Old Bailey Proceedings, 25th October 1827.
Reference Number: 18271025
Reference Number: f18271025-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ANTHONY BROWN, MAYOR.

EIGHTH SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 25th of OCTOBER, 1827, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1827.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ANTHONY BROWN , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt.; one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; and John Atkins , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Thompson , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Thomas Chs. Lewis ,

Edward H. Fearn ,

Wm. Brace ,

Charles Law ,

James Wigg ,

Gamanl. Bishop ,

John Hall ,

John Johnson ,

Thomas Matthews ,

Thomas Brane ,

Frederick Pite ,

Wm. Elliott .

Second

Wm. Tuttiett ,

Wm. Lewis ,

John Debie ,

James Scott ,

Wm. Towers ,

John Skinner ,

Wm. Whittington ,

James R. Belton ,

David Read ,

Benjamin Ingram ,

Wm. Osborne ,

Edw. S. Flemming .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Thomas Clack,

Robert Clark,

John Crawley,

Thomas Cox,

Robert Cranwell,

Thos. H. Cook,

Alfred Daniel,

David Davies,

James Evil,

John Elsmore,

Richard Elam,

Henry Evans.

Second

Thos. Davidson,

Robert Davey,

Thomas Dawson,

John Ellis,

Edward Eyre,

Thomas Evenden,

Wm. Ealingdon,

Samuel Dixon,

Wm. Dover,

Robert Donaldson,

Isaac Darby,

Thomas Daniels.

Third

John Bailey,

Thomas Bates,

Charles Burchet,

Isaac C. Curtis,

John Cox,

Edward Condon,

John Chandler,

Wm. Challey,

James Coxhead,

Jethro Coleman,

John Crossley,

Thomas Coles.

Fourth

John Cousins,

James Collins,

Wm. Carr,

James Capey,

Wm. Constantine,

John Cresswell,

Thomas Carter,

Michael Crouch,

John Clark,

Wm. Craft,

James Davis,

Alexan. Davidson.

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 25, 1827.

BROWN, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18271025-1

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1981. WILLIAM ISAAC SMITH was indicted for that, at the Assizes holden for the County of Southampton, on the 3d of July, in the 7th year of his present Majesty's Reign, the said William Isaac Smith was in due form of law tried and convicted upon a certain indictment against him for felony, and thereupon received sentence of Death for the same, but was reprieved and ordered to be Transported for and during the term of his natural Life; and afterwards, to wit, on the 8th of October , feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, at St. George, Bloomsbury , before the expiration of the said term for which he was so ordered to be transported, as aforesaid , against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, stated that he, at the said Assizes, was ordered to be Transported for and during the term of his natural Life; and that he was afterwards at large, as in the first count.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18271025-2

1982. JOHN BARRY and SAMUEL GRIFFITHS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Jackman , on the 12th of October , at St. Giles in the Fields , and stealing 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d., his property .

WILLIAM JACKMAN. I live at No. 60, High-street , in the parish of St. Giles, and rent the house. On the 12th of October, about 6 or 7 o'clock in the evening, I was at home - the prisoners were brought into my shop by the witnesses, who charged them with breaking my glass and taking a pair of shoes out of the window; the shoes were produced - I knew them to be mine: I had not particularly noticed them in the window that day, as I had a quantity there; the pane of glass had been cracked before, but was puttied up quite secure. I had not particularly noticed the window before the robbery.

JOHN BOSTON . I am a porter, and live at No. 59, Tottenham-court-road. On the 12th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was on the opposite side of the way to Mr. Jackman's house, in company with Roberts, and saw the two prisoners in company, standing near the window; I observed Barry press his thumb against the window several times - he left, and Griffiths remained at the window; Barry returned, and I heard the glass shoved in; Griffiths took something out - Barry ran down the street, and they joined each other at the end of Denmark-street; we laid hold of them, and out of Griffiths' apron I took these shoes; they had only got to the bottom of the street; when Barry pressed his thumb I heard the glass fall inside - I found on Griffiths a little bit of iron, sharp at the end, and a knife all over putty.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Boston. I am a painter and glazier. I heard the glass fall; we watched them; I assisted in apprehending them, and saw the shoes found in Griffiths' apron - they were in company together. Boston's evidence is correct; a knife and a broken nail was found on Griffiths - they were both together.

WILLIAM JACKMAN. I have no doubt of these shoes being mine.

BARRY'S Defence (written.) At the time the robbery was committed I was playing with my little sister in Denmark-street; Griffiths came up, and spoke to me, but I saw no shoes in his hand, nor did I know he had committed the robbery. I am innocent; I unfortunately was committed to the House of Correction for three months, and had only been out a week; the constable who took me thought I must be guilty, because I spoke to Griffiths, who had also been in the House of Correction with me, in the same yard; but I am innocent, and have kept myself innocent of robbery ever since I have been out of prison.

BARRY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of their youth.

Reference Number: t18271025-3

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1983. WILLIAM TARNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 4 oxen, price 50l. , the property of Joseph Whaller and John French ; and FRANCIS SAVILLE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH WHALLER. I am in partnership with John French in these oxen; he is a salesman at Smithfield . I am a grazier , and live at Plaistow, in Essex. I have a field near a place called Abbey Marsh, in Essex . On the 8th of July, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I saw these four oxen safe in that field; and about seven on Monday morning, the 9th, in consequence of what my man said, I went into the field, and missed them; they were all black bullocks; one had his old coat on, and a white ring round his tail at the bottom; another had his right flank white - another had a white streak along his back, from head to tail, a white tail, and a grey star in his forehead, and a piece

chipped off the point of his right horn; the other had a brown muzzle. On Tuesday morning, the 10th, between six and seven o'clock, I saw two skins at Leadenhall-market; they were then marked F. on the nose. I saw the other two hides in a slaughter-house in Newport-market the same day - it was a common slaughter-house - they were marked D. on the nose.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What makes you recollect that it was on the 8th you saw them safe? A. Because I was in the field; I had more than thirty-two head of cattle, but only these four were in that field; I had sold no beast that year; they were not fit for sale. People pay a commission to kill at this slaughter-house.

JOHN FRENCH. I am in partnership with Mr. Whaller. I saw two of the hides at Leadenhall-market on Tuesday, the 10th of July, and knew them; we had no private mark on them; I knew them by the colours, and the natural marks; there was F cut on the nose; on the same day I found the two others in a slaughter-house in Newport-market, marked D. on the nose. I have no doubt of their being the hides of our bullocks.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you take an active part in the business? A. I attend the market - we bought thirty-two in one lot; I was present when they were bought - Mr. Whaller looks after them generally. If they had been sent to market I should have marked them.

COURT. Q. Were these four part of the lot of thirty-two? A. Yes. I saw them three or four times a week?

JOSEPH PILGRIM . I assist at the toll-gate on the Iron-bridge, at the beginning of the Plaistow-road. I sat up on Sunday night, the 8th of July, and on Monday morning, between two and three o'clock, four bullocks passed through the gate; they were all over dust, and were panting - it was day-light. I believe the prisoner Tarnan was with them - I am quite sure he is the man. The toll was 21/2d.; Tarnan gave me half-a-crown - I went in to get the change, and when I came out with it he had gone on a few yards without the change - I followed, and gave it to him; I had told him the toll was 21/2d. Mr. French's boy came up in about five minutes, with about eight score of sheep; a man came up soon after, and asked me if four beasts had gone over the bridge - I said Yes, and he went through the gate; he had 3d. in his hand - each foot passenger pays 1d. It was a person exactly like Tarnan, of his height; I am quite certain he is the man - I did not know him before.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you say just now that you believed it was him; had you not some doubt of his identity before you came here to day? A. Why, Yes - I saw one Sturgeon before the Magistrate, and said he was the man who went through the gate; there were two men before the Magistrate beside the prisoner. I swore to Sturgeon - he and the other man were discharged. I am in the habit of sitting up all night; I know it was the 8th of July, because Mr. French's boy came up to me. I had sat up till one o'clock the night before.

COURT. Q. Was not what you said before the Magistrate, that Sturgeon was the man who came up and asked if four bullocks were gone through? A. Yes; I did not swear he drove the cattle through. Tarnan drove them through, and gave me the half-crown - I swore so before the Magistrate.

MR. WHALLER re-examined. My field is rather more than half a mile from Plaistow-gate.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a sailor. On Sunday, the 8th of July, I was employed at Newport-market - I slept that night in the bullock-pound in the market, under the shelter, close to the slaughter-house; the pound is a place where they keep cattle till they are slaughtered. Saville, the foreman, called me up at half-past three o'clock on Monday morning, and asked me where the keys of the pound were; I said I had them - he said, "Give them to me;" I did so, and he said I might go to bed again; I said I should not, but should take a walk to Smithfield. I did not go to Smithfield, but stood at the corner of Litchfield-street, and in about ten minutes I saw four black oxen; one had a white streak along his back: Tarnan and another person were with them - I had seen him before in the slaughter-house, and have no doubt of him; I told Saville there were four beasts - he said nothing to it; the beasts were very dusty. As I stood at the corner of Litchfield-street; Tarnan asked me if Frank and the other man were in the slaughter-house; (Saville's name is Frank - he is foreman of the slaughter-house;) I told him I did not know. The man who was with Tarnan had a white smock-frock on. I saw Saville and that man come out of the pound together, and when they came out Tarnan, who stood at the corner of Litchfield-street, called Frank; they all three went down Litchfield-street, towards Long-acre together; the beasts were then in the pound; I had seen Tarnan two or three times before, and have seen him and Saville going out of the slaughter-house before - he always called him Frank; they appeared to know each other. I never saw them drink together. I had heard Saville say, about three weeks before, that he expected a countryman was going to fetch him four beasts out of the country. I saw them again about ten minutes before eight o'clock that morning, in the slaughter-house. The tails of the beast had then been cut- when I saw them before they had not been cut. The beasts were then in their rough state; the tails are usually cut in Smithfield. When the beasts came to be killed two were marked D. and two F. on their hips, and the same marks were put on their noses after they were killed, to know who the skins belonged to. I never knew Saville get up so early before.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose somebody is owner of this place? A. Yes - Mr. Baker. I had been employed there about three weeks, in the room of a man who was ill - he is now well, and I do not work there now; there may have been two or three hundred heads of cattle slaughtered there while I was there; the place is used for the whole market; there were eight more beast in the pound at that time: they are marked to distinguish whose they are: cattle usually come from Smithfield, but they sometimes come direct from the country.

Q. Have you been threatened to be prosecuted about this affair? Q. No. Saville is paid as a servant to Baker; I always sort the skins, and put them into seperate heaps for the owners.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do beasts which are brought to the pound come with marks on them or not? A. They come with marks on them; these were marked on the hip after they were put into the pound.

MR. BARRY. Q. Do you mean to say they never come

to the slaughter-house without marks? A. Not from Smithfield; I have known several come there without marks.

COURT. Q. You did not know this slaughter-house before you were employed there? A. Yes; every body about there called Saville Frank - he was foreman of the place; he asked me for the keys about a quarter of an hour or more before the cattle came - he had to see the beasts killed - Monday is Smithfield-market day, when we often have cattle brought; we open the pound about seven o'clock, not before - we slaughter every day, and generally expect cattle on Monday morning. Saville's business is to see them properly put into the pound, if any are brought - the persons who bring the beasts bring a man to kill them.

MR. WHALLER. I bought these beasts about the 2d of April, and always kept these four by themselves in the same field.

JOSEPH BAGGETT . I am an assistant slaughterman, in Newport-market. On Monday, the 9th of July, I went to the slaughter-house as usual, about half-past seven o'clock, and after eight, nine beasts were driven from the pound - eight of them were stale, as we call them - they were left from the Friday's market; the ninth was a fresh one: I marked the eight stale ones, as I knew them; Saville told me to put F. on the ninth. Soon after, seven others were driven in from the pound; I marked four of them, which I knew belonged to some butchers in the market; I did not know the other three, and asked Saville how to mark them- by his direction I marked two D. and one F. Thomas Page, who is servant to Mr. Griffiths, took away the two hides marked F.; the two marked D. remained - they were put into Mr. Challis' heap.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you worked at this slaughter-house? A. Six years, for Mr. Baker; Saville was there before I came; he was a servant like me: we slaughter for all the market, and mark all the cattle and the skins to distinguish the owners; we sometimes have them from the country; they are driven in in a rough condition; if a stranger brought cattle we should kill them; I saw nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN BAKER . I am clerk to Mrs. Doggerel, the proprietor of this slaughter-house; Saville was foreman; I have been there five years - he came there before me, and conducted himself well; he gave me an accountonce a week of the beasts that have been slaughtered; it is customary to put a clip upon all the hides; I saw four bides at Bow-street - they had no clip; I never knew four beasts brought together to be killed for a stranger all the while I have been there.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you always on the spot? A. No; I live in the market, and leave a good deal of the business to Saville, but I never heard of such an instance; I do not examine the hides myself, but I know it is customary to clip them.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who takes an account of the beasts slaughtered? A. Saville; he gives it to me once a week.

COURT. Q. Your employer is proprietor of the slaugter-house? A. Yes; she is a widow; we have so much a head for slaughtering - we should not refuse to kill for a stranger - they might come from a fair or from the country, without going to Smithfield; if I saw a beast without a mark, I should not order it to be marked; we have no notice of what cattle are coming.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am a patrol. I apprehended Saville, and asked him who brought the beasts to him; he said two men, but he did not know their names - he did not give me either of their Christian or sirnames; he said they told him to mark two with an F., and two D.; I asked what address they had given; he said they stated they had taken a shop somewhere by the Regent's-park, and that he did not know them at all; I asked how they came to leave the heads behind, when they took the rest of the offal away; he said the man who took the offal said he understood the heads were sold, and would not take them, but would take the tongues; and they were cut out; I afterwards went with French to Leadenhall-market, and saw a cart full of hides belonging to Mr. Griffiths; I saw Page take from the cart two marked F. in red ochre; French claimed them directly; a witness, named Aldridge, has been out of the way ever since last Session - I believe he is a helper about Whitechapel-market.

THOMAS PAGE . I am carman to Mr. Griffiths. On Monday morning I had a bullock hide marked F., and that evening had another marked in the same way - I had them both from the slaughter-house by Saville's direction; Alderson and French afterwards saw them - I am sure they are the same that Saville gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you ever at the slaughter-house before? A. I have been there twice a day for eight years.

ANDREW VALLANCE . I am a patrol, and went with Mr. Waller to the slaughter-house; he claimed two hides there marked D.

TARNAN'S Defence. I wish to observe, that I have been told by a man, who is now under sentence of death, that he was at the toll-gate that evening, and that he is the man who took the money instead of Pilgrim; and that his evidence is false. I declare I was never in the slaughter-house is my life, nor was I ever in the market but twice in my life.

JOSEPH PILGRIM re-examined. I am sure I was at the toll-gate all night on Sunday; my partner Const was asleep in bed; I attended at the gate, opened it, and received the money. I awoke Const, the toll-man, to get the change; he gave it me, and then kept up a little.

COURT. Q. What time did Tarnan go through the gate? A. Between one and two o'clock in the morning - the gate is three miles from Whitechapel church; I did not look at the clock, but think it was between one and two o'clock.

THOMAS HARRISON. Saville called me up about half-past three o'clock - I had no clock, but I heard the watchman calling half-past three o'clock when I came out, and it was a quarter of an hour after that when I saw the beasts.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON. I think it is between two and three miles from Whitechapel church to Newport-market.

SAVILLE'S Defence. I did not know they were stolen; the two men came with them a little after four o'clock. I called the witness up for the key, as somebody was coming to take the dung out: these two men came and asked if I belonged to the slaughter-house, and asked at what time they could have the beasts killed; I said when we began to kill, but we must kill the stale ones first, they told me how to mark them; they said they brought them

from market; that they had a shop in the Regent's-park, and were to come in a cart in the afternoon for the offal.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-4

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1984. MARIA PALMER , MARY SERINO , JOHN VASON , and MARY BECKWORTH , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Timothy Wright , on the 21st of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 5 sovereigns, his monies .

TIMOTHY WRIGHT. I am a carman , and keep a greengrocer's shop . On the 21st of July, between 3 and 4 o'clock, in the afternoon, I was coming home from the Regent's-park, and in the Strand I met a woman; I was robbed by some women, whom I indicted last Session; they were acquitted, but that has nothing to do with this robbery; I was going in search of some officers to take the parties, and was robbed again.

SIMEON HANNELL . I collect advertisements for newspapers. I was taking a pint of beer with a friend, in a public-house, kept by Cuthbert, at the corner of Wych-street, about half-past six o'clock in the evening; four women and two men came in, and used some bad language about some money; the landlord turned them out - the prisoners were some of that party - I never saw the prosecutor till he was at Bow-street; there are two doors to the house - I had not seen them come in.

JOHN CUFF . I have been a corn-chandler, but occasionally work as a porter. I was in the Punch Bowl I public-house, Temple-bar; the prosecutor came in and called for a pipe of tobacco, and as the landlord did not hear him, he left his seat; I thought he was gone to the bar; a person in the bar said he was an officer, and asked if he could point out the persons who had robbed him; he said he could; several people went to the back part of the house; there was a noise, and after that I saw the three female prisoners come out through the room I sat in - they had not gone in through that room - there were six or seven others - some came one way, and some another; there are two ways into the room; they appeared to be women of the town; the three women and one man ran out of the room I sat in; I did not see either of them near the prosecutor - there was a partition between us, and I did not see him robbed.

ELIZABETH ELLIS . I now live at Somer's-town. I was serving at the bar of the Punch Bowl on this day, and was very busy; I did not see any of the prisoners that night to notice them - they were often there - I know nothing of the robbery.

SAMUEL GILES . I am a Bow-street patrol. In consequence of information, about eight o'clock on the night of the robbery, I apprehended Beckworth and Palmer in the Strand, and about nine I took Serino about ten, and Vason the next morning; I found a half sovereign tied in the corner of a handkerchief, which Palmer had on her neck - the others had nothing.

TIMOTHY WRIGHT re-examined. I went to a public-house with the woman I met in the Strand, and had half a pint of porter - it was not either of the prisoners; I waited to pay the waiter for half a pint of beer, and a bottle of ginger beer; the waiter was out; I was sitting on the bench - the woman sat in a box; I had sixteen sovereigns, and was robbed of eight of them in that house; Palmer was one of the persons, who robbed me there - she was tried and acquitted last Session. I went down the Strand in search of the street-keeper, and when I got by the Punch Bowl, a man asked if I had been robbed; he said he was an officer, and if I would walk in there the business should be settled, as he had the party in custody; this was about a quarter to four o'clock; I went in at a door which he introduced me to, and which I opened myself - it drew towards me, with a spring behind it; I opened it; the prisoner Vason was sitting on a bench - he came towards me, and stood at the door while I opened it; I found it was a dark passage, and was about retreating, when I was thrust into the passage by a blow on my back from this supposed officer; I turned to the left; the door was closed on me; my mouth was stopped, and the parties were immediately round me, and took the money out of my pocket; they dropped two sovereigns in the passage - they ran out; I picked up the two sovereigns, and one was left in my pocket; I went to the bar and told the landlady I had been robbed, but no notice was taken of it; I immediately went into the street, and told the street-keeper; he pointed out two officers in the Strand, whom I went to - one looked into the house, and said there were a set of thieves in the parlour then, I had better go in and see if I knew them; he went in with me; the prisoners were not there then - the prisoners who were discharged last Session were taken, and I pointed out Vason in the house as one who had robbed me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you seen any of them before? A. Never; the woman I met in the street was genteelly dressed; she asked me for half a pint of porter; she did not pick me up as a girl of the town - I am a married man; I never saw her before - I had not the slightest notion of her being an improper character; I prosecuted three women last Session for the first robbery, and swore that Palmer held me down while I was robbed; she was acquitted on that charge - I do not swear to her being concerned in this robbery - I knew none of the prisoners before that day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1985. JAMES BURTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Murrell , in the King's highway, on the 16th of September , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 4l.; 2 seals, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 5s.; 1 watch-chain, value 1d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 brooch, value 10s.; 1 crown, 1 half-crown, and 8 shillings, his property .

JOHN MURRELL. I have been a publican , but am now out of business, and live near the Regent's-park. On Sunday, the 16th of September, I went down to see a friend at the Blue Anchor public-house, Petticoat-lane, in the parish of Christ-church, Spitalfields; I got there about one o'clock- I had two glasses of rum and a pint of porter; I staid there till about six o'clock; I had nothing more there. I called at the next public-house in my way, and got one glass of gin there; I staid there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I went to the next public-house, and had half a quartern of gin - I staid there about a quarter of an hour -

I was going on, and felt myself tipsy on the road - and going towards Shoreditch I met a man who pretended to know me - he called me by my name, and asked how I did - that was not the prisoner; that man persuaded me to go into the King and Queen public-house ; I cannot say whether he had any body with him - he called for a quartern of gin, and asked me to drink - we stood at the bar; I drank a little; he asked me to pay for it, and I would not: there were several persons standing at the bar; I do not know any of them. I was pushed and shoved about there, and my hat fell off - I was pushed down; there were ten or twelve pushing me about - they made a bit of a push - a sort of a shove, and got me out of doors, pretending to go and see me home; they were leading me along the street, and pushed me down two or three times.

Q. Did they push you down, or might you not have fallen? A. I will not swear it; I felt somebody pulling my coat behind me; I do not recollect what happened afterwards, for I became senseless by the fall, and did not come to myself till morning, when I found myself in the watch-house. I had a silver watch, two gold seals, a gold key, and a gold ring in my fob, and 18s. in money, all of which were gone. I cannot speak to any body having robbed me.

WILLIAM CANCH . I am a shoemaker, and live at Bethnal-green. On Sunday evening, the 16th of September, I was going towards home, and saw the prosecutor dragged out of this public-house; there were ten or twelve persons about him. I saw that all was not right, and suspected the men about him; I spoke to the witnesses Keyworth and Blaizey, to help me get him away. I went and laid hold of the prosecutor's arm - the prisoner had hold of his other arm: we tried to get him along between us. I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's right hand breeches pocket - I told him to take his hand out, for he was robbing him - he did so; I saw him put his hand into the pocket again. I saw them tear his trousers in pulling him about; they pulled him down several times; the prisoner had hold of one of his arms, and forced him back, as I forced him forward. I saw the prisoner tear his fob right off; I could not see the watch in it, but saw the seals hanging to it; the prisoner then walked down the street. I conducted the prosecutor to the watch-house, for a place of safety, and did not follow the prisoner, but I knew him before perfectly well; he was generally about the coach-stand by Sun-street. I am certain he is the man who had hold of his arm, and tore his fob off, and went away with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How near were you to him when you saw him pull the fob out? A. I had hold of the prosecutor's arm, and saw the seals, but not the watch; he was leaning on me with one arm, and on the prisoner with the other. I had not been into the public-house - they came out of Norton-falgate into Shoreditch - it was just dark.

Q. Why did you not try to take the prisoner? A. I went with the prosecutor - two witnesses followed the prisoner; I cannot say whether the prisoner was sober - he reeled about a little, but whether it was real or not I cannot tell - he walked down the street.

ABRAHAM KEYWORTH . I saw what Canch has stated, I have heard his evidence. I was a yard or two from the prosecutor - it was about half-past six o'clock in the evening; the gas was lighted. The prosecutor was very drunk, and the prisoner was in liquor; I saw the prosecutor on the ground, and the prisoner on him, and two others on each side; they lifted him up; the prisoner's hand was then in the prosecutor's pocket. I saw that he drew his hand out, and walked up Plough-yard2, and two others with him; the two others looked in his hands - he appeared to be showing them what he had got; I cannot say what it was - I saw nothing else; I did not see the fob taken - I and Blaizey followed the prisoner - we did not offer to take him, as we could see no officer near; he asked us to have something to drink - we said, "No thank you," and left him- we followed him for half a mile, and two others followed us at a distance behind; we left him opposite Shoreditch church. I have no doubt whatever of his being the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you first see them? - A. In Shoreditch. I walked after the prisoner for half a mile.

Q. Did he not return almost to the spot where you had seen him at first? A. Yes; there were plenty of persons about. I did not meet many persons when I followed him, but when I saw him a second time there were several people passing, but the first time I did not meet above four or five people: he did not attempt to run; the prosecutor had not got his hat on when I saw him. The prisoner was not so tipsy as to be unable to walk.

SAMUEL BLAIZEY . I was in Shoreditch, and saw the prosecutor and prisoner together; there were several people about him. Canch had hold of the prosecutor's arm, and the prisoner had hold of the other; I did not know him before, and did not see him do any thing; after he had left the prosecutor I followed him, and saw something white in his hand like cloth.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they all appear pretty far gone in liquor? A. Yes.

JOHN BROWN . I am an extra constable of Bishopsgate. I apprehended the prisoner at a public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not learn there that he was aware you were coming for him? A. No.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am an officer of Worship-street. - I received information of the robbery in the morning, from the prosecutor, and in the evening I went with Brown, and assisted in bringing the prisoner to the office. I searched him, and found nothing but a knife, a letter, and a few halfpence about him. Two or three evenings afterwards a patrol brought a hat to me at the office - the prosecutor claimed it.

JOHN MURRELL. Here are the trousers which I wore that night; the fob is torn quite out - it was all right before this happened. The trousers are torn very much, and are very dirty.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure they were not torn before? A. Yes; my hat was knocked off.

Q. Did not the landlady detain it for the gin that you had? A. I cannot say.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

MARGARET CUFLIN . I am a widow. The prosecutor was at my house on this Sunday night - he came into our room; somebody called for a quartern of gin - he caught hold of the measure, or I should not have let him have it, and after he had it he reeled against the bar; his hat fell over the bar door - I was going to give it him; the other man said, "Keep the hat, and I will go and see him home, and

come back and pay for the gin. I never saw either of them before - I do not know who the other man was who went out with him; I will swear it was not the prisoner; there were three or four others there. I did not see the prisoner - I should have known him if he had been in the house.

Q. Did you know him before then? A. No; I think I should know the person who went out with him; they only came to my bar; neither of them sat down in my house.

COURT. Q. What district is your house in? A. Norton-falgate - I got my license from Lambeth-street.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Reference Number: t18271025-6

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1986. WILLIAM LAYTHORM was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Grade , on the King's highway, on the 1st of October , at St. Botolph Without, Aldgate , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l., his property .

THOMAS GARDE. I am a journeyman cooper , and live in Dean-street, East Smithfield. On the 1st of October, about half-past 11 o'clock at night, I was coming home from the Borough; I had been at work that day, and was quite sober. As I was coming along by the Tower , three men rushed against me; one put his foot before me and upset me - the others took my watch; after they got me down, they took the watch - the prisoner is the man who upset me; it was in a very remote place, there were no lamps there - it did not last above a minute; I did not know the prisoner before - they kept me down about a minute: I then pursued the prisoner, calling Stop thief! he was stopped by the watchman, when I had pursued him about five minutes - I had lost sight of him for two or three minutes, when I came up and found him in custody; I knew him again and gave him in charge - I am quite sure he is the man - I have not found my property.

JOHN SMITH . I am a labourer, and live near St. Katherine's Docks. I saw the prosecutor on the ground, and a parcel of people round him - he got up, and said he was robbed of his watch; he ran after the prisoner, and I ran also - I saw him stopped; I never lost of him till he was taken - I am sure he is the man who ran immediately from the prosecutor.

JOHN SIMKINS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him, as there was a cry of Stop thief! he was running from the cry; I had heard the cry for three or four minutes - nobody else was running in the same direction - the prosecutor came up in about two minutes, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am headborough of St. Botolph Without, Aldgate. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house about half-past eleven o'clock at night, quite out of breath - I asked him what he was; he said a hatter, and that he lived at the west-end of the town - I asked him where there; he said at Bethnal-green.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been ill for nearly five months; on the evening in question I had been to the Borough for a bottle of medicine - I met a friend, which kept me later than I should have been; as I came over Towerhill, I saw three or four men hustling together; I was four or five yards from them, and heard the prosecutor call Stop thief! I stepped quick to get out of the way, and was taken - nothing was found on me but the medicine; the witness told the watch-house keeper that he saw me knock him down, but he told the Magistrate he did not see me knock him down, but saw me run away; the prosecutor said I was the man who knocked him down, and held him down - that I tripped him up, and knelt on his breast; the Magistrate asked if he saw me kneel on his breast, he said No, he did not: it is not likely I could knock a man down and rob him, being in the state I am: when he came to the watch-house, he was in a heavy state of liquor - he admitted to the Magistrate that he had been at a raffle, and drinking beer: my friends are not here, not expecting I should be tried so soon.

THOMAS GARDE. I had been at a raffle, and drank my share of two pots of beer among fourteen or fifteen persons - I was as sober as I am now.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18271025-7

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1987. GEORGE WILLIAM PARNELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jeremiah Harris , on the King's highway, on the 23d of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 1 ring, value 10s., his property .

JEREMIAH HARRIS. I am a coach smith , and live in Leigh-street, Mary-le-bone. On Sunday evening, the 23d of September, about ten minutes past eleven, I was going home, and as I crossed the road between St. Giles' church and Oxford-street , the prisoner came up to me and put his left hand to my breast; he cried "Where is your watch?" and out he pulled it with great violence from my fob - he pulled it out by the seal, and ran off immediately as hard as he could; I ran after him, calling Stop thief! but did not take him - it was a silver watch, with a gold seal; I never saw him before - he was not many minutes with me - I was not at all tipsy; there was a splendid light from the gas; I did not notice the moon - it happened better than half way over the crossing; he had a hat on, but I saw his face plainly.

Prisoner. Q. You said once that I was in the dress that I am in at present? A. I believe I said he had a black waistcoat and light handkerchief, but I spoke to his features the moment i saw him in prison - he had the same dress on before the Magistrate as when he robbed me - it was a blue coat, drab trousers, black waistcoat, and light-coloured handkerchief - I do not think the handkerchief he has on now is the same.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am a police constable of Mary-le-bone. I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of September, between two and three in the afternoon, on other charges; he was remanded for re-examination, and while he was in custody, the prosecutor came to the office and identified him among six or seven other prisoners in the lock-up room - he denied the charge; I told him if he would tell me where he was on the Sunday night, I would endeavour to get his friends here to prove it, but he declined.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday morning I went out to breakfast - I returned to my lodgings, cleaned myself, put on a drab coat and buff waistcoat; I returned to Whitehall to see a friend, and from there went to the Three Tuns public-house, Oxford-street, and waited there for my cousin, I had some ale, and it was exactly ten o'clock when I returned to my lodgings.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-8

1988. GEORGE WILLIAM PARNELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , at St. George, Hanover-square , 10 sovereigns, 4 half-sovereigns, 12 shillings, 3 rings, value 1l.; 1 brooch, value 10s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the property of Sophia Grigg , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Marshall .

SOPHIA GRIGG. I am bar-maid at the Hanover-square public-house, in the Bayswater-road , it is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, and is kept by Thomas Marshall. On Friday, the 14th of September, the prisoner applied for a lodging at the house, and was admitted - he remained with us till the 19th; he then went away, without paying his lodging, my box was in his room - I slept in the room underneath. When he was gone I missed from my box a purse, containing ten sovereigns, four half-sovereigns, a quantity of loose silver, a brooch, four rings, and two silk handkerchiefs; I am sure my box had been locked, and I found it still locked; there were no marks of violence on it- I am sure the things were there when he came to the house, and I left it all safe on the Tuesday night before he went to bed; he slept in the room that night, and went away on the Wednesday morning - I had opened my purse that night to take some money out; I was present when he was apprehended, and pointed him out to the officer - he had then got one of my handkerchiefs in his possession.

THOMAS MARSHALL. I am the landlord of this house, and have been there ever since the 13th of September; I have paid some taxes - the house is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square: I only know the prisoner lodged there.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took the prisoner into custody at a public-house at St. John's Wood, Mrs. Grigg sent for me - he was playing in the skittle-ground, and was putting this handkerchief into his hat as I went into the ground.

SOPHIA GRIGG. This is my handkerchief, and was in my box on the Tuesday; it is marked I. B., which are the initials of a person who gave it me - I have had it three years; the prisoner appeared to be a carpenter .

Prisoner's Defence. That handkerchief laid on the box by the side of my bed; I took it in the morning, and wrapped up two or three of my things in it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18271025-9

1989. GEORGE WILLIAM PARNELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 seal, value 1d.; 1 key, value 1d.; 3 tablecloths, value 6s.; 1 sheet, value 3s., and 4 shirts, value 8s. , the goods of William Evans .

MARTHA EVANS . I am the wife of William Evans - I lodge at No. 18, Middlesex-street, Mary-le-bone ; the prisoner came to lodge there on Monday, the 10th of September. He came into my room on Wednesday, and asked what o'clock it was; I said I did not know, for my watch was not going, and that I wanted to sell it; he asked what I wanted for it - I said 26s.; he said it was worth that, and he would buy it: he asked if I would let him have it, to see how it went; I refused: he asked if I would let him take it to a watch-maker, and he would pay me for it on Saturday - I was not willing; he said I need not be afraid, he would return it next night - he, accordingly, took it into his bed-room; next morning I found he was gone, and the watch also - I found it at the pawnbroker's; I also lost four shirts, a table-cloth, and towel.

JAMES HILL . I am shopman to Mr. Gofton, a pawnbroker, of Gilbert-street. On the 24th of September, the prisoner pawned this watch, for 18s., in the name of William Parnell - I knew him before.

JOHN EDWARD NEEDES . I am shopman to Mr. Baker, a pawnbroker, of Upper George-street, Bryanstone-square. I believe the prisoner to be the man who pawned two shirts for 4s., on the morning of the 15th of September, in the name of George William Ellis, Little Mary-le-bone-street; he pawned two more the same evening - I am sure he is the man.

SAMUEL WISE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Duke-street, Manchester-square. I have two table-cloths pawned on the 12th of September, in the name of William Parnell, for Mary Parnell - I cannot identify the man.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I searched the prisoner, and found a number of duplicates on him, among which were five for this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to lodge with her; she said her watch did not go, as it had been over-wound - she said she wanted to sell it, and asked 26s. for it; I said I would have it on Saturday night: I went out, returned about nine o'clock that evening, and did not go to bed till ten - I asked if she would let me have it to see what was the matter with it, and I would get it repaired, and pay her on Saturday evening; but I went down to Hounslow and got a job, and did not return for a few days - I did not intend her to lose the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18271025-10

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1990. ELIJAH BARLOW , JAMES HAINES , and JAMES WHEELER were indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Harrison , on the 11th of October , at Paddington , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 12 shillings, his monies .

RICHARD HARRISON. I live at No. 38, Charles-street, Lisson-green, and am a pedlar - I sell confectionary and sweetmeats . On the 11th of October, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was at the Reservoir, near Bayswater-fields , going home; three persons came and knocked me about - they knocked my basket off my head: I said, "Oh God! what have I done?" I was knocked down in the mud, and said, "Oh Lord! spare my life, and take my money;" I can swear to Wheeler - he is the person who kept his hands over my eyes and mouth, while the others robbed me.

Q. What were the others doing while he held his hands over your eyes and mouth? A. I was robbed of 12s.; I felt my money taken out of my left-hand pocket - I cannot say who did it, but I am certain of Wheeler: I got up, and a private watchman came and asked me what was the matter; I said I had been knocked down and robbed by three persons - he said, "Which way are they gone?" he ran, and I cried Stop thief! as loud as I could: in five minutes I saw Wheeler in custody - he was taken to the watch-house and detained; as soon as I saw him, I knew him to be the man who had his hands over my eyes and mouth - I am quite sure he is the person; I saw the other two prisoners in custody on the afternoon of the next day - I cannot speak to them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. It was dark? A. Yes; I was not far from a gas lamp - about twenty yards;

it is neither a field nor a street - it is a new road forming: I had been to Hammersmith.

Q. Were you perfectly sober? A. Yes, comfortable; I do not exactly know what I had drank; I do not have a regular dinner - I eat some of my stock - I cannot say how many public-houses I went into, or how many I drank at.

Q. After Wheeler was taken, did you not say there was another man whom you should know? A. No.

COURT. Q. Do you call at different public-houses to sell your goods? A. No, I sell them at shops

ROBERT EDMANDS . I am an excavator, and live at No. 1, Conduit-place, Bayswater. I was going home about half-past eleven o'clock on this night, and at the top of Prague-street is a new street, called London-street - I heard a running; I suspected something, and stepped behind a stack of bricks, and in a minute or two I heard a cry of Stop thief! and Murder! the three prisoners instantly came along by me; I rushed out, and made a catch at Haines with my right hand; he slipped by me, to the right; Wheeler stopped, as if to hit me - I said, "What, will you hit me?" he said he was not going to hit me: up came a watchman, and I gave him to him - they were all three running in a direction from where I heard the sound of running and the cry of Stop thief! and Murder! they were together - I should think a good large handkerchief would cover the three; they were as close together as they could be to run: I have seen them before, in the neighbourhood, and have seen two of them in company; I am certain of them all three; Haines and Barlow were running with Wheeler.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you always been as certain? A. Yes - I was close under a gas lamp. I attended before the Magistrate; I said when Harrison came up that his face was all over blood and mud; they call him Brandyball Dick - he is known about there.

ROBERT DOUGLAS . I keep the Swan public-house, Kensington Gravel-pits. I know the prisoners, but not before the night of the robbery - they were all three in my house on the night in question - I saw them all three in my house; they left about a quarter before eleven; they had been there in company nearly an hour; the robbery was about half-past eleven o'clock; my house is about three quarters of a mile from where it happened. I saw them again next evening at seven o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. When was your attention first called to the transaction? A. Next evening.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. - In consequence of information I apprehended Barlow and Haines in Richmond-street, in Mary-le-bone parish: they were in a front parlour, in company with a person who keeps the house, and her daughter. I said I had a charge of robbery against them - they asked what for - I said for robbing Dick, the pieman; they made no answer, but said they would go with me.

BARLOW'S Defence. I was in company with Wheeler at the public-house, but I and Haines left him at Bayswater gate, before he went into the field; a man accompanied us up to Tyburn.

Prisoner WHEELER to RICHARD HARRISON. Q. Do you say I put my hand over your mouth? it is false? A. I do, it is the truth.

WHEELER'S Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

One witness gave Barlow a good character.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoners - I know nothing more.

BARLOW - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

HAINES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

WHEELER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of their youth.

Reference Number: t18271025-11

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1938. JOHN HOOPER , JAMES HIGGINS , and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , in the dwelling-house of Catherine Barber , 5 10l. Bank notes, the property of Benjamin Mackay .

BENJAMIN MACKAY. On the 14th of September I lodged with Mrs. Catherine Barber, a widow, of Little Newport-street . I am a butcher . I had 50l. or 60l. in Bank notes in a box in my bed-room; I saw them safe about three weeks before I missed them - they were 10l. notes; I had received 175l. in all, for cheques upon Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co. Hooper lodged in the same room with me for about two months; I do not think he ever saw, me with the notes - I had had them by me about eight months; Hooper and Higgins are both butchers; I knew nothing of Davis till he was apprehended; there was the mark of a large knife where the hasp of the box had been wrenched off. This money had been left me, and I had sold it out of the funds.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Does Barber keep a general lodging-house? A. No, it is a public-house - she lets lodgings to single-men; only I, Hooper, and one Cutmore lodged in that room; he and Hooper slept together; I slept alone. There is another bed-room on the same floor, in which Prague and Webb slept; I was living upon this money; I had taken a shop, but was disappointed about it; Hooper was out of a situation: the room door was never locked. Higgins did not lodge there.

JOHN GOLIGHTLY . I am clerk to Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co. Here is my book, in which is an entry in my writing, of having paid a cheque drawn by Messrs. Davis and Co., stock-brokers, in November, 1826, for 98l. - I paid five 10l. notes, Nos. 9495 to 9499 inclusive, dated the 11th of November, 1826, and five 5l. notes, Nos. 609 to 613, dated the 27th of October, with 23l. in gold - I do not know to whom I paid it.

THOMAS CULVERWELL . I am clerk to Mr. Jones, a silversmith, near Waterloo-bridge. On the 11th of September, the prisoner Higgins purchased two rings for 16s., and gave me a 10l. note; I gave him the change; I exchanged it for sovereigns a few days after at the Bank: I asked his name; he said, "Henry Marks, No. 22, Blackwell-street, Clare-market," which I wrote on it in his presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. No; I did not take the number of the note - it was in my possession till I took it to the Bank: I produced it at the Thames Police Office three or four times, as Higgins was taken into custody on my charge originally, and discharged upon entering into recognizances to meet my charge; he came to our shop between twelve and one o'clock in the day, and remained there about ten minutes.

AMELIA MATTHEWS . I lodge at No. 9, Orange-street, Leicester-square. The prisoner Hooper came to my lodg

ings on the 11th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and asked Higgins, who lodged at my house, to go out with him; I refused to let him go - I had seen Hooper before, but did not particularly know him; Hooper came to my house a few days afterwards, and asked me to go and get change for a 10l. note; I went to Waterloo-house, Cockspur-street, and laid out 8s. or 9s. in linen-drapery, and got it changed; I gave some of the change to Hooper, and paid some of it to a Solicitor to go down to the Thames Police Office; I believe Davis was present when Hooper gave me the 10l. note - I had not seen him before, but he came in with Hooper.

Cross-examined. Q. When did Hooper give you the note? A. I think on the 13th of September; Higgins lived with me; I gave Hooper four sovereigns; I paid the Solicitor, and paid some expenses; I could not read sufficient to tell the number or amount of the note, but he told me it was a 10l. note.

CATHERINE BARBER. Mackay and Hooper lodged with me; Hooper had lodged there about three weeks.

Cross-examined. Q. The room was occupied by two other persons? A. Yes; one of them had been with me for three years; Hooper has respectable friends; the room door was never locked - I never locked my own bed-room, I had so good an opinion of the lodgers; whoever goes up stairs from below must go through the bar.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I took Higgins on the 14th of September, and told him I understood he had passed a note, which was stolen from Mackay; he said the note he passed he had received from a man, for some writings belonging to his wife which he had sold; he afterwards said at the office that he had told a falsehood, for he had received it from Hooper, who was present; I procured the note from the Bank, and produce it; I compared a large knife with the marks on Mackay's box, and it exactly fitted the impressions.

Cross-examined. Q. Who gave you the note at the Bank? A. Mr. Bently in the Accountant's office.

THOMAS CULVERWELL . This is the note which I wrote upon in Higgins' presence - it is No. 9499, dated the 11th of November, 1826.

ROBERT DUKE . I produce the knife which Mr. Barber gave me; I compared it with the marks on the box, and they tallied exactly - it is a very large clasp knife - it being a leather trunk, the marks are very plain; the point appears to have been under the hasp, and the shoulder of the knife has been prized down for the length of an inch and a quarter; the box is about a yard long.

CATHERINE BARBER. I found that knife in the top drawer of the room where Mackay and Hooper slept; I had seen it in Hooper's hands before, and heard him say it was his.

FRANCIS FAGAN. I recollect that all the three prisoners were examined before the Magistrate; when the witness Matthews was examined a second time.

COURT to AMELIA MATTHEWS. Q. What did you say before the Magistrate at the second examination of the prisoners? A. I told him Hooper came to my house on the 11th of September, and asked Higgins to go out.

Q. What did you say about a key? A. Hooper came and told me he had taken the key out of Mackay's pocket while he was asleep, and taken some money out; he had locked the box, and put the key into his pocket again.

ROBERT DUKE. I examined the box; the nails had been driven into the hasp again, but it had certainly been forced.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-12

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1992. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for that he at the Delivery of the King's Goal of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 12th of January, in the 6th year of his present Majesty's reign, was convicted on his own confession, on a certain indictment against him for feloniously being at large, without any lawful cause, at St. Martin in the Fields, before the expiration of the term of his natural life, for which he had, at the Delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the said County, on the 5th of December, in the 2d year of his present Majesty's reign, been ordered to be Transported, and was thereupon ordered to be hanged by the neck until he should be dead; and afterwards, on the 16th of February, in the 7th year of his present Majesty's reign, was pardoned, on condition of being Transported for the term of his natural Life; and afterwards, to wit, on the 11th of October , feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, at Weyhill, in the county of Southampton , to wit, at London, that is to say, at the parish of St. Sepulchre , before the expiration of the said term, for which he was so ordered to be Transported, as last aforesaid , against the statute, &c.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18271025-13

1993. SAMUEL HASSAM was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , 18lbs. of cheese, value 10s. , the goods of William Were .

MR. WILLIAM WERE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Botolph-lane . I know nothing of the circumstances of this case, except that the cheese is mine. I have no partner.

JOHN LEWER . I am in the service of Mr. Were. On the 22d of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, this cheese was about two yards within the shop - I had seen it safe about two minutes before it was taken - I saw the prisoner take it; he sat down on the iron-railing under the window - I saw him reaching the cheese with his left arm; he got it on his right thigh, and under his right arm, and ran off with it - I went after him, and never lost sight of him - I stopped him against Botolph-alley with it under his arm.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not close under the window when you saw me, and I had fallen down on the cheese? A. No, that is impossible.

JOHN STARLING . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner with the cheese.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday evening I had been to Walworth, to see my sister, who is in service; a cart was loading at the warehouse, and the ropes were on the pavement; there is a cellar window, which leads into the warehouse - I fell over the ropes against the cheeses, which were close to the window; it fell off the step - I was just taking it up to put it on the pile; this man came and collared me, and said, "I have just caught you at it"- I was not in Botolph-alley.

JURY to JOHN LEWER. Q. What bars was he sitting on? A. The bars of the shop-floor, which open to let goods down into the cellar.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-14

1994. MARTIN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of John Howell .

JOHN HOWELL. I am a hosier and glover , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 13th of October, a little after nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop with a female, and requested to see a pair of stockings - I showed him a pair of black worsted stockings; he was a considerable time looking at them, and objected to them as being dear - I had seen these stockings safe in the centre of the counter, half a minute before; he and the female went out together, without buying any thing - I followed, and laid hold of him, about a yard and a half from the door, and took these pair of stockings from him; the female accompanied him to the watch-house, and then went away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had the female some things in her apron? A. Yes; he did not say he thought they were things which she had dropped out of her apron; she opened it at the watch-house, for the officer to see - I saw a shirt and a counterpane there, and inquired at a pawnbroker's, and found he had been, and taken some things out of pawn.

SARAH HOWELL . I am the prosecutor's wife. I was sitting at the top of the shop, and saw the prisoner come in with a woman; he asked to see a pair of black stockings, for his sister; they bought nothing, and as he went out, I saw him put his right hand on four or five pairs of stockings; he took the top pair, and immediately went out - I told my husband, who went out, and took them from under his arm - I followed, and caught him myself.

Cross-examined. Q. How many pairs were on the counter? A. Five pairs.

HOWELL GODDARD . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop with my sister, who had just come from the country; she wanted a pair of black stockings, but would not give the price he asked - I said, "Have them, and I will pay for them" - she said they were not worth the money; we were turning out of the shop - there was a board with stockings on it, and as I was going out I saw a pair of stockings under my feet - I thought she had dropped them, as she had redeemed some at Mr. Layburn's; they went to the pawnbroker's, and found the other things were redeemed - I refused to let the prosecutor have the stockings, till he saw whether my sister had lost them.

JOHN HOWELL. He did not refuse to let me have the stockings, nor did he say he thought his sister had dropped them - I went to the pawnbroker's, as I knew the prisoner before, and if I could serve him, I should have been glad; he was once a temporary watchman in our district - I knew him by seeing him pass the door - I went to inquire if he had redeemed a sheet and quilt, as I did not wish to injure him - I have no shop mark on them; but they were in the paper; they are not black stockings.

SARAH HOWELL re-examined. Two persons came into the shop as he was going out.

GUILTY . Aged 4.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-15

1995. JOHN FOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of John Howell .

JOHN HOWELL. I am a hosier , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 10th of October, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and took down a pair of stockings, which hung about fifteen inches within the door - I was told of it, and went in pursuit; I first saw him about one hundred yards off, and did not lose sight of him till he was secured by a gentleman - I had raised an alarm; I took this pair of stockings from his hand - they had been fastened by three pins, to a very large cord; a strong pull would disengage them - they were safe half a minute before.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a constable. I was passing the shop, and took the prisoner in charge - he said he hoped the prosecutor would forgive him, and that he was in distress. I searched him - he had not got a farthing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had them put into my hands just at the corner.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-16

1996. ROBERT CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Orchard , from his person .

JOHN ORCHARD. I am a draper , and live in Regent-street. On the 3d of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was on Holborn-hill , coming towards the City; my coat was buttoned up; I felt my silk handkerchief drawn from my outside pocket; I turned round, and caught the prisoner by the collar - I found my handkerchief in his hand; there appeared to be another person in his company, who passed on, and took no notice, but they were close together. I think the prisoner could not have taken it without the other seeing it. When I took it from the prisoner's hand he begged me to let him go - that was all he said; I said I should give him in charge; he then rescued himself from me - I pursued, and never lost sight of him till I secured him.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with this handkerchief; I found 1s. 11/2d. on him, also a copper wire, with a hook at the end of it, and a sharp crooked pointed knife, a clasp knife, with a turn at the end of it, like a gardener's knife.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CROWSE . I stopped the prisoner, and helped to take him to the watch-house, as I had seen him escape from Orchard.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of Brook-street - a person stopped me at the corner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-17

1997. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 deal plank board, value 2s. 4d. , the goods of Nicholas Richards .

NICHOLAS RICHARDS. I am a carpenter , and live in New North-road - I carry on my business in London-wall . I had a quantity of plank ends there, about thirty feet from the door, which is generally open in the day time.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the Magistrate ask if you could swear to the timber? A. I believe he did. I can swear clearly to it - it is a particular sort, and is marked. I made no mark on it at the office. I bought 16000 of them in 1825.

JOSEPH GWINNALL . I was passing by the passage leading to the prosecutor's workshop, and saw the prisoner coming out with a deal end under his arm; it is less than three feet long - I asked where he got it; he said he bought it in Beech-street; I stopped him, knowing him to have been there before, and gave him in charge.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable, and took charge of him with the deal.

Prisoner's Defence. The deal fell off a cart; I picked it up - the street being narrow, and several carts passing, I slipped into the passage while they passed, for fear I should be knocked down.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-18

1998. JOSEPH FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 sovereign, the money of John Chappel , his master .

JOHN CHAPPEL. I am a stationer , at the Royal Exchange . The prisoner had been a fortnight in my employ - I took him from his father; he came from sea. On Friday, the 21st of September, after five o'clock in the evening, I gave him a sovereign to purchase some pamphlets for sale - he did not return; I did not see him again till his father had given him into custody at the Mansion House, on the Tuesday following; he has never returned me the sovereign or the pamphlets.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-19

1999. CHARLES FOUNTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 15 ozs. of sewing cotton, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James Chadwick and others.

WILLIAM HUNT . I am in the employ of James Chadwick and others, sewing cotton manufacturers , of Love-lane . On the 16th of October, about half-past one o'clock, while the work people were at dinner, the prisoner came into the warehouse - I was at the bottom of the warehouse - he came half way down, and asked if I could recommend him to a situation; I said I could not - he turned round, and as he went out he pulled the door after him, without waiting for an answer - this raised my suspicion; there was a pile of cotton between him and me, so that I could not see him take any thing, but hearing paper rustle I went out, and saw him turn the end of the lane, with something white in his hand; I ran, and stopped him with about 1 lb. of sewing cotton; I took it from him: he ran away - I called Stop thief! followed, and brought him back to the warehouse. We had only finished this cotton an hour before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was intoxicated, and did not know what I was about.

WILLIAM HUNT. I thought him quite sober.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-20

2000. CHARLOTTE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 151/2 yards of ribbon, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Meeking .

JAMES RANDALL . I am in the employ of Charles Meeking, a haberdasher , of Holborn-hill . On the 10th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in alone, and placed herself near the counter, without asking for any thing - I was in the middle of the shop; several persons were serving; she was near the door - I turned my back, to call somebody to attend to her, and as I turned again I saw her thrusting something into her bosom; I walked up to her, put my hand to her, and felt something concealed under her gown; I asked what it was - she said she had got nothing: I took from her bosom this piece of ribbon, containing fifteen yards; it has our shop mark on it. She begged we would let her go.

SAMUEL HEINSELL . I am a constable, and took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in with another woman, to buy some print, and picked this ribbon up, not knowing who it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-21

2001. LAMBERT JOHN TITTERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 wooden bound cask, value 1s., and 637 herrings, value 19s. , the goods of John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON. I live in Great Tower-street, and superintend the landing of barrel herrings at Billingsgate ; they are under my care - I am answerable for them. On the 24th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing from the water side; there were 136 barrels just landing; I observed the prisoner rolling one barrel away, which had been put on the platform in the market - he was just turning the corner, about fifty or sixty yards from where it had been put- I came up with him about half way up the market, and asked what he was going to do with it - he said he was going to take it on to room land, and one of the men had employed him; I asked him to come back and point the man out; he said he would not, and used bad words; he appeared tipsy - I gave him in charge; he did not offer to go away; these casks are never rolled away, but always carried on men's knots.

THOMAS HOUGH . I am a waterman and lighterman. I saw the prisoner pull the barrel down as it stood on end, and roll it away. I have often seen him in the market.

WILLIAM BUXTON . I took him in charge; he did not at first appear in liquor, but afterwards clung to a post, and I could hardly get him along.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been on board a foreign steam-packet, and drank some foreign liquor, which overcame me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-22

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2002. ROBERT MOFFITT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster , 1 clock, value 10l., and 2 spoons, value 2s., the goods of George Greig , in his dwelling-house .

THE REV. GEORGE GREIG. I am a clergyman , and live in Vincent-square , in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, Westminster. On the 16th of August, about five o'clock in the morning, I came down stairs, and remained in my parlour till after six; I then rang my servant up, and finding that she was stirring I went up to my room - I had not been there long before I heard a scream, and found a person had dropped from the parlour window - I had opened the window myself when I first came down, and thrown up the sash, and left it open; when I came down I found the clock gone, which had stood on the side-board in the parlour; it cost twelve guineas thirteen or fourteen years ago; two silver salt-spoons were also missing.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Greig. On the morning in question, at half-past six o'clock, I came down stairs, and went into the kitchen. I opened the shutters, and saw two men fall, as if from the parlour window; I ran up stairs, missed the clock from the sideboard, and the spoons off the dumb-waiter; they were safe the night before. I could not swear to the men - it appeared to me be a stout man that fell from the window, the same size as the prisoner.

THOMAS STRINGER . I am a smith, and live in Bellplace, Westminster. On Thursday, the 16th of August, I was about fifty yards from Mr. Greig's house, and saw his parlour window was open - as I went along the square I saw Barnett and the prisoner together, lurking about opposite Mr. Greig's house; I went along as far as the end of the square, stopped a few minutes, and presently saw Barnett go up the front garden, and receive a parcel from the window. The prisoner was waiting outside; a person came out of the window, and all three ran off together. The prisoner was close outside the railing when the bundle was thrown out - I am sure he is the man.

WELCOME COLE . I am a letter-carrier at the Post-office. On the 16th of August I got up to go to the office about half-past six o'clock - I live in Bell-street, near the prosecutor's house; there is a court almost opposite my house, and half way down that court Barnett passed me, and at the end of the court he pulled his jacket off, and stopped - I stopped, turned my head round, and the prisoner came up with the clock under his arm; Barnett immediately covered it with his jacket; before that it was covered with a handkerchief or cloth. I am quite certain the prisoner had the clock - they escaped at the time. I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody, on another charge, and identified him.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I detained the prisoner at Union-hall, where he was brought on the 19th of September - I had been looking for him before, but could not find him; Cole described him to me accurately, and gave the same account as he has now.

Prisoner. I did not consider that I should want any witnesses, knowing myself innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18271025-23

2003. SARAH WALBY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 13 shirts, value 5l.; 3 table-cloths, value 15s., and 1 Bible, value 5s. , the goods of Ann Diggens .

ANN DIGGENS. I am a widow , and live in Francis-place, Westminster - I am a laundress ; the prisoner assisted me to wash and iron . I missed about 6l. worth of property at different times, and found it all at the pawnbrokers. I cannot say how much was taken at once.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me these things to pawn? A. Never; I have been obliged to pay for most of them.

WILLIAM HARDY . I am servant to Mr. Morris, a pawnbroker, of York-street, Westminster. The prosecutrix came to our shop and redeemed this property, which had been pawned by the prisoner at different times, in September, November, and December, 1826.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD CUFF . I am an officer, and took her in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me them to pawn; she said at the office she had only lost three shirts, and that they were worth only 2l.; she afterwards said she would do for me, and bring these things against me, as she could not find all her property.

ANN DIGGENS. It is false.

GUILTY. Aged 33. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-24

2004. WILLIAM CREW was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Vickery , on the 2d of October , at St. Mary, Paddington , and stealing 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 2s.; 2 shirts, value 10s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 9 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 night-cap, value 6d.; 1 towel, value 6d., and 9 shillings, the property of William Salley .

WILLIAM SALLEY. I am a coach wheeler , and live at Robert Vickery's house, No. 22, Irongate Wharf , in the parish of St. Mary, Paddington. On the 2d of October, about five minutes after eight o'clock in the evening, I found master's shop-door a little way open, and the lock a little way off - I put my hand to it; the prisoner opened it, and came out of the shop - I knew him before; he had no business on master's premises - he had got nothing: I asked what he did there, and went to lay hold of him; he said he only went in to lay down - he ran away; it is a wheeler's shop - he never worked for master; I ran after him about one hundred yards, crying Stop thief! and a man stopped him in the street - he was brought back: I searched, and found my two boxes turned out, my hat put on the bed, and the articles stated in the indictment tied in a bundle handkerchief, which was not mine, ready to be carried away; I had seen them all safe in my boxes the day before, in my bed-room; the property is all mine, and is worth 3l. 9s. 6d.; the shop door was padlocked - I found the padlock off, and laid in the shop; I had seen it all secure an hour before - I had fastened it all up safe and tried it; it did not appear to have been broken; my master lived in Kent-place - I am his regular servant, and sleep in this house as his servant.(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCIS BRADBURY . I am a watchman, and took the prisoner in charge; he was without a hat or handkerchief, and said he had left them behind him in the place; I found a hat there, and he claimed the handkerchief the bundle was tied in.

Prisoner's Defence. It was half-past seven o'clock when I went in, and not half-past eight.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18271025-25

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2005. JOHN EVERETT was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Thomas Ross .

JAMES DONNELLY . I am a prisoner, confined in Clerkenwell - my sentence of imprisonment expires on the 30th of November. On the 24th of July , Ross and the prisoner, who were also confined there, were on the tread-wheel - I was at work at the same wheel as Ross; it was his duty to count the tallies - I was the next man to him - the prisoner was at work at the next wheel; Ross was supposed by the prisoner to call the tallies wrong - Ross said he was a liar, he did no such thing; Everett said, "You did;" - Ross, in reply, called him a lying Irish b-r; Everett said he could not prove that of him; Ross said, "I can." Everett immediately jumped off the wheel, and Ross, who was on the stage, struck him in the face - I am sure Ross gave the first blow; Everett, in return, struck Ross in his left eye and in the throat - those were the only blows that passed; Ross and Everett went and sat on their different forms - no more fighting took place; in five or ten minutes, Ross kept rubbing his eye with his shirt sleeve, and complained very much of his head - he died on the 26th of the month; there was no previous quarrel - the prisoner was not a quarrelsome man.

MR. THOMAS WEBBE . I am surgeon of Clerkenwell Prison . On the 25th Ross came to me with a black eye, and complained that he had had a fall; I said I was certain that black eye did not arise from a fall, but that he had had a severe blow on it, and I had no doubt had been fighting; I examined his eye, and ordered him into the infirmary; he made no further complaint, and on Friday morning I found he was dead - I examined him with Mr. Hunter.

RICHARD HUNTER . I am a surgeon, and attended with Mr. Webbe at the examination of the deceased, and under the membrane covering the brain, I found about two ounces of coagulated blood, which was produced by a rupture of an artery; it was most certainly occasioned by a blow on the temple, and I have no doubt was the cause of his death.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-26

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2006. MARY HAROLD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wooster , on the 2d of October , and stealing 1 bonnet, value 5s., and 1 shawl, value 3s., the goods of Martha Wainwright .

MARTHA WAINWRIGHT. I am single , and live at Thomas Wooster's, in Warwick-place, White-cross-street, St. Lukes ; he is a costermonger . On the 2d of October I went with him and his wife to Croydon fair - I saw him fasten the door; he put his hand through the window, and fastened the bolt; any body outside could push it back - I left my bonnet and shawl in a box under the bed; we lived in an adjoining room; we returned from the fair together on the Friday following - I found the door had been unfastened, but fastened again; it was bolted as we had left it, but must have been opened, as the bonnet and shawl were gone; the prisoner lived in the same court - I have since seen my bonnet in Cochran's possession(looking at it); this is it - I bought it last Whitsuntide, but had only worn it half a dozen times; the ribbon which is now on it is not mine; this strange bonnet was left in the room.

ELIZABETH WOOSTER . I am the wife of Thomas Wooster; we went to the fair with Wainwright - I saw my husband fasten the door; when we returned it appeared the same as we had left it, but the bonnet and shawl were gone.

MARGARET COCHRAN . I am married, and live in Brackley-street. On the 2d of October, I met the prisoner; she said she was locked out, and asked where she could leave this bonnet to pay for her lodging till the next morning - I gave the bonnet to Mrs. Collet for a lodging for her.

SUSANNAH COLLET . Cochran delivered me this bonnet, on the 2d of October. I kept it in my possession till Bridges, the officer, came, and then gave it to him.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I received the bonnet from Collet.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutrix had lent her a bonnet, which being very old, she had exchanged this one for, and that Cochran had persuaded her to borrow 1s. upon it, and she intended to return it. She received a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-27

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2007. CHARLES SAGO was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Chorley , on the 17th of October , at St. George, and stealing 2 waistcoats, value 3s., and 1 gown, value 2s., his property .

MARY CHORLEY . I am the wife of James Chorley; we live at No. 8, Chaple-street, in the parish of St. George in the East ; my husband is at sea ; he rents the whole house - I occupy it for him. On Wednesday evening, the 17th of October, about half-past eight o'clock, I was at my sister's house - she lives just round the corner - I left nobody in my house - I had the key with me, and am sure I fastened it up in every place - I returned at half-past eight o'clock; I found it still fastened; it appeared as I had left it when I went out, which was about four in the afternoon, but I had been home to fasten it up at six o'clock; every thing was then safe; before I got home somebody had been to my sister's, and told me thieves were in the house - I went to the back of the house, and saw the shadow of two men up in the bed-room, with a candle lighted - I went to the front of the house, and saw the prisoner in custody of several persons - I saw him throw a black waistcoat out of his hand - I picked it up - it was my husband's - I have it here; he was taken to the watch-house - I followed him there, and saw a light waistcoat produced, that was my husband's - a gown of mine was shown to me before I got to the watch-house - I found a tobacco pipe left in my room, some matches on the carpet, and a candle on the chair - I had not left them there.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me in the place? A. I cannot swear he is the man I saw the shadow of - he is the man I found in custody - I saw him throw the black waistcoat away.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am chief constable of Lambeth-street. This parish is often called St. George in the East, but I believe the proper name to be St. George Middlesex.

WILLIAM HAGERTY . I am a labouring man. On the night in question, about eight o'clock, I went to the door of this house, and the prisoner came out from inside the house, with a lighted candle in his hand; not a word passed between us; he blew the candle out; a short man came out of the door first; the prisoner then came out; I followed, and took him eight yards from the door, with the property about him; I held him till the watchman came up, and gave him in charge of Thomas Pope.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me come out of the house? A. I am quite positive of it.

THOMAS POPE . I went up at the time in question, and found the prisoner in Hagerty's custody; he delivered him to me; his hat fell off, or was knocked off; I took a waistcoat out of it, which I gave to Cartwright.

THOMAS LANGHELT . I am a watchman. I was on duty on the night in question; I went up after Pope, hearing a cry, and took the prisoner to the watch-house; as I returned from the watch-house, the same way we had gone, I kicked against a gown, which I took up and delivered to Cartwright.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am a constable of the night: the two witnesses brought the prisoner to the watch-house; Pope delivered me this waistcoat, Langhelt delivered me a gown, and this other waistcoat was delivered by some other person; I found two knives on him.

MARY CHORLEY. I know this gown to be mine by a join in the band; this black waistcoat I picked up myself; I saw him throw it away; both the waistcoats are my husband's; I had not left a candle in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Blackwall, on board the Aurora; I was going as cook and steward on board of her. On going by the prosecutrix's door, there was a cry of Stop thief! that gentleman caught hold of me, and he took me to the watch-house; I had bought a new knife, and had another ready for the voyage. I have two written characters here from my last ship; the captains I have sailed with are not in town - the witnesses took nothing out of my hat.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18271025-28

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2008. SAMUEL THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , at St. Mary-le-bone, 1 coat, value 4l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 16s.; 1 handkerchief, value 5s., and 1 shirt, value 10s., the goods of John Pryse , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. JOHN PRYSE. I am an artist , and live at No. 12, Wellington-road, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . I was in bad health, and the prisoner was employed to help dress and undress me ; on the 6th of October, in the evening, my coat, waistcoat, handkerchief, and shirt were in a cupboard in my painting room; I locked them in the cupboard that night; the prisoner was in the room with me, and slept in the same room with me; I got up about ten minutes after eight o'clock, and expected him to dress me; I called him, and found he was gone; I immediately missed these articles, which he had taken off me the night before; my back door and the door leading to the gate were open, and the keys left in them; I had locked them the night before myself, and put the key on the dressing-room table; I did not see him again till about three weeks afterwards, when he was in custody.

ELIZABETH LIDYARD . I live with my parents, in High-street, Portland-town. I have known the prisoner about a fortnight - I only knew him as Mr. Pryse's servant; Mr. Pryse dealt with my father; I saw him on a Saturday, about a fortnight ago - it was the 6th of October; he was in Park-road, coming towards the New-road, with a bundle on his head, tied in some patch-work - it was about the size of these things - I am posititive he is the man.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the 6th of October Mr. Pryse applied to me; I afterwards found the prisoner in custody of a watchman, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I own I ran away from the prosecutor, but never saw the things.

MR. PRYSE. I believe he was a very forlorn creature - his mother turned him out of doors.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18271025-29

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2009. GEORGE ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , at St. Margaret, Westminster, 8 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the monies of Charles Holloway , in the dwelling-house of William Angus .

CHARLES HOLLOWAY. I am a jobbing coach-maker's labourer . On the 15th of October I was at work on the premises of William Angus, at Fulham-bridge, Lambeth, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster ; at a quarter before five o'clock, I got my tea, and afterwards took off my coat, and hung it on a peg in the shop; there were eight sovereigns and a half in the pocket, wrapped in two pieces of paper; the prisoner was employed to look after the horse and gig and do odd jobs about the shop; I went to my coat about twenty minutes to eight o'clock, as I saw it was off the peg and thrown on the ground: it could not have fallen by accident, as I had hooked it on tight; I took it up, felt in the pocket, and all the money was gone, and the outer paper which it was wrapped in laid by the side of it; I had produced my money in the prisoner's presence on the Saturday night, at the Fulham Bridge public-house - I pulled it out of my coat pocket, and put a single sovereign in the paper; he saw me do it, and said, "You have got plenty of sovereigns;" I said, "Yes; it is not mine longer than Monday evening, for I am going to pay my landlord the rent:" he saw me return them to my coat pocket, and it was on Monday I lost them; I saw the prisoner that day, within eight yards of where the coat hung.

Prisoner. Q. Did any body besides me see your money? A. I had shown it to nobody but him; some persons were standing at the bar, but nobody saw it but him - I stood at the corner of the bar, and he was near me; some of the persons were employed at Angus', and two of them were employed in an interior part of the building on the Monday, fifty or sixty yards from where the coat hung.

Q. Were there not ten or twenty men working within ten

yards of your coat? A. No, there were not; I am certain nobody but the prisoner knew I carried the money about me.

WILLIAM WOODBERY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the day after this Monday; I went with Holloway, and found him coming out of Angus' shop- I told him he was suspected of taking Holloway's money; he said he knew nothing about it: I took him into a private room of the Fulham Bridge public-house - I searched him, and found 3s. 6d. in silver and 71/2d. in copper: I then said to him, "Has your wife any money at home?" he said she might have 1s. or 2s. unknown to him; I asked what he received for wages on Saturday night - he said 17s.; I asked what he gave his wife on Saturday night - he said he gave her nothing on Saturday night, but gave her 2s. or 3s. of it on Sunday morning; I said I must lock him up while I went to his wife - he said he was very willing: I put him in the watch-house, and went to his house - his wife was not at home: I was directed to where she was; I went to the place, but she was not there - I waited till she came back; I asked her if she had any money, and went with her to the prisoner's lodgings (I knew she was his wife, and that it was his lodging) - and in a mug over the dresser were 10s. in silver; on searching further, there was a paper with a quarter of a pound of moist sugar - I was going to lay hold of it, but his wife laid hold of it, unfolded it, and gave me this piece of paper; I opened it, and found five sovereigns - I looked round on the floor, and saw a quantity of things rolled up in the form in which pawnbrokers roll them - they appeared to have been recently redeemed; there was a hat-box, and some things in it - I do not know their value; I found 6s. 9d. on the wife's person - the prisoner had told me there was no money at home, except his wife might have a few shillings unknown to him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I tell you there was or was not money at home? A. He said his wife might have a shilling or two unknown to him.

Q. Did you find the sovereigns in a box, or in the sugar-paper? A. On the sugar.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Monday morning I went to work as usual; I had not been at work above half an hour, before the prosecutor came, and said, "How are you?" he said, "Shall we go and have something to drink?" we went and had a pint of half and half - he said to the woman,"Put this up to me." He went out again, and had some rum and milk, then went to breakfast, and after breakfast there was some half and half had - and after dinner there were two gallons of beer, which was placed to his account; we went to tea, and remained at work till seven o'clock in the evening: there were six smiths, four wheelwrights, and three coach-body makers at work in the upper shop; we left about seven in the evening, leaving the prosecutor and another man in the shop - we went into the public-house; this man came in, and called a man out; we remained there an hour, and then went home: I went to work, as usual, on Tuesday morning till one o'clock, when this man came and said he wanted me; I told him what money I had - he searched me, and said, "Have you any money at home?" -"Yes," said I: he said, "Where is your wife?" - I said,"I don't know; she was at home at breakfast - I am going to dinner, and expect to find her at home:" he said, "Have you any money at home?" - I said, "Yes; if I had not, how could I keep myself in the winter when I am out of work:" I told him a man had paid me 8l. 17s. - he locked me up, and went to Pimlico: I was taken to Queen-square, and remanded till Friday; I was brought into Court, and the Magistrate asked how I came by the sovereigns; I told him I had been in the habit of earning 30s. a week in the summer, and had put this by, except what had been paid me by a man at Pimlico, which had been 25l. at different times - Mr. Harmer has the receipt which was given for it.

WILLIAM WOODBERY. He said he had no money, except his wife might have a trifle - he said nothing of having received 8l. odd.

CHARLES HOLLOWAY . His wages were 18s. a week; that was all his means - he did not board with master.

LAURENCE EASTENCE . I live at No. 15, Arlington-street, Pimlico, and am a house-painter. I received 25l. for the prisoner more than twelve months ago, and used it in my business - I have paid him the whole at different times; I sometimes paid him 3l. or 4l., and sometimes 10s., just as I could; the largest sum I ever paid him was 4l. 11s. or 12s., that was since the 7th of August last; since that he has received 8l. from me - the last payment was on the 9th of October; it was paid at my house, to his wife - it was paid in cash, whether in silver or gold I cannot say, for it was given by my wife - I ordered her to pay it.

Q. Did you give it to her in gold or bank notes? A. It was not in notes; whether there was a half-sovereign, or it was all silver, I cannot tell; when I made the last payment, I took a receipt in full of all demands, which I gave to my daughter within the last five days, and I believe it is in Mr. Harmer's possession.

Q. When was the receipt given? A. On the 9th - I wrote it, and the prisoner signed it; I heard of the prisoner being taken the day after - I knew he was remanded for further examination - I did not attend before the Justice, to prove I had made him the payment - I did not think it my duty to attend to other people's business.

Q. Then a friend lent you money in distress, and you did not think it your duty to attend for him when charged with a capital offence? A. No.

Prisoner. I told the Magistrate I received the 25l.; he said if I could bring the man forward, it would be a great thing on my side.

COURT. We have before us an account of what you said to the Magistrate; do you wish it to be stated.

Prisoner. No, my Lord.

The prisoner afterwards desired this statement should be read. It was as follows: - The prisoner says, "I have nothing to say- I never meddled with his money, I have worked hard for the money the officer found - it is part of 25l. which I received from a friend."

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18271025-30

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2010. BENJAMIN BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 2 sovereigns, the monies of Joseph Clark , from his person .

JOSEPH CLARK. I live in Round-court, Strand, and am a coal-heaver . On Saturday, the 20th of October, at half-past five o'clock, I was at the Ship and Shovel public-house, in St. Martin's parish , with Pope and Wells - the prisoner was pot-boy at the house; I gave him two sovereigns to go to the bar to get change, to divide among us - it was our wages; he left the room: I waited a quarter of an hour, but

he did not return; there was a person named Newman with him; I saw them speaking together before I gave the money - Newman was pot-boy at another house; he did not remain after I gave Barker the money: I went in pursuit of the prisoner till half-past eleven o'clock, and found him in custody at Mary-le-bone Office on Monday morning.

CHARLES POPE . I was at this house on Saturday night. I saw Clark give the prisoner two sovereigns to get change - I found him on Sunday morning, at a gin-shop in Barrett's-court, Wigmore-street, with Newman, and three or four girls, about half-past eight o'clock - I collared him, and asked what he had done with the two sovereigns; he said he had spent them.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was intoxicated on the night in question, and next morning found himself in this public-house; he was going to return when he was apprehended, and that he supposed some women must have robbed him of the money.

JOSEPH CLARK. He was quite sober.

CHARLES POPE. He was sober that night, and so he was when I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-31

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2011. WILLIAM WHEELHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 shawl, value 2s.; 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of John Turpin , from the person of Mary Ann, his wife .

MARY ANN TURPIN . I am the wife of John Turpin; I had been in the workhouse for about a month; I had leave to go out for a day, on a Saturday - we are allowed to stop out all night, at a friend's house, if we like; I did not return in time to be let in, and between six and seven o'clock in the morning I was by a gin-shop in Shoreditch , just by Worship-street; I met the prisoner - he asked me to treat him with something - I have known him for two years; I did not treat him, but went on. I met Catherine Solesbridge - I took her to a public-house, and gave her 1d. worth of beer; the prisoner came in, and said I was spending all my money upon that Kit, and swore he would beat her; I said, "Don't beat her - I will give you 1d. worth of gin;" he said he would have 11/2d. worth, and I gave it him; I took out 1s. 6d. for the landlady's daughter to give me change, and he snatched it out of my hand; about an hour afterwards, as I stood in the yard of the house, he took my shawl off my arm; I ran out after him, but he got away, and I have not seen it since.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give you 6d. back, and say,"You are the worse for the liquor, and you shan't have the rest till the afternoon?" A. He did give me 6d. back.

CATHERINE SOLESBRIDGE. The prosecutrix was treating me about half-past seven o'clock; I saw the prisoner take 1s. 6d. out of her hand; she had a light shawl on - she followed him into the tap-room. I afterwards saw her without the shawl; he returned her 6d., and said he should keep the shilling till he thought proper to give it her - she was sober.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner - I asked him for the shawl, and he said he had not got it.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix is out of her mind; she was three months confined for cutting her throat - there is the mark round her neck now. I took the money because she was drunk, and said the shilling would do her more good in the afternoon. I went into the house afterwards; she came and said, "Where is my shawl?" I said I had not got it; the landlord and his daughter said, "We can clear Wheelhouse, for you was in the yard with four men."

GEORGE TWITCH . I am a brush-maker, and live in Sun-court, Grub-street. I met the prosecutrix in Worship-street, and asked what she did there; she said Mr. Wheelhouse was there, for he had a shawl of hers and a shilling, but said she, "I only want 3s. 6d., then I shall have nothing to do with it, for I was drunk;" I went, as a man would do for any poor unfortunate man, and found his son, who lives in Rose-alley - I got the 3s. 6d., and gave it to her - I understand she did not appear at the Justice-room that evening; she received the 3s. 6d. not to prosecute. I never saw the shawl - she was perfectly satisfied till Walton thought proper so fetch her to the office again; she is one of the most despicable characters that ever breathed. I was not acquainted with her.

CHARLES ANNEY . I was at the public-house, and saw the prisoner and the prosecutrix drinking together; I saw him go home to dinner, and saw that the prosecutrix had her shawl on then.

JAMES SHUTWELL . About one o'clock on Sunday I saw the prosecutrix, intoxicated, by the dust-hole in the public-house yard; I lodge there. The prisoner was in the passage; the prosecutrix asked me where she could pledge her shawl - I said I did not know. I and the prisoner went home; I went to my mother's to dinner, and left the prisoner at the corner of the street; he said he was going home to dine with his children.

MARY ANN TURPIN. I know these witnesses; they are all bad men who frequent the house; what they have said, I declare, before God and man, is lies. I never wanted to pledge the shawl; I was as sober as I am now. Why should I pledge the shawl when I had 1s. 6d.?

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-32

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2012. THOMAS BAYSE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , at St. John, at Hampstead , 15 spoons, value 15l.; 4 forks, value 3l.; 2 ladles, value 30s.; and 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s., the goods of Andrew Robertson , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH VAUGHAN . I am servant to Mr. Andrew Robertson, of Hampstead. On the 4th of October, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I went up stairs, leaving a pair of silver sugar-tongs, a tea-spoon, and desert-spoon, on the kitchen-dresser; the rest of the plate was in a basket, which stood by the corner of the dresser; there was a dozen silver forks, a dozen table-spoons, ten desert, and two gravy-spoons, all silver; there is a door leading from the garden into the back kitchen. I came down, and on opening the back kitchen door, to go into the garden to shake the carpets, I saw a roll of pencils; I picked them up, and on going up the steps I saw the plate-basket, which I had left in the kitchen, standing on the steps, and the plate stated in the indictment was gone - the back door was only latched - the back and front garden are one; there is an area behind the street door. -

I found all the plate at the Mansion House on the 9th of October.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long before you went up stairs had you counted the plate? A. I counted it the last thing the night before - I took it up stairs with me, and brought it down in the morning, but did not again count it; I had been up stairs about a quarter of an hour. I was the only servant in the house; the family were in town; my brother called on me last Sunday - that is the only friend I have had there. Any one acquainted with the house might have come in - I never saw the prisoner till he was in custody.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On Thursday, the 4th of October, about one o'clock in the day, I was coming out of Petticoat-lane, towards Bishopsgate-street, and saw the prisoner and another person on the opposite side - the prisoner crossed, and turned into a public-house - I laid hold of the other man at the door of the public-house, and gave him in charge; I then went through the public-house into a back wash-house, and found the prisoner coming out of the wash-house door; I said, "What have you got about you?" I opened his waistcoat, and the handle of the gravy-spoon was in his fob, with the bowl up, between his waistcoat and shirt, and on looking round, on a heap of saw-dust in the wash-house, I found this bundle, containing the rest of the plate; he at first denied all knowledge of the bundle, but afterwards said he picked it up in Old-street-road.

Cross-examined. Q. The other man is not in custody? A. No - the Magistrate discharged him; I am sure he did not at first say he had found it.

Q. It would be very foolish to expose plate in Petticoat-lane, would it not? A. I should think so.

MR. ANDREW ROBERTSON. I live at Downshire-hill ; I do not know the name of the parish. I know this plate to be mine - it is worth more than 5l.

Cross-examined. Q. Has there been any attempt to erase the marks? A. No - the ladles never were marked.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Old-street-road about half-past twelve o'clock; I had occasion to go into a building, and picked up this property.

GUILTY. Aged 25. Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-33

2013. HENRY MILES and WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Took , from his person .

JAMES TOOK. I am servant to Mr. Clutterbuck. On the 7th of October I was following the soldiers in St. James' Park ; Morgan spoke to me - I did not understand him, and walked on; I afterwards found I had lost my handkerchief, which was safe just before I got to the Palace. I afterwards received information, and found it at Bow-street; I had not observed the prisoner near me.

PHILIP PARISH . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in the Park on the 7th of October, noticing the persons following the soldiers. I saw the prisoner Miles press close against Took, and Wilson pressed close to him; I saw Miles take a handkerchief out of Took's pocket, and hand it to Wilson, who put it into his breeches pocket; I seized him, took it out of his pocket, and Morgan secured Miles, without his getting out of my sight.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MILES' Defence. I was following the band - a parcel of boys were running; they said some boys were taken for picking pockets. I went to look at them, and the officer said it was me - I never saw the handkerchief.

WILSON'S Defence. I went to see the band, and picked a handkerchief up off the ground.

PHILIP PARISH. I had been watching them for five minutes, suspecting them - I cannot be mistaken.

MILES - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-34

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2014. JOSEPH PEARKES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 40 shillings, the monies of George Esdaile , from the person of Thomas Ferguson .

THOMAS FERGUSON. I am in the service of George Esdaile - he is a baker . On the 6th of October, at ten minutes past seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of New-street-mews, Mary-le-bone - he walked to and fro, opposite master's house; I went out to get some short bread, and as I returned I met him coming out of the shop door; when I got in master sent me with 2l. worth of silver, in a paper bag, to Mr. Brooks', in Alsop's-place, to give them change for two sovereigns; when I got there the prisoner stood at the gate, and said,"You have brought the silver for Mr. Brooks, the cowkeeper - you can give it me, and I will bring you the two sovereigns." I did not give it to him, but took it down to the house door; he went with me, and wanted me to give it to him there again; I could hardly get it out of my pocket with one hand; he put his hand and took it from me - he went round to the back of the house, saying he would go round to the kitchen door - he came back, and said he was going to bolt the gate, and they would bring me the two sovereigns; he went towards the gate, and then began to run; I ran after him, hallooing Stop thief! he was stopped at the corner of Northumberland-street.

GEORGE ESDAILE. I sent Ferguson on an errand, and while he was gone the prisoner came in, and said, could I give Mr. Brooks, the cow-keeper, change for two sovereigns; while I was counting it he said I must send it round directly, as he had not got the sovereigns; the boy came in, and I sent him with the money.

BENJAMIN BROOKS . I am a cow-keeper. The prisoner had been carter to one of my sons, and frequently came to my premises - he had left my son about five months. I never sent him to procure silver for me; there is no other cow-keeper of my name.

WILLIAM BRADFORD . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner, who was running before the rest. I found 40s. in silver on him, in a paper bag.

GEORGE ESDAILE. This is my bag.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy gave me the money - I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271025-35

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2015. ELIZA BLATCHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 3 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 2 half-handkerchiefs, value 1s., and 1 waistcoat, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Wilcox Fairlam .

RICHARD WILCOX FAIRLAM. I am a pawnbroker , and live at Lisson-grove . On the 22d of September, about half-past ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop as a customer; she stood near the window in which there were some handkerchiefs; in consequence of what a customer said, I looked and missed some handkerchiefs; she held her apron up, as if something was in it - I said"You have taken some handkerchiefs from the window;" she did not reply, but threw part of them behind her - I came from behind the counter to speak to her - I took up some handkerchiefs, and on missing a pink one, I said,"You have taken more;" she directly threw that one down, and a waistcoat, which I had not missed; it was in the same window - I put them there about four o'clock, and believe I had been out since that; she begged of me not to send for an officer, and while the boy was gone for one, she ran out of the shop - I found her in custody in two or three minutes.

HENRY COOPER . I am beadle. A boy fetched me - I met the prisoner running towards me, and took her about eighty yards from the shop - I asked what could possess her to do such a thing; she said, "Oh Sir, I did not mean to do it;" she said she went in with a young man to pawn a handkerchief, and picked them up on the floor.

RICHARD WILCOX FAIRLAM. I saw a young man who went out of the shop, give her a black handkerchief; she might have picked them off the floor, but they could not have fallen out of the window, because they were in a glass-case.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-36

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2016. THOMAS BLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 half-sovereign; 6 shillings, and 8 pence , the monies of Thomas Collier .

SARAH COLLIER . I am the wife of Thomas Collier; we live in Green-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 22d of September, the prisoner came and asked if I could tell him of a situation, as he was in much distress - I did not know him before - I said I did not know of one, but if business improved, I should want a lad of his description myself, and would take him, but I would employ him to deliver some bills, that afternoon, if he could stop; he did so, and I gave him 1s., telling him to come next morning and fetch my load from Covent-garden-market - I am a green grocer; he came and continued with me till five o'clock in the afternoon; he breakfasted and dined at my house - I agreed to give him 4d. for fetching the load - he asked if I could spare him for half an hour, as he knew some of the Marquis of Anglesea 's servants, and thought he could get me their custom; he returned, and ordered about 3s. 4d. worth of fruit for the Marquis, which I was to send, with change for a sovereign - I sent the fruit by him, with half a sovereign, and 6s. 8d. - he never returned, but was apprehended in Silver-street, Golden-square, in about two hours; he said at the watch-house, that I need not have been so hasty, for he had got my money, and was going to bring it to me - 8s. 21/2d. was found on him, but no half sovereign, nor the fruit.

ELIZABETH GILL . I live at the Marquis of Anglesea's. My husband is porter there - I never saw the prisoner there; we never ordered fruit, or any thing of him - I attended the door all day; the Marquis was out of town.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge, at the watch-house, in Vine-street, Piccadilly - I asked him where the sovereign was; he said he had left it at home at his mother's, as he had a hole in his pocket, and was afraid of losing it - I said, that was not true; he persisted in saying he had left the fruit at the Marquis', till a messenger, whom I had sent, returned from there - I found 8s. 21/2d. on him; he then acknowledged that he had not been to the Marquis', but had eaten part of the fruit, and given the rest away; he said he had spent the money, and was sorry for it, and hoped he should be forgiven.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-37

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

2017. JAMES CHORD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 ream of writing paper, value 10s. , the goods of William Venables , and another.

WILLIAM RATTEY . I am in the service of Mr. Aldermen William Venables, who has a partner; they are paper manufacturers . Yesterday evening I was driving the waggon in Camomile-street ; it contained different reams of paper - I stopped the horses - as I turned my head, I saw a man's head above the rail of the waggon - I went to the tail of the waggon, and found the prisoner getting out over the tail - I laid hold of him, and he had a ream of paper in his hand - I collared and held him fast, till I got him into a shop, and gave him in charge; he had a ream of quarto post, worth 13s.; he was a stranger; he said nothing; two other persons endeavoured to get him away - they were between the hind wheel of the waggon and the wall, when I first seized him; they endeavoured to prevent my getting hold of him; they dragged me to the other side of the road, but I kept hold of him; he dropped the paper the moment I collared him - I picked it up, and missed a ream from the waggon.

Prisoner. He never saw me near the waggon. Witness. I laid hold of him coming out of the waggon with it in his hand.

WILLIAM WORCESTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, after he was secured.

Prisoner. I am innocent - I work hard for my living; I worked two years for Mr. Smart, who used to live in Basinghall-street.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-38

2018. THOMAS SLADE was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE COUTTS . I am a baker , and live in Warwick-lane . The prisoner was in my service, and intrusted to receive money for me - Mr. Wilson owed me 6s. 91/2d., and generally paid weekly; the prisoner called there daily with bread; he has never paid me this money; he had 7s. a week, with board and lodging - I had him apprehended, in consequence of suspicion.

EDWARD WEST . I am servant to Mr. Wilson , who is a cutler, and deals with Coutts. On the 28th of September I paid the prisoner 6s. 91/2d. - I always paid him; he had lived there for three quarters of a year; he wrote "Paid" on the bill, which has been mislaid in the indictment office.

MR. COUTTS. He has lived about ten months with me.

Prisoner. I received the money, and spent it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-39

2019. THOMAS DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 key, value 2s., the goods of Charles Thomas Harwood , from his person .

CHARLES THOMAS HARWOOD. I am a wine-cooper , and live in Blossom-terrace, Elder-street, near Spital-square. On the 23d of October, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, I was going towards Long-lane, from St. John-street - I felt my watch safe in my fob just at Smithfield-bars ; the prisoner came behind me, threw his arm round my neck, pinioned my arms, and drew my watch from my fob; he instantly ran off; he was the only person near me - I turned round, and saw no other person near me - I instantly pursued - I received a blow from some other person, at the back of my neck - I still kept sight of him, and pursued him - I think I did not lose sight of him before he was stopped, but the blow staggered me, and other people who came running, might have obstructed my view; he ran as far as Cow-cross, where he was taken, and dropped the watch - I described it before I saw it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you say at the watch-house that you had been struck? A. I did not - I was not at all intoxicated - I had taken part of two glasses of gin and water with a friend - I knew perfectly well what I was about; the blow produced a degree of confusion about me.

DAVID EVANS . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre. At ten minutes before twelve o'clock, as I stood by the Bull's Head public-house, near Smithfield-bars, I heard a cry of Watch! - I saw the prisoner running towards me, from Long-lane; he was the only person running - I waited for him to come to the corner, and crossed the bars to pursue him; he crossed over, and ran faster than before - I followed him, but saw he was gaining ground, and I sprang my rattle - I saw two patrols by Cow-cross-street, who stopped him; he is the very person - I saw the prosecutor in three or four minutes; when I collared him the patrols wanted to take him to their watch-house - I said No, he was my prisoner - I heard the case of the watch drop from him - I could not pick it up immediately - Cummings, the patrol, picked it up - I took him to our watch-house, and three or four yards from where I took him, I heard him drop something, which turned out to be a watch - I did not pick it up, nor see it picked up; the watch and case were produced at the watch-house; the prosecutor said, "That is the man who took my watch, I will swear to him;" he described the watch before he saw it; it corresponded with his description; he seemed to have been stunned, but was quite sober.

Prisoner. Q. Did he say at the watch-house that he had been struck? A. He mentioned that he had received a blow at the back of the neck.

JOSEPH PRICE . I am a patrol. My beat is at the end of Cow-cross - I was waiting in the watch-house, to go on duty, at twelve o'clock - I heard a rattle spring, went out towards the spot, and saw the prisoner running from Smithfield, towards Cow-cross, alone; the watchman was pursuing him - I came up with my partners, who stopped him - I thought I heard something fall on the ground, close to him - I had hold of him at the time - I stopped and picked up the watch, without the case, about a foot from him; the seal, chain, and key were attached to it - I took it to the watch-house; the prosecutor described it before he saw it.

JOHN CUMMINGS . I am a patrol. On Tuesday night I heard the rattle, and ran out of the watch-house - I saw the prisoner running in a direction from Smithfield, towards Cow-cross - Price ran to stop him; the prisoner knocked him backwards; he got hold of him, and they swung round together - I collared him, went part of the way to the watch-house with him, and as I returned, I picked up a silver watch-case, very near to where he was laid hold of, on the spot where he tried to get from the patrol - Harwood appeared to give a very correct account of it.

SAMUEL HOPSON . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought in, and the watch and case produced- the prosecutor did not appear insensible, but was under the effects of liquor - I did not hear him say he had received a blow - I noticed a mark of dust on his neck, and asked if he had been struck; he said No, it was only the dust of the cellar where he had been gauging liquor; he said the watchmaker's name was Lormier, but on opening it, the name of Edwards was in it; he afterwards produced a bill of it, as bought of Edwards late Lormier; the watch was bruised by the fall, and the glass broken.

CHARLES THOMAS HARWOOD. The watch and case are mine, and are what I was robbed of - I said the name was Lormier, but immediately said I recollected that it was Edwards.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-40

2020. JANE ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 lace veil, value 18s., and 2 shawls, value 3l. 8s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

JAMES REYNOLDS . I am shopman to Thomas Hall, a linen-draper , of Bishopsgate-street . On the 26th of September, about half-past twelve o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; she asked for some shawls to show Mrs. Stott, whom she said was her mistress; I knew Mrs. Stott lived opposite, and gave her two, to take over to show her, as one of our young men knew she had lived with Mrs. Stott; I did not feel exactly satisfied, and went to our door; I saw she passed Mrs. Stott's; I fetched her back, and gave her in charge: I gave them to her for the sole purpose of showing Mrs. Stott; we did not debit Mrs. Stott for them, not knowing whether she approved of them.

JEMIMA STOTT . I live nearly opposite Mr. Hall, and dealt with him; the prisoner lived four months with me, and left in July; I did not see her afterwards till inquiry was made about these shawls - I never sent her for them.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable, and took her in charge; she said she was sorry for what she had done.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-41

2021. ANN HUMPHRIES and ELIZA DENT were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 chain, value 6d.; one key, value 1d.; 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of Robert Pittman , from his person .

ROBERT PITTMAN. I am a labourer , and live at Barkingside, Essex. I have been in the army, and came to town on the 6th of October, to receive my pension; I am a stranger in town: I saw Humphries just by St. Pauls, and went to a liquor shop with her; we had a quartern of gin between us; we went into a linen-draper's shop in Fleet street , I believe, to buy a handkerchief, and as I was talking to the gentleman about the handkerchief, he said, "Does that woman belong to you?" I said No; he said, "She has just drawn the watch out of your fob;" she had just got it out of doors; I went out, and took her ten or a dozen yards off; the officers came and took charge of her; I had been drinking with a friend; I know nothing of Dent.

CHARLES TIDMUS . I am a silk-mercer, and live in Cheapside; the prosecutor came into my shop with Humphries; he was very much intoxicated, and asked for a handkerchief; he chose one, which came to 3s. 6d.; I cut it off, and then they made some scruple about the price; both said they would not give more than 2s. 6d.; I said I should not take less - they were both intoxicated, but the man was most so; I went to the end of the counter for some paper to wrap it in, and thought she was taking my handkerchiefs; I found his watch was gone; she immediately went out; Dent was outside the window - I saw Humphries give her the watch - she put it into her pocket, and Humphries returned into the shop; I had seen Dent standing outside, but did not particularly notice her - I did not see her come to the door with them; the prosecutor had not sufficient money to pay for the handkerchief; I insisted on his leaving; I asked if the woman belonged to him, and said, "I suppose you are aware she had taken your watch, and delivered it to the other one outside;" he began to swear; I could not leave the shop, but went to the door, and called Dent three times; she declared she had not got the watch; Humphries said, "Come, we will go to the public-house where we were before," and they went away.

WILLIAM STOWELL . I am a porter to the Salters' Company. I was coming down Cheapside, and saw a number of persons round Mr. Tidmus' door; Dent and the prosecutor were standing on the step, and Humphries seemed angry with Dent; they walked down Cheapside, and turned down Friday-street; Humphries followed behind, and put her hand into Dent's pocket, took something out, and put it into her bosom; she turned out of the street, and went towards Bow-church; I went and asked the prosecutor if he had lost any thing; he said Yes; I said, "The person who has left you has got it;" he followed and caught Humphries near Bread-street; I said, "You had better give the man his watch, you will only get into trouble:" she persisted in refusing; a mob came round, and she was taken into custody; I saw the watch found on her.

THOMAS TUNNELL . I am a constable, and received the prisoners in charge; I took the watch out of Humphries' bosom in Cheapside - she had part of the chain in her hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HUMPHRIES' Defence (written). I met the prosecutor; he asked me to have something to drink, and also to go and purchase a handkerchief; he borrowed 6d. of me; we were both in liquor, and I have no knowledge of what happened afterwards, and beg for mercy.

HUMPHRIES - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

DENT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-42

2022. EDWARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , 1 jacket, value 3s., the goods of Joseph Thomas Gomersall , his master; and 1 coat, value 20s., the goods of William James Cockerell ; and 1 flute, value 5l , the goods of James Sowell .

JOSEPH THOMAS GOMERSALL. I live in Burlington-arcade; the prisoner was employed by me to take care of a sailing boat , which I had on the river; it was kept at Arundel-stairs ; I saw the coat and flute safe in the boat about a fortnight before he was charged with this; he absconded, and duplicates of the property were brought to me.

JAMES SOWELL. I saw my flute safe in the boat, at Arundel-stairs, on the 3d of September, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; the prisoner was then in the boat: I found it at Guildhall last Wednesday week - it cost more than 5l.

SARAH KING . I live in Hanging-sword-alley, Water-lane. I have known the prisoner some time; he asked me to pledge this coat - I pawned it at Grey's, in Fleet-street, for 4s. on the 4th of September, and gave him the duplicate with the money.

WILLIAM WILCOX . I am servant to Mr. Grey; King pawned this coat in her own name.

HORATIO THOMAS WILLIAM ELLIS . I am shopman to Mr. Balfour, a pawnbroker. On the 5th of September this jacket and handkerchief were pawned; the person who took it in has left us.

JOHN FLOWER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoe-lane. On the 5th of September the prisoner pawned this flute.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WOODWARD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge on the 15th of October; I said I supposed he knew what I took him for; he said, "Oh, for the business of Mr. Gomersall's; if he had paid me what he owed me I should not have done it; he has got his duplicates, what more does he want?"

MR. GOMERSALL. He had been in my employ from the 9th of July - he had 4l. a year for taking care of the boat, and 5s. for every day he went out, which I always paid him at the time - he had no money due.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-43

2023. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 wooden tub, value 6d., and 30 lbs. of butter, value 15s. , the goods of Edmund Ronalds .

WILLIAM TURNER . I am carman to Edmund Ronalds, a wholesale cheesemonger , of Upper Thames-street . On the 10th of October we had just loaded the cart with

25 firkins of butter; an alarm was given that half a firkin was taken off; I immediately ran, and saw the prisoner about twenty yards from the cart with it - he threw it down as soon as I caught hold of him - he was alone.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-44

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2024. HARRIET HURRAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 2 sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, 1 Bank-note, for payment of and value 20l., and 1 Banknote, for payment of and value 5l., the property of Abraham Belasco , to whom she was a servant , in his dwelling-house ; and ELIZABETH WATTS and JOHN ROGERS were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

ABRAHAM BELASCO. I live at No. 17, Denmark-court, Strand ; I am a teacher of the art of self-defence ; Hurran had been about two months in my service; the prisoner Watts is her sister, and came to visit her about a quarter of an hour before the robbery; I know nothing of Rogers. On the 24th of September, about twelve o'clock at night, I put a pocket-book, containing all this property, between the sacking and clothes of my own bed; I went to bed then, and am sure it was secure; my wife got up at half-past nine o'clock to let Hurran into the room, to light the fire, as usual; my wife came to bed again, and we both went to sleep; I awoke at half-past ten o'clock, and found myself very cold, and on looking about, I found the window sash was open; we sleep on the ground floor; I called Hurran to shut the window, but received no answer - she was not in the room; I then thought I had been robbed- I opened my pocket-book, which still remained there - it was at the foot of the bed - any one could take it out; I opened it, and missed these notes and gold - the notes were taken from the middle of others which they were folded in, so that at first I did not miss them; Hurran had given us no notice that she was going; I immediately went to Watts' house, in Palace-street, Westminster; nobody was at home; I made inquiry, and saw Watts in the evening at her own house; she came home about eight o'clock- I said, "What have you done with your sister, and the money she has stolen?" she said she knew nothing about her, or the money; I sent for an officer, and in a small bundle, which she had in her hand, we found a pair of stockings and a new pair of boots, with three sovereigns in the toe of them; I asked how she came by that money; she said, "You can't swear to sovereigns;" I said, "But I can swear to one of the stockings, which the money is wrapped in, for here is the fellow to it;" she began to cry; I said if she would tell me where my property was I did not want to hurt her; I went next morning, with an officer, to No. 133, Bethnal-green, in consequence of what she said to me; it is a private house; Rogers lived there; I asked Rogers where my 20l. note was; I did not say who I was; he said he had changed it next door, at his cousin's; we went there, and found it - it was my 20l. note; I went down to Manningtree, in Essex, on the 26th, and found Hurran there; I got from her part of the change of the 20l. note; I had before that said if she would tell me every thing, I would forgive her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you besides a teacher of self-defence? A. I attend sales, and deal in jewellery or furniture, or any thing; I keep no shop or warehouse to deposit my things - I put them where I think proper; my wife hired Hurran as a servant, in my presence - she was to have wages; we did not ask her character, or where she came from.

Q. On your oath, do not ladies and gentlemen come to your house? A. Yes; I was never here before - I have once been in a Court of Justice for assaulting an officer.

Q. Now, I caution you, will you swear deliberately that you was never in a Court of Justice but once, and that was for assaulting an officer? A. Yes, I do; I swear it.

Q. Were you ever in a Court of Justice in Surrey? A. Yes; I was taken up in a waggon coming from the races with a party of six - a party of smashers; there was a parcel of bad money in the machine, and they called me a party concerned; I was tried and imprisoned twelve months, but I was innocent.

A JUROR. I will not take that man's word at all.

THOMAS GRIST . On the 24th of September, at seven o'clock in the evening, I was fetched to Watts' house - Belasco was there; when I asked where she bought these boots, she said she did not know - I found the name of Brown, Shoreditch, in them: I went the next day to Rogers, and asked if he knew any thing of the 20l. note which he had changed; he asked why I asked the question - I said a 20l. note had been lost, and I had come to make inquiry; he said, "I shall not satisfy you, unless I know who is to pay me for my trouble;" I said I was an officer; he then said, "I will go and show you where I changed, it at my cousin's:" I went to Mr. Monkton's, who said he had changed it for him, and given him 19l. 10s., and he was to have the rest that afternoon.

WILLIAM MONKTON . I am a butcher, and changed this 20l. note for Rogers - he brought it open in his hand; I had several customers in my shop.

ABRAHAM BELASCO. This is the note; I got it from the Bank - the clerk who gave me the number of it is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-45

Second London Jury - before Mr. Justice Park.

2025. HENRY GUNSON was indicted for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a certain false, forged, and counterfeit order, for payment of 120l., with intent to defraud George Grote and others .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am clerk to Messrs. George Grote and Co., who are banker s - there are three more partners. On Friday, the 21st of September , between two and three o'clock, a person called at our house and asked for Mr. Evans' pass-book and a new cheque-book, which I gave him - the pass-book contained the paid cheques for three days; and about a quarter to five o'clock that afternoon this cheque was presented (looking at it); I paid it in a

100l. and a 20l. note; here is the entry in my own handwriting: the 100l. note was No. 5043, dated the 1st of September, and the 20l. note, No. 2704, dated the 5th of July - these are the notes (looking at them); the cheque is signed" Thomas Newman , by procuration for John Evans " - we have been in the habit of paying to that order for some time.

RICHARD DODD . I work at bristling stocks; I was fifteen years old last month - I am servant to Mr. Wise, a tailor, Castle-court, Birchin-lane - I have been two years with him: my father lives at No. 7, Fish-street-hill, and works at a bottle warehouse - I asleep at my master's private house, at Stoke Newington, and dine at my father's. On the 21st of September, about a quarter to five o'clock, I was going on an errand to Silver-street, Wood-street, and met the prisoner in Bartholomew-lane; he said, "My lad, will you go to No. 62 round this street here, and get me change for this cheque, in notes and sovereigns?" he said, "There is 6d. for yourself," which he gave me - he said nothing more; I went and got change for the cheque, in 100l. and a 20l. note - I was detained there five or ten minutes: when I came out I went to Bartholomew-lane, expecting to see the prisoner, as I had left him there, but he was gone: I waited about five minutes in the lane, and then went on my errand to Silver-street; I did not see my father till about two o'clock next day - I had not mentioned the matter to any body before I saw him; I gave him the two notes, which I had kept in my waistcoat pocket all the time; I told him how I came by them, and left them with him; I looked about to see if any bills were posted up, as my father ordered me, but did not see any. I saw the prisoner in a small room at the Mansion-house, about a week afterwards - it was three or four days before I was first examined as a witness - two persons were in the same room; I cannot say whether they were prisoners: I went to see if I knew any body there, and I knew the prisoner: I had before that described him to Mr. Gates, the solicitor, and his clerk, the night the officers came to me - I am certain he is the person; I presented the cheque at Grote and Prescott's.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you went to the Mansion-house, were you not told if you went into that room you would see the person who gave you the cheque? A. No.

Q. Have you never said you was told so? A. Yes, Sir - No, Sir. I have said that Mr. Gates told me it was thought it was the person, by the description I gave of him; one of the persons in the room was an officer, who had been to me at Newington - I do not know the other; he was short, and older than the prisoner: I can read - I saw the name of Evans at the bottom of the cheque, just as I opened it to give it to the bankers.

Q. You went to Silver-street; do Campbell and Stewart live there? A. Campbell does; I saw him, but did not tell him of my having the money - I saw my master when I went to Newington to sleep; I did not tell him that night, nor in the morning; I carried the money in my pocket to Newington; there are two persons employed at my master's town house - I did not tell them or any body of it till I saw my father; I did not know the prisoner before - I thought it extraordinary, but did not go to the banker's to mention it.

Q. On your oath, have you ever said to any body that you did not know, or did not think you should know, the person who gave you the cheque? A. No; I said so at first to Mr. Gates, the solicitor, and I told my master I thought I should not know the person.

COURT. Q. How come you to be so confident now, when the very day or two after it happened you said you should not know him? A. Why, his complexion, Sir.

Q. He is not the only fair man in the kingdom? A. No.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you not said to Stewart that you should not know him, for you were in such a hurry you did not look in his face? A. No, I do not know Stewart; I know the young man who lives with Campbell.

Q. Have you not said to that young man, that the bankers had promised to give you money if the prisoner was convicted, and that you were determined to hang him? A. No, nor any thing of the kind.

Q. Did you not say the bankers would not give you any money before the trial, but they would afterwards, and you were determined to have a good tuck-out on the day of trial? A. No, nor any thing of the kind; I have talked to Campbell about it, in the presence the person who lodges with him.

Q. Have you ever said that if the bankers had given you all money, or notes and money, you would have kept the money and destroyed the notes? A. No, Sir. I have seen Campbell here this morning, and the person who lodges with him, and spoken to them.

Q. Did you not tell them this very morning you hoped they were not here, to tell what they heard you say? A. No - I said, "Have you come to say what I told you?"

COURT. Q. What did you tell them then? A. I told them the circumstance of Gunson giving me the cheque - that is all.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know Sullivan and Bryan? A. Yes; Sullivan is a journeyman tailor, in Mr. Wise's service, and Bryan is his apprentice; I told them I did not know that I should know the man; I did not tell them that I was determined to hang the prisoner; I said he deserved hanging - that was after he was committed.

Q. Did you not say you would be d-d if you would not hang him? A. No.

MR. BRODRICK (on the part of the prosecution) here stated, that having no one to confirm the testimony of this witness, he begged to withdraw from the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-46

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2026. ELIZABETH (THE WIFE OF JAMES) COLE , ELIZABETH SMITH , MARY MILTON , RICHARD ROWLAND , GEORGE RILEY , and JOHN AUSTEN were indicted for that they, contriving and intending craftily, deceitfully feloniously, and traitorously to deceive and defraud our Lord the King, and his people, on the 17th of October , at St. Giles without Cripplegate , six pieces of false, feigned, and counterfeit money and coin, to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, falsely &c. did forge, counterfeit, and coin, against the duty of their allegiance , and against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting the word shilling, and substituting sixpence.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. -

On the 17th of October, in consequence of information, I went with Edwards, Lloyd, Kirby, and Reynolds, to No. 1. Ponder's-place, Reynolds'-court, Ropemaker-street, Cripplegate - we are all officers except Reynolds; we got there about four o'clock in the afternoon, and found the street door open; I opened the door of the parlour on the right hand side, which was on the latch; Lloyd went in with me. I saw all the prisoners there, very near the fire place - Mrs. Cole was sitting very near the fire, close to the table - the other five prisoners were all round the table; Cole had her bonnet off, and nothing on but her gown; Smith was the same - Milton had her bonnet and shawl on - the men were dressed, and had their hats on: we forced them all from the table, up into the corner of the room, which is near another door of the room, which opens into White-street; it is a corner house, with two doors to it. The other officers then came in; they began to secure the prisoners, and I heard money drop - I cannot tell from which of them, but it dropped from somebody in that corner; after we secured them we sent for Mr. Powell, and in about two minutes the two Mr. Powells and Mr. Field, the inspector, came, and the prisoners were sent to the office; Edwards, Kirby, and Lloyd went to the office with them; before they went Edwards found some money in the corner, and picked it up; there was a basin with water in it on the table, with four counterfeit shillings, and four counterfeit sixpences in it; they were in a rough state, just as they came from the mould; before the prisoners were taken away we found two moulds, one on each hob; one for shillings, and the other for sixpences - I felt them, and they were quite warm.

Q. Was the warmth such as they might acquire from being on the hob, or as if they had had hot metal in them? A. As if they had had metal in them; the hobs were brick; in my judgment the moulds had been recently used; the window of the room had a curtain from top to bottom, which made the room quite dark; nobody could see into it. Mr. Field felt the moulds as well as I did; when the officers returned we proceeded to make a general search; I found the four shillings and four sixpences in the basin of water on the table; it stood there when we went in; one mould was on each hob - that was all I myself took possession of. I found a linen apron on the back of the chair where Mrs. Cole sat; there are spots of white metal on it, as it has been dropped when hot - it is metal itself.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you say whether you know Cole has been deserted by her husband? A. I cannot say that of my own knowledge.

Prisoner SMITH. There is a curtain to the window, but it was drawn up when they entered. Mrs. Cole desired the officers to put it down. Witness. The curtain was down; there were people pulling it up and peeping through, and Edwards pushed them away. There are two windows; one is a glazed door, which looks into White-street, that had no curtain to it; people could look into the room through that, but I cannot say whether they could see the fire-place from there - I believe they could not.

Prisoner SMITH. There are only three squares of glass, and one of them is broken in half; the curtain is green; Cole begged of them to put it down, that there might not be a bustle in the place.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I did not look at the window the instant I went it; it might possibly be partly rolled up when I went in, and let down afterwards, but not to my knowledge.

Prisoner ROWLAND. He says we were standing round the table, near the fire - that is quite false.

JOHN LIMBRICK. It is true; they were all round when I went it.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer, and accompanied Limbrick and the other officers to the house in question, and assisted in securing the prisoners; I secured Milton: I followed close behind Limbrick; there was a small table in the middle of the room, near the fire place, and they appeared to me to be all round it. Limbrick went nearest to the fire-place; Cole was close to the fire - I do not know whether she was sitting or standing; Limbrick went first - I took hold of Milton's left hand; she was standing near a chair at that time: she then sat down - I still held her hand; I stood up myself, and heard something fall from Milton, apparently from her right hand; I afterwards saw it was six counterfeit shillings, and two counterfeit sixpences. I found three of the shillings and one sixpence on the chair, on which she sat; I did not observe that chair before she sat on it; I found the other shillings and sixpence on the floor; there was no carpet - they fell on the boards; one sixpence was in the chair, and one on the floor. I took possession of them, and now produce them; I did not pick them up till we returned from taking the prisoners to Hatton-garden; I observed them in the place before I went away, but left them till I returned.

Q. When you went to Hatton-garden, did you leave any body in the room? A. Yes; the two Mr. Powells, Mr. Field, and Limbrick; on my return I found the money as I have mentioned, and on the table, close by where Milton sat, I found this piece of sand-paper, which appears to have rubbed some white metal; I saw some green baize on the table, close by where Milton sat, and here is a piece of metal adhering to it, which has been dropped on it in a hot state - there are several pieces of metal on it - there were two tables in the room; this was on the largest table; the marks are only on one side of the baize, but the other side has something white on it, like plaster of Paris; I found a piece of old carpet near the fire-place, with a quantity of metal adhering to it, like that on the baize.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I went with the other officers and Reynolds to apprehend the prisoners; I entered the room three or four minutes after Limbrick and Lloyd; I intended to go in at another door, but could not find it; I first observed that Limbrick and Lloyd had got the prisoners up into the corner; I assisted in securing them, and after they were secured I saw the prisoner Smith throw something from her hand.

Q. By being secured, do you mean handcuffed? A. Yes; her left hand was handcuffed to another prisoner; she threw it from her right hand, which was at liberty; I picked it up immediately, and put it into my pocket, where I had nothing else; when I took it up I found it was shillings and sixpences, and they were quite warm;

I afterwards counted them - there were fifteen counterfeit shillings, and twenty-four counterfeit sixpences.

Q. Do you mean that the warmth was from their being newly manufactured, or was it the warmth of the hand? A. The warmth of the hand; on our return from the office, having left Mr. Powells and Limbrick there, Mr. Field gave me some plaster of Paris out of the right hand cupboard; there was a tin cannister full, and some in a paper; on the left hand side of the fire-place I found two earthen pipkins on the hob; they have been on the fire, and in one of them is a portion of white metal; I found some glass-paper by the fender, and it has been used - it is finer than sand-paper, and would finish the coin after the application of the sand-paper; in the left hand cupboard I found this crucible, with a portion of metal in it: I found the frame of a mould, but it was spoiled, and a mould, the impression of which is defaced - it is made of plaster of Paris; I found on the hob a quantity of pipes, and metal has run right through them; I found two pairs of large scissars, which would clip metal.

COURT. Q. I suppose you have been employed on similar occasions before, would these scissars clip off the ragged parts of the coin? A. Yes.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I accompanied the officers; I was with Edwards and Reynolds; on going into the room, I saw all the prisoners in one corner; we took them to Hatton-garden, and on returning I found against the door in White-street, inside the room, five counterfeit shillings; that was the spot where the prisoners had been standing; and under the turn-up bedstead I found a small file, which has white metal in the teeth of it now.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I entered the room with Edwards and Kirby, and observed the prisoners all in one corner - I saw Milton sitting on a chair, and saw something drop from her hand - Lloyd had hold of her; when she got up, I picked off the chair four shillings, and one sixpence - I put it down again in the same place, by Limbrick's order - I saw Smith near the door, after her left hand was handcuffed, throw something down from her right hand: it was loose coin - Edwards picked it up - I went with Mr. Powell to Pentonville, and returned after the search had taken place.

JOHN LIMBRICK re-examined. When I returned from the office, every thing appeared in the same state, as when I left it.

RACHAEL WHITEHEAD . I keep the house in which the prisoners were taken - Mrs. Cole rented that parlour - I let it to her on the 3d of March; she came with her husband, as I supposed; he was there till the Wednesday before, or the Wednesday after Whitsuntide; when I missed him, I asked her where he was; she said he had assaulted a landlord, and was taken up for an assault - I have seen Austen come backwards and forwards there - I knew Smith for a fortnight before she was taken; she was there backwards and forwards as a young woman out of a situation, for that fortnight, and I believe was there by night, as well as day - I believe she slept with Mrs. Cole; there was no other bed in the room, except a small one, for a little boy about eight years old - I never saw Milton or Riley, till the day they were apprehended; Mrs. Cole told me she was a book-folder, and worked at a shop - I never saw her employed at home.

COURT. Q. When she first came to your house, used she to go out early in the morning? A. Yes, and return to her meals, as if she was engaged some where; this continued till within a fortnight of her apprehension, and during that time she seemed to be very ill.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Who paid your rent? A. Mrs. Cole paid me weekly - sometimes she would pay me two or three shillings, or sixpences, and the rest in copper.

Cross-examined. Q. Has she any children? A. Two - one a boy, about eight years old, who lives with her, and a girl about twelve, who is kept by the grandmother.

Q. Since her husband left her, has he come to give her any support whatever? A. No, and I believe she very often wanted bread for her child; she continued to work up to the fortnight, and then appeared ill; she appeared an industrious woman.

Prisoner AUSTEN. Q. How long before the apprehension, had you seen me there? A. I believe it was some time before - I have seen him while the husband was at home, and since he has left; it must be three weeks or a month before he was taken, that I had seen him there - I have seen him there, three or four times - I cannot say how long he stopped, as he might go in at one door, and out at the other - I never knew him there long together.

Q. Did he remain there long enough to be engaged in any work in the room? A. Not to my knowledge.

JOHN LIMBRICK. I produce the pair of moulds which I found on one hob; here is a piece of money in it, which was in the basin of water, on the table, and it had then the mark of the channel of the mould, in which the metal ran; it is just as it came from the mould; the impression agrees with the mould; it has evidently been cast in that mould.

JOHN DOMINIC GIANNELLI . I am a plaster-figure and mould-maker, and live in Cock-lane, Smithfield. I have frequently seen Cole at my place; she frequently came to purchase 6d. worth of plaster of Paris, and more than once I have seen Smith with her; neither of them ever told me for what purpose they meant to use it; it was purchased in the powder: plain water would render it into a composition; the moulds produced, appear to have been made of plaster of Paris; to the best of my knowledge, it is two or three months from this time that they came to my shop, but I am by no means certain of the time.

COURT. Q. The mould once used to take an impression, cannot be again used, can it? A. I do not know about that.

Prisoner SMITH. I was never in his place in my life? Witness. I am certain you and Mrs. Cole came together.

SARAH WHITEHEAD . I live in this house. Cole first came there on the 3d of March; a man came with her, and left her a week before, or a week after Whitsuntide; she had a little boy who slept with her - I have seen Austen at Mrs. Cole's; he came frequently, when her husband was at home, and since, but for five weeks or a month before she was taken, I have not seen him - I know Smith by seeing her with Mrs. Cole during the fortnight before the apprehension - I saw Rowland there a week before the apprehension.

Prisoner ROWLAND. Q. What day did you see me, and

how long was I there? A. I cannot say what day it was, or how long he was there - I saw him go in; the door was open, and he left it open.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin, of the Mint. I have examined these shillings and sixpences, and all the money produced; it is all counterfeit, and all of the same description; it is a white metal, generally called Britannia metal, which common spoons are made of; the money is all cast in a mould - I have compared it with the moulds found - I have compared one of the shillings produced from the basin found on the table, with the mould; it fits precisely; here is a lump on the side, which fits the broken part of the mould exactly - I have compared some of the shillings produced by Edwards, with the pair of moulds; there is a crack in the mould, from the heat; and I find on the coin, an impression of that crack; the moulds have evidently been used a great many times; the sharpness of the impression diminishes every time it is used; these have been used a considerable number of times - I went into the room a few minutes after the prisoners were in custody; the Mr. Powells were with me - Limbrick handed me two pairs of moulds from the hob - they appeared quite hot through - I felt them inside and out - I cannot say how the heat might have arisen - I apprehend, it is necessary to keep the moulds always hot, as the metal will then flow into them better, it does not chill; the coin produced by Edwards, I suppose, to be all in a state in which they would put it into circulation - I constantly find it in circulation in that state; there is one mould for sixpences, and another for shillings.

COLE's Defence. A great many words the witness has said are false, for, when he entered the room, he stood with his back against the bedstead - I begged of him to pull the curtain down, and shut the door, that there might not be a disturbance, and one of them pulled the curtain down - I was not sitting down, but standing up - I do not think I have any body here to speak for me, as I thought my trial would not come on till evening.

SMITH's Defence. I was out of place, and went to lodge with Mrs. Cole, about a fortnight before I was taken - I was not at home in the day time, not in the morning; I went to look after a situation; one day as I was going after a situation to Parr's office, Mrs. Cole was going part of the way up Holborn; she met Milton, and asked her to come and take a cup of tea with her; she had not been in the place half an hour, when we were taken - I had nothing in my hand, and dropped nothing - I never saw any thing of this kind going on whatever - I was out almost all day.

Prisoner SMITH to MR. GIANNELLI. Q. Can you swear you have seen me in your place with Cole, for I never was in your shop? A. Yes, I have, I am quite certain - I had nothing particular to draw my attention to them; a great many persons come to purchase plaster of Paris, both men and women - Smith said nothing - Mrs. Cole asked for the plaster; I cannot recollect how long ago it was.

JURY. Q. Was she there more than once? A. I cannot say that - I know she was there once; she never came alone, that I know of; she did not ask for any thing.

COLE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, considering them not old offenders.

MILTON - NOT GUILTY .

AUSTEN - NOT GUILTY .

ROWLAND - NOT GUILTY .

RILEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-47

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2027. THOMAS TALBOT was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ann Hold .

ROBERT MOSER . I am a merchant, and live in Upper Thames-street. On the 24th of September , about noon, I was in Aldersgate-street ; there were five or six drays following one another round the corner of Long-lane; the dray of which the prisoner was driver came in contact with the post at the corner of the lane; the violence of the shock brought the shaft-house round upon the curbstone - the deceased was standing there, and was knocked down; the horse, in the effort to extricate the dray from the post, plunged violently, and struck the deceased many times - she could not be got away till she was dreadfully mangled; she was taken to the hospital, and died within ten minutes; she was beat about her body sadly; I do not think her head was hurt. As soon as I had recovered the shock, which the circumstance had occasioned, I went up to the dray; the prisoner was then approaching; he certainly was not with his horses at the time of the accident - his was about the centre dray. I remonstrated with him on the impropriety of being away from his dray, and pointed out to him the consequences; he expressed great sorrow, and said a call of nature had kept him from his dray for a few minutes; he followed the deceased to the hospital, and there expressed his great regret. The deceased was Ann Hold, the wife of a man who lives at the Bull and Mouth stables.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you certain there were five or six drays? A. I am sure of five; each was drawn by three horses - they were going at a quick walk, in the usual way, at no improper speed; the near-wheel caught the post.

Q. Did he tell you he had stopped the dray while he expected to be detained? A. Certainly not - he could not have done so; he might assist to convey the woman to the hospital; he behaved exceeding well.

CHARLES CASWELL . I am house-surgeon at St. Bartholomew hospital. I saw the deceased immediately she was brought in - she was dying then; she did not live five minutes. I have no doubt her death was occasioned by this accident.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he stopped a short time for a necessary purpose, and requested his companions to mind his horses, but they did not hear him - that the accident was quite unavoidable, and would cause him sorrow all his life.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-48

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2028. MARY HUNT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Elmer , on the 5th of October , at St. Luke , and stealing 2 sheets, value 2s.; 1 pair of bellows, value 1s.6d.; 1 cap, value 1d.; 1 saucer, value 1d.; 2 jugs, value 4d.; 1 tea-caddy, value 2d., and 3 plates, value 3d., the goods of Samuel Jones .

HANNAH JONES . I am the wife of Samuel Jones, and lodge in the second floor back room of Thomas Elmer's house - the prisoner lodged in the same house. On the 5th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went out to work; I locked the room door, tried it after me, and took the key with me; I returned soon after twelve o'clock, and found it locked as I had left it, but missed two sheets, a pair of bellows, a cup and saucer; two jugs, a tea-caddy, and three plates, all of which I had left safe in the room when I went out; I saw Fordham find them in the prisoner's room; (looking at the property) these are my bellows - this jug and every thing here is mine.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am a parish officer. I was fetched to Mr. Elmer's; I went to the prisoner's room, and found all these things there, except the sheets; she said they belonged to her; the plates and crockery were in the cupboard.

ELIZABETH ELMER . My husband rents this house - it is in the parish of St. Luke. The prisoner lodged in the next room to the prosecutrix; when Jones came home she unlocked her door, and found her room stripped; she came down, and told me she had seen the prisoner with a mug in her hand, similar to hers. I then went into the prisoner's room, and found the crockery on the bed, and my own things were taken out of the room - I sent for an officer.

HANNAH JONES . The crockery is the pattern and shape that mine was; I am positive of them, and I know the bellows.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court. My husband had left me in distress - I could not get my own living; I had just come out of the hospital, and took this room; I did not take the sheets; a person found them in her own room; she had been in the habit of lending me crockery out of her room - I took a female there, who took the bellows to use.

HANNAH JONES . She was in distress; I never lent her any thing but once, that was when she first came - she asked me to lend her a mug to get a pint of beer; I am sure I never lent her any thing else - I am sure I locked the door.

JURY. Q. Have you examined the property? A. Yes - it is common crockery, but I am positive of it - there is no particular mark on it, nor on the bellows; my sheets were thrown into the middle of the room afterwards. I have had the bellows about two months, and am certain of them. I can swear to every thing - this tea-caddy I bought new, about a fortnight before; I used some of the crockery that morning at breakfast.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to mercy, on account of her distress.

Reference Number: t18271025-49

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2029. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 watch, value 40s.; 1 chain, value 10s.; 4 seals, value 10s.; 1 key, value 1s.; and 2 rings, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Thompson , from his person .

HENRY KILBEY . I am a constable. On the 24th of October, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, I was going home, and saw the prosecutor with the prisoner in Lower Seymour-street - he was rather tipsy, and I suspected she would rob him - they were arm-in-arm; I followed them as far as Baker-street chapel; I then saw him turn round, and get from her; he crossed over to my side of the way, passed me, and turned up George-street; a young man then went up and spoke to the prisoner, and they then both ran after the prosecutor; the prisoner overtook him, and took his arm till he got to the corner of Charles-street ; they stood talking a minute or two together; she then seemed to clasp him in her arms, and immediately ran away; I ran over to the gentleman, and said, "Are you robbed Sir?" he put his hand to his breeches, and said, "Yes, I have lost my watch;" I ran after her, and took her in King-street-mews, about five hundred yards off, and said, "You have got a watch?" she denied it. I brought her into King-street, and met the prosecutor, who asked her for his watch; she denied it, and in the middle of the road in the mews, on the very spot where I apprehended her, I found the watch.

JOSEPH THOMPSON. I am a servant out of place ; I was in Seymour-street. The prisoner came up, and asked me to take a walk with her - I said I wished to have nothing to do with her, and told her to let go of my arm; I got from her opposite the chapel; she overtook me again at the corner of Charles-street, and laid hold of me all in a moment, round the waist, and snatched my watch; I did not miss it till Kilbey came, and asked if I had lost it; he went to King-street-mews, and found it; I had not been in the mews that night at all - I was intoxicated.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-50

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2030. CHARLES HARDY was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN ENGLEY . I am a chair-maker , and live in Commercial-place, City-road . The prisoner was my errand-boy ; I sent him with a chair to a customer named Howard, who owed me 4s. 6d. before - this made 2l. 2s. 6d.; I made a bill out, and asked the prisoner if he could write a receipt if it was paid - he said Yes; I told him not to ask for the money, but if it was paid to write a receipt - this was about half-past twelve o'clock; he returned at two; I said, "Did Mr. Howard pay you?" he said, "No, he wants to look at the bill of the 4s. 6d., as he does not recollect it, and if you will call at four o'clock he will give you the money;" I sent him to dinner, and went out myself - he ought to have returned about three o'clock, but did not. I called on Howard, and from what I heard I suspected him; I did not see him again till twelve o'clock at night - he was then in custody.

JOHN HOWARD . I live in Leman-street, Goodman's-fields. I owed Engley 4s.6d. - I bought a chair of him, which the prisoner brought to me, with a bill, and also a bill for the 4s. 6d. - I asked if he had a receipt - he said No; I asked if he could write one - he said Yes; I immediately paid him 2l.2s.6d.; I wrote the receipt, and he put his mark to it. I said nothing about wishing to look into the 4s. 6d.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, with Vann, at Sadler's-wells theatre, on this Saturday night; I found 7s. on him - he said he had paid 2s. 6d. for his dinner, and bought a coat, and intended to go to sea.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer, and was with Walters. I asked the prisoner what he had done with the 2l.2s.6d. which he had received for his master - he said he had paid 2s. 6d. for his dinner, and bought a pair of new boots; I said,"What have you done with the other?" he would not tell me, but on Monday he said he had lost a sovereign in the company he was in.(Bill and receipt read.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). The prosecutor sent me with these two bills, to receive the money; when I got to Red Lion-street no such person lived there; I then met one Hill with three young men; we went to have something to drink, and got quite intoxicated; they showed me where Howard lived; a woman opened the door, and told me to wait; I waited half an hour - at last the gentleman came out, went up stairs, and looked at the bills; he looked over all his books, and said he believed he had paid it; I returned and told master - he sent me to dinner; I went to the play, and these two gentlemen came and asked one where the brass was - they took me away, and asked where the money was; I said I knew nothing of it; they said, "Come, and we shall soon settle with your master;" I asked what they meant and they could not answer - Vann will swear any man's life away - it is known he has perjured himself before.

MR. HOWARD. I am certain I paid the prisoner the money; I might have said I had no recollection of the 4s. 6d., but on referring to my book I saw I had not paid it. The prisoner was perfectly sober.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-51

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2031. JOHN CAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Samuel Bower , from his person .

SAMUEL BOWER. On Sunday, the 30th of September, about four o'clock, I was passing along Broad-court, Bow-street , with a lady, and just at the entrance into Bow-street I felt my coat pulled; I turned my head round, and perceived my handkerchief drop from the prisoner's hand- I immediately seized him, and had some difficulty in securing him - he got from me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD VALLANCE . I saw the prisoner running away, and followed him; I took him to the corner of Wild-passage, Drury-lane, about one hundred yards from Broad-court; Mr. Bower came up very soon.

Prisoner's Defence. Directly I turned round he began to throw me down, which was the reason I ran; he knocked me about, and a young woman who was with him said I was not the man; he said, "I will send you where I have sent a good many more - I will transport you for life."

SAMUEL BOWER. The lady who was with me, said,"How could you see him take it? you could not see him," but she spoke under fear. I am sure he is the man - he was a short time out of my sight; he struck me, and knocked my hat off; I lost sight of him while I picked it up. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-52

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2032. RICHARD HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s.6d., the goods of John Gale , from his person .

BENJAMIN MURRAY . I am a constable. On the 1st of October, when the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs were at Westminster-hall , I saw Mr. Gale at the bottom of the stairs of the bridge, looking at the procession by water - I saw the prisoner pull the handkerchief partly out of Mr. Gale's pocket; Mr. Gale then went under the arch, as it rained, and I there saw the prisoner take the handkerchief quite out- I immediately told Mr. Gale, and secured the prisoner on the bridge, with it in his pocket.

JOHN GALE. I was looking at the procession; I did not know I was robbed till the witness spoke to me under the arch - I saw him find my handkerchief on the prisoner - it was safe two or three minutes before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and meant to keep it for my own wear, not knowing it was stolen; I stopped there for ten minutes.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to mercy.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-53

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2033. CORNELIUS MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s.6d., the goods of John Douglas Close , from his person .

JOHN DOUGLAS CLOSE. I live at Kilburn. About half-past seven o'clock on the evening of the 24th of October I was walking through Holborn , and missed a handkerchief from my coat pocket - I had used it a few minutes before; I turned round, and saw six or seven ill-looking fellows walking away in different directions; I saw the constable take one in the middle of the street - that was not the prisoner; the constable showed me the handkerchief afterwards.

JESSE PHILLIPS . I live in Lincoln's Inn-fields. Last Wednesday, about half-past seven o'clock, I was in company with Whittingham, on the opposite side of the way to Mr. Close, and saw the prisoner attempt his pocket several times - two others were with him; the prisoner put his hand in, and tried to pull something out; when they got near Kingsgate-street, one of his companions ran back - we crossed over; Whittingham laid hold of one of them, but he escaped; his hat fell off in the scuffle - I picked it up, and the handkerchief was close by it - I gave it to Whittingham; I secured the prisoner; I am sure they were all three together.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I was in Holborn with Phillips - I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw the prisoner and two others close behind Mr. Close, and saw the prisoner's hand five or six times at Close's pocket; the handkerchief fell from the hat of one of his companions.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-54

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2034. ELIZABETH WHITFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 breeching, value 2s. , the goods of John Jefferson .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL JAMES . I am coachman to Mr. John Jefferson, surgeon , of Islington - Mr. Beardmore's stables join our's; the prisoner's husband is his coachman - they slept over the stables. I missed this breeching on the 20th of October, and found it at Mr. Warren's, the sadler; her husband had been away two months.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES WARREN . I am in the service of Hezekiah Warren , a harness-maker, who lives at Islington - he is my father. The prisoner sold us this breeching on a Saturday, about three weeks ago, for 1s. - she said her boy found it near Highgate-hill; I delivered it to Cope.

THOMAS COPE . I apprehended the prisoner last Saturday; she said, voluntarily, that she took the breeching out of the stable - her husband was in the country at the time.

Prisoner. I hope you will consider my family: I committed this rash act; it is a thing I never did before - I hope you will be merciful.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months . (See the Fifth Day.)

Reference Number: t18271025-55

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2035. JAMES WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 nose-bag, value 2s. , the goods of Sir Benjamin Hobhouse , Bart. , and others.

THOMAS SILBY . I am drayman to Sir Benjamin Hobhouse and Co., at the brewhouse, in Chiswell-street. On the 8th of October the dray stood at the door of the Magpie and Stump public-house ; a man came into the house to me in about ten minutes, and said one of the nose-bags was gone from the horse's head; I went and saw the prisoner with it under his arm, about a quarter of a mile off: he saw me running, and threw the bag away - I caught him, without losing sight of him; he said he did it because he was hungry.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-56

2036. JAMES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 pair of reins, value 2s. , the goods of James Dickinson .

GEORGE COVENTRY . I am a private watchman of Tottenham-green. On the 13th of October, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner coming in a direction from Edmonton, with a sack; he said he was going to fetch a horse from London; I said he had more harness there than was necessary - I detained him, and Stafford claimed the things in the bag.

NATHAN STAFFORD . I am servant to Mr. James Dickinson, who lives at Edmonton . I put all this harness away in the stable on the night of the 13th of October, and at half-past five next morning found it gone - I found the prisoner in custody with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH WEBB . I took the prisoner in charge. I heard his examination read over to him, saw him put his mark to it, and saw the Magistrate sign it - it was quite voluntarily; this is it (read.)

The prisoner voluntarily confesses, and says, "I have been a sailor for about six years, since which I have worked in a brickfield at Edmonton; I left my employ about two months ago: last night I went into Mr. Dickinson's stable to sleep, and took the bridle, harness, and sack away."

JAMES WILSON , his X mark.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-57

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

2037. HENRY PHIPPS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , at St. Stephen, Coleman-street , 1 gelding, price 14l.; 1 covered spring cart, value 30l., and 113 yards of woollen cloth, value 48l., the property of Robert Emmerson , to whom he was servant .

ROBERT EMMERSON. I am a finisher and packer , and live in Coleman-street - I have no partner; the prisoner was in my service, as under carman ; I was not at home when this happened - my foreman knows the circumstances.

WINTER WINTERBOTTOM . I am foreman to Mr. Emmerson. On the 20th of June, a little after two o'clock, I saw the cart and horse; there were two pieces of woollen cloth, an end and half of cloth, in it - that would be about one hundred yards; it was to go to Mr. Lee, of Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields - it would not take above two hours to go there; the prisoner was to drive the cart, and had the care of the goods; he did not come back; the stables are near master's house - I did not go to the stables that evening; I saw the cart and horse about half-past nine o'clock on the following morning, in the yard of a public-house in Vassall's-road, North Brixton, about three miles from London-bridge - the cloth was gone; I went to Mr. Lee, but did not find the cloth; the prisoner was taken into custody on the 25th of September - I did not see him before he was taken; he was in master's constant service, as under carman, and had given no notice: I asked him if he knew me; he said No: he used to see me every day - the cloth has not been found - the horse was a gelding.

ROBERT BURDETT . I am servant to Mr. Emmerson. I measured the cloth - there was 113 yards of woollen cloth; I did not see it put into the cart; it was to go to Mr. Lee's, of Great Queen-street - I have not seen it since; the prisoner was in master's service about two months; I saw him at the Magistrate's office when he was taken.

WINTER WINTERBOTTOM re-examined. I saw the cloths put into the cart; the prisoner put three packages in himself - I put in one; I found the delivery-book next morning, behind some more cloths - he ought to have taken it with him - I have not got it here.

GEORGE LEE . I live in Great Queen-street. I ent four packages of cloth, containing above 100 yards, to Mr. Emmerson, to be pressed - I have never got them back; they should have been delivered to me before the end of June; it was worth between 40l. and 50l. - I do not know the prisoner.

JAMES CRUNDALL . I am a builder, and live in Vassall-place, Brixton. About nine o'clock on the night of the 20th of June, I saw the horse and cart near the Perseverance public-house, Vassall-road, nobody was with it - I told the landlord he had better take care of it, as there was nobody to take charge of it - nobody claimed it then.

MATILDA PRATT . I live at No. 16, Vassall-road, Brixton, and am servant to Mrs. Bell. On the 20th of June,

between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw this horse and cart nearly opposite the Perseverance public-house - a man was with it then; directly he brought it, he jumped out, and ran up the road, leaving it there - I cannot speak to the man; it stood there till after nine o'clock, and the watchman took it into the Perseverance yard.

ROBERT STOKES . I am a watchman. I went on my beat at a quarter-past nine o'clock, and directly took the horse and cart into the yard of the Perseverance; there was nothing in the cart except a whip: I went next morning and informed Mr. Emmerson's foreman, in Coleman-street, as the name of "Robert Emmerson, Coleman-street," was on the cart - he claimed it when he saw it.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer of St. Luke's parish. I heard Mr. Emmerson had been robbed; and about the 18th of September I saw the prisoner at the corner of Whitecross-street, and secured him; I told him I took him about the cloth in Coleman-street - he said he knew nothing about it: when I got him to the watch-house, I asked how he happened to lose the horse and cart; he said he went into a baker's-shop to buy a 1d. loaf, and some one drove away with the horse and cart - that he followed them as far as Blackfriars'-bridge, and could not catch them; I neither threatened, nor made him any promise: I asked why he did not go back and tell his master; he said he was afraid - he did not say where the baker's-shop was - I found no money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 20th of June I was trusted with the cart and cloth to take to Queen-street - I went by St. Clement's church; I went into a baker's-shop, and bought a 1d. loaf, then went into a public-house at the corner of New castle-street to get some refreshment, and when I came out the cart was gone; I proceeded after it down Fleet-street - I found it had gone over Blackfriars'-bridge, but could gain no further intelligence of it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18271025-58

2038. GEORGE BURGE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 bag, value 6d., and 56lbs. of ginger, 30s. , the goods of Henry Hearon , and others.

JAMES LEMAY . I live in Club-row, Church-street, Shoreditch, and am servant to Henry Hearon and Co., who are druggists ; this parcel of ginger was packed in a bag, and stood within four or five yards of the shop door; I saw it safe about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 26th of September, and missed it in about half an hour; I found the prisoner in custody with it about five o'clock.

WILLIAM HARGRAVE . I am a cordwainer, and live in Grub-street. On the 26th of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Bishopsgate-street , about two doors from Mr. Hearon's, and met the prisoner, arm-in-arm with a person; I watched them, and saw the other let go of the prisoner's arm, go to the prosecutor's door, and come out with a bag, which the prisoner took of him at the door, and made off with it as fast as he could; I followed him as fast as I could, about one hundred yards to Pea-hen-court, where he was joined by another person; he turned up the court by himself, stopped there, put the bag on his knee, and tore a piece of paper or parchment off the corner; I passed him, and went down some steps at the bottom of the court, into a green-shop, and inquired for an officer; while I stood there he passed me with the bag on his shoulder; his companion came up in a short time, laid hold of my collar, and said, "Come, I will make it all right with you;" I said, "No, I won't, for I know that bag is stolen, and shall stop him with it;" I followed, and stopped him myself - both his companions went off.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was the bag recovered? A. I took him with it; I had only lost sight of him once; I know one of the men who was in his company.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable, and received him in charge in Broad-street; the bag of ginger then laid at his feet; he said a man had given it to him to carry to the Brown Bear public-house, Moorfields; Lemay claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Hargrave describe the other persons? A. He did, and I have searched for them.

JAMES LEMAY . This is the bag of ginger; it had no direction on it, but a piece of paper with the weight.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-59

2039. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 handkerchief, value 6s., the goods of William Plaistowe , from his person .

WILLIAM PLAISTOWE. I am an officer of Aldgate Ward , and live in Fenchurch-street. On the 2d of October, at twenty minutes after seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Leadenhall-street ; there was a mob collected, occasioned by a man with a large bag, appearing to be drunk; I went up and told him to go on; he took up his bag, let it fall, and fell on the top of it; he then said he had been knocked down, and the watchman and officers were all thieves; while I was talking to him I felt something at my right hand pocket; I put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round, and saw the prisoner within a foot of me, in the act of tucking my handkerchief into his bosom; I secured him with it.

Prisoner. He said before that I stood half a yard away from him, when the handkerchief was on the ground. Witness. It was in his possession - it was never on the ground.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Mr. Brown's, in Elbow-lane, and in Leadenhall-street the officer was wanting this drunken man to go on; I stood with my hands in my pocket, on the left hand side of the officer; he took his handkerchief out of his pocket, threw it on the ground, and then collared me; he swore I took it out of his pocket - he wanted several gentlemen to come as witnesses, but they would not.

WILLIAM PLAISTOWE. The road was muddy, but the handkerchief was quite clean - he had it not out of his possession till I took it from him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-60

2040. RICHARD ERLING was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 6 lbs. of pork, value 5s. , the goods of John Spooner .

JAMES WILCE . On the 6th of October I was assisting at Mr. Spooner's, in Aldersgate-street ; this pork was at the back of the shop. Between eight and nine o'clock on Saturday night, the prisoner came into the shop for 1 lb. of 14d. butter; he then ordered some lard, eggs, cheese, and 1 lb. of 10d. butter - he had three baskets, two of which were empty, the other had fish in it; the things he ordered

were put into his basket - Mrs. Spooner came round and took this pork out of his basket; I had not seen him put it in - it was at the back of the shop; she said, "You are a pretty sort of a fellow!" he said, "What do you mean, ma'am?" but did not say how it got there: I asked him to pay for the goods he had ordered; he pulled out a shilling, and said he only wanted the 10d. butter - I took back the other goods; he appeared sober.

ELIZABETH SPOONER . I am the wife of John Spooner; the prisoner was not a customer. On the 6th of October, at night, he came in; I went round to cut the cheese - my back was then turned to the pork: when I had cut the cheese, I missed the pork from the pickling-pan - I opened the lid of his basket, and took it out, saying, "You are a pretty fellow, for I lost some pork last Saturday night;" he said nothing to it, but offered 1s. to pay for the goods, saying that was all he had.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. I took him in charge on Saturday night; I found 1s. 6d. on him, including the 1s. he had produced; I found a fork on him, which would enable him to take the pork - he appeared sober.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-61

2041. JAMES SCOTT and SAMUEL SALTONSTALL were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 2 silver dishes, value 26l., and 1 silver handles, value 4l., the goods of Richard Aldridge , being in a certain boat on the Navigable River Thames .

SECOND COUNT, calling it 30 ozs. of silver.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the goods of Thomas Stephenson , and not charging it to have been in a boat upon the river.

HENRY HEBBERT . I am a linen-draper, and live in the Strand. I received an order from India for these articles, and gave it to Griffin to execute; I saw the goods about the 14th or 15th of February, 1826, when they were finished; I paid for them, and had nothing to do with them afterwards - they were to be sent to India; I saw some goods at Alcock's, in Little Britain, about a month ago, but cannot recognize them - the order came to about 90l.; there were more goods than these: these came to between 30l. and 40l. - the whole have been returned from India.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What is the amount of the whole order? A. Between 400l. and 500l.; but I shipped 400l. worth by another vessel.

GEORGE FREDERICK ALCOCK . I am a refiner, and live in Cox's-court, Little Britain. About the latter end of February 1826, the prisoner Scott came to my counting-house, with a brown paper parcel, containing broken silver plate; it appeared to be new plate broken in pieces - I afterwards put them together, and they formed two dishes with handles; he offered them for sale - I asked where he got it; he said it belonged to a friend, who requested him to bring it for sale - I said, from its appearance, I thought it was not properly came by, and requested to know who his friend was, and where he lived; he said he did not know his name, or where he lived, but he occasionally called at his house - I said it was extraordinary he should undertake to sell plate of that description, for a man he had no little knowledge of; he said he had known him many years, though he could not tell his name, and he expected to see him again in the evening of the day, and was then to give him the proceeds of the plate - I said, I had no doubt it was stolen, and should detain it, and he must send his friend to give a proper account of it; he said he was sure it was all right, and I had better give it him back - I refused; he went away, for the purpose of sending his friend, but before that, I took his name and address, which he said was, "James Scott, a weigher at the Custom-house, No. 10, Harwich-place, Wellclose-squars;" that was about ten or eleven o'clock; he returned between three and four in the afternoon, said he had seen his friend, and told him what I had stated - that he found it not convenient to call then, but would call next morning - I let him go away, as he produced his deputation from the Custom-house, to show me what he had said was correct - I did not see him again till he was apprehended - Saltonstall came next morning alone, and said he called respecting the plate which Scott had brought - I asked if he was the owner; he said, Yes - I asked how he came by it; he said he bought it of a foreigner, and gave 15l. for it - I asked how it came in that state; he said it had been taken out of a fire abroad; it was discoloured, by having been put into a fire, which had not heat enough to melt it; it appears to have been cut up; the solder about it had run; if it had been injured in a fire, there was no necessity to cut it up: it would still be a complete dish, fit for use; the solder might have separated the handle and border; it was cut into about fifty pieces; it would certainly sell better without being cut - I said his account could not be correct, as the plate was English manufacture, and one piece bore the Goldsmiths'-hall mark, for that year; I asked if he was in the habit of buying plate; he said not particularly, but he bought any thing he could get a shilling by - I said, under all circumstances, I did not think proper to return the plate, but should take it to the Lord Mayor, and state the case, and if he ordered it, I should not object to give it him; he said it was giving me a good deal of trouble, I had better give it him back, and have done with it - I refused, and he appointed to meet me at the Mansion-house the next day - I went, but neither he nor Scott appeared - I saw nothing more of them, till they were taken; the plate is worth about 18l. in its present state; they have never been for it - I saw them in custody early in this month - I cannot be mistaken in their persons - the plate appeared to have been recently manufactured; it had the maker's initials, and the hall mark for that year.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did Scott come to you three times? A. No, twice; he was to receive the money, if I had bought it.

Q. Did he not say his landlady would enable him to find the person? A. No - I stated my suspicion to him the first time he came - I was satisfied when he showed me his deputation.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Saltonstall came but once? A. No; he was about a quarter of an hour with me; his features were familiar to me, though I could not recollect who he was - I am certain I had seen him before; it was eighteen months before I saw him again - I am quite certain of him - I have not inquired whether

Scott's address is correct. I succeeded Messrs. Cox and Co. in business.

Q. Is it likely a man would bring plate to you, if he had come dishonestly by it? A. Not if he knew what he was about; there are a variety of places where he could dispose of it more easily; it is not impossible for a foreigner to sell English plate - I understood him, that the foreigner had said it came from a fire; if I had come by plate honestly, I should not object to go to the Mansion-house; it has been in my custody ever since - weighers at the Custom-house do not come in contact with foreigners particularly.

MR. BARRY. Q. Was it understood that Scott should send the man to you, whom he had it from? A. Yes - I had then done with Scott; he did not call about it afterwards - I advertised the plate; it was not claimed for some time - Mr. Griffin saw it at the office.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN . I am a silversmith, and live in Cornhill. In 1826, I had an order from Mr. Hebbert, to make some plate, to go abroad - I was living with my brother, who is a manufacturer - I took it down to the Custom-house myself, and entered it for Calcutta - I believe it was to go by the Duke of Bedford; we receive a drawback of 1s. 6d. an oz. at the Custom-house; after it is weighed by the inspector, it is left in the Searcher's office, for the lightermen; an inspector from the Hall attends at the Custom-house; it was manufactured at Sheffield; there were two silver dishes and covers, two warmers, and four egg-cups, in the box which I took to the Custom-house - I saw them before I packed them - I saw this plate at the Mansion-house, when the prisoners were there; this appears to be the bottoms of the dishes; the edges were shells and gadroons, and these correspond - I left it to go by Aldridge's lighter - Barker, his clerk, was at the Custom-house when it was examined.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you see it delivered to him? A. No; it was left in the Searcher's office; it receives the Hall mark at Sheffield; all manufactured plate is marked; shells and gadroons are common - I do not swear to the plate.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you ever take plate to the Custom-house before? A. Yes; we always leave it in the Searcher's office - I think it was in February that I took it; it was in a deal box, with a tin lining fastened at the four corners: but it was opened at the Custom-house, then soldered down, and would not be opened again.

SAMUEL WALKER . I am a silversmith, and live in Beaufort-buildings. The dishes and covers were made at my manufactory, at Sheffield - I saw the plate at Lambeth-street; the letter "I," which was the Sheffield-hall mark for that year, was on some of the pieces, and there are the initials S. and C. Y. for "Samuel and Charles Young and Co.," who made it for me at Sheffield, in 1826, for Griffin's order - I have no doubt of its being the same - I delivered it about the middle of February.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you afterwards see it advertised? A. No - I manufactured about 120 ozs. - I know these articles by the pattern - I can swear there was not another pair of dishes made by us that year of that pattern; we call it the Waterloo border, which is common; but we are the only persons who manufacture that handle; it was a new pattern made about that time - I cannot say how many we have made.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Is the hall mark different in Sheffield and London? A. I believe so; it is sent down from the Stamp-office every year - I will swear these handles have been made by us; I think no one else has this pattern, but will not swear that; I can swear to our mark; every body would know that was the maker's initials - it still remains on the plate.

Q. Between January, 1826, and the middle of February, was there time for plate marked with the letter of that year, to go abroad and come back? A. It might have gone to France or Holland; I had no more handles made of this pattern; I have no doubt it is the plate.

THOMAS BARKER . I am clerk to Mr. Aldridge, a lighterman . I attended Mr. Griffin at the Custom-house; when this plate was brought it was deposited in the Searcher's-office, and was afterwards put into our lighter - we got a receipt from the commanding-office of the Duke of Bedford for it, as delivered in good order; I gave the receipt up to the broker, who gave me a bill of lading. It was to go to India.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. It was put into your lighter? A. Yes; I was not on board when it was put in, but I made out a receipt for it, and must have seen it in the regular course of things. I know a box with that direction was put on board.

Q. Can you swear that it was put on board, or do you swear from having the receipt? A. Yes; I got the receipt - no other parcel was shipped by the same party: we generally take plate on board as late as we can, not wishing to have it on board longer than we can help. We never open the packages.

JOHN SHORT BRINDLEY . I am a ship-broker. Thomas Stevens is owner and captain of the Duke of Bedford.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. When did she sail? A. She left Portsmouth in March; she was in the river in February, and was at Gravesend three or four days. I was on board at Portsmouth, and heard no complaint of a robbery.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I apprehended Saltonstall on the 8th of this month, going up with a barge, off St. Katherine's Dock - he was acting as lighterman . I charged him at the office on suspicion of stealing some plate from a barge going to an Indiaman - he said he knew nothing of it. Next day I took Scott, on board a foreign ship, acting as a Custom-house officer; I told him it was for taking some silver to Alcock's - he said he took a brown paper parcel - that he did not know exactly what was in it, but he believed it was old silver; he said he got it from a person, but did not know his name.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do not you know that he was a Custom-house officer? A. No doubt of it; I have known him for seven years, by sight.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long had you been looking for Saltonstall before you found him? A. About three days. I saw no advertisement about the plate.

ROBERT DAVIS. I am an officer, and was with Miller when he apprehended the prisoners. I heard Scott say he took a brown paper parcel, containing silver, to Alcock's - that is all.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. That is all then? A. I heard nothing more; I did not hear every thing that was said.

SCOTT'S Defence. The brown paper parcel that I took belonged to my landlady; she asked me to take a small parcel of old silver, and directed me where to sell it; Mr. Alcock asked if I could produce the person it belonged to; I said I thought I could, and in an hour I went back to the landlady, and told her; she went out, returned, and said the person was gone to Deptford, but on his return no doubt he would call - I went and told Alcock so.

SCOTT - GUILTY . Aged 45.

SALTONSTALL - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-62

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, OCTOBER 29.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2042. MARY ANN CORHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 coat, value 12s. , the goods of Ephraim Smith .

EPHRAIM SMITH. I am a carman . On the 13th of October the prisoner accosted me in North-street, City-road; she asked me to go home with her; I refused: she then asked me to give her something to drink, which I did - I was not above four minutes with her; I left her, and thought she was gone. I went down my master's stable yard, in North-street , and put my coat on a coach up the yard - I had left her a hundred yards off. While I stood there for a necessary purpose I saw her come down the yard, and go back again; I ran after her, but could not find her. My coat was gone; nobody but her could have taken it - it was a light drab coat.

THOMAS ETTRIDGE . I am a watchman of North-street. I saw the prosecutor going to a public-house with the prisoner - he had a coat on his arm; and in about five minutes I saw the prisoner come from the coach, with it on her arm - it was a light drab coat; I called to know what she had there - she said it was an old Benjamin - I said she had no business with it; she said, "Why, the young man you saw me with sent me for it" - I took no further notice.

JOHN CLARK . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge a few nights afterwards.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating the prosecutor had given her a piece of old carpet, which was what the watchman had seen her with.

THOMAS ETTRIDGE . I was close to her, and am sure it was a coat she had. I said, "Now, Polly, I know you well, and know where to find you if it is wrong;" she said, "Do you think I should be a thief for such an old Benjamin?"

EPHRAIM SMITH. I gave her nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-63

2043. ROBERT BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 14 spoons, value 3l. 10s., and 1 butter-knife, value 10s. , the goods of David Stewart .

HENRY CHARLES KING . I am servant to Mr. David Stewart, a land surveyor , who lives in Great Russell-street . On the 27th of September, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw this property safe in the pantry, on the area floor; I missed it afterwards. I did not see the prisoner till he was examined on the 20th of October.

WILLIAM NATHAN . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, a pawnbroker, of Bloomsbury. On the 27th of September, in the afternoon, the prisoner pawned four spoons, in the name of John Andrews.

JOHN HARRIS . I am servant to Messrs. Chaffers and Co., pawnbrokers, of Greek-street. I have a butter-knife and two tea-spoons, pawned by the prisoner, on the 27th of September, about five o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a public-house in St. Martin's-lane, and saw a man, who stated himself to be a distressed tradesman, and wished me to purchase this silver - I did not want it, but, after some persuasion, I said if he liked to pawn them, I would give so much more for the duplicates; he waited outside while I went and pawned them; I gave him 12s. for the tickets, and was going to redeem the desert-spoon, when I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-64

Before Mr. Recorder.

2044. NICHOLAS BYERS , CHARLES CHILD , and JOSEPH HENRY GEORGE , were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 gelding, price 25l. , the property of Patrick Desmond .

PATRICK DESMOND. I live in Cockpit-yard, James-street, Bedford-row , and am a servant out of place ; I kept my gelding in Cockpit-yard - it was worth 25l.; this happened last month - I forget the date; Byers and George came twice to the stable to me, to buy the horse; they looked at it; Byers said he had a horse that had his knees broken, and if he could sell that he would buy mine, or else make a swap with me, on condition that I gave him three or four days' trial with it; I said I would give him three or four hours' trial, provided I was with him, and would go any distance with him that he liked; I did not mean to part with the horse out of my view. George and Byers came to me afterwards, and told me they wished to have a trial; I borrowed a cart of my neighbour, harnessed the horse to it, and we went as far as Mary-le-bone, riding him about; they seemed to approve of it; they then said they wanted to call at a public-house in Southampton-buildings, Holborn; I think this was the Saturday before the 15th of September; I went to the public-house with them, with the horse and cart (I had not then seen Child); they seemed to be satisfied with the horse, and called for something to drink; Byers said "You had better take home the cart, and bring me a saddle and bridle, to lend me till Monday; I will ride the horse home, and send the saddle and bridle home on Monday;" I went and left the cart with the man I borrowed it of, and returned with the horse; my little boy rode the horse, and Harrington came with me, and brought the horse back to the public-house, with the bridle and saddle; when I got there, I met George at the door; he said he was poorly, and could not stop there any longer, for there was a smoke there; Byers and Child came out, and all three went down with George to a house in Chancery-lane; my little boy rode the horse there, and went with us; I thought they were then going to pay me - they asked if I had the balance of a bill, note, or cheque, or something; they produced a paper to me - I can neither read nor write - I thought it was a cheque - they were to

give 25l. for the horse; Byers was the purchaser; they gave me the paper, and said it was as good as gold, and would be payable on Monday; they knew I could neither read nor write, for I told them so; I relied entirely upon what they said about the paper; both George and Byers said it was as good as gold; Child was close to them, and must have heard that; upon their representation I gave them four sovereigns in exchange; they gave me 1s. 6d. and the piece of paper - they said it was to be paid in Euston-square, by a man named Palmer; Harrington was close by, and said he would not sell the horse for that paper, for it was of no value; I said, "Here, take it, and show it to somebody, and see if it is right;" he took it to the bar, but the publican was not there; he left the room, and brought it back to me, saying,"I am not satisfied with that paper - I am certain it is not right; I would not take such a thing for my horse:" I then turned round to show it to a gentleman in the parlour, and while I was so doing the prisoners all slipped out, one after the other; and, when I went out, my boy was off the horse, and the horse gone: I went to the door as soon as the gentleman had read the note and returned it to me; I went, in consequence of what he said, to tell them I would not take the paper - they were all three gone - I could see neither of them; I gave the paper that night to the officer of the night; I did not go to Euston-square; I have not received the money for the paper - the horse was found in Fleet-market, about two o'clock the next day; at the door of a public-house; I laid hold of it - it was put into the Green-yard, and I have got it back; Palmer came to Guildhall when the prisoners were apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was this your horse? A. Yes; my master is dead; Harrington and I found the horse next day in the open street, harnessed to a chaise; I do not remember Byers telling me at what number in Euston-square Palmer lived; they called for gin and water, rum and water, and ale: I was not sober, but sober enough to know what passed.

Q. Did you not tell a man named Stone that you sold the horse? A. I might; I do not recollect that I did - I will not swear that I did.

Q. Did not you see George that very night? A. Yes; he was taken that night.

COURT. Q. About what time did they go away with the horse? A. About seven o'clock, as near as I can say; I saw George in less than ten minutes, for Harrington kept his eye on him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who was the buyer of the horse? A. Byers; George was with him, and said to him "I will take the horse, if you don't like him in a little time, by your taking a little less;" I did not see them go away with the horse.

Q. Do you remember riding over a man in St. Giles', when you were showing the horse? A. Not that I know of; the cart came against him; I did not stop to see if I had hurt him, for they kept calling out, "Keep on, keep on;" there was no cry raised after me - my horse was kept in Harrington's stable.

Q. What house in Chancery-lane did this happen at? A. The Hole-in-the-Wall public-house, kept by Randull; no objection was made to Harrington's showing the note to the publican; I did not know George before.

COURT. Q. Had you given the change before you showed the note to any body? A. Yes; I threw the change down; I did not know whether I was going to have a cheque or not.

Prisoner BYERS. Q. Was not the bill read over to you before you handed over the sovereigns? A. No; I thought it was a cheque; he might tell me to bring the difference of the paper, when I went home with the cart; I do not recollect his telling me to bring a friend with me - I do not think he did, but cannot say whether he did or not.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not Byers charged before Sir Peter Laurie with having forged the bill? A. The man it was payable on happened to be there; Harrington said it was not a good bill.

Q. Did not the man acknowledge the name was put on it by his authority? A. I do not know.

Prisoner BYERS. Q. What did you fetch Harrington for? A. To see me paid for the horse, as I was a little in liquor; if I had known it was a bill, I would have had nothing to do with it; I have seen cheques, but I cannot read, and do not understand them.

Q. What answer did you make to me when I asked you to let your son go home with me, and bring the bridle and saddle back that evening? A. I told you to send it home, and it would do as well.

COURT. Q. Did he propose for your son to go home with him, to fetch back the saddle and bridle? A. I will not say that he did not.

Prisoner BYERS. Q. Was not that three quarters of an hour after you had taken the bill and given me the difference? A. You did not let me show the bill to any body before you were off - George wrote a receipt for the money.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is this your receipt? A. It may be the same; I put my mark to a paper which George wrote, and which they called a receipt. (reads)

Received of Mr. Byers, Twenty-five Pounds, for a horse, delivered on the 13th of September, 1827.

£28 0 0. P. DESMOND, his X mark.

Prisoner CHILD. Q. When the bill was given to you, did I represent myself as Palmer's clerk? A. I do not recollect that you did; you said you had come to pay Byers a bill for some eggs for a gentleman, that is all I heard you say: I gave the bill to a gentleman to read after they went out - I forget whether I heard it read before they went out.

Q. Did not Byers tell you he was disappointed in getting the bill cashed, but there was the bill if you would take it? A. I did not hear that - I did not know but that I was going to get sovereigns when I took the cart home: the bill had not been shown me then.

EDWARD HARRINGTON . I live in Cockpit-yard, and am a labourer; at the time in question I was a costermonger - I have known Desmond about twelve months; I went with him and his little boy with the horse to the public-house in Southampton-buildings; George came to the door, and said he could not stand the smoke - the other two came out afterwards; we all went to the Hole-in-the-Wall, public-house, in Chancery-lane, with the boy and horse - we went into the parlour; I left the boy at the door, telling him not to part with the horse till I came to him - I told him his father was tipsy; the three prisoners, I, and Desmond were all together in the parlour - several other gentlemen were there; they called for some gin and water, rum

and water, and ale - I considered Desmond at that time to be drunk; Byers and George both wanted me to drink, but I would have nothing but one glass of ale - I was perfectly sober; I told Desmond several times, in the prisoners' hearing, that he was drunk, and told Desmond he was an old fool for taking such a thing after they wrote it.

Q. What did they write? A. I am no scholar - I saw them write more than one paper; Desmond put his mark to a paper which George wrote, and I called him an old fool: Byers took a paper out of his pocket, and told him that was a bill for 28l. 18s. 6d., payable on the Monday following, and that it was as good as gold; Desmond put four sovereigns on the table - Byers took them, and gave him 1s. 6d. back; I heard him read the bill to us, but I told him I did not understand bills or cheques; it was after Desmond gave the money and took the paper that I called him an old fool; he then gave me the bill, and asked me to show it to some gentlemen, to see if it was right - I went to the bar - the landlord was not there; and as I returned from the bar, I met Byers and George rushing out of the parlour - I said nothing to them; Child and Desmond were sitting down at the table; I gave Desmond the bill, and told him to show it to some gentlemen: I then followed them out, and George had some gin in a half-pint glass - he wanted me to drink; he stood by the side of the horse, and the little boy was on it; Byers pulled the boy off the horse, and got on himself; he did not do it with violence, he took him off quietly; Desmond and Child were then in the parlour, not within sight of the horse; I told Byers the man was not satisfied with the bill, and I should like him to wait till he came out - George was by at the time, wanting me to drink gin; George told him the gin was not paid for - Byers pulled a red pocket-book out of his pocket, and gave him, saying that would settle for all, and galloped away on the horse: I then told George to go in and see if Desmond was satisfied, but he said he had nothing at all to do with it - Child came out, and walked away in another direction towards, Holborn; I laid hold of George, and kept him till I came up to a watchman - I said he had the pocket-book belonging to the man who ran away with the horse, and if he did not settle for the horse, I would deliver him to the watchman - I did so; he said he did not know any thing about Byers, or the bargain - he did not know any of the agreements, or at all about it; this was on Saturday night, after dusk: the next day, at half-past two o'clock, I saw the horse harnessed to a chaise, at a ginshop door in Fleet-market; I gave it to a constable to take to the Green-yard; a groom, who was in the chaise, was brought before Sir Peter Laurie, and discharged - I have not seen him since: on Monday, Byers and Child came to Guildhall - Byers threatened that he would lock me up, for taking the horse on Sunday; I did not go to Euston-square about the bill.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Nobody presented the bill that you know of? A. No; Byers and Child came voluntarily to Guildhall - Desmond told me they had been trying the horse; he was told the bill was for 28l. 18s. 6d., and gave the change in my presence - Byers did not object to my showing the bill to the landlord, but as soon as I went to show it, he ran out and took the horse away.

Q. Were not you and George sitting together in the public-house? A. I was there listening; I did not know but hey were going to pay for the horse.

Q. Was any force used to compel him to take the bill? A. Not in my presence; it is a very large room - there were eight or nine persons in it.

Prisoner BYERS. Q. Did not you hold the horse while I mounted it? A. Yes; and I told you to wait till he came out, but you wished me good night; I heard you say, "Will you lend me the saddle and bridle till Monday?" Desmond said, "Yes, and the boy shall go with you if you like;" this was in the public-house, after he had paid the sovereigns; Desmond was in the public-house when he got on the horse - I bade him stop, and he gave George his pocket-book, and said, "That will settle for all."

JOHN DESMOND. I am twelve years old. I rode my father's horse to Southampton-buildings, with the saddle and bridle; I afterwards went to another public-house in Chancery-lane; the prisoners walked with my father there- I recollect George and Byers; Harrington was with us; I staid outside on the horse for about half an hour, walking it up and down; a man came out with a white apron on - I believe it was Byers; I saw George with him: Byers pulled me off the horse, and jumped on himself. I said,"Sir, you must not have the horse till my father comes;""Oh, my boy," said he, "your father is paid, and it is all right:" he galloped away with the horse - I saw no more of him; George walked away down a street - Harrington followed and caught hold of him; I am sure I told him he must not have the horse till my father came out.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Harrington present all the time after Byers came out? A. He was just coming out when he did; when my father came home with the cart I did not see him take any money out with him; George did not go away with the horse; he walked quickly away - Harrington kept his eye on him, and overtook him easily; he went very quick when he got into the other street. I heard nobody ask for the money for the liquor.

RICHARD SAUNDERS, JUN. I am a watchman. Harrington delivered George to me, and charged him with defrauding Desmond of a horse; the pocket-book was found on him at the watch-house; he denied being concerned in the transaction, but did not deny all knowledge of it.

Cross-examined. Q. He denied being concerned in any fraud? A. Yes; he acknowledged he had witnessed the transaction.

RICHARD SAUNDERS . I was constable of the night. - George was brought to the watch-house; I found three pocket-books on him - one was a red one; Harrington said Byers had given him that; there were several bills in George's own pocket-books, and some duplicates in the red pocket-book, which were returned to Byers; I did not go to Crescent-street myself. Byers and Child came voluntarily to Guildhall on Monday, the 17th, and were detained.

The bill paid to Desmond was here produced - it was dated the 13th of August, 1827, at two months after date, for 28l. 18s. 6d., value received of Nicholas Byers, upon and accepted by Wm. Palmer, rag-merchant, No. 49, Crescent-street, Euston-square.

WILLIAM KELL . I keep the Golden Horse public-house, Theohald's-road. On Monday, the 10th of September, Byers and a man named Geary called at my house, and had a pint of beer at the bar - Desmond came on his cob; Byers said he wanted a horse, and thought that

would suit him very well - that he had got a broken kneed horse, and if they could swap he would do it. On Thursday, the 13th, George and a young man came, and said they understood I knew where they could see the horse; I took them to Desmond - his stable is near my house: this was about five o'clock in the afternoon, and in about half an hour Byers came and said they were two friends of his, whom he had sent to see the horse; he then went down to Desmond - he returned to my house with Desmond, and stopped there drinking till about eleven o'clock at night; they were both in liquor when they went away on the Friday evening. George and Desmond came again and were there above three hours. Byers said if Desmond would let him have the horse for two or three days, to try, he would leave the value in any body's hands - Desmond objected; he said he might have a trial, but he would be with him. I went with Desmond on the Sunday, and found the horse at Mr. Lay's wine-vaults, at the corner of Fleet-lane; the groom was taken before the Magistrate, and discharged.

Prisoner BYERS. Q. Did Lay tell you I had lent him the horse? A. He did.

GEORGE THOMAS HARRINGTON . I am a constable. - On the 16th of September, between two and three o'clock, Desmond came to me, and said his horse was in Fleet-market; I took possession of the man who was with it - he gave the name of George Cousins. I detained Byers and Child when they came to Guildhall.

Cross-examined. Q. They came of their own accord to give an account of the transaction? A. They did.

RICHARD SAUNDERS . I returned the pocket-book to the prisoner, by the Alderman's order; Palmer was examined, and was arrested at Guildhall - he is in Whitecross-street prison now.

PATRICK DESMOND re-examined. Q. Did you see Byers go out of the room after you sent Harrington to inquire about the bill? A. Yes - I did not expect he was going to take the horse; I did not mean him to have it till I was satisfied about the paper - he did not say he was going to take it, nor did I think he was going to take it, till I had received an answer to my inquiries. I had met him twice about the horse besides on this Saturday. I saw Palmer at Guildhall - he was not arrested at my suit.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I was on duty at this Court - Sir Peter Laurie sent me to make inquiries in Crescent-street - I did not have the bill, I had a direction on a piece of paper: I went to a house close by Euston-square - I am not certain of the street or number - the person was not at home: I left word for him to come to Guildhall - I understand he did come.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-65

2045. GABRIEL ORE was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Elizabeth Payne .

MR. PHILLIPS (on the part of the prosecution) declined offering any evidence, as he was totally unable to substantiate the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-66

2046. JOHN FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , at St. Pancras , 1 gelding, price 40l.; 1 saddle, value 2l., and 1 bridle, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Samuel Mott .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES PETCHY . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Samuel Mott, who lives at Muchadam, in Hertfordshire . I had the care of his gelding: on the 23d of July I turned it out into the field about six o'clock in the evening - I put the saddle and bridle into the stable, and locked the door - the saddle had not been used that day - there are two gates to the field from the road: I put the gelding into a field through the gate leading out of the stable yard - there are two other gates to the field - one leads out of that field, into another, and one leads into the garden - that gate has hurdles set round an apple-tree, to protect the apples: the hurdles went all round the gate - the horse could not get through that gate without breaking through the hurdles, which were all closed, but I am not certain whether they were all tied; all the gates were fastened - the small gate leading into the garden was pinned, and the horse could not get out without the pin being taken out. On the following morning, between six and seven o'clock, I found the stable door standing a little way open, and the bolt of the lock forced out; I missed the saddle and bridle. I went into the field, and the gelding was gone; there was a poney and another horse left; I found in the field one girth of the saddle and the corn-seive, which had been taken out of the corn-bin. I saw that one hurdle was open, and traced the horse through the gate into the garden, by his foot-marks; he was peculiarly shod - he had then gone up a grass walk by the side of the field, through two gates, which had been left pinned, and had then to cross more fields into the road. I accompanied master to London next day, and went with Armstrong and Attfield to several places - and about eleven o'clock in the morning of the 25th, I saw the horse in Chenies-mews, near Tottenham-court-road, and saw the saddle and bridle hanging in the stable there; it was a dark brown gelding. I saw the prisoner, but not when I first went in - I saw him a little after one o'clock; I waited for him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that you saw the prisoner that day? A. Yes; what I said was taken down; I was asked if I saw French, and said I did - I was there two or three times; I only signed my examination once - it was read over to me, and I signed it. I cannot say whether every thing I said was taken down.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. On the 25th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock, I went with Armstrong and Petchy to No. 42, Chenies-mews; a woman answered the door - I went into the stable, and Petchy immediately identified the first horse in the first stall; he said, "Here is my master's horse" - we found a saddle and bridle there, which he also claimed; we waited some time, for the owner of the stables to come home - we did not see him, and we took the horse to a stable in the Curtain-road. On the 6th of October I, Garton, and Armstrong went to a house in Park-place, near Kennington-common - I knocked at the door; a woman looked out of the first floor window, and I knew her to be the woman whom I had seen at the stables in Chenies-mews - we were admitted at last; I went up stairs, and saw the prisoner there - it is above three miles from the mews. I said, "French, here you are" - "Yes, Mr. Attfield," said he; I told him

I had had a great deal of trouble in looking after him since the 25th of July - he said he was exceedingly sorry for it, but he had been kept out of the way by the parties, who had allowed him 1l. a week - I said he must get ready and go with us; I asked him about the horses in Chenies-mews, whether the stables there were his - he said they were: we then took him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. He said at once they were his stables? A. Yes - he behaved very well, and came very quietly. He said that the parties had allowed him 1l. a week to keep out of the way.

THOMAS GARTON . I am head constable of Worship-street. I was with Attfield and Armstrong at the prisoner's apprehension; the horses were brought to the office on the 25th of July, and taken to Westall's livery-stables, and on the 26th I delivered one of the horses to Mr. Mott - it was one that Attfield had brought to me.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD re-examined. The horse delivered to Mr. Mott was the one I found in the stable.

MR. JOHN HENRY STANDEN . I am a solicitor, and live in Upper Gower-street. The stables behind the house belong to my mother; they are No. 42, Upper Chenies-mews - I let them to the prisoner about February last, for two years, from Lady day last.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether he has horses of his own, or takes them in to keep? A. I cannot say.

MR. THOMAS SAMUEL MOTT. The horse delivered to me from the stable was my property: I have no other Christian name. It is impossible the horse could have strayed - I gave 70l. for it. My house is twenty-eight miles from Chenies-mews.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

JOSEPH TOWNLEY . I am a hackneyman, and live at Islington - I have known the prisoner between two and three years; he attended to my horses; he bore an honest character - I trusted him with horses to doctor, before he went to Chenies-mews - I think I sent one to Chenies-mews; he was in the habit of receiving horses to doctor.

Four other witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

THOMAS FRENCH . I am the prisoner's son, and am seventeen years old. I saw these horses taken away from the stable - I remember a dark brown one - I was present when it was taken away.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, how that horse came to your father's stables? A. I went out to work at six o'clock on a Wednesday, I think it was, and when I came back to breakfast it was there; it was not there when I went out; my father was at home when I went out in the morning.

Q. Do you know who brought the horse there? A. A tall young man brought it; he was there on the evening before about it; his name is Thomas Shaw - I have seen him before at my father's stables; he lives in Osnaburg-street, New-road - I do not know the number; it is a stable-yard; he was to pay a guinea a week for the horse - I heard that said.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did you hear it said, he was to pay a guinea a week? A. On the Monday morning - I cannot say what day of the month it was.

Q. Monday would be the 23d? A. Yes.

Q. Was it Monday morning that Shaw came to the stables? A. It was Monday when I came from breakfast.

Q. You said before it was Wednesday? A. Yes; the horse came on Wednesday - I came home to breakfast at eight o'clock on Wednesday; my father was not at home then, but he was at six.

Q. When you came home on Monday night, was your father at home? A. Yes; he went out on Tuesday morning, after I went out - I found the horse there on Wednesday morning - I do not know who brought it myself; my father was out on Wednesday; only one horse was brought - there were two there before - I do not know who brought them - I have known Shaw twelve months; he is very well, I believe - I have not been to Osnaburg-street since my father was apprehended - I did not know before this morning that I was to come here to give evidence - Shaw keeps livery-stables.

COURT Q. You went out at six o'clock on Wednesday - when did the officers come? A. On Thursday; it was Thursday; I was fetched from my work, when they came, as there was nobody at home with the children; a little boy who lives opposite fetched me.

Q. Then you came and spoke to the officers? A. Yes; the horse was brought on Wednesday, between six and eight o'clock - I saw the officers when I was fetched - I did not tell them when the horse was brought; they did not ask me.

Q. Did you ask why they took the horses away? A. No; my mother was at home, crying, as they took her away from the children - I did not ask them why they took my mother away; which way was I to interfere? they took the horse away with her.

Q. Did you not say, "That is the horse my father is to be paid for?" A. I told Attfield it was the horse that was brought in the morning, and my mother told them who brought it - I will swear that.

Q. Who did she tell them had brought it? A. The name of Young - I believe the name of Wright; the young man who brought it, said his name was Wright.

Q. You said it was Thomas Shaw? A. Thomas Shaw came about the horse; he bargained about it; my father and I were in the stable at the time; my father slept at home the night before the horse was taken away - I do not know where he slept the next night; he was not at home, nor my mother; the officers had taken her away; they locked her up at Worship-street, and would not let me see her - I did not state at Worship-street, that it was Shaw's horse; they did not ask me any question.

Q. Did you say to the officers, "My mother knows nothing about this horse; it was brought by Shaw, and you will find him at Osnaburg-street?" A. No.

Q. Did you tell any body, from that time to this, that the horse was brought there by Shaw? A. No - I have not been at home: I have been at work at Dulwich - Shaw keeps livery stables; he keeps them at this time; he had not room in his own stable for it - I was there the day before; he had three horses tied up under the shed then - I do not think I have seen him since that night.

Q. Did you not go to him, and say, "My mother is taken, because your horse was found in our stable, come and get her liberated?" A. No - I have not been to him;

my father has been taken up three weeks on Saturday - I have not been to look after Shaw - I have not had an opportunity - I have been at my place.

Q. Well, but your father's life was concerned, and did not you go and inquire for Shaw? A. No - I had no idea of it; there were my sisters at home - I did not send them there - I was not present when my father was examined.

Q. After your father was taken, did you tell any body Shaw had left the horse there? A. No.

Q. What became of the stables after the horses were taken away? A. There was nobody to do the business - I do not know where my father was, and did not inquire where he was - I have since been living at my place, with Mr. Berwick, coach-master of Dulwich.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Berwick, that your father had been taken up for a horse, lodged in the stable by another man? A. No - Shaw is a tallish young man - I have not seen him since; my mother was kept in prison three weeks - I went to see her; she did not desire me to call on Shaw - I did not tell her Shaw had brought the horse; she was up stairs when it came, and could see if she liked - I was not there when it came - I have not talked with her about it, or how it came there.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 54.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Reference Number: t18271025-67

2047. BENJAMIN BYFIELD was indicted for manslaughter .

JAMES KING. I keep the Mulberry Tree public-house, at Mile end . On the 25th of September , at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, and John Williams , the deceased, were at my house - the prisoner and a friend brought in some steaks, which were cooked, and the witness Young, who had come in with the deceased, wanted some of it; the prisoner said, "Take it all," but he afterwards wished a particular piece, which she had put her fork into - Young called the prisoner a great many disagreeable names, and abused him - the deceased then got up, and struck the prisoner with his fist, twice in the breast, before the prisoner struck him; the prisoner was very hungry, but wished Young to share in the steak - he then got up, and hit Williams on the breast - he then fell backwards on the fender - the edge of the fender cut his head, which bled profusely - I wished to send for a doctor, but he said he was doing very well; the prisoner did not attempt to strike him again, and had done nothing to offend him - Young took him away - I afterwards saw him dead.

JAMES EDWARDS . I was at this public-house. I saw the prisoner and the deceased there, but did not know them before; the prisoner sat having some steaks; the deceased sat on the opposite side with Young, and some more friends - Young went over and asked him for a piece of steak; he told her to take some; she put a fork into a piece, which he wished to keep; he shoved the plate forward to her, and said,"Take it all;" the deceased and Young then both called him names, and the deceased struck him; somebody said,"You are big enough to take your own part; why don't you have a fight?" the deceased then struck him again, and the prisoner fell back in his seat; he got up and struck the deceased in the chest; he cut his head against the fender - I did what I could to stop the blood, and left him in the care of Young - the deceased was certainly the man to blame.

JOHN WILSON . I am a carpenter, and knew the deceased. He came in for some beer, sat down with me, and we drank together; the prisoner came in, and was eating - there was a bustle - I saw Young there; Williams jumped up: I said, "For goodness don't interfere, you have nothing to do with it;" he struck the prisoner twice over the table: the prisoner said he would forgive that, if he could get his dinner comfortably; I said, "Oh, he is tipsy, don't take any notice;" he said, "I won't - only let me eat my dinner:" somebody said he was big enough to take his own part - Williams struck him again; the prisoner then struck him once with a sort of shove, and he fell with his head against the fender - it bled very much; the deceased was the person to blame.

CATHERINE YOUNG . I had seen the deceased several times - the prisoner was eating his dinner; I asked him for some - he allowed me to take it; after he had done, he said I might take it all; I went to put a fork into one piece - he took it away, and put it into a piece of paper to put into his pocket; and while I was gone up stairs, words occurred between them - I saw Williams strike him twice; the prisoner then gave him a push, and, being intoxicated, he fell - I attended him to the hospital; he died on the Monday: he did not think himself at all in danger, but said he should soon be out, for no material damage was done.

-. I am a surgeon. I attended the deceased at the hospital; the injury he received produced erysipelas, which caused his death.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the witness, Young, had thrown the steak at him, and afterwards three pewter pots, and used disgusting language, to induce the deceased to interfere.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-68

2048. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Josiah Taylor , and stealing 2 blankets, value 20s., his property; and 2 sheets, value 20s., the goods of Daniel Hardwicke .

DANIEL HARDWICKE. I am a gardener , and live at Josiah Taylor's, at Old Brompton - I sleep in the kitchen. Last Tuesday night, between six and seven o'clock, my sheets were taken from the end of the house - the person who took them must have got over the stable-yard, over the veranda, and pulled a pane of glass out of the window, which I had seen whole at six o'clock; we did not discover the robbery till we went to bed; the house was secure at six o'clock, and I then saw the sheets safe - they were brought to the house next day by Wilsden, with two blankets belonging to Mr. Taylor.

WILLIAM WILSDEN . I am carman to Mr. Gunter, of Earl's-court, about half a mile from Mr. Taylor's. On Tuesday, the 23d of October , I found our cow-house door was not fastened as usual; I opened the door, and found the prisoner laying there in these blankets - he said a gentleman gave them to him in a street by the side of Piccadilly - he had also got the sheets; I gave him in charge; I do not know what parish Mr. Taylor's house is in.

JOHN JAMES . I am a constable, and took him in charge from the cow-house; he said he got the property from a

house just by - he pointed Mr. Taylor's house out to me, and they claimed the property; I found a knife on him, which he said he cut the glass out with - that he then put his hand in, and opened the catch of the window: I am not certain what parish the house is in.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28. Of stealing only . - Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-69

2049. ELIZABETH PRINCE and MARY BROWNING were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Carlisle , on the 21st of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 hat, value 4s.; 1 piece of copper, value 1/4d.; 1 sixpence; 2 penny pieces, and 5 halfpence, his property .

THOMAS CARLISLE. I live at a butter-shop in Chiswell-street, but sleep in Grub-street. On Sunday, the 21st of October, about eleven o'clock at night, I had been to my place, stopping with my mistress' grandmother, as master and mistress were gone out for the day; I left there at near eleven o'clock: as I was coming down Type-street, the two prisoners stopped me, and asked if I had got any money; I said I had 11d.: Browning took hold of the collar of my coat, and took me down an alley by the side of a public-house; she took me underneath the arch, which goes out of Type-street into Grub-street .

Q. Did you cry out? A. There was nobody near me; Prince immediately followed after her - Browning did not ask me to go any where with her, or say any thing, but immediately began pulling me about; she undid my waistcoat and the waistband of my trousers - I said nothing to her; Prince held my arm up - Browning searched my pockets; and on my calling out, somebody looked out of window - nobody came to my assistance till after it was all done; I then went down the court, and saw the watchman; I felt in my pocket, and the money was all gone - Prince took off my hat; they stood in the court with a man - I asked him to take the women away, but he refused to assist; I saw the watchman at the bottom of the court - he said he did not hear me call out - I told him what had happened; I cannot say how far the prisoners were off then: I went down Type-street and Grub-street with the watchman; he looked down the alley, but could not find them; I went to the watch-house and told what had happened - the officer sent the watchmen round with me again; we found Browning on the pavement, and Prince under the archway with a man - they asked the man whether he had got my money; he said No.

Q. How came you to let them do this without crying out? A. I did call out, after they got my money; I attended at the watch-house, and gave the same account at the office the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not because you were afraid your master would inquire about your hat that you gave any alarm? A. I cried out as soon as they took my money; a man looked out of a window, and Prince took my hat off - I cannot say how long I was in the alley - it might he a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes; I was pulled into the alley; I did not want to go with them - the public-house was shut up, and there was nobody for me to call out to - I am not in the habit of being out late; I did not know there was any harm in telling them what money I had got - they were pulling me about, and searching my pockets; I was very much frightened - I do not know why I did not halloo before; I have seen Browning at our shop - she came to buy butter; I do not recollect seeing Prince before - she was tipsy - the man stood looking on all the time, and heard me halloo - both the prisoners were with me when the person looked out of the window - I was dragged into the court.

COURT. Q. Did you get your hat again? A. Yes; Prince threw it down; they did not fondle with me, or attempt to entice me any where.

GEORGE STAPLES . I am a watchman. About a quarter past eleven o'clock, I was in Type-street, and saw this lad come out of a court, on the other side the road, crying- I was about nine yards from the court - I called him over, and asked what was the matter; he said he had been robbed of 11d. by two girls; I asked if he should know them again; he said Yes; I took him through the next court, thinking they might come into Grub-street, but could not see then; I then took him into the court he was robbed in - only two or three houses there are inhabited; I took him to the watch-house, and afterwards went out with him again; he pointed to Browning, who was about 100 yards off, and said, "There is the young woman:" my brother watchman took her; he said, "There is the other," pointing to Prince, who was talking to some man; she said, "What am I to go to the watch-house for?"

Cross-examined. Q. Were you on your beat? A. Yes; it is about twelve yards from the court; I heard no hallooing; I had come up that moment from calling eleven o'clock - it is a very dark narrow court; there is one lamp there, but it gives a bad light; he could not see them, unless it was done under the lamp; the public-house had been closed sooner than usual that night; when I saw the boy his waistband, and his waistcoat were open.

JAMES HODGSON . I live at No. 3, Type-court; I was in bed a little after eleven o'clock, and heard what I thought the cry of a little girl in the court; I laid a minute or two, and heard the voice say, "Pray let me go; I have got no more;" I jumped out of bed, opened the window, and called out, "What are you doing with that girl?" I then saw it was a boy - I saw Browning, as I suppose there - I could only distinguish her by her voice; I have heard her speak several times before; after I called out, she let go of the boy, and went down the court; Bruce called the boy to him, and asked what they had robbed him of; he said 11d.

Cross-examined. Q. It is a bad light in the court? A. It is an oil lamp; I could not discern any body's features.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a constable; the prisoners were brought to the watch-house on this charge; the boy said, in their hearing, that he was going up Type-street, and one of them met him at the end of the court, and took him up there; that one held his hands while the other robbed him, and then took his hat off; that a man hallooed out of a window to them, and they ran away, after dropping the hat; they denied it; I found on Browning 1s. 31/2d. in copper, including a pocket-piece called a Macclesfield halfpenny; also 2s. in silver; a man passed by the watch-house, whom I knew kept company with Browning; I took him in charge, and fetched Carlisle to the watch-house; as we came along, he said he had lost a Macclesfield halfpenny; I threw the money down on the table, and he picked out the halfpenny.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find a sixpence on either of them? A. No; I found nothing on Prince.

WILLIAM JOHN BRUCE . I am an auctioneer: I was up stairs, looking out of my window, in Type-court; I saw a boy crying, and begging very hard to be let go; the prisoner Browning was holding him; another woman was some distance off, whom I could not recognize; she must have heard him crying out; I was at the second floor window, and called out to know what they were doing; he was saying, "You have got all my money, pray let me go."

Cross-examined. Q. The court is dark? A. Yes; there is an oil lamp there; I knew Browning's voice, and I recognized her features, for she looked up.

SAMUEL ANDREWS . I am shopman to a linen-draper; I was in bed, in Type-court, and heard a person begging to be let go - I thought it was a girl's voice, but on looking out of the window, I saw Browning having hold of the boy's hands; she swore she would wring his neck off - I have seen her several times before, and swear positively to her; there were two women and a man there; Bruce called out, and they went away.

BROWNING's Defence. There is only one lamp in the court, and nobody could perceive a person unless they were close to them; the prosecutor said at Worship-street, that the watchman was twelve yards off, and afterwards said he did not see him till he came to Type-street; Harrison asked him if he had lost a pocket-piece, and he said Yes; there is hardly a 5s. paper of half-pence without such a pocket-piece as that in it; I had treated this young woman with a quartern of rum, and she is innocent.

BROWNING - GUILTY. Aged 22. Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Seven Years .

PRINCE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-70

2050. CAROLINE BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 carpet, value 3s., and 1 pair of scales, value 5s. , the goods of Timothy Moriarty .

TIMOTHY MORIARTY. I live in Little Ormond-yard, Queen-square ; the prisoner and her husband lodged with me for four months; they paid regularly; her husband still remains there. On the 6th of October I missed these things; her husband was in bed at the time, and I believe they were in distress.

SARAH LEE . I live in Boswell-court, and keep a rag-shop; the prisoner sold me this carpet for 2s. 6d., and Moriarty claimed it next day; she had left the scales at our house also, and fetched them away.

ROBERT HALL . I am a watchman, and took her in charge; she told us where she had sold the carpet.(Carpet produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-71

First London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2051. EDWARD ERRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 3 lbs. weight of lamb, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Mann .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-72

2052. HENRY POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 1 sovereign , the money of Henry Jarvis .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-73

2053. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , at St. Andrew, Holborn, in the dwelling-house of John Marchant , 1 tin box, value 5s.; 4 seals, value 30s.; 3 watch keys, value 15s.; 1 ring, value 2s.; 2 buckles, value 1s.; 3 guineas, 3 half guineas, two 7s. pieces, 1 half sovereign, 68 shillings, 37 sixpences, 1 piece of foreign coin, called a Spanish dollar, value 4s. 6d., and two 10l. Bank notes, his property .

JOHN MARCHANT. I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live at No. 6, Field-lane, Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . This property was in my cash-box, which was deposited in a desk in my bed-room, which is the first floor front room - I rent the house - I saw it safe on Monday morning, the 8th of October, when I took some silver out - it was then all correct; I went out, and on coming home, between ten and eleven o'clock that evening, I was informed it was stolen; I looked, and found my desk forced open, and the cash-box and contents were gone - it had contained 29l. 17s. 6d, in money, three gold seals, three gold keys, a gold wedding ring, and silver seal - the box was found, with the contents untouched.

RICHARD RICHARDS . I am a cordwainer, and live next door to Marchant. On the 8th of October, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, my wife alarmed me, and I heard a noise in the back premises; I looked out of the window, and heard somebody trying to get up some place - I heard the noise of somebody getting up; I looked towards Marchant's yard, and asked who was there, but received no answer; I asked again, but got no answer; I presently saw a man getting up Marchant's water cistern; I asked what business he had there; he said he was looking after his dog; I told him that was not the place to look after his dog, he ought to go into the front place to look for it; he then got from the cistern to the tiles; he said his dog cost him half a guinea, and he would be d-d if he would not have it; he walked across the tiles, and I saw him trying to get into my house; I ran down stairs to the street door; somebody said he had fallen into the water-butt - I went towards the yard door, and met him in the passage - it was the prisoner; I laid hold of his collar; he asked me to let him go; I said he should not till he had got the dog he was looking after; I took him to the street door, he said, "Let me go, can't you?" I said, "No, not till you have got your dog;" I called Dupuis to my assistance.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. It was quite dark? A. Yes; I saw no dog - I did not look into any other yard.

Q. After you called to him he came towards you? A. He came on the tiles; he would have gone into Marchant's yard again if he could; I was on the second floor; he came into my yard, and into my passage.

CHARLES DUPUIS . I live next door to Marchant. On the 8th of October I was standing three doors from his house; his son came out, and complained of the house being robbed; I ran into the house, through the passage, and saw the prisoner on the party wall, in the act of dropping into my yard - I ran round to my own door, and saw Richards, my lodger, in the passage with the prisoner; I caught hold of him, and found this cash-box concealed up his back -

- I said, "What have you got there?" he said "Nothing." I said, "Give me the box," and took it from him - I gave it to Brown.

Cross-examined. Q. You were three doors off? A. Yes. Richards did not call me to his assistance; the box was locked; he did not say he found it on the tiles.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a watchman, and received him in charge; I held his hands, as he endeavoured to get rid of something, and Corby took from him a phosphorus bottle, a bundle of matches, a picklock-key, a latch-key, and a chisel.

GEORGE CORBY . I am watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought in about ten o'clock; I found these implements on him.

THOMAS GREEN . I am constable of the night. I took charge of the box, and in an hour and a half Marchant produced a key, which opened it.

JOHN MARCHANT. I cannot swear to the box, but to its contents - I have the key here; it contains two 10l. notes, and the rest of the property stated in the indictment - it is worth 35l. altogether. I rent the whole house, and am sorry to say I do know something of the prisoner - he was not in my service.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18271025-74

2054. JAMES NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , 2 heifers, price 26l. , the property of Jacob Bosanquet .

JOHN COZENS . I am a bailiff to Mr. Jacob Bosanquet, of Broxonbury, near Waltham-cross, Hertfordshire. On the 3d of September I missed two of his heifers out of a mead, called South-mead, in Hertfordshire ; they were at pasture with others - I had seen them all safe on the 1st: they were shut in a field. I saw them again the same evening, and knew them. I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

THOMAS BURRELL . I am a salesman at Smithfield - I live in Essex. Seven or eight weeks before the 3d of September I bought ten beasts out of those belonging to Mr. Bosanquet - he had about forty. I looked at the whole, and drew ten out of them: I noticed the whole in selecting them. I particularly noticed one which I rejected as not fit for market. On the 3d of September I saw the prisoner trying to get two heifers into Smithfield-market; it being fair day he had a great deal of trouble - one of them passed close by my cattle - I knew it to be the one I had so particularly handled at Bosanquet's. I questioned him about it for twenty minutes - he said he was employed by a person named Brown, to bring them to market, and was not to sell them unless he made 17l. a piece for them before his master came - I had them tied up with my stock, as he said his master would soon he there. I made him stop, and kept my eye on him: I was very busy, and the first opportunity he had he made off. I let the beasts remain there till the market was over, and then sent them home by Gibbs to Mr. Bosanquet. I looked for the prisoner daily, and met him on the 1st of October, near Shoreditch church - I jumped out of my gig, and took him.

JOHN COZENS . I saw the heifers when they came home, and knew them.

THOMAS GIBBS . I drove the heifers to Mr. Bosanquet's- Cozens saw the same, and claimed them.

JOHN ROE . I am a City patrol. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 1st of October.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it all to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18271025-75

2055. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 2 pieces of mahogany, value 10s. , the goods of Benjamin Ingram .

MARY INGRAM . I am the daughter of Benjamin Ingram, who has a timber-yard in Beech-street . On the 19th of September, about a quarter-past nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner went up the yard, and came down again with a pair of mahogany posts - I gave information, and he was taken immediately.

WALTER PEARCE . I am a cabinet-maker. I met the prisoner with the property about thirty yards off - I made inquiries at the yard, then returned, and secured him in a court in Whitecross-street - the property was then at his side.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-76

2056. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James John Brassington , from his person .

JAMES JOHN BRASSINGTON. I am a clerk . On the 8th of October, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing down Lombard-street , and was told my handkerchief was taken; the street-keeper came up with the prisoner, and produced it.

WILLIAM ROW . I was in Lombard-street, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's right-hand coat pocket; I told a person near, who informed him, while I followed the prisoner a few yards up White Hart-court, and found him in Kilby's custody. I am sure he is the person.

THOMAS KILBY . I saw two persons running after the prisoner - he turned up White Hart-court, and when I got there I found him standing in a shop-door, with the handkerchief between his legs - I picked it up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-77

2057. MARTHA BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of John Annis .

HENRY THOMAS . I am servant to John Annis, a pawnbroker , at Sparrow-corner . On the 1st of October, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came in; I turned her out, having suspicion of her, but in five minutes she came in again, and took a gown down; I followed, and took her with it, about a quarter of a mile off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271025-78

2058. SOLOMON JACOBS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Whitworth, the

younger , on the 10th of October , and stealing 1 coat, value 3l., and 1 cap, value 3s., his property .

JOSEPH WHITWORTH, JUN. I live in Rose and Crown-court, Broad-street-buildings . On the 10th of October I went to bed about half-past ten o'clock, leaving the door on the spring-lock, and there was a spring-latch as well; Mr. Potter, who was out, had a key to let himself in; my wife alarmed me about twenty minutes after one o'clock; I saw a light go out of the shop: she called out that there were thieves; I called Stop thief! out at window, and awoke my cousin; he came down; the watchman came by, crying half-past one - we got a light from him, and found the inner door had been bored with a centre-bit, to admit a man's hand to undo the bottom bolt; I had not been in the bed-room, which is the middle room, more than ten minutes before I heard a rustle at the door, and a rapping at the shutters; then somebody whistled through the key-hole, and said, "Jem, Jem - Harry, Harry;" and before two o'clock a second rapping came, and the same whistling and hallooing was repeated, and a voice said, "What are you about so long?" my cousin and I dressed ourselves - I got behind the front door, with the latch in one hand, and the lock in the other - my cousin stood with a sword, and said if he approached in he would cut him down. When the watchman had called two, I heard a person come down the court, rap at the door, and call, "Jem, Jem - Harry, Harry - what are you about so long?" it was the same voice. I can swear the prisoner came up to the door, and repeated the same words; just as he had got Je out of his mouth, I came out, and turned the corner quick - the step of the next door projected, and he stumbled, and was secured; there was not another soul to be seen in the court. A coat and cap were taken away.

JOHN WHITWORTH . My cousin awoke me - I heard the noise at the door three times - it appeared to be the same voice. I helped to take the prisoner.

JONATHAN LOVETT . I am a watchman. On the morning in question I saw two men, one of them resembling the prisoner - I looked at them - they turned their backs to me, and moved on about twenty yards; I turned, and saw them cross Rose and Crown-court, about twenty yards - I left them, and saw no more till the alarm was given.

WILLIAM POTTER . I locked the door after I came in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-79

2059. THOMAS WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 1 horse-collar, value 12s., the goods of Bartholomew Watts , his master .

JAMES WESTWOOD . I am foreman to Bartholomew Watts, a horse-breaker , in South-place, Finsbury . The prisoner worked for us; I lost a horse-collar on the 27th of August, and have not seen it since. The prisoner left next day.

JOSEPH WYETT . On the 27th of August I saw the prisoner come out of the yard, with a collar; he went down Brokers'-row, and returned in three minutes, without it; he worked till eight o'clock next day, and left without notice - I told the foreman of it, but he expected his master home, and did not take him. I knew the collar, as I had worked there once - I had two horses to mind, or I should have taken him; he knew me well, but took it out publicly.

Prisoner's Defence. That young man went away ill, and I took his situation; the foreman and him were drinking for three or four hours together, leaving me at work; I complained to the foreman about it - he said he would discharge me - I said I should discharge myself, and get work before the winter came on. I was taken before the Magistrate, and acquitted - he said he would prosecute if it cost him 50l.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-80

2060. BRIDGET CARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 umbrella, value 2s.; 1 half-crown, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of John Luck .

JANE LUCK . I am the wife of John Luck - he is a tailor , and works in Finsbury-square. I was crossing Camomile-street into Bishopsgate-street , close behind the prisoner, who was a stranger; she stooped, and picked up a blue leather purse; she turned round, and said, "You shall have half;" she walked a little way, and opened it - she undid a piece of paper, and took out a ring - I said, "You can't halve this;" she said, "Give me 10s. or 11s., and you shall have all;" I said I only had 5s. - she asked me to give her my cloak, and then my shawl; I refused, and at last she had the umbrella and 5s. I took off my own ring, and seeing there were more stamps on it than on that, I took it into a jeweller's shop - she was gone then, with the money and umbrella, which I had given her, conceiving them to be half the value of the ring; she took them, but did not seem satisfied with them. I thought she might go into Petticoat-lane to sell the umbrella - I went and met her in about twenty minutes, without the umbrella; a man was walking before her - I asked what she had done with the umbrella - she called me every name she could think of; the man spoke to her in some language which I could not understand, and then told her to give me back my umbrella, but I said I wanted her; she was going to run away - I caught hold of her, and she bit a piece out of my finger; she gave me 3s. 6d., and asked me to let her go - I refused; she then gave me another shilling. Two men came up, and took her to the watch-house. She was quite a stranger to me; she said it was a lady's gold ring, and worth full 2l. I would not have parted with my money if I had not thought it was gold.

FREDERICK AMONIER . I am a jeweller. This ring is worth about 1d.

THOMAS HART . I took her in charge, and found the purse on her.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had picked the purse up, the prosecutrix claimed half, and offered her the umbrella and money for it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-81

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2061. WILLIAM VALENTINE MAYBURY was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-82

2062. ELIZABETH WHITFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 spoon, value 10s. , the goods of Joseph Beardmore .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH FULLER . I am servant to Mr. Warren, who has the use of Mr. Joseph Beardmore's house and furniture, in Canonbury-square ; the prisoner was Mr. Beardmore's coachman's wife, and was employed between five and six o'clock, on the 20th October, in cleaning knives in the house; she had been occasionally employed there before - I missed a spoon after she was gone; the officer brought it; it is marked J. M. B.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Islington. On Saturday evening, the 20th of October, about six o'clock, the prisoner pawned this table-spoon, in the name of White - I knew her before, and knew her to be Mr. Beardmore's coachman's wife.

THOMAS COPE . I searched the prisoner, and found some duplicates on her.

Prisoner's Defence. The cook gave me some cold vegetables; it was dark, and when I went to warm them at home, I found this spoon in the middle of them; it being Saturday night, I did not know how to get victuals for my children, and I borrowed 2s. on it, intending to redeem it on Monday, and carry it back; the pawnbroker valued it at 10s.

WILLIAM SMITH . She only asked for 2s. - I asked if it was her own; she said, "It is my own to be sure, whose did you think it was?" - I thought she had been sent to pawn it - I had no idea of its being stolen; she always pawned in the name of White; the initials on it are J. M. B.

ELIZABETH FULLER. The spoon was in the kitchen when I was washing the dishes - I cannot say where she took it from - I was allowed to give her food, but am sure I did not give her the spoon in the vegetables.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years . (See page 779.)

Reference Number: t18271025-83

2063. ANN DOGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 4 books, value 10s. , the goods of of Ann Taylor , widow .

ANN TAYLOR. I am a widow, and live in Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place . I deal in books - I was sitting in my parlour, and saw the prisoner passing to and fro, and at last saw her take two books from the stall before the door - I sent my son to fetch her back; he secured her about forty yards off - I did not see her searched; my son is ill,

ANN TAYLOR . I was sitting in my mother's parlour, and saw the prisoner walking to and fro, for a quarter of an hour; we went and called my brother, I was so agitated I did not see the books found on her; and have not seen them since; my mother let her go.

Prisoner. Q. Did not your mother say, I was not the woman who took them, and I opened my basket, and showed her I had not got them? Witness. Yes; but you had a cloak in your basket, they might be under that.

CHARLES HAMILTON . The books were brought to my shop in Wardour-street, by a lad, who is not here.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, with a basket, which the prosecutrix said was the one she had at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. She said I had a smaller basket, and several people said, I did not take them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-84

Before Mr. Recorder.

2063. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , 2 lbs. of tobacco, value 7s., and 1 bag, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Fish and William Collins , his masters .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. I was employed to watch the premises of Messrs. Fish and Collins, in St. John-street . On the morning of the 22d of October I saw the prisoner come out of their shop-door, about nine o'clock - I followed him about one hundred yards, when he turned into the Gun public-house - I followed him in, and saw a man named Ryland standing up; he knew me, and said to the prisoner, "Be quiet" - the prisoner slipped into a box, and I saw Ryland give him some gin - I turned round, laid hold of Ryland, and handcuffed him - I then laid hold of the prisoner, who made some resistance - I called the landlord, who ran round, and the prisoner twisted out of my arm - I gave Ryland to the landlord, and followed the prisoner to the back door; he got out at the door - I followed him down a court, and seized him, without losing sight of him; we scuffled for some time - I brought him back to the house, and with assistance, took this tobacco from his breeches pockets, which were very large, and it was pressed down very tight indeed - I found on him 1 lb. 15 ozs. - it was not in paper; he had an apron on over his pockets - I found Ryland still in custody of the landlord - I then went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Rahere-street, Goswell-street, and found a bag, locked up in a cupboard, which had contained tobacco; there was a little tobacco dust in it; it was stained, and smelt of tobacco - I have kept the tobacco in my possession.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How much did you find? A. 1 lb. 15 ozs. - I am certain he is the man who came out of Fish and Collins' house; no one came out with him - I tied the tobacco up in paper, and produced it at the office - it was sealed up - I now produce it; nobody would suppose, from his appearance, that he had any thing about him.

WILLIAM COLLINS. I am in partnership with Samuel Fish. We have a very extensive manufactory; the prisoner was in our service, and was employed to pack tobacco ; we make our tobacco by a particular process, and I am certain this is our manufacture; it would be in this state in the prisoner's hands; he had access to it; it is worth about 7s.

Cross-examined. Q. What work was he doing that morning? A. I do not know; he packs, and does any thing that is required of him; the tobacco is in a finished state; we give each man an ounce and a half every Saturday night - the men should be searched as they leave the premises, but it is neglected at times - I understand he was not searched that morning - I think I could swear to this tobacco wherever I saw it.

Q. Are you able to swear to your tobacco, finding it any where? A. To form a very correct opinion of it, I think

I could swear to this tobacco, if I found it in any other place - I can form a very correct opinion of it - I can swear to this, from its appearance, flavour and smell.

Q. Has not all tobacco the same appearance, flavour and smell? A. Not all - there are many different descriptions; it is shag tobacco; there are various kinds of that - I swear to this positively; when we sell it, it goes out in paper packages; he has been eight years in my service - I did not suspect him till lately; he has not stolen any money from me - I know nothing of a 10l. note being detained. Our business is under the Excise.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-85

2065. WILLIAM RYLAND was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 21st of October , of a certain evil-disposed person, 35 lbs. of tobacco, value 6l., the goods of Samuel Fish and William Collins , which had been lately before stolen by the said evil-disposed person, the prisoner well knowing it to have been stolen, against the statute .

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. I was desired to watch the premises of Messrs. Fish and Collins, in St. John-street ; and on the morning of the 22d of October I saw Wright come out, and followed him to the Gun public-house, St. John-street, about one hundred yards off; I saw the prisoner standing up in the house - he knew me, and said to Wright, "Be quiet," and pointed with his hand for him to sit down - Wright sat down; I handcuffed the prisoner, and left him in the landlord's care, while I followed Wright and secured him. When I first went in I stood at the bar for a minute or two before they saw me - I saw the prisoner give Wright some gin; after they were secured I went to search the prisoner's house, in Little Coleman-street, St. Luke, Middlesex - I know it to be his house - and in his room I found a drawer which had contained tobacco - there was about half a spoonful of tobacco dust in it; I found a little girl in the house; I afterwards searched a Mrs. Scott's room, on the first floor, and found this box, which was locked - I broke it open; it contained about 35 lbs. of tobacco - the box and all weighed 48 lbs. 9 ozs.; I brought it down stairs, and Mrs. Scott with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST, Q. Where is the tobacco dust? A. I have not brought it here; I did not think it necessary, it was so small a quantity; I showed it to the prosecutor - he took the drawer out, and shook the dust into one corner of it; Ryland holds part of the house, there are only three rooms - he had two of them; I always considered it his house; I took Mrs. Scott to the Magistrate - he thought proper to admit her evidence; she attended four days at Hicks'-hall; I have not seen her here: I found her in the room the box was in - I cannot say that it is her room; she did not take me into the room, I went there without being led - it was about half-past nine o'clock- Mrs. Scott stood at the street door I believe when I first went in; I asked for Mrs. Ryland, and she was looking for her.

MR. QUIN. Q. Would the grains of tobacco give the drawer any smell? A. It would; I smelt the grains of tobacco - they stuck round the drawer.

WILLIAM MOTTRAM . I am landlord of the Gun public-house, and was present on the 22d of October, when the prisoner was taken; I had frequently seen him and Wright at my house together for some months before - they generally came about nine o'clock in the morning, sometimes together, and sometimes one followed the other; they adjourned into a small box in the tap-room - Wright generally went out first - they sometimes went out together; they were at my house most days for some months.

Ann Scott , being called, did not appear.

ELIZA LAWRENCE . I was the prisoner's servant, and have lived nine months with him. I know that box, and have seen it in Ryland's room; I have moved it about when I have been cleaning - it was always heavy, and was kept by the side of his bed the whole time I was there; he lives in one room - I saw it in his room when I came down to light the fire at seven o'clock in the morning of the day the officer came - it was on a chair by his bed-side; I have seen Wright come to Ryland's, but not often - I was always turned out of the room when he came, and the door was locked.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the box that morning? A. Yes - I have often moved it; I once put it on the carpet - it was heavy then, but not so heavy as when it was full; it always seemed full of something, and was always equally heavy; I believe the first morning I went there I saw it open - I think there were a few clothes in it, but I did not look into it; I am sure it was not Mrs. Scott's box, for I saw it in master's room every day; I do not know how it got into her room - I was never in the room when master dressed.

MR. QUIN. Q. The first day you were there was nine months ago? A. Yes; I took no particular notice when I saw it open.

COURT. Q. Were there any servants in the house but yourself? A. No. Scott cleaned her own room - I fetched her errands; I never saw the box in her room; she left the house about three days ago: my master is a shoe-maker - I never saw him deal in tobacco; I am thirteen years old; I have been to a Sunday-school - I believe God will punish wicked people who speak falsely.

MR. COLLINS. I accompanied Vann to the prisoner's lodgings; I saw a large drawer there, and it had a small portion of tobacco left in it - it smelt as if much more had been there; I saw this box in a room which I was told Scott occupied; I am certain the tobacco in it is ours - it is manufactured by a peculiar process, and is worth about 7l.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-86

2066. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 9 ivory balls, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Oliphant .

THOMAS OLIPHANT. I keep the Hare and Hounds public-house, in St. John-street ; these ivory balls belong to a bagatelle-board which I had taken with the fixtures; I allowed nobody to play, unless they were respectable. On the 13th of October the prisoner and one Wright came into the house; I saw my son taking the balls out of the drawer to take to them to play with: in five or six minutes I saw them going out in a hurry, before they could have played; I went to the door, kept my eye on them, and called to my son to see that every thing was safe - he called out that the balls were gone; I pursued, and collared the prisoner: he said, "Don't hold me so tight; I am not in possession of the balls, the other has got them; but I will see them re

turned to you;" my son took the other with the balls - he has been convicted.

- OLIPHANT . I am the prosecutor's son; my brother took these balls to the men, and when they were missed, I went and took Smith with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was perfectly ignorant of Smith being in possession of the balls till he was stopped, and charged with stealing them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-87

2067. SARAH BOWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of John Robinson .

JOHN ROBINSON. I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live at Walworth. I lost a pair of boots this day eleven weeks off my stand in Brentford-market ; the prisoner frequently came to my stall on a Tuesday, under pretence of purchasing goods, or of waiting for a friend; I saw her at my stall on this day, and saw the boots in her hand - she took them up under pretence of looking at them - she looked at them, but bought nothing; she was familiar with me as usual - she said nothing about buying them; I missed them the instant she was gone: I was fitting a pair of shoes on a lady - the prisoner stood at the corner of my stand with them in her hand; I stooped down to fit the lady's boots on, and, suspecting the prisoner, kept my eye towards her; but before I could get my eye on her again, she was gone: I went after her instantly, but could not find her - she was gone in an instant; I saw her in the market seven days after, and when she saw me she went away: I followed her into the Magpie public-house; I got a constable, but she was not taken; I went to the Magistrate to get a warrant, but found I did not require one; I went to the public-house, and while I was talking to the constable, she called her husband out into the yard - I followed them - they were in conversation, and pointed to me; they came in in a great hurry, and went to the Magistrate's office, and began to tell Mr. Clark there that she had not stolen the boots; I followed her in, and heard them tell Mr. Clark they had not taken them - they acknowledged that she had them in her hands.

Q. Was any body near enough to take them away beside the prisoner? A. Not a soul was near besides her and the lady - the lady could not have taken them; they were worth 5s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. She had been to your stall before? A. Yes - she never bought any thing; I never knew her husband before she was taken.

Q. Did not her husband stop you at Acton for hawking shoes? A. I never was a hawker in my life; I was selling shoes at Brentford - I go to public markets; mine is a stall, about eight feet long - there was no other person near enough to take them; the market was not crowded - it was between 12 and 1 o'clock; the market was nearly over; she was pregnant - I do not know that she was lame; I followed her as soon as I could, but could not find her - her artfulness prevented my finding her; I did not know whether she went into the crowd, or down the passage to her house - I understand the passage leads to her dwelling, which I did not know before; I sent for the constable and the market-keeper, and described her to them that day; I swear positively that she took them - I made this charge seven weeks afterwards.

Q. Do you think it possible she could be about the market two hours without your discovering her? A. I think it was impossible; I never told her if she paid 4s. 6d. she she might go - I was three times before the Magistrate.

Q. Did you not, on one occasion, swear you saw her with the boots; and on another occasion, only that you missed them after she was gone? A. No - she was bailed; certainly, the solicitor wished to compromise the business, but the Magistrate said he would not allow a compromise; she attended the office voluntarily twice, when the Magistrate was not in attendance; the constable had given her notice to come forward.

BENJAMIN STARR . I was at Brentford-market; I am a brush-maker. I stood next to Robinson, and saw the prisoner take the boots off the stall, and put them under her shawl; my stall is next to Robinson's.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. No; Mr. Robinson ordered me to come here as a witness for him - he did not take me before the Magistrate; I was ready to go up, but was not called for - he did not ask me to catch her for him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and have witnesses to prove he offered to make it up.

ELIZA FURZE . I am the daughter of Widow Furze, who goes out washing - I live at Isleworth. On the day the prosecutor lost his boots, I was in company with the prisoner - we went to his stall: he said, "Good morning, Miss;" and I said, "Good morning, Sir;" that is all that passed - if he has said she was alone, he has sworn falsely: she tried on a pair of shoes, not boots - she bent the soles back; he said, "They are a serviceable pair for you;" she said she was not much in want of them that day: he put them down on the stool himself - we came away, and he wished us good morning; we were publicly about the market together for two hours afterwards; she was lame, and with child - she was confined soon afterwards; she could not have taken the boots or shoes without my observing it.

COURT. Q. The market is held every week, how do you know on what day he complained of losing his boots? A. As near as I can say, it was seven or eight weeks ago; I was with her on the day the boots were lost - it was this day eight or seven weeks; the market day is every Tuesday.

Q. You are not with her every Tuesday that she is in the market? A. Yes, very nearly - I always go to market with her; I heard of the boots being stolen about a fortnight or three weeks afterwards, I do not know which; I know it was the day he lost the boots, because he says so.

Q. Did he tell you on what day it was? A. No; I know I was with her, because she tried on the button shoes; and he said he lost his boots the day she tried on the button shoes - I was with her all that day: I went before the Magistrate, but was not called for; I was told not to say any thing before I was called - I was persuaded by the people in the Court-room not to speak; I have not mentioned to any body that I was with her all day, from that time to this - I have heard it talked of, but never told any body that I was with her; her husband is employed by a coal-meter - I am a shoe-binder.

JURY. Q. Did you not tell her husband that you was with her that day? A. Yes - I told nobody else.

COURT. Q. Did not he tell the Justice there was a person there who could prove his wife's innocence? A. Yes; I did not say any thing - he did not call me; I have told my mother that the prisoner did not take them; I have heard some people talk of it, and told them she was not guilty, for I was with her the whole of the time - they were strangers to me - I do not know their names; I swear I was with her on the very day the boots were stolen, and she tried a pair of shoes on that day.

BENJAMIN STARR . There was not a soul with her - nobody but herself.

JOHN ROBINSON. This woman has been near my stall at different times, but was not near it that day; I swear positively that the prisoner was alone.

JURY. Q. Did the prisoner try on any boots or shoes that day? A. No; I declare she never did on any day; I did not tell the witness that it was the day she tried on the button shoes - I have never seen her from that day to this, and never told her any such thing - I never told any person so.

Q. How did it happen that you did not give intimation to the person at the next stall, that the prisoner had stolen the boots? A. I merely said to the lady, "Sit still, a person has stolen a pair of boots," and I immediately ran after her; I sung out, "The woman has stolen a pair of boots;" I told the Magistrate I had two witnesses, right and left of me, who would come forward, but he said there was no occasion - the other one was close to the prisoner.

JOHN THOMAS . I am a labouring man, and live at Mr. Leader's, a pawnbroker, of Brentford. I was at the Magistrate's office. at Brentford, four or five weeks ago, when the prosecutor charged the prisoner with stealing the boots; he said he missed the boots after she left the stand; her husband fetched her to the office; the prosecutor said he would give up the charge if her husband gave him 4s. 6d. - she said she would do no such thing, for she was innocent of the charge, and would rather go to prison and perish than pay for what she never had; he said, "So you shall;" she was admitted to bail at the last examination, on the 16th of October - this conversation was on the 2d of October.

COURT. Q. Where was it you heard him say this? A. At Mr. Clark's office - no Magistrate was present that day; Mr. Clark, the Magistrate's clerk, was present, and must have heard it - he said nothing then, but he said afterwards, "Bowley, I think you had better pay the 4s. 6d., and have done with it;" he said, "No, Sir, my wife declares herself innocent; I don't like to pay for what she never received;" she was examined before the Magistrate a fortnight afterwards - this was said at the office - the charge was made at the office, and her husband fetched her there, but the Magistrate was gone; and on the next Tuesday he was ill; on the following Tuesday the case was heard; I was present, but I did not tell the Magistrate of it; I have told different people of it.

Q. Did you hear Robinson charge the prisoner with stealing the boots? A. Certainly, and Mr. Clark heard it; he said a pair of boots were taken from the stall, and he supposed that woman to have taken them; he charged her with stealing them.

Q. And the Magistrate's clerk advised the husband to give 4s. 6d.? A. He said he had better give it; I know the last witness; she was by when the words were made use of; and more than that, Robinson came within ten minutes, and asked the husband to pay 4s. 6d.; the husband said she should go to prison, for she said she was innocent; he said, "So she shall;" he told the Magistrate the first time, they were leather boots, and afterwards that they were worth 5s. 6d., and if he had the 5s. 6d. it was all he wanted; the Magistrate said, "Most people like to have their rights; and some people want more than their rights." I am acquainted with the prisoner's husband.

JOHN ROBINSON re-examined. I did not say if 4s. 6d. was paid, it was all I wanted; the Magistrate did not say what this man has stated, nor any thing of the sort.

MR. JAMES RILEY . I am an attorney, and have a house at Hounslow, as well as in London; I attended the office twice, but in consequence of the illness of Mr. Crighton no examination took place; on my cross-examining the prosecutor before Mr. Clithero, I asked him if he had not offered to give it up for 4s. 6d.; he said he had not, but if he was paid for his goods that was all he wanted. Colonel Clithero said people often wished the value of their goods; he admitted having told the husband that if they were paid for, he would not go any further; I did not enter into any conversation with him the first or second time; I was attending on other business as well; as there was no Magistrate the prisoner was allowed to go away, and attended next time, and after the examination she was bailed - the witness Furze stood very near the prosecutor, for the purpose of stating what she knew, and I told Colonel Clithero I had a witness, who was with her at the time, but he said, "He has sworn to the thing being stolen, and you must put in bail;" I am certain, however, that the prosecutor acknowledged then that this woman was with the prisoner, explicitly and expressly; he said, "That woman was with her;" I put it to him whether any woman was with her at the time she stole the boots; he turned round, and said, "Yes, this woman."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-88

2068. JOHN SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 1 tin can, value 3s., the goods of Elizabeth Thomas , from the person of Edward William Thomas .

ELIZABETH THOMAS. I live at No. 27, Hart-street, Covent-garden; my son Edward William is seven years old. On Sunday evening, the 23d of September, he was with me; I had to call with some milk in Clement's Inn, which I brought from my master's place, in High-street, Bloomsbury: I gave a quart can to the child to hold - I was absent from him above three minutes; the child had walked from the door about two yards - I saw the prisoner, as I came out take the can from the child's hand, and walk away with it; I ran after him, and asked what he wanted with it; he said he wanted milk for his coffee - he was no customer of mine - there was a pint and a half of milk in it; I laid hold of it, and he would not give it up to me for some time; he said neither the can nor the child belonged to me; he did not run away, but stood there, and two patrols came up; I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Where was this? A. In Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields ; there was a great mob about; I said, "I suppose you are one of the men who robbed me before."

Q. Is there not a man very much like the prisoner? A. Not exactly like him - there were two of his brothers there - I swear to him, because I saw him take the can, and took it from him; the patrol came up in a quarter of an hour; I was holding him then - he stood and talked to me - I would not let him go - he attempted to knock me down when the patrol came up; I never said I wanted 20s. to give up the prosecution.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOEL SPENCER . I am a patrol. I was coming up Wild-street, and saw several lads, of the prisoner's age, standing at the corner of Steward's-rents - he was about the centre of them - this woman came about six yards from him, and asked me to take him for taking the can from her boy; he said he was not the lad; he went quietly with me - his brothers would have rescued him if they could - they were tumultuous; the can was delivered to me - the prosecutrix recommended him to mercy, and the Magistrate bailed him, and I gave it up.

Cross-examined. Q. The woman left him to come to you? A. She did, for ten or eleven yards; there were several persons round him.

Prisoner. I have witnesses to call.

JOHN BOURNE . I am a bricklayer's labourer, and live in Oxford-street. I was present when this happened; the prisoner's brother asked the child to let him drink; the child looked back, and then ran away; the mother came back to the young man, and asked if he wanted to thieve the can: he laughed at her, and asked if she was drunk - they jaw'd one another; two patrols came up; she went and told them that he took the can from the child; the young man who had asked to drink, walked aside; the prisoner stood with his back to the wall of Steward's-rents, and she gave him in charge.

COURT. Q. In whose hands was the can? A. In the mother's; she took it out of the child's hand; it was never in the prisoner's hand; it was never out of the child's hand till she took it out - the two young men had drank a drop; there was no interruption to the patrol taking the prisoner, but I did not follow them - nobody drank out of the can; the young man who asked to drink, did not get any; it was two young men, two brothers; when she saw the child run away, she thought they had taken the can - I told the patrol, that was not the man who asked to drink, and that he had never touched the can - I was working last at Tyburn-gate - I do not know who for - I knew the prisoner, for about a month, by having lodged where he did.

JOEL SPENCER re-examined. I cannot say whether this witness was among the persons - nobody told me the child had not had the can taken out of his hands, not that I recollect; some person did come up and say that was the wrong man; the person who stands there, and another, who has gone out, were the two who behaved disorderly; they laid hold of me on each side - I said I would knock them down; they then desisted.

MATTHEW SHEEN . I went and asked the child for a drink of water, thinking it was water - I did not molest him any further - he went on with the can - I never had my hand on it; the mother came up and said I meant to take the can away; the patrol came up, and she gave charge of my brother - I went and laid hold of the patrol, and said he was innocent - I thought the child was coming from Wild-street pump, with some water - I have seen water carried in such a can; it was never out of the child's hand, till the mother took it; she has sworn falsely - I touched the patrol on the shoulder, and said my brother was innocent.

Q. Did he not tell you, he would knock you down if you interfered? A. He did not tell me exactly; there were a good many round - I touched him on the shoulder - I did not lay hold of him - I sell things about the street now.

JOEL SPENCER. That is one of the young men whom I threatened to knock down, if he interrupted me; he was pulling me by the collar, and the other patrol, King, who was with me; he said I had got the wrong man.

JAMES KELLY . I work at Mr. Jones', a smith, in Well-street - I live in Wild-court, and was in Steward's-rents - the prisoner and his brother were standing together - the child came along with the can in his hand; the prisoner's brother went up, and asked for a drink of water - the child looked back - the mother came up to the brother, and asked what he wanted with the child - he said, "Only a drink of water" - she stood there, calling us thieves and pick-pockets, and asked why we did not take her up for calling us such names - the patrols came by, and she gave charge of the wrong boy, and said he took the can; but he did no such thing.

COURT. Q. Nobody took the can then? A. No - it is all a lie - I had seen a boy fetch water from the pump, in a can like it, but it had no top to it like this - I did not follow the patrol to the watch-house, or say any thing to him.

Prisoner. I was standing in Wild-street; the woman came down with the child, who had the can in his hand; she was intoxicated, and asked if I wanted to take the can; my brother, who stood by, had asked the child for some water, and she gave me in charge - I was let out on bail, and have surrendered.

JOEL SPENCER. I did not consider her in liquor; she was in a rage.

PROSECUTRIX. I took the can out of the prisoner's hand; he did not appear as if he wanted to drink; he said he wanted it for his coffee; he held it some time before he would give it me; there were several round him, but I held him by the collar, till I crossed over to the patrol - I let go of him, to go to the patrol.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-89

2069. SAMUEL BEARD , ALEXANDER REED , MICHAEL KIRTON and PATRICK FLINN were indicted for the wilful murder of John Kemp Crow .

MR. THOMAS TATUM . I am house-surgeon of St. George's hospital. The deceased was brought in there about three o'clock, on the 1st of October , in a state of very great depression; he had several ribs broken on his left side, and also his collar-bone - I did all I could for him; he remained there till the 7th, when he died - I opened his body; there was a rupture of the spleen, which might be occasioned by a violent fall - a violent fall might have occasioned the whole of the injury; the rupture of the spleen occasioned his death; that must have been caused by violence; he was only once under apprehension of be

ing near death - I had no conversation with him at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The rupture occasioned his death? A. Yes - I think the injury alone would not have occasioned it; a portion of the last rib projected into his spleen - the breaking of the rib forced it into his spleen, ruptured it, and caused his death.

JOHN HUTCHINSON . I live at No. 4, Providence-place, Brewer's-green, Westminster. I knew the deceased John Kemp Crow; he lived in Bell-street, Vincent-square - I saw him fighting at Old Oak-common , which is six or seven miles from Westminster - I believe Crow went there in a coach - I went there, expecting to see a fight, and saw the beginning of it; the four prisoners and the deceased were in the ring - Beard and the deceased went into the ring stripped to fight; the others were in attendance on them - Reed and one Moyer were seconds to the deceased - Kirton and Flinn were seconds to Beard; they fought for about thirty-five minutes - nobody interfered to prevent it; they closed together very often, and fell - the deceased was generally undermost, but sometimes Beard was undermost - the other three picked them up when they fell; there were two hundred or more people there - the ring was not made with cords, but by the persons round - I did not observe any thing further, till the close of the battle, when the two men fell together, and the deceased undermost - the seconds said they should fight no longer, for they thought the man was hurt; the battle then ended - they both appeared very much hurt; the deceased was taken to the Green Man public-house, about a quarter of a mile off, and medical assistance fetched - Beard did not exactly fall on him the last time; the deceased fell a little on the right - Beard was a little on his belly, but a little on his side - I heard the battle was to be fought the day before - I knew nobody but Crow - I knew he was going to fight.

Q. Why did you not give information of it, which would have saved his life? A. I was not aware of the consequences. I could not leave my work to go to see him on the Sunday; he was dead when I got there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the deceased a stout man? A. Yes - he was stouter than Beard if any thing. I was not near enough to hear whether the seconds remonstrated against his continuing to fight - there was nothing at all unfair; there was no foul play - both seemed to be equally beaten about; Crow had called at my lodgings, and said Beard and him had had words, and were going to fight - it was not a prize-fight, but arose from a quarrel.

JOSEPH CHARLESWORTH . I live at No. 10, Bell-street. The deceased lodged in my house - he told me he was going to fight, on the Tuesday or Wednesday before, when I let him in. I had seen Beard - he is a tailor ; I do not know where he lived. I never saw any of the others before the fight; I went to Old Oak-common, and was there when it began; Beard and Crow fought: the other three acted as seconds; I saw the men go in and strip - they then shook hands, and commenced fighting; I saw no constable near: they fell down together at the last round - Crow was undermost; he seemed week, and much distressed - he was taken in a coach to the Green Man, in the Harrow-road; he was bled there, and afterwards taken to the hospital; I saw him next morning at the hospital, but not afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. You had heard so early as Wednesday that he was going to fight? A. Yes - he said he had got Beard to fight him at last - those were his words; he had often expressed a wish to fight Beard - he said before, that he had done all he could two or three times to provoke him, but could not get him to fight; he spoke with joy when he said he had got him to fight; he came and shook hands with me in the morning, and said he was going to fight his man, and challenge another. I know he has before fought with a stone-mason, and beat him - the battle was quite fair. I had seen Beard before the fight - we all three belonged to the same club; I never exchanged a word with him, but always understood him to be a very good natured civil man.

WILLIAM WADMAN . I keep an eating-house, in Cross-street, Carnaby-market. I did not see the fight, but know there was a quarrel between Beard and the deceased - the last quarrel I heard was on the Wednesday previous to the Monday - I have heard the deceased challenge Beard on different occasions, in the most provoking manner - and on the Wednesday evening I saw him get up, when Beard was sitting down quite peaceably; he called him a cur and a coward, and said he was no man, or he would fight him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he would spoil his face for him? A. He did; Beard bore his expressions much more quietly than any one could expect - I do not think I ever heard a man bear such language better; but after the language used on Wednesday night he jumped up, and said, "Well, I will not be insulted night after night in this way, but will fight you now, and then;" I have known Beard eight or nine months - he was the most peaceable man I ever knew; Crow said he would not fight him there, but would have him out to fight.

BEARD - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Seven Days .

REED - GUILTY . Aged 25.

KIRTON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

FLINN - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Of Manslaughter only.

Reference Number: t18271025-90

2070. DANIEL MULSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 75lbs. of lead, value 12s., the goods of the Governors of the hospital of the poor, or alms-house, called Sekforde's alms-house, in Woodbridge, Suffolk , and fixed to a certain building in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the goods of different persons.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . I am a constable. On the 8th of October, about ten minutes to seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Castle-street, Saffron-hill - he had a cloth, with something in it; I followed him into an iron-shop; he put it on the ground: I asked what he had there - he asked what it was to me; I said I was an officer, and insisted on knowing - he said it was iron, and while I was looking at it he ran out; I marked it - it was lead. I ran out, calling Stop thief! secured him, and gave him to Waddington; he struck at me several times: I took him to the office; I afterwards fetched the lead - he said he

had found it against the foundry gates; I went to the foundry in School-house-yard , and found a considerable quantity of lead gone from the roof, about 18 cwt. - he had 75lbs. I compared it with two places on the roof - it fitted exactly, and was certainly cut from that roof; the edges appeared quite fresh, and bright.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He told you he had found the lead? A. He said it was iron - nobody could tell what it was without opening the cloth; he was about a quarter of a mile from the foundry; he was asked where he lived, and said in School-house-yard: I then said,"I will be bound it came from the foundry;" I went to his house, and saw two or three children. I found a half-crown and a knife on him: his window leads out into the foundry yard. I found a ladder in the cellar of the foundry; it is not now used as a foundry. I found no lead in his house, nor any thing which appeared to have cut lead.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. I compared the lead with the roof - it matched with the gutter which it had been cut from.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search his house? A. No - it was shut up, and his children crying at the window.

GEORGE PYNE ANDREWS . I am clerk to Mr. Henderson, who is clerk to the Sekforde's charity; this foundry belongs to the Governors. I went and found lead taken from the roof.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I went to compare the lead - it corresponded. The prisoner was given into my charge; he said he worked in School-house-yard, and from the window of his room there were marks on the wall, as if somebody had been getting down.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was the ladder? A. Within sight of the window.

WILLIAM MAKEPEACE . I rented this foundry, and gave up possession on the 29th of September.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-91

2071. JOHN WEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 7 half-crowns, 77 shillings, and 19 sixpences, the monies of John Reed , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN REED. I live at Wapping-wall , and keep the Three Mariners public-house . On the 26th of October I went out, about eleven o'clock in the morning, and left 6l. odd in the till of the bar; the key was in it. I returned in half an hour - the prisoner was then sitting in the bar, taking a pint of porter: while he sat there I took 1l. worth of silver out of the bag in the drawer, and expect I left 5l. odd there, in half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences - I do not know how many of each. My wife and daughter attend the bar; they are not here. The prisoner remained there above an hour - I met him in the passage (he had paid his reckoning); he asked me to take a glass of gin with him; I declined. He had been there alone some time - he bid me good morning, and left; I have known him some years. I directly went to the drawer, and found the bag of silver gone; I ran out, and overtook him about two hundred yards off; I tapped him on the shoulder - he turned round, and said, "Is any thing the matter - is not all right?" I said I would thank him to walk back, and he did so - I took him into the bar, and accused him of stealing the bag, which he denied; I said several times, if he would deliver it up I would let him go - he refused. I then asked what silver he had about him - he said he might have 2l. or 3l. worth. I send for an officer, who found 5l. 4s. in silver in his breast pocket - the bag was found in the fire-place, close to where he sat; nobody but him had been in the bar; he said he had brought the silver from Bristol, as Bristol notes would not pass in London. I cannot swear to any of the coin.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found seven half-crowns, seventy-seven shillings, and nineteen sixpences in his left-hand waistcoat pocket, with some tobacco and segars, and 61/2d. in copper in his breeches; he said it was of no use to have Bristol notes in London. I said, "Where is the bag - I must search for that;" he said, "You cannot find it;" it was afterwards found under three or four coals in the stove; the fire was not lighted. The strings which tied the bag laid between his legs where he had sat.

Prisoner's Defence. I brought the money from Bristol - I had come by the coach that morning.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-92

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2072. MARY DUNNEGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 25lbs. of mutton, value 7s. , the good of George Fielding .

ELIZABETH FROST . On the 6th of October I was passing the door of Mr. Fielding, a butcher , in New Gravel-lane, Shadwell at half-past eight o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoner on the step of the door - I was close by her; she took part of a sheep down from off a hook; she took it to the next door, where she lives. I acquainted Mr. Fielding, who went and took it; a woman was in the shop, and a man outside hanging up meat.

GEORGE FIELDING. I keep the shop. Frost told my man of this - I went next door, and found the meat in a back room on the ground floor; there are 25lbs. - it is the hind quarter of a sheep. I believe she dealt with me at times - she said she took it in a joke, and meant to return it; they do joke so in the market - it might be a lark.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-93

2073. ELIZABETH GODDARD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Jones .

ELIZABETH JONES. I am single , and live in Denton-street, St. Pancras . The prisoner came to char for me, and I missed these things.

VALENTINE PERRY . I am servant to Mr. Griffiths, a pawnbroker, of Hopton-street, Somer's-town. On Saturday the prisoner pawned this shirt and handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-94

2074. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 reticule, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 2 keys, value 1d., the goods of Sophia Le Maitre , from her person .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-95

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2075. GEORGE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 coat, value 1s., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s., the goods of Simon Gowing ; and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Bebee .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-96

2076. GEORGE GODFREY GARNER was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Parliament-street, Westminster . The prisoner was in my employ up to the 20th of September - it was his business to receive money from different tradesmen, to whom I trust goods; he was to enter the sums received in a book in which the names are entered, and to hand over the money to me when he came home. Teece is a customer of mine; I have the book here, which the prisoner kept, and in which he ought to enter his accounts; he has not entered the sum of 8s. on the 17th of July , as paid by Mr. Teece; he has entered it on this bill on the 17th of July, but it has not been entered in the book at all - he left me on the 20th of September.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. This was in the course of tally-trade, was it not? A. Yes. I cannot tell how many persons he had to collect from, perhaps one hundred and fifty. I have other persons who collect money - I do not mean to state their accounts are always correct; I have found them to bring me more money than they have put down; he brought home on the 17th of July, 24l. 9s. 8d. - it did not include the 8s., for I have gone all over the account: the cash he paid that days was 4s. more than he had entered.

Re-examined. Q. Have you discovered any other sum deficient in the entry that day? A. Yes, there is one other sum I have discovered. The prisoner left my service suddenly - he has not accounted for this 8s. since; he was apprehended ten days after he left me - he came to my shop on the 25th of September.

COURT. Q. What did he come for? A. To demand his wages and clothes; I said I should not give them till I had looked over his accounts; he said I had no right to detain his clothes, he should bring an officer; I said he might do as he liked, I should be satisfied before I gave them up - I have not given them up. He had been in my service about twelve months - it was my intention to discharge him, in consequence of his irregular habits.

JANE TEECE . I am the wife of Thomas Teece, who is a carpenter, and lives in Garden-place. I paid the prisoner 1l. 17s., at different times - I paid this 8s. on the 17th of July - here is the receipt he gave for it - it was for Mr. Thompson.

- JONES . I am in the employ of Mr. Thompson; the prisoner was in his employ till the 20th of September; he went away that day - he had not been discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Had there been any dispute with him and you about the irregular time he came to sleep? - A. Yes; my orders were, to admit no one after ten o'clock- he was out all night frequently, and used to return in the morning; I locked him out two or three times; we had some words about it; I know the nature of the business the prisoner had to transact - errors will sometimes happen in it - it does sometimes happen that more money is paid to my master than is down in the book.

Re-examined. Q. Are not these things made right soon afterwards? A. Yes; it is set right the following week - the prisoner never gave an explanation of this 8s., to my knowledge.

COURT. Q. As I understand you, the errors in the book would be detected by looking at the book itself? A. Yes, if there was more paid than was put down in the book; I have known such errors so detected; or by going round the next week, we can see by the bill that more was received than was down; Mr. Teece still continued on his list.

JANE TEECE re-examined. He called after the 17th of July, but that was the last time I paid him, as it was not convenient.

Prisoner's Defence. My master has been in the habit of putting down in his ledger such, and such a sum of money received, to make the book right, and he has done so when there have been errors; this book lasts thirteen weeks, and here are seven out of the thirteen wrong.

MR. THOMPSON re-examined. Q. Who keeps this book? A. A young man named Chapman; here are seven weeks wrong, but the error was detected immediately I looked it over - it was an error in his putting it down, but he is a very bad scholar; the prisoner knows that; and is a very good scholar - here are thirty-six weeks of his without a mistake; he has contrived to make the accounts agree. I have no reason to suspect Chapman of dishonesty.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not the duty of the prisoner to put down on the bill the sum he received? A. Yes - I do not go round to their houses, or I should have detected the mistake - he would go till the bill was settled.

JURY. Q. Have you made a minute of the 4s. which was overpaid? A. Yes, here it is.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-97

2077. GEORGE GODFREY GARNER was again indicted for a like offence .

JOHN THOMPSON . The prisoner was in my service - Crate was indebted to me; the prisoner has not entered 5s. received from her on the 18th of September - he has entered sums received from other customers on that day. and they amount precisely to the sum he paid me. I went out of town on the 20th of September - he had not paid it me then; he never told me of any mistake of this kind.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Might not this 5s. have been put down in the name of some other person, in some subsequent account? A. He received nothing after that; he left on the 20th of September - I have no reason to suppose this has gone to any other person's name - I am morally certain of it - I did up his book myself, on the 18th of September - I think what he received was, 18l. 19s. 1d., and I received 18l. 17s. 9d. - the rest was allowed to get him some refreshment - I received it, and these figures are mine - I had not discovered this error on the 25th of September, when he called; it was discovered that day by Jones - I suppose I now owe him 6l. or 7l. for wages.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Suppose all the accounts were settled between him and you, would you be in his debt, or he in yours? A. I think he would be considerably in mine.

TABITHA DORCAS CRATE . I am a customer of Mr. Thompson's. On the 18th of September I paid the prisoner 5s. for Mr. Thompson; he wrote this receipt for it, on the back of the bill.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-98

2078. THOMAS WALKER and RICHARD THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 bonnet, value 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., and 1 cap, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Marchant .

ANN MARCHANT . I am the wife of Thomas Marchant - I sell fruit in the street. On the 20th of September, I went out of my apartment, in Pye-street, Westminster , for a kettle of water, at near seven o'clock in the morning - I left in my room, a leghorn bonnet, a lace-cap, and a silk handkerchief - I returned in about ten minutes, but did not miss any thing - I went in the country with cucumbers, and returned in the afternoon, and then found these articles tied in a handkerchief, in the middle of my room - I knew nothing of either of the prisoners being there - I have only one room - I had left my window open.

Prisoner THOMAS. Q. What time did you miss your property? A. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I did not take my bonnet to a Magistrate, because it was a good deal bruised and injured, and I took it to a person to get it set to rights - I took the constable to my lodgings to get the cap, and then I took him to York-street, where the bonnet was; there are two lodgers in the house; one is a married man, who goes out daily - they do not get their living by plunder.

COURT. Q. Did you go to Thomas'? A. Yes, and I asked him if he knew of any body going up my stairs; he said No, he had been out at work; he lives close to me.

JOHN FORTH . I am a chandler, and live in Perkins'-rents. On the 20th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw Walker in Pump-court - I saw him receive a bundle from Thomas, tied up in a red and yellow handkerchief - he came past me with it, and went along the street - I afterwards saw Thomas go away without any thing - I did not see what was in the bundle, but it was in the shape of a bonnet.

Prisoner THOMAS. Q. How far off were you? A. I stood at the corner of the street, eight or ten yards off - you was without your hat; it appeared to be like a bonnet - you then returned into the house, and went up Pye-street.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am a constable. On the 22d of September, about ten o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoners - they denied the charge.

Prisoner THOMAS. Q. When the Magistrate sent you with the prosecutrix, did you get the property at her place? A. I got the cap there, and then she took me to where the bonnet was altering.

JAMES SACKER . I am a coal-dealer, and live in Perkins'-rents. I saw the two prisoners together about half-past six o'clock that morning; they went into Old-Pye-street, and then Walker returned into Pump-court; Thomas was in Wilkinson's-court, which is at the back of No. 53, Old Pye-street - Thomas handed a bundle over the wall to Walker; he then came by me, within about five yards - they went up Old Peter-street; he had a bundle under his right arm, which appeared like a bonnet - it was in a yellow belcher handkerchief, which I believe was silk - I did not then know whose it was.

Prisoner THOMAS. Q. You say it was a yellow belcher handkerchief? A. Yes, a lemon colour; I saw it was a bonnet tied up in it, and he had it under his arm; I did not tell the Magistrate that it was in the shape of a coal-scuttle.

WALKER'S Defence. I am quite innocent: I was at the Tower to meet my brother going to Margate in the steamboat; the witness said he thought it was a bonnet, and now he says it was a bonnet.

THOMAS' Defence. I was in bed at eight o'clock: I got up and was going to work at nine; I saw the prosecutrix looking out of her window, and said to her, "It will be a fine day:" when I came home at nine o'clock at night, I went to bed, and she came to my bed-side with a parcel of neighbours, with a key and a Bible, to know if I had seen the things - I said I had not; the next morning she came to me, and I said I was innocent.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-99

2079. CHARLOTTE WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 shirt, value 2s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 4s., and 1 brooch, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Marshall .

JOSEPH MARSHALL. I lodge with Mr. Bennet, in Yates'-court, Clement's-lane . I missed some property on the 9th of June - I know this shirt; these two pairs of trousers and this brooch were in the drawer in my room - I left them there on the 10th of May; the prisoner was servant there.

EDWARD DANIEL DORMAN . I am a pawnbroker. I have a brooch, pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of June, and a pair of trousers and a shirt, pawned on the 10th of May, in the names of Elizabeth White and Ann Marshall.

JAMES HOPPER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of trousers, pawned by the prisoner, on the 10th of May, in her own name.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it: I am surprised at his bringing such a charge, after the connexion he has had with me - my character has been ruined; if he had given me ten times the amount, I should think I had not wronged him.

COURT to the PROSECUTOR. Q. Have, you ever had connexion with her? A. Never but once, and then she came to my room; I never gave her leave to take my property.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-100

2080. ALFRED TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 2 pairs of sheets, value 8s.; 2 pairs of pillow-cases, value 5s; 5 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 1 basket, value 2s.; 2 gowns, value 8s.; 2 shawls, value 10s.; 1 set of bed furniture, value 8s.; 4 towels, value 1s.;

18 shillings, and 9 sixpences , the property of Elizabeth Cole , widow .

ELIZABETH COLE. I am a widow. I lost all these articles out of my room, which is an attic, at No. 10, Marsham-street, Westminster ; the prisoner lived in the next room; I knew him very well; the articles were locked up in my drawers, and 1l. 2s., which was wrapped up in a bit of paper. On the 3d of October I went out to work in the morning, leaving my drawers locked, and the room door locked; I returned at one o'clock to get my dinner; when I unlocked my door I saw the curtain drawn in back, the partition between the prisoner's room and mine was broken through, and my drawers and boxes were open; I went down to the person who keeps the house - he came up with me, and then we went into the prisoner's room; I found some of my articles in the basket in his room, but the sheets and towels were gone; I have not seen them since.

Prisoner. Q. What time did you go out? A. About eight o'clock; I left one old box, which had two gowns and one shawl in it, unlocked - one was a brown gown, and the other a Norwich crape; some of the other articles were taken from the bottom drawer, which had been locked, and was broken open - I had nine locks broken - I missed one gown from a box; the money was taken from a small box; I told the Justice there was 22s., and I believe half of it was in sixpences - it was safe when I left; I did not say there were only nine sixpences - it must have been a mistake; it was exactly my rent-money, which I wished to pay on the Monday.

JONATHAN CLEAL . I lodge in the same house: just as the prosecutrix got up stairs, the prisoner came down running - I did not see any thing on him; but the prosecutrix came down, and I went with her up to her room: I saw the things broken open, and a hole through which a person had burst into her room; I went into Turner's room, where I saw this basket, with these things in it - I saw the locks had been been broken in the prosecutrix's room; the next day, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner's little boy came and told me something; I went to Smith-street, and saw the prisoner leaning on a post - he saw me, and ran away - I took him in St. John's Church-yard; I asked him how he could be guilty of robbing Mrs. Cole; he asked where Jesse was, meaning his wife - I said she was safe, and he said he would give himself up.

Prisoner. Q. What time was this? A. At dinner time - Mrs. Cole cried out, "Mr. Cleal, I am robbed!" and then she came down stairs; you came down stairs very fast, two stairs at a time - my door was open - I was sitting at the window; I had blinds to my window - I did not see you pass the window; I saw him pass my door; I knew him by his footstep and his dress - he had a kind of dirty striped trousers on - I saw him go down eight or nine steps; I believe the things were in the basket in his room; the tea things were on the table: I did not state at the office that my little boy was sitting at the door, that I asked him who passed, and he said Mr. Turner - I say distinctly, I saw the prisoner pass; I did not see any thing in his hand: he was standing still, or walking gently, when I took him: I said to him, "Turner, what have you been doing?" he said, "Where is Jesse?" I said, "She is safe;" he said,"I suspected she was in Tothill-fields;" he said, "Then I will deliver myself up, as she is innocent."

WILLIAM WOODBERY . I am a constable. On the 3d of October I was sent for to No. 10, Marsham-street; I went into Coles' room, and saw a door broken through, which led into the prisoner's room - there is a kind of closet and a sort of door which divides the two rooms; I went into the prisoner's room, and Mrs. Cole said, "This is my basket, with the things in it:" I saw a hammer and this chisel and pinchers at the place where the breakage was; the chisel fits the marks on the boards: on taking him to Newgate, the prisoner said he was guilty of breaking into the room, but had not taken any property but what was in his room - that there was no money, and Mrs. Cole had made a mistake.

Prisoner. Q. Which room did you go into first? A. Yours; I found the place open, and a little child had been in the room; your mother said these tools were what she had lent you - I have compared the chisel with the marks on the drawers; I found this property in the basket, as it is now - he said he had broken in the room, but conveyed no property away.

Prisoner's Defence. It appears to me a very strange thing that the witness states that he had plenty of time to see me pass, and I had no bundle; now, according to the evidence, there is two pairs of sheets, four pillow-cases, four towels, and some other things, and it would have taken a large handkerchief to have tied them in; and how is it possible they should be conveyed away without his seeing them? and again, she accused me of taking eighteen shillings and nine sixpences, and now states that there was but 22s. in all.

The prisoner then handed in a written paper, stating that the prosecutrix had several times made some very unpleasant insinuations against him, and acknowledging that he had broken into the room, and taken the property found in his room, but nothing more, intending to return it in a few days to surprise her; that immediately she came home, he repented of his folly, and being unable to return them without being seen, he absconded, but afterwards resolved on surrendering himself; and denying any felonious intent.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-101

2081. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 1 coat, value 20s., and 1 shawl, value 1s. , the goods of James Clark .

JAMES CLARK. I am a hackney-coachman . I lost a box-coat from the stand in Conduit-street , about one o'clock in the day, on the 3d of October; I was in the watering-house, and heard the alarm, and went out; I took the prisoner with it on his shoulder, in George-street, about a quarter of a mile from the place - he said he had it from a person who took it from the coach; I first saw him going down George-street towards the first coach.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I received him in charge with the coat; I searched him, and found a shawl in his hat - he said a man named Palmer told him to do it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Palmer and I saw a boy take this coat and shawl - I pursued, and he gave them up to me in Maddox-street - I was returning towards the coach with it.

JAMES CLARK. He was near the bottom of Conduit-street - I cannot say which way he was going.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-102

2082. FREDERICK PEPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 11/4 yards of velvet, value 14s., and 1 box, value 2s., the goods of Robert Whittaker , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY , Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-103

2083. MARGARET CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 2 pecks of apples, value 5s., and 1 basket, value 1d. , the goods of William Graham .

WILLIAM GRAHAM. I am a salesman at Covent-garden-market : this basket of apples were in the market; I heard they were lost - I went and found the prisoner; Ballantyne had the apples.

RICHARD BALLANTYNE . I deal in oysters. The prisoner came up to me in the market, and asked me to mind this sieve of apples for her, and desired me to put them out of sight in a box; I would not do that, but said they might be on the ground - she went away; I heard a bustle, and gave Graham the apples.

TERESA GREEN . I saw the prisoner come and take this sieve of apples off two other sieves - two women stood before her; she crossed the market with it: and I told Graham, who went after her.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had bought the apples of the prosecutor, and paid 2s. for them, and removed them to empty them from the basket.

-. I am an officer. The prisoner told the Magistrate she had paid for them, and said two women could confirm it - but they were not heard.

CATHERINE MALAY . I live in Golden-lane, and sell fruit and fish. I was in the market, and saw the prisoner and several more round the prosecutor, buying some fruit; I stopped to see if there was any thing to suit me - I heard the prisoner bid 2s. 6d. for a sieve which was covered over - I did not see what was in it; she said, "Will you take a half-crown - if you don't, you shall have no more of my money:" he hesitated, and said, "Well, give us your money;" I saw her give him two shillings and a sixpence; I then walked away.

WILLIAM GRAHAM. She did not offer to buy them or pay me for them.

TERESA GREEN. That woman and another stood before the prisoner at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-104

2084. HANNAH MARIA COE was indicted for stealling, on the 1st of October , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Currie .

MARY MOORE . I saw the prisoner take this bacon from Mr. Currie's window, and put it under her apron, between nine and ten o'clock at night, on the 1st of October; she asked me to take it of her; I refused, and told Mrs. Currie; I went with Hookham, and we overtook her in Wentworth-street.

CHARLES THOMAS HOOKHAM . I am shopman to John Currie, a cheesemonger , of Church-lane, Whitechapel . Moore came and gave me information; I went with her, and overtook the prisoner in Wentworth-street; she had no bacon then, but some bread and cheese; I charged her with taking it; she said she had left it at a house in Wentworth-street, to boil for her supper; I went there, but they denied it.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman, and took her.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-105

2085. ELIZA COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 bushel of apples, value 4s., and 1 basket, value 6d. , the goods of James McCormick .

JAMES McCORMICK. I am a salesman at Covent-garden-market . On the 13th of October I saw the prisoner take these apples off my stall: she went about fifty or sixty yards; I followed, and told a man to keep her while I got an officer - she was intoxicated.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I took her in charge; she said "For God's sake, let me take them back, and pay for them:" she had 2s. and a duplicate in her purse.(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-106

2086. JOHN HARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 3 lbs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Castle .

RICHARD CASTLE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Broad-court, Long-acre . On the 3d of October, about nine o'clock at night, the window of my shop was lifted up, and this bacon taken out; I heard an alarm; the watchman brought the prisoner in; Vaughan said he had stolen the bacon - he did not deny it.

THOMAS VAUGHAN . I saw the prisoner go and take the bacon from the window; an alarm was given, and he was taken immediately; a boy name Howe tried to take it first; the prisoner then went, and did take it, and threw it to Howe, who let it fall at his feet, and I took it up.

ROBERT CLEGG . I am a watchman, and took the prisoner as he came out of the court.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stood in the court, but saw nothing about it; the gentleman took me, and was going to let me go - I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-107

2087. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 2 wine-glasses, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Mecham .

THOMAS MECHAM. I keep the Duke's Head, public-house, Red Lion-street, Spitalfields ; these are my glasses, and have my name on them.

MARY ANN MECHAM . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I washed six glasses, and put them on the bar counter; I went into the kitchen; the prisoner came in, and took two- I heard a noise, and saw her going out; I followed, and took her outside with them in her hand; she said she had been out of her mind for three days.

The prisoner put in a petition, stating that at times her intellects were affected.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-108

2088. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 saw, value 6s. , the goods of John Greenacre .

JOHN GREENACRE. I am a carpenter . On the 4th of October I was working in Montpelier-square, Westminster , and lost my saw from there; the pawnbroker, who has it, is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-109

2089. JOHN POWELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 saw, value 10s. , the goods of George Usher .

GEORGE USHER. I am a carpenter . I left this saw in the house, in Montpelier-square , between twelve and one o'clock, on the 2d of October; when I returned from dinner it was gone; the prisoner is a bricklayer , and was working at the sewer there.

HENRY DUPLEX . I am a pawnbroker. On the 2d of October the prisoner pawned this saw - I am sure he is the man.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; he at first denied it, but afterwards told where he had pawned the saw.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-110

2090. JOSEPH SIBLEY and WILLIAM BATES were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 child's chaise, value 15s. , the goods of William Lovelace Hunt .

WILLIAM LOVELACE HUNT. I am a carpenter , and live in Earl-street, Mary-le-bone . On the 29th of September, about half-past four o'clock, I saw Sibley take this chaise from the door; he took it about four doors; Bates was then taking it from him; I ran out, threw Sibley down, and pursued and took Bates - the chaise stood at my door, on the rails, for sale; they said it was merely a lark.

JOHN DUBERLY . I am an officer. I received them in charge.

SIBLEY'S Defence. Some boys pulled the chaise down. A little girl called out, "Somebody is stealing the chaise;" and this man came out.

SIBLEY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

BATES - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-111

2091. SAMUEL WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 collar, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Harrison .

SAMUEL HARRISON. About six o'clock in the evening of the 25th of September, my wife called me, and said a muslin collar had been taken out of my window with a wire; I ran out, and saw the prisoner walking away with it- as soon as he saw me, he ran; I pursued, and fell down; he threw the collar behind him, and was taken by the street-keeper - it was drawn through a hole, which is made to fasten the shutters.

THOMAS SIPLESS . The prisoner was stopped in Charlotte-street; I ran up, and took him; the prosecutor came up, and said, "He has robbed me:" I took him to the watch-house, and in his hat I found these three wires, and this duplicate.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I was with Sipless; I found this large gimblet, this file, and penknife, in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-112

2092. CLEMENT WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 belly-band, value 10s. , the goods of Edward Lowe .

ABRAHAM LOWE . I am the son of Edward Lowe, who is a cow-dealer . I took a load of dung down to Hornsey for him, and left the belly-band in the field there.

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am a constable of Hornsey. On the 28th of September I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Lowe's cart, and then hide something in the ditch; I went over a stile into another field; I then saw him with this belly-band in his hand - I took him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly did take the property from the ditch, but not with intention of stealing it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-113

2093. GEORGE ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 5 shillings, 2 sixpences, 3 penny pieces, and 9 halfpence, the monies of Robert Williamson , his master .

SARAH WILLIAMSON . I am the wife of Robert Williamson - the prisoner was in his employ. I gave him a sovereign on the 17th of September, to pay the laundress a bill - he returned, and gave me the change; he said the woman had not change herself, but he had got the change at the wine-vaults; the bill was 6s. 71/2d.: he gave me 13s. and some halfpence, which I did not count.

HANNAH BURROWS . I am the laundress - Mrs. Williamson owed me 6s. 71/2d.; the prisoner came down with a sovereign - I said I had not got change, but his mistress might pay me the next week; he gave me the book, but I did not have the money.

MARGARET AIKMAN . I saw Mrs. Williamson give the prisoner a sovereign.

MRS. WILLIAMSON. He was taken on the Monday, on another charge, but we did not know of this then; he told me he had paid the laundress - she came the next week, and said there was a week owing.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the laundress could not give him change, and he had returned the sovereign to Mrs. Williamson; and that he was in the habit of paying small sums for his mistress, or keeping back a few shillings for that purpose.

MRS. WILLIAMSON. He was in the habit of laying out small sums when I was out of town, and kept a shilling or two.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-114

2094. GEORGE EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 11 lbs. weight of brass, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Thursfield , his master .

THOMAS THURSFIELD. I am a brass finisher ; the prisoner was my apprentice . I believe this brass to be mine - he had access to it; I was not at home when it was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHER. Q. How long was he with you? A. About three years. I know the

brass - one piece here corresponds with a piece which it was broken from, and I have brought it here - and I know this curtain-rod - it was cast from this mould, which I have here.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES THURSFIELD . I am the prosecutor's son. On the 21st of September I sent the prisoner with some brass-dust to exchange for new metal; he returned with a correct account of that. An officer came next morning with a bag of brass, which I examined, and believe to be my father's.

Cross-examined. Q. Did a man and a boy come into the shop with a bag that night? A. No.

THOMAS TYRRELL . I live in Eagle-court, Clerkenwell. On the evening of the 21st of September I was in the street, hearing a song; the prisoner came up. and asked me to sell some brass for him; he took me to Sutton-street, and said if I would go and sell it he would give me 6d. I went, by his direction, to Harcourt's - he went round the corner while I knocked and asked what they gave for brass - they said they would not buy it by candle-light - I went and told him; he then went to the house himself: I waited about five minutes - he did not come out - I went home, and put the brass behind a water-butt; I told nobody about it - my mother got up at half-past five o'clock; I got up, and was going out at the same time. I took the brass out, not knowing what to do with it; the watchman took hold of me, and asked what I was going to do with it; I was going to tell him, but he took me to the watch-house; and I there told all about it, and showed where he had told me to sell it; we went in there, and they gave us a direction; we went near Oxford-street, and found the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Nobody interrupted you when you went to sell it? A. No. I hid the brass because my mother would ask where I got it, and beat me perhaps. I told the watchman I was going to my master's, in Red Lion-street; I have no master there, but the prisoner told me to say so if any one spoke to me - I did not suspect any thing.

CHARLES WYBROW . I am a watchman. I stopped Tyrrell with the bag of brass - I knew him, but know nothing against him; he said he was going to Red Lion-street, but I said he was going from there; he then said, "I mean Red Lion-street, Holborn." I took hold of it - he fell on his knees, and said he would tell me all; I then said, "Come along" - he said a man asked him to sell it, as he was now stated. I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody, and heard Tyrrell say he was the man who delivered it to him; the prisoner looked at him, winked, and said, "Was it me?" he said, "Yes - I will swear to you?"

DINAH HARCOURT . I live in Sutton-street. Tyrrell came in about seven o'clock in the evening of the 21st of September - he offered some brass for sale; I said we bought nothing after dark, and he went away; the prisoner came soon afterwards, with his master's dust, and had what he wanted - he said nothing about the brass.

JOHN ROBINSON . I received Tyrrell in charge. I went to Harcourt's, and then to Thursfield's, in Well-street, Oxford-street, and Tyrrell pointed the prisoner out.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to Harrcourt's I saw some persons about the door, but did not know them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271025-115

2095. CATHERINE KERCHURCHVALL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 sheet, value 4s.; 2 shirts, value 8s.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 4 table-cloths, value 12s.; 1 scarf, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 caddy-spoon, value 1s. 6d., and 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 6s., the goods of John Pye , her master .

JOHN PYE. The prisoner was in my employ. These articles are all mine; part of the duplicates were found on her.

CHRISTOPHER LAMB . I live with Mr. Thompson, a pawnbroker. A shirt and sugar-tongs were pawned with us - I cannot say who by, but these are the duplicates of them.

THOMAS BIRCHMORE . I took the prisoner in charge - she at first denied it, but afterwards said she had taken the property and pawned it, intending to redeem it.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, and have a variety of articles here, which were pawned by the prisoner, whom I well know; I gave her these duplicates. I have others goods, pawned by another person.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-116

2097. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 1d., and 1 watch-key, value 7s., the goods of John Bastin , from his person ; and WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN BASTIN. On the 28th of August, about twelve o'clock at night, I met the female prisoner in the street; she took me to a lodging-house, in Bear-street ; we went to bed - I put my trousers under the pillow; my watch was then in my pocket - I was not there three quarters of an hour; the male prisoner came up stairs; she got up and said it was her husband come home; she opened the door, and let him in; he made use of dreadful language, swearing what he would do to me; he then went away - I got up directly, and missed my watch - I told her I was sure I had it when I came there, and she must have taken it, and given it to the man - I said I would have a watchman - I gave an alarm; the watchman came, and searched her and the room, but did not find it - I was rather drowsy, but had not been asleep - I am positive he is the man who came into the room; it was moon-light; there was no candle - I swear to him by his stature, voice and size.

Prisoner ELIZABETH SMITH. Q. Did I not get a light while the man was in the room? A. No; she got one after he was gone.

GEORGE PALMER . I am a watchman. On the 28th of August I heard an alarm, went to No. 1, Bear-street, and found the female prisoner and prosecutor there; he said he had been with her, and lost his watch; she said she knew nothing of it - I went afterwards with the officer, and saw him find the duplicate of the watch on the male prisoner.

JOHN JAMES LLOYD . I am a pawnbroker. This watch

was pawned with me, on the 29th of August, by a woman in the name of Field - it was not the prisoner - I gave her the duplicate produced.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. In consequence of information I took the male prisoner, on the 21st of September, and found this duplicate in his fob; he said it was his own; he afterwards said he had bought it of a girl of the town, who he met in the Broadway; he then said he got the watch from Elizabeth Smith, in Bear-street, that he had had it stolen from him, and a girl of the town returned the duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH SMITH'S Defence. I opened the door, and the other prisoner came in - I went to get a light, and soon after he went away - I did not know he had the watch.

WILLIAM SMITH'S Defence. When I went into the room he was getting but of bed - I turned round, and went down again.

ELIZABETH SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 24.

WILLIAM SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-117

2097. ANN BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 crown, 1 half-crown, 2 shillings, 2 sixpences, and the sum of 9d. in copper monies, the property of William Maize , from his person .

WILLIAM MAIZE. On the 6th of October I went home with the prisoner to a house in George-street, St. Giles' , about one o'clock in the morning - I was there about twenty minutes; we did not go to bed; my watch was in my fob - I fell asleep, and the prisoner went down stairs; the people below came up, and asked me if all was right; they roused me up - I then missed my watch, and other property; an alarm was given, and in about half an hour I saw her in custody with my property - I was not exactly sober.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I am landlord of this house in George-street. I and the watchman stood at the door, when the prisoner came out - I sent my servant up to see if all was right, and from what I heard, I went with the watchman to her lodgings, in another house, and found the watch behind the grate; she was in bed, and I believe undressed - I sent for Maize, who said she was the woman.

GRIFFITH JONES . I am a watchman. I went with Hawkins; he found the watch - I found 1s. 31/2d. in her purse.

GEORGE PRATT . I am a patrol. I found this handkerchief - she had some clothes in her room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she was intoxicated, and could not say how she came possessed of the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-118

2098. MARY CREED was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 watch, value 40s., the goods of Thomas Forster , from his person .

THOMAS FORSTER. On the 30th of September I was in a passage, in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell , with the prisoner; my watch was in my fob - I was not there more than two minutes - I felt her hand at my fob; she ran away - I felt, and missed it - I gave an alarm, and the watchman took her; she denied it.

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I searched her, and found nothing but 1s. - I locked her up, and listened - I heard her tell the other prisoners there, that she had taken the watch from the old fellow, and chucked it down an area - I went and found it down an area on the spot she was taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HATT . I am a watchman. I heard an alarm, and stopped the prisoner - Forster gave charge of her.

Prisoner's Defence. He wanted me to go with him - I refused; he came and said I had taken his watch, which I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-119

2099. GEORGE FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 purse, value 6d., and 4 sovereigns, the property of Richard Harper , from his person .

RICHARD HARPER. I was at the Sun public-house, Sclater-street, Bethnal-green , on the 1st of October, about twelve o'clock at night - I had been there since nine, and drinking, but not to excess; the prisoner was there, but he was not of my party - I had my purse when I went into the parlour - I had been at a Lodge there, which closed at half-past eleven o'clock; we then all came down to the lower room - I called for a pot of beer - I did not miss my purse till I came outside the door - I returned to the house, but they would not let me in; the prisoner was in the room five minutes before I left; it was a steel purse.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHER. Q. Were you not to have a medal presented to you that night? A. I was, but I got the money instead, from the landlady, and put it into my purse, in my left hand pocket; the prisoner sat close to me - I had no gin - I found him next night in Swan-street, where there was another Lodge to be held; he slipped off his handkerchief, and ran away, but I followed, and took him - I never offered to drop the prosecution, if he gave me half.

JAMES HARPER . I saw my father receive a sovereign, and put it into his purse; he took out 1s. and paid for the beer; he put the 6d., which he received in change, into his pocket - I saw the prisoner put his hand into my father's left hand waistcoat pocket, and draw it out shut; there was something bright in it; he directly took up his hat, bade them all good night, and went out; my father came out in three or four minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not you been asking your father that evening for money to buy bread? A. Yes - he put his hand to his pocket, and said, "My purse is gone" - I told him of this, when we came out; several people were in the room.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an officer. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to the watch-house the night after the robbery - I searched him, and found a shilling, a sixpence, and a penny on him; he denied the charge.

MR. CHURCHER called -

JOSEPH WILLIAMSON . The prisoner and prosecutor were at my house on this evening; the prosecutor went out, returned in a minute, and said he had lost his money; there were about twenty people in the tap-room - I believe I was there all the time; if any thing had been said, I would have had the prisoner searched.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I was at my father's house; the prosecutor was showing his money about, and let some drop - I took it up, and gave it him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-120

2100. SARAH PLUMTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 11 sovereigns, the monies of John Timson , from his person .

JOHN TIMSON. I am a seaman . I met the prisoner on the 27th of September, and went with her to a house in Sun-yard - I had been drinking, but was sober - I had eleven sovereigns in my trousers pocket - I put the trousers under the pillow, and laid on the bed with the prisoner; it was about eleven o'clock in the day - I went to sleep; when I awoke my trousers were there, but the money and the prisoner gone; while I was dressing, she came into the room - I asked her about the money; she said five sovereigns were at Mr. Fletcher's, and that was all there was - I said I had eleven sovereigns; she said I had not - I said I would go with her to get them; we went to Fletcher's, where I got five.

JOHN GASKIN . I am an officer. I was applied to, on the 28th of September, by Timson: he went to the house; and pointed the prisoner out to me; she at first denied it, but afterwards said, the sovereigns she took from him she had left at the public-house - I said there was more; she said there was not - I asked if she had any box; she produced one, in which I found several new articles; she said she had bought them with a sovereign she had taken from him, and told me the shop - I went there; they said she had said for them with a sovereign.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she and the prosecutor were intoxicated, and he gave her eight sovereigns to take care of, saying she might keep three of them herself.

GUILTY . Aged 16. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-121

2001. GEORGE ROLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 canvas bag, value 2d; 1 half-sovereign, and 1 shilling, the property of William Elms , from his person .

WILLIAM RATSON . I know William Elms. I was at Grosvenor-row, Pimlico , and saw the prisoner draw his hand from Elms' left hand jacket, or breeches pocket; two pieces of silver fell from his hand, on the ground, but I cannot say what they were - I could not see who took them up - Elms was on his hands and knees - I do not know whether he had been knocked down; the prisoner then asked for a light - I said, "What do you want with a light, when you have taken it from him?"

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHER. Q. What time was this? A. Between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, as I was putting up our shutters - I am certain it was silver - Elms was drunk; several other persons were round him, but none of the reat were touching him; it was his breeches pocket, to the best of my knowledge; he drew the pocket out with his hand; nobody else could see it, except four or five, who I believe were helping him- several had hold of him.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I keep a public-house in Grosvenor-row. William Elms lived with me; he came home on the 6th, about seven or eight o'clock, and asked me for some money - I gave him a half-sovereign, half a crown, and some silver.

CHARLES HEWLETT . I was on duty at the watch-house on the 6th of October, and heard an alarm about a quarter-past twelve o'clock - I went out, and saw the prisoner run away; the persons round said he had been robbing the man - I pursued, and brought him back; he had only 41/2d. in his pocket; I went to the spot in the morning and found a half-sovereign in a bag, within a yard of where he had been; I went to attend to Elms, who was covered with blood; I could not bring him to the watch-house without assistance - and when I returned, the night constable had liberated the prisoner, as only 41/2d. was found on him.

ANDREW VALLANCE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th of October: as I took him to the watch-house, he said, "Now you have not got me;" he ran off - I pursued, and secured him.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you say you took him for? A. I said at first it was for knocking down a woman - I went to see for Ratson; the prosecutor is here, but he is completely deaf - it is impossible to make him understand any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-122

2102. JOHN HUMPHREYS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 7 drinking-glasses, value 9s.; 3 decanters, value 18s., and 1 cork decanter stopper, with a silver top, value 3s., the goods of John Hatchett and another, his masters .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS CHESTER . I am principal waiter at Hatchett's hotel , which is kept by Mr. John Hatchett and another gentleman; the prisoner lived there about two years; Cheesley lived there about twenty-two months: we frequently missed property - and, in consequence of information, on the 5th of October, I and Schofield watched the prisoner to Cheesley's lodging, No. 16, Henrietta-street; we went up, and found him and Cheesley in the attic; I looked round, and saw two decanters on a chest of drawers - one with wine in it, and a stopper, with a silver top; I looked further, and found eight glasses: I said to the prisoner, "What does all this mean?" he said, "I don't know;" I said, "You must know something of them;" he said, "By G - d, Chester, I know nothing about them;" I was going to take the things away; he said, "That wine-glass does not belong to Hatchett's, but to the woman of the house;" I looked at it, and think it was not ours. I was him afterwards at Marlborough-street; he there said the decanters were his - that he gave them to Cheesley - that he bought them in a court, but could not tell where; this was not taken down in writing - the Magistrate was not sitting; he was asked if it was at an old iron shop - he said No, it was not a shop, he bought them of a man he never saw before; he at last said it was Gee's-court.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I went with Chester and Mr. Beer to Cheesley's room, and found this property - the prisoner denied all knowledge of them; I found some keys on him, one of which he said belonged to a sideboard cupboard, in the room No. 1, at the hotel; I went there, and found in it a decanter of wine; he said it was his - he had saved it the night before; he said at the office that he bought the property.

THOMAS CHESTER . He had no authority to lock wine up.

MR. BEER. I went to the lodgings and the office; the witnesses have spoken correct.

MARY CHEESLEY . I was housemaid at Hatchett's, and left on the 6th of September - the prisoner was courting me; I had left there twice, on account of ill-health - he visited me, and brought the decanters and glasses - he presented them to me; the said he bought them at Barrett's, in Oxford-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You have been in custody yourself? A. Yes, ever since.

PHILIP PHILLIPS . I am a glass manufacturer, and live in Old Bond-street. I made these decanters for Hatchett's, and knew them directly - I make them for corks instead of stoppers; I make none like them for other people.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271025-123

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2103. REUBEN JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of September , 3 silver ladles, value 15s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 1l., and 1 nutmeg-grater, value 10s., the goods of George Fennell , the said goods having been stolen by an evil-disposed person, he well-knowing the same to have been stolen .

GEORGE FENNELL. I lost some property in my dwelling-house on the 22d of August last; I live at Iver, in the county of Bucks ; my house was entered by applying a centre-bit to the shutter - we went to bed that night about ten o'clock, and arose at six next morning: among the things lost, there were three ladles, a pair of Snuffers, a pair of sugar-tongs, and a nutmeg-grater - as near as I can guess, I lost 10l. or 12l. worth of property. In consequence of seeing an advertisement in the paper, I came to town, and saw my property at Bow-street - I never saw the prisoner till them.

THOMAS WHITE . I am an officer of the City. I went with Forrester to get a warrant backed, and then we went with Morris, of Bow-street, to the prisoner's house, in Monmouth-street, on the 18th of September; the prisoner was at home; I told him to open his drawers, and he did so; they were in the back room; a gentleman said that he wanted to find some broad cloth; we did not find any, but I found some silver of different descriptions - there were some watches and other things; he said they were his own property; we took the prisoner and plate to Bow-street, and Sir Richard Birnie remanded him; the prisoner is a general-dealer, in the clothes line.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you demanded the key of the drawer, did he put his hand into his pocket and take it out without hesitation? A. Yes; I understand the Magistrates have given him back the principal part of the plate; I said, when I saw the plate, "This looks suspicious;" I took the prisoner into custody at the time - he could not have run away if he liked - he made no such attempt - but I had my eye on him; Sir Richard Birnie said he would admit him to bail - very little of the plate was claimed: I know the manner of the Jews very well; I believe that the 22d of September is their new year's day - I know that on holydays they like to make a great display of plate; I never saw any thing more fair and honest than the prisoner's conduct on the occasion.

COURT. Q. Was the plate exposed for sale? A. No; there were a great many new clothes in the shop; some of the plate was marked, and some not.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I accompanied White; the property found was taken to Sir Richard Birnie: I agree in the account White has given.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I am a constable of Bow-street. I went with the witnesses, and I know nothing further than what they have stated.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was there not a great quantity of plate returned to him? A. There was.

Q. Had any attempt been made to erase crests or initials from any of it? A. Certainly not.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took these things in exchange for articles I sold in the shop: I have nothing more to say, only that I did go out and return once or twice while the officers were there.

THOMAS PARKINSON . I am a carver and gilder, and live at No. 19, Plumtree-street, Bloomsbury. I have known the prisoner five or six years; during the time he has lived in Monmouth-street, I have had dealings with him, and always found him an upright man; I have dealt with him for clothes, blankets, and sheets, and on one occasion I bought six silver spoons of him.

COURT. Q. What is he? A. He is a general-dealer; he exposed only clothes for sale - I never saw any spoons exposed for sale in the shop, except when I bought mine, and they laid on the counter.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If you had a shop in Monmouth-street, should you like to expose spoons in it? A. No.

JOHN GEORGE . I am an auctioneer, and live at No. 48, Duke-street, St. James'. I have known the prisoner sixteen years; he has been in the habit of purchasing articles at my room - plate, apparel, and other things; I always understood him to be a respectable man.

COURT. Q. What sort of property do you sell? A. When I sell the property of a lady or gentleman deceased, there is plate, linen, and other things; whoever purchases them pay for them before they are taken away; I sell plate at so much per ounce. I sold the prisoner some in Clark's rooms, in Hollis-street, four years ago.

THOMAS DALMAN . I live in Compton-street, Soho, and am a corn-chandler. I have known the prisoner four years - he dealt in any thing which he could buy at sales, and get a profit by. I never saw plate exposed in his shop; I suppose he locks it in a drawer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-124

2104. REUBEN JOSEPH was again indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of September , 7 silver spoons, value 1l. 2s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1

silver cream-ladle, value 5s., and 2 silver knife-resters, value 15s., the goods of Elizabeth Ellett , spinster, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH ELLETT. I live at Hayes, Middlesex , which is six or seven miles from town. I lost the property stated in the indictment on the night of the 16th of September - I went to bed at ten o'clock, when the house was secure; but some persons entered during the night; we were frightened, and gave an alarm - they entered the front bed chamber window, by meads of a ladder. I got up about two o'clock, because I heard a noise - the thieves were in the house at the time, but went away when the alarm was given. Among the articles taken were those now produced, which I saw at Bow-street on Monday, the 24th of September; it was on a Sunday night they broke in; I do not know any thing of the prisoner; there was a spoon, a gold watch, a brooch, and other things taken, which I have not seen since; they were in my bed-chamber. This is old family plate, and has my initials on it now.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I went to help search the prisoner's house, and found the property stated in the indictment - White took it from the drawers.

THOMAS WHITE . I executed a warrant on the 18th of September, when I found this property in some of the drawers in the back room; part is marked, and part not. The articles were not exposed for sale.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was this found at the same search as before? A. Yes; the prisoner opened the drawers, which was a place where I should expect to have found plate for family use; I dare say there was ten or fifteen times as much plate as this in value; excepting the articles in the indictments it has all been returned. We asked him how he came by it; he said, "I either purchased it, or got it in exchange;" it was exposed in the drawers; there was no concealment whatever.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I know nothing more about this plate, only that I went to Bow-street with the City officers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. This is very old silver, and nearly worn out - we consider we are allowed to buy such. I have no guilty knowledge about it. I laid out a deal of money at the Duke of York's sale; I gave eighty-eight guineas for one article, and thirty for a gold-headed dagger. I wish - I had known it was necessary, I would have had Mr. Christie here.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-125

2105. BARNET BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 watch, value 50s., the goods of George Myers Pearman , from his person .

GEORGE MYERS PEARMAN. I am guard to the Portsmouth mail , and live at Newington. About 7 o'clock in the evening, when I was between King-street and Gray's Inn-lane , a person snatched at me, and took my watch - he made his escape; I was lame and ill, and could not catch him; I have seen the watch since; I cannot speak to the prisoner being the person.

EDWARD CHARLES ANDERSON . I am a watchmaker, but my books were destroyed when my house was burnt down, so that I cannot tell whether I sold this watch to the prosecutor.

JOHN VAN . On the 10th of this month I was in Whitechapel-road, and saw the prisoner - I took him, and searched him - he said he had nothing about him, but I found this watch in his fob; he then said, "This is an old watch which I have had some time;" I said, "What did you give for it?" he said, 1l.; he then said he had bought it of a man in the street.

FRANCIS FIELD . I took the watch out of his pocket - he said he had bought it that morning, in the street, but did not know of whom.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-126

2106. ANN ALDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 sovereign, the money of Thomas Edwards , her master .

THOMAS EDWARDS. I am a publican , and keep the Seven Stars public-house, Brick-lane, Spitalfields . This occurred on the 29th of September last. The prisoner had been in my service nearly three months; the money was taken out of a private drawer; the officer found a sovereign on her - I never had suspicion of her before, but I had lost money. On the night in question I heard the keys of my private drawer rattle - I was in the bar, and looked back; I saw her hand in the drawer, which was half open; in this drawer I keep my purse and brewer's books; I drew her away, and asked what business she had there - she then put her hand into her bosom, and pulled up her gown. I said to my wife, "She has robbed me, and put something into her bosom;" the prisoner said she would not be searched except by an officer; the officer did search her afterwards, and a sovereign dropped from her clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you see the sovereign drop from her person? A. No - the room is carpeted where she was searched; it was possible for the sovereign to drop without being heard or seen. I never said I saw it drop; she said she had only half a crown, which her sister gave her. When the sovereign fell she said, "There it is;" the bar in size is four yards by six yards; no person was in the bar but the prisoner and me; she was about six feet from me when she rattled the keys.

JEMIMA EDWARDS . I am the prosecutor's wife. My husband has spoken the truth about the sovereign; the prisoner refused to go up stairs at first, but said she would follow me; I took her to my room - when I said, "For God's sake, let me see what you have got in your bosom, and tell me the truth, and you shall not be hurt;" she said she would not be searched by a woman, but if an officer would come she would strip naked; when he did come she stripped very indecently; she was not left a moment after the robbery, before the officer came.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not your husband very passionate at the time? A. Yes - I never quitted her; during the time we were in the room she had a nap - she had taken a little liquor, and was dosey; she had been out to buy butter that day, which is kept in a safe on the stairs, and not in the bar; it was a silk purse, with a snap, from which she took the money; the drawer was locked, but the keys were in it.

THOMAS HART . I went to the prosecutor's, and found the prisoner there; I searched her, and stripped her of

part of her clothes; she told me she had only half a crown when I went - I saw the sovereign drop down on the carpet - Mrs. Edwards picked it up; the prisoner then said it was her own.

Cross-examined. Q. Was no other person in the room besides Mr. and Mrs. Edwards? A. No; I did not observe the prisoner act indecently; I helped her to pull her gown off, and she pulled off her petticoat herself.

Prisoner's Defence. The sovereign was my own; my clothes caught the keys, as I turned to put the butter into the cupboard, but I never touched the drawer.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-127

2107. WILLIAM HIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 2 pieces of chain, value 9d.; 2 knobs, value 4d.; 2 bolts, value 4d., and 1 piece of iron hoop tyre, value 3d., the goods of William Harman , his master .

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the 27th of September, in consequence of information, I was lying in wait in Oxford-market , and saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Harman's shop - I watched him towards a marine-store shop - I stopped him, and asked him what he had got; he said old iron; he carried part in his apron and part in his pocket. I told him he had brought it from Mr. Harman's - he made no reply, and I took him back there.

SOLOMON WILLOUGHBY . I am foreman to the prosecutor - the prisoner had worked for him ten months. The things taken are not of much value; it is old iron, part of which we sometimes work up again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed in clearing the shop, and found these things in the dirt - I thought them of no value.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-128

2108. WILLIAM LARKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , two 10l., and one 5l. Bank notes, the property of Samuel Hinder , his master .

SAMUEL HINDER. I keep the Manchester Arms public-house, Adam-street East, Manchester-square . The prisoner lived with me twice, but only two months the last time. On the 1st of September I gave him two 10l. and one 5l. notes, to go to Messrs. Combe and Delafield's, to get silver, where he had been several times before; I never saw him again till last Saturday. but I was on the look out. I have not recovered a farthing of the property.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I apprehended the prisoner, at the Griffin public-house, and told him the charge - he said,"I have spent it."

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-129

2109. RICHARD ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 half-crown , the money of Charles Chasemore .

CHARLES CHASEMORE. I am a butcher , and live at Fulham; my father is manager of the toll-house at Fulham-bridge ; this half-crown was stolen from me; I was toll-keeper that day; the prisoner trimmed the lamps at the toll-gate ; this occurred about four o'clock in the afternoon - I counted up 9l. worth of silver, and put it into a drawer, locked it, and put the key into my pocket when I went off duty; the prisoner came at five o'clock to trim his lamps; he kept his oil and cotton in the toll-house; after I had told the money twice, my brother counted it in my presence.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The money was all in silver? A. Yes; there were some half-crowns, but I do not know how many; there was no half sovereign; while the prisoner was there I was obliged to go out to the door, to attend my duty at the gate; I do not know that he had any key to open the drawer; when he was searched a razor was found on him.

HENRY CHASEMORE . I am the brother of the last witness; I saw my brother lock the drawer - I counted the money twice over, and there was 9l. - we had strong suspicion of the prisoner - the drawer was locked with a common key; when I counted the money afterwards there was only 8l. 17s. 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear that no person was in the place but the prisoner? A. Yes; I do not know that it was stated before the Magistrate that there were other persons there; I swear there were several half-crowns among the money; I do not recollect saying any thing to the prisoner - I do not know what my brother said to him - I was in and out of the toll-room; I never heard him make him any promise to my knowledge.

JOSEPH SMITHERS . I am a Bow-street officer, and apprehended the prisoner; he said he knew nothing about the charge, and denied it altogether; he then said if I would let him go to his prosecutor, he would let him know all about it; I took him to old Mr. Chasemore; the old gentleman did not say he should be forgiven if he told what had happened; he told him he was in the hands of an officer, and the law must take its course; the prisoner then said he opened the drawer with a key, which he threw into the water.

HENRY CHASEMORE . I do not know where my father is.

RICHARD CUFF. I belong to Bow-street; I found the key where the prisoner said he had put it, near Putney-bridge - it opens the prosecutor's drawer.

CHARLES CHASEMORE re-examined. The boy has been with us four years, and down to lately we had a good opinion of him: my father never promised the prisoner any favour - he is very ill.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18271025-130

2110. JAMES BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 watch, value 20s. , the goods of Benedetto Guista .

BENEDETTO GUISTA. I am an Italian, but have been some time in this country. I have known the prisoner six or seven years - he is a stable man ; he came to me on the 2d of October; I asked him to dine with me, and he staid until seven o'clock; before he went out I missed my watch, which had hung up in the room - he was taken into custody the same evening, but denied it.

HENRY TUCKER . I met the prisoner in St. Martin's-lane, at eight o'clock the same evening; I apprehended him, and found this ticket upon him.

GEORGE WALKER . I am shopman to Mr. Young, a

pawnbroker, of St. Martin's-lane. I produce a watch, which was pledged by the prisoner, on the 2d of October, for 15s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18271025-131

2111. JAMES CUFF was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 glue-kettle, value 18d. , the goods of Richard Bushell .

MARY ANN BUSHELL . My husband, Richard Bushell, lives in Piccadilly . On the 11th of October the prisoner came to work at our house as a bricklayer ; he left at a quarter before five o'clock in the afternoon, with a bundle under his coat - it turned out to be a leaden glue-kettle; he said he had got grub.

FRANCIS MACE . I produce the glue-kettle claimed by Mrs. Bushell.

The prisoner received an excellent character GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-132

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2112. JOHN BUCKLE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September, 1 bridle, value 12s., the goods of William Dickenson .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-133

2113. RICHARD HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 3 shillings, 1 sixpence, 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the property of Francis Day .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-134

2114. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for embezzlement .

MESSRS. BRODRICK and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM JONES . I am an upholsterer. I went to Mr. Hopkins' shop, No. 60, Shoreditch, between the 5th and 11th of July - I cannot tell the day - the prisoner attended to me there; I bought of him four pieces of chintz, and ninety yards of bordcring; I had selected them nearly a week before, in his presence, and under his direction; I told him to lay them by for me, and when I went again he produced them; I asked him for a piece of striped chintz; he got the key, and went up stairs at No. 62, which also belongs to Mr. Hopkins; I there chose one piece, and brought it down; I was to give 18s. for it; he made me out this bill (looking at it) - it is in pencil, but the same writing is on it as when he gave it to me; he made out no other bill that I saw - the three pieces of chintz were 1l. each, and the fourth 18s.; I bought a piece of brown holland for 25s., being 6l. 3s. together; I paid him six sovereigns and three shilliags; these remnants are part of the chintz; I afterwards went there again to purchase more of the same; I did not see Mr. Hopkins, but in consequence of my going there again he came to my house, and I showed him the bill.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you any receipt? A. No; I swear this did not happen before the 1st of July - there is no date on the bill; my attention was not called to it before September; I did not at first recollect when it was, till I looked at some documents - here is one of them - it is a bill which I sent with some goods - it is dated the 9th of July, and is for a couch, which I covered with some of the chintz; I swear the purchase was before the 1st of July, without referring to any thing - the couch was made all but the chintz.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you certain it was after the 1st of July? A. I have no doubt of it whatever.

JOHN HOPKINS . I am a linen-draper , and live at Nos. 60 and 62, Shoreditch . The prisoner was in my service about fourteen months; I discharged him in August, as I took stock then, and found a deficiency of about 500l. - it was his business to attend in the shop, and sell goods; we have private marks on the goods to denote the price; when he sells goods, it is his duty to make out a bill, and give it to the next young man to sign with a letter - each shopman has a letter to describe him - the prisoner's letter was P; he was also to make out a cheque, and take to the desk to deliver with the money to the cashier, who receives the money, enters it in a book, and files the cheque; the prisoner also had a small book, in which he should enter the cheque - he left his cheque-book with me when he went away in August. In consequence of information from Jones I examined his cheque-book from the 5th to the 11th of July - here are entries, but none of 6l. 3s.; the bill produced is his hand-writing - there is no letter on it to denote its having been examined by another; I have my cash-book, which is balanced every night by the cashier; the shopmen then call over their own books, and if that differs from the cash-book, reference is made to the cheque file; there was no mistake of 6l. 3s. at this time; Jones produced some chintz to me - I saw the mark on it - the three pieces should have been sold for 35s. each - they cost me 31s.; the striped chintz should have been 37s. 4d. a piece - he bought them at three guineas less than the original cost.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You keep several men? A. Yes; each man has his own department; as soon as they write a cheque they take it with the money to the desk; they always take them singly, not five or six together.

COURT. Q. If another customer comes in and takes his attention, may he not sell again, and make another cheque? A. No; he puts down the amount immediately, and goes to the desk with it - I never knew such a thing happen; the desk is not six yards off - I never knew a cheque dropped; one transaction is always settled first.

ROBERT RALSTON LEE . I was a cashier to Mr. Hopkins, in the first week of July - I continued there all the time, except at meal times, when the other cashier takes my place - I did not receive 6l. 3s. that week; here is the cash-book; there is no such entry - I have examined the prisoner's private cheque-book; no such entry is there; it was his duty to enter it there, and bring it to me directly - Burton attended the books the second week in July.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you often found more money in the till of an evening, than has been entered? A. There has been 2s. or 3s. - I never had two cheques brought to me at once - I did not say so at the office.

Q. Has not a sum, purporting to be one man's, been paid by another? A. It has happened.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the highest amount that has been over in the till? A. Two or three shillings; it is impossible a mistake of 6l. 3s. could be made.

JOHN ROBERT BURTON . I was assistant cashier; when Lee went to meals, on the first week in July, I took his place - I did not receive 6l. 3s. from the prisoner - I attended the second week as cashier, and did not receive it then - I have examined the books; there is no such entry, nor is there in his private book.

Cross-examined. Q. You have many hundred cheques in the course of a day? A. Yes.

WILLIAM JONES. I bought the goods between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. If any mistake has happened, it has been in the hurry of business.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-135

2115. ALEXANDER MUNRO was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Eleanor Featherstone , from her person .

ELEANOR FEATHERSTONE. I am the daughter of John Featherstone . On the 17th of October I was on Tower-hill , and felt this handkerchief taken from round my neck- I turned round, and saw the prisoner within a yard of me; he ran, and I saw it in his hand.

Prisoner. She gave it me to hold. Witness. No; he took it off my neck.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer. I received information, and took the prisoner on Sunday morning last, and asked what he had done with the handkerchief; he said he had sold it to a Jew for 1s. 6d., and spent the money at the play.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-136

2116. WILLIAM DUNKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Scannall .

WILLIAM SCANNALL. I am a cobler , and live in Monmouth-street . On the 13th of October, I was down stairs; I came up, and my wife was selling a pair of shoes to the prisoner; she stooped to sound the money, and missed a pair; she told me a man had run off with them - I pursued, but could not find him; she detained the prisoner; he had done nothing.

MARY SCANNALL . I sold the prisoner a pair of shoes; he said to his comrade, "These will fit you;" he took them up, and gave them to his companion, who ran off with them; the prisoner did not go away.

Prisoner. I did not know the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-137

2117. JOHN FEATHERSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 2 sheets, value 6s. , the goods of John Palmer .

JOHN PALMER. I am a journeyman tailor , and live on Back-hill, Hatton-garden . On the 11th of October I let the prisoner a furnished room, at 3s. 6d. a week; he gave his name as John Wilson ; there were two sheets in the room - he only staid one night - he went away next morning, locked the door, and took the key; we opened the door, and missed the sheets.

MARY PALMER . I went into the room, and missed the sheets.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found another sheet in his hat.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I live with Mr. Nicholls, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of sheets, pawned by the prisoner, on the 13th of October.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-138

2118. ROBERT GASALEE , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 2 dead fowls, value 5s. , the goods of John Pomfret .

JOHN POMFRET. I am a poulterer . These fowls laid in my shop-window.

JOSEPH SELMAN . I am a tailor, and live at Tottenham , near Mr. Pomfret's. On the 1st of October I saw the prisoner take these fowls from the window - I gave an alarm, and saw him brought back with them.

STEPHEN HESCOCK . I saw the prisoner take the fowls, and stopped him with them, four doors off.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to look at them, when he laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-139

2119. THOMAS HALFPENNY , EDWARD STEVENS , and WILLIAM PRATT were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 4 handkerchiefs, value 5s. , the goods of Elizabeth Hickman .

ELIZABETH HICKMAN. I am single , and live in Johnson-street, Somers'-town . On the 26th of September, about six o'clock, five handkerchiefs were on a stool, outside my wash-house, in the garden, which is inclosed- I had washed them, and put them there, and in about an hour, I was hanging some things up at the first floor, and saw some boys in the field, at the bottom of the garden wall - it is an inclosed field - they had no business there - I missed them, and thought they had gone out another way - I went to the field again, and saw one boy on the wall - he jumped down into the garden - I opened the window, and asked what he wanted; he said his hat - I said there was no hat there; he said there was- he came up to the wash-house, caught at the handkerchiefs, and took four of them - he threw them over the wall - I believe Stephens is that boy - it was not dark - I ran down, and gave an alarm.

Prisoner HALFPENNY. Q. Did you not swear to me and Stevens at the office? A. No.

ELIZABETH LAMPRELL . I was washing for Hickman, in the wash-house; at a few minutes part six o'clock I saw Stevens come up to the wash-house window; he rather frightened me - I asked what he wanted; he said, "My hat" - I said, "Go along, there is no hat here" - he snatched the handkerchiefs off the stool, and ran - I called Stop thief! - Cockren caught hold of his leg, as he got over the wall - Halfpenny came up, and said, "Let him

go, or I'll make you; what has he done?" - I said he had stolen some handkerchiefs; he said, "He has not."

JAMES COCKREN . I live next door to Hickman. I heard a noise in her yard; I saw Stevens run up the yard; he called to Halfpenny to look out, and threw something over the wall - Halfpenny caught it; I got over, and caught him as he was getting over the wall: he called to Halfpenny, who asked what I was doing; I said he had stolen something - he said it was a lie, and struck me on the head; I let Stevens go to secure him, and held him till an officer came up: there was a third person about thirty yards off, whom Halfpenny went towards when he received the handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You never saw them nearer than you have said? A. No.

JAMES PEACOCK . I am an officer. I was at home, in Bridgwater-street, about three hundred yards from Hickman's; I saw Halfpenny and Pratt in the field - he gave something to Pratt, but what, I could not see; I pursued Pratt, who ran across the field, over the rails, and escaped: I went next day, and found the handkerchiefs in a box at Pratt's lodging, in Warren-street, Camden-town - his mother was there.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know she was his mother? A. She said so; I am sure he is the boy - I asked some boys if Walters was not with them, thinking he might be concerned; I did not ask if the third person was Walters.

WILLIAM JAMISON . I am street-keeper, and took Pratt, by his mother's house in Warren-street; he saw me, ran in, ran up stairs, and bolted the door: I went up, broke the pannel of the door to get in, and saw him put something under the bed - his trousers were undone at the time; I took him to the watch-house, returned, and found these handkerchiefs in a box under the bed.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell his mother what you took him for? A. I said linen, as I thought so at the time - she had time to remove them.

WILLIAM PRICHARD . I am an officer. On the 26th of September I took Stevens in Johnson-street, Somers'-town.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HALFPENNY'S Defence. I was coming up Clarendon-street, and saw this woman coming out, calling Thieves! a man and some boys got over the fence - the man had hold of the boy; I asked what he had done - he said stealing something; he let go of him, and took me, and afterwards brought back Stevens, who is not the boy who got away.

STEVENS' Defence. I was crossing the path leading to Camden-town, and was taken.

PRATT'S Defence. I found a bundle in the path, and took it to my mother's, to see if they were advertised.

JAMES COCKREN . I am sure it was Stevens whom I took hold of.

HALFPENNY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

STEVENS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

PRATT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-140

2120. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 pair of trousers, value 30s; 1 watch, value 40.; 1 seal, value 40s.; 1 watch-key, value 30s.; 1 ring, value 16s.; 1 bunch of keys, value 5s.; 1 pair of braces, value 5s.; 1 comb, value 1s.; 1 penknife, value 1s.; 8 shillings, and 8 sixpences , the property of James Storer, the younger .

JAMES STORER, JUN. I am a furnishing undertaker . On the 26th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was bathing in the Serpentine-river , and left this property on the bank; when I got out, I missed my trousers, watch, and all these things; I know nothing of the prisoner - I frequently bathe there.

Prisoner. Q. How far from the water were they? A. About a yard and a half - many persons leave their things there; I was not more than a minute in the water.

JOHN LEWIS . I am an officer. I went to a coffee-shop in George-street, and saw the prisoner, searched him, and found the watch in his fob, also these keys, a knife, and 2s. 41/2d. in money; I asked how he came by them - he gave me no answer; he afterwards told the Magistrate he picked them up in an old stocking: I found the duplicate of another pair of trousers on him; I got Mr. Storer's trousers from a coffee-shop in Westminster, in consequence of information.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded great distress, and denied the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-141

2121. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 25 lbs. of leather, value 2l. , the goods of Edward Stubbs and John Dixon Hancock .

THOMAS BROWN . I am a patrol. On the evening of the 9th of October, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Whitechapel, with a bundle of leather on his shoulder - he walked very sharp across the road; I followed him to Wentworth-street, and asked what he had got- he said some cuttings of leather; I asked who he worked for - he said Mr. Hammer, whom I fetched, but he knew nothing of him; he then said he worked for the prosecutors- I fetched Mr. Hancock.

THOMAS SMITH . I saw the prisoner at the watch-house and heard him say he worked for Mr. Hammer, and the leather belonged to him; he afterwards said it was the prosecutors', and he had brought it away, a small parcel at a time - it is in small pieces.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He had it altogether? A. Yes.

JOHN DIXON HANCOCK. I am in partnership with Edward Stubbs; we are harness-makers , and live in Whitechapel-road ; the prisoner came into our employ in April, 1826: I have no doubt this is our leather.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any private mark on it? A. No; I have no doubt of it - he said he took it from us; he was once in business for himself - we considered him as highly respectable, and intended to put him in a better situation.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken by surprise, and do not know what I said; but I brought this leather from the country - part of it is patent leather, which the prosecutors do not use, and there is some brace-webb.

THOMAS SMITH. The leather he alludes to I found in a box under his bed - that I have not produced.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confinned One Year .

Reference Number: t18271025-142

2122. MARY CROW was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 9 handkerchiefs, value 35s., and 1 shawl, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of Owen Kelly .

OWEN KELLY. I am a hawker , and live at the Redcross tap, Barbican. On the 25th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in the street, and asked her to buy a piece of cloth - we went together to her house - she appeared the owner of the house. I showed my goods there - we could not agree about the price. I then went to the Pickled Egg public-house - she came after me, and said she would treat me with some gin; we were alone in the parlour - my bundle was in the room; she went out twice; the second time she went out I missed two new handkerchiefs from my coat pocket - I had them for sale. I told the landlord - he then took my pack into his care - I was tipsy. Next day I missed a piece of handkerchiefs, containing seven, and a shawl. I was sober when I went into the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You went there at her invitation? A. I went in, and she followed; I drank at her expense - I do not know how long I was there, I believe about two hours. I gave her nothing, I am sure; I do not remember how much I drank; I saw her take the two handkerchiefs, and put them into her pocket, before I got quite intoxicated; I took them from her - she then said she took them out of a lark. I continued drinking with her - she drank a good deal.

THOMAS FINCHER . I keep the Pickled Egg. The prisoner and prosecutor came to my house, and had a pot of porter and two quarterns of gin; they called for more gin, but had no money to pay for it; they called for more gin, soon get money; she went out, and came back again twice; before she went out the second time I went into the parlour, and took the prosecutors's pack up stairs, as he was not able to mind it; he came into the tap-room soon after, and pulled off his hat - he said he had lost two handkerchiefs, and accused me of robbing him; I said, "I don't think you have been robbed at all - you have got two handkerchiefs in your hat now;" he said, "Yes, but there should be four;" I said, "If you have been robbed I can find the woman who was with you." I went out, received information from one Moore, and went to a pawnbroker's in Wardour-street- I found some property, and in about an hour I found the prisoner in the street, close by my house; Kelly did not then know that he had lost more than two handkerchiefs; I went home and asked if he had lost any thing else - he then described the other handkerchief and shawl.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not they drunk? A. Yes; Kelly was turned out of the office that night, because he was drunk; the prisoner might be the worse for liquor; she said she had done nothing with the handkerchiefs. she went out at first between five and six o'clock; she was sober then.

WILLIAM PYATT . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker. I have a shawl and two handkerchiefs, pawned by the prisoner, about six o'clock in the evening of the 25th of September - she was sober.

WILLIAM RAVEN . I am an officer, and took her in charge - she gave me this handkerchief off her neck.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not visible to every body? A. I had not noticed it.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 25th of September, in the evening, after dark, the prisoner pawned these six handkerchiefs - she appeared sober.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were given to me to pawn: I was to sleep with him all night.

JOSIAH DEAN . I am a linen-draper, and live at Blackwall-lane. I was at the Pickled Egg that night, but not in the room they were in - I heard the prosecutor charge her with taking two handkerchiefs; I thought it frivilous, and asked if he had cut two off the piece - he said he had; I said, "I suppose you cut them off to give to her;" he said,"I did not intend to give them to her - I laid them in her lap to take care of for me." I know nothing of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-143

2123. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS. This watch is mine - I gave it to a man named Daley, to repair; I think it was the latter end of March - Lucy Say, and the prisoner lived in the same house with him.

LUCY SAY . The prisoner and Daley lodged at my house- Daley gave me this watch to take care of on the 3d of April; I did not notice it particularly - it had a chain and seal like this: I missed it on the 4th of April; the prisoner left the lodging the same night: I never could find him till the 3d of October.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned on the 5th of April; I believe by the prisoner, but cannot be positive to his person.

WILLIAM RAYNER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner - he denied the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left the lodging on the 3d of April; the witnesses missed it on the 10th - I was at Maidenhead at the time.

LUCY SAY. He lodged ten days with me; he had paid me for one week - I did not know he was going.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-144

2124. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 cup and cover, value 2s. 6d., and 1 pan-cover, value 6d. , the goods of Saul Lahee .

WILLIAM MCKENZIE . I am a porter. On the 25th of September I was employed by Mr. Lahee, at a sale in Devonshire-place, Cavendish-square - I had charge of the drawing-room - I saw the prisoner there that afternoon, just as that day's sale was concluding; I missed a cup and cover off the pier-table, and found them in his breast pocket.

JAMES CHANDER . I am foreman to Mr. Lahee, and saw the prisoner at the house; he was much intoxicated; he asked me if he could be of any use; I said No, but rather than keep the company waiting, I told him he might take the remainder of the lot up stairs from the scullery.

THOMAS HOOKER . I took him in charge.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was intoxicated, and could not account for his possession of the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-145

2125. THOMAS PERRY , ALEXANDER FRANCIS , and WILLIAM TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 36lbs. of lead, value 4s., the goods of William James Summerland , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM JAMES SUMMERLAND, JUN. My father keeps a public-house in East Smithfield ; my bed-room window looks on the leaden gutter. On the morning of the 23d of September, between six and seven o'clock, my father called me to look on the leads, and I saw Turner and Francis on the gutter, taking the tiles off the lead; another man was with them, who I cannot swear to; he was in a room of an empty house at the back of ours, with his head and hands out of a hole; I went down to the front door, and up to the empty room, and found the three prisoners there; they said they came there to sleep; I got an officer, who took them all; about a quarter of a cwt. of lead had been taken from the gutter - we found some lead in another room in the empty house; it appeared the same as that in the gutter; I found a shoe in the gutter, and Perry had only one shoe on; the one found did not match the one he wore. I found a knife under where they had been sitting.

Prisoner PERRY. This witness' father ordered me to go over the house every night; I went, and somebody fired at me; I went into the room, and the other prisoners were there. Witness. We had offered him 5s. to find who had taken some lead before; my father fired a pistol up in the air.

THOMAS OBORNE . I received them in charge, and fitted the lead to the gutters - it fits exactly - they all said they came there to sleep.

COURT to W. J. SUMMERLAND. Q. You said at the office, that it was Perry and Turner who were on the roof, and Francis was looking out of the hole - how came you to say it was Perry? A. I saw the shoe fall from the man's foot who went through - I did not say it was Perry.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-146

2126. WILLIAM PUDDIFORD , EDWARD JAMES and WILLIAM MORRIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 2 coats, value 45s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., and 1 key, value 1d. , the goods of Edward Long Fox .

EDWARD LONG FOX. I am a broker , and lodge in New Church-street, Edgware-road . On the 12th of October these things were hung up in the passage - the key was in the coat pocket - I saw them safe about seven o'clock that morning; about half-past seven a chimney-sweeper knocked at the door, and gave the servant information; she called me; I went out, but have not found either of the coats since; one was drab, and one blue.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a chimney-sweeper. On the 12th of October I saw James run into Mr. Fox's passage, and return with a drab great-coat - I stood at the corner of the street, and saw him give it to Puddiford, who stood at the door; Morris stood facing the window; Puddiford followed the other up two streets - I went and knocked at the door, and asked the gentleman if he had lost a greatcoat - he said Yes - I told him which way they had run - James and Morris had ran down Church-street - Puddiford ran round Nightingale-street, with the coat.

Prisoner JAMES. Q. Was the door open when you saw me take the coats? A. The door was a-jar - I was going to a job, and a coffee-woman, at the corner, sent me to tell the gentleman.

COURT. Q. Why not tell the gentleman sooner? A. My master was coming up the grove, and he hallooed to me - I saw Morris walk down the street with James; he walked to the bottom of Church-street, and then walked very fast.

Prisoner JAMES. Two weeks ago I saw that boy with two others; he stole a hat from the corner of Homer-street and Crawford-street - I know the man who wears the hat now - he bought it of him.

Witness. I never stole a hat in my life, nor was I concerned in stealing one; I was never at the shop he mentions; I was once taken up for breaking windows, but was discharged; I was never in the House of Correction.

JAMES GEE . I live with Mr. Gee, of Copeland-street, about twelve yards from Mr. Fox's. On the morning of the 12th of October, about seven o'clock, Puddiford passed me with two coats, one blue and one light coloured, under his arm; he was running from Mr. Fox's house, and not above twelve yards from it - I gave an alarm - he ran down Nightingale-street - the witness knocked at the door to inform Mr. Fox; this was about five minutes after I saw him with them.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 12th of October I apprehended the prisoners, from the description given by Williams; I found a few halfpence and some silver on Puddiford.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I assisted in apprehending them, and found 2s. on James.

MORRIS'S Defence. The gentleman says he saw the coats safe at seven o'clock - the witness says it was about seven that he saw Puddiford run with them.

THOMAS THOMPSON re-examined. I was some time with James, and told him a sweep had seen him turn out of the house with the coats - I described the sweep to him - he is well known among them all - he told me he had seen him steal a hat and some bacon.

JAMES' Defence. This boy is in the habit of sleeping in empty houses, and stealing property - he is a running dustman.

PUDDIFORD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JAMES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-147

2127. JOHN ROBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Lockton .

ROBERT LOCKTON. I live in Wellington-place, St. George's in the East . The prisoner lodged two or three nights with me; he went out in the morning, and as the sheets were missing, I went and told him he was wanted; he returned till within two doors of the house. and then ran away; I pursued for half a mile, calling Stop thief! and he was taken.

ROBERT MARSTON . I heard an alarm - Lockton was pursuing the prisoner - I followed, and saw a man take the sheet from him, and tell him to be off - I took the prisoner, and took the sheet from the other man - he said he was in distress, and had nothing to eat.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-148

2128. MARY ROWLEY and HENRIETTA GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 6 handkerchiefs, value 18s. , the goods of William Browne .

JAMES HUGHES . I am in the employ of Mr. Wm. Browne, linen-draper , of Edgware-road . The prisoners came to the shop together on the 3d of October, to pay for some things they had bought, and asked to see some bandannas, which I showed them - I missed one piece, and accused them of it - they denied it for some time, but afterwards went into the passage, and Rowley produced them, as if from her pocket; they had come in together, and both looked at them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see Green do any thing? A. No; some other women, who were there, pressed into the passage - they were respectable women - some of them went out, and said they would return, and did so - the prisoners were locked in the passage from four till seven o'clock, when Mr. Browne came in, and an officer was sent for.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer, and took them in charge, but found nothing on either of them.

JAMES HUGHES. Rowley offered me a 5s. piece and a 6d. for my own use - I declined it - she then said she would leave it on the bandannas.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

GREEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-149

2129. SAMUEL SUMNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 copper boiler, value 20s. , the goods of David Keen .

LEWIS TURNER . I am servant to David Keen, of Islington . I put this boiler at the door out on the curb, on the 12th of October, between one and two o'clock, and in about an hour it was stolen - the prisoner was taken with it.

SAMUEL TYNDALE . I am a fishmonger. I saw the prisoner loitering about Keen's premises - I saw him take the copper up, and put it on his head - I ran out, took him, and gave charge of him - he said a man told him to take it, but he pointed nobody out.

WILLIAM JONES . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave me 1s. to carry it. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-150

2130. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 truss of hay, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Jeremiah Humphreys .

JEREMIAH HUMPHREYS. I am a farmer , and live at Chingford . On the 15th of October I was fetched to the office, and found some hay, which I think was mine; it had been sown very late, and was very poor - the prisoner was my carter , and drove my team - the hay was in my stack-yard.

TIMOTHY READING . I am a patrol. On the 15th of October I was with Smith - I saw a cart with some hay, near the Fountain public-house, at Clapton; there were three horses, but no carman - we waited a few minutes, and saw the prisoner come out of the Fountain yard with a pail in his hand - he dipped four or five pails of water, and poured it into the trough for the horses - he then got on the top of the cart, turned back the tarpauling, and threw down a truss of hay - he got down, took it up, and went towards the stable with it - I went and took hold of him, and asked what he was going to do with it - he said to leave it till he returned from London - I asked if he had enough hay for his horses till he returned - he said he had- I said, "My lad, I think you are robbing your master"- I gave the hay to Smith, and took the prisoner, cart, and horses up to the watch-house - there was some hay tied to the side of the cart for the horses - Mr. Humphreys' name was on the cart; I got on the top of the cart, and found one truss with only one hand on it - Cowley said,"That is the bottle-truss; we must detain that" - I threw it down, and asked the prisoner where the load of hay was to go; he said, "To the King's Arms public-house, Leadenhall-market;" I took it there, and delivered thirty-six trusses of hay.

THOMAS SMITH . I was with Reading; his evidence is correct; the prisoner had taken the truss about a dozen yards up the Fountain yard.

JOSHUA PEPPERCORN . I am servant to Mr. Humphreys. I loaded his cart last Saturday week, in the evening, to go to town on Monday morning; I put thirty-six trusses into it, and one bottle-truss in the hind part of the cart - there was no other truss there - there was no other truss tied up in the yard, that I know of; I saw this hay at the watch-house, and believe it to be master's.

WILLIAM COWLING . I received the prisoner at the watch-house, and asked why he was going to leave the truss; he said to feed his horses on his return; I said, "I suppose you have some manger-meat for them?" he said No; we found the bottle-truss in the cart.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-151

2131. THOMAS WILLIS and JAMES EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 42 lbs. of lead, value 5s., the goods of William James Summerland , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

MOSES TOMS . I keep a chandler's shop, opposite William James Summerland's house; I went on the roof of the house between seven and eight o'clock, and found a hole through which a person could get; I called, but no one answered; Inglish then came, and got through the hole; we saw a small piece of lead loose; we found Willis there, and took him to the watch-house; we returned, and found a piece of lead, some more lead turned up, and a knife lying near it; we found Edwards up the chimney of an empty room.

GEORGE INGLISH . I went up the stairs of the empty house; I found nobody in the room; I found a hole, and saw Willis on his knees there; we took him, and found 3 lbs. of lead in the gutter, and a knife by it.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer. Willis was given into my charge about eight o'clock; I then went and fetched Edwards; they both said they went there to sleep.

WILLIS' Defence. We went there to sleep.

WILLIS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-152

2132. HENRY SMITH was indicted for bigamy .

WILLIAM BROWN . I was present at the prisoner's marriage, on the 30th of September last, to Elizabeth Fry ,

my sister-in-law; he went by the name of George Morris , which I then thought was his name; I did not know that he had been married before; I did hear, about six weeks before the marriage, that he went by the name of Smith - Fry was living with me then; the prisoner owed me 7l. - he was taken up three days after their marriage; I got 4l. out of the 7l. before he was taken; I swear I never knew he was married before.

THOMAS POCOCK . I was present at the prisoner's marriage with my sister Sarah , on the 11th of September, 1822, at Brighthelmstone; she was alive last Sunday - I saw her.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were they married by banns? A. Yes; I believe he has left her for twelve months; I know nothing of their separating by mutual consent - they have two children.

ELIZABETH FRY. I married the prisoner - I did not know he was married before.

Cross-examined. Q. Had the consummation of the marriage taken place? A. No; that was not his fault, for I prevented it - we dined together, but did not spend a very pleasant day: the reason why we did not sleep together was, because I was not to leave my brother's till the Thursday, and I was very ill; he told me his name was Morris, but he had passed by the name of Smith - Mr. Gerrard first gave me information respecting it - I had no property - he could have no motive of that kind.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-153

2133. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 9 ivory balls, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Oliphant .

THOMAS OLIPHANT. I keep the Hare and Hounds public-house, St. John-street . On the 13th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner and another go into the parlour; they called for a pint of beer and the bagatelle-board; my son went into the parlour - the board was carried in: they soon after rushed out; my son pursued and took the prisoner, and the balls were found in his pocket.

GEORGE JAMES OLIPHANT . I pursued and took the prisoner, with the balls in his pocket.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-154

2134. GEORGE BLOOMFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 2 horse tail cases, value 2s. , the goods of John Marks .

JOHN MARKS. I am carman to Mr. Wiggins, of Gravel-lane ; while I was in the country, these tail cases were taken from the stable, where I had left them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am a Thames Police-officer. I saw the prisoner go to an old iron shop, in Rosemary-lane, with these cases under his jacket - I went to him; he said he got them from a boy named Davis, on Tower-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-155

2135. GEORGE FLINT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 2 live tame ducks, price 4s. , the property of Phineas Davis .

PHINEAS DAVIS. I live at Ranger-hill, Ealing , and am an officer to the Sheriff of Middlesex . In the beginning of July I left home, and left these ducks safe.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Were they wild ducks? A. I do not know - I never saw wild ducks.

COURT. Q. How long had you had them? A. Fourteen months; I bought them at Leadenhall-market.

ROBERT LOUNDEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Davis. I missed two ducks (which I had fed in the morning), in the early part of July.

JOHN MILWARD . I keep a public-house in Webb's-lane, Ealing. The prisoner brought the ducks to me - I gave him 5s. 6d. for them; he said the person to whom they belonged was obliged to part with them, because they got into the premises, and distroyed some wheat.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Loundey see them on your premises? A. Yes, among several others; he at first said he believed one was his master's, by the rings on the neck- he said he could not speak to the others; he hesitated about the brown one; he did not select them - I pointed them out.

RICHARD CHARD . I apprehended the prisoner.

ROBERT LOUNDEY. I told Milward I could swear to them by the ring round their necks; I saw them among others, and said these two were master's - the rest were young ones.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-156

2136. JAMES ERWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 3 planes, value 12s., and 1 saw, value 4s. , the goods of Robert Estling .

ROBERT ESTLING. I am a carpenter . I left these tools on a bench at Stamford-hill , where I was at work, on the 27th of August - the prisoner worked at the same shop.

EDWARD HALES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 22d of August the prisoner pawned this saw for 2s.; and on the 28th, these three planes for 3s.

WILLIAM COWLAN . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-157

2137. ESTHER HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 3 drinking-glasses, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Clayton .

EDWARD CLAYTON . My brother, Thomas Clayton, is a publican , and lives in Edgware-road . On the 1st of October I saw the prisoner take a wine-glass off the counter, and go out; she returned, and took another - we secured her, and found a third on her, and a piece of bacon; she was the worse for liquor.

EDWARD FARRISS . I took her in charge; she might be rather in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and unfortunately have addicted myself to drinking since the death of my husband.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-158

2138. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 sheet, value 4s. , the goods of Jane Atkins , widow .

JANE ATKINS. I am a widow, and live in Sweep's-alley - I take in washing . The prisoner formerly lived near me; his mother lodged with me about three months ago. On the 13th of October I lost this sheet.

ANN WATSON . The prisoner gave me a duplicate to give his mother when I went home, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am shopman to Mr. Peachey, a pawnbroker, of Old-street. This sheet was pawned with me, on the 13th of October, in the afternoon, by the prisoner.

THOMAS HANDLEY . I am the watch-house-keeper. - Watson was given into my charge as disorderly; I found a duplicate on her, which she said was given her by Jones; I find the prisoner has nobody to take care of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18271025-159

2137. JOHN MADDEN , EDWARD WALDEN , and JAMES LAWTON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 2 brushes, value 7s. , the goods of Henry John Wilcox .

HENRY JOHN WILCOX. I keep a tobacconist's shop , in Paddington-street . These brushes are mine, and have my hand-writing on them.

WILLIAM TRIGG . I lodge at the Turk's Head, public-house, Mary-le-bone. I saw Madden on the 20th of September, with two brushes, at a pawnbroker's shop, near the prosecutor's shop; he came out of the prosecutor's shop, nudged two other boys, and said, "Come along;" one of them said to him, "Have you got any?" he said Yes; I followed, and took him with two brushes under his jacket; I did not notice the other two at that time: they were like the other prisoners - I cannot swear to them; I did not swear to them at the office positively. I did not take so much notice of one as the other.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. Trigg brought Madden to the office, where I was; I afterwards saw the other two lurking about the gate behind the office, and took them, knowing them; Madden said they knew nothing of it, and that he did it from hunger.

MADDEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

WALDEN - NOT GUILTY .

LAWTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-160

2138. WILLIAM VERNON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 glass goblet, value 6s. , the goods of Robert Johnstone .

ROBERT EDWARD POWELL SEALEY . I am assistant to Mr. Robert Johnstone, chemist , of Greek-street, Soho . On the 28th of September I saw the prisoner leave the shop hastily - I followed him into the street, and brought him back; he produced this goblet, and said he was starving, but was no thief.

CHARLES BOWLER . I took him in charge; he seemed much distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-161

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2139. STEPHEN COTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of Richard Rickett .

RICHARD RICKETT. I drive a cart for my father - it was in Whitechapel , with a load of hay, last Saturday, and my coat was on it; I sent my boy between nine and ten o'clock to get it; he returned, and said it was gone. I saw it again in less than half an hour.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty in Whitechapel on Saturday, the 20th of October, and saw the prisoner with the coat, going down Castle-street, towards Wentworth-street; I followed him - he threw it down, and ran; I took him, and Craig, who was with me, took it up.

ROBERT CRAIG . I was with Keys, and took up the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-162

2140. MARY HICKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 jacket, value 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Murray .

ROBERT MURRAY. I am a seaman , and lodge at the Helmet public-house, in Burr-street . I gave Hunter these things to take care of for me, on the 18th of October.

JOHN WHITE . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner, about a quarter to twelve o'clock at night, on the 18th of October, with these things in a bundle - I asked whose they were; she said a man's, who was going home with her - I stopped some time, no man came, and I took her to the watch-house.

PETER HUNTER . I am a ship-carpenter. Murray was a shipmate of mine; he gave me a bundle of clothes to take care of for him, on the 18th of October - I laid the bundle on a seat, by my side, in a cook-shop, in Ratcliff-highway; the prisoner came in - I did not know her before; she came once or twice up to the board where I sat, I told her to go along - I afterwards went up stairs to bed there, about half-past eleven o'clock, and by mistake left the bundle below; in about five minutes the landlady alarmed me, and it was gone,(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me to go home with him, and told me to take the bundle, and he would come after me.

PETER HUNTER. I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-163

2141. MARY HORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 18d. , the goods of William Gammage .

WILLIAM PEARCE . I am apprentice to Wm. Gammage, a cheesemonger , of Drury-lane . On the 3d of October, in the evening, I saw the prisoner take this bacon out of the window, and put it in her apron - I followed, and brought her back it.

NATHAN JACKSON . I am headborough, and took her in charge. GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-164

2142. GEORGE WHITFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 2 sovereigns , the monies of John Marson .

MARY ANN MARSON . I am the wife of John Marson; we live in Feather's-court, Drury-lane; he is a cook . On Saturday the 22d of September, about eleven o'clock at night, I went to Lamb and Gideon's, pawnbrokers, in Stanhope-street - I gave up a duplicate of a suit of clothes, which I pawned for 2l. - I laid two sovereigns on the counter, and was feeling for some silver, to pay the interest; the prisoner came in, and seized the two sovereigns off the counter - I seized his hand, and begged him not to rob me; he rushed out, and the door struck me a violent blow, as I followed him - I got out, and caught sight of him in a moment; he ran down two streets, and was taken at the corner of Duke-street.

Prisoner. Q. When I was taken to the watch-house, did not you say you did not know the man? A. No. I did not whisper to my husband.

JAMES HOPPER . I am shopman to Lamb and Co. Mrs. Marson gave me a ticket of a suit of clothes; a man at the same moment gave me one for a pair of trousers - I turned round to get them, heard an alarm, ran back, and saw a man going out, and the prosecutrix following him - I cannot swear the prisoner is the man who gave me the ticket, or who ran out - nobody has applied for the trousers; when I saw the prisoner in custody, he had on a black coat, and black handkerchief, the same as the man had.

EDWARD AVERN . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house - I found no money on him, but a duplicate which corresponds in name with the duplicate of the trousers.

JAMES HOPPER . This is a ticket in the name of John West; the one for the trousers is George West.

WILLIAM CROWL . I was coming out of a house facing the pawn-shop, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me - I caught at him, but he put out his foot, and nearly threw me down - I pursued him; he ran against a watchman, and was taken; he said, "What do you want with me? what have I done?" I said, "I don't know, you will know in a few minutes;" this poor woman then came up, and said he had taken two sovereigns - nobody else was running; he said his father was a Bow-street officer; but no such person is known - he made no resistance.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop - I was in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-165

2143. MARIA COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 1 sovereign, and 10 shillings, the monies of Thomas Ansley , from his person .

THOMAS ANSLEY. I am a sailor , belonging to the Lady Camden, a free trader - I am a Welshman, but was in London, on the 5th of October; my ship had been paid off, about three months ago - on that evening I was walking down Whitechapel, and fell in with three women; the prisoner was not one of them; one of these women took hold of my hand, and carried me home with her - I should knew her, and the house, but I do not know the name of it; we went into a ground floor room, and she asked me for a shilling - I would not give it her - I said I wished to to have nothing to do with her - I wanted to go home; she then demanded payment for the room, abused and black-guarded me very much, and spit in my face - I said I would not pay till the mistress or the watchman came; the prisoner then came in, and said she was the mistress - I said she was not, and I would not pay her; she did not name any particular sum, but she would have payment - I said I would not pay till the mistress came; another woman came and turned the other two out - that woman got me to lay down in bed with her, and in a few minutes I felt her hand in my pocket - I then got up, and saw my money on the bed - I took it up, and was looking at it in my hand; she made a snatch at my hand; the prisoner and the others instantly came in - the prisoner collared me, and the other two took the sovereign, and 10s. from me- the prisoner held me while they took it - they all three went out together, as they thought the watchman was coming - I waited there, and in ten minutes the prisoner came in, and demanded the light and payment; I said, "D - n you, have you the impudence to come and demand money again - I will have one of the three" - she ran out - I pursued, and gave charge of her to the watchman, just as she was going into a public-house - I was quite sober.

PETER LUMBY . I am a watchman. I heard Ansley call out, and saw the prisoner run across a street, and down George-yard; he was following her, about two yards off - I caught her just against a public-house; nothing was found on her but a duplicate.

JOHN DUNGATE . I am watch-house keeper. I searched the prisoner, but found nothing but a duplicate; the prosecutor was quite sober, and gave the account he has now.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up the court; this man stopped me - I know nothing of him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-166

2144. MARY RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 key, value 6d.; 1 jointer, value 6d., and 9 shillings, the property of Thomas Moran , from his person .

THOMAS MORAN. I am a bricklayer's labourer , and work for Mr. Clement's, in John-street, New-road - I live in Exeter-street. On the 21st of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner, and went with her to No. 4, Dean-street, Lisson-grove - I gave her 1s. for herself, and 1s. for the room; she locked the door; the key was in it - I never saw her before - I undressed, and went to bed - I slept for two hours and a half; she then awoke me - I got up, put on my trousers, and missed this property - I said she had got my money; she denied it; the landlord of the house came up; he kept her while I fetched an officer, who found part of the money, the key, and jointer about the bed - I had counted my money when I was giving her a shilling; it was all safe in my trousers pocket - we had a glass of gin at a public-house; it was on Sunday.

ABRAHAM DAVIS . I keep this house, and deal in clothes. About nine o'clock I was in bed, and heard somebody in the entry; I said, "Who is there?" the prisoner

said, "I went to go up stairs;" I said the servant was out, But she could go up - the servant came in soon after: I sent her up, and she brought me down a shilling, and in two hours and a half, the servant said they were asleep, and soon after there was a disturbance; I went up, and saw the prosecutor - he was not quite sober; he said she had robbed him of 9s.; she said she had but 1s., which he had given her: I kept her while he got three officers.

ANN PAYLES . I am servant at this house; I was out. Some time after I came in, I heard an alarm, went up, and the prosecutor charged the prisoner with stealing his money- I heard nothing about a jointer and key; she said she had never seen his money; after they were gone I moved the bedstead from the wall, and 5s. 6d. fell down.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I searched the prisoner, and found in a pocket in her stays two sixpences, and between the bed and bolster a half-crown, key, and jointer; Payles afterwards gave me 5s. 6d.; the prosecutor was not drunk, but had been drinking. I went, by her desire to the Brazen Head public-house, and found he had been there with her, and changed half a sovereign.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-167

2145. JOHN MEW was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , 24 penny-pieces, and 48 halfpence, the monies of Thomas Cordery , his master .

THOMAS CORDERY. I am a green-grocer , and sell goods about the street - the prisoner was in my employ; I boarded and lodged him and clothed him, according to his behaviour - I had made no bargain with him. On the 8th of September I gave him 4s. in copper to get 4s. in silver with, at Mr. Wilson's - he took my little child with him, left her three doors off, and never returned; I did not see him again till the 9th of October.

GUILTY . Aged 16. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-168

2146. ROBERT NELSON and ELIAS HISCUTT were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 pair of half-boots, value 5s. 6d., the goods of Charles Edwin Kendall , their master .

ELIZABETH FRENCH . I lodge at Mr. Kendall's, a shoemaker , on Saffron-hill . On the 22d of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went out through the shop; I returned in five minutes, and saw Nelson behind his master's cutting-board, tying up two pairs of shoes - Hiscutt was standing in the shop; they both lived there; I went to call Mr. Kendall - he was out, and I told his wife.

Prisoner NELSON. Q. Can you swear you saw me with the shoes in question? A. No; I did not see what he did with the bundle.

CHARLES EDWIN KENDALL. The prisoners were in my employ. I found a pair of boots at Cross'; I have found three other pairs at other places - Hiscutt bore a very good character.

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am apprentice to Mr. Cross, a pawnbroker, of Turnmill-street; Hiscutt pawned this pair of half-boots, on the 22d of September.

JOHN GARDEN . I am a constable. I took the prisoners on the 22d of September; I asked Hiscutt how he came to pawn the shoes; he said he did not - but afterwards said he did pawn them in the name of Gregory; and Nelson said,"The ticket is destroyed."

Nelson put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor's house was a brothel, and French an inmate; and declared his innocence. Hiscutt also put in a written defence, stating that Nelson had sent him to pawn the boots, saying they were his own.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-169

2147. WILLIAM FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 70 lbs. of rope, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Rogers and John Rogers .

THOMAS ROGERS. I am a rope and rag-merchant , in partnership with my brother John, we live at Wapping-wall . On the 14th of September, about a quarter-past ten o'clock at night, I came home, and the servant was in her bed-room, watching for some persons she suspected would come; she said there were two men on the tiles of the warehouse - I fetched my brother; we went to the warehouse stairs - I opened the door, and saw a light; I took a poker; we rushed in, and I saw Smith (who is not here) with his hand on the bannisters of the stairs, with a piece of rope in his hand, carrying it up the warehouse stairs which go to the first floor - the prisoner was helping him; they were going to get out at the tiles: I said, "Smith, what, is that you?" he made no answer, but dropped the rope and ran up; I threw the poker at him and knocked him down - the prisoner instantly put out the light, which left me in total darkness; I went up stairs in search of Smith, while my brother went for a light: I could not find Smith, and called my brother to bring a light; as he was coming I heard some person up stairs; I went up again in the dark and kicked against a stick - I took it up, and went to the place where I heard a noise; I struck, and, unfortunately, broke the prisoner's arm - I struck again, and hit him on the head, but lightly, or he would have been no more; I called for a light, and found him apparently in a lifeless state: I raised him up - he recovered a little, and said, "Don't kill me - do what you like to me:" I asked where Smith was - he said he did not know; I got the watchman; we searched the house and warehouse, but nobody was found - I have seen the prisoner before. This rope was removed two or three yards - a large bale of rope had been divided into three parts; they entered the warehouse through a bulk-hole in the top of the warehouse: my mother and the servant were watching, in consequence of our having been robbed shortly before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did you strike him with? A. A stick - no one else struck him in my presence; my brother had some weapon in his hand, I think it was a stick - I dropped the poker; my brother did not strike him to my knowledge - I have not brought the stick here - it was about the size of my two fingers: I struck him once when he was down.

COURT. Q. Did not this occur in the dark? A. Yes; I was in danger of my life - I did not know who was there; I did not strike at him before the light was out.

SARAH STEPHENS . I was servant to the prosecutors. I had been watching that night, and at this time was just going up to bed; I put out my light, looked towards the window, and saw some persons in the act of getting into the warehouse, at a wooden window or loop-hole - master came

in, and I told him; he and his brother went into the warehouse: the prisoner is the person I afterwards saw.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having broken his arm, and believing Smith to be the greatest offender.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-170

2148. THOMAS LYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 coat, value 30s., and 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of John Reed .

The prosecutor's name being John Manrose Reed, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18271025-171

2149. JAMES SMITH and HENRY PHILLIPS , were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 brooch, value 3s., 4 crowns, 8 half-crowns, and 30 shillings, the property of Thomas Cooper , from his person .

THOMAS COOPER. I keep a horse and cart ; I knew the prisoners before this happened. I was in a stable in Little James-street, Mary-le-bone , between three and four o'clock on Sunday morning, the 7th of October; my horse stands there; I sat down on some hay, and fell asleep; I awoke in about half an hour, and missed my money and brooch, which were together in my pocket; I had gone to feed my horses - I am up most nights - I did not see either of the prisoners there - they had no business in the stable - I had only pulled the door too; my pocket was cut off; Pearce was in the stable when I awoke, lying on the bin; I accused him of it, and he told me who it was; I did not see the prisoners till between eleven and twelve o'clock; I have found nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw nobody but Pearce? A. No; he was there when I first went in- it is a large stable - there was no light - it was a dark cloudy morning; there is a gas-light opposite the stable - I was quite sober.

THOMAS PEARCE . I am a bricklayer. I was out of employ, and Cooper gave me leave to sleep in his stable; I went in about two o'clock; I saw the prisoners come in at the door; I then went to sleep; I was awoke, and found both my braces cut; I saw the two prisoners, who ran behind one of the carts - I could see them by the gaslight; Cooper afterwards came in, and laid down; the prisoners went up to him, and Smith found 4d. in one of his pockets: Phillips said, "I think his money is in his other pocket;" he pulled out a bread and cheese knife, and cut the other pocket off; I saw the money fall - they took it up, and as they passed me, they said, "We shall see you up at the Brazen Head;" I made no answer, but fell asleep again; Cooper awoke me at day-light, and I told him.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-172

2150. JOHN RUSH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 15 smelling-bottles, value 60s., the goods of Joseph Heeley , his master .

JOSEPH HEELEY. I live on Saffron-hill . The prisoner has been twenty years in my service. On the 14th of October the errand-boy came in the morning, and said he could not sleep all night, as something was on his mind; he communicated something to me; I sent him for an officer, who went with me, and we found the prisoner intoxicated in a public-house; I have lost a great many smelling-bottles.

WILLIAM CLANES . I am a pawnbroker, of Liquorpond-street; I have two smelling-bottles, pledged by the prisoner, on Saturday night, the 13th of October.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a pawnbroker, of Clerkenwellgreen. I have some smelling-bottles pawned by the prisoner, on the 6th of October.

THOMAS COOPER . I am a baker, and live in Hatton-wall. I was at the Prince of Orange public-house, as the 13th of October, and saw the prisoner there intoxicated; he came and struck me; I pushed him from me, and saw two smelling-bottles fall from him.

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am apprentice to Mr. Cross, a pawnbroker. I have three smelling-bottles, pawned on the 11th of October - I am not certain by whom.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer, and took him in charge- I found nothing on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE LEDGER . I am a pawnbroker, and have five bottles, pawned at different times - I cannot say who by.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-173

2151. WILLIAM CHENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 watch, value 4l., the goods of Edward George , his master .

EDWARD GEORGE. I am a baker , and live in Park-street, Grosvenor-square ; my watch hung in the bake-house, on the 17th of October, in the morning, and in about five minutes; I missed it - the prisoner was my servant ; I found him in about two hours, and accused him of it - he denied: I sent for an officer, who found the duplicate on him.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer; I found the duplicate on him, and 25s.; he appeared sober.

PETER DIXON . I am servant to a pawnbroker, of High-street, St. Giles; the prisoner pawned the watch, on the 17th of October, for 25s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and do not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-174

2152. JOSEPH EASTON , JOSEPH BALDOCK , and JOHN BYRNE were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 umbrella, value 25s., and 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Edward Reddish Thomas Blyth , from his person .

EDWARD REDDISH THOMAS BLYTH. I am a baker , but was out of business. On the 15th of October, about half-past four o'clock, I went into the Masons' Arms public-house, Oxford-market , to see for a friend, who was not there; the prisoners were all in company, sitting at the same settle; I had seen them before, but not to associate with them; I sat down, and Easton asked me to pay for a pot of beer; I hesitated, but did so; we drank together; I paid for another pot, and while that was drinking, one of the witnesses said, "Blyth, look out;" I immediately went out, and caught Baldock with my umbrella in his

hand, which I had put in the settle; I asked what he was going to do with it; he said, "To pawn it;" I struck him with it, and broke the top - I missed my handkerchief from my pocket.

WILLIAM HEARING . I work in Oxford-market. I was at the public-house, and saw Byrne take the handkerchief, put it into his hat, and walk out; soon after I heard something about an umbrella; the prisoners were secured; Baldock said he took it in a joke; I think that might be the case - there was no concealment about it.

ALEXANDER EDMOND . I am a baker, and was at the public-house, in their company, all the afternoon; I saw the umbrella taken down - Baldock took it out - they are all bakers.

JOHN HAWKINS. I apprehended the prisoners - they all seemed to have been drinking.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-175

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2152. JOHN MAHON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 2 pairs of scissors, value 4s.; 3 razors, value 2s., and 2 waistcoats, value 5s., the goods of John Robertson , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-176

2153. SAUL HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 33 yards of cotton sheeting, value 40s., the goods of Robert Herod , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-177

2154. FANNY SUCKSPEACH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 key, value 1/2d.; 1 hat, value 6d.; 1 crape hand, value 4d.; 1 handkerchief, value 2d.; 1 half-crown, and 4 shillings, the property of Richard Hitchman , from his person .

RICHARD HITCHMAN. I am a porter . On the 2d of October I met the prisoner in Old-street - I took her to a public-house, and went with her and another girl to a house; the other girl was outside the door, which was not fastened- I went to bed with the prisoner - we got up; and the prisoner, I, another man, and that woman played at cards, for some brandy; the prisoner was my partner; I lost, and we had some brandy: we came out into James-street , and the man followed us; he came behind, and took my hat off- I ran after him, and either the prisoner or the other girl came and took about a 1l. worth of silver out of my pocket- I pursued them, and the watchman ran after me; we went to a house, and took the prisoner and two other girls; the man had got away. I was in liquor.

WILLIAM RICE . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner, but found nothing on her; I found 4s. outside the window.

THOMAS HARRISON . The other girls were brought to the watch-house; I went to the room, and found some papers, and half a crown laid on the side of the stove.

ROBERT LOCK . I am an officer. I found the prosecutor's hat in a cupboard in the room, and a key on the floor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-178

2155. ELIZABETH BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 1 pin, value 30s.; 6 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the property of Edward Jackson , from his person .

EDWARD JACKSON. I live in Brick-lane. I was in Old-street on the night of the 23d of September, and met the prisoner, who was a stranger; she asked me to give her something to drink- I took her to a public-house, and gave her something; we came out, and she accompanied me on my road home; I may have gone into another house with her, but think not; I was sober. We went to an oyster-shop, and called for some, but eat none, for I found her hand in my breeches pocket - she took out six sovereigns and three half-sovereigns. I seized her left-hand, and half a sovereign fell out; I looked at my money, and I was six sovereigns and two half-sovereigns short; when I accused her of it she said, "Come into the passage, and I will give you back your money;" I did so, and she gave me three sovereigns- while we were there some woman passed, who saw her take my pin from my bosom - she said to her, "Why don't you give the man his money." I then gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Did you not first go to the Grapes public-house? A. I do not know the sign. I might go to the Angel public-house, in the City-road, but do not recollect it. I had two glasses of gin at one house, and had had two pots of half and half with two friends before I met her; she took me to a house in White Lion-street, and wanted me to go there, but I would not go in - she then asked me to take her to the oyster-shop- I drank nothing there; I lost no silver. I do not recollect going to any other houses.

COURT. Q. Did you not fall down in the oyster-shop? A. I do not know. I left my friends between eight and nine o'clock.

JOHN THOMAS INGRAM . I am a watchman. At half-past eleven o'clock at night I heard a cry of Watch! I went and saw the prosecutor, who gave the prisoner in charge, near the oyster-shop, by Worship-street .

Cross-examined. Q. What state was he in? A. Very correct - he was sober; the oyster-shop is open very late.

JAMES BEVILLE . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge; he said he had been robbed of 7l.; I told him to look; he found six sovereigns and two half-sovereigns in his pocket, including the three which were returned; he then said he was four sovereigns deficient - he said he had been robbed of seven, but she had returned him three; a young woman said he had lost a pin from his breast; he said he had; she said the prisoner had stuck it on a post in Bolt-court; I went and looked there, but could not find it.

Cross-examined. Q. What woman was that? A. She appeared a decent woman; she said she was married, and lived in Kingsland-road; several persons were about the shop.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found a shilling and a penny on her - I desired her to be searched further, and two sovereigns dropped from between her pocket and stays; the prosecutor appeared quite sober, and gave a clear account - he said he had 11l. in all.

Prisoner's Defence. When we were in the Blue Last public-house the landlady told him he had better give me

his money to take care of; he said he would trust me with 100l.; he was showing his sovereigns about.

- MARSDEN . I keep the shell-fish warehouse where the prisoner and prosecutor came; I was up stairs at supper with some friends; I heard a disturbance, went down, and the prosecutor stated the prisoner had robbed him, but he was so intoxicated he could not tell whether he had lost two, three, four, or five sovereigns; he first said one thing, and then another; he has perjured himself by saying he had oysters in my shop - he had none; I heard him say to her, "Pay for them;" she said, "No, you pay"- he took out half a sovereign, and in handing it to the shop-girl, the prisoner took it, and he said he had been robbed; I advised him to call the watchman: the prisoner then said, "Come out, and I will give you what I have;" she went out, and gave him some sovereigns; she was given in charge. The officer came back from the watch-house, and he was drunk. I am astonished that I was not called as a witness.

- MARSDEN . I am the sister of the last witness. The prosecutor called for oysters, but had none; the prisoner said he was to pay for them; he drew out half a sovereign, and let it fall: I picked it up, held it to him, and the prisoner took hold of it; she said if he would go up the court she would return his money, and she gave him three sovereigns- he was so intoxicated he would have fallen down if my brother had not caught him; he had accused her of taking them.

THEOPHILUS WHITING re-examined. I was called out of bed; I could not be much intoxicated - Marsden was intoxicated. GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-179

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2156. MARY WAGSTAFF was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 pair of half-boots, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of James Peart .

JOSEPH ALLARDYCE . I live with James Peart, a pawnbroker , of Whitechapel . On the 16th of October, about half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner take these boots, which hung about a foot and a half within the door - she put them under a child, which she had on her left arm, and walked to the next door - I took her.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHER. Q. Did she say she was going to buy them? A. Yes, when I brought her back.

JOHN VANN . I took her in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to pay for them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18271025-180

2157. WILLIAM BUCKLEY and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 20 sovereigns, and eight 5l. Bank notes, the property of John Thompson , from his person .

JOHN THOMPSON. I am a sailor , belonging to a sloop in his Majesty's navy. On the 25th of August, about nine o'clock, I was in Ratcliff-highway - I was not quite sober, but knew what I was about - I had twenty sovereigns and eight 5l. Bank-notes, in my pocket - I had been paid off the day before - my money was in a purse in my breast-pocket - they were all safe in the afternoon; when I came out of a public-house, about nine o'clock at night, I met four women - my money was safe then - they said they would take me home - they were leading me home - the prisoners were walking after me - there were more men; the women and men appeared to know each other - the two prisoners laid hold of me; I am sure of that; they made a stop opposite Old Gravel-lane - the woman ran her hand into my bosom - I thought to catch hold of her, but one of the prisoner's laid hold of me across my breast, and the other took hold of my arm - they both held me, and asked me what was amiss - they then gave me a shove into the highway, and ran off the same way as the woman had. I felt her take the purse while they held me - it was on Saturday, the 24th or 25th of August - I went home, and gave information on the Monday or Tuesday - I have not found my money.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHER. Q. How much had you been drinking? A. I had a share of four or five pots of beer - some people sat there - I treated them all as they came in - I was sober enough to walk straight, and know what I was doing - I had seven sovereigns and some silver besides - I know it was safe when I came out of the public-house - I had received it at Somerset-house - I know Catherine White - I had gone out with her between 5 and 6 o'clock - she drank nothing that I know of - I had some beer and a glass of gin or so - I recollect changing a sovereign to pay for liquor while she was with me - a quarrel arose in the house - I took off my jacket, and gave it to her to take care of - she returned it to me - the prisoners followed me all the way from the house - I looked over my shoulder and saw them - the purse was between my shirt and Guernsey frock - I called out that I had been robbed - the prisoners took hold of me the moment the girl took the money - she was convicted last Session.

WILLIAM COLEMAN . I am a seaman - I saw Buckley and another man lay hold of the prosecutor when the girl snatched at his money - she ran away with something in her hand, which looked like a purse - Buckley and three other men then ran away after her.

Cross-examined. Q. Had Buckley hold of him? A. One of them had hold of him; they then all ran away after the girls - I do not know that I can swear that I saw Buckley do any thing.

CHARLES LEBBY . I am a sailor, and was in the highway with Coleman - I saw the girls; one of them had hold of the prosecutor's right hand, and one of his left - four young men came behind - I saw one of the women put her hand into his bosom, draw something brown out, and put it into her bosom - he called out "I am robbed" - she gave him a shove and ran off, and one of the men took hold of him - there were four of them - Smith was one - I had seen him once before.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Buckley? A. I had not seen him before, but think I recollect his face - he was behind, and told the girl to take it home - I did not see him do any thing - the prosecutor walked very well.

CATHERINE WHITE . I am married - I was with Thompson in the public-house, and saw him have the money there - I saw the notes in his purse - he took it out of his pocket, and went out - I know nothing of the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he very drunk? A. He was drunk.

JAMES LILL . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners at Astley's on the 25th of September - I found on Buckley a half-crown and a shilling: and this pocket-book was found in Smith's pocket, but no money in it - here is on a piece of paper in it, "Buckley, 3l. 8s." - I found some cards in the pocket-book.

JAMES HENRY SCOTT . I am a clerk in the Navy Pay-office. On the 24th of August I paid Thompson 60l. in cash and notes.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am an officer - I apprehended Jacobs, who was tried last Session; I afterwards found the prisoners in charge.

JAMES WAYLING . I am an officer. On the 9th of September, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I was with my wife, passing near St. George's church, in the Borough, and saw the two prisoners standing with other persons; I knew Buckley was wanted; I went and took him, and took him into a public-house; Smith and several others attacked me, and rescued him from me.

BUCKLEY's Defence. I was taken on a charge of changing a 5l. note at the Bank; the cashier said neither of us were the men; I am innocent of this robbery.

SMITH's Defence. I had been travelling with a company of comedians; I met Buckley at the theatre, and we were taken; the prosecutor said he did not know us; I was seventy miles off at the time, but cannot bring witnesses.

BUCKLEY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-181

2158. JOHN DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 120 halfpence, and 60 penny-pieces , the money of Joseph Brook .

MARY ANN BROOK . I am the wife of Joseph Brook, a corn-chandler , of Poland-street . On the 24th of September I was in my parlour, between six and seven o'clock; I saw the prisoner in the shop; I thought at first it was our journeyman's boy, and did not go till a person called out, "Mrs. Brook, you are robbed;" he was then at the end of the flour-bin; Beecher had caught him, but found nothing on him; I found in the flour-bin two papers of copper, which I missed from the till; he said he had come in to ask his way to Whitecross-street, but there was nobody to ask.

MATTHEW BEECHER . I saw the prisoner in the shop with the coppers in his hand; he went and put them into the flour-bin.

JOHN MARTIN . I am an officer, and produce the copper.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-182

2159. JAMES DRYSDALE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 watch, value 2l. 10s.; 2 seals, value 8s., and 1 key, value 2s. , the goods of Isaac Bull .

ISAAC BULL. I am a box-maker . On the 29th of September, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Mary-street, Hampstead-road - I had just turned out of Charles-street; I saw the prisoner a short distance before me; he stopped, and I was going to pass him; he snatched my watch from my pocket; the glass broke; he ran off; I cried Stop him! he has got my watch! he ran into Little Charles-street and was taken, and my watch produced; he had got out of my sight for a few minutes; I believe him to be the man.

Prisoner. Q. What distance was the prisoner walking before you? A. A short distance.

PETER WALKER . I heard Bull say he had lost his watch, and saw the prisoner run from him into Little Charles-street. I pursued and never lost sight of him till he was taken; I did not see the watch drop from him, but nobody else could drop it, there was no one near him; I heard something drops some glass was found on the spot where the watch was taken.

NICHOLAS WINTER . I live at No. 3, Little Charles-street; I was standing at my door, and heard an alarm; I ran into the street, and saw the prisoner running towards me, pursued by Walker and another, but nobody was near the prisoner; I laid hold of him; he sprang out of my arms; I pursued five or six yards further, and then seized him by the neck; he said he was not the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you let me go? A. No, you broke from me.

RICHARD HAYMAN . I was coming up from my lodging in Little Charles-street, and heard an alarm; I ran to the rails, and saw the prisoner running towards me - he was the first who came up; I seized him - I saw nothing in his hand, but a gentleman picked up this watch close to the rails.

TIMOTHY BYRCHMORE . I am watch-house-keeper, and have the watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor cannot swear to me- it was as likely to be the person who gave him the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-183

2160. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 hammer, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Palmer .

CHARLES PALMER. I am a plasterer , and live at Hoxton. The prisoner was my labourer - I lost this hammer from the scaffold.

CHARLES GEORGE VINCENT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicate in his pocket.

HENRY FRAKES . I am a pawnbroker. This hammer was pawned by a lad, in the name of John Smith, to whom I gave this duplicate - I cannot swear to the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned it by mistake for my own.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-184

2161. MARY ANN MILLER and MARY PUGH were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 ring, value 14s. , the goods of Don William Nathaniel Tuck .

ELIZA WEBB . I am the sister to Mrs. Tuck, of Castle-street, Leicester-square . On the evening of the 19th of October the prisoners came into the shop, in company; Miller asked for a ring for her fore finger - I got out the tray, and while they were looking at them, Pugh asked if we sold silver thimbles; I said I would show her some presently; I heard some one coming from the parlour; I turned my head for a moment, and saw it was my sister - she came up to the tray, and said, "Where is the ring off this card?" I had seen it on the card when I took the tray from the win

dow; they were both near enough to take it - they were close together, and one must have seen the other take it. - Mrs. Tuck charged them with it; they both denied it: it was a remarkable large gold ring. An officer was sent for, who took them.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer, and took the prisoners. I produce the ring, which I received from Wells.

CHARLOTTE TUCK . I am the wife of Don William Nathaniel Tuck. I saw the prisoners in the shop; I went, and looked at the tray, and missed the ring - I had seen it safe at one o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARRIET WELLS . My husband is the watch-housekeeper. The prisoners were brought in between four and five o'clock, and denied it; I searched, but found nothing on them. Early next morning, in the watch-house-yard, close by where they passed, I picked up this ring.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

PUGH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-185

2162. DANIEL MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 3 boot-legs, value 9s. , the goods of John Giblett and James Giblett .

SAMUEL McARTHUR . I am a boot-maker, and live in Carey-street. I knew the prisoner some years ago - he worked for me. On the 7th of October he called, and asked to speak with me in private; I said he could speak there - he then said he had some fronts to sell for a shopmate, who was going out of town, and wanted to raise a little money on them; I told him to let me see them, and he produced three tops of boots, in an unfinished state; I said I would detain him till the person would come and own them - he said he would have them back - I said he should not; he said he would bring an action against me; I then sent for a constable, who said, as he had been a housekeeper he would let him go, and call in the morning; the prisoner returned to me in a few minutes, and said it was useless for him to come again, and I had better give them to him - I refused, - he went away, and next morning I found the owner.

JOHN GIBLETT. I am in partnership with James Giblett - we are curriers ; these boot-legs are ours, and are odd ones; the prisoner occasionally came to our shop to buy leather - they are unfinished; here is the mark of the man who dressed them: we never sell in this state except to country curriers; here is the fellow to one - I think the prisoner was at our shop on the Monday before.

EDWARD NEWMAN . I am shopman to the prosecutors; these are odd legs, and are theirs - I never sold them: if sold, they must go through my hands.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the Crown public-house, in Vere - street; a man there said, "Will you buy a little cabbage?" they were quite in a rough state; he said I should have them for 2s., as money ran short; I said McArthur would buy them - he said I had better go, and I went; he would not give them back to me: I afterwards went with the officer to Stonecutter-alley, where I heard the man lived, but could not find him: the officer said Mr. Giblett suspected one of his men.

FRANCIS GOODSON . I am an officer. I went with him to Stonecutter-alley, no such person was to be found; some persons had left their lodgings there: I never said they suspected one of the men.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-186

2163. MARGARET LIVINGSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 3 lbs. of cheese, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Gearey .

DENNIS DENNAHY . I am a watchman. On the 21st of September, at nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Gearey's shop, in Broad-street, St. Giles' ; she took this cheese, and ran up George-street - I followed and took her.

HENRY GEAKE . I live with Wm. Gearey. The watchman brought the prisoner in with this cheese, which I then missed from the window.

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-187

2164. HENRY CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES. I work at an iron-foundry . On the 9th of October I missed my trousers from Brown-court , where I and the prisoner lodged; I left them safe about six o'clock on the morning of the 7th, and left him in bed - he slept with me, and worked at the same place; I never allowed him to wear or pawn my clothes.

JOHN O'BRIEN . I am an iron-founder. The prisoner and prosecutor both lodged at our house - I called them both up; the prisoner came down last; I called to ask if he was not going to work; he came down, and went out- he did not come to work, and the trousers were missed; when he was taken he offered me the duplicate, and 4s. 6d.

THOMAS PEWNER . I am a pawnbroker, of Somers'-town. I produce a pair of trousers, pawned by the prisoner for 5s.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had lent him the trousers.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-188

2165. JOHN MERRYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 20 bolts of canvass, value 30l. , the goods of William Dunbar, the younger .

JONATHAN VENSON . I am a watchman, and live in Swan-yard, Shoreditch. On the 1st of October, at nine o'clock at night, I met a man in Dorkin's-court, Shoreditch, with two bolts of canvass; this was two miles from Dunbar's - I watched the man into the prisoner's house with it, but I do not believe the prisoner is the man who carried it - I fetched the officer, and we waited some time- we saw a light in the cellar, and I saw the prisoner there; before I went for the officer I saw two persons leave the house, and go round by the coach-yard - the prisoner was not one of them.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I am a headborough. Vincent came to me - I went to the cellar, and took the prisoner, when he came out of the house - I took him into the cellar, and found this canvass.

WILLIAM COX . I am a constable, I met the prisoner coming out; I took him into his own room, and said,

"Have you not had some goods moved in here to night?" he said No - I said, "I think you have" - I took him to the cellar, and told him to open the door; he said he could not - I said I would break it open; he then took a key off a ledge, and opened it, and we there found the canvass.

WILLIAM DUNBAR, JUN. This property is mine; my warehouse had been broken open that evening; the prisoner is the father-in-law of a discharged servant of mine, named Batchelor, who has absconded.

THOMAS SPARKS . I am a carman. I carted these goods by Batchelor's order; he came to my master's yard, and ordered a cart; I went with it to Mr. Dunbar's, and carted away twenty bolts of canvas - this is part of it; I took them first to Mile-end, and then to Shoreditch church, close against the bar, where they were unloaded; they were taken away by three men, and I am sure the prisoner was one of them; I do not know that I had seen him before; each took a load from the cart, and returned for another till they had unloaded it; the prisoner did not assist in loading at the warehouse; Batchelor and another did that.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-189

2166. DANIEL BROCKFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 5 sovereigns, and one 5l. Bank note, the property of John Hope , from his person .

JOHN HOPE. I belong to a West India ship ; I came from Jamaica; the prisoner kept a boarding-house for sailors , at No.2, Harrow-lane, Poplar ; I lodged there from Wednesday till Tuesday; when I received my money, I received a 5l. note, five sovereigns, and ten shillings, for wages, in London-street, Stepney; the prisoner had followed me, and saw me receive it; he said, "What will you do with it, will you go to the play?" I said No; he said,"What will you do? if you are going to have a spree, give me your money;" I said, "No, I am going home;" when we got home, he said, "What have you done with the five sovereigns?" I said they were in my pocket; he said,"Show them to me;" I took them out; he snatched them out of my hand, and said he had got it, and would take care of it; I said I had been a week with him, and he might pay himself, and give me the rest to-morrow - I owed him 5s. and the week's lodging, which was 16s.; I then went to bed, pulled off my clothes, and took my 5l. note in my hand into bed; he followed me up, and said,"Where is your money?" I said he had got it; he said,"You have got 5l. more;" I said I had not: he felt in my pockets, then tossed me out of bed, and pulled up the clothes: he could not find it; he then took hold of my shirt and tore it down, saying he came for money, and money he would have; he then took the note out of my hand, and said, "Now I have got his money, he may go to hell;" he opened it, and showed it to three persons in the room; I asked him for the 5l. note in the morning; he would not give it to me; I then went with him to a public-house, where he had a pot of beer, and asked me to pay for it; I said I had no money; he gave me a sovereign, and said I should have the rest to-morrow; next day he went over to a house in the Borough; I went, and took him there, drunk.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many people were in the bed-room? A. Three; West and I lodged there; he showed him the note - I was sober; I swear that; the examination was not adjourned for him to make up the money; he said he would make it up, but he could not.

FREDERICK WICHSSER (through an Interpreter). I am a native of the East Indies, and am a sailor; I lodged in the same room with Hope. On this Tuesday evening I saw the prisoner and Hope come into the room; the prisoner took a 5l. note out of his hand by force - Hope only had his shirt on, and the prisoner tore it; he showed the note to two or three people in the room, and then went away with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a friend of Hope's? A. I knew him - the prisoner showed the note to us all; we slept in the house that night.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner shew the note to 'you all? A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-190

2167. JOSEPH THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 4 lbs. of cake, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Ford .

HENRY FORD. I am a baker , and live in Cow-cross . On the 21st of September I lost part of two cakes, about 5 lbs. weight; I went to the prisoner, who lived with his parents just by; he was called up, and I accused him of it; a person, who was with me, put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out some of it.

JOHN THOMAS . I saw the prisoner take the cake from the shop window, outside.

JAMES LIVOCK . I was in the shop, buying a loaf; when I came out, Thomas said a boy had ran away with some cake; Ford and I went to the prisoner; I found a small piece of cake in his coat pocket - this was half an hour after.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-191

2168. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 plane, value 2s., the goods of William Bailey ; and 2 other planes, value 3s. , the goods of James Reynolds .

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am an officer. On the 15th of October I saw the prisoner in Church-street. Bethnal-green, with something in his apron; he crossed over to an old iron shop; I went up, and took one plane from him, and Gilbery took two.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHER. Q. They were not concealed? A. They were in his apron.

THOMAS GILBERY . I am an officer, and was with West- I took two planes from him.

WILLIAM BAILEY. This plane is mine; I left it at dinner time, at Limehouse workhouse .

JAMES REYNOLDS. I lost these two planes from the committee-room at the work-house.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-192

2169. JAMES REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 hat, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Burchett ,

PETER MATTHEWS . I am an undertaker, and live in Paddington-street , opposite Mr. Burchett. I was watching the prisoner for a quarter of an hour, on the 24th of

September, and saw him take this hat from Burchett's door, and walk deliberately away with it; I pursued him- he dropped it, and ran; he dodged me; I caught him, and brought him back.

THOMAS BURCHETT. This is my hat - it was at my door for sale.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. In looking for work, I saw it outside the door, and took it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-193

2170. SAMUEL JOSEPH PINE and THOMAS TOMLIN were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 3 brushes, value 3s. , the goods of Charles William Hastings Stratford West .

JOSEPH SAUNDERS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 22d of September I was in Seymour-place, Camden-town , between eleven and twelve o'clock; I saw the two prisoners go into West's shop; Pine came out with this brush; I went into the shop, and found Tomlin with his hand in a tub - these two brushes were by him; I asked what they were doing there; Pine said he was looking for a place, and then said he came to buy a brush.

CHARLES WILLIAM HASTINGS STRATFORD WEST. I was out at the time, but know these brushes to be mine - I know nothing of the prisoners.

PINE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

TOMLIN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-194

2171. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Mark Rushmer .

RICHARD COLSON . I am a baker. On the 25th of September I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Rushmer's shop, King's-terrace, Commercial-road , and run out with something; I asked Mrs. Rushmer if she had lost any thing - I then pursued, and took him, concealed under the arch of the bridge, and within three or four doors of the house - he pulled this handkerchief from his bosom - I gave him in charge.

MARTHA RUSHMER . I am the wife of Mark Rushmer. This handkerchief was taken from our shop, near the window - I know nothing of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-195

2172. THOMAS HAYWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 lock, value 2s., and 1 key, value 6d. , the goods of William Kegell .

SUSAN BAILEY . I live opposite to Mr. Kegell, on Saffron-hill . I was looking out of window, and saw the prisoner at the door - he took this lock and key out at the door- I gave information.

WILLIAM KEGELL. Bailey gave me information - I missed a lock and key; I found the prisoner in Turnmill-street, with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was intoxicated a little.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-196

2173. WILLIAM HERRING , MARY BULPIT , and JOHN CUTTLE were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Watts , with intent to rob him, and his goods and monies from his person feloniously to steal .

GEORGE WATTS. I am a gunsmith , and work in Well's-place - I live at No.6, Dock-street, Rosemary-lane- I was going along Ratcliff-highway , on the 15th of September about 12 o'clock at night; I was going home with Eliza Crispin - we met the three prisoners and several more persons with them; when I came up to them, Herring said to me, "You are a bl-y nose;" I had known him for four or five years, but was never in his company that I know of; I once sat in a public-house where he was, some years ago; I asked what he meant by that - he up with his fist, and knocked me down into the kennel; the other prisoners were there at the time - it was a violent blow, and knocked two of my teeth out; Bulpit said, as I laid in the kennel, "Now, Bill, chib the b-r," and Cuttle snatched my seals, and broke the ribbon; he did did not get them, as Crispin caught his hand, and he dropped them; he broke the ribbon - I went to rise up, and Herring kicked me, so that I was scarcely able to rise from the ground; Cuttle ran towards Tower-hill, and Herring ran down Gravel-lane; they all ran away - Crispin followed Herring, and I got after her, into Pennington-street, where she was holding him by the neck-handkerchief, and he was knocking her about the head - we called the watchman, who came up, and took him; the gang came round me again; the watchman gave Herring to another watchman, and he took me to the watch-house - I saw Herring and Bulpit at the watch-house; Herring came and took hold of my hand, and said, "For God's sake, forgive me - I have done wrong;" I said I would not. I afterwards met the officer, who told me to come to the Thames Police-office on Monday; I said at the watch-house, that I had been robbed and almost murdered.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Does Crispin pass as Mrs. Watts? A. No - I swear that; we had had a pot of half and half between us. I saw Cartwright that night at the watch-house - I did not offer to make it up with Herring; I was bleeding. I was never in prison, or before a Magistrate, I have known Bulpit five years, but was never in her company.

Q. Did you not, in the presence of Cartwright, offer to make friends with one of the prisoners? A. No.

COURT. Q. Were you taken to the watch-house to be taken care of? A. Yes.

ELIZA CRISPIN. On the night in question Watts and I were going home, and met the prisoners and several others; on coming up to them Herring stepped of the pavement, called Watts a nose, and struck him; he fell on the ground; he kicked him in the mouth and several other places; Bulpit said, "Go it, Bill, chib him;" Cuttle then laid hold of his seals; I went to see what he was doing - he broke the ribbon, but did not get them; they all ran off; I pursued Herring, and kept hold of him till the watchman came; he was beating me about the head; Watts came up - I heard Herring say to him, "For God's sake, George, forgive me - don't give charge of me to night - take a warrant on Monday morning;" the watchman came up, and took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Watts sober? A. Yes; we had had two pints of half and half; I live with him as

his wife; I have gone by his name. I do not know whether he has heard me called Mrs. Watts; I was never tried any where. I was not in the watch-house myself.

JOHN SWINGLAM . I am a watchman. About twelve o'clock at night I heard a cry of Watch! and Murder! I ran up, and found Watts surrounded by a desperate gang, all over blood and mud; I inquired who it was - they said it was Herring, whom Crispin was holding; I took them to the watch-house, and did not know what became of them till the Friday following.

ROBERT MARSTON . I am a constable of the Thames Police. On the night of the 15th of September, I met Watts with his mouth smothered with blood; he said, "See how Bill Herring has served me!" I said, "Come to me on Monday morning," which he did, and shewed me the bruises on his side; I then went to a house, and found Bulpit on a bed - I took her, and said, "Where is Bill?" she said, "He is at Crawley's;" I went there, and found Herring - he said, "Is it about Watts?" I said, "Yes:" he said, "I expected I should be nailed to-day:" I afterwards went with Shields, and found Cuttle in a room, which we broke open.

Cross-examined. Q. Had these persons been well acquainted? A. No doubt they knew each other; I have inquired, and find Watts is a hard-working man.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer. I went with Marston- his account is correct; I found Cuttle in the cupboard of a room which we broke open, between six and seven o'clock in the morning of the 29th.

HERRING's Defence. I can prove what they have said is false - that the prosecutor and myself were both in liquor, and that my mouth was bleeding.

BULPIT's Defence. When we met them, Crispin came and insulted me - she said she would fight me; I said I would take other means if she did not go about her business; I went to the watch-house with my husband (for we are married), and when they came away, I left with them - I said nothing in the watch-house.

CUTTLE's Defence. Crispin wanted me to go into a brothel, I would not; she then said she would find George to give me a good hiding - Watts came and struck me; Herring said, "Don't strike him, he is not old enough to strike again;" he then knocked him down.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am an officer of St. George's in the East, and have been an officer twenty years. The parties were brought into the watch-house for fighting in the street; both Watts and Herring were very much in liquor - their faces were both very bloody, I am certain; they called one another Bill and George; Watts said, "You had no right to strike me;" they shook hands and walked out of the watch-house: I was afterwards sent for by the Magistrate, to know why I dismissed the case; but they made it up themselves before any charge was booked.

COURT. Q. Did you see Swinglam? A. Yes - but nothing was said about a robbery; I did not hear of that for four or five days after, when he came and said, "Those persons should not have been discharged - they were accused of a robbery;" I heard Herring ask Watts to forgive him- Watts said, "I will not be served in this way."

Q. If they had only been fighting, why should he ask forgiveness? A. He asked him to make it up, which he did; Herring said, "We will go and have a pot of beer;" if a robbery had been mentioned, I should have taken the charge; I know nothing of either of them; several persons rushed into the watch-house - there might be a dozen there.

JOHN SWINGLAM re-examined. When I took Herring, somebody said, "He shan't take him to the watch-house tonight;" I took him there, but was sent out before the case was discharged; I heard that they had shook hands and settled it.

Prisoner HERRING. I was coming along, and saw the prosecutor ill-using Cuttle, who was a stranger to me I said, "George, don't ill-use him;" he turned round, and struck me in the mouth; I said, "If you strike me I will strike you;" he said, "I'll fight you for 1l.;" I struck him in my own defence - I had been to market with my wife.

GEORGE WATTS. I had not struck him at all - I never quarrelled with him in my life; I did not shake hands with him in the watch-house; he came, caught hold of me, and said, "Forgive me:" I said, "How can I? you came to rob me, and I know you have been a thief for years."

HERRING - GUILTY . Aged 22.

BULPIT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

CUTTLE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18271025-197

2174. THOMAS WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 2 pairs of boots, value 16s. , the goods of John Brightwell .

JOHN BRIGHTWELL. The prisoner lodged with my father, in Plow-square, Whitechapel - I am a ladies' shoemaker . On the 29th of September, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I missed these boots from the garret.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer. I found the prisoner at a house in Backchurch-lane, which I was searching for stolen property; he came in - I asked him about these boots; he said they were made for his sister; we have not found them - I was told the prosecutor had taken 10s. 6d. not to prosecute.

JOHN BRIGHTWELL re-examined. I took the case before the Magistrate. I saw the prisoner take the shoes, as I returned from the public-house; he passed me on the stairs with them - I heard them rattle in his hand, and asked where he was going; he went out, and I followed, but a person stopped me from pursuing - I gave information - I caught a glimpse of them in his hand - his friends came to my mother's house, after the first examination, and gave 10s. 6d. - I wished to make it up.

Prisoner's Defence. My sister was measured for these boots; they were to be done on Saturday night - I went and asked if they were done; they said Yes; I said,"Give them to me, and meet me at Coats', in Whitechapel;" but he did not - I went to him; he was gone to bed, but got up, and we went and had some drink; he then let me have them; here his receipt for the 10s. 6d.; he told me not to let his father know, as he had made them unknown to him.

JOHN BRIGHTWELL. This receipt is my writing - I wished to make it up, but the Magistrate would persevere;

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-198

2175. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 1 carpet, value 17s., and 1 rug, value 3s. , the goods of William Blake .

SUSAN BLAKE . I am the wife of William Blake; we live in Homer-row ; he is a butler in a gentleman's family- I am a corset-maker. On the 5th of October, these things were put at my door, to be beat, and in a few minutes I heard a man had run off with them - I saw them at the door, about five minutes before they were taken.

WILLIAM TRODD . I was in Crawford-street - Mrs. Blake came and informed me - I ran towards Bryanston-square, where I found the prisoner with this carpet and rug - I asked how he came by them; he said he might as well take them as any body else.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard of a situation at the Cock public-house, in Manchester-square - I was going there, and saw these carpets on the pavement - I did not know who they belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-199

2176. JOHN WESTALL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 hat, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Coward , from his person .

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. I was in Long-acre , about ten o'clock at night, on the 21st of September, and saw the prisoner, and another larger than him, following two gentlemen; they got on to a dark place, near St. Martin's-lane, and when I got opposite them, on the other side of the way, I saw Coward leaning over a post, very sick; he seemed in liquor - I saw the prisoner go and take the hat off Coward's head, and run away - I followed, and took him and his companion; the prisoner had the hat on, and his own cap under it - the other was discharged.

JOSEPH COWARD. I was in Long-acre - I had been drinking - I am a currier , and live in Park-street - this is my hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it in the kennel, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18271025-200

2177. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 1 pair of boots, value 12s. , the goods of Robert Nottage .

ROBERT NOTTAGE. I am a gardener , and live at Walthamstow. I was at the Black Dog public-house , about five o'clock on the 23d of October - I went out for a minute, leaving the boots tied up on the table; when I returned they were gone - I charged the prisoner with it - he denied it.

JAMES ARCHER . I was at the Black Dog; while Nottage was out, the prisoner took the boots, and put them under the bench - Nottage charged him with it - he denied it - he afterwards took them out.

EDWARD WILLIAM WIGGINS . I live with Mr. Latter, a pawnbroker, of Commercial-road - a man pawned these boots on the 23d of October, in the name of Jeremiah Sullivan - it was not the prisoner.

PETER WILSON . I took the prisoner in charge - Nottage gave me the duplicate - he had received it from another person, who has not been seen since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I and the prosecutor were both inebriated.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-201

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2178. ROBERT GRAHAM and WILLIAM STONE were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 chain, value 6d., and 1 seal, value 6d., the goods of John Starkey , from his person .

JOHN STARKEY. I live in John-street, Brick-lane. On the 7th of September, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was in Brick-lane - I was pinioned while my watch was taken - I felt it go, but did not see it go - I said,"That fellow has got my watch," but I did not see who took it - he turned from me in a moment - I could not see him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you not so drunk that you could not see at all? A. I walked from Smithfield without assistance; the fair was just over; I saw my watch safe in Long-lane; I was the worse for liquor; I will swear I felt it drawn from me in Brick-lane - I did not see Calley near me - it happened ten or twelve yards from St. John-street, in Brick-lane, on the right hand side.

THOMAS CALLEY . I was in Brick-lane, and saw the two prisoners (whom I knew), coming along with Starkey, who appeared very drunk - they were coming up towards me - Graham on his right hand, and Stone on his left - they went a few yards beyond me, on the other side of the way - I looked to see what they were going to do, and saw Graham pinion the prosecutor's arms - Stone drew out the watch, and drew it up his own sleeve with a jerk - he passed on directly from the prosecutor.

Q. Then you gave an alarm? A. Yes; I alarmed my brother, and called to a man who came out of the Hare public-house - I particularly noticed Stone - he passed three or four lights, with his face towards me.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I keep a fruit-stall at the corner of King-street, Brick-lane, which is less than twenty yards from where the robbery was committed - I had come from my stall to the other side of the way - I told a man, who came out to take the prosecutor from the door - it was half-past nine o'clock - the watch does not sit till ten - I went to the Hare to ask them if they knew the prosecutor - I knew the man who took it; I went next morning to the constable, and to Worship-street on Saturday.

Q. Do you often go to the Police-office? A. No; only when I have a call; I never applied there for employ; the prisoners ran different ways; I saw Stone about a fortnight after, and Graham two days after.

Q. Why not send for an officer and have them taken? A. There are such dreadful characters about there, if a man dare to interfere, he would be crushed under foot; Graham had a white jacket on; I did not notice whether he had a hat or cap on; my brother was against the public-house.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am a constable of Bethnal green. I took Graham on the 5th of October; Calley had given me information the morning after the robbery, and described their persons, but did not tell their names; I knew Graham, but not by his description; I received fur

ther information from another person afterwards, and took him; I showed him to Calley, who said he was one of the party; he said he was innocent.

SAUL POWELL . I am a constable. I went on the 5th of October, and took Stone at the Turkish Slave public-house; Calley was with me, and said, "That is one of them, take him;" I said, "Which do you mean?" he said,"If you do not take him, I will;" I took him into a butcher's shop where there is a strong gas-light, and said,"Look well at him;" he said, "That is the man;" I then took him.

THOMAS CALLEY . The man who came out to take the prosecutor home is not here.

STONE'S Defence. I was at the Turkish Slave when I was taken, and was there the night the robbery was committed, having part of a pint of beer; the servant came in, and said she saw a gentleman robbed of his watch, but at that moment the bell rang, and she went out.

JOHN ABSON . I am a porter and watchman, and have known the prosecutor some years; I was present the night he was robbed; I saw two persons near him, one of them had a light jacket on, that was not Graham; he is a head taller than that man; (I lodge at the Hare) I said to them, "Where are you going to take this man?" they said, "Home;" I said, "Do you know where he lives?" one said, "Yes, next door to the Sugar Loaves public-house;" I said I would see him home; they then went away.

COURT. Q. Did you see him robbed? A. No; he said he was robbed; he turned round, and said to another gentleman, "That is the person who robbed me;" I saw neither of the prisoners there; a young man and a lad were leading him; when I spoke, the tall young man let go; he said immediately that he was robbed.

Q. Why did you not take these men? A. Because he at first said it was another man - I knew Graham before, and if he had been there I should have seen him. I have been a watchman nine years.

MARY McDONALD . I am servant to Mr. Brown, of the Turkish Slave public-house, Brick-lane. I remember the night this gentleman said he was robbed; I saw Graham that night, sitting in our tap-room; he had a black coat and black handkerchief on - I went out with beer that night, and saw the prosecutor tipsy; the prisoners at that time were both in our house, and they were not the men who had hold of him.

Q. Could they rob him and get back to the house before you returned? A. No. I know the prisoners well.

COURT. Q. Did you leave them in the house when you went out? A. No. I was about a quarter of an hour delivering my beer, and found them in the house when I returned; I saw Calley in the street, just at my arm - he was drunk.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see any persons leave the prosecutor? A. Yes; they went towards Whitechapel.

JOHN ABSON . The two men did go towards Whitechapel; the Hare is about one hundred and fifty yards from the Turkish Slave.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-202

2179. THOMAS CAMPLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 saddle, value 7s.; 1 breeching, value 7s.; 1 wanty, value 5s.; 1 crupper, value 3s.; 1 backhand, value 10s.; 2 hames, value 10s.; 1 set of reins, value 5s., and 1 bridle, value 7s. , the goods of William Ward ; and GEORGE CANE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WARD. I am a cow-keeper and live at Tottenham . Camplin was occasionally in my employ, to do odd jobs. On the 5th of September, about ten o'clock in the evening I saw my harness in the cow-house; I missed it about six o'clock next morning. I saw the witness Hills on a Saturday, about a fortnight after, and went to the prisoner Cane's shop, in about three hours after that - he keeps a shop next door to the Cherry Tree public-house, Kingsland-road - it is a sort of harness shop, and he deals in marine-stores. Cane was in the shop - I asked if he could suit me with a good second-hand harness; he said he might, but it wanted looking out; I said if he could I should feel obliged; he asked where I lived; I said, at Enfield-highway, and I would call again - he asked when- I said in a week or two, or perhaps next week. I went again on the Monday, and asked if he had got it - he said, "Are you the young man that lives at Enfield-highway?" I said Yes - he then showed me one saddle, and asked if that would suit me; I said No; he showed me two more, to which I objected; he then showed me my own - I immediately recognised it, but the four W's were taken off, and four brass-plates put on in their places; there was no other alteration in it; I saw a friend pass, and said, "There is a friend I want to speak to" - I went and told him to send me an officer - I waited in the shop; two officers came: I said, "I want you to take charge of this, which I lost about a month ago" - and said to Cane, "You may as well fetch up all, it will make it better for you;" he then brought up all except the reins; I asked how much he might give for it; he said 12s., and that he had bought it of two young men whom he did not know; he had said he should expect about 2l. of me for the set of harness; the reins were found behind a door, which divides the shop from the parlour; he was then taken in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who is Hills? A. He is ostler at the Thatched House, Islington. I told him if he could do any thing in it I should be obliged; I knew him from having formerly lived next door to him for seventeen years; I thought he might get information, as he lived near town - I applied to every body to look out; I said I would give him a sovereign if he could get it, as I knew Camplin was a noted thief, and I suspected him; I did not give him the sovereign; it depends on how he swears to day; if I get my harness back I will pay him.

Q. Did not you tell him the result of the trial depended on his fixing the guilt on one of these parties? A. No - he is the only witness against Camplin; he knows I shall not pay him unless I get it back.

Q. Unless he does the business well to day, he will not get the sovereign? A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Cane showed you several saddles? A. Yes. I found all my harness there - it is common to hang reins behind a door; I have not found the four W's - I did not lose the collar.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What do you mean by its depending on Hills doing the business well? A. I mean if he gets my harness back, I shall give him a sovereign. The harness cost 5l., and is now worth two guineas and a half.

JONAS HILLS . I am ostler at the Thatched House, Islington. Ward spoke to me about his harness; I saw Camplin on the Friday following, I think - I said, "There is some disturbance about Ward's harness - do you know any thing of it?" he said, "Yes - we collared all but the collar;" I said, "Sometimes I may have such things myself - where is the best place to get rid of them?" he said, "Somewhere near the Cherry Tree, Kingsland-road, but the old b - r will not give much for it."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not care about it? A. I had known Ward seventeen years, and he had said if I could get information he would satisfy me; he said nothing about giving me 10l. - I would not take it if he did; he said he would not mind a sovereign if he could find it; I would take that. I expect to be satisfied for my trouble.

Q. Does not your expectation of the sovereign depend on the prisoners being convicted? A. Yes.

JOSEPH WEBB . I am a constable. I apprehended Camplin; I said I wanted him on suspicion - he resisted; I got him into the Bull public-house, and sent for Ward, who said, "You are a bl - y rogue for stealing my harness.

GEORGE COLLEY . I am an officer. On the 1st of October I was in the Kingsland-road, with Holt; we went to Cane's, where I saw Mr. Ward, who said he had been robbed of some harness about a month ago, and that a saddle which laid there was his; we desired Cane to fetch up the rest, which he did - he might be half an hour fetching it all from different parts of the house; he produced all but the collar and reins; he said he bought it of two men for 12s. - that he might know the men perhaps, if they were brought to him. I found the reins behind the door.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were there not other reins there? A. Yes; his boy was afterwards brought, to see if he could identify Camplin, but he could not - he said two men sold it, and he could identify them.

WILLIAM HOLT . I was with Collins, and confirm his evidence.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the boy brought at the desire of the prosecutor, or the prisoner? - A. The prosecutor; he looked at Camplin, and said he did not know him.

Cane put in a written defence, declaring his innocence, and stating that he had acted openly in producing the property to the prosecutor, and had exposed part of it for sale.

CHARLES ROGERS . I am a saddler and harness-maker, and live at Hackney. I have known Cane three or four years; he bore the character of an honest respectable man; harness sells for less money about Michaelmas than in the spring - it would not fetch above half as much; if this harness had been brought to me without the brass, to be repaired before I could sell it, it would not be worth above 12s.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What would you make such a harness for? A. Two pounds, twelve shillings; if it had been a gig harness it would be worth more; it is a cart harness.

WILLIAM GROVE . I am a corn-dealer, and live at Croydon. This harness I think not worth more than 12s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-203

2180. JAMES HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 jacket, value 9s. , the goods of Joseph Baugh .

WILLIAM DAWSON BAUGH . I am the son of Joseph Baugh, a tailor , of High Holborn . I did not see the prisoner take this jacket down, but my father gave an alarm; I went out, and took him, about three doors off, with it - it had hung at the door.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the jacket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-204

2181. ANNE CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 1 shawl, value 35s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s., and 1 frock-body, value 3s., the goods of Grace Martin , her mistress .

GRACE MARTIN. I am single , and live at Brompton-row - the prisoner was my servant . I sent her on a message, and missed a pair of ear-rings from a room adjoining the kitchen; I lost the articles in question, and found them that day at her lodgings.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. What house do you keep? A. I take in lodgers - they are females generally; my door is not kept open at night - it is quite a regular house; I am a widow; I had a respectable character with her; she had the shawl in her hand; she had left me on the Wednesday before, and brought me her box to examine, but I would not: I know the property to be mine - one handkerchief belongs to Mrs. Edwards, who had lent it me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL DAWKINS . I am an officer, and went to the prisoner's lodgings - this shawl was in her hand: I took the key of her box from her, and found this handkerchief and frock-body in it; another handkerchief was in a bundle of linen - the box belonged to Mrs. Allicot, who was there: the prisoner said Mrs. Martin had a shawl of hers, and she must have taken this by mistake.

MRS. MARTIN. I had no shawl of hers.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Edwards gave me a hat-box and a yellow pocket handkerchief - Mrs. Martin's son wanted to buy it, but I would not sell it; I told the officer Mrs. Edwards gave it to me - I had the shawl in my hand, and was going out to give it back to her; I picked the body up in the dust-hole.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-205

2182. JOSEPH RAINBIRD , WILLIAM ROCHESTER , and JOSHUA QUICK were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 live tame goose, price 5s. , the property of Thomas West .

THOMAS WEST. I am a labourer , and live at Enfield . I lost a goose on the 2d of October out of a field, about a quarter of a mile from my house - it was turned out into the stubble-field.

JOHN RUSKIN . On Tuesday afternoon, the 2d of October, I was at my mother's, and saw Rainbird take the goose from Mr. Vaughan's field - I knew it was Mr. West's - he put it into a bag; the other two prisoners were by the side of the hedge, and they all ran away together; I went to Mrs. West's, but she was not at home; I knew the prisoners - they live at Enfield-town.

Prisoner ROCHESTER. Q. What do you know me by? A. I had seen him before about Enfield.

JANE WEST . I am the wife of Thomas West. Ruskin told me that young Rainbird had taken the goose, and that Rochester and Quick were with him; I went to the constable, who took them all: the goose was found the next morning - it was then dead.

Prisoner ROCHESTER. The boy said he did not know my name before the Magistrate.

JOHN RUSKIN. No, I said I knew them all three.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure you knew Rochester and Quick by their names? A. Yes: they were about twenty yards from Rainbird when he took it.

GEORGE ABBOTT . I keep a public-house. Rainbird came there on a Tuesday or Wednesday; he had a pot of beer, and asked me if I would buy a goose - I did buy it; and after that the two other prisoners came in, and they all drank the beer; I had some suspicion, and told the constable the next morning, I thought it was not right - my wife partly picked it.

JOHN MEAD . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoners.

JOHN WILSON . I saw the prisoners all in company going towards the field, about two hundred yards from it - they had nothing then.

BAINBIRD'S Defence. I met a man, who got me to sell it.

ROCHESTER'S Defence. We were not going towards the field; the prosecutrix said she had seven and five geese, and then said she had thirteen.

MRS. WEST. I had six old and seven young ones.

BAINBIRD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks .

ROCHESTER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

QUICK - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-206

2183. JOHN MASON and JAMES MALONE were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 1 truss of hay, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Thomas Woods .

HENRY THOMAS WOODS. I lost a truss of hay, on the 3d of October, from my loft, over my stable, in Clare-street, Clare-market - I was not at home at the time - I heard it was missing, from a man in the shop; the prisoners have annoyed our neighbourhood for some time.

JOHN FORD . I am a turner, and live in Clare-street, opposite the stable. On the 3d of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I looked out of window, and saw Malone in the stable; immediately after, I saw Mason march up, take a sagacious look round, and then walk away; immediately after, Malone followed him, with a truse of hay on his back - I thought it was not right, and went and asked Wood's foreman, if he had sold a truse of hay; he said No - I said Malone had gone towards Vere-street with one; he then went after him - I could not see the entrance of the stable, but I saw Malone in the stable, from the second floor window.

JAMES ELLIS . I am foreman to Mr. Wood. About nine o'clock, Ford came and gave me information - I pursued, and took Malone with the truss on his back - Mason had Malone's hat in his hand; he dropped the hay, and I took him - Mason got off - this is Mr. Wood's hay.

MASON'S Defence. I had occasion to pass the stable, and in Vere-street; Ellis came up, but took no notice of me - I was there again about three o'clock, and was taken.

MALONE'S Defence. In passing the stable, a man offered me a pint of beer to carry the truss to the corner of Vere-street, and he would be there before me.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MALONE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-207

2184. GEORGE HALKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 2 blankets, value 4s.; 1 fender, value 2s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 4s., and 1 pillow, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Bailey .

ELIZABETH BAILEY . I am the wife of Joseph Bailey. I let a furnished room to the prisoner and his wife, three weeks ago. I suspected the things were being taken, and the next morning my husband stopped the prisoner; we went into the room, and missed these things; he said he intended to redeem them, and gave us up the duplicates.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 2d of October the prisoner pawned a blanket.

GEORGE LANCASTER . I am a pawnbroker, and have a fender and fire-irons, pawned by the prisoner, on the 15th and 22d of October.

CHARLES COLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and have a pillow. I do not know who pawned it.

JOSEPH BOOKER . I am a pawnbroker, and have a blanket, pawned by the prisoner on the 22d of October.

JOSEPH COPE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded extreme poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-208

2185. JOSEPH HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 pair of trousers, value 3s. , the goods of Frederick Wood .

FREDERICK WOOD. I am an apprentice on board the Prince George , which lay in Blackwall basin . The prisoner was working on board - I lost my trousers from my hammock; they were safe about five o'clock.

HENRY SCHLETTE . On the 28th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come from the ship - I suspected him, and asked what he had in his hat; he said nothing - I pulled it off, and the trousers were in it.

Prisoner's Defence. They were given to me; they laid in the forecastle, and the lad said I might take them, but he denied it afterwards.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18271025-209

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY. OCTOBER 29.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2186. ISAAC CLAPHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 shawl, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Alderson .

HENRY ALDERSON. I am a linen-draper , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 9th of October a person came and gave me information - I looked and missed a shawl, which had hung near the door.

JOHN BOSTON . I saw the prisoner and another person go up to Mr. Alderson's; the other person snatched the shawl from the door, and gave it to the prisoner, who wrapped it in his apron - I told Carter, who ran over and secured him; he took it out of his apron, and threw it down: his companion escaped, but I afterwards took him in St. Giles.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the shawl, which he threw down.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-210

2187. WILLIAM BROAD , ROBERT PRENDERGAST and THOMAS DONOUGHDOO were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 case of surgical-instruments, value 5s. , the goods of William Simpson .

WILLIAM SIMPSON. I am a surgeon , and live in Angel-terrace, Hammersmith . On the 28th of September I missed a case of instruments, from a little parlour at the back of my shop; the constable produced them the same day - I know nothing of the prisoners - I cannot identify these instruments, but Pearce made the case; my surgery door is generally open, and my boy not always there.

SAMUEL PEARCE . I am a cabinet-maker. I made this case to fit these instruments - I am sure this is the case I made.

WILLIAM FRIAR . I am a carpenter. I was at work at Hammersmith, between twelve and one o'clock on the 28th of September - Lovegrove called me to the back window, and I saw Broad scratching some time away; he and Donoughdoo seemed to deposit something there; he and a third person covered it over, and went away - I desired Lovegrove to go and see what it was; he went and brought this case - I took Broad and Donoughdoo that day.

CHARLES LOVEGROVE . I was at work with Friar - I am a carpenter. I saw Broad scratch the hole, and Donoughdoo put something in from a handkerchief, which he untied - Broad and Prendergast covered it over - I went to the spot, and took this box out; it was about two hundred yards from Mr. Simpson's.

DAVID DAVIE . I am an officer, and have produced the box - I took Prendergast by information - I did know them before.

DONOUGHDOO'S Defence. I was returning from work, and Friar seized me - I had not been there that morning.

BROAD - GUILTY . Aged 11.

PRENDERGAST - GUILTY . Aged 12.

DONOUGHDOO - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-211

2188. GEORGE ARDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 pair of sheets, value 12s. , the goods of John Yates .

JOHN YATES. I keep the Cheshire Cheese public-house, Northampton-street, Clerkenwell - the prisoner came and lodged at my house on the 8th of October; he was going out at seven o'clock in the morning, and seeming rather bulky, I called to my wife - she missed the sheets; I went out and took him with one round his body, and the other in his hat - he said he had come from Norwich.

Prisoner. Q. Had I not my hat in my hand? A. Yes.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from Hertfordshire, and was dripping wet through - and in the morning I came down with my hat in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-212

2189. JOHN RALPH was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM QUIGLEY . I keep the George public-house, Vauxhall-road - the prisoner was my pot-boy . I paid him weekly - he did not account to me for any money paid by Smith, on the 25th or 26th of August - he should account to me every morning for what he had received the day before; he absconded on Sunday night, the 26th; he should have given me that morning what he received the day before. I gave information, but could not find him for some time - his week's wages would be due on Monday morning; he lived six weeks with me, and behaved well.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I have beer from Mr. Quigley's - the prisoner brings it. On the 25th of August in the evening, I paid him three separate shillings for my weeks beer.

EDWARD ALLEN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner on the 10th of October - he said he was sorry for what he had done.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person who asked me to go and drink - I got tipsy, and did not like to return.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, in the Country of Surry.

Reference Number: t18271025-213

2190. RICHARD PARSONS and THOMAS PARSONS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 20 quarters of Malt, value 60l. , the goods of John Lyall and others.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JAMES BAXTER LYALL . I am a brewer and live at Chelsea , and am in the partnership with John Lyall and another - we have a warehouse, which we call the malt-house; this malt was stolen from there; it adjoins the yard of the Old Swan public-house - we have a window which opens into their skittle-ground - this malt was in a bulk in the malt-house - we have two doors, one leading close down to the river, and the other towards land - we unload barges at the door next the river. On the morning of the 6th of September, in consequence of the report of my men, I went to the malt-house without an officer, and then went for an officer - I found the window looking into the skittle-ground had two or three iron-bars removed from it

and a sufficient aperture made for a man to enter - the bulk of the malt was diminished to the amount of about forty quarters - the door leading to the river was in the same state as before. I afterwards went with the officer to search for the malt, to a place up the river, called the Broom-house dock, which is about half a mile on this side of Fulham-bridge, on the Middlesex side - it is between two and three miles from our premises - on arriving there, we saw some malt close to a wall near the river - it was scattered about, apparently as if dropped from sacks which had been pitched there, before they had been put into carts, as I suppose - it was near the Thames. I picked up some of it; it is in the possession of the officer - I have a sample taken from the bulk of the malt. I saw the prisoner Richard Parsons at Battersea that day, after I had been to the dock - there were several watermen there - he came forward alone, and the officer who was with me took him; he was taken to our counting-house - he said something to the officer when he was taken, which I did not hear. I asked him, at the counting-house, where he had been the preceeding day - he said he had been to one public-house only, which was the Yorkshire-grey. I desired him to recollect himself - he then mentioned three other public-houses, but omitted the Swan. I recollect one house was the Cricketers - I afterwards asked if he had been to Dodson's house, (who keeps the Swan) - he said he did not know the house. I again asked him, and after considerable hesitation and prevarication, he admitted that he did know Dodson's, and that he had been there - he was then taken on board the Police-ship. On the following day I continued my search, in company with another officer; we were going along the Fulham-road, and arrived at Mr. Poole's malt-house, which is about a mile and a half or two miles from the Broom-house dock; there is a road from the dock to Poole's malt-house. I knocked at the door of Poole's malt-house, but it was not opened; the flap of a window was suddenly raised, and then let fall again, as soon as I knocked at the door - the malt-house door was not opened to me. I then went to Mr. Poole's private residence, and Mr. Poole accompanied me to the malt-house; he had no key - he went to the neighbouring house, to the wife of Jefferies - there is a communication from that house to the malt-house. I did not go through - Mr. Poole went through, and opened the malt-house door to me; I then went in, and there were nine sacks of malt unground, and one sack ground. I cannot say whether any name was on the sacks - (my malt was all unground) - the malt was all removed to our premises. I believe the malt found there to be ours, and part of what we lost - neither Mr. Poole or any body attempted to hinder me from moving it. I saw a woman in the house adjoining the malt-house - she said she was Jefferies's wife; about an hour after I discovered the malt I found Thomas Parsons in custody in the Fulham-road, in a gig, being conveyed to our counting-house; he was taken there, but nothing passed in my presence - the value of the malt stolen is about 120l. I have been experienced in grain this seven or eight years; I was not entirely bred up to the trade. I have seen the samples of malt which are here, and compared them with the bulk; they appear to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Your father is one of your partners? A. Yes; his name is John, only; the door of our premises appeared the same as the night before - the malt could have been moved to where we found it by land, in carts; there were three or four other watermen with Richard Parsons; I do not know that he made use of any expression; he advanced towards us; I did not tell Richard Parsons what he said would be used against him, or that he need not say any thing without he liked; I saw Thomas Parsons in the gig, in custody - that was a quarter of a mile from the malt-house; I know nothing of his previous habits; my father is not here; I heard nothing pass between him, and any one else; the officer was not present when I questioned Richard Parsons.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was there room for a person to have got the malt through the window into the skettle-ground, and from there to the water? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. How was the door? A. It is fastened by a lock and two bolts; I am told by my servant that it was locked and bolted that night - I did not notice it myself - the end of the skittle-ground comes down to the Thames.

WILLIAM ISBESTER . I am a Thames Police surveyor. I was stationed on board the Thams Police-ship, off Arundel-stairs, Strand; on the 6th of September I went to Mr. Lyall's, Chelsea; I went to the malt-house, and saw a wire window, which looks into the skittle-ground of the Old Swan, had been bent inwards, so as to admit a person in; we then went down to the river - there were two or three carts there; I then went into a punt, which laid just off the door of the malt-house; I could step from the door to the punt; it is a cabin-punt, and there were muddy foot-marks on the top of the cabin; I stepped from the door to the punt gunwale without treading on the bank; there was one naked foot-mark very plain on the punt cabin, and some marks of feet in the mud; there is a cause way from there to the skittle-ground of the Old Swan; I then went up the river, with Mr. Lyall, in search of the malt; I saw Dawson, a lighterman, and from what he said, I went to a wall, close by the water side, and there picked up some malt, near to Broom-house dock; I have preserved it; I then went to Chelsea, landed Mr. Lyall, and then went in search of a barge, of which I had received information; I found it, and went on board - the name of "Waight, Chelsea," was on it; the oars were locked - it was at Mr. Batcock's wharf, near Cheyne-walk-terrace, about one hundred yards from Mr. Lyall's; I found under the head-sheets some loose malt, which appeared to have fallen through the cracks; I took it up, and have it here; while I was in the barge I received more information, and went in search of Richard Parsons; I found him, and took him; I asked if he had the key of Waight's punt; he said No; I asked if he had not borrowed her yesterday; he said Yes, he had borrowed her, and shifted her out of the hole where she laid afloat; I then asked if it was not to do a job for Mr. Mead; he said No, that when he came back after shifting the punt, the person, who hired him, told him he did not want him to do the job; he said the person was a stranger to him; I asked if he knew where he lived; he said No; he said he believed he lived at the top of the hill, but he did not know where; I took him at Battersea; there is a Mr. Mead, a colourman, who has some water-side premises there; I asked him what he was to have done; he said to fetch some wood up from Milbank, he believed: I took him, and said if he would come up to Waight, he would

hear some more, but Weight was gone up the river; I then took him to Lyall's; I went to Chelsea, and took Thomas Parsons; I afterwards went into Richard Parsons' boat, and found a small quantity of malt under the burthen-boards, which are boards used to step upon when the barge is loaded; I then went to Thomas Parsons' boat, which laid aground alongside the causeway at Battersea; I there found nearly the same quantity of malt, at the bottom of the boat - I have preserved all those different parcels of malt, and have them here - their names were on their boats; I then returned to Mr. Lyall's, and, as Waight had not returned from Richmond, I took Richard Parsons on board the Police-ship, and left him in chage of Mitchell, the officer. I went next day, with Mr. Lyall, to Mr. Poole's malt-house; I left Mr. Lyall there, and returned to the Broom-house; I then went to Battersea, and on returning, in a gig, Thomas Parsons was pointed out to me by Bell; he was a good deal in liquor, and had a girl under his arm - he was not above five minutes walk from Poole's; we took him to Mr. Lyall's counting-house; when we had been there about an hour, he got a little sober, and I asked what he was doing at Fulham; he said he had been to Jefferies' to inquire about his brother Dick, that his mother gave him 6s. to take to him, and he meant to spend one of them before he took it; he then said, without my asking him any question, "As to Wednesday night, I slept at home." I had not then told him what I took him for; I said,"Where did you sleep on Thursday night?" he said, "I slept at home also:" he then jumped up, took a pen, and said, "No, I did not sleep at home; but, if you will give me some ink, I'll tell you where I did sleep - I slept with that girl you took me away from:" before the ink could be fetched, he hove down the pen, and said, "No, I shall tell you nothing about it - you may find it out." Mitchell afterwards came there with some malt in a cart; Thomas Parsons then began crying, and I came away.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been a surveyor? A. About twelve months - I have been a constable nearly ten years - there were three examinations before the Magistrate; the prisoners were present at them all.

Q. Upon your oath did you say one word about the asked foot-mark to the Magistrate? A. I was never asked it - I do not know that I did mention it - I did not mention that I asked Richard for the key, not that he had said he borrowed the punt, and set her afloat - I said I asked him if it was to do a job for Mead - I did not state he said it was to fetch wood, nor that he said he did not know where the man lived - I was not asked about it - I did not tell him he need not answer questions without he liked, nor that it would be used against him; I did not caution him - my deposition was taken by the clerk, and read over to me, in the presence of the prisoners and the Magistrate - I stated what I was asked - it was but a short deposition - I think I stated to the Magistrate that I asked Thomas Parsons what he had been doing at Fulham - I did say he told me he had been at Jefferies' to inquire for his brother Dick - I think what I said was taken down - I did not tell Thomas Parsons he need not answer any questions without he liked, or that it might be used against him - I supposed it might - I will not swear whether I told the Magistrate he had said he slept at home on Wednesday night.

Q. On your oath, was not the man drunk when he answered? A. He was, but he had got a good deal soberer than at first - I cannot say he was drunk; he knew what he was talking about - I did not state about his taking up a pen to write - my deposition was taken very short - I will not say that I stated he said he had slept with the girl, or his afterwards refusing to write any thing.

Q. On your oath, was he not at the time he was crying beastly drunk? A. No.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is this deposition signed by you? A. Yes, it is signed by me - there were three examinations.

Q. Was not the greater part of these three days' examinations occupied with other persons than the prisoners? A. Yes, three other persons were indicted with the prisoners - one person was there who had part of the malt in his possession, for I was examined about that affair.

The witness' deposition being read, did not in any degree differ from his evidence, except that it was not given so fully.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames Police surveyer. On the 6th of September I was on board the Police-ship off Arundel-stairs - late that evening I saw Richard Parsons on board, in the hold, but I was not there when he was brought on board; when I saw him he was asleep - there was no other person there - I overhauled his shoes, which were off, and the only shoes there; and found this grain of malt in one of them (producing it) - I awoke him, and asked if he had been at work among any corn - he said No - I said "There is a grain of corn in your shoes - do you know how it came there?" he said he did not know, without it had been put there. On the following day I went with Lyall and Isbester to the Fulham road - I left Mr. Lyall at Poole's malt-house, and I want on to the Broom-house - Mr. Lyall came and fetched me back - I went into Poole's malt-house, and found nine sacks of malt unground, and one sack below ground - Poole's name was on all the sacks - after the malt was found I was left in charge of it till the dray came, and while there I saw Thomas Parsons, walking backwards and forwards, opposite Poole's malt-house, in company with a woman - I did not then know him - I afterwards saw him in Isbester's custody in the house, and recognized him as the person I had before seen with the girl - I went that evening to Walham-green, and there took two men, named Lake and Evans, into custody - I found two carts in Lake's shed with some grains of malt at the bottom of them - Bell, who was with me, took them - I took Lake before the Magistrate, and from what he said I went to a man named Higgs, at Pimlico, and found twenty-seven quarters and a half of malt, which I have now in my possession - I saw Thomas Parsons at Mr. Lyall's counting-house the same evening; he certainly was not sober - I had brought the malt there from Poole's - Thomas Parsons said he wished to speak to the elder Mr. Lyall, who took him up stairs, and I followed them - Mr. Lyall asked what he wished to say to him, and he said, "Oh, my poor brother, my poor brother! I do not care for myself, but for his wife and family" - he was not sober certainly - he was not beastly drunk - I will not swear it, but I think he knew what he said.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you carry away Poole's sacks as well as the grain? A. I did; there was no malt but that I brought away.

Q. Whether it had been mixed with any other malt you cannot tell? A. No; Thomas Parsons was not cautioned before he said any thing.

WILLIAM WAIGHT . I am a lighterman, and live at Chelsea. I know both the prisoners - they are watermen , and each have boats of their own; I have a punt. On Wednesday morning, the 5th of September, Richard Parson asked me for the loan of it; I asked what he wanted it for; he said, to fetch some timber for Mr. Mead, of Battersea, from Messrs. Campbell and White's, at Milbank: I told him if he wanted her, he might go home and get the key, as I was going to Richmond - the key was to unlock the cars; he told me he could not tell positively when he wanted her, as he had to go to Battersea, and he did not know whether he should want her or not before he went over to Battersea: I went to Richmond, and returned about nine o'clock; the key had not been fetched - it still hung in its place; I do not know where my punt was then; I saw it next morning, at Mr. Batcock's wharf, where she had been the might before, but she had been moved by some one - my name is on her: I did not see it searched - I was at Richmond that day; I have had her twelve months last April; she was never used to convey grain to my knowledge: I took her down on the Tuesday, and had her loaded with coals; I saw Richard Parsons on the Tuesday, in the parlour of the Swan - he came in from the skittle-ground.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known Richard? A. All my life - I never knew any thing against him; I have no knowledge of his having taken the punt - some one had her, for she was moved: he told me if he wanted her, he would come and let me know in an hour, but I went away to Richmond; he might have had the key if he had wanted it - I told him so.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How could a person get the punt along without the oars? A. By another pair of oars, or it might be towed along.

WILLIAM MEAD . I am a colour-maker. I never dealt with Campbell and White, and never had any wood from them; I never had any conversation with either of the prisoners about fetching wood from there: I have employed them occasionally to fetch coals, some months before the 6th of September.

GEORGE WILSON BELL . I am a waterman, and live at Chelsea. I was present at a conversation between Richard Parsons and Waight - he said he wanted the punt; I heard Waight's statement, it is correct: I saw the two prisoners together the same day, between twelve and one o'clock, opposite the Yorkshire Grey public-house, which is not far from Lyall's brewery - I think it was on a Tuesday or Wednesday: I went next day to Battersea, with Mr. Lyall and the officer - the officer took Richard Parsons into custody; I saw the officer search both the prisoners' boats, and there was malt under the burthens of each boat - they were the boats the prisoners worked in, and had their names on them; I saw Thomas Parsons at Mr. Lyall's when the dray came - I was in the counting-house; Isbester went out to speak to Mitchell; Thomas Parsons began crying, and said he was not sorry for himself, but for his brother's wife and family.

CHARLES DAWSON . I am a waterman. On the night of the 6th of September I went up with half a score of coals to Broom-house dock - I got up there at one o'clock in the morning; the water was not high enough for me to get into the dock; I laid-too, and a barge came dropping up; I hurried, for fear it should get before me - there was the name of Waight or Wick, or some such name, and "Chelsea," on it - there was one man in her; I did not see him using any oars - he appeared to me to be using a staff to get round the bank, there were some sacks in her: it came into the dock - there was room for us both: I said to the man,"Fellow-servant, are you going to unload here?" there was another man sitting on the bank - I cannot say whether either of the prisoners were the men; I saw a wherry pulling over from Wandsworth, with two men sitting in her and one rowing - they landed on the causeway; they were close to the punt; I did not see them do any thing, or say any thing - it was then between two and three o'clock; I saw three sacks carried out of the punt, and placed against a wall - what they contained I do not know; I afterwards saw a punt in the possession of the officer, and have not the least doubt of its being the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever say they appeared to be tall men, six feet high? A. I said they appeared less than six feet; they appeared to be taller than the prisoners.

JAMES WHITE . I am a lighterman, and work on the Thames. I was out in the night between the 5th and 6th of September, walking along the Cheyne-walk, near Battersea-bridge, about two o'clock in the morning; I saw Waight's punt go up the river, from London, towards Battersea-bridge - it went through the third or fourth arch; I knew the punt before; I saw a person towing her up in a wherry - I think I saw some sacks in the punt; it was a hazey morning; the person in the wherry looked like Richard Parsons, but I cannot swear it was him; I speak from his rowing; I cannot swear it was him, or form any judgment about him. I know Lyall's brewery - it was going from the brewery, towards Broom-house dock.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from it? A. I might be from eighty to one hundred yards; I cannot swear that it was Richard Parsons'; I knew them both as very honest men.

JOHN WESTON . I am clerk at Swan-wharf. I saw Richard Parsons playing at skittles between two and three o'clock that afternoon, there,

JOHN STOAKS . I am a carpenter. I saw Richard Parsons in the Swan-yard skittle-ground, on Wednesday, the 5th of September, between three and four o'clock; there were several in the ground - I did not see him come in or go out.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you live at Chelsea? A. Yes; I did not know him before.

SAMUEL POOLE . I am a malster, and have a malt-house in the Fulham-road - Jefferies had the key of my malt-house; I had no malt there at the time in question - there was none there with my knowledge.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of a man is Jefferies? A. About five feet nine inches, I suppose - he is taller than either of the prisoners.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . Here is the sample I received from Mr. Lyall; this is the grain taken from the shoe, and this is taken from Higgs' brew-house, and here is a sample of that found at Poole's.

WILLIAM ISBESTER . I produce the malt found on the ground at Broom-house dock, that found in Richard Parsons' wherry, and that found in Thomas Parsons' wherry.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. In what state was Richard Par

sons' wherry when you took it from there? A. The burthens were a little wet, but Thomas' was dryer.

MR. LYALL. To the best of my belief these samples are parts of the same malt; this one grain is the same sort; malt is dried in different manners.

Cross-examined. Q. How is it dried? A. In a kiln: we dry ours pale; all pale malt would have the same appearance, if dried from the same quality of barley; this has no particular appearance, except that it is pale; the single grain appears the same; all pale malt is similar, certainly - if it got wet at the bottom of the wherry it would be more difficult to distinguish while wet, but when it got dry it would resume its former state.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. One man's pale malt, made the same way, and dried with the same degree of heat, would appear like another man's? A. Yes; we had pale malt in our possession that night: this resembles ours in quality of grain and mode of manufacture, the spears not being suffered to grow very high.

WILLIAM HAMLIN . I am an agent to brewers and malt-factors, and have been so this thirty years, and have had great experience in the quality of malt. I have no doubt these samples are all of the same malt; the description of grain is the same, and the degree of heat appears the same: if I was in the market, and received one of these samples, I should have been satisfied to receive the rest.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear to that single grain? A. Certainly, from the circumstance of the working of this malt - malt is dried differently.

RICHARD PARSONS' Defence. I know nothing about it- they have mistaken the men.

RICHARD PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 33.

THOMAS PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-214

2191. JOSEPH PHENTON and WILLIAM DAVIES were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 coat, value 2l. 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 25s., and 1 shirt, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Thorpe .

THOMAS THORPE. I am a waiter at the King's Head public-house, King-street, St. James' . This property was locked in a box, in the first floor front room. I saw it safe about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 20th of October, when I went to my box - I went to Drury-lane, and on returning missed it - I found the prisoners in custody that evening.

RICHARD BELL . I am pot-boy at this house. I was going out about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, and met five soldier s going in; they asked me, if any of their chaps were there - I said I did not know - I then went round for my pots, and on returning, heard that the prosecutor's box had been robbed - I found it had been broken open; the soldiers were then gone; the prisoners were two of them - I went to Wilson's, in Drury-lane, to fetch Thorpe - I came out, and saw the prisoners together, with another, passing Wilson's door; the third was carrying a bundle, which he gave to Phenton - I followed into the Crown and Cushion public-house, Russell-street - I fetched an officer.

MARY McDONALD . I live at the King's Head, King-street. On the 20th of October five soldiers came to the house together, about three o'clock - I served them with beer and ale, in the room up stairs; they had three pots of ale; they went out about four o'clock, all together; nobody else was there - I went up stairs, and saw one of them rise on his toes, to see who came in - I leaned on the bannisters, and looked over the room - I cannot swear that the prisoners are two of the men - I saw one man on each side of the table; they put something into their pockets and caps - I ran and told mistress; she said,"Give me the key, and I'll go and see" - I was not watching them all the time; it is a large room.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did not you stop them? A. No; mistress left me in the bar.

HENRY CARR . I am an auctioneer's porter: I was in the Crown and Cushion public-house; Phenton came in with a bundle; I asked how he was; he had not been there many minutes before Whitworth came in, and said to him, "Come on," or "Come here;" and he said the same to me; I went out, and he said to me, "Just take this bundle, and come with me." I went out with him to Bow-street; he said, "You go this way - I'll go this, and meet you;" he did not come, and I returned to the public-house, with the bundle.

JOHN BIRCHALL . I am an officer, and produce a shirt and trousers, which I found on Phenton - the trousers were inside his own; he threw this shirt under the seat; when I went in Davis and he were looking at it together; Carr came in with this bundle, and I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVIS' Defence. I was at the Tower from eight o'clock in the morning till three, and in Russell-street I saw Phenton at the public-house door; I went in with him.

PHENTON - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-215

2192. WILLIAM WILLIAMS & EDWARD WELLS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Clark , from his person .

JESSEE PHILLIPS . I am a china dealer. I was in the Strand about eight o'clock in the evening of the 21st of September - the prisoners passed me - I watched them for about ten minutes, and saw Mr. Clark and another gentleman going up the Strand ; the prisoners followed close behind him for a considerable distance, and when they got to the corner of Albemarle-street, Williams took a handkerchief from Mr. Clark's pocket, and ran across the road - Wells was close behind him, and escaped - I saw Williams throw the handkerchief on the ground - Mr. Clark pursued him; he is not here - I do not know his Christian name.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. I was with PHILLIPS, and saw Williams take this handkerchief from Mr. Clark's pocket; Mr. Clark accompanied me and Williams to the watch-house - he wrote his name "Thomas Clark," and his initials are on the handkerchief; I went out to look for Wells, and when I returned they had not taken his residence; I have not been able to find him since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever seen the gentleman before in your life? A. No; I am sure no address was given; the watch-house keeper is not

here - I have not got the paper on which he wrote the name - he booked the charge himself.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How soon afterwards did you see Wells? A. In about half an hour - I appeared against three persons last Session on a similar charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-216

2193. JAMES MANUEL and WILLIAM HIGGINS were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 umbrella, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Bowdage and Joseph Greenslade .

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was in Oxford-street , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening of the 24th of October; I saw Higgins go to several shops - he went into a doctor's shop, and bought two penny worth of other - he then went to the prosecutor's, and brought out an umbrella; Manuel was a short distance from him - I had seen them in company - they joined again as soon as he came out; I ran, and secured Higgins with the umbrella - another person took Manuel - they appeared in company.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not Manuel part from him? A. He did for a short time.

ROBERT BOWDAGE. I am a green-grocer , and live in Oxford-street; this umbrella was behind the door.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a partner? A. Yes, Joseph Greenslade - it belongs to us both.

HIGGINS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

MANUEL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-217

2194. WILLIAM MURPHY, alias BURNS , and WILLIAM PURCELL were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , four spoke-shaves, value 2s.; 1 saw, value 1s. 6d., and 4 pairs of compasses, value 2s. , the goods of George Miles .

EDWARD PERRY . I live in Thomas-street, St. George's. On the 16th of October, about seven o'clock in the morning, a person called, and gave me information; I went down into my kitchen, and found four boys - they all ran up, leaving these tools - I am sure the prisoners were two of the boys; they had no right in my kitchen; I knew them all before - they must have brought the tools there, for they were not there five minutes before.

GEORGE MILES. I am a cooper ; these are all my tools - I lost them between the 13th and 16th of October, from a room over a stable, in Camomile-buildings - the door was locked, but they got on the tiles, and broke through the lath and plaster into the room; I know nothing of the prisoners - my house is a very short distance from Perry's - he is a chimney sweeper; the kitchen he speaks of is where his boys go.

JAMES FLANNAGAN . I know the prisoners; I saw them the day before they were taken, with some tools, at that house; they were compasses and planes, which had been taken from the prosecutor's.

WILLIAM REDDING . I am beadle of Mary-le-bone. I met Miles in Welbeck-street; he gave me information; I went, and found these tools in Perry's kitchen.

MURPHY'S Defence. One of his boys told us to come down and see what he had.

MURPHY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

PURCELL - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-218

2195. WILLIAM FITZPATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 plough, value 20s. , the goods of Isaac Elvin .

ISAAC ELVIN. I am a carpenter , and live in Exmouth-street, Hampstead-road; I lost a plough from Mr. Wells' house, where I was at work, on the 20th of October.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HILL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker; this plough was pawned in the name of William Fitzpatrick - I cannot say who by, but I gave him this duplicate.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and in a hat-box there I saw his master find this duplicate - he said it was his own plough.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-219

2196. WILLIAM FITZPATRICK was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 1 guage, value 2s. , the goods of William M'Lean .

WILLIAM M'LEAN. I am a carpenter . On the 10th of September I lost a guage from Mr. Turner's, in Bond-street ; the prisoner was backwards and forwards there.

SAMUEL WISE . I am a pawnbroker, and have a plane, which the prisoner pawned with me.

The prisoner called -

MARY FITZPATRICK . I am the prisoner's daughter. - The prosecutor left this basket at my father's five or six weeks ago, and I found this guage in it.

WILLIAM M'LEAN. I left that basket at his house about a week before I missed the guage, but the guage was safe after that, on the top of my tool-box.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-220

2197. HENRY BOSMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2 sovereigns , the monies of Robert Carter .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the monies of Nathan Levy .

ELIZABETH LEVY . I am the wife of Nathan Levy, who lives in Sandy's-row, Spitalfields , and is a broker . The prisoner occasionally worked for us. On the 10th of October he was sent to Mr. Carter's, with a load, but we did not authorise him to receive any money - I did not see him again till late that evening - they came to 2l.

EDWIN CORPE . I live with Robert Carter . The prisoner brought a load of goods from Levy's; I do not remember the date - it was this month; they were tied in a bundle - I saw Mr. Carter pay him two sovereigns for them - he was to take them to Mr. Levy's.

MRS. LEVY re-examined. When I saw him in the evening he was rather intoxicated; I asked if he had received the money; he said he had; I asked for it - he said he had none of it left - he had lost it. I went to his lodging at ten o'clock at night, and asked if he had any money left; he put a piece of tobacco into my hand, and said that was all he had left.

DAVID LEWIS . I was in Frampton's cook-shop on the 10th of October, and saw the prisoner there, drunk - he pulled out two sovereigns, and was showing them to every body.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am an officer, and took him - I asked how he came to receive the money - he pulled out his fob-pocket, which appeared cut, and said he had lost it.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Levy sent me with the parcel, and said, "Bring me two sovereigns;" Carter was not at home; Corpe said, I must call at six o'clock; I went, and was paid; I was coming along, and felt hungry; I changed one, and spent 4d., as I had to be paid for the job - I put the rest into my fob. I was pulled back by three men by Widegate-alley, and my fob was cut off.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-221

2198. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 gown, value 3s. , the goods of John Sowerby .

JOHN JACKSON . I am shopman to John Sowerby, of No. 100, Brick-lane , a pawnbroker . On the 24th of October this gown was found in the prisoner's lap, in our parlour - it was stolen from our other shop, No. 49, Brick-lane.

GEORGE MERCER . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, at No. 49, Brick-lane. The prisoner pawned two handkerchiefs - I know this gown.

JAMES HANDLEY . I was passing Mr. Sowerby's - Jackson called me in, and I found this gown in the prisoner's lap - she was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-222

2199. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 watch, value 4l., and 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Isaac Edwards .

ISAAC EDWARDS. I live with Mr. Humber, who keeps a coffee-house. On the night of the 21st of October the prisoner slept there - my trousers were in a cupboard in my room, on the second floor, and my watch in the table-drawer on the first floor; I missed them in the morning, and have not found them; I went down from my room to breakfast, and left the prisoner in his room - I missed my property after that. I saw the prisoner the same day, in Rosemary-lane - he saw me following him, and ran through some alleys: he was secured, and taken to the watch-house - I had not charged him with any thing. There was not another lodger in the house - nobody went up stairs while I was at breakfast.

JOHN HUMBER . I am the son of Mr. Humber. The prisoner is the man who slept at our house; my mother told me to light him up to bed; he said, "I am sure this is not the right room;" I said it was - he said, "Then take the candle and go down;" I saw him in Rosemary-lane next day.

ANN HUMBER . The prisoner is the man who lodged at our house - nobody went up stairs while Edwards was at breakfast.

Prisoner. Q. Another man slept on the same floor? - A. Nobody else slept there.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271025-223

2200. FREDERICK WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 24s. , the goods of John Jenner and John William Soppett .

THOMAS HALL PETTITT . I live in Compton-street . - On the 26th of October I saw the prisoner at the prosecutors' shop door, which is opposite my house - he bent forwards, and took this print off the pile; I went, and seized him with it.

JOHN PACKLAM . I am in the employ of John Jenner and John William Soppett. This is their print - it was within the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground - this man took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-224

2201. JOHN HOOPER and ROBERT CAMPBELL were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 11/2 yard of floor-cloth, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Baasher .

MARY ANN PRITTEY . I am eight years old, and live with my father, in Broad-street, Golden-square , next door to Mr. Baasher. On the 25th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was going on an errand, and saw the prisoners there; Hooper took this floor-cloth from the rails; Campbell was standing by our door: they both walked down the street - I went and told my mother.

FRANCIS KELLY . I live with Thomas Baasher. On the 25th of October I found the two prisoners in Cambridge-street, standing in a doorway, with a piece of floor-cloth between them; I had been alarmed, and followed them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOOPER's Defence. I was in the road.

HOOPER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CAMPBELL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18271025-225

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2202. STEPHEN MARKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 7s.; 8 yards of cloth, value 7s., and 2 brooches, value 2s. , the goods of George Abbott .

GEORGE ABBOTT. I keep a public-house at Enfield . On the 2d of October the prisoner was in my house - I missed these things after he was taken, but have not found any of them.

THOMAS ELDRIDGE . I am a labourer. I was at Mr. Abbott's, and saw the prisoner come down stairs with a bundle under his arm, and something tucked between his jacket and waistcoat - he told me I should have part if I would say nothing about it - I said I would have nothing to do with it; he went out into the lane; I told Abbott next morning.

Q. Why not tell him that night? A. I did not give it a thought; he had a pair of light plush breeches on; he said he had a pair of small-clothes and a waistcoat of Mr. Abbott's.

Prisoner. It is all false; he wanted me to steal some potatoes from a field; I would not, and then he told this of me. Witness. I did not; I knew him before.

WILLIAM FRODSHAM . I am a tailor. I was at Abbott's that night, and saw the prisoner there in the evening; I fell asleep, and awoke in five minutes; he was then gone, and Eldridge was sitting in his chair; he said nothing about any robbery; I heard the staircase-door shut, and the prisoner came from the staircase; I saw nothing in his hand; he came into the tap-room; Eldridge went our after him; this was about six o'clock; I saw them in the tap-room again about nine.

GEORGE ABBOTT. Eldridge told me next morning to

go to my bed-room, and see if I was not robbed; he said he thought Markwell had taken the things, and gone to King's, at Edmonton, to pawn them; I went there, but they were not there; Eldridge said he had offered to share half the blunt with him if he said nothing; he said he did not tell me the night before as it was late.

WILLIAM CUFFLEY . I apprehended the prisoner between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; he denied the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-226

2203. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 4 brass cases, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Blair .

THOMAS WEBB . I received these cases from Duke, who gave me information.

JOHN DUKE . I belong to the ship William Fairley; these cases were on board, under lock and key; the prisoner was on board, as my yeoman , and since we have arrived I occasionally employed him. On the morning of the 25th of October I went on board, and saw him standing near the bread-room, where these cases had been; I saw something in his hand; he stepped aside, and put it down; I found the lock of the bread-room drawn, and the staple out; I went to a little cabin which I saw the prisoner go into; he kept pressing the door too; I told him to move, which he did very slowly, and I there found those cases; I said, "You rascal, is this the return you make for what I have done for you!" he said he knew nothing about them; I went and called the carpenter; he then said he had taken one case to ask what it was.

ROBERT RIDBATH . I am steward of the vessel. On Wednesday afternoon I locked the door of the bread-room, and kept the key; I saw the cases safe in the morning.

THOMAS WEBB. We search every body who comes out of the yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not take them out, as I was sure to be searched; I considered this ship my home- I found these things out of their place, and was going to return them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-227

2204. CATHERINE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 watch, value 2l., and 1 seal, value 2s., the goods of John Roddam , from his person .

JOHN RODDAM. On the 24th of October I met the prisoner on Cock-hill, Ratcliff-highway, and went home with her; I was quite tired, and could not get on board my ship; I gave her 2s. for a bed, and went to bed with her in her room: I put my watch under the pillow; and when I had been there some time, I awoke, and missed it; I got up, and alarmed the house; the prisoner answered me from up stairs, in the dark - I asked her for a light; she came down in the dark, and wanted to persuade me I had not lost a watch; I called a watchman, who found it on her.

Prisoner. Q. Was you not with another woman? A. No, I was with nobody but her; there was another woman in the house, whom I took for the mistress.

WILLIAM TUCK . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Watch! I went to the spot with my fellow-watchman, and the prosecutor said he had lost his watch; I questioned the prisoner - she said she knew nothing about it; I said I must take her to the watch-house, and she said she would go with me: she went up stairs - I darkened my lantern and followed her, and saw her take the watch from her bosom - I then caught hold of her arm; she then said she would give it me, if I would not take her.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am an officer. The prisoner said she heard the watch ticking under her head; that is all I know. GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-228

2205. ANN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 6d.; 1 key, value 6d.; 12 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 6d. in copper money, the property of John Johnson , from his person .

JOHN JOHNSON. On the evening of the 23d of September I was at an oyster-shop in Bunhill-row - I saw the prisoner; she asked me for an oyster - I gave her some, and went home with her, but did not go to bed; we sat down by the fire-place; a man came in, whom she called Jem, and a young woman came in, who said she wanted something to drink; Jem soon after went away - and soon after he left I missed my watch; I fell asleep in the chair soon after, and in the morning, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner; she said Jem had been and took my watch, but she knew where to find him - she then turned the key and locked me in; I could not get out till ten o'clock, when I got out of the window - the room was on the ground floor; I returned there in the evening, but could not find her: on the Monday following I met her, and asked if she had got my watch; she said No, but she would get it on Saturday night, and told me to come then - I went home and slept with her again on the Wednesday night - she then said she would get the watch or the duplicate; I went on Saturday night again - she said Jem and her would be there, but he was not - I slept with her again that night.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I went on the Sunday night with the prosecutor to the prisoner's room, but could not find her - I afterwards saw her in Old-street; she said, "Tweedy, I want to speak to you; I picked up a man, and went home with him - we were both drunk; I lost 9s. 6d., and he lost his watch - I don't know what became of either." I took her to the watch-house; she begged to be let go, declaring she had never seen the watch.

JOHN JOHNSON. I was the worse for liquor - she was not drunk; she might be the worse for liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I sat on the chair with him, and afterwards on the bed; a young woman brought in a candle, and he gave her 1s. to buy liquor; I went to sleep, and in the morning found him in bed - I lost 12s.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-229

2206. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , 4lbs. of tobacco, value 14s., the goods of Samuel Fish and William Collins , his masters ; and JOHN NIGHTINGALE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am officer of Bow-street - the prosecutor applied to me, and about nine o'clock in the morning of the 22d of October, I saw Wright come out of their premises - I followed him from there into a court in the Old Bailey, opposite Newgate - I waited on the New

gate side, and saw him go into a house. I presently observed a woman come out with a jug and go to a wine-vaults - she went into the court again, and went into the same house. Wright came out and I followed him into Smithfield - I then went towards Fish and Collins', and met Mr. Collins. I then took Wright into custody, and took him to the watch-house; I found tobacco dust in his waistcoat and breeches pockets - I locked him up, and returned to the house in the court, and found Nightingale in a room up two pair of stairs. I said, "Nightingale, you have some tobacco here, which a man has just brought;" he said, no man had been there. I said, "Have you any tobacco in the house?" he said, "Yes," and shewed me a jar, with about one pound and a half in it. I said,"Is this all you have?" he said, "I have got a little more." I then went to the cupboard, and found about 3lbs. more, which was warm. I searched further, but found nothing more - I saw a jug on the table, with a little gin in it; it was like that which the woman had; I asked if he dealt in tobacco; he said Yes - I said, "Who do you buy it of?" he said of a man at Chelsea or Chelmsford; I do not know which. I asked for his permit - he said he had none - I asked if he was a retailer - he said Yes - I asked if he had a licence; he said No. I then took him in charge. Wright lodges in Coleman-street, St. Luke's.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How many houses are there in the court? A. Two or three I believe; it is called Green Harbour-court. I cannot say how many - my eye was only directed to one house; I stood about fifty yards off. I had a reason for not following him. Wright had a tobacco box in his pocket; I found 1s. on him; he had left the court five or seven minutes before I searched him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you been an officer? A. Some years. I live in Brick-lane; I was never in the court but once before; I think there are only two or three houses there. Wright had a blue coat, trousers, and an apron; I saw nothing about him; I do not think his coat was buttoned up; he might have tobacco about him, and I not see him. I have put the tobacco altogether; he could not have 3lbs. I think.

COURT. Q. Would not the greater part of it go into two large breeches pockets? A. I should think so; his apron hung down before him.

WILLIAM COLLINS. I am a tobacco manufacturer , and live in St. John-street , in partnership with Samuel Fish; the prisoner Wright was employed in the finishing department of our manufactory . On the morning of the 22d of October, I went with Keys to the house in the court in the Old Bailey, and saw Nightingale. Keys said, he had come for some tobacco, which he had just received - he said he had none, and that no man had been there; Keys said he must know of some which had just been brought; he then produced a small parcel. Keys said,"You have more than this;" he said "I have a little more," and then produced more in a jar; Keys said it was warm; I put my hand to it and found it so; we had been drying tobacco that morning, which would produce that sort of heat; we never send it out in that state; this tobacco is all alike, and I have no doubt of it being ours; I can tell it by the smell and flavour; I believe it to be ours; we manufactures by a peculiar process, and this is of a peculiar flavour.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Will you swear that it came from your place? A. I have no doubt of it being ours. I examined it at the time; we sell large quantities; it does not adhere to the hands by being handled; the men usually wash their hands when they leave work; I have handled a good deal, but never found it come off my hands by putting into my pocket; a man might have a particle stick to his hands; we allow each man 11/2 ozs. every Saturday night; it is our practice to search our men, but it is not always done.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What is the name of this court? A. Littlewood-court I believe - there is only a few houses there; it leads down from the coach-stand - I was not present all the time Keys was talking to Nightingale; when Keys said it was warm, he said, "It is, because it stands near the fire;" it was not near enough to arquire that heat - I think I should have known it to be mine, if I had seen it any where promiscuously - Wright generally wears an apron.

MR. QUIN. Q. How much might a person carry? A. I think he might carry 3 lbs. in his breeches, if his apron was down, without it being seen; except from being warm, that tobacco would be the same as the parcel.

WRIGHT's Defence. I went out with a man named Clark that morning; if I had tobacco about me, the witness must have seen it.

NIGHTINGALE's Defence. When they came to my house I showed the tobacco very readily - Mr. Collins was very rough; he took me by the shirt, and asked how I lost my arm; I told him in the field of honour abroad; he said I will now send you to the field of dishonour abroad. The fact is, the tobacco was smuggled.

FRANCIS KEYS re-examined. There was very little fire in Nightingale's room.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 28.

NIGHTINGALE - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-230

2201. JOHN NORTON and GEORGE SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 2 bed-posts, value 10s. , the goods of Joseph Thumbleby .

JOSEPH THUMBLEBY. I am a carver , and live in Long-alley, Shoreditch. On the 4th of October, between five and six o'clock, I sent William Last with two bed-posts, to Mr. Cooper, to Flower and Dean-street; he returned in a short time, and said a man had taken them from him - I afterwards saw Norris and Couch, who came and asked me if I had lost any thing; they said they had got them, and should have the men before morning, as they knew them - Norris produced them at Worship-street; they are old ones, fresh done again.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM LAST . I am twelve years old. I was sent with these posts - when I got to Bishopsgate-street , Norton took them from me - I did not know him before; he said I had no occasion to go any further - I then went back to master - I had not then seen Smith.

Prisoner NORTON. Q. Did not you come to me, and say, "These bed-posts are for you?" A. No, nor any thing to that effect.

COURT. Q. Did you think he was the person who was to have them? A. Yes - I thought so, because he took

them: but not before he took them - I did not know Mr. Cooper.

WILLIAM CAUNCH . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Bethnal-green. On the 4th of October, about ten minutes past six o'clock in the evening - I saw Smith in Artillery-lane, with these posts on his shoulder - Norton was walking behind him, and knowing Norton, I watched them down into Petticoat-lane, and saw them offer them for sale; they could get no purchaser, and left them at a public-house- I went to Lambeth-street; two officers came and took them away - I saw Smith next morning, in Norton-folgate, and secured him.

Prisoner NORTON. Q. Did you ever say you would proceed no further, if you got 1l.? A. No.

Q. Here is your mark, which says you have received 10s. 6d.? A. Yes; from the time I was at the office: his wife has been bothering me - I received 10s. 6d., and have it at home - I did not undertake not to appear, on receiving the rest; the mark on this paper is not mine.

COURT. Q. It says, "Mr. Briggs received 10s. 6d." - Did you make your mark to this? A. No - I never saw that paper before; ever since I was at the office, she has been after me - I would not tell her where I lived; she offered me several sums, if I would throw out the bill - I said I would not do any such thing, and the prosecutor, to get rid of her, told her where my sister lived - I took it from her, to get rid of her bother; she said if I would take 3l. she would get it me.

Q. Why did you take it? A. She put it into my hand.

WILLIAM WELDING . I keep a wine-vaults, in Petticoat-lane. On the 4th of October the prisoners came to my bar, sat down, and called for two glasses of gin; they had some bed-posts, and asked me to put them into the bar for them, which I did; after they were gone two officers came, and I gave them up to them.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am an officer. I received these posts from Welding - I apprehended Norton in Shoreditch next morning.

JOHN NORRIS . I went with Davis.

NORTON's Defence. I was going along - the lad came up, and said, "These are for you - I was going to take them to you" - I took them, and Smith, who was with me, said, "We will leave them safe, till we can find the owner for them;" we went to Belcher, a carver, and inquired of him; he said he did not know the owner, but would make inquiry - I told the officer they were at the public-house.

ROBERT DAVIS . He did not say so, till I had told him I had found them there.

JOSEPH POOL CONNER . I sell fish, and live at No. 8, Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street. I know both the prisoners by sight - I saw Smith the evening before he was apprehended; he was much intoxicated; my little boy made some remarks about it - I said it was a concern which did not trouble me; this was between seven and eight o'clock- I saw 10s. 6d. paid to Caunch by Smith's wife; she put her hand to me, as I was in the public-house, having a pint of beer, and said, "I will be obliged to you, to see this - this young man agrees not to appear, if he has 10s. 6d." - she asked if 10s. would do he said No, he would have half a guinea - I made my mark on that paper, and he made his.

WILLIAM CAUNCH . On my oath, that is not my mark - this man was so drunk, he could not stand - I was pulled into the public-house by his wife.

NORTON - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-231

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30.

First London Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2208. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 2 saws, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas John Copeland .

THOMAS JOHN COPELAND. I am a carpenter , and was working at a house in Bishopsgate-street , on the 9th of October; I just crossed the road, and as I returned I met the prisoner coming out, with these saws concealed under his coat.

BENJAMIN LAW . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was intoxicated, which he was driven to in consequence of his wife deserting him, - and could not account for his possession of the property.

THOMAS JOHN COPELAND. He was not in liquor at all- he works for a gentleman in the Borough, who was here last night.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18271025-232

2209. SAMUEL LECOUNT and MATTHEW CREAMER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Restall , from his person .

JOSEPH RESTALL. On the 1st of October I was in Cheapside , and felt my handkerchief snatched from my right-hand coat pocket; it was about twenty minutes past nine o'clock in the evening; I turned round, and saw Lecount by the light of the gas, and my handkerchief on the pavement, about half a yard from him; there was nobody so near to me as him.

THOMAS PEAKE . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoners together in Cheapside, near the Old 'Change, for about half a minute; they were as close together as they could stand; I saw Mr. Restall come up, and Lecount took a handkerchief from his pocket; I stood close to him, and collared him; he stuck the handkerchief under Creamer's arm - I then collared him, and held them both - the handkerchief then dropped.

WILLIAM WOOLF . I was officer of the night, and received them in charge.

LECOUNT's Defence. I was going on an errand to Mr. Bromley's shoe warehouse; I saw a mob, and crossed over- the gentleman directly took hold of me, and said I took the gentleman's handkerchief. As for this lad, I never saw him before.

CREAMER's Defence. I saw the people run across the road; I went over, and in two minutes the officer laid hold of me.

Lecount received a good character.

LECOUNT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Seven Days .

CREAMER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18271025-233

2210. CHARLES GRAINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , 1 chimney-cloth, value 3s.; 1 sack, value 1s.; 1 wooden shovel, value 1s.; 1 brush, value 2s., and 1 scraper, value 1s., the goods of William Smith , his master .

WILLIAM SMITH. I am a chimney-sweeper , and live in Rose and Crown-court, Foster-lane . Grainger was in my employ. On the 14th of August, between nine and ten o'clock, I sent him to sweep a chimney in Thames-street; he went away with all these tools.

SAMUEL HOPSON . I am an officer. I found the prisoner, and took him; he told me he had sold all the things for 2s., in Petticoat-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18271025-234

2211. MICHAEL HARLEY and JAMES WHITTLE were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a certain person unknown , from his person .

WILLIAM JAMES . I am a constable of Aldersgate-ward. On the 12th of October, about half-past two o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoners on Fish-street-hill; they attempted to pick the pocket of a gentleman, who was crossing East-cheap; Harley had the gentleman's coat flap in his hand, and two fingers of his right hand in his pocket; I crossed over, to have a better view; they left him, and went up Cannon-street , and there Harley took a handkerchief from another gentleman's pocket - Whittle was trying to hide him, but I was on the other side of the way, and saw it distinctly; I followed them from there to Watling-street - I saw Harley put the handkerchief into his hat, and hold it up to show Whittle, as they passed Budge-row - they passed on; he attempted another gentleman's pocket, and Whittle tried to hide him - I followed them as far as St. Paul's church-yard; I did not know the gentleman; I followed them, and could not inform him.

WILLIAM COOK . I saw the prisoners together in St. Paul's church-yard.

THOMAS WAGSTAFF . I am an officer. I went up, and took Harley in St. Paul's church-yard; he was very desperate - he got the staff from James, and cut James' head with it.

SAMUEL LONG . I saw James scuffling with the two prisoners; I was called to assist - it was Harley who resisted so desperately. I took Whittle to the Compter - he made no resistance.

THEOPHILUS SMITH . I saw Harley near Doctors' Commons, with the constable's staff in his hand - he had taken it from James, who had his head cut, and the blood was streaming down.

HARLEY's Defence. He says he saw me take the handkerchief in Cannon-street; it is very odd he could not tell the gentleman - instead of which he follows us, and seizes me; he said I was his prisoner - I asked for what; he would not tell me; I certainly got from him, and he struck me.

WHITTLE's Defence. I saw a mob, went up, and one of the gentlemen said, "Take him - he is one of the party."

HARLEY - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

WHITTLE - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18271025-235

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2212. JOHNSON GILLIGHEN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JAMES NICHOLLS . I am a draper, and live in Charlotte-street, Whitechapel. On the 1st of October I was at the Bell public-house, Old Bailey ; the prisoner came in, went into the parlour, and called for porter and bread and cheese; nobody else was there; he called for some salt and mustard, and quarrelled with the boy for handing the mustard in the way he did; he drank the beer, came out with the bread and cheese in his hand, and said he would go to the next house; he returned presently, and said he had been ill-used at the other house. (I did not see him with any bundle;) he then asked for a bundle; inquiry was made whether he had left one there, and nobody knew any thing of it; he wanted to go into the parlour; I stopped him, and twice put him out of the street door; a gentleman who lives on Ludgate-hill, came in presently; he went into the parlour, and called for a pint of beer; the landlady went in with it, and on coming out, she looked round the parlour, near the door where the prisoner had sat, and saw something lay; she took it up, and put it into my hand; it was a blue handkerchief, twisted up; I took it to the bar, untwisted it, and saw it was money. I went and asked the prisoner what he had lost; he said a blue handkerchief - I asked what was in it; he said he did not like to say; I said, "You ought to tell;" he said he would not tell me. I went and pushed him into the parlour, and said again, "What have you lost?" he said, "I don't like to tell you." I asked what was the value of it; he said there was 3l. in it - I said (in the presence of two or three persons, who had followed me into the parlour), "Is this yours?" he said Yes; I said, "Is what is in it yours?" he said Yes - I then said, "It is counterfeit coin, and I shall detain you;" he then tried to escape, but was detained till the officer came; there were seventy-nine counterfeit shillings in the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHER. Q. Do you carry on business on your own account? A. Yes; I am often at the bell; I was not in the parlour when the prisoner went out; he asked the landlady for his bundle; he was partly drunk, but capable of knowing what he was about, and walking about. I saw the landlady pick the bundle off the seat where he had sat, and feeling something in it, she put it into my hand; the money was so bad, every body could tell immediately that it was counterfeit; I would not have taken it; I should have refused it at first sight.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were you present at the different times he asked for the bundle? A. Yes; he asked the landlady, the servant, and myself.

JOHN CHARLES BARRELL . I am a broker, and live at the Bell. On the night of the 1st of October I came home at a quarter to ten o'clock, and went into the parlour; the prisoner was there, crying; he said he had lost his property; Nicholls was standing at his side, with this handkerchief in his hand - the prisoner said it was a blue handkerchief - I said to Nicholls, "Give the poor fellow his handkerchief;" he said, "It is this coin;" I then said,"I must fetch an officer" - I went to the door - an offices was coming by - I called him in - the prisoner had before that said he would not go without his handkerchief, and

that it contained about 3l. - he was given in charge - the officer found, I think, 1s. 6d. in good money on him - he said, "I am done."

Cross-examined. Q. He was crying? A. Yes; he seemed anxious to recover the parcel - he heard me say I must fetch an officer.

GEORGE LOCK . I am an officer. I was called in, and found the prisoner in custody - Nicholls gave me this coin in this handkerchief, as it is now - I found 1s. 6d. in good money, and 8d. in copper on him.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of coin at the Mint - the whole of this is counterfeit - it is what is termed cast money, made of white or Britannia metal, such as spoons are made of.

MR. CHURCHER addressed the Court on behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18271025-236

2213. MARY MURRAY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CHESTER . I keep the Fortune of War public-house, in Giltspur-street . On the 16th of October the prisoner came to my house a little before ten o'clock in the morning - she asked for a small glass of gin and milk- I served her - she put down a piece of base metal in the shape of a sixpence - I looked at it, and asked where she got it - she said in change from a neighbour - I asked if she had any more - she said what did I mean by that - I said, "I suspect you have" - she said, "Why, that is not a bad one" - she snatched it up and went out - I followed, and brought her back; she was then in company with another woman.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found a few articles in her pocket, but no base money; I then shook her stays, and this purse dropped from her back, with fifteen bad shillings in it; I asked where she got them; she said a friend gave them to her, and she thought she might get something by them; I have had them ever since; they have been turned about before the Grand Jury; they looked better b