Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th July 1827.
Reference Number: 18270712
Reference Number: f18270712-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ANTHONY BROWN, MAYOR.

SIXTH SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 12th of JULY, 1827, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1827.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ANTHONY BROWN , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Birch , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; William Garratt , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Crowder , Esq.; and John Key , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol; Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

H. J. Doubleday ,

John Pewtrese ,

Stephen Keyte ,

John Geo. Page ,

Robert Storrar ,

Samuel Wintle ,

Edw. J. Holland ,

Wm. Jackson ,

Samuel Pope ,

George Barnard ,

Joseph Defriez ,

Wm. N. Hughes .

Second

John Watson ,

James Burrows ,

Wm. Baker ,

Peter Duval ,

John Davis ,

George Stacey ,

Geo. Thompson ,

John Smith ,

Wm. Hadden ,

George Shepherd ,

Walter Bradshaw ,

James Adlard .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Wilkinson ,

Henry Woodward ,

Henry Wheeldon ,

Thomas Williams ,

Wm. White ,

Wm. Wallace ,

Richard Wince ,

Richard Wace ,

Wm. Wright ,

Chas. Woodward ,

Wm. Wieland ,

Robert Wilkinson .

Second

Christopher Ward ,

Wm. Wright ,

James Whitton ,

Charles Williams ,

G. R. Whittington ,

Laur. Williams ,

Thos. Woodward ,

John Whitaker ,

Edward Walker ,

Wm. Wallis ,

Geo. Dud. Webb ,

Wm. Wheatcroft .

Third

Jeff. John Allchin ,

Wm. Atkins ,

Richard Armfield ,

Wm. Brecknell ,

Samuel Brown ,

Frederick Bollin ,

James Bernard ,

Joseph Blunt ,

John P. Bernard ,

Henry Banner ,

Wm. Borrow ,

John Funge .

Fourth

Richard Faye ,

Wm. Furze ,

Joseph Sparrow ,

James Coles ;

Ovid Thompson ,

Fred. Thorowgood ,

Peter Thurlow ,

Wm. Townsend ,

Wm. Tidd ,

Wm. Troubled ,

John Vincent ,

John Venn .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JULY 12, 1827.

BROWN, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18270712-1

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1347. JOHN BYFORD SMITH , JOHN WRIGHT , and JOSEPH WELLS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Andrew Berkeley Drummond , Esq. , about the hour of ten o'clock in the night of the 6th of June , at St. Mary-le-bone , with intent to steal the goods therein .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

BRYANT BENWELL . I am coachman to Andrew Berkeley Drummond, Esq., who lives at No. 2, Bryanstone-square, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On the 6th of June, about twenty minutes or a quarter before nine o'clock at night, I locked up the stable; I returned about a quarter past ten, and found the three prisoners there - Smith stood with the door ajar; I said, "What are you doing here?" I collared him and led him out - he whispered to me, and said there were two more in the stable. He was about a yard within the door; I held him fast, and pulled the door too with my left hand. Wheeler, the groom, locked the door, and called the watchman. I held Smith. A watchman came, and called two others; we opened the door, went in, and found Wright and Wells in the stable; they had moved from the bed-room to the stable five coats, three pairs of breeches, two stable jackets, a silk handkerchief and other things - I had seen them all in the bed-room(which is over the coach-house, and is part of the stable) that afternoon; they all laid loose on the stable floor - one coat was tied in a silk handkerchief, which did not belong to us - they were livery coats. The stable joins master's house, and is surrounded by the same wall - there is a way through the house into the stable.

WILLIAM WHEELER . I am groom to Mr. Drummond. I was with Benwell, and saw all the men secured, and saw the clothes which had been removed; Smith had three of the coachman's coats on his back, besides his own, when we took him - they are all strangers. It was a quarter or twenty minutes before nine when we left the stable; we found them there about twenty minutes to ten - it was quite night.

- RUSSELL . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house with this property.

BRYANT BENWELL. Here are the three coats which Smith had on.

The prisoners put in the following Defence: - The Defence of the prisoners sheweth, that on the 7th of June, about ten o'clock in the evening, we went down the mews for a necessary purpose, when a genteel looking man came and asked if we could inform him where he could find a porter, as he wanted some goods moved; we said we could not, but, being out of employ, we would do it for him - he showed us the stable door, and told us there were some bundles and linen there, which we were to carry to the Feathers public-house, at the corner of Brown-street, and he would wait there for us; we went there by his desire - the coachman came in immediately, laid hold of Smith, and shut the door; we knocked inside, and he called the watchman. We hope you will shew us mercy, as we are entirely innocent, but were led into it by this man.

One witness gave Smith a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

WRIGHT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

WELLS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18270712-2

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1348. WILLIAM RAYMOND , CHARLES JOHNSON , GEORGE LOVELL , and JOHN COWLEY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry James Harman , on the King's highway, on the 8th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 sovereign, 2 shillings, and 2 penny pieces, his monies .

HENRY JAMES HARMAN. I am a paper-stainer , and live in Gun-street, Union-street. On the 8th of April, about a quarter to five o'clock in the morning, I was at the Black Dog public-house, Drury-lane ; there were twenty or thirty people in the tap-room - the four prisoners were there - I never saw them before, but am certain of them. - Lovell acted as waiter ; the other three sat at the same table as me. I had not been there many minutes when Raymond whispered across the table to Johnson; I became alarmed, and wanted to go out; Raymond said I should not go unless I tossed with them for a pot of beer - I refused, but he said I should not go out till I did - I then tossed, and lost; he said I should not go till I had tossed for another pot, which I also lost; I threw a shilling on the table, then jumped over the table, to get away, but I was directly surrounded by eight or ten of them - the four prisoners were among them; I cannot say that they laid hands on me - my arms were held up, and my throat seized, but I do not know who by; I felt some hands in my pocket, and my money was taken from me, but I cannot say who did it. As soon as they let me go I went to the door; there was a watchman there, I told him I was robbed, and a young man came to the door with another watchman; we all four went

in together - I pointed Raymond and Cowley out; they were taken to the watch-house; I said there were two more whom I could describe; as soon as I entered the room Johnson held his head down; he was taken. The watchman went to the bar, and asked the landlord who officiated as waiter; he said George - he called out, "George," and Lovell came along the passage; I said he was the man, and he was taken. I lost a sovereign and 2s. 2d. When we got to the watch-house Lovell said to Raymond, "You know who has got the sovereign as well as I do;" Raymond said, No, he did not - Lovell said, "Yes you do - it is Bill or Jack - I do not know his other name, but you do."

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. In whose employ are you? A. In Mr. Palmer's, of Bishopsgate-street. I then lived with Mr. Dobson, of the Strand. There were twenty or thirty persons in the room, and some females, but none at the table with us. Raymond did not complain of losing money in the scuffle - he did not ask me to drink; I believe he said he was a bricklayer, and I said I was a paper-stainer. I am certain that when they let go of my throat the four prisoners were round me, and before they took hold of it they were all as close to me as they could be. I had not talked to any females. It was quite daylight; there was no disturbance except with their surrounding me - the prisoners surrounded me, and prevented my going out, or I should not have been robbed. I cannot say who robbed me.

Prisoner JOHNSON. Q. Were you not sitting between two women of the town? A. As God is my judge it is false - I spoke to no woman.

Prisoner LOVELL. Q. Did you not knock at the door about half-past three o'clock? A. I was in bed at that time; the doors were open when I went in.

JOHN BRIEN . I am a watchman of St. Giles'. I was in my box about half-past four o'clock on this morning, when Harman called out Watch! I went to the door - his waistcoat was unbuttoned, and he seemed much agitated; he said he had been robbed, and was in dread of his life; I asked him to go in and point them out - he said he would wait at the door, and they would be out presently; he pointed out Raymond and Cowley; I took them to the watch-house. I returned to the public-house, and he pointed out Johnson in the tap-room; he said the other officated as waiter; I asked the landlord where he was - he called George, and Lovell came; I secured him, and at the watch-house he said to Raymond, "You know who has got the sovereign," or the money; Raymond said, "I know nothing of it." A young man had come out of the house to look for a watchman, before Hariman called me; I cannot find him now.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search the prisoners? A. Yes - I found several shillings on Cowley, but nothing on the others; he was outside the door when I took him; the man who fetched me pointed him out, and Harman identified him; Harman did not appear intoxicated.

RAYMOND's Defence. I got up that morning to get some spirits to send to my father-in-law, at Birmingham - I went into the Black Dog, and the prosecutor asked me to drink out of his pot; I sat down, and joined his company; he was between two girls of the town - he said he would toss me for a pot of beer; I did not like it, but Cowley whispered to me to toss him - I tossed, and won two pots - he put a shilling down; I took it to take for the beer: he then offered to fight any man in the room for a sovereign - he had some words with another man, and stepped over the table - he was surrounded, but I was sitting at the table. - When he went out I followed, and he said it was through me he was robbed. I lost 6s. myself in getting over the table.

The other prisoners made the same Defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-3

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1349. THOMAS WILSON and JOHN HAGGERTY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Williams , on the King's highway, on the 11th of June , at St. Giles in the Fields , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 7s.; 1 shilling, and the sum of 7d. in copper monies, his property .

RICHARD WILLIAMS. I am a servant out of place , and live in Church-street, St. Giles. On the 11th of June I was walking about in search of employ, and as I was in Church-street , going home, alone, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night, I saw the two prisoners and another person - I did not know them before; they were quite close to me, and followed me a considerable way; I had a good view of them - they were very few yards behind me; I crossed over opposite the brewhouse, and went against the wall for a necessary purpose - they all three followed me close, but I did not think they were going to interrupt me; I went to the wall, and just as I turned back again my heels were kicked up by Wilson - I had observed him go behind me; I was on the ground immediately, the other two were with him - they were all three behind me; I had seen them go behind me - I can swear that Haggerty was with Wilson, and he was close behind me also. After tripping me up Wilson took my hat from my head, and in endeavouring to get my hat back they drove my head against the wall - they all three beat my head against the wall - they said nothing; they got my hat, and then ran away; I felt very great pain in my knee, and my head was bruised in the fall. The moment they ran away I observed that my breeches pocket was cut completely out; I had a shilling and 7d. in copper there, and the key of my trunk; my pocket handkerchief was taken from my coat pocket; every think was safe just before; they all made the best of their way off, and I after them; I called out Watch! as loud as I could - none came; but in about two minutes after I got up into my bed-room two watchmen came up, and asked if I was the young man who had been robbed - I stated to them what had happened; one of the watchmen said he knew them, and told me to let it remain till next night - I had seen both the prisoners about the streets in the neighbourhood several times before, but never spoke to them. Wilson was taken on the 13th - I saw him in Pearson's custody - and on the 14th I saw Haggerty in custody at Marlborough-street; I saw them taken - I pointed Wilson out in Church-street, and next day pointed Haggerty out - I knew them well, and swear they are two of the men. I have not found any of my property - it was all taken away.

Prisoner WILSON. Q. Did I get out of your sight? A. Yes, you turned a corner, and I lost you. I had told Pearson of it on the 13th, when I saw him in the street.

ROBERT PEARSON . I am a patrol. On the 13th of June I saw Williams at the end of Bainbridge-street - he

said he had been robbed on the Monday; he described Wilson to me, and said he had seen him that night - I told him to go and look for him; he came back to me, and said he had seen him; I went with him to the end of Church-street, where Wilson was sitting on a post - I secured him; Williams had described Haggerty to me, and I took him next day; the prosecutor stood close by - I said, "Is that him?" he said Yes, and I took him; they both said they were not the persons. I found nothing on them relating to the robbery.

Prisoner WILSON. Q. You said the prosecutor charged me with robbing him of his hat, and I said I heard so twenty minutes before, and had thrown myself in your way on purpose to clear myself? A. You did not say so to me.

HAGGERTY's Defence. When he took Wilson from the post I was on the opposite side of the way - the prosecutor knew it, and did not point me out; he said it was a stouter lad than me. On the 13th the officer came and took me - I made no resistance; he took me up to Williams' room - fifteen or sixteen people were there; he asked him if I was the lad; he said No I was not, for there were two a great deal stouter than me, and the other was taller; the officer said,"Are you positive of it?" and he said, "Yes, you may let him go, and he did so. On the 14th I was going along the street, and was taken - Williams said then that I was the lad, and at the office he said he had said I was not because he wanted to take us all together.

RICHARD WILLIAMS re-examined. I saw him in the street some time before, but not at the identical time that Wilson was taken; I saw him the same evening, but several people persuaded me not to take him into custody. I never said it was a stouter lad than him - I said the one who took the hat was a larger man; I never said he was not the man; he was taken twice - a Bow-street officer took him the first time - I said he was not the person who took my hat, but was one of the party; the officer let him go - I had no doubt of him; I only said he was not the person who took my hat, as I wished to get Wilson.

WILSON's Defence. I knew nothing of the robbery till twenty minutes before I was taken, when a woman came and said the officers were after me for robbing a man named Williams, of Church-street, of his hat - I said I was innocent, and went into Church-street, and sat on a post at the corner of Bainbridge-street; a man came and said I was charged with stealing a hat, and somebody had gone for an officer - he had not been gone a minute before the officer came and said, "Williams charges you with stealing his hat" - I said I thought so.

WILSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

HAGGERTY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18270712-4

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1350. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Harriet Orchard , single woman , in the King's highway, on the 8th of June , at St. George, Bloomsbury , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 gold watch, value 10l.; 1 gold chain, value 2l.; 1 gold slide, value 10s.; 5 gold seals, value 3l.; 3 gold keys, value 1l.; 1 gold ring, value 5s., and 1 gold watch-hook, value 10s., the goods of the said Harriet Orchard .

MISS HARRIET ORCHARD. I am single, and live at No. 9, Great George-street, New-road. On the 8th of June, at a quarter before 4 o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking up George-street, St. Giles' , and on turning the corner into Phoenix-street a lad (whom I perceived standing at the corner) struck me violently in my chest, and at the same moment snatched my watch, watch was pinned on with two watch-hooks, one fastened the watch, and the other the seals - he tore the one which fastened the watch, and tore my dress to get it, but the one which the seals were on he broke; the watch was fastened to my waist, and pinned with six very stout pins; there were five seals to it, which he also got, and three keys, a gold chain, and a gold slide were on the chain, set with turquoise.

Q. Did he strike you with one hand and at the same moment snatch the watch with the other? A. Yes - the blow was first, and I felt him pulling my watch - he struck me violently with one hand, and was pulling at the same moment with the other; I felt the blow before I felt him pulling - it was done as near as possible together, for it was all done in five minutes or less - he wrenched the watch round, and got it in a moment; he ran away - I pursued him down three streets, till I was stopped by the mob, somewhere in St. Giles' - I do not know the name of the place; he got quite away - I had no opportunity of seeing his face; I only saw his size and height as he ran before me; the man was the prisoner's size as exactly as possible; I believe from his size, and what I saw of him, that he is the man, but my sister, who was with me, can tell more.

Prisoner. Q. Was the person standing with his back or his face towards you? A. I did not see him standing - he came with his face towards me, and struck me, but he held his head down, and darted right against me - he ran away immediately; I followed, and was stopped as I turned the third corner; I had come to near the same place as where I was robbed; I followed him into the same street again; he got clear away. I afterwards went to Clerkenwell prison, but did not see the prisoner - I pointed out a person there as being about the size of the man, but did not say he was the man. I did not see the prisoner in the yard; I said a lad there was near the size of the man, but I did not like to identify him.

MISS JANE ORCHARD . I am the prosecutrix's sister. I was walking with her up George-street, St. Giles'; I was about a yard before my sister; I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of the wall as we turned out of George-street into Phoenix-street; he was standing with his back against the wall as I passed him; I took particular notice of him when I passed him, seeing him standing there, so decently dressed, and in such a low place - he had white trousers on then; I saw his face as I passed him, and am certain he is the man; I passed him before my sister - I heard her scream, then turned round, and she said, "He has got my watch;" I knew she had her watch before, for she looked to see if it was right by St. Giles' church; I saw her watch was gone, and instantly followed the prisoner, who ran; I followed him round three streets, without losing sight of him; he got round into the same street again, very near to where he had taken it, but the mob came up so strong I could go no further - I saw no more of him.

Prisoner. Q. Was the person standing at the corner? A. Yes, with your face towards me; I saw your face; any body passing might see it; I ran first, and my sister followed, but we were parted.

Q. Did not you swear at the office that your sister was stopped directly she crossed the road? A. No; I said it was in the fourth street; I saw a person lay hold of you, but you got by him; I did not observe any body meet you before you turned the corner.

MISS HARRIET ORCHARD re-examined. I saw nobody lay hold of him; I was stopped at the third corner, by a man who laid hold of my reticule; it was held for nearly two minutes; my sister was almost out of my sight; she was almost the length of the street from me; I could not see whether any one stopped him, for I did not see him in the third street, except at the beginning of it.

THOMAS ADAMS . I am a labourer, and live in George-street, St. Giles'. On the 8th of June, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner standing against the dead wall, opposite my window - I am certain of his person. I saw these two young ladies come up the street; I saw him make a drive at one of them, but what he took I could not see; she had a reticule in her hand I think; she screamed out, and both of them ran after him: my leg was so bad I could not go out to follow him: a crowd collected directly, and several people pursued. I did not see whether he got any thing away.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you? A. Standing at my shop window, looking through the glass; I live at No. 40, within seventeen yards of where you stood; you ran directly up towards Rats' Castle, right up George-street, and the lady after you; George-street and Phoenix-street join each other; my window faces the dead wall where you stood.

JENKIN STRADLING . On the 8th of June, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going along George-street, and saw the prisoner; I turned round to speak to Fitzgerald, whom I knew - he was going up the court; the prisoner ran down the court; Fitzgerald put his arm out to catch him, but he slipped down just by him, and ran towards a mob of people, who made way for him to pass between them; these two ladies came up - I took them into a shop, went out to find the beadle, and described the man to him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see the ladies coming up George-street? A. No, coming down Church-street, I think it is called; Fitzgerald caught you in his arms, coming down the passage; you went round, and came down the passage, so that the ladies met you; I went down Broad-street, and lost sight of you by Phoenix-street.

THOMAS FITZGERALD . I live at No. 33, George-street, St. Giles'. On the 8th of June I was standing by my own door, and heard a cry that a lady had been robbed - I turned round into the adjoining street, and saw a young man running towards me; conceiving him to be the thief I remained quiet till he came up, then caught him in my arms, but he slipped away; this was in Ivy-street, St. Giles' - it leads into George-street.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you when you heard the cry? A. Standing at my own door; I saw the ladies running, and a young man in a blue coat and white trousers running before them; I stopped him; I cannot swear you are the man: I caught hold of him in Ivy-street, which was formerly called Rats' Castle; there was nobody very near him. I did not notice who was in the street; a good many people followed him; when he got from me he ran into George-street, and turned, I believe, to the right.

ROBERT DUKE . I am a constable of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of June, in George-street, St. Giles'.

JENKIN STRADLING re-examined. I know the prisoner to be the man; I pointed him out at Bow-street, from among other prisoners; he had changed his dress, but I knew him; I saw Fitzgerald lay hold of him, but I do not know the name of the street it was in.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 12th of June I was walking down George-street - a man laid hold of me, and said he wanted me, and his brother officer had been insulted in St. Giles'; I said I knew nothing about it: he took me to Bow-street; a gentleman came and looked at me in a little time, and Duke said, "You know what is the matter now?" I said No, and about eight o'clock I was taken before the Magistrate, and remanded till Monday. The first witness came to the House of Correction, with Mr. Beeby, a young gentleman, and another; every body in the yard was told to stand round - the young lady looked round, and said she believed a young man named Anderson was the person; Beeby said, "Put on your hat, and turn round; he did so, and she said she believed he was the person. At my examination on Monday the lady and two or three more witnesses came against me, but none of them swore to me; I was remanded for another week; then Adams and the lady's sister swore I was the person. Now the first witness says she saw me standing at the corner of Phoenix-street, with my head down, that I snatched her watch and ran, and she lost me in turning the third street; the next witness swears she saw me at the corner, holding my head up, that any body might see my face, and when her sister screamed she followed, and in turning the third street she saw a person lay hold of me, and yet the sister did not see that. One witness swears I ran up George-street and the ladies swear I ran down Church-street; I could not run both ways at once. The next witness swears that as I was coming through Ivy-street, the ladies came round and met me, but they say they followed me. God knows I am innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18270712-5

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1351. JAMES BRECKEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , at St. Luke , 1 writing-desk, value 20s., and 3 sovereigns, the property of Jose Maria Barrero , in the dwelling-house of Francis Harvey .

JOSE MARIA BARRERO. I live at Mr. Harvey's, in Smith's-buildings, City-road . On the 15th of June I had a writing-desk in my parlour, with three sovereigns in it. but I was not at home when it was taken.

HANNAH HARVEY . I am the wife of Francis Harvey. we live in the parish of St. Luke. On the 15th of June I was in the back parlour, and heard something fall down in the front room; I went in, and missed this desk, which I had seen on the table just before; I directly went into the street, and saw the prisoner with it under his arm; I hallooed Stop thief! and he let it fall, but was taken within three minutes, without my losing sight of him - I am sure he is the man; I picked the desk up, took it back to the parlour, and delivered it to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you rent this house? A. Yes, and pay the taxes; it was about three o'clock.

CAROLINE HILLS . I live next door to Harvey. I saw the prisoner come down the path of the garden in front of the house, with a bundle of wood under each arm; he returned with a writing-desk; he never entered the house, but took it through the parlour window, I suppose, as the door was shut; I only saw him come from the house with it- he went into the road; I saw no more of him till he was brought back - he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. In my parlour; I have no curtain to my window. I did not see him take the desk; I saw him go with the wood, and come back with the desk; I lost sight of him for about three minutes. I was sitting within the room.

THOMAS COPE . I was in the City-road, and saw a crowd of people; I went up, and found this house had been robbed. I found the prisoner in custody, and received the desk with three sovereigns in it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, there being no aggravating circumstance attending the case.

Reference Number: t18270712-6

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1352. JAMES HEYWOOD was indicted for stealing on the 30th of March , 1 watch, value 4l.; 2 seals, value 15s., and 1 ring, value 5s., the goods of William Monk , in the dwelling-house of William Hinchelwood .

WILLIAM MONK. I lodge in North-street, Chelsea , with William Hinchelwood. On the 3d of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my lodgings, about a job which I wanted him to do, but he asked more than I could give him. I offered him something to drink; he took nothing, but went away - the instant he was gone I missed my watch, which I can swear was in the room when he came in, for I had just wound it up - he was not there above ten minutes; he lived a few doors off. I went to his house - I found him in bed, and told him I had lost my watch; he denied it, and said"Who was that man that stood behind me in the room?" there had been nobody there but him or I should have seen them - I left him, and went to Bow-street. I have not found the watch - it hung over my bedstead; he kept close to the bedstead all the time. I went to the cupboard to get him something to drink, my head was then turned away - I did not search his room.

Cross-examined by Mr. J. ALLEY. Q. You had a job for him? A. Yes; some drawer handles to lacker - my room is on the first floor; it is not very small - there are other lodgers. I never said the watch was either on the bedstead or mantel-piece; I do not know Charlotte Young - there is a Life Guardsman lodges in the house; when I went to the prisoner's room his wife said "Hold your tongue, and I will find it for you;" and she looked about the bed - he heard what she said; he got up and came to me that evening, I understood, but I did not see him. I went after him next day, but he was not to be found.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of June; I had been looking for him before, but he was gone to a job in the country - he said he had come home on purpose to have this business settled, that he was uneasy about it, and had come to have himself righted.

Cross-examined. Q. You had no difficulty in finding him? A. No; his street-door was open; he had only been home half an hour. I have known him five or six years; he was a pretty fair character.

WILLIAM PRIOR . I went with Bailey and found the prisoner up in a lodger's room, at dinner; he said "I know your business, I have come up to have myself righted, as it is preying on my mind."

Prisoner's Defence. As I came down stairs I met a Life Guardsman, and stood aside to let him pass. I never said there was a man behind the door in the room - I had a job in the country, and went to it.

CHARLOTTE YOUNG. I lodge at the prisoner's house, and remember the prosecutor coming there one night, between eight and nine o'clock. I was in the room - he charged the prisoner with stealing his watch; he at first said that it was on the bed, and then he was not sure whether it was on the bed or the mantel-piece - the prisoner's bed and both his rooms were searched; the prisoner afterwards went to the prosecutor's house, and when he came back he said he had been to know if they had found the watch; he remained at home till the Monday, and then went into the country.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-7

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1353. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing on the 14th of June , at St. George, Hanover-square , 1 watch, value 10l., the goods of Richard Walker , in the dwelling-house of the Earl of Harewood .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD WALKER. I am under butler to Lord Harewood. On the 14th of June, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I was in my bed-room, which is in the pantry, and saw the prisoner come into the pantry and take my watch off the table - he walked out with it; he must have come down the area, the gate of which was open. I immediately followed him out of the pantry and collared him at the door, he immediately pulled his hand out of his right-side trowsers' pocket, with the watch in it; he began to cry, and begged to be let go - his Lordship's house is in Hanover-square , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - here is the watch. I gave ten guineas for it; he could not see me, as my bed-room is dark - I left the pantry door open to give light. I know nothing of him, but have been informed that he is a sweep's boy , he said he had been to the house many times before to sweep the chimneys.

LESTER BRAND . I am in the service of his lordship. I came down stairs and saw Walker holding the prisoner and the watch, he acknowledged to the Earl that he had taken it, and said it was his first offence, and if he would forgive him he would never do so again. I saw the watch in his possession.

Prisoner's Defence. A young woman asked me to go down the area and enquire for Mr. Johnson. I found the gate and the door open. I knocked at two rooms beside the pantry several times, but nobody answered. I did not take the watch - the gentleman said there were two

robberies done there before, and he should make me a thief, and he put it into my breast - it was not found on me, he had it in his own hand.

RICHARD WALKER. He did not knock at the pantry door, but came in quite softly - I have only had the watch two months.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18270712-8

1354. MARY MORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 purse, value 6d.; 3 sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, and 1 sixpence, the property of John Upton , in the dwelling-house of John Drew .

FRANCES UPTON . I am the wife of John Upton - we lodge at John Drew's, in Wych-street . On the 23d of June I engaged the prisoner to mind my children and clean my room , while I attended some chambers. I had a large box in my room containing this money in a silk purse, it laid at the bottom of the box, which was not locked, but there was another box on the top of it. I saw the money safe on Saturday morning, about nine o'clock, and the cap also. On Sunday about three o'clock, I wanted some money, and missed it - she was in and out of the room on Sunday morning; I went to her house, in Drury-court, that afternoon, and found her in the second-floor room, which is not her own - I sent for a constable, and found the ring of the purse in her pocket; here it is - I have had it many years, it is a common one. I have no mark on it - I found the cap in a drawer in her mother's room. I also missed a bed quilt which I have not found; the constable who had the cap is dead.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-9

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1355. HENRY DALEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Fairbairn , in the morning of the 27th of June , (he and others being therein) and stealing 1 bed quilt, value 5s., and 1 shawl, value 2s., the goods of Hannah Bick , widow .

HANNAH BICK. I am a widow, and lodge at Thomas Fairbairn's, in Little Wild-street, St. Giles' . On the 27th of June I went out between three and four o'clock, leaving nobody in my room. Mary Fairbairn and several lodgers were in the house - I returned in ten minutes, and met the prisoner coming out of the street door, with a bundle in his hand - I took it from him and called the landlord; he ran up-stairs and was secured - the bundle contained the quilt and shawl, which I had left on a press-bedstead, doubled up; he said he picked them up in the passage - he was a stranger.

NATHAN JACKSON . I am a beadle. I took him in charge with the property.

MARY FAIRBAIRN. Brick lodged at our house. I and several other persons were at home when this happened.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Wild-street - a man asked me to go up to the second-floor back room and inquire for a man named Wood. which I did; and in the passage I took up this bundle - the prosecutrix opened the street door, and said "Go up stairs;" I went up by her order, and she had me taken.

GUILTY. Aged 15. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18270712-10

1356. JOHN HODGES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 coat, value 3s. , the goods of James Marshall .

JAMES MARSHALL. I am a clerk at No.29, Cornhill . On the 5th of July this coat was hanging in the back office, on the ground floor - it is one I occasionally wear after business; I wore it the day before, and missed it on the following evening, the 5th of July. The prisoner was at work there for a carpenter who lives in Bush-lane; I saw it on the Monday following, in the possession of the beadle - he was then in custody. I am certain the coat is mine- it is not worth above 3s.

GEORGE PIPER . I am groom to Mr. Arsant. I was at work at Mr. Perry's, where Mr. Marshall lives; I heard the shopman say the coat was stolen - this was on the 5th of July, and the next morning I saw the prisoner go to a chest at Mr. Arsant's, No.4, Bush-lane, where he worked, and take out a strange coat; I asked where he got it - he said his mother sent it him from the country; I asked him to deliver it up - he said he would not, and I told Pope, the foreman. I saw Marshall claim it before the Lord Mayor.

HENRY POPE . I am foreman to Mr. Arsant. Piper gave me information on Sunday morning; I went to the prisoner, and asked how he came by the coat which he had got on his back; he said it was from his mother in the country. I made him take it off, and give it to me; Marshall claimed it. He was taken up on Monday; he had not gone away. He was apprentice to Mr. Arsant, and had served four years.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a beadle, and have the coat. I took the prisoner; he said he intended to take the coat back on Sunday.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master sent me to the banking-house, to assist the bricklayer; I laid my own coat in the passage, and in the evening, it being dark, I took this instead of it; I went back for my own on Saturday evening, and on Sunday I was going to take this back.

JAMES MARSHALL re-examined. I heard of no strange coat being found there, and never heard of his coming for any coat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-11

1357. WILLIAM BRIFFITT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , at Christchurch , 188lbs. weight of mutton, value 6l.; 108lbs. weight of beef, value 3l. 7s.; 24lbs. weight of veal, value 15s.; 1 cart, value 20l.; 1 set of harness, value 6l., and 1 mare, price 40l. , the property of George Francis .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE FRANCIS. I am a butcher , and live in Wells-row, Islington. On the 30th of April I was at Newgate-market, and had Newton, my servant, with me there; I passed the City toll-bar at Barbican, with my cart that morning, and saw Payne, the toll-gatherer, there; he knew me very well; I pay him my toll once a week. When I got to the market I left my cart, with the mare in it, in Newgate-street , and sent Newton a short distance for some meat - in about five minutes I heard my cart and mare

were stolen; there were eight legs of mutton in it, and a crock and steak piece of beef, a leg of veal, and two pairs of hind quarters of mutton. My name and address were on the cart, and the number; it was drawn by a bay mare, a very good one, and worth 40l. - value of the meat was 10l., and the cart 20l. I went to the Green-yard, to see for it, but it was not there; I then advertized it, offering 10l. reward - I saw it again in five weeks all but two days afterwards, at Somers' livery-stable, Lambeth. I do not know the prisoner, and never authorized him to take the mare and cart any where - he was a perfect stranger. I afterwards attended at Guildhall, with the same mare and cart, which was shown to the different witnesses.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you any partner? A. No. I left home before six o'clock, and arrived at the market a quarter past six; the market was not very full; there were several carts there, but not so many as usual; business was very slack just at that time; it was on Monday morning, the 30th of April; I had left Newton, my lad, in the cart, but he left it to come to me, by my order. I pay my City toll once a week, on a Saturday generally.

ISAAC NEWTON . On the 30th of April I went to market with my master, and while he was in the shop, paying for some meat, he sent me to Mr. Hailes, which was about two minutes walk; I left the cart alone, and when I came back it was gone. The account which my master has given of the meat that was in it is true. I saw the cart and mare at Guildhall.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the meat put into the cart? A. I put it in myself.

WILLIAM ROBERT PAYNE . I am collector of City toll at the corner of Barbican. I know Francis' cart and mare well; he passed me with them on the 30th of April, between five and six o'clock: I saw the cart and mare come back about a quarter past nine o'clock; the prisoner was in the cart. I ran up to take my toll, but seeing the name on the cart I went back, as I take that toll once a week; I am sure the prisoner is the man. I heard of the robbery afterwards, and told Francis - I knew the cart and mare well' I used to drive her once a week myself, and am certain it is the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you always said you knew the prisoner? A. Yes; he stood upright in the cart. The man and the master usually drive it.

HESTER COX . I am the wife of John Cox , who is a labouring man. On the 30th of April we lived at Mr. Heath's, No.4, Coronation-place, Borough-road; on that day, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner drove a cart and horse to our door - I took notice of the cart and the horse also; I did not see the name on the cart. The prisoner brought some meat in, and asked me to let him leave it there - I gave him leave; I cannot say how much there was; it was mutton, beef, and veal; there was a great quantity of it: the prisoner went away with the cart and mare. Mrs. Heath afterwards saw the meat. The meat was afterwards taken away.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your husband? A. He is not right in his head now, and is in Newington poorhouse - I also live there. I do not rightly know the day of the month when this happened. I was subpoenaed to come here about three weeks ago; I had one room at Heath's - my husband was not there. I am sure the prisoner is the man; I saw letters outside the cart, but cannot read, and cannot tell the name. I have seen the cart twice since, and have rode in it once; I am sure it is the same cart by the make of it and the gilt letters. I do not swear to it from having rode in it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who had the meat away? A. John Judson. I was called on to give evidence about him the next day or day after that. I saw the cart and mare at Guildhall, and am certain they are the same.

ELIZABETH HEATH . I am the wife of Robert Heath - he is a horse-dealer. Cox lodged at our house; I remember on the 30th of April the prisoner came to the door with a cart and mare; I saw G. F. on the back of the cart, in yellow letters, but I did not see what was in front - I only saw it from my first floor window; I saw the meat taken into the house, by the prisoner and other persons, but who I cannot say. There was a crock and steak piece of beef, a leg of mutton, and two hind quarters and a leg of veal.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a butcher's wife? A. My first husband was a butcher. I was standing at the window; I do not think I saw Cox. I saw the prisoner giving the meat out of the cart. I have been examined seven times in all about this. The officer came to me the same day as it was brought. I was examined at Union-hall - that was before the cart was found. The mare and cart were produced at Guildhall.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know the mare at Guildhall? A. Yes; I have no doubt of the mare, the cart, or the prisoner.

JOSEPH MARSH . I am a porter. On Monday, the last day in April, I saw a cart against the pin manufactory in the London-road - it stood there about twenty minutes. I saw the name of "George Francis, Wells-row, Islington" on it, and there was G. F. in a cypher, behind, in yellow letters; there was a mare in it. I did not see what was inside the cart; it was moved from there, and I saw it again in the Borough-road; I had not seen any body drive it away. I saw the prisoner get into it at the pin manufactory, and am certain of him. I had seen him once or twice before.

Cross-examined. Q. Where had you seen him? A. At the Dog and Still public-house, close against where the cart and horse stood. I had not heard of any robbery; it stood there so long different people were noting. I went round to see the name on it, but did not look inside.

Court. Q. Did you see the same cart and mare at Guildhall? A. Yes, about a month ago.

- MYERS . I am a constable of Surrey. I apprehended the prisoner on the 3d of June, at his own house, in Robert-street, Kent-street; I did not either threaten or promise him any thing; he was sitting in a chair, I said I wanted him for a cart and horse, and a load of meat; he said he had been tried for that and discharged on the Friday before - that he was tried capitally, and knew nothing about it; I told him he must go with us; he did so. Goff was with me.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

Reference Number: t18270712-12

1358. WILLIAM ALDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 31/2lbs. of copper, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Devey and Elizabeth Devey , to whom he was servant .

WILLIAM DEVEY. I am in partnership with Elizabeth Devey, who is a widow ; we are brass-founders , and live in Shoe-lane . On the 25th of June some metal was bought by my man, who showed it to me, and I thought it was ours. On the 26th of June I desired my confidential servants to watch, and this was discovered. The prisoner was in our employ two years and a half, at different times. No man is allowed to take any thing away.

JOHN MUNDIN . I am in Mr. Devey's employ. On the 26th of June I concealed myself at half-past six o'clock; the prisoner had been in and out at different times, and while he was down at half-past six o'clock, I took down his hat, which felt very heavy, and found in it a lump of copper, which weighed 31/2lbs., covered with a handkerchief; I hung it up, and watched, and at seven o'clock, when the bell rang, the prisoner put his hat on, and walked into the street - I called him back, and said I thought he had master's property about him. I sent for the officer, who found it in his hat.

ALEXANDER JOHNSON . I am a constable, and took him in charge; his hat was off then and the copper in it, covered with a handkerchief; he owned the hat, and at the watch-house said it was his first offence.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not put it into the hat.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270712-13

1359. WILLIAM GODDARD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 2 saws, value 7s. 6d., the goods of William Duke ; 1 saw, value 4s., and 1 square, value 1s., the goods of Richard Elliott ; 1 saw, value 4s. 6d., and 1 square, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Quick .

WILLIAM DUKE. I am a carpenter . On the 27th of June, at six o'clock, I left two saws at a new building in St. Bartholomew Hospital , where Richard Elliott and I were at work. The prisoner was a stranger; we went to work at six o'clock in the morning, and our tools were gone; we found the prisoner in custody with them.

EDWARD LLOYD . I am a watchman of St. Bartholomew Hospital. On the 27th of June, between seven and eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner three or four yards from the building; I thought he had something - I stopped him, and found four saws and two squares about him; I said he had robbed the building - he made no answer; they were claimed next day at Guildhall.

WILLIAM GATES . I received him in charge, and found three saws, in his side pocket, and a large one under his waistcoat; the squares were in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-14

1360. ARTHUR CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 shawl, value 20s., the goods of William Reeve , from the person of Frances, his wife .

FRANCES REEVE . I am the wife of William Reeve - he is a tin-plate worker ; we live in Shoreditch. On the 29th of June, about ten minutes past nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopsgate-street , going home, alone; my shawl was partly confined by my left shoulder, and I held one end in my hand, and near Angel-alley it was snatched off my shoulder by a sudden jerk, and I let go of it; I turned, and saw the prisoner, who was alone, about seven yards from me; I called Stop thief! and pursued him as far as I could into Little Angel-alley, and then lost sight of him; I saw my shawl in his possession: Sapwell asked what I had lost - I said a shawl, told him the colour, and showed him the spot where he went to; he immediately pursued, and in about nine minutes some person said, "We have got your shawl;" I saw Sapwell bringing the prisoner back - he produced the shawl.

JOHN LIMAN . I am constable of Bishopsgate. I was coming by Angel-alley; I found a crowd, and proceeded up the alley with Sapwell; I saw a quantity of people standing together - I went in among them, and went down the alley; a boy said, "It is is Hearty;" I found the prisoner in the house of one Steele, who keeps a chandler's-shop; he immediately pulled the shawl out from under his jacket; Mrs. Reeve claimed it. He made great resistance, but did not deny it.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. I was going by and heard the alarm. I saw this lady, who said she had lost her shawl; I went down the alley, and somebody said it was Hearty. I saw the prisoner in a shop, and took the shawl from under his waistcoat; he said a man gave it to him - this was within five minutes of my seeing Mrs. Reeve.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD HALE . I was the first person who secured the prisoner, and saw the shawl taken from him; I saw him take it from the prosecutrix, and followed him, calling Stop thief! I never lost sight of him till he got into the shop; he was taken within ten minutes.

Prisoner's Defence. It is altogether false; if you will search his character he has a brother in Newgate now, and I do not think he is any better himself. A man ran up the alley, and dropped the shawl; I picked it up, and went to show it to the man.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270712-15

1361. JOHN WARDROBE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 1 mahogany plank, value 12s. , the goods of Charles Hayne .

JOHN HENDERSON . I am in the employ of Charles Hayne, a timber-merchant , of Long-lane, Smithfield . On the 3d of July, about half-past eleven o'clock, the prisoner came into the yard, looked round, took this plank on his shoulder, and walked out - I stopped him in Cloth-fair, and brought him back with it.

SAMUEL HOPSON . I am an officer, and took him in charge; he cried, and begged to be let off; I find his parents are very honest people.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I used to work with a young man, who said he would get me a place; he told me to take this plank, and said if I did not he would half kill me.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-16

1362. GEORGE ANDREWS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD GRANT TUCKER . I am a starch manufacturer and drysalter , and live at Queenhithe . The prisoner was in my service for more than six months, as town traveller ; he

took out bills, and received money on my account; I have a book in which he should enter all monies which he receives - he signs the book every night; he keeps the book himself. On the 26th of May he did not pay me 1l. 2s. 2d. on account of Mr. Tuttiell, nor at any other time. I dismissed him about the 2d of June, and on the 9th he was taken up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any partner? A. No; I heard that he had offered his services to a Mr. Turner, a starch-man; I cannot say whether I heard that before or since he was taken; I know I had given instructions for the warrant before I heard of it; I am not aware that he could take any of my connexion away; he was in my employ about three years ago.

Q. You would not have taken him again if you had not had a good opinion of him? A. I thought his wife and family would be a sufficient guarantee, after I had once pardoned his robbing me. I do not know of his falling off a stage-coach - I once saw him with a swollen face.

WILLIAM TUTTIELL . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Sparrow-corner. I deal with Mr. Tucker. On the 26th of May I paid the prisoner on his account one sovereign, two shillings, and two pence. (Looking at a receipt) I saw him write the whole of this.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain what coin you paid him in? A. Yes. (Receipt read.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18270712-17

1363. GEORGE ANDREWS was again indicted for embezzling 6 sovereigns, and 1 shilling , on the 14th of March .

The book containing the statement of this transaction not being in Court the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18270712-18

1364. GEORGE ANDREWS was again indicted for a like offence , on the 25th of May .

WILLIAM DOWDELL . I am a grocer, and live at Islington - I deal with Mr. Tucker. On the 25th of May I paid the prisoner on his account 7l. 16s.; I am sure I gave him seven sovereigns, but whether the rest was all in silver I cannot say - he wrote this receipt in my presence (read); this is the only transaction I had with him.

MR. TUCKER . On the 25th of May the prisoner did not pay me 7l. odd on Mr. Dowdell's account, nor has he at any time. Here is the book in his hand-writing; there is no such entry.

Cross-examined. Q. Here is 7l. 16s. in this page? A. No - that is 7s. 10d.; I have furnished him with a copy of this book since he has been in custody; I gave him a whole week to rectify his book if it was incorrect, and to account for any thing he might be deficient in; Mr. Dowdell's name is not in this book at all; he should account to me every night for the money he receives that day; he had a guinea and a half a week.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Tucker took the book from me, and being deprived of that I could not make up my accounts.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-19

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JULY 13.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1365. ANDREW MOWATT was indicted for stealing on the 1st of July , 1 fowling-piece, value 10s.; 2 shifts, value 4s.; 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 4s.; 3 napkins, value 1s.; 2 shirts, value 8s.; 7 waistcoats, value 14s.; 3 pairs of pantaloons, value 1l.; 1 shawl, value 1l.; 2 gowns, value 30s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 3 table-cloths, value 4s.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 night gown, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2d.; 1 crown, 2 half-crowns, 4 shillings, 2 pence, and 1 farthing, the property of John Gingell , in the dwelling-house of William Anderson .

THOMAS ALEXANDER . I lodge in Conduit-place, Paddington , exactly opposite to Mr. Anderson, where Gingell lives. On Sunday, the 1st of July, about twelve o'clock in the day. I saw the prisoner in Anderson's yard, with a bundle - I kept looking at him, not knowing whether he had stolen it; but a man came out. crying Stop thief! I immediately ran out towards the fence of the Grand Junction premises and the prisoner came running round the corner and dropped this bundle - I am sure he is the man; I secured him - the bundle was claimed by Gingell.

ROSANA GINGELL . I am the wife of John Gingell - we live in Anderson's house. I am his servant. On Sunday, about eleven o'clock, I dressed myself and went to a place of worship. I left every thing safe - I came home after twelve o'clock, and found the prisoner in custody with the bundle, containing this property, which I had left in different drawers in two rooms, on the ground floor; the window was about three inches open when I went out - a person in the yard could open it; I had left the servant girl at home - the property is worth 7l.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY WELSH . Gingell left me at home. I was in the kitchen - I heard no alarm at all; I went to the bed-room door and could not open it. I then went to the engine house, to ask Mr. Gingell if he had locked it - he came down with me; we then found the door open and the property gone - the drawers were open. I went out and saw a man in the yard, he ran away; and the prisoner was brought back - he was tying up the bundle on the pipes in the yard when I saw him - I will not swear to his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in the fields and was suddenly taken ill - I went into an empty house by this place, for a necessary purpose, and in about five minutes this man came in, and said "Here he is, come out," and charged me with the robbery.

GUILTY. Aged 19. Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-20

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1366. EDWARD HUDSON TREDWAY was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann, his wife .

SARAH TREDWAY . I am the wife of Hudson Tredway , who is the prisoner's brother; the prisoner's wife's name was Ann - we live in Great George-street, Chelsea; the prisoner is a china-man , and lived in Grosvenor-row, Chelsea ; he came to my house on the 1st of June , about eleven o'clock at night, and asked me to go with him, as he was afraid he had killed Nance, meaning his wife; he said it was done by giving her a nudge with his elbow in bed; that it was done unintentionally, that he was in a

great passion; he was quite sober, and desired me to advise him as a friend what he should do. I went to his house and saw his wife, she was then dead and lying on the bed; we got there as near eleven o'clock as possible; it did not take me five minutes to go; he begged me to come to render all the assistance I could; he said he had been bathing her face with vinegar, and tried all in his power to recover her. I advised him to call in a neighbour; he wished for a medical man and fetched Mr. Turnbull; there are no lodgers in the house; they have three children, the eldest is eight years old.

GEORGE TURNBULL . I am a surgeon, and live in Sloane-square, Chelsea. On the 1st of June, about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came to me; he seemed in great distress, and said he was afraid his wife was dead; he desired me to go with him directly, which I did. As we went along he said."I am afraid I have killed her." I asked him which way he had done it - he said he had given her two blows in her left side, with his elbow; that with the first blow, she said, "You have hurt me very much," and at the second, she said, "I am very bad, get up;" that he got up and struck a light, and got some vinegar, with which he tried to recover her, and used what means he could - but vinegar was the chief thing; he said they had been quarrelling a great deal; that it originated from jealousy, and he had struck her in her left side - he came to me to endeavour to restore her; when I got there, I found her with her head at the bottom of the bed, propped up with a pillow, and her feet hanging over the side of the bed; she was quite dead. I attempted to bleed her, and used other means - I endeavoured to introduce some hot spirits and water into her stomach - only two or three drops of blood came from her - there were some scratches on her nose, a grazed mark on the left collar bone, and the appearance of a blow on the left arm - those were the only external marks; I went again on the Saturday, by order of the Coroner, and opened the body that evening - Mr. Laisne, a surgeon, was with me - upon opening the belly there was nearly five pints of fluid and coagulated blood - I also found the sixth rib under the breast fractured, and the spleen ruptured - every other part of the body was quite sound - the blows she received caused her death; from the account he gave, in my judgment they were sufficient to occasion those appearances, and to occasion her death - in my opinion, she died from the internal hemorrhage, occasioned by the blows.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was from his own lips you had the account of what had happened? A. Yes; it was all voluntarily - there was no external mark where the spleen was ruptured. He kissed his children affectionately, and was in the utmost agony - there was a strong smell of vinegar in the room - the external marks had nothing to do with her death; I have known them for twenty-one years; I never saw any thing unkind on his part - I occasionally attended them.

CONSTANTINE JOHN LAISNE . I am a surgeon, and live in Grosvenor-row. I was at the prisoner's house on Friday evening, the 1st of June, and saw his wife - she was then dead - the moment I felt her hand, I expressed my opinion that she was dead - Mr. Turnbull was endeavouring to administer some warm spirits and water, and attempted to bleed her - I perceived some slight marks, but not sufficient to cause her death; the prisoner was below stairs when I first went in, and gave me a candle; I attended the Coroner's Inquest, and assisted Mr. Turnbull in opening the body; the cavity of the belly contained five pints of blood in a fluid and coagulated state - the sixth rib was fractured, and the spleen ruptured - in my opinion her death was caused by hemorrhage, from the rupture of the spleen; he stated in the course of Friday evening, that he had given her two violent blows in the side with his elbow, and expressed that they were blows given as if in an angry feeling or rage, with violence - he expressed that to convey the manner in which he might have done it; he said they had been quarrelling in the course of the day - that she knew he was of a jealous disposition, and ought not to have aggravated him; in my opinion the blows were sufficient to have occasioned the rupture and the hemorrhage; the rupture must have been from some violence.

Cross-examined. Q. The blows he described could have been given with his elbow as they lay in bed? A. Yes; there were no marks of violence immediately external to the seat of the injury; he appeared in great agony of mind - the woman appeared to have had her face bathed, and I smelt the vinegar.

SAMUEL VORLEY . I am a constable. On the night in question a gentleman fetched me from the watch-house, and pointed out this house - I knocked at the door, a woman opened it - I told her my business, and asked who was there; Mr. Laisne came down - he went up to the prisoner, who came down and showed himself to me, but said nothing; I went up-stairs - he seemed in a good deal of trouble; I told him it was my duty to take him into custody, but I did not wish to hurry him - he said he had struck her, but did not mean to kill her, he hoped I would wait a little while, and he would send for his brother, who came; and been treated him to take charge of his house and children, and some money which he had in his pocket; he then knelt down in the room where two children were in bed, kissed them, and said, "Good bye;" he entreated me not to put him in irons, and we went arm in arm to the watch-house; he made no resistance; he forced some conversation on me on the road - he said he did not mean to kill her - it was not a likely thing that he should, for there were 200l. coming to her in a short time, and it was not likely he should kill her before that at any rate, for that would make them all comfortable; he said he had struck her with his elbow, that she had dropped a word which very much displeased him, which was the cause of his striking her; he wished me not to put him into a cell alone, and I allowed him to sit up with me all night; he was agitated during the night, and frequently said, "Oh! my soul! Oh! my Nance!"

Cross-examined. Q. He pronounced her name in great distress? A. Yes; he certainly appeared much distressed; and was very affectionate towards his children.

Prisoner's Defence. I loved my wife, and if I had one fault, it was having too strong an affection for her - my whole soul was devoted to make her happy; I was never happy out of her company, and never spent an evening from her, except when business called me; had I contemplated murder, should I have fetched the sister to give

evidence against me - it is contrary to nature, which dictates self-preservation; I should have quitted home instead of going for assistance - it was the furthest thing from my thoughts; I would have given my soul to have called her back to life. You will find by reference to the medical evidence there was not sufficient to cause death; therefore, reflect - weigh well - consider, and if any doubt arises, I trust you will give an unfortunate prisoner the benefit of it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 47. Of killing and slaying only . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-21

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1367. WILLIAM YOUNG , GEORGE KING , and ISABELLA STEARS , were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Key , on the night of the 18th of May , and stealing 4 pieces of silk, containing 160 yards, value 15l.; 5 pieces of linen, containing 125 yards, value 10l.; 18 pieces of muslin, containing 300 yards, value 17l.; 50 muslin lengths for dresses, value 10l.; 1 piece of handkerchiefs, containing 7 handkerchiefs, value 35s., and 15 pairs of stays, value 10l., his property .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ANN WIGGINS . I am servant to Mr. William Key, of Isleworth , he is a Quaker. On the 18th of May I shut up the house, and saw it safe about eleven o'clock at night, when I went to bed - it was quite dark; I left one of my mistresses sitting up in the room where this robbery was committed - the next morning, at half-past six o'clock, I came down-stairs, found the back parlour window wide open, and part of a brick wall broken away, just behind the shutter, where it fastens - the hole was large enough to admit a man - the shutter was not broken - it opens inside - somebody must have got through the hole to have undone it - this parlour is used as a warehouse; I found it all in confusion - the drawers were all open, things out of their places, and the money taken out of the till; I cannot identify the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. J. ALLEY. Q. A person was left up in the room? A. Yes, till half-past twelve o'clock, as she says, it was a back window - the wall was not broken when I went to bed; I have seen Stears buying articles at the shop before the robbery - I heard no noise in the night.

JAMES CHAMBERLAIN . I live at Twickenham-common, and am in the employ of a baker. On a Tuesday morning in May, about eleven o'clock, I saw Grimshaw grubbing a hole, with his hands, in some rubbish, in one of my father's fields - I went to that spot about seven o'clock in the evening, and found some new hay in the rubbish, and under that a handkerchief and two gown pieces - the hay was over them to keep them clean - I took them home and gave them to my father, who gave them to Simmons.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoners there? A. No; Grimshaw lives on the common.

EDWARD WARD . I live at Twickenham. I went on Tuesday evening with Chamberlain, and found two silk gown pieces under the hay.

WILLIAM GRIMSHAW . I was taken into custody in consequence of information given by Chamberlain; I know the prisoners King and Young - King gave me two gown pieces, and asked me to sell them for him; he said he had been and robbed the Quaker at Isleworth, and if I sold them, he would satisfy me; I did not sell them, but hid them in this heap of dirt, to give them back to him.

Q. Did he tell you whether he was acquainted with a man named Young? A. Yes; he said they took a great deal of property from the Quaker's, and should have taken a good deal more, but they could not stop, as the dogs were there, and they were afraid the master, or somebody would come down; he said they had sold 13l. or 14l. worth of goods - I afterwards saw Young, he told me that him and King, William Stears , and a man whom they call Little Tom, had been and done the robbery - both he and King said they had been to London, and sold some of the property, and parted the rest among them; Simmons and Todd took me up; and on my way to the House of Correction with Young and King, Young came and took hold of my hand and pulled me, and told me when I came to my trial, not to say any thing, and I should get off, and so should they if I did not tell any thing - I immediately told the constable what he had said.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you sleep last night? A. In the House of Correction - I have been there thirty-one days - I was there once before - a young man had taken a handkerchief; I was in a public-house with him, and was taken up as well as him. I know Mr. Dickenson of Twickenham; I was not a witness in a case of his, it was my brother. The property was given to me the morning after the robbery, as they told me; they told me it was committed the night before. I knew them before, but we were not intimate; I asked one person to buy the gown pieces, they said No; I told King I understood the property stolen was worth between 200l. and 300l.; he said it was not 20l.; I asked if he had committed it, and he said, Yes; he had been living about there, and doing nothing; I thought he could do nothing else - I told nobody of it till I was apprehended - I was afraid; it was my intention to tell if I was taken - I cannot say whether I should have told if I had not been taken. Tom cannot be found.

Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you been able to see Little Tom since they told you he was in the robbery? A. No; I have known the prisoners fourteen years, and have drank with them several times; they said there were some silk shawls and a great quantity of black silk, and some red twill and muslins among the goods; I asked how they got into the house, they said through the brickwork, and it was at near three o'clock in the morning; what made me ask if they were in the robbery was, because they had always plenty of money, and never did any work.

Mr. J. ALLEY. Q. You did not see them frequently at public-houses? A. Yes; I have seen them full twenty times; they were always about the place; there was so much talk about them, every body wondered how they got so much money, and yet never worked; I had seen them with money two months before the robbery.

JOHN SIMMONS . I am a constable of Twickenham. I apprehended the two male prisoners; I know a man named Stears and Little Tom. I have made great enquiry about them, but cannot find them; I frequently saw them before I took the prisoners; I have two gown pieces in a handkerchief, which Mr. Chamberlain gave me; as I was conveying Grimshaw to the House of Correction, I saw Young go up to him, but could not hear what he said; I ordered

Hall to take him away; he and King were in custody at the time; we were conveying them all to prison; I took them in consequence of Grimshaw's information.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. As we were conveying the prisoners to the House of Correction, I saw them both speak to Grimshaw, and when we got to the public-house, Grimshaw said, "They have desired me, when I go to London, not to say any thing about them;" he said this immediately after Young had spoken to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were the prisoners at that time? A. They were gone off to the New Prison.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable of Twickenham. The prosecutor's house was broken open on the 18th of May; I know that Little Tom was acquainted with the prisoners - they were always together; on the night before the robbery I saw King and Young go by my door about five or six o'clock - they were coming from the White Hart, public-house; I saw Little Tom immediately after, but he went up towards the common - I did not see them talking together - he lived on the common; the prisoners turned to the left, but both roads meet. Mr. Key's house is not in that direction - they were going towards Twickenham - William Stears was a particular acquaintance of theirs; I have made diligent search, but cannot find either him or Tom - I saw them all at Twickenham on the day of the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Little Tom was not with the prisoners? A. He came along in about two minutes after them; I did not see them afterwards; they were a mile and a half from Mr. Key's - Stears' father was brought up about this, but he was only asked how he came by a bag.

EMMA HARVEY. I am the wife of John Harvey. I have known King and Young all my life; I know William Stears and Thomas Burn, who is called Little Tom; about half-past ten o'clock on the night of the robbery; I saw Young and Stears together, going down the village where they live, towards Isleworth, in the road to Mr. Key's- I said, "Good night," and they answered me; I have not seen Stears or Tom since - they were always about before that.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say that Little Tom is a bad character? A. Yes - very bad; I have met the prisoners about before, but never so late as that; they were coming from their own house.

ROBERT WILSON . I am a Manchester warehouseman, and live in Watling-street. I sold Mr. Key some prints and cotton dresses; I sold him a quantity of gown pieces like these on the 14th or 15th of May; I cannot identify these.

KING's Defence. At the time he says he saw me, I was working at Mr. Rush's, at Garratt.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-22

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1368. FREDERICK BEAL and EDWARD GRIFFITHS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Adam , about two o'clock in the night of the 16th of June , at Fulham , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 5 coats, value 8l.; 2 waistcoats, value 16s.; 2 seals, value 2l.; 1 ring, value 15s.; 3 brooches, value 30s.; 4 spoons, 30s., and 1 watch key, value 5s., his property .

HENRY ADAM. I am a market-gardener , and live in the parish of Fulham, in Middlesex - I am the sole occupier of the house. On the 16th of June, 1826, I left my house about twelve o'clock at night, to go to Covent-garden market - the doors and windows were all fastened; I let myself out by a key, locked the door after me, and put the key into my pocket. About five o'clock in the morning a woman, who was in my employ, came to me, and informed me the house was broken open - I returned, and got home between ten and eleven. I found the street door, which I had fastened, broken open; it appeared to have been opened from within, the first floor window was broken, large enough to admit a person through. I do not know how they got to that window; there were two or three marks outside the door, as if a crow-bar had been applied to it. I missed a brown box-coat, two black coats, a blue and a brown one, a striped, a black silk, and a white waistcoat, two pairs of trousers, one dark mixed and the other a black, six or seven bottles of brandy, two or three bottles of home made wine, a black hat, two gold seals, a gold ring, key, three brooches, and four silver spoons - some of them were in drawers and some in a chest. I lost about 6l. in money; every thing was safe when I left home. I wore part of the clothes two days before - the value of the articles stated in the indictment is about 15l. I gave information at Bow-street that day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has any of it been found? A. Part has been found at some pawnbrokers - the street door was broken open; the girl who fetched me is not here - the market is five miles from Fulham.

ELIZABETH GOLDING . I live in Fulham-fields, near Mr. Adam's; my husband's name is George. In June, 1826, about two o'clock one morning, I was near Mr. Adam's house - it was very moonlight, and there was light enough to see a person's face without the moon; I was going to Mr. Adam's, to see if his cart was gone to market; I am in the habit of going there at that time in the morning; I found the door ajar, and heard several people talking inside the house; I listened, and heard James Evans swearing dreadfully in the parlour. I heard the parlour door open, and then made my escape to the water-butt; I saw James Evans come out, with an iron crow-bar in his hand. I saw the prisoner Beal come out with a sack on his shoulder; I had known him before for a long time. There was Richard Chip , Henry Woodger , and the prisoner Griffiths also there; Griffiths was the last man who came out of the house - I have known him from a child; the last three were not carrying any thing; they used very improper words; when they came out Griffiths put his hand behind, and drew the door too after him; they all went away to Mr. Adam's pit, which is a low piece of ground - I was afraid to speak to them, and went home as fast as I could; when I got to the corner of my own house I stood till they came along; they came swearing down the road; three of them came by my side, Evans with the crow-bar in his left hand, and Beal with the sack; Chip had got nothing. I said to Evans, "Jem, tell me what it is o'clock;" he made no answer till he had passed me - he then used an improper word, and said, "Run, for she knows us;" I followed them at a distance, and hallooed after them; I saw them pull two bottles out of their pockets, and throw into Mr. Poynter's garden; one was found whole, and the other broken;

Beal pulled out one bottle, and James Evans the other; I was examined twice at Bow-street, as Griffiths was not in custody at first. I do not remember what day in June it was.

Cross-examined. Q. When you heard them in the house you hid yourself behind the water-butt? A. Yes. I have always told the same story; I said so when I was at Bow-street; I have not spoken to any body in the neighbourhood about it - I might in a private way mention it. I know Elizabeth Oakley ; I said nothing to her about it, except that I saw them by my own house; I never mentioned to any one that I had seen them in the house, for I was afraid to say so - I was afraid of my life, for they are all thieves colleagued together; I told Elizabeth Salter I saw them by own house; I was afraid to say I saw them in the house; I said nothing about the waterbutt to them. I had some conversation at Maria Abbott's- I did not mention the water-butt to her, they are such bad characters altogether; I was afraid to say I saw them in the house. Mr. Adam's house is not further from mine than from here to Newgate.

Q. Was your husband at home that night? A. No - he was out watching his master's fruit garden.

Q. On your going from the water-butt to your own house, had you not to pass the garden where your husband was watching? A. Yes, but I could not speak to him. The garden wall is not a dozen yards from my house, but I cannot say in what part of the garden he was - I hid behind the butt because I knew what sort of people they were; nobody but my children were at home - I stood at my door till they came by, as I could have called my neighbours if they had insulted me. I never quarrelled with Beal - I owed his father some money; Beal never came for it; his father has come - I never said I would serve him out. I may have been asked for the money three or four times - it might be five or six; he might come when I was out.

Q. When Griffiths was taken did you not say you could not swear to him exactly? A. No; I never said I could not swear to him; I have not paid old Beal - it has never been in my power.

CATHERINE HAYES . I live at No. 12, Perkins-rents, Westminster. One Saturday morning in June, 1826; I do not know the day of the month; at half-past five o'clock I saw James Evans, the prisoner Griffiths, and Henry Woodger; they came to my house - I was in bed; my door was not fastened; they opened it, came in, and awoke me - they asked if I would have any thing to drink - I said I did not mind; they said I should have some brandy - they took a small glass off the mantel-piece, then took a bottle out of one of their coat pockets, and poured a glass full, but it was wine instead of brandy; they remained there about a quarter of an hour, and asked if I could get up and take breakfast with them - I got up, and went with them to No. 9, Perkins-rents; I lived at that time at No. 56, Old Pye-street - we breakfasted at No. 9, Perkins-rents; they asked me to take a walk with them: we went over the water; Evans asked if I would pledge a waistcoat for them - Griffiths was with us, but not close enough to hear what he said; I pawned it in the Borough, for 3s., I do not know the pawnbroker's name; Woodger asked me to pawn a coat - I pawned that at Sowerby's, in Cable-street, for 1l., I think; Griffiths did not hear him ask me to pawn it, he was behind a long way; it was a dark brown coat - he had it on over his own; the waistcoat was a striped kerseymere, with brass buttons. The prisoners went on while I went into the shops; I parted with them about five o'clock in the afternoon; we were together all that time.

Cross-examined. Q. You have mentioned all the persons who were with you? A. Yes; Beal was there, but I received nothing from him; Woodger gave me nothing to pawn. This was above a year ago. I was examined before the Magistrate at Westminster; I was taken into custody. I am an unfortunate girl. I recollect it was in June, and near the end of the month I believe, but will not swear whether it was the beginning or end; they were in the habit of coming down the place where I lived; they never called at my lodging before; I was alone. The officer took me up a fortnight afterwards, and then I told this, as I could not swear falsely - I did not accuse them to save myself; I will not swear I had no fear for myself. I did not mention it till I was taken up.

Q. You accused them to save yourself? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Was Chip there? A. Not in my room; I saw him with the others that morning. I was not afraid of being prosecuted; I was afraid of being ill-used, as some people of Hammersmith said they would murder me if I said a word about it. I appeared against them because I was taken.

Q. You said just now it was to save yourself that you accused them? A. Yes, to save myself from being ill-used. The men from Hammersmith said if I said a word against them they would dash my brains out.

Q. How could you save yourself by accusing them? A. I have been threatened to be ill-used so often; I was obliged to accuse them when I was taken for it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you were taken for this robbery, did you not accuse them to get yourself out of a scrape? A. Certainly I did - if I said otherwise I should say false.

COURT. Q. How came you to accuse them? A. I was brought to appear against them; every thing I have said is true.

MR. PHILLIPS to ELIZABETH GOLDING. Q. Did not you tell Elizabeth Salter that you hid yourself in a hedge and point out the spot to her? A. I said I was at the corner of a hedge, by my own house, when they came by.

Q. Why not tell her of the water-butt? A. I did not wish every body to know my secrets; it was of little consequence to tell her, as she is of no character whatever.

ELIZABETH PARKER . I lodge at No. 9, Perkins-rents, and did so in June, 1826. I remember one Saturday morning in June, at four o'clock or a little after, these men, whose names I did not know, came to my room - I had no acquaintance with them; the prisoners were not in my room at first; Tom Evans and another, whose name I do not know, came in - Beal and Griffiths afterwards joined them; I was in bed. Chip was with them, but he did not come into the room till afterwards; the two men first came in, and asked me to have something to drink; they said I should have some brandy - they took a bottle, and poured some into a cup on the chimney-piece, but it turned out to be wine - I said it was wine; they staid

there, and all had breakfast together with me - five of them breakfasted with me; only two came in first, and the rest afterwards; after breakfast they drank some brandy. Catherine Hayes had come with two or three of them, and breakfasted with us, and after breakfast we all went out together, across Westminster-bridge, and over London-bridge, right up to the Minories; the five men went with us - one of them, Tom Evans , took off a light top coat, and gave it to me to pawn in the Minories; I pawned it for 1l. 7s.; he came over, and whispered to me to pawn it; the others did not hear what he said; Evans took off another coat afterwards, and asked me to pawn it, which I did, for 1l. - the prisoners did not hear him, as they were crossing over to a public-house; I pawned it in Sparrow-corner.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you remember whether this was the beginning or end of June? A. No; I did not mention it till I was taken up; I told the truth to save myself; I did not know but what they were their own clothes. I am an unfortunate girl.

COURT. Q. How came you to tell about it? A. I was taken up for pawning the coats. I was afraid to come against the prisoners.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not the fear of being convicted yourself which made you tell? A. Yes; I would not have come but I was forced.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 19th of June last I saw Beal with two more persons, in the Strand; I followed him up to Covent-garden-market, as I had received information of this robbery; I suspected them - I went up and said I suspected something was wrong, and should take him into custody; I said, "Don't you know Mr. Adam, of Fulham?" he said Yes; I put him into the watch-house, and searched him, but found nothing relating to the robbery; the next morning, as I was going from the watch-house to the office, I told him there were persons up against him - he said, were the girls against him, meaning, I suppose, the two women; I said, Yes, and a person named Golding as well; I said it was a long time since the robbery occurred, and perhaps Golding would not know him - he said Yes, she would be sure to know him; I did not either threaten or promise him anything; I said I wondered he had escaped so long - he said he had been to Brighton; I said he had better have continued there - he said he should have done so, but he could get no employ - he then said he knew nothing of the robbery. The pawnbrokers are not here, as the things were redeemed.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in the habit of examining prisoners? A. No; this was promiscuously, in the course of conversation.

MR. ADAMS re-examined. The robbery was between the 16th and 17th of June. I have a coat on which I redeemed; here is a striped waistcoat with brass buttons, a pair of trousers, and a box coat - they were all taken from my house at the time in question - I can swear to them all - the waistcoat was new, and worth 10s., the trousers, 15s., the box-coat, 30s., and the one I have on is worth 30s., it had only been worn three times when I lost it - I got the box-coat from Matthews, a pawnbroker, in the Minories: the close coat from Annis, at Sparrow-corner - the trousers from Watts, of Smithfield, and the waistcoat from somebody in the Borough. I swear positively to them all.

CATHERINE HAYES. I pawned this waistcoat in the Borough - I had it from Evans; I do not know the coat which Mr. Adam has on.

ELIZABETH PARKER. I can swear to this box-coat - I pawned it in the Minories; Tom Evans gave it to me, and the coat Mr. Adams has on I pawned in Sparrow-corner; Evans also gave me that. The prisoners were in our company, drinking afterwards; and they had been together before Evans gave me the property.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were they from him when he gave you the coat? A. About one hundred yards.

CATHERINE HAYES. When Evans gave me the waistcoat the prisoners were about fifty yards off; they had been drinking together before.

BEAL's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GRIFFITHS' Defence. The woman is false.

Four Witnesses deposed to Beal's good character, and one to Griffith's.

BEAL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary.

Reference Number: t18270712-23

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1396. CATHERINE LYONS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Jackson , on the morning of the 12th of June , (no person being therein) and stealing 2 blankets, value 7s.; 3 waistcoats, value 2s.; 1 coat, value 1s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 1s. 6d., and 1 shirt, value 6d., the goods of Charles Drewett .

CHARLES DREWETT. I live in Lisson-street, Mary-le-bone . On the 12th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I locked my room door, and went out - I returned as the clock struck one; I found the window had been lifted up and this property taken. Mr. Jackson keeps the house, and lives there. I lodge in the kitchen - there are several lodgers.

HESTER ROGERS . My aunt lodges in the second floor of this house. I went into the area for some water, and saw a woman get out of Drewett's window, with her lap full of clothes; she told me the woman was not at home - I did not know who lived there, as the people had just come in. She went into the street; I went and told the lodgers, who went out to look for her - I never saw her before.

JOHANNAH TAME . I live next door to Jackson. On the 12th of June I saw the prisoner go down to the area. I knew her before, and thought she might be going into the yard - I went in doors. I came out in a few minutes and she was gone; she had nothing in her lap when she went in. I saw her in Lisson-street, between four and five o'clock, with a bundle; I called Mrs. Jackson - we watched her into a house in Little James-street; she threw a lap full of things on the floor. I fetched Smith the officer.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I took the prisoner in a house in Little James-street; the property on the floor did not belong to this prosecutor - his articles have not been found.(See Third Day.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-24

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1370. JAMES HAWES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , 1 clock,

value 5l., the goods of Richard Joyce , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a constable of Bow-street. I live in Peter-street, Friars' Mount, Bethnal-green. On the 20th of June, about half-past 1 o'clock at noon, I saw the prisoner in Brick-lane, and watched him into Brown's-lane, where I secured him, with this clock under his arm; I asked him what it was - he said a clock; I asked where he was going with it - he said he could not tell me, but he would show me - I asked where he brought it from - he said from Mr. Matthews, of Dalston. I found two ladies' gowns in his trousers, they were wet, and I asked how he came by them - he then said he would tell me the truth - that he met a man at Dalston, who said he would give him 1s. to carry them to Spitalfields church, where he would meet him; he was about a mile and a half from the prosecutor's house. I have had the property ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go with him to Spitalfields church? A. No; he said if I would I should see the man there; I locked him up, and then went - he was about ten minutes walk from the church. I took him to the watch-house, which is about ten minutes walk, in White Lion-street, about a quarter of a mile from where I took him; the church might be about a quarter of a mile from the watch-house - it might be twenty minutes before I got to the church. I saw nobody waiting there; he was going in a direction from the church when I met him.

RICHARD JOYCE. I live at Cambridge-house, Hackney-road , in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I keep a laundry , and rent the house - I missed this clock a little before twelve o'clock on the morning of the 21st of June; I had seen it the day before, about the same time - here it is; it is mine, and worth 5l. and more, the maker's name is Stroud.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it? A. The handle is a very particular one, which I ordered myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I came by it as I stated to the officer.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270712-25

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1371. GEORGE ROTHWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 yard of striped marcella, value 4s., and 3/4 of a yard of figured marcella, value 3s. , the goods of John Lethborg .

THOMAS GARDNER FINDLAY . I am in the employ of John Lethborg - he is a tailor , and lives in Grub-street . On the 9th of July, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, I put this marcella in the shop window - I saw the prisoner about the window, looking in, and suspected him - I was called next door, and while there I saw him going into the shop; he came out with something behind his coat - I secured him about three yards off, and saw this marcella on the ground; he must have dropped it, for nobody was near him.

MARY BARROW . I live next door to Lethborg. I saw the prisoner go into the shop and come out - Findlay stopped him; he took the Marcella from behind his coat and put it down - there was nobody near him.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a constable. I took him in charge; he said a man in a fustian jacket took the property and dropped it by his side.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Grub-street, on my way to the New London Bridge, and just as I passed the shop door, a young man threw something down at my feet; the person collared me, and charged me with this robbery, of which I am entirely innocent.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270712-26

1372. DAVID COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , 1 wooden cask, called a pipe, value 10s. , the goods of John William Goss .

STEPHEN PHILLIPS . I am in the employ of John William Goss, who is a wharfinger ; this pipe was in the lane opposite the wharf - the prisoner was quite a stranger. On the 11th of June, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner rolling it away, he had got nearly to the top of the lane, about fifty yards - I ran and caught him just round the corner, and asked what he was going to do with it - he said he was going to roll it over to the owners', Messrs. Potts' - there was a brand mark on the head, with their name on it; it is a vinegar pipe. I went for a constable, and gave him in charge - he was going towards Messrs. Potts'; it is not usual to take them away without our leave.

JAMES LANE . I am clerk to Messrs. Potts. I do not know the prisoner; he was never in their employ; he had no authority to fetch this pipe - it was directed to our house, by a customer from the country - men sometimes bring pipes to us, and we pay them 1s.

NATHANIEL LAWRENCE . I am a constable, and received him in charge with the pipe - he said he was going to roll it to Messrs. Potts', and thought he might get 6d. for it.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a general rule to allow 1s. or 6d. for taking a cask home, and having nothing to do, I was going to take it home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-27

1373. JAMES MORLEY and GEORGE ATKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 2 lbs. of ham, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of Mary Stevens .

JAMES GRIFFIN BISHOP . I live at No. 102, Fetter-lane , Holborn, with my father - he is an ironmonger. Stevens keeps a chandler-shop , at No. 45. On the 30th of June, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners about the place - they had been up and down the lane for a week past. Morley took a piece of ham out of the window and gave it to Atkins, who put it under his apron. I called Welsh out of the shop, and he went after them.

EDWARD WELSH . I am servant to Mary Stevens, who is a widow . Bishop gave me information - I went out and saw the prisoners in Holborn, and just before I caught them Atkins dropped the ham - I picked it up, and caught hold of them.

THOMAS STEVENS . I live with Mary Stevens - the prisoners were brought into the shop with the ham, which is here; it is worth 1s. 9d., there is 2lbs. of it.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am a constable, and received them in charge with the ham.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MORLEY's Defence. I was going down Fetter-lane, looking for work, and was taken.

ATKINS' Defence. I was going towards Holborn; a boy threw the bacon into my lap - I ran away with it, and did not know whether he had stolen it or not.

MORLEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

ATKINS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-28

1374. HENRY WESTOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 piece of black twilled stuff, containing 28 yards, value 21s. , the goods of Samuel Sykes .

SAMUEL SYKES. I am a warehouseman and live at No. 49, Bow-lane - the prisoner is quite a stranger. On the 6th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was engaged in the counting-house, and heard a noise in the warehouse, the door was half open - I went in, and missed two pieces of stuff from the counter, which I had seen safe a quarter of an hour before. I went into the street, and in a court adjoining I observed a boy with two pieces - I will not swear that it was the prisoner. I returned to fasten my warehouse, and then went in pursuit, but without effect. I returned to my street door, and in about ten minutes I saw the prisoner (who appeared to me to be the same boy) coming to the door, with a piece of stuff under his arm - I laid hold of him and took it from him. I gave him in charge; it is one of the pieces which had been taken from my warehouse - there are twenty-eight yards of it; it is worth 21s. He said he had picked up it - this was within a quarter of an hour of its being stolen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The boy took two parcels? A. Yes; I found the prisoner close to my door, with only one.

HENRY MACKRILL . I am a constable, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-29

1375. JOHN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 piece of brown holland, containing 51 yards, value 21s. , the goods of William Farrar .

THOMAS HUTTON . I am servant to William Farrar, who keeps a Scotch warehouse , at No. 56, Bread-street . On the 11th of July I was in the warehouse, the door was ajar - I heard a noise, turned my head, and saw a hand just within the entrance of the door, but I could not see the person's face - the hand laid hold of a piece of holland, and took it out. I opened the door, and the man let the goods fall - I pursued, and merely lost sight of him for half a minute, as he turned the corner. I am sure I caught sight of the same man again - it was the prisoner; he was stopped in my sight - the holland is worth 21s. I saw him drop it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BROWN . I am a porter. I heard the cry of Stop thief! at the corner of Bow-lane, Watling-street; I saw the prisoner running down Watling-street, and stopped him; Hutton and several others were pursuing him; he said, "It is nothing, only just a lark - let me go;" Hutton took him back.

THOMAS WILLIS . I am a constable, and took him in charge with the holland - he had nothing to say.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-30

1376. MARY RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 key, value 2d., and 1 ribbon, value 1d. , the goods of Joseph Bolsover .

JANE BOLSOVER . I am the wife of Joseph Bolsover - he is a dealer in coals , and lives in Moor-lane . This watch was silver, and worth 30s.; there was a key and ribbon to it - it hung in the parlour, behind the shop; I saw it safe about half a minute before it was stolen; the prisoner was in the parlour, alone - I had asked her to take a cup of tea with me; I had occasion to go into the yard, and on looking through the window I saw her take the watch down off the hook; she ran out as fast as she could with it - I ran in, and said to my man, "Run out, for that woman has taken my watch;" I have not found it. I did not see her again till last Wednesday; I did not know where she lived.

MARY HANCOCK . I live in White-street, Moorfields. I went into the prosecutor's room, and saw the watch hanging there - I went out, leaving the prisoner in the room, and the watch safe; I went home, and in five minutes I saw her run out of the shop.

JAMES WRIGHT WHITCOMB . I was in the prosecutor's service at that time; my mistress came out, and sent me after the prisoner, but I could not find her.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable. I apprehended her last Wednesday week, in Star-court, Grub-street - she said she knew nothing about the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-31

1377. WILLIAM RICHARDS and MICHAEL COUGHLAN were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Giles , from his person .

WILLIAM GILES. I live at Mitcham, and am private secretary to Mr. Hoare, the banker . On the 5th of June, about the middle of the day, I was going up Fetter-lane , near Rolls-buildings; I did not miss my handkerchief, but the witness Reeve told me it was gone - I had used it an hour before; I then felt in my pocket, and missed it; I returned with him into his mother's shop - he said he had sent the shopman after the thieves, and in five minutes both the prisoners were brought in; my handkerchief was not found - it was worth 3s.

CHARLES POLLETT . I am shopman to Mrs. Reeve, No. 118, Fetter-lane. On the 5th of June I was dining in the parlour; my young master called me out, took me to the corner of Rolls-buildings, and pointed out the two prisoners; they turned a corner into White's-alley - I followed, and turned round; Coughlan was going up a place which is no thoroughfare - I collared him, and called Stop thief! after the other; I dragged him after me, and caught hold of Richards, who was about ten yards off - they were both close together before; I charged them with picking a pocket; they said they were innocent, that they were both looking for work, and were strangers to each other. They were running close together when I first saw them.

Prisoner COUGHLAN. Q. Was not I looking into a

window, reading a bill? A. He just turned his head round towards a window, whether there was a bill in it I do not know.

WILLIAM THOMAS REEVE . I am fourteen years old, and live with my parents, in Fetter-lane - they keep an oil and Italian warehouse. On the 5th of June I saw Mr. Giles at the corner of Rolls-buildings; the prisoners were close to him; I saw them draw a pocket-handkerchief out of his pocket - Coughlan was the one who drew it out; he put it into his breast pocket; I was four or five yards off; they turned down Rolls-buildings. I went into the parlour, and called out Pollett; I then went and told Mr. Giles what I had seen; I did not pursue; I afterwards saw them in Pollett's custody, and was quite sure of them - they were taken in four or five minutes.

Prisoner RICHARDS. He said at first that I was not with Coughlan. Witness. No; I said there was a third one behind them.

THOMAS TOOVEY . I am a contable. The prisoners were delivered into my custody on this charge - I took them to Hatton-garden.

COUGHLAN's Defence. I was coming up Fetter-lane, and on turning down Rolls-buildings it came on very wet - I ran; a man came and pursued me; I stopped at a window to look at a bill, and he said I had picked a gentleman's pocket - I said I was innocent. They searched me three times, but could not find the handkerchief; I never saw the other prisoner before in my life.

RICHARD's Defence. I heard a gentleman halloo Stop thief! I immediately stopped; he took Coughlan towards me, and said it was for picking a pocket.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

COUGHLAN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270712-32

1378. SARAH CLARKE , ANN PAINE , and ELIZABETH WOODHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 jacket, value 1s. 6d., and 1 waistcoat, value 6d., the goods of John Large , from his person .

JOHN LARGE. I live in Cowcross, and have been in the Navy . On the 11th of July, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking about, fronting the bar at the Key public-house, in Fleet-market , taking some refreshment - I had my jacket on my arm; there were some women there. Clarke and Woodham were there. While I was walking about (I was a little fresh, but not drunk; they were quite strangers) they asked me to give them some drink - I gave them some liquor at the bar. I put my jacket and waistcoat on a cask by the bar, and walked about without them; I missed the clothes - the women were then gone; this was between half and three quarters of an hour afterwards. I went into Holborn, and told an officer; they were taken very soon afterwards, with the things - they were brought into the watch-house; I only remember Woodham and Clarke; I saw my jacket and waistcoat at the watch-house next day, and knew them; I am sure they are the women who were at the public-house.

Prisoner CLARKE. Q. Can you be certain of me? A. She was certainly there with Woodham, but I cannot say I gave her liquor.

Prisoner WOODHAM. He took me out of the market into the public-house, to drink. PROSECUTOR. I did not - they did not go in with me; I think they must have been in before me; I cannot swear they did not go in at the same time with me. I did not speak to either of them in the market; I did not know Woodham before - I never spoke to her before.

JOHN THOMAS GRAY . I am an officer of the Mansion House. On the 11th of July, a little after five o'clock, I saw Large, who said he had been robbed of some money, a knife, a jacket, and a waistcoat - that he had been drinking with some women at the Key, in Fleet-market; he was far from being sober; I went to a house in Fleet-lane, and saw Paine and Clarke; Paine had the jacket and waistcoat in her possession; I asked where she got them - she said she had them that afternoon from a woman, who told her they belonged to her husband, who was dead - I said,"Where?" she said, "At the Key, in Fleet-market;" I took them to the watch-house; Large said the clothes were his; he said nothing about the women; I then went to the Key, and found nobody there. I then went to the watch-house, and told Paine the woman was not there; I took Paine to her lodgings in Parker's-rents, and found Woodham in bed there - she denied the charge; I took her to the watch-house; Large was there, and said she was one of the women, but he did not speak to either of the others; Paine said to Woodham, "Ought not you to be ashamed of yourself for getting an innocent woman into trouble; Large did not identify Clarke till next day, at Guildhall. Woodham had been drinking.

JOHN LARGE . This is my jacket and waistcoat; I am sure I did not give them to her. I had some silver.

WOODHAM's Defence. When I met him he had not a farthing in his pocket - I have known him many years; he used to come backwards and forwards to me in Peter-street - he had been treating some girls; I went into the Key, and treated him with two quarterns and a half of gin; he put down these things, and told me to take them and make what I could of them; I was quite tipsy when I took them - he had been fighting in Fleet-market.

PAINE's Defence. I was at home and in bed; I had laid down after dinner, and these things were brought to me - I was to pawn or sell them. I thought they looked too old to pledge; I tried them, and nobody would take them in - I offered them for sale in Fleet-lane, believing them to have belonged to Woodham's deceased husband; a man gave me 1s. 6d. for them, saying he would return them in half an hour; I went to Woodham, who said she must have more; I went and was stopped, as they were stolen; the first time I saw the man, was at the watch-house.

CLARKE's Defence. I met him talking to Woodham; they went away together - I saw nothing more.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-33

1379. JAMES TAYLOR and SAMUEL ROGERS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Lawton , about nine o'clock in the night of the 21st of June , at St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate , with intent to steal, and stealing 18 gold rings, value 4l., and 1 silver snuff-box, value 20s., his property .

EDWARD GRIFFIN . I am in the employ of Philip Lawton, who lives at No. 151, Bishopsgate-street, City , in the parish of St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate - he is a pawnbroker , and rents the whole house. On the 21st of June these gold rings and snuff-box were in the window - I was at home; it was light enough, outside the house, to distinguish a person's features; I saw the prisoner Taylor at the window, about ten minutes before eight o'clock - he was at work at the window, backwards and forwards - he had a bag over his shoulder, and his hand under the bag - his thumb was at work at the window, which had been cracked the day before - I did not see the other prisoner; I saw Taylor break the window - the rings were not above an inch from the broken pane - they were in the silver snuff-box, and were worth near 5l. without the box; I saw him take them out - I ran to the door, and found he was stopped; the rings and box were produced - they are the same - I had not seen Rogers - he was not taken for a day or two afterwards; my master has no partner.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer, and was in Bishopsgate-street; I saw Taylor, Rogers, and a third person, all in company together - I observed them together for three quarters of an hour - I went into Mr. Good's, a stationer's-shop opposite, after watching them; I saw Taylor go to the prosecutor's window to and fro several times - Rogers was at a distance off with the other; Taylor left the window, for about three minutes and went to speak to them - Taylor returned to the window, and was there some minutes; he had got the bag over his shoulder, and I suspected he had got a knife in his hand - I could see his elbow at work; Rogers and the other were at the corner of Union-street, which is forty or fifty yards off, at the time - all at once Taylor ran away from the window, and went in a direction towards Rogers; I and two others ran out after him; he had not got so far as Rogers when we laid hold of him; he ran into my arms; I did not see Rogers any more till we came before the Lord Mayor, at the examination; he was close to Union-street at the time I ran out to take Taylor - they had gone by the shop, to and fro, several times; I saw Taylor drop the box, which I picked up, it contained eleven gold rings; seven more rings were picked up by a gentleman who ran out of the shop with me - he gave them to me; the box had not opened in the fall, and those rings could not have been in it - it was a silver box; I searched Taylor, and found a little knife in his pocket; I looked at the window next day, and the putty was scraped away from it, and there was putty on the knife; the rings and box were claimed by Griffin.

EDWARD GRIFFIN . This is the box - it contained more than thirty rings, but in the confusion some of them fell out; I saw him take some and put into his jacket before he took the box.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. I watched Taylor at the window, and saw both the prisoners talking together at the window; I was in Mr. Good's shop with Keys; Taylor was backwards and forwards at the window till about nine o'clock, when he ran from the window, and I after him; he ran to the coach-stand - I saw the box drop from his hand - it was picked up; I did not see Rogers when Taylor was seized; this was Thursday night, and he was taken on the Saturday I think; the property was claimed by Griffin; I had seen the window in the afternoon, it was then safe.

ABRAHAM LEVISON . I am a working-jeweller. I was near Mr. Lawton's shop, and saw Keys at the corner of Union-street; I spoke to him, and then observed Rogers with the third one, beckoning to Taylor to come from the window, as if somebody saw him; he then came away, but did not come up to him; I continued waiting - he went up to the window again - some people were coming by, and he left it again; I went into Mr. Good's shop, opposite, with Keys - Keys said, "Go out;" I crossed the road, and heard a conversation between Taylor, Rogers, and the third man - Taylor said, "It is all right for the fawneys and the sneezers," meaning the rings and snuff-box; I crossed over into Good's shop, and soon after he accomplished his purpose; we ran out and took him; Rogers was then gone; I saw the snuff-box, which I took up.

ROBERT CRAIG . I am an officer. I received information of the robbery, and took Rogers on the Saturday, in Whitechapel - I told him it was for a robbery at Mr. Lawton's, he said, "Me, Sir!" that is all.

TAYLOR's Defence. I came out by myself. I know no more of this boy than you do; he was not with me.

ROGERS' Defence. I never saw any thing of this boy before; I was playing in Bishopsgate-street with another boy - I bid him good night about a quarter to nine o'clock, and went home - I was in Whitechapel, and the officer came and said he wanted me for breaking a window in Bishopsgate-street; I said, "I know nothing about it.

TAYLOR - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

ROGERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary.

Reference Number: t18270712-34

THIRD DAY. - SATURDAY, JULY 14.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1380. CATHERINE LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 4 gowns, value 15s.; 1 tippet, value 1s.; 1 frill, value 6d.; 3 pairs of drawers, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 6d.; 2 curtains, value 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 napkin, value 2d.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 1 bag, value 1d.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 sash, value 1s.; 1 necklace, value 5s.; 1 belt and buckle, value 3s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s. , the goods of James Kirkham .

SOPHIA KIRKHAM . I am the wife of James Kirkham, and live in Belton-street, New-road . On the 12th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed the articles stated in the indictment, from the back attic - I had seen them safe between eleven and twelve o'clock; the street door is generally open; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN WHITTAKER . I am shopman to Mr. Gideon, a pawnbroker, Stafford-street, Lisson-green. I have two handkerchiefs which the prisoner pawned on the 12th of June, in the name of Catherine Manners , of No. 5, James-street; I saw her at Mary-le-bone office about a week afterwards, and am sure of her person.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, at her lodging in Little James-street; a duplicate of this handkerchief was found in her pocket; I found in her room four gowns, two curtains, a necklace, a waistcoat, a cap, and a frill, all of which Mr. Kirkham claims.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman whom I had not seen for two years - we went and drank together; she had these things in her apron, and asked where she could get a lodging; I said she might make shift at my place - she got me to pawn these handkerchiefs.

J. J. SMITH. She said at the office that the necklace was thrown into her window, and the rest of the things she had of a lady in exchange for some flowers.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years . (See page 528.)

Reference Number: t18270712-35

Reference Number: t18270712-36

1381. WILLIAM SHEEN (THE YOUNGER) stood indicted for the wilful murder of a certain male child, of tender age (to wit), about four months , baptized by the name of Charles William .

TWELVE OTHER COUNTS, calling it "a male bastard child only," "a male bastard child, called and known by the name of Charles William;" "William - Billy - and Charles." "A male child, called and known by the name of Charles William - William - Billy - Charles." A male child called and known by the name of William Sheen.""A male child, whose name is unknown," and "A male bastard child, whose name is unknown." To this indictment the prisoner put in a plea of autre fois acquit - the plea, upon being read, stated that the prisoner had been acquitted of the premises in the said indictment mentioned, that Charles William Beadle , for whose murder he had been tried and acquitted, was the same child as in this indictment mentioned, and that the murder charged in this indictment was the same; and that the child described in the former indictment was as well known by the name of Charles William Beadle as by the several names in this indictment, or by any of them. It was admitted on the part of the Crown, that the prisoner had been tried and acquitted on an indictment for murder, and that the male child mentioned in both the indictments was one and the same, but that the child was not so well known by the name of Charles William Beadle as by any or either of the names stated in the indictment now before the Court. Upon this plea and replication a Jury were impanneled, to try the issue. (See Fifth Session, page 395.)

Messrs. CLARKSON and CRESWELL (on behalf of the prisoner) called -

JOHN SUTTON . I am clerk to the solicitor for the prosecution. I examined the register of baptisms of St. George the Martyr, Southwark; I saw the parish-clerk copy this extract from the register, at his own house - it is a true copy: (read.)

This was a certificate of the baptism of Charles William, son of Lydia Beadle, of Mr. Willis' poor-house, Lombard-street, baptized on the 31st of January, 1827.

ELIZABETH CABLE . I am nurse at Willis' poor-house; we had a woman there named Lydia Beadle - she was delivered of a male child there - it was in January, to the best of my knowledge; it was baptized at St. George the Martyr- I stood Godmother to it; I do not know when it left the workhouse. The mother brought it to the workhouse on the day it was murdered, to see the grandmother, who was there; this was before it was dead. The mother was single at the time she was delivered - she was married nearly two months afterwards; the name the infant was called by, was either William or Billy, that was after the baptism; a young woman who laid-in at the same time, also stood to the child, and two young men in the house stood Godfathers; I do not exactly know their names - they were strangers to me.

COURT. Q. Should you have known this child by the name of Beadle or not? A. Yes.

Q. If anybody spoke of it you would have known it as Beadle? A. Yes; I should have known it as Charles William Beadle: if any one had inquired of me about the child as Charles William Beadle, I should have known who it meant; I never heard it called by the name Beadle; it was called by the name of William or Billy.

WILLIAM SHEEN, SEN. I am the prisoner's father. I did not know my son's child till after it was dead; my wife is here; she knows no more than I.

Q. Did you ever hear, during the life-time of the child, what its name was? A. Yes, Sir, Charles William Sheen, I heard; I have heard that its mother's name was Lydia Beadle. I know nothing of the baptism; I cannot swear that my son and Beadle were ever married.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT ANDREWS. Q. From whom have you heard that its name was Charles William Sheen? A. I heard it from several persons; I do not recollect who; it was not from my wife. I really cannot exactly say what the name was.

Q. Did you not say on the former trial that you did not know its name, and never heard it till after the child's death? A. I cannot answer.

MR. SERGEANT ANDREWS (on the part of the Crown) called - SARAH POMEROY . The prisoner and his wife came to lodge with me, No. 2, Christopher-alley, Whitechapel; they were there for about two months before the child's death; it was about four months old when it was killed; the child came with them. When I asked the mother what its name was, she said "William." I heard her call it William, and never heard it called by any other name.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know whether the mother was married when she came to lodge at your house? A. She said so.

JOHN MALPAS . I first knew Mrs. Sheen, the mother of this child, two days before she was married, which was on a Tuesday, in March; since that I have frequently seen her with the child; she called it William and Billy. I never heard it called by any other name; I have been present when old Sheen and his wife have been there. I never heard the mother call the child by any name in their presence.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What was the mother's name before she was married? A. Lydia Beadle; I did not hear the child called by any name before the marriage.

COURT. Q. You knew her name to be Beadle; if you had heard the child called William or Billy Beadle, should you have known who it meant? A. Yes.

Q. I mean, if persons were talking of little Billy Beadle, not in the presence of the mother, should you have known who was meant by it? A. No; I should not know who it meant, because I never heard the name called.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You knew the mother's name to be Beadle, and you know the child to be hers; then if you heard the child called William or Billy Beadle, should you not have known it to be hers? A. In her presence I should; but after her marriage I should have called it Sheen.

HENRY BUCKLER . I am short-hand writer to the Court, and took notes of the trial in question; the witness, William Sheen, was asked, (reads) "Did you ever hear the child's name?" his answer was, "I did not know what the name

of the child was, till after I heard it was dead." He was then asked, "Did you hear that from your son?" and answered, "No." "Did you ever hear the child called by any name by your son?" Answer, "I don't recollect that I ever did." "Are you sure about this?" "Not that I recollect."

COURT. Q. Was there any person called to prove that the child in question, was the same as was baptized? A. No, my Lord.

The Jury found a verdict for the prisoner; namely, "that the child was known as well by the name of Charles William Beadle, as by any of the names stated in the present indictment." He was accordingly discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-37

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1382. JOHN ROWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 gelding, value 5l.; 1 chaise, value 3l., and 1 set of harness, value 3l. , the goods of Daniel Daniels .

DANIEL DANIELS. I live in Britannia-Row, Hoxton, and am a paper-stainer . On Friday, the 18th of May, I entrusted the prisoner to go to Smithfield to sell a horse, chaise, and harness - he came and asked if he should go with it to Smithfield. I said I was going myself, and did not particularly want him that day. Mr. Davies came up; the prisoner got into the chaise - I told Mr. Davies he had better get into the chaise too, as I was younger than him, and could walk. I told the prisoner to ask 14l. for it, if he was there first, but not to sell it, for I was coming directly after him. I got to Smithfield about three o'clock - I had told the prisoner I would allow him 1s. in the pound on what it sold for. When I got to Smithfield I saw Davies first - we went to the prisoner, and placed him in Smithfield to show it; we went round the market, came back, and found him in the same place; he said nobody had bid him any money. I told him not to sell it - and Davies said "Don't sell it yourself; Mr. Daniels will soon be back and would like to sell it himself." Davies went home - I stood by the prisoner some time; then the prisoner's uncle came, whom I had known for sixteen years - he and I went round the market, leaving him in the same place, and when we came back the prisoner was gone; the last time I left him was about a quarter to six o'clock. I have known him fifteen or sixteen years; the horse and chaise were also gone. I did not see him again till the 19th of June - his uncle is employed in the same factory with me, and as the prisoner was out of work, he asked me to employ him to sell the horse; the uncle did not apply to me first. I told him myself that I wished tosell it. On the night of the 10th, he said the prisoner was out of work, and might he go to Smithfield with it. I said I should like to go myself; the uncle said, the business was so urgent I had better let him go - I asked if he thought it was safe to trust him, and I told the prisoner he might go; he had only said, that he could go. I told him not to sell it, but to bring me a customer; he took it to Smithfield on the 11th, about three o'clock. I went at six, and found him there - I went back with him, as it was not sold; and on the 18th we went again, as I have stated - his uncle is a man of property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I ask you, did you never give the prisoner authority to sell this horse? A. No; I never told any body that I gave him authority to sell it. I never told his uncle Bull so; I know Mr. Spencer, a cooper - I saw him the evening it was stolen, and told him the prisoner was gone away with it, but did not say I had given him leave to sell it - nor did I ever tell Dawes so, nor Mr. Gigg - I swear I never told any person that I had given him authority to sell it. I told them all that he had been to Smithfield to get me a customer.

Q. Did not the prisoner come to you one evening and say, he had been offered 12l. for it, at Smithfield? A. That was on the 11th; I said if he knew where the person lived he might have strained another pound. I did not blame him for not taking the 12l. I never said to his uncle, when he did not come home, that I dare to say he had sold it.

JOHN DAVIES . On the 18th of May I saw Daniels at his stable; he asked me to go to Smithfield with him - the prisoner came in; Daniels and he put the horse too; the prisoner got in and drove about one hundred yards - Daniels said, I had better ride, and I got in and rode with the prisoner. I got out at the pig-market, and said, "Mr. Daniels and I will be with you in a few minutes, you draw the horse and gig into Smithfield," which he did, and in five minutes Daniels came up - we went to the prisoner; Daniels said, "We are going to take a walk - if anybody comes, ask 14l., but don't sell it, for I shall be back in a few minutes;" I said, "No," do not sell it, for Daniels wishes to sell it himself - we came back, and he said nobody had been to look at it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Daniels a stranger to you? A. Not particularly; my brother married his sister. I never told the Magistrate that I was merely acquainted with him.

WILLIAM GIGG . I am a coach-maker. On the 19th of May, about half-past three o'clock, the prisoner came to my factory, at Islington, with a plater, who works for me - he asked me if I would buy a yellow pony chaise. I appointed to meet him at seven o'clock at my house - he came; and I went with him to the Leaping-bar stables, in St. John-street. I saw the chaise, and told him it would not suit me - I went on the 23d, with a gentleman who wanted one, and left a note for him to come to me on the following morning, which he did, at twelve o'clock. I asked the lowest price of the chaise; he said he had been bid 50s. for it, and said he had a duplicate of some harness. I said I had three, which I had bought of a lodger, for 24s.; he said he would take them in exchange; I went to the pawnbrokers and redeemed the harness, which was pawned for 30s., and I bought the chaise for 50s. On the 28th the officer came, and I delivered him the chaise.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Daniels ever tell you he had given him authority to sell the property? A. On the 30th of May I was at the Hugh Middleton public-house, he said he had given him permission to sell it, that if he did not, he should not think of giving him anything; but if he did, he was to have 1s. in the pound.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

JOHN SPENCER . I am a cooper, and live in Old-street. Daniel's told me on the very night this property was missing, that he had left it in the prisoner's possession to dispose of.

HENRY BULL . Daniels told me he had given the prisoner authority to sell the property, and that if he could not sell it altogether, he was to sell the horse and chaise; this was on the 9th of May - and when it was missing, he

said, "Most likely he has sold it, and is looking for us, as it is getting late."

COURT. Q. Did he ever say so after the prisoner went away with it? A. No; one night when the prisoner said he had refused 12l. for it, Daniels said he was foolish in not taking the man's address, for he might have got a pound or two more.

THOMAS DAWES . I am a green-grocer, and live in Charles-street, Leonard-street. Daniels told me one day that the prisoner was gone down the road to show the horse to a gentleman; he did not say he had given him authority to sell it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-38

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1383. JOSEPH DEACON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 pair of breeches, value 20s.; 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 sovereigns, one 10l. Bank note; one 10l. and one 1l. promissory notes, the property of Robert Parkinson , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Hanstead .

ROBERT PARKINSON. I live at Newmarket. On the 4th of June I slept at the White Lion public-house, Charing-cross , in a double-bedded room, with a friend. I found there was no fastening to the door, and I blocked it up with a chair; I got up first next morning, between seven and eight o'clock, and found the door had been opened and left ajar - and immediately after breakfast I missed two sovereigns out of my purse, which was in my breeches pocket - a 5l. country note was still left in the purse; I said nothing about it, but slept in the same room again next night - I blocked the door up as before, and put my breeches between the bed and mattress - there was a 10l. Bank note, a 10l. and a 1l. country notes, two sovereigns, and a watch in my pocket; I was awoke about a quarter-past five o'clock, by the prisoner kneeling at my bed side, with his hands drawing my breeches from under me - he had got part of them to the edge of the bed, but had not taken them completely from under me; he had got hold of them, and was pulling, when I seized him by his shirt - he had not got them completely from under me, for I was drawn with the breeches - I was still resting on some part of them - he had moved me with them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-39

1384. JOSEPH DEACON was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 4 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 3 sixpences , the monies of John Chatterton .

JOHN CHATTERTON. On the night of the 5th of June I slept at the White Lion public-house , with a friend, in a double-bedded room - my friend left town the next day; I slept in the same room at night - and when I went up I found the prisoner lying on the bed which I had slept in the night before; he was perfectly naked, except a small flannel shirt; I went down and asked for another room, but could not get one, and was obliged to sleep in the other bed; I threw the clothes on him before I went to sleep, and about half-past five o'clock in the morning Mrs. Foster, who manages the business of the house, awoke me - I found the prisoner in custody - I felt in my pockets, and missed 14s. or 15s. 6d. - most of it was in half-crowns.

JOHN CRICK . I took the prisoner in custody in Mr. Parkinson's room. I searched him in the watch-house, and found four half-crowns, three shillings, and two sixpences, in a purse in his breeches pocket, and about 6s. loose in his waistcoat pocket; the prosecutor could not swear to the money; the prisoner did not say how he came by it.

WILLIAM STANBERRY . I am waiter at the White Lion. The prisoner came there on Sunday morning - he slept there that night, and I found a room door burst open the next morning.

ANN FOSTER . I manage the house. When the prisoner was found in Mr. Parkinson's room I went and awoke Chatterton; I had sent the prisoner his bill the evening before - he said he should not pay it till morning, for fear he should not be called in time.

JOHN CHATTERTON. I know I had four half-crowns among my money, but cannot swear to any of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-40

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1385. ELEANOR PARKER was indicted for that she, on the 6th of July , in and upon Thomas Robinson , feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating her intent to be to disable him, or to do him some grievous bodily harm.

THOMAS ROBINSON. I live at Mr. Clayton's. I have known the prisoner about five years - she lived there about two years. On the 6th of July, between five and six o'clock, William Poole , Mrs. Clayton, Clayton's daughter, the prisoner, and I, were all dining together - the prisoner sat at the head of the table, and said, "Why don't you take your victuals?" I said, "When they have all done I will take mine;" she then jumped up, went down stairs, and sang two songs to herself - she then ran up, and said, "If you please Thomas come down stairs for five minutes, for I want to speak to you;" she repeated this fifty or a hundred times - and at last, with a good deal of persuasion, I went down into the room; I saw her pull a pen-knife out of her bosom and open it - she seemed in a great passion, and I caught hold of her wrist, and took the knife from her - I shut it and gave it to Mrs. Poole. Mrs. Poole said, "See how the blood runs!" I did not know till then that I was cut - I then found I was wounded in my right hand; I did not take the knife from her till I found the blood running, and cannot say whether she meant to injure me or herself; she had said nothing to me - she said she was very sorry for it, that she did not mean it for me, but for herself - she had been jealous of me for some time. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-41

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1386. EDWARD CLARKE and HENRY PARRY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Hobson , on the 5th of June ( John Parrington being therein), and stealing 10 handkerchiefs, value 30s., the goods of Joseph Teale and others .

ISAAC COCKLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Marshall, who lives in Shoreditch , opposite to Mr. Hobson. On the 5th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I stood at our window, and heard a rattling of glass; I looked, and saw both the prisoners at Hobson's window; I saw Parry put his hand into the window, and draw out two pieces of handkerchiefs, one yellow and the other red and yellow; Clarke stood close at his side - they both run off, Parry putting

them into his hat, as he ran; they turned down Swan-yard- I could not leave our shop, as I was alone; in about five minutes Clarke returned to the shop, and went to the window again - he stole another handkerchief, and walked up the street; I pursued, and when I got within twenty yards of him he pushed his hat off; I still pursued, and took him at the corner of White Lion-street; a woman picked up his hat and gave it to me.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am an officer. I saw Cockley running down Shoreditch, after the prisoner Clarke - he was secured, and when we came back a woman gave us his hat. When Parry was apprehended I found a key on him, which he said belonged to his box.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How far were you from the shop? A. About two hundred yards.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I apprehended Parry at eleven o'clock at night on the 5th of June; a handkerchief fell from him, which I gave Robinson.

WILLIAM COX . Robinson gave me the key - I took it to the prisoner's father's house, in Ann's-court, Montague-street, Mile-end, and in a box, which the key opened, I found two pieces of handkerchiefs, quite new. The prosecutors are bankrupts, and I understand Mr. Teale is an assignee; there is nobody here to prove it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-42

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1387. SARAH BLOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , in the dwelling-house of William Walters , one 10l., and one 5l. Bank notes, the property of John Holme Jones .

JOHN HOLME JONES. I live in King-street, St. Luke's . On the 6th of April my master paid me a cheque, for 17l. 10s., on Messrs. Harvey, of Bucklersbury. I gave it to my wife next morning.

FRANCES ANN JONES . I took the cheque to Messrs. Harvey's, and received a 10l. and a 5l. Bank note, two sovereigns, and 10s., which I brought home, and put into the table-drawer. William Walters keeps the house, and lives there. The prisoner lodged on the same floor as us, and saw me put the notes away; we went out together that morning, by appointment, and when we got into Bunhill-row I had forgotten a small parcel, and, having my child with me, I asked the prisoner to go back for it, while I minded her little girl - this was between ten and eleven o'clock; she returned in ten minutes, and we went home together about five o'clock in the evening; I then expected to find the change of the notes in the drawer, as I had left them there for my husband to get change; I went to the drawer - none of the money was there, and I thought he had got it. When he came home, at eight o'clock, I found they were stolen. The prisoner had gone out about six o'clock - she returned about nine, and we said we had lost the notes - she only laughed at it; my husband got the street-keeper, but we did not like to give her in charge, and it rested till the 4th of May, when I saw the 10l. note, and knew it to be the same, by the number, which I got from Mr. Harvey. We could not find the prisoner for a month afterwards; she had left the house about a fortnight after the robbery; she had four examinations, and was then bailed - she has now surrendered.

FRANCIS RALPH . I am shopman to Mr. Stieber, of Old-street. The prisoner came to our shop one Monday morning, about the middle of April, I believe, and asked if I could give her change for a 10l. note - I said No.

JOHN SCOTT . I live in Tottenham-court-road, and am a linen-draper. About the latter end of May a woman bought some goods of me, and paid me a 10l. note - she gave me the name of Butler, Sun-street, Bishopsgate, which I wrote on it - (looking at a note,) this is it. I do not know the woman.

ANN LOUISA ALLEN . I live in New Gloucester-street, Hoxton. I know that two years ago the prisoner went into the Lying-in Hospital by the name of Butler - I have been abroad since, and have not seen much of her. I never knew her to live in Sun-street.

SARAH WALTER . My husband keeps this house. The prosecutrix and the prisoner went, out together on the 7th of April - the prisoner came back in about five minutes, and was only up-stairs long enough to take a parcel and come down again - she went away a fortnight afterwards; I did not see her with more money than common, or with new clothes. She paid me two sovereigns on the Tuesday - the note had been changed on the Monday; I had never seen her with so much money before. She said the gentleman she lived with had given it her.

JOHN VANN . I apprehended the prisoner the beginning of June - she gave me the name of Bloss.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. This 10l. note was paid in on the 3d of May.

FREDERICK WILLIAM PEEL . I am clerk to Messrs. Harvey and Co., of Bucklersbury. I paid this 10l. note for a cheque, drawn by Mr. West, payable to Jones.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-43

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1388. MATTHEW FRAYNE , ELIZABETH PRATT , and SARAH WOOD were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Hinton , in the night of the 29th of June , and stealing 1 bottle, value 2s.; 3 goblets, value 3s.; 14 wine-glasses, value 7s.; 2 salt-cellars, value 3s.; 1 vinegar-cruet, value 6d.; 1 pepper-box, value 6d.; 6 beer-glasses, value 3s., and 1 table-cloth, value 2s., his property .

RICHARD HARRINGTON . I am servant to John Hinton, who keeps the Hare and Hounds tavern, St. John's-wood . On the 29th of June I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock, and locked the doors. I was in bed about seven o'clock, when the officers came, having stopped the prisoners with this property; the articles stated in the indictment were safe in the coffee-room about the middle of the day before. I found one outer and two inner doors forced open; some instrument like a chisel had been used to all three doors, which were safe when I went to bed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you the last person up? A. No - a person sat up all night.

JOHN HARGREAVES . I am a constable. On the 30th of June, about four o'clock in the morning, I was coming out of Kilburn, about a mile and a half from St. John's-wood, and saw the three prisoners in a field; Pratt had a quantity of glass in a table-cloth, in front of her - there were four persons in all: I seized Pratt - the other three went off; Sanders pursued them - we went to Mr. Hinton's, and saw Harrington, who went and claimed the glass;

Pratt said she had found it, and nobody could hurt her; I saw a water-bottle in Wood's hands.

JOSEPH SANDERS . I am an officer. I saw the three prisoners and another crossing the fields - Hargreaves was about fifty yards before me; I was in the road: one of the female prisoners had the glass, tied in a table-cloth - the man who has escaped held what he had got before him, that I should not see it - I took the decanter from Wood, as she came through the hedge; I gave her in charge, and ran after the two men - Frayne secreted himself in a ditch- I pulled him out, and found two wine-glasses in his pocket; his finger bled very much, and in going along the woman asked how he had cut it - he made no reply, but in going back we found some glass broken, with the name of Hinton on it; we found three doors broken at the house, and by the side-board in the coffee-room we found several spots of blood on the floor; we were just below Kilburn gate when we saw them - they were walking; they were about a mile and a half from the house, but there is a nearer way, across the fields - it was quite daylight.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WOOD'S Defence. I was coming from Kilburn, and saw the things tied up in a table-cloth.

FRAYNE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

PRATT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing only. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-44

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1389. MARGARET BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 2 sovereigns, 12 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the monies of Patrick Connolly , in the dwelling-house of Theodosia O'Keeffe , widow .

ANN CONNOLLY . I am the wife of Patrick Connolly, who is a porter - we lodge at Theodosia O'Keeffe's, in Gray-street, Manchester-square . On the 4th of June the prisoner was at my lodgings; she had washed for me - while she was there she saw me put 19s. 6d. into my box - there was a sovereign and 5s. in a piece of paper there before, and another sovereign loose; she went away about a quarter-past five o'clock; I took out 6s. about a quarter to nine, leaving the rest there - I did not lock the box, but I locked the room door, and went out; I had seen the two sovereigns in the box about four o'clock; I returned about half-past twelve - my husband went upstairs first - he had the key; he called me - I went to the box, and found the money all gone. I went to the prisoner's lodging, in Hopkins-street, and told her I had lost my money - I neither threatened or promised her: she immediately said she had robbed me, between nine and ten o'clock that night; and if I would let her go she would find the money, for her husband had all but 3s., which were found on her. She said next morning all that she had taken was 1l. 10s. 6d.

PATRICK CONNOLLY. I came home with my wife, and found the room door open.

THEODOSIA O'KEEFE. I keep this house. On the 4th of June, after eight o'clock at night, I was laying down in the back room first floor, very ill - somebody asked for a light, and about nine o'clock I saw the prisoner sitting on the stairs; I asked if she was the person who had asked for a light - she said Yes, that she wanted to go into Connolly's room, for she was sent to finish some work; I asked if she was sent to do it when they were out - she said that was no business of mine; I asked how she could get in - she showed me a key, which I knew was not the right one- she asked if I could lend her one - I refused. We went up-stairs; I tried the key, but it was too small - she said Mrs. Connolly gave it her; she sat down on the stairs, and was there till past ten o'clock.

JOHN HUNT . I am a watchman, and apprehended the prisoner; she said she took 1l. 10s. 6d., and her husband had taken all but 3s., which she had in her pocket.

MRS. CONNOLLY. I never gave her a key.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-45

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1390. HENRY SOLOMON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 27 watches, value 114l.; 7 pairs of ear-rings, value 2l. 10s.; 7 brooches, value 25l.; 14 watch-keys, value 4l.; 14 seals, value 16l.; 28 rings, value 25l.; 5 watch-chains, value 24l.; 8 shirt-pins, value 1l.; 2 eye-glasses, value 1l.; 2 pairs of bracelet-snaps, value 14s., and 1 locket, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of George Grant .

GEORGE GRANT. I am a watch-maker and jeweller - my shop is at No. 21, Chancery-lane , but I do not reside there; nobody sleeps there. On the 24th of May, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I left my shop quite secure - it was locked and bolted. I returned about five minutes after nine o'clock next morning, and found an entrance had been made at the back of the shop, from the pastry-cook's next door; they had broken out a pannel. I missed the articles stated in the indictment (enumerating them.) I saw them all again the day but one following, in the possession of Mr. Cope, the marshall, at the Mansion-house. I found the prisoner in custody on the 6th of July. I am quite certain the property is mine - it is worth 160l. or more.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You locked your shop up carefully? A. Yes. I conceive considerable violence was necessary to break it open. I had not seen the prisoner about the premises. The robbery was in the night, between the 24th and 25th.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am a marshal of the City. On the 25th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I went to the prisoner's house, in Gravel-lane, Houndsditch - I know it to be his house; it is in the City. I do not think the prosecutor's shop is in the City. The prisoner was not at home; I found in his house a box, which I produce - it contained the articles stated in the indictment; it was on the ground floor - there was a bed in the room. I took it to the Mansion-house. I knew before that the prisoner lived there - I did not see him till the 6th of July; I did not call at his house myself, but gave directions to the officers to look after him. Vann apprehended him. What passed at the Mansion-house was taken down in writing. Grant saw the property on the 26th of May, and claimed it all.

Cross-examined. Q. That box is of considerable weight? A. Not very great - I should think a boy of eight or nine years old could carry it from Chancery-lane to Gravel-lane - the distance may be a mile and a quarter; or a mile and a

half; I should think the prisoner might carry it very easily, if it were five or six times the weight. I have not examined the place that was broken open. The prisoner has a son, named Ikey, who has absconded; I did not go to the prisoner's house myself after the 25th of May - he was not at home then; the box was locked when I took it. Ikey Solomon made his escape the very day that I found the property.

COURT. Q. How long had Ikey been in custody before he escaped? A. Some days, and I believe he was in custody till one or two o'clock on that day.

JOHN VANN. I am an officer of Bow-street. I do not know the prisoner's house - I apprehended him on the evening of the 5th of July, in Surrey, near the Obelisk; I told him I took him on suspicion of felony, for some things which I believed were found in his house; he said, Oh! there was no occasion to apprehend him, for he was an old man; I knew he lived in Gravel-lane, but was never at his house; I told him I must take him into custody; he said, Oh! he could not carry such things, that they were brought there by his son; and on our way to the Compter he asked me where my warrant was to apprehend him - I told him I had no warrant, and had no occasion for any; he then said he would not go with me - I said if he did not I should call for assistance, and put him into a coach; when he found I was determined to take him he said, "I should have surrendered myself in two or three days."

Cross-examined. Q. When was this? A. On the evening of the 5th of July, about a quarter-past seven o'clock - it was broad daylight. The Obelisk is a very public thoroughfare, about three quarters of a mile from London-bridge; when I got to the Borough-market he objected to go again - I met a brother officer, and asked him to assist me. I did not exactly know the identical house he lived in.

Q. When did you hear he was wanted? A. I was here last Session, and Mr. Cope gave directions to my conductor to apprehend him if he was to be found; he did not tell me to take him; I met him by mere accident. I did not ask him to treat me on the road; he appeared frightened, and trembled very much - he said, "I hope you will let me have something to drink" - I did so, and drank with him - he paid for it; I think it was a glass of porter we had.

MR. GRANT. This box contains my property - I lost 10l. or 12l. worth more.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. COPE. Q. Is Vann the man you gave instructions to? A. No - I gave instructions to nearly all our men to look out for him; several of them knew where he lived; some of them went with me to his house.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Cope to the prisoner's house; I went to the house two or three days afterwards, and found the door fastened - somebody called out that he was gone away; I went by the door several times, but did not go in - his wife was in the house afterwards. I did not see him from that time till he was apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. You never went to the house except once? A. Not direct to the house; I do not know what day of the week it was, but am certain it was not on his Sabbath, for it was not the day after; which was the Sabbath, and it did not exceed four days from the time I found the property; I did not knock very loud at the door. I have seen his wife - she appears about seventy years old; the box is a light one.

COURT. Q. What do you mean by not going to the house direct? A. I frequently went near the house to look for him, but did not go to it.

MR. GRANT. The box is not mine.

MR. JOHN WONTNER , (keeper of Newgate.) Ikey Solomon was in Newgate on the 25th of May - he was in custody all the night of the 24th, and for nearly three weeks before - he could not be in Chancery-lane at the time in question.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner is in a state of infirmity? A. Only by his own statement - he was put into the infirmary by direction of the Lord Mayor.

Prisoner's Defence. I am upwards of seventy years old, and have worked hard to support my family. I never got a penny dishonestly in all my days - I have worked for every factory in London. I hate the very thoughts of a thief and of a receiver - it is very well known that I have brought several things forward concerning government. I can prove it by a solicitor, at Somerset House, and by several officers, who have known me upwards of forty years that I never robbed a man of a single farthing - I have been ill upwards of three years, and cannot get out of bed without my wife or daughter putting my stockings on - having had a hurt across my loins; and is it possible I could break open a house with violence? I do not know where the house is - I declare by my Maker, that I do not know that I was ever in the street - this Vann, when I saw him, said "Solomon, where are you going?" I said, to the Circus; he said, "Come, treat us, before you go in;" I gave him a glass of gin. I treated him twenty times in Whitechapel - he said, "Solomon, have you got any blunt in your pocket?" I was at large every day, and can point out twenty people who saw me daily about Bishopsgate-street and Whitechapel. I was in-doors till between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and when I came home I knew nothing about the box - it is hard I should be put here for things I am innocent of.

SARAH NATHAN . I am a widow; the prisoner is my father - he is seventy years old; he is a very ailing man, seldom or never well. I have lived in his house for the last five years, and take care of my father and mother - she is seventy-three years old.

Q. For the last five years, have you ever known him sleep out of his own house? A. Never in his life - he is never out after eleven o'clock; he slept at home the night before the 25th of May, the day my brother escaped. On that day, (the 25th,) between twelve and one o'clock, a lad brought this box to the house - it was locked; he said he left it for Isaac Solomon. I took it in - I then took it off the table, and put it on a table in the adjoining room. My father was not at home.

Q. Now; could your father have been out from nine o'clock the night before your brother escaped, till three or four next morning, without your knowledge? A. No; he was never out after eleven o'clock, on my oath - he got up about nine or half-past. I do not know Chancery-lane, nor Fleet-street.

Q. Do you know Temple-bar? A. I have passed there

several times; we live in Gravel-lane. I was not at home when Mr. Cope came and took the box away.

JURY. Q. Was there a key left with the box? A. No.

COURT. Q. How long have you lived in London? A. I have never been out of London. I never heard of such a place as Chancery-lane; I will swear that; I have been through Temple-bar, but was never in Chancery-lane. I may have been through Temple-bar one hundred times or twenty times. I am seldom out; I go into no company - I had gone home with my work when the box was taken away. I do not know the boy who left it; I paid nothing for it - he said he was to leave it for Isaac Solomon; he mentioned his name; he said he was to leave it for Isaac Solomon. I do not think my father is able to walk at all, to tell you the truth - I cannot say that he walked to the Obelisk; I was at home when he went out in the morning, about ten o'clock; I do not know whether he had a coach - he did not return at all. I did not call a coach for him when he went out - he went out on foot.

Q. Suppose he had told you he should walk to the Obelisk, in St. George's Fields, should you not have said, "You are not able to do it?" A. He never asked me about it, if he had I should have told him to take a coach.

Q. Then, I suppose, you were surprized to hear he was found on foot at the Obelisk? A. I cannot say about that - I went to the Mansion-house, when my father was examined. I was down-stairs ready to be called, if I was wanted; I told Mr. Humphreys, the attorney, at the Mansion-house, that the box was left for my brother - I told nobody else so.

Q. How long before the box was left, had your brother been in Newgate? A. I do not know; for we were not friends with him. I knew he was there, but did not recollect when he was sent - he did not live at my father's, but in Bell-lane; that is not far from Gravel-lane, is not more than a quarter of a mile.

Q. As this box was left for your brother, whom you knew to be in Newgate, did you tell the boy to take it to Bell-lane? A. No; he left it there, and I thought I might take it in - he went out directly he put it down. I had no time to ask him a question.

Q. Did you ask him to stop? A. No; I took the box in, and said, "Very well." I put it into the adjoining room, on the table, that is my bed-room - my father never knew it was there; he was not at home.

Q. Did he know it was in your room before he was taken up? A. Of course he knew when he came home, that it had been taken away; I told him so when he came home, about seven o'clock - he had gone out about ten o'clock that morning, and did not return till seven - I do not know whether he went in a coach.

Q. Did you go for a coach? A. How could I? when I was sitting at home, at work - I saw him go away; he did not have a coach from the door; I cannot say whether he took one any where else; I do not know where he went - he did not dine at home; perhaps he had business to do - he went to sales at times; he did not have a coach to go to the sales; but they were not far; I do my work at home. I was at home on Friday, as it is the Sabbath - the sales he attended were sometimes near home; nobody ever came to the house to enquire for my father.

Q. How long after the 25th of May did you first hear your brother had made his escape from the officers? A. I never heard it.

Q. Had you never heard it from that time, till you attended at the Mansion-house? A. No; I never did hear it - I did not hear at what hour he escaped.

Q. You were not asked the hour - I ask, how long after the box had been left, did you hear your brother had escaped? A. I never heard it. I heard of his being taken up; the box was left between twelve and one o'clock.

Q. Well; how many days or weeks after that, did you first hear your brother had escaped from the officers? A. I did not hear anything of it; I did not hear at what time it was; he escaped the day the box was left - I heard about two o'clock that day, that he had made his escape.

Q. You were told of it about two o'clock, on the day the box was left? A. Yes; I did not understand you at first - a person came and told me of it; he was a stranger. My father was not at home then; my mother was out at work - a stranger came to the door, and said he had escaped; the door is generally open - I did not ask him a single question, it frightened me in such a manner; he said my brother had escaped, and away he went. I did not open the box, for there was no key; it was no business of mine. I went home with my work between two and three o'clock, and left my mother at home. I know Vann by sight; I never saw him at our house - I never told anybody that the box had been left there, except Mr. Humphreys; it was not very heavy, nor yet very light - if the box had not been here, I could have told you the celour of it; my father is a glass engraver.

Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. You have been asked about Vann; did any of the whole tribe of City officers come to your house, from the 25th of May till the 5th of July? A. Never; not one - my mother was out when the box was left; my brother's escape caused a great deal of talk. I dare say every body was acquainted with it - the box was locked; I put it on the table, locked as it was - my father generally works at home; there is a coach-stand in Whitechapel and in Bishopsgate-street - he never sent me for a coach. I told Mr. Humphreys what I have stated to-day; I was not examined at the Mansion-house - my brother Ikey was not on good terms with the family.

JURY. Q. Were you in the habit of taking in boxes and parcels for your brother? A. No; I never saw the box before. I do not know whose it is.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. COPE. Q. Were you at the Mansion-house when the prisoner was examined? A. Yes; no witnesses were examined for the prisoner. I did not hear Mr. Humphreys tell the Lord Mayor that he had a good defence - he might have said so without my hearing it. I found the box on a table in an inner-room; three females were in the house, but I did not see Nathan - the prisoner's wife was there. I was there about four o'clock; Chancery-lane is a very public place, I believe, during most of the night.

COURT. Q. From the time you took the box till the prisoner was committed, did you ever hear from any body that it had been left for Ikey Solomon? A. Never.

THOMAS JONATHAN WOOLER . I happened to be at the Mansion-house when the prisoner was examined; before the Lord Mayor committed him I heard Mr. Humphreys

say to his Lordship, "I have a good defence;" the Lord Mayor did not hear any witnesses for the prisoner - I did not hear any offered; it is the general custom to commit upon a prima facie cause being made out. Mr. Humphreys requested he might be sent to the infirmary.

COURT. Q. You have not been very often at the Mansion-house, have you? A. Some forty times.

JOHN VANN re-examined. The prisoner told me his son had brought the goods there.

Five Witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 69.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18270712-46

1391. JOHN WELCH , MICHAEL WHITE , and JOHN CLARKE were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of John Bustard .

ELIZABETH BUSTARD . I am the wife of John Bustard - we keep a green shop in West-street . On the 13th of June these two shillings, and two sixpences, were in a glass behind the counter. I went next door on an errand, about two o'clock; a person called me - I went, and found White in the shop; he asked how many gooseberries I sold for a halfpenny; I showed him a mug, and he said he ought to have a pint; I told him to go away, and he went - I had not seen the other prisoners; I missed my money directly; in a short time a boy gave me information; I saw Clarke over the way, and ran and collared him - I brought him into the shop; he said, "What are you going to do with me?" I said I should send for an officer; he said, "What for? I have met a little boy, and he gave me 3s. to return you;" and he gave me 3s. in copper; I then sent him about his business, and in about twenty minutes Welch came and asked why I had taken his money from the boy Clarke; I said it was not his; he used very bad expressions, and said he would have it out of me; I fetched an officer, and he was taken and while I was gone White was taken.

HANNAH SMITH . I live in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. I was at my mother's, which is opposite Bustard's, and could see all through her shop - I saw White and Clarke come up the street, with another, who I think is Welch - I saw all three in conversation. I went away, and when I came back I saw White go into the shop, go behind the counter, and take the money out of the glass - Clarke and the other went away, leaving him in the shop- I saw no more of them; when Clarke brought back the money, I said to him, "Where is the boy who took it?" he said "I met him in Smithfield, and he gave it me to bring back; how much is it;" Mrs. Bustard said 3s.; he said, "No, half-a-crown;" she said it was 3s., and he gave her three shillings in copper, and I saw him with about 30s. in silver; shortly after that Welch came, and said, "I want the money you have taken from the boy;" I told her to give him into custody - he told me to hold my check, for I had nothing to do with it; I pushed them both into the shop while she fetched an officer; White was brought to the shop - I said, "Take him in, that is the boy who took the money;" I asked Clarke what he had done with the silver which he had - he said it was only buttons.

GEORGE HANNINGTON . I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge; I found 1s. 3d. in copper on Welch, but neither money nor buttons on Clarke.

WELCH'S Defence. I saw Clarke with 3s. - he said he was going to buy a pair of shoes - he came back and said the woman had taken it away - I went and told her it was a shame.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

WELCH - NOT GUILTY .

CLARKE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-47

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JULY 16.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1392. PETER JOHNSON HAMILTON was indicted for that he, at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, held for the County of Middlesex, the 9th day of January, in the 6th year of his present Majesty's reign, he was tried and convicted of knowingly uttering a counterfeit shilling, and at the same time knowingly having about him another counterfeit shilling, and was sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction, at Clerkenwell, and kept to hard labour for one year, and at the expiration of that time to find surities for his good behaviour for two years more - and that having been so convicted as a common-utterer of false money, afterwards, on the 22d of June last, at Enfield , one other piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good sixpence, as and for a good sixpence, unlawfully, unjustly, deceitfully, and feloniously did utter to one William Garment, the said prisoner at the time when he so uttered the said last mentioned piece of counterfeit money, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only omitting the words in italics.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18270712-48

1393. ELIZABETH RYDER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Marsh Pigram , in the King's highway, on the 10th of June , at St. Luke , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 silver watch, value 2l.; 1 gold key, value 3s., and 1 ribbon, value 3d., his property .

CHARLES MARSH PIGRAM. I am now out of a situation, but at the time in question I was shopman to Mr. Atkinson, a grocer, of Whitecross-street. On the 10th of June, at half-past ten o'clock at night, I was going home - I then slept at Mr. Atkinson's; as I went along Whitecross-street a man and two women stood at the corner of Plough-yard - I was quite sober: I passed them, and when I had got about two yards past them, the man came behind me, thrust his hand into my neck, and almost stopped my breath, by forcing his knuckles into my throat; and while he was holding my throat in this manner the prisoner came in front of me, took my watch out of my fob, and ran down Playhouse-yard with it - it was a moonlight night, and there is a gas lamp at the corner of the street - I am certain she is the woman; I did not see the other woman after I passed them; the man held me till the prisoner was gone, and then ran away himself. I had not seen the prisoner before - I had not walked with her in Beech-street, nor had I been in Beech-street that night - it is at the end of Whitecross-

street. I ran home as fast as I could, and told my master of it directly the door was opened; it is dangerous to run down an alley after thieves, or I should have pursued her. I saw Harrison next morning, and described her to him; she is a remarkable looking woman - her face came quite close to mine; I could see her plainly, and am certain of her; Harrison apprehended her about two hours after I gave him notice; it was a silver watch, with a ribbon and gold key.

Prisoner. Q. Can you deny walking with me in Beech-street, and going into Golden-lane, giving me 4d., and asking if that would satisfy me - I left you, and you had white trousers on? A. It is all false - I had not been in Beech-street, and have not got a pair of white trousers.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer, and have been so two years. The prosecutor described the prisoner to me at half-past six o'clock on Monday morning - I immediately knew her, and where she lived; I went to her lodgings between seven and eight o'clock that morning - she got out of bed to open the door to me; she had been in bed with two men and her sister; she said she knew nothing about it - I said, "If you are not the woman I shall not detain you long;" the prosecutor saw her, and identified her immediately; she was only in her shift when she opened the door. I saw the prisoner make her mark to this statement (looking at the depositions) - here is the Magistrate's signature to it- (read.)

The prisoner, in her Defence, says, when I met that gentleman in Beech-street we went up Golden-lane, and in Sun-alley the prosecutor pulled out 4d.; I asked him what it was for; he asked if it would not satisfy me; I told him No, I would go and get something to drink with it: he gave me the 4d., and we parted; I went away.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I was told I was not to be prosecuted.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18270712-49

1394. FRANCIS CORAM was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Gould , in the afternoon of the 6th of June ( Charlotte Gould , spinster, being therein,) and stealing 1 coat, value 10s., his property .

JAMES GOULD. I am a butcher , and live in Whitecross-street . On the 6th of June, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I went over the way about twenty or thirty yards, leaving my daughter Charlotte, who is four years old, in the shop - the door was open. My coat was up in the bed-room, the door of which was fastened with a catch, but not locked; I had been up there three quarters of an hour before - the catch was then fastened; there was nobody but the child in the house - I was absent about ten minutes, and as I returned I saw the prisoner come out of the shop door, with my coat on; I ran and overtook him about two doors off, and said, "You have got my coat on;" he made no answer, and I gave him in charge - he was quite a stranger to me.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Have you a lodger named Summers? A. I think that is his name - he lodges there now. When I laid hold of the prisoner another man came across, and pulled the collar of the coat up for him - it was a great coat; I had not seen that man before; the prisoner seemed to be intoxicated, but he walked away very fast with my coat. The other man ran away as fast as he could. I knew him to be a reputed thief, and described him to the officer.

COURT. Q. Did you find any coat left in your room? A. None; it was put on over his own; he never said any body else gave him the coat - I have had it about twelve months - I would not take 20s. for it.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge with the coat - he appeared half drunk, and very much frightened.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been five years in his Majesty's service, and received several contusions in my head, which, when I drink, render me incapable of knowing what I am about; I had been drinking all the afternoon with Summers, who lodges at the prosecutor's; he left me to get his tea, and desired me to wait till he returned; he did not return, and I went after him - I suppose I went into his room, and put on the coat, thinking it was his. I was unconscious of any thing till I found myself in the watch-house.

JAMES GOULD. It was not Summers who was helping him on with the coat.

GUILTY. Aged 33. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-50

Second London Jury - before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1395. OWEN DAINTREY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one 5l. Bank note , the property of William Codd and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Thomas Henderson , and others.

The SOLICITOR-GENERAL, with Messrs. BOLLAND and SHEPHERD, conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HARE . I am clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Cox, Biddulph, and Co. (Looking at a cheque.) On the 10th of February I paid this cheque, and I believe this 5l. note (looking at one) to be the one I gave for it; it agrees in number and date.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Have you any memorandum of the transaction? A. Here is the book - I made the entry myself - it is an account of the cheque. and how it was paid.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. Is there an entry in that book of the payment of the cheque? A. Yes; the note was No. 59,941, dated of 2d January, 1825.

CHARLES LYNDON . I am clerk to Messrs. Philip Codd, and Co., of Fludyer-street, Westminster. This cheque bears the signature of Mr. Edward Septimus Codd - I drew it on the 10th of February, to obtain a 5l. note, to be remitted to Henderson and Culey, of Ramsey, Isle of Man; I took the number and date of the note which I received for it on this piece of paper - (producing the paper) - this is the note I received for the cheque - (looking at it) - I enclosed it in a letter which I wrote, and then put it on Mr. E. S. Codd's desk for his signature - this was on Saturday the 10th of February.

EDWARD SEPTIMUS CODD. I am a partner in the house of William Codd and Co. On Saturday, the 10th of February, a letter addressed to Henderson and Co. was brought to me by one of the clerks to read and sign - I signed it, and sent it with the 5l. note in it - I left the letter on the desk for some time, took it up in the course of the evening, and either delivered it at the Post-office in Scotland-yard, or to the bellman in St. James's-square.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you lose sight of the letter after signing it before you sealed it? A. No; I sealed it with a wafer.

JAMES ELLERY . I am a postman. On the 10th of February I was on duty in St. James'-square with my bag - I do not know Mr. Codd - I delivered all the letters I received that night to the mail-cart in Charing-cross; I do not know who drives the cart - my bag was locked, as it always is; we put the letters into an opening.

GEORGE GLADMAN . I am driver of the mail-cart from Charing-cross. On Saturday, the 10th of February, I took all the bags which I received, safe to the Post-office, and delivered them to the proper person.

SAMUEL HURST . I belong to the Post-office. On the 10th of February I was the opener of James Ellery's bag; it arrived safe in its proper state - I opened it at the Post-office, and passed it over to a man to empty the contents.

Cross-examined. Q. How many hands do the letters pass through, from the time the bag is opened till they get to their different divisions? A. There are three persons to assist me at the entrance - I open the bags - one Townsend then shakes the letters out into a basket; they are then taken to the facing table.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I do the duty at the Post-office in Scotland-yard. On the 10th of February all the letters which were brought there were put into a bag, sealed up, and delivered to Morris.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons beside yourself are engaged in Scotland-yard? A. I always seal the bag; nobody has access to the letters but me and Mr. Gill, who keeps the office - he is not here; I always take the letters from the box and put them into the bag - unpaid letters are always put into the box, and not brought into the office.

GEORGE MORRIS . I drive one of the mail-carts. On the 10th of February I received the Scotland-yard bag, and delivered it at the office in the same state as I received it.

THOMAS POOLE . On the 10th of February, Howlett and I were the openers of the bags at the Post-office. I cannot say whether the Scotland-yard bag arrived safe or not; I do not remember any one arriving not safe; I can refer to the book - the entry here is made by James King - I did not see it made; I do not remember any bag coming wrong during the month of February.

ROBERT WATMORE . I am one of the Presidents of the Inland-office. I was on duty on Saturday, the 10th of February; a letter addressed to the Isle of Man would be assorted to the Liverpool division, or to the Liverpool-road; I had the general superintendance of the whole office; the prisoner was employed that night as assistant at the Liverpool division; letters for the Isle of Man would pass through his hands - he would receive them; after being charged, it was his duty to place them in the box; he would arrive at the office a little before five o'clock, and remain there till the mails were all made up, which would be a little after eight; he had to assort letters into the different boxes on the road - he would be sorting letters first till twenty minutes after five o'clock, and begin sorting again at twenty minutes after six - he would put the unpaid letters into the different boxes - after the sorting was complete he would have to tell up the postage - he would be alone at the division several parts of the evening.

Cross-examined. Q. When you say he was alone at his division, you mean nobody assists him at his business? A. The division is against the wall - he is there at times by himself - there may be a hundred and fifty persons in the room; the nearest person to him would not be more than two yards off; three or four persons would be within two yards of him; there are two seats, where two Presidents sit - they have a view of the whole office when in their seats - but they have to go round the office and see that every body is at his post; the taxing-clerk sits about two yards from the prisoner, but their backs are to each other; the prisoner would have to fetch letters from the taxing-table to his own; it is impossible for me to say how many hands a letter may go through, but his is the last hand that they go to. When a letter first arrives, it is put to be faced - there are fifteen or twenty facers - they then go to the stamper; there are three stampers.

Mr. SOLICITOR GENERAL. Q. Is there any separation between the places in which one clerk and the other sits? A. There is a partition between each division.

- DAVIES . On the 10th of February I and Tapper were employed to tie and seal the bags in the Post office; we made up the whole of the Liverpool division, and tied them up property and safely.

THOMAS TAPPER . I was employed on the 10th of February to tie and seal letters in the Liverpool division - I did part, and Davis the rest; I sealed them all properly.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you seal all? A. None but the Liverpool division.

THOMAS WINCH . On the 10th of February I was clerk at the Liverpool-road, in the Post-office; after the bags were sealed by Tapper, it is my duty to examine them - the Isle of Man bag was properly sealed.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you more recollection of that day than any other? A. Not in particular; it is my duty to see they are properly sealed.

Mr. SOLICITOR GENERAL. Q. How soon after did you hear of any thing happening? A. On the Wednesday following - I then recollected that the bag was properly sealed.

SUSANNAH GRAVES . I am the wife of John Graves , post-master of the Isle of Man, On Tuesday morning, the 13th of February, at nine o'clock, the bag which would leave London on the 10th arrived safe - I opened it, and the letters were delivered to the different persons they were addressed to.

THOMAS HENDERSON . I live at Ramsey, Isle of Man; Mr. John Culey and I were trustees for Lieut. Fielding On the 13th of February I received no letter containing a 5l. note on account of the half-pay of Lieutenant Fielding; the last remittance I had from Codd and Co. was in October, 1826.

Cross-examined. Q. For whose use was this money? A. For the benefit of his creditors, of whom I was one - it was arranged twelve months before, that the remittance should be made to us at his own request; the money was to be applied to the liquidation of his debts; it was part of his quarterly payment.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. Did you act as trustee for his creditors? A. Yes; and I am a creditor myself.

JOHN CULEY . I and Mr. Henderson were trustees for Lieut. Fielding's creditors, and acted as such. On the 13th of February I received no remittance from Codd and Co.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am one of the City Marshals. On Monday, the 12th of February, I was sent for to the General Post-office, and directed to search the prisoner; I told him to take all his money out of his pockets, and out of his right-hand small-clothes pocket, he took the 5l. note produced; he said he took it from Mrs. Brooks, of Nelson-square, where he lodged; that he had a bill to pay for her, and had promised to make up the remainder of the money - he parted with the note very readily; this was between one and two o'clock - he was in custody when I first saw him. I did not part with him till between six and seven o'clock that evening, when I left him at the Compter. Mr. Peacock, the Post-office solicitor, Mr. Wood, and I, went with him in a coach to Nelson-square, to search his lodgings. Mr. Peacock stated to him, that the account he had given of the note was false, as Mrs. Brooks had denied that she ever gave it him; he then said, that he had not taken it from Mrs. Brooks, and he would not disclose to the solicitor from whom he had taken it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Mrs. Brooks here? A. I do not know; I have not inquired for her lately - I know where she lived, it was the second door on the right hand side, after you go from Blackfriars-road.

RICHARD GARDENER . I went to No. 60 or 61, Nelson-square, which in the second or third door to the right; I think it is the second. I could not find Mrs. Brooks there; I inquired in the neighbourhood, and found she had gone away in debt and sold all her things off.

SAMUEL HURST re-examined. The bag should arrive at the office at twenty minutes after six.

The prisoner, in an exceeding long address to the Court, stated the case to rest entirely on presumptive evidence, and that it was by no means conclusive against him; that he had taken the note in question on the evening of the 10th of February, at a gambling-house, No. 6, King-street, St. James-square; and that the account he first gave of it arose from his reluctance to acknowledge his having been to a house of that description; that on arriving at the office on Monday morning he was informed Mr. Stow had sent repeated messages for him, and on his going to him he questioned him, and told him he should want to speak to him again; as such, if he had come by the note feloniously, he should certainly have destroyed it, which he had ample opportunity of doing before he was taken into custody.

CHARLES COMPTON . I am employed in the Post-office. Mr. Stow is a President of the Inland-office. On the morning of the 12th of February, he inquired for the prisoner before he had arrived; when the prisoner came I told him Mr. Stow had sent for him three or four times - he immediately went to him; he returned and remained in the Accountant-general's office for an hour or more; there was a fire in the office - he was sent for again, and went to Mr. Stow; he certainly might have destroyed any papers if he had chosen.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL. Q. Did you tell him what Mr. Stow wanted? A. I did not know; the prisoner was employed as an extra clerk; it is very likely the President may often want to speak to a clerk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-51

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1396. THOMAS NORTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Fuller , on the King's highway, on the 11th of September , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 case of surgical instruments, value 40s.; 2 cases of lancets, value 20s.; 1 hat, value 20s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pen-knife, value 1s.; 1 pin-cushion, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence, his property .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HENRY FULLER. I am a surgeon , and live in Suffolk-place, Hackney-road. I lived there in September, but not in the same house; on the 11th of September I was on my business in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel, and in the way home from the last patient I called on, (which was in Pugh's-row, Elliott-street, Brick-lane) I arrived at Fleet-street-hill , about half-past seven o'clock, when I got on the hill, I heard a number of footsteps behind me; one of the persons called out, "Now;" and immediately after there was a loud whistle. I was then surrounded by about twenty men and boys; several of them had sticks in their hands - my arms were tied behind me, and one of them, whom I believe to be the prisoner, called out, "If the b-r speaks knock his b-y brains out." I begged of them not to ill-treat me, and the man who held my right arm, said I should not be hurt - that man's name was Boyce; they were all close to me. Boyce was on my right, and rifled my right-hand pockets - from my right-hand trousers pocket was taken a case of surgical instruments, and two cases of lancets; from my right-hand waistcoat pocket, two or three keys, and a piece of ass's skin - from my left-hand trousers pocket, two sovereigns, three shillings, and a sixpence, and a pen-knife, with a broken point; and from my left-hand waistcoat pocket, a small velvet pin-cushion; they next untied my cravat and took that; the prisoner then came up to me, and took my hat off my head with both his hands, it was a fine starlight night. I cannot exactly say whether the moon was up; I am certain of the prisoner's person - he had a blue or dark coat on, with gilt or polished buttons and light trousers. I believe it was a blue coat; I am not able to speak to any other part of his dress. I saw West, the officer, that evening, and described the prisoner, and some of the others to him.

Q. After having taken your cravat and hat, what next occurred? A. The prisoner called out, "Now give the b-r a rum one;" before my hat was taken Boyce had rubbed my trousers down, feeling for my watch; and when my hat and cravat were taken off Houghton, who was one of them, came up to me and unbuttoned the flap of my trousers, and Boyce cried out, "The b-r has got no toy." After that - they were about to run away I asked Boyce to give me my keys, as they were no service to him; he returned me one, saying, "You b-r, there is your key;" they ran away, and I after them, calling Stop thief! it was immediately after my hat was taken that the prisoner said, "Now give the b-r a rum one;" and Boyce said, "Don't hurt the poor b-r."

Q. Now, look at the prisoner again, and say, on your oath, have you any doubt that the prisoner is the man who

did the acts you have stated? A. I have no doubt whatever; I am certain of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How often have you been here before? A. In September and October Sessions; I indicted seven persons, Henry and James Boyce, Houghton, Hackman, Ore, Bishop, and Downes; I have seen Hackman and Ore since the trial - four in all have been acquitted.

Q. Did you not swear as positively to their identity? A. I did. I was out of the Court during part of their trial; I heard part of the defence made by the prisoners - several persons came up to prove that they were not on the spot at the time of the robbery. I have been on a trial at the Sheriff's Court, in Red Lion-square; I was tried at Clerkenwell, for assaulting an officer in the execution of his duty - but I did not conceive him to be on his duty; that was after the trials happened in this Court, I never said, "If any person came to take me up for a debt, that I would shoot them." I was found guilty of the assault and went into custody; I was brought up on the Saturday for judgment, and paid a fine of 1s., and the law expenses - my solicitor settled the expenses for me.

Q. Where had you been on the day of the robbery? A. I had been attending my patients the whole of the day - I am certain of the prisoner. I did not say I believed he was the man, but that he was the man; I saw him just before he called out - I believe he is the person who first called out. Hackman, Bishop, Ore, and Downes were present at the robbery.

Q. You state your arms were tied behind you, and one cried out, "Knock his b-y brains out;" have you always stated this to be so? A. I have; he also said, "If the b-r speaks, "I stated on the former trial that a man on my left-hand side used that expression - I did not name him. I did not swear that Boyce said that; nobody collected round till after I cried Stop thief! which was two or three minutes. I saw nobody come up till then, except the men who robbed me; but it is impossible for me to say that nobody did come. I was much alarmed at first, but Boyce promised I should not be hurt, and I looked about at them - some had sticks in their hands; I swear to the prisoner from his person, not from his dress - from his person and dress also. I believe he was examined four times at Worship-street - the first examination was Saturday fortnight, and the last on Monday last; he was committed on the third examination. I did not attend the first, being unwell; I was not able to produce sufficient evidence on the second, and was allowed till Saturday fortnight, on account of illness. I believe Garton was in the office; I do not recollect his being desired to leave the office. I never said I did not know the prisoner, or that I only believed him to be the man - I spoke positively to him in the first instance. I know Mr. Turner, who keeps the Rein Deer, public-house, on Bethnal-green - I do not recollect speaking to him that night, but I might; his house is a mile and a half or two miles from where I was robbed. I spoke to several people.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you a perfect recollection of the person of the prisoner? A. I have; I never entertained a doubt about him - the moment I saw West I told him I should know the person who took my hat, and described his person. I have always declared I should know the person who took my hat; Boyce and Houghton, were convicted - Boyce was executed.

LEWIS MYERSON . I am an officer, of Bethnal-green parish. I have known the prisoner some years. I saw him on the morning of the 11th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock, in Bishop Bonner's-fields; he had a blue coat, with bright buttons, and canvas trousers on; I am quite sure of his dress - I have seen him scores of times in the same dress.

Cross-examined. Q. How many times have you been here? A. I have been here several times, but not in this case. I am not a Jew.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am an officer of Bethnal-green. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of June, at a place called Botany-bay. I had been looking for him ever since the robbery - I did not threaten or promise him in any way whatever. I said I apprehended him for a highway robbery, committed on Dr. Fuller - he said, "I wish I had given myself up at first - it would have been all over before now," and when we were waiting next door to the Police-office, before the examination, the same morning, I asked him what he had been doing with himself, as I had been after him to different places, full two hundred miles - he said he would be hanged sooner than come it - come it means impeaching against an associate - it is a term well known. On the evening the robbery was committed I saw the prosecutor about twenty minutes to eight o'clock, in the shop of the churchwarden, in Bethnal-green-road - he had no hat nor cravat; I went for assistance to the Bladebone public-house, which is about five doors off; there is a window in the passage, which shows the public house clock - I saw the clock, and it wanted about two minutes of a quarter to eight - that enables me to speak with certainly to the time I saw Mr. Fuller - he gave me information of the person of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Botany-bay by no other name? A. No; it is situated in Hare-street-fields; I do not know it as Granby's-row; I never looked up to see if it has any name - it may be a mile from Mr. Fuller's; I have stated accurately what the prisoner said; I have related all the conversation as near as I can recollect.

ROBERT FERNEE . I live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. Mr. Fuller came into my house on the 11th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, without a hat or cravat - I lent him a hat; when I saw him it was a few minutes before or after eight o'clock; he told me what had happened.

WILLIAM RICHARD MANN . I live at the corner of Pollard's-row, Bethnal-green-road. On the evening of the 11th of September I saw the prosecutor at five minutes after eight o'clock; Mr. Fernee lives about five minutes walk from me; Mr. Fuller had a hat on when he came to me; after he mentioned what had occurred he went in doors, and it was five minutes after eight by my clock; Fleet-streethill is eight or nine minutes walk from my house, or less.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST re-examined. I saw Mr. Fuller on the night of the robbery; he described several persons to me, and the prisoner among others; it was by the description he gave me that I apprehended the prisoner.

The prisoner made no defence, but Mr. BARRY called -

THOMAS TURNER . I keep the Rein-deer public-house, Cambridge-heath, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal

green. I have known Mr. Fuller more than two years. On the night in question I was going out with my beer, it was from twelve minutes to a quarter past eight o'clock at the furthest; he came up to me from towards Fleet-street-hill, as I was taking up my tray - he said, "Turner, see how I have been served;" I asked how it happened - he said, "Them chaps about Fleet-street-hill;" I said, "Do not you know any of them?" he said he was surrounded by such a number he hardly knew who; he said nothing about its being dark, but it was dark enough at that time; I have a strong gas-light at my door, which made me see him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18270712-52

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1397. ESTHER HOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 10 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the monies of Abraham Lyons , her master, in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-53

1398. CHARLES CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 2 watches, value 3l.; 6 tea-spoons, value 1l.; 10 sovereigns; 1 half-sovereign; 4 crowns; 8 half-crowns; 25 shillings; one 5l. and one 1l. Banknote, the property of William Fox , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-54

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1399. LYON LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 28 cut-glass smelling-bottles, with silver tops, value 12l. 12s.; 4 other smelling-bottles, with silver tops, value 1l. 10s.; 2 other cut-glass smelling-bottles, with gold tops, value 30s., and 3 other cut-glass smelling-bottles, with silver-tops, gilt with gold, value 30s. , the goods of Richard Reece .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL CARTER . I am assistant to Mr. Richard Reece - he is a chemist and druggist in Piccadilly . On the night of the 16th of June I left the house about nine o'clock - every thing was fastened and secure - I returned the next morning, which was Sunday, between ten and eleven o'clock - I found the door shut, but the lock unlocked with a pick-lock key; I found about 10l. in money had been taken from the desk, and the articles stated in the indictment were also missing.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am a marshal of the City. On the 28th of June, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to the prisoner's house, No. 4, Cock and Hoop-yard, Houndsditch, and found a box there containing the property stated in the indictment; when I entered the room the prisoner was sitting in the front-parlour, with the box before him - his hands were in it; he appeared to be counting the articles out; I asked him who they belonged to - he said they were his own, and he could show me a bill of parcels of them; I asked him to do so, but he said he was so confused that he could not find it then; no bill of parcels has ever been produced; I took him into custody with the articles; Mr. Reece saw them two or three days afterwards, and claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How far is his house from Piccadilly? A. I should think two or three miles - there seemed all sort of things there; I do not know that he attends sales.

COURT. Q. Was there any appearance of a shop? A. Not the least; nor were there any shelves to deposit property on - it was quite a private parlour.

MR. RICHARD REECE . I have a warehouse in Piccadilly, nearly opposite the Burlington-arcade. I have seen all the property produced, and examined it - it is part of what was stolen from my house on the night in question.

Cross-examined. Q. How have you been sworn? A. On the Testament; I consider that oath not only binding on my conscience, but on my soul - I never doubted about a future state. I have a very large stock of smelling-bottles - they constitute a family; I know them by their features; here is a cut-bottle with a gilt top, which had been broken, and has been mended - it had been filled with salts before it was mended, and the smell still remains in it; my salts are of a peculiar compound - there is an article in them which nobody else puts, and by that I know the scent; here is another with the face of the Duke of Wellington on it - I made no mark on them, but I know them from their general appearance, and the salts that are in them; my young man purchased them from the manufacturer; I do not believe I have sold two of this sort; here is one filled with a sponge of a particular shape, and one with a tarnished silver top, which I can swear to, as well unto a man's countenance - it had got tarnished by the gas.

Mr. ALLEY. Q. They had got tarnished by the gas? A. Yes; they were kept near the gas, and became tarnished; one has a particular bruise on it, which I can swear to.

SAMUEL CARTER . I have examined these bottles, and believe them to be the same as were stolen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not all plated or silver goods tarnish by being kept some time? A. Yes; we have had these three or four months; here is a bottle, with a peculiar smell, which I can swear to; I swear conscientiously, that no salts like these are kept any where else; they cannot be exactly like ours; the composition is our own; we have had this peculiar scent three or four months; we may have sold fifty bottles with it; we fill bottles when they are brought to us; these bottles are made by Gilbertson; his porter brings them to us; I have been to his house - he is an engraver and a chemical apparatus maker.

COURT. Q. Have you had many from Gilbertson with gilt tops? A. About half a dozen; here is one with a portrait of the Duke of Wellington - another with a bruise, which I can swear to; I believe them all to be ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I am nearly sixty years old, and have been ill for twelve months, and was never in prison, as to the bottles, I leave that entirely to my Counsel.

Philip Phillips , Joel Davis , and Joseph Emmanuel , were examined on behalf of the prisoner, and deposed to their being in his company, at the Surry Theatre, on the 23d of June.

Mr. ALLEY. My Lord, this robbery was on the 16th - this evidence has nothing to do with the case.

PHILIP PHILLIPS. My Lord, I can prove where he was on the 16th, as well as on the 23d; I was asked about the 23d before.

Q. What have you to say about the 16th? A. On the 13th I received an order for goods, and on the 14th and 15th I was getting them ready; (I am a watch-maker, and occupy the first-floor at No. 4, Cock and Hoop-yard) on the 16th I was very poorly, and was taking salts, and stopped at home all day - and at that time the prisoner was very bad, and attended by Dr. Keith; he did not go out all day, for he was very ill - and on the 17th, which was Sunday, I left him to walk with my wife to Highburybarn; I got home about nine o'clock, and sat with him till ten, when I went up to supper - I returned and sat with him (which is not uncommon) till I went to rest. I have locked the street door myself every night for the last ten months, to preserve my property; I locked him in that night.

COURT. Q. When were you told it was material to prove where he was on the 16th? A. I was not told to prove it at all; I knew there were two indictments against him; I was first given to understand this indictment was on the 23d, and afterwards on the 17th. Mr. Wooler told me it was on the 23d.

Q. When did he tell you it was on the 16th? A. He told me that last Saturday evening.

Q. How came you then, when you were first examined, no to mention a word about the 16th? A. Because I was not asked. I recollect very well where he was on the 16th- my wife was with me, but she is not here. Dr. Keitch lives in Somerset-street, Goodman's-fields; I asked him to come here, but he said his profession would not allow it, he was so very busy; I did not call on him myself; I sent to him last week; I have not desired him since to come; my wife is very well: she knows as much about the prisoner being at home on the 16th as I do; I did not think it necessary to bring her - I do not know what was the matter with the prisoner - no doubt it was some internal complaint; he was at home also on the Sunday.

JOSEPH HART . I recollect Mr. Lyons being taken ill on the 15th, and he was ill the next day; I have boarded in his house for two years. I am sure he was not outside the door on the 16th.

COURT. Q. What part of the house do you occupy? A. I boarded with Mr. Lyons, and live in the same room.

Q. Then you have an opportunity of seeing what business is carried on in his room? A. I am not in his room all day; I do not know what business is transacted there; I went under an operation at Guy's Hospital on the 19th of April, and since that have been in the habit of laying down two or three hours every day - I cannot say what happens when I am asleep. The officers awoke me up when they came. The prisoner occupies the second floor - I sleep on the ground floor, but in the day time lay down on his bed; he is down-stairs in the day time, for he also occupies the front room on the ground floor, and I have the back room ground floor at night also; I went to bed on the 16th, about eleven o'clock, after he had had retired to rest.

Q. How do you let yourself in? A. Mr. Phillips always locks the door, and takes the key up with him; he left the house on the 23d, to go to the play. I was desired to come here to-day, but was not told to prove any thing about the 23d.

MR. COPE re-examined. The house in question is in the City.

Ten witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18270712-55

1400. WILLIAM JONES and GEORGE JENKS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 wooden box, value 18d.; 1 wrapper, value 6d.; 3 gowns, value 6l. 10s.; 1 parasol, value 8s.; 1 straw-bonnet, value 1s.; 2 pairs of stays, value 7s.; 1 petticoat, value 6s.; 8lbs. of ham, value 5s.; 2 muslin-collars, value 20s.; 1 pelerine, value 2s.; 1 pair of net sleeves, value 2s.; 1 head-dress, called a poncean gauze chiffon and wheat-ears, value 6s., and 5 sovereigns , the property of William Jones .

JOHN HENLEY . I am a jobbing porter. On the 19th of May, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming up Cheapside with Girton, and saw the prisoners standing at a post at the end of Cheapside; they were strangers to me - I was on the opposite side of the way; another stood at another post; we saw them all join company, and watched them about three parts of the way down Newgate-street; they then met a carrier's cart - they all three turned back with it. I continued to watch them; the cart came down into Cheapide, and stopped a short time at the end of Milk-street - both the prisoners stopped with it; the other walked on the other side of the way; he had crossed some time before; I think I should know him again - they stood close by the cart; the third man stopped opposite to them: the cart then went on to Gracechurch-street - the prisoners followed it very close all the way, on the footpath. The third man still kept on the opposite side of the way, and was in Gracechurch-street with them; the carman left the cart in Gracechurch-street , opposite Bell-yard, which is opposite the market; the cart stood on the side next the market - Jones and the third man went and looked into the cart; they left it for a minute, and then talked together; Jones then got into the cart, and reached a box out to the third man; I did not see Jenks at that moment - he was there just before; I turned round to look for Girton, and then they got out of my sight; the box has never been found. I did not see them again till the 9th of June, when they were in custody; I was positive of them both; I had them in sight nearly an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I suppose you had no job that day? A. Yes, I had, but I had two or three hours to spare; I am only a jobbing porter; I live in White Hart-yard, Coleman-street. I was a minute or two looking for Girton, and when I turned back they were gone. I went across the street to look for him. I went to the carman when he came back, but alarmed nobody else - Girton is an officer, and I was walking with him - I have known him some years; I do not often walk out with him.

JOHN GIRTON . I am a constable of the Ward. On the 19th of May I was with Henley, and saw the two prisoners and another - I had seen the prisoners before, and knew their features - I saw them standing at a post at the top of Cheapside; they moved into Newgate-street all three together; I watched them - the errand-cart was coming up, and they turned back immediately after it; the prisoners were on the left-hand side, and the other on the right; the cart stopped opposite to Bread-street, near Milk-street; the carman

went down Bread-street, and returned in a few minutes; the prisoners stood close to the cart, and looked into it - they followed it, on the same side of the way, into Grace-church-street, the third man keeping on the opposite side; there was a hamper behind the cart, and I thought they were after that. The cart stopped nearly opposite Bell-yard - they stopped, and I told Henley to give a sharp eye on them while I went a little further down - I was on the same side as him; some carts and coaches came along, and I lost sight of the cart altogether; I might be a dozen yards from Henley; I saw him half an hour afterwards. I found the prisoners in custody on the 9th of June, and am certain of them - I should know the other man.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been a ward constable? A. Two or three years - I am a porter by trade; I was going on duty. I have known Henley some years. I saw nobody in the cart.

CHARLOTTE FIELD . I live at Mr. James Deacon Hughes ', in Southampton-row. I packed this box up for the carrier, and put most of the articles into it myself; there was a letter in it, with some money, but I do not know how much; the ham was outside, and it was all enclosed in a wrapper.

MARY ANN TURNER . I am in service with Field. I delivered the box to Jones, the carrier, about two o'clock, to go to Lewisham.

WILLIAM JONES. I drive the errand-cart - it is my own. I received this box from Turner, and put it inside the cart, between two and three o'clock - it was directed to Lewisham; I went down Holborn, along Newgate-street, and into Cheapside - I book at the Bull public-house, in Bread-street, and stopped the cart to go there; I went from there to Gracechurch-street, and into Lime-street, left something there, and returned into Gracechurch-street - I stopped at the corner of a passage leading to the market; I went up to fetch a box from the market, and returned in ten minutes - I received information, and missed the box - it has never been found. I have got to pay 15l. to make it good.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you see the box safe? A. When I left the cart; after I came out of Lime-street. I saw Girton in about fifteen minutes, or it might be less - he had been in pursuit of the men; Henley also came up. The box might weigh a quarter of a cwt.

JOHN THOMAS GRAY . I am a Mansion-house officer. On the 8th of June I apprehended the prisoners, going down Ludgate-hill together; I told them it was for robbing the Lewisham errand-cart, on Saturday, the 19th of May - they said they did not care any thing about it, and knew nothing about it. Henley and Girton identified them at the lock-up room, among other prisoners.

JENKS' Defence. I was coming from Deptford, and met Jones in St. Paul's church-yard - I had known him eighteen months, and got into conversation with him.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

JENKS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-56

1401. JOHN HARRIS and THOMAS TUCKEY were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 5 live tame rabbits, value 5s. , the property of John Maddox .

JOHN MADDOX. I am a ship-caulker , and live in Bermondsey-wall . These rabbits were in a hutch in my yard; I got up at half-past three o'clock on Friday morning, the 15th of June, and saw them all safe; I went out at a quarter-past four o'clock, and at half-past six I missed them - the yard has a fence, nearly six feet high. I found them at the Mansion-house, and the prisoners were in custody; I have no doubt of their being mine.

EDWARD SMITH . I am apprentice to a ship-wright, and live near Maddox. About a quarter-past five o'clock on this morning I was going to call my fellow-apprentice, and saw Harris looking over these palings - Tuckey stood close by. I knew them both before.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a poulterer. On the 15th of June, between eight and nine o'clock, these rabbits were brought to my master's shop, in Newgate-market, by the prisoners - I received them from Harris, after my master had paid Tuckey 5s. for them.

MATTHEW SMITH . I am a constable of Bermondsey. I apprehended the prisoners in the afternoon of the 15th - they denied the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

TUCKEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270712-57

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JULY 17.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1402. JAMES SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 61 pairs of spectacles, value 27l.; 1 case of drawing instruments, value 18s.; 1 compass and case, value 18s.; 1 thermometer, value 7s.; 2 pairs of compasses. value 2l.; 9 magnifying glasses, value 20s.; 4 rules, value 2l.; 2 egg glasses, in frames, value 12s.; 1 set of drawing instruments, value 30s.; 4 dividers, value 1l.; 2 steel pens, value 8s.; 2 bow pens, value 8s.; 27 files, value 8s.; 2 knives, value 3s.; 2 pencil-cases, value 4s.; 1 pen holder, value 2s.; 1 magnet, value 2s., and 38 spectacle cases, value 1l., the goods of William Elliott , his master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT. I am a mathematical instrument maker . I lived in Great Newport-street , at the time of the robbery; I now live in Holborn - the prisoner had been fourteen years in my employ. I placed implicit confidence in him, and treated him like a brother. On Monday, the 25th of June, in consequence of information, I went and searched his house. Mr. Glover and two officers were with me; I there found a quantity of my property. I had never given him authority to take it.

Cross-examined by MR. MITCHELL. Q. Had you missed any of these things? A. I missed property at times, but had not the least suspicion of him, and when I have mentioned that things were missing, he has said, it was most likely I had sold it and forgotten it; he did piecework, but never took any thing home except a few wheels. I never allowed him to take any thing else home; he had no tools at home to finish any thing else. I have other workmen, but nobody but him attended in the shop. I thought him incapable of robbing me - I considered him as one of my family.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Look at this letter, is it his hand

writing? A. It is; he had 3l. a week. When he first came he had but 1l. a week; the value of the property is 40l. or 50l.

The following extract from the letter was here read: "It is my first fault: I am truly repentant; you will sooner be pleased by saving a man to his family, who truly repents; it is a greater exertion of virtue to save a repentant sinner than a thousand acts of justice."

FRANCIS GORDON . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Elliott to the prisoner's house; I found all this property in his bed-room, on the second floor. I apprehended him before I went there; he asked what it was for, I told him his master had lost a considerable deal of property - he made no answer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find any articles of this sort, except what the prosecutor claimed? A. There were a few trifling things, which he said he would not swear to.

MR. MITCHELL to MR. ELLIOTT. Q. What promise did you make to the prisoner's sister, before he wrote you this letter? A. I told her I did not wish to press the capital charge, as I thought he would be hung if I did; I do not know whether that was before or after he wrote the letter. I desired the attorney not to press the capital charge, as these articles must have been taken at different times.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 36. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-58

1403. JOHN WHITTALL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 150lbs. of lead, value 50s., belonging to James Grundy , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JAMES GRUNDY. I live in the East India-road, and am a builder ; I built two house in Grundy-street, All Saints, Poplar . On the 3d of June I received information, and found the lead was gone from the front of both houses - it had been fixed; I went round the brick-field with a person, and met Haggart, who gave me information; I found part of the lead in a ditch at the bottom of a garden. I received information, sent for an officer, and went in pursuit of five men; when I got to Bow common Lee, who lives on the common, sent for me into his house - he gave me information. I went over the bridge to Mile-end-road, and when I came within a hundred yards of Twig-folly-bridge I found two pieces of the lead, tied in a handkerchief, laying in a field, and one piece in a kind of apron; I gave it to Haggart, and went to Twig-folly-bridge, where some more lead was taken out of the water - I compared it with my house, and it fitted - it is worth 3l.; there was 184lbs. taken from one house, and 150lbs. from the other. I found the prisoner in custody the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. MITCHELL. Q. Had you any mark on the lead? A. No, but it had been screwed to the house, and the screws soldered over; the holes corresponded.

THOMAS COLE . I am a carpenter. On Sunday morning, the 3d of June, I went with Grundy to Bow-common, to Mile-end, and then to Twig-folly-bridge - I saw the prisoner standing there, with a bundle on his shoulder - I knew him before; another man was with him, whom I do not know; the prisoner threw his bundle down between Mile-end and Twig-folly-bridge; he had a waistcoat on, with sleeves; they both ran away - I left Grundy and pursued; I lost sight of the bundle in following another man, but I left Grundy standing by it - when it was opened it contained lead, which I saw applied to the building, and it exactly fitted - I did not take the prisoner myself. The lead in that bundle weighed about 40lbs.

Cross-examined. Q. There was water near the place? A. Yes; he could have thrown it into the water if he had carried it further. I heard a fortnight after he was taken, that the parish had offered a reward; and I said "If so, I had as much right to part of it as any body." I cannot say that the bundle is the same that the prisoner threw away.

SAMUEL ELMERS . I am a labourer to Mr. Grundy. I was with him and Cole, and saw the prisoner throw the bundle off his shoulder - I ran after him; another man in a fustian coat was with him; I saw a man throw another bundle into the water - he was running before the prisoner; the bundle contained 40lbs. or 50lbs. of lead. I saw it fitted to Grundy's house, it matched exactly.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see it thrown away? A. Yes; but I could not identify it - the lead was fixed in front of the house; I have heard nothing about a reward.

WILLIAM HUNT . I live at Poplar, and am a sawyer. I met the prisoner going toward Mile-end-road, with a heavy bundle on his shoulder; it was in something like this handkerchief - three or four others were with him, one of them had a bundle.

HENRY WORKMAN . I am headborough. I went in pursuit, and saw two or three men apparently resting - when there was a cry of Stop thief! they ran; I saw two run over the bridge and one under - whether any more ran I cannot say.

Cross-examined. Q. When did the parish offer a reward for this? A. They have offered no reward for this - there is a board up offering a reward about murder, burglaries, and such things.

HENRY COLE . I was with my father and saw the prisoner, between Mile-end and Twig-folly-bridge, with a bundle on his shoulder - I saw him throw it down; I knew him before, and am certain he is the man. I only saw two men.

JAMES HAGGERT . I am a rounder of Poplar parish. I went with Grundy, and found two pieces of lead in a dry ditch - I took it home; it fitted the house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent - if I had been guilty I should not have gone, and laid down within a hundred yards of the house; I made no resistance.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-59

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1404. JAMES SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years then to come .

Reference Number: t18270712-60

1405. SARAH SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a constable, and live in Seeth

ing-lane. On the 13th of June I was with Bissett, and saw the prisoner in Mincing-lane with Elizabeth Buckley ; we took them both into custody - and as we took them to the Compter I saw some loose money fall from the prisoner at the end of Cheapside - I picked it up; there were two half-crowns and seven sixpences, all bad, and two good shillings; I said, "Halloo, what more of this;" she used a bad expression, but said nothing else.

JOHN BISSETT . I am a constable, and was with Thompson. I searched the prisoner in Tower-street, and found five counterfeit sixpences in her pocket.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin; these five sixpences are all counterfeit, and each cast from the same mould; if they are cut or rubbed they appear white all through, and would deceive any body; these seven sixpences are of the same description, and the half-crowns are counterfeit.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-61

1406. ELIZABETH BUCKLEY was indicted for a like offence .

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a constable. I was present when this prisoner was taken into custody with Smith; I found in her hand these two sixpences, tied up in a bit of rag.

JOHN BISSETT . I saw Thompson find this money on the prisoner.

Mr. FIELD. They are both counterfeits, and of the same description as those produced in the last case - they are cast from the same mould.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-62

1407. ANN KELLY was indicted for a like offence .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-63

1408. JOHN VALENTINE was indicted for a fraud .

MRS. MARIA USTONSON . I am a widow , and keep a fishing-tackle shop , No. 204, Fleet-street . On the 13th of June George Smith , my apprentice, brought me a parcel, and asked for 2s. 6d. for the carriage; the shop bell rung, Smith ran down, and I told him to send the boy for the money; I gave the boy the half-crown to pay for the parcel - 2s. 6d. was written on it, as the charge for carriage; upon opening it I found two letters in it - one which was unsealed, contained an order for goods to be packed and sent to No. 14, Houndsditch, that evening; I was busy, having an order to complete for his Majesty, and sent Smith to Houndsditch to ask if they could wait for the goods.

GEORGE SMITH. I am an apprentice to Mrs. Ustonson. On the 13th of June, between two and four o'clock, the prisoner brought this parcel to the shop, directed to Mrs. Ustonson; he said there was half a crown to pay for it - I took it up stairs - my mistress sent half a crown down by the boy, who I saw delivered it to the prisoner; I afterwards went to Houndsditch, but could find no No. 14; I found a Mr. Johnson, an ironmonger, in Houndsditch, but his name was not John; we have not supplied him with any articles - the prisoner said he brought the parcel from the Edinburgh mail.

The letters enclosed in the parcel were here read - one was addressed to Mrs. Ustonson, dated Edinburgh, the 12th of June, desiring various articles of fishing-tackle to be sent by Thursday night, to John Johnson, No. 14, Houndsditch, and was signed William Monro ; the other was addressed to John Johnson , and desired him to forward the tackle, with some other articles, to Mr. Monro, at Edinburgh.

MRS. USTONSON. I have had no complaint of these articles not having been forwarded.

JOSIAH EVANS . I am street-keeper of Candlewic-kward. I assisted in taking the prisoner into custody on the 15th of June, at a public-house in West-street, Smithfield.

Prisoner's Defence. That I delivered the parcel, I acknowledge - but I believe there are a thousand cases in London similar to that in which I was placed; it is nothing uncommon for parcels to be delivered by strangers; it was delivered to me by a stranger, who had all the appearance of a guard (belonging, as he told me, to the Edinburgh coach) he offered me 6d. to deliver it to the lady; distress would not have caused me to do it, had I known I was doing wrong; I have been made the dupe of another man.

GUILTY .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-64

1409. ROBERT NORMAN was indicted for a fraud .

DEAR MOON . I am the wife of Thomas Moon - we keep the Barley Mow public-house, in Thames-street - the prisoner lodged at our house for a week. Between three and four o'clock on the 20th of June he sold me the duplicate of a watch for 2s.; I took it to the pawnbroker's that evening - they said it was forged; he was apprehended that night at our house; I told him the pawnbroker said it was forged - he said, then he had been deceived - he had paid for every thing at our house.

DANIEL FOX . I am a pawnbroker, in partnership with John Clarke - we live in Bermondsey-street. This duplicate is one of ours, but it has not been filled up by any body in our shop - there is now a watch entered on it, as pawned for 10s., in the name of Norman, Lambeth-hill; it is a forgery altogether - when Moon brought it to me I detained it.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. Fox delivered me the duplicate; I apprehended the prisoner at Moon's house, in bed; he said he had been deceived.

Prisoner's Defence. I offered to sell Moon the watch itself the evening before; I gave a person the duplicate, who gave me this one, and 1s. 6d., saying he had pawned it in the vicinity of his own lodging.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270712-65

1410. JOHN WHITNEY was indicted for a fraud .

PETER WILLIAMS . I am an apprentice to a tailor , who lives in Fleet-street. On the 28th of May , about twelve o'clock, I was looking into the window of Mr. Reeve, a pawnbroker, on Snow-hill , as I wanted a watch-key - the prisoner, whom I never saw before, beckoned me up King's-arms-yard, and showed me two seals, a ring, and a chain - he said they were gold, and I should have them a bargain; he asked if I would give 30s. for the lot; I said I had not got quarter of the money - he said, "Pawn your watch for 30s.;" I said I would not - he took one of the seals off, and asked if I would give 10s. for it; I said I

had not got half that; he told me to give him all I had, which was 2s. and a halfpenny: he said the seal was gold, and the stone garnet, and I could have my name engraved on it; I gave him 2s. and a 1/2d. for it; he said he was so much in want he would take any money; he borrowed my knife to cut it, to show me that it was gold; I am eighteen years old.

Prisoner. Q. When was I apprehended. Q. On the 18th of June; I was a quarter of an hour with him, and am certain he is the person.

Q. Did you not say if I would return the 2s. you would let me go? A. No; Mr. Wood, the clerk at the Despatch-office, where I live, told him so, and he said he had not got 2s.

CHARLES HARDEN . I am a jeweller. This seal is made of copper and brass; it is as common an article as can be made - the stone is only glass.

GEORGE GOUGE . I am an officer. This seal was given to me at the Despatch-office, in the prisoner's presence.

Prisoner's Defence. He followed me up Fleet-street, called me into the passage, shut the door on me, and sent for an officer.

GUILTY .

Publicly Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-66

1411. CHARLES JONES was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-67

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1412. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 shawl, value 14s.; 3 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign , the property of Mary Johnson , widow .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-68

1413. THOMAS MILLS, alias MILLER, alias THOMAS WARD MILLS , was indicted for bigamy .

WILLIAM POCKNELL . I am a shell-fish monger, and live in St. Martin's-lane. I was present on the 13th of January, 1825, when the prisoner was married to my sister, Ann Pocknell , at St. Martin's in the Fields , (she was at that time single.) I was a subscribing witness to the register.

CHARLES PARKS . I live in St. Martin's-lane, and am assistant clerk of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields; here is the marriage register of that parish. On the 13th of January, 1825 , Thomas Ward Mills was married to Ann Pocknell - I was present at the marriage; the prisoner is the man. The register is witnessed by William Pocknell.

JOHN POCKNELL . I am brother of William Pocknell. - I have a copy of the register of the marriage of Thomas Miller with Rhoda Winnell , at St. Mary, Bury St. Edmonds, on the 26th of January, 1813.

BENJAMIN PETTIT . I was present at the marriage of the prisoner with Rhoda Winnell, at St. Mary, Bury St. Edmonds; the prisoner is the man - he was married by the name of Thomas Miller. I saw his wife, Rhoda, yesterday.

JOHN BURCHALL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 5th of March, at Mr. Pocknell's, in St. Martin's-lane.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated that in 1816 he had quarrelled with his wife, who had sworn the peace against him; he was at last compelled to leave his business and home to avoid her - that about six years after he wrote to the Magistrate, to know if she was living - and receiving no answer, concluded she was dead; he then married again; and having been separated seven years, he conceived he was not acting illegal - and that the prosecution was brought by Pocknell's brothers entirely, contrary to her desire.

ANN POCKNELL. I married the prisoner - he did not tell me that he had been married, and had children. The prosecution is instituted by my desire.

Prisoner. I am prevented from having legal advice, having assigned all my property to my wife.

SAMUEL LEADBETTER . I live at Uckfield. The prisoner has made an assignment to me, on behalf of his present wife, since he has been taken up, but I sent it back again to him.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-69

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1414. THOMAS COCKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Ross , Esq. , from his person .

COLONEL JOHN ROSS. I am in the Army . I was in Regent-street about eleven o'clock on Sunday evening, the 10th of June - I felt a motion at my coat pocket; I put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief; I turned, and caught hold of the prisoner close at my elbow, with it in his hand - I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Were there not many persons passing? A. Yes. I am sure he was close to my back; I did not see him stoop - he made no resistance.

JURY. Q. Was the prisoner nearest to you? A. Yes, so close that I immediately took hold of him; he begged to be allowed to go. I am convinced almost that it was his first offence, and I beg to recommend him to mercy.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-70

1415. JOSEPH OSMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 6 pairs of stays, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Howell .

THOMAS HOWELL. I am a stay-maker , and live in the London-road. The prisoner was my town-traveller - I hired him at a salary in December last, but he did not give me satisfaction; I then offered him 5 per cent. for what he

sold. I took the prisoner before a Magistrate at Union-hall, about five weeks ago, but he was not committed, because the parcel was stolen in Middlesex; Mr. Chambers advised me to go and get a bill; he absconded for some time - it was his duty to sell goods and to collect money; he was to receive 5 per cent. for what he sold; he refused to have any salary beside that - he had parcels to show to customers, but I sent this parcel to Fulham.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Mr. Chambers commit the prisoner for this? A. No.

JOHN WILSHIRE . I am a draper, and live at Fulham. I received a parcel from Mr. Howell in the middle of April, by coach, it contained six pairs of stays - I did not know there was such a person as Mr. Howell, and had had no dealings with him; the prisoner came to my house in about a quarter of an hour, and said, "You have received a parcel which does not belong to you;" I said, "I know it don't" - he took it from my house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-71

1416. JOHN BRIDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 1 gig, value 30l. , the goods of James Bennett .

JAMES BENNETT. I am a coach-maker , and live in Little Moorfields - I let out gigs. The prisoner came to me on Saturday, the 26th of May, between two and three o'clock, and asked if I would let him a gig to go to Hammersmith, to fetch his mother; I asked his address, and he said George Bridges , No. 9, Whitmore-row, Hoxton; he fetched a horse, and in about an hour he came and took away the gig - I asked when he expected to return - he said about seven or eight o'clock in the evening; he paid me 3s. for the use of it on going out - if he had told me he should be longer I should have charged him more. The gig did not come back, and on Monday I heard there was a man before the Magistrate - I went, and found him there - he had a cheque in his pocket, for 14l.; I traced the drawer of the cheque to Cockspur-street, and there I found the gig. I certainly did not intend to sell it to him. I inquired at Hoxton, but no such person lived there.

Prisoner. Q. I just wish to ask if it was a gig? A. You may call it a gig or a chaise - he asked for a chaise.

WILLIAM GEORGE MERES . I am an auctioneer, and live in Cockspur-street. The prisoner, who was a stranger, came to me on the 26th of May, about two o'clock, and brought a note from Mr. Cox, an auctioneer, in St. James'-street, whom I knew - this is the note - (read.)

Dear Sir, - The bearer wishes to dispose of a tilbury in your next sale.

I took the gig, but said I had not a sale immediately; I asked what he wanted for it - he said from 16l. to 20l.; I ultimately purchased it of him for 14l.; my man showed the same gig to Mr. Bennett.

JAMES STEWARD MECKLEHAM . I am clerk to Mr. Meres. I showed the same gig to Mr. Bennett which I saw the prisoner leave there - what Mr. Meres has stated is correct. I knew the prisoner about two years ago - he was an auctioneer's clerk.

JAMES SAVAGE . I am a headborough of Bethnal-green. I took the prisoner on another charge; I found a cheque upon him, which I showed to Mr. Bennett.

W. G. MERES. This is the cheque I gave the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270712-72

1417. JAMES CORNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 pair of boots, value 8s. , the goods of Stephen Gibbs .

SAMUEL BUCKTHORP . I am a porter of Lincoln's Inn. I saw the prisoner and another lad in Lincoln's Inn; they went up the stair-case of No. 16; I watched them, and saw the prisoner trying on a pair of boots - I asked him twice what he was doing - he made no answer, but when I asked him a third time he said he had found the boots in a dark corner; I took him - the other lad ran away; another person came up, who told me to take care of him while he fetched Mr. Gibbs, who came and owned them.

STEPHEN GIBBS. I live in Portugal-street . These boots are mine - they hung about five feet within my shop; I saw them about nine o'clock that evening, and before ten a person called me. I found the prisoner with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the boots lay, and took them up; the witness came up to me, and I told him where I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-73

1418. JAMES CARRUTHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 tea-kettle, value 8s. , the goods of Michael Cullen .

THOMAS REED . I live with Mr. Cullen, a tin-plate worker , in Clerkenwell . I was shutting up his shop on the 7th of June, about ten o'clock; I saw the prisoner come and take the kettle - he ran; I pursued and called Stop thief! I saw him drop it - I lost sight of him for about five minutes; he was taken on Clerkenwell-green.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many other boys were there? A. There were more in the street, but I did not particularly notice them; there were not more than half a dozen. I do not know what became of them; but when I went back I found many men and women, and boys there.

COURT. Q. Where were the other boys? A. Playing about in the street; I am sure the prisoner took the kettle.

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with this kettle.

MICHAEL CULLEN. This is my kettle; I was sitting in my parlour and heard my boy call Stop thief! I ran out and saw the prisoner carrying the kettle - I pursued, and stopped him within about fifty yards.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who stopped him? A. Three gentlemen; he was stopped before I came up, at the corner of Ray-street - he had not turned a corner; he dropped the kettle on Brook-hill.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-74

1419. SAMUEL CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 1 plank, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of John Coles .

JOHN COLES. I am a carpenter , and live in Princes-street, Lisson-grove . On the 9th of June, between twelve and one o'clock. I saw the prisoner take a deal from a

pile which had not been sawed an hour before; my men were gone to dinner - he was quite a stranger. I was standing in the street, and saw him come and take up the deal, and mark it TB - he carried it about twelve yards from my premises. I went to him, and he said some man had told him he might have it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and a person came and told me to carry this up to the Yorkshire Stingo, and he would give me 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-75

1420. HENRY CAMDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 saddle, value 15s.; 1 bridle, value 25s., and 1 sack, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Young .

THOMAS COPE . I am street-keeper of Islington. On Saturday, the 30th of June, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming up Lower-street, with this sack on his back. I asked what he had got; he said what was that to me. I took hold of it and found this property; he then said he had bought them in Cheshunt-street.

THOMAS YOUNG. I live at Walthamstow ; this property is mine. I know nothing of the robbery.

CHARLES BIRD . I live with Mr. Young; this is his property. I had seen it safe in the barn on the 29th of June - and on the morning of the 30th it was gone; I locked the door the night before; my master found it broken open in the morning, and he called to me - it appeared to me to be broken with this piece of iron. I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Cheshunt-street, and a man offered me this property for 16s., which I gave him.

T. COPE. I found no money on him; he was offering them for sale for 14s.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-76

1421. JAMES PURCELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 coat, value 2s. , the goods of James Purcell, the elder .

JAMES PURCELL, SEN. The prisoner, I am sorry to say, is my son. I live at No. 10, North-wharf-row, Paddington , and work on the road - he was at home with me on the 17th of June, and had been so for about a fortnight. I had a coat there, and my wife missed it, and gave information - I was then under the necessity of going to appear against him. I have never seen the coat since.

PAUL WAGER . The prisoner's mother came to me, told me the case, and told me to take him if I could. I found him in Covent-garden and took him; he said "What have you to do with me?" I said, "What did you do with the coat?" he said, "That is nothing to you, it was my mother's coat, and I was not going to starve." I have known him all his life.

JOSEPH PRICE . I am a Bow-street officer. I received the prisoner; he said, at his first examination, that he had sold the coat in Monmouth-street - and then said, he sold it to a Jew for 6d.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work, and had but 2d. on the Saturday, which I bought a loaf with; and then I took the old coat and sold it for 6d. - as I did not know what use it was to my father.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-77

1422. JOHN RUSHOLM was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 5 shirts, value 15s. , the goods of William Berry .

WILLIAM BERRY. I am a licenced victualler and live in Frederick-street, Regents'-park . The prisoner had been in my service about two months before the robbery. I had some shirts in my drawers, in my bed-room, and missed them about the 17th of June - he had access to that room; he had left my service before we missed them. I took a constable with me, and went and accused him of it - he at first denied it and then acknowledged it; we found three of the shirts at his mother's, and a duplicate for two others; he told me I should find them there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you tell him, that if he told you where they were, you would not prosecute him? A. No; I have heard he has a good character.

JAMES MEE . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner; I went to his mother's, where I found three shirts and this duplicate.

ROBERT BERRY . I am a pawnbroker, in Gray's-inn-road. I have two shirts, pawned, I believe, by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-78

1423. JAMES BROWNWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 200 plants, commonly called camellias, in pots, value 20l., and 200 other plants, in pots, value 20l. , the goods of James Higgins .

JAMES HIGGINS, JUN. I am the son of James Higgins, who is a florist , and lives at Brixton . I lost some plants on the 31st of May; they were in pots, in a frame near my house - the lights had been lifted off. I lost about forty or fifty double camellias, and a number of single ones - I had seen them safe at nine o'clock the night before, in the nursery-ground - there are trees growing there, and I call the place a nursery-ground; they were all in pots - I know nothing of the prisoner. I went to Highgate, and found my plants at Mr. McPhersons, on the 1st of June - they opened the stable-door, and a barrow full of these plants were brought out. I could swear to all of them; the pots were not taken away - they are standing in the same place now. Before I saw the plants I said, "If they are mine, there are two myrtle heap camellias;" they were nearly all found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know the plants? A. By the working of them. I swore to three of them at the office - they were in frames in the nursery-ground; they are very delicate plants - they are always kept in the pots.

COURT. Q. Were the pots plunged? A. No; here is one of them - it is grafted here; I had sold none of them - I know them by the working of them, which I do myself.

WILLIAM McPHERSON . I am a nurseryman, and live at Highgate. Higgins came to my house and inquired for some camellias. I showed him a barrow-load, which had

two or three hundred single ones and about fifty double ones. About eight o'clock in the morning, on the 31st of May, the prisoner brought them to my house, at Highgate; he first inquired for employ, and said he had come from Mr. Jones, of Wandsworth. I told him we did not want any hands - he then said, Mr. Jones told him to ask if I wanted any camellias, and that he had brought some with him - they were then brought into the yard in a barrow; another man was with him, who appeared intoxicated. I cannot say which brought them in. I looked at them, and asked the prisoner how they came in that state, as they were out of pots; it was a very hot morning, and there was nothing over them but a flannel jacket; they appeared more like laurel cuttings than anything else - the prisoner said Jones had an execution on his premises, and was glad to get them out any how. I asked how they got broken so, as some were literally smashed; he said the man who assisted him in wheeling them had fallen over them - I asked what Jones wished me to do; he said he wished me to send him 2l. for them. I said that was nothing like the value - he said, I could settle it with Jones when I saw him; I said, "Jones must come himself to me;" he said he could not, for he was ill in bed. I looked over the plants, and thought proper to detain them; I gave the prisoner 1l., and told him to call next morning; he begged hard for more, as Jones was much distressed - I gave him 5s. more; he asked for a pint of beer, which I gave - his name he said was Steel. I asked Jones' direction; he said, "No. 3, Church-lane, Wandsworth." I made inquiry, and Higgins came to me next morning - the prisoner also came next morning, and I detained him; I delivered him to an officer - another man was with him, who ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know what a conservatory is? A. Yes; plants in a conservatory are turned out of pots; but in green or hot-houses they are in pots, and stand on frames generally.

JAMES DIXON . I live with my father, a nurseryman, at Lambeth - we lost some plants, and I went to Mr. McPherson, but these were not ours. I informed Higgins - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am an officer, and received him in charge. I produced some of the plants.

Prisoner's Defence. I was engaged by the other man to take them to Mr. McPherson, and he told me the very words which I used.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18270712-79

1424. MARY BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 silver spoon, value 10s. , the goods of Richard Abraham .

RICHARD ABRAHAM. I am a picture dealer , and live in New Bond-street ; the prisoner charred at my house. On the 25th of June, when I returned home, I heard that a quantity of plate had been stolen from a drawer in the bed-room. I sent for an officer. She denied the charge - we searched and found a silver fork and a silver case in some hay, in the wine-cellar; she was taken in charge - and at her lodging we found some pieces of baize, of mine; and next day Hinds produced this spoon.

MARY HINDS . The prisoner lives next door to me. She came on Sunday the 24th, and asked me to mind this spoon for her till next morning; she borrowed 1s. of me - she said she would pawn it next morning, and pay me. I heard she was apprehended next morning, and gave it up. She has been a very respectable housekeeper, but has six children, and is greatly reduced.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer, and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Strongly recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270712-80

1425. JOHN BATTES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 guitar, value 5l. , the goods of Marcus Aureling De Zain Ferraity .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-81

1426. JOSEPH LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 1 watch, value 20s. , the goods of George Stocker .

GEORGE STOCKER. I am a grocer , and live in Whitechapel ; the prisoner was employed as a journeyman in painting my house . On Thursday, the 31st of May, at night, I missed my watch from my dressing-table, in my bed-room. I had seen it at ten o'clock in the morning - he had been there that day, but not painting. I went next morning and informed his master.

GEORGE BLAKE . The prisoner was in my employ. I took him on Sunday - the duplicate had been sent to the prosecutor's on Friday, by post.

STEPHEN STEPHENS . I am a pawnbroker and live in Long-lane; the prisoner pawned this watch on the 31st of May. I am certain of his person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My employer engaged me to do some writing at the prosecutor's. I asked for money to get the gold, he said I must get the money to get it. I had no money - I did not pawn the watch.

GEORGE BLAKE. I did not tell him so.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-82

1427. JAMES DOBBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 sack of peas, value 9s. 6d. , the goods of William Bishop .

WILLIAM BISHOP. I am a salesman . On Saturday morning, the 30th of June, I was in the open part of Covent Garden-market , and had some peas for sale; and about half-past nine o'clock the prisoner was walking round my stand, with another man, who was bargaining for some peas - the prisoner walked to and fro with him, as I supposed to listen to the price; I agreed with the other man to take 9s. 6d. a sack; he put the money into my hand - I said I could not let him have the sack; he said he would return it- I then said, "Take your money back," which he did; after that I saw Green with a sack of peas; the prisoner was by his side - I sent Coles to tell him to come back - he was about thirty yards from my stand, and presently they sent me the sack back, but not the peas; no money had been offered for the peas. I took the prisoner into custody - he at first said he had paid 9s. 6d., then that he meant to pay - some money was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you sold

any peas? A. Not within twenty minutes of that time; he was taken in about a quarter of an hour; he had a donkey in Russell-street: he said at Bow-street that he meant to pay me, and also in the market; Green was at times employed by me as a porter. I swear he did not pay me for them.

JOHN GREEN . I am a porter, and unload Bishop's goods. I was going up to the stand; the prisoner pointed to a sack of peas, and said, "Take this up for me;" I took it on my shoulder, into Russell-street, and shot part into the hampers on the donkey and part into a sack; I did not hear Bishop call after me. Coles came up, and said the sack was to come back - I gave it to him. We returned together, and Bishop said they were not paid for; we went back, and found them in the hampers on the donkey; the prisoner was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. You were paid for the porterage? A. Yes, a penny; about half of them were in the hamper: those in the sack were gone.

WILLIAM BISHOP re-examined. I told a person to stand by the donkey, and the prisoner came to remonstrate with me for keeping the donkey - he had then got twenty or thirty regular thieves with him, and I detained him.

JOHN COLES . I was employed by Bishop. I saw Green carrying a sack round Russell-street - Bishop sent me after them: I brought back the sack: Bishop then said they were not paid for, and in about a quarter of an hour Green brought the prisoner back.

ROBERT BISHOP . I am the prosecutor's son. I stood by the donkey - the prisoner came there, and we took him to my father. The peas have been sent back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-83

1428. GEORGE RYE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 1 bottle-jack, value 5s., and 1 skillet, value 2s. , the goods of John Butt .

TIMOTHY BRIDGMAN . I am an officer, and live in Bethnal-green-road , next door to Butt. On the 27th of June, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner carrying this skillet and jack by my door, and stopped him; another person was with him, but he got away.

JOHN BUTT. These articles are mine. I have seen the prisoner about the road - I was out at the time.

AMELIA BUTT . I am the prosecutor's wife. These things were at the door, for sale - I did not see them taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a jobbing porter. I was going by, and a young man asked me to carry these things for 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-84

1444. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , from the person of William Gadsby , 1 pocket-book, value 6d.; 14 sovereigns, two 10l. and six 5l. Bank notes, and one 5l. promissory note, his property .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GADSBY. I am groom to Lord Frederick Bentic , and have been so for thirty years, but have not been much in town; we have been hunting for the last sixteen years. On the 26th of May, about half-past five o'clock, or near six, I was in Holborn, near Fleet-market - the prisoner tapped me on the shoulder, and said, "Ah! Mr. Gadsby - how long have you been from Nottinghamshire?" I said,"I have been here since Tuesday last, but I don't know you;" he said, "No, but you know a man who lives under the Duke of Portland, and has a large farm;" I said,"The Duke has several large farms;" we walked on together; he said, "The man I mean is a horse-dealer, and keeps a public-house;" I said, "Then it is Ben Smith;" he said, "Yes it is - he is my own cousin." I asked where he himself came from - he said from Lincolnshire; he asked when I was to return; we had a good deal of conversation; I told him I was to return next night, from the Angel, St. Martin's-le-grand, and had just taken my place; I asked where he lived in town - he said in John-street, Islington, and that he had only come that day; we talked about the country. He said he wondered I did not know him, for he was at his cousins five or six weeks back, and I had brought a message about a horse - I recollected that, but did not tell him so; we went on - he said, "You was not at Lincoln fair;" I said No - he said his cousin was there, and had a wrangle about a horse - I had heard about that; we walked on - he looked up, and said, "What place is this?" I said, "Holborn; you must be as strange as I am" - he then asked if I would go with him to a public-house while he wrote to his cousin, as there was a little difference between them, which might be settled by a letter, and they were both interested in it - he asked if I would carry the letter for him. He was dressed like a country farmer, and had corded breeches on; he had the same on at Bow-street, but had a fine pair of overalls over them then; I said I would not go into a public-house, but if he would call on me at the Duke of Portland's I would take the letter - I was then turning into Lincoln's Inn-fields, going home - he said his business lay at Islington, but as he was walking for recreation he would go with me a little way. When he got into Lincoln's Inn-fields he looked about, and said, "There are no carriages here - what place is it?" I said, "You are as big a stranger as I am;" we got into Queen-street - he said, "Here is a public-house, I'll treat you with a glass of any thing, if you will go in while I write the letter;" we went up into a parlour - he asked what I would take; I said only a little beer; he called for half beer and half ale; he pulled out his book, and said, "I want change for a sovereign," and said to me, "These are the things to go through life with - sovereigns and Bank of England notes are the things to keep - country notes will be run on, as they have been before." A man came in, who appeared to me to be muddled in liquor, and asked if a lady had been to inquire for him - we said No; he asked how long we had been there - we said only a few minutes, and he had better inquire of the landlord - he went, and came back; he then said he had got a great deal of money, and had 170l. a year left him; and was going to marry a clergyman's daughter, and she had a good deal; he threw his money on the table; I then said to the prisoner, "Come - here is no paper here, and I want to be going;" he said, "No, there is no accommodation here - we will go on;" we went on - the drunken man came out, and said he wanted to go to Wiltshire; I said, "I will show you where there is a coach, and will see that no harm comes of you;" the prisoner said, what a good thing it was that he had fallen into our hands. I then said I had to go to Wild-street; I went to a grocer's shop there, to buy some tea, and when I returned the prisoner stood at the top of Wild-street; he then said he would go into another public-house, in Long-acre - we did

so, and found the drunken man sitting there, with a glass of liquor before him; the prisoner then asked for pen and paper, and said, "Bring a glass of brandy and water;" they brought it with pen and ink, but no paper; three persons, who looked like gentlemen, came in; they went into another seat, and began to play - the drunken man played with them. The prisoner then shook a hat, with halfpence in it, gambled with the drunken man, and won a sovereign of him; I said that was not right - he said he did not mean to keep it, and gave it him again. About two glasses of brandy and water were drank; the drunken man then offered me money to take care of him; I had never seen him before; I did not like their going on, and said I would go- the prisoner said if I would give him my direction he would call on me, and then said he would meet me at the Angel next night, and go into the country with me, to see his cousin; I then took out my pocket-book, to get the case of a letter, to write my direction on; the drunken man took hold of the book, shook it, and said, "You have sovereigns there;" the prisoner then laid his hand on it, and said,"Here are notes as well as money" - I put my hand on it, and said, "Let my book alone;" I took it up, put it into my left side breast pocket, and said I would go; the drunken man then came again, and offered me money to let him go with me; the prisoner then took and shook the left breast of my coat, and said, "Take it, take it;" I said, "No; I will go directly." I took up my umbrella, and away I went - they both followed me down the stairs, and before I had got far along the street the prisoner came and said,"Mr. Gadsby, where is the man?" I said I did not know; he said, "I suppose he is forward, in the crowd;" I said,"You may go after him, for I won't" - he went. The three gentlemen said to me in the public-house, "What a good old gentleman you are to take care of that man." - When I got home to the Duke of Portland's I went to take out my pocket-book - it was gone, and this brown paper parcel was there - he must have taken my pocket-book out, and put this in instead of it, when he shook my coat - no man had laid hands on me but the prisoner. My pocketbook contained two 10l. and six 5l. Bank notes, fourteen sovereigns, and a 5l. Leicester note, payable in London. - The prisoner was taken next day, at the Black Horse public-house, in the Borough - he was then dressed quite like a gentleman.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How many public-houses had you been to that day? A. Only to the two I have mentioned; I had part of the brandy and water, and a little porter - I had dined at home - I drank nothing else; I left the second public-house about eight o'clock, or a quarter before; I missed my money about a quarter or twenty minutes past eight o'clock; he took hold of my coat with one hand - I did not see him put the other hand to me - I did not look at him particulary; he must have put his other hand into my pocket; I was about three yards from the other men; I was about a quarter of an hour in the house - I did not talk with the three men at all; I do not know what has become of the drunken man; I was in town about two years ago; I do not know how he learnt my name; I heard my sovereigns jingle when my book was on the table; when the prisoner was taken he had got some bright farthings - it was a sovereign he wanted changed; I did not go out of my way with him; I am still in his Lordship's service; when he took hold of my coat the table was not between us - I was at the end of it, and he was close to me.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner say that Ben Smith, who keeps the public-house, was his cousin? A. Yes.

SARAH CARN . My sister keeps the Coachmaker's Arms, Long-acre. I recollect seeing the prosecutor and prisoner in the club-room, on the 26th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening - four other persons were there; I did not see any of the transaction.

BENJAMIN SMITH . I live at Norton, in Nottinghamshire, and keep the Tiretius public-house. I do not know the prisoner - he is not my cousin; I had a wrangle about a horse at Lincoln-fair, and got my horse again. I am a servant to the Duke of Portland, and keep a public-house as well.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at Martin's, the prize-fighter, the Black Horse public-house, Blackman-street; I found on him a book, five new farthings, and a piece of a country note; he had on a pair of white trowsers over corded breeches and top boots.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not deny being with him - he said he was a stranger; I sat on the opposite side of the table to him, and the drunken man at his side; I got the farthings at Mrs. Seely's, where I live; I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270712-85

1430. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 9 half reams of paper, value 1l. 18s. , the goods of John Henry Kelly .

JOHN HENRY KELLY. I am a stationer , and live in Vigo-street, Regent-street - I know this paper to be mine. On the 25th of June, while I was in the City, it was stolen from the further end of my shop.

JANE HODGSON . I was sitting in Mr. Kelly's back parlour, and saw the prisoner going out of the shop with these two parcels - I had not seen him come in; I ran to the door, called Stop thief! he was pursued, and brought back with the parcels, by Mr. Skinner, who was passing.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know him before? A. No; I was about ten yards from him - he looked round, and I saw his full face - it was in the morning; I saw him distinctly.

HENRY SKINNER . On the 25th of June I was passing Mr. Kelly's door, Mrs. Kelly stood at the door and alarmed me - I turned, and saw the prisoner running with the paper; I pursued - he threw it down; I secured him without losing sight of him, and my wife, who was with me, took it up; I am sure he dropped it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not somebody run before him? A. No; Mrs. Kelly did not say he was not like the person.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I am an officer. I received him in charge; he said distress drove him to it. I found 4d. on him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-86

1423. JAMES TRUBSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 2 shillings and 4 sixpences , the monies of Edward King .

EDWARD KING. I keep the Horse and Groom public-house, John-street, Edgware-road . On the night of the 5th of June there was 13s. in my till, and next morning I missed two shillings and four sixpences; I got an officer, who took the prisoner and another lad; the prisoner pulled out two sixpences - I saw them, and they had my mark on them; I had locked the bar door at night, and opened it in the morning.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - I asked what money he had; he pulled out two sixpences, which were marked in the way I had seen the prosecutor mark his silver; he at first said he had received them of Mr. King on the Saturday before; and then that he had had them a week - he afterwards said he climbed over, got into the bar, and opened the till.

EDWARD KING. I had given him no sixpences the night before; he was my servant - he must have had a key.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-87

1432. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 coach-lamp, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Bray .

CHARLES BRAY. I am a coach-maker , and live in Theobald's-road . I was called down-stairs, and this lamp was produced - it is mine.

WILLIAM GILL . I am a coach-maker. I was at the Horse and Groom public-house, opposite Bray's, and saw the prisoner go and take this lamp from under the boot of a phaeton, I ran and secured him, about a hundred yards off, with it; he said he was out of work, and had taken it to sell.

THOMAS DAVIS . I took him in charge; he said he was very badly off.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Holborn; a person gave me 3d. to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-88

1433. JOHN MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Francis Campion Newcomb , from his person .

FRANCIS CAMPION NEWCOMB, I was in Palace-yard, St. James' , on the 18th of June - the witness told me my handkerchief was gone - I felt, and missed it; this is it.

THOMAS WHITNEY . I saw Mr. Newcomb in company with two or three others; I saw another person take the handkerchief, and put it into the prisoner's hand, who put it up his coat; I seized him, and took it from him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there many people there? A. Several people; I am a cooper, but out of work.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I received him in charge - he denied it; the soldiers were exercising, and people looking at them.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it laying on the ground, and took it up. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-89

1434. SAMUEL SYKES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Foster , from his person .

WILLIAM FOSTER. On the 28th of June I was near Sadler's Wells ; I felt a twitch at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me - my handkerchief fell from him - nobody else was near - he must have dropped it.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am an officer. I heard an alarm, and found the prisoner scuffling with the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from the play, I never had it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-90

1435. MARY CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 18 yards of ribbon, value 13s., the goods of James Salthouse , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM CALF . I am shopman to James Salthouse, linen-draper , Goswell-road . On the 14th of June, about half past five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and bought a yard of 10d. print; she asked for ribbons - I showed her a drawer - some time after she showed a piece which she wanted to match; I said we had none like it, I put the drawer in, and missed a piece of ribbon; I went out, and brought her back - she denied it, but as I was positive, she said she had it, and gave it up.

WILLIAM READ . I took her in charge; she cried, and said it was her first offence; I found 1s. on her.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-91

1436. CHARLES HODSON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MOORE . I am a salt merchant , and live at No. 8 Wharf, Paddington ; the prisoner was employed to receive money for me, up to the 1st of June, but no longer; this was received on the 15th.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-92

1437. CHARLES HODSON was again indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN MOORE . The prisoner was entrusted to receive money for me till the 1st of June. Mr. Parsons owed me 7s. for a sack of salt, delivered on the 4th of May. I have never received the money from the prisoner - he made a minute of what he received; I checked it off in the book - he paid me some money on the 12th of May. I had given him a receipt for Parson's; he brought it back, and said it was not convenient to pay it.

JACOB PARSONS . On the 4th of May, I received a sack of salt from Moore. I paid the prisoner 7s. for it a few days after. I am certain there were some shillings among it; he wrote this receipt on the bill.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I took him in charge.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that his master having had to pay a fine for his not paying the turnpike, and had stopped 2l. 17s. 9d. of the prisoner's wages, and that he took this cash to provide for his family.

JOHN MOORE. This is false; I paid him 2l. 1s. 8d. on the 1st of June - I was fined 2l. 16s., but never stopped it out of his wages. It is entirely false.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-93

1438. JAMES DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 11 brushes, value 24s., the goods of William Bracey Kent , his master .

WILLIAM BRACEY KENT. I am a brush-maker , and live in Great Marlborough-street ; the prisoner was in my service. I have missed brushes from my warehouse daily, for years past - he went through the warehouse to go to work.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you sold many of these brushes? A. Yes; they are all stamped like these. I cannot swear that these have not been sold - I never paid workmen in goods; I sold Moriarty some once, on credit; I paid his wages weekly - I may have sold Wagner brushes - he has been in business himself; I have sold some to most of my workmen. I have sold Roberts some; the prisoner told the Magistrate that he bought them of me, but they are not entered in the book.

JOHN HAWKES . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned these eleven brushes, on the 5th of June, in the name of John Berry , No. 5, Silver-street. I always knew him by that name.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I apprehended the prisoner; he said his wife had pawned the goods.

Mr. PHILLIPS to W. B. KENT. Q. Look at this brush; is it yours? A. Yes; it completes this dozen.

Q. Why, this was made in Newgate; have you any mark on it? A. No; I swore to it, to the best of my belief.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-94

1439. MARY ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 7 yards of printed cotton, value 7s. , the goods of John Kentish .

JOHN KENTISH. I am a linen-draper , and live in Long-acre . On the 6th of June, in the evening, I came home to my shop and saw several people there; the prisoner was there. I saw her take this print, put it under her shawl, and walk out with it. I went out and overtook her with it, about one hundred yards off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MATTHEW PATISON . I am a patrol, and took her with the print.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-95

1440. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 15 pieces of Switz pine, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Tomkison .

JOHN RAMBO . I am journeyman to Thomas Tomkison, a piano-forte maker , who lives in Dean-street, Soho . On the 8th of June I saw the prisoner in the yard - he took fifteen pieces of Switz pine on his back, and as he went to the door I called, and asked where he was going, as he was a stranger - he said he would not tell me; he made this reply three times. I saw Blacke, who pursued, and brought him back with it.

RICHARD BLACKE . I was coming down the stairs and saw Rambo talking to the prisoner. I followed, and took him with the wood on his shoulder - I asked him how he came to take it - he said, "What is that to you."

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-96

1441. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 2 books, value 6s. , the goods of John Poynton .

JOHN POYNTON. I am a bookseller , and live in Russell-court, Drury-lane . On the 22d of June, while I was writing, two volumes of Burns' poems were taken from my window, which was open. I went out, and found the prisoner with them. I find he bears a very good character; his wife is dangerously ill, and he was in distress.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-97

1442. FRANCES WILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of Barnard Murphy , from his person .

BARNARD MURPHY. On the 2d of July I met the prisoner, and went to No. 2, Ship-yard , with her, to sleep. I missed my watch next morning - she was still in bed, she denied it; I am sure it was safe at night - I was in liquor; it was found by the landlady afterwards.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable. I received the watch from the landlady - it was wrapped in a piece of a handkerchief, which she owned.

SUSANNAH PEARCE . I keep the house, No. 20, Shipyard. I heard the prisoner come down and go backwards, the prosecutor was accusing her of this; she denied it - I afterwards found the watch in a box of dirt in the yard.

JOHN PATEY . I lodge at Pearce's. The prosecutor knocked at my door, and said he had lost his watch - and while he was gone to the officer, I heard the prisoner come down and go into the back yard; she went out, returned shortly, and I pointed her out to the officer.

BARNARD MURPHY. I did not search her when I missed it, nor did I search her clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it; I did not own the handkerchief - he got up in the night, and went backwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-98

1443. ROBERT MILLER and JOHN MILLER were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 7 sheets, value 14s., and 1 iron, value 6d., the goods of John Waugh , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH WAUGH . I live at No. 29, New Tothill-street , and am the wife of John Waugh; the prisoners lodged at No. 6, which we rent and let out. Robert and his wife took the room; John is his son - they left without notice, and took the key - Robert came back, and brought me the duplicate (I think he knew nothing of it) on the 20th. I broke the door open and missed these things.

JOHN ROBINSON JACKSON . I am a pawnbroker, and have a sheet, pawned by the prisoner John.

JOHN NICHOLIS . I am a pawnbroker. John Miller pawned two sheets with me.

JOSEPH HILL . I am an officer. On the 20th of June I was sent for; the prisoner Robert gave me these duplicates, and said his wife gave them to him, but he knew nothing of it.

ROBERT MILLER's Defence. My wife has been in the habit of taking things - I spoke to her about it, and she tried to cut her throat; she is perfectly deranged.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-99

1444. JOHN AINES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 10 stockings, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Strickland .

MARY STRICKLAND . I am the daughter of Samuel Strickland; we live in William-street, Westminster . On the 15th of June, at eight o'clock at night, I washed these stockings, and hung them in our back-yard. I missed them next morning - I was in York-street, and met the prisoner; I suspected him, and had been looking for him - he was coming out of his father's house with some of the stockings in his hand. I asked him for the rest, he said he had no more - my father got an officer.

SAMUEL STRICKLAND. I found the stockings on the prisoner; he begged hard for mercy.

GEORGE HUNTLEY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; he said if I would not handcuff him he would produce two more pairs, which he did, from under his bed - these are them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it from want.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-100

1445. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 1s.; 1 yard of dimity, value 6d.; 1 night-gown, value 6d.; 1 bolster-case, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 towel, value 3d.; 1 pair of breeches, value 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 coat, value 1s.; 1 scarf, value 2s.; 2 caps, value 1s.; 1 Prayer-book, value 6d., and 4 pieces of bed furniture, value 13s. , the goods of James Perrey .

ANN WINTER . I lodge on the third floor of Mr. Perrey's house, a baker , in Gray's-inn-lane . On the evening of the 30th of June I was coming down stairs, and saw the prisoner on the first flight of stairs, with a shawl on her shoulder - she asked if there was room to go by; I said Yes, and as I passed, I saw some things near her on the stairs. I gave an alarm - Mrs. Perrey flew out at her; I went for an officer.

MARY PERREY . I am wife of James Perrey. Winter called me - I found the prisoner with my shawl on her shoulder, and some things in a bundle, at her side - they were mine; the scarf, handkerchief, and two caps were in her bosom, and the Prayer-book in her pocket; she said nothing till the officer came - but then she appeared to be in liquor, and cried, saying she was in distress.

JAMES WILKINSON . I am an officer, and took her in charge.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-101

1446. ROBERT BEVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 ham, value 20s. , the goods of Samuel Nokes .

JAMES BRYANT . I am shopman to Samuel Nokes, a cheesemonger , of Camden-row, Bethnal-green . On the 5th of June I missed a ham from the side of the window; I pursued, and took the prisoner, walking away with it under his arm.

JOHN HANCOCK . The prisoner came to my master's, which is next door to Nokes', and bought a penny loaf - he and his companion then went to Nokes' shop - the other took the ham, and gave it to the prisoner at the corner; I alarmed Bryant - we followed, and took him - he dropped it, and I took it up.

GEORGE SHARPEY . I saw two men standing at Nokes' private door - I saw the other take down the ham; they walked on; I turned round, and then saw the prisoner with it - I pursued.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A decent man offered me 6d. to take it to No. 8, North-street.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-102

1447. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 sheet, value 2s. , the goods of George Tucker .

GEORGE TUCKER. I keep the Horns public-house, St. John-street . The prisoner lodged there on the 14th and 15th of June.

MARY BURROWS . I am in Mr. Tucker's service. I missed this sheet two or three minutes after the prisoner left the house, on the morning of the 15th of June; I went out and caught him in the street, and said, "If you please, come back - master wants to speak to you;" he said he would not till he had got his breakfast; I asked him to come now - he said he would not; master then came, and brought him back; he shook his jacket, and said he had nothing about him; I said, "Is it in his hat?" he took it off a little way, and said, "Here is nothing here;" master took his hat quite off, and it was there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN HAYSFORD . I am an officer. I took him in charge - he said he did it from distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-103

1448. MARY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 3 yards of linen, value 6s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas McKell .

MARY McKELL . I am the wife of Thomas McKell, who has been in the Army , but is now superannuated. On the 26th of June I was moving, and employed the prisoner to move a box, containing linen and other things - it was not locked, but corded; she had seen me put the things into it. I soon afterwards saw a shawl concealed inside her gown - it was my grand-daughter's, and had been in the box. I afterwards saw her intoxicated - I went to the box, and missed the linen and shoes.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you take me into a public-house, and give me some gin? A. I did in the morning, and sent for some early in the morning; I only took her to one public-house.

WILLIAM WINKS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner - she denied all knowledge of the property. I found five duplicates on her, which do not relate to this property; I asked if she had any more - she said No, but I found two in her bosom, which relate to the property; she was nearly drunk, but McKell was quite sober.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . I am shopman to Mr. Perkins, a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a remnant of linen, for 2s. 6d., and a pair of shoes, for 1s. 6d., at different

times, on the 26th of June, in the name of Leonard - she appeared sober.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me them to pawn, and we spent the money in gin.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-104

1449. JOSEPH COOK and MOSES MORE were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 4 live tame fowls, price 4s. , the property of John Davis .

ANDREW VALLANCE . I am a patrol. On Sunday, the 17th of June, about 4 o'clock in the morning, I was going off duty, and saw the two prisoners, with one Shirley, turn round a corner of Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea; Cook had three loaves; More had a bundle, and Shirley another parcel; I pursued - Cook threw down the loaves; More threw his bundle over into No. 1, Frankland's-row; I knew him before, and am certain of him; the bundle was like a large dish tied up - they separated. I pursued Shirley, and lost sight of the others; he threw his bundle over a high fence- that contained the four fowls; More's parcel was a leg and loin of lamb - the fowls were quite warm.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you lose sight of More? A. Yes, for nearly half an hour - I then took him; I might be fifty yards from him when he threw it away - one Allen pursued them; Cook ran past me; I took another turning, and More came up to me. Cook gave himself up to a watchman.

JOHN DAVIES. I live on Chelsea-common . I missed four fowls at eight o'clock in the morning of the 17th of June - they were all safe the night before; the head of a bantam cock was left behind. I saw the fowls at the officer's house; the body of one matched the head - they appeared just killed.

LUKE NIXON . I was with Vallance - his statement is correct. I knew both the prisoners before.

COOK's Defence. I had no fowls about me. I was at the Cheshire Cheese public-house - this man came to me; we got intoxicated, and it being late we slept in the fields - we met Shirley in the morning, with a bundle, which he said was linen; as we went along he said, "There is the Bow-street officer - you had better run."

COOK - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MORE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-105

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JULY 13.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1450. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 2 pecks of oats, value 1s. 9d.; 1 ham, value 10s., and 3lbs. of cheese, value 2s., the goods of Frederick Purssord , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Weeks , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270712-106

1451. WILLIAM MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 1 coal-scuttle, value 6s.; 3 shoe brushes, 3s. 6d., and 1 bottle of blacking, value 6d. , the goods of William Brumwell .

JANE ELSEY . I am servant to William Brumwell, who lives in Connaught-terrace, Paddington . On the 2d of July, at half-past five o'clock in the morning, a person knocked at the door; I got up, and opened it, but saw nobody there - I went up again, and called my master, then came down, and saw a small deal table standing against the wall in the area, with the blacking-bottle on it, and these brushes under it - the coal-scuttle stood in the corner of the area, tied up - nobody could come there without getting over the rails; there are no steps. The prisoner was in the area, near the table, which had been moved from quite another part of the area, and the coal-scuttle under it - I said nothing to him, but sent for an officer.

THOMAS CHILDS . I am a stable-man, and live at Paddington. On the morning of the 2d of July I was going along Connaught-terrace, and saw a person or two standing, and saying it was not all right; they knocked at the door - I peeped over, and saw the prisoner in the area, and the articles as the witness has described. I saw the prisoner take the bottle of blacking out of his pocket, and put it on the table, while Mr. Brumwell was looking another way.

PETER HOLT . I am a constable. I found the articles in the area - the scuttle was tied in a handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-107

1452. MATTHEW STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 cheese, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Burt .

RICHARD BURT. I live in Cross-street, Hoxton . On the 7th of June I lost a cheese from the step of the door, about half-past three o'clock; I went and saw the prisoner running with it under his arm, four or five hundred yards from the shop; he dropped it; I lost sight of him, but am certain of him.

WILLIAM KING . On the 7th of June I was collecting pots, and saw the prisoner take the cheese; I followed, and took him.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-108

1453. WILLIAM HALES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 smock-frock, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Prince .

RICHARD PRINCE. I am hostler to the Bath horses, at the Swan inn, Holborn-bridge . On the 30th of June, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came and asked at what time the Bath waggon went out - I told him at twelve o'clock; he waited, and went with it - in about an hour I missed my smock-frock from the stable; I went and overtook the waggon at Hanworth, and found him with it on.

THOMAS JENKINS . I am an officer, and took the frock off him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-109

1454. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 jacket, value 2s. , the goods of John Madden .

JOHN MADDEN. I live behind the Bird-cage public-house, at Bethnal-green . On the 5th of June Boult told me

my jacket was taken; I went and found it on the prisoner, about five hundred yards off.

WILLIAM BOULT . I saw the prisoner come out of Madden's door with the jacket.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-110

1455. NORAH CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 4 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 1 cap, value 2s.; 1 purse, value 6d., and 2 frills, value 1s. , the goods of James Hughes .

BRIDGET HUGHES . I am the wife of James Hughes - we live in Church-street, St. Giles' ; the prisoner lodged two nights with me - I missed these things, and went to the workhouse, where she had gone for a pass - she denied it; I had her taken, and found them in her bundle, which was on her back - she had a child about four years old.

MAURICE NICHOLAS . I found the articles in the prisoner's bundle.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-111

1456. EDWARD HARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d. , the goods of John Hamilton .

JOHN HAMILTON. I am cook on board a ship . The prisoner lodged with me; my clothes came from the mangle last Friday, and next morning I missed them from my chest; he said he had not got them; I found them in the officer's possession.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer. I found the prisoner at Ratcliff-highway, at nine o'clock, on the 7th of July, offering these things for sale; I asked how he got them; he said, a black man, named Peter, gave them him to sell; he said he lived at Mr. Clark's, but I could find no such person.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid this man for my lodging, and he took every thing I had, and pawned it; I took the shirt and handkerchief to get something to eat.

JOHN HAMILTON. He had no money to pay, and my wife pawned a shirt of his to pay for his washing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-112

1457. ELIZA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 3 pairs of trousers, value 12s.; 3 shifts, value 6s.; 3 bed-gowns, value 1s. 6d.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 3 towels, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 9d.; 3 aprons, value 9d., and 1 piece of calico, value 2d. , the goods of Charles Ely .

EMMA ELY . I am nine years old. (The witness appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath.) About a month ago I had these things in a bundle; I was bringing them from the mangle, in Little Mary-le-bone-street, and taking them to my mother's, in North-row, Mary-le-bone; the prisoner came up to me in Duke-street, and asked if I would go on an errand for her; I knew her before; I said, Yes; she took me into another street, and asked if the things were not very heavy; I said Yes; she asked if she should carry them; I said Yes; she then unpinned the bundle, put her foot on a step, and asked if I had a pin - I had none; she then took out a paper bag, took a pin out of it, pinned it up, and said, "Come along with me;" she took me into Hanover-square, and then into Hanover-street ; she then put her foot on the step of a door, and told me to go to Mr. Jameson's, and get three shirts - she said it was the second turning; I went there, but could not find him; I then went back to the place, and she was gone; she said Mr. Jameson would give me 6d.; I was to take the shirts to my mother, and should have 4d. of it myself; I am certain of her.

GEORGE LEICESTER . I am Ely's brother-in-law. I went out, from her description, and found the prisoner in Newport-market; she said, "That is the woman;" the prisoner turned round, and said, "Did you speak to me;" I said Yes; and told her what my sister had said; she denied having seen her; I asked if she would go back with me; she said Yes; and when we had got a little way, she wanted to return to her friends; I saw in her hand a paper bag; I then told her it was of no use to deny it, as my sister had described her as having such a bag as that; she again wanted to go to her mother's in Covent-garden; I went part of the way, and then gave her into custody; I asked her again about the things - she said she was so agitated she could not tell if she had taken them, but she had not.

RUTH SHANKS . I keep a mangle. I left the articles stated in the indictment, in a bundle, with my son, to deliver to Ely - her mother is my sister.

WILLIAM SHANKS . I delivered Ely the bundle which my mother left with me.

ELIZABETH ELY . I had sent these things to Shanks' to be mangled, and next day sent Emma for them; my husband's name is Charles; I found one gown hanging up for sale in Crown-street.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I took the prisoner, and found 5s. or 6s. on her; and this paper bag, with some pins in it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-113

1458. WILLIAM JARVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 2 shillings, the monies of Philip Harrison , from his person .

PHILIP HARRISON. On the 7th of July I was in Castle-street, Leicester-square ; the prisoner came up, and put his hand into my right side waistcoat pocket - I caught his hand in my pocket, and it had my money in it; I was quite sober.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Do you swear that? A. Yes; it was about twenty minutes past one o'clock in the morning; I had left home with a friend at ten o'clock at night; I was not talking to any women, and had not seen the prisoner before; I went into a public-house - he came in after us - they refused to draw me liquor, because it was an improper hour, not because I was drunk; I never said I had dropped my money; I gave an alarm directly; he said my waistcoat was unbuttoned, and he would button it; I said, "No, I thank you;" he took hold of the bottom of my waistcoat, and took the money - only two buttons were undone; a female was near me, who asked a question, which I did not hear - and while I turned my head, he put his hand into my pocket; I seized him - he returned me the money, and ran away; the watchman came up and took him.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a watchman. I heard a call of watch - I ran, and saw the prosecutor, who said he was robbed - he was sober; I followed and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-114

1459. ELIZABETH SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 2 books, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 1 frill, value 6d.; 1 napkin, value 1s.; 1 pillow-tick, value 1s. 6d.; 1 knife, value 1s.; 1 brooch, value 3s., and 1 pair of ear-rings, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Oldham , widow .

ANN OLDHAM. I am a widow, and live in Brook's-row, Bagnigge-wells . I employed the prisoner as a char-woman on the 16th of June, and on that day I missed a pair of ear-rings and a brooch, from a drawer in my bed-room, to which she had access - I had had no other person in my house; I believe that it was real necessity that induced her to do it; she has a very bad husband, and I believe wanted bread.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's-inn-road; this handkerchief and frill were pawned on the 16th of June by the prisoner.

THOMAS CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of June I took in a fruit-knife, brooch, and a pair of ear-rings, from the prisoner; I am certain of her person.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am an officer, and found these duplicates on her.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-115

1460. THOMAS TORLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 1 gallon of beer, value 2s. , the goods, of Walter Morrison .

WALTER MORRISON. I keep the Regalia, public-house, in Augusta-street, Regent's-park ; the prisoner was my cellarman and waiter . On the 22d of June, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I went into the wash-house, and found a gallon of stout secreted in the copper; I told the pot-boy (who had informed me of it) to watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. How long was he in your service? A. About two months; he had no dispute with the pot-boy; the stout was kept in the cellar, under the bar; it is a superior sort of beer.

EDWARD HUNT . I was pot-boy to Mr. Morrison. On the 22d of June, in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the pot-house, cleaning knives; I went towards the copper - he said to me, "What are you going about?" I said, "To boil and scower the pots;" he said I had better do it tomorrow; I said, "I shall do it to day;" he then said,"I have got a can of stout in the copper;" I asked where he got it; he said, "From the cellar;" I told my master, who told me to watch; I afterwards saw him sell five quarts of stout out of that can, to different people in the garden; he put the money into his pocket; I said, "You are carrying on a nice game;" he said "Yes; I mean to do more yet."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever quarrel with him? A. Never; he must have filled the can again, as it only holds four quarts; I went into the garden at eight o'clock at night, and saw him sell two pots out of it; I told my master, who saw him sell one pot.

Q. Do you never throw the slops into a can? A. No; it may be done by some people.

WALTER MORRISON. The prisoner came to the bar in the evening, and had one pot of stout; I saw him take two into the garden - he had the key of the cellar, but should come to the bar for every thing.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-116

1461. THOMAS LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 reticule, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 12 half-pence, and 1 farthing, the property of William Daniel Owen , from the person of Susan, his wife .

SUSAN OWEN . I am the wife of William Daniel Owen, a linen-draper . On the evening of the 26th of June I was in Marchmont-street - my husband had just left me, and was crossing the road; I was looking into a shop window - the prisoner came up and snatched my reticule, which had a handkerchief and some halfpence in it; he tore my dress, and two petticoats, from top to bottom; I turned round and saw him - he took his hat off, put the reticule into it, and put it on again; I gave an alarm, and he was taken before I lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Did you see the person who took it? A. My back was towards him when he came up - but I turned round instantly and saw the property in his hand; when he was brought back, a man said, "If you don't wish to prosecute, don't go with the prisoner."

JOHN MITCHELL . I was in Tavistock-street on this evening, and met the prisoner running from Marchmont-street; I stopped him, brought him back, and saw this lady.

ROBERT DERRY . I am a constable, and received him in charge; I found the property in his hat.

WILLIAM DANIEL OWEN. I had just left my wife - I heard an alarm soon after; but the prisoner had turned the corner before I saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-117

1462. JOHN MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Robert Farquhar , from his person .

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am an officer. On the 19th of June I saw the prisoner running in Frith-street; I inquired what was the matter - a lady said he had robbed a gentleman of his handkerchief - I took him, but found nothing on him; a gentleman named Robert Farquhar came to Marlborough-street office afterwards, and said he had been robbed of his handkerchief; the prisoner did not deny it, but begged him not to prosecute.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Did he say it was the prisoner who took it? A. No.

SUSANNAH WHITE . On the night of the 19th of June I was in Frith-street , and saw a gentleman walking very steadily along, with an umbrella under his arm; I saw the prisoner and another lad together; the prisoner drew a yellow handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket; I crossed over, took hold of the prisoner, and said, "Give

the gentleman his handkerchief;" he put up his hand, and said, with an oath, "I have got nothing" - and gave the handkerchief to the other boy, who ran away with it; the prisoner tried to get away, but I held him, and called to the gentleman, who turned round, and I said, "This boy has robbed you of your handkerchief;" he felt in his pocket, and said, "I have lost my handkerchief, which I had, not ten minutes ago;" the prisoner then fell on his knees, and begged the gentleman not to do any thing with him - he let him go; Morris came down the street and took hold of him; I was afterwards fetched to Marlborough-street, and saw the same gentleman there - he said his name was Farquhar, and I think he said John.

Cross-examined. Q. You think it was John? A. Yes.

WILLIAM MORRIS . Here is a paper on which he wrote his name - it is Robert Farquhar.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady said it was a red one.

SUSANNAH WHITE. No, I said yellow.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-118

1463. JAMES O'BRIEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 shawl, value 10s., the goods of Margaret Shorter , from her person .

MARGARET SHORTER. I am a widow . On the 17th of June, as I was coming down King-street , from Euston-square, my shawl was taken from my person; I turned round and saw it in the prisoner's hat; I caught hold of it and said, "What do you want with my shawl?" he said,"You shall not have it;" I said, "I will;" Bertram came up and said, "Why don't you give it up?" he said he would not - she called the patrol, who came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What are you? A. A laundress . I was alone; it was half-past ten o'clock at night - I missed it from my shoulder, turned round, and found it in the prisoner's hat - he said I should not have it till I swore to it - he did not call the watchman - I held him.

JURY. Q. Did you feel it go from your shoulders? A. Yes, and I saw the corner of it going off - it might have fallen off - I saw it in his hat directly.

MARGARET BERTRAM . I was passing, and saw Shorter contending with the prisoner - I called the patrol, who took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not dispute her right to it? A. Yes - he said it was his.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness who picked it up.

ELIZABETH DIAS . I am single, and live in Bear-street. I have known the prisoner a good while - I was with him on that evening, and picked up the shawl in King-street, Holborn - I gave it him to look at - he took off his hat and put it in - he was looking at it in his hat - we walked on about twenty yards, when this good woman said, "That is my shawl; I lost it, and I will have it;" he said he did not like to give it up till he knew the proper owner, and would have further proof of it being hers, and if it was hers to charge the watchman with him - Pratt came up and took it.

COURT. Q. Where was Mrs. Shorter when you picked it up? A. I do not know; she was turning the corner of Orange-street when we got up - I think I told the patrol that I picked it up, but cannot exactly say - I said so at the watch-house, and I said so when the patrol came up - I will swear that.

GEORGE PRATT . I am the patrol. I did not see this woman till we were going down to the watch-house - she was not present when I took the prisoner - I took him at the corner of Vernon-place - she came up at the bottom of King-street - I have no recollection of her saying that she picked it up, but he said, on going along, that she picked it up - she did not come into the watch-house - they talked together about her picking it up - the prisoner said at first that he had picked it up - I cannot say whether he said a woman picked it up before she joined him; the prosecutrix was quite sober.

MRS. SHORTER. I saw this woman at the watch-house-door.

M. BERTRAM. I did not see the witness till we were going to the watch-house - only Mrs. Shorter and the prisoner were present when I first came up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-119

1464. ISAAC SOLOMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 watch, value 26s., the goods of George Smith , from his person .

GEORGE SMITH. On the 25th of June I was in Sun-street, Bishopsgate , facing Long-alley; there was a Benefit society coming along - I waited a minute for them to pass; I saw the prisoner at my left hand; he then came right in front of me, bent forward, and pushed me into the crowd; I had no power to do any thing; I felt my watch drawn from my fob; he turned his head and bolted across the road - a waggon stopped him - I called out, "You have robbed me of my watch;" he said, "I have not;" the officer came up and took him into a public-house; I have not found my watch; when we were at the office he offered to pay me 5s. a-week to make up for the watch; I said I should go before the Justice.

COURT. Q. Where was he in the crowd? A. He stood just on my left-hand - he stood very quiet for a minnute, then came and stood in front of me, with his back towards me, bent himself and pushed me into the road - I could not move or stir; I had an umbrella; and his back was towards me. He pushed me intentionally; there was no occasion for it; I felt my watch go at the moment he pushed against me, he then turned round - I caught hold of his tail as he crossed the road, and a waggon came by.

GEORGE PALMER . I am an officer. I was looking at the band. I heard the prosecutor cry, "My watch!" he had hold of the prisoner's coat-tail. I ran up and collared him - he had a large handkerchief flying in his hand; I took him, but found nothing on him - he said he had lived many years with Mr. Solomon, about Petticoat-lane, and had been to Peerless-pool to bathe - we were some time at Worship-street; another witness there, stated that she had seen him take the watch and give it to another person - but she says she will not come here till the prosecutor pays her expences. I summoned her; she afterwards said it was only hearsay. The prosecutor said the prisoner had offered him 5s. a week.

Q. You say in your deposition, "The prosecutor stated to me part of what he has now said, but did not mention the 5s. a week?" A. I said it because he had not said so the first time, he had stated it when I was examined - he mentioned it to me before he went in to the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. When I had my back to him, how

could I take the watch from him. I am no relation to Ikey Solomon and trust my name will not prejudice me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-120

1465. GEORGE WIX was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Richard Wilkinson , from his person .

RICHARD WILKINSON. On the 13th of June, about half-past one o'clock at noon, I was in Chiswell-street , and had my handkerchief stolen from my pocket. I did not see it taken; it was safe between eleven and twelve o'clock, when I left home - I did not see the prisoner.

JOHN BEE . I am an officer. On the 13th of June I was at the corner of Bunhill-row, and saw the prisoner and three other boys together, following the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and roll it up. I ran up, took hold of him, and he threw it down.

GEORGE BARROCLOUGH . I am a watch-case springer. I saw the prisoner running, and the officer following him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18270712-121

1466. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 watch, value 4l.; 3 seals, value 2l.; 1 key, value 5s., and 1 watch-chain, value 1s. , the goods of Robert Gingell .

ROBERT GINGELL. On the 23d of June, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was at the top of Strutton-ground, Westminster ; the prisoner came up and took my watch from my pocket - she ran off with it. I swear she is the person - it has not been found.

JOHN JAMES . I was in the street and saw the prisoner take the watch. I followed and took hold of her, but was immediately knocked down - the watchman came up and secured her.

THOMAS SPEED . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor about half-past nine o'clock - she asked me to go and have something to drink. I took him to the Half-moon, public-house, and had three glasses of rum; he said, "Take my watch and wind it up." I said, I did not like; he then took it from his fob, and put it into my hand; he and this witness came out with me. I had my shawl taken off my shoulders and was knocked down - the prosecutor was tipsy.

JOHN JAMES . She was not knocked down - I was knocked down by some persons who she called, and they took the watch from her hand, without any violence; she took it out of Gingell's fob, while I was supporting him - he was tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-122

1467. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 row of coral beads, value 2s., and 1 clasp, value 1d., the goods of John Windell , from the person of Sarah Ann Windell , spinster .

SARAH WINDELL . I am wife of John Windell - my daughter, Sarah Ann, was playing in the street, about twenty yards from the door, with some children. I saw the prisoner come up with another, and take her beads off. I sent two lads after him.

MARY WINDELL . I am ten years old. I was playing with my little sister, and saw the prisoner take the beads from her neck.

PETER WILSON . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. This lady came up with two children, and asked them if I was the boy, they said Yes.

SARAH WINDELL. I did not ask them; I was confident of him.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-123

1468. JOHN LOVEGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , part of a watch-chain, value 28s.; 1 seal, value 7s.; 1 key, value 4s., and 1 ring, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Webb , from his person .

SAMUEL WEBB. I am a master mariner , and live at Ratcliff. On the 7th of July, about ten minutes to twelve o'clock, I was in Ratcliff-highway ; the prisoner came up on my left side, and pulled at my watch; I think it was the prisoner, but did not see his face. The chain broke; he got that, with the seal and key; I ran after him - there were two or three others; I called Stop thief! and the prisoner was taken by a blacksmith - I had lost sight of him in turning Gravel-lane, but caught sight of him again directly; there were from four to six running with him - nothing was found on him when he was taken, which was within a minute and a half. I was robbed about one hundred yarns from Gravel-lane.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames Police surveyor. I was in Ratcliff-highway, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and followed him till he was stopped - I had lost sight of him for about half a minute; he was running first, but there were others close after him - I did not see Webb till I brought him back; when he came up he said, "This is the rascal who took my seal and key - search him;" I did so at the watch-house, but nothing was found on him; he said he was running home to Lower Chapman-street, but he was going quite a contrary way.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to my sister's - a mob gathered; the gentleman had lost his seals, and was going to take me, as he said he thought I was the person.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-124

1469. SARAH SAYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , one 5l. Bank note, the monies of William George Slyfield , from his person .

WILLIAM GEORGE SLYFIELD. I live at Chelsea , with my father, who is a gardener. On the 22d of June I was in the house; the prisoner, who lives near, came in, and asked how I got on, as I had just come from sea; she said, "Have you got your money;" I said Yes, and took out of my pocket three 5l. notes; she said, "You will give your poor mother one;" I said Yes, and threw one to my mother; the prisoner then took the other two, and my discharge-ticket, out of my hand; I said I would have them back, and she returned me one and the ticket,

but kept the other; I was not quite sober, but I had my intellects about me.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not cut my hand with a penknife? A. No - she put her hand through the window and cut it.

WILLIAM GEORGE HUBBARD . I am the prosecutor's shipmate. I went to his mother's with him; he was not very sober. I laid down on the bed; they awoke me, and said he was robbed of a 5l. note; the prisoner was then breaking the window with her hand, and said Slyfield had cut her - I fetched a constable; she was gone home when I returned. The constable went and took her.

SARAH NEILE . I am Hubbard's sister. I was at Slyfield's; I had been rather in liquor, but got better. The prisoner came in, and asked if he had got his money - he said Yes, and pulled out three 5l. notes and his ticket; she said, "Give your mother one;" he did so - she then snatched the other two, and the ticket, out of his hand; and said neither father nor mother should have them from her till they fetched a constable, to make her give them up; he got one back, with the ticket, and with his trying to get them, her hand went through the glass.

Prisoner. He threw them on the fire - I only took one off. Witness. There was no fire in the room - I went to my sister's room, who lives in her house, but not into the prisoner's room.

JOSEPH SLYFIELD . I was present, and was sober. I saw my brother take three notes out of his pocket - the prisoner said, "Give your poor mother one," and he threw one on the ground, towards his mother; the prisoner snatched the other two and the ticket from him; I asked her to return them - she refused; she ran into the next room - my brother was going to run after her, and while we were holding him back I saw the prisoner break the window.

RICHARD CUFF . I am an officer, and apprehended her - nothing was found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the note; he threw some paper on the fire; I took it off, and gave it him - I only saw one piece of paper; he was throwing his money about; he cut my hand; I said I would not go out of the house till a constable was sent for; when I caught the paper off the fire I said, "Nobody shall have this but his mother."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-125

1470. THOMAS TAZZY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 needle-case, value 1d.; 1 crown, 3 shillings, 1 sixpence, 12 pence, and 18 halfpence, the property of James Barry , from his person .

JAMES BARRY. On the 15th of June I was at the White Hart public-house, Mary-le-bone , and fell asleep; nobody but the prisoner was in the room; when I awoke I missed from my pocket a needle-case and 15s. 6d., which were safe when I went to sleep; I was sober when I awoke.

Prisoner. He was very tipsy, and asked me to come and keep him company; he had several glasses of gin and porter, and went out several times - he came in, and said he would take a nap, told me to take his money out of his pocket, and take care of it for him, which I did; this was at four - I sat at his side till seven o'clock; I then awoke him - he said he was robbed; I said, "No, you gave me your money." Witness. I never gave him the money, nor did he say so.

ANN DAVIS . I live at this house; Barry came in about twelve o'clock, and the prisoner about one; Barry treated him with some porter - he went to sleep, being rather in liquor. I did not see any money taken from him; I saw Barry's money about four; when he awoke the prisoner asked him to treat him; he felt for his money, and said he was robbed; the prisoner said he had not robbed him, but a rat-catcher had, and they had shared the money among them all; he pulled out 1s. 9d., and said the ratcatcher gave it him as his share.

JOHN LEWIS . I am an officer, and took him in the house. I found one crown piece, five shillings, and a needle-case in his pocket, and two shillings in his hand; as he went to the watch-house he said he had the money from government - that he had a pension of 1s. a day; he seemed rather in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-126

1471. JOHN PRESNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 30 yards of baize, value 30s., the goods of John Lewis , privately in his shop .

JOHN LEWIS. I am a hosier , and live in Mile-end-road . On the 29th of June, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I received information, and missed a piece of baize from about four feet within the shop; I went out, and secured the prisoner a few yards off, running away with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man passed me, and dropped it - I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-127

1472. WILLIAM CHIVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 3 pipe grates, value 6s.; 1 pipe board, value 1s.; 1 tea-chest, value 1s.; 1 rolling board, value 6d., and 1 pinch-plate, value 6d., the goods of William Williams and another, his masters .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I am a tobacco-pipe maker , and am in partnership with my brother - the prisoner was in our service. I missed property several times.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BRENAN . I am apprentice to the prosecutors. - On the 20th of June I saw the prisoner's daughter go out with a basket; I followed her - she saw me, and in trying to get out of my sight, she fell down with her basket; there was a ball of clay in it. I told my masters, and went with the officer to the prisoner's house, in King-court, White-horse-court, and found all these things. I found him concealing himself in the privy - he said he had taken them from his masters.

JAMES FOWLER . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, and saw the prisoner's wife; she said he was not at home - we found the property, and then found the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to do a little work for myself.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-128

1473. HENRY FARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 30 books, in sheets, value 3l.; 1 bag, value 1s.6d.; 2 sovereigns, and 1 shilling, the property of Joseph James Smith , his master ; and SARAH FARMER was indicted for feloniously receiving, maintaining, and harbouring the said Henry Farmer, after the felony aforesaid, knowing him to have committed the same ; and RICHARD BIRCH was indicted for feloniously receiving 30 books, part of the said property, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JOSEPH JAMES SMITH. I am a book-binder , and live in Little Wild-street . The prisoner H. Farmer was about seven months in my employ. On the 22d of June I told him to call on Mr. Wright, in High Holborn, and he absconded - I found him in custody on the following Thursday.

WILLIAM HAMPSHIRE WRIGHT . I am the son of Peter Wright , a bookseller, of High-street, Bloomsbury. On the 22d of June H. Farmer called, and asked for orders, and brought some books for us; I gave him thirty books, and saw my father pay him two sovereigns; we pay money every week, and balance every six months.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. I apprehended Henry Farmer on the 28th of June, in Holborn; I went with him to Birch, who keeps a marine-store shop, No. 15, Short's-gardens; I there found a number of books in sheets, which I produce; I took Sarah, his mother, in Great Wild-street; she said she had given a bag to take something to Birch's; H. Farmer said he had lost the sovereign, and spent 1s.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not say the books were safe? A. No - he said his mother would settle about them, and she said her son had lost the sovereigns; she did not tell me the books were placed at Birch's while she was moving. I found them in a chair, near the bed; he said, the second time, that the boy's mother left them there till he returned from breakfast; he did not say the boy was going to call for them.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer. I went with one Campbell to Birch's - he said, "It is all made up - I will give you all the money I have;" he offered me thirty sovereigns not to take him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not that as a security for his appearance? A. He said, "I shall be locked up all night," but did not offer it as security, I am certain - Campbell is not here. The books had been found before.

W. H. WRIGHT. I believe these to be the same books - they are twenty volumes of Don Juan, and ten of Kirk White's poems.

HENRY FARMER's Defence. I did not mean to keep the books, but to send them the same day - I had lost the sovereigns.

BIRCH's Defence. Mrs. Farmer sold me an old kettle; she afterwards brought this paper in her hands, and said would I let her leave it till the boy returned from breakfast - I put them in the chair, without looking at them. The officer came in a quarter of an hour, and took them - about nine o'clock at night the officers came, quite drunk, and said I must go to the watch-house; I said I would give them security till to-morrow; I offered them 10l. - they said that would not do, and I asked if 30l. would do- they said, "Let us see it;" I produced it - they clapped the handcuffs on; the boy was frightened, as he had lost two sovereigns.

JOHN GREEN . He did not offer it as security, but for me not to take him.

THOMAS PIPKIN . I live with my parents, at No. 23, Short's-gardens. I saw Mrs. Farmer leave the bundle at Birch's shop; it looked to me like waste-paper; Birch was at the door - I was on the other side of the way, and heard Mrs. Farmer say, "Let me leave this here till he comes from breakfast, and he shall call for them;" I am sure of this - I knew her before; I saw her in the street with the bundle before she went there.

HENRY FARMER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

SARAH FARMER - NOT GUILTY .

BIRCH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-129

1474. ELLEN NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 5 pairs of stockings, value 5s., and 1 shirt, value 2s., the goods of Hyam Levy , her master ; and MARGARET MILLER was indicted for feloniously receiving 3 pairs of stockings, part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

ANN LEVY . I am the wife of Hyam Levy - we live in Broad-street, Ratcliff ; Norman was our servant . On the 2d of June I went out for the day - I returned about nine o'clock in the evening, and found her coming out of the door - she looked bulky; I said, "You have something there;" she said No; I said, "Let me see?" I opened her gown, and saw two pairs of stockings in her bosom. I took her in-doors, and found the duplicate of a shirt on her. I looked, and missed several pairs of stockings.

JOSEPH MACKLEFIELD . I am a pawnbroker, and have a pair of stockings, pawned on the 7th of May, by Miller, in the name of Ann Miller .

CHARLES COTTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of stockings, pawned by Miller, in her own name.

EMANUEL HARRIS . I am a headborough, and took the prisoners. I found two pairs of stockings and the duplicate of the shirt on Norman.

NORMAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

MILLER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-130

1475. JAMES SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 10 lbs. weight of cream of tartar, value 11s.; 4 lbs. weight of jalap, value 12s.; 1 lb. weight of bark, value 2s., and 1lb. weight of aloes, value 3s., the goods of Elias Carpenter Winter and another, his masters .

ELIAS CARPENTER WINTER. I am in partnership with Mr. Harris - we live in North-street, City-road . The prisoner was our carman two or three years; we missed different drugs - he kept the key of the stable.

JOSEPH WIGGINS . I am in the prosecutors' employ. - On the 28th of June I was in the stable, and saw in the corn-bin a paper of cream of tartar and jalap. I gave them to the foreman.

HENRY PAGE . I am the foreman. Wiggins gave me the two parcels. I sent for an officer, and when the prisoner returned I gave him in charge; we went to his bed-room, and searched his box, which was unlocked, and found a quantity of bark, and some aloes in another box, which he gave us the key of.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Do you swear to any of these articles? A. No. I was always on good terms with the prisoner.

GEORGE WOODGATE . I am an officer. I went to his bed-room, and found the bark in a box.

JOHN VANN . I went to the prisoner's bed-room, and found the aloes - I asked how he became possessed of them - he said he bought the cream of tartar at Smith's, in Fenchurch-street, for 1s. 6d. a pound - that he did take the bark, but the foreman knew it; after I found the aloes he said he bought them at Smith's.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the aloes as medicine for the horse. GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-131

1476. JOHN FEATHERSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 2 sheets, value 18s., and 1 counterpane, value 12s., the goods of Benjamin Hilton , in a lodging-room .

SARAH PRICE . I am Benjamin Hilton's daughter-in-law - he is a sword-cutler , and lives at Battle-bridge . On the 13th of June the prisoner took a room, and next morning, at a quarter-past nine o'clock, I heard him going down very slowly - I ran to the door, and thought I saw him; I went to his room, and missed the counterpane and sheets, which were safe at a quarter to eleven the night before. When he was apprehended I said, "I suppose you know me" - he said Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he appear in want? A. No - he was respectably dressed. I was with my mother when he took the room; the property has not been found; I saw it safe at half-past eleven o'clock at night, when I drew the curtains.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. Nothing was found on him.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-132

1477. MARY WOODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 pillow, value 2s., and 2 sheets, value 3s., the goods of William Brooks , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH BROOKS . I am the wife of William Brooks. The prisoner lodged at our house - I missed these articles from her room.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you let her the room? A. Yes.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates of this property in her room - she seemed poor. I went to her father; he said he would not give her a penny to save her from starving.

HENRY PARKER . I am a pawnbroker, and have a pillow, pawned by a woman - I cannot swear to her; this duplicate is mine.

WILLIAM PYALL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, pawned by a woman - I cannot say who; I gave her this duplicate.

JOSEPH JOHN GOOD . I am a pawnbroker, and have a blanket, pawned by a woman, on the 27th of June - I cannot say who it was, but one of the duplicates found on the prisoner is what I gave the person.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-133

1478. MARY ANN FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 3 blankets, value 6s.; 2 sheets, value 7s.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 2 pillows, value 4s.; 1 flat-iron, value 3d., and 1 frying-pan, value 6d., the goods of John Fox , in a lodging-room; 2 blankets, value 4s.; 2 pillows, value 4s., and 1 flat-iron, value 3d., the goods of the said John Fox .

JOHN FOX. I live in Crown-street, Seven-dials . The prisoner took a room of me in April, and staid till the 4th of June - I then missed several articles from her room, and two blankets, two pillows, and a flat-iron, from the next room. I found a duplicate in the room.

CATHERINE BROTHERS . The prisoner came to my house on Sunday, the 2d of June, and said she had two children and had no food for them, and if I would let her have two loaves for a blanket she should be obliged - she laid it down, and took a quartern loaf; she said she was going out with coffee next morning, and would bring the money and take the blanket.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE . I am a pawnbroker, and have two blankets - I believe the prisoner to be the woman who pawned them.

HENRY LONG . I am a constable, and found the duplicate on the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-134

1479. HENRY RICHARDS and HENRY BOLTON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 17lbs. of lead, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Jeakes , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

THOMAS JEAKES. I have a dwelling-house in Coach and Horse-yard, St. Giles' . The watchman produced this lead, which I have applied to my gutter - it fits exactly.

MICHAEL MALONEY . I am a watchman. About ten o'clock at night, on the 7th of June, I saw Richards with a sack on his shoulder, and Bolton just before him, in Charles-street, Drury-lane - they passed me; Richards stared in my face - I turned and sprang my rattle; they both started off; I was about two hundred yards from Jeakes' - they dropped this lead; I took it up, and apprehended them next morning; I have compared the lead - it fits exactly.

RICHARDS' Defence. I was in bed at the time.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BOLTON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-135

1480. RICHARD MILLER was indicted for embezzlement .

HORATIO PHILLIPS . I keep the Jews' Harp public-house, St. Pancras . The prisoner was in my employ, and accounted every evening for what money he received. - On the 3d of June he did not render any account; I inquired for him about ten o'clock at night, and he had absconded.

SAMUEL TASKER . I am a waiter at the Jews' Harp. - On the 3d of June I assisted the prisoner in delivering beer - I received 5s. 10d., which I gave him when we got home, as he asked me for it, to make his account right - there were shillings, sixpences, and halfpence among it.

JOHN WEATHERLY . I am an officer, and took the pri

soner on the Saturday following - he said he had heard there was a warrant against him, and was ready to go - that he thought of going back.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-136

1481. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 2 sheets, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Ewer .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-137

1482. ELIZABETH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 towel, value 1s., and 91/2d. in copper monies , the property of William Page .

WILLIAM PAGE. The prisoner was in my employ. On Sunday, the 7th of July, I put two 5s. papers of halfpence on my breakfast-table, and about eleven o'clock, when she came to set the breakfast things, I missed one paper; I said nothing, but in the evening, after my house was closed, I heard a noise at my till; I went up, and missed 91/2d. from the till; I called her, and said I wanted to speak to her; she was pushing something down her bosom - I shook her stays, and 91/2d. fell from her; I sent her down stairs, and observed her move her gown; I went down and took from her petticoat this handkerchief; she wanted to go to the water-closet; I called her out in a few minutes, and found another handkerchief there.

CHARLES BOWLER . I am an officer, and received her in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-138

1483. MAURICE DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 10 iron knees, value 4l.; 4 iron hoops, value 12s., and 3 iron bars, value 8s., the goods of William Thomas and others, being on a certain wharf adjoining the navigable river Thames .

THOMAS THOMAS . I am a ship-owner , in partnership with my brothers. I lost these articles from the wharf on the 10th of May, early in the morning; I had seen them all safe at nine o'clock the night before; I afterwards saw and identified them.

JOSEPH PARSONS . I have a wharf at Greenwich . On the 10th of May, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw some iron put out of some boats into one of our lug-boats; there was no one with it, but about six o'clock the prisoner and another person came to me, and asked me to buy it; I lent them a rope to get it in, and asked where they got it; the prisoner said he got it up in ballast-bags; it weighed about 9 cwt. 3 qrs.; I paid him 2l. 13s. 6d. for it; it remained in the scale till Dodd, our clerk, came; and on the 13th Mr. Thomas saw and claimed it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I bring it to you? A. Yes; you made the rope fast to it, and took the money.

JAMES WHITE . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-139

1484. THOMAS DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 2 pairs of shoes, value 8s. , the goods of Peter Chartres .

PETER CHARTRES. I am a shoemaker , and live in Church-lane, Whitechapel . I did not miss these shoes till the officer brought the prisoner in with them, on the 28th of June.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's shop, and come out with two pairs of shoes under his coat; I secured him with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young lad told me to take them.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18270712-140

1485. WILLIAM HENDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of Edward Slocombe .

EDWARD SLOCOMBE. On the 14th of June I missed my coat off my cart, at the Duke's Head public-house, Bedfont - I left my cart in the prisoner's care between nine and ten o'clock at night - he was a stranger.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BRICKMAN . I went into the house with Slocombe, leaving the prisoner in care of the cart; the coat was then safe.

JOHN EMMERSON . I am a patrol. I found the coat in the prisoner's garden that night; he was then in bed; I knew him before; his wife told me where it was.

Prisoner. I did not take it. GUILTY Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-141

1486. JAMES MILTON and JAMES FURNESS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 pair of spectacles, value 2s., and 1 hat, value 3s., the goods of Jonathan Bolton , from his person .

JONATHAN BOLTON. On the 26th of June I was in White-conduit-fields , and went to sleep under a hay-stack about five o'clock in the morning; my spectacles were in my pocket, and my hat on my head; I awoke between six and seven, and missed them; I saw the spectacles found in Milton's pocket - he was then asleep, about one hundred and fifty yards off; Furness and two or three others were with him; somebody pointed the prisoner out to me; my hat was found next day in some hay.

WILLIAM FRANKHAM . I live at Pentonville, and was at work in this field. I saw Bolton without hat or shoes - I asked where they were - he said those three chaps, who lay on the grass, had got them - I went and saw them all laying together - I went to Bolton, who went and took Milton's hat off, and ran towards the stack - Milton said, "Give me my hat;" Bolton said, "Give me mine and my shoes, and I will give you yours;" a scuffle ensued, and Milton's hat was taken away.

JOSEPH WIGGETT . I was in the fields, and found a hat behind a load of hay.

THOMAS CAMPS . I am an officer. I and Palmer apprehended the prisoners.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MILTON'S Defence. The prosecutor came and took the spectacles out of my pocket - I had just found them in the grass - a lady saw me find them.

MILTON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

FURNESS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-142

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1487. DANIEL MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on

the 8th of June , 1 live tame fowl, price 3s. 6d. , the property of Charles Benfield .

CHARLES BENFIELD. I am a milkman , and live in Kingsland-road . On the 8th of June my fowls were in the field; I missed one between five and six o'clock; I saw the prisoner running, and overtook him with it in a bag - it was dead - he said he did it from want.

THOMAS RYECROFT . I am a watchman. I received him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-143

1469. JOSEPH PICKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 silver watch, value 4l., the goods of William Maher , from his person .

WILLIAM MAHER. I am a gardener , and work at Mr. Ellis', Pine-apple-place, Edgware-road. On the 23d of June, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in Holborn - I had been with a friend, and had part of three pints of beer - but I think I was sober; I was walking along with a female, whom I met at the door of a public-house in Drury-lane, about eight o'clock; I had gone with her to another public-house, and staid there till near twelve - when we got into Holborn - I saw three men standing up against a door, they rushed out against us, and one of them, who had a short pipe in his mouth, run against my breast, and said, "I hope I don't intrude;" the prisoner was the middle man; I felt my watch drawn from my pocket, and saw it in the prisoner's hand; the woman said, "Give the man his watch;" I seized him, but he handed it away - I never let him go, and am certain he had it.

CATHERINE STEVENS . I was with the prosecutor, and just before twelve o'clock three men all rushed up against him; I saw the watch in the prisoner's hand; he handed it to the others, who got off; I swear that he had it in his hand; I said, "Give the man his watch;" he said, "In a minute;" I knew the prosecutor before.

GEORGE FORDYCE . I am a watchman. The prosecutor and witness were both drunk on this night, but not insensible; he distinctly stated to me, that three men met him, that a tall one took his watch and gave it to the prisoner, whom he seized, and he gave it to the other, who got away; he stated this distinctly.

Q. What do you mean by saying he was drunk? A. He staggered - they both knew what they were about; the woman gave the same account.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he picked this woman up, and she robbed him.

WILLIAM MAHER. I did not.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not taking up for passing bad money once? A. I once took a half-crown in change, and was in the watch-house ten minutes for passing it. I had four pints of beer between me and the woman.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-144

1489. FRANCIS MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 37 pairs of shoes, value 5l., the goods of George Dupen , his master .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE DUPEN. I am a shoe-maker , and live in Ratcliff-highway - the prisoner worked for me. On the 25th of June my foreman called me out of the parlour; I found the prisoner in the shop, and charged him with stealing a pair of shoes, which he denied; I put my hand into his pocket, and found this pair; he then said, "I have, I know;" he pulled them out, put them into a chair, and said, "For God's sake forgive me;" I said, "I cannot, I think you have taken more;" he said if I would go with him he would tell me - and as we went along he said,"I will tell you how it was - I have lost 20l. at dog-fighting, and that is why I took the shoes;" I gave him in charge; I have found thirty-seven pairs of shoes in all, which have been taken at different times.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you swear that this pair were in his pocket? A. I do.

HORATIO DUBERLIN . I am servant to Mr. Dupen. On the 25th of June the prisoner brought some work to me; I saw him put his hand into a glass frame behind him, and put a pair of shoes into his pocket; I called my master - he denied it at first, but afterwards said it was only the second time.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. I took him in charge; he said he had lost a great deal of money with dog-fighting; I went to his lodgings, and found duplicates of a quantity of shoes, which the pawnbrokers have given up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought a good many of them; I meant to have restored them as soon as I could.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-145

1490. WILLIAM PAPWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 coat, value 20s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 6s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of William Foster .

WILLIAM FOSTER. I am a weaver , and live in George-street, Bethnal-green ; the prisoner worked for me between four and five months. On the 23d of June my wife fetched me from my cousin's, and said I was robbed; I went over to Lambeth, where the prisoner's father lived, and found the prisoner there, with my shoes on, and the duplicates of my coat and trousers were in his pockets.

Prisoner. Q. Have I not borrowed a coat of yours? A. I once lent him an old coat and handkerchief. I had discharged him that morning for bad work.

CHARLOTTE FOSTER . I am the prosecutor's wife; this coat and trousers were on a box in a lower room; my husband discharged the prisoner before he went out; I saw the property safe after he went out.

WILLIAM BROCKWELL . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of June the prisoner pawned this coat and trousers.

CHARLES HASKETT . I am an officer. I took him in charge with the shoes on, and the duplicates in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Having borrowed them before, I took them this morning when he was out, and meant to return them in the evening; I was asked for some money and pawned them, intending to redeem them in the evening.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-146

1491. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the

3d of July , 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s., the goods of Abraham Hill , from his person .

ABRAHAM HILL. I am a shoemaker , and live in Thomas-street, Hackney-road. I went into the Woolpack and Star public-house, in Kingsland-road , on the evening of the 3d of July, to play at skittles; I pulled off my coat; the prisoner came there, pulled off his coat and put it by the side of mine - when the game was over he put on his coat, and said he would go and fill a pipe of tobacco. I afterwards went to put on my coat and missed two silk handkerchiefs from my coat pocket - I inquired, and the prisoner was gone. I received information and went to the George the Fourth public-house, in Haggerston-lane - the prisoner came in in two or three minutes, and was accused of having my handkerchiefs - he denied it; but they were found in his pocket.

JOSEPH GRIMWOOD . I am the officer. I produce the handkerchiefs, which I have had ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 30. Of stealing, but not from the person . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-147

1492. JAMES NEIGHBOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 fish, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Edgar Sanders .

RICHARD EDGAR SANDERS. I live in a cottage, called Nut-shell Cottage, Hornsey-lane, Islington . My fish-pond had been dragged, I think, between twelve and one o'clock on the morning of the 19th of May - I saw the marks of several feet round it, and the flowers were trodden down, and some of the young spawn was on the bank. I then went to an officer, and directed him to search for the parties - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not he admitted to bail? A. Yes; he has now surrendered.

MARY ANN RANKLING . I lodge in the same house as the prisoner, in Catherine-street, Holloway. On Friday night, the 18th of May, the prisoner was out - my husband went out about four o'clock in the morning, and at half-past six the prisoner came home - he knocked at the door; the landlord let him in - he had a watering-pot in his hand and asked him to see what beautiful fish he had got - I saw them afterwards; there was one large gold fish, full of spawn, and two small silver ones - he put them down by the water-butt; they were there at eleven o'clock in the morning, when I went out, and before twelve I was accused of stealing his fish.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I keep this house. I let the prisoner in with the fish - he did not say where he got them.

THOMAS EATOUGH . I am an officer. On the morning of the 19th of May I was at the door of the Coach and Horses public-house, and heard the prisoner and Rankling at high words - I heard her say he had brought in the fish, and that they were in the house - I found them in the watering pot - he said at the examination that he got them from his father's pond.

Mr. SANDERS. I cannot swear to the fish.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-148

1493. GEORGE SKONE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 sovereign , the money of Hannah Timson , spinster .

HANNAH TIMSON. I am servant to Mr. Sergeant Rough. Last Saturday, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was in Dean-street , and dropped a sovereign. I looked and it was gone - Davis took hold of the prisoner; I went up to him, and he denied it - four sovereigns were found on him. I had no mark on mine - I followed him; he came back with me to Davis and offered to give up the sovereign if I would swear I had dropped one - a boy pushed him away.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a druggist. Timson was at my shop, and as she went out I heard something fall from her, at my door - it sounded like a sovereign. I went out- and a boy said the prisoner had picked up the money; I ran round the corner and seized him. I had seen him pick something up - he said he would not give it up; he was afterwards brought to my shop, and said he would give it up if she could swear she had dropped it - he said he would go to the Magistrate to decide it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not run away - I said if she could prove she had lost one I would give her one, if Davis would be answerable for it - as I could prove it was mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-149

1494. EMMA ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 9 caps, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 1s.; 2 shirts, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s., and 1 shift, value 8d. , the goods of William Emms .

MARY ANN EMMS . I am the wife William Emms, of Lisson-grove . On the 10th of March my husband went out early - I got up at seven o'clock and missed these things, which I had to iron - I know nothing of the prisoner; the door had been left on the latch.

BENJAMIN BARREN . I live with Mr. Flint, pawnbroker, Edgeware-road; on the 10th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned a shirt in the name of Armstrong - she offered a shawl; but I would not take it in, as it was dirty.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer, and apprehended her on the 6th of July. I knew her before, but could not find her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Kilburn, and was asked to pawn a shirt and shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-150

1495. JAMES BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 3 bars of iron, value 10s. , the goods of John Batkin .

DANIEL BRITT . I work with Mr. Barwick, of Hoxton . On the 12th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at work in the City-road , next to Mr. Batkin's premises, and saw the prisoner take a bar out of the oven in Mr. Batkin's premises; he got over the wall with it - I seized him, and brought him back.

GEORGE BARWICK . I am a painter. I saw Britt take the prisoner.

JOHN BATKIN. This is my bar; it fits my oven exactly - it had been in my oven.

GUILTY . Aged 9.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-151

1496. DOROTHY CLARK was indicted for stealing,

on the 11th of June , 1 waistcoat, value 5s. , the goods of Daniel Folkard .

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I live with Daniel Folkard, a pawnbroker , in Providence-row . On the 11th of June the prisoner came to redeem a gown; she remained there half an hour, saying she was waiting for her husband. I told her to wait outside - she went out; and in a quarter of an hour Winterbottom alarmed me, and I missed a waistcoat from near where she stood - I found her at Walkers', with it.

WILLIAM WINTERBOTTOM . I live at Mr. Walkers, in Tabernacle-walk, the prisoner brought this waistcoat to pawn - I saw a ticket on it, and detained her.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Petticoat-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-152

1497. MARTIN CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 bed, value 25s.; 1 bolster, value 5s., and 1 sheet, value 1s.6d. , the goods of Ann Clarke , widow .

ANN CLARKE. I am a widow, and live near Middlesex Hospital , and am a dyer . The prisoner is my son; in consequence of his conduct a person was set to watch - I lost the articles stated in the indictment from my shop; he had slept on the bed that night.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a watchman. I was directed by an officer to watch the prosecutrix's house, and last Sunday morning, about five o'clock, I saw the prisoner bring the bed out of the house, and cross the street. I seized him; another man took the bed - the bolster and sheet were wrapped in it - he was not quite dressed.

ABRAHAM LORIMER . I am an officer. In consequence of information I set the watchman to watch the house.

ANN CLARK. I believe the property to be mine - the sheet is marked; they were all taken without my consent or knowledge. I was told by a person that they were going, and desired the officer to watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out of the shop at all. I only opened the door for light.

THOMAS CLARK. He had crossed the road about ten yards - he had no coat or waistcoat on; he stopped at a door on the other side of the street; but it was not opened.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-153

1498. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 8 chisels, value 2s., and 6 planes, value 4s. , the goods of Joseph Hogg .

ROBERT BULLER . I am a watchman of Wellclose-square. On Sunday morning, the 10th of June, about half-past five o'clock, I met the prisoner in Church-lane, St. George's in the East, and stopped him, with a bag of tools on his shoulder; he said he was going to Bury's, a dealer in marine-stores, and that he had brought them from a person at Stepney - we found it contained eight chisels and six planes - he was three or four hundred yards from Hogg's premises.

JOSHUA HALL . I was with Buller - his evidence is correct.

JOSEPH HOGG. I am a plane-maker - these are my working tools, and were taken from my workshop, in Cl fton-street, St. George's in the East . I left them safe at night- I bolted the shed inside, but it could be slipped back.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man at Stepney, who asked me to carry them to Cable-street.

JOSHUA HALL . He told me it was one Langard, of No. 14, Silver-street, Stepney; I went there, but could find no such person.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-154

1599. RUBEN COLLENDER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of James Hett .

JAMES HETT. I am a publican , and live in Ropemaker's-fields, Limehouse . The prisoner was an occasional potboy ; on the 23d of June, I missed a silver spoon, and found it at the pawnbroker's, broken up.

JOHN OWEN ELDRED . I live with my brother, a pawnbroker, in Three Colt-court; the prisoner brought me this spoon to sell, it was broken in three pieces - I detained him; he said he found it - I asked if he would go with me to his master - he said Yes; we set off, and he took me about two miles out of the way. I told him to be a good boy, and I would do all I could for him - he then said he had stolen it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up; and only went to ask him if it was silver.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-155

1500. JOHN CALLAHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 10s. , the goods of William Hanwood .

WILLIAM HANWOOD. I am a porter to Mr. Broughton. On Sunday morning I was in George-street, St. Giles' , just opposite the chapel, about a quarter-past four o'clock; I had been out with a friend, and was going home; I was standing for a minute - the prisoner and two others came round - the prisoner stood for a moment, and then caught these shoes from under my arm - I pursued, and the watchman took him; I am sure he is the lad; I was quite sober; I had lost sight of him; he hid the shoes on a wheelbarrow - I am not quite certain what jacket he had on, but am certain he is the boy; he was taken in ten or twelve minutes - the other two threw me down, or I should have taken him; I looked him full in the face.

MICHAEL KELLY . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutor - he was quite sober; I heard an alarm - he came to my box, and said he was robbed of a pair of shoes; I went with him - we met the prisoner coming out of a court - he pointed him out; I found the shoes in a barrow, in the court, with a little straw over them; the court is no thoroughfare; he was all of a tremble.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to market, to carry some fruit for a person, and was coming home, when he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-156

1501. MARIA FRASER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 sheet, value 4s.; 1 piece of linen, value 3s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; 1 shift, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Alexander Simpson .

ANN SIMPSON . I am the wife of Alexander Simpson, a private in the Coldstream Guards . I have known the prisoner about eighteen months, but had not seen her for twelve months, till the 28th of May, when she came to me in great distress, without clothes or food; I took her in, and kept her till the 30th of June, when I went out, and on my return I missed these articles - she was out, but came home about a quarter-past ten o'clock at night; she took off my gloves and laid them on the table - they fell off, and some duplicates fell out of them; I said nothing, but on Monday went to the pawnbroker's, and there found my property, and gave her in charge.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I am an officer. I went to the prosecutrix's house and took the prisoner; she said she knew nothing about it; I asked her how those duplicates came in the glove; she then said she had taken them, and hoped Mrs. Simpson would forgive her.

GEORGE HANWELL . I live with Mr. Nicholson, a pawnbroker, Gray's-inn-lane. On the 26th and 29th of June, the prisoner pawned a sheet, some linen, a pair of shoes, and a handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-157

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JULY 14.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1502. GEORGE HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Nixey .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-158

1503. PETER CAPON was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY WILSON . I am a timber-merchant , and am in partnership with John Deacon ; the prisoner was our foreman .

JOSEPH HENDERSON . I am a cabinet-maker. On the 6th of July I paid the prisoner 1l. 7s. 5d. for some rosewood veneer, which I bought at the shop - it was Mr. Wilson's money; I did not go to make a bona fide purchase - it was only to detect the prisoner; the money was Mr. Wilson's.

Mr. WILSON. When I came home the prisoner produced his book, for which he accounts for 1l. 3s. 4d. only.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-159

1504. LUCY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Harris .

RICHARD HARRIS. I live in Swan-passage, Mount-street . I look after hackney-coaches - the prisoner is my daughter, and had been at home for a day or two; I missed a pair of shoes from under my bed on the 1st of July.

JANE COX . I keep a broker's-shop - I buy and sell old clothes, and live in Adam and Eve-court. On the 1st of July the prisoner came and asked if I had a pair of shoes larger than these - I said No; I then bought these of her for 1s. 6d.

WILLIAM KIMBERLEY . I am an officer. I went and got these shoes from Cox.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. My father turned me out of doors - I was in the street for a fortnight; I then came home, and asked my mother to give me a bit of bread - she would not, and I took the shoes.

RICHARD HARRIS . It is not true - she has had two or three good places, but ran away from them; her mother said she would not give her any thing till she told where the shoes and other things were; I have no doubt but I could get her a place again.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-160

1505. ROBERT JENKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 6 knives, value 2s. 6d., and 6 forks, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas William Dobby .

SOPHIA DOBBY . I am the wife of Thomas William Dobby, and live on Air-street-hill . On the 20th of June, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw this property safe in the shop; I had seen the prisoner and two others about the house - he then had a blue coat on; I heard a cry of Stop thief! ran, and missed the knives and forks from my window; Hancock secured the prisoner, and Brown picked them up, as the prisoner threw them down.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I took the prisoner with the property.

WILLIAM BROWN . I saw the prisoner and two others loitering about for some hours; I then saw the prisoner take the knives - I ran out of my father's shop, which is just by, and called Stop thief! he threw them down - I took them up, and saw him taken; I did not lose sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had a blue coat on; I did not take them, and was not in company with any body.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-161

1506. THOMAS MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 shawl, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s., and two handkerchiefs, value 8s. , the goods of Charles Pitt .

ANN PITT . I am the wife of Charles Pitt - we lodge in New-court, Holywell-lane - the prisoner lodged on the same floor. I saw this property on the foot of my bed - I went into the garden, and on returning missed them; I charged the prisoner with it, and he denied it; I sent for an officer, who found the waistcoat under his bed, with the duplicate of the shawl; one of the handkerchiefs was under his coat; I never sent him to pawn it.

ELIZABETH OATES . When Pitt missed her property she sent me into the prisoner's room - she accused him of it; he said he knew nothing of the articles; I saw the handkerchief under his coat; I took the waistcoat and duplicate from under his bed.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I was sent for, and received the property; the duplicate was torn in pieces, and could scarcely be identified.

MATHEW POULTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Holywell-lane; the prisoner pawned this shawl on the 4th of July; I think this is my duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Billingsgate,

and met this woman - I went to a wine-vaults with her; soon after she came into my room, and sent my child for liquor, nine or ten times, and was quite intoxicated; she said she had spent all her husband's pension money, and desired me to pawn her shawl to get him a dinner.

ELIZABETH OATES . The prosecutrix was rather in liquor, but knew what she was about; the prisoner denied all knowledge of it.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-162

1507. JOSEPH PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 4 umbrellas, value 5s. , the goods of Oliver Dixon Green .

OLIVER DIXON GREEN. I am schoolmaster to the Society for promoting Christianity among the Jews , at Cambridge-heath. The property there is under my care. On Friday, the 22d of June, between nine and ten o'clock, I sent Marcus with four umbrellas, one was to be returned to my brother-in-law, and the other three to be repaired at Sanderson's, in Bishopsgate-street - I have not seen them since.

JOSEPH MARCUS . I went out with the umbrellas, and near the pump in Shoreditch , the prisoner was looking at some birds - he came and asked me for a flower - I said they were not mine to give - he then asked me to sell him the umbrellas - I said No, they were going to be mended - he then asked me to sell him one - I said No - he then said he had to get two boys to fetch two bundles of silk from a shop, and I might be one, and earn 3d. if I liked, as well as any one else - we went down Primrose-street - he called a young man and asked him if he wanted a job; he said Yes; he told him to show me to the haberdasher's shop, and to go and get some bundles of silk, and he would take charge of my umbrellas - I left them with him, and went with the young man till we got to the new market - he told me to go and knock at a gentleman's door, and as soon as I left him he ran down a narrow turning - I thought something was wrong, and returned to where I had left the prisoner, but he was gone - I did not see him again till he was before the Magistrate, on the 2d of July - I am quite sure he is the boy - he had exactly the same dress on.

WILLIAM CUTHILL . On the 22d of June I was going to work in Finsbury-market - I saw Marcus with a lad about eighteen years old, and the prisoner walking at a distance, with four umbrellas - I saw the other leave Marcus and beckon to the prisoner, who ran off with him towards Long-alley - I was not aware that I should do right, or I could have taken them - I went on to one of my work-people, and as I returned I saw Marcus crying - I took him to Worship-street, and gave information.

The prisoner begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-163

1508. ROBERT PITCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 2 planes, value 6s.; 1 saw, value 2s.; 1 hammer, value 1s.; 1 basket, value 6d., and 1 apron, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Haselgrove ; 1 plane, value 3s.; 1 screw-driver, value 2s.; 1 hammer, value 1s.; 1 oil-stone, value 1s., and 1 square, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Norris ; and 1 axe, value 2s. , the goods of George Martin .

WILLIAM NICKELLS . I am a watchman. On the 8th of June, at half-past three o'clock in the morning, I went behind the houses in Liverpool-street, Battle-bridge, and saw the prisoner coming over the wall, with a basket of tools- he walked towards me, set them down, and turned his back to me - I told him to take them up and come with me- he took up a screw-driver to strike me - I fenced it off with my staff, and told him to come with me - as we went over a plank I fell off, either from the shaking of the plank, or his striking me, and he ran; I got up and followed him till he was stopped - there was nobody running but him and the watchman.

GEORGE BASSET . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner, who was running.

JOHN HUTT . I am watch-house-keeper, and received him with the tools - I found a square and apron in his pocket - he said they belonged to the tools.

THOMAS HASELGROVE. I am a carpenter . This plane and some other tools are mine - I had left them in a new house in Liverpool-street , about six o'clock the evening before - the back door, which was broken open, had been bolted with two wooden bolts.

THOMAS NORRIS. I am a carpenter . Here are my tools, which were left in the same house.

GEORGE MARTIN. I left this axe in the house; the tool-chest has been broken open with it, as the marks correspond.

Prisoner's Defence. The basket was in the yard - I did not go into the house for it.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-164

1509. THOMAS POOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of James Badkin .

JAMES BADKIN. I am apprentice to Mr. Atkins, of Old Nichol-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me. On the night of the 22d of June he asked if I had sold my trousers - I said No; they were in my box, which was locked. I went to work next morning, leaving him in bed. I did not miss them till Sunday, when I found the box broken open. He had left the house - he came again about a week ago, and asked what we were going to do with him.

FREDERICK GROSSMITH . I am a patrol, and was called in. I took the prisoner. He told me where the trousers were pawned.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Castle-street, Whitechapel. The prisoner pawned these trousers on the 23d of June.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-165

1510. JOHN PEACOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 1 plane, value 1s. 6d., and 1 saw, value 1s. , the goods of George Elwood .

PEARCE AUSTIN . I am a bricklayer. On Friday, the 15th of June, I was at work at Hoxton , and saw the prisoner put this plane and saw under his arm - I stopped him - he said he had had no victuals for two or three days.

WILLIAM NOAKES . I am van officer, and took him, he had no money.

GEORGE ELWOOD. I am a carpenter , and had left these tools up three pair of stairs - they are mine.

The prisoner pleaded extreme distress.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-166

1511. JAMES STAGG was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 1 trowel, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Emery ; and 1 trowel, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Rowley .

CHARLES SMITH. I am a carpenter. On the 22d of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was dining in a building in Torrington-square - my tools were in the next building. I saw the prisoner pass, went out, and overtook him at the corner. I said, "What business had you up the scaffold?" he said he was after no harm. I put my hand down, and felt a trowel in the waistband of his small-clothes. I gave him in charge - another trowel was found upon him. I had not seen him on the scaffold, but suspected him.

WILLIAM BERNS . I am a constable, and took him into custody.

EDWARD ROWLEY. This trowel is mine - I was working at the building.

JOHN EMERY. I left this trowel there - I had seen the prisoner on the scaffold that morning; he came up with our labourers.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-167

1512. THOMAS BRADFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 2 jackets, value 3s.; 2 waistcoats, value 1s., and 3 pairs of stockings, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Harrison , from his person .

SAMUEL HARRISON. I live with Mr. Hornylove, a trunk-maker, in the City-road. Last Sunday night, about half-past ten o'clock, I was at the corner of Gloucester-row, Hoxton , going home to my aunt's, with a bundle, containing these articles. Just as I turned round the row, the prisoner came behind, and snatched it out of my hand- he ran into Myrtle-street - I pursued, and called Stop thief! I lost sight of him in Cross-street, for about three minutes, but I saw him again, and he was taken - my bundle was picked up by the watchman. I am certain of his person; no one else was running.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am a watchman. I was on duty; heard a cry of Stop thief! went out of my box, and saw a mob with the prisoner - the bundle was thrown down by somebody. I took it up, and took the prisoner to the watch-house - I did not see who the bundle fell from.

WILLIAM HADDELL . I was in Myrtle-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I pursued the prisoner and took him about one hundred yards off - nobody was running before him, I am certain. He immediately said, "Pray let me go, I have dropped it" - I took him back.

JOHN LILLY . I am a watchman. I assisted in taking the prisoner back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-168

1513. MARGARET PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 hat, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of Charles Goodwin and John Harrington .

CHARLES GOODWIN . I am in partnership with John Harrington; we are hatters , and live in Norton-falgate . On the 4th of July, about a quarter before nine o'clock, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner come and take a hat off a stand - I pursued her two doors off - she put it into her apron; I took it from her. I wished to let her go, but she followed me and made a riot - I gave her in charge. She was intoxicated.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-169

1514. RICHARD BOWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 pair of gloves, value 10d., 15 yards of cotton, value 5s., and 1 shawl, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Moss Phillips , from his person .

MR. CHURCHILL conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS MOSS PHILLIPS. I am in the law , and live in Bryanston-square. I have been about twelve months in town; I came from Shropshire. On the 6th of June I was in Oxford-street, about five o'clock in the evening, and was accosted by a man, who said he had some cheap gloves to sell. I went with him to a house in Robert-street , where a man produced a sample of some gloves and other articles. I agreed with that man for two dozen pairs of gloves, at 10d. per pair - I had not seen the pirsoner then. The man said I should have them in the evening. He then gave me a piece of linen and a shawl, to keep as security - I gave him a sovereign, and he left the room; and the prisoner then entered the room, pushed by me, and took the goods from me. I told him I had paid for them - I was standing at the table, with them in my hand. He said I should not have them till I had paid more money; I said I had paid a sovereign, and would have them - he swore I should not, till he had more money, and I left the house to get an officer - I could find none, but gave information.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the value of the goods? A. I cannot tell; the cloth was as thick as my arm; I did not go back to the house that evening - I passed by, to know the name of it, but spoke to no one, nor did I go into it, I swear that. I never saw the man who sold me the gloves, in the prisoner's company. I went to the house next day, and inquired of the landlord for the prisoner; two dozens of gloves were sent to my house after the prisoner was examined. I did not go back and see the prisoner at the house; I walked up the street, to see for an officer, and as I returned I think I saw the prisoner near the door, but I could not find an officer, and could not wait, as some friends were coming to dinner; I did not speak to him; it must have been between seven and eight o'clock when I passed the house - I had dined then, and had a friend with me; I did not go in - I did not like the looks of the house.

Q. Did not the prisoner say the parcel was his, and the man had no right to leave it with you? A. No. I would not give 1l. for the things; I only took them as security; it was a cotton shawl.

MR. CHURCHILL. Q. You took them as a deposit, and did not purchase them? A. No.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 15th of June, in Holborn - I said"'Richard, I want you - there is information that you committed a felony in Robert-street, respecting some gloves;" he denied it - I said I must secure him - he said, "Well, what would you advise me to do?" I said I could advise him nothing, and as we went along he said, "Do you think if the swell gets his money he will be satisfied?" I said, "No, I think he means to prosecute." I left him with Furzman, while I went into the City - when I returned he said, "Now, Buckeridge, as a man, what would you advise me to do?" I said I could advise nothing, and took him to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a licenced-hawker, and went out with a man who carries goods for me; I met my brother and a friend; we went to the Rodney's Head, in Robert-street, and left my bundle with the landlord; I sent my man to get some steaks - we dined, and about half-past four o'clock the prosecutor and another person came and went into the parlour; a man named Bond then came in, took up my goods, and carried them into the parlour, to this gentleman. The other person came into the tap-room, and said he hoped I should not be offended, but he had left a piece of linen and a shawl with the gentleman; they had cost me above 4l. - I said he had no business with my goods. I went into the parlour - my goods were on the table; I went to pack them up - the prosecutor said, "These goods are to go with me, as I have paid a sovereign for some gloves," and pointed to the man who had spoken to him in the street; I said he was a stranger, and unless he paid for them I would not let them go; he went away, returned at half-past five o'clock, and inquired if the person who was to sell him the gloves had returned- they said he had not, but he would be there - he then asked if I would give him the sovereign which he had paid; I said I had had no sovereign, and would give nothing - he went away, returned about six o'clock, and said again,"Will you give me the sovereign?" I said No - he then said if the gloves were not sent that evening, he would next morning see further about it; I heard no more till I was taken in charge. I knew the man who sold the gloves had been arrested, and sent to the Marshalsea - he said nothing about the bundle when he came back. I never said, would the swell take his money.

JOHN AVANT . I am a soda-water maker, and live in Camden-town. I was at the Rodney's Head about an hour, when the prisoner came in; I was in his company two or three hours, from four o'clock till half-past six or seven- I am certain he was there till half-past six.

MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did he not leave the house during all that time? A. No - he had a pipe - I was in the same room with him; he was not away above two or three minutes.

COURT. Q. How long had you known him? A. Twelve or fourteen years. I was a publican when I first knew him - he lives somewhere in the City. I met him by accident - I did not see the prosecutor there. I know Bond, a broker; I believe I have seen the prisoner in his company, but not lately - it is two or three months since I have seen Bond; I cannot say where it was, or when; I have drank with the prisoner at that house. Bond very likely might be there, but I do not recollect it. I never knew the prisoner by any other name - I never heard him called Bond.

THOMAS HUSBAND . I met a young man about the 18th of June; he asked if I would go over to the Marshalsea prison; I went there, and saw Bond - he told me to call next day, and gave me a parcel of gloves and a note, which I took to No. 26, Bryanstone-square - I left them with the servant - they were gloves.

COURT. Q. How long have you known Bond? A. Ever since I was a child; I have known the prisoner two or three years - I had no message from him to Bond; I had heard of his being in custody, and mentioned it; I saw it in the newspaper. I work for my uncle, a silk manufacturer. I have sold the prisoner a few articles.

ISAAC BOWERS . I am the prisoner's brother, and am a printer. I went to this house with my brother; as we went into the room he took his bundle from the lad, and asked the landlord to take care of it; I saw the prosecutor there that evening; he asked if the young man had returned, who he paid a sovereign to, for some gloves; a young man there said he need not fear, as he would be sure to send them. A young man said he had taken the liberty to leave some of my brother's goods; my brother went in a passion, and said he had no business to leave them - he went into the parlour, and got them. We remained there till about seven o'clock, and went away together.

MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Who is your master? A. Mr. Walden; he had sent me to Duke-street with a message, but it may hurt him to mention who I was to go to; I went out about half-past twelve o'clock, and went to Duke-street - I do not like to mention the business I went about. The prosecutor asked if that fellow had returned, who he had paid the sovereign to; I went into the house between 3 and 4 o'clock - my master lives about a mile and a half from the public-house; my brother was in the parlour for eight or ten minutes; I do not know the man who took his goods - he was quite a stranger; I have heard his name was Bond; Mr. Phillips came to the house twice that evening - whether he gave his address I cannot say; my brother was angry at his goods being taken- he was with me all the evening; I might see Bond come in, but I do not know him. I went to a house in King-street, Westminster, with my brother, about half-past eight o'clock, and remained till half-past ten - he had a bundle and a blue bag.

JOHN AVANT. Bond has been a broker, in the upholdstery line, and dealt in drapery.

MR. PHILLIPS. The goods were in my possession - I had my hand upon them.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-170

1515. GEORGE MARTIN FAINT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 31 pieces of wood, value 25s. , the goods of Samuel Fox .

EDWARD PALMER . I am a Bow-street officer. On Sunday, the 1st of July, about half-past ten o'clock I and Parker were at Hornsey-lane-end, and saw the prisoner driving a cart, apparently loaded with hay, towards town; we stopped him, and asked what he had got - he said nothing but hay, which he was taking to his master, at the Sluice-house - I turned the hay up, and found a quantity

of timber; I asked whose cart and horse it was; he said he did not know. There was no name on it - he said his master had bought the timber of Mr. Fox - I took him back to Fox - he then said he did not buy it there, that he got it at the Jolly Butchers public-house; the cart and horse turned out to belong to Faint, of the Sluice-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did not you know he was a servant at the Sluice-house? A. No. I saw a man on Fox's premises that night - he has absconded.

PETER PARKER . I am a patrol, and confirm Palmer's account.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the prisoner drunk? A. Yes. I saw a man on Fox's premises that night - he has not been seen since. The prisoner was sober enough to walk, and to answer questions.

WILLIAM ADAMSON . I am an officer, stationed at Southgate. I met the officers with this cart and timber - I went to Fox's, and searched the premises - I found marks of a cart wheel at the back of the premises; they were very recently made, and the timber there appeared the same sort as that in the cart; one piece is large, and would take two men to put into the cart; the rest are planks.

GEORGE MORLEY . I am Mr. Fox's sawyer, and know part of this timber - I sawed part of it myself; I saw it all safe on Saturday night, and on Sunday night part of it was lost.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Mr. Fox's gardener? A. Yes; I believe his name is Mills, but they call him Crockford; I have not seen him since the Saturday night.

HENRY BIGLEY . I am a surveyor. I have compared this timber with that on the premises - it corresponds exactly.

CHARLES JOHN MYLES . I live in Samuel Fox's house. I was called up on Monday, and saw the timber, which I know to be his property. The gardener has absconded; I was present when the prisoner's brother bought the hay of Mr. Fox.

CHARLES MARTIN FAINT . I am the prisoner's brother, and keep the Sluice-house. This cart and horse is mine- my wife had lost the number of it; I had sent to Somerset-house for another, but it had not come. I had my brother from the country shortly before, and sent him for the hay. I know nothing of the timber.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the gardener on that day? A. Yes; he had an opportunity of speaking to the prisoner. I had told my brother to fence the field round, that the cattle should not go out.

Prisoner's Defence. I went for the hay, and some person at Fox's took the cart, and put the wood into it- the hay was put on the top.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-171

1516. HANNAH BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 watch, value 4l.; 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of William Beard , from his person .

WILLIAM BEARD. I am carter to Mr. Draper, of Richmond. I came to town on the 26th of June, about two o'clock in the morning, with a load of garden-stuff; I put my horses up, and met the prisoner about three o'clock in the morning, in the market - she asked me to go with her and lay down an hour or two. I never saw her before - we went to her room somewhere in St. Giles' - I do not know the name of the street; I took my watch and money wrapped them in a handkerchief, and put them into my hat; I then fastened the door. We went to bed - I fell asleep, and was awoke in about twenty minutes, by the prisoner opening the door; I jumped out of bed, and went to my hat; my watch and money were gone; I charged her with it - she said I had no such things with me; she then went into another room, where a person was laying; I followed her; the prisoner said, "What do you want here?" I said, my watch and money - she said, "You had no watch." I looked about, but could not find it; I went and fetched the watchman up - she again denied it ten or twelve times, but after some time she drew it from her pocket, but she would not deliver up any money.

MORRIS LEONARD . I am a watchman. I was called up, and the prisoner denied the charge several times - when I said I would take her to the watch-house she drew the watch out of her pocket.

Prisoner's. Q. Did not you take it out of the man's hat? A. No; she threw away this purse, with the money in it.(Purse and watch produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the watch in the bed, and gave it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-172

1517. MARY KEVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 1 hat, value 18s., the goods of John Williamson , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAMSON. I was in Lamb's-passage, Bunhill-row , about twelve o'clock at night, on the 2d of July, and fell asleep there - I had a hat on my head I am certain - I was not quite sober.

JOHN BRINT . I was coming from the west end of the town, and saw Williamson laying down asleep, and the prisoner rifling his pockets - she then took off his hat, and attempted to put it under her clothes; she put it under her left arm, covered it with her shawl, and went up Chiswell-street - I called the watchman, who took her.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a watchman. I was called, and took the prisoner, with the hat under her arm.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the hat, and the witness asked me to give it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-173

1518. HARRIET LARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 tobacco-box, value 1d.; 4 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of John Cooke , from his person .

JOHN COOK. I work in the Docks . On the 4th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, I was coming out of the Phoenix public-house, Norton-falgate; I was rather groggy, but knew what I was about; I met the prisoner on the pavement - she took hold of my arm, and said,"Come along Jack;" she took me across, down Magpie-alley, into Blossom-street ; she put her arms round me, and I heard my tobacco-box, fall, empty on the ground; I cannot tell whether she took it, or whether she caught it falling, but it fell empty; there had been three shillings, four half-crowns, and one or two sixpences in it; I had paid for my liquor at the house within twenty minutes,

and know it was all safe then; I seized her, and said,"You have robbed me; she said she had not; I called Watch! no one came, and as I was taking her to the watch-house, she put 5s. 6d. into my hand, saying, "There is your money, will you go home with me?" I said, "No; here is not all my money;" I was pulling her along; a watchman came up and took us both to the watch-house - he found my money; I have been a mariner.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am a watch-house keeper. I found the prisoner and prosecutor at the watch-house - he said she had robbed him, because he was a little groggy; he said she had taken 13s. or 14s., and gave me two half-crowns and a sixpence, which he said was all he had got back; I asked her what she had got - she said, "I believe half a crown, and 1s.;" I searched her, and found two more half-crowns, three shillings, and a sixpence; I detained them both, as he was groggy.

CHARLES BRESSEY . I live in Blossom-street. About twenty minutes to twelve o'clock I saw the prosecutor and prisoner pass our window - I heard them at words, and told them to move on; he said he would not till he had got his money; I had heard something fall on the stones - I got a light, and found the tobacco-box under the window.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him - he gave me 5s. 6d. to sleep with him - I refused, and he gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270712-174

1519. DANIEL NEWNING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Pennd , from the person of Sarah Pennd .

SARAH PENND. I am the wife of William Pennd, and live at Hammersmith. On the 30th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was waiting about for my husband to come home - some man came by and pushed me down - I did not know him; I do not know whether he took my shawl off, or it fell off - I tried to keep it on my shoulders - I had hold of it, and slipped off the pavement, which made me let go.

Q. Now, have you ever said, before a Magistrate, "The shawl was dragged from me?" A. I said the same as I do now; there was a crowd, and I could not find it; I never allowed any one to take it - I saw it again next day; I do not know the prisoner; I saw him in about half an hour, and thought he was the man, but was not positive; I went up and asked him for my shawl - he said he knew nothing of it; I thought he might be the man, and gave him in charge - a strange woman returned it to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not swear at the office the very reverse of what you have to day? A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Did not the man who took your shawl accuse you of taking his money? A. No; he never spoke about any money; I did not swear to the prisoner at the office; I did not swear that I saw a man do it; I had spoken to no man before it was taken; I cannot say more than I have; I did not say it fell down, and I could not tell who took it up.

Q. Have you not frequently been taken up on charge of robbery? A. No; I shall swear to nothing. I was married eighteen months ago, at the new church at Chelsea; my maiden name was Bury.

Q. Do you persist in saying you are the man's wife? A. I shall say no more - I am married to him - I have not been in custody; I knew Swan, and was never in his custody, or any body else's in my life, for any thing at all; I have been taken up for being a little intoxicated, but never for theft.

JOSEPH SMITHERS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On Monday morning I found the prisoner and shawl at the watch-house; he said the prosecutor and his wife charged him with stealing it, and that it was under the straw; I found it there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prosecutrix say he took it? A. Certainly - and she said so at the office.

WILLIAM PENND. I am married to this woman; she had a shawl like this.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been married? A. About eighteen months; it was at the new church, Chelsea; I cannot tell whether she has been in custody; she was not since she has been my wife; she has been taken for drunkenness.

Mr. PHILLIPS called -

JEREMIAH SWAN . I am a watchman of Hammersmith. I know the prosecutrix well - she has been in my charge for defrauding five or six different people of property, but they gave up the charges sooner than be exposed - the last time was six or eight months ago; I have had her several times within the last two years; I sometimes kept her about an hour.

COURT. Q. What were the charges? A. Picking people's pockets.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-175

1520. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of William Walker .

WILLIAM WALKER. I am a wheel-wright . On the 4th of June I was at the Prince of Orange public-house, Westminster , and put my coat in the skittle-ground, and missed it; I pursued the prisoner, whom I knew, but he was not taken then.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. You were all playing together I suppose? A. Yes; I had known him some years by sight.

LEONARD GEORGE NEEDS . I live at Mr. Graham's, a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this coat on the 4th of June, in the name of John Chaffin, Union-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WEBBER . I saw the prisoner run out of the Prince of Orange with the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-176

1521. ELLEN McHENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 watch, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 30s.; 1 ribbon, value 2d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of George William Cambourne .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE WILLIAM CAMBOURNE. I have known the prisoner twelve months - I met her on Monday morning early, in New Tothill-street; she asked me to give her

something to drink; I said there was no house open - we went to her lodging, No. 52, Old Pie-street , with another girl. I put my watch and seals into my stocking, and put them in my hat, and we went to bed together; I awoke between four and five o'clock in the morning - my things were then safe; she was then gone down stairs - she came up, took them out of my hat, and was out with them in a moment. I have not recovered them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you known her? A. Six or seven years; but I never was at her own home - another girl was in the room; they were both in the bed. I was not much in liquor - I had some beer there - I had not time to stop her, nor to cry out.

HENRY PAULSOM . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in her room - one stocking was on the table, and the watchman found another on her leg; she denied the robbery - and said he had robbed a man in Battersea-fields, and given his watch to her.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. I was called, and next day took the prisoner. I found one of the stockings on her leg, and a handkerchief on the bed.

GEORGE WILLIAM CAMBOURN. They are mine. I am an artificial-flower maker , and live with my mother. I was once with her about six months before. I have seen her parents once - it was not I who first led her astray.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-177

1522. THOMAS HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 2 gowns, value 4s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 book, value 2d.; 3 knives, value 6d.; 2 forks, value 6d.; and 7 drinking-glasses, value 18d. ; the goods of John Donovan .

JOHN DONOVAN. I live in Church-street, St. Giles' . On the 4th of June these articles were in the first floor front room, where I lodge - I caught the prisoner in the room at four o'clock in the morning. I do not know how he got in, but I was awoke; and a man who slept with me, was jostling with him - he was at the side of my box, my things were all turned upside down; he said if I would let him go he would make the things all right, which he had taken before. He had got into the house somehow, and broken a hole through the lath and plaster, and unbolted the door; he said he had taken two parcels before, and the watchman had taken one parcel from him. I went and found the watchman had got part of my property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He told you where the watchman was? A. Yes; I believe he bears a good character. I have found all but some glasses.

MICHAEL KELLY . I am a watchman. About two o'clock in the morning the prisoner passed me with two bundles in his hand - I knew him before, and asked what he had got; he said nothing, and ran - I followed - he threw down one bundle and got away - the bundle contains two gowns and a handkerchief.

THOMAS LESLIE . I am a watchman. I have some knives, shoes, and handkerchiefs, which I found in a bundle at the prisoner's house.

MARY DONOVAN . The prisoner lodged with me - he sent for me, and told me where to find this bundle.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy, having a good character.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-178

1523. WILLIAM NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James McCleery , from his person .

JAMES McCLEERY. I live at Belfast. I was opposite Westminster Abbey last Sunday, about three o'clock; I had a handkerchief in my coat pocket, and was not aware of any thing till a person behind told me I had lost it - the prisoner rushed by me at that moment, and I followed him, and saw him drop my handkerchief, which my wife took up and gave to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. No.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a bricklayer. I saw the prisoner running, with a yellow silk handkerchief - I saw him take it from somewhere; I think it came from a pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Could you see me take it, when you were two yards before me? A. I was exactly opposite you.

Prisoner's Defence. It was thrown in my face by some person who ran by - I caught it and went to run; that gentleman stopped me.

Eleven Witness gave him a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18270712-179

1524. JANE BRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 neckerchief, value 1d.; 1 half-sovereign, 3 half-crowns, 7 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Hugh Higgins , from his person .

HUGH HIGGINS. I am a hatter , and work for Mr. Austin of Uxbridge. On the 24th of June, about two o'clock in the morning, I left Uxbridge; and when I came to town I went into the Black Horse public-house, St. Giles' , for refreshment - this was between seven and eight o'clock; the prisoner came in, and asked what countryman I was - I said an Irishman; she asked where from - I said Dublin. I asked her to drink, which she did; I gave her 1s. to get an apron - she returned, and sent her girl to get breakfast; she took me to her room - I sat on the bed; she asked for 1s. to get breakfast, which I gave her - the landlord then came in for his rent; she had not enough, and asked me for another shilling, which I gave her - I laid down and fell asleep; when I awoke I gave her another shilling - she bought four mackarel, and then said she was going to a wake, and would I give her half a gallon of beer, which I did - when she was gone I missed my money from my fob. I had put my trousers under the pillow; there had been another woman there, but she was not near the bed. I missed a handkerchief from under my head - I found two halfpence in my fob, which I am certain were not there when I went to sleep. We found her in about an hour and a half, drinking gin at the bar of a public-house - we found five shillings and my handkerchief in her pocket.

ROBERT PEARSON . I am an officer. The prosecutor was standing in the street, talking to the prisoner's daughter, about the robbery - we got information, and at last found the prisoner in a public-house, at the corner of Plumtree-street. I found 5s. 61/4d. and this neck-cloth on her.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me to take care of the handkerchief; he said he had been robbed of 35s. 6d. in the morning, and lost his apron.

PROSECUTOR. I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-180

1525. FRANCIS SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 60 ozs. of silver, value 20l., the goods of Kensington Lewis , his master .

RICHARD BLACKFORD . I am clerk to Kensington Lewis, a silversmith , of St. James's-street ; the prisoner was his errand-boy or light porter. In consequence of suspicion we were looking about, and on the 12th of June I found some silver at Mr. Betts, in Long-acre - it was part of a plateau, and which we had missed. I am certain of it, as I have some more pieces of it here; there is other silver, sixty or seventy ounces in all.

HYLA BETTS . I am a refiner, and live in Long-acre; this silver was brought to me, at different times, within the last month - the prisoner brought all that I took in of it - I mixed it with other silver; but we had no more of this description in the house - he came first about two months ago; I was going out at the time, and when I came back, my man showed me some of this silver; when I saw the prisoner again, I asked where he got it - he said he sold books, and took this ornamental silver of an old lady in exchange for books. I am quite certain part of this silver was bought of him.

JOHN BURCHELL . I apprehended the prisoner at his own lodgings - his father is a very respectable man. I found a key secreted under some books; it opens a glass case, at his master's, where the silver is kept.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgement Respited.

Reference Number: t18270712-181

1526. JOHN REDIT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Melville Macpherson , from his person .

MELVILLE MACPHERSON. I am an artist . I was in St. Martin's-lane , opposite the church, about eleven o'clock last Thursday night; I saw the prisoner and another lad, standing about, and making signals to one another - they passed me once or twice; I told them to walk on - they then both ran; I felt, and missed my handkerchief. I pursued and caught the prisoner - I found my handkerchief in his breast; the other got away.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it off the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-182

1527. JAMES INGRAM was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 3 books, value 2l., the goods of William Leake , his master .

SECOND COUNT, calling it 1 cwt. of paper.

JOHN WILLIAM BURY . I live with Mr. William Leake. The prisoner was his footman - here are three books, which are master's; he has a great number of them - I missed them - they were afterwards brought to the house - they had never been given to the prisoner - one is a ledger, and was in constant use - my master is a solicitor .

JOHN SEALBY . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Mary-le-bone-lane. About the middle of May the prisoner sold us this book, as waste paper, at 4d. per pound - he said it was given him to light fires; it weighed 30 lbs.; I afterwards bought two others of the same sort.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a very good character.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-183

1528. ELIZABETH SHERWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Davis , privately in his shop .

HENRY CUTTER . I live with Mr. William Davis, linen-draper , Chiswell-street . On the 19th of June, about 5 o'clock, the prisoner came to match some ribbon; we had none; she then looked at crape handkerchiefs, and after they were moved I saw one under her arm; I followed her out, and took her; she did it very clumsily; she said it had stuck to her apron.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17 Of stealing only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-184

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1529. PHOEBE ISAACS and LOUISA POWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 3 half-crowns. and 2 penny-pieces, the monies of Edmund Smith , from his person .

The prosecutor's name being Edmund James Smith , the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18270712-185

1530. GEORGE LONSDALE was indicted for embezzlement .

FREDERICK JAMES FRITH . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Chiswell-street . The prisoner was only two days in my service; I sent him out on the 30th of June , with goods; he was to call on Mrs. Davis, in Tabernacle-square, for 1l. 1s. - he never returned - on the Monday following I saw him at the corner of Field-lane; I ran after him, and he was stopped.

CATHERINE DAVIS . On the 30th of June the prisoner brought me some butter; I paid him half-a-crown, 6s. 6d. in copper, and 12s. in sixpences and shillings.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Nine Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270712-186

1531. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 pair of candlesticks, value 5s., the goods of Richard Roy ; and 1 jacket, value 1s. , the goods of John Bicknell .

JOHN BICKNELL. I am groom to Richard Roy, of Regent-street . On the 11th of July these candlesticks were on the dresser; about five o'clock I went into the pantry, and found the prisoner there - he seemed confused - I asked what he wanted - he said one Elizabeth Smith, who had lived there; I said she did not live there, and told him to walk up stairs, which he did - I went into the pantry, and found these candlesticks rolled in my jacket, which hung on my bed a quarter of an hour before; I sleep in the pantry; we then pursued and brought him back; he said he had done nothing.

JOHN CLEMENCE . I was passing Mr. Roy's, and saw the witness accusing the prisoner, who then ran away - I pursued, raised a cry, and took him in Hanover-square.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is he not a hackney coachman? A. I do not know.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am a constable. I took him in charge; he said he only came to see for his cousin, and that he had left his coach at the corner of Bond-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-187

1532. TIMOTHY DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 4 pairs of boot legs, value 10s.; 10 pairs of shoe uppers, value 10s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 5s.; 1 pair of boot uppers, value 3s.; 100 pieces of leather, value 20s.; 3 pairs of boots, value 2l., and 32 lasts, value 10s., the goods of Joseph Borsley , his master .

CHARLES CARTWRIGHT . I know Joseph Borsley, of Wigmore-street ; the prisoner had lived about three years with him. On the 6th of July I went to his lodgings in Pall-mall-buildings, with Lacey, (the beadle) and found several articles; he said Charles Pope gave them to him to convey away, at different times.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 6th of July the prisoner came to pawn a pair of boots; I suspected him, and said I would go to his direction, if he would give it me; he immediately ran out as fast as he could; I followed and took him, and found another pair on him.

SAMUEL WISE . I am a pawnbroker, and have a pair of boots, which were pawned by the prisoner, on the 31st of May.

THOMAS CONDIE . I am an officer, and went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found several articles.

JOHN LACEY . I found the property at the prisoner's lodgings, and the duplicate of the boots pawned at Wise's, in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Pope gave me them to pawn; the other property from time to time, he gave me to make up at home.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-188

1533. JONAS BRADHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 2 pairs of boots, value 15s., and 1 pair of boot legs, value 9s., the goods of Joseph Borsley , his master .

CHARLES CARTWRIGHT . I only know that the prisoner says Pope gave him these boot legs to make up at his own lodging - he is a sober, industrious, honest man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-189

1534. CHARLES POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 12 pairs of shoe uppers, value 16s.; 3 sole leathers, value 1s.; 1 pair of boot fronts, value 3s., and 1 kid-skin, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Borsley , his master .

CHARLES CARTWRIGHT . The prisoner was in Mr. Borsley's employ, in a confidential situation. I went to his lodging on the 6th of July, and found these articles; I can swear to some, by their being Mr. Borsley's cutting; and the mark is on the toe, which is usual: the prisoner worked in the house, and has not done journey-work for fifteen months.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Can you tell when these articles were in your shop? A. We had no satin of this colour till within the last two months; we might have some nearly like it; he was at our shop from seven o'clock in the morning till nine at night; I swear to the colour of the silk; the foreman is not here.

COURT. Q. Were such things as these laying about the shop? A. Yes; the prisoner did not work - his duty was to attend the shop, and give out work; his wife sometimes came to the shop.

JOHN LACEY . I am a beadle. I went to the prisoner's lodging, and found the property in drawers, and in a chest, which was not locked; he said he knew nothing about them- his wife was there, but said nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I at first had work from Mr. Borsley, and every night I took work home to do from nine o'clock to twelve; if he had brought my book it would show that I had done work for him.

CHARLES CARTWRIGHT. Here is his book; here are eight pairs of shoes entered, which his wife had to bind; and here are two pairs entered to be made.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-190

1535. THOMAS BARRETT was indicted for stealing' on the 16th of June , 1 stove, value 2s., the goods of a certain person, whose name is unknown .

THOMAS HUTCHINS . I am a porter at the London Mechanics' Institution, Southampton-buildings . I was sweeping the door at eight o'clock on the morning of the 16th of June; the prisoner came up to me and said he had helped to build the Institution, and was desirous to see it; I said he might come in and look at it; I then went to breakfast; my wife said there was a stranger in the yard; I got up and saw that he had got into the shrubbery; he went and took a stove that stood there, and put it over the rails; he then got over himself; I ran down to Staple's-inn, to the porter; we followed; he was taken in Cursitor-street with it; he said a man had employed him to carry it.

DAVID HAINES . I am a porter of Staple's-inn. I stopped him with the stove in Cursitor-street; he said a man had employed him to carry it.

JOHN HOWARD . I am butler of Staple's-inn. Mr. Cookeny took a cellar there, and in clearing it out I found this stove, and put it into a recess in the garden, from which the prisoner took it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man, who looked like a bricklayer, told me to carry the stove to Cursitor-street, and he would give me a job.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-191

1536. THOMAS BLEWETT, alias STEVENSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 2 pairs of saltcellars, value 7s. , the goods of Robert Lilley .

CAROLINE VICKERS . I am the niece of Robert Lilley, a publican , of Stepney . On the 30th of May I missed these salts from my room - the prisoner lodged there - I knew that he went into my room for the utensil. He went out about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning - the salts have not been found; no other person lodged there. I locked the stair foot door between nine and ten o'clock, when I had lighted him up stairs - I missed the salts between nine and ten in the morning; I had seen them about five on the evening before - the door had been kept locked.

Prisoner. Q. Who was down stairs first in the morning? A. You was; I opened the door to let you down; the door was locked at five, when they were safe.

JOHN NORRIS . I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-192

1537. MAURICE CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 1 watch, value 2l. 10s., the goods of James Wiltshire , from his person .

JAMES WILTSHIRE. I was at the Hat and Plough public house, Whitechapel , on the 4th of June. The prisoner and another came in about twenty minutes to twelve o'clock- I knew him before. He sat down, and had a pot of beer; I drank with him; he asked me the time; I pulled out my watch, and told him. He said, "You seem to have a pretty good watch there, let me look at it". I did so - he said it was pretty, and put it into his pocket. I asked him for it; he said, "I wish you may get it," and soon afterwards he went out with it. I went to him next morning - he rerefused to go with me - I told him he had had my watch raffled for; he denied it. I had him taken afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How many other persons have you charged with stealing your watch? A. None. I never charged Talbot with stealing one, nor Pollock. I was at the Black Horse, that day, but charged nobody there with it, nor fetch an officer to take a man there. I found the prisoner at a public-house with Brooks, a hair-dresser - he staid there while I fetched the beadle to take him. I have never got my watch back. Two more were in his company, one is named Garvin - I swear I did not give him the watch to look at, out of my hand. I was sober; I did not see him go out; I did not know where he lived - I mentioned it to nobody that evening - I said I had lost it, but I forgot then that he had not returned it to me, but I recollected myself afterwards.

ELIZABETH GOLDACRE . I keep the Hat and Plough. I saw the prosecutor, Garvin, and another, drinking together - one of them said my clock was stopped - the prosecutor then pulled out his own watch, and said it wanted a quarter to twelve - the prisoner then pulled out his, and it wanted twenty minutes. The prisoner said,"Coachman, you have a nice watch there, let me look at it;" he took it, and sat about twenty minutes, with the two watches in his hand. Wiltshire then said, "You have my watch, I expect you to return it." The prisoner said, I wish you may get it;" and in about twenty minutes the prisoner and the other two went out; Wiltshire staid there. He said no more about the watch, and I suppose he had forgotten it - they were all sober.

Cross-examined. Q. How many went out with the prisoner? A. Two. I had forgotten about the watch then - he did not hand the watch to the prisoner, he took it: he was taken next morning.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a headborough. I was fetched to the Hat and Plough, and took the prisoner. He said he had got no watch, and that he had raffled his own last night, but I found his own in his fob.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not attempt to go away? A. No. I met Partridge, who said he would be answerable for his appearance, and then the prisoner went free. He said he had returned it.

Prisoner's Defence. The watch I raffled my brother had won.

DANIEL HURLEY . I was with the prisoner at the Hat and Plough; a person came in and asked the time - the dial did not go. The prisoner pulled out his watch, and the prosecutor his; he handed it to Connor, as there was a dispute about time; Connor had them both in his hand some time; he then got up and got as far as the door, then returned and said, "Here is your watch." The prosecutor then said, "Lend me yours now;" and the prisoner said, "I wish you may get it," and went away. I had known Wiltshire by sight before. I live in New-court, Whitechapel.

MICHAEL GARVIN . I live in Plough-court, close by the public-house. I was there with the prisoner, and saw him return a watch to the coachman - I was there when they both pulled out their watches; the prisoner said to the prosecutor, "Let me look at yours - it cannot be right;" he had it some time, and returned it - the prosecutor said,"Let me look at yours;" he replied, "I wish you may get it:" I left the room.

COURT. Q. Did you see the watch opened? A. No; a gentleman came to me, and said, "Garvin, had not this man better make it up." I said, "If I was innocent I would not make it up."

HENRY FLAGG . I keep the Black Horse, George-yard, Whitechapel. Wiltshire was at my house on the 4th of June, about four o'clock - he was not quite sober. I heard a noise, came down, and found him in my tap-room; he said he had lost his watch in my tap-room; nobody was there - he went out, fetched an officer, and charged a man who came in, with robbing him, as I understood. I heard the same evening, that another man was charged with it. I think it was on the same evening.

- NORRIS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. - Wiltshire came to the office - I went with him to the Black Horse; he said he had lost his watch there - he said he had been asleep in the house, and supposed some one had taken it - a man came in, and he said, "This man was in the house when I lost it" - he appeared sober.

GEORGE PALLETT . I was at the Black Horse, and saw the prosecutor; he said, "George - do you know where my watch is?" I said I knew nothing of it - he said, "If you can tell me about it, I will spend a sovereign;" he accused me of having been there while he was asleep.

THOMAS TALBOT . I was in the stable yard of the Black Horse on the 4th of June - Wiltshire came, and asked me to have a drop of beer; we went in, and had a pint; I went to work again; this was about four o'clock. I went in about five, to call him to go with his coach, and found him asleep; he came out to me afterwards, and said,"Have you got any thing of mine?" I said No; he then said, "I have lost my watch, and thought you might have taken it for safety.

MRS. GOLDACRE re-examined. I am certain when he said, "I wish you may get it," that it referred to the prosecutor's watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you not in the bar? A. Yes, and so were they - if the watch had been returned I must have seen it, I was so near - my head was sometimes turned to the customers.

- BROOKS . I heard the prosecutor, next morning, asking for the prisoner's direction - I went with him, and found him; I have known him ten years - he came quietly, and went himself for the beadle. I said, "Now, Maurice, if you know yourself innocent, why not go to my son-in-law, who is the beadle?" he went and brought him.

COURT. Q. Do you know any thing about money being offered to make this up? A. Yes; I went to the office, and knowing the prisoner, I said it would be a pity to go on, and for the sake of two guineas, which I under

stood the coachman was willing to take, would it not be better to make it up - he said, "No, I know myself innocent; and will rather go over the herring-pond than offer to make it up;" the prosecutor had deputed me to settle it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-193

1538. MARY CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of James Peachey .

JOSEPH PEACHEY . I am the brother of James Peachey, a pawnbroker , of Old-street . On the 26th of June I saw a woman stoop, as I was writing; I came round the counter, and found a handkerchief and spencer on the ground, and four handkerchiefs were missing from the counter; I cannot say whether the prisoner is the woman.

LYDIA BURROUGHS . I was in the shop. I saw the prisoner come in - she went into the front of the shop; I did not see her take the handkerchief, but she went out without being served.

WILLIAM CLARKSON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 26th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, Peachey's man gave me information, and in a quarter of an hour the prisoner came - I knew her; she offered to pawn this handkerchief - I detained her, and sent to Peachey's - his man came, and identified it.

JOHN VANN . I took her in charge with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-194

1539. JAMES MUNNENS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 glass bottle, value 1d., and half a pint of brandy, value 8d. , the goods of our Lord the King.

MESSRS. ALLEY and PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH WARDEN . I am an officer of the Customs, and gate-keeper at the London-docks . On the 12th of July I saw the prisoner going out; I took off his hat, and found a pint of brandy in a bottle in it - he said it was given to him by the Excise officer in the dock - I asked his name; he said he would not tell me. I said, "Now is that the truth?" he said, "Well, I will tell you - I had it from the sample man, out of the sample box." I saw the Excise label on the bottle, and went and missed this bottle out of the sample-box, No. 3 - he was a stranger.

WILLIAM HADEN . I am a Custom-house guager. I searched, and missed this bottle from a box, where it had been, with thirty-five others, between twelve and one o'clock; he must have come into the proof-room, which is in my care - he must have taken it while my back was turned.

GEORGE EDESON . I know this bottle by the label.

Prisoner's Defence. A person gave it me, and asked me to leave it outside.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-195

1540. WILLIAM CULLENDER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 1 saw, value 15s. , the goods of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN. I am a wheel-wright , and live at Stepney . On the 12th of June, in the morning, I missed a saw from my yard - it was safe the day before. The prisoner had been about the premises till ten o'clock that evening.

DANIEL DARCEY . I am a sawyer. I worked with this saw on the 11th of June, at Mr. Green's, and missed it next morning - I found it at Mudd's, in Angel-lane, Stratford.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a broker, and live at Stratford; the prisoner brought this saw to me, to sell, on the 13th of June. I bought it of him, and sold it to Mudd, of Stratford, the same day.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer. I went with Darcey to Mudd's, at Stratford, and found this saw.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who gave it me to sell for 5s., as he was going into the country - I do not know who he was.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-196

1541. JAMES MAYELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 sovereign , the money of Simeon Harris .

ELEANOR HARRIS . I am the wife of Simeon Harris. - On the 6th of July, I expected the sweeps at half-past ten o'clock, and at ten the prisoner and a little boy came; we were not quite ready, and the prisoner helped to clear the room - the boy swept the chimney, and they went away; their master afterwards came, and asked if I had lost any thing; I then missed a sovereign from the mantel-piece, which was there when they came; I went, and saw the prisoner - he denied taking it; his master took him to the watch-house.

ABRAHAM PATERNOSTER . I am shopman to Mr. Hulme, a pawnbroker, Museum-street. On the 6th of July the prisoner came and bought a coat, trousers, shirt, and handkerchief, which came to 13s. 6d. - he gave me a sovereign, and I gave him in charge.

JOHN DAVIS . I sent the prisoner and a boy to sweep this chimney; after he returned this bundle of clothes was put into my drawer - I went and inquired of my customer, as I knew he had no money.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am an officer. I received him in charge - he said he took the sovereign off the shelf.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-197

1542. ELIZABETH McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 kettle, value 3s. , the goods of John Ledwick .

HENRY CLARK . I am servant to John Ledwick, a broker , of Shadwell . On the 29th of June the prisoner came and bought a 2d. spoon, and looked at other things; after she was gone I saw her going along with her hands before her - my master missed a kettle from the door.

BRIDGET HOLMES . I live in Shakespeare's-walk. The prisoner passed me with this kettle and saucepan - she asked me to let her leave them at my place; she left the kettle there; I gave it to her at her own door, when I heard one was missing.

JOHN MIDDLEDITCH . I apprehended the prisoner at her lodging; she produced a tea-kettle, and said it was all she had. Holmes then brought this kettle to the door.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-198

1543. WILLIAM VERNON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 jacket, value 8s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 1s. , the goods of James Hulme .

ABRAHAM PATERNOSTER . I am shopman to James Hulme, a pawnbroker . I pinned this suit of clothes at the door on the 4th of July - they were stolen that night.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. I was in Broad-street, St. Giles' , and saw the prisoner go to Hulme's door, and try to get this dress down, but he could not - he then went into the shop, and soon afterwards I stopped him in the street, with it - he used very bad language.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a public-house - a woman treated me with gin, and then asked me to pawn these things.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-199

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JULY 16.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1544. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 6d., and 1 gold key, value 4s., the goods of Arthur Meggs , from his person .

ARTHUR MEGGS. I live in Old Gravel-lane. On Tuesday morning, the 5th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in the neighbourhood of Bedford-square, Commercial-road; I had been at a Parochial dinner the day before, and was going home rather intoxicated, but knew what I was about; I met a man in crossing Whitechapel, and asked him to show me the nearest way into the Commercial-road; he took hold of me by the arm, and conducted me to the neighbourhood of Bedford-square - he got me down by some means or other - I cannot say how - I then missed my watch; got up, and raised the cry of Stop thief! some gentleman who was passing, pursued, and took the prisoner to the watch-house; I cannot say he was the man who took it - but I saw the watch found, and I knew it had been in my fob before.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. I am told that you were exceedingly intoxicated that night? A. I was not very drunk - I had been drinking a bottle or two of sherry, perhaps, but I had no porter; I had not been talking about the watch, and swinging it about.

CHARLES BIGGS . I am a ship-broker. I was in the neighbourhood of Bedford-square; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me - the prosecutor was running in the same direction - I took the prisoner; he was taken to the watch-house, and this watch was taken from his coat pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the coat taken off his back? A. Yes - by Mr. Tedwick, a friend of mine - he is not here; it came off in the scuffle, and was carried about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour's walk; I believe my friend carried the coat the whole time; he might have given it to another person for a minute or two, as I lost sight of him - the prosecutor was not very drunk.

PETER WILSON . I am a constable of Mile-end. I saw the prisoner brought into the watch-house without a coat- I searched and found the watch in his left-hand coat pocket; I do not know the gentleman who gave the coat. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Whit Monday I had a holiday, and was going home with two young men, who I had met at a public-house - one of them said, "Here he comes!" there was a cry of Stop thief! they ran, and somebody pushed me down - but I know nothing of the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-200

1545. JOSEPH ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 127 brushes, value 7l., the goods of William Bracey Kent , his master .

WILLIAM BRACEY KENT. I am a brush-maker , and live in Great Marlborough-street . The prisoner was in my employ - I missed a quantity of brushes, and took him on suspicion; a duplicate of some was found on him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you been in the habit of paying any of your men in burshes? A. Never; I often sold them brushes; the prisoner used to make pattern brushes; I do not know that he worked for himself; I once had a porter named Robert; I do not know his sirname - I dismissed him for spoiling some goods - the prisoner was never discharged, but he was not at work about the time the duplicate is dated.

THOMAS DENDERS PERRY . I am shopman to Mr. James Aldous , a pawnbroker. I have one hundred and twenty-seven brushes, which belong to the duplicate found on the prisoner; they were not pawned by him, but by his mother; I have two lots pawned by him on the 27th of January, and the 8th of March.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer. On the 23d of June I went into the public-house, next door to the prisoner's house; he came and asked if I wanted him; Mr. Kent gave him in charge - he was quite intoxicated; he wished me to make away with the duplicate.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not so drunk that he did not know what he was about? A. Yes.

MR. KENT. I will swear to these clothes-brushes - some of them are not finished; the tooth-brushes are finished - I never sold them.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tooth-brushes of Mr. Goodlad, of Hatton-garden - some of the others were booked by Mr. Kent, to one of his men - the others I bought of Mr. Roberts in January.

MR. KENT. I sold Roberts some brushes four, five, or six years ago, but we were not then in the habit of selling brushes of this description to working people - I do not know how long ago it was, as I do not sell them myself.

HENRY ROBERTS . I was in Mr. Kent's employ, and frequently received brushes for work done in March, April, and May, last year; I had half in wages, and half in goods; I received brushes of this description from him and another house; other men were paid in the same way, and pawned a great many.

COURT. Q. When did you leave Mr. Kent? A. The latter end of January - I left of my own accord; I have had some thousands from him at different times; I have sold the prisoner some previous to January; I sold him at different times fifty or sixty within twelve months, of the very same pattern and make as these.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-201

1546. JOHN COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Nathaniel Smith Machin , and Robert Debenham .

JOHN EDENSOR MARSDEN . I am a porter to Nathaniel Smith Machin and Robert Debenham, auctioneers , King-street, Covent-garden . Last Thursday my coat hung in the sale room; I missed it, and went to the prisoner's lodgings - he was out; I met him as I returned, with a strange coat on, and accused him of taking my coat, which he acknowledged, and gave me the one he had on - that was not mine; he took me to the pawnbroker's where he had pawned mine; I let him redeem it, and then gave him in charge; he occasionally worked at our house; he had a good character.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-202

1547. MARY CLANCEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 sovereign, and 11 shillings, the monies of Samuel Ellis , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-203

1548. SUSANNAH THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 1 watch, value 12s.; and 1 key, value 3d., the goods of John Nelson , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-204

1549. MARY McCAULEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 chain, value 3l.; 3 seals, value 3l., and 2 keys, value 2l., the goods of John Towser , from the person of George Towser .

JOHN TOWSER. I live in Drury-lane, and am a tinplate worker . On the 11th of July, about a quarter-past eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came up to me in Drury-lane , and asked what o'clock it was - I would not tell her; she snatched at my watch, and took it from my fob; she ran off - two watchmen met her - she then turned back, and I caught her; she dropped the watch.

EDWARD RENTMORE . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running towards me; she turned back, I followed, and found Towser holding her; I took her in charge.

CHARLES MOSS . I am a watchman, I heard a call of Stop her! and found Towser holding the prisoner - he gave her in charge - I took her by the arm, heard something fall, and my partner picked up the watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him, and he took me to two public-houses; he said he had no more money, and left his watch with me for 3s., and when he got down-stairs, he called Watch!

PROSECUTOR. Not a word of this is true.

GUILTY. Aged 27. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-205

1550. MARY BRYANT , ELLEN BRYANT , and SUSAN SHIPLEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 10 yards of cotton, value 10s., and 1 shawl, value 1s. , the goods of James Sawyer .

MARY SAWYER . I am the wife of James Sawyer, a painter , we live in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove . On Wednesday last, the prisoners came to my house together - I knew Mary Bryant before; they said they were come to smash a young woman, who lodged with me, named Swail - my door was open - I followed them into my room, and told them to walk out, and not make a noise in my house. Mary said, "Don't push me;" and after some-time they went out. When they were gone I missed this cotton off the bed - Mary had sat down by the side of it. I went out and found them in Chapel-street, Edgeware-road - Mary had got my shawl on her neck; I gave charge of them. Mary Bryant had lodged with me.

Cross-examined by MR. SMITH. Q. Do not you keep a bad house? A. I do not; Swail is a dress-maker. Mary Bryant brought persons home to my house, and therefore I got rid of her.

DAVID TRAIL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chapel-street. On the 11th of July Shipley, I believe, pawned this cotton, in the name of Brewer. Mary Bryant was with her.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not certain of her? A. No.

MARY CHAPMAN . I live my parents in Harrow-street. I know all the prisoners. On the 11th of July, I saw Ellen Bryant at the top of Charles-street, with this cotton in her lap, shewing it to a young woman; I heard her say"Here is some cotton, which I have been and collared;" she then ran away. Mary Bryant was about twenty yards off.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure of her? A. Yes; and that is the cotton. I go out charring. The prosecutrix keeps a lodging house.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge - I found Ellen Bryant in bed; she asked me to make it up.

MARY BRYANT's Defence. This woman kept a bad house; she asked me to go and lodge with her. I was there a fortnight, and then returned to my parents - Swail had promised me a shawl, and I went for it.

SHIPLEY's Defence. I went to get an article out, but did not pawn the cotton.

MARY BRYANT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

ELLEN BRYANT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

SHIPLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-206

1551. WILLIAM BROCKLING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pen-knife, value 3d.; 3 sovereigns, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of Richard Smith , from his person .

RICHARD SMITH. I am an excavator , and live in Upper Park-place. On the 9th of June, as I was going along the Strand, home, about twelve o'clock, I met a girl nearly opposite Charing-cross; and went with her to No. 3, Duck-yard , to the first floor room; I bolted the door, undressed, and went to bed. I had a duplicate of a watch in my fob pocket - my money was in my trousers pocket, and a penknife in my waistcoat pocket. I put my trousers under my head; I was awoke about five o'clock, by a knocking at the door, by the prisoner, another man, and a woman - they came into the room; as I told them to come in. I then said if they would withdraw I would dress myself; they said they wanted a man to go with them to Billingsgate, to

buy mackarel. I do not know what name they mentioned - I got up to put on my things, and said, "I think that woman has taken my stockings;" the prisoner said, "Look: perhaps they are in your hat;" (the girl was then gone down) he went up to my hat and gave it me - my stockings were there; he might have been near the hat - he asked if I had been robbed. I knew then that I had, but I said,"It is of no consequence;" as I did not wish to give them any information - we then all came down together, and I took notice of the house. I had missed my duplicate and money when I began to dress myself. I went on Monday morning early, to the pawnbroker's, and desired him to detain any one who came to take the watch out. The prisoner was afterwards taken, and my knife found in his waistcoat pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Where had you been? A. Paying some men, and receiving money. I had drank some ale and gin, but was not drunk - I had the sovereign in my hand when I went into the house - the girl was gone when I awoke; my trousers were not on when the property was taken.

GEORGE KING. I am shopman to Mr. Cotterel, a pawnbroker. On the 10th of June the prosecutor came to stop the duplicate of the watch, and about eight o'clock the prisoner came in with the duplicate. I asked where he got it - he said he bought it of a young man, whom he knew perfectly well. I asked if that was true - he then ran out; I followed him nearly half a mile, and brought him back.

WILLIAM TRODD . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took him into custody - I found this pen-knife on him, and 18s. 2d.

RICHARD SMITH. This is my knife.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-207

1552. EDWARD BOWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 200 yards of silk, value 17l. , the goods of Frederick Goodridge .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Francis and John Giles .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK GOODRIDGE. I am a mercer , and live in North Pavement, Bethnal-green . On the 3d of March I had two pieces of green and one of chocolate silk, from Messrs. Giles. I left them safe, up stairs, on my premises, about half-past eight o'clock. I returned at half-past nine and saw a light on the table on the ground floor - I had left a lodger at home - it was his light - I missed the property. On the Monday I went with the officer to the Three Cranes, public-house, where the officer found some silk in the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Is your lodger here? A. No.

SARAH GOODRIDGE . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I went out about eight o'clock, and came home with my husband about nine; the silk was then gone.

PHILIP PARISH . I am an officer. On the 3d of March I went to Goodridge's house, and found the silk cut out of the looms; a chisel lay there, but the door appeared to have been opened with keys.

THOMAS GOODING . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 5th of March I went to the Three Cranes public-house, Mile-end-road, which is kept by the prisoner - he and his wife were at dinner in the bar; I called him aside, and told him I had a warrant to search his house for stolen silk; he said he had no silk in the house, and I might search in welcome, but might he finish his dinner first - I said Yes; he went into the bar, but instead of finishing his dinner, whispered to his wife, and then said, "I am now at leisure to go any where with you; what part of the house will you go to first;" I said "Up-stairs, into your bed-room;" we went up - I found a chest of drawers locked; he said the key was down-stairs; he called for it - the servant handed it up, but I found no silk; I came to another chest of drawers which were locked; I asked for the key, and at that time he put a paper into my hand, which proved to be a 5l. note. I said, "I must look;" he then said, "You had better give me that back again;" we came down together - he called for the key of those drawers; I took the prosecutor up with me, and left the prisoner in charge of two other men below, but found nothing in the drawers; I came down, and sent the prisoner and two men to search the back premises - they staid some time - I went, and the prosecutor said, the prisoner was gone out at the gate, and the boy had let him out; I returned to the bar, and found a handkerchief, containing these silks, in a little side, dark place, like a child's bed- it laid on the bed-clothes; the prosecutor claimed it; the prisoner was never found till Thursday week, when he sent me a note, and came to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Of course you returned the 5l. note? A. No - I have kept it.

Q. Was it not, on your finding the tobacco, on which duty had not been paid, that he offered the note? A. I found a quantity of tobacco; his wife said the silk had been left an hour before, by a short young man; she did not hear what I had said to the prisoner; he has one female and two male servants.

MR. QUIN. Q. Were not two officers left below while you went up stairs? A. Yes - in the passage, to see that nobody went out

SARAH GOODRIDGE. I cannot swear to the silk - I really forget it.

FRANCIS GILES. I am a silk manufacturer . I know one piece of this silk; I only give out the raw silk - this is manufactured.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-208

1553. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 7 dresses, value 3l.; 1 scarf, value 10s.; 3 sheets, value 6s.; 3 shifts, value 6s.; 1 pelisse, value 10s.; 1 frock, value 2s.; 5 petticoats, value 8s.; 2 shawls, value 2l.; 3 yards of cloth, value 30s.; 1 table-cloth, value 10s.; 1 apron, value 3s., and 1 note-case, value 3s., the goods of Sarah Honeyman , her mistress ; and MARY WHITE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

SARAH HONEYMAN. I am single , and live in the Strand - Brown was my servant ; she left on the 30th of May, without notice - no wages were due to her. I missed all these articles after she left; I gave information, and she was taken; I rent two floors and a kitchen; I placed great confidence in her, and did not lock them up. I

know nothing of White, but she was taken with a silk gown of mine on.

LEWIS HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Strand. I have a shift, two gowns, a bed-gown, and other things, pawned at different times - I cannot say by whom.

JANET SULLIVAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Clare-street. I have a gown and a frock, a silk gown, a sheet and gown - some of them were pawned by Brown.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am shopman to Messrs. Townsend and Co., pawnbrokers. I have shift and gown, pawned by Brown.

WILLIAM CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and have a frock and apron; I do not know who pawned them.

JOSIAH SHERGOLD . I apprehended White in Turner's-court, Strand, last Wednesday - she showed me a number of duplicates in her room - she said they were her own; I thought the gown she had on was the prosecutrix's - she said Brown gave it to her.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am an officer. I went to Brown's lodging, and took her; I found five duplicates on her, one of which relates to this property - she told me where I should find eleven more duplicates, by which I traced this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN's Defence. This woman bid me pawn a gown - she then threatened to tell mistress if I did not give her more money - I then pawned the other things.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, believing her to have been seduced by White.

Confined Six Months .

WHITE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-209

1554. ELIZABETH BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th June , 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 shawl, value 9d. , the goods of Diana Harding , spinster .

ANN FREEMAN . I lodge in the first floor of the same house as Harding. On the 25th of June, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I heard somebody cough; I got up and found the street-door open; I shut it, and went up and saw the prisoner pass my door - I went in and shut my door, knowing her to be acquainted with Harding; I did not go to bed again, and at half-past three I went down to fill my kettle, and saw the prisoner put her hand out of the third floor room window, in which room nobody lives; I went up to my room again, and at half-past seven o'clock opened my window, and saw the prisoner going down the steps with a bundle, and soon after heard of these things being lost; I told the prosecutrix.

DIANA HARDING . I lodge in the second floor of this house. The prisoner is an acquaintance of my mother's - this property is all mine, and hung on a line in my room; I was in bed at the time in question; my mother awoke a little after seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner on the stairs; I do not know how she got in.

EDWARD HALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aldersgate-street. On the 25th of June the prisoner pawned this gown.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I was fetched and took the prisoner at the Golden Anchor public-house, with this shawl and apron on her; she threw this duplicate across the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. Her mother lent me the gown to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-210

1555. CATHERINE ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 cloth cape, value 1s.; 2 yards of net, value 10s.; 1 pelisse, value 5s.; 1 chest, value 10s.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 12 stockings, value 6s.; 1 hat, value 1s.; 1 bonnet, value 1s., and 1 half-handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of the Rev. Thomas Newcome .

ANN MARIA NEWCOME . I am the daughter of the Rev. Thomas Newcome, who lives in Hertfordshire. The prisoner came into his service in December; she was going to leave on the 5th of July - I missed property, and on examining her box, I found a piece of lace and a shawl of mine; she said she had bought them in the neighbourhood; she left, and I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JAMES EVANS . I apprehended the prisoner last Thursday at her lodging, at No. 17, Market-street, Shadwell - I was told she was not within; it was her who answered me - I called in Miss Newcome, who knew her, and I took her; she was washing, and had this net wet in her hands; I found all this property there, except the box.

MISS NEWCOME. None of the property in the indictment is found, except the net; these other things are of no value - we give them away to poor people.

Prisoner's Defence. I once found Mr. Newcome's purse, with eighty or a hundred sovereigns in it, and took it to him - these things are of no value - they were in my box when I left her house.

THE REV. THOMAS NEWCOME. I have no recollection of her bringing me a purse with any money in, but it is not impossible; but I think there could not be so much in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-211

1556. GEORGE RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 gown, value 1s.; 1 dress, value 3s.; 1 coat, value 6d.; two cruets, value 2d., and a pot, value 4d. , the goods of James Edward Allshorn .

WILLIAM FUDGE . I am a patrol. On the 11th of July, about half-past four o'clock, I saw the prisoner and two others in Hyde-park - they separated; I took the prisoner, and found these things in his apron - he said he found them under a tree, but could not shew me the tree.

GEORGE ODDY . I was in company with Fudge.

JAMES EDWARD ALLSHAW. I am a school-master . I have a window looking into the Park; I saw this property safe at one o'clock, on the 11th of July, and missed it in the afternoon - I found the window open.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it under a tree.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-212

1557. THOMAS THOMAS and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 6lbs. of soap, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Reece .

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was at the corner of Charles-street City-road , at half-past nine o'clock, on the 12th of July, and saw the two prisoners

and two other boys, near Mr. Reece's shop; the other two went to the shop two or three times, and came back; I saw the prisoners immediately run away - I and Levisen secured the prisoners; Thomas had a cake of soap under his jacket; I am sure they were all in company, and could see what the others did.

JOSEPH REECE. I am a tallow-chandler , and believe this soap to be mine; I did not see the robbery committed.

ABRAHAM LEVISON . I was with Keys - his statement is correct.

THOMAS' Defence. I picked this soap up, and did not know the owner.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-213

1558. SAMUEL CHURCH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, 2 sixpences, and the sum of 1s. 81/2d. in copper monies, the monies of Jeremiah Sullivan , from his person .

JEREMIAH SULLIVAN. I am a porter . On Saturday, the 8th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I went into a public-house - I had 1l. 4s. of my wages - I was quite in liquor, and lost my money; I cannot say whether I saw the prisoner.

MICHAEL HARROGAN . I am a watchman. About three o'clock in the morning of the 8th of July, I saw the prisoner with the prosecutor, who was very much in liquor; I went down the street, and saw the prosecutor down on his back, and the prisoner kneeling on him; I saw him take the money out of his trousers pocket, and put it into his own waistcoat pocket - I saw him do it three different times; he then got up and ran towards me - I seized him- he tried hard to get from me, but I held him, and found the money in his pocket; there were two half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences, and 1s. 8d. in copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I received a sovereign from Mr. White, which I changed; I saw the prosecutor laying tipsy in the street, and the watchman poking him about with a stick; I assisted him up - he said he lived in Wild-street - I took him there, and he said he lived in Gate-street - I took him there, and again into Wild-street - he fell down; I thought I could leave him, when the watchman stopped me; the prosecutor was also taken to the watch-house; he said in the morning that he did not know what money he had.

JEREMIAH SULLIVAN. I had received a sovereign, and changed it at the public-house. I know nothing of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-214

1559. CHARLOTTE SMITH and MARY ANN NICHOLSON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 11 yards of ribbon, value 9s. , the goods of Jonathan Orme .

ROBERT ORME . I am the son of Jonathan Orme, a hosier , of Little Russel-street, Covent-garden . The prisoners came to the shop together, at half-past nine o'clock in the evening of the 13th of July, and inquired for broad ribbons, which was shown them - they then asked for narrow ones, and paid 1s. and a farthing, and wanted 6d. change; while the young lady was gone for a sixpence, I saw Nicholson take a broad ribbon, and hand it to Smith, who kept it till they got out, and then returned it to her; I followed, and told them they had got a piece of ribbon - she then dropped it - I picked it up.

SMITH's Defence. I never saw it.

NICHOLSON's Defence. Whether it rolled off the counter I cannot say.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

NICHOLSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-215

1560. FREDERICK SPELLERS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 jacket, value 12s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of William Smith .

LYDIA SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith - we live up two pair of stairs, at No. 13, Henry-street, Hampstead-road . My child's jacket, waistcoat, and trousers, were on a chair in my room - I left my room for about ten minutes, and when I returned, they were gone, but I did not miss them till the next morning; I knew the prisoner, but had never given him permission to take my things.

ELIZABETH GRIBBLE . I keep this house. On Sunday, the 10th of June, I was standing at my door with my mother, when the prisoner passed by me and went up-stairs; he came down again with the clothes under his arm; I saw the sleeve of the jacket quite distinctly; the next morning I heard the things had been stolen; I did not stop him, because I had no suspicion of him; he had been there on the Friday night.

ANN RICHARDSON . I lodge in this house. I was standing at the door with Mrs. Gribble, and saw a man going out with the child's dress; I knew the jacket, but I cannot say that it was the prisoner.

THOMAS FRAMPTON . I was sent for, and took up the prisoner, but found nothing on him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-216

1561. JOHN HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 1 pair of trousers, value 15s. , the goods of William Cecil .

WILLIAM CECIL. I live in Austin-place - the prisoner lived opposite. On the 3d of July I lost my trousers from my drawers; the key was left in my door.

MARY KEYTE . I live in this house. I heard the prisoner on the stairs between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I knew his voice, and heard him ask the gentleman below to give him a light; he had no business in the house - I heard him go up to Cecil's door, to get the light - I believe he was out of work.

SAMUEL SHERWOOD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. John-street-road. On the 3d of July these trousers were pawned in the name of Hunter, by a young man; I cannot positively swear to the prisoner.

JOHN DAVIES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and locked him up for two or three hours; I said to him, "How do you like that place?" he said,"Not at all, and it is very hard I should be here for a thing I did not do;" I said, "Well, you know who did do it;" he then said, "My brother took them, and pawned them;" his brother, who was about nine years old, said the prisoner took them, and he pawned them; the Magistrate discharged the brother; the signature to this exa

mination is signed by the prisoner. (Read.) "The prisoner says, "I stole the trousers, and went myself and pawned them."'(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-217

1562. HENRY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 10 keys, value 10s. , the goods of the Reverend William Valentine , clerk , and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Hirst .

WILLIAM HIRST. I am employed at the London Hospital , and had the care of the gate. On the 7th of July, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I got up to let in a person who had met with an accident, and these keys were taken from inside the gate.

RICHARD MANNING . I was on duty at the watch-house and saw the prisoner pass me - I said, "Where are you going?" he said home, and that he had come from Fairlop - I took hold of him, and found these keys on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-218

1563. WILLIAM BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 40lbs. of hemp, value 15s. , the goods of William Marns .

HENRY BALL . On the 12th of July I saw the prisoner and another in Strutton-fields: they got over to me, and asked what I was about - I said I was minding some cows - they left me, and on turning round I saw one on the others back, getting over into Mr. Marns' premises.

ROBERT DOW . On the 12th of July a man told me two men were robbing Marns' premises; I went up to two men in the fields, and took hold of the other, who had a bag of hemp - he got away, and I seized the prisoner, who is the other.

WILLIAM MARNS. I am a rope-maker . I missed a quantity of hemp, and believe this to be mine. The prisoner was formerly in my employ, and knew my premises; they broke in at the side of the warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I was laying in the field, and saw this bag on the ground - I took it up - Dow came and said, "Well - we will take this one."

ROBERT DOW. I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-219

1564. GEORGE CROSBY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 3 boxes, value 6d.; 2 sovereigns, 6 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the property of Joseph Carr , from his person .

JOSEPH CARR. I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 13th of July I received 6l. 0s. 2d. - I paid away 3l. odd, and had two sovereigns in my purse, and 7s. or 8s. in my tobacco-box - it was was taken out of my right-hand pocket as I went up Jews'-row - I saw it taken out.

SIMON FRAZER . I am a carpenter. On the 13th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prosecutor laying down on the pavement, and the prisoner close to him - I saw him put his hand into his pocket; he said,"He has not got any money" - he pulled a bit of rag out of his pocket - he felt again, and pulled out some money and a tobacco-box, emptied the silver out of the box, and counted the money - there was 2l. 8s. in all - he did it openly, while I and another were looking at him. I said,"You must take care of the man and his money" - he went and got him a lodging. I told him to deliver the money up at the house - he refused, and I gave him in charge. The prosecutor had been drinking.

JOSEPH POYNTON . I saw the prosecutor on the ground. Frazer told the prisoner to take care of him - he said,"He has got no money now;" he said he had taken 2l. 8s. from him.

RICHARD MAYBANK . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and denied having any money at all at first, but when I was going to enter the charge he gave me two sovereigns and some silver.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am assistant watch-house-keeper; the prisoner at first denied having the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I had not robbed the man; I gave up the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-220

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1565. JOSEPH DONALD was indicted for killing and slaying James Connolly .

BENJAMIN COLLINS BRODIE a surgeon, of St. George's Hospital, having examined the deceased, was unable to state the cause of his death, and conceived the injury not to have occasioned it. The other witnesses were not examined.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-221

First London Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1566. MARY MINCHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 2 pairs of stockings, value 5s., the goods of John Woolmer , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am shopman to John Woolmer, a haberdasher , of Barbican . On the 10th of July a lady pointed the prisoner out in the shop; I went to her as she was moving towards the door, and asked what she wanted - she said some muslin; I took hold of her, and asked what she had got; she drew this paper of stockings from under her shawl.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH ORTON . I am an officer, and received her in charge. I only found a few halfpence on her; I find she is a very industrious woman. I found a piece of cotton on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I had bought a bit of cotton - this parcel fell from the counter - I took them up, and gave them to the shopman; he said, "Go about your business."

WM. EDWARDS. I did not tell her to go - she might have bought some cotton.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270712-222

1567. WILLIAM TAPP was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of George Russell and Edward Medgett , on the night of the 10th of June , and stealing 6 pairs of silk stockings, value 42s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 4s.; 3 shillings, and 24 pence, their property .

SECOND COUNT, calling it the dwelling-house of George Russell only.

EDWARD MEDGETT. I am in partnership with George Russell and three others - we live at No. 11, Maiden-lane, Wood-street ; Mr. Russell lives there; I sleep there in his absence. The prisoner was first in our service as porter, and then as warehouseman - he left in September. - Early in the morning of the 10th of June Newman came to my door, and said there were thieves in the warehouse - I got up, and called the watchman - I went down, and unlocked the warehouse door. I got a candle, and Newman pointed out a broken window, which has no shutter; a hand could be put through the aperture, and unfasten the screw, which keeps the sashes together; there was no line to it, and when that was out the top sash falls; we looked further, and found the prisoner concealed between some loose paper and the wall - I gave him in charge, and saw him searched at the watch-house; some money was found on him, which I cannot swear to - we found a paper of six pairs of silk stockings in a room, where some carpenters had been at work - he must have passed the door of that room to get to where he was. I believe them to be mine, but have no mark on them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was this? A. About three o'clock in the morning - it was day-break.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I am porter to the prosecutors. I was awoke by the window on the leads of the warehouse breaking - I called Mr. Medgett - his account is correct.

EDWARD PRITCHETT . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. Newman called me; I examined, about nine o'clock that morning, I found the lock of the silver drawer broken, and 3s. taken - I had seen it safe the night before, and about 3s. in copper was gone.

RICHARD McDONALD . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner to the watch-house - he knocked me down at the end of Warwick-lane, but I secured him, and took him to the watch-house.

HOWELL GODDARD . I searched the prisoner, and found on him 6s. 6d. in silver, and 3s. 31/2d. in copper; I asked how he came to get into this place - he said he was locked out, and went there to sleep with the young man.

MR. MEDGETT. I found the stockings about an hour after the prisoner was gone - they are kept in the warehouse; we do not miss any.

Prisoner's Defence. I was found there, but I did not steal the articles.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-223

1568. RICHARD THEOBALD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 half-crown, and 6 farthings, the property of John Harvey , his master .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WATTS . I am cashier of Mr. John Harvey, of Ludgate-hill , haberdasher ; ours is a house of great business, and persons often drop money. On the 29th of June, I dropped on the floor a half-crown and a shilling, both marked, and I placed one hundred marked farthings in a bowl; the prisoner is our porter - he brought the shilling next morning to Manlove, the other cashier; and in about two hours I sent for an officer, as the half-crown and six farthings were gone. I saw them found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it usual to throw money about your floor? A. It is impossible to prevent money falling sometimes - it is usual to bring me what money is found.

Q. If you or your master are not there, would it not be proper to keep it till you came? A. No; for there are three cashiers - Colson is the principal one; I cannot say whether he was in the shop. It could not belong to customers, because it was in the desk-rail, on the floor; only the cashier sits in that desk - the prisoner sweeps it out in the morning; we have had no other prosecution of this kind - the bowl was under the desk. I believe the prisoner has been there four years; he has been searched once before - he said that he found the shilling under the desk; he has returned money before. I put it there to see whether he would take it.

Q. You left it there to try how many temptations his honesty would resist? A. Yes.

MR. QUIN. Q. Where was the bowl of farthings? A. About three-quarters of a yard from the floor, under the desk. I counted the farthings the last thing at night, and could not have dropped them.

- MANLOVE , I am in Mr. Harvey's service. On the 29th of June the prisoner returned me a shilling.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a witness on the part of the prosecution? A. Yes; when I was subpoenaed first the prisoner's master did not say I should not attend - Mr. Cook, the foreman, wanted to know whether it was really necessary for me to attend. The prisoner said he found the shilling in the desk, when he swept it out.

JAMES SNOW . I am an officer. I was sent for; the prisoner was in the counting-house - Mr. Harvey desired me to search him, and I found this half-crown and six farthings on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he intended to go and clean his windows, and return the money when he had done? A. I think that was his very answer.

JOHN WATTS . This is the marked half-crown and the farthings.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time do you take your seat at the desk? A. About half-past nine o'clock; but that morning I came down about eight o'clock - the prisoner was taken about ten.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-224

1569. CORNELIUS GLANFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Cattley , from his person .

HENRY CATTLEY. On the 21st of June, I was in an alley leading into Fenchurch-street , and felt my handkerchief going from me. I turned round and saw the prisoner turning away from me - I took hold of him, and at that moment saw it drop, apparently from him; another boy was in front of me, but the prisoner behind - it was a narrow alley; there seemed to be nobody else from whom it could fall - the alley is dark. I saw nobody else; the prisoner said he did not take it, and the boy in front also said so.

CHARLES THOROUGHGOOD . I am an officer; and received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. There were several other boys there - I saw some of them fumbling at his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-225

1570. JOHN MASON was indicted for stealing, on the

19th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a certain person unknown .

WILLIAM LAMBERT . On the 19th of June, about one o'clock at noon, I was at a friend's house, at the corner of Cheapside , and saw the prisoner and two others following a gentleman - the prisoner was in the middle of them; I saw him raise the flap of the gentleman's coat, and take a yellow handkerchief from his pocket. I do not know who the gentleman was; the prisoner crossed and went down Paternoster-row; I followed, and took this handkerchief from him. I am certain of his person.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you? A. In a shop nearly opposite to you.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been on an errand when the gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-226

1571. AMBROSE MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 20s.; 2 gold rings, value 20s.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 snuff-box, value 6d.; 1 half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, and 1 shilling, the property of Mary Ann Wilson , from her person .

MARY ANN WILSON. On the 7th of July, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was at the Hope public-house, Minories , and fell asleep. I was awoke about half-past ten; and in about a quarter of an hour missed these things - the ring was taken off my finger, and the ear-rings from my ears. I have not found them - I thought I heard my keys in the prisoner's pocket - they had been in my purse; a snuff-box was found on him, which I think is mine - I believe it was in my bosom, but forget - my keys were found down an area.

Q. You thought you heard them in his pocket? A. I think so - the prisoner and another man were in the house before I fell asleep - I believe one of them threw the keys down an area.

Q. Did you see him throw them down? A. I did.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am an officer. I heard a noise in George-street, Minories - I found a crowd round the prisoner and prosecutrix; she said she had been robbed - and that he had taken her keys, and dropped them down an area. I took them to the watch-house, and on the prisoner found this snuff-box, two half-crowns, a sixpence, and a half-penny.

JOHN BEAZLEY . I found this purse in George-street, by the curb stone, and the keys in an area.

GODFREY ELIAS . I am a constable, and have two keys, which were given me from the area.

SARAH WHEELER . I keep the Hope public-house - the prisoner and Wilson came in with another man, about half-past ten o'clock, and had some rum and water - I heard a tumbler break, and demanded payment; one of the men said he would go and get one - he returned, said he could not get one, and would pay me for it. Wilson was laying her head on the table; it was fair time, and thought she was tired; I awoke her - she went out, and I heard a violent screaming in George-street. I was fetched to the watch-house - I had not observed any ear-rings in her ears. I cannot say whether she was intoxicated.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he had got into the prosecutrix's company on the Ilford coach - that she was much intoxicated, and throwing her things about, and conducting herself very indecently - that she gave him the snuff-box; and as he was helping her home, she complained of being robbed, when the other man ran away.

J. TAYLOR . She appeared to have been drinking.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-227

1572. HENRY CARPENTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of George Henry , from his person .

GEORGE HENRY. On the 6th of June I was on Holborn-hill , and was called to by Murray. I then missed my handkerchief from my pocket - I found the prisoner in his custody, with it.

BENJAMIN MURRAY . I am a steel-worker. On the 6th of June, the prisoner and another lad passed by me - the prisoner walked close behind Mr. Henry; his companion took the handkerchief from him, and gave it to the prisoner, who I secured with it; (the other ran away.) It was twisted round his hand; I took him to the prosecutor, who claimed it.

Prisoner. Q. You took it off the pavement? A. No: it was in his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270712-228

1573. JOSEPH HAWKINS , JAMES PRIOR , and EVAN BALLARD , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of a person unknown , from his person .

BENJAMIN MURRAY . On the 30th of June, about eleven o'clock, I was at the corner of Fleet-market, and saw the three prisoners going up Skinner-street; they turned to the right, round St. Paul's Church-yard, to Ludgate-hill - I there saw Prior take a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket; the Glass-blower's were passing - the mob was so great I could not follow the gentleman; the prisoners went on to the end of Fleet-market - I went and informed an officer; who came - he and I looked for them, and saw them at the corner of Bouverie-street, and took them - they were close together when the handkerchief was taken - I could see what Prior did; I did not know the gentleman - Hawkins had his hand on the shoulders of the other boys.

JOHN GIRTON . I am a constable. Murray fetched me. I took Ballard, he was in company with the other two - Murray took Prior; several other boys were about, but not in their company.

THOMAS GREEN . I took Hawkins.

HAWKINS' Defence. I had leave to go and see the Glass-blowers - I met the other prisoners by Fleet-market, and walked with them; I was parting with them, when I was taken. PRIOR - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

HAWKINS - NOT GUILTY .

BALLARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-229

1574. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 flannel waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Daniel Donoghoe .

DANIEL DONOGHOE. On the 7th of July I was at work in St. Bartholomew-church, Royal Exchange , and missed

my flannel waistcoat off a bench - I found the prisoner in Tooley-street, on the 13th, with it on - I charged him with stealing it - he said he was sorry for it.

WILLIAM MOORE . I took him in charge - I find he bears an excellent character.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the church for some boards, and took it by mistake, for one I had lost.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-230

1575. WILLIAM DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., 1 knife, value 6d., and 1 comb, value 3d., the goods of Joseph Randall , from his person .

JOSEPH RANDALL. On the 14th of June, about a quarter past 3 o'clock in the afternoon, I was near St. Paul's Cathedral . White, the officer, called to me, and asked if I had lost any thing. I felt, and missed my handkerchief, knife, and comb, from my coat pockets - they were immediately produced, and I was certain of them all - they are not here. I examined them, and have no doubt of them.

Prisoner. The handkerchief is not his; if he would look at it, he would see that it is darned, and burnt.

THOMAS WHITE . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner and two others, and watched them some time - I saw the others hustling round Mr. Randall. I went up, and asked if he had been robbed; he said Yes - I did not see them take any thing from him - the prisoner was in their company - Cowley went up, and I apprehended all three. Cowley took the hat off the prisoner's head and found a handkerchief, which the prosecutor claimed. I took the prisoner to the Compter, and in his waistcoat pocket I found the knife and comb - he said nothing about the burn and darn in the handkerchief till after he had seen it.

JOHN COWLEY . White brought the men to the gate of St. Paul's - I took off the prisoner's hat, and found the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. The comb and knife were taken from another man.

THOMAS WHITE . No; they were taken from him.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-231

1576. JOHN BRADSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 jacket, value 5s., and 1 pocket-book, value 1d. , the goods of George Mason .

JOHN TAYLOR . On the 14th of July I saw Mason with a waggon at Messrs. Roebuck and Co's. warehouse, St. Mary-at-Hill - I saw the prisoner go in front and take this jacket out - I gave an alarm, and the porter took him.

GEORGE MASON. My jacket was in the waggon, and the pocket-book in the pocket - Taylor alarmed me, I pursued, and saw the prisoner taken, with the jacket in his possession.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270712-232

1577. JOHN MASON and WILLIAM DARLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Stephens , from his person .

JOHN STEPHENS. On the 14th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the forenoon, I was in Fleet-street - the officer called me. I felt, and my handkerchief, which was safe five minutes before, was gone - he produced it; I know nothing of the prisoners.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am a constable. On Saturday last I saw the prisoners going down Fleet-street - I followed, and then I saw Darley take a handkerchief from Mr. Stephen's pocket - Mason was so near he must have seen this; Darley dropped it - I secured him, and picked it up. - A gentleman secured Mason. They were in conversation together.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MASON'S Defence. I was going home to Water-lane.

DARLEY'S Defence. I do not know the other prisoner.

MASON - GUILTY Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

DARLEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgment Respited.

Both recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, on account of their youth.

Reference Number: t18270712-233

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JULY 17.

First London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1578. PATRICK MANSFIELD and THOMAS PEAUGH, alias PUGH , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Charles Leake , from his person .

CHARLES LEAKE. I live at Witney, in Oxfordshire. On the 8th of June, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was walking up Holborn-hill , opposite St. Andrew's-church; I had put my handkerchief into my pocket carefully, and thrust it down. In the course of a minute or two a gentleman passed me, and said, "I think you have lost your handkerchief;" I felt, and it was gone. Immediately after the patrol came up, and said, "I have got your handkerchief, and the person who took it." I saw him with Mansfield, in custody.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . On the 8th of June I was going down Holborn-hill with a gentleman, and saw the two prisoners following the prosecutor - Mansfield made an attempt at the bottom of the hill, but the gentleman took his handkerchief out, and used it. I then went on the opposite side of the hill, and saw them go up to the prosecutor with another person - the other two covered Mansfield while he took the handkerchief out of the pocket, and ran down the hill with it - I pursued, and took him with it in his hand; and as we were taking him to the compter I saw Peaugh, and secured him. I knew them both before.

Prisoner PEAUGH. Q. Will you swear I was with the other boy? A. Yes, you were.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MANSFIELD'S Defence. I stood at the end of Field-lane; two boys passed me, and dropped this handkerchief - I took it up, and the man took me.

PEAUGH'S Defence. In going up Skinner-street a man came and took me.

MANSFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 13.

PEAUGH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-234

1579. LAURENCE SHEVLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 15 yards of silk, value 50s., and 4 pieces of handkerchiefs, containing 7 in each, value 4l. , the goods of John Smyth .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SMYTH. I live in Love-lane, Aldermanbury , and am a general warehouseman . The prisoner is a hawker - he and several others kept their boxes at my warehouse. On the 29th of June, in consequence of suspicion, I went with the officer to search his lodging, and found some property of mine - he was in custody on another charge, before it was found; I saw he had a good deal of money, and asked if he had bought any other goods - he said he wished he might not go out of my warehouse alive if he had bought any goods of any person besides me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did you find? A. Several pieces of silk handkerchiefs - I swore to one particular piece, to the best of my belief - here it is; I swear to it as having been in my house, and I never sold it to him; I do not think I have had six pieces of this pattern for the last year, but will not swear that; I bought it at the East India sale - there may be more of the pattern - I know it by it being a miss-print.

COURT. Q. Had your attention been directed to it before you found it at his lodging? A. Yes; on account of the miss-print; I had not missed it; they are often miss-printed; the others correspond with goods in my warehouse - they are worth 5l. together.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I found these silks in the prisoner's pack; and after I apprehended him I found a 70l. Bank post bill on him; I went to search his lodging, and on my return told him I had found some silks in his pack, which Mr. Smyth had claimed; he said they were not Smyth's - I asked if he had any bill of them; he said No - that he bought his goods at the best market he could, and was not going to give Mr. Smyth 24s. for handkerchiefs, when he could buy them for a guinea, and said, "Well, at any rate, they cannot swear to them;" Mr. Smyth and his boy both identified this piece.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he swear to this piece? A. He said he believed they were all his, but this one had been a long time in his counting-house, because it was miss-printed; the prisoner was committed on another charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I travel the country, and make exchange of goods with other hawkers, and buy them in any part - I can neither read nor write.

MR. SMYTH. I have fourteen or fifteen pieces of coarse cloth of his now in my warehouse, and have a small claim on him for carriage - I offered to give it up.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270712-235

1580. JOHN CHURCHMAN and RICHARD HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 500lbs. of lead, value 4l., belonging to Alexander Lamb , and fixed to a building of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Goodson , and fixed to a building of his.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I met the prisoners on the 30th of June, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, in Princes-street, Bank ; they had a truck, and stopped at the door of Mr. Lamb; in a few minutes I went up and saw a piece of lead in the truck, and Churchman was bringing out another piece of lead, and put it into the truck - Harris was by him; I looked at the house, and said to Churchman, "What, are you repairing here?" he said Yes; I said "Who employed you?" he said "Mr. Banner, of Fore-street" - I walked round, and saw no name on the truck; I then said, "Why, you have broken the door open"- he said "No, I have a key;" there was a key in the door - he turned it backwards and forwards, but I saw the door had been broken, and have brought a piece of it here - Churchman then said, "We will go to Mr. Banner's;" I said, "No, I'll go to the Mansion-house;" I took hold of Harris, Churchman walked on pretty quick, and then ran - I called out, and he was taken - I got a man to drag the truck - I went to the house, and saw lead had been cut from the sky-light - it was the same sort as this - there was about 5 cwt. in the passage, ready to be carried off.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were not people living in the house? A. No; I did not compare the lead.

FRANCIS GIFFORD BANNER . On the Monday after the 30th of June, I saw, in the Times newspaper, an account of this robbery, and that the men had said they were employed by me; I went to the Mansion-house, and saw the prisoners - I had not employed them - I did not go to Mr. Lamb's house.

JOHN SIMMONS . I was employed to let or sell this house, and had the key - I am an auctioneer - it belongs to Mr. Alexander Lamb - Mr. Goodson is a friend of his, who had been at the house - I know nothing of the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Has the house been repaired? A. No.

CHURCHMAN'S Defence. I was at home; Harris came and asked if I had any thing to do; I said No; he said,"We will walk into the City, and see if we can get any thing," and at Aldgate a gentleman crossed the road and asked if we wanted a job; I said Yes - he asked if we could get a truck; he said if we met him with it, he would take us to a house to move some lead to Mr. Banner's - we went to Mr. Collins', who told us where we could get a truck - we went and met the same person, and followed him to the house; he unlocked the door, told us to take the lead to Mr. Banner's, and he would meet us there - we had no knife at all.

JOHN COLLINS . I am a wheel-wright, and live in Little Turner-street, Commercial-road. I have known both the prisoners sometime; they came to me on the 30th of June, and asked if I had a truck - they said they had a job to do for a gentleman in the City, and if they did not get a truck he would get somebody else - I recommended them to Mr. Dale, a neighbour, and passed my word for a truck for them - I had lent them one two or three times - they did not tell me where they were to take it.

CHURCHMAN - GUILTY . Aged 36.

HARRIS - GUILTY Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-236

1581 ALICE ALLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 sheet, value 3s., and 1 quilt, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Caberne , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS CABERNE. I live in Grub-street, Cripplegate . The prisoner and her husband hired my second floor room, at 4s. a week, furnished, for four or five months, and paid

the rent regularly. On the 5th of June I was told the prisoner was intoxicated - I went up, and missed the sheet and quilt - she was there, drunk; her husband and two or three others were there. I sent for an officer, who found two duplicates on the table.

JAMES VINT . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner - her daughter put these duplicates on the table- she is about seventeen years old.

THOMAS EMBERSON . I live with Mr. Russell, a pawnbroker, of Fore-street. I have a quilt, pawned in the name of Ann Allison - I cannot tell who by.

SARAH GILLETT . My husband is a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, which I took in pawn from the prisoner - I am sure of her person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 57.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-237

1582. SUSAN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 1 Leghorn bonnet, value 30s., the goods of Charles Stewart , from the person of Isabella, his wife .

ISABELLA STEWART . I am the wife of Charles Stewart, who is a coachman . On the 8th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I was coming home, over London-bridge , with a bundle in one hand and an umbrella in the other; my bonnet strings were loose, and I pinned it to my cap. The prisoner came behind, and snatched it off my head - I called Stop thief! and she was taken in my sight.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I was on London-bridge, and met the prisoner - I saw her take the prosecutrix's bonnet off, and took hold of her - she directly threw it over into the water.

SAMUEL HOLLOWAY . I am a watchman, and was on the bridge - I ran over, and took the prisoner. I saw her throw the bonnet over the bridge.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18270712-238

1583. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 piece of drugget, value 5l. 8s. , the goods of John Scott and Michael Ellis .

ABRAHAM WESTON . I am a clerk, and live in Cateaton-street , opposite to the prosecutors. On the 10th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner go into their warehouse, and come out - he appeared to make a signal to somebody - another person then went up, and joined him; the other person went in, and brought out this drugget - the prisoner stood opposite; I ran out, and saw the other drop the drugget at the door.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where were you? A. At my desk. I am certain of his person.

JOHN ELLIS . I live with John Scott and Michael Ellis. I heard an alarm, ran out, and this drugget was dropped at the door; Weston said, "That is one of them," and I took the prisoner.

MICHAEL ELLIS. I was in the counting-house, and sent my brother out. This drugget had been on a pile, about two yards from the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270712-239

1584. ABRAHAM ISAACS , DAVID MOSES , and SAMUEL BARNETT were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 pocket-book, value 1s., the goods of Alfred Benjamin Elkin , from his person .

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 2d of May, between four and five o'clock, I and Fowler were in Whitechapel , and saw the prisoners near the church, in company; Mr. Elkin was with another young gentleman and Mr. Levy - I watched the prisoners as far as Aldgate church, following the prosecutor; when they got near Aldgate church they all closed upon him - I said to Fowler, "They have done it;" and as I ran across the road I saw Moses with the pocket-book in his hand, putting it under his coat - when he saw me he lifted up his coat and let it fall; I picked it up, secured him, and dragged him after the prosecutor. Fowler secured another, and called Stop thief! the other was then taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see Barnett touch the prosecutor? A. No.

JAMES FOWLER . I was with Keys, and saw the three prisoners walking behind the prosecutor; they made several attempts - we followed them, and concealed our red waistcoats as well as we could; just opposite Aldgate church Barnett went on, then turned, and met the prosecutor; the other two were just behind - they closed altogether, and I saw them hustle Mr. Elkin; I saw Moses put his coat up, and then put something into his own breast - we both ran across the road, and Moses dropped the pocket-book, which Keys took up, and secured him: I took Barnett, and called Stop thief! after Isaacs, who was taken in a few minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it true that Barnett did not touch the prosecutor? A. I saw him touch him - he closed upon him; my brother officer was with me, but might not see it.

ALFRED BENJAMIN ELKIN. I was near Aldgate church, and had a pocket-book in my left side pocket; I did not observe any of the prisoners near me. The officers produced my book; I did not know it was taken.

WILLIAM RILEY. I was at Aldgate, heard a cry of Stop thief! and took Isaacs.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ISAACS' Defence. I was coming from the Borough, and Riley took me.

MOSES' Defence. There was a mob - I got off the pavement, and the officer took hold of me and said,"Drop it;" I said, "What do you mean?" he took this book up.

BARNETT'S Defence. I turned to look at the clock, and he took hold of me.

ISAACS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MOSES - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-240

1585. WILLIAM TELFORD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mark Anthony Orme (Hester, his wife, and another person being therein), on the 20th of June , and stealing 1 tin canister, value 4d., and 4ozs. weight of snuff, value 2s., his property .

MARK ANTHONY ORME. I live in Houndsditch , and rent the house - I am a tobacconist . On the 20th of June, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another lad come to my window - the prisoner raised the glass with some instrument, and left for a few minutes, then returned, and loosened the glass;

he took it out, laid it down, and went away - they returned in three or four minutes, and took a canister of snuff out. I ran over the way, and took the prisoner; he threw the canister over the church-yard rails; I believe there was a flaw in the pane before; there was a small crack in it, but no cut. My wife, Hester, and a female servant were at home. The snuff is sold for 2s.

JOHN FORRESTER . I received the prisoner in charge, and took this knife from him, with some putty on the point.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES TAYLOR . I found the canister of snuff in the church-yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to run behind a coach, heard a cry of Stop thief! stopped, and was taken.

GUILTY. Aged 14. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270712-241

1586. JAMES ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , 6 yards of striped valentia, value 1l. 16s. , the goods of Thomas Russell and others.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270712-242

1587. SOLOMON JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 3 bracelets, value 2l., and 3 pairs of ear-rings, value 10s. , the goods of George Bower and another, his partner.

THOMAS WOODRUFF . I am servant to George Bower and Son, who are Birmingham warehousemen , and live in Thavies-inn, Holborn . On the 13th of July, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner came and asked to look at some goods; another young man attended to him - I was present - he showed him several articles and ear-rings among them; I saw him put some along side on the counter - his hat laid by the side, near them. I saw him take his handkerchief from his hat, put it over the goods on the counter, and put them into his hat - he then put it on his head; he then went to the end of the counter, and looked out three pairs of bracelets from a lot - he put them on the counter, took off his hat, and covered them with his handkerchief, put them on his head, and put it on again - I told master, who had such confidence him he would not believe it; he called him into the back warehouse, and said, "Jacobs, you have some goods which are not booked;" I said, "Where are the bracelets you had in your hat?" he said, "What bracelets? I have none." I took his hat off, and found three pairs of bracelets and three pairs of ear-rings in it.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. He has dealt some time with you? A. Yes; eight years, to my knowledge; he has not bought on credit since he failed; we considered him an excellent character - master was in the back warehouse; I never quarrelled with the prisoner, and never said so - I never disagreed with him.

BENJAMIN DAVIS . I am shopman to the prosecutors; the prisoner came and inquired for goods; I took out two papers of bracelets - he looked at some, but did not decide; he asked if we had any thing else; I showed him some chains, rings, and ear-rings; I said, "There is a small balance on the ledger, perhaps you will settle it now;" he said he would; and while I was gone for the ledger, I believe this took place.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the amount? A. 2l. 13s. 6d.; it was for things we had regilt for him; his hat was about half a yard from me, laying on its side; I did not see him wipe his face.

GEORGE BOWER, JUN. I am in partnership with my father. I called the prisoner into the warehouse, and said,"Jacobs, you have got some goods not booked." He made no answer, but laughed. My man said, "I want those bracelets and ear-rings" - he took off his hat, and to my astonishment, turned the bracelets and ear-rings out - he begged forgiveness.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Was his handkerchief in his hat? A I believe so; it was a blue one - It is impossible they could have stuck to the handkerchief, they were too heavy - he is a singular man altogether. We have dealt with him to a large amount.

The prisoner, in very broken English, made a long defence; which, as far as could be understood, went to state that he had selected these goods; and, as he usually did, put them into his hat, intending to buy them; he also put in a written paper, stating that they were in his hat without his knowledge. He received a very good character.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270712-243

1588. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 canvass wrapper, value 1s., and 131 yards of calico, value 4l. 19s. 3d. the goods of Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington .

ISAAC BOWDEN . I am clerk to Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington, of the Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street . On the 14th of July I saw the prisoner taking this truss out of our yard - he was a stranger, and had no right there.

JOHN ANGEL . I am a clerk. I had entered these goods, to go to Farnham, by the prosecutors' waggon - there are one hundred and thirty-one yards of calico in the wrapper.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I took the prisoner into custody.

The prisoner pleaded great distress, and severe indisposition. GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .


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