michael was holding my collar, Dennis put his hand into my right hand waistcoat pocket - I had two sovereigns loose in that pocket - I know they were safe when I left my friend's house, for I had had my hand on them the moment they came up to me - I begged for mercy, and put my two hands up; he tore my pocket, and took the two sovereigns out; here is the pocket; I have had it mended; when he knocked my hat off, I ran to pick it up- Michael's wife picked it up - I saw it in her hand, and do not know what became of it, till I got a warrant against them, and the officer got the hat.

Q. What was the warrant for? A. I swore a highway robbery against them; I told the Magistrate I was robbed - Mr. Lee had the warrant - when I went to swear the highway robbery, two or three officers would not let me in - they brought the book outside, and swore me, and they did not make any thing of it but an assault - I told my story to the Magistrate after he had signed the warrant - when the men were taken on this warrant, I thought it was all right, but he got false bail, and I cannot find the other man.

Q. Was the prisoner sent to gaol or about his business? A. He was sent to gaol of course; he had his trial before the Magistrates; he was sent to Clerkenwell, and got bail.

Q. When you first went to the office, you say the officer would not let you in? A. No; the warrant was granted without my going before the Magistrate; the officers shut the door, because they said I could come down upon them with the warrant, and find him; I and my cousin both went to the office.

The warrant, being here produced and read, was for a common assault.

Q. What further passed, was Michael's wife with them? A. Yes; she asked me to shake hands with her; she kept delaying me till my friend got out of sight, and was knocked about; I felt my money between the prisoner's fingers when he tore my pocket, and he ran away as soon as he got his hand out - I went to the office next morning, and they would not grant any warrant, but kept me about for two or three days, and afterwards the officers would not let me in, but brought the book to me, and

made nothing but an assault of it, and I indicted them both; I saw two watchmen, and told them I was robbed - I asked them to come after the prisoner - one of them said, "Do not you know what way the watchman was served the other day? he was struck by an Irishman, and knocked down with a stone and killed, you must go to Whitechapel watch-house, and get an officer" - I did not go to the watch-house - I have subpoenaed two witnesses, named Riley and Graddon, who saw me knocked down, but they will not come.

Q. You had been ill in the hospital, how came you to have two sovereigns? A. I got it from my master - the foreman paid me off - he gave me 3s. 6d. after I came out of the hospital.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Now, on your oath, did you say a word about the sovereigns till you went before the Grand Jury? A. Yes; I said I was robbed of two sovereigns - I told Lee, the officer, so - I am sure Michael held me while the prisoner robbed me.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate the prisoner and Michael robbed you? A. Yes, when they led me in the second time; I swore the first time before the officer.

Q. You mean to persist that you swore before the Magistrate that you lost two sovereigns? A. I swore it from first to last, and proved it too - I have known them since I was twelve years old - we only had a few words inside the house.

Q. How many persons were in the street when you were robbed. A. The two Ragens, Michael's wife, and me - the disturbance did not last long - when they first struck me, I ran away about twelve yards, and Michael came and put his hand into my pocket - I cannot swear how long it lasted - one of my witnesses was present - I told my cousin I was robbed - I saw him as soon as I got home, and told him of it.

COURT. Q. Did you cry Stop thief! when you got up? A. Yes; but he was gone as soon as he got the money - I hallooed out, Watch! Stop him! the watchman came up, and two men hallooed out, Shame and Murder! they are not here; I subposuaed two men, but they will not come; they are Irisltmen, and acquainted with the prisoner.

MR. BARRY. Q. Did you take your cousin before the Grand Jury? A. No; he did not see any thing of my robbery; we had one of them before the Justice.

LEWIS MYERSON . I am a constable of Bethnal-green. The prosecutor came to me early one Monday morning, and said he had been robbed about a month or three weeks ago - I found his hat in the first-floor room, at No. 18, John-street, Whitechapel; Michael Ragen 's wife occupied that room - I saw the hat taken out of there into another house - when I went to apprehended Michael, I saw him escape over the wall, on a signal being given to him - he is a labouring bricklayer, and when I got on the scaffold, a signal was given, I took the person who assisted him over the wall, but did not take Michael - the prosecutor went before the Magistrate with me, and swore a robbery against them both - only Michael's wife was before the Magistrate - he discharged her; I did not see Dennis or Michael afterwards - I was not before the Grand Jury - the prosecutor subponsed me last Monday - he came early on a Monday morning, and gave me a warrant for felony - I do not know who it was signed by - I cannot read writing, but I gave it to somebody to read - I read the printed part of it - it was from Lambeth-street - it was for felony - I gave it to several people to read - I gave it back to the prosecutor.

Q. Where is it now? A. The Magistrate took the warrant, rolled it up, and threw it away, and said he would have nothing to do about it, and abused me in some respect; a person in the office took it up.

Q. I thought you said you gave it to McCarthy? A. Why, after a bit, I asked the Magistrate to have the kindness to give me the warrant - he gave it me, and I gave it to McCarthy.

Q. What, after he had thrown it down? A. No, before that; he requested to see it again; he rolled it up and threw it down, and said he would have nothing to do with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in the habit of taking warrants for felony from the parties themselves? A. Sometimes I do; the officer who had it first would not go. I did not know the Magistrate had said he would have nothing to do with it; it was after I had it that I heard the Magistrate say so. I thought it would be my duty to apprehend the prisoner, particularly as the man was knocked about and robbed.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say you would have taken a man on a warrant for felony, which you saw the Magistrate reject, and say he would have nothing to do with? A. I mean to say when it first came into my possession; but after the Magistrate rolled it, I should have nothing to do with it. I first knew McCarthy about a week before he gave me the warrant. I found the hat about twelve o'clock on the day he gave me the warrant.

JEREMIAH McCARTHY. This is the hat they knocked off my head.

COURT. Q. Was Myerson the first person you applied to? A. No - Mr. Lee. I went to him several times before he went after the prisoner. I was obliged to give him 5s., for he used to say "I am tired and busy now;" he went and found the man on the top of the scaffold. Lee did not take the prisoner; the street-keeper of London-bridge took him.

JOHN RIGG . I am a watchman. Myerson requested me to go after the men. I went to a house where the hat was found - we did not find the prisoner there; we went to a building, and a signal was given to Michael to escape. I did not read much of the warrant, and cannot say whether it was for felony or assault.

- LEE. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I did not see the prosecutor at the office when he applied for the warrant. I apprehended Michael and saw the prosecutor at the office then; he spoke of a fight between them; he made no charge of robbery, and no warrant was granted for felony - it was a peace warrant; he said he was afraid to go about, for he was in danger of his life, and that the people had threatened to kill him; the Magistrate granted the warrant produced.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long was he stating his case to the Magistrate? A. I suppose about ten minutes - he was heard all through patiently; he said he had lost two sovereigns in the scuffle, and his hat, but it was not stated in the way of a robbery at all.

Q. Did he shew his torn waistcoat before the Magistrate? A. He did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-51

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

51. EDWARD FRANKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 7 knives, value 2l. , the goods of Sarah Smith , widow .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-52

52. JOHN CRAMER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 4 pieces of flannel, containing 500 yards, value 48l. , the goods of William Jones .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-53

53. ELIZABETH WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 2 pairs of gloves, value 2s., the goods of John Savage - also 3 ozs. weight of tea, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Richard Clarke - also 1 pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of William Cant .

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18271206-54

54. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 plough, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Robert Veitch; and 1 saw, value 3s. , the goods of James Stark .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped near Southampton-street .

Reference Number: t18271206-55

55. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 shawl, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Alderson .

HENRY ALDERSON. I am a linen-draper , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the evening of the 9th of October, about nine o'clock, the officer brought Clapham with this shawl to my shop; it is my property - I had not missed it: I had seen it safe in my shop about half an hour before- it has a mark on it of my own making.

JOHN BOSTON . I was by the shop on this evening, and saw the prisoner snatch the shawl, and give it to another person, who was taken; the Magistrate desired me to take the prisoner if ever I should see him - on the 11th of October I and Roberts were going down St. Giles' - we saw the prisoner, and took him; he made great resistance: I am confident he is the person who took the shawl; I had seen them together for half an hour before, in a good light.

JOSEPH CARTER . I saw two persons together at the prosecutor's window; they were pointed out to me: I did not see the shawl taken, but I saw Clapham run and drop the shawl, and I took him.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I took the prisoner, by the information of Boston.

The prisoner put in a petition, acknowledging the offence, stating himself to be in the greatest distress, having been deserted by his parents when young, and begging to be placed in the Refuge for the Destitute.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Proscutor.

Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18271206-56

56. THOMAS ANSTUS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 2 pillows, value 5s.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 set of bed furniture, value 9s., and 1 counterpane, value 1s. , the goods of William Davey .

ELIZABETH DAVEY . I am the wife of William Davey- we live in Castle-street, Leicester-square . The prisoner lodged at our house from August till the 8th of November; he then went away, without notice - he was to bring my rent that night, but did not; my husband opened his door his door, and I went in and missed these articles, which had been let to him, as part of the furniture of the room. The bed was all cut to pieces.

JOSEPH KING . I am a pawnbroker. I have a bolster, pawned on the 8th of October, by another person, and two pillows, pawned on the 1st of September, by the prisoner.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a quilt and bed furniture, pawned by the prisoner's wife, on the 3d of September; they have been customers with me for some time.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them through distress. I had promised to pay a week's rent that night, but it was too late before I received the money; I should have got the things out on the Saturday night, and made it good.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-57

57. WILLIAM BLACKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 3 fixtures, that is to say, 3 window-sashes, value 25s., belonging to Charles Smith , and fixed to a certain building of his, against the statute .

JOHN PENDERGAST . I am agent to the property of Mr. Charles Smith; his houses are in Gloucester-street, Hackney-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; I do not live near the spot. On the 26th of November, the night officer of Bethnal-green came to my house - I went to the premises, and missed the window-sashes, which I had seen safe the preceding week.

OWEN SHEEHAN . I am a watchman. On the 25th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was at the corner of the street in Hackney-road, and saw the prisoner coming with something on his shoulder; when he came up to me he crossed the road; I ran, and stopped him with these sashes in a rug - I asked what he had got- he said, sashes - that they were his own, and he had brought them from Hackney; he said he got them from his master: my brother watchman said, "I won't stand that;" he then threw them down, and ran away; I pursued, and sprang my rattle; he was stopped, without my losing sight of him. I have seen the sashes fitted in the house by the carpenter.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am a shoe-maker. On the night of the 25th of November I was coming along Hackney-road, and heard the rattle spring; I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him - Sheehan came up, and took him.

ELIZABETH THOMAS . The prisoner lodged at my house. About half-past nine o'clock on the night in question, he brought home some sashes in a quilt, which I afterwards saw at the office.

JOHN EDWARDS . I was on duty with Sheehan, and saw the prisoner go along with the sashes in a rug - I asked to look at them, and he said they were his own, and he brought them from Hackney; I said, "I won't stand that"

- he then said, "Take them and be d - d," and threw them down.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I received the prisoner at the watch-house.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, begging for mercy, and expressing his sincere contrition for his past conduct.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his telling where the other sashes were taken, and his great contrition .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-58

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

58. THOMAS DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 copper door-lock, value 14s.; 1 metal lock, value 14s., and 1 lock, value 14s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

LAWRENCE OPERMAN . I am a broker, and live in Rosemary-lane. On Thursday, the 1st of November, the prisoner came to my house, and offered a copper lock for sale for 5s. - I told him I did not like the look of it, and asked if he would take half-a-crown; he said it was worth more, but agreed to take it; he said it was his own; I asked where he lived, and he wrote his address, "Jonathan Davey, New Charlton;" while he was writing it, I told a man to go and get change for a half-crown, and I sent for a headborough - I had shot the lock, and seen the broad arrow on it; the man returned with the change, and I gave the prisoner four sixpences, and 6d. worth of copper; I then asked him how he came by it, as it was a King's lock, he again said it was his own; I said he must go with me, and I took him to the Thames Police-office; in going there, he said he would give me the lock and 5s. if I would let him go; I said it was a trick played upon me, and he must go before the Magistrate, who might do as he pleased about it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is it a perfect lock? A. Yes; there is nothing wanting but the key, and the box which the lock goes into - it is worth about 2s. 4d. as old metal, but it might be used as a lock, with a key; as a lock it is worth about 1l.; I did offer half-a-crown for it; I knew it was a King's lock as soon as I saw it, as I have been in the King's service myself - I could swear to it without seeing the broad arrow on it.

COURT. Q. What were you in the King's service? A. Carpenter on board the Semiramis.

THOMAS HAMILTON . I am a Thames Police constable. The prisoner was given into my custody by Operman, with this lock; I asked what ship he belonged to, and he said the Weymouth frigate, lying at Deptford, in ordinary; I asked how he got the lock; he said a peterman had been dredging at the bottom of the river, that he came alongside, and said this was a good lock fit for use, which he had got up from the bottom, and he should have it for 6d.; but here is whitewash on it, and I have seen it opened - it has never been in the water at all.

THOMAS WHITE . I was carpenter of the Weymouth; the prisoner succeeded me in that capacity. On quitting the ship I went over the stores, and gave the prisoner an inventory of them; there was a lock like this on board, and on the 7th of September he asked me where the copper lock was; I said down in the store-room: I got a light, and showed it him - it was the only lock of this description - there were other locks; on the 10th of September I showed it to him again; and on the 2d of November I was desired to go on board to see if this lock was there, and it was not; on the 19th of November I was ordered there again on a general survey; the lock was then missing, but I found the key in the place where the lock had been - I know this lock to be the King's property, and I believe this whitewash has been dropped upon it - all the other stores were there.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you now? A. I am carpenter of his Majesty's ship Inconstant. I cannot exactly swear that this is the same lock, but it is a magazine lock, and there was such a one on board the Weymouth - they are all copper locks, and I have seen many others like this.

HUMPHREY GREEN . I was boatswain of the Weymouth about three years ago, and had charge of the carpenter's stores for about six months; I remember a copper door-lock on the magazine; I was asked by Mr. White if I knew any thing about this lock, and I asked if there were spots of lime on it, as I had a faint recollection of the circumstance.

Cross-examined. Q. How came those spots on it? A. I suppose by washing the magazine.

RICHARD MARVEN . I am a clerk in the Dock-yard, at Deptford. I searched among the stores of the Weymouth, and found this key in the store-room - it fits this lock exactly, and I have no doubt it is the key of it; the lock of the Weymouth's magazine is missing.

The prisoner put in a petition begging for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 54.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-59

59. CAROLINE ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 opera-glass, value 4s., and 1 ring, value 8s. , the goods of Jacob Silverstone .

JACOB SILVERSTONE . I am a native of Poland, and a licensed hawker . On the 11th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I went down Denmark-court, opposite Beaufort-buildings, Strand . I saw the prisoner looking out of a window; she asked what I had to sell; I said jewellery; she told me to come in - the door was open - I went into the parlour, where I saw her and two other women; she said, "Let us see what you have got?" I put my box on the table, and opened it: the prisoner said she should like to buy something, but she had no money; I said I would take old silver or rings in exchange; she said, "Let us go into my room, and very likely I have got some there;" she took me into a room up two pair of stairs; I put my box on a table; she took hold of a coral ring, tried it on her finger, and asked the price; I said 8s.: she then took up a French opera-glass, and asked the price, which was 4s. - she put that into her bosom; I said, "Now, where are your old rings?" she began to laugh at me; she then collared me, and turned me out of the room - the other girls were down stairs; I went down, and tried to get out, but the street door was locked; she followed me down stairs - there was one of the other women in the passage; I passed her, and went up to the door; the prisoner then came up to me in the passage, and struck me on the side of my head; I

fainted away nearly, I was so frightened when she struck me; the servant came up from the kitchen, and said,"What is the matter?" I said I was not well, and asked for cold water, which she brought me; I washed my face, and got better: I then said to the prisoner, "Pray open the door - I want to go about my business?" she said,"You had better come into the parlour, and open your box, to see if you have lost any thing;" I said I knew I had lost the ring and opera-glass, and would not go into the parlour; she said, "You shall not go out if you don't look - may be you will find them in your box;" I said "I cannot open my box here, for I am afraid I shall lose more, and if you don't open the door, I'll make a row here;" she then opened it; I went out, and went to a baker's-shop, at the corner, and told them what had happened: I waited there about half an hour, till an officer came by, and I went with him to the house; he asked the prisoner to give my property back; she took the opera-glass from her bosom, and gave him; she had the ring on her finger.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she take the ring off her finger up stairs? A. She put it on her finger; I did not see it afterwards; I was about five minutes in her bed-room - I made no proposals to her; I only went to sell my goods; the officer saw the mark of the blow on my forehead - I did not kiss her; her clothes were not disordered when she came down. I swear there was a lock on the door, and it was locked. The officer went up and searched, but the ring was not found; she said I had given her the glass, having taken liberties with her, but I had not - it is against my Religion; she said she would look for my ring. I swear I never said to any body, that the ring might have rolled away, and the servant got it.

JOHN PRIECE . I am an officer. I was passing the baker's shop, and saw the prosecutor there; he complained of losing a ring and an opera-glass, and took me to the house; I went in, and asked if the young woman was in - the prisoner came up from the kitchen; I said, "This gentleman says you have robbed him;" she said, "I have not"- she then took this glass from her bosom, and said, "He gave me this for a certain purpose, but I have no ring - you may search." I went up stairs - she wished to go before a Magistrate, and we went; I did not examine to see if there was a lock on the door.

Cross-examined. Q. In what state was she? A. Her hair was loose, and her bosom open, and when we were up stairs she pointed to the bed, which was tossed about, and stated, before his face, that he had taken liberties with her.

Prisoner's Defence. He proposed to go up stairs; he gave me the glass in the parlour, and said it was worth a guinea, and I should give him 3s. to boot; he never opened his box up stairs; he put it on the foot of the bed; I said,"Have you no money?" he seized me by my hair, and went out. He brought an officer - I gave up the glass, and told what I had it for.

WILLIAM SWIFT . I am an historical-engraver. I saw the prosecutor at the Northumberland Arms public-house, Clerkenwell-green, yesterday, about half an hour after this bill was found; he told me he was sorry for what he had done, but he was urged by the baker, and that it was very probable the ring had rolled away, and the servant got it.

COURT. Q. How came you there? A. I went to inquire after the prisoner, knowing her brother. I have worked for the late Sheriff Kelly twelve or fourteen years; we drank together. I knew nothing of the prisoner. The officer was not present.

JOHN PRIECE re-examined. There was a lump on the side of the prosecutor's head - he complained of being struck in the passage.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-60

60. JOHN DOWNS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4d., the goods of Michael Ambrosia , from his person .

MICHAEL AMBROSIA. I am an Italian. I was in King-street, St. Giles' , at half-past six o'clock in the evening of the 6th of November; I felt my pocket handkerchief go from my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner run: I caught him with it - this is it.

GEORGE IVESON . I am an officer. I did not see the handkerchief taken.

THOMAS IVESON . I was in St. Giles', and saw the prisoner and another boy; the prosecutor came along, and the prisoner's companion spoke to him, as if he was asking the price of his images, while the prisoner took the handkerchief, and ran away. I told my father of it: the prosecutor caught the prisoner, and gave him to my father.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-61

61. JOHN FLYNN and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 sow, price 2l., and 2 pigs, price 2l. , the property of Mary Hargrave .

MARY HARGRAVE. I live at Laytonstone, on Epping-forest . I had a sow and two store pigs on the forest; I saw them safe on Wednesday morning, the 7th of November, after ten o'clock, when they went out, and in the afternoon a woman came and told me two men were driving my pigs away.

GEORGE HATCHER . I live on the forest. The prosecutrix keeps the Green Man public-house, at Laytonstone. I saw the two prisoners take the pigs from the bottom of our garden, which is about a quarter of a mile from her premises, on Wednesday, the 7th of November; I saw them driving them among the bushes: some persons were coming up, and they left them - they returned again, took the pigs out, and drove them away, across Wanstead-flat, towards the Rabbits public-house, in the Ilford-road; they then crossed the road, and went on to Plaistow; I followed them, and in Plaistow I got an officer, and gave charge of them - they were both driving the pigs.

JAMES HAYWARD . I am an officer. Hatchard spoke to me, and I went and overtook the prisoners; Brown was then driving the pigs; Flynn was walking on the pavement, just abreast of him; I went up to Brown, and asked if they were his pigs - he said No; I asked if they were for sale; he said No, but that was his master (pointing to Flynn), who had employed him to drive them. I then asked Flynn if they were his pigs - he said, "Yes, Sir;" I said, "Are they for sale?" he said No: I said, "I suppose you are driving them to town?" he said, "Not quite to town;" he then made a stop at a shop, and pointed to something, as if inquiring the price - he came out again, and crossed the road; I crossed too, but he did not see me: he then went on, and turned up a street. I then went and took them. There was a sow and two store pigs, which Mrs. Hargrave claimed.

MRS. HARGRAVE. They were my pigs - I am certain of them.

FLYNN's Defence. I know nothing about them - I never said they were mine.

BROWN's Defence. I was hired on the Iford-road, to drive the pigs towards London, but this is not the man who hired me; I lived in my last situation nine years, at Mr. Goedchild's.

FLYNN - GUILTY . Aged 27.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-62

62. JAMES GILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 12 live tame fowls, price 20s. , the property of William Wybrow .

WILLIAM WYBROW. I live with my parents, in Morning-lane, Hackney. I kept fowls - they were all safe on Saturday, the 10th of November, at six o'clock in the evening, in a yard, which is enclosed with a fence; the next morning twelve of them were missing - I have seen eleven of them since, which were found at Mr. Bailey's, in Shoreditch, on the Tuesday following - these are them.

SOPHIA WYBROW . I know no more than my son has stated, except that I was the first person who missed them. I have seen the prisoner about the spot, but did not know him. The yard is enclosed with palings six feet high.

THOMAS BAILEY . I live in High-street, Shoreditch, and deal in poultry. These eleven fowls were brought to me by the prisoner, about half-past nine o'clock at night, on the 10th of November, for sale; I said I had as many as I knew what to do with - he was very desirous to sell them, and at last I told him I would lend him 9s. on them, on condition that he would fetch them away the beginning of the week, as I did not want them.

JOHN DENT . On Saturday night, the 10th of November, I was coming down Morning-lane, and met the prisoner with a bag on his back, and another person with him who had something under his arm; I touched the bag, and felt something warm in it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271206-63

63. CHARLES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 35lbs. weight of beef, value 25s. , the goods of William Weaver .

WILLIAM WEAVER. I am a butcher , and live at Pimlico . On the 7th of November, at a quarter after one o'clock, I went in to dinner - I came out again in about two minutes, and missed a piece of beef; a person said two men had run down Pimlico with it; I ran, and overtook the prisoner about a mile off, with it on his shoulder; he said it was given to him to carry - there were 35lbs. of it.

ROBERT SERJEANT . I live near Mr. Weaver. I saw the prisoner and another person carrying a piece of beef, about one hundred yards from his shop; they walked slowly, and stared at me; I think the prisoner had the beef. The prosecutor came up in about four minutes, and I assisted in pursuing the prisoner - he was secured; the other got away.

Prisoner's Defence. I had lived with Mr. Haddon, and had been up to Sloane-square, to see a young man; as I was coming back a young man was walking with this beef, and he asked me to hold it while he went into a house: we walked on, and the prosecutor came and took me - I started when I heard it was stolen. The other man stood talking with them. I had time to get away if I had chosen.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-64

64. MARY MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 neat's tongue, value 5s. , the goods of Alexander Thorn .

HENRY OTTEY. I live with Mr. Alexander Thorn - he keeps an oil and Italian warehouse , in Holborn . There was a neat's tongue at our door on the 12th of November - a lady told me a person had taken it; I went out, and found the prisoner twenty or thirty yards off, with it in her apron; I brought her back - she was a stranger: she said a lady had bought the tongue, and told her to take it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it lay on the ground, and took it up; I was only half a yard from the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271206-65

65. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 7 yards of oil-cloth, value 24s., and 1 hearth-rug, value 9s. , the goods of Daniel Abbott .

DANIEL ABBOT. I live in Seymour-street, Euston-square , and am a broker . On the 24th of November a boy came and told me this oil-cloth was stolen - I pursued, and took the prisoner with it on his shoulder, about a quarter of a mile off; he got from me, and was taken by a watchman; the oil-cloth was about twelve feet within my shop.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did you see any one talking to the prisoner? A. No; no man said in my presence, "I will give you 1s. to take this oil-cloth to Gower-street;" as soon as I took him, he ran away; he did not say, "It is not stolen property;" he was taken again in the next street.

FREDERICK BREEWOOD . I saw the prisoner near Mr. Abbot's shop, with a bag on his arm; that was in another street; another man came up, and put the oil-cloth into the bag, and said shoot; they went off together.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say, it was not the prisoner who took it? A. Yes; he put it into the bag.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know they were stolen; the prosecutor came, and collared me, and I ran from him, to go after the man I got them from.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-66

66. WILLIAM SHIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 bobbin of silk, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Murphy .

JOHN MURPHY. I am a silk-weaver . I live in Grey Eagle-street, Spitalfields ; the prisoner lived in my house - I lost eight bobbins of silk; he had to pass the door of my room in going to his bed-room; about ten o'clock at night, on the 20th of November, I marked what bobbins I had in my workshop, and left work; the prisoner was in my shop at the time; he is in the same business, but did not work for me; the next morning I missed one bobbin, and sent for the officer; he searched the prisoner in

my shop, and took this bobbin of silk from his trousers, with the mark which I had put on it; he bore an honest character.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. I was sent for - I asked the prisoner what he had about him; he said Nothing - I then searched him, and found this bobbin of silk in his trousers pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-67

67. JAMES TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , five 10l. Bank notes , the property of William Payne .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of James Bennett .

JAMES BENNETT. I live at the King's Head, Canterbury. On the 6th of February, 1826, I was head waiter at Mr. Panyne's, Brunswick Hotel, Jermyn-street ; he gave me a 50l. cheque, on Messrs. Hammersleys - I gave it to the prisoner to receive; he was our occasional porter ; I told him to bring five 10l. notes; he never returned.

HENRY VICARY WILSON . I am cashier to Messrs. Hammersleys, bankers, Pall-mall. On the 6th of February, 1826, I remember the prisoner bringing a 50l. cheque, drawn by Mr. Payne - I gave him five 10l. notes for it.

GEORGE AVIS . I apprehended the prisoner about three weeks ago, and asked what he had done with the money; he said he had spent part of it, and lost the rest, when in in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, and went to drink with him - I laid out part of the money, got drunk, and lost most of it. I have been miserable ever since.

The Court ruled, that the prisoner should have been indicted for stealing the cheque, and not the notes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-68

68. DANIEL DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 1 key, value 2s., the goods of Richard Blunt , from his person .

RICHARD BLUNT. I am a gentleman , and live in Sidney-street, City-road. On Saturday, the 27th of October, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was going up Goswell-street ; I was surrounded by a gang of four persons; the prisoner was one; they came round me, and one snatched my watch; one of them directly ran down Goswell-street, and three down Charles-street, into Northampton-square; I followed them, calling out, "Stop those three thieves!" they ran faster than me, and when they came near the square, they separated - I followed the prisoner, who turned to the left, along Smith-street, and he was taken there - I had not lost sight of him - I lost my watch, seal, key, and ring - I am certain he is one of them, but cannot say he is the one who took it; the watch was found in about an hour.

JOHN MORGAN . I was going down Smith-street, on the 27th of October: I heard a cry of Stop thief! turned round, and saw Mr. Blunt, and the prisoner was secured; I had seen him running; several were running after him, but none before; he was collared, and swung round and nearly fell - I and others took him to the watch-house, and on returning, I looked at the place where he had been stopped, and in the mud, I found this watch, seal, and key; this was in half, or three quarters of an hour.

EDWARD TOMPKINS . I am a butcher. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I came to the door, and saw the prisoner running - I crossed over towards him, and when I got near him, he called Stop thief! but nobody was before him - I collared him; he swung himself round - I saw nothing fall.

THOMAS GARNER . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and in three quarters of an hour, Morgan produced the property.

GEORGE CORBETT . I saw the prisoner running from Charles-street; he called Stop thief! and was taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the gentleman; he said he would not give charge of me, not knowing me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-69

69. ELLEN KIETH was indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT NOWELL . I am a milkman , and live in Drury-lane; the prisoner was in my service to carry out milk, and receive money - we generally settled accounts every night, but when she receives bills she gave me that money immediately, and took the receipt either that evening or next morning - I always receipt the bills myself. On the 14th of November she did not give me any money from Mrs. Scott - I found it out on the 26th - she said she had received no bill of Mr. Israel's; but I found three had been paid - she was eight or nine months with me, and had 8s. a week.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If a customer leaves the walk, is not the carrier to make it good? A. No. I did not pay all her wages every week, as she robbed me before of 4l., which she was paying off - she never had less than 6s. a week.

MARY SCOTT . I am cook to Mr. Israel, of Kepple-street - the prisoner used to bring the milk. On the 14th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I paid her 4s. 2d. on her master's account - I had no bill for that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She brought you a bill? A. Yes, on the 30th of October, for 4s. 9d., but that was not for this.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271206-70

70. JOHN CORNER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 3 pairs of shoes, 2l. 8s. , the goods of John Bann , his master.

ROBERT COLLINS . I am in the employ of Mr. John Bann, shoemaker , of New Bond-street - the prisoner was in his employ - he was a blocker . On the 23d of November I was directed by another shopman to look into the pocket of his coat, which hung against the wall - I put my hand in, took out one shoe, and asked the prisoner if he knew any thing about it - he said, No - I said, "Do not deny it, for you know the fellow is in your pocket;" he said, "It is all right;" he took the other shoe out of his pocket, and told me to say nothing about it.

HERBERT JOHN CLARK . I am shopman to a pawn

broker, the prisoner came to our shop on the 24th of October, and pledged a pair of shoes for 4s.

JAMES WALLIS . I am shopman to Mr. Aldous, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes which the prisoner pawned.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found these two duplicates on him, and a pair of shoes were delivered me by Collins.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-71

71. GEORGE GARBETT was indicted for embezzlement .

ANN BLAND . I am the wife of John Bland , a baker , of Park-place. The prisoner was about eight days in our employ, and received money on our account.

JOHN BLAND. The prisoner was my servant ; I gave him bills to receive; there was one on Foster for 1l. 3s. 3d., and another on Mrs. Jenkins; I was arrested, and made out my bills, and gave him them to receive.

GEORGE BARDETT . I work for Mrs. Foster, of Oxford-street: I paid the prisoner 1l. 3s. 3d. on the 18th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, for Mr. Bland.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What was it for? A. Bread, which my mistress had; I saw it delivered every day; none of it was for peas: here is the receipt; I never saw him before.

ELIZABETH JENKIN . My husband is a gardener; we live in Chester-mews; I paid the prisoner 2s. on Bland's account one Monday, two days before Bland was liberated.

JOHN BLAND. Q. Did you desire the prisoner to receive these bills? A. Yes; I gave them to my wife for him; the money was never brought to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he a journeyman? A. Yes; he was to have 14s. a week; I had paid him nothing; I ordered him myself to collect the bills.

ANN BLAND. I sent the prisoner for these bills; he accounted to me on the 18th of October; he gave me 5s. from Foster, and said that was all they could pay then, but on Wednesday they would pay the rest; he said Jenkin was so ill she could not pay any money; on Wednesday he gave me 7s. more from Foster.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you pay him his wages? A. They were not due; I paid him 3s.; I did not give him leave to keep these sums for wages; he had been but sixteen days with us; I authorised him to go and sell twelve quarts of peas, and bring the money to me, not to pay his wages; I never had the money - Mr. Bland's mother was not at the house - she lives in the country - there was an execution in the house, but the peas had not been seized - the officer saw me send them out.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-72

72. JAMES COBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 2 purses, value 4d., 9 sovereigns, and 15 shillings, the property of Joseph Nicholls , from his person .

JOSEPH NICHOLLS. I am a labourer . On the 19th of November I went to Taylor's, the Queen's Head public-house, to inquire for a person to do a job, but he was not there; I saw the prisoner there - he asked me to give him a job - I said I was going to Billingsgate, and was not sure I should buy any thing, but he might go with me; we went together; I gave him 1s. to carry a tub of herrings to Taylor's, in Holborn : we had some beer on the road, and had another pot at Taylor's; I had 9l. 15s. in my purse, in my right hand pocket. I am certain, and think there was more; I fell asleep there, and when I awoke the people said my money was gone - I asked the prisoner about it - he said he knew nothing of it - I said, "You shall not go till an officer comes;" an officer came, and found both my purses on him, with seven sovereigns and some silver.

EUSEBIUS BEAL . I am a constable. I was fetched to the Queen's Head public-house - the prosecutor told me he had been robbed, and was sure the prisoner was the man - he said he had not got it, and knew nothing of it - I searched, and found these two purses, three sovereigns, and 3s. 6d., in his right-hand breeches pocket.

JAMES TERRY . I went with Beal to take the prisoner: he was muddy - he had been fighting a few minutes before - I felt something in his fob, and found four sovereigns there - he was not quite sober.

JOSEPH NICHOLLS . These two purses are mine - I cannot swear to the money, or say whether my pocket was buttoned.

Prisoner. I did not take his money from him - I picked it off the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-73

73. MARY LEICESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 purse, value 6d., and 7 sovereigns, the property of Thomas Hopkins , from his person .

THOMAS HOPKINS. I am a labourer ; I worked for Mr. Weaver on the 25th of November, and as I was returning that evening about half-past nine o'clock, I met the prisoner in William-street; she accosted me, and said, "Excuse me, I am taken very ill, will you stop and take care of me." I believed her, and said I would - she appeared very ill. I stood with her some time, and asked how she was; she said she found herself better, and said "Let me walk alongside of you, will you." I said she might - she did so till we came to the bottom of the street, and then asked me to go and have something to drink. I said No; but she urged it, saying, "Do come - I'll treat you with any thing you like for your kindness." I went, and had a glass of peppermint, and she a glass of gin - we came out; she asked me to have something else. I said I would rather not; she said she found herself perfectly well, and I must go and have something else. I said, I thought she had better go home; she made me go to another house - she called for a pot of beer, and warmed it, and had some gin in it - she offered it to three or four other people, who drank; she then said she would have another pot, which was brought; she had paid for the first, and was going to pay for the second - I said she should not, as she had paid for the other. I took out my purse, took out a sovereign, and got change. I put the change into my purse, drew the ring down on my money, and put it into my pocket again; when we had drank the beer, I told her to take up her money again; we came out together, and she

said, "Will you see me home?" I said Yes; we went on till we came to Lady Daker's alms-houses, at Westminster ; we came to a passage there; she said "This way." I said"Do you live down there" - she said Yes; she said at the corner, "My pattens are off, will you pick them up." I stooped to do so, turned round, and she was gone - I missed my money instantly. I pursued her a little way. I then went to a public-house, and found a constable. I described her to him - she was taken next morning; the purse and six sovereigns were found.

HENRY DALY . I am a constable. Hopkins described the prisoner to me. I found her next morning at No. 23, Tothill-street. I told her I took her for taking seven sovereigns from a man last night."Poh! poh! nonsense" said she, and wanted to push by me - she got a few yards off; I seized her, and called on Hopkins, who said, "That is the woman, I will swear to her;" she then said "It is all right, I have taken care of it for him," and said, she would go with me, and show me where they were. I wanted to search her, but she said her husband knew nothing about it, and I did not. I went with her to her friend's house, where she said she had left them; she said, on the road, that she had got four sovereigns in her stocking. I made her let it down, and give me them out - they were in this purse; when we got to her friends, we found two more, which she said she had left there.(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Kensington; the prosecutor offered me his arm, I was ill; he asked me to drink, and wanted to go home with me. I said, I could not, as my husband was at home; he then gave me the purse, which I believe he thought had only got the change of the sovereign in it. I went home, and on finding what was in it, I left the two sovereigns with a friend, and gave up the others.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-74

74. MARY MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 6 half-crowns, and 2 shillings, the monies of Robert Anthony Cluse , from his person .

ROBERT ANTHONY CLUSE. I am a labourer belonging to the East India Company. On the 2d of December, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I was in Gray's Inn-lane, having spent the evening with a friend in Whitechapel; the prisoner accosted me in Gray's Inn-lane - we were together three or four minutes. I had 17s. in my breeches pocket, and 10d. in my waistcoat-pocket - I felt it safe not a moment before, as I kept my hand in my pocket. I had not spoken to her; she came up to me as I passed the end of a court, put her hand round my neck, and said "My dear, how are you?" and in a moment a man passed by. I said, "What the d - l are you about?" and missed my money directly. I charged her with it - she said, "Oh! my dear, if you are fond of going to the watch-house, you shall go." I asked her three times for my money; she said she had not got it. I gave her in charge. I had been drinking.

EVAN WILLIAMS . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in. Cluse charged her with robbing him of 17s. or 18s. I searched her in the back room; she at first said she had only 1s. 6d. I found 2s. on her. I then came out, and on the spot she had stood, I found 17s. - nobody else had been there - it must have come from her. Cluse was not drunk, he gave a distinct account of the transaction.

JAMES BOSTOCK . I was in Gray's Inn-lane, and saw the prosecutor give the prisoner in charge, for robbing him of nearly 1l. of silver.

ROBERT ANTHONY CLUSE . My money was half-crowns and shillings. I had 17s. 10d., but found the 10d. in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-75

75. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 carpet-bag, value 5s. , the goods of Hinton Brown Foster .

JOHN MUNROE . I am servant to Hinton Brown Foster, a trunk-maker , of New-street, Covent-garden . I missed this carpet-bag from the door on the 15th of November, and saw it again on the 23d.

JANE HUGHES . I keep a clothes-shop, at No. 29, Monmouth-street. On the 15th of November the prisoner came to sell this bag; I asked how he came by it - he said a boy gave it him. I gave him in charge with it.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-76

76. JOHN ALDGATE and HENRY JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 2 stoves, value 16s. , the goods of Mary Shirley .

RICHARD BEDFORD . I am a watchman. On the 14th of November, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners together, about three hundred yards from Mrs. Shirley's house; I suspected them, took off my great coat, and watched them till six o'clock, when the watch goes off; as soon as I had given up my coat I ran back, and saw the prisoners, with each a stove, about fifty yards from Mrs. Shirley's, in Wynyatt-street ; I and Grove secured them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What time was it then? A. It was going on for seven o'clock; there was a woman with them, but we let her go to secure the men - I have not seen her since.

THOMAS GROVE . I am a watchman. I was with Bedford - we saw the prisoner with a woman, at five o'clock, and watched them above an hour. I took off my coat, returned, and met the woman; I went on towards Mrs. Shirley's, and met the prisoners, with each a stove on his shoulder - we secured them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the woman appear to be directing them to the house? A. No, by no means. I have not seen her since.

MARY SHIRLEY . This is my house. I know these stoves to be mine; they were fixed to my house. I am a widow. They fit the fire-places: one was in the first floor, and the other on the second - the house was empty.

ALDGATE's Defence. I was stopped by the other prisoner, and a woman in the City-road; they asked if I would earn a shilling, to carry a stove from Wynyatt-street: we went in - she opened the door, and gave us the

stoves out, and told us to go to the City Arms public-house, and wait for her.

JOHNSON's Defence. I met a woman, who hired me to carry the stoves - I was glad to earn 1s.; she told us to take them to the City Arms.

ALDGATE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-77

77. JOHN CARPENTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 dead fowl, value 2s. , the goods of James Wight .

JAMES WIGHT. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Edward-street ; I missed this fowl from my window, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning; I had seen the prisoner and another young man looking about the shop; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner about twenty yards off, with his hands in his pockets. I followed him to Oxford-street, met an officer there, and gave him in charge; the fowl was in his pocket.

RICHARD GODWIN MACE . I took the prisoner, and found the fowl in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing there - a lad came up, and asked me to sell the fowl for him; I went to try: he said, "There are two persons following us, and I stole that;" he went away.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-78

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

78. WILLIAM FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 12 pairs of stockings, value 15s. , the goods of Sarah Solomon .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-79

79. JAMES GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 1 hearth-rug, value 15s. , the goods of James King .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-80

80. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 spade, value 2s., and 1 foot-iron, value 6d. , the goods of William Jessopp .

WILLIAM JESSOPP. I am a labourer , and live at Camden-town. On the 9th of November I left my spade and iron in a shed at Haverstock-hill, Hampstead , where I was working - the shed was not locked; in the morning they were gone. I suspected the prisoner, who worked with us the day before, and accused him of it; he said he did take them on Friday, and they were found in his room.

WILLIAM JEMMISON . I am an officer. I went and took the prisoner at the Britannia public-house, Camden-town; he said he had taken the tools, and that he and another man had sold them at a place in the Hampstead-road, but I found them under his bed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-81

81. WILLIAM DREW was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Simeon Browne .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am shopman to Simeon Browne, a hosier , of High-street, Holborn . On the 17th of November the officer brought in this shawl, about nine o'clock in the evening; I had seen it safe two hours before.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. About nine o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner, with two others, go up to Mr. Browne's shop; a young man was cleaning the windows; one of them went by the side of the ladder, as if to take his attention. The prisoner and another, who he called Frank, immediately ran off towards Drury-lane; I suspected they had something, and followed them to an archway, where I seized the prisoner, and called out some name, to make them think I had somebody at hand; he called out, "Frank, muzzle him," and he immediately attacked me - he was fighting me all the way down to the Coal-yard; I saw a door open, pushed him in, and left him in charge of the man of the house, while I went after the other, but he got away; it was Frank who took the shawl, and put it into his hat - but under the archway he took it out, and was showing it to the prisoner; I seized it: the prisoner was at the doorway with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Holborn, and fell in company with Frederick Bentley and James Rush; I asked where they lived - they said they had nothing to do; that they had been out two nights, and had a good mind to steal something to get a lodging; Rush took the shawl - they ran, and I followed, fearing I should be taken; he was showing it to Bentley, by the gateway.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-82

82. ABRAHAM DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 5 umbrellas, value 20s. , the goods of George Ince .

GEORGE INCE. I am an umbrella-maker , and live in Fashion-street, Spitalfields . I went out at nine o'clock on the morning of the 19th of November; I returned about half-past twelve, and missed five silk umbrellas, which had been standing against the wall. The prisoner had supplied me with whalebone - he had asked me to go with him and buy some whalebone that day, but he came too late, and I told him to come another day.

ELIZABETH BURLING . I am Ince's sister-in-law. - The prisoner came about eleven o'clock, and asked if he was at home; I said No - he went away, and came again with another man, and said my brother-in-law had sent him for five silk umbrellas - he took them up, and went away with them; I did not give them to him.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the other man ask the price? A. No.

GEORGE INCE. I had not sent him for them.

THOMAS NEEDHAM . On the 19th of November, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner brought five silk umbrellas to my place, to sell; I immediately said I knew them, and had sold one of them myself to Ince - I let him go, and ran down to Ince, to tell him, but he was out.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor had offered to keep out of the way for 25s.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-83

83. HANNAH DEMPSEY was indicted for stealing, on

the 23d of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of William Austin .

WILLIAM HENRY HOBBS . I am a shopman to William Austin, a pawnbroker , of Old Gravel-lane . About half-past eleven o'clock at night, on the 23d of November, the prisoner, and four men; were in the shop; two Irishmen came in, and looked at some shirts; the prisoner came in and took down these shoes; I asked if she was going to buy them; she said she had no money, and while I was showing the other men a hat, I suddenly missed the shoes; I put my arm round her waist, and she pulled her hand out of her pocket, with the shoes in it; the four men tried to get her from me; one of them put his fist in my face; the shoes were under her gown.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and took the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded intoxication; and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-84

84. THOMAS FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 cheese, value 12s. , the goods of Frederick Johnson Everard .

FREDERICK JOHNSON EVERARD. I am a cheesemonger , and live at Kingsland. On the 26th of November, on coming home, I thought I missed two cheeses, but am certain that I lost one; I went to Gibson's house, and she desribed the prisoner to me; I went and took this cheese from under his smock-frock, in about ten minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you any mark on it? A. No, but I am certain it is mine.

EMMA GIBSON . I saw two men at the prosecutor's step, as I went in for some butter; I came out in a few minutes - they still stood there; they passed me in a few moments - the prisoner was one, and he had the cheese; I knew him before. Mr. Everard came to me, and I told him they had gone towards Dalston.

JOHN CHAMBERS . I am an officer. I received him in charge; he said it was a bad job, he was very sorry, and cried very much.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-85

85. SAMUEL BALL and JAMES TOVEY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 2 harrows, value 4l. , the goods of James Doggett .

JAMES DOGGETT. I am a farmer , and live at Stoke Newington . On Tuesday, the 27th of November, two harrows were missed out of my ground; some parts of them are here, and part seemed to have been burned; I believe these to be part of my harrows, as they are of a particular make, and one has been mended in a singular way; I knew Tovey - I have heard of Ball.

THOMAS DOGGETT . I am the prosecutor's nephew. I went with the officer to search Tovey's house, where we found this iron work, and these pieces of burnt wood; I am positive this iron belonged to my uncle's harrows.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any particular mark on this iron? A. No; but I know this piece - it is a chain, which I put on myself; I knew it again directly - it is not fit for a harrow, but I put it on as we had no better - it is not commonly used for such a purpose; and here is another piece I know.

WILLIAM HARVEY . I am a servant to Mr. Doggett. I know his harrows very well, and was at work with them on the 23d of November; I missed them on the 27th - I am certain these irons belong to them - here is every thing corresponding with the iron, and some of the wood-work matches it - it would not match other wood-work; I can swear to this iron - it is the coupling of the harrows; it came apart one day, and I fastened it together, and can swear to it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You mended it? A. Yes, as well as I could - I know all the iron.

ROBERT BOYD . I am a servant to Mr. Doggett. On Tuesday, the 27th of November, I went to work in the field, and missed the harrows; I had seen them two or three days before; I informed master, and we afterwards traced them from where they had been, across two fields, over a hedge, then over two fields and a bank, to within one hundred yards of Tovey's house; I saw Ball at the gate of the house: I went and got Brown, the officer; he told me to go in and see what the sawing, which we heard, was about. I went in, and saw Ball sawing up the harrows; I touched him, and said, "Samuel, I am sorry for you." Here is the piece he was cutting; I then called in Brown; we took Ball and the harrows; I am positive they are master's - I saw them making, and used them many times about the farm. Tovey was not there; I remained in the house while Ball was taken to the watch-house - I could swear to the harrows from a hundred.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any private mark on them? A. Here are three nails in one piece, where it had been broken. I understand Benjamin Ball has left the country - I have not seen him since the transaction; I have heard he lived in the same house; I know Tovey has lodgers.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I went to the watch-house with Ball; I found part of the property in Tovey's closet, and part in the fire; Tovey's girl was cutting up part of the wood with a pick-axe; the iron was in a loft; I took Tovey at the workhouse, where he was at work; he said he was innocent.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not other people live in his house? A. Yes, a woman and a man; I saw the woman there - she might be Mrs. Tovey, for what I know; Benjamin Ball, and all the rest of them, were there; I cannot find him - I believe he has absconded; I did not see Tovey in the house.

JOSEPH DUSSETT . I took Tovey in charge.

BALL's Defence. Tovey was not at home.

BALL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

TOVEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-86

86. SAMUEL BALL and JAMES TOVEY were again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 6 pewter pots, value 3s. , the goods of Frederick Homer .

ROBERT BROWN . I found six pewter pots in Tovey's house, when I searched it, and a quantity of melted metal - it was all in the loft with the iron.

JOHN HOMER . I am the son of Frederick Homer; these pots are his.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-87

87. JAMES TOVEY was again indicted for stealing,

on the 28th of November , 2 tin cans, value 2s. , the goods of John Judge .

HENRY PAYNE . I am servant to John Judge, a publican, at Hackney; these cans are his.

ROBERT BROWN . I found these pots with the metal.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-88

88. JOHN MORTON was indicted for that he, on the 12th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone, feloniously did threaten to accuse one Richard Anthony Salisbury , of a certain infamous crime (that is to say) of having attempted to, and endeavoured to commit the abominable crime of b-gg-y with him, the said John Morton, with a view and intent to extort and gain from the said Richard Anthony Salisbury, a certain sum of money, (i.e.) the sum of 50l. his monies, against the statute, &c.

2d COUNT, for feloniously accusing, &c. as in the first count.

3d COUNT. that he feloniously did accuse the said Richard Anthony Salisbury of having made solicitation and persuasion to the said prisoner, whereby to move and induce him to permit the said abominable crime of b-g-g-y to be committed by the said Richard Anthony Salisbury, with him the said John Morton, with a view and intent to extort and gain from the said Richard Anthony Salisbury, the sum of 50l.

4th COUNT, for feloniously threatening to accuse, &c. as in the third count.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS, BARRY, and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MARY WEBSTER . I am cook and housekeeper to Mr. Salisbury; the prisoner was in the same service; soon after he came into the service, he asked me if master had not been accused of an unnatural crime - I told him the report had been so, but I did not believe it; he said he had heard many such reports, and if he offered such a thing to him, he would make him repent it - he would make him pay for it; he said more than once, that he would make him pay for it; before he came into the service, which was on the 7th of July, (I think,) master had broken his arm, and went out of town in consequence of the accident; this conversation took place before he left town.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did this conversation take place? A. I think three or four days after the prisoner came into the house - I am sure he did not come into the service before July; he remained in master's service till the 10th of September.

Q. How many times did he go out of town in company with the prosecutor? A. I do not know - I have been with master nearly three years.

Q. Were you with him at the time of the present charge? A. No - I lived with him four years, two years ago. and then left him - I returned in July, the prisoner and I both came the same night - I was aware such a charge had been previously made against master - I had left on account of ill-health - I did not inform master, or any body, of the conversation I had with the prisoner - I was first told to come here and give evidence, the day before yesterday - I know nothing of the bill being found in September.

Q. Did you hear a word from your master, or any body, about your coming here, before last Tuesday? A. Not positively; master broke his arm on the 11th of June, I believe - I called there a few days after accidentally; and heard he wanted a servant - I had called many times since I had left him, and he had spoken to me about coming again, but I was in service; when he left town I do not know where he went; he left town with the prisoner more than once - I cannot say how many times: my master first told me I was to come here - I have not been examined by his attorney.

COURT. Q. Were you not examined by some gentleman previous to coming here? A. I was asked a few questions - I do not know whether it was taken down.

RICHARD ANTHONY SALISBURY. I am in the sixty-eighth year of my age, and live at No. 18, Queen-street, Edgware-road. Some years ago I was accused by a person of an attempt to commit an unnatural offence upon him - I was not brought to trial; the man's name was Tomes. About the middle of June last I broke my arm in three places, and crushed my hip - I could not turn in bed for some weeks - I keep two men servants, but at that time I had but one; he was going to leave, and I wanted additional assistance - I had seen the prisoner repeatedly before that, working in the garden of Mr. Jenkins, in the New-road, where I was in the habit of buying plants: knowing the prisoner there, I engaged him; he brought me a written character, which I knew to be true, from other circumstances; he had before that applied to me, to recommend him to another situation, and, in consequence of my accident, I engaged him for four months positively, and said, if the situation suited him, I would do something more for him - I was labouring under the effects of my indisposition all this time, and required the constant attendance of a man servant, and now I can put on my braces, but cannot button them, or my shirt, my nerves are so paralysed - I shall never have the full use of my hands again - I left town, and took the prisoner with me, not only for assistance for myself, but for recreation for him, and to introduce him to the gardens - I went to Maldon Wells, to the Well's House, which is an hotel; the prisoner went with me; this was in September. On Sunday morning, the 9th of September, I went up into my bed-room, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and to my surprise, I found him dressed for travelling, when I expected to find him in his usual morning jacket - I expressed my surprise, and he said, "Sir, to be plain with you, I must be off; if you will give me 50l. I will go off to Liverpool, and never give you any more trouble, but if you do not, I will accuse you of an unnatural crime."

Q. Did he explain, whether Liverpool was the end of his journey? A. Not at that time; I told him he was a villain, to go to hell, and leave my presence; he immediately left the room - I was sick, and a full hour before I recovered myself - I then went down, and inquired after him; he was not to be found; I sent all my servants to seek him - I did not see him again at Maldon - I was at that time in my usual morning dress: when I put on my coat and waistcoat I found a letter in my waistcoat pocket (looking at one) - this is it; it was in the pocket of my dinner dress clothes - I can swear it is his handwriting - I had opportunities of seeing him write before - I travelled post all night, and arrived in town on Monday

- I drove to an hotel, and next day went to my residence in town, but I went to consult my attorney as soon as I came to town - I did not sleep at home till next night; my servant presented me with this letter (looking at it) the morning after I slept in town; the direction does not look like the prisoner's writing, but the contents I have no doubt are his; I had gone to my house early on Tuesday morning, and laid down, and got up at eight o'clock; I went to Bow-street on Monday night, about the letter I received at Maldon, and then again on Tuesday, about this other letter. I remember going home on Wednesday night, the 12th of September, in company with my servant Scott; when we got to Queen-street, the watchman was going past ten o'clock; I told Scott to stop and get something, which he did; and, while I was walking by myself, I saw the prisoner; he came over the street to me, and immediately said, "Will you give me the 50l.?" I said, "Go along with you, villain! I will hold no converse with you"- I was alarmed, and the watchman was at a distance - I retreated, and saw Scott coming - I then went on, wishing to get into my own house - the prisoner came up again, and said, "If you will not give me the 50l. I will accuse you of an unnatural crime; but if you will, I will be off to Dublin, and you shall hear no more of it" - he said this in a very loud, menacing, passionate tone, the last time, but not the first - Scott was close behind me the last time, and there was a man named Smith there, I did not know him at that time, but he was coming the other way - I think he must have heard the words Morton uttered - he might have been heard across the street - I said I would give him in charge; he took to his heels, and ran down Seymour-place, and I rushed into my own house - I afterwards consulted Mr. Adams; he thought fit to get an indictment, and we went and got the bill - Mr. Smith left his address; we wrote to him, but he was not to be found then; we had a warrant against the prisoner before this: I employed people to search diligently for him; I left the business with my attorney - he was taken a long time afterwards. I had a letter from an attorney, named Woolley before he was taken. I attended at Bow-street on Saturday, the 10th of October, to identify the prisoner, but he was not there - I attended again on a Monday, in November, and saw him - I had in the mean time been in communication with the Magistrates at Bow-street, as so to attend them if I was wanted.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You say the prisoner was taken a long time after you obtained the warrant; on your oath, was he taken at all, or did he surrender? A. He did not surrender; Smith took him into custody; he is an officer, and got the warrant from the other officers - I found the bill in September - I had a warrant before that; and another after finding the bill - the Magistrate gave it to Taunton, and he let Smith have it.

Q. On your oath, do not you know the warrant never was executed? A. No; I did not desire it should not be executed - I know he was taken on the Monday - I do not believe that he voluntarily surrendered to the charge - there was an appointment made by Woolley, his attorney, to meet me there, but whether he came in custody I do not know - I did not see him come - I believe he was there before me - I did not see him till he was in the office - I believe he was in custody, but I do not know the forms of the place - I went to the Portugal hotel, Fleet-street, on coming to town - I did not sleep there, or sleep at all, I was so agitated - I passed the night partly at the hotel and partly walking up and down, and at five o'clock in the morning I got home - I had not spent much time at the hotel - I went to Bow-street on the Monday evening; I got to town about twelve o'clock on Monday morning, then went to consult my attorney, and went to Bow-street at seven o'clock in the evening, when they met - I staid there an hour at least.

Q. Where did you go to from Bow-street office? A. I am not certain; I went to a public-house opposite - I do not know the sign - I am a gentleman, living on my fortune - I have some times been in a common public-house- I took some coffee, and remained there perhaps half an hour - Scott was with me; he did not take coffee with me; I will not swear that - I walked homeward after that - I continued to walk homewards till twelve o'clock; it might be nine before I left the public-house - I walked up and down Portman-square - I had my reasons for not going home; I was unhappy, and walking relieved me; I was relieved in some degree at twelve o'clock.

Q. Why did not you go home at twelve o'clock? A. I did not choose it - I was unhappy, and went meditating; I was in a nervous frame of mind: that is the only reason I give for not returning home - I felt no inclination to go home - Portman-square is near my residence, but I walked up and down Edgware-road till five o'clock, and then went home - I was better at five o'clock, but not much - Scott left me in the street, I cannot recollect the precise place, probably near some of the streets turning from Oxford-street, before I got to Portman-square - he might leave me about nine o'clock, I cannot say - I paced the square several times - I got home at five o'clock; I have always the key of the area-gate - all my servants were in bed when I got home - Scott and the female servant were in bed.

Q. How came you to go home then? A. Because I chose; my mind was materially relieved.

Q. Were you not directed by your attorney to go home as fast as you could? A. He might - the prisoner came into my service early in July - I once told him when I saw him at Jenkins' nursery, that I knew a situation that would suit him - I do not recollect telling him what situation it was - I had seen him at the nursery frequently before I told him this, and he had applied to me two or three times before I hired him, for a gardener's place - I swear that he was not an acquaintance of mine - I had seen him there, and I have recommended gardeners to some of the best places in the kingdom.

Q. Had he introduced himself to you? A. He had come and asked me the name of plants repeatedly - he was told I was a botanist - all the men at Jenkins' know that; when he asked me to get him a situation, I said I would if I could, and about a fortnight before I hired him myself, I told him I knew of a situation which would just suit him - I do not know that I told him whose place it was; on the 6th of July I went to Jenkins', and told him I would take him myself.

Q. Did you not tell him that was the situation you spoke of? A. No, but I had seen him a handy clever fellow. I said he would have to take care of the plants in my courtyard, and do a great deal in the house besides, and I would

give him all the instruction in my power; that his wages would be 40l. a year, and if he behaved well, they should be 50l.

Q. Did you tell him, that after your decease, he would be provided for? A. I told him, at my decease, all my servants would have a sum left them, if they had continued a year with me, which, by my will they are entitled to; he told me he was in a destitute situation. I said he should have 5l. in advance, and he had a sovereign of it. I cannot recollect telling him he should have 5l. that evening.

Q. Did you not tell him you had a woman making a silk waistcoat for him? A. That was afterwards. I did tell him so - he wished to have one like mine; it was soon after he came, because he had not clothes to appear in - he had clothes of every description made for him. I ordered a blue coat for him when he came into my service, He brought some plants home to me.

Q. When he brought them into your parlour, did you not tell him to try on the silk waistcoat? A. I cannot tell - there were two silk waistcoats; which do you mean?

Q. Which did he try on when he came to you with plants, as the servant of a market-gardener? A. That was the blue one.

Q. On that occasion did you give him 5l.? A. I believe I might. I do not know whether I gave him the first or second - he had 10l. in advance. I have no garden at my house - there are between two and three hundred plants in pots; every upper servant I have had used to take care of them.

Q. Give me the name of one? A. The last man I had turned out insane; James Crawley, who is now with Lord Foley used to take care of them.

Q. On the 13th of July, did you give the prisoner a brooch? A. Yes, a very handsome one, similar to one I have here - they are called diamonds, but I believe they are not. I did not give him a chain, seals, and key - they were to be deducted from his wages - the brooch was a gift. I let him have an old coat of mine in July - it was too small, but he wore it a few days till another was made for him. I went to Seven Oaks in company with him, in my own carriage, as my servant and companion, his behaviour was such, I treated him with uncommon kindness.

Q. Did you not pass him off at Seven Oaks as your intimate friend? A. No; but he was a very amusing man; he would tell several stories like Denisan, in the Arabian Nights; that was not entirely the reason I took him in my carriage, for he had the tooth-ache very bad, and he is an incomparable mimic, he can take you or any body off; he said, "Will you allow me to amuse you, by seeing how I can behave myself like a gentleman." I took him to the Duke of Dorset's garden, and took his arm there, as I was lame, and wanted assistance; we did not go into the gardens - we walked round. I wanted assistance to walk up the hills in the Duke's park.

Q. Was he equally serviceable to drink punch with you? A. Yes; I passed him off as my friend at the Crown Inn - we slept in a double bedded room there, at his particular desire - no infirmity of mine made it necessary; the reason he assigned was, that he should be ready to assist me.

Q. On the oath you have taken, (it is my duty to ask), after taking your tea and punch, and retiring at that inn, did you not ask him to come into your bed? A. Never, never, nothing like it. I never said any thing about*****, nor had we any conversation about women on that journey, I am quite sure; he was particularly delicate with me, and never talked on any b-w-dy subject, nor did I to him - it is all an invention of his own. I missed some rings when I arrived in London, in August, and wrote to him on the subject. I addressed him "J. Morton, Esq." to indulge his whim and frolic, at his request, and because I had represented him as my intimate friend. I have repented it but once since. I do not recollect telling him I had made an Esquire of him, and would do more for him yet; I believe I did take him to the Bank with me in August - he might go. I did not tell him he was to do all my business for me. I said he might have to do business - we went to Blackwall together - I fed him on white-bait, and we had punch together. I bought him a gold ring - I do not recollect whether it was the same day, or what I gave for it. I told him at first that I would make him look like a gentleman.

Q. Did you, on the 4th of September, order him to come to town to buy a gold keeper? A. Yes; I went to Mr. Walker's, but could not get one. I bought silk stockings and gloves. I do not recollect whether he went arm-in-arm with me. I went to Worcester with him about the 5th of September; the carriage was at my door at nine o'clock, and the prisoner was told to get up behind, and he got inside at Kensington - it was his wish. I did not take Scott that day as he was ill, and thought he might be unwell on the road - his going was talked of. I do not know whether I told him why I did not take him.

Q. Did you on that occasion give the prisoner 25l.? A. Yes, to pay for the journey. I do not recollect how much it was - I will not swear it was not 25l. I did not tell him the cheaper he travelled, the better, as he should have the rest when he got there, or that if he got off a large portion of the expences, I would put the rest in the Saving-bank for him. I travelled on to Oxford, and met Dr. Williams, a professor of botany - I did not introduce the prisoner to him as a young gentleman fond of botany, but as a young man fond of gardening and botany; I do not believe I introduced him as a gentleman - I might, I will not swear I did not. I did tell Dr. Williams I and my companion were on a botanical tour; we had a double bedded room at Woodstock, at his desire. I got a medical mixture for him at the next house, and it relieved him; he said he had an eruption in his shoulder - I told him he must rub it - I did not see him do it; I was in the same room, but the curtain was drawn - I swear I did not see him use it; he was in the arm-chair by the side of his bed - I was on the other side of the room, and in bed. I did not see him naked - he always saw me in bed before he undressed - I had supper and punch with him. I never went by a different name on my travels with him - I know nothing of the name of Malcolm - my family name is Markham; I had 10,000l. to change it, and have the King's sign manuel to do so.

Q. Did you tell the landlady your name was Markham? A. He wished it to be done. I am acquainted with the classics - I have read Virgil, in Latin, and Homer, in Greek - I recited passages to him, and he began to learn Latin; I have heard him lessons. I have been charged with a similar offence before.

Q. Now, on the oath you have taken, before your Ma

ker, and as you shall answer it before your Maker, did you ever, at Woodstock, Oxford, or any other place, take any indecent liberties with the prisoner, when you slept in a double bedded room? A. Never.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was he to be your servant out of livery? A. Yes - I let him have these things because he was not fit to be seen; the clothes were to be deducted from his wages. I made him these presents at his desire; he wished to appear a gentleman, and to dress like me; I never introduced him to any individual as my companion, nor took him to any party of friends, as my equal; he always waited on me as my servant, but when we were alone this familiarity took place. On our journey to Seven Oaks and Maldon I had 250l. about me, and he said it would be safer by sleeping in a double bedded room, and he wanted me to buy pistols.

Q. You say you walked the street in great agitation - had you not been out of bed two nights? A. Yes - I went in at five o'clock, and went to bed. I left the warrants to my attorney, and left word with the Magistrate where I might be found at any time. I was never out of the way, but was always ready to meet this, and the former charge. I went to Bow-street, expecting to meet the prisoner and Woolley.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How often had you seen him write? A. Repeatedly, in the house - he has written copies and bills, and several verses, which he took down; I swear both letters are his writing - part of the second letter is in pencil, but it is all his.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were any proceedings taken against you, on the receipt of the first letter? A. No.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were there never any proceedings from any person on his behalf? A. Yes, from a man named Barton - that was shortly after the receipt of the first letter.

The letters being read were as follows: -(First Letter.) Holywell House, September 9, 1827.

SIR - I have to let you know that, owing to the treatment I have received from you since I left London, I am compelied to take an opportunity of vindicating my character, and declaring your guilt to the world at large. I leave here with the intention of proceeding to London, and from thence to a gentleman's residence, who will vindicate my cause; you may depend on hearing from me, by letter, on your arrival in London, until which time I intend to exercise my faculties to the utmost, in making an appeal to the tribunal of justice of my country, where I doubt not I shall have justice done me. As I cannot consent to s-d-y being committed on my person, I find it useless stopping longer in your service.

I am your injured Servant, J. MORTON.

N. B. I intend to prosecute as far as the law of my country will allow, so that you have very little to expect, and the sooner you proceed to London the better for you.(Second Letter.)

SIR - If you will send a certain person 50l. as soon as you return, he will go directly to Dublin: you will repent if you do not. Your sincere Friend.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am servant to Mr. Salisbury, and have been so from the 5th of August - the prisoner was there before me; he and master went to Maldon. On Monday, the 10th of September, I saw the prisoner, when he returned - I did not expect to see him alone; I went to him afterwards, (in consequence of a person calling on me,) to a public-house opposite our house, and saw him; I said I was surprised to see him, and asked where master was; he said he had left him at Worcester; I said, "How so?" he said, master intended to discharge him as soon as he came to London, and he thought he would take the opportunity first, so he had written a letter, and left him; he then gave me his address, and told me if master gave me any money, I should know where to bring it to him, but I was not to let master, or any body else, know his address. On Tuesday morning, the 11th, I went into the front area, and picked up a letter, which I took to master, and he read it; I went to the milkman's in two or three hours, and saw the prisoner there, taking brandy and water with the milkman; he told me he was very sorry for what he had done, and did I think master would take him back again - I said I did not know, he had better see master himself; master went to get a warrant against him that night; I saw master in the street on the Wednesday night, and saw the prisoner there: master was at the Portugal hotel - I went to meet him. I was returning with him, about ten o'clock - I was a few yards behind him, and saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards before the house; I recollect seeing the witness Smith; the prisoner went up to master, and asked him for 50l.; master said, "Go along you villain - I will have nothing to do with you;" the prisoner went away a few yards and came up again, and said, "If you don't give me 50l. I will charge you with an unnatural crime; and not leave you a feather in you cap, and if you give me the money I will be off to Liverpool, and you shall hear no more of me;" my master called out Watch! and the prisoner made his escape down Seymour-place, and I saw him no more.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What, did your master go to the Portugal hotel on the 12th? A. Yes; that was not the night he came home; I went home the night he came home; I did not go to the office with him on the 1st instant - it was Tuesday night - he went home after he had been to the Police-office; I do not know what time he left the office - he went straight home - I was with him, and walked home with him; I cannot tell what time he got home; I think I was at home by ten o'clock; I am certain we were at home before twelve - I went in at the area gate.

Q. Are you quite sure you were not in bed and asleep when your master came home? A. Yes; we went to no public-house, or coffee-shop, as we went home - we did not take tea or coffee together that night, I am sure. The milkman's name is Webber; When I went into master's service, his arm was broken, and in a sling.

Q. Was he capable of walking for eight hours, without being fatigued? A. No.

Q. When you first saw the prisoner after his return, did not he say his master had taken indecent liberties with him? A. No; nor did he say so at the milkman's - I do not recollect his saying any thing of the kind.

Q. Had you never heard of such a thing before? A. No farther than what the prisoner said when he came, and what the housekeeper said. I gave evidence at Bow-street - I do not recollect when I was told to come here.

MR. BARRY. Q. When you first saw your master, what time was it? A. About the middle of the day, on Tuesday.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a grocer, and live at No. 33, Mitre-street, New-cut. On the evening of the 12th of September I was in Queen-street. I saw three persons in a scuffle, as I imagined, and heard Watch! called - it was about the middle of the street; I crossed, and saw a man run away, saying at the same time, "If you don't give me the money, you shall repent it:" this was a little after ten o'clock; I should not know the man; I went up, and saw Mr. Salisbury was one of the persons there; the observation appeared to be addressed to him - I did not know him before - he went into No. 18; I have had no intercourse in the way of trade with him; I left my address, as I was requested; I was not before the Grand Jury, as I was absent, and the bill was found before I returned. I called at Mr. Salisbury's, and received a subpoena to attend last Tuesday.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far were you from the person? A. Within two or three yards - I had not seen the prisoner before; my address was asked of me by the footman.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. About what age and appearance was the person who ran away? A. About the size and appearance of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I never saw Smith till to-night, and never wrote a letter to extort money from Mr. Salisbury, or for any other purpose. Smith is a false witness.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the debased character exhibited by the prosecutor .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-89

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

89. WOOLFRY JAMES MIDDLEDITCH was indicted for embezzling, on the 25th of April , the sum of 11s. 6d.; also, on the 1st of August, 19s. 2d., which he had received on account of Richard Snell and Alexander Bruce .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 38.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18271206-90

90. MARY ANN HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 boots, 5s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of John Hopkins .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-91

91. JAMES GAINSFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 38lbs, weight of potatoes, value 1s. 10d., and 1 bunch of turnips, value 2d. , the goods of Joseph Mash .

JOSEPH MASH . I am a potatoe-dealer , and live on Clerkenwell-green . On the 25th of November I had a person watching outside, who brought in the prisoner, and this property; I knew him before - his father worked for me; he said he had paid me for the things on the Saturday, but I had not seen him for some time.

Prisoner. My mother washed for his man; he said he had no means of paying her, but on Saturday night he said, if she would send on Sunday, he would give her some vegetables; at the watch-house the prosecutor asked if he could punish me and not him, and he sent him away.

JOSEPH MASH. The man and the prisoner have been robbing me for some time. I have sent the man back to his friends, as they are respectable.

JAMES MASH . My cousin set me to watch, and about twenty minutes past seven o'clock on Sunday morning, I saw the prisoner go into the shop with an empty sack, and come out in about two minutes with these articles in it; I followed and brought him back; he said they were paid for on Saturday night.

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am a constable. I took him in charge; he said they were given him by the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-92

92. PETER HEALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 47 yards of flannel, value 39s. , the goods of Jonathan Nicholson and William Nicholson .

RICHARD NICHOLSON . I am shopman to Jonathan and William Nicholson, who are linen-drapers , at Holborn . On the evening of the 24th November, I was at the back of the shop, and saw a man go out with a roll of flannel in his hands. I followed, and he turned round Southampton-buildings; I lost sight of him while he turned - he had got about twenty yards; I called Stop thief! and he threw it down; I took it up, and lost sight of him. Whittingham then came up to me, he brought the prisoner to the shop afterwards, and he said he was obliged to do what he did to live, and that he was in distress.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoner passing and repassing in front of this shop; I crossed the road, and got behind a cabriolet: I then saw him in the shop, drawing the flannel to him; he whipped away with it, and ran down Southampton-buildings - I am certain of his person - I knew him well before; I followed, but lost sight of him; I stopped, took the flannel from the shopman, and went down to where he lived, but did not find him there; I found him at eleven o'clock that night, at a public-house in Chick-lane. I took him to another public-house, in Snowhill, and told him I wanted him for a roll of flannel; he denied it, and said I was wrong. I took him to the shop, and he then said he had done it through distress, and that his mother lay dying.

Prisoner. Q. As you took me to the office, did not you say, "You had better plead guilty, and it will be more in your favour? Witness. I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer came into the public-house, shook hands with me, and said, "I want to speak to you;" I came out, and he said he thought I had stolen some flannel. He took me to the shop, and said I had better confess; I said I knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-93

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

93. WILLIAM TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 3 lbs. of opium, value 45s. , the goods of the London Dock Company .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS POOCK . I am a Thames Police-officer, stationed at the London Docks. On the 10th of November, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came up to the gate, with the rest of the labourers; I searched them all as usual, and suspecting the prisoner, I gave him over to Bolton.

THOMAS BOLTON . I am an officer. Poock handed the prisoner over to me; I found 3 lbs. of opium about him- there was a small piece in the waistcoat pocket, and the rest up his sleeves - it is all in small pieces.

JOHN SCOTT . I am warehouse-keeper at the Docks. On the 10th of November the prisoner was employed in a warehouse where this opium was; I have compared it with what is there; it exactly tallies. I have missed above 50 lbs. from one cask - it is worth 15s. a pound. The prisoner has been upwards of twenty years in the Company's service.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He bore a good character? A. Yes. I believe he has a family.

Prisoner. I found it under the mashes, and was tempted to take it.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-94

94. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of a certain man, whose name is unknown.

JESSEE PHILLIPS . I am a china-dealer. I believe this happened on the 19th of September - it was in the Strand , at a few minutes past eight o'clock in the evening, near Arundel-street; I saw the prisoner and another following a gentleman some distance - Whittingham was with me. On the opposite side of the way, I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from the gentleman's coat pocket, and cross the road, towards me; the gentleman, and another who was with him, both pursued the prisoner; he threw the handkerchief down; I took hold of it. I did not see the prisoner taken - I saw him at the watch-house about half an hour after.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you in the watch-house? A. Yes; I did not hear what name the gentleman gave.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer, and was in company with Phillips on the 21st of September; I saw the prisoner, in company with another, following two gentlemen; I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and then cross towards us; I suppose he saw us, and threw it down: I ran to the spot, and took it up. The prisoner was secured almost immediately, by a street-keeper. I have taken a great deal of trouble, but cannot find Wells, the other man.

Cross-examined. Q. You prosecuted this boy last Session? A. I did. I have stated every thing. The gentleman gave me his name as Thomas Clarke ; I did not ask his address: he appeared a very respectable man - the watch-house-keeper took his name down. I went out in pursuit of the prisoner at that time, as he was not brought in. I did not, to my recollection, swear on the last trial, that I knew the prisoner to be a bad character before.

Q. Did you not swear it in your oath? A. Not this boy - I never knew him before. I believe he was tried on a Monday, towards the evening; the Judge told me I might prefer another bill if I thought proper, and I considered I was bound to do it.

Q. Did you ever say to any body, that it was in consequence of the way you was treated on the trial, that you preferred this bill? A. Not, to the best of my recollection. I think the Grand Jury were discharged on the Wednesday, and I believe it was in the early part of the day; he was discharged from here - I took him up the night after the Sessions; I could not get the copy of the indictment to prefer the bill on Tuesday. I went from here to Mr. Stafford, who made out the bill, and I went before the Jury - I could not force them to have the bill; I told Mr. Clark I had preferred another bill, but the prisoner had been discharged on the evening he was tried. I think they told me he was discharged an hour after the trial.

Q. Did you not say to one of the prisoner's relations, that you preferred the second bill because you considered yourself ill-treated on the last trial, by his counsel? A. No - that I swear positively; I never said so, I swear positively, to any body, nor any thing like it; nor did I swear I knew him to be a boy of bad character.

Q. Do not you know that Sir Richard Birnie let the prisoner out on bail, saying it was the most scandalous thing he ever heard? A. I can vouch safely, if I was to die before I moved, I never knew he was out on bail till yesterday. Phillips appeared on the last trial.

JESSEE PHILLIPS re-examined. Q. When did you hear the prisoner was to take his trial to-day? A. I heard nothing about it till I was sent for this morning, about twenty minutes past nine o'clock. I never knew any thing against the prisoner. Whittingham did not, to my knowledge, say on the last trial, that he knew the prisoner to be a bad character - he knew Wells to be so; to the best of my belief he did not say so of the prisoner.

JURY. Q. Are you in the habit of walking with this officer at night? A. Yes - to detect persons of this description.

MR. PHILLIPS to WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM. Q. Is the street-keeper here? A. No, nor the watch-house-keeper. I believe his Lordship told me on the last trial I ought to have had them here. The Jury did not request that I should not have my expenses - on the contrary, they desired I should have them, and I had two days allowed me.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

JOHN BRIDGER . I was present on the last trial; I was in the gallery, and had a cold; I could not distinctly hear what Whittingham said.

COURT. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. Yes, upwards of seven years. I am a broker, and live at No.29, Great St. Andrew-street. I was one of his bail, for 50l.

- WILLIAMS. I am the prisoner's sister. I never saw Whittingham till I went to him, to inquire where my brother was - that was when he was in Newgate last time; I saw Whittingham the night he took him the second time, directly after: he said he was ordered by Mr. Sergeant Arabin to find another bill, and he was compelled to do it by his conscience. Phillips said, "Bill, you can't lock him up;" he said, "I will take him - I am compelled to to take him;" Phillips said, "If you do, I am blowed if I appear against him, unless I am dragged - you see the lad is going to work." He had worked for his father, as a plasterer, before he was first taken, till within three weeks, and he was still at home till he was taken away.

COURT. Q. Did you ever hear the name of Wells? A. Not till my brother was taken. I saw him in Newgate when my brother was taken.

The prisoner received a good character from five witnesses.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-95

95. JOHN GIBBONS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 4 pairs of pattens, value 4s. , the goods of Mary Little and Ellen Earnshaw .

ROBERT SHILLITOE . I am a fishmonger, and live opposite the prosecutrixs' shop. On the 1st of November I saw the prisoner and another boy near the house; I watched, and saw the other take down a pair of pattens from the door - the prisoner received them into his blue apron, and ran away with them; I pursued, and came up with him in Castle-street, where he threw them down; I took them up, and still pursued him, on to Oxford-street, and did not lose sight of him, except in turning the corners: a gentleman stopped him in Poland-street, and I am certain of his person.

WILLIAM LITTLE . I am in the employ of Mary Little and Ellen Earnshaw. I saw nothing of the transaction, but am certain these pattens are theirs.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-96

96. SAMUEL PIPER and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of David Davis .

DAVID DAVIS. I keep a clothes-shop at Shadwell . On the 21st of November, about one o'clock, Piper came and sold me an old hammock and some blankets - Smith was with him; they were about half an hour in the shop, and when they were gone I missed a waistcoat from the window - they both acted together; I saw them come back about five o'clock; I went and accused them of it - they denied it at first, but afterwards Piper said Smith stole the waistcoat, and put it under his jacket, and after they left the shop he took it from his jacket, and showed it him - I secured them both.

EMANUEL BARNETT . I am a salesman, of Rosemary-lane. On the 21st of November, between one and two o'clock, the prisoners came to my shop, and Smith sold me this waistcoat, for 2s.; I gave it to the officer.

JAMES JEFFRIES . I received the prisoners in charge. This examination is signed by the Magistrate; (read.)"The prisoner Smith says, 'I bought the waistcoat, with a jacket and trousers, four months ago - I might have told Piper I took it out of the shop, but do not recollect it."'

SMITH's Defence. I bought it at Chatham, when I was paid off.

PIPER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-97

97. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 10s., and 1 watch-key, value 1d. , the goods of William Mattocks .

WILLIAM MATTOCKS . I live at Aberdeen. The prisoner lodged at my house, and left on the 3d of November, and took his passage to London; and next day, when I cleaned myself for church, I missed my watch from a chest of drawers in the room he slept in; he sailed that day. - I came to London, and gave information at the Thames Police.

JAMES EVANS . I am an officer. In consequence of information I went on board a smack in the Thames, and saw the prisoner; I asked what he had done with the watch which he took from Aberdeen; he said he had taken no watch; I found this watch in his fob.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I had bought it? A. He did, to the Magistrate.

Prisoner to WILLIAM MATTOCKS. Q. Can you swear I stole it? A. It is mine; he was only three days with me: he came from America.

Prisoner. I bought it of a shipmate who lodged in the house, a quarter of an hour before I came away. Witness. There were two lads lodged in the house; one of them came home drunk that night, and said, "Bill is off with the watch." The prisoner had not seen me use it; his shipmate could get to the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-98

98. JOHN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 coat, value 2s. , the goods of James Crossley .

JAMES CROSSLEY. I am a brush-maker , and live in King-street, Covent-garden . On the 12th of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner followed my boy into the shop, as he was taking down the shutters; I came from the parlour to the passage door - my wife, who was in the parlour, said, "He has got your coat;" I ran out, and caught him eight or ten yards off, with it doubled round him; it had hung on a chair in the shop, a few yards within the door.

JOHN HICKS . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it at the door, and took it up.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-99

99. JOHN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of Manwell Stabayanne .

JAMES BULL . I am coachman to Manwell Stabayanne, the Brazilian Minister . This was the footman's livery great coat. On the 15th of November, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, the carriage was in Earl-street - I got down to light the lamps; the coat was then on the box - I heard a voice say, "Coachman, there goes a man with your coat" - I went behind the carriage, and saw a man going along with it under his arm - I hurried, and when I got near him, I stepped on the coat, and fell down - I then called Stop thief! and the prisoner was stopped by the watchman - I cannot swear he is the man, as I lost sight of him about a minute when I fell.

JOHN FALIN . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running with the coat - I jumped over the coachman, who fell down, and pursued; he dropped the coat, and I took him within a few yards.

ELIZABETH COCHRANE . On the 15th of November, I was out selling things - I gave the coachman a light - I saw the prisoner take the coat down - I hallooed out, and he ran off with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. What they have stated is all false; a man ran on before me; the coachman could not swear I took it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-100

100. JAMES SULLAVAN , JOHN BURGESS , WILLIAM FLOOD and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 lb. of bacon, value 6d., and 24 ozs. of cheese, value 1s. , the goods of John Ellis .

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. On the evening of the 19th of November, about seven o'clock, I saw all the four prisoners together in New Compton-street, trying at a shop-door - I watched them till near nine o'clock; they tried to get into a baker's, a bookseller's, and several shops; they got into Mr. Ellis' in Wardour-street - Burgess had a pair of list shoes on - Smith passed by the shop first; he and Burgess stood for a minute or two - Smith took a piece of cheese or bacon, the other two then went up, and Flood or Sullavan took a piece of something; they then all turned, and ran down a street - I got assistance, and pursued - I pushed them all into a house, and they dropped this cheese and bacon at my feet - I cannot say who dropped it.

JOHN ELLIS . I keep this shop; we had a lad to watch the window; a woman came in and bought something of him - I saw two lads pass the window, and take something, but I thought at first it was my own lad - I can swear to these articles - I have brought the corresponding pieces.

Prisoner BURGESS. Q. Did not you say, that your boy had sold it? A. No.

SULLAVAN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

BURGESS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

FLOOD - GUILTY . Aged 14.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-101

101. HENRY DIGNUM , GEORGE COLLEAPY , and JOHN COPE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Philby , from his person .

HENRY PHILBY. I am an attorney . On the 19th of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Coventry-street, alone, by Great Windmill-street , and felt two or three tugs at my pocket - I thought it might happen from the people passing, and when I came to the end of Windmill-street, Whittingham and another person came and asked if I had lost anything - I said, "Yes, my handkerchief;" Whittingham took me down the Hay-market, and pointed out the three prisoners; we followed and took them at the end of the Haymarket, in the act of picking another gentleman's pocket; my handkerchief was found in Dignum's hat; this it it.

Prisoner DIGNUM. Q. Can you swear you did not drop it? A. That I cannot tell.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. I saw the three prisoners following Mr. Philby - I followed and saw them several times try his pocket - I had followed them through Leicester-square, and when we got through the alley, I crossed rather to the left; they went to the right, and near the end of Coventry-street, I saw them close on the prosecutor, but could not perceive which of them took any thing; directly afterwards I saw Colleapy and Dignum hold a handkerchief up to the gas-light - I immediately crossed, and asked Mr. Philby if he had lost any thing; he said Yes; we went down the Haymarket, following the prisoners, who were dancing down the street; a gentleman and lady were going down; they went and attempted the gentleman's pocket; I said "This is the time"- I drew my staff; we ran over and took them into a coffee-house. I found Mr. Philby's handkerchief in Dignum's hat.

COLLEAPY's Defence. I was three streets behind the others.

DIGNUM's Defence. If he saw me hold the handkerchief up, why not take me then?

DIGNUM - GUILTY . Aged 20.

COLLEAPY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

COPE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-102

102. JOHN SELWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 watch, value 30s., and 1 seal, value 6s. , the goods of Edward Rickards .

EDWARD RICKARDS. I live in Rudduck's-buildings, Long-alley, Bishopsgate . On the 20th of October, when I went home, about nine o'clock at night, I missed my watch from the mantel-piece; it was safe in the morning, when I went out, and I then left the prisoner, who lodged with me, in bed; he had access to the room; he was gone at night, but we had given him notice to quit; he came back on the Sunday week following, and said, "I understand you have got a warrant against me" - I said, "I have, for taking my watch and seal; did you take it?" he said, "That you have got to find out."

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say, if I gave up the ticket, you would not proceed? A. I did.

BRIDGEGET RICKARDS . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went out about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and on returning in half an hour, the watch was gone - I never gave the prisoner leave to take it; we always found him honest - I believe he was in distress.

JOHN MARTIN HAIGH . I am shopman to Mr. Brown, a pawnbroker, of Fetter-lane. On the 20th of October the prisoner pawned this watch.

PETER KELLY . I live in the house. Mrs. Rickards desired my wife to listen to her child, while she was out, and the door was left open, that we might hear; the prisoner went up stairs, came down in about five minutes, and went out; my wife, said, "Are you not going to stop till Mrs. Rickards comes in?" he said he should be back in five minutes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-103

103. GEORGE VANE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 gallon of chesnuts, value 1s., and a basket, value 4d. , the goods of John Parkins .

JANE PARKINS . I am the wife of John Parkins; we keep a chandler-shop in Little George-street, Bethnal-green . On the 25th of November, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was in bed, in my room; my husband was gone out for milk. I heard a noise at the shop-door, and called out "Who is there?" twice, and received no answer; I called again, and the prisoner answered, "Me, don't you know me?" I said "No, what do you want?" he said,"Some tobacco, can't you serve me?" I said "No, I am

in bed, my husband will be in shortly;" he said he would come again in a quarter of an hour; I heard a bustle, got to the foot of my bed, looked into the shop, and saw him lifting the basket of chesnuts - I ran out just as I was, and caught hold of him; he got away from me with the basket. I said, "I know you;" he has been in my shop before and taken things - I have cautioned him about it; he drew me to the street-door, and then I drew back; he took the basket out, but dropped the chesnuts about the street; he was taken on the Tuesday following - he lived a little way off.

JOHN COOKE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; the prosecutrix said he was the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove I was in bed and asleep at the time.

CHARLES BULL . I live in Ram-alley, and am a willow-cutter; the prisoner has lodged with me for two years, and works for me. Last Sunday week, at the time this robbery is charged, he was in bed; I will swear before God, my maker, I roused him up myself at eight o'clock, and sent him to this very shop for a pint of beer - I did not send him there, but her husband tells me he went there - he brought no basket back; I heard the clock strike eight, and then roused him, as I often do, for he is fond of sleep. I know the clock struck eight, but the husband told me he came a quarter before eight, and the woman said it was a few minutes to seven, which I know to be false - I counted the clock particularly that morning.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-104

104. SARAH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 18 yards of ribbon, value 15s. , the goods of Griffith Foulkes .

RICHARD FOULKES . I live with Griffith Foulkes, my father - he is a linen-draper and silk mercer , in Little Russel-street, Covent-garden . On the 1st of December, in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop between nine and ten o'clock - I had often suspected her of taking ribbons; she asked for black ribbons - I set the drawer before her - my attention was taken off by another person. I suspected by the prisoner's manner, that she had taken something; I turned round to her; she desired me to cut a yard off, which I did - I wrapped it in paper and gave it to her; she put down 1s., which I took to the desk and got change; I took it to her, then told her I suspected she had taken some ribbon, and desired her to come to the end of the shop; I asked if she would let me look under her shawl, and there I found this half piece of ribbon - it has my writing on it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PHILIP PARISH . I am an officer. I took her in charge, and found 13s. on her.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-105

105. ROBERT MASTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Wasp and John Wasp , his masters.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I am in the employ of Thomas and John Wasp, of Holborn ; the prisoner was their shopman . On the evening of the 1st of November he asked me to mind the shop, which I did - he went into the yard, and in a quarter of an hour brought in some water, and sprinkled the shop; he went into the yard again for about a quarter of an hour, then returned, and began to shut up; he appeared much agitated, and could only put up three shutters - he then left without finishing - I put up other shutters; he had began to shut up about a quarter-past ten o'clock - he did not go away till about eleven. I saw a pair of shoes in his trousers pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did not he appear very ill? A. No; he went into the yard twice - I saw the shoes quite plain.

THOMAS CURRANT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge on the Friday following, and asked what he had done with the shoes - he seemed much agitated, and began crying; he said they were at his lodgings, but he meant to pay for them. I went there, and asked his sister for the shoes - she said he had measured her, and brought them - I found them there.

Cross-examined. Q. He told you where they were? A. Yes.

JOHN WASP . I am in partnership with Thomas Wasp; I heard of this circumstance; the prisoner has worked for us some years; he had permission, about three weeks before, to take a pair of shoes for his wife; he brought them back, saying they would not do, and he would make a pair - I told him to do so, and not take any more, as we did not like it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not a fresh quantity arrived on this night? A. Yes; he might find a pair to fit her among them - his character has been excellent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-106

106. JOSEPH STEPHENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 9 spoons, value 4l.; 3 ladles, value 2l. 12s., and 6 forks, value 3l. , the goods of Elizabeth Gill , her mistress.

ELIZABETH GILL. I live in Surry-street, Strand . The prisoner was my waiter and footman - I keep a boarding-house - he was a weekly servant - he was about five months with me, and had the care of my plate. On the 22d of July I had a larger dinner party than usual, and noticed that it was not a silver ladle that was brought to dinner; I mentioned it to my daughter - I could not then examine, but in the evening I sent for my son-in-law; the plate-box was looked over, and a great number of articles missed; the prisoner was asked about it, he admitted taking them, and gave me up the duplicate - I had no character with him - he had referred me to the York hotel, Margate.

JAMES SAYERS . I am shopman to Mr. Austin, pawnbroker, of Drury-lane. I have two spoons and two ladles, pawned in June and July, all by one person - I cannot swear to the prisoner, but the duplicates produced are what I gave him.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I took the prisoner. Mrs. Gill gave me the duplicates of the property.

WILLIAM CLUNES . I am shopman to Mr. Angel, pawnbroker, of Liquorpond-street. I have a spoon, a ladle, five forks, five table-spoons, and two desert-spoons, pawned at different times, from the 27th of April till the 7th of July, in the names of Stevens and Stevenson. I only took in the soup-ladle, and believe the prisoner to be the person,

though he is much altered - these are the duplicates of the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. BODKIN to MRS. GILL. Q. Had you authorised him to pawn any of this property? A. No; I know he has a wife and one child - I never allowed him to pawn any article - I did not take him when he gave me up the duplicate, as I thought I could get my property; but they would not give it up - he slept in my house that night, and next morning I said to him, "You will go and point out the property at the pawnbrokers," and when he got out he ran away, and was not taken till November. I am very sorry, indeed, to prosecute him.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-107

107. THOMAS CUMMINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 2 shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Jonathan Murray and Joshua Hall .

JOSHUA HALL. I am a pawnbroker , in partnership with Joshua Murray, of East Smithfield . On the 30th of November these shoes hung at the door; I heard a noise, sent my shopman out, and he took the prisoner with these shoes - I had not seen him in the shop.

ROBERT MARSTON . I took the prisoner in charge with these shoes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them, but they were a little bit down from the door, and I had not a bit of shoe on my foot. GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-108

108. THOMAS HALLIDAY and FRANCES HALLIDAY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 looking-glass, value 3s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 1 bolster, value 3s., and 1 pillow-case, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Cudby .

SOPHIA CUDBY . I am the wife of Charles Cudby, and live on Back-hill ; the prisoners took my second-floor room, at 5s. 6d. a week, in September; these articles were let with the room - they paid five weeks regularly - I went into the room one day when they were absent, and missed this property; they came home, and I gave them in charge - they are husband and wife.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I took the prisoenrs at the house; I took the woman into the back-room, and she delivered up the duplicates; I went to the pawnbrokers, and got the articles.

WILLIAM PYATT . I am shopman to Messrs. Moat and Co., pawnbrokers, in Wardour-street. I have two blankets, a pillow and pillow-case, all pawned by the female prisoner, on the 20th of October, in the name of Halliday, I think.

RICHARD EDWARD BARBER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a bolster, pawned on the 19th of October, and a looking-glass, pawned on the 14th of October, by the woman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCES HALLIDAY's Defence. It was done through distress - she knew of the looking-glass being pawned, because I lost the duplicate, and got the affidavit of it, which she saw.

PROSECUTRIX. No, I never did, upon my oath.

FRANCES HALLIDAY - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

THOMAS HALLIDAY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-109

109. THOMAS WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 knife-case, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Eden .

THOMAS EDEN. I am an upholsterer , and live in the City-road . On the 19th of November, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was informed I had lost a knife-case; I went out, and pursued the prisoner, who had got to the top of Featherstone-street; he had this knife-case- he had not bought it.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Have you no one to assist you in your business? A. Yes, my daughter; I am certain she had not sold it, for she was sitting by my side; I had seen it safe about ten minutes before - he did say a man had employed him to carry it to Whitecross-street.

PETER CLELAND . I was at my master's door; I saw the prisoner with the property on him; I did not see any one give it him, nor how he got it.

WILLIAM PATRICK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man gave it me to carry to Whitecross-street, and said he would give me something for it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-110

110. RICHARD JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 2 writing-desks, value 3l. , the goods of Richard Soar .

RICHARD SOAR . I live in the Kingsland-road . On the 3d of November, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the parlour, and saw the prisoner taking these desks out - he carried them three or four houses off, when I overtook him he was carrying them away before him; he was brought back by several people.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master sent me with a pair of shoes to Ivy-lane; I was returning home; a lad accosted me, and asked me to hold the desks, which I did; the gentleman came up in a minute, and took me; I put them down to run after the lad, but I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271206-111

111. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 1 book, value 14s. , the goods of Martin Doyle .

MARTIN DOYLE . I keep a book shop , in Holborn ; this book is mine, it was on a small board outside my window.

CHARLES KETTLE . I keep a bookseller's shop, in Holborn; the prisoner brought this book to me to sell on the 3d of November, about a quarter-past four o'clock, on the day it was stolen; I got an officer, and took him to Mr. Doyle's.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did he say where

he got it from? A. He said he got it round the corner, of a man, for 2s. 6d.; he tore off this label, in my presence, and I partly knew where it came from; he threatened what he would do to me.

THOMAS CURRANT . I took the prisoner.

MARTIN DOYLE. This is my book; I generally tear off the label when I sell a book - I missed it a little after four o'clock - it is a 36s. book, the full price of it - we generally sell it at 14s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Holborn, at the end of a street near the prosecutor's shop; a man came to me, and asked if I would buy a book; I said, "No, I have no money to spare, and I am out of work;" he pressed it upon me; I at last gave him 2s. 6d. for it; he said, "There is a piece of paper on the back, I wish you could take it off" - I then suspected all was not right - I had come from Shrewsbury but a few weeks before, to find work.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18271206-112

112. MARY ANN MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 sovereign , the money of William Acles .

MARY ACLES . I am wife of William Acles; we live at the Queen's Head public-house, Broad-street, Ratcliff-cross ; my husband works on the water . On the 20th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, a gentleman came to the foot of the stairs, and said, "Come down, Mrs. Acles, and bring some money;" I put my hand into my trunk, took out my money, and went down - I saw Mr. Hurst, who said, "I want two sovereigns and a half to pay for some ballast;" I put down two sovereigns and a half on the counter - the prisoner came in at the time, and, in stepping back, I dropped a sovereign from the paper in my hand; I saw the prisoner stoop and take up something - I said, "Mrs. Mills, that is my sovereign, give it me" - she said, "No, it was a half-penny" - I said, "No, it is my sovereign" - she said,"You old cat it is well come to your time to have a sovereign;" I said, "Mrs. Mills, give me my sovereign" - she said, "You old cat, I did not rob you of your sovereign, I picked it up, and all you can demand is half of it, and I will spend the other half jolly with you:" the gentleman of the house then said, it might have gone down in the cellar - I said No, but he took a light, and went down - when he came up he said no such thing had dropped there; the prisoner was then gone; I had given two sovereigns and a half to Mr. Hurst, and had the other sovereign to wrap up in the paper. I went and got the officer, and took the prisoner; she pushed and shoved me about, and would have beat me but for a gentleman - she was sober.

JAMES COYLE . I went to this house; Mrs. Acles and the prisoner were having very loud words - Mrs. Acles insisted that she had taken up a sovereign; I heard the prisoner say, "I have your sovereign, and will keep it; you cannot demand above half."

MARY RING . I called in at this house; I saw Mrs. Acles drop a sovereign, and saw the prisoner pick it up; I am sure it was a sovereign; I had seen the prisoner before: she said it was only a halfpenny - Acles said, "It is my sovereign;" the prisoner said, "D - n your old eyes - it is well come to your time to have a sovereign; I have got it, and you cannot demand more than half."

EMANUEL HARRIS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner half an hour afterwards; I asked her for the sovereign - she said, "I wish you may get it;" she was very drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the Queen's Head public-house with her; she said she had dropped a sovereign; she got a light, and went down to look for it: she came up, but did not charge me with it; and the publican told me to go home; I heard I was charged with it, and went back to the house.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-113

113. WILLIAM PETERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 8s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 3s.; 2 shoes, value 4s.; 1 hat, value 4s.; 2 handkerchiefs. value 2s. 6d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of George Potts .

GEORGE POTTS. I am a sailor on board the Earl of Talbot, of London. On the 28th of October she was in the river, off the Hermitage-stairs ; the prisoner was a stranger, but had been on board about ten days, assisting the men to discharge a cargo of bark and timber; he asked me that day if I would let him lay in the cabin - I had the care of the vessel, and gave him leave: I kept my clothes in master's state-room, which is near the cabin: next morning I saw the cabin lamp laying by the windlass - I then missed my clothes from my chest. The prisoner was then gone - I did not see him again for about sixteen days.

JAMES WAYLING . I am a Thames Police officer. I took the prisoner on the 14th of November, and found the upper part of his stockings very clean, and the lower part in a terrible mess - Potts claimed them.

GEORGE POTTS . These are my stockings; they have my mother's initials on them, M.P. - Mary Potts.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the stockings from my mother, nine months ago - her name is Mary Peterson.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-114

114. THOMAS REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 2 pairs of boots, value 20s. , the goods of George Eadie .

THOMAS YEUWARD . I live with George Eadie, a publican , of Little George-street, Bedford-row . These boots were on a shelf on the kitchen stairs. On the 18th of November the prisoner and another person came in, and had liquor and porter, and about two o'clock the other went down stairs, and came up again. The prisoner then went down; I had some suspicion, as I had seen them there a fortnight before, and told mistress of it - I then heard a rush out at the door; I directly looked, and missed the boots; I went out, and saw the prisoner running with them - he threw them away and I stopped him, without losing sight of him.

HENRY RUSHMER . I am a servant in John-street, Bedford-row. About half-past two o'clock on this afternoon I

heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running with the boots, and assisted in stopping him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-115

115. ADAM TILSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 earthen pot, value 2d., and 8lbs. of honey, value 8s. , the goods of Robert Bryan .

JOHN BUTCHER . I am a servant to Robert Bryan, a tallow-chandler , of Wardour-street, Soho. On the 29th of November I went down the area of Sir John Richardson's house, for orders, leaving my basket outside; the servants told me I had lost something - I came up, and a jar of honey was missing; I pursued him - he put it down on some steps in Tavistock-street, and I took him.

HENRY ADAMS . I saw the prisoner running along Tavistock-street, wrapping this jar in his apron; he put it down, and was taken.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I am an officer, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. Another boy took it out of the basket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-116

116. JOHN BUTT TARING was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 watch, value 50s. , the goods of John Henry Freeman .

JOHN HENRY FREEMAN. I am mate of the Woodport . On the 8th of November she was in the West India Docks, at Limehouse ; I left my watch hanging in the captain's state-room - I missed it at ten minutes past one o'clock; I was not absent from the vessel; I had not seen the prisoner on board, but I was under the bowsprit.

JOHN CHUBB . I am servant to Mr. Reynolds, a pawnbroker, of Shadwell. On the 8th of November, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner pawned this watch, in the name of Reynolds.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman. On the 8th of November the prisoner came and asked me to purchase a duplicate of this watch; I sent for it, but finding it not worth more than had been lent on it, I sent it back. The prisoner is a seaman, and lives in the neighbourhood. I have known him five years, and believe him to be an honest man.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had met a shipmate named Roberts, who asked him to pawn the watch for him, and gave him the duplicate to sell for him, being in want of money, as he was going a voyage.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-117

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

117. JOB WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 book, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Walton .

WILLIAM WALTON. I am a bookseller , and live in Goswell-street . On the 21st of November I did not see this book taken, but between four and five o'clock, the officer brought the prisoner in with it; it had been on a narrow board outside my shop; I keep a boy to mind it constantly.

THOMAS TOOLE . I am a shoemaker, and live in Goswell-street. On the afternoon of the 21st of November I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards, before the door of the shop; I went out for some oil, and saw the prisoner go and take the book from the stall; some officers came up - I told them; they pursued, and took him. I am sure he is the person.

JOHN BEDFORD . I saw the prisoner running down Hatfield-street; there was an alarm of Stop thief! I saw him stopped, and he pulled this book from under his coat, and threw it up a court - I picked it up, and gave it to the officer.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrol. This book was given to me by Bedford. I took charge of the prisoner about half-past five o'clock; he said before the Magistrate that he took it to get himself a pair of shoes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my work, and saw this book laying down - I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-118

118. THOMAS CUMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 till, value 1s.; 30 pence, 15 halfpence, and 1 farthing , the property of Henry Philip Reeve .

ANN JONES . I am house-keeper to Mr. Henry Philip Reeve, who lives in Liverpool-road, Islington . On the 30th of October I was in the back parlour, and heard money rattle - I instantly got up, and saw the shop door about a foot open - it was shut when I sat down; I looked round, and saw the prisoner in front of the flour-bin, laying at full length, with the till out, just under his nose; I had seen it safe a quarter of an hour before; he had taken it out, and put it on the floor: he said two boys had opened the door, and told him to come in, and they would give him a shilling if he brought the till out, and he had crawled in on his hands and knees; there was 3s. 3 1/2d. in it.

JOHN WILES . I am a constable. I received this till from Jones, with the 3s. 3 1/2d. in copper in it; two bigger boys followed him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Two bigger boys told me to go in, and take it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-119

119. MICHAEL MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of Henry Turner .

HENRY TURNER. On the 23d of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, on my return from town, to my master's house, at Stamford , I saw the prisoner coming out with a coat on his arm - I could not leave the horse, but as soon as I got the horse to the stable, I looked, and missed my fustian-coat off the copper.

JOHN MILLER . I am an officer. On the 23d of November Turner described the prisoner to me - I took him in about an hour, with this coat on, under his smock frock; he said he bought it - Turner said, if it was his, there was a button and some tobacco in the pocket - I found a button there, and some tobacco in the prisoner's hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been up many nights with a child, who was dying, and I had pawned the shirt off

my back; seeing this door open, I was tempted to take the coat; the child died on the Sunday.

GUILTY. Aged 65.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-120

120. EDWARD MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 2 coats, value 3l.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; 1 pair of overalls, value 5s.; 1 jacket, value 5s.; 1 hat, value 10s., and 1 pair of boots, value 1l. , the goods of Edward Geoffery Smith Stanley .

JOHN STRINGER . I am butler to Edward Geoffrey Smith Stanley, Esq. of Upper Grosvenor-street. On the 26th of November these articles were taken from the stables of the Earl of Darnley, which are occupied by Mr. Stanley - I saw the prisoner in the house that morning; he was in his service; he came on the 3d of November, and I delivered him his livery, and on the 26th, he suddenly absconded from the stables, and we found his clothes were gone; they were to last him twelve months, and his greatcoat two years - I told Mr. Stanley, who desired me to go to the office; he was taken on Wednesday night.

WILLIAM MABBELT . I am coachman to Mr. Stanley. I was sent into the country with a note, on Monday morning - I returned before one o'clock, and missed the prisoner from the stable - I went up stairs, and missed his clothes from the room - I met him in Oxford-street, on Wednesday night, and asked him about the things; he said he could get them, and would bring them in the morning, all but the great-coat, which he had sold to a Jew for a sovereign; his brother was with me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had he not warning to leave? A. Yes; he said he would bring the things to his brother's - I said, if he brought them back, nothing would be done to him. I took him the same night, as he said the coat was sold; he said they were in the care of Sarah Scott - I did not go to see for them. I believe he is a respectable lad.

JOHN LACEY . I am a beadle, and took charge of him; he said the property was at Mrs. Dubery's, No. 14, Woodstock-street - I went there, but found nothing - I went to the watch-house, and said, "You have given me a false direction;" he said, "No, I did not;" he took me to No. 15, Woodstock-street, where I found all the property, but the great-coat; he had got the boots and hat on.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you think he made a mistake in the number? A. Yes.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-121

121. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 2 frocks, value 6s.; 1 bedgown, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and a pincushion-cover, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Urquhart .

ANN URQUHART. I am the wife of John Urquhart, an upholsterer ; we live in College-place Highbury . On the 8th of November, between three and four o'clock, I left this property on a line in my yard, and next morning, between seven and eight, it was missing.

JOHN MORGAN . I saw the prisoner, on the morning of the 9th of November, about a quarter-past three o'clock, in the Hornsey-road, with a bundle on his head - I stood in a gateway till he came up; when he saw me, he threw it down and ran - I pursued and caught him; the bundle contained these articles, and some potatoes.

THOMAS GRAFTON . I am the watch-house keeper. Morgan brought the prisoner to the watch-house, with this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going after a drove of beast, and saw a man hide this bundle in a hedge. I went and took it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-122

122. FRANCIS AMBROSE was indicted for stealing, on 29th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Beckett , from his person .

JOHN BECKETT. On the 29th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitechapel , sitting at the back of a Blackwall coach, between two gentlemen; a person ran behind, and said, we were robbed; I felt and missed my handkerchief, which had been safe just before, in my coat-pocket - I rode on, and did nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. On the 29th of November, I was in Whitechapel, and saw the stage coming from Church-lane; the prisoner ran behind, got up, and hung by his hands for about a hundred yards; he took a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, and then got down - I ran up and took him with it, took him to the watch-house, and sent Fryer to tell the gentleman; there were some other boys at the corner of Church-lane, but not in company with the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not offer a boy 5s. to say I was in it? A. I did not - I found 6s. 3d. on him; he said,"You may take that, and let me go" - I said, that was not the way I did my duty.

JOSEPH FRYER . I saw the prisoner get behind the stage, and take the handkerchief - I ran and told the gentleman.

Prisoner's Defence. I ran to get a ride, and saw the handkerchief lay where the gentleman put their feet.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-123

123. EDWARD DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, 2s., and a key, value 2d., the goods of John Verity . from his person .

JOHN VERITY. On the 30th of October, about half-past six o'clock, I was in Princes-street, Soho , and missed my watch, which was safe ten minutes before - I do not know who took it - I was knocked down by some means. I was a little elevated.

ROBERT DENNISON . I was in Princes-street, and saw the prosecutor either fall, or knocked down, but suppose he fell from intoxication - I saw the prisoner go to him, as I supposed, to get him up; and in a minute or two, I saw the watch flying up in the air; the prisoner then left him, and went towards Crown-court, putting something into his pocket - I could not see what it was - I followed him to Crown-court, and took him into a shop; he denied it - I seat for a constable; he then took the watch from his

pocket, laid it on the counter, and said he hoped I would let him go - I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You think the man fell from intoxication? A. I think so; he was very tipsy; the prisoner said he picked it up.

SAMUEL LINDLEY . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-124

124. OWEN DACE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 sovereign, and 9 shillings, the monies of Charles Collard , from his person .

CHARLES COLLARD. On the 30th of October I was on Saffron-hill , and had a sovereign and 9s. loose in my right hand waistcoat pocket; I did not see it taken, but was told of it - I was inebriated; I had 2l. 16s. or 2l. 17s., and I then only had 1l. 7s. left.

THOMAS MOORE . I live at No. 3, Field-lane; I came down, and saw the prosecutor sitting at my door; I offered my service to take him home; we were going along Saffron-hill together, when the prisoner put his hand into his pocket, and took out the money; I pursued him, with a constable, and he was taken - I did not lose sight of him.

JOHN MARTINGALE . I was assisting the prosecutor home; the prisoner met us on Saffron-hill, and followed us about five yards; he then hustled up against the prosecutor, put his hand into his pocket, and took his money out. I ran after him, and never lost sight of him.

JAMES DOHERTY . I heard a cry of Stop thief! and pursued the prisoner. I found a sovereign, and 9s. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the man intoxicated, and assisted him a little way; the money was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-125

125. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 sovereign, the money of Thomas Rowlands , from his person .

THOMAS ROWLANDS. I am a ship-cooper . On the 28th of November I was going on board, and met the prisoner in Ratcliff-highway; she asked where I was going, and said I had better go with her; I did so; there was a bed in the room; she asked if I had any money; I said I had a sovereign, but no change, and, if she would take my word, I would pay in the morning, and stop with her; my sovereign was in my tobacco-pouch; I shewed it to her, and in five minutes she put her hand into my pocket; I took hold of her hand - she got out the tobacco-pouch, my spectacles, and silk handkerchief - the handkerchief fell on the floor; there was another girl in the house, who flew to her assistance; the prisoner told her to take the tobacco-pouch, and be off: the prisoner held me the while. I then got my spectacles from her by force, and called the watchman, who came and took her.

Prisoner. He gave me the sovereign to get change; I gave it to Julia Sweeney, and, as she did not come back, he said he would murder me, if I did not give him the sovereign. Witness. I never gave it her to get change; I did not ill-use her.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I went to the house where Julia Sweeney and the prisoner live as I heard the prosecutor and prisoner calling Watch! at half-past two o'clock in the morning. I asked the prosecutor what was the matter; he said he had lost his sovereign, and that the prisoner had given it to another woman, who had run away with it. I found only 6d. on the prisoner; after she was in custody, she called to me, and confessed that she had taken it, and gave it to the other girl, who ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. He given me the sovereign, and I gave it to the other girl for change. I could not help her not coming back it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-126

126. RICHARD BEACH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Christopher Martfield , from his person .

CHRISTOPHER MARTFIELD (through an interpreter). On the 17th of November, I was in the Half-moon public-house; the prisoner was there, and took from my waistcoat pocket this money, in the passage. I laid hold of him, and he ran into the tap-room - I was sober.

HENRY LEDOLPH . I was at the Half-moon and Punchbowl, and saw the prisoner there; the prosecutor said he was robbed - there was a mob there; the prisoner ran into the tap-room, and went up to the window; I took hold of him, took him to the watch-house, and there the money was found on him.

CONRAD JACKSON . I am a watchman. The landlord of the house called me; I took the prisoner; 2s. 6 1/2d. were found on him; I understood the prosecutor to say he had lost three shillings, but at the watch-house he said two shillings and a sixpence; he did not know how to express himself - he was sober.

THOMAS BROWN . I was at the watch-house; I found 2s. 6d. on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have a pint of beer; several of these Germans were fighting; I stood there with the rest, and presently this man said I must know something about his 3s.

HENRY LEDOLPH . There were two men fighting in the passage.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-127

127. WILLIAM BARBER was indicted for feloniously receiving 12 bells, value 1s., the goods of James Southgate Stevens , which had been stolen; he knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SOUTHGATE STEVENS. I am a plumber , and live in Duke-street, Grosvenor-square . In September last I was working at the Victualling-office, at Deptford; on the 3d of September, and for three weeks after, I was backwards and forwards there, and could not so well attend to my property at home - when I came home to remain, I missed property to a considerable amount - I called my servants together, and questioned them. William Dixon was one of them - he was my stable-boy - he afterward told me he had taken some things away - in consequence of information I went with Westcoatt to the prisoner's shop; he deals in marine-stores, in Gee's-court, Oxford-street; it is a paved court, with flat stones - I saw the prisoner, and said we had come to look for pipe-moulds and other brass which I had lost, to a considerable amount; he said he had no such things

in his possession; I said, "If you have not, you had them, for the boy has acknowledged it;" he said, "I don't object to your searching; I know nothing of it;" we searched, and found nothing of mine - I said, "Mr. Barker, you you must know something of these moulds, for my boy states he sold them to you and your man, Jackson, and as you deny it, I will send for the boy;" he said I might send for who I pleased - Dixon was fetched - I said to him, in the prisoner's presence, "Do you know this gentleman?" he said, "Yes;" I said, "What did you sell him?" he said he sold him three pairs of brass moulds, and he got 8s. for the first, and 6s. a pair for the others, at the rate of 4d. a lb; we are allowed 2s. 4d. or 2s. 8d. a lb. for them as old brass, in exchange - old broken brass is worth 7 1/2d. a lb. - the prisoner said he knew nothing about it, he never saw him before - I told the boy to look about and see if there was any thing of mine; he went out and looked in at the window, and pointed out these five bells; I directly claimed them - I knew them, by having mounted them for my little boys; they were marked with ink - I had twenty-four, twelve in each parcel - here is the writing on some of them, it is my hand-writing - but it is very faint and nearly rubbed off, but they are a particular sort of bells - I can swear to this, No. 4, being my own writing - I said I could swear to them - the prisoner said, "When am I to go to the office?" the officer said, "Directly;" I saw several other things there, which I think were mine, but would not swear to them - we took him to the watch-house; Dixon said it was false for the prisoner to say he did not know him, for he had seen him many a time - the prisoner still said he had never seen him: Dixon said,"Did not I sell you one pair of moulds at 4d. a lb.?" he said, "Never - how could you sell them? I never saw you."

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long has Dixon lived with you? A. Nearly eighteen months - the bells are not worth more than 1s. 6d. as old metal; I searched the prisoner's premises the day after I discovered my loss; I never suspected Dixon before - he denied the robbery, but confessed it in about three hours, voluntarily - I had said I would send for an officer.

COURT. Q. Had you missed these bells? A. No; I had seen them about two months before - there are twenty-four gone.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am an officer. I went with Stevens to the prisoner's shop, and said I had a warrant to search for brass - he said we were welcome to search where we liked - Clements was with me - he staid up stairs - I went below - I could find but one piece of brass - I came up, and Dixon was sent for, and said, "This brass is part of the property I sold that man," pointing to the prisoner, who said he knew nothing whatever of him - Dixon looked into the window and pointed out these bells, and said, "This is some of the property I sold you;" the prisoner said, "I know nothing about it, or you."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The boy went outside the window to point out the bells? A. Yes; any one passing could see them - the prisoner afforded us every facility to search - I had been about an bour in the shop before Dixon came.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were the things you looked for bulky? A. I believe the moulds were, but we did not find them.

WILLIAM DIXON . In September I was Mr. Stevens's stable-boy, and took property from my master, which I sold to the prisoner; I did not know him before - it was while master was at Deptford - he paid me 4d. a lb. for brass - when I first went he asked if that was all I could get; I said I would see; and about three days after I took a pair of brass moulds - he bought them of me - they were quite whole - he paid me 8s. for them. at 4d. a lb. - they weighed 48lbs. - I saw him weigh them - I received 8s. - it was 48lbs. - he asked if I could get any more; I said I would see; the pavement was up at that time - they were repairing the sewers - I took another pair the latter end of the week, and got 6s. for them - he told me not to bring them at that time of day, as the officers were there, watching the sewers while the men went to dinner, but to bring them at eight o'clock in the morning, when they were gone to breakfast - I afterwards sold him another pair for 6s., and some bells and broken metal afterwards - I sold him one dozen bells, tied on a string, and some broken candlestick branches - when master came to town I told him of it - I was fetched to the shop afterward, and master asked if that was the gentleman I sold it to - I said it was, and pointed out these bells and this piece of brass - I cannot swear they are part of what I sold him - I got 6d. for the bells.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How old are you? A. Eighteen; I lived a year and a half with master - I was about two months robbing him - I did not confess before all the other men.

JOHN SMEE . I am an officer. I was attending in Gee's-court, in September last, by order of Sir Richard Birnie - there were twenty-five or twenty-six feet of ground up - I did not go to breakfast, and was watching at one time as much as another - there was no other officer there.

NOT GUILTY.

128. THOMAS JACKSON was again indicted for feloniously receiving 12 bells, value 12s., the goods of James Southgate Stevens, well knowing the same to have been stolen; also, receiving, on the 13th of September, 1 pair of moulds, value 4l., his property.

Mr. Adolphus declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-128

129. EDWARD TUCKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 6 live tame fowls, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of Hugh Ross .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be dead fowls.

HUGH ROSS. I am a miniature painter , and live at Bow-hill-farm, near Hillingdon, Middlesex . On the 9th of November I lost six fowls, which I had seen safe the day before; I heard the dogs barking between nine and ten o'clock at night, and suppose they were taken then; I had nobody but a boy in the house, and did not go to see. I went to bed before ten o'clock, and heard some horses pacing down the lane by my house; I got out of bed, and went to the window with a gun. I saw the fowls at eleven o'clock next morning, at Jarvis', at Hayes - they were then dead; they were alive the day before - Jarvis had fifteen or sixteen; I knew five hens, and one cock to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is any body here who saw them alive the day they were taken? A. No; I have lived there about a year and a quarter. I did not

know the prisoner, and know nothing of his being an orphan.

WILLIAM FAIR . I am a horse-patrol of Bow-street. On the 9th of November, at a quarter to twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner walking behind a waggon of hay - he had a sack on his shoulder; I stopped, and asked what it contained; he said water-cresses; I laid my hand on it, and found something warm; I dismounted, and found fifteen fowls in it, some of them quite warm; he gave no account of them, and I took him to Jarvis, the constable of Hayes.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a warrant against any other men? A. Yes, but they have not been taken; the prisoner told the Magistrate that Pearson and Allen were in company with him, and that he did not take them.

STANLEY JARVIS . I received the prisoner with the fowls; the prosecutor identified six of them.

JOSEPH WYAT . I live with Mr. Ross; I saw the fowls at Jarvis', and know six of them - I had seen them alive in the stable-yard about three o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you put them into the henroost? A. No; they go in themselves.

Prisoner's Defence. Joseph Pearson and Philip Allen gave them to me as water-cresses.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-129

130. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 heifer's tongue, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Jeremiah Underwood .

JEREMIAH UNDERWOOD. I am a butcher , and live in the City-road . On the 28th of November, about eight o'clock, I missed this tongue off the shop-board - I know it by a cut in the root. I was in the shop, serving two customers; I heard a call of Stop thief! and ran out.

THOMAS BRIDGES . I was in the City-road, and saw the prisoner take the tongue off the shop-board - I pursued; he dropped it about twelve yards off, and ran down Tabernacle-walk, into a broker's shop, where I took him.

Prisoner. He looked in my face, and said "It was not him." Witness. I had not lost sight of him - I did look in his face; I picked up the tongue.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I was desired by my brother to take the prisoner - I am an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I was eight weeks in the hospital at Oxford, and could not work.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-130

131. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Bennett ; 1 pewter pot, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Brown Underwood ; and 1 pewter pot, value 6d. , the goods James Budd .

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter. On the 5th of November, I saw the prisoner in Cleveland-street ; he went into a door-way, and attempted to take a pot off a rail - I watched him; he came away, then went back and took it; I followed, and asked what he was going to do with it - I took it from him; it rattled against another; he said he would give me the two pots to let him go, and resisted a good deal. I took him into a public-house, and found on him four pints and one quart pot in all.

JOSEPH BENNETT . These two pots are mine - we lose a great many; the prisoner appeared to have a large pocket made on purpose.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-131

132. JOHN POWELL and THOMAS MEED were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 4 brass door-plates, value 6s. , the goods of John Castle .

STEPHEN SANDHAM . I am shopman to John Castle, ironmonger , of Whitecross-street. The prisoners came into the shop on the 3d of November, in the morning, about half-past seven o'clock; Powell bought a box-staple, and the other, two Dutch rings; and about nine o'clock the officer came; I then missed a parcel of door-plates off the counter; I saw them safe the night before - the officer produced them; they have our mark on the paper.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner Meed going into a locksmith's shop, in Silver-street, and took these brass plates from him; Meed said he had found them, and was taking them to this shop to get screws made to them; Powell walked away - another officer stopped him for me. I found the things they had bought on them.

JOHN BOWYER . I saw the prisoners going into this shop, and took Powell.

POWELL's Defence. This man went out of the shop, and I remained there; I afterwards saw him looking at some dogs fighting in Silver-street - he went into a shop; curiosity induced me to look in, and the officer took me.

MEED's Defence. I have a wife and family; my wife is ill - I am sorry for it.

MEED - GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months .

POWELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-132

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

133. SARAH BULLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 spoon, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 jacket, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d.; 1 shawl, value 6d.; 1 piece of muslin, value 6d., and 1 cap, value 3d. , the goods of Thomas Acland .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-133

134. THOMAS WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Frederick Dover , from his person .

FREDERICK DOVER. On the 10th of November I was walking up Holborn : I lost my handkerchief from my coat pocket. The officer, who had the prisoner in charge, stopped me, and produced it; I did not feel it taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH CADBY . I am an officer. I followed the prisoner from Fleet-market to Hatton-garden; I saw the prosecutor walking with another gentleman: the prisoner and another in his company, followed them to the corner of Gray's Inn-lane, before they succeeded in getting the handkerchief out - I saw the prisoner take it from the pocket; I was close to him; I followed him close, and he threw it down. I have seen him before, and am certain of

his person - I took him and the other into custody, but they both struggled, and the other got away.

Prisoner. He said at Hatton-garden that he and his brother officer were on the other side of the way, and then that he was behind us. I think he was in liquor. Witness. I was sober.

WILLIAM COLTON . I was with Cadby. I saw the prisoner and another follow the prosecutor - I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief partly out, and when he got to the end of Gray's Inn-lane he took it quite out; I went after the gentleman, and Cadby took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I turned down a court for a private purpose - Cadby came and took me; there was a lad about my size in a brown coat and a cap - he threw the handkerchief down at my feet; the officer let me go, and took hold of him; he got away, and the officer took me.

JOSEPH CADBY . The other lad was as far off as the length of this Court. The prisoner threw the handkerchief down, and tried to kick it down an area.

WILLIAM COLTON . The handkerchief was in the prisoner's hand, not in the other's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-134

135. CATHERINE POLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 piece of cotton, value 2s. 11d. , the goods of William Petherbridge and others.

WILLIAM PETHERBRIDGE. I live at No. 106, Whitechapel , and have two partners. On the evening of the 30th of October Couche, my shopman, spoke to me; the prisoner was then in my shop, looking at some striped twilled cotton - I observed her; she made a purchase, and paid for it: she was then going towards the door; I stopped her, and stated that I suspected she had more about her person than belonged to her - she remonstrated, and said her name was Polland or Pollock; I stated more particularly then what I suspected, and offered to search her - she did not appear at all inclined to submit to it: she said it was impossible she could have done such a thing; I then sent for my housekeeper to search her; I talked of sending for an officer - she said, "You need not do that - I will give you what you want;" she then put her hand under her dress, and drew out this piece of cotton; she put her hand through what I suppose was her pocket-hole, but I cannot say whether she put her hand into her pocket - she drew out this cotton - it was rather loose; she had a shawl on: it is an article of the same description and colour as what she bought, but it is finer; she had the piece she had bought in a paper in her hand - she had got about six feet from the counter before I spoke to her. I saw a number of pieces of calico on the counter while she was bargaining, but I cannot say I saw this piece in particular - I am sure I had seen it a few days before; here is our shop mark on it, made by Price, my partner.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Where is what she bought? A. Here it is. She has been bailed before Sir John Bailey; the piece she bought is of more value than this; there were twelve or fourteen people in the shop - none of them are here.

Q. Did she not tell you that if she had it, it must be quite a mistake - she was incapable of such an act? A. She said she was incapable of such an act; I do not know that she said it was a mistake; she said she had bought things of me before.

Q. Had she not the week before laid out 13l. or 14l. at your shop, and your porter taken the goods home? A. I cannot speak to that; I am out of the shop half my time - a Mrs. Poland laid out as much.

COURT. Q. When she said she was incapable of such an act, did you know she had this cotton about her? A. No.

JOHN COUCHE . I am shopman to the prosecutors'. - The prisoner came and asked me for red twilled cotton; I showed her a wrapper, containing a great many pieces - she was a considerable time at the counter, and I noticed her unpin her shawl, which was pinned high up, and pin it down low; she then asked the price of another piece, which was at a distance, and I noticed something drawn off, and the heap shrunk; she then paid me 4s. 4 1/2d. for the piece she bought. I told Mr. Petherbridge what I saw - he spoke to her; she had then arisen to go, and had got about six yards from the counter. Mr. Petherbridge took her into the back warehouse; I heard him before that say he had reason to suspect she had got more than she had paid for; she said, "Oh! I am incapable of such an act - I am Mrs. Polland (or) Pollock," or some such a name; Mr. Petherbridge said he would have her searched by a female, and send for an officer - she then put her hand into her pocket-hole, drew out this piece of cotton, and said, "Do not send for an officer - I will make you any recompense you please."

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you know her? A. No; I have not been there more than two months - I cannot say whether she has bought things before: she gave the name of Poland at the office. She did not say our porter had carried goods home. She produced the cotton from her pocket-hole: the cotton is worth 2s. 11d. - it is much finer than what she bought.

COURT. Q. Was she sitting or standing when she altered her shawl? A. Sitting close to the counter.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - the property was then on the counter; she sent a boy with a note to her husband.

MR. PETHERBRIDGE re-examined. I have thirteen or fourteen shopmen. I recollect the transaction of the 13l. - it was my own transaction - I think the goods were sent to No. 13, Alie-street.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Is this the bill of the goods? A. Yes - it is 13l. 6s.

The prisoner made no defence, but five witnesses gave her an excellent character, and stated her to have seven children, and to be in respectable circumstances.

GUILTY. Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her family and character .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-135

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

136. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , 9 yards of carpeting, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of James Leigh .

JAMES LEIGH. I live in Whitechapel-road, and keep a carpet-warehouse . On the 2d of November I sent Fisher with five pieces of carpet, in a truck, to Mr. Brockhole's,

No. 26, Saville-row, Mile-end. I know this is one of the pieces.

CHARLES FISHER . I am in the prosecutor's employ. He sent me to Saville-row ; I got to the house about half-past three o'clock. I began to unload, and took the carpets into the passage; Mr. Brockhole came up the passage, selected one, and told me to measure the room; I laid down my rule to do so, and he asked me if I had a lad with me; I said No; he said, "A lad has run off with a piece of carpet;" I ran out, and saw the prisoner about fifty yards off, with a carpet; I came up to him; he struck me twice on the ear, and dropped it - I still kept hold of him till Mr. Brockhole came to my assistance.

ROBERT BROCKHOLE . I live in Saville-row. I had selected another carpet, not this one. Fisher's evidence is correct.

JAMES BEALE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a lad, who asked me to carry it; he seemed fatigued, and said I should have 6d. to carry it to Globe-road.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-136

137. JOSEPH BILHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 saw, value 2s., the goods of Ed-Ovenden; and 1 square, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Philip Payne .

EDWARD OVENDEN . I am a carpenter. On the 20th of November I lost a saw from an empty house, near the North-road , while I was at dinner. I have seen the prisoner about there; he said he was a bricklayer .

THOMAS REDPATH . I live with Mr. Walker, a pawnbroker, of Goswell-street. The prisoner pledged a saw and square with us on the 20th of November.

PHILIP PAYNE . This is my square; I lost it from the same house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the premises that day, as I knew a bricklayer there; I went again, and they gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-137

138. ANN JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 cloak, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Windsor Allen and Charles James Maynard .

HENRY MANSER . I am in the employ of Thomas Windsor Allen and Charles James Maynard, who are pawnbrokers , of Clare-street . In consequence of information I went out on the 25th of November, and overtook the prisoner about one hundred yards off; I asked her where she got the cloak which was on her arm; she said somebody gave it to her to pawn. I gave her in charge - she had taken it off the door, inside the shop.

MARIA SMALLWOOD . I was passing this shop; I saw the prisoner unpin the cloak, double it up, and hang it on her arm.

ALEXANDER THOMAS . I took her with the cloak on her arm.

Prisoner's Defence. A man pushed against me, put the cloak into my hand, and told me to pawn it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18271206-138

139. ELIZABETH CLIFT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 slice of beef, value 9d.; 15 candles, value 1s.; 7 eggs, value 6d., and 3 pieces of soap, value 4d., the goods of John Martineaux, her master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 28.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-139

140. MICHAEL ANDERSON and JOHN SHARWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2d.; 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Elizabeth Reading , from her person .

ELIZABETH READING. I am the daughter of William Reading , a carpenter, of Princes-street. On the 11th of November, I was at the corner of Tower-street, Earl-street, Seven-dials , about a quarter past nine o'clock in the evening, carrying a bundle, containing the two half-crowns, 2s., and a sixpence - I was bringing it from my grandmother to my father - the gas-lamps were lighted; when I came to Compton-street, the two prisoners followed me on to the corner of Tower-street; I crossed the road two or three times to avoid them, and, at the corner of Tower-street, Anderson snatched the handkerchief from my hand - they were both in company, and both close to me; he handed it round to Sharwood, who ran away; I caught hold of the tail of Anderson's coat; a gentleman came up, and took him to the watch-house; I knew both the prisoners before by sight; - Sharwood was taken next morning; a third boy also followed me, whom I had never seen before; I have never got my money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was this? A. About a quarter-past nine o'clock - I had not been drinking - I never spoke to either of the prisoners before; the gentleman gave his name, but did not come next morning; I am certain I had been drinking with no girls; I live with my parents - I know Rebecca Howe and Elizabeth Hornsby by sight; I spent no money in liquor that night; I am not quite seventeen years old.

WILLIAM READING . I am this girl's father - she had not been drinking, I am certain; she described the party to me, and as I was going with her to Marlborough-street, she pointed out Sharwood in Broad-street, Carnaby-market - he saw her point him out, and ran away; he was pursued and taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Had she been out that evening? A. Yes, to her grandmother's.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am goaler of Marlborough-street. I was near Carnaby-market, saw Sharwood running from the alarm, and took him.

ANDERSON's Defence. I was taking a walk, and this girl said I had robbed her; nothing was found on me.

SHARWOOD's Defence. I was running to my work, and was taken.

ANDERSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SHARWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-140

141. JOSIAH KETTERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 2 pieces of mahogany, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Clark .

JOSEPH CLARK. I am a builder , and live in Holbornrow, Mile-end ; the prisoner worked for me about two months; one piece of mahogany was found on his premises

- one piece was taken from my hay-loft, and the other from a house which he worked at.

GEORGE ARNETT . I am a carpenter, and work for Mr. Clark. I saw the mahogany found at the prisoner's house - it was safe on the 23d of November.

JOHN GODDARD . I am a horse-patrol. On the 24th of November a watchman gave me information; I saw the prisoner in Well-street, Hackney, at night; when I got within one hundred yards of him, he called Watch! and when I got up to him I said, "Who called Watch?" he said, "I did;" I said, "Why?" he said, "Because some one called me." The watchman came up, and said, "This is the man I saw carrying the board;" he said he knew nothing about it. I went and searched his house, which is just by, and in his bed-room I found this piece of mahogany.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had he any thing in his hand? A. Not when I saw him - I knew him before - he has a large family.

WILLIAM COWLING . The prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house.

JOHN WILSON . I am a watchman. The prisoner passed me about half-past twelve o'clock at night, with a piece of coloured wood under his arm - a bay was at his side with a saw. I said, "Ketteridge, you should not carry such things at this time of night; if you pass me, and the next watchman stops you, I shall get into disgrace:" he said, "Oh, I have passed a watchman and patrol - it is all right;" the horse-patrol came up soon afterwards, and I told him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE ARNETT . The prisoner had one piece out to work on, with my leave: but not the other piece, which was in a house he worked at.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor, who engaged to employ him again .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-141

142. JOHN MARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 watch, value 20s., and 1 key, value 2d. , the goods of Josiah Kite .

JOSIAH KITE. I live at Isleworth ; my watch hung over the fire-place on the 13th of November. I am foreman at a mill . I went out about half-past eight o'clock that morning, into the town, on my master's business; I met Herbert in the town, with the prisoner in custody, seven or eight hundred yards from my house; I heard the prisoner say, "I have thrown the watch over the wall;" I went and found it; here it is - it is mine. I had left my wife at home - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JAMES HERBERT . I am a carpenter, and live at Isleworth. I was going to do a job on the 13th of November; I saw the prisoner running, and a woman after him, calling"Stop thief! he has stolen a watch:" I collared him, and said he must stop; he said, "No, don't stop me - I have only been begging: the beadle is driving me out of the parish;" he said, "I have got no watch - you may search me;" I said, "I have no power to search you - you must come back to that woman, who was running behind you;" she came up, and said, "This is the man who stole my husband's watch;" he said, "Well, I did steal it, and threw it over the wall;" the prosecutor came up, and found it- I find he bore a good character at a place he left a year ago.

CHARLES SPINDLER . I am a constable, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-142

143. JAMES LUCAS and JOHN HITCHCOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 150 lbs. of lead, value 20s., the goods of Samuel Preston Child , and affixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a Bow-street Patrol. I know Mr. Samuel Preston Child's building, in Chester-place, Bethnal-green ; it is a large stable, adjoining the mad-house. On the 4th of November, at half-past three o'clock in the morning, I was going off duty, and when near that building, I heard a person jump over a fence, and in a moment I saw Hitchcock - we knew each other, and he bid me good night - I went on about ten yards, and saw Lucas; I thought something was wrong - I went on about forty yards, then stopped, and saw them come on together under a gas-light, and stand and talk; I still remained there; they passed me; I then went down a back lane, where Hitchcock lives; stood in a passage, and saw Lucas come by with a sheet of lead; I seized him, called the watchman, and we took him to the watch-house with it, and then found another sheet of lead just by the spot where I heard the jump; I took Hitchcock next morning; I have matched the lead with the top of the premises, and both sheets fit exactly.

WALTER CREED . I am a watchman, and assisted Mitchell, who had Lucas in custody; we found another sheet of lead on the ground.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I went with Mitchell, and took Hitchcock at his house.

DANIEL SHIELDS WARNER . These premises are the property of Samuel Preston Child; it is his stable. I saw the lead matched; I had seen it safe on Saturday evening, about seven o'clock.

LUCAS's Defence. I saw two men run away and drop this lead; I took it up to took to the watch-house.

HITCHCOCK's Defence. I know nothing of it.

LUCAS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

HITCHCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-143

144. WILLIAM BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 7 planes, value 23s.; 2 saws, value 10s.; 2 squares, value 5s.; 1 basket, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 6d., and a jacket, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Isaac Marchant .

ISAAC MARCHANT. I am a carpenter . On the 19th of November I was working at Robert-street, Hampstead-road , and left all my tools in a box in the building, which was padlocked; I left at six o'clock in the evening; I returned at six in the morning, and found the door open, which had been fastened with a piece of stick; my trunk was broken open with some pinchers, which they had brought and left there; all my tools were gone.

GEORGE WRIGHT . I live with Mr. Chapman, a pawnbroker, near Fitzroy-square. The prisoner came to pawn two planes on the 15th of November, and having received information, we gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY STOELL . I took him into custody at Chapman's, and he had the prosecutor's apron round his waist; nothing but this, and the planes have been found.

Prisoner's Defence. A man said he would give me 6d. to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-144

145. JOSEPH BELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 4 sovereigns, 2 shillings, and 11 pence , the monies of Edmund Ringrose .

EDMUND RINGROSE. I am a farmer , and live at North Mimms; the prisoner was my servant . I sent him to London on the 20th of October, with a load of hay; he was not authorized to take any money for me; the salesman was to receive the money; he left my team with a load of dung on the road.

JOHN GIBBS . I am clerk to the salesman of Whitechapel. The prisoner brought a load of hay and put it in the market; I gave him 4l. 2s. 11d. for it; it is my rule to pay the carter; I paid it him on account of his master.

ANDREW STOKES . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge; he said he had had the money and spent it.

EDMUND RINGROSE. He was not employed to receive money for me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-145

146. RICHARD FARROW was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Riley .

MARY RILEY . I am the wife of Richard Riley, and keep a clothes shop at Bethnal-green . On the 14th of November I lost three pairs of shoes from my door, about four o'clock; I told the officer, who brought the prisoner to me with one pair on his feet; I had seen him lurking about for three hours.

SAMUEL MAYNE POWELL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner on the 15th, about a mile from the prosecutrix's house - she claimed the shoes he had on his feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-146

147. CATHERINE FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a shirt, value 4s. , the goods of James Robert Cassell .

CHARLES WORLEY . I am shopman to James Robert Cassell, a pawnbroker , of Old-street. On the 10th of November I received information, and saw the prisoner about twenty yards from the house; I followed her into a passage, and under her shawl I found this shirt - she resisted very much, but I got assistance.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer, and I took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it laying on the ground; and being two days without victuals, took it up; I took it to the court to look at, and thought I would take it back, but they knocked me about, and gave me a dreadful black eye.

THOMAS WALKER . It is false; she had a black eye, and her bonnet was knocked off in our endeavouring to take her.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-147

148. LYDIA DOWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 2 gowns, value 9s.; 1 shirt, value 8s., and 1 shawl, value 8s. , the goods of John Brickell and William Mill .

JOHN BRICKELL. I am in partnership with William Mill - we are pawnbrokers , of Tottenham-court-road ; the prisoner was a frequent customer at our house; we lost several things, and I had her taken up on suspicion, on the 1st of December, as she passed the shop, and we found several duplicates on her, some of which referred to our property.

JOSIAH PEARSE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Norton-street, Middlesex-hospital. I produce a gown, a shirt, and shawl, pledged by a woman - I cannot swear it was the prisoner, but these are the duplicates I gave of them; the shawl was pledged on the 6th of November.

THOMAS FRAMPTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found these duplicates on her, among others; I went to her lodgings, and found one gown, which is claimed by the prosecutors.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271206-148

149. ALEXANDER AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 coats, value 20s.; a pair of shoes, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2d. , the goods of William Owen .

WILLIAM OWEN. I am assistant to Mr. Bowen, a surgeon , of Hoxton-square . The prisoner was employed to keep the accounts and mix the medicines - he had been there about a fortnight. On the 5th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, I went out, leaving him there (he had been apprehended there before, and absconded); he was gone when I returned - I first missed a pair of shoes, then two coats and a handkerchief, from the surgery; he was taken in about a week.

CHARLES BOWEN . The prisoner was my servant; he was found about a week after this transaction, at Mr. Smith's, in Barnard's Inn, and I gave him in charge - he said he had sold the coats for 5s., the shoes were on his feet, and the handkerchief in his pocket; he only said that he had no shoes to wear.

Prisoner. I said I knew nothing of the coats; I did not say I had sold them. Witness. He said he could not find the man he had sold them to.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer. I found these shoes on the prisoner's feet; he told me he knew nothing about the coats, that he had no shoes on his feet when he took them, and that his master owed him for a trial which he had been on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The place was open - any body might take them; I had to attend a trial at the King's Bench, for which I have not been paid - I could have taken plate or any thing.

MR. BOWYER. He had absconded after robbing me,

but as it was necessary I should have him as a witness, he having mixed the medicine. He can speak Latin, and writes a beautiful hand, and is a lad of considerable abilities.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-149

150. SAMUEL DAVIES , RICHARD MURPHY , and JAMES LANGSHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 piece of ribbon, value 1d., and 1 watch-key, value 1d. , the goods of Elizabeth Marrs , widow .

ELIZABETH MARRS. I keep a fruit-shop in North-street, Lisson-grove , and am a widow. Murphy and Langshaw came to my shop on the 27th of November, and bought a halfpenny worth of apples: they came again about half-past four o'clock that afternoon, with Davis, who bought a halfpenny worth of apples: Murphy and Langshaw were pushing each other about; they pushed against my elbow, and pushed me aside - I saw them reach over to the fire-place where this silver watch hung, they took it, with two brushes; and all ran away as fast as they could; I missed the watch instantly, and followed them to the door: I had no one these but my two little children, and could not leave the house; I found the two brushes at a shop just by, but the watch I have not found - I am quite sure they are the boys.

JOSEPH DE CAISNE . I live with my father. I saw Langshaw and Murphy come out of this woman's shop, and run down a street as fast as they could; there was another boy with them, but it was not Davies.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I was applied to, and found Davies; I took him to the prosecutrix, who said he was one; the other two lads were brought up on another charge, for shop-lifting.

DAVIES' Defence. I was at work from nine o'clock in the morning till half-past nine at night, that day, at Quebec-street, New-road.

EDWARD GATLIN . I live at the corner of Union-street, Mary-le-bone. Davies has been in my employ ever since Michaelmas. On Tuesday, the 27th of November, he was at work with me the whole day, till half-past nine o'clock at night; we were setting stoves all day.

Langshaw received a good character.

MURPHY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

LANGSHAW - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

DAVIES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-150

151. GEORGE HILL was indicted for that he, on the 11th of November , feloniously did make an assault on William Clarke , with intent to rob him of his goods and monies .

WILLIAM HILL . I am a hatter - I am just out of my apprenticeship to Mr. Holmes of Aldgate, since which I have been living with my parents, at Fountain-place, City-road. On the 11th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was returning home, having supped at Islington; the prisoner overtook me in the City-road, near the wall of the Vinegar-yard - he caught hold of my arm; I was rather startled, and told him to be off - he was quite a stranger. I kept walking on - he kept close to me, and said, "Will you stand something to drink?" I made no reply; he still followed me, and asked me again - he pretended to be quite drunk, but certainly was not so; he asked me if I would toss up for something to drink; I still walked on, and said, "No, Sir, I am not in the habit of tossing, or drinking with strangers;" and that I considered he had had enough; he then crossed Old-street-road, and again laid hold of me - he staggered; he asked me for something to drink - I told him to be off, and not insult me, and pushed him away; he said he did not intend to insult me, he knew I was a gentleman, and had plenty of money, I told him it was of no consequence, and told him to be off; he came up and tapped my trousers pocket, and again asked me to toss him to drink - he repeated the same question several times; I walked a little way further - he came and tapped my pocket again, said he knew I had plenty of money, and caught hold of my arm again - I pushed him away; he turned round, struck me in the eye and breast, and knocked me down - I called Watch! the watchman ran and caught him - he did not appear drunk; when he was taken, he said "It is all right watchman, come along Bob," meaning me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where had you been at Islington? A. Nearly opposite the new chapel, at Miss Plumbers. I considered myself sober - I had taken brandy and water. I had passed Fountain-place; I was sleeping at a coffee-house in Finsbury-market, as my mother's house was under repair; there are a great many bad women about the Vinegar-yard - I do not think he intended to rob me at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-151

152. THOMAS BOWMAN and JOHN BUCKERIDGE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 book, value 5s. , the goods of William Henry Hughes .

WILLIAM HENRY HUGHES. I keep a book shop , at No. 1, Red Lion-street, Holborn . On the 16th of November, I saw a book snatched from my window, which was open; I ran to the door, but the person had turned down Holborn; the officer afterwards brought the prisoner in with it.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners, and watched them some time; they went and stood by Mr. Hughes' door talking, for some time. I saw Buckeridge take the book, put it into his apron, and they ran off together - I ran and took them both, and found it in his apron.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

BUCKERIDGE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-152

153. NORAH HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 2 rings, value 5s.; 1 gold drop, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 6 yards of lace, value 6s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 6d., and 2 caps, value 1s. , the goods of Isabella Facey , her mistress.

ISABELLA FACEY. I am a widow , and live in Park-lane . The prisoner was my servant of all-work - I missed my property from my room - I had been missing property for the last twelve months; she has lived two years with me - I had given her warning; she was going on the 1st of December - I wished to search her boxes, which she refused - I sent for an officer, who found these articles in her cloak, which was in the trunk; she then said they

were mine, but did not say how she got them - I had not given her any of them.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I was sent for; the prisoner said she had nothing of her mistress'; her mistress asked if she objected to my searching her trunk, and, after a little time, she said No; she opened a trunk, took up this red cloak, and said, "Here is nothing here" - I took and opened the cloak, and felt something in the hood - I said, "Here is something;" she said, "Yes, and it is my mistress;" I found the lining had been unsown and pained up again, with all these articles in it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them off the ground - I never opened any drawer - I found the drop in the ashes, and the rings on the floor. I received no wages.

WILLIAM BALLARD. Her mistress said she had been with her two years, and received no wages, but I found 12l. 2s. 6d. in her box.

MRS. FACEY. I have missed several things; she has only received two sovereigns of me.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-153

154. ELIZABETH SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 shawl, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Robert May .

SARAH MAY . I am the wife of Robert May, a fishmonger . On the 10th of November I was at the Gentleman and Porter public-house, about half-past ten o'clock at night, and missed my shawl; the prisoner, who had been in the room, was gone - I went and told the watchman, who took her.

GEORGE SMITH . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found nine duplicates on her; one of which is for the shawl.

WILLIAM COMBS . I am a pawnbroker, of Shoreditch. On Saturday night, the 10th of November, a female pawned this shawl. I gave her this duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-154

155. HENRY WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 pair of bellows, value 3s. , the goods of George Lavell .

GEORGE LAVELL. I am a bellows-maker , and live in Queen-street, Seven-dials . The officer brought the prisoner in with these bellows, which were taken from the front of my shop.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer. On the 1st of November I saw the prisoner running across the street, with these bellows - I seized him, and Lavell claimed them; he was within two hundred yards of the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271206-155

156. ANN THEOBALDS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 5 shillings , the monies of John Jones .

HARRIET JONES . I am the wife of John Jones. We came to town, and I got the prisoner to pawn a coat for me, on the 23d of October, which she did, and brought me 10s., and the duplicate. On the 30th of October I got her to get me 5s. more on it; she brought me the ticket, and 5s., and said, "The pawnbroker has made a bungling job of it; he has put down 1l. on the duplicate, but it is of no consequence" - I afterwards found she had had 1l.

GEORGE LAW . I advanced the prisoner 1l. on the coat in all. I am a pawnbroker.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-156

157. MARY THORP was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 2 blankets, value 9s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 bed-tick, value 3s., and 1 pillow, value 2s. , the goods of George Wood .

GEORGE WOOD . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . The prisoner lodged in a small furnished house of mine; she left in about six months, and took the key with her - I got in at the window, and missed this property, which had been let with the room; the duplicates were left in the room.

JOSEPH KING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. I have two blankets - I do not know who pawned them, but these are the duplicates I gave the person.

SOPHIA WOOD . I am the prosecutor's wife. I redeemed the other things; the prisoner sold things in the street. I always thought her honest.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-157

158. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 6 shoe-brushes, value 4s., and 3 shoe-stretchers, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Prideaux Ball .

THOMAS EADY . I am servant to Thomas Prideaux Ball, of Russel-place, May-fair . On the 4th of December, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, this property was taken from the area; the gate was locked; I saw the prisoner in the area with the articles in her hand; she went up the steps, and I saw her get over the gate to go away - I caught her in a moment, and gave her in charge.

THOMAS KELLEN . I am a watchman; my box is opposite Mr. Ball's - I was called, and took the prisoner, who had got over the gate, with these articles.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-158

159. ELIZABETH THETFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 9 sovereigns, 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Richard Martin , from his person .

RICHARD MARTIN. I am a labourer . I came to town, from Cambridgeshire, on the 24th of November, to look for work - I had nine sovereigns, and 14s. 6 1/2d., in a bag, in my breeches pocket - I had my smock-frock on - I got to London at a quarter-past four o'clock, and went to the Swan public-house, Whitechapel, had two pints of beer, and some bread and cheese - I could not get a bed there under 1s., which I thought too much - I came out and asked a fish-woman in the street, where I could get a cheap lodging; the prisoner was just by, and said she could inform me where I could get one for 4d. a-night - I went with her to George-yard , as I understand; we went to the ground-floor - I did not notice whether there were a bed; there was just a snuff of candle burning; there was two

doors to the room; she opened the other door, and put her head out for a moment - I put my hand into my pocket for 2 1/2d. to give her a pint of beer, for shewing me the lodging; she rushed her hand into my pocket, and took out my bag, with nine sovereigns, and 14s. 6d., in it, and went out at the other door, which was fastened, in a moment; and I saw no more of her - I came out to look for her, and two men were about me in a moment; they knocked me down, and kicked me about - I was then out in the street; I had not seen the men in the house; they struck me directly I came out; there was an old woman there, who said she knew nothing about the place; the people told me to give notice at the office - I saw the prisoner again on the following Thursday, and am sure she is the woman - I picked her out from several others.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you know any body in London? A. No - I was never in town in my life before - I had left home on the Wednesday night, and walked all the way - I was two days walking - I was quite sober, I am certain - I am married; my wife is in the country, with my brother - I brought the money, as I might want it; the prisoner was not to have slept with me, I swear - I had not spoken to any other women - I had no pork sausages, or any thing after I left the Swan - I had never seen her before; it was about seven o'clock; it was moonlight, and the lamps were lighted.

COURT. Q. Who do you work for in Cambridgeshire? A. My brother, who has about forty acres of land, and a farm.

THOMAS SHELWELL . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I took the prisoner on the Thursday, from the description given by the prosecutor, and which was entered in the robbery-book; he saw her among thirty or forty more women, and pointed her out directly.

Cross-examined. Q, What description did he give of her? A. As a middle-sized woman, with a black eye.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271206-159

160. ZACHARIA SAYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Brickell and William Mill .

HENRY LIVERMORE . I live with John Brickell and William Mill, pawnbrokers , of Tottenham-court-road . On the 30th of October I was going towards the door, and saw the prisoner take these shoes, and put them under his coat; I pursued, and took him a few yards off: he dropped them, and I took them up.

JOSEPH COLE . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The shoes laid in the street - I took them up, and gave them to the young man.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-160

161. JOHN STOCKINGS and JOHN BAILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 15 books, value 8s.; 8 tracts, value 6d., and 1 box, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Bithray .

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a constable. On the 14th of November I saw the prisoners together, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, looking in at several windows; I went over to a door to watch, and in a minute or two Stockings went into a private house, in Britannia-row, Islington , and came out - Bailey then went in, and then Stockings went in again; I was at some distance, and cannot tell whether the door was open or shut; they came out in a few minutes, and Stockings had this box; they turned down towards some fields: I pursued, with assistance, and secured them - Bailey then had the box; I found a piece of baize round Bailey's body, next his skin; he said it was to keep his stomach warm.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Whether Bailey sent Stockings in to take any thing you do not know? A. No - he did not tell me Bailey had employed him.

WILLIAM HENRY ATKINSON . On the 14th of November I was in Britannia-row, and met Stockings with this box; I followed with Taylor; the box was thrown down, and I took it up; I took hold of Stockings.

JOHN HALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoners.

JOHN BITHRAY . I live in Britannia-row. This box, and the books in it, are mine - it generally stood in my passage, but I was out when it was taken. The baize is not mine.

STOCKING'S Defence. This young man asked me to carry the box for him - he gave it to me.

BAILEY's Defence. I saw this man with the box, and the officer took us - I made no resistance.

STOCKINGS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271206-161

145. MARY PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 2 shirts, value 8s., and 1 shift, value 2s. , the goods of James Stephens .

JAMES STEPHENS . I live in Eagle-street, Holborn . On the 14th of November I was out for about five minutes, between five and six o'clock; I pulled the door too, but did not latch it - on returning, the door stood open, and the mat against it; I went in and shut it, and found the prisoner at the corner of the kitchen stairs; she said she had nothing of mine - I said, "You have got the linen off the line in the yard;" she then produced them out of her apron.

MARY HILL . I occupy the front parlour of this house - I saw the prisoner in the passage, with the things in her apron - she is a stranger.

JOHN EVANS . I am an officer, and took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-162

163. JAMES MORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of Samuel Handley .

SAMUEL HANDLEY. I keep a shoemaker's-shop , in Saffron-hill . I saw the prisoner come and take these boots from my door-post; I pursued, and as he ran he struck a witness on the arm - I secured him.

JAMES ISAAC . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

JOHN EVANS . I saw the prisoner take the boots - he struck me, but I still followed, and collared him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-163

160. MARGARET MARTIN and MARY BUSH were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 3 shoes, value 4s. , the goods of James Mace .

HENRY JENKINS . I live in Ratcliff-highway. On the 8th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came to my shop together; Bush came behind my counter - she said, "I beg pardon for making so free, but I want a pair of shoes;" she took up a shoe; I told her to walk on the other side of the counter, to take a chair, and try them on; she went round, but said she could always fit herself by her hand; I gave her several pairs, which she put her hand into, and objected to them; I observed, as I gave her them, that she took them with only one hand; I came round, and said, "What are you doing?" she was stooping - she said, "I beg your pardon, but my clothes are all coming down;" I then looked and missed a pair of men's shoes off a nail - she denied taking them; I said I would send for an officer; she then dropped them from some part of her dress - she had her hand as if she was adjusting her clothes; Martin stood by her side - my wife then said,"Perhaps the other has got something in her basket;" I went to Martin, and said, "What have you in your basket?" she said, "Only a bottle of medicine;" I took it, and found this one pair of shoes, and an odd one in it - I asked where she got them; she replied, "They are not mine - they are the other girl's." I sent for a constable.

JAMES MACE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Ratcliff-highway. The prisoners came to my shop together on the 8th of November, in the evening; Martin asked to look at a pair of child's shoes: they objected to the price, and bought none; Bush said the price was too much. I did not miss any thing, but in about an hour the officer produced these shoes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When had you seen them before? A. I cannot say. I have the fellow of the odd one.

THOMAS AMES . I am an officer. I took them in charge - Martin said the basket was hers; Mace claimed the shoes which were in it. As I took them along I asked where they got them; they at first said they found them: I said, "I am sure you stole them;" Martin said, "Well, we did steal them, not far off." There was an empty bottle, but no medicine in the basket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Bush put in a written Defence, denying all knowledge of the offence.

MARTIN - GUILTY. Aged 18.

BUSH - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Both recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-164

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

165. AARON LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 seal, value 2l., and 1 key, value 10s., the goods of Cresar Long , knowing them to have been stolen .

CAESAR LONG. On the 14th of November I lost my watch and seals; I think I was in Artillery-lane, Bishopsgate , at the time; I was accosted by two females, who took hold of each arm; I walked between them a little while - it was half-past ten o'clock at night, I think; I had been detained rather late; when I had walked a little way one of the girls disappeared, and I directly missed my watch; I was not perfectly sober; I had been with a friend; my watch was safe ten minutes as a quarter of an hour before, when I was at a tobacconist's and looked at it - this is my watch (looking at it) there was a seal, key, and ribbon to it; I know it by its general appearance, and the maker's name; I do not know the number; I had bought it about eight years ago, of Mr. Brinkman - I swear positively to it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you undertake to swear you did not drop your watch by accident at the tobacconist's? A. I do not recollect that I did; I swear it was in my pocket previous to missing it; I cannot say I did not put it inside my trousers instead of my fob; I took the other woman into custody; she was discharged after three examinations - I did not feel it taken; the tobacconist's is in Artillery-lane - I will not swear either of the girls took it; I have no mark on the watch - I know its appearance and the name; I swear positively it is mine - I put it into my fob, to the best of my belief - I find the prisoner bears an excellent character, and supports his father and mother.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer. I found this watch in the possession of Charles Hoppe, on the Monday week after the robbery - he said he bought it of Levi.

CHARLES HOPPE . I bought this watch of Levi, on Friday, the 16th of November.

Cross-examined. Q. Inquiry was made about it after you gave it up? A. Yes.

MOSES LEVI . I sold this watch to Hoppe - I bought it of the prisoner, on Thursday, the 15th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening; he came to my house and asked four guineas for it - I gave three guineas and a half - I lived at No. 8, Goulston-square - I did not ask where he got it, nor did he tell me - I am certain he said nothing about it; I had bought watches of him before - he dealt in them.

Q. Did he give no reason for selling it? A. He said he would not sell it for that if he had not wanted money.

Cross-examined. Q. Where do you live now? A. At No. 95, Long-alley, Sun-street; I had lived in Goulston-square about twelve months - I am in the watch line - I often buy second-hand watches, without asking questions of people; I know I sold it for 4l. 15s. a day or two after; the officer desired me to attend at the office - I said there that I bought it of the prisoner - I can prove it by a gentleman, who is not here - his name is Emanuel Josephs - he is constantly in Wales, but comes to town once or twice a year; I told the officer directly that I bought it of the prisoner; he deals in jewellery, and sells at a stand; Josephs left town last Sunday week - I told the Alderman he could prove it.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am an officer. I apprehended Levi.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he say Josephs was present when he bought the watch? A. Yes, and that he was in Wales; I believe I mentioned this before the Magistrate myself - he said he got 3l. 15s. in money, and 1l. in segars, for it; I afterwards went and took the prisoner - I asked if he knew anything of a watch which he had sold Levi - he said, "What Levi?" I believe I said,"Of Goulston-street;" he said, "Yes, I know - it is Levi the cloberer;" I asked if he had sold him a watch; he said No; but as I was taking him from Harrow-alley, where I

found him, he said he had sold Levi several watches; and after the examination, he said he could not tell whether he sold that watch or not; he said at first that he recollected nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Thursday after the robbery a gentleman, named Smith, sold me a watch for 3l. 5s. and I sold it to Levi for 3l. 6s.; I had sold him several in a fair way of trade, but the watch produced is not the one I sold him: I would not sell one for 3l. 6s. which he could sell for 4l. 15s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-165

166. JOHN LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 2 saws, value 25s. , the goods of Joseph Clarke .

JOSEPH CLARKE. I am a sawyer . On the 9th of November I was working at Mr. Elslop's, at Wapping , and left two saws there; next morning I missed two of them; there were eight saws there - I had left one which I worked with, at the Pitt's Head public-house, and the other stood against the wall; the yard is left open for the ac commodation of the captains and mates; I found them at the office that day - I know them - one has a tooth broken out, the other I know - those who use saws always know the filing of the teeth.(Property produced and sworn to.)

EBENEZER DALTON. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. The prisoner was brought to our office by a saw-maker, who said he had offered to sell him a saw for much less than its value; he only produced one - I asked the prisoner where he got it - he said he brought it from Birmiagham, and had another at home; I went to his lodging, and there found this other saw.

Prisoner's Defence. I brought these saws from Birmingham.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-166

167. ELIZA LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 15s. , the goods of Edward Reddish Thomas Blythe .

EDWARD REDDISH THOMAS BLYTHE . I am a baker , and lodge in Eden-court, Westminster : the prisoner lodged on the same floor as me. On the 24th of November I had a pair of trousers, which I had let fall; they were scowered, and thrown over a line on the stairs to dry; I did not hang them there, but I saw them there soon after eleven o'clock at night, on the 24th of November: the prisoner came up stairs after I had seen them - she came up to the room she had been living in, and a little before twelve o'clock, the person who had washed my trousers called to ask me if I had taken them; I said, No; I said,"Then Mrs. Lane must have taken them;" I then went out to where her father and mother live - I saw her, and asked her about them - she took hold of them, and said,"Are these any thing like them?" I said Yes; they were on the bed - I went out and got an officer - we then went and took her and them.

Prisoner. I had not been into my own room that evening. Witness. I think she did; her husband had made me a pair of shoes, and she came to me for the money that evening, and I paid her.

JANE EARL . I live in this house, and had washed the trousers - I hung them up about half-past ten o'clock - heard two female voices on the stairs afterwards; I was down late to fasten the door, and missed the trousers.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am an officer. The prosecutor applied to me - I went with him to the house where I found the prisoner in the room; these trous were on the bed, very wet; the prisoner said she did know how they came there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. How came I to be acquitted from Bow-street for a whole week, and then taken again?

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON re-examined. There was sufficient evidence at first, and she was discharged; the prosecutor came again, and said the prisoner and her friends been abusing him very much, and Mrs. Earl would con forward; I then went and took the prisoner again.

Prisoner. Blythe said he would take 12s. for the del but my husband could not get it, so I was taken again - my husband signed a paper at Bow-street - it was to be settled for 12s.

THOMAS BLYTHE . No, that is not true; I deny it altogether.

COURT. Q. Was any payment of 12s. to be made? There was no payment no promise, except that the office should not lose his expenses.

Q. Were you to have the money? A. The officer to have it, and he did not part with the trousers till be g his pay.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON re-examined. Q. What were you to have 12s.? A. No, my Lord; I did refuse give up the trousers - I said I had lost two days in looking after another girl, and I asked 7s. for the two days.

Q. Have not you a salary as an officer? A. I have only 2s. 6d. a night - I am a night officer - I am paid by people for what I do in the day.

Q. Is Mr. Halls aware of that? A. Yes, he is, my Lord - I took the other girl by the prosecutor's description- she was taken before the Magistrate, and denied knowledge of it, and went away about her business - Mr. Earl came and gave her evidence, and then the prisoner was taken again.

Q. How comes it that 12s. was to be paid? A. That know nothing about; but after the prisoner was discharged I looked to the prosecutor for 7s.

JURY to T. BLYTHE. Q. How came the sum to be 12s. A. Why, I did not know what the expenses might be; I said it might be 1l., I did not know - the prisoner's husband said, I must be as favourable as I could; and I said,"Bring what you can, only show yourself a man;" I did not then know what the officer's charge would be.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I had not told him then what my charge would be; I told him afterwards he could not pay me less than 3s. 6d. a day.

JURY to BLYTHE. Q. Had you been into the room before you saw the officer? A. I just went to the door, and she said, "Are these any thing like them?" Two women had gone to show me the house.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON. I first saw the trousers on the prisoner's mother's bed; she was sitting there, very drunk, and so was the prisoner.

JANE EARL re-examined. I went before Mr. Halls, and stated that there were two women's voices on the stairs; I

saw the prisoner, but not the other; I heard another female voice.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-167

168. JOHN INGLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 1 reticule, value 4s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 2s., and 1 key, value 2d. , the goods of Teresa Bowditch .

TERESA BOWDITCH. I am single , and live in Cornwall-street, Commercial-road. On the 3d of December I went into a cookshop, in Church-lane , to supper - it was after eleven o'clock at night; the prisoner was there, and another man with him. I put my reticule down on the bench by my side in the room - I went into the shop, leaving it there; I saw through the window the prisoner's arm over the table, and the reticule in his hand; I directly went into the parlour, and the man who had been with him rushed past me. I accused the prisoner of having it - he said he had not got it; the watchman was called, and he was taken - nothing was found on him; he said he did not know the man who was in his company; next morning he offered me 5s. to say nothing about it, and then three half-crowns.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Do you go by any other name? A. No; I get my living by needlework, and no other way; I had not been at work that day - I had been to the theatre, with a gentleman who lives at Woodford - he left me at Red Lion-street; there is another Cornwall-street, inhabited by loose women, but I do not live there; I never said I saw the prisoner give it to the other man.

Q. Did not the prisoner call out, that the man had taken it? A. He did not; he went to the door; I do not walk in the Commercial-road.

SARAH LAY . I keep the cook-shop. Bowditch came in and laid her reticule on the bench - I went into the shop; she came and said she would have some pudding, and as she returned to the room, another man rushed out; she exclaimed "I have lost my reticule;" that is all I heard.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she accuse the prisoner of it? A. I did not hear that - ours is a narrow shop; the man who ran out had paid, and so had the prisoner. I never said the prosecutrix was a street-walker.

DANIEL CURTIS . I am a watchman. I was called, and took the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-168

169. ELIZABETH JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 saw, value 5s. , the goods of James Nash .

JAMES NASH. I am a carpenter . On the 5th of November, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I was at a public-house in St. Giles's, and my saw was taken - I had just come to town; the watchman brought it in just as I missed it - I had put it by the street door.

CORNELIUS KENNEDY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner pass my box in Plumbtree-street, with this saw under her shawl; I asked where she got it - she said it belonged to her husband, who was at the public-house - I found the prosecutor, who owned it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, she did not intend to steal the saw, but to return it to the prosecutor, expecting to get some liquor for it.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-169

170. CHRISTOPHER KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 2 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign , the monies of Austin Gibbons .

AUSTIN GIBBONS. I am a Custom-house officer , and lodge in the same house with the prisoner; I went out with him on the morning of the 15th of November; I told him I was to receive some money, and wished to send home to my wife, by him, two sovereigns; he went with me to Mrs. Hart's, where I bought a cap for 2s. I took two sovereigns and a half-sovereign from my fob, and 3s. or 4s. I handed her 3s.; I stooped to do something to my shoe, and then missed the money off the counter; I turned round, opened my pantaloons, and gave myself a shake, thinking I had not put it down, and it might be about me. I said to Hart,"It is very odd, my money is gone;" she said, "That is the man who took it;" she went to the door, and called a man, who called a constable, and he took the prisoner in charge; I laid my hand on his shoulder, and said "Kelly, give me my money, and go about your business;" he put his hand down to his shoe, took up a sovereign, and gave it to me; I said, "This won't do, I must have my money, or give you in charge;" he would not return it, and I gave him in charge; the constable found a sovereign, 2s. 6d. and 1s. in his pocket - he was intoxicated; and next morning, at the watch-house, when he came to himself, he confessed that the money was mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you known him? A. I believe nearly two years; he is my countryman, and often went about with me - he could often have robbed me if he had chosen; he has sometimes taken care of my money for me; if he had not drank too much, he would not have deined taking it - I really think he would have returned it, when he came to himself - I do not think he intended to steal it.

COURT. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate so? A. I cannot say, but I told the whole truth; he said, that as he was putting it into his fob, it fell into his shoe, which was very likely the case.

PHOEBE HART . These persons came into my shop, they both were in liquor; I saw the prosecutor put the money on the counter; the prisoner took it up, and put it as if to put it into his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-170

171. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Ann Russell , from her person .

ANN RUSSELL. I am single . On the 4th of November, between two and three o'clock in the day, I was coming down Wheeler-street, Spitalfields - I was standing with the handkerchief round my neck, and Adams, who has run away from Worship-street, took it, and gave it to the prisoner, who stood alongside of me; he put it into his pocket - I saw a bit of it hanging out of his pocket. My sister asked him for it - he called us a very bad name, and knocked us down; they then all ran away; there were several persons there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know the other man's name is Adams? A. I think that is the name he gave at the watch-house - I am not sure. He was taken to the watch-house, and the officer let him go - I told the officer he took it off my neck, and I stated so at Worship-street, but he ran away just before he got there.

Q. Was there any fight? A. Yes - it was between the young man who took my handkerchief and some others; he was fighting with my brother, and after he beat my brother he took the handkerchief - he did not stay there after he took it.

Q. Did he not come next day and give up a shawl which you had lost? A. No, it was my sister who had lost that. The prisoner himself knocked me down, and called me a very bad name - my sister had gone up to him, and said, "Young man, give me that handkerchief - that is all I want;" he then called us a very bad name, and knocked us down - the other had beat my brother, but my brother never lifted his hand against him; he said it was of no use, there were so many of them; I was frightened - I said to the young man,"Pray don't beat my brother," and then he took the handkerchief from my neck; I had him in sight about ten minutes. I had a Jew and another person taken on the charge - I have heard the name of Reuben, but do not recollect whether that was the Jew's name.

Q. And young Duff, who escaped? A. Yes - I had three taken altogether; I only swore to Duff at the office; I did not swear to Reuben. The Magistrate was not going to commit my brother to prison that I know of; he said something to my brother about it; he was never threatened to be committed before, that I know of; I know nothing of 4l. being left with any publican, nor did I go to any public-house about it. Duff was the one who beat my brother in the mouth - I swore positively to him, as positive as I do to the prisoner: it was not proved that he was a mile and a half from the spot.

MARY ANN RUSSELL . I am the prosecutrix's sister-in-law; we were both walking together - my husband was on before. I saw a man named William Early take the handkerchief - he gave it to the prisoner, who put into his pocket; I went to him, and said, "Young man, have the goodness to give me that handkerchief - it don't belong to you;" he called me a very bad name: I said, "You had better give it me, or we may see further into it" - he then struck me, my sister-in-law, and my husband: I was quite senseless with the blow.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose property was this? A. It belonged to my father. My husband is a bricklayer. I charged nobody with it but Early and the prisoner. I was at Worship-street; two other men were charged with assaulting us - they were a Jew, named Reuben, and a boy, whose name, I believe, was Duff; I said at first I thought Duff was the young man; the Magistrate said, thoughts would not do; I did not hear my sister-in-law swear against Duff - I was out of the room. I did not see Duff do any thing; I was senseless with the blow - I did not go to a public-house - I heard nothing about 4l. The prisoner knocked me down; my husband did not strike them, there were so many; the prisoner struck him before he struck me - they were round my husband about half an hour; there was no mob when I came to myself: he was ill-used about ten minutes before I was struck - I saw the blood come from him; my sister was knocked down first. The last blow I had was from the prisoner.

Q. Had you not a shawl returned to you next day? A. No; Early gave me my shawl before I had the blow.

COURT. Q. As far as you know, was the handkerchief ever returned to your sister? A. No - I have not seen it since.

JOHN RUSSELL . I am the prosecutrix's brother. I was with her and my wife; I saw Early take her handkerchief - he gave it to the prisoner, and I saw it in his right-hand - that was after I was knocked down; I did not see what he did with it. I was knocked down twice before they touched the handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you besides a bricklayer? A. I have been taken up on suspicion of being what they call a resurrection man - the last time was about a year ago, and about a year before that - it was only twice, to my recollection; I will not swear I was not taken up four times; I will swear it was not five: I do not know what I was taken for the last time - I will not swear that; I am on my oath; it was for taking out some windows; the first time was for going through Bethnal-green church-yard - on suspicion of a robbery of a place being broken open, where I was at work. I do not recollect being taken up three times before - I have only been three times before a Magistrate - I once was under bail. I took up a man named Duff, but his father said his two sons were much alike, and the Magistrac did not commit him. The Magistrate said he had a great mind to commit me, because I did not swear to the two prisoners the third time. I would not swear to Duff after what his father said.

JOSEPH FRYER . I am a Bow-street day patrol. On the 6th of November I went with Russell to King-street. Spitalfields: he pointed out the prisoner to me, looking out of window; I made towards the house, and the prisoner put his head in; I went up to the room, and the door was fastened. I got a poker to open it, but seeing a loft over my head, I got up there, and saw the prisoner near the chimney.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-171

172. HENRY HASTINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 ham, value 10s. , the goods of John Tate .

RICHARD HARRISON . I live shopman to Mr. Tate, a cheesemonger , of Oxford-street . On the 1st of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was behind the counter; Mrs. Tate called out, "Stop thief! a man has stolen a ham, and gone up that court" - I followed up the court, crossed Tottenham-court-road, and took the prisoner in Russel-street; he threw the ham down under a cart - a butcher took it up, and gave it to the watchman. I saw the prisoner throw it down, and never lost sight of him. - The hams were kept in the door-way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it your custom to keep them there? A. Yes. I had not seen the prisoner's face; mistress was at the shop door; I took him about one hundred yards off; he turned out of the court, but I was close behind him - I did not see him in the shop.

COURT. Q. Your mistress told you a man had taken a ham? A. Yes. I first saw the prisoner about twenty yards from the shop; I kept him in sight, and saw him drop it.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me by a watchman, with the ham.

Cross-examined. Q. Is anybody here to swear to it? A. The shopman swore to it by a label on it; the mistress said she could not swear to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing from Hanway-yard to Great Russel-street, and was taken.

RICHARD HARRISON. The label on it "Super Westphalia" - I saw it safe about half-past four o'clock; I saw the prisoner with one, with something white on it, and I missed one from the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-172

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 10.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

173. CHARLES CALLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 cloak, value 2l., and 1 worsted comforter, value 1s. , the goods of Edward Frisby Howis .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18271206-173

174. RICHARD ISAACS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of Richard Waters .

RICHARD WATERS. On the 5th of November I was walking up Ayre-street-hill , about two minutes past six o'clock in the evening; I lost my handkerchief from my right hand coat pocket; I felt a slight pressure upon me, and I missed my handkerchief; I turned sharply round, and saw three men - the prisoner was one, and he ran away - I followed, and called Stop thief! he turned a corner, and threw my handkerchief down, and was stopped by an officer; I picked my handkerchief up; I am certain of his person.

WILLIAM COLTON . I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was the first person running, and I stopped him; Mr. Waters came up, and I took the prisoner in charge. I received this handkerchief from Waters.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry Stop thief! and ran to see what was the matter.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-174

175. GEORGE HODGETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 mahogany board, value 19s. , the goods of Perceval Turner .

PERCEVAL TURNER. I am a timber-merchant , and live in Old-street-road . On the 29th of October I saw the prisoner come into the yard, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, as I was at my bed-room window, watching, suspecting he would come - I knew him before; I saw him take this board off a rack in the yard: I ran out - a man said, "There he goes;" I then saw him put the board against a public-house, about one hundred yards off, and run off as fast as he could; he fell, and I collared him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It took you some time to come down stairs? A. Yes; he said a person gave it to him to carry, but I saw him take it.

PETER PLEDGE . I was working in Turner's yard; he called me, and I saw the prisoner standing by the board - he ran off, fell down, and was taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-175

176. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 set of chaise harness, value 50s. , the goods of Simeon Marks .

SIMEON MARKS. On the 30th of October, in the morning, I lost a set of chaise harness from my stables, in Gunyard, Houndsditch - I had seen it safe the day before. I received information from my lad next day.

JACOB COHEN . I am in Mr. Marks' employ. On the 30th of October, at four o'clock, I cleaned this harness; I went to the stable again, at five o'clock, found it gone, and the door open. I know nothing of the prisoner.

RICHARD INGLEDEN . I live in Lyndon-terrace, Hackney-road, and am a harness-maker. The prisoner came about half-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 30th of October, with this harness to sell: I was engaged, and told him to call next morning, at half-past eight or nine o'clock, which he did - I questioned him about it; he said he brought it from a stable in Gun-square; he said, "Will you buy it?" I said No, I should detain him - he begged to be let go, and while my wife was expostulating with me about keeping him, he escaped. I gave information at Worship-street; he said he had not stolen it, but another person stole it, and asked him to sell it for him.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner - he said, "I am sorry for it, but Dick, the coachman, was the cause of it;" I cannot find Dick.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I went in search of the coachman: I heard the prisoner say he was the cause of it.

Prisoner's Defence. A groom gave me the harness to sell. I went to the shop about selling it - he had been there two or three days before, and I asked if a person had not been there about selling harness.

RICHARD INGLEDEN . A person had called about three weeks before, and asked if I would buy a harness.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-176

177. JOHN BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 2 planks, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Cubit and Lewis Cubit .

THOMAS RADCLIFF . On Wednesday evening last I was in Messrs. Thomas and Lucas Cubit's office, Belgrave-place - I am their foreman - a person came in between seven and eight o'clock, and said a man was stopped with two planks; I went out, and knew them to be master's - I had had them in my hands twice that day; the prisoner keeps a small coal-shed, not far from master's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any private mark on them? A. No - one is an unsound plank - I knew them well; we have too many to miss them; I am positive of this unsound one.

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . I am an officer. I took these two boards from the prisoner at the corner of Allington-street, Vauxhall-road, at six o'clock on the evening of the 5th of December; I and Covington saw him coming from the canal - he said he lived in Allington-street, and was taking them home to cut into bundles; I told him to show me where he bought them, and in Vauxhall-road, he said,"I bought them here, of a man - I do not know who he was;" this was in the road. I went to Cubit's, and Ratcliff claimed them. The prisoner said he gave 5s. for them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not describe the man as

having a red cap and trousers on? A. Yes, afterwards. I stopped him about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutors' wharf.

JAMES COVINGTON . I am an officer. I was with Southerwood. GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing one board . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-177

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

178. NATHANIEL DURHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 6 brass weights, value 3s. , the goods of George Jackson .

ELIZA JACKSON . I am the wife of George Jackson, a broker - we live in William-street, Westminster. These weights were taken off the counter while I was out - I left the errand-boy in the shop.

HENRY DULY . On the afternoon in question I was in the street, and saw the prisoner running, pursued by some persons; I ran and took him, and found these seven weights, two cravats, and a knife on him. I took him back to the shop; he said he took them off the counter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271206-178

179. JAMES GARLICK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 4lbs. of orange and lemon-peel, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Wilkins and John Wilkins .

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a brass-founder. I saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's shop, in St. John's-street, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, and take this parcel off the counter; I had seen three others with him before - he went on to Wilderness-row; I told a young man, who went and took him.

THOMAS HALL . Morgan gave me information; I pursued, and took the prisoner with this parcel.

WILLIAM CAULFIELD . I am in the employ of Edward and John Wilkins, who are wholesale confectioners . The prisoner was brought back with this parcel of orange and lemon-peel, which is their's; I had left it on the counter while I went into the counting-house to make out a bill, two or three minutes before.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-179

180. WILLIAM HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 chest, value 5s.; 1 hammock, value 10s.; 9 shirts, value 20s.; 1 bag, value 2s.; and 1 pair of boots, value 3s. , the goods of William Elder .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-180

181. JOSEPH COMMANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 184 lbs. of lead, value 30s. , belonging to the Governor of the poor or alms-house, called Sekford's alms-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of the Master of the Rolls for the time being, and the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas .

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be the property of the Right Honourable Sir John Leach , Knt., Master of the Rolls , and the Honourable Sir William Draper Best , Knt., Chief Justice of the Common Pleas .

FOURTH COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Bewdley ,

MR. BODLAND conducted the prosecution.

JAMES DUFF . On the 6th of November I lodged in the third floor of a house, in Woodbridge-street, Clerkenwell ; between two and half-past two o'clock in the morning, I found the water coming through on my bed; I got up, went to the window, and saw the watchman; I called him, and we went into the next house, which is unoccupied: we searched every room till we came to the top room, where we found some lead, lying in two pieces, not rolled up, but in sheets; we found the prisoner partly up a chinmey of the next room, about four yards from the lead. I and a watchman went on the roof of the house; I found one piece of lead had been removed from the building, and laid down - lead had been quite removed from three places; I have seen the prisoner before - he did not live in that building, nor near it.

RALPH BRANCH . I am a watchman. I was called, and went into this house; I found some lead in the top room, and in the next room (the door of which was put too), we found the prisoner partly up the chimney. I took him to the watch-house - he was quite sober, but shummed intoxication after I took him.

RICHARD SMITH . I am a watchman. I was called about half-past two o'clock; I went up with Duff, on to the top of the house, and found a large piece of lead, lying flat, but loose, ready to be taken away - it had been moved quite from the place where it had been fixed.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. I received the prisoner and lead at the office; I compared the lead with the premises - this piece comes from the gutter, between Nos. 8 and 9, one piece from the roof, and another piece from between Nos. 9 and 10, and which would let the water into Duff's room - it had been fixed in the mortar - they had forced the tiles up, and dragged it away.

THOMAS GARNER . I produce the lead; there are about 190 lbs. - it appeared to have been recently stripped off.

GEORGE PAYNE ANDREWS . I am clerk to Mr. Anderson, who is Solicitor to the Governors of Sekford's Charity - here is the Act of Parliament, by which they are made trustees of the houses in Woodbridge-street.

JOHN BEWLEY . I had agreed with the trustees of Sekford's alms-houses to purchase these houses, but the contract was not completed.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my master's at a quarter to nine o'clock, went to a public-house, and met one Wilson, who gave me some brandy and rum, which took away my senses; how I came into the house I cannot tell.

THOMAS GARNER . He did appear drunk at the watch-house - his hands and face were very dirty.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-181

182. MARY ANN LYONS and JANE LODGE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 hat, value 8s.; 1 hat-box, value 3d.; 1 jacket, value 3s., and 10 sovereigns , the property of Daniel McLeod .

DANIEL McLEOD. I am a seaman . On the 16th of November my vessel was in the West India Docks; I went into the Bull's Head public-house, in Ratcliff-highway - I had been buying a bed, and, hearing a fiddle playing, I went into the public-house. I saw the prisoners there, and about a dozen other men and women; I got a pot of beer, and gave the prisoners and the other people some - they all began to dance. I had a 10l. note in my fob; I

changed it at the bar; the landlord wanted me to leave my money with him, but I would not; I got nine sovereigns, and 1l. in silver; I put the gold into my jacket pocket, where I had another sovereign, and the silver in another pocket. Lyons was sitting down on the seat, close to me; I then pulled off my jacket, and gave it to White to hold; I put my hat and box on the table - Lyons took it. I left the house (when I had done dancing) with a person named Archer, and the two prisoners; we went to a cook-shop, to have some victuals - the prisoners sat next to me, but I cannot say which of the two was nearest to me; I staid there a quarter of an hour: I felt Lyons put her hand into my jacket pocket, where the gold was, but cannot say she took it out at that time - I did not feel my pocket till after they were gone, and I had got out into the street again; I then found I had but 4s. 6d. left - they left me suddenly; after we got athwart the road, they hid me good night - nobody else was near me - I was not very drunk; I gave information at nine o'clock next morning - I have found my hat, but not my money.

REBECCA WHITE . I take in needle-work, and live in Bluegate-fields, next door to the prisoners. I went into the Bull's Head public-house, with a friend, and saw the prosecutor come in - he had a new hat-box, which he gave Lyons to hold for him; he gave me his jacket to hold, and began dancing; in a few minutes Lyons came to me, and said "You have no business with that jacket;" I said,"Well, then, take it," which she did; she had then got the bat-box - I went away, and saw no more; the prisoners were sitting together. I did not see Lodge touch the jacket, or box, but they laid on the table before them - I was quite sober.

JOHN BENNETT . I keep the cook-shop; the prosecutor, Archer, and the prisoners, all came in together - the prisoners often resort in that neighbourhood; they had refreshment, and all went out together. I saw Lodge take out the hat-box and jacket - the prosecutor was not very drunk.

JOHN ADAMS . I am an officer of the Thames Police. McLeod applied to me on the morning of the 17th of November, and described the prisoners; I went with him to Ratcliff-highway, and he pointed out Lyons to me - I questioned her about the property; she said she knew nothing of it - I said she must go with me to find the other girl; we found Lodge, who also said she knew nothing of it; the Magistrate committed Lyons, and dismissed Lodge - I went away with her; she then took me to another public-house, where I found this hat and jacket.

HARRIET ROWLAND . I keep the Hoop and Grapes public-house. Lodge came to me on the 16th of November, and told me to take care of this hat and jacket - Lyons was with her, but Lodge spoke.

D. McLEOD re-examined. I am certain I had my money when I left the public-house - it could not have fallen out; I felt Lodge's hand near my pocket - it was in the jacket I have on - it was an upper jacket that I pulled off. I changed my note after I had done dancing, and came away directly - I knew Archer well - he did not take it.

LODGE's Defence. I saw this young woman with the hat and jacket; she said she did not know where the man was, and I proposed that we should go and leave them at the public-house. LYONS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

LODGE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-182

183. MARY LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 gown, value 5s , the goods of Margaret Reardon , spinster .

MARGARET REARDON. On the 7th of November I missed my gown from No. 4, Greyhound-court - I had slept there with the prisoner two nights; the gown hung on a nail in the bed-room; the prisoner told me afterwards that she had stolen it, and was sorry for it - she gave up the duplicate to the constable: I did not know her before these two nights - I went out at six o'clock in the morning, leaving her in bed; I returned at eleven, and missed it. I am a servant, but was then out of place.

JOHN GORTON . I took the prisoner up. I found two duplicates on her - one is for this gown; she said she took it, and had pawned it.

MAJOR SOAMES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the 26th of November this gown was pawned by a woman, in the name of Jane Stevens, whom I do not know, but I gave her the duplicate produced.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-183

184. OBADIAH LAWLESS and RICHARD WINKFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 30 bushels of soot, value 15s.; 1 sieve, value 1s., and 2 padlocks, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Johnson .

ROBERT JOHNSON. I am a chimney-sweeper , and live at Pentonville. I keep my soot in Horn's-alley - I missed two sacks on the 24th of October; also a sieve and padlock on the 7th of November, and four sacks of soot; I had put four marked halfpence among the soot, to know it again; my cellar had been broken open twice; on the morning of the 7th of November I saw some soot spilt in the street - I and the officer traced it to a shed in an alley in Turnmill-street, belonging to the prisoners; I found about thirty bushels of soot there, all loose - I sifted it, and found three of the marked halfpence among it - the prisoners were taken next day - their premises are about one-eighth of a mile from mine; the prisoners are jobbing sweeps - I found my sieve, two padlocks, and a kettle, on their premises - I believe the soot to be mine.

Prisoner LAWLESS. Q. Did you ever see me near your cellar? A. Yes; I caught you there twice; you said you came there to sleep.

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoners' place - I found a padlock on the door, and in the door-way we found a sieve - there was a quantity of soot there, with three marked halfpence on it; I know the prisoners worked there - I found the key of the cellar padlock in one of their pockets.

JOHN LOADSMAN . I went with Vincent, and saw the soot sifted; we fastened up the door - they came afterwards and broke it open.

- LANGDON. I let the prisoners the shed which this soot was found in - Winkfield hired it, but Lawless paid me the rent.

LAWLESS' Defence. This young man engaged me to work there - he gave me 2s. 6d. to pay the rent.

LAWLESS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

WINKFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271206-184

185. JOSEPH MILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 book, value 2s. , the goods of John Sisson .

JOHN SISSON. I am a bookseller , and live in Crown-court . On the 6th of December I saw the prisoner take this book off the board - I followed, and took him with it, a few yards off - I find he bears a good character.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am an officer. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury . Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-185

186. JOHN PHIPPS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Price .

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an officer. On the 27th of October I saw the prisoner in Tottenham-court-road, with something under his coat; I stopped him, and found it was these boots; he said he had bought them - they were an inch too short for him - I took him to Bow-street, and found the prosecutor afterwards.

SAMUEL PRICE. I keep a shoe-maker's shop , in Phillips'-buildings, Somer's - town . These boots are mine - I had made them, and put them into my window - I did not see them taken.

Prisoner's Defence. He said three young lads came to buy a pair of shoes - I bought them of a young man, who said his father had sent him out to sell them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-186

187. MARY SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 8 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 2 gowns, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 pelisse, value 3s.; 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d., and part of a child's dress, value 2s. , the goods of Christopher Stuchbury .

ELIZABETH STUCHBURY . I am the wife of Christopher Stuchbury, who keeps the Yorkshire Grey public-house, Seven-dials . The prisoner was about three weeks in my service. On the 3d of December, between one and two o'clock in the morning, the watchman came and asked if I had lost my servant; the prisoner was missing - I had not given her warning, nor leave to take any thing.

JAMES DUNN . I am an officer. At half-past one o'clock on Monday morning, I saw the prisoner with this bundle of articles, about seven or eight hundred yards from the prosecutor's - I stopped her, and asked what was in it, and where she was going; she said it belonged to her aunt, and she was going to take it to a coach-office; I detained her - she said the watchman at Seven-dials knew her - I took her there, and a watchman said he knew something of her, but knew nothing of the property; I took her to the watch-house - she said she lived at No. 2. Chapel-court; I went there, and found it was false; I found out the prosecutor's house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix, believing she had been seduced .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-187

188. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 2 frocks, value 1s., and 1 piece of plaid stuff, value 6d. , the goods of James Yeomans .

ANN YEOMANS . I am the wife of James Yeomans. We live in Bulstrode-mews . On the 30th of November I went out, and on returning to dinner missed these things off my drawers; I had left my two children at home; I know the prisoner - we were brought up together.

WILLIAM TRAIL . I am a pawnbroker, of Chapel-street, Edgware-road. I have two frocks and a piece of stuff, pawned on the 30th of November, in the name of Ann Cook - I cannot say who by.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I was applied to, and took the prisoner, who was in liquor - I found 1s. 8 1/2d. in her hand - she at last told me she had pawned these things in Chapel-street - I went there, and found them.

Prisoner's Defence. I believe I met the prosecutrix, and had a glass with her; I was much in liquor, and at the office she was too tipsy to be examined - she gave me leave to take the things.

ANN YEOMANS . I had not seen her for six months - my husband would not allow me to keep company with her.

PHILIP WEBSTER . The prosecutrix was rather intoxicated at the second examination, but not at the first.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18271206-188

189. WILLIAM SCARESBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 14s. , the goods of Abraham Coger .

WILLIAM COGER . I am the son of Abraham Coger, a bootmaker , of New-street, Covent-garden. On the 4th of December the prisoner came into the shop, and took these boots - I followed him out, and took him with them, about forty yards off.

JAMES BOND . I received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them - I had them in my possession.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18271206-189

190. JOHN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 3 saws, value 15s., 1 chisel, value 1s. 6d.; 1 screw-driver, value 6d., and two hammers, value 6d., the goods of Robert Claxton ; and 1 saw, value 6s.; 1 chisel, value 1s. 6d.; 1 guage, value 1s., and 1 plane, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Wood .

ROBERT CLAXTON . I am a cotton-manufacturer , and live in Hoxton-square. I saw these tools safe in the shop adjoining my manufactory, but they were missed at various times; the prisoner has worked for me these three years, and had access to them.

JOHN WOOD . I work for Mr. Claxton. I lost my tools from the factory.

JOSEPH BOYCE . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner. I asked what he had done with the tools; he took me to a little iron-shop, where he said he had sold them - I found all these tools there, except the saws; I took the man up, but the Magistrate discharged him.

RICHARD LAW . I am a pawnbroker. I have two saws, pawned on the 29th of October, and the 1st of November. I cannot say who by.

PHILEMON HARVEY. I am a pawnbroker. I have one saw, pawned at my shop. I cannot say who by.

THOMAS VANN . I went with Boyce, and found the tools.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Master said he would let me go, if I told where they were.

ROBERT CLAXTON . I never said so.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, who engaged to employ him again .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18271206-190

191. CHARLES WILLINGALE (THE YOUNGER) was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 3 pairs of boots, value 10s., and 7 pairs of shoes, value 20s. , the goods of Charles Willingale , the elder.

CHARLES WILLINGALE. I am a shoemaker , and live at No. 31, Queen-street, Soho . The prisoner is my son; about a month ago I missed some boots and shoes from my shop - I heard my son had been taken to the watch-house, in a state of intoxication - I went there and charged him with taking my property, and he acknowledged it; he had lived with me, about four months before, but he had been in the Hospital, and we took him in again, at some inconvenience to ourselves - I had tried to bring him up to my own business; he was Inclined for other trades - I tried him with a grocer, butcher, carpenter, and other trades, but he did not settle to any thing; he had epileptic fits for four years, which prevented his setting.

BENJAMIN COGSWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Edger, pawnbroker, of Drury-lane. I have two pairs of women's, and four pairs of children's shoes, pawned by the prisoner at different times, in the name of Charles Williams.

GEORGE SHEPPARD . I am shopman to Mr. Wood, pawnbroker, of High-street, Bloomsbury. I have two pairs of women's shoes, one pair of women' shoots, and a pair of girl's boots, pawned in the name of Charles Williams. I cannot swear to the prisoner.

CHARLES WILLINGALE. These are mine. I never allowed him to take any thing from my shop; he was taken up for breaking glass, in a state of intoxication.

Prisoner's Defence. It was extreme distress drove me to do it; my father knows that.

CHARLES WILLINGALE. I knew he was out of employ, and I was not in a situation to allow him any thing, I believe his faculties have been impaired by these fits, and he lost his place in consequence of the fits, about six months ago.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, hoping his father would find him some employment.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18271206-191

192. ALEXANDER HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Isaac Brook .

ANN BAXTER . I am in the employ of Isaac Brook, a shoemaker , of Cranbourne-passage . On the 1st of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop; there was no other person in the shop; he looked at several pairs of shoes, and then said, if I would give him a bill of the shop, he would call again, and bring a person to fit a pair; while I turned to get a bill, he took a pair of shoes, and put them into his bosom - I directly told him he had a pair of shoes; he made no answer, but ran out - I gave an alarm at the door; he was brought back, and I knew him to be the person.

ROBERT WOTTON . I was opposite the house, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I looked round, and saw the prisoner running some yards from the shop - I followed, and saw him stopped; he dropped the shoes, about two hundred yards from the house - I did not see his face, but his back; the watchman knocked him down. I picked the shoes up.

GEORGE TIMOTHY KIMLAND . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, with the shoes; he said he went into the shop, and said he would send a female.

EDWARD ROURKE . I am a watchman, and saw the prisoner running. I struck him on the head, and stopped him; nobody was running before him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a family, which I hope you will consider.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-192

193. WILLIAM PULLEN was indicted stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 truck, value 6l. , the goods of John Fisher .

JOHN FISHER. I am a green-grocer , and live in Love-lane, Eastcheap. On the 22d of November, at eight o'clock, I lost a truck from a yard, at No. 3. Love-lane ; I had put it there at half-past three o'clock that day; I found it, on the 3d of December, in Artillery-lane, Bishopsgate-street; the witness Thomas was drawing it; the name of Thomas Miller , Hackney-road, was on it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know a man named Matthews? A. No.

THOMAS THOMAS . I work for Mr. Miller, in Hackney-road. On the 3d of December I had this truck in Artillery-lane; I was going to Petticoat-lane, for some stones for Miller - I had seen the truck in Miller's possession for eight or nine days - I saw him pay the prisoner 2l. 5s. for it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you there? A. I was in the yard; I did not hear him say he sold it for Matthews.

GEORGE TWEEDY . I live with Mr. Miller. I am a carpenter, and live in Cooper's-gardens - Thomas was my servant; I bought the truck of the prisoner on Friday, the 23d of November, for 2l. 5s.; I stopped 5s. till it was repaired, as it wanted blocks under the springs; he did that himself, and I paid him; I knew him before, as he lives in one of Mr. Miller's houses, and is a wheelwright.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know William Matthews? A. No - unless it is a person who used to live with the prisoner: he said he got the truck from Matthews; I gave a fair price for it - it was not fresh painted - I went myself to find Matthews, but could not find him.

RICHARD JOHN CLITHEROE . I am a carpenter. On the 22d of November I was in Love-lane, and about four doors from the prosecutor's house I saw a person about about the prisoner's size, and similar to him in dress,

drawing the truck out of Fisher's yard - I thought something might he wrong; I called and told Fisher of it - I did not stop the man.

Cross-examined. Q. There is nothing extraordinary in the prisoner's appearance? A. No; it was half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and dark - I do not know Matthews.

GEORGE TWEEDY. The man I have seen with the prisoner is about his size - I think not quite so tall.

JOHN FISHER. This truck cost me 7l., and I had two props put to it, which cost me 8s.; I had had it about four months, and had 6l. 10s. offered for it within a month before - I gave it to Franks, the beadle of Fore-street, when I found it - and next day we went to Worship-street, where we found the prisoner, and the person who bought the truck, and they agreed to make it up; but, by a woman not making up the money, they took the prisoner into custody again, and sent to me for the truck - the officer came first.

MR. CLARKSON to GEORGE TWEEDY. Q. What are you? A. I am Mr. Miller's bailiff; I would not give more than 2l. 5s. for the truck - it was a large one - I did not inquire how he got it - he was a wheel wright.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-193

194. JOHN BOOTY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 copper, value 4l., the goods of William Kingdon , and fixed to a building of his .

JOHN THOMAS . I was in care of an empty house, No. 21. Finsbury-place , belonging to William Kingdon, for a fortnight or three weeks before the 6th of December; I went out that day a little after three o'clock, leaving this copper safe - I returned about five, and found the house door open; as I went down the area, I saw the prisoner and another man go out - the prisoner had the copper on his head, on a knot; I ran and seized them both - the prisoner appeared to try to throw the copper on me - he threw it down - but I seized him again, and held him - the other got away - they had forced their way in at the back of the premises, and pulled the copper out of the brick-work.

EDMUND CHAPLIN . I am a servant at the next house: I had seen this copper secure about three o'clock, and just before five I heard a disturbance, ran out, and assisted in taking the prisoner.

HENRY WALTER . I was at work in Finsbury-place, and heard a noise, ran out, and, being an officer, I took charge of the prisoner - I fitted the copper to the place - it fitted exactly.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along with a knot - a gentleman took me to the house, opened the door, and told me to take the copper to his dwelling-house - he could not open the door, and gave me 2 1/2d. to get a pint of beer, and return in half an hour, as he could get in at the back of the premises - I went in half an hour, and he let me in.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-194

195. JAMES FRENCH and HENRY MOUNTAIN were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 6 lbs. of pork, value 5s. , the goods of William Raper .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM RAPER. I am a pork-butcher , and live in Titchbourne-street. French was in my employ for three years. On the 28th of November I placed Punn to watch the premises; Mountain was an ostler at an inn.

WILLIAM PUNN . I watched on the stairs on the 28th of November; soon after my brother-in-law went out to market that morning, I saw French open the door, look out, close the door again, and then go down to where we keep the pork; he came up with something in a bag, put it on the counter, and opened the door; Mountain came in, took the bag, and said to him, "Go to the door, and see that all is right;" he did so, and said, "It is all right - go on;" Mountain then went out - I cannot say what was in the bag.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-195

196. JAMES FRENCH and HENRY MOUNTAIN were again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 6lbs. of pork, value 5s. , the goods of William Raper .

WILLIAM RAPER. On the 30th of November I set Luckie to watch outside my shop, and Punn inside; I went out to market as usual.

JOSEPH LUCKIE . On the 30th of November, at six o'clock in the morning, I was watching outside this house; I saw Mountain come out of his stable-yard, and pass Mr. Raper's house; Mr. Raper came out soon after; I then went nearer to the house, and saw French come to the door; he beckoned Mountain, who stood at some distance; he went inside, and staid some minutes, and as he went in he took a bag out of his hat - the door was then closed, and in a few minutes I saw French come out, as far as the curbstone, look about him, and then beckon to Mountain, who came out with a bundle under his arm, which weighed 12 lbs. or 15 lbs. I seized him, and said, "You are the man I want - you have robbed that house;" he said, "I have been buying pork." I turned to look for an officer, who was to have been there, but he was not come; I called Watch! several hackney-coachmen came up, and hustled and pushed me about; I was obliged to let Mountain go with his bag; they said he was no thief, and I should not hold him; he got away.

WILLIAM PUNN . I watched on the 30th of November, and when I heard the door shut, after Mountain was gone, I went and said to French, "What is the matter - is the house on fire?" he said, "No, there is nothing the matter, but some butcher has been passing, and said he saw a person come out with a lot of pork." I said, "Why, you have not left the door open?" he said, "No: I have been down stairs, and I put the chain up." Gook came in soon after; I said, "People say somebody has been out with some pork;" he said to French, "Do you know any thing of this?" he said No - he had not let any one in, and knew nothing about it; Gook said, "Do you know the ostler at the Black Horse" he said No; Gook said, "Henry Mountain I mean;" he replied, "I don't know any such person." Gook then took him into the parlour, and when my brother came home he attempted to take him away; French put himself into a fighting attitude, but Gook took him.

THOMAS GOOK . I went to the house by appointment, but was rather too late; I asked French if he knew any thing about it; he said he did not, and that he did not know the ostler of the Black Horse, nor Henry Mountain; when Mr. Raper arrived he gave charge of him; he put up his hands,

and said he would knock my bl - y head about; I presented the wrong end of my staff to him, and he thought it was a pistol; I took him to the office. I went to the inn yard, and took Mountain; he said to French, at the office,"What, you have been snitching, have you - there are others in it as well as me; you might as well tell of them."

WILLIAM NADAULD . I am a constable. I went to the Black Horse public-house, with Gook, and took Mountain. I looked about, and, in a loft, concealed under some chaff, I found this pork.

MR. RAPER. I am certain this leg of pork is my cutting.

MOUNTAIN - GUILTY . Aged 53.

FRENCH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-196

197. JOHN CRUDGINGTON and DAVID BARON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 sow, price 3l. , the property of William Hatfield .

WILLIAM HATFIELD. I live in Park-street, Kennington-cross . I saw my sow safe on the 6th of December, while I was cleaning the sty, about twelve o'clock; I turned her into the yard; she cost me 5l. before she pigged: when I had done the sty I could not find her; and about ten o'clock at night I received information, and found her next day, at Blakeway's, a hog-keeper, at Shadwell; she never strayed - she is worth more than 3l.

THOMAS BUCHANAN . I am a wine-cooper. Between four and five o'clock on the 6th of December, I saw the prisoners driving this sow in Tower-street - I knew it to be the prosecutor's; I went up and asked Baron if it was for sale - he said it was, and asked 2l. 10s. for it: Crudgington was close by, and must have heard this; I offered 2l. - he hesitated, and then said I should have her, and asked where I lived; I said, in the Hackney-road - that I could not take her home then, but would call for her that evening or in the morning, and asked where I should find her; he said at Blakeway's, a pig-dealer, at Ratcliff-highway. I lodge with the prosecutor, and when I went home I told him; he and I went to Blakeway's next morning, and found it; we then went to the prisoners' premises, and they were not there - we left word that we had come to pay for the sow, and in a few minutes they came running down to Blakeway's, for the money, and were taken.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did you see them come from the house? A. No.

WILLIAM SAWYER . I am a constable, and took them in charge at Blakeway's.

The prisoners received a good character.

CRUDGINGTON - GUILTY Aged 34.

BARON - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-197

198. JAMES CHARNOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 4s., and 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of George Vincent .

GEORGE VINCENT. I am a sweep , and live in Cross-street, Carnaby-market . On the 8th of December I went out at half-past five o'clock in the morning, and fastened up master's front cellar, where I slept; I returned about half-past six, and found the prisoner in the cellar, which was open; I gave an alarm, got a light, and found these things laying at his feet; I had left them all in a box. I gave him in charge - I knew him before, but he had no right there.

JOHN BARKER . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, came up, and took the prisoner in the cellar; the things laid there; he said, "You have found nothing on me."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman, who asked me to go to order the sweeps; there was nobody there; I went in, and this young lad came.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18271206-198

199. MARGARET PRENDERGAST was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 2 knives, value 1s.; 3 keys, value 1s. 6d.; 1 bottle, value 1d.; 3 half-crowns, 2 sixpences, and 1 farthing, the property of William Sawyer from his person .

WILLIAM SAWYER. I am an extra exciseman . Last Saturday night, about half-past twelve o'clock (I had spent the evening with my father, at Ratcliff-highway), I met the prisoner in Whitechapel-road ; she spoke to me in rather a singular way - I thought she was tipsy, or out of her senses; she laughed and twisted round me, behind and before; I walked on. I live in Finch-street, Whitechapel - I did not stop at all; before I reached home I found my pocket was turned out, and all my money and these other things gone; I had given her nothing - she had then left me; I went to the patrol - he pursued her- she was taken in about twenty minutes, and produced most of the things herself.

JOHN DUNGATE . I am watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by the patrol; she took no notice of the charge, but laughed, and said he offered her two half-crowns, which the prosecutor denied; I said, "Let us see what you have got;" she pulled out this money and all the other things but the ink-bottle, which I found in her pocket.

EDMUND WINTER . I am a patrol, and went after the prisoner; I saw the property found - she said nothing to me, but laughed, and asked what I took her for.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SAWYER . I swear I gave her nothing, and had no conversation with her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me 5s. to go home with me, and when I did so he had no more money, and left me the keys and other things.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-199

200. JAMES BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , 1 board, value 3s. , the goods of Harbut Ward , and Harbut John Ward .

HARBUT JOHN WARD. I am in partnership with Harbut Ward, and Harbut John Ward.

HARBUT JOHN WARD. I am in partnership with Harbut Ward - we live in Water-street, Bridewell Precinct. - I believe this board was taken from the new Scotch church, Regent-square , which we have been building - it is a scaffold-board; it is branded with our names. We had no work going on in Fleet-street.

WILLIAM COLTON . I met the prisoner on the 2d of November, in Hatton-garden, carrying this board on his shoulder - I asked where he got it; he said he found it in Fleet-street, and was going to take it to Old-street-road.

SAMUEL MOUNT STEPHENS . I am a constable. I was with Colton, and saw the prisoner with this board.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Fleet-street, and saw this board in the carraige way - it was all muddy, and I saw no mark on it; but when the officers took it they mopped it over, and found the brand-mark.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271206-200

201. MICHAEL DELOUD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 hat, value 14s., the goods of Hugh Kelly , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-201

202. JEREMIAH CRAWLEY and MARTIN BLANEY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Peterson , on the 3d of December , at St. George, and stealing 2 straw bonnets, value 20s. , his property.

PETER PETERSON. I live in Church-row, in the parish of St. George , and am a straw bonnet-maker . On Monday last, the 3d of December, I came home about half-past five o'clock in the evening, and sat down to tea; I heard a noise in the shop; I ran through the passage into the street, but did not go into the shop; I saw the two prisoners run from the window; I pursued directly, and never lost sight of them; I took Crawley first, and then Blaney - they were within a pace or two of each other - they had stopped just before I got up to them, and walked a little way; as I went out I saw a bonnet lying outside my window, but did not stop to pick it up; I pursued the prisoners directly, and when I came back with them, I found two bonnets had been removed, and the bonnet-stands were knocked down; the two bonnets. had not been on the stauds, but on the further end of the counter - they had lifted up the sash, and got in at the window; I had passed the window as I went home, just before; it was then quite down and safe; I had not been home more than two or three minutes; I found the window quite up, as high as it would go; they begged and prayed of me to let them go, and said they would do so no more - I had not seen them inside the window.

MARGARET PETERSON . I am the prosecutor's daughter, and am eleven years old. The window was down when my father came in to tea, and the door was shut and fast - all the bonnets were quite safe - I was sitting at tea with him, and heard the bonnet-stands knocked down - I looked through the glass door, and saw Crawley in the shop - he had got in at the window, and was reaching to a bonnet on the work-table - I ran into the shop, and my father ran out at the passage; before I got into the shop Crawley had got out at the window, and got two doors off, I believe; one bonnet laid on the pavement, the other was moved from the work-table into the window; I am certain it was Crawley who I saw in the shop - here is the bonnet which was on the pavement, and this one was in the window - I know them both to be my father's.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am an officer. I took the prisoners, and have produced the property.

PETER PETERSON . These bonnets are both mine.

CRAWLEY's Defence. I know nothing of this boy - I was walking on the pavement - this man came up, and said some person had broken a window.

BLANEY's Defence. I was walking along, this man came up, looked in my face, and then took hold of me.

CRAWLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

BLANEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18271206-202

203. JOHN KILMINSTER and CHARLES STANLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , at St. Luke, in the dwelling-house of James Huson, 2 gowns, value 4l.; 1 pelisse, value 3l.; 52 shirts, value 6l.; 4 sheets, value 1l.; 4 shifts, value 10s.; 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s. 6d.; 1 apron, value 1s., and 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s., his property; and 3 gowns, value 25s.; 4 petticoats, value 6s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 pair of stays, value 1s. 6d.; 4 aprons, value 2s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 3s.; 3 caps, value 8s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 2s., and 1 bonnet, value 3s. , the goods of Jane Sanderson , spinster .

ELIZABETH HUSON . I am the wife of James Huson, but he does not live with me. I have not seen him these six or eight months; we have been separated about ten years- I live at No. 1, Playhouse-yard, Whitecross-street, in the parish of St. Luke : we are not separated by any deed - he has never lived with me in this house - he lives in town, but I do not know where. On the 7th of November I washed this linen, and gave it to Sanderson to hang up in my first floor front room, which she did, and left the window open; all the articles stated in the indictment were in that room - the house is two stories high - I missed the property next morning, with several articles not mentioned in the indictment, as I cannot recollect them; the whole was worth above 20l. - I found part of them at the office; I know nothing of Kilminster, but Stanley lives opposite to me; I cannot say how they were taken.

JANE SANDERSON . I am servant to Mrs. Huson. On the 7th of November I hung all this linen in the one-pair front room - my own articles were in a box in the same room; I saw the linen all safe at nine o'clock in the evening, hanging on the lines; at eight next morning I found my boxes empty, lying about the floor, and every thing but some towels gone off the lines; my things were worth between 6l. and 7l. - I had locked the room door, and found it still locked in the morning; I slept down stairs, in the back room, with my mistress - the house was fastened up at night, but I had left the window of the room open to dry the clothes.

ROBERT LOCK . I am headborough of St. Luke's. On the morning of the 8th of November, about half-past ten o'clock, Harrison called and told me there had been a robbery; we went together to Cowheel-alley, Golden-lane, into a house, and while I was in the lower part, Harrison, who was up stairs, called me up; I went up, and saw the two prisoners on the top of the stairs; Harrison said, "Do you know any thing of these two men?" I said, "I do, open that door" - I put the prisoners into the room, and there we found all this property; I said, "This will do," and we went to take the prisoners into custody; they resisted, and Kilminster said, "We are only us four here together, take the things, and let us go" - I threatened to fire on them, if they resisted any more, but made them no promise - I said No,

and handcuffed them together - Kilminster then undid his clothes, and pulled from round him this black silk gown - Kilminster then said to the other prisoner, "Turn out," and a shirt then dropped from one of them, but which, I cannot say - I thought, by his saying "Turn out," that there was some other things about him, but I only saw the shirt drop - I found in Stanley's hand a padlock and key - Harrison took the property, and I took the prisoners to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was Stanley found on the top of the stairs? A. Yes; they were both there, close together - I have always said so.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer. I received information, and went to this house with Lock; we had searched over two houses before we went to this, which is at the corner of Hartshorn-court - I went up, leaving Lock below - Stanley was then leaning over the railing, and Kilminster stood on the top stair - I passed them both, went into the room, and saw the property in a cupboard - I called Lock up, and he pushed them into the room - Kilminster said, "Here is the property, don't lag us this time" - lag means transported.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Kilminster alone on the stairs? A. No; they were both together - I saw one as soon as the other.

GEORGE GARRETT . I am a watchman. About one o'clock on the morning in question, I saw Kilminster opposite Playhouse-yard, in Whitecross-street, and I saw Stanley run out of the yard; they went on together; they had nothing with them at that time.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they come from near the prosecutrix's house? A. I cannot say; they went down the street together.

ROBERT LOCK . Here is the gown which was round Kilminster's body.

ELIZABETH HUSON. All these articles are mine, but here is not all that I lost; this is my gown; they were all safe at nine o'clock the night before.

JANE SANDERSON. Here are some of my articles, but not all that I lost.

STANLEY's Defence. I was in Old-street that morning, and met this young man - I knew him; he asked me to go with him; we went together to this house; he said a young man had ordered him to fetch these things, but before we got to the door, the officer came and took us.

KILMINSTER - GUILTY - DEATH Aged 18.

STANLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18271206-203

First London Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

204. HENRY HAMMOND FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 watch, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of John Bamfield .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-204

205. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 19s., the goods of John Albert , to whom he was servant .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18271206-205

206. JOHN USHER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Pratt , from his person .

ALEXANDER JOHNSON . I live in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street, and am a constable. On the 22d of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Fleet-market - I saw the prisoner and another following Mr. Pratt, and draw a handkerchief from his pocket - I saw the prisoner whip it into his bosom - I went towards them; the prosecutor turned, and they ran away; I pursued between the shambles, and as the prisoner ran, he drew the handkerchief from his bosom, and threw it down; I followed him to Fleet-lane; the other turned up there - I followed the prisoner, till a person jumped from a cart, and took him - I had not lost sight of him; the handkerchief has not been found.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did you see the handkerchief put into the prisoner's pocket? A. No, into his bosom; it was dark, but it happened opposite a light shop; I could not find it when I returned - I am certain he threw it down; he was not out of my sight at all; he threw a stick down at the same time; if I had stooped to take it up, I should have lost sight of him.

WILLIAM PRATT . On the 22d of November I was in Fleet-market, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I felt, and my handkerchief was gone - I had used it a minute before - I saw the officer pursuing somebody, and saw the prisoner when he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Where do you live? A. On St. Mary-hill. I had not seen the prisoner near me; the officer said he had put it into his bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Fleet-market; a boy ran before me; the officer called Stop thief! I ran - the officer pushed against me, and took hold of me; two or three gentleman said, I was not the person, for they saw him run up Fleet-lane, with the handkerchief in his hand.

MR. PRATT. I heard nobody say so.

ALEXANDER JOHNSON. I heard nothing of the kind.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-206

207. HARRIET JONES, alias ANN TOMLINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 counterpane, value 10s.; 1 watch-guard, value 2s.; 1 quite, value 5s.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 tea-spoon, value 1s. 6d.; 1 printed bound book, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Phoebe Robinson , her mistress.

PHOEBE ROBINSON. I am a widow , and keep the Angel inn, St. Martin's-le-grand . The prisoner was two or three years in my service, but I discharged her about a month ago, on suspicion - I ordered her, at nine o'clock at night, to leave, and she went about nine the next morning, and the same morning, after she was gone, I missed featherbdes, bolsters, tea-spoons, and a variety of articles, some of which are in Court.

SUSAN MYRON . I live in Bleeding-hart-yard. I was in the prosecutrix's service, but left in February last - I received a sheet, a blanket, and small handkerchief from the prisoner with a note, in her hand-writing - I have burnt it - I forget what was in it, and I do not know who brought the articles; I made use of them, till the prosecutrix came to my house - then had the sheet and blanket on my bed; the prisoner also gave me a spoon, an eye-

glass and watch to pawn, and gave me a coloured quilt, as a present.

JAMES PALMER . I am a shopman to Mr. Muncaster, pawnbroker, of Skinner-street. I produce a quilt and tea-spoon, pawned by a female, on the 23d of October.

WILLIAM CURTIS . I was in Mrs. Robinson's employ, and left her about three months ago; the prisoner sent me to inquire about a parcel, which was to be left at the Spotted Dog public-house; I went there with the guard of a coach about it, but it was not come; it was to be left there for Susan Myron.

NATHANIEL ROUTH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner up on the 15th of November, by the prosecutrix's desire; she was then living with me as a servant. I searched her box, and found this book, counterpane, and tea-spoon; I received a handkerchief from Myron.

Prisoner's Defence. Myron could not have lived nineteen months in the family, without knowing the things.

SUSAN MYRON. I knew nothing of them; I had seen such things, but many things are similar. I knew she was going to housekeeping, and did not know where she might have got them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-207

208. MARY FOLLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 pair of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of David Reid .

DAVID REID. I am a linen-draper , and live in Beech-street . On the 29th of October I was in the back room, and heard a noise in the shop; I went out, and Parker said the prisoner had stolen a pair of gloves; she said they were her own, that she had bought them before; Parker said several times, he was certain she had stolen them, and I went for an officer - the prisoner stood there till the officer came; the gloves were found before.

Prisoner. He told me to go out of the shop, or he would give me in charge; I said he might, as I had bought them an hour before, and could not afford to lose them. Witness. She did say so.

EDWIN PARKER . I am apprentice to Mr. Reid. I was in the shop; the prisoner came in between two and three o'clock, and bought a pair of gloves; she came again about five, and asked for a pair of gloves out of the window, marked 7 1/2d.; she said, "I want another pair of gloves like what I had before;" they were the same sort as she had bought before. I got a packet of gloves out of the window - she was looking at them; I turned my head to the window, and in a moment, I saw her draw a pair from the pack, and put them under her shawl, quite tight under her arm. I said nothing to her till she had bought a pair and paid for them; I then charged her with it; she said they were what she had bought before - I took them from her; Mr. Reid heard the noise, and came into the shop - I do not know how many pair were missing from the pack; she did not deny having them, but said they were her's, before she produced them.

MR. REID. She could not have left the shop, as there was another young man there; the gloves were tacked together.

JAMES THORN . I am a constable. I was sent for, and found a number of duplicates on the prisoner; she had a pair of gloves in her hand, in paper, and Mr. Reid delivered me another pair.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the glove-line, but having a gathering in my hand, I could not make them. I had an order for some; the first pair were not large enough; I went to buy another pair; they said they could not tell how many pair they had.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-208

209. HYAM NATHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of James Smetzer .

JAMES SMETZER. I am a shoemaker , and live in Fore-street . On the 6th of December, about a quarter to nine o'clock, I put these shoes on a shelf, and went to breakfast; I was called down in a quarter of an hour, and found the prisoner in the shop, with Warren, who said he had stopped him near the shop, with the shoes in his hand; he said he had taken them to shew to his brother.

SAMUEL WARREN . I am a Sheriff's-officer. I was was passing the prosecutor's door, and saw the prisoner with the shoes in his hand; directly I came up to him, he said, "I am not going to steal them, but to see if they fit my brother;" I said, "It is rather a curious way," and took him into the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the shoes near the door; I took hold of one pair, and said "I don't suppose they are more then 9s. 6d." I had no thought of stealing them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-209

210. JOSEPH BURT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 7 1/2 ozs. of silver, value 30s. , the goods of Charles Frederick Day , his master.

LAWRENCE CHILD . I live with Mr. Syren, a refiner; the prisoner came to the shop, on the 16th of November - I had seen him before; he brought some silver-cuttings to sell; I suspected him, and told him to call again, which he did. I had informed my master of it, and when he called, I asked his address; he said "Smith, No. 17, Mary-le-bone-street," and said he was a silver spoon maker; I detained the silver, and said I should inquire - he wished to take it away; he never came for it again. I inquired through the trade, and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Are you certain he is the man? A. Yes; it was in the evening, but we had a gas-light.

CHARLES FREDERICK DAY . I am a silver spoon maker ; the prisoner was an articled servant to me; I know this silver to be mine - it is scrapings and filings; these bits are cuttings - we always melt it down; I know it as these are cut with a three-square file, and all the trade I believe cut it with a chisel - I missed some.

Cross-examined. Q. You say you know nobody who cuts their silver with a file? A. I know nearly all the trade; if any other did so, it would be like this; but here is one piece, which I scolded him for cutting off so large - I know that piece; I expressed no doubt of it before the Magistrate - I did not suspect him before; I am an out-door workman to Mr. Henly. I never said I would not have prosecuted him if it had not been for Mr. Henly.

COURT. Q. What is the value of the silver? A. About 30s.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer; this silver was given to me at Guildhall.

SAMUEL CHILD . When I got to Guildhall, Mr. Henly had got the silver from Day; I think it is the same as the prisoner brought me.

Cross-examined. Q. Has silver of this sort been brought you before? A. Yes; by masters in the trade - it is not cut in an unusual way.

THOMAS THEOBALD . This silver was given to me by Mr. Henly - he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271206-210

211. MARY DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 8 yards of printed cotton, value 7s. , the goods of George Clamp and William Adams .

GEORGE CLAMP. I am in partnership with William Adams, we are pawnbrokers , and live in Aldersgate-street. On the 12th of November the prisoner came in to pawn a handkerchief for 2s. 6d.; and when she was gone, my man gave me information. I followed her, and took this cotton from round her waist; I had seen it safe a quarter of an hour before, at the back of the shop, hanging on a nail, which I found broken down - she was rather intoxicated.

JAMES GAULDEN . I am in the prosecutors' employ. I saw the prisoner going out with the cotton partly under her shawl; we went out and took her.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am officer, and received her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written paper, stating, that she was intoxicated at the time; and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-211

212. JAMES STAPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 comb, value 20s. , the goods of Arthur Gardener .

ARTHUR GARDENER. I keep a shop in the Old Jewry - I sell combs . On the 1st of November Herdsfield came and gave me information; I then found my window broken, and missed two combs; he produced one, which has my writing on it.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I was coming up the Old Jewry at a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 1st of November; I saw the prisoner running from the shop, towards Cheapside; he called out Tom, and joined another young man - I secured the prisoner, and found this comb under his apron.

Prisoner's Defence. A man in a fustian coat stood at the street; a man crossed over, and gave him two combs- he dropped one, and I took it up; he came and said it belonged to him; he ran away, and the officer came and took me.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD. He was running before he joined the other man.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271206-212

213. JAMES KIMMERLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 hat, value 2s.; 1 knife, value 6d.; 1 pencil, value 1d.; 2 half-crowns, and 21 shillings, the property of Isaac Stanley , from his person .

ISAAC STANLEY. I am a sawyer . On the 4th of November I was in Shoe-lane , about half-past ten o'clock at night; I had been to look for a sawyer, to pay him 10s. - I had been to different places, and some people gave me some gin, which affected me; I sat on a step, and fell asleep; some person took my money, my shoes off my feet, my handkerchief off my neck, and my hat, while I was asleep - I am sure I had my shoes and every thing on when I sat down.

JOHN JOHNSTON . I am a watchman. I was calling half-past ten o'clock in Shoe-lane; Delaney called Watch! I went up - she said the prisoner was taking this man's jacket off; the prisoner immediately threatened Delaney, and said if she was a man he would knock her bl - y head off - she was holding him at the time; I said, "Come down to the watch-house;" we went there, and I took these shoes off the prisoner's feet - the prosecutor claimed them.

MARY DELANEY . I was going out on an errand, and saw the prosecutor sitting at a door, very tipsy; I saw the prisoner go up to him, and say, "If you will get up, I will see you home." I looked round presently, and saw he was trying to get his jacket off; I gave an alarm, and he was taken to the watch-house.

HENRY WAKE . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house.(Shoes produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man came to me about six o'clock, and asked me to buy a pair of shoes for 3s. 6d. - I gave him 2s. 6d. for them, and put them on. I saw this man sitting at the door, and went to him to take him home- the woman came and asked if I knew him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-213

214. FREDERICK BENTLEY and JOHN RUSH were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 16s. , the goods of John Alger .

JOHN ALGER. I am a bootmaker , and live in Ludgate-street. On the 6th of December, about a quarter-past eleven o'clock, I came home, and these boots were produced to me, which have my writing on them, and are mine. The prisoners were in custody - I know nothing of them.

ROBERT HOCKLEY . I am in Mr. Alger's employ. The two prisoners came to the door on the 6th of December - Rush took these boots, which stood on the floor, within the door - he could just reach them by putting his foot on the step; I was near the window, behind the counter: I ran round the counter, and followed Rush down the street- he ran on, and Bentley followed him; I passed Bentley, intending to take Rush: Bentley took hold of my clothes- I fell down, and he too; I kept him down till I got assistance, and when I came back to the shop I found Rush there, and the boots also. I should have passed Bentley, and taken Rush with the boots, if Bentley had not laid hold of me.

SOLOMAN GEDDES . I am a printer. I was on Ludgate-street, between nine and ten o'clock on the 6th of December,

and saw three persons running; Rush was first with a pair of boots in his hand - Bentley and Hockley were following him: I stopped to see if Rush was taken, and saw Bentley and Hockley fall down - I pursued, and took Rush, with the boots, just turning into the Old Bailey, and took him back.

Prisoner BENTLEY. Q. Did you not say in the shop,"I am a poor man - this will make a very good thing for me?" A. I did not; my own employ suits me much better than this.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer, and received them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENTLEY's Defence. I was merely going by - Hockley threw me down it, and he said I threw him down.

BENTLEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

RUSH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-214

215. EDWARD WINSOR was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 pair of boots, value 25s. , the goods of John Alger .

JOHN ALGER. I live in Ludgate-street . I was in my back room on the 17th of November, and heard the alarm - I came out, and the prisoner was soon after taken.

ROBERT HOCKLEY . On the 17th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and took these boots off two nails, in front of me, against the side of the shop; he ran off - I pursued, and overtook him near the Old Bailey, with them under his arm; I took him back, and he dropped one boot, which I took up.

JAMES SNOW . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running, and went to meet him - he dodged from me, and went towards the Old Bailey: Hockley followed, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very badly off, and had had no work for three months.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-215

216. WILLIAM GUION was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 flock bed, value 8s. 6d., and 1 flock bolster, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of David Timothy .

DAVID TIMOTHY. I am an upholsterer , and live in Barbican . On the 5th of December, about half-past five o'clock, my sister-in-law alarmed me - I ran out in pursuit, and took the prisoner in Princes-street, Barbican, with this property on his shoulder.

EMMA CASSANETT . I was at my brother-in-law's shop on the 5th of December - I saw the prisoner come into the shop, put these things on his shoulder, and walk away - I gave an alarm, and he was taken.

JAMES THORN . I am an officer, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271206-216

217. JOHN CHEESMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 100 gold Napoleons, value 80l., and 8 Louis-dors, value 50l. , the property of Adey Bellamy Savory .

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalsman of the City. On the 26th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I heard a disturbance at Mr. Savory's shop, in Cornhill ; I went, and found the prisoner with several others - he was charged with breaking the window, and stealing a bowl of foreign coin; I went in, but Mr. Savory, being a Quaker, refused to give him in charge; and I took him on my own responsibility - his hat was on the ground, or in a chair, and in his hat I saw a great quantity of coins; I am not sure whether I or the prisoner took it up; Mr. Savory took the hat to the counter, turned out the coin, and counted it; there were gold Napoleons and Louis-dors - I think he counted eighteen - there was a quantity of gold cuttings in the hat - nine other pieces of gold were brought in from the street; I know Mr. Savory's name is Bellamy, and believe he has another name- I have heard him called Adey Bellamy; it is Adey Bellamy Savory in the Directory; the prisoner was quite sober.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . On the even