Old Bailey Proceedings, 31st May 1827.
Reference Number: 18270531
Reference Number: f18270531-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ANTHONY BROWN , MAYOR.

FIFTH SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 31st of MAY, 1827, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1827.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ANTHONY BROWN , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; John Key, Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Benj. Stanley ,

Fred. Sansum ,

Sam. Kirkpatric ,

John Simons ,

Henry Lec ,

Wm. Davidson ,

Thomas Hislop ,

Robert Graham ,

Wm. Gorton ,

Wm. Smith ,

Charles Godwin ,

Thomas Cruise .

Second

Henry Huddy ,

Thomas Johnson ,

Joseph Poulden ,

Alex. Cunning ,

John F. Isling ,

Jonathan Kilton ,

Thomas Watson ,

Henry Hooper ,

John Marsh ,

John Mills ,

Benjamin Orton ,

Saml. B. Rankin .

Third

Jph. Dandridge ,

Thomas Archard ,

John Barling ,

James Edwards ,

Francis Barker ,

James Williams ,

John England ,

James Smith ,

Nathaniel Cook ,

John Newson ,

John Watson ,

Peter Mudie .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Henry Bouts ,

Charles Glass ,

Samuel Gatliffe ,

John Frost ,

John Locke ,

Alexander Rivaz ,

Wm. Chs. Sturt ,

Richard Taylor ,

James Wilson ,

Edward Coleman ,

James Curtis ,

James Christmas .

Second

Joseph Crabtree ,

John Darnley ,

Thos. Elsworth ,

John Perram ,

Wm. Cook ,

James S. Glennie ,

Robt. Fergusson ,

Thomas Fenwick ,

Charles Fox ,

John Hares ,

Thomas Fear ,

Jerard Debeny .

Third

Henry J. Lynam ,

Luke Leck ,

Henry Verender ,

Phil. Richardson ,

John Stride ,

John Unwin ,

Thos. Weddows ,

Tho. Horncastle ,

John Low ,

Robert Ackroyd ,

George Austin ,

Benj. Massey .

Fourth

John Ed. Barnet ,

John Dunn ,

Wm. Ball ,

Philip Theobald ,

Thomas Sear ,

Chs. Broadbridge ,

Frederick Purser ,

Frederick Barry ,

James T. Hooper ,

Thomas Bartlet ,

Wm. Batts ,

Peter Chambers .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, MAY 31, 1827.

BROWN, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18270531-1

1013. LEWIS SOLOMAN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Richard Bayley , on the night of the 13th of March , and stealing 3 pairs of boots, value 2l.; 1 pair of shoes, value 14s., and 1 shoe, value 2s. , his property.

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-2

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1014. WILLIAM HACKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 25 yards of linen cloth, value 50s., the goods of William Greig , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GREIG. I live in the City-road . The prisoner was in my service, as groom, for about fourteen months - he left me in November last; shortly before he was apprehended I missed some property. I found this cloth at the office on the 26th of February - it is mine - I am positive it was safe within five or six weeks of that time; it was on the warehouse shelves: the warehouse is part of the dwelling-house.

EDWARD HAINES . I am captain of St. James' watch. On the morning of the 26th of February, about two o'clock, I stopped the prisoner with this cloth under his arm - he said it was sheeting, which his brother had bought to send into the country, to his mother; I asked where his brother lived - he said in Gray's-inn-lane. I took him to the watch-house, and then he said his brother lived in Wimpole-street, which turned out to be true; his brother came to the office, and said, in his hearing, that he knew nothing at all of it. I marked it, and delivered it to Avis.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. The prisoner was brought to the office, and I had some conversation with him; I neither threatened nor promised him any thing: he told me, after some conversation, that he got the cloth from a place where he had lived, and said it was from Mr. Greig's, in the City-road - he afterwards said he had been along with two Jew lads - that they took the property, and gave it to him; he afterwards said he took it himself out of Mr. Greig's warehouse, and that he got in the back way; he afterwards told me where he lived, and gave me the key of his box, which I searched, and found in it duplicates of two pieces of linen, which he said were Mr. Greig's, and a book, with Mr. Greig's name in it; I got the linen out of pawn.

MR. GREIG. This piece of cloth is mine. I am certain I never sold it; the fluctuation of the market is so great I cannot estimate the value. His friends are respectable, and I believe this to be his first offence.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270531-3

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1015. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joshua Kirby Trimmer , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 17th of April , at Chiswick, with intent to steal, and stealing 2 candlesticks, value 2s.; 2 silver spoons, value 3s.; 16 yards of linen, value 35s.; 1lb. weight of tea, value 9s., and 1 silver prong of a fork, value 5s., the goods of the said Joshua Kirby Trimmer; 1 purse, value 2s.; 1 thimble, value 10s., and 2 silk stockings, value 3s., the goods of Mary Trimmer ; and 1 hat, value 15s. , the goods of Herbert Trimmer .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JOSHUA KIRBY TRIMMER. I live at Strand-on-the-Green, in the parish of Chiswick, Middlesex . On the 17th of April I went to bed soon after eleven o'clock - I went round the house myself, and saw that every thing was safe: it is my dwelling-house: it is unusual for me to awake before five o'clock, but from some cause or other I was awoke as near two o'clock as possible - I got up and opened the bed-room window-shutter, which is my custom; I found it was quite dark - I went to bed again. About six o'clock Foreigner, my servant, came to me, and I went down stairs with a light - I found several doors had been broken open; the first entrance had been made through the back kitchen window - the wood-work, into which the iron bar fastened, was cut away with a centre-bit, and the bar forced out - a pane of glass was broken in the casement, through which a hand could be put, and the hasp of the casement opened; a person could then enter the house: there were two doors bolted within before they could get in further - the first of these doors was forced off the hinges, and put on one side - the pannel of the second was cut out with a centre-bit - any one could then get through. I have a bureau in my front parlour, and my son has another; they were both broken open, and the papers in some measure displaced, but they appeared to have been disturbed in the act; a tea-chest in the room was broken open, and the tea taken out - that room was quite dark, and the shutters closed; they could not have been there without a light, though it was day-light when I was there.

JOHN REYNOLDS . I am constable of Hammersmith. - On the morning of the 18th of April, about twenty minutes

past five o'clock, I met the prisoner at Hammersmith-turnpike, which is about four miles from Strand-on-the-Green; he was walking along very steady; I spoke to him just after he got through the turnpike - he had a bundle in his right hand; I asked him what it contained - he said what he had got he had come honestly by; I collared him, and said I wished to know what he had got - he said it was no business of mine; I took my staff in my hand, and said I insisted on knowing before he went further; he then dropped the bundle out of his hand, and tried to get away - he made no resistance then, but before I got him to the watch-house he caught hold of me by the throat; I struck him with my staff, and took him to the watch-house - I searched him there, and found on him a dark-lantern, a crow-bar, a chisel, a centre-bit, thirteen door-keys, a knife, a pair of scissars, a brad-awl, a die, a pair of black silk stockings, a silver purse, and a gold thimble, and he had a quantity of tea in a handkerchief in his hat which he had got on. I did not hear of the robbery till night; I went to Mr. Trimmer's the following morning. the 19th, and found a door forced off its hinges, and put on one side - I produce the pannel which had been taken out of the other door, one piece was cut out, and I took the other part out myself; I have compared the centre-bit found on the prisoner with the holes in the pannel, it fitted them exactly; the centre-bit was broken at one of the points, and will not cut so clear as a perfect one - these holes appear to have been cut with a broken centre-bit. I showed the articles found to Miss Trimmer, and she claimed some of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what hour do you leave your beat? A. At five o'clock, or sometimes a few minutes past; I had left then: it was exactly twenty minutes past five when I was at Hammersmith-turnpike, just before I stopped him; it was quite light enough for me to see the clock.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. Is there a clock at the turnpikegate? A. Yes. He was about four miles from the house; I will not swear it was exactly four miles from the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear it is three miles and a half? A. I will not swear exactly to the distance; I will swear to two miles and a half, and I think it is more; I judge it to be four miles, but I never went to Strand-on-the-Green before.

MISS MARY TRIMMER . I am the prosecutor's daughter, and live with him. This purse, gold thimble, and silk stockings are mine - I know the stockings by a mark - they are worth 2s. or 3s. I know the purse by the string being broken, and one of the tassels bent; it is silver, and cost 10s., but being broken I suppose it is worth about 2s.; this is part of an old gold thimble. I saw the stockings safe on the day of the robbery, and the purse and thimble a few days previous - I kept them in my desk, which had been opened, but I had left it unlocked. I came down between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and missed them; when I went to bed on the night of the 17th I put the candles out, and left two candlesticks on the parlour-table, where the desk was - they were gone the next morning; they are not worth more than half-a-crown. I missed the silver prong of a toasting-fork from the other parlour - I had seen that the morning before - it was worth about 5s. The fork and candlesticks were my father's property.

Cross-examined. Q. This prong had been separated from the handle? A. It was screwed up on the Tuesday morning, when I saw it, but is now unscrewed, and the handle left behind - it was my grandmother's, and had been in use some years; the top of the thimble had been knocked off by one of my brothers.

ANN DEANS . I am the prosecutor's servant. On the 18th of April I came down at a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, and in going down stairs I had to pass through the door at the bottom - on opening that door I found a table set against it, which was not there when I went to bed; I found the pannel cut out of the kitchen door; the back kitchen door and window were open - I alarmed Mrs. Foreigner.

MARY FOREIGNER . I am house-keeper to the prosecutor. On the morning of the 18th of April Deans called me - I got up, and alarmed my master and the family; I went down stairs, and found things as my master has described; I missed a piece of cloth from the kitchen, which measured fourteen or fifteen yards; it was Mr. Trimmer's. I had left it on the dresser about eleven o'clock on Tuesday night, when I went to bed; I am sure there were fourteen yards; it was new and worth 2s. 6d. a yard; my own tea-caddy was broken open, and some tea taken out; I missed a silver spoon of Mr. Trimmer's, which I had put into the cupboard with some tea things that night - it was worth 1s. 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the Irish linen to be done to? A. To be scalded before it was made up for shifts or shirts - I do not know what it cost of my own knowledge; I measured it in a rough way, not with a measure, but am sure it was fourteen yards.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. Do you conceive it to be worth 2s. 6d. a yard? A. Yes.

HERBERT TRIMMER . I am the prosecutor's son. I missed a new hat out of the hall - it was mine, and worth about 1l.; I bought it about a month before, but had not worn it six times; I gave 28s. or 1l. for it.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot tell what you gave? A. No; I bought it in Sackville-street - it was put down to my father's bill. I asked the price, but do not recollect what it was.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Battersea fair with my wife and two children; I left them about two o'clock, and, being rather in liquor, I got out of my way - two men came along the road, and asked me to carry these things for them. I told the officer I had come honestly by them.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Reference Number: t18270531-4

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1016. JOSHUA BOGGIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , at St. Mary, Islington, 4 Bank notes, for payment of and value 10l. each, the property of John Butcher , the younger, in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BUTCHER. I live at No. 6, Tyndale-place, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . The prisoner was employed to varnish some furniture at my house on the 6th of June, 1825; I left the house about eight or nine o'clock in the morning of that day - I had four 10l. notes in a small book,(not a pocket-book) which I left on the mantel-piece of the second floor front room, tied round with a piece of tape,

with other memorandums; I missed the notes on the following morning. I had put the book on the mantel-piece on Sunday evening, the 5th of June; I saw the book on Monday morning, but did not open it; my family were out of town. I saw my notes at Hatton-garden about a month ago; I had received them from Messrs. Hankeys, my bankers, on the 4th of June, but did not take the numbers of them myself. The prisoner had not finished his work; he was painting - it was his duty to return on the 7th of June, to finish the job, and take away his tools, but he never came for them. My servant is here.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you any other servant in your house that day? A. No. My family were at Highgate; my wife was at home on the morning of the 6th, and went out with me; I had occasion to leave town - I was out all day, and returned in the evening. The prisoner had not finished varnishing some furniture as I was informed - he had been working for me under Mr. Shaw's orders, some days before. I am not accustomed to leave my property about; the house had been painted throughout, and every thing of value was locked up. To the best of my knowledge there was no one in the house that day but him and the servant.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You left the book on the mantelpiece on the Sunday evening? A. Yes. The prisoner left a paint-pot and some small brushes behind him; he had been employed by Mr. Shaw to paint, but not to polish the furniture.

MARY MATLOCK . On the 6th of June, 1825, I was in Mr. Butcher's service; I saw the prisoner at work there on the 6th of June - Mrs. Butcher left about ten o'clock; nobody but the prisoner and I were in the house all day; I saw him leave the house about six o'clock in the evening; he said he had not finished his work, and would come again in the morning to finish - he left the tools behind him, and never came for them, or to finish.

Cross-examined. Q. What tools were they? A. Some small brushes, a paint-pot, and a knife; I cannot say whether they were his or Mr. Shaw's. I am positive nobody else was at the house - no tradesman called; there was no carpenter or any other workman there; I did not go out further than into the garden all day - I might be there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I will swear the front door was shut all day; I will not swear there was no knock at the door, but am positive there was nobody in the house. The prisoner went out to dinner, and came back at two o'clock - nobody came while he was at dinner, to the best of my belief, but it is so long ago I cannot recollect; I was asked about the notes; but never suspected myself; I was not searched, nor were my boxes; I was asked if I had been with the man in the different rooms - I had been up and down, backwards and forwards. I had been in the kitchen with him; there is no bed in the kitchen - there was nothing happened between us on any bed that day. I was not examined before the Magistrate. I was the only person who had the care of the house.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you asked to go before the Magistrate? A. Yes, but I was not subpoenaed, and my master and mistress I lived with would not let me go; I had lived with the prosecutor three months. I am sure the prisoner said he would return next morning to his work; he had left the scrutire unfinished - he said he had not finished it, and would come in the morning to do it.

JOSIAH ALLINSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Hankeys - the prosecutor banks there. I have a book here, the entries in which are mine - I find that on the 4th of June, 1825, a draft of his for 50l. was paid in four 10l. Bank notes, Nos. 5275 to 5278 inclusive, and ten sovereigns; I am certain No. 5278 was one - it was dated the 18th of May, but we do not enter the year; here is the cheque, but I do not know to whom I paid it.

MR. ROBERT BUTCHER . I am the prosecutor's brother. On the 4th of June I presented this cheque to Messrs. Hankeys, and received four 10l. notes and ten sovereigns - I presented no other cheque that day; I gave my brother the same notes.

Cross-examined. Q. What enables you to recollect having four 10l. notes? A. Their being stolen soon after made me recollect it. I heard of the robbery on the Tuesday following; I will not swear this is the cheque, but it was for 50l.

JAMES SEABY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Tremain, a hatter, of King-street, Holborn. I know the prisoner, and remember his coming to our shop on the evening of the 6th of June, 1825, between seven and eight o'clock - he purchased a hat for 24s., and gave me this 10l. note, No. 5278; I knew him before this occurred, and cannot be mistaken in him - he mentioned his name to me in the shop - he waited in the shop while I went to Mr. Young, a baker, in Holborn, to get change; I wrote Mr. Tremain's name on the note, in Young's shop - I never wrote my master's name before on a 10l. note - this is the note, and has my writing on it. The prisoner came again in about two hours afterwards, and ordered a drab hat of my master, and paid 4s. in part of it - he was to call for it on the Saturday, and pay the difference - it was to be 24s.; he never called for it. He called again on the 21st of July, 1826, and had a black hat - he deducted the 4s. which he-had paid the year before out of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Mr. Young here? A. No. I recollect the date - he appeared to have been drinking, and said master could never make him a hat big enough - master said he had not got a block big enough. I recollect it was the 6th of June, because I have the book here in which master made an entry when he came home, and I told him of it- I never changed a note for the prisoner before, and never saw my master change one, to my recollection; I never changed so large a note as a 10l. at Young's before; Young wished me to go back for my master to put his name on it. but he not being at home I wrote it myself.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When your master came home you told him what had happened? A. Yes, and he entered it in the book with the date, and when the prisoner returned I saw my master enter the white hat down - here is the entry: I had seen him frequently at the shop before, but only once since - that was in 1826. I am certain he is the man.

ANDREW DAVISON . I am clerk to Messrs. Hall and Davison, flour-factors, Broad-street-buildings. In 1825 Young, of Holborn, dealt with us - I produce our ledger - it is kept by my brother - I know his hand-writing; (looking at the note No. 5278) this note was in the possession of our firm in 1825; we paid it into the Bank of England - I did not pay it in myself.

Cross-examined. Q. Except from the book can you

state it was ever in your master's possession? A. Except from his hand-writing being on the note.

GEORGE DYER . I am clerk in the accountant's office at the Bank. This note, No. 5278 was paid into the Bank on the 17th of June, 1825, from Messrs. Hall and Davison, in a total of 105l. - they have an account at the Bank; the note is dated the 18th of May, 1825. I have two of the other notes here, Nos. 5278 and 5277 - the other note has come into the Bank, but has no name on it.

Cross-examined. Q. You speak to these facts from having yourself indorsed one of the notes? A. Yes, and from reference to the books - they are not here; the entry is not in my hand-writing.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am a constable of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of April, 1827.

Cross-examined. Q. In 1826 had you seen the witness Seaby? A. No. Young was examined before the Magistrate, who did not bind him over - I believe what he said was not taken down.

Mr. CLARKSON called -

MARKHAM CONEY . I have known the prisoner four years - he bore the character of an honest young man; he worked for my father about two years ago, in the country.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know him in 1826? A. I did not see him in 1826 - my father lives at Lynn, in Norfolk. I know about two years ago my father wanted some work done there, and he told me Boggis did it.

Q. Did you, from the 7th of June till the end of July last, know where the prisoner lived? A. I always applied at his father's for him when I wanted him, but I did not go there within that time.

THOMAS COCHRANE . I live in Fair-street, and am a saddler. I have known the prisoner since October 1825 - he has had an honest industrious character; I lived in the same house with him for ten months - he lived with my father in 1826.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where? A. In Mary-le-bone-lane, in October 1825 - he was living in the house when I came to it, and in January 1826 he removed to No. 18, Davies-street, Manchester-square - Mrs. Catley, a widow, is the landlady; I do not know whether she lives there now. I now live in Fair-street, Battle-bridge - I cannot say how long in 1826 I lived with him, but it was in February, March, and April; he was about publicly. I have known him intimately since - he works as a painter.

THOMAS NELSON . I have known the prisoner eighteen years, and understood him to be an honest man. I did not see him in 1825, 1826, or 1827.

EDWARD EVERETT . I am a painter, and live in William-street, Hampstead-road. The prisoner worked for me at Cirencester-place last September, for nine weeks - he was not concealed; I did not know where he lived, but always heard of him at his father's, in Edmund-street, Battle-bridge.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, in consequence of the temptation laid in his way .

Reference Number: t18270531-5

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1017. ELLEN DRYNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , at St. Giles-in-the-Fields, 20 sovereigns, 18 half-sovereigns, 100 shillings, 34 sixpences, 96 penny-pieces, 12 halfpence, 2 gowns, value 20s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 1s., and 1 Bank note, for payment of and value 10l., the property of John Coffee , in the dwelling-house of David Haley , against the statute , &c.

ELIZABETH COFFEE. I am the wife of John Coffee - we lodge in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane , in the house of David Haley. The prisoner was in my service - she attended to my child. I went out about five minutes before seven o'clock on a Tuesday morning in March - it was before Easter - I left her in the room, with my child, and left the key with her; I returned about eleven o'clock, and could not get into the room; I heard the child crying - I got my landlady's key, and found the child in the room, but the prisoner was gone. I found a box which I had left locked was broken open, and missed a 10l. Bank note, several sovereigns and half-sovereigns, some half-crowns, shillings and sixpences, a cloak, two gowns, a shawl, petticoat, and apron - they were all my husband's property, and I am certain I left them locked in the box - every thing was on the Sunday, when I went to the box, and I kept the key in my possession. I saw my petticoat and one gown at Bow-street. My money was not marked - I know we had altogether 45l. 5s. 6d.

ELLEN HALEY . I live in Short's-gardens, in the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields - my husband, whose name is David, rents the house; Coffee and his wife lodge with us. Between seven and eight o'clock on the morning in question I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner come out of the passage into the street - she had a cloak on - it was on a Tuesday morning, but I do not recollect the date; I saw no more of her: Mrs. Coffee came home about eleven o'clock- I lent her some keys; the child was locked in the room, and crying - she complained of missing her property. I did not examine her box.

JOHN COFFEE. I am the husband of the first witness. I received a 10l. note, about June last, from Mr. Lockey, a hatter, in change for a 20l. note; I gave it to my wife to put by - I saw it in the box several times since - there was 45l. 5s. 6d. in all. I saw all the money safe on the Sunday afternoon, about three o'clock; I took it out of the box and put it in again - it was stolen on Tuesday, the 13th of March - my wife's clothes were also in the box on Sunday.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I am an officer of the Police at Cork. I saw the prosecutor at Cork in March last, and on the 21st of March, in the evening, about six o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner at Cork, at her sister's house - her sister delivered a trunk to me - the prisoner saw the trunk; I asked if it was hers - she said it was: she ran into the next room - I left her there in the care of Coffee and a gentleman while I examined the trunk; I found in it a cloak, a shawl, a petticoat, a gown, and a small box inside, containing a 10l. Bank note and seventeen sovereigns, which I have had ever since - I delivered them up before the Magistrate; I put the box and all the property into the trunk, which I corded and sealed - Coffee was present when I examined it. I brought the property to England, and delivered it to Alderson.

Prisoner. Q. Did I say the money was his? A. She said all the property was his - she did not mention any thing in particular.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am a Bow-street officer. I produce the trunk, which was corded and sealed; I have just opened it.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . This is the trunk.

JOHN COFFEE. I heard the prisoner acknowledge that all the property was mine. I cannot read, and do not know the note - here are sixteen sovereigns, seventeen were found, but the Magistrate ordered me to give one for expences.

ELIZABETH COFFEE. Here is my cloak, shawl, gown, and petticoat.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18270531-6

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1018. WILLIAM FAIRN, alias FARK , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 1 coat, value 2l., and 2 waistcoats, value 1l., the goods of Evelyn Waddington , in the dwelling-house of Robert Joy .

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the 11th of May, in consequence of information, I went to a front attic, No. 1, Leg-alley, Long-acre, of which Mr. Joy gave me the key, from a hat-box; and on a chair I found a coat and two waistcoats.

EVELYN WADDINGTON. I lodged at Mr. Joy's hotel, Covent-garden , but was absent when this happened; I left two or three coats and waistcoats on the bed, in an inner room - these clothes are mine, and what I left there; my initials were on the waistcoat, but they are nearly effaced. I think the coat worth 2l., and the waistcoats 5s. or 10s. each.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did you leave the hotel? A. On the 29th of April - I had been there about a week, and intended to return; I had kept my things there - I never gave a waiter at Joy's any wearing apparel - I had had the coat five or six months, but only wore it occasionally; I had had the waistcoats eight or ten months - they may have been washed a dozen times.

THOMAS JOY . I am chamberlain at the hotel, which is kept by my brother Robert. The prisoner was a waiter there for about three months. Mr. Waddington left several coats, waistcoats, and trousers there - I saw Webster take a key from a hat-box, which the prisoner used to claim as his - it was kept in the kitchen, where we clean the plate - I have seen him take things out of that box.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot tell whether any body else used it? A. No - I have seen him take neck handkerchiefs out of it; he was employed there three or four years: gentlemen often leave clothes in their room, but waiters have no business with them - I never knew them take them.

HENRY FARR . I live at No. 1, Leg-alley. The prisoner's wife took an apartment with me on the 13th of April - he came on the same evening, and asked if a person named Farr had come to ledge there - I said Yes, and asked if he was her husband - he said Yes, and I showed him into the room; he came there once or twice a day, and sometimes not for two or three days - I do not know that he slept there - his wife went to lay-in at the hospital on the 7th of May; he came there about three hours afterwards, and I never saw him again - he had the key of the room. Mr. Joy and an officer came on the 11th, and showed me the key of the room; I opened the door, and found the clothes there - the prisoner paid me one week's rent on the morning his wife left: he kept the room locked all the time.

Cross-examined. Q. The lodgings seem more to be taken by the wife? A. Yes.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-7

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1019. WILLIAM TURNLEY was indicted for stealing 1lb. of coffee, value 3s. , the goods of Nicholas Yarrow .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-8

1020. RICHARD PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 pocket-book, value 2s., the goods of a certain person whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am a provision merchant, and live in Queenhithe. I was in an office at the corner of Queenhithe on the 10th of March, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, and looking through the window I saw the prisoner in company with another man; the prisoner opened the pocket of a gentleman's coat, and took a pocket-book from it - I did not know the gentleman - he was unconscious of what had been done; I left the office, and pursued them till I found them gaining ground; I then called Stop thief! they had then got to the bottom of Maiden-lane - the prisoner turned to the right, towards the river; he was pursued and stopped by Three Cranes-wharf - I lost sight of him for about a moment, but swear to him; his companion went in a different way. The pocket-book has not been found - it was a black one.

JOHN HALL . I am a private in the 1st regiment of Guards. I was in Thames-street between twelve and one o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief! at the bottom of Queen-street - the prisoner came towards me - I pursued him down Thames-street, and stopped him, without losing sight of him; he threw something from his person as he ran- I saw his hand move from him: I gave him up to the constable, and went with them to Guildhall - I did not observe Mr. Allen till I got there. Before he was taken I saw him throw a tortoiseshall snuff-box away, which I picked up, and gave to the officer. Mr. Allen charged him with taking a pocket-book from a gentleman - he said nothing to the charge.

PETER BURNSKILL . I am in the coal trade. I was in Thames-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was running. pursued by a crowd - I pursued, an I laid hold of him about the same time as Hall, without losing sight of him - I saw Mr. Allen in a minute or two, who said he saw him take a pocket-book from a gentleman's pocket: he said nothing to the charge - he threw a snuff-box away.

JAMES HARDY . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in custody - he said nothing to the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny having the snuff-box.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270531-9

1021. GEORGE HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 basket, value 6s., and 6 loaves of bread, value 4s. 6d. the goods of Robert Coveney .

ROBERT COVENEY. I am servant to Mr. Race, a baker, of Fenchurch-street. Between two and three o'clock on the 30th of March I left my basket in Dove-court , while

I took six loaves into Swithin's-lane - I was absent six or seven minutes; when I returned it was gone; the prisoner had followed me into the court, and into Swithin's-lane; he must then have returned, and took the basket, I suppose - I have not found it.

LYDIA TODD . I live in Dove-court, Lombard-street. I saw Coveney with two baskets; he brought the prisoner into Dove-court; what took my attention was, that the prisoner put his head into our window, which was open- Coveney then took one basket to Mr. Traver's in Swithen's-lane, and the prisoner followed him, but immediately returned, took up the other basket and went away - I did not see him again till the 2d of May, when he was in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the prosecutor in Cheapside, and being a baker, I asked if he knew of any work - I was acquainted with him, and followed him to the place, he left his basket there; I said, "You had better take it into a public-house, and then nobody will take it"- I then went away.

ROBERT COVENEY . I knew him two years ago; he did come and ask if I knew of a situation.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-10

1022. RICHARD HOUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 16 fish, called Dutch plaice, value 5s., and 2 fish, called maids, value 1s. , the goods of Jacob Spashett and others, his partners.

JOHN GOLDHAM . I am an officer of the City, attending Billingsgate-market . On the 11th of May, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner shoreing fish from the fish-boat to the stairs - he, (being a waterman plying at those stairs), contrived to get his wherry between the fish-boat and the stairs, and as he carried the fish on shore, he contrived to drop part of the fish into his own boat; there was no occasion for his boat to be there; after the fish-boat was unladen, all but two fish, he went on board, and took out two plaice, which he put into his own wherry - he then put the board of the wherry over the fish to conceal them - I then desired my man to go on shore, while I hired a boat, and went round in his rear to secure him - I got round without his perceiving me - he was in his own boat - I told him he had got stolen fish there; he said he had not; my man got into his boat, and under the boards we found sixteen Dutch plaice and two maids; he said he would not be taken out of his boat, but we secured him; he surrendered quietly; the fish belonged to Mr. Spashett.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was the boat Hero there? A. That is the boat he took the fish from - I never knew him in Mr. Hall's employ; they have 1s. for carrying the fish from the boat - I never knew any fish given to them besides.

MICHAEL DUENE . I am in Mr. Goldham's employ. I saw the prisoner coming on shore with fish in his own wherry; when he delivered the fish he kept part back in his wherry; he sheered up from the stairs, and went to another fish-boat, which I believe is called the Hero - he took two maids and put them into his own boat. Mr. Goldham went to him, and said, "You have got some fish there;" he said he had not - I took up the boards and found the fish under them; they could not have dropped through there by accident; he then said he would not be taken out of his own boat.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know him very well? A. I have seen him about for four months - I carry a few fish when master tells me - I take the condemned fish.

Q. Do not you take a few when you think you are badly paid? A. No.

CHARLES WEABE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge with sixteen plaice and two maids; he told me the fishermen had given them to him.

JACOB SPASHETT . The Hero is my boat. I have partners - I did not see the prisoner till about eight o'clock on this morning; these plaice would have sold for about 6s., and the maids for 1s. - I had not given them to him, nor was he employed to land any fish from our boat - I paid another man 12s. to shore them.

Q. Do not persons you employ hire others to help them? A. We had three men; but he was neither of them; they sometimes employ others, but none were wanting.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired by the waterman to bring the fish on shore for 1s.; the man on board said I was to have a bit of fish as well.

MR. GOLDHAM re-examined. I saw the waterman who brought Spashett's fish on shore give the prisoner 1s.; it is usual for them to get men to help them; he gave him the 1s. on board the Hero - I do not consider that the waterman was at all implicated.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-11

1023. ROBERT JACKSON, alias EVANS , and ROBERT SMITH were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Sykes , on the night of the 22d of April , and stealing 4 hats, value 1l.; six foraging caps, value 8s.; six bottles, value 1s.; six pints of wine, called champaigne, value 1l.; 196 yards of printed cotton, value 10l. 2s.; 48 yards of twilled cambric, value 48s., and 66 yards of striped florentine, value 3l. 5s. , his property.

WILLIAM SYKES. I keep the Old Catherine Wheel public-house, Bishopsgate ; this property was in my warehouse, which joins the dwelling-house, and is under the same roof. I am an inn-keeper. On the 21st of April, at a quarter past twelve o'clock at night, I saw my premises all secure - I was called by my servant at a quarter past six in the morning, it was then daylight - I found both my warehouse doors broken open by a crowbar; one warehouse is over the other; the packages were broken open, and part of the goods gone - I found the prisoners at St. Leonard's watch-house, about nine o'clock that morning - I saw some of the goods at the officer's house - I think I have seen one of the prisoners before - I have only one gate leading to the inn-yard; that was safe over night, but I found the small gate in the larger one had the locks picked.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is the warehouse joined to the dwelling-house by any wall. A. It joins the dwelling-house, and is under the same roof; there is a covered way from one to the other.

GILES BOLLEN . I am a watchman. On the 22d of April, about a quarter to five o'clock in the morning, I

was in Crown-street, Finsbury, and saw two men standing in a door-way, one with a livery coat on, the other had a hat tied up in a handkerchief - it was broad daylight; they were about the eighth of a mile from Mr. Sykes'; while my back was turned they shifted across the street into another door-way; while I was ringing at a public-house to call some people up, a man passed, looked at the two men, and then looked at me - I thought all was not right, and was going to challenge them, when a private patrol in the same street got out of his box, and started them; they moved off, and as I went towards them I saw a piece of linen drop from under the coat of the man in the livery coat; that man went up Clifton-street, and got away - I followed the other, who was the prisoner Smith; he was caught, and given into my custody - I lost sight of him three or four times, merely as he turned the corners; but am sure I caught sight of the same person, and that he is the man - I saw him throw a hat down, which was tied up in a silk handkerchief; it was the same as I had seen him with in the door-way - I do not know that I have seen the man who was in his company since - I saw him make a blow at Holden, who pursued him - I also saw him drop a bottle which had some liquor in it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you the first person who pursued? A. Yes; persons who were before me joined in the pursuit, after I gave the alarm - I had a great coat on, and had been up all night, and was tired - Holden ran faster than me.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. Did you not see the man in the livery coat give me the hat. wrapped up in the handkerchief? A. No - I saw him pull the coat off, and the linen dropped; my brother watchman took up the coat and linen.

COURT. Q. Did you see Jackson? A. I saw him a little before five o'clock the same morning, standing at the corner of the City-road, just out of Finsbury-square - I was without my watchman's coat, and saw him look at me, and walk away - I then went after him, and called Stop thief! - I lost sight of him for about a minute; but am certain he is the person; he was taken by a watchman of St. Luke's; I saw a hat drop off his head; it appeared never to have been worn before.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far is Mr. Sykes' house from Finsbury-square? A. I cannot exactly tell; the hat which fell from him appeared the same as the others found; they all three appeared hats of one sort and east; I believe nothing was found on his person.

THOMAS DEAKIN . I am a watchman of Shoreditch; my beat extends to Crown-street. I heard a rattle spring just before five o'clock - I ran down Crown-street, and saw a piece of linen in the road in Clifton-street - I picked it up, and took it to the watch house.

RICHARD MAYNARD . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Hodson and Lake, Manchester warehousemen, Cheapside. On the 20th April they sent a bale of goods to the Catherine Wheel - I directed them myself, to William Laing of Thetford, and packed them up myself; they were twilled cambric stripes and florentines - I saw a piece of striped florentine at the Mansion-house afterwards; here it is - there are thirty-two yards of it; it is worth about 34s. - I am sure it is part of what I packed; (looking at the invoice) I know this is what I put into the package; it is in our clerk's hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know the florentine? A. The length is on it, in my hand-writing; it is the only piece I have marked since I have been in the house.

WILLIAM SYKES re-examined. I have the package at home; it is directed to Laing of Thetford; the invoice produced was left in the package, with one piece of florentine.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any other partner? A. No, not as an inn-keeper; they were sent to me as an innkeeper - I cannot say whether this package would have gone by any of my conveyances - I have a partner in my carriage-business; my house is not half a mile from Finsbury-square.

SAMUEL BRAGG . I am warehouseman to Mr. Cooper, a hat-manufacturer. I sent a package of hats to the Catherine Wheel, to go to Littleport, and believe I assisted in packing them - I saw three hats at the Mansion-house, which I believe to be part of them; they are from 5s. 3d. to 5s. 9d. each.

Cross-examined. Q. You believe you assisted in packing them? A. I am sure of it; we have made a great many of this sort - I cannot tell how many have been sold; we never sell any single ones, and sell none in London; we might have sold 5 or 600, but they all went into the country; no doubt there are 1000 of the same quality in London, but these are our manufacture.

JOHN HARMAN . I am a watchman of Tabernacle-row. On Sunday morning, the 22d of April, about five o'clock, there was a cry of Stop thief! raised by two men down the City-road - I saw Jackson run down the road at full speed, pursued by two men - I crossed over the road - he made a blow at me, and he crossed the road - I finally secured him, without losing sight of him; he threatened to ill use me - I shook him a little, and this new hat fell off his head; a watchman picked it up, and delivered it to Tickner at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you catch him? A. In Tabernacle-row - I found no hat, but the one he wore; Deakin came up in about two minutes.

JONATHAN LOVETT . I am a watchman of Long-alley, Sun-street. On Sunday morning, the 22d of May, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner Jackson, alone, coming up Long-alley: he passed me as I sat in my box - I thought he seemed rather intoxicated; in about a quarter of an hour after that I heard a rattle spring, at the corner of Clifton-street - I went to the spot, and saw this piece of print lay on the pavement; I left it in charge of the watchman, and went in pursuit - I turned back, came down Long-alley again, and saw Smith coming up Long-alley, in the custody of Bollen and another man; I went with him to the watch-house, pulled off my coat, and went in pursuit of another, and in the City-road I saw Jackson running - I called to another watchman to stop him; one tried to stop him at the corner of Featherstone-street, but he crossed over, and got down Tabernacle-row; he was secured; he had a hat on then, but it fell of several times on the way to the watch-house; it was delivered to Tickner - I did not observe whether it fitted him.

Cross-examined. Q. How did it happen to fall off?

A. Through scuffling with the watchman - I saw nobody else running when Smith was in custody; it might be twelve minutes before I went to look after the other person: Jackson was running when I caught sight of him.

WILLIAM TICKNER . I am constable of the night; Smith was brought to the watch-house, about a quarter past five o'clock, with a hat - I do not know whether it was tied up or loose; he had no hat on when he was first brought in, that I recollect; a hat was brought in tied up - Jackson was brought in about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and another hat delivered to me - I did not notice whether he had one on; I have three hats which were delivered to me at the watch-house; they are all new - I have had them ever since.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. How many hats were brought to the watch-house before Jackson was brought in? A. I do not know whether it was one or two - I am sure three were not brought in before Jackson.

Cross-examined. Q. Did any body bring in an old hat, which they said fitted Jackson? A. No old hat was brought to me.

SAMUEL BRAGG re-examined. These are the hats I saw at the watch-house, and the same sort which were packed by me; one is rather soiled, as if it had been on a head.

Cross-examined. Q. One is rather soiled? A. Yes; wearing it a very short time would do that - I have no private mark on them.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. On Sunday morning, the 22d, between six and seven o'clock, I was fetched to Mr. Sykes' premises; I found two locks broken open, and one picked; and in the top warehouse I found a taper, two old hats, and an old cap left behind; they have all been a good deal worn; one hat is torn; an old umbrella was found in the yard, which nobody claimed - I have not fitted the hats on any body.

JACKSON'S Defence. I was in the City-road about four o'clock in the morning, going home rather intoxicated, three or four watchmen laid hold of me: a young man collared me, and beat me with a stick, but I never resisted; he took up a hat in the watch-house, and said, "Does this belong to you?" I said, No; there were three hats there.

SMITH'S Defence. A man gave me the things at the corner of Clifton-street, and said, he would pay me for carrying them; the watchman saw him give them to me.

JACKSON - GUILTY. Aged 21.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-12

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JUNE 1.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1024. JOHN HASWELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Thompson , about seven o'clock in the forenoon of the 14th of April , at St. Mary, Islington (the said John Thompson, and others being therein), and stealing 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 seal, value 1l., and 1 watch-key, value 19s. , the goods of the said John Thompson.

JOHN THOMPSON. I live at No. 12, Portland-place, New North-road, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . On the 14th of April, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was at home, and up; my wife, children, and servant were in the house - I heard the bell ring; I looked out, and saw two persons, dressed as sweeps, but cannot say whether the prisoner is either of them: a watch was lost, which I could not replace for less than 15l.

ELIZABETH BAKER . I am servant to Mr. Thompson. On the 14th of April, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the sweeps rang at the bell - I did not expect them, and they were strangers; I opened the street door to them; the prisoner was one of them I am certain - they were both dressed as sweeps; his companion said he was desired to call and sweep a flue, which leads from the oven into the kitchen chimney, which the boy had forgotten to sweep six weeks ago when they swept the chimney; I said I was sure he was mistaken; he said, No, his master had desired him to come - I said, "Who is your master?" he said, "Mr. Shipley of Broad-yard" - I let his companion in; he came down into the kitchen, and began to sweep the flue; the prisoner did not come in with him, but walked down the street; about five minutes after the prisoner came up the steps, and knocked at the door - I went up to the door, leaving his companion sweeping the flue in the kitchen; the prisoner came down stairs: the other said, "Here Jack, take the brush and sweep;" he did so, and the other took up the soot, and then said,"Now, will you be so kind as to let us out?" the other put the soot into the yard, and went up-stairs before me; I followed him, and the prisoner followed behind me - I had left him in the kitchen; he followed me directly, but when he got to the kitchen door he closed it - I had got out, and he being inside, I turned back, saying, "What do you mean by this?" and pushed the door open; he said, "Nothing, Ma'am;" it must have been done on purpose - I immediately said, "Please to deliver up the silver spoon, which you have taken off that dresser." as I missed it; he looked at me, and without saying a word, delivered the spoon from his bosom; the other came down stairs, and said, "What is the matter?" I said,"Why this fellow has taken a spoon off the dresser;" he said, "Jack, you ought to be ashamed of yourself; don't you know better, you may rely on it, I shall tell your master" - I said, "You need not trouble yourself, I will do that;" I then let them both out of the house, and when they had been gone about five minutes, my master asked me what the time was - I went down into the kitchen, and missed the watch, which hung over the dresser just before they came in - I had hung it there that morning; it was mistress', and has never been found; one of them must have taken it: it was worth full 10l. - I told master I had let the sweeps in, and instantly went to Mr. Shipley - the prisoner was brought to me on the 22d - I had described his person to the officer - I swear positively he is the man who had the spoon - I should not have let them in if I had not believed they came from Shipley.

EDWARD SHIPLEY . I am a chimney-sweep, and live at Islington. I know nothing of the prisoner, and never sent him to Mr. Thompson.

THOMAS JEFFERY . On the 14th of April, I was near Portland-place, twelve doors from Mr. Thompson's, and

saw two sweeps run down the road from the house - I believe the prisoner to be one of them.

SARAH LANGLEY . I live at No. 15, Portland-place. On the 14th of April, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house, dressed as a sweep; he rang the bell, and said he was ordered to come to sweep the flue - I told him it was a mistake; he said it was not, but I would not let him in, and he went to Mr. Thompson's - I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM PIZEY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of April, at the corner of Frying-pan-alley, Turnmill-street - Baker had described him to me, and identified him immediately she saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. She stated before, that I was the lad who went to the house first, and was there ten minutes before the other came, and she took the spoon out of his bosom.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18270531-13

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1025. IPHIGENER MORSE was indicted for the wilful murder of Jeremiah Murphy , by administering to him one drachm of arsenic, in a pint of beer .

On the examination of Mr. Samuel Byles , surgeon, of Spitalfields, who had opened the body of the deceased, he stated, that he found it in a very high state of putrefaction; that he had applied a variety of tests to the contents of the stomach, but was unable to discover that there had been any mineral poison there; he was unable to decide whether the death had been caused by discase, accident or poison. - The Court consequently declined examining the other witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-14

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1026. WILLIAM SHEEN , THE YOUNGER, was indicted for the wilful murder of Charles William Beadle .

The prisoner was also charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition, for the wilful murder of Charles William Sheen.

MESSRS. ANDREWS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH CORDEROY . On Thursday, the 10th of May , I was in company with the prisoner, at Mr. Collins', the King of Prussia public-house, in Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane - we were playing at skittles there; he was in a very good humour; he was the worse for liquor; he had been drinking in my company for three hours - he drank nothing but porter - I cannot say how much, but suppose we had six or seven pots between four of us; about half-past five o'clock his wife came for him, and wished him to go home - I had seen her once before - he was in a very good humour; they went directly, and I went with them to their house, which is in a court in Lambeth-street, close to the Police-office - I was never there before; it is a small room up-stairs, with a bed in it; he said he had worked three days for his father, and instead of giving him 12s., he had only given him 7s. 6d.; he said he would shew me a paper of his marriage; he appeared in a very good humour; his wife was in the room all the time that I was there; his boy was in her arms alive and well - I did not observe whether he took any notice of the child - I went away in about a quarter of an hour, of my own accord; he did not ask me to go away - I did not observe any appearances of ill humour between him and his wife while I was there; she had the child in her arms. He had a drab fustian coat on, and a white hat - I did not notice whether his shirt was clean - I observed nothing particular about his linen; his coat was in the shape of a shooting jacket - I left him and his wife in the room together, at a quarter of an hour before six o'clock- I saw nothing more of him.

SARAH POMEROY . I am landlady of the house where the prisoner and his wife lodged; it is No. 2, Christopher's-alley, Lambeth-street, Whitechapel ; they have lodged there about two months - I was at home on Thursday, the 10th of May, and at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner's wife came to me, and in consequence of what she said, I went up to the top room, which is theirs, and as soon as I entered the door I saw a child's head on the table; it stood up, its neck being on the table; it was separated from the body: whether it was bleeding or not I do not know, for I ran immediately away to the office for assistance - I left nobody in the room - I ran away, and the mother, who had gone up with me, followed: we went to the Police-office, which is but three doors of - I got the assistance of Dalton the officer, who came with me; he went up stairs first, I followed into the room; the child's head lay on the table, in the same position as before; it had not been moved - I did not examine the head, I was too frightened: there was blood on the table; the floor was covered with blood - I saw Dalton find the body of the child on the foot of the bed, laying across, covered with a counterpane; it had on a little blue bed-gown - I just saw the neck, which was all over blood, and the head off - I knew the child when living; it was a male, about four months old - I have seen Mrs. Sheen suckle it as her child - I have no doubt that was the body of the same child; the head was bald - I cannot say whether there was any mark on it - I did not see the prisoner all that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. They had lived with you about two months? A. Yes; I never heard any quarrelling between them.

EBENEZER DALTON . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On Thursday the 10th of May, about half-past seven o'clock, Mrs. Pomeroy came to the office; in consequence of what she said, I went to her house, to a room up two pairs of stairs, and on entering the room I saw the child's head on the table, and a quantity of blood - I searched, and in the corner of the room was a bed, with the body of the child covered with a counterpane; there was a great quantity of blood on the floor, as well as on the table; the head appeared as if it had been cut off with some sharp instrument, which I looked for, but could not find - I had been at the office from six o'clock in the evening, and in the morning from nine till three - I heard of no disturbance in the neighbourhood - I found nothing in the room.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to say you had been in the office all day? A. No - I had been about executing warrants and other things - I cannot say how long I was there; there are a great many Irish in White chapel, but not exactly in the neighbourhood; there are frequent disturbances among them.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. As far as you know, was there

any complaint of a disturbance made at the office? A. No.

WILLIAM SHEEN . The prisoner is my son. I live in White's-yard, near Rosemary-lane; he came to my house on a Thursday evening in May, about eight o'clock - I cannot remember the day of the month - I think it was the second Thursday of the month; he was dressed in his shirt sleeves, and had no hat on: he said very little - I asked if he had been fighting; he said he had been fighting some Irishmen in the skittle-ground - I walked with him a little way.

Q. Did he say whether any thing had happened while he was fighting in the skittle-ground? A. He made mention, in going along, that the parish-officers were after him for relief, for his wife and child, which I did not recollect before - I accompanied him to Mr. Pugh's in Carnaby-market; he said nothing more about the Irishmen, that I can recollect - I think there was something mentioned about a knife - I really cannot say the particulars.

Q. You must tell us, as well as you can, you must tell the truth: did he say any thing more? A. He got 10s. at Mr. Pugh's - I accompanied him to Oxford-road, and he said he was going to Barnet; he mentioned something to Mr. Pugh about a knife, which I did not particularly attend to, for I was drinking a glass of gin at the time; he went to Pugh's for a coat and hat, which he got there, and 10s. to put into his pocket; I left him in Oxford-road; he shook hands with me - I bade him good night, and did not see him again till he was in custody; he had been married about five weeks - I suppose his wife had had the child two or three months before - I think her name was Beadle before she was married - I did not know the name of the child till after it was dead - I do not recollect, that I ever heard him call it by any name.

Cross-examined. Q. The name of the woman who afterwards became his wife, you had only heard, I suppose? A. No; I heard it before and since their marriage; she went by the name of Beadle - I was not acquainted with her myself, she was such a bad character.

Q. Then you only know what name she went by before by report? A. Yes - my son was a humane hard working, well conducted lad.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I went to Pomeroy's house about eight o'clock in the evening of the 10th May, after Dalton had been there - I did not search the room then - I saw the child's head on the table, and the body on the bed - I searched the same room the next morning, between ten and eleven, and found a fustian coat lying on the floor, towards the back of the room, opposite the window: it lay thrown down carelessly; there was some blood on both sleeves, and the front: the blood was splashed upon it; there was a good deal upon it in one place or another - I produce the same coat - I knew the prisoner before this happened - I had seen him often, and have observed his dress; I have seen him wear such a coat as this - I saw him two or three days before the 10th of May, but cannot tell what coat he had on then - I have seen him wear such a coat within about a week of that time - I marked this coat, and locked it up at the office - I examined the child's head on the Thursday night, and observed a dent or little bruise on it - I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him at a farmhouse in Radnorshire, Wales, called the Lane-house, on Thursday, the 17th of May, a little before ten o'clock in the morning; I had been in search of him from the day after this happened - I found him sitting in the lower room in the chimney corner - I had made a complete search of that house, at three o'clock in the morning of that day, and did not find him; the prisoner said, when I went in, "O, Davis. is that you? I shall go any where with you" - I secured him, and took him to the Seven Arms inn at Penybout, where I had a horse and chaise - I did not search any other house in that neighbourhood - I took him afterwards to a house at Radnor - an old lady there, who appeared to be the landlady of the house, said to him, "In God's name," or "In the name of God, how came you to do such a cruel thing?" (I had not used either threat or inducement to him - I had asked a question, which he declined answering); his answer to the woman was, "It was not God, it was the Devil;" when we were on the road from the farm-house to Penybont, I asked how he came to be guilty of such a thing, he would not give me any answer - I had not then told him why I took him, but I had before the landlady asked the question - I told him immediately I got him out of the house, that I took him on suspicion of murder; he said, "Very well, Mr. Davis;" this was before I asked him how he came to do such a cruel thing.

Q. Did you use the word cruel? A. Yes; nothing more passed between us; at Kinton, about sixteen miles from Penybout, I saw him change his shirt: the one he took off was bloody; here it is, (producing it) it is bloody on the left sleeve, and in front of the breast; it was just as it is now, and appeared to have been worn a good deal.

Q. Did you, during your journey from Radnor to London, use any threat or promise to him? A. Never; I heard him say, "Oh, my poor mother, when she knows I am taken it will break her heart" - I heard him say nothing more. I put my name and the day of the month on the jacket before I locked it up - it is on it now.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the only person who keeps the key at the Police-office? A. No. The landlady of the inn is not here. I was in the prisoner's lodging twice, but did not search until Thursday night; there was daylight enough for me to see - I did not see the jacket there then; there was a considerable quantity of blood on the floor. I cannot say whether the room had been occupied on the evening of the 10th, or whether the jacket was there then.

JANET PUGH . I live in Cooper's-yard, Carnaby-street. On Thursday, the 10th of May, I was at home - old Mr. Sheen came to the house between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, and got a coat and hat - I saw him have the coat and hat, and 10s. The prisoner came in about ten minutes - the old man had not left; I saw the prisoner standing at the door when the father came; the father got the coat and hat the first time he came, and the second time I lent him 10s.; I lent it to the father.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner? A. At the door: that was the second time the father came - he then had my husband's coat and hat on, which the father had borrowed- the father had said something to me, which induced me

to ask the prisoner what he had done with the knife which he struck the Irishman with - he gave me a knife, and told me to burn it for God's sake; I threw it on the sink: I gave the same knife to Dickenson, the officer, the next morning. The prisoner said nothing more, but went out; I never saw the prisoner before, but I knew his father, and am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your husband alive? A. Yes - he was at home, and heard what passed, but he had had rather too much; he gave old Sheen the coat and hat - there was no blood on the knife; it was much in the same state as it is now.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What did you say about his having had too much? A. He had been out all day, and had had rather too much liquor - his name is Thomas.

Thomas Pugh was in attendance, but was not examined.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I went to Mrs. Pugh's on Friday morning, the 11th of May - she gave me a knife, which I produce (a small clasp-knife), and have had it ever since - it was in the same state, and as clean as it is now; I saw no blood on it - I showed it to a person named Smith before the Coroner.

THOMAS SMITH . I am beadle of Whitechapel. I examined the head of the child and the neck, and I looked at the body, and the part of the neck there; the skin at the back part of the head was very much in notches - it was cut off directly at the upper joint, at the back part of the neck; there were some notches in the skin, at the back, about the place where the joint had been cut through - the head could be taken off with such a knife as this, according to my judgment.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you examine the head? A. I first examined it on Friday, about eleven or twelve o'clock - it was afterwards pointed out to me by Dickenson; I then examined it very minutely, and rubbed the saw-dust off; this was just as the Coroner's Jury were leaving the room. After they had returned their verdict on the Saturday, the master of the workhouse had the care of the body - he is not here.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you form your judgment from the head, or the body? A. From the head mostly; I saw the head on Friday - it was in the same state with respect to the neck, but was all over saw-dust.

SARAH POMEROY . I heard the child called by the name of William, but nothing else. I did not know them before they came to live with me.

JOHN SUTTON . I am clerk to the attorney for the prosecution. I have examined the register of baptisms at St. George the Martyr, Southwark; I saw this extract made from the register, and examined it with the original - it is correct.

Cross-examined. Q. How did you examine it? A. By taking the register in one hand and the certificate in the other, and comparing them; the parish-clerk examined it also, but did not read it to me, nor I to him - I saw it signed - it was signed at the time I examined it.

This certificate was here read, and stated the child to have been baptized on the 31st of January, 1827, as Charles William, describing it as the son of Lydia Beadle, of Mr. Willis' poor-house, Lombard-street.

SARAH POMEROY. I have heard the prisoner's wife called Lydia.

MR. CLARKSON contended that the deceased child having been born out of wedlock had, in law, no name, consequently, if it had not by reputation acquired the name stated either in the indictment or inquisition, the case could not be supported, and that the certificate produced was not sufficiently shown to have been that of the deceased. - The Court ruled that the indictment and inquisition were bad, but ordered the prisoner to be detained, and the witnesses bound over, to prefer a fresh indictment .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18270531-15

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1027. SAMUEL PANTON was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for payment of 5l., with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, calling it a promissory note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intention to be to defraud Michael Hayes .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL HAYES. I am a higgler , and live on Saffronhill. On the 19th of April I was in the Haymarket , selling my fowls - the prisoner came and looked into my basket at them; I asked if he wanted to purchase any - he said he had lately had nine fowls stolen, and he wanted to replace them; I said I would serve him as well as any body - he paused for a moment, and asked what I would sell six hens and a cock for - I said 16s.; he turned away for about half a minute, then turned back, and said, "I will lay out 1l. with you;" I said, very well, he could have eight hens and a cock for that - he went to a cart about six yards off, and brought a small basket; we tied the legs of the fowls; I said the basket was too small, and they would be suffocated in it - but he did not care, and seemed not to care about what fowls he had - he left it all to me, and when he had got seven I said, "You want another;" he said, "Never mind, that is sufficient;" having put them into the basket, he said, "Have you change?" I said, "For what?" he said a 5l. note - I said I had; he gave me the note, and I gave him four sovereigns, and said, "Is this a good note?" he said, "Yes, as far as I know;" I went to look at the cart, to get the direction to put on the note, but found the cart was gone; I went into Mr. Jackson's, and showed him the note, which he looked at, and said it was bad - I ran up Piccadilly, and caught sight of the prisoner going into Regent-street, with the basket of fowls on his shoulder; I caught him by the shoulder, and said he must come back, for I believed the note he gave me was a bad one - he told me to let him go and stop the girl who was gone on with the cart, for fear she should go astray; I refused - he then put his hand into his pocket, and gave me the four sovereigns and the fowls. I then let him go and stop the cart - he returned in about a minute, and asked where the note was - I said at Mr. Jackson's, if he would return with me he could get it; we each took hold of the basket, and went to Jackson's - he said his name was Samuel Panton , of James-street, Kensington, but afterwards said, of Jennings'-buildings, Kensington - that he sold a horse at

Barnet fair, for 12l., to a man who said he was a butcher, living at Kingston, and took that note in part payment.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. What time was this? A. About ten o'clock; I asked him to buy the fowls - he did not bate me down at all; he had a donkey-cart, with a child ten or eleven years old in it. I am sure he said he lived in James-street at first.

MAGNUS JACKSON . I live at the corner of the Hay-market. Hayes brought me a note, which I at first thought was good, but afterwards said it was bad; he afterwards returned with the prisoner: I had kept the note in my hand, unmixed with any other; I asked his name; he said."Samuel Panton, No. 6, James-street, Kensington;" I said, "Are you quite certain you live in James-street?" he said, "Yes, that is my address;" he afterwards said Jennings'-buildings; I wrote both addresses on the note - this is it (looking at it); he said he took it from a butcher at Kingston, named Bourton, for the sale of a horse - I have written on it, "Of Mr. Bourton, Kingston." I sent for Herring, and he was secured. I gave Herring the note.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain he did not say he lived in Jennings'-buildings? A. He at first said he lived in James-street, but afterwards said Jennings'-buildings - my impression was that Jennings'-buildings were in James-street; I believe he said he was employed to sell the horse.

DAVID HERRING . I am inspector of the patrol, and took the prisoner in charge; he said he took the note at Barnet fair, in payment for a horse - he at first said he lived in James-street, and then in Jennings'-buildings; I asked who knew that he had the horse - he said it was not his own, but a gentleman in St. Paul's-church-yard, named Smith, gave it him to sell; I said, "Well, we will go there;" he said, "No, he is in the country." I found three persons in St. Paul's-church-yard of the name of Smith.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he did not say that Smith lived in Holborn? A. Yes - but when I was telling the Magistrate that he said St. Paul's-church-yard, he said, "No, I could not say that, for nobody lives there," and then said something about Holborn.

SARAH TYSON . I live at No. 11, Jennings'-buildings, Kensington; James street is at the bottom of Kensington-square, about half a mile from there. The prisoner lives in Jennings'-buildings, higher up than me - I do not know the number; I never knew him keep fowls; I have lived close to his stable seven years, and never saw any fowls there, though it was often open.

Cross-examined. Q. May you not have been for a month together without seeing his stable? A. Yes, or perhaps six weeks - he might have fowls.

ANN TILBURY . I am Tyson's daughter, and live in New-cut, opposite the prisoner's house - I have been into his apartments several times with his wife, and never saw any fowls there.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you ever in his stable? A. No.

JOSHUA SMITH . I am a silversmith, and live in St. Paul's-church-yard. I never employed the prisoner to sell a horse - I do not know him.

BAKER PETER SMITH . I have an office in the Chapter-house, St. Paul's-church-yard. I know nothing of the prisoner - I never employed him to sell a horse.

HENRY BATES SMITH . I am a wine-merchant, and do business in St. Paul's-church-yard. I do not know the prisoner, and never employed him to sell a horse.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note produced is forged throughout, in paper, plate, and signature.

ROGER CLOUGH . I am a clerk at the Bank, and authorized to sign 5l. notes. This note purports to be signed by me, but is not my signature - there is no other clerk of my name.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-16

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1028. THOMAS ROACH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Thompson , about two o'clock in the night of the 29th of April , at St. George, Hanover-square, with intent the goods and chattels therein being feloniously and burglariously to steal .

HENRY THOMPSON. I keep the Barley Mow public-house, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On Sunday night, the 29th of April, a little before twelve o'clock, I and my family went to bed; I had been into the cellar about twenty minutes past eleven, and tapped a barrel of ale - the cellar flap was all fast then - it was fastened with a padlock, which was safe. I was alarmed by the watchman about twenty minutes after two o'clock; he knocked at the door, and said there were thieves in the house; I came down, and got a light from the watchman - we both went into the cellar, which is part of the dwelling-house; I found the prisoner concealed behind two hogsheads of ale; I asked how he came there - he made no reply; I brought him out, and gave him in charge; he was taken into custody. I had locked the cellar door before I went to bed; when that door is open there is a communication from the cellar to the rest of the house - the flap between the cellar and the street was locked outside with a padlock, which fastened the bar of the flap - I found it broken open, and the padlock thrown away; the small flap was open - he must have got in that way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Must you get into your house to get at the cellar? A. Opening the flap would admit him without going through the house; the flap was broken open. I was the last person up, and took the key of the cellar-door with me.

HUGH PERRY . I am a watchman. I was going my rounds about two o'clock on the morning in question - I observed nothing particular at the prosecutor's cellar then, but at half-past two, when I came round again, I missed the padlock off the flap; I called to Stewart, and desired him to remain at the flap while I went round the corner, and called the landlord; the flap was put to, but not the bar; I went with the landlord into the cellar, and found the prisoner concealed between two butts - I took him to the watch-house; he made no resistance. I found nothing on him but two small latch-keys. The padlock was broken off; another watchman afterwards found it. The flap was put to, and the bar was down, not on the hasp.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he was beat about very

much? A. The landlord beat him over the arm with a stick.

JOHN STEWART . I am a watchman. I stood at the flap while Perry awoke the landlord; the man who found the padlock is not here.

HENRY THOMPSON . This is my padlock. The bar was fast over night, and the lock on it - I have a wife and one servant.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Duke-street, and dropped some silver on this flap; I stooped to pick it up - four or five men crossed the road, and threw me down into the cellar; I tried to get out again, but hearing the watchman I went behind the butts.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18270531-17

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1029. THOMAS PARKER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Harper , about nine o'clock in the night of the 28th of April , at St. Giles-in-the-Fields, with intent to steal, and stealing 1 pair of breeches, value 2l.; 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 pair of overalls, value 10s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of the said Thomas Harper.

THOMAS HARPER. I live at No. 4, China-mews, in the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields ; I have only one room over my stable; it is my dwelling-house. On the evening of the 18th of April I went out about half-past 8 or 9 o'clock - it was then dark; I fastened the door, and left nobody within. I returned about five minutes before ten, and found the stable door unlocked; it had been opened by a false key, for the lock was not injured; I then went up to my room, and found that door unlocked also; I had locked it, but left the key in the door - on going in I missed two livery coats, one from behind the door, and the other from off the bed; they were provided by my mistress, but were worn out, and were mine; I went to my box, and missed two pairs of breeches, a jacket, overalls, and waistcoat; they were all in the room when I went out; I also missed two stable jackets. I know nothing of the prisoner.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone-office. I have known the prisoner for three years; on Saturday night, the 28th of April, at a quarter or twenty minutes past ten o'clock, he passed me in Dean-street, Lisson-grove, with a bundle under his right arm; the instant he passed he turned, and seeing me following he flung the bundle down; I followed him about fifty yards, calling out Stop that man! the streets there have a number of turnings, and I did not pursue further, but turned back and picked up the bundle, fearing I should lose it; I am sure it is the same bundle. I saw him again next morning, at a quarter-past eight o'clock, standing at a corner shop in Lisson-street, with his face towards me - I was about fifty yards off; I suppose he saw me, for he turned his face, and looked into a shop: I ran up, and caught him by the collar of his coat; he did not run away; I said, "You ran from me last night, but I have caught you this morning, and you must go with me;" he asked what for - I said for the bundle which he had flung down; he then laid down, and said he would not go unless I fetched a coach - I took him to the office. I am positive he is the man, for I have seen him about twelve times a week for the last two or three years. I produce the bundle.

T. HARPER. Here are two pairs of breeches, two pairs of overalls, and a pair of livery breeches, all of which are mine, and were in my room when I left - the coats have not been found.

Prisoner. I know nothing about them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18270531-18

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1030. NATHANIEL VICARY , JOHN SAUNDERS , and JOHN CROSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of a certain person whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . I am one of the City day patrol. On the 23d of May, about a quarter before eleven o'clock in the morning, I was on Holborn-bridge, and saw the three prisoners following two gentlemen up Skinner-street, till they came to Snow-hill; the gentlemen then both crossed over, and went on towards Newgate-street; the prisoners turned about in another direction, and in a few minutes I saw them following a gentleman who had a small part of his handkerchief hanging out of his coat pocket - they continued to follow him, and when they got within a few yards of Hatton-garden I saw Saunders take hold of the gentleman's left-hand pocket with his left hand, and put his right hand into the pocket, which he lifted up, and took a handkerchief out - it appeared to me to be a red one; the other prisoners were close by; the gentleman did not perceive it; I saw Saunders hand it to Croson. I was on the opposite side. I ran across, and secured Croson - Lovell, who was with me, took another of them; I put Croson into the watch-house, which is close by, and then ran to assist Lovell, who had hold of one of the prisoners; Cox had the other - I am sure they were all three in company, and close together at the time the handkerchief was taken. I found two handkerchiefs in Croson's hat. I do not know the gentleman - I had no opportunity of informing him.

WILLIAM COX . I am a watchman. I was coming down Hatton-garden, and heard a cry of Stop thief! Saunders was running, pursued by several - he ran the fastest, but I stopped him; Lovell came up, and charged him with picking a gentleman's pocket. I took him to the watch-house. Wiltshire produced a red and yellow handkerchief from Croson, and I have another yellow one found in his hat.

JAMES LOVELL . I was on Holborn-bridge, and saw the three prisoners following two gentlemen; they left them by Snow-hill, and turned back - a gentleman passed them, whom they immediately followed; he had a parcel in each hand, and his handkerchief hung a little out of his pocket. Between Ely-place and Hatton-garden I saw Saunders take the handkerchief, and give it to Croson; the three prisoners were then together; I and Wiltshire directly crossed - they were then turning up Hatton-garden; Wiltshire took Croson, and I took Vicary - Cox took Saunders; I saw two handkerchiefs found on Croson - one of which was red, with a border to it, and that was the one he took from the gentleman's pocket - it has not been claimed.

CROSON's Defence. The handkerchief belongs to my brother, who is at work in the country.

VICARY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SAUNDERS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CROSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270531-19

1031. WILLIAM BRIFFITT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 gelding, price 20l., the property of Charles John Brickerton Chesterton ; 1 cart, value 20l., the goods of Richard Spike ; 12 fowls, value 4l. 16s.; 12 other fowls, value 3l., and 6 ducks, value 1l. 7s. , the goods of Richard Spike and Robert Spike .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT SPIKE. My father is a poulterer , and lives in Jermyn-street, St. James' - I carry on business in the same shop with him, but am not in partnership with him; his name is Richard. On the 7th of May I went to Leadenhall-market with his cart, and a gelding belonging to Charles John Brickerton Chesterton; Parsons was with me - we got there about half-past five o'clock in the morning, and went into the market to purchase poultry, leaving the cart and horse in Gracechurch-street, as usual- I bought twelve fowls, twelve chickens, and six ducks - the fowls were delivered to Hart, to take to the cart; when I returned the cart, gelding, and all were gone. I have seen two of my fowls in the possession of one Royer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were they dead or alive? A. Dead; I never saw Chesterton write, but have heard him repeat all his names.

WILLIAM PARSONS . I am servant to Mr. Chesterton. I was with Spike; I went into the market to make some purchases, leaving the cart in Gracechurch-street. I have seen two fowls in the possession of Wallis, and know them to be two of those I bought; I had sent them to the cart by a porter; when I went to look for the cart it was gone - I had been absent about half an hour.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you still in Chesterton's service? A. Yes - his horse was brought to Jermyn-street by a person; my fowls were dead and plucked - I had put no mark on them - I had bought two dozen, and these two were precisely of the same quality and sort as the cost; they were tied the same way, by the leg; fowls are not all tied that way. I say they are two of the fowls - I bought them of Brooks, who had a great many fowls.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you see them? A. I think it was the day after I lost them - they had a few feathers left about the head.

JAMES HART . I am a porter at Leadenhall-market. - On the 7th of May I took a dozen large fowls from Spike for Mr. Liven - I put them into Spike's cart, which stood in Gracechurch-street - I have known that cart for years; there was a horse to it; I put them into his box in the cart and came away.

WILLIAM TOMKINS . I am servant to Mr. Bailey, a poulterer, of Davies-street, Berkeley-square. I was in Gracechurch-street on the 7th of May, and saw Spike's cart there, with a horse in it - I know it to be his; I saw the prisoner in the cart, driving it away; I had never seen him before, but have not the least doubt of him - he was in Gracechurch-street, driving it towards Bishopsgate.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time was this? A. It might be twenty minutes before seven o'clock - he had a hat on, and I think he wore the same coloured coat that he has now; he was driving very slow, and without a whip; I did not suspect him - he was not more than a minute passing me, it was just by the Cross Keys, opposite the market; his hat shone - I cannot say whether it was a glazed one.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. The cart was on the opposite side to you? A. Yes, just across the road; I took sufficient notice to be able to swear to him positively, when I saw him at the office.

MARY WALLIS . On the 7th of May I made a purchase of a man, but I cannot swear to him, I took so little notice.

JAMES MACKINTOSH . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. On the 16th of May I was fetched to the Turk's Head public-house, Charlotte-street, Portland-place, and Mr. Trapnell gave the prisoner into my charge; I told him it was for taking a horse and cart - he said the fowls he had sold Trapnell he had taken in exchange for string, in St. Giles', of a man whom he only knew by sight; I found some string and 17s. 6d. on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is Trapnell? A. He is dead. Trapnell said he had dealt with him for string for seven years.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-20

1032. WILLIAM ROWLAND WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , at St. Andrew Undershaft, 1 gold watch, value 20l., the goods of Thomas Dobson and others, his partners, in their dwelling-house .

HENRY GLOVER . I am a goldsmith and jeweller , and live at No. 144, Leadenhall-street ; Thomas Dobson is my partner; there are three partners in the firm; our house is in the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft; we all three live in the house to which the shop belongs; it is two houses, but one shop. On Wednesday, the 28th of March, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop, and desired to see a gold watch, which was taken from the window and shown to him; that was not exactly what he wanted, and another was shown to him; and in all eight were shown him, one after the other; he did not bargain for either of them, but wished then to see some watch-chains; three were shown him; he very quickly decided that one would suit him, and then wished to see some seals. and Barnes, our shopman, took a tray out of the window and before he could lay the tray down on the counter, the prisoner, in a very hurried manner, said, "I will just step over to the India-house and fetch my father, who will select one for me; he had not looked at the seals; the shopman stepped to the door and watched him; he never returned, either alone or with his father; in the space of a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes we missed a gold watch; no other customer had been into the shop at all, from the time the prisoner was there till the watch was missed; I had been in the shop all that twenty minutes; nobody could have come in and taken it without my perceiving it; I had put the watches in a place of safety. I did not see him again till a month or five weeks afterwards, when he was at Hatton-garden. I did not know him before he came to the shop, but was quite sure he was the person who had bargained for the goods; he was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour

within my observation, with only the counter between us; he did not pay for any thing, nor fix on a watch; I saw the watch at the office, and am quite certain it is ours, by a private mark - I should charge 20l. for it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had never seen him before? A. No; I was not showing him the goods, but merely looking on; he had a hat on; Mr. Dobson has no other Christian name; I have known him thirty years; the watch is worth 20l. at an under value; the price of it is 24l.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARNES . I am shopman to the prosecutors. On the 28th of March I saw the prisoner in the shop, and am quite certain of his person; he was there fifteen or twenty minutes; he came in and asked to look at a gold watch; I shewed him one - he looked at several in succession, but agreed for none of them - they were put on the counter before him - he then asked to look at some watch-chains - three were shown him - he chose one almost directly - it was not paid for - I do not recollect the price - he then asked to look at some seals - I took a tray from the window, and before I had put it on the counter, he said he would step over to the India-house, to fetch his father to make choice of a seal for him - he left the shop, without paying for any thing, and never returned - I saw him go under the portico of the India-house, but could not observe whether he went in - we missed the watch in fifteen or twenty minutes - I had not delivered him either watch, chain, or seal - if he took either away it was without my knowledge or consent - he was a perfect stranger before - I never saw him again till he was in custody, about a month afterwards, at Hatton-garden - I saw the watch there, and have no doubt of it - the selling price is twenty-four guineas ready money.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you live in the house? A. Yes; Mr. Baker is the third partner - they all three sleep in the house.

THOMAS CORDING . I am a jeweller, and live in Holborn. About the latter end of March a person came into my shop to look at some watch-keys - I know nothing of this case.

ALFRED MARTIN . I am an officer of St. Andrew, Holborn. On the 25th of April the prisoner was given into my charge for stealing a gold watch - I searched him, and found in his breeches pocket a gold watch, which I produce - it had a chain and seal to it - I took him to Hatton-garden - Mr. Glover and Barnes both claimed the watch there - I have had it ever since - the prisoner gave no account of it.

MR. GLOVER. This is the watch - it has our private mark, which is a number and figures in a private character; I can tell that the number is 1878, but cannot tell the private number without looking at it - I put that down on a piece of paper, but not as soon as I missed the watch - there is a private mark on it, made by my young man, besides the number - I observed the private mark before it was stolen; it is still on it; my stock-book corroborates the mark; I have not got the book itself, but a copy of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you look at the private mark when you stood up here? A. Yes; but I could not carry it in my mind; I saw the private number at the office, but did not take it down there; I copied this number from my stockbook to-day; I can swear to the hand-writing on the watch.

Q. If you had been asked at the office what the number on the watch was, could you have told without looking at it? A. Yes; I had advertized it in a bill as No. 1878 before that, but that is the manufacturer's number, not my private one.

COURT. Q. After seeing the number at the office, did you know it to be yours? A. Yes; I knew it from its general appearance as well, and am certain of it - the private mark is scratched on it by my shopman - I enter in my shop-book the manufacturer's number and my private number against it - my shopman can also swear to it.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARNES re-examined. To the best of my recollection the private number is 104(looking at the watch), that is on it - it is a private mark made by myself - I have not the slightest doubt of its being the watch, both from the private mark and its general appearance; we have never sold No. 104, nor one with the manufacturer's No. 1878 - we always mark them off when they are sold.

Cross-examined. Q. What paper did I see you give your master? A. The ticket which was in the window, specifying the price of the watch; I told the magistrate the private mark on the watch before I saw it - I have looked at the watch-paper since I have been here to refresh my memory; both the paper and the number on the watch are my hand-writing; we have two letters of the alphabet as private marks, each answering to one number - the first two letters are either F. B. or B. N. - there must be two of those letters on the watch, but I do not name them as coupled, and I think the selling price underneath is either E. N. or I. R. two of those four letters; I have put no figures on it besides 104 myself; if 6 is on it, it has been added since - I have been two years and a quarter in the shop, and do not recollect selling any of this particular description of watch; my master has no more of that make and fashion, though it is not peculiar.

COURT. Q. When was the bill printed about the watch? A. The next morning; that only stated the No. 1878; No. 104 on the watch is in my hand-writing; I never marked any other gold watch with that number; I have not the slightest doubt of this being the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18270531-21

1033. WILLIAM ROWLAND WILLIAMS was again indicted for stealing on the 27th of March , 1 seal, value 42s., the goods of Samuel Jones , in his dwelling-house .

MR. SAMUEL JONES. I am a jeweller . I live in Cheapside , and rent the house - I know the prisoner's person. On the 27th of March, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, he came into the shop, and asked to look at some gold chains - I showed him one or two; he then asked to see some gold seals, which I showed him; he was about ten minutes in my sight, with only the counter between us; he turned his back to me, and pretended to count the money in his waistcoat pocket; he then said he had not sufficient money, but would call again, and went out - I did not see him again, till about a month afterwards, when I found him at Hatton-garden; immediately as he left, I thought I missed a gold seal, and on looking over the tray next morning I missed a very remarkable one; I only had one of that pattern; it was a plain stone, but the shape was remarkable - I found it at Hatton-garden, and have no doubt of it; it is worth about two guineas, and cost me more.

ALFRED MARTIN . I am a constable. I apprehended

the prisoner on the 25th of April; I found on him a gold watch, and this gold seal was fastened to it - I have had it ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Whether there is a young man in town like me or no I cannot tell, but I am innocent.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Reference Number: t18270531-22

1034. ELIZABETH DRAYNIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 carpet, value 5s. , the goods of Rebecca Inwood .

REBECCA INWOOD. I live in Angel-court, Angel-street, St. Martin's-le-grand . I am a widow . This carpet was on my first floor landing-place at a quarter before eleven o'clock, on the 23d of May, when I went out - I have a lodger, and the door is often open; when I returned at night I found the prisoner in custody with it.

MARY REYNOLDS . I lodge on the ground floor; about eleven o'clock in the morning, I heard somebody coming down stairs - I opened the door, and found the prisoner, who was a stranger, at the bottom of the stairs, with the carpet in her possession; she asked for some name which I could not understand, and I gave her in charge.

JOHN TONGUE . I took her in charge; she dropped the carpet at the door, when I came up, and said it was her own, and they could not hurt her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-23

1035. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 pair of trousers, value 9s. 6d. , the goods of Stephen Whitaker .

STEPHEN WHITAKER. I keep a pawnbroker's shop , in Long-lane, Smithfield . These trousers hung inside my shop, but within reach of a person who was passing - I saw the prisoner come to the door, snatch them down, and run away - I pursued, and did not lose sight of him, till he turned into Charterhouse-lane, where he threw them down; the beadle stopped him - I am sure he is the man.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am a constable, and have the trousers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-24

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JUNE 2.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1036. WILLIAM WANT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 watch, value 4l., the goods of Robert Travill , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT TRAVILL. I am a labourer . I rent two rooms over a stable in Water-street, Strand ; no one lives there but myself; the prisoner had worked with me nearly four months, for Mr. Hutchings. On the 25th of April, when I went out, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I left my wife and child at home, and the watch on the mantel-piece of the lower room; my wife came to me at one o'clock - I went home and missed the watch, and have never found it: it cost me four guineas twenty years ago; the prisoner was taken the next day.

MARY TRAVILL . I am the prosecutor's daughter, and am eight years old. I knew the prisoner before this happened; he came at twenty minutes to ten o'clock, when my mother was gone out to market, and brought a shirt for my mother to wash; he told me to carry it up stairs; I said, "Let it lay there till mother comes home;" he said, "No, take it up-stairs," but I let it lay there - I saw him go and warm his hands at the fire; he then took up this watch, and put it into his breeches pocket, and went away with it; my mother came home to dinner at one o'clock: nobody but him had been in the room, while she was gone.

SARAH TRAVILL . I am the prosecutor's wife. The watch was safe at twenty-five minutes past ten o'clock, when I went out - I returned ten minutes to eleven - I left nobody but my daughter at home - I did not miss the watch till one o'clock, not having looked for it; I said nothing to the child about it - I never washed for the prisoner; he had no business in my place - I found a dirty shirt there.

JOHN SCOTT . I apprehended the prisoner on the day of the robbery - I found three half crowns on him; he said, "I know nothing about the watch."

Prisoner's Defence (written). I went to Travill's apartment with my shirt to be washed, and left it with the little girl, but never saw the watch.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-25

1037. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , at St. George, Hanover-square, two candlesticks, value 13l., the goods of Ann Elizabeth Mountague Douglass Scott , spinster, commonly called Lady Ann Scott, in her dwelling-house .

JAMES SAXEY . I am butler to Lady Ann Scott, her names are Ann Elizabeth Mountague Douglass Scott, she lives at No. 3, Chaple-street, Grosvenor-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On Sunday, the 18th of June, 1826, at eight o'clock in the morning, I missed a pair of silver candlesticks from the pantry, which is in the middle of the house, down-stairs; I cannot swear that I had seen them since Friday morning; the area-door is occasionally open - I saw them again at the Police-office, on the 7th of July, and knew them; I brought them from the office on the 14th; they are now in Court- I know them to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know where they were yesterday? A. They have been in common use, mixed with other candlesticks since; there are two pairs of the same pattern; but I can tell those which were stolen; my mistress is not married; she is the daughter of a Duke.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 17th of June, 1826, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Petticoat-lane with Hanley, and saw the prisoner on the same side of the way as we were; he crossed over, and I crossed also; he had a basket, and was in company with another man; they immediately ran away, and separated; he ran down a small alley into

Bell-lane: his hat fell off - he threw the basket down, and one of these candlesticks fell out - I picked up the basket, and the other candlestick in it - Hanley still pursued him, but lost him. I was on the top of a Hackney stage, on the Thursday following, and saw him - I got off, and caught hold of him by his coat and handkerchief; but he got away, leaving his coat and handkerchief in my hand - I found him in the police van the other day, and identified him - I advertized the candlesticks, and marked them before I delivered them to the butler.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer, and was in Petticoat-lane. I saw the prisoner and another man cross over, nearly opposite the Coventry Cross public-house; the prisoner ran up Frying-pan-alley; his hat fell off, and he threw away a basket, which Waters picked up - I pursued him into Bell-lane, but he got away - I returned, and met Waters with the basket and two candlesticks, which I now produce, the butler having delivered them to me since he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far were you behind? A. I was within six or seven yards at one time - I saw his face a short time - I never saw him again, till the 3d or 4th of May.

THOMAS WATERS . These are the candlesticks - here is a mark which I put on them before I parted with them.

JAMES SAXEY . These are my mistress' property: they are solid silver, and worth full thirteen guineas.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why, the initials on them do not answer to your mistress' names? A. They are meant for the three sisters: they all live in the house - I cannot swear that they are not their joint property.

COURT. Q. Who is mistress of the house? A. Lady Ann Scott; the house is rented by her: she pays the rates and taxes, and the servants' wages - I have been fourteen years in her service.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270531-26

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1038. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , at St. George, 1 pier glass, value 2l. 10s., and 1 gilt frame, value 1l. 10s., the goods of George Daniels , in his dwelling-house ; and THOMAS BAILEY was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, and at the same parish, the aforesaid goods, he well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen , against the statute.

ANN REARDON . I am servant at the Prince of Wales public-house, Hermitage-street : it is kept by George Daniels. On the 18th of December, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, when I got up, I found a chair put against the door, which was open, and the weight, which was fastened to it the night before, was cut off; that would make a noise when the door was opened, sufficient to awake any body in the house - I went into the parlour and missed the looking-glass, which hung against the wall: it was a large sized glass - the prisoner Smith lodged in the house at the time, and for about a fornight before; upon missing the glass, I went up to his room, and he was not there, but the other two lodgers were still in the house - I did not see Smith again, till he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you saw him at the office there was an examination? A. Yes - he was set at liberty the first time, and taken again some weeks afterwards; he was first taken I think about a month after the robbery.

GEORGE DANIELS. I keep this public-house . On the 18th of December Smith went to bed, with a small piece of candle, about eleven o'clock - I fastened the doors that night; I locked the parlour door, but the key was left in it; I also locked the front door. I did not see Smith go up to bed, but heard him go up - I never saw him any more till the 24th of January; he had taken the lodging by the week - his week commenced on Tuesday or Wednesday; it was on Monday night that he left: he was brought to my house by a friend on the 24th of January, and I gave him into custody - he was discharged at the office, as the property was not found. On the 17th of May I went to the prisoner Bailey's house, No. 9, Roger-street, Bethnal-green, and saw my glass hanging up in his parlour - it was worth about 4l.; the plate is worth 2l. 10s., and the frame 30s. - it was not nailed to my wall, but hung on a hook, and rested on two nails at the bottom - the weight was on the door at night on the 18th of December, and the next morning it was cut off, and found laying on the ground; it must have been taken off by somebody inside. My house is in the parish of St. George, Middlesex.

Cross-examined. Q. What time do you generally get up? A. At a quarter to eight o'clock; my lodgers are working men - I had two others, one of them is here; if a man wants to go out early he can pull the lock back and open the door; I had not moved any of my goods about this time. I have had the glass about five years, and have a mark on it, which I can swear to; any body might see it hanging in Bailey's room, if the parlour door was open - his is a private house; Smith was discharged a week after the 24th of January, and retaken on the 17th of May.

ANDREW BIGGS . I lodged at Daniel's house at this time, and slept in the adjoining room to Smith; I have to go through his room to get to mine - he came to bed after me on the night before the glass was missed; I did not hear him come to bed. Between one and two o'clock on the morning of the 19th I saw a light shining under the door of his room; I got up, went into his room, and said I was afraid he had left the candle near the bed, and danger might arise - he was laying on the bed, with his clothes on, quite dressed, and the candle was placed very near the grate; he told me to go into my own room, and not trouble myself with him; I went away, and went to sleep; I awoke again, and heard the clock strike four; the candle was then burning, but I did not see it afterwards.

ADAM HIGH . I am an officer of the Thames Police. Smith was given into my custody on the 24th of January; I asked where he lived, and he refused to tell me; I asked again, and he said sometimes in one place and sometimes in another, but refused to say where; I asked if he wished to send for any body; he said No, but after the examination he sent me to the prisoner Bailey; I found him at work at a house in Bedford-square, Commercial-road, and told him Smith wished him to come to him in prison; he said he would go. I told him he was charged with stealing a looking-glass. Daniels, who was with me, had

some conversation with Bailey, who promised that he would have some conversation with Smith, and get out of him what had become with the glass if he could, and that he would let Daniels know the result. I saw Bailey at the office about a week afterwards, and asked if he had seen Smith - he said Yes, and that he believed he knew nothing about the glass at all, and that he himself never knew any harm of him; Smith was discharged, and Bailey, he, and Bailey's wife, as I suppose, all went away together; Bailey's wife was at the office with him all day, till Smith was discharged. On the 17th of May a warrant was put into my hands, and I went, with Daniels and Blabey, to No. 9, Robert-street, Bethnal-green; I saw the same woman in the house as I had seen with Bailey; this looking-glass was in the room - Daniels said it was his, but it had been altered; I brought it away, and have it here. I went that day to Tottenham-court-road, and found Bailey working at a house there, as a carpenter - I told him I had been to his house, No. 9, Robert-street - he said he lived there when I asked him; I said, "The glass we have found in your house is said to be stolen from Mr. Daniels;" he said, "That glass - I bought it at a sale in Gracechurch-street;" I asked what he gave for it - he said 5l., about two years ago; I asked who was the auctioneer - he said Mitchell, of Norton-falgate. I took him into custody, and on our way to the office he said, that when he bought the glass it was in a mahogany frame, and he had since had a new gilt frame put to it, and that he could produce the person who had put the frame to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take Smith? A. Yes, the first time - it was on the 24th of January that I told Bailey that Smith was taken for stealing the glass; he knew I was an officer. I did not know where he lived till the 17th of May - he did not deny the house being his.

ANN FORBES . I live in the Dog-row, Bethnal-green - Bailey lives a good way from me; his daughter came to my house in the winter, about January or February - she is a young woman; she came with her sister; one stood over the way, opposite my window - the other came over, and said something, and in a very few minutes brought a looking-glass over - they said it was a looking-glass; I did not unpack it - it was taken away sometime afterwards.

FRANCIS FOSSEY . I live with Mr. Pitcher, a looking-glass manufacturer, at No. 16, High-street, Shoreditch. I remember the day of the Duke of York's funeral - I think about a week before that a man and a woman brought a looking-glass to the shop, and I took it of them; Bailey is the man, I am quite sure; I saw him at the Thames Police-office afterwards, and saw the woman at a public-house just by the office, with two ladies. I am sure Bailey is the man who brought the glass - they asked if we brouzed glasses over, and the woman said, "We want this glass done over" - the frame was all gilt then; she said they wished some parts of it bronzed, like one which I showed them in the shop - I did it according to her direction, and should know it again - we kept it till the day of the Duke of York's funeral; the same woman who brought it then called, and asked if it was done; I said Yes, and showed it to her; she approved of it, and asked me to take it home - I took it to a street on the left-hand side of Bethnal-green-road, and the house was on the lefthand of the street - I think it was No. 9; she went with me, and I left it there; I am sure Bailey is the man who accompanied the woman with it. (Looking at the glass) I am certain this is it; the parts which are now bronzed were gilt before - we were obliged to take the glass out of the frame while we did it - we put this black stripe inside the frame.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not two brass things to nail it to the wall? A. I think not.

BENJAMIN BLABEY . I am an officer, and accompanied High - I know nothing more.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the glass nailed to Bailey's wall? A. It hung up.

GEORGE DANIELS. This is my glass - I can swear to it; it was all gilt when I lost it; some part is now bronze - I know it by a bruise in the frame, and a defect in the quick-silvering - it was valued by an appraiser at 4l. 10s. - it is worth 4l. now - I have been in this trade myself.

Cross-examined. Q. Were these defects in the frame when you bought it? A. Yes; it was not new then; I bought it five years ago - it was not nailed at all.

BAILEY's Defence. I bought it and paid for it honestly.

Two witnesses gave Smith a good character, and four deposed the same for Bailey.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy, in consequence of his good character .

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-27

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1039. WILLIAM PHILIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 yard of quilting, value 6s.; 6 gross of buttons, value 2l. 14s.; 5 yards of linen, value 5s.; 12 reels of cotton, value 2s.; 11/2 yard of linen, value 1s.; 1 brush, value 1s.; 1 box, value 1s. 6d., and 5 yards of calico, value 2s. 8d., the goods of George Hudson and William Henry Story , his masters, in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM HENRY STORY. I am in partnership with George Hudson - we are tailors and drapers , and live in Bond-street. The prisoner was engaged by us as groom , but has lately acted as our porter. In consequence of information, about the second week in May, I gave him in charge of Lewis, in my shop, as I had an anonymous letter; I and the constable went with him to his lodging in Lancashire-court, Bond-street; we found our property there, concealed in different parts of the room - there were buttons, various wrappers, and some remnants of calico; I found in a box, which was locked, different lengths of Irish linen, four or five yards together, and a new clothes brush; we could not miss this property, as it was taken from a large quantity, and perhaps at different times; he had no access to our premises except when he was in our service. No one article is worth 40s.

THOMAS LEWIS . I took the prisoner on the 17th; we found the property at his lodgings - two or three wrappers were under the bed, that might be merely to put them out of the way. Mr. Story said, "You have served me a nice thing;" he said he took the property, but did not say where from.

MR. STORY. To the best of my recollection he said he took the property from my house, or my premises. I

received a good character with him, which I believe is true.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270531-28

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1040. MICHAEL WHITE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Butler , on the King's Highway, on the 13th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 watch, value 20s. , his property.

EDWARD BUTLER. I am a stone-mason , and live in Margaret-street. I have known the prisoner from a boy. On the 13th of May I was in a public-house in Rosemary-lane , about seven o'clock in the evening; as I came out I saw him in the house; he said, "Mr. Butler, I know you, come and drink with me;" I said, "No; I shall go home;" I took a glass of gin and peppermint at the bar, and was waiting for an acquaintance inside; but as he did not come, I was walking away slowly, alone; the prisoner met me in a court, thirty or forty yards from the door; another man was standing with him; the prisoner struck me in the face with his fist, and knocked me down; he beat and kicked me when I was down; I bled at my nose and mouth; I called robbery and murder; my watch must have been taken from me on the ground, for I had hold of it while I was down, and turned and laid hold of the prisoner's legs, but he got away; I lost a handkerchief from my hat; I was sober; somebody helped me up, and I was informed the prisoner was in custody; the officer brought him to me; he denied having my watch or handkerchief; I have not found either of them.

FRANCIS LEONARD . I am a labourer, and live in White's-yard. I was standing at the corner of the yard, and saw the prisoner running down Rosemary-lane, pursued by several persons, calling, Stop thief! I stopped him, and asked what was the matter; he said he was fighting, and obliged to flee, as there were so many against him; his coat was torn, and he was bloody; the mob gathered round him, and he said the first who struck him he would fight.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I desire you to save my life? A. He said they were going to kill him.

GEORGE GRIEVE . I am a headborough. I was fetched to quell a disturbance at this public-house; there was a cry to Stop thief! and about two hundred people were running after the prisoner; I got into the crowd and took him; the prosecutor was not sober; he could not stand; he told me he had had part of six or seven pots of beer and half-and-half; he told me at the watch-house that White had knocked him down and robbed him.

E. BUTLER. I was sober; I had not drank half a pint of beer, for it made me ill; I was sober enough to go home.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had been drinking; that the prosecutor had called him a thief and other bad names, for which he struck him, but never touched his property, and that the prosecutor's friends surrounded him to take his part, which induced him to run away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-29

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1041. NORAH RAGAN and JULIA DRISCOLL were indicted for feloniously assaulting Jacob Abohbot , on the 30th of April , at St. Giles-in-the-Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will 7 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 13s.; 1 dress, value 1l. 8s., and 1 shawl, value 1l. 6s. , his property.

JACOB AROHBOT. I am a native of Morocco, and a licensed hawker . On Monday, the 30th of April, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was at the White Lion public-house, High-street, St. Giles, both the prisoners were there; Driscoll asked me to give her a glass of gin, to which I agreed; the landlord refused to draw it; she and I left the house; Ragan did not go with us; we went to another public-house in St. Giles'; I gave her a glass of gin there; she asked if I had a handkerchief to sell her like one which I sold the servant of the White Lion a week before - I said I had; she said, "If you will come with me, I will look at them;" we left the house together, and went down Maynard-street ; we met Ragan; Driscoll asked her to go with her to look at the silks, and we all three went into a house in that street, into a room up-stairs; I opened my bundle, which contained shawls, dresses, and handkerchiefs; they looked at them, and said they wanted nothing; they asked me for drink, and I gave Driscoll 1s. to let me go out, as I saw I was in a hobble, as she said she would not let me go till I gave her something to drink; I had my bundle all safe at that time I am sure; she sent Ragan out with the 1s. for some gin; she returned with some, and asked me to give her the change, which I did; they drank the gin between them; I was coming away, but Ragan laid hold of me - she said nothing, but held me - I desired her to let go of me - I could not get from her, for Driscoll came and took my bundle of goods out of my hand, and kicked me down-stairs - I got up, pulled the bundle from her, and looked it over to see what I had lost out of it; when I took hold of it she let go, after getting what she liked out of it; I did not see what she got out, as I was falling down-stairs; Driscoll took the bundle, but Ragan was standing by at the time; I then left the house with my bundle; I examined it in about two minutes, by the door of a public-house near the house, and missed a silk dress, worth 29s., six silk handkerchiefs, a crape handkerchief, and two crape shawls; I am sure I dropped nothing out of it myself, for I held it tight in my hands - it was loose when I left the house where they were; I gathered it up in my hand for fear I should lose any thing more; all was safe after I had shown them my goods; I am sure they took them from the bundle after they kicked me down-stairs; when I missed the things I went for Castles, the beadle; I found him in the street; he went with me to the room where I had left them, but they were both gone; I described them to him, and about eleven o'clock I saw Driscoll at the White Lion; I am sure of her - I called Leonard, the watchman, and she was taken - Ragan was brought into the watch-house at half-past eleven - I knew her directly she was brought in - I pointed her out to Castles myself - she was not pointed out to me - I was sober.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you perfectly sober? A. Quite so; I had been drinking after that, but not before I had my supper.

Q. At what o'clock did you go to drink and have your supper? A. About a quarter to twelve - I went to bed at twelve - I was locked out of my lodgings, and slept in a room near the house I was robbed in - I had not been there before, and do not know whether it was the same house or not

- I found in the morning that it was Maynard-street, No. 9; I supped at the Castle inn, Oxford-street - I did not know, till morning, that I had slept in the same street - a woman said she would give me a bed, because she saw I was locked out - she was a stranger - I did not ask the prisoners to let me sleep there, or offer any one 2s. 6d. for a bed - I gave the woman 6d. for the bed - I was not with the prisoners half an hour altogether.

Q. Will you swear you did not sleep in the very same room? A. I could not swear about it, as I did not take notice of the room - I had dined before the prisoners met me, and drank half a pint of beer, but no spirits - I treated Driscoll with two-penny worth of gin at the public-house, and had one penny worth of beer myself - she asked me to treat her, and stood at the door talking to a person, while I was at the bar - I showed them all my goods - they examined them for about five minutes - I never let go of the bundle while they were robbing me - I did not see the goods taken, but when I opened the bundle I missed them; I used to see Driscoll at the White Lion before, but never saw the other.

MORRIS LEONARD . I am a watchman of St. Giles'. The prosecutor came to me about eleven o'clock - Driscoll was brought out of the White Lion to me, and I took her into custody by his orders; he pointed her out to me - he seemed to be sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know where he slept that night? A. In Maynard-street - I do not know the house - he told me he lodged in Oxford-street, at the Boar and Castle.

J. ABOHBOT re-examined. I lodged at the Castle, in Oxford-street; I do not know whether it is called the Boar; I supped there before the robbery, at half-past nine o'clock, and after that went, at a quarter to eleven, to another public-house - I went to look for the prisoners after I was robbed.

Q. Then you went home to sup after being robbed? A. After being robbed; I was robbed about half-past six.

CHARLES CASTLES . I am a patrol of St. Giles'. The prosecutor came to me about a quarter before seven o'clock on this evening - he lives about a thousand yards from where he came to me; he took me to a second-floor room, No. 9, Maynard-street; I found neither of the prisoners there; he described their persons, and about a quarter past eleven I took Ragan from his description - I took her to the watch-house, and he was there with Driscoll, and said, as soon as she entered, "That is one of the women."

Q. He took you to the house he was robbed at? A. Yes.

RAGAN'S Defence. I know nothing of him.

DRISCOLL'S Defence. I know nothing of the man.

RAGAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

DRISCOLL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270531-30

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1042. THOMAS CARTER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Frances Wallis , widow , on the King's highway, on the 20th of April , at St. George, Bloomsbury, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 reticule, value 20s.; 1 purse, value 5s., and 4 sovereigns , her property.

FRANCES WALLIS. I am a widow, and live in Great Russell-street. On the 20th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Charlotte-street, crossing to go into Holborn , and by the side of the chapel a man caught hold of my bag - I held it very tight, with the chain in my hand - I had not seen him before - he caught hold of me very roughly, and tried to drag the bag out of my hand - I screamend violently, and resisted all I could, having the chain round my hand; he succeeded in getting it away, by breaking the chain, and leaving the broken part in my hand - I was very much frightened - it was a French bead reticule, containing a purse, four sovereigns, a Morocco pocket-book, and a small bunch of watch seals- he immediately ran away - I followed him down Phoenix-street, calling, Stop thief! but he got away - Martin, the beadle, came up soon after - I described the man to him, and saw him at Marlborough-street the next evening - I am quite sure the prisoner is the man - I had an opportunity of looking in his face, and have not the least doubt of him - it happend near my own door - I have found none of my property.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am beadle of Bloomsbury. On the 20th of April, about half - past two or three o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Wallis made a communication to me, and by her description I apprehended the prisoner coming down Church-street, St. Giles - I had another beadle with me - when he saw me, he ran down into a cellar in the street - I went down and secured him - I took him to the watch-house, and then to Marlborough-street, where Mrs. Wallis came and identified him immediately.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18270531-31

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1043. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 6 gowns, value 20s.; 12 aprons, value 5s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 5s.; 3 night-gowns, value 5s.; 10 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 6 petticoats, value 5s.; 2 pairs of stays, value 5s.; 9 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 10 shifts, value 10s., and 1 sovereign, the property of Sarah Steele , in the dwelling-house of Henry Bond .

SARAH STEELE. On the 13th of January I left the service of Mr. Henry Bond, of Park-road, Regent's-park - I left a box there in care of Moore, my fellow-servant, which contained all this property - he was to send it to my sister's, in Castle-place, Pimlico, where I went to lodge - I have not seen the box, or its contents since - my property was worth 13l.

GIDEON MOORE . I was Steele's fellow-servant, and took charge of her box on the 13th - it was locked - I delivered it to the prisoner (whom I knew before) on the 17th, to deliver at No. 2, Castle-place, Castle-lane, Pimlico - that direction was nailed on it - I saw no more of him or the box.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are there any other servants beside you? A. Only one - I gave it to him outside the gate, locked and corded, as she had left it - I have known him two years - he was formerly a watchman.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I apprehended the prisoner in the Uxbridge-road, between Tyburn-gate and Bayswater - he was talking to a woman, who saw me within twenty yards of them - she then turned her head, and he instantly walked away very sharp - he did not run - she knew I was a constable - I overtook, and collared him, saying, "I have got you at last, Young" - he said, "What is the matter?" I said, "I believe your name is Young;" he said No, in a

low tone of voice - I said I took him for stealing a box from No. 10, Park-row - he said he knew nothing about it- as I was going to lock him up, he said, "It is of no use for me to tell you any lies; I did receive the box, but I had been drinking that morning, and in my way I met with a friend - we got drinking and tossing together, in the meantime some person came, and took it away."

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not appear to have been drinking? A. No; this was four months after - I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never recollect receiving it.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-32

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1044. CHARLES THOMPSON and GEORGE WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , at St. Mary-le-Bow, 18 handkerchiefs, value 5l., the goods of Ann Garton and Eliza Garton , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN LATIMER . I am in the employ of Ann and Eliza Garton, who live in Cheapside , in the parish of St. Mary-le-Bow - they are hosiers, and deal in handkerchiefs . On the 21st of May both the prisoners came into the shop, at a quarter-past 8 o'clock in the morning; I did not know them before - they asked to look at some cotton braces, which I showed them - they objected to the first parcel, but selected a pair from the second which I showed them - there were no handkerchiefs within their reach - they then asked to look at some stockings - I showed them some which were too large - I turned round to look for some others, and saw George Wilson pulling aside the glass sash, which protects the goods in the window - he was then near enough to reach the handkerchiefs - I watched him - Thompson stood close by him - I turned round, and saw another sash was drawn aside - there are three sash slides which separate the goods in the window from the shop- I then perceived that the handkerchiefs were gone - a boy had followed the prisoners into the shop almost immediately they came in, and before I observed the slides drawn aside - the boy did not speak to them, but went away before I missed the handkerchiefs - I did not know him - the handkerchiefs were tied up in a bundle - when I perceived that they were gone, I accused the prisoners of being concerned with that boy - they denied it - I am certain George Wilson drew the slide aside - I had not perceived it drawn aside before the boy came in - he stood behind the prisoners, and could not have drawn the handkerchiefs out himself - he was not tall enough to reach them - he could have drawn the glass partition aside, but could not reach the handkerchiefs out - I did not see him attempt to touch it, but I saw Wilson doing it - the handkerchiefs have never been found - they are worth about 5l. - I detained the prisoners, and sent for a constable - I gave them in charge - they only said that they were innocent.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you the only person in the shop? A. Yes; they did not attempt to go away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did your mistress come down directly after? A. Just as I missed the handkerchiefs; I asked her, in a hurried manner, if she had taken the handkerchiefs away, as I was confounded at missing them - I had seem them just before the prisoners came in, but I was much flurried on missing them; there was a chair between the prisoners and the window, and the counter parted me from the prisoners - it is not a yard wide - the handkerchiefs being taken would make no difference in the shade of light, as they did not hang up, but laid in a corner of the window, in a bundle - my back must have been turned when they took them - I asked mistress, in a hurried manner, if she had taken them- I was sure she had not, for they were there the minute before, and I missed them before she came down - Thompson bought a pair of braces, which I think came to 1s. 6d.; he put the money down just as I missed the handkerchiefs; I did not take it up; the other boy leaned over the counter, and did not speak; he did not appear connected with the prisoners.

ELIZA GARTON. I am in partnership with Ann Garton- we rent this house jointly, and both inhabit it - it is No. 97, Cheapside - I was not present when the prisoners came in; when I came into the shop, I observed the two prisoners standing there, and noticed two cases standing open, which contained handkerchiefs and other things - I went to pick up a ticket, which laid on the floor; it had been attached to some Angola hose - I was going round to put the ticket on the counter, when Latimer passed me, and in a very hurried manner, asked if I had taken some silk handkerchiefs out of the window (the boy had left the shop before I came down) I had not taken them, and said so - he accused the prisoner Wilson of moving the case; the handkerchiefs could not be got without moving the case - Wilson said he had not moved it; Latimer then said he was positive they were both connected, and that they were connected with the boy who had gone out of the shop; he accused them both of being concerned in taking the handkerchiefs - they denied it, and a constable was sent for; I had not been in the shop that morning before - I had left the shop at twelve o'clock on Saturday night; this bundle of handkerchiefs was then in the window, with the glass slide secure; I did not particularly notice them, but every thing in the window was even and smooth.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You did not particularly notice the handkerchiefs? A. Yes, I did - my sister is not here; she occasionally serves in the shop; nobody else does, besides Latimer; we both took the house together; nobody is engaged in business with us; it was between eight and nine o'clock - I sent my maid servant for a constable, who came in a very few minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There was nobody in the shop but your young man? A. No; they heard me send for a constable, but remained quietly till he came; when Latimer spoke to them about the slides, he had come round the counter between them and the door - one constable came first, and said he would send for Smith, another constable; he asked what I knew of it - I said the young man missed a bundle of handkerchiefs from the window, and accused Wilson of moving the slide, and he was positive they were connected with the boy; Thompson asked me if I belonged to the business; I told him I did; they were in the shop three, four, or perhaps five minutes before the constable came.

COURT. Q. Till the constable came your man was in the shop, and close to them? A. Yes; the handkerchiefs cost us about 5l. to sell again.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable, and was sent for. I found the prisoners standing in the shop, Latimer was between them and the door; they were charged with opening the window case, and a third person had come in and stolen the handkerchiefs; I found 35s. on one of them, and 15s. on the other; I took them before the Lord Mayor.

THOMPSON's Defence. I was coming from my house, in Marsh-place, to go to Whitechapel; and in Cheapside I bought a pair of stockings and braces; I put the money on the counter, and was going out; he asked if any thing else was wanted; I said No; he said, "Here are some good stockings;" and I bought a pair and put the money down; I was accused of the robbery.

WILSON's Defence. I had been from Mile-end to the West end of the town, and received 12s. 6d.; on returning I went into this shop to buy some shoe-ribbon, but waited for the prisoner to be served; I was accused of pushing the casement back, which I denied.

J. LATIMER re-examined. They did not ask to look at the handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not usual for persons sometimes to look at a piece of handkerchiefs? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. When he drew back the slide, did he say,"I want to look at the handkerchiefs?" A. No; I observed Thompson point out something to Wilson; they came into the shop together.

One witness gave Wilson a good character.

THOMPSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

WILSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270531-33

1045. CHARLOTTE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 1 shawl, value 4s. , the goods of Joseph Morris .

JAMES REYNOLDS . I am shopman to Joseph Morris - he keeps a linen-draper's shop , at the South end of Fleet-market . On Thursday evening, the 24th of May, at half-past six o'clock, the prisoner came and asked me to show her some shawls - I did so; there were other customers in the shop; we have two counters - another customer was at my counter, but nobody else serving - she did not approve of the first shawls, and while I was getting more I thought I saw her putting something under her dress- I showed her a second parcel; she bought none. I went round the counter in a minute or two, and asked what she had got under her dress - she said, "What have I got?" but nothing more. I saw a shawl under her gown, and sent for an officer, who found it there - it is worth 4s. 6d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN THOMAS GREY . I am a constable. I found this shawl under her gown - she said she did it from distress.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270531-34

1046. WILLIAM DAVIS and THOMAS JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 silver spoon, value 10s. , the goods of William Thomas and Samuel Lepard .

ROBERT NESHAM . I am a plumber. On Sunday, the 15th of April, about six o'clock, I saw two men standing opposite Mr. Shepherd's house, in Cloak-lane - one of them, which was Johnson, was in the act of stooping down to the area - I saw him rising up, with something shining in his hand; they immediately went away. I went by the house, and saw two or three silver spoons on the kitchen dresser; I then followed after the men. A person in the street could reach to the window, through the area railing- it was the house of Messrs. Shepherd, Thomas, and Lepard; I ran down Cloak-lane, and followed them till they came to the very same place again; I saw nobody about - I saw a watchman - and saw Johnson stopped.

MR. WILLIAM THOMAS . I am one of the partners of this house; Mr. Shepherd is the only partner who lives there, but he has no property in these articles; by a private arrangement between us the silver articles belong to Mr. Samuel Lepard and myself - this spoon is ours.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a watchman. On Easter Sunday, between six o'clock and a quarter-past, I was going my rounds, and saw the prisoner run from Cloak-lane, across Dowgate-hill; there was a cry of Stop thief! I pursued, and took Johnson - I saw this spoon found on him in the watch-house; High took Davis - they were both running together.

JOHN HIGH . I am a watchman, and stopped Davis five yards up Swithin's-lane, as there was a cry of Stop thief!

JAMES WEBB . I found Davis at the watch-house - Johnson was brought in - I found a silver spoon on him, also a piece of wire, a stick, and a box of composition - the end of the stick is covered with this composition, and any thing which it touches will stick to it.

JOHNSON's Defence. I got up early to buy some eels, and picked up these things by the church wall.

DAVIS' Defence. My daughter lives in Thames-street- I had been to seen her; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran with other people.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-35

1047. WILLIAM BRACER , JOHN BLOOMFIELD , and HENRY ROBINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Croom , from his person .

JOSEPH CROOM. I live at the Sussex-hotel. Bouverie-street. On the 24th of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking with a friend towards Cheapside, and had a handkerchief in my pocket; nearly opposite St. Martin's church, Ludgate-hill , I felt a pull at my pocket - I immediately turned round, and laid hold of the three prisoners, who were all close together, and close behind me; I had not noticed them before. My handkerchief was found in the back of Robinson's coat, near his collar; I held them till the constable came - Robinson got from me for a minute, but a gentleman brought him back, and my handkerchief was found on him.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a constable. I was on Ludgatehill, and as I passed Mr. Croom I saw a crowd - he asked if I was an officer, and gave charge of the three prisoners,

whom he had in his hands. The handkerchief was produced and sworn to at Guildhall.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBINSON's Defence. I was returning home, and saw a crowd before me; as soon as I got into the crowd I saw the handkerchief, and picked it up - I held it behind me; these boys were in custody; the gentleman laid hold of me, and said it was his.

BRACER's Defence. I never saw this lad before - I was going to Billingsgate, to inquire how eels were.

BLOOMFIELD's Defence. I was going with Bracer, to see the price of eels.

Two witnesses gave Robinson a good character.

BRACER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BLOOMFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

ROBINSON - GUILTY Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-36

1048. DAVID WIGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 3 pairs of silk ancles, value 13s. 6d. , the goods of William Chamberlain .

EDWARD THOMAS . I am in the employ of William Chamberlain, a wholesale hosier - he lives in Gutter-lane . On the 26th of April, at nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, whom I had seen the day before, came into the warehouse, and ordered three dozens of brown cotton stockings, and two dozens of white - he said they were for Barker and Adams, of Love-lane, Wood-street, who have bought goods of us; I gave him the goods, supposing he was in their employ; these ancles were on a shelf, within his reach - I know they were there the night before, and nobody had been that morning; I went to the desk, to make out the invoice, and when I came down he had got close to where the candles were kept, and I saw on the counter, on his right-hand side, a small parcel, which was not there when I went up to the desk; the ancles were kept in brown paper. I delivered him the invoice; and suspecting something I followed him, to see if he went to the right place - he went towards Cheapside, away from Love-lane; I followed him into Cannon-street, and there saw a Jew join him - they turned down Bush-lane, into the Bell public-house together. I then went to a friend, and brought him down to the public-house, to watch them, while I fetched an officer - we opened the tap-room door, and there he had got the goods laid out - the Jew was standing over them - we took them into another room with the goods, but finding nothing on the Jew we let him go. I asked the prisoner who he ordered the goods for - he said for Barker and Adams - I asked why he did not take them there - he gave no answer. I went to Barker and Adams, and saw the prisoner's brother; when I got back I saw on the on the top of the goods these three pairs of ancles, in a parcel - I am sure they were in the warehouse when the prisoner came in- Barker and Adams have not claimed the goods which I delivered to him.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am beadle of Walbrook. I was brought to the public-house, and saw the Jew and the prisoner standing by the door - the parcels were all tied up then - the Jew had nothing. I secured the prisoner - he took a parcel from some part of his person, and laid on the other parcels - immediately Thomas returned he said it contained the ancles, which I found correct.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-37

1049. THOMAS DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 silver cruet-stand, value 20s.; 1 cheese-knife, value 10s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 1 sugar-ladle, value 3s.; 1 watch, value 30s., and 3 sovereigns , the property of Sarah Wheeler .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Thomas Day , the elder.

SARAH WHEELER. I keep a public-house in Jewry-street, Aldgate - the prisoner is my nephew. About the latter end of September I delivered to the prisoner a box, containing the articles stated in the indictment, to take to his father, for safety (having lodgers), who lives in Tyson-street, Clerkenwell - he had promised to take care of them. I found them all except the sovereigns.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure you sent them to his father on account of having lodgers? A. Yes, that was my only motive; I do not exactly know the month I delivered them to him in - I think it was the 8th of January - and about a month after that I saw his father about them.

JOHN SHAW . I am shopman to Mr. Reed, a pawnbroker. On the 5th of March I took in pawn a silver cruetstand, a pair of sugar-tongs, a cheese-knife, a spoon, and a watch, for 2l. 10s., in the name of Wheeler, Tyson-street. I cannot take upon myself to swear to the prisoner.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. The prisoner's father gave him in charge on the 21st of May; I found nothing on him - he said nothing to the charge.

THOMAS DAY , SEN. My son never delivered me a box containing these articles - I suppose it was brought to my house; there was a box put into my bed-room the latter end of December, I think - I do not know who brought it into the house. I opened it, but did not look at any thing in it. I gave him in charge on the 21st of April; I presume the box belonged to my sister - I cannot tell what was in it - I did not send it to my sister, and have not seen it in her possession. I have seen no duplicate in my son's possession.

MRS. WHEELER. The box was brought to me by a gentleman whom I sent to inquire after it, and that gentleman brought me a duplicate.

MATTHIAS PEARCE . I am in the provision trade, and live at St. Mary-at-Hill. On the 7th of April I went to Mr. Day's, and received a letter from his hand, in which this duplicate was enclosed with three more; I took it to Mrs. Wheeler.

THOMAS DAY . I do not know who put the duplicate in the letter.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-38

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JUNE 4.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1050. RICHARD RUDOLPH , and JOHN WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 46 pieces of China crape, value 100l., the goods of James Mahon ,

on board a ship in the port of London, the same being a port of entry and discharge .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the goods of the East India Dock Company .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD EAGER . I am a labouring man. On Tuesday the 3d of April, the prisoner Rudolph came to the gate of the East India Dock , where the extra men stand for work - he asked if I had a needle - I said Yes; he told me to go down to the Eliza, and wait till he came, that she was the second ship down the south side; he told me not to go to work till he came - I went and waited on the upper deck; he came and said, "Come into the hold, and I will show you what to do?" - I followed him into the hold; he went forward and showed me a box, which was two or three feet long, and a bag was sewed over it, and there were some mats over the bag; the bag was very rotten; he said

"I want to see if you can mend that box up, it has been broken by the sea-faring people, or somebody, and I want it mended up tidy, that it may not be laid to us;" it was very much broken - I know something was in it, because it rattled when I turned it about; it was three parts full; he came to me again in a few minutes, and said, "Can you make any thing of it?" I said, "No, I don't think I can, for the box is broken, and the bag is so rotten;" he said, "Very well, I suppose you can't, I am going to write an order for some bags;" he called me on deck soon after, and went to the ship-keeper; he wrote an order for some bags, and I went and got either two dozen, or one dozen - he said,"Take one of the bags, and take the things out of the box, and put them into the bag," which I did; they were paper parcels, about a foot long, three or four inches thick, and nearly square - I put them into the bag; he said,"Put them aside for the present, I will see about sending them out by and by;" he said, "This broken box, break it up smalier," which I did; there was a tin case inside, which was bent about very much - I broke the box into small pieces, and while so doing, one of the men, who was working near me, came and asked me what I was about - I said, "Breaking this box up; the foreman is there, you can ask him what it is for;" he was near enough to hear that - one of them called the man away to mind his own work; after breaking the box up, Rudolph came to me, took the box up, and threw it about the hold, some on one side and some on the other; the bag was put on one side, with some mats thrown over it - I then went to my work - the next morning Rudolph said to me,"Go up and tell Wilson and Bright to clear away off the fore-hatchway" - I did so, they were the only men at work there: they cleared off, and in the afternoon, Rudolph ordered the hatches off, as he said he wanted light; some time after they were off, he said, "Eager, you hail Wilson" - I said, "Who is Wilson?" he said,"The tall man" - I did so, and he said, "Hand that bag up to Wilson," which I did, and towards the evening, when they were going to shut up the ship, I said something to Bright, and saw the bag forward in the ship in a hole under some ropes, but I saw it through the ropes,

Q. When you handed the bag up to Wilson, did you say any thing to him? A. I said the foreman ordered me to hand it up to him - I gave him no directions about it; next morning I went down into the hold, and Rudolph came to the hatchway and said, "What has become of the tin-case which was here yesterday?" I said, "I suppose it is forward where the box is;" he said, D - n it, I thought I saw something shine;" he then said,"Take and hand it up between decks" - I said, "Who too?" he said, "To Wilson" - soon after that I had an accident with my foot, and in the afternoon the gang went to work between decks - I said to Wilson, "What has become of that tin thing which was handed up this morning; he said, "I have put it under those coals, where he told me to put it;" in the evening, before I left work I went between decks, and Bright pointed the bag out to me - I examined it, and saw a shawl or scarf which I had put at the bottom of the bag: it was loose in the hold, and the papers in the bag were much broken - I saw some silks with handsome flowers on them in the papers.

COURT. Q. Can you tell how many parcels there were in the bag? A. I did not take any notice; the loose pieces were put into the bag, at the top; the paper parcels were quite in a different state to when I put them in the bag.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you been employed much on board ships which come from the East Indies? A. Yes, for the last two or three summers- I have heard of packages being broken in the voyage; Rudolph was foreman of the gang, and it was his business to superintend the men; the ship was half empty when I went to work: the box was in the hold when I heard Rudolph last give any order about it - I do not know what was in the box of my own knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know Wilson? A. Only by sight - I do not know whether he was an extra man that day - I never saw him before - Rudolph told him and Bright to clear the fore-hatch.

Q. Was there not a pulley used to get the things from between decks? A. Yes, afterwards; Wilson had been at work at the pulley.

COURT. Q. You found the package broken when you were first called to it? A. Yes - I was to repair the bag, if I could have done it neatly, it would not have been noticed - as I could not, he told me to break it to pieces, and he threw it away himself about the hold.

GEORGE BRIGHT . I am one of the East India Dock Company's labourers. On the 4th and 5th of April I was working between the decks of the Eliza with Wilson - Rudolph was generally below; I saw a tin cannister handed up from the hold - I was not near enough to see who handed it up - Wilson received it, and shoved it forward; nobody but me and him were between decks; about five minutes after I asked him what was in the tin-case, as I observed something yellow, which I thought was nankeen; and he said it was; I saw a bag come out of the forehold on Thursday; the ship-keeper called me below, just as the bag was coming up, and I went, Wilson was between decks, and he said to me, "Will you have one?" meaning a silk scarf; he mentioned some scarfs - I said I would not; I never saw the scarf; but he had told me, after he said it was nankeen, that they were silk scarfs.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not Rudolph's business to give orders to the men? A. Yes; he was in trust of

the goods, and constantly on board, except at meal times; he took twenty minutes for breakfast and dinner. Mr. Lighterness used to overlook Rudolph - I did not see Rudolph on deck when the tin or the bag were handed up - I was between decks, and could not see; he was not there when Wilson asked if I would have a scarf.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you an extra man? A. Yes - Wilson and I were both taken on together; there were seven or eight men in the hold; only I and Wilson were between decks: the other men were in the hold, but not within hearing - I acted under Rudolph's direction - I saw the mouth of the bag come up - I did not see the tin-case opened.

ALEXANDER LIGHTERNESS . I am a superintendant at the East India Dock - the ship Eliza lay there: all the property in the ships is under the cave of the Company - James Mahon is the captain - I superintend the delivery of the cargo, and employed the two prisoners amongst others; Rudolph was foreman. On the 6th of April I was directed not to suffer any men to go down to the ship; the constable and dock-master accompanied me on board - I saw the constable find a bag under the rigging in the forehold; it contained crape scarfs - I found the pieces of the wooden case in the hold and was present when the tin case was found among the coals, with some rigging over it.

COURT. Q. Were the bag and tin-case in their proper place? A. Certainly not - I produce the pieces of the wooden case, the tin-case, and bag; the port of London was the port of entry and discharge of the ship.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. On what day did you find these things? A. On the Friday - I was on board every day - I do not remember Rudolph being seat to another vessel - I have occasionally sent him on business while I remained on board - I did not send him away on either of these days.

Q. The very way to discover the robbery, was to leave the tin-case and things on board? A. That I cannot say; they could have been thrown overboard.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do not accidents often happen to cases? A. Yes; but we seldom meet with one that cannot be repaired - Rudolph has been above four years in the Company's employ.

EDWARD EAGER . The loose scarfs were of a darkish colour, like some of these, and those in the papers were the same as these.

CHARLES ALEXANDER DUNBAR . I searched the rigging, and found the bag and tin-case - I took the prisoner into custody.

JAMES GORDON . I superintended the delivery of the ship for Captain Mahon; there were articles on board of this description.

Prisoner RUDOLPH to MR. LIGHTERNESS. Q. Was I not absent from the ship generally three times every day; and was I not on board the Java two hours and a half? A. He was once - I have sent him on board ships while I waited in the Eliza; the Java lay on the east side of the Dock.

JURY. Q. What was his duty upon finding a case in case in that situation? A. To report it to me immediately - he made no report of it.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you always on board? A. I was always on one of three ships close by; he could have sent one of his men to me, or have informed me on my return - I was never absent above an hour; it was his duty to get the external package repaired, if it wanted it.

RUDOLPH's Defence. I solemnly declare my innocence.

RUDOLPH - GUILTY. Aged 37.

WILSON - GUILTY. Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

The prisoners received a good character, and were recommended to mercy .

Reference Number: t18270531-39

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1051. OWEN DAINTREY was indicted for stealing, from and out of the Post Office of Great Britain, a certain letter containing a 5l. Bank note, which came to his hands and possession while employed by and under the Post Office , in sorting letters and packers .

Witnesses were examined as to the usual routine of the Post Office business; but the most material witness, Charles Lynlon having absented himself, Mr. Gurney (who conducted the prosecution) declined proceeding further.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-40

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1052. GEORGE WARNER and ELIZABETH HARVEY were indicted for that they, on the 25th of April , at St. Mary-le-bone, contriving and intending, our Lord the King , and his people, craftily, deceitfully, feloniously, and traitorously to deceive and defraud, 2 pieces of base coin, each of them resembling the current silver coin of the Kingdom, called an half-crown, falsely and deceitfully, feloniously and traitoriously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver, against the duty of their allegiance, and against the statute , &c.

SECOND COUNT, for deceitfully, feloniously, and traitorously colouring, with materials producing the colour of silver, two pieces of base coin resembling shillings, on the same day, and at the same parish.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

SARAH PRIDEAUX . I am the wife of R. Prideaux, we live at No. 16, Little Chesterfield-street, Mary-le-bone . The prisoners came to my house on Easter Tuesday - I had a bill up to let a room, and they took my first floor back room that day, and came to it on the Wednesday- they were both together, and agreed to pay 4s. 6d. a-week: the man gave me 2s. as earnest - they referred me to No. 1, Riding-house-lane; they got up early in a morning, and generally went out together at eight o'clock, and always returned together at night - I have heard them come home at eight o'clock, and sometimes sooner - I never went into their room - I never observed any visitor come to see them - Limbrick has produced a shovel to me, since their apprehension; it is very red, as if it had been on the fire - I had let that shovel to them with the room; it was not in that state then - there was no counterfeit money in the room when I let it them, nor any liquid - I kept the room locked till they took possession.

Prisoner WARNER. Q. Did not somebody sleep in the room the night before we came? A. No - it had been

unoccupied for a fortnight; I cleaned it myself, and nobody else went into it.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. - In consequence of information which I received I went, on the 25th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, with a search-warrant, to No. 16, Little Chesterfield-street, with Edwards, Kirby, Lloyd, and Mr. Powell, the assistant solicitor of the Mint - Kirby went first into the back yard, while Edwards, Lloyd, and I went up to the first floor back room; we opened the door, went in, and found the two prisoners sitting at breakfast; I heard something fall from the man, and perceived some half-crowns on the mantel-piece - we laid hold of him, handcuffed him, and sent for Mr. Powell - when the man arose from his chair I saw some money in his chair; Mr. Powell came, and we all looked at the prisoners' hands; Harvey's hands were rather dirty, and the tips of her fingers were yellow, as if with the paste which they rub base money with; Warner's hands were clean. We sent them to the office, by some of the officers, and when the officers returned I took this cork off the shelf - it has some paste on it. I perceived this board on a shelf over the door - it is marked in places with the size of a half-crown, a shilling, and a sixpence. I found a file, which appears to have been filing metal - also some sand-paper, which is used to rub the sharp edges off the money; I found a small phial with aquafortis in it, and this jar of paste; I tried the paste on copper, and it produces the colour of silver. I found this shovel in the room, and showed it to Prideaux; I found some pieces of paper cut, large and small, to wrap half-crowns and shillings in.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer, and accompanied Limbrick on the 25th of April - on coming into the room I seized Warner, and immediately heard something fall on the floor; I could not ascertain from where it fell; I observed nothing drop from the person, but what I heard fall appeared to fall from his person, and I saw it close to his chair - I took it up - it was two counterfeit shillings, wrapped up in paper, separately; I examined them - they appeared to be fit for circulation; they appeared to have been blacked over, and had the appearance of good shillings - they were not exactly smooth. I examined the chair he had been sitting in, and found in it one half-crown, wrapped in paper, and another loose; I now produce them in the state they were in - they were on the chair when he got up. I saw a great many pieces of paper of this description on the table, near to where he sat, and by the side of the fire-place, close to the chair in which he sat, I observed an old handkerchief, and in that handkerchief, in a bag, I found, wrapped in separate papers, ten shillings in one paper, separately wrapped up, and five shillings and four shillings, all in separate parcels - I produce them in the state they were in. I also found another paper, containing three counterfeit sovereigns; I found a brown bag, containing three hundred counterfeit shillings, which were bright, and not ready for circulation. I also found a cotton stocking, containing a quantity of sparable nails and sand paper, which was broken into very small pieces - there was the appearance of a great deal of metal, of a yellow nature, among the nails - on our way to the watch-house the male prisoner said it was all up, that it was laid on well, and had we been a little later he should have been out; that we came at a very bad time, for he was very short blunted, as he had laid it all out yesterday; I searched Harvey, and found a good half-crown on her - I observed her hands - the internal parts seemed blackish, and the finger ends yellow; the paste found will produce that effect; I have tried it several times on a halfpenny, and it produces a yellow colour on the finger.

Here the witness rubbed some of the paste on a halfpenny, which produced the colour of silver.

Prisoner WARNER. Q. Did I not tell you I was short of money, and beg of you to take care of some duplicates which were in my coat pocket? A. Yes, and that you should have been at Drummond's bank in about an hour.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I accompanied the other officers, and saw Warner on the left-hand side of the table and Harvey on the other, at breakfast. I found a half-crown, finished, another not quite finished, and twelve just as they came from the die, close to Warner, on the table; I found some pith or marrow and a tooth-brush, which is used to rub them over at the last process - the tooth-brush is black and greasy. I searched Warner at the office, and found 10s. 6d. in good money on him.

Prisoner WARNER. Q. Did you find the twelve half-crowns on the table or mantel-piece? A. On the table-there were fourteen half-crowns on the table. I found them before you were handcuffed.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am an officer. I entered the door of the house first, the prisoners being in custody, Limbrick called me up-stairs - I found twelve counterfeit crowns upon the mantel-piece, bright, just fresh from the die - I produce them.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin at the Mint. I have seen the various articles the officers have produced - here are two half-crowns which have been fitted for circulation, by being rubbed down, then resilvered, greased, and blacked, to give them the appearance of having been in circulation before; the rubbing down, is to remove from the surface of the coin the sharpness which it receives from the die - it is coloured by nitrate of silver and salt, which forms a paste - this paste is now dry. [The witness here moistened the paste with some water, and rubbed a small portion of it on a half-penny.] This operation, performed by the fingers, corrodes them, and produces a deep-yellow stain on the fingers, which remains some time, more or less, according to the quantity - here is some grease, which is applied to the coin after it is re-silvered; it is of a glutinous nature; it is spinal marrow; this makes it appear to have been worn, and kept in a greasy pocket. Here is a phial with nitrous acid, which is used in colouring; here are two half-crowns and two shillings, which have been prepared in the manner I have described. There are a great many more here. All the coin produced is composed of brass; the file has metal in the teeth of it, in which metal there appears to be silver.

Prisoner WARNER. Q. How many shillings did you find in the bag? A. I never counted them; there were above two hundred. I have seen a bag of sparables and small pieces of sand-paper - this might be used for the purpose of friction; there are particles of metal among

them, which have been rubbed off by friction. The whole of the coin produced is counterfeit.

ANDREW LLOYD . Twenty-eight half-crowns have been found altogether; the bag containing three hundred shillings was close at his side in the handkerchief, by the fire.

MR. JASPER ATKINSON . I am a moneyor of the Mint.(Looking at two half-crowns and two shillings) these are counterfeit.

WARNER's Defence. This woman was my hired servant - I gave her 2s. a week and her victuals; she had only been six days with me. I am a gardener and fruiterer, and hired her for the summer - I took this lodging, and had been there six days, and on the morning the officers came I cleared the top of the cupboard, and found a handkerchief and a bag, with a great deal of counterfeit coin in it; I asked the woman who it belonged to - she said she did not know; I said, "I shall call the landlady up, and ask who it does belong to;" she said, "Stop and get your breakfast first;" I did so, and the officers came - I never moved; they seized me by the hand - there were four or five half-crowns laid on the table. The officer touched the table-cloth with his coat, and the half-crown fell down.

HARVEY's Defence. I was engaged by this man to do what he had to do, and work at my own business if I had any - I had some shoe-binding the day before; I saw him on that morning take the bag from the cupboard; I knew nothing of it - he said he would go and ask the landlady about it after breakfast; he took some of them out of the bag; the officer came in - my hands were dirty, as I had been lighting the fire, and the shoe-leather stains my fingers very much.

JURY to SARAH PRIDEAUX . Q. Did you clean the room out while it was uninhabited? A. I did - there were certainly none of those articles in the room; I put all to rights the afternoon they came in - the woman called him her husband.

WARNER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

HARVEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-41

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1053. JAMES HANSON was indicted was stealing, on the 11th of April , 45 ozs. of silver filings, scrapings, and cuttings, value 10l., the goods of John Lias , Henry Lias , and Charles Lias , in their dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LIAS. I am in partnership with my two sons, Henry and Charles; we are silver spoon and fork manufacturers , and live in Finsbury-street, Middlesex ; the prisoner has been some years in our employ - he was occasionally a porter , and employed to make spoons, but was not a firstrate maker. On the 11th of April, when he returned from dinner, I asked him what he had done with the silver he had taken out with him; he was confused, and said he did not know what silver I meant; I then requested him to turn out his pocket, but he did not - my son, who was present, put his hand into his pocket, and found some silver scrapings in it, which flew about it - it was a very strong pocket- my son said there was evidence that he had had filings and scrapings in his pocket - I asked if he had sold the silver - he made no reply; I said an officer was gone to search his house - he then said he did not know; he was taken into custody - I had seen him pass the counting-house between one and two o'clock, to go to dinner - he returned between two and three, when this happened.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He worked at piece-work? A. Sometimes; he might go in and out when he liked - he bore a good character.

ROBERT HENRY WALLIS . I am a journeyman in the prosecutors' employ. On the 11th of April I had been making some salt-ladles - we have a leather apron nailed to the work-board, the other end of which we fasten before us to catch the silver filings - I went to dinner about twenty minutes after one o'clock that day - there was then about 9 ozs. of scrapings in the apron - when I took it off my neck I hung it over the rack to keep them in; I left the prisoner and several others in the shop; I came back in about an hour, and missed about 4 ozs. of scrapings and filings.

Cross-examined. Q. How many men did you leave behind? A. There might be six; I was absent when the prisoner returned.

JAMES BERRY . I work for Messrs. Lias, and was in the work-shop on the 11th of April, when Wallis went away, and I left the prisoner there about half-past one o'clock, with Hagger, the boy - the rest of the men were all gone before me - nothing was ever done to Wallis' apron while I was there, or I must have seen it.

Cross-examined. Q. How large is the work-shop? A. About twenty feet by twelve. I was shaping spoons; I could see all round the shop while I was at work, and am certain nobody touched the apron.

JOHN HAGGER . I am an apprentice to Messrs. Lias. I was left in the shop with the prisoner, and nobody else; after Berry was gone master sent me out; in about a quarter of an hour I left the prisoner alone in the shop; when I returned he was gone; nobody touched the apron while I was there; I was not absent more than three minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you kept your eye very close on it? A. I sat opposite - Berry was working about eight feet from it; nobody could touch it without my seeing them; nobody went near that side of the shop.

HENRY LIAS . I am in partnership with my father. On the 11th of April I sent Hagger on an errand; the prisoner was left alone in the workshop; he was about six yards from Wallis' apron; in consequence of information which I received I went, with Brown and Manning, to the prisoner's lodgings, in Whitechapel-road; I saw a box found there, containing 45 ozs. of silver filings, scrapings, and cuttings; it was worth 5s. an oz. - before we went there, I had all the men searched, except the prisoner, who was the only one absent; nothing was found on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to all their lodgings? A. No.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house; I found this silver there, and in a basket was a crucible, with some charcoal would melt metal - I afterwards turned out the prisoner's pocket, and found a small portion of silver filings.

JOHN LIAS re-examined. The filings found in his pocket are such as were in Wallis' apron - those found at his house are also the same.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose there was nothing to distinguish them from other filings? A. No; except that

there is a portion of wood, which at times comes off the block in scraping the spoons, and one piece of wood answers to Wallis' block, which is here.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where did you first see this wood? A. It was among the filings when we first found them.

JOHN BROWN . This piece of wood was among the filings when I found it.

R. H. WALLIS. This is the block which I work with.

Prisoner's Defence. I turned out my pockets without refusing - the charge is totally false - nobody could take any thing without being noticed, and as to the strong pocket, in my last place I have been trusted with 500l. or 600l. - the piece of wood was not among the filings when it was examined.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-42

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1054. DAVID DONALDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 9lbs. of soap, value 5s., the goods of James Lambert , his master .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT FINCH . I manage the business of Mr. James Lambert, of Ludgate-hill; the prisoner was his porter . On the 17th of April I followed him down-stairs to where the soap is kept, and charged him with being dishonest; he at first denied it - I said unless he produced the property he had about him, I should send for an officer, as I suspected him - he seemed agitated, and produced three cakes of mottled soap from his breeches - they weighed 9lbs. - he begged I would let him go, and he would be better man in future, but I refused.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you make him no promise? A. No; I said it would be better for him to say where he was going to take it - I believe master had a good character with him.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-43

1055. THOMAS WAINE was indicted for embezzling a certain sum of money, to wit, the sum of 2l. 10s., which he had received for and on account of David Passmore Taylor , his master .

The Court ruled, that it was necessary the indictment should specify some coin, or valuable security embezzled, and that this indictment could not be sustained .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-44

1056. JABEZ PARKER and THOMAS BATES were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 21 chaldrons of coals, value 38l. , the goods of Thomas Horne and others, his partners.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SCOTT . I am foreman to Messrs. Thomas Horne and others, whose business is carried on at Falcon wharf, on the Surry side of Blackfriars-bridge . On the 27th of March we had a tier of barges on the river - the Rose was laden with twenty - one chaldrons of Londonderry Wall's-end coals - they lay all over the beams - I saw her safe about six o'clock that evening, rather on the Surry side, in the middle of the tier, towards the middle of the river; I missed her the next morning, and found her empty a little after seven o'clock, at Old Swan-stairs - she was a three roomed barge - I then went with Isbester, an officer, as far as Chelsea-bridge. On Friday, the 30th, we found the Matthew barge at Chertsey, laden with coals, covered with stones - I could see the coals when I looked at the surface - the stones did not entirely cover them, but nearly so - it was an open barge - the prisoners were on board - I asked if they had any certificate of the coals; they said they had got none; it is necessary to have a certificate, stating what quantity are in the barge - I asked Parker if he did not lay at Trig-stairs on the Tuesday night, the 27th - he said he did; Trig-wharf is in the City, between London and Blackfriars-bridges - I asked if he did not take the coals in on Tuesday night; he said he did - I asked whose barge he took them out of; he said Mr. Spedding's; he then stated that a gentlemanly looking lighterman spoke to him on the Coal Exchange on Monday, and asked if he would take a score of coals to Staines; he said, Yes; and the man said the barge should come over on the next day, but he did not come till night - that the lighterman came down in the barge and hailed Parker's folk, and went below the barge, made her fast, and then went on shore; that he saw nothing more of the lighterman; that he then dropped his own barge down along side of the lighterman's, then went, and got a man to assist him in heaving the coals out, and when the barge was empty the lighterman came and took her away; that he had never seen him before, and did not know him; I asked who he was going to take the coals there for; he said for a gentleman, named Davies, at Inglefield-green - Isbester took them into custody; I went with the barge, and delivered the stones to one Knight, at Staines, as Parker said they were for him; she was brought back to London with the coals, and on Monday they were put back into the Rose again; there were twenty-one chaldrons, as near as possible, and filled the Rose the same as before; they were very large Londonderry Wall's-end, and appeared to be the same coals.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Parker want to go to Staines, saying the man, who employed him, would be there? A. No; he wanted to go there to deliver the stones; he did not say his employer would be there; I did not hear him say he wanted to go to Staines; I have been a lighterman thirteen or fourteen years; it is not regular to take coals on board without a certificate; we are bound to take one; I never let them go without, in our firm; we have sent coals into the craft, and sent the certificate afterwards; I cannot say what other people may do; I have known it done in other concerns; it is not regular.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When you have known it done, has not the certificate followed? A. Yes; these coals have never been claimed by any body; the Rose belongs to Mr. Horne, his name is painted on it.

WILLIAM ISBESTER . I am an officer of the Thames Police. On the 30th of March I went with Scott to Chertsey, and found the Matthew there; the two prisoners were on board; Scott asked Parker if he had a certificate of the coals; he said, No - he was then asked if he did not lay at Trig-wharf on Tuesday night; he said, Yes, and that he took the coals in there on Tuesday night, and he believed they came from Spedding's; their wharf is on the Surry side of Westminster-bridge; he said he was on

the Coal Exchange on Monday, when a gentlemanly looking lighterman came to him, and asked if he would take a load of coals to Staines; he said his barge laid at Trigstairs, and he should have the coals to-morrow; but instead of that the barge did not come till eight o'clock at night - that the lighterman, who fetched the barge, hailed Parker's folk, made his barge fast a little below, and went on shore; that he dropped his barge down along side, went on shore, and got a man to help him to turn the coals out of that barge into his own - that the lighterman then came and took the barge away, but he never saw him. I went to Inglefield-green, but could find no gentleman there of the name of Davies; there was a servant living in a gentleman's family there.

Cross-examined. Q. What sized place is the green? A. It is large; but I do not suppose there are a dozen gentlemen's houses. I inquired at the different public-houses, several people assured us no such person was living there - Knight expected the stones, but not by Parker; Parker did not ask us to let him go on to Staines - he never told us where Davies was to be found.

ALEXANDER MITCHEL . I am inspecting surveyor of the Police ship. On the 30th of March the prisoners were brought in custody - I found a bill of lading for the stone on Parker, to go to Knight; and he had a receipt for a score of coals, which I returned to him; it came from Davey and Peggs - it was for a former voyage - it was money paid for coals; he gave me a similar account to what the other witness has stated; I could find no Davies at Inglefield; the coals were never claimed.

Cross-examined. Q. He always persisted in the same story? A. Yes; handbills were posted from Vauxhall to Limehouse about the coals; I made sufficient inquiries to be satisfied that no Mr. Davies lived at Inglefield - it is a small village.

WILLIAM RESTALL . I live in Trinity-lane, Queenhithe. On the 27th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Thames-street, and saw Parker; he said, "Jolly. I have got some coals to throw, if you will go and help;" he asked if I could get another man; I said, Yes - he said he would go and ask Bates (who is his fellow-servant) to help - I went on board, just below Trig-stairs - Parker's barge laid just below Trig-stairs; the barge, with the coals, was on the London side - Parker, I, and Bates, went into seperate rooms, and threw the coals on board Parker's barge; it was a very dark night - I remained on board till the coals were nearly all out - nobody came on board while I was there - I neither saw nor heard any body - I left about one o'clock, leaving the prisoners in the barge; Bates works on board Parker's barge.

Cross-examined. Q. Bates was brought there by accident, as you were? A. Yes, for all I know. I could see there were only three rooms to the barge.

WILLIAM PLATT . I am a lighterman, and know Parker- the Matthew is his barge, and Bates worked with him. On the 27th of March, about half-past seven o'clock at night, Parker called to me out of his barge just below Trig-stairs, and asked me to lend him my boat, to go across the water - he said he wanted it to discharge two tarpaulins; he came and brought it back in about half an hour.

JAMES ROSE . I am a bargeman. On the 27th of March, in the evening, I was at Trig-wharf, with my barge - the Matthew laid alongside of me, inside, next to Trig-stairs - I was putting my things to rights on my timber about a quarter past seven o'clock, and saw Parker and another man go over the water; they returned about eight o'clock, and Parker dropped his barge down below another. Nobody had hailed him or I must have heard it - I had been in my barge all the evening.

MR. THOMAS HORNE . I have two partners. I sold no coals to Parker on the 27th of March, or to any person to deliver to him. I never sold him any - the coals on board this barge were not sold; I enquired, but could find no Davies at Inglefield-green.

MR. PETER DAVEY . I sold no coals to Parker after January - he wanted to buy some on the 26th of March, but I refused to sell them.

PARKER's Defence. I carry goods for hire. On the 26th of March, a person came up and asked if there was a Staines bargeman there; I said I was one - he said he had some coals to send to a gentleman named Davies, at Inglefield-green. I gave him my card, and asked for the order - he said there was no need of an order. I asked him on whose account they were; he said on account of Spedding, and he would bring them down to me. On Tuesday, after high water, he brought them to me - on Tuesday evening, a little below bridge, he hailed the barge - I answered him. I said it was rather late, and rather refused taking them in; he said, "Then somebody else must," for he wanted the barge. He went on shore, and I went for a man to help me to throw them out - the lighterman then came, and took the barge away; I asked for the certificate - he said it was sent down to Davies, of Inglefield-green. I went from thence to Limehouse, and took in the stones for Mr. Knight - I then went to Chertsey. I wanted the officer to let me go to Staines, but he said he could find an owner in London. If I had stolen them I could have claimed them by the bill and receipt in my pocket, as it was about the same quantity.

PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

BATES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-45

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JUNE 5.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1057. JOHN CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing a fender , the property of Uriah Briant .

The prisoner did not plead to the indictment, and upon the evidence of Mr. Wontner, the governor of Newgate, and John Bishop, the turnkey, the Jury found him INSANE .

Reference Number: t18270531-46

1058. JOHN CATON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , at St. Luke, 3 pairs of trowsers, value 8s; 8 waistcoats, value 14s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 6s.; 1 pair of boots, value 2s.; 7 books, value 5s.; 73 numbers of the History of England, value 1l., and 1 box, value 6d., the goods of John Evans , in the dwelling-house of William Davies .

JOHN BUTT . I am assistant to William Davies, who lives in Chiswell-street, St. Luke , and is a haberdasher; it is his dwelling-house. On the 15th of May, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, Evans' box stood in a

private passage - the private door was left open to dry the shutters, which were painted; a young man ran into the shop, and said a young man had taken a box from the passage. I went out and turned down Finsbury-street, and there saw the prisoner with the box on his back, about twelve yards from the house - he was going at a slow run- I immediately called Stop thief! he dropt it, and immediately made his escape - I overtook him myself, without losing sight of him - Evans, who had followed me out, took up the box.

Prisoner. Q. Did you stop me? A. A woman arrested his progress, which allowed me to get nearer to him; but I stopped him without losing sight of him.

JOHN EVANS. I am shopman to Mr. Davies. My box, containing the articles stated in the indictment, stood in the passage - I heard an alarm; ran out, and saw the prisoner carrying it, he threw it down I took it up, and Butt secured him.

JOHN FELLS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer of St. Luke. I was sent for, and found Fells there.

JOHN EVANS . This box contains the articles stated in the indictment; they are all mine, and are worth 2l. 19s. at a moderate value.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Hoxton, and a man stopped me as the thief.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18270531-47

1059. CHARLES RANDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , at St. Botolph without, Aldgate, 1 violin case, value 3s.; 3 violins and bows, value 4l. 10s.; 2 flutes, value 10s.; 2 music-books, value 3s.; 2 combs, value 25s., and 1 wig, value 20s., the goods of Solomon Josephs , in his dwelling-house .

SOLOMON JOSEPHS. I am a hair-dresser , and deal in musical instruments. I live in Dean-street, Tower-hill, in the parish of St. Botolph without, Aldgate , in the county of Middlesex; the prisoner was in my service - he boarded in the house, but did not lodge there - he was a weekly servant . On the 19th of May I went out at half-past ten o'clock, in the morning, leaving the property stated in the indictment safe, and the prisoner in care of the premises - nobody was at home but him. I returned in half an hour - he was gone, and I missed a violin case, three violins and bows, two flutes, two music-books, two combs, and a wig. I immediately went and gave information to Jamieson - he was taken that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you belong to a club with the prisoner? A. No.

ROBERT JAMIESON . I am a publican. On the 19th of May Josephs came and gave me information, and about ten minutes afterwards the prisoner came in as a customer, and asked for a glass of ale. I detained him, and was going to send for an officer, but he bolted out of the door, I ran out and secured him about three hundred yards off, and took him to an officer - he was searched at the watch-house, and two tortoise shell combs, and a dress wig, were found on him, also 1l. 10s. in gold, and 111/2d. in copper.

Cross-examined. Q. You have a free-and-easy club at your house? A. It is not a club, any one may come to it - they meet once a week: it is not composed of very young people.

RICHARD MANNING . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found two combs on him, and a wig in his hat, 1l. 10s. in gold, and some copper - I found the violins at a pawnbroker's.

EDWARD EDMUND CHILD . I am servant to Mr. Lorton, a pawn broker, of Bishops gate-street. I have three violins, and two bows, in a case, which were sold by the prisoner on the 20th of May, all at one time.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. No - he was about a quarter of an hour in the shop. I am certain of his person.

SOLOMON JOSEPHS . This is my property, and worth upwards of 5l. at a moderate price.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The violins seem old. A. They are the more valuable for that - this is a gentleman's new wig, and is worth 1l. I left them all in the shop when I went out; the violins alone are worth 5l., they were all three in the case when I went out.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18270531-48

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1060. WILLIAM BROADWAY was indicted for the wilful murder of John Broadway .

SARAH BURCHINALL . I live in Bath-court, Islington. On Monday morning, the 30th of April, I saw John Broadway - he came through Islington church-yard; he had a little blood on the top of his head, and on Tuesday morning I applied something to his head, which was wounded, but nothing that I thought would be of consequence - there were three very small wounds - I could scarcely see them - he died on the Monday following. On Sunday, the 29th of April, he was in company with my husband and another young man, at our house. about a quarter-past 4 o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner had come there at half-past two and left - he was always very affectionate to his brother; he came again about a quarter-past nine in the evening, the deceased was still there - the prisoner was then not altogether sober, nor was he drunk; his brother John was quite sober. He came a third time and they went away together; there had been a few words between the prisoner and my husband - the brothers went away together, apparently in good humour. John did not go to a regular surgeon until Saturday - I applied Dutch drops to his head; I saw him on Friday evening - he said,"I am very bad, God bless you, I shall not see you any more." The brothers always lived very affectionately together.

Cross-examined by MR. ROTCHE. Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing the prisoner, and the deceased together after the words? A. No; I have seen them at other times; the prisoner was remarkably attached to him, and would have died for him. I do not know why he came to my house the last time, unless he expected to see my youngest sister, who he was very much attached to - he was then so much in liquor he seemed not to know what he was about; he quarrelled with my husband - his brother did not interfere.

MARY PHEBY . I live in Brittania-row, Islington; the deceased was my son. On Sunday, the 29th April, when the prisoner was at supper, he said he would go and fetch John home - he went out for that purpose, but came back

alone, and sat down; John came in a short time afterwards with a can in his hand, which he had some beer in - the prisoner was not affected with liquor in any way, though he was not sober. John threw the can down and struck William, who had not said a word to him; but John told him that he would do for him that night, he would know who was master. William then walked out of the house, down the yard, saying, "John, I will not fight nor quarrel with you." John immediately followed, and knocked him down with his fist; he got on him, and beat him when he was down - William said, "For God's sake, mother, call somebody to help, or I shall be murdered;" the watchman opened the door and came in, having heard him call out - the watchman took John off him - William then got a stick and struck at John over the watchman's head. I really do not know what stick it was - I had no rake, but whether he borrowed one I cannot say - he was gardening that morning: whatever it was, it lay on the spot - he did not go any where for it. I was so frightened, I cannot tell whether he hit John - the watchman took it from him, and threw it over the pales - John went out, and William came into the house - his face was bruised and bleeding; I put something to it - they slept together that night, and did not have a word afterwards. John only went next door, and came back almost directly. I do not know the cause of their quarrel, they were always particularly sociable.

Cross-examined. Q. William bore all this before he cried out, and only took up this thing to defend himself? A. No.

THOMAS SINFIELD . I am a watchman. I was on duty at half-past ten o'clock at night - I heard a scuffle in the yard, and the mother calling out; when I went in William was on the ground and John on the top of him, beating him over the eyes with his double fist - his face was very much swollen; I collared John, and pulled him off, and kept hold of him, expecting he would fly at him again; William jumped up immediately, and caught hold of a small garden-rake, which laid close to him, and struck John on the head; he did it all in a moment - I saw blood run down his face - I suppose the teeth of the rake made the wound; it was a small iron rake - I snatched it out of his hand, and threw it away. William was rather in a passion when he jumped up - John did not attempt to got to him again; I staid there about ten minutes - William went in doors quietly, and his mother dressed his eye. I have not seen the rake since - I begged of John to let me look at his head, but he would not.

Cross-examined. Q. Was John on the floor in the course of the scuffle? A. No. The rake must have been close by, for it was done instantly - it was small, and would feel like a stick in his hand. John was so violent that any one would have defended themselves against him; he said he would doctor the wounds himself, and went to the water and washed them - he went next door, and had half a pint of vinegar to wash them.

ROBERT MARTIN . I am a surgeon. I was called in to attend the deceased on Saturday, the 5th of May; I found him nearly insensible; there were three small wounds on his head, which might be produced by a garden-rake; he was bled, and the usual remedies applied, but he got gradually worse - it was too late to do him any good - he died on the Monday; I opened his head, and on turning back the scalp I found a great effusion of blood- the wounds had penetrated the scalp, and through the skull; one of the teeth of the rake had passed the dura mater - no doubt death was caused by those wounds; if medical and had been applied sooner it would have had no effect on the wounds - he might perhaps have lived a short time - there was a large quantity of pus formed on the dura mater.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it the extravasated blood which caused the pressure on the brain? A. There was no extravasated blood on the brain - it was an outward effusion - it is possible he might have been cured, but not very probable.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention of injuring my brother.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-49

1061. JAMES SIMKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , one 5l. Bank note, and one 1l. promissory note , the property of Ann Herbert .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Thompson .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-50

1062. JAMES SIMKINS was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , from the possession of William Eccles , a person employed by the Post-office, a certain letter , the property of John Thomas Waisey .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner for stealing letters which came into his possession by virtue of his employment in the Post-office, upon which no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18270531-51

First London Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1063. CORNELIUS DRISCOL & ANDREW MORGAN were indicted for feloniously forging a certain will, purporting to be the last will and testament of John McDonald , with intent to defraud the next of kin of the said John McDonald .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating their intent to be to defraud different persons.

WILLIAM ROSS . I am a mariner, and was chief mate on board the Woodbridge - we sailed for Sierra Leone on the 8th of April, 1826, and returned on the 5th of November - there was a seaman named John McDonald on board - he shipped at Sierra Leone, not from this country - he died on the passage home - he had been about six weeks with us. He had fifty-seven Spanish dollars, 7s. 6d. in English money, and 81/2d. in copper, which he gave into my charge just before he died, and told me where to send it; when we arrived at Spithead Captain Lamb demanded it of me, to put with his wages, and I gave it to him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you give the captain the direction which McDonald gave you? A. Yes; there was only one McDonald on board.

SAMUEL BENNETT LAMB . I was captain of the Woodbridge - we arrived from Sierra Leone in November; John McDonald was shipped on board there, and died on the passage - we had only one man of that name; he was a

common seaman; he shipped himself by that name - he died on the 30th of August, on his way home - I received from the mate fifty-seven Spanish dollars, 7s. 6d. in silver, and 81/2d. in copper. After coming home I wrote a letter to Catherine McDonald , and directed it to No. 19, Fore-street, Plymoth - I made a mistake, it should have been New-street. The prisoner Driscoll applied to me at my house, No. 26, Lower-John-street, Commercial-road, a few days before Christmas, to know what wages McDonald had due to him - I told him, and that there were also fifty-seven dollars, and that he had left a verbal will, that the dollars were to be given to his daughter - he said the daughter was gone to Ireland, that she was a natural child. I had told him I had written to her at Plymouth - he said he had married a sister of McDonald's, and had a will made by McDonald before he left England - I said if he would give me the daughter's address I would write to her, and if she consented, I would give the money to him or any body else, provided she went before a Magistrate, and swore she was a natural child, but I should not pay him or any body till I heard from the daughter - he said nothing about McDonald being in debt to him - I saw no more of him till early in February, when he said he had come after the money; I said I expected he was going to give me the daughter's address, or have written to her himself - he said he should not, that he had proved the will, and had the probate; that he was left executor to all McDonald's effects, and if I had paid the daughter, he should have arrested her, as McDonald owed him near six times the sum. I saw him again on the 17th of February, at Munnings', the owner, in Little Bell-alley, in the City; he then produced the probate of the will - Munnings said he had looked it over, and believed it to be correct - Driscol said it was the probate of John McDonald's will, and that he had a right to every thing he died possessed of - Munnings said it was extracted by Clarkson and Son, and he thought I should be justified in paying him the money; this was on Saturday; I said I would leave it with Munnings on Monday, and if he would call there on Tuesday morning he would pay him. I saw Munnings on Monday, and on Tuesday, the 21st of February, I paid Driscol myself 12l. 6s. 51/2d. sterling, at Baxendon and Co.'s, King's Arms-yard, Coleman-street; I found afterwards that the direction the mate had given me, was New-street, Plymouth, instead of Fore-street - I never saw Morgan till he was at the office; I received a note, but never talked with him about it.

Cross-examined. Q. If a letter had come to you by post, signed Catherine McDonald, you would have paid Driscol the money? A. Yes, if she desired it - I have not seen any person purporting to be Catherine McDonald - McDonald came on board on the 24th of July, but he is dated a mouth back in the ship's articles - he would receive a mouth's wages more by that - the owners would have been informed of it - he shipped himself on those terms, on account of the lowness of the wages - I did not tell the owner of it on my arrival; I believe it came out by accident at the office.

COURT. Q. You first found you had directed the letter wrong in February? A. Yes; when he said he had got a probate; he repeated that she was in Ireland, and was merely an adopted child.

JOHN CADWALLADER . I was apprentice on board the Woodbridge. I remember McDonald dying - I saw Morgan on board three weeks after our arrival; he asked me if the ship was from Sierra Leone, and if a man named McDonald had died on board - I said, Yes, and he went away - I am sure he is the man.

MARY HUGHES . I am the wife of Richard Hughes , and live in St. Ann-Street, Limehouse. Morgan has lodged at our house for nine months - Driscol sometimes called on him - he first called about January, to the best of my recollection - he sometimes came twice a day, but sometimes not for three or four days; I have heard them talk about writing, and say it was all right what they had to do - I can neither read nor write; I heard them say to one another that they had been on board the Woodbridge; I do not know what for; I was minding my own business; I heard Driscol say he should get some money from a gentleman in London - he said a man had left him he will - I have seen them write together; I went to Mr. Muaning, and told him not to pay Driscol the money, for I did not think it was right; because I heard them say it was all right between them, that they should get the money - Driscol came in while I was there; Manning asked if he had brought something about the will; he said No, the captain had kept it, but he had got the money from him; this was after Christmas, but I do not know when; Munning said,"Driscol, take care what you are about; here is a woman who says it is not right." Driscol said it was all right and he would come again with the will; I then left the room; I saw Driscol afterwards, and he called me very unbecoming names; I said he should never draw it if was in my power to prevent him; he had only got part of the money then.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you had your own business to mind when you heard this? A. Yes; I was in and out, but heard what they said; I have no other lodger whom Driscol did business with; I have known Morgan write something for him about money due to him at the Admiralty - he has lodged nine years with me.

GEORGE MUNNINGS . I am owner of the Woodbridge. Driscol came to me in February, and asked if McDonald had any pay or money due to him - I told him to call the next day, and I would examine the list - he called in two or three days - I said there was about 3l. due to him - he asked if there were not some dollars - I was not aware of it then, and said there were some belonging to another man - he said he knew of 47 dollars and 7s. 6d.; that he had his will and power - that McDonald lodged with him before he went to sea, and he was a relation - I said well he must administer, and if he produced me the probate he should be paid - he called several times, as he had some difficulty with Lamb - and after I had seen the probate, I gave him a note to Lamb - I told Driscol that the dollars were correct, and Lamb had written to his daughter at Plymouth - he said he had no daughter, and the person, who passed as such, was not so - I have not paid the wages yet, as I found out the fraud in the list being antidated - that was my only reason. Mrs. Hughes came to my lodgings in town, and just as she was going a way Driscol came - I told him to mind what he was about, for that woman charged him with forgery - he said, "It is all correct what I have done."

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Hughes come to you and talk wild and angry? A. Yes.

DANIEL HARRISON , a clerk from the Registry Office, produced the will in question from the registry at Doctors'-commons; it was proved on the 7th of February.

CHARLES HENRY ORTELL . I am clerk to Clarkson and Son, proctors. On the 8th of February Driscol came to our office alone, and produced this will to be proved; the jurat on it is my writing; I was present when he took the oath as sole executor, before the surrogate; he gave it to me to be proved as the will of John McDonald; he had the probate two or three days after.

The will was here put in and read.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 22d of February Morgan came to the office with another man - he said he had been to Sir Richard Birnie to give evidence of a forged will - he said it was the will of John McDonald, who died on board the Woodbridge, on his return from Sierra Leone - that he had witnessed the will in a public-house near the Mansion-house, where it was made - he said it was written on a sheet of foolscap paper, with ink into which a little copperas and urine had been put to make it look old - he stated all this of his own accord, and said they examined the paper, to see if the water-mark would agree with the date they were to give the will - and the water-mark in the corner of the paper was 24, and they dated the will the 2d of January, 1825 - that the name of John Browne was also put as a witness - that it ended with an e, but that his own name stood first - that they had been on heard the Woodbridge, and found he had some dollars and 50s. left in a bag at his death - he said, "I was to have one half of the money" - that he had learnt from Captain Lamb, that the man who had acted with him had received the dollars and he had applied to him, but could not get his share, and if I would go with him and apprehend Driscol, I should find the money on him - I could not go then, but I went the next morning, about eight o'clock, to White-horse-court, Poplar, and apprehended Driscol - Morgan was then within a few yards of the house - I told Driscol I wanted him for forging the will of John McDonald, of the Woodbridge - he said he had nothing to do with it, and did not know the Woodbridge - I handcuffed him, and then related the whole particulars as I have here - he shook and trembled a little, and asked me what would be the worst of it, in case of conviction; I said he had better not question me, for whatever he said must be given in evidence; he pressed me, and I said convictions of this kind generally ended fatally - he wished to have some spirits as he was rather faint - I took him into a public-house, and in his pocket found the probate; I said, "Driscol, this is the thing;" he said, "Mr. Wilson, that is a true will; the person who gave me that was a lodger of mine some years ago;" he pressed me to say who had given me information; I said I could not; he said, "Wilson, you must understand this, McDonald was once a lodger of Mrs. Hughes; you must have had the information from her or her daughter; they told me he was once a lodger of theirs, and ewed them money, and asked me for part of it, but I would not give it them; they have done this out of spite;" I took him to the office, and went next day to Hughes, and found Morgan lodged there; I asked Mrs. Hughes, in Morgan's presence, if she knew any thing of this affair; she said, "I heard Driscol and Morgan talking in the parlour, and thought it was all wrong;" Morgan said, "You know all about it, Mrs. Hughes, if you will speak out; you was to have the money for my lodgings you was present when we divided the money for the last will, and I paid it over to you before I put it into my pocket;" she said, "I did not know it came in a bad way or I would not have had it; as soon as I knew this was bac I went and told Captain Munnings." Morgan went with me that day to the dock, and pointed out the ship; he came to me on the 7th of March, and said Driscol had sent for him to Clerkenwell prison; that he had been with a person named Fallen, and he went to a public-house close to the prisongates, and they offered him 5l. to go out of the way.

Cross-examined. Q. How many public-house did Morgan take you to, to show you where the will had been written? A. To two or three; he at last took me to the Bull's Head public-house, in Bread-street, and said that was it, for he knew the pot-boy, by his having sore eyes; he told me all this of his own free-will; he was at liberty from the 22d of February to the 8th of March; at the second examination he said that every word he had stated was false, that was when the book was offered to him to be sworn - I did not hear him say he had stated it all out of malice: he was then made a prisoner of, instead of a witness.

Q. Did you desire him to get somebody else to help him in swearing to the will? A. No - there is a man named Barry outside, I suppose you mean him - I asked him if he knew Driscol's hand-writing, but did not ask him to swear to it, or any thing to that effect, nor that I would get him well rewarded if he did - I asked Barry if he knew Driscol's hand-writing, and he pointed out one Mahoney, whom I summoned.

COURT. Q. What Morgan said at the office was taken down in writing? A. Yes - he was not sworn at the first examination.

THOMAS FALLEN . I am a mariner, and live in Red Lion-street, Poplar. I know both the prisoners - I gave Morgan 15s., by order of a man named Driscol, but not the prisoner - I did not see the prisoner Driscol on the subject.

CAPTAIN LAMB. McDonald did not sign the ship articles: he put his mark, and I put his name against it, as he could not write.

DRISCOL'S Defence. All I have to say is, that the will is genuine.

MORGAN's Defence. Driscol called on me at Mr. Hughes', and promised to pay me for the trouble of proving McDonald's will, as I had witnessed it. In consequence of a dispute I had with him, and to be revenged on him through spite and malice, I went and told him every thing that came into my head, thinking it would only get him into a little trouble - Wilson promised to get me 50l. and a free pardon, if I would prosecute, and if I would get another person to join me in evidence he would give him three or four sovereigns - I was requested to make oath of my first words, but could not, unless I perjured myself - merely to satisfy Wilson I went to show him where I said the will was made; on my saying I could not find it, he said, "Well, go and look for it, and if you don't, say any house you like;" it was made at a public-house at Poplar - Wilson always said

he would be my friend, and I should get more money than I should by two voyages to the Indies.

WILLIAM WILSON . Not a single sentence of this is true, as it respects any promise or hope of reward held out by me - I never had any quarrel with Driscol - I should have stated, that in Morgan's presence, I asked Hughes if McDonald ever lodged with her, Morgan replied, "No, Mrs. Hughes nor any body else never knew such a man, till the arrival of the Woodbridge."

JOHN BARRY . I know Wilson the officer - he asked me if I knew Driscol's hand-writing - I said I was no scholar - he said if I could prove it to be Driscol's writing, or get any one else to do it, he would get them rewarded; this was the very night the prisoners were committed.

THOMAS ROACH . I know Driscol - I rented two rooms of him about two years ago - I was present when John McDonald was at Driscol's shop; he came in with another young man, and they had some conversation about some money, which McDonald owed to Driscol; he said he was unable to pay then, but said, "If I don't come back from sea, here is a will in power for you, if that will satisfy you" - Driscol threw it into his desk, and afterwards read it to me, and two or three more - I cannot identify the paper.

ROGER MACDONALD . I am a publican, and live at Poplar. I have known Driscol for fourteen years, and have frequently seen him write; I do not believe the signature to this will to be his hand-writing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-52

1064. HENRY HILLIARD was indicted for feloniously forging a bill of exchange, for payment of 66l. 12s., with intent to defraud John Weston , and others, his partners .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with a like intent.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, for forging an acceptance to the said bill, and uttering and publishing the same as true.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE FREDERICK ALCOCK . I am a gold-refiner, and live in Cox's-court, Little Britain. The prisoner came to my house, in company with another man, whose name I do not know - I knew the prisoner before, he is a watch-gilder; he tendered me a bill of exchange, stating he would take 6 ozs. of gold out of the amount of it, if I approved of it; it was drawn by Weston and Son, on Messrs. Herries the bankers, in favour of John Barton, and not being indorsed by Barton, I said, "Who is John Barton, who should have indorsed it?" the prisoner replied, "This person with me is Mr. Barton;" and perceiving him to be a working man, I said, it was extraordinary, a person like him should be in possession of a bill of that amount; the prisoner replied, that Barton was to receive a legacy which Weston and Son had to pay, and they had given him this bill upon the banker for it, to turn into cash - I said Barton could have nothing to do with gold; he said, he had arranged with Barton respecting it, and he should use the gold in his business - Barton said nothing to this. Considering the bill not regular, it being drawn by the town house, on a town banker, which is unusual, I told Hilliard, his story appeared to be correct, and if he gave me time to ascertain that it was so, I should have no objection to take it; they then talked together, and asked if I would ascertain in half-an-hour, I said I might in the course of two hours; they promised to call in two hours, and left me the bill - I sent my clerk with it to Herries, and in two hours Hilliard returned without Barton, and asked if it was approved of - I had determined to have nothing to do with it, but told him it would do, provided he brought his friend Barton to endorse it - I did not communicate my suspicions to him; he went to fetch Barton, and returned in two hours, and said he was surprized he had not met him, as he had appointed, at the Ram at Smithfield - I said the bill would not be negotiable till he had indorsed it, and be must continue to search for him; he went to look for him again, thinking he had missed him - I heard no more that night, but next morning the prisoner's nephew came and said, he had called from his uncle, to know if Barton had been respecting the bill, and in case he called, not to pay him the proceeds, as he was afraid something was wrong - I found the prisoner in custody about an hour afterwards - I did not exactly know where he lived.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did Mr. Weston go with the constable? A. Yes - I had ascertained the prisoner's address, and given it to him.

THOMAS WESTON . I am the son of Mr. Weston, of Bond-street. The bill is certainly not drawn by him, or any person in his firm.

JOHN EDWARD BRAND . I am clerk to Messrs. Herries, the bankers; the acceptance to this bill is not the hand-writing of any person in their house.

JOHN RILEY . I apprehended the prisoner at his house in Albemarle-street, Clerkenwell, without any difficulty.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-53

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1065. HENRY JAMES SUNSHINE was indicted for a rape . NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18270531-54

1066. JAMES BROUGHTON was indicted for embezzlement .

ANN STEVENS . I live in James-street, Lisson-grove. I know the prisoner; he used to call for orders for Messrs. Davenport; I paid him 13l. on their account, on the 24th of June, 1825. I am sure there were eight sovereigns among the money; I took his receipt.

HENRY EDWARD TEMPLE . I am in the service of Messrs. Davenport, of Fleet-street. The prisoner was in their service, as town-traveller, and should account to the cash-keeper for what money he received. On the 29th of June I was cash-keeper; he never paid me this money; here is his book in which he enters the cash he receives; he has entered 8l. received from Stevens on the 24th; he has only accounted for 8l. on the 24th; he left about the 14th of July, the very day we found this account.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-55

1067. JAMES BROUGHTON was again indicted for a like offence .

RICHARD HUXLEY . I live in Tottenham-court-road, and dealt with Messrs. Davenport. On the 8th of June, 1825, the prisoner called on me; I paid him 8l. 12s. on account of

Messrs. Davenport; I took his receipt, which I produce; I am certain there were some sovereigns among the amount.

HENRY EDWARD TEMPLE . I am clerk to John Davenport and others. The prisoner was in their employ, and received money on their account, which he should account to me for; I have the book here in his hand-writing; he entered all the cash here which he received; there is no sum whatever accounted for as received from Huxley on the 8th of June; this account is not entered at all; he left in July, without warning; we could not find him till he was apprehended; this receipt is in his hand-writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the greatest distress, with a wife and six children; my salary was to be 65l., and I was to have 2s. a-day travelling expenses; I received 1l. every week, on account - the balance still retnains in the prosecutor's hands; I conceived this amount might be placed to the account of my salary; I have not been from London.

H. E. TEMPLE . I do not know how the prisoner was paid - he drew something every week, and I believe so much every quarter besides; he never came to claim any amount due to him.

GUILTY . Aged

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-56

1068. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 1 watch, value 2l. 10s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 20s.; 2 shirts, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Wood , in the dwelling-house of James Greeves .

JAMES GREEVES. I live in Wood-street, Cheapside , and am a publican. Wood lodged with me; the prisoner did not lodge at my house - he had come to town from Manchester on the Wednesday before this happened. On the 24th of April he came into my parlour, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and had a glass of beer - I saw him come down stairs and go into the privy - he remained there about five minutes, then came out, and was going away - I met him in the passage, and said I believed he had been upstairs - he had no business there; he said Yes, he had been to look for Bennet, the guard, who lodged with me, but he had been out four hours - I asked how he knew where Bennet lodged - he said he was in his room three days ago, and that he wanted to send a parcel to his wife by him; I searched him, and found two shirts in his hat, and the coat and trowsers in the privy - he told me they were there, and said he was in distress - he had got 18d.

WILLIAM SMITH . I took him to the watch-house with the property.

THOMAS WOOD. I am a journeyman butcher . This property is mine - I kept it in a box in my bed-room.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-57

1093. DAVID HENDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 coat, value 3l.; 1 waistcoat, value 12s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 24s., and 1 oil-skin cap, value 8s. , the goods of George Shoobridge .

JOHN TENNISON . I live with Mr. George Shoobridge, a tailor and draper , of Cheapside . On the 11th of April the prisoner came to the shop and looked out a coat, waistcoat, trowsers, and a cap, which he put on; he tendered me a paper in payment, which I read, and told him it was of no service; he said very well, he could get it changed at his agents on Tower-hill; I sent a man there with him to receive the money, and ordered him not to part with him without it.

JAMES SCALY . I am in Mr. Shoobridge's employ. The prisoner had put these clothes on; I went with him to receive the money - he had talked of drawing money out of the Bank, and in Cornhill I said, "There is the Bank" - he said, "No; there are plenty of banks;" he went into a banking-house in Lombard-street, and produced the paper; the clerks laughed at him, and told him it was of no use - he then said he would go to Tower-hill - I said, "Where there?" he said, "Oh! to some place there; never mind;" I said he must return and settle with Mr. Shoobridge, and as we returned he ran from me in Bow-lane, but I followed and secured him.

MR. GEORGE SHOORRIDGE . I only know that the prisoner was brought back to my shop - I desired him to pull off the clothes, and gave him in charge; there was then no appearance of his being wrong in his mind, but there is now no doubt of his having been deranged for some time.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, but that I will take the clothes, if they will give me them, and pay for them.

Mr. John Box, assistant to his father, the surgeon of the goal, and Mr. Woutner, the governor, both deposed to the prisoner's insanity.

NOT GUILTY, being insane .

Reference Number: t18270531-58

1070. EDWARD GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 3 waistcoats, value 11s. 6d. , the goods of Alexander Purse .

EDWARD STOW. I am shopman to Alexander Purse, a pawnbroker , of London-wall . On the 26th of April, between twelve and one o'clock, I was behind the counter, and saw the prisoner enter the shop - he lifted up a bar, and took off these three waistcoats; he ran out - I pursued - he threw them down. I caught him, without losing sight of him, and they were picked up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy with them under his arm - he dropped them; I followed him, and took one up- the gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-59

1071. WILLIAM SLIM was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 16 ozs. of almonds, value 18d.; 21/2lbs. of sugar, value 17d.; 8 ozs. of raisins, value 3d., and 1 cake of lemon-peel, value 1d., the goods of George Lee , his master .

GEORGE LEE. I am a grocer , and live on Ludgatehill - the prisoner was three weeks in my service, as porter . On the 7th of April I desired he should be watched, and about twelve o'clock, when he left the shop. I sent a watchman after him - I found him in the watch-house; these raisins, which he acknowledged taking, were on the table - I asked for the key of his box; he said his boxes were at Chelsea, but he lodged in a court in Fleet-street; I went there to the house he pointed out, and found in a bag 16 ozs. of almonds and 21/2lbs. of sugar - he said he had taken the almonds from the back part of the warehouse, but had saved the sugar up out of half a pound which he bought every week.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. These things are of trifling value? A. Very - they are worth 3s. or 4s. - he is a single man.

JOHN FISHBURN . I am a watchman. I followed the prisoner from the premises to Black Horse-court, Fleet-street; I took him to the watch-house, and saw some raisins and lemon-peel found on him - he told his master that he lived in Poppin's-court - the constable went there

WILLIAM ELMES . I was constable of the night. I went to the prisoner's lodging with Mr. Lee, and found some almonds and sugar in a bag; he said nobody gave them to him, that he took them.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear he did not say he found them? A. No, I will not - he might have said both.

SAMUEL HARRIS . I am in Mr. Lee's service - the prisoner was an out-door porter. I went to the watch-house- the prisoner said he found the almonds in the warehouse, by the mill; and the lemon-peel on the floor, as he swept the shop, and that he had saved the sugar up.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Elmes present when he said he found them? A. Yes; I have eaten a good many almonds without master's leave - that is allowed, but we are not allowed to take any thing out - they are worth 1s. 6d.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the sugar - I bought the almonds, in Botolph-lane, and found the lemon-peel.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-60

1072. JOHN DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of James Oram .

JAMES ORAM. I am a tailor , and live in Newgate-street . On the 19th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at my window - I turned, and looking through an inner door I saw him enter the shop and pull down these trousers, which hung on the ceiling, eight feet high; he ran out - I pursued, and never lost sight of him; he threw them down, and was stopped in Bagnio-court.

JOHN HARRISON . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man ran by me - I directly heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran with the people.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-61

1073. JOSEPH (alias HENRY) SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 snuff-box, value 12s., the goods of John Webster , from his person .

JOHN WEBSTER. I am servant to the master of the Charter-house. On the 17th of May, at ten o'clock at night, I was in Aldersgate-street - the prisoner rushed by me; I suspected he had robbed me, from his manner; I felt in my coat pocket, and missed my snuff-box. I followed, and collared him - he denied the charge, but threw my box into the middle of the road; I held him, and picked it up; he cried bitterly, and said it was his first offence; I saw nobody with him.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-62

1074. JOHN PAMPLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 sovereign, the money of Sarah Logsdon , his mistress .

THOMAS FITZJOHN . I am in the service of Sarah Logsdon, who keeps the Hertfordshire errand-cart . The prisoner was porter at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate - I gave him a sovereign (which mistress had delivered to me) to pay Mr. Powell, of Bishopsgate-street - I gave it to him in the Four Swans yard; it was the same sovereign as mistress gave me; he brought me a receipt back, with no name to it.

SARAH LOGSDON. I gave Fitzjohn a sovereign to pay Mr. Powell - I had received it from Mrs. Jones for that purpose, in my business as carrier. The prisoner has been my porter for two years, and had 2s. a day - I came to town, and asked him to go and clear this matter up, but he went away.

JAMES POWELL . On the 13th of February I received no money from the prisoner, nor have I up to this time - I wrote to Mrs. Jones in March, for her account, and this was discovered; he has been out of the way ever since.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-63

1075. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 1 pair of boots, value 9s. , the goods of John Power .

JOHN GRIMWOOD . I am a watchman. On the 31st of May, about half-past eleven o'clock in the day, I was in Fleet-street , about two hundred yards from Mr. Power's shop, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I stopped the prisoner running down Water-lane, with two boots under his arm.

JOHN POWER . I am a shoemaker, and live in Fleet-street. These boots are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-64

1076. HARRIET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 ribbon, value 1d.; 2 watch-keys, value 6d.; 2 rings, value 6d., and 1 slide, value 1d., the goods of Thomas Brittain , from his person .

THOMAS BRITTAIN. I am warehouseman to a drysalter. On the 13th of April, about one o'clock in the morning, I was in King-street, Snow-hill, going home to Bridgewater-gardens - I fell in with the prisoner; she laid hold of me, and asked me to walk with her, in a lane which runs into Chick-lane - she enticed me down there, into some yard; I was not more than three minutes with her. I took my watch from my fob and put it into my pocket, when I met her; I gave her 2d. or 3d.; she asked me to go to a house with her, but I declined. I missed my watch almost immediately she left me - she went straight down the passage; I went after her, and met a watchman - we went in pursuit, but did not find her, but in about ten minutes I found her in the watch-house with my watch - I am sure she is the girl.

GEORGE RICE . I am a watchman. The prisoner passed my box in John's-court, as the clock struck one - hearing of this I described her to my brother watchman, who stopped her at the corner of Field-lane, and gave her to me, and as I brought her by the Saracen's Head she took

this watch from her bosom; I took hold of her hand, and asked her to give it to me, but she said she would give it to the man it belonged to.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him - he talked with me, and looked at his watch, and all at once said, "Take my watch, and hold it a few minutes, while I go up here;" I waited ten minutes - he never returned; I walked about till the watchman took me - I said I wanted to find the man to give him his watch. I went to the watch-house, and gave it into his hand; he said I had not robbed him; the constable said I might go, and as I came out the gentleman came in, and said, "This shall be made a charge of felony - you must go to the Compter."

GEORGE RICE . She said nothing of the kind - she was taken within ten minutes of the robbery.

T. BRITTAIN. I did not give it to her I swear.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-65

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1077. ISAAC JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , at St. Mary, Stoke Newington, 1 mare, price 5l. , the property of William Heath .

WILLIAM HEATH. I am a farmer , and live at Palmer's-green, Middlesex, near Edmonton . On Saturday, the 5th of May, about five o'clock, my mare was put into a field adjoining my farm-yard - the gate was fastened as usual. I missed it myself, on Sunday morning, about four, and found it next morning, at Islington watch-house, in custody of the officer. It is worth 5l.; the prisoner is a labourer, and lived in the neighbourhood - he worked for me eighteen months ago, and knew my premises.

WILLIAM ARNOLD . I am Mr. Heath's plough-boy. I put the mare into the field, by the farm-yard, at five o'clock, on Saturday, and fastened the gate in the usual way, with a peg; she was very good-natured - at nine next morning, I found the gate open and she was gone; she always laid in that field at night. I informed my master. I have seen her since - it is the same.

JAMES PRICE . I am supervisor of the watch, at Islington. On Sunday morning, the 6th of May, at a quarter-past four o'clock. I was in the Green-lanes, near Stoke Newington-turnpike, five or six miles from Mr. Heath's, and saw the prisoner riding this mare towards the turnpike - he got off, opened the toll-gate, and let himself through, and put it too again - I went up to him and asked where he was going with the horse, he said to Islington - I asked where he got it from - he said from Southgate. I took hold of him and said I suspected he had stolen it - he resisted and tried to get from me - our noise awoke the tollman, who opened the door and I forced him into the toll-house, handcuffed him and took him to the watch-house. I found a phosphorous box, matches, a piece of candle, and a piece of brown paper, two skeleton keys, and some money, in his pockets, and in his hat I found a pair of cassimere leggings for riding - a halter was round the mans's neck, also a bridle - it is the sort of halter which horses are generally caught with, and is a shew halter, with red tape to it, to make it appear as if the horse was for sale - he had spurs on. I secured the mare till Heath claimed it - Arnold also saw it.

W. HEATH. Neither the halter nor bridle are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in the road who gave me half-a-crown to take the mare to Islington.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18270531-66

1078. JOHN PETRE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , at St. George, 1 watch, value 4l.; 3 coats, value 3l.; 3 waistcoats, value 6s.; 1 pair of socks, value 6s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 2 shirts, value 7s.; 1 hat, value 1l.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 snuff-box, value 4d., and 1 prayer book, value 1s., the goods of Walter Bulkley , in the dwelling-house of Matthew Hayden .

WALTER BULKLEY. I lodge at Matthew Hayden's house, Pennington-street, St. George's East . The prisoner slept in the same room, but not in the same bed, with me, for about a month. On the 26th of May I got up at half-past six o'clock in the morning, and went out, leaving my watch and the other articles stated in the indictment, locked in my box - the prisoner was then in bed - an officer came to me afterwards. I went home, found my box broken open, and the property gone. I saw my watch found, concealed in the knee of the prisoner's trowsers, at the office.

SARAH HAYDEN . My husband, Matthew Hayden, rents this house - it is in St. George's parish; the prisoner and prosecutor lodged in the same room. On the 26th of May, I heard the prisoner go out at a quarter-past seven o'clock. I went into the room about eleven, and found Bulkley's box broken open, and the things strewed about. I went and informed the officer - the prisoner was taken that day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any other lodger? A. An old gentleman, on the first floor.

JEREMIAH BULKLEY . I am a constable of the Thames Police. I received information of the prosecutor, who is my brother, being robbed. I went and informed him - then went and found the prisoner at the Three Crowns, public-house, Wapping - he had shifted his dress, and held his head down but, I shoved his head up, and my brother identified him - he resisted a good deal, and would not be searched but - at the office we at last found the watch in his trousers - after we had got him, before the Magistrate - it took four of us to hold him to be searched - the other property is not found.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not search him before he was examined? A. I tried to do it but could not.

WALTER BULKLEY . This is my watch. I have had it twelve weeks - it cost me six guineas, and is worth 4l. - the property together is worth 15l. He had come from the country a month before, and I allowed him to sleep in my room.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out about a quarter of an hour after him, and left the door ajar. I went to two shops for work - could get none, and in returning I found the door open - the watch laid on the mat, and I took it - not thinking anything of it - but at last, as I had left the door open, I thought it might be laid to me - fear over came me, and I did not know what to do - if I had taken the clothes some money would have been found on me. I have only been from Scotland a short time.

SARAH HAYDEN . I often left him in my house during my absence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18270531-67

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1079. AVIS POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , at St. Mary-le-bone, 1 watch, value 35s.; 1 bonnet, value 1l.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s. 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s. 6d.; 1 tea-caddy, value 5s, 6d.; 2 caps, value 10s.; 1 thimble, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 collar, value 9d., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Mary Donahoe; 1 pelisse, value 30s.; 2 gowns, value 15s.; 1 night-gown, value 2s.; 3 petticoats, value 4s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 1 night-cap, value 6d.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 pair of stays, value 6d.; 2 shawls, value 5s.; 4 aprons, value 2s. 6d.; 1 collar, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 5 sovereigns, 5 shillings, 3 sixpences, and one 1l. Bank note, the property of Catherine Hart , in the dwelling-house of Mary Wallice , widow .

CATHERINE HART. I am single , and now live in Baker-street, Mary-le-bone. In April last I lodged in the house of Mary Wallice, a widow, in Sutton-place, Lissongrove - the prisoner slept in the same room, but not in the same bed as me. On the 18th of April I got up at six o'clock in the morning, and missed my clothes - she had gone to bed there that night; about a quarter after six when I missed my clothes, I saw her going out of the room door with a bundle; I was still in bed; when I heard the street door shut I got out of bed, opened the window, and saw her turn the corner of the street; I then went to my bed, missed my pocket and money, and all the clothes which I had worn the day before, with several other things, all of which were in my bed-room the night before; she had told me the night before, she must get up early to wash, but said nothing when she went out in the morning; she had two bundles tied in an apron, and a blue band-box; I did not see her again till five weeks after, when she was in custody; there was a 5l. note, a sovereign, and 5s. or 6s. in my pocket, but no 1l. note; I lost a pelisse, two gowns, one night-gown, two petticoats, two pairs of stockings, a night-cap, two shifts, a handkerchief, two pairs of stays, two shawls, three aprons, and other things - the clothes were certainly worth more than 40s.; there was a watch and five sovereigns belonging to Donahoe.

MARY DONAHOE . I am single, and lodged in the same room as Hart and the prisoner - I slept out on this night, but saw my property safe on Tuesday, about ten o'clock in the morning; my watch hung over the chimney-piece in the bed-room; my tea-caddy was on the mantel-piece; I also left a gown and other articles there; they were gone at ten o'clock next morning, when I returned - the watch was silver, and cost me 2l. about two years ago; a silver thimble was locked in my caddy, that cost 2s. about a year ago.

C. HART . I did not notice whether the watch or caddy were safe when I went to bed; my things were all safe at night.

MARY WALLICE . I am a widow, and rent this house, in Sutton-place, Lisson-grove, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone - the witnesses and prisoner lodged with me. Hart informed me of the robbery on Wednesday morning; the prisoner was then missing; I did not hear her go out, I was in bed.

WILLIAM TRODD . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. On Friday, the 25th of May, I apprehended the prisoner in Bryanstone-square, in a state of intoxication - I found this watch and thimble on her, and this wearing apparel, which she had on.

C. HART. Here is my stays, which I wore the day before; also a shawl and a petticoat; I made them myself, and they are marked.

M. DONAHOE. I know this to be my watch by the maker's name, and the thimble is mine.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18270531-68

1080. JOHN RUTLEDGE was indicted for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a forged promissory note, for payment of 20l., with intent to defraud James Hawkins .

JAMES HAWKINS. On the 28th of March I was at a lock-up-house in Cursitor-street; the prisoner was there, and said he had procured bail and had sent his nephew into the City to meet them, and given him the money to pay them - while his nephew was gone, his bail came there - he said they would not wait for his nephew's return - he asked Mr. Colebeck and me if we had 8l. to lend him till his nephew returned - I pulled out my purse, and let him have 8l. - I had seen a 5l. in his hand; but one Pearson, whom he sent down with it, said they would not take that, and I saw another note in his hand - he promised to pay me before he went away - in about an hour I asked him for it - he said he could not pay me that night- that his nephew had returned, but he wanted all the money - I asked if had not some notes - he said he had a 20l. note, which he would leave with me as security till next morning, when he would bring the money and take the note back; it was a Wellington note, payable in town; I sent it next morning to a banking-house, by a porter, who is not here, and I sent it again by another man - I cannot swear they brought the same note back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-69

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

1081. JOHN HAINES, alias MACKEWEN , and BENJAMIN BACKSTAY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Prince , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 5th of May , at Fulham, with intent to steal, and stealing 1 cornelian stone, value 2s.; 1 coral, value 1l.; 1 watch, value 7s.; 1 pair of metal cases, value 2s.; 12 tea-spoons, value 5s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 2s.; 3 necklaces, value 16s.; 27 rows of heads, value 15s.; 24 seals, value 5s.; 14 necklaces, value 14s.; 2 pairs of steel clasps, value 2s.; 3 pencil-cases, value 18d.; 10 chains, value 12s.; 3 penknives, value 1s. 6d.; 10 pairs of scissars, value 8s.; 19 brooches, value 2l.; 3 buckles, value 5s.; 12 pairs of snaps, value 1s.; 2 pairs of drops, value 1s.; 2 pairs of tweezers, value 1s.; 1 portrait, value 7s., and 1 gold pin, value 1s. , his property.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PRINCE. I am a watchmaker , and live at No. 20, Dorvill's-row, Hammersmith, in the parish of Fulham, Middlesex - I live in that house with my family, and have no partner. On Saturday, the 5th of May, about twelve

o'clock at night, I fastened my house up myself, and am sure it was quite safe - no door or window whatever were left open - I was alarmed at four o'clock next morning - it was then daylight - I got up, opened my window, and discovered that some trays, which had contained goods the night before, were laying in the kennel - I immediately came down-stairs, and discovered that the shutters of the shop had been forced open; they had been hored by a centre-bit - the bottom rail of a shutter was broken off, and two squares of glass broken out of the window - the window does not lift up - a person could not get through that hole, but could reach the goods through with their hands - I examined my stock, and missed the articles stated in the indictment; and on the Monday saw the property at Queen-square - I know it to be mine - I know nothing of the prisoners. The shop is part of the dwelling house - you must go through it to get to the house; it is a room in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far do you live from Hyde-park-corner? A. About four miles I have no other Christian name, nor any partner.

JOHN WARREN . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the night of the 5th of May I was on duty near Kensington church; Young was on the opposite side of the way, and about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners in company with another; it had then been day-light above an hour; they were coming towards Kensington, in a direction from Hammersmith - the two prisoners had nothing that I knew of at the time; the other man, who has escaped, was carrying a bundle under his left arm; they were all three in a line together, in conversation - I saw them a great distance before I came up to them; I did not know them before; when I saw them there was a watchman named Wilkinson on the side of them - I told him something; he is not here - I called to Young, with a low whistle, but before he came to me the prisoners and the other man came up to me; all three were together; the man who carried the bundle was on the left, Backstay in the middle, and Hayes outside - I saw them all three look down, as if they had done something - I collared the man who had the bundle, and said, "What have you got here?" I said this in the prisoners' hearing - I was answered by Haines, "Grub," which means victuals; the man said, "Bread and cheese;" I said, "That be d - d," and threw the bundle down on the ground - I felt what was in it - I immediately collared Backstay with my left hand, and the man who had the bundle with my right; the handkerchief came off that man's neck - I immediately laid hold of his coat; he got away, but before that Haines ran away; my partner and a watchman who is not here, ran after him, - I was left with Backstay, and the one who is absent - Backstay said, "What do you collar me for? I have got nothing;" he shook about a good deal, and up with his fist and struck me on my left side; he ran away, and made his escape - I turned round to see that he did not take the bundle which laid on the ground - I cried loudly for help - I turned my face to the man who had the bundle as quick as I could, to hold him, and thought I would draw my cutlass, but could not get it out, before I received a slap in the face; he knocked me down on the ground, then put his foot on my breast, and kept kicking me - I held his coat fight, till he slipped it off - I was then left with hat, handkerchief, dark lantern, and coat, and the bundle which contained Mr. Prince's property, all of which came from the man who escaped; my partner returned with Haines, who they had taken - I stood by while he was secured, and then went in search of the other two men, taking the bundle with me - I produced the same bundle afterwards before the Justice at Queen-square; it contained the same things - I am quite sure of both the prisoners' persons; they were full ten minutes in my presence during the scuffle; I saw Haines again the same night; he was taken and brought back - I saw Backstay again on the 14th; I have never had a doubt of his identity - I did not know the officer who apprehended him, and never saw him before in my life - I went in before the Magistrate and said, another man was taken; the officer came up, and said, "Is your name Warren?" I said Yes; he said, "Is this the man?" I said it was - I knew him immediately.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The scuffle lasted altogether ten minutes? A. From the first of my seeing them, till they got away - it was after Haines got away, that the man who escaped, put his foot on my breast and treated me as I have described; I should think that lasted five or six minutes; Haines ran away almost directly - I looked at the two men who were loose from me; I never saw either of them before to my knowledge; I am a patrol on the Hammersmith-road - I saw them two miles and a half, or rather better, from Mr. Prince's house.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. You state you were about six minutes on the ground, being kicked by the man who got away? A. Not kicked all that time - I was holding him and scuffling - Backstay had escaped about two minutes before that; he struck me the first blow, but did not knock me down - I was not on the ground six minutes, but was scuffling; I swear Backstay is the man.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I think you stated that the place you met them was in the direct road from Hammersmith to London? A. It was. I took Wilkinson to Queen-square, but he was not bound over.

MICHAEL HALL . I am a watchman of Camden-hill, Kensington. On Sunday morning, the 6th of May, near four o'clock, I heard a watchman's rattle spring, and saw a man come running up the New-road, Camden-hill, towards me, in a direction from Kensington church, towards the Uxbridge-road - I saw a watchman and patrol in pursuit of him; there was nobody else near the place; the watchman sprung his rattle, and the patrol hallooed Stop thief! the prisoner Hames came up to me - I told him he must stop; I took him by the collar, and held him till Young, the patrol, came up - I delivered him to him; the spot where something has been found, was pointed out to me, by two boys, Boult and Leeson, about a week after; I took him about forty yards farther, but he would have passed that spot, and I saw him make a stop - it was some time before I heard of any thing having been found; I then got them, and they both pointed out the spot to me.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose they are here? A. Yes - I think it was a full week afterwards that they pointed it out; it was in the exact road the prisoner had run - it is a

foot-path leading from Kensington-road to Uxbridge-road; it is a public-road. I had been told they had found something.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Sunday morning, the 6th of May, I was in Kensington, and heard a whistle from Warren, which first called my attention - I turned round, and saw three men coming in a direction from Hammersmith, towards London; one of the three had a bundle on his left arm - I have heard part of Warren's evidence - I came up, and saw him collar two of them, which was the one who had the bundle, and the other was Backstay; I am quite sure of his person; my attention was particularly attracted to him; when I came up I looked him in the face some time - he stood nearest to me - the third man, which was Haines, ran away; I followed him - he ran towards Hammersmith, and turned up a lane called Camden-hill, and about twenty or thirty yards after he entered the lane he made a stop - I observed him put his hand under his coat, as though he was feeling for something - he started and ran again; I saw Hall, the watchman, coming down the lane, and called to him to stop him - he did so; when I came up he gave him up to me; I took him back to the place where I had left Warren, and found the two prisoners, whom I had left him with had escaped. I then handcuffed Haines; I had not lost sight of him at all, and am sure he is the man - nobody was running before me, in the same direction; the other watchman followed me in the pursuit; Boult and another boy pointed out a spot to me - it is the same spot as where Haines stopped and did something under his clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You say you did not lose sight of Haines till he was taken; how was it that you before said your attention was principally directed to Backstay? A. After he ran away, I said I did not lose sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long were you with Backstay? A. I might be looking at him for about a minute and a half or so; I saw him again on the 17th of May.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you saw him on the 17th of May, or to this moment, had you any doubt of his identity? A. Not the least.

JOHN BOULT. I live at Thornton-street, Kensington. On Tuesday, the 8th of May, I was on Camden-hill with Leeson, and found a crow-bar, and Leeson found a cornelian stone - we found them both in the ditch, by mere accident; I gave them to Warren afterwards; we were playing, lost our ball, and went into the ditch to look for it; I pointed out the place to Hall first, and then to Young; it was about a day or two after, I cannot exactly say; I showed them the very same place, as near as I can tell - it might differ a yard or a foot.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is this a public place? A. No, Sir; it is a footpath, but no thoroughfare for carriages; a good many people may pass there - it leads to Camden-hill, from the New-road - it is a short cut- I did not put any mark on the spot, but knew it by the stump of a tree; it was about a yard from the stump.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is the place much frequented, compared to the many people who go on the highway? A. Very few people go that way.

ROBERT LEESON . I live at Thornton-mews, Kensington. I was at play with Boult on the 8th of May, in the fields adjoining the New-road, Kensington. Boult found a crow-bar, and I found a cornelian stone in the lane, in a ditch, by the footpath - Boult pointed the place out aftwerwards. I was not present then; he went with me, and pointed it out to Hall, the watchman; we showed him the place as near as we could judge; it was within three or four feet of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you make a mark on the spot? A. No - it was guess work; I pointed it out to Hall the same afternoon, and so did Boult.

COURT. Q. Why, you was not with him? A. Yes, when he pointed it out to Hall - it was the same afternoon as we found the things.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was not two or three days after? A. No; I am not quite certain that it was the same afternoon, but think so - I think I pointed it out on the Saturday too, we pointed it out to Hall twice; he was at work on the road on Saturday, and we were there; it was on Tuesday we found the things, and I am not certain whether it was Tuesday or Wednesday that we pointed it out to him first; I showed it him again about three days after - it is a public thoroughfare for foot-passengers - a great many people come down that way from Kensington gravel-pits, but not so many as go along the carriage-road.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you sure you pointed out the same place to Hall? A. Yes; There is a bit of wood put up there to keep the bank up, close to where the crow-bar was, and some lilac there.

MR. CRESWELL here stated he had received information that Warren, the officer, had been talking with the witnesses.

Q. Has any body been speaking to you about any thing? A. An elderly man asked me if I picked up any thing; he said nothing about what I was to say.

JOHN WARREN . As I went down the steps of the Court after I was examined (having been desired to leave the Court) Grossmith stood there; I said to him, "I don't think Young has got the things;" that is every word I said. I solemnly declare I have not at any time suggested a word to the witnesses.

FREDERICK GROSSMITH . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Sunday, the 13th of May, I took Backstay into custody on this charge, in the Broadway, Deptford, Kent, sitting on the step of a door; I had been in search of him for a week; I asked if his name was not Benjamin Backstay; he said it was not; he was sitting leaning his head towards the pavement; I moved the brim of his hat, looked at his face, as I knew him well before - I then told him I wanted him for something done, but whether I at that time said at Hammersmith, I will not be certain; he then directly ran away - I ran after him, and took him into custody - I left him in Deptford watch-house, and afterwards brought him to town - I told him when I handcuffed him in the Broadway, where I took him, that it was for a burglary done at Hammersmith - I took him to Queen-square the next day.

JOHN WARREN . I produced the bundle containing the property - I have had it ever since - I have also the cornelian stone and the crow-bar - they have been in my custody ever since I received them from the boys - here is the coat which came off the man who escaped.

MR. PRINCE. The property in this bundle is mine - and

was stolen that night - I know them again - they were in the trays which I found in the kennel - the value of the property here is about 7l. or 8l. at the lowest - I should give 7l. to buy them - this cornelian stone is mine, and part of the property stolen that night.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They seem small articles? A. Yes; I do not over value them; I have a clock in my house, which I looked at when I was awoke - it was exactly four.

PRISONER HAINES. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Four witnesses gave Haines a good character.

ELIZABETH WALTER . I am married, and live at No. 10, Little Falcon-court, Borough - I go out to washing and charing - Backstay lodged with me for seven months; I recollect Saturday, the 5th of May - he lodged with me then - he came home on that Saturday, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock at night, and went to bed at a quarter-past twelve - he supped at home - it is my custom to take away his candle - I did so that night, at one o'clock - he was then in bed - I sat up that night to finish my ironing, till about twenty minutes past four in the morning - he could not have gone out without coming through my apartment - he never went out till I called him up in the morning at half-past eight o'clock - he was in bed when I called him - he was very well in health; he breakfasted and dined at my house, and went out at nine in the evening - he did not go out before, because it rained, or he was going to his father's; he was very regular in his habits, and never out after ten o'clock - he often went to his father's, sometimes for three days at a stretch, when he had no work; he did not go to see his father that night because it rained so hard - he was only out from nine to ten - he bore a very honest character, and worked hard.

Q. What impresses it on your mind that it was the 5th of May that he came home before twelve o'clock? A. Why, I left him to keep my place while I went home with my work, which I frequently did - I have no other reason for remembering it, only he came home late; I asked where he had been; he said he had just left a friend twenty minutes before.

Q. What reason have you for knowing it was the 5th of May? A. I read in the newspaper, when I had it with a pint of beer, what a burglary had been done on the 6th, and I was certain the young man was at home.

COURT. Q. When did you read it in the paper? A. On the Wednesday; I have said all I know, and can say no more.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Look at that person (Warren), and tell me if you ever saw him before? A. No, sir, I do not know that I ever saw him in my life, till I saw him here - I swear I never spoke to him - I know Grossmith by seeing him about, but he never had me in any trouble; Falcon-court is close to what is called the Mint, but it is not in it. My husband's name is Samuel - he lives with me, and was at home on this night in bed and asleep by ten o'clock; he slept in the same room as the prisoner, up one pair of stairs.

Q. You remember the 5th of May particularly well? A. I do not remember it particularly, no more than when Grossmith and them came - I do not remember any thing more; I did not read any thing about Backstay in the papers - I read that a burglary had been done.

Q. Well, but you said you recollected Backstay was at home on that day? A. No, nothing particular about that day - I heard him say his father lived at Greenwich - I was never at the house - I cannot say where he was on the following Saturday - I know he was at home at ten o'clock.

Q. What day of the month was the Saturday following? A. I do not pay attention to the day of the month - I know it is June, but cannot say what day.

Q. You cannot swear where he was on Saturday, the 12th? A. No, I cannot indeed - I will not swear he was at home at ten o'clock - he was not at home all - I thought he was gone to his parents - I did not know he was going - he was not at home on the Friday - I do not think he was at home on Thursday - he left me on Wednesday I think; it was Wednesday evening when I came home from work, that I read the paper - he went away that day - I had been out to work at five o'clock that morning, and did not see him after that - Grossmith only called at my house once - he did not inquire about Backstay - he said nothing - he walked in and walked out - that was on Thursday; I have another lodger, who has been ten years with me, and an old gentleman - nobody else, except my family - I left my husband at home this morning - he is very well - there is nobody here but me.

Q. When you heard of Backstay being in custody, did you go to Queen-square? A. I was sent for and went. but was not called upon - some young man came, and said Backstay wanted me; I do not recollect when that was - I did not want to go - I am no relation of his.

Q. Now, recollect what you are saying; on your oath, did you or not, when at Queen-square Office, talk to Warren? A. No, I do not know that I spoke to him, on my oath, if I was to die this minute, I do not know that I ever saw the man before to-day with my eyes. I will not swear that I did not talk to him.

Q. Did you tell him you was Backstay's mother? A. No, I never did; I never owned that I was Backstay's mother.

Q. You never owned it; is it true then? A. No; my name is Walter; I am sure I did not say so - his mother was there.

Q. Did you ever ask him if he was a father himself; if he was a parent of children? A. No, I did not - I never said such a word, I will take my oath; nor did I say, "If you are a father, be lenient with this young man;" or any thing of the sort - I never spoke to him; he said the other day, "D - n the woman, what business has she here at all?" he said that outside the door several times - a great many people outside heard it.

Q. Did you desire Warren to be as lenient as possible, because Backstay had been led away by bad people? A. No, I did not; I never said I was his mother, nor any thing to that effect - I had two young women and a young man with me - one of them was his fellow-servant; they are not here; I was not at Queen-square above five minutes, and came away directly when I saw him handcuffed; I was not near the place; I did not go inside no further than the gateway.

Q. Did you tell the officer, or any one there, that you knew he could not he guilty of any such thing, for he was at home at your house all night? A. No. I never said such a word - if Warren will take his oath that way, it is very false - it is a pity he should have his way just as he likes.

JOHN WARREN. On the 21st of May, when Backstay was under examination at Queen-square, I saw Mrs. Walter there, in the yard - Backstay was in the strong-room; she asked if I was a father, and if I would he lenient to Backstay, for he had been led away by bad company; and in answer to a question of mine, she said she was his mother - a young woman was with her, in a black beaver bonnet; she was quite a girl, not old enough to pass as Backstay's mother - I am sure Walter is the woman who said this to me.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. Was this in the yard of Queen-square Office? A. It was; it is a large yard - I saw only four persons besides themselves, and a boy there - she came aside to me, and dropped a curtsey when she spoke - I never saw her before - I had a red waistcoat on; I suppose she knew me by that - I was coming out of the gate - she said, "Are you the officer who apprehended Benjamin Backstay?" I said, "No, but I am the officer that lost him; I can swear to him" - she said, "I suppose you have got children of your own;" I said, "I have; are you his mother?" she said, "Yes I am, be as easy as you can, for he has been led away by bad company." I walked away, and left her - I had only one conversation with her; as I came out of the office into the yard, she met me full butt, and curtsied; there was only a girl with her, a boy, two soldiers, and another in the yard; that young woman has been here all the Session; I believe she is a witness for the prisoners - nobody is here to support my evidence.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did either the boy, the soldiers, or the other person hear a word of the conversation? A. No; nor did the young girl.

HAINES - GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 27.

BACKSTAY - GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 20.

Before Mr. Recorder.

1081. REBECCA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 2 fur tippets, value 4l., the goods of James Salthouse, in his dwelling-house.

JOSEPH WILLS. I am shopman to James Salthouse, a linen-draper, of Goswell-road, On the 26th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and asked for Mr. Salthouse - she was informed he was expected in, in half an hour; she went away, and returned in half an hour - I said he had not returned, and asked if she would leave any message for him - she said she supposed I could do as well - that she wanted to select half a dozen fur tippets. She looked at some and came again about twelve - o'clock; she had then selected half a dozen, which I told her the price of; she said she would go and fetch the money - and as she left one of the shopmen came round and asked if I knew what tippets I had on the counter - I counted them, and found one of a particular sort wanting - which I am certain was in the shop when she was there - I went out, and in about a quarter of an hour found her at Northampton-square, and desired her to walk back - she said she would, and did so. I told her I pretty well knew what she had got about her - she said she had no doubt but I did - and begged me to let her go; when she got to the shop she delivered up two tippets which had been shown to her - they might cost about 3l. 10s. I am certain I saw them both when she was with me the last time. I did not know her before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If you saw both when she was there, how is it you only missed one? A. I only counted one sort, and missing one, I went after her directly. I counted them all after she left in the morning.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. I was fetched from Hatton-garden to Mr. Salthouse's, and found the prisoner there - these two tippets laid on the counter - she begged I would speak a word for her, for she had some money to make up that evening, which was the sole cause of her doing it, being in distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270531-70

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1082. THOMAS NELMES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 144 pairs of habits, value 8l. 12s., the goods of John Trist Marsh , his master .

JOHN TRIST MARSH. I am a wholesale glover , and live in Maiden-lane, Wood-street, Cheapside. The prisoner was six weeks in my warehouse as wareshouse man and town-traveller - it was his duty to receive from Pratt, my man, samples of goods, to wait on the customers during the day.

THOMAS BROOK PRATT . I am servant to Mr. Marsh. On the 14th of February I looked the prisoner out a certain quantity of goods, which I entered on a slate - when he comes home at night I always rub it off the slate, and enter what is deficient in the book. I cannot tell how many I delivered him, but he was deficient twelve dozen. I am sure I delivered him that number, or more, that morning - he was to take them round to the customers and account for what were deficient: the entry remained on the slate when he came back, which was between three and four o'clock. I entered from his own book into our day-book, (which is here) - the number deficient - I find I have entered to that date, from his book,"3 dozens to W. Salthouse, 3 dozens to Brown and Son, 6 dozens to Venable's" - we have inquired of those parties, they are not here - but we have found the goods in pawn; he went out on the morning of the 11th, and never returned - this was discovered afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know how many you gave him out? A. No; I only know how many were deficient - I will swear he was twelve dozen deficient - I always see that his book corresponds before I clear off the slate - they are ladies' gloves, which we call habits in the trade.

MR. MARCH. The prisoner went out one morning with goods and never returned - he had given me no notice whatever - I agreed to give him at the rate of 80l. a-year, for the first three months; a small sum was due to him when he left - he made no application for it. I got information and went to his lodgings in the Lambeth-road, with an officer - and while we were in the house he escaped out of the back window - we found some duplicates in the pocket of a waistcoat which I had seen him wear - twelve dozen of habits were afterwards produced, which have my private mark on them - I never sold them to him.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you were told he lodged there? A. Yes; I have heard he was once in

business for himself - there was no dispute about his salary, for I took him from a place of custody, and he was thankful for the situation - his success did not depend on his making a number of sales. I have no ides of his object being to make it appear that he had effected sales.

ASHER HARRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, pawnbroker, Strand. On the 14th of February the prisoner pawned twelve dozen habit gloves with me, for 3l. - they are still in the paper he brought them in - the constable has the duplicate I gave him - I am sure of his person - by his desire, I gave him two duplicates for six dozens each.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I accompanied Mr. Marsh, to Prospect-Place, Lambeth, about the 20th of March - and in the ground-floor room I found a bed and a box of men's apparel - two duplicates dropped from a waistcoat, each of which relate to six dozens of habits, pawned on the the 14th of February, in the name of Thomas Day, 15, Noble-street. I apprehended the prisoner at the Gentleman and Porter, public-house, Falcon-square, and told him it was for robbing Mr. Marsh of some gloves - he said he could bring nothing home to him, for nothing was found. I said I had found some duplicates at his lodging - he said nothing to that.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-71

1083. HARRIET HANN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 shift, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 3 petticoats, value 3s. 6d.; 2 speucers, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 5d.; 1 yard of jean, value 6d.; 10 yards of binding, value 6d.; 1 pair of stays, value 6d.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 7 aprons, value 1s. 6d.; 3 pairs of gloves, value 1s.; 3 whalebone busks, value 1s.; 6 caps, value 1s., and 1 straw bonnet, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Eaglesfield , her master.

THOMAS EAGLESFIELD. I am a tailor and stay-maker . and live in John-street, Lambeth . The prisoner was apprenticed to me by the parish, two years ago - she ran away on the 16th of May, about six o'clock in the morning - and we missed all this property.

MARY ANN EAGLESFIELD . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner left without my knowledge - I found her about twelve o'clock the same day, at a house in Shoemaker-row, Doctors' Commons; she had got the whalebone busks and the shift, the other things were afterwards found - she delivered me the shift, sheet, shirt, and three petticoats.

JOHN MITCHELL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at No. 2, Shoemaker-row - I believe she has a relation there; her mistress had part of the property in her hand; the prisoner said some of the things were upstairs; she went up and fetched them down - I found more at her mother's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL SWAIN . The prosecutrix delivered the prisoner into my charge the day after the robbery.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270531-72

1084. MARIA PEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 2 half-crowns, and 13 shillings, the monies of James Mitchell , from his person .

JAMES MITCHELL. I am a trimming manufacturer , and live in Primrose-street, Bishopsgate. On Thursday, the 17th May, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was in King-street, Smithfield - I had been out about four hours, and taken two glasses of rum and water - I was on my way home - the prisoner caught me by the arm, but I did not encourage her at all; she talked a parcel of nonsense - I walked on without stopping; she was not a minute and a half with me; my money was loose in my trousers pockets - I did not perceive her hand about my person; thinking her conduct suspicious I buttoned my pocket, but the button being bad, is easily opened; she left me suddenly - I instantly felt, and my money was gone - I followed and stopped her; she called the watchman herself, and she accused me of attempting to rob her of her shawl - I was so exasperated that I held her till the watchman arrived - I felt my money in her hand; it was tightly clenched; I held it to prevent her throwing it away; the watchman opened her hand, and found 18s. in it - I had not given her any thing.

GEORGE BUSH . I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! about half-past twelve, and found the prosecutor holding the prisoner; he gave her in charge for taking 18s. or 18s. 6d. from his pocket; she said nothing; he was holding her hands, one of which was closed, and I found in it two half-crowns and thirteen shillings; she did not say how she came by it.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the silver.

JAMES MITCHELL . I swear solemnly I gave her none.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-73

1085. THOMAS WESTCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th April , 1 wooden box, value 6d., and 33lbs. of almonds, value 2l. 5s., the goods of John Hilton , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES VARLEY . I am servant to John Hilton, a grocer , who lives in Queen-street, Cheapside . This box of almonds stood about four yards within the warehouse, which is part of the dwelling-house; the door was open - I saw the prisoner going out with it; I followed him about two hundred yards; he walked; I laid hold of him with the box under his arm; I gave him in charge; they cost more than 45s. - I have not emptied them out to see that they are all sound.

JOHN THOMAS SEARL . I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man told me to cross over into the warehouse, and take the box out, and bring it to him at Blackfriar's bridge, and he would give me a few half-pence.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-74

1086. JOHN LAMPEY and JOSEPH EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 3 pairs of trousers, value 8s., and 1 pair of half-boots, value 4s. the goods of Thomas Brewer , the younger.

THOMAS BREWER, SEN. I am a tin-plate-worker,

and live in West-street, Smithfield ; this property belongs to my son Thomas; my shop-door is usually open. On the 11th of April, I found the two prisoners in my two pair back room; they had come to sweep the chimney - these clothes were in the front room cupboard - Evans came down and asked me if they should sweep the other chimney - I said there was one on the same floor to be done, he said he had done it; I said it was impossible, for the door was locked, and I had the key - I went up, and seeing the door open, went to the cupboard, and missed the boots and trousers - I had Evans detained; Lampey had gone away; my son and I went after him and found the property in his soot-bag; no violence had been used to the door - I had locked it an hour before.

HENRY BREWER . I went after Lampey, and found the boots and trousers on him; he said he did not know they were in the bag.

FRANCIS GITTENS . I am an officer. I found Lampey in Kingsland-road in two hours, with the property in his soot-bag.

LAMPEY'S Defence. While I was up the chimney, this man went into the other room, and said there were two pairs of old breeches and boots, and would I have them - I told him to do no such thing; he said he would not; he must have put them into the bag unknown to me.

EVAN'S Defence. I put these old things into the bag, thinking them of no use.

LAMPEY - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-75

1087. CHARLES GREEN, alias HENRY GRORGE CLEMENTS , was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , at St. Dunstan in the West, 250 snuff-boxes, value 60l., the goods of John Micklam and William Plucknett Micklam , in their dwelling-house .

THOMAS MICKLAM . I live at No. 12, Fleet-street , and am the son of John Micklam - he is in partnership with my brother William Plucknett Micklam - it is my father's dwelling-house; I live in the house myself. On Sunday evening, the 22d of April, at eleven o'clock, I was going home, and found the door ajar; my friend Collins was with me - I had been absent since 7 o'clock in the morning. I pushed the door open. I sent a boy for a watchman, and two came (my father lives in Drury-lane - I live in this house for him); the watchmen, I, and Collins searched the house - we found nobody in it; I missed a great quantity of snuff-boxes out of the window of the shop, which were there when I left the house in the morning; I had left a boy to lock the door, but do not know whether he did it. I missed other snuff-boxes from shelves behind the counter - I missed more than two hundred in all; I have since seen seven or eight of them at Mary-le-bone Office, when the prisoner was in custody - this was within a week after, I think. I am certain of part of the boxes being my father's and brother's; the value of all I missed is about 60l. I did not see the prisoner near the premises - he is quite a stranger.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You live in this house? A. Yes, for my father, who lives at No 141, Drury-lane; he never sleeps at Fleet-street, but in Drury-lane; it is his own house; my father very seldom takes his meals in the house; the business is carried on there for him; I do not pay the rates - I believe my brother does.

JOHN MICKLAM. I am in partnership with my son, William Plucknett Micklam; the rent of this house is paid out of the partnership funds - my son Thomas lives there, by our permission - we sell snuff-boxes and other things. I saw the house on the Saturday - the stock was all safe then. On Sunday night I had information of this robbery - I did not go there that night, but went on Monday - about sixty doxens of Scotch snuff-boxes were missing, which are worth above 100l., near 120l. I knew nothing of the prisoner till he was before the Magistrate - some boxes were produced before the Magistrate; I can swear to two or three being part of my stock, which was safe on Saturday night - the house is in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any second Christian name? A. No. I sleep at my house in Drury-lane, not in Fleet-street; my son Thomas lives in Fleet-street; I have marks on the boxes, by which I know them; they are not private shop marks, but some of them have marks by which I know them; I think I swore to two at the office; I and my son who is in partnership with me pay the rent and taxes of the house in Fleet-street - we pay every thing belonging to the house.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am servant to Mr. Baylis, a pawnbroker, of No. 35, Upper Mary-le-bone-street. On Wednesday, the 25th of April, about eleven or twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at my employer's shop - he came to pledge six snuff-boxes, and wanted 25s. on them; I asked if they were his own - he said they were not - that he had had them on commission for sale, from a friend of his in Scotland - they are Scotch boxes. I told him I had information of such boxes being stolen, and must detain him - he said he hoped I should not, and entreated me to let him go, and said if I would allow him to go he would send the person who sent him; I said I could not, and detained him till an officer came and took him into custody; I gave the boxes to the officer - I attended at the office, and Mr. Micklam identified three of them, I believe.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. On the 25th of April I was sent for to Baylis', and found the prisoner there; I took him in charge. The boxes were delivered to me - I have kept them ever since, and produce them; the prisoner was locked up in the parlour till I came to take him - I searched him, but found nothing particular on him; I asked where he came from - he said he did not wish to tell me, he did not wish to disgrace his friends; I asked where he got the boxes from - he said they were given to him by a man at the corner of Well-street, to pledge - he did not say who the man was, nor his name, nor say where I could find him.

Q. You mean Well-street, Oxford-road? A. Yes. Mr. Micklam claimed some of the boxes. The prisoner had a child in his arms at the time, about two years old; the Magistrate wished him to give up where he lived, that the child should not be locked up - he then told the Magistrate that if it was taken to No. 19, Queen-street, Golden-square, somebody would take care of it; I took the child there by his direction - I afterwards went to No.

4, Whitcomb-court, Oxendon-street, Haymarket - I saw the prisoner's wife there.

Q. What makes you say she was his wife? A. I never saw the prisoner and her together, or heard them acknowledge each other as man and wife. On searching the first floor front room in that house, in a cupboard, I found three snuff-boxes, which were claimed by Mr. Micklam, besides what the pawnbroker delivered to me. On searching in the wash-hand-stand drawer I found four keys - I cannot say that they were ever in the possession of the prisoner - he has not claimed any thing in that house.

Cross-examined. Q. On what day was this? A. On Wednesday, the 25th, three days after the robbery; I never saw the prisoner in Whitcomb-court.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. When the prisoner was brought to the office he told me to take the child to No. 19, Queen-street, Golden-square, and to say it came from Charles Green; I took the child there, but did not deliver that message; from what I was told there I took the child to another house, nearly opposite in the same street, and from what I heard there I took it to No. 4, Whitcomb-court, Oxendon-street; I went there with another man, and delivered the child to a female there, in the first floor front room; I never saw her and the prisoner together - I searched that room, and in some of the boxes there I first found a small bunch of keys, four of which are skeleton, and under the bed I found this basket, containing three dark-lanterns, a small crow-bar, a chisel, and one or two odd keys, and under the same bed I found another box, containing forty-one skeleton-keys; I then searched the cupboard in the same room, and found a box, containing a number of skeleton-keys, and a bag containing twelve skeleton-keys and several others; I then found a pocketbook with some memorandoms and certificate of a marriage; I saw Gibbs find in a cupboard three snuff-boxes, which the prosecutors claim; the prisoner said nothing about them - I found nothing else. I brought the female in custody to the office with the child which the prisoner had delivered to me; I cannot be certain whether what the prisoner said was taken down in writing; the clerk was writing there the whole of the time; the prisoner spoke to that woman and to the child; he was prevented by the Magistrate from having any conversation with her till the examination was gone through, and the gaoler stood between him and the woman to part them; they spoke to each other before the examination began; he was going to say something to her, and the Magistrate ordered the gaoler to stand between them; I did not hear what he said - he whispered to her, and addressed the child; I do not know whether they talked together afterwards - the woman then gave her name Maria Clements; after the examination was taken, I produced the certificate of the marriage which I found in the pocket-book; the Magistrate asked him whose certificate it was - I cannot say whether what he said was taken down.

The Court here referred to the examinations returned from the Magistrate, and they contained no statement made by the prisoner.

Q. What did the Magistrate ask the prisoner? A. Whether the certificate was his - he said, "Yes, it is, and this is my wife," meaning the woman who gave her name as Clements; the Magistrate asked him if the name, Henry George Clements, in the certificate was his - he said it was.

Cross-examined. Q. The only house the prisoner desired you to take the child to was No. 19, Queen-street, Golden-square? A. It was; I never saw him in any of the houses I have mentioned, not to my knowledge; I never saw him at Whitcomb-court; I did not search No. 19, Queen-street.

Q. Will you swear that the child was in the office at all during the time of his examination? A. I will not swear to its being there all the time - it was there part of the time; it might be outside the office part of the time; I swear positively, to the best of my belief, that it was in the office part of the time; I will swear it was in the office during part of the examination.

JOHN HURLEY . I am apprentice to Mr. Micklam. I sleep in the house in Drury-lane. I was in the house in Fleet-street about half-past five o'clock on Sunday afternoon, alone; I stopped there about five minutes - I opened the window, and saw all the things were quite safe; the shop was quite safe - I locked the door, and pushed against it three times, and am certain it was all safe; I left nobody in the house; I was not there again till after the robbery - I saw the boxes produced before the Magistrate - I know there were a great many taken; a great quantity were gone, which were done up in a paper in one corner.

PETER WARE . I live at No. 4, Whitcomb-court, and rent the house; I took it on the 5th of April - there is only one room on a floor. I let the prisoner the first floor room, and the second floor to two young men; the prisoner lived there, with his wife and one child; I saw him at the office on the Monday after he was taken, but did not see his wife there - he went by the name of Clements, and she was called Mrs. Clements.

Q. On the Wednesday that the prisoner was taken up, did his wife and child live in that room? A. Yes; I knew nothing of the officer's having been till the Friday following, when they came for me to attend at the office - I do not know where Mrs. Clements and the child live now, but believe some where about Queen-street, Golden-square - she gave me a week's notice to leave on the day after the prisoner was taken, but she did not stop all the week; the things were moved away on the Saturday following, when they paid the week's rent - the prisoner and her lived together in my house as man and wife for ten days, when he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at home from Wednesday night till Friday? A. I cannot say; I had not heard of the officers searching the house till they came on Friday; I sleep at home every night, and go out in the day-time when I have no work - I have a wife and four children; I did not hear of the officer's searching the house till they told me so on Friday; it was never searched before to my knowledge; I was at home all day when I had work - whether I had work on Thursday I do not know; my door is generally shut; it can be opened by litting a latch; it is often open in the day time; I have no servant; I saw the prisoner's wife on Thursday morning after breakfast; she knocked at the room door, and gave warning; I did not hear from

her that the officers had been and searched - we had agreed for a week's warning; there are only three rooms in the house; I was at home on Wednesday and at work, I dare say - I did not hear of the officers being in the house.

COURT. Q. If they had made a noise, should you have heard them? A. Certainly; or if they had knocked at the door.

MR. PHILLIPS to H. STOWELL. Q. Did another officer go with you to the house? A. He did; a man took us to the house - he opened the door, and walked up-stairs; we walked up after him very softly - there were three of us; we might be there a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - I will not swear to five minutes, but think it was about twenty minutes; we went into no other room; I did not see Ware or any of the family.

MR. PHILLIPS to P. WARE. Q. Did the prisoner or the woman take the lodging? A. His wife took it of my wife - I was not present; he paid his first week's rent himself to my wife - they lived together then as man and wife till he was taken up, and treated the child as theirs - nobody else lived in that room.

J. MICKLAM. (Examining the boxes produced by Chapman). Here is one box, which I can swear to by a stroke over the head of the figure on it, and another stroke besides - here is another I can swear to by a mark close to the shoulder of the dog, and a scratch inside; here is another I know by a spot on it; I only know these three - I lost a great many different sorts of boxes (looking at the three found at the prisoner's lodging). I can speak to one of these by the gas having fallen on it, and spotted the varnish in different parts - I only know one of these, and the three produced by the pawnbroker.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You talk of a mark on the head, where is it? A. Just over the head of the fox; it is an old shopkeeper; I have had it four years, and seen it much too often. I have seen the mark a great many times; I have had the one with the spot on it some years most likely; I may have seven hundred boxes in my house, but not fifty of this description now, for they are taken - this one I can tell by one mark outside and two inside.

Q. Did you say at the office, on examining the boxes, that you could be more positive about them if another had been found? A. I do not believe that I did, but will not swear I did not; I have been thirty-five years in the trade - there may be fifty thousand Scotch boxes is London.(here the witness pointed out several marks by which he identified the boxes.)

THOMAS MICKLAM . (Looking at the boxes produced by Chapman). Here is one I can swear to, and I know the two my father identified; I do not know the other three, nor any of those found at the prisoner's lodgings.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there a private shop mark on any of them? A. No; I speak to three; there may be many thousands of the same description; here is one which has a mark of my own making, though not a private mark - I made a mark with a penknife on the one with the dog, before it was stolen.

Q. Will you swear you did this with a penknife? A. No, I will not swear what it was done with, but I recollect making the mark; I thought I did it with a penknife, and I do not now say that it was not so.

Q. Did you not say at the office that you was sorry another box was not found, as you should then be more certain? A. I do not recollect it, but will not swear one way or the other; my brother formerly slept in the house, but has not done so for six months or more.

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to say that the boxes are my own; they were sent to me for sale on commission by a friend in Scotland - as to the keys I was not at home when they were left at my house, which was the day before, as my wife stated at the office.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18270531-76

SEVENTH DAY. THURSDAY, JUNE 7.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1088. JOHN PERCY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of William Honeywill , in his dwelling-house .

MARTIN JOYNER . I work for Wm. Honeywill, of Berner-street, Oxford-street. On the 18th of April, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner coming out of the counting-house, with this box-coat under his arm - he was quite a stranger; as soon as he saw me he threw it down. I laid hold of him at the door and asked what he wanted - he said he wanted a job, and that he was in distress; the coat laid in the counting-house, about four yards from the door - my master was at tea; he has had the coat two years.

Prisoner. Q. Where was the coat? A. On the stool - and when you took it, you threw it down by the stool.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge, with the coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to look for a job, being a coachmaker; I went into this house, and seeing nobody went backwards.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-77

1089. JONATHAN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 2 coats, value 1l.; 2 waistcoats, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 13s. 6d.; 1 watch, value 1l., and 3 books, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Henry Williams , in the dwelling-house of William Woolley .

HENRY WILLIAMS. I lodge in the back parlour, at William Woolley's, in Robert-street, New-cut, Lambeth ; the prisoner slept with me. I went out at half-past five o'clock in the morning of the 24th of May, leaving him in bed. I returned about half-past eight to breakfast; he was gone - I found my box broken open and this property gone - he had only slept there three nights.

WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Theobald's-road. I have two coats, a pair of trourers, and two waistcoats, pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Nicholson, of Greville-street, on the morning of the 24th of May, for 21s. Williams came the same afternoon and claimed them - the prisoner came next day to redeem them, and I detained him.

JAMES WILLIAMSON . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge - I found three books on him.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I received him in

charge, and found a watch on him; at the office he was asked if he could tell the number, he said, Yes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 54.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-78

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1091. HENRY NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, 6 sheep, price 9l. , the property of William Rogers , the younger.

WILLIAM ROGERS, JUN. I am a farmer and salesman . I live at Southall-green, Middlesex . On Thursday morning, the 10th of May, at half-past six o'clock, I missed six sheep, which I had seen between five and six o'clock the evening before - they were in some fields which I rent, in the parish of Cranford, in Middlesex. I had one hundred and fifty-six sheep all safe there the night before; they were in different lots - the six missing were, four of one sort, and one of each of another sort; they were four ewes, a Lancashire, and a South-down. On the 17th of May I saw the whole six again, at Westall's livery stables, Curtain-road; Garton and Armstrong, the officers, showed them to me, and I claimed them. I had one hundred and fifty left. I could not find any where that they could have crept out - but I saw the marks where a cart had been backed up, close to the paling, and a piece of the paling was broken off. I examined the sheep in the Curtain-road, and am quite certain they are the same - they are store sheep, and worth about 9l.; I saw the prisoner at Worship-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What sort of a field were they in? A. A pasture field - there are three fields, which open by gates, for them to run into; they are parted from the road by hedges, gates, and palings - two of the fields join the high road - the bedges were very close; a hare could not get through. I counted the sheep at night myself; they were alive when I found them - my father is living, and he is the same name as my own, One ewe had two brand marks. I know them by their description and species - there was none like them in any of the adjoining parishes.

WILLIAM BUTT . I am a butcher, and live at No. 45, Turk-street, Bethnal-green. On the 10th of May, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house; I did not know him before; he said Mr. Green had recommended him to me; he wanted me to kill half a dozen sheep for him; I knew there was one Green, a cow-keeper; I said I would go and look at them first - he said they were at the back of Bethnal-green church, near Hare-street-fields, and that he had bought them of his brother, at Beaconsfield; I went with him to see them, and found them in a yard of a house in Hare-street-fields - I looked at them, and asked what he gave for them - he said 1l. 8s. each; they were worth that - I said they were not fit to kill, they were not fat enough, but I would kill them - he said he thought they were fat enough for the neighbourhood; I was to kill six, and take five of them to market for him - we went and had some porter together; I did not kill them - I was to go again the same night, but did not - I saw Armstrong, the officer, on Friday, and told him, and on that night I went to the prisoner again - he and Green, and another person or two, were waiting in this yard for me to come and kill them; I had not been there two minutes before Armstrong came in, and asked me, in his presence, whose sheep they were; I said "They are mine, I am going to kill them;" Armstrong said, "Where did you get them from?" I said, "You must ask that man that question, I have got them to kill;" he asked the prisoner, who told him he bought them of Mr. Reeves, of Woburn, in Buckinghamshire; Armstrong secured him; I assisted in driving the sheep to Westall's stables, in the Curtain-road, near the office, and on the 17th I saw the same six sheep delivered to the prosecutor, at Worship-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you keep a butcher's shop? A. Not now; I am a jobber - I have not kept a shop for twelve months - I kill sheep at the owners' houses - I knew Armstrong before; I went to him on Friday - he did not come to me - the prisoner told me they had come from his brother, at Beaconsfield - I think I told the officer directly he said they came from Woburn, that he had said they came from Beaconsfield - Green had told me ten days before, that he thought he could recommend me to a job - I have not seen him here - there was never any particular intimacy between us - I had never seen the prisoner before - neither Green nor I were taken into custody - I said they were mine and looked at the prisoner sideways - he did not deny that they were mine - I do not know how I came to say so - it came out all at once - I had given information to Armstrong.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. Butt came to me on the 11th of May, and in consequence of his information, I went with Attfield, another officer, to a house in Hare-street-fields that night - I found Butt, the prisoner, and Green, in a back yard of a house, with these six sheep - Butt had hold of them - I asked him whose sheep they were; the prisoner heard that - Butt said "They are mine, I am going to kill them;" I asked who he was going to kill them for, and he pointed to the prisoner; I asked the prisoner how he came by them; he said he bought them of a man named Reeves, of Woburn, in Buckinghamshire, and paid 28s., a-head; I asked if he had a receipt for the money - he said Yes, but his wife had got it; I took him to the office - I let the sheep remain a day or two with Green, as I knew him - he works at the gas-works opposite; the officer and he then drove them to Westall's livery-stables, Curtain-road; I delivered them over to Green; I can identify one of them, which is here.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you mark it? A. No; it was cut, it is like the same; they were not in my care more than three-quarters of an hour; Green is not here.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I was with Armstrong, and confirm his statement; I was not with him when the sheep were taken to the stable.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present when Butt first went to Armstrong? A. Yes; on Friday.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 14th of May I received six sheep at the office, from Butt and Armstrong, and kept them in a stable at Westall's until the 18th, when I delivered them over to Mr. Rogers; they were the same as I received; one of them is here.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you keep the key of the sta

ble? A. No; but I went there two or three times a-day and saw them, and am certain they are the same.

WM. BUTT . I assisted in driving them to Westall's, and saw them delivered to Garton; they are the same as the prisoner had in his possession for me to kill; I have seen one of them here this morning, and know it.

Cross-examined. Q. You have not seen it from the 18th till this morning? A. No; there is a mark on the one here; it is a shorn sheep; there is a piece cut out of the ear; farmers often make that mark; I am certain I delivered Garton the same sheep.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I examined the sheep, and am certain of them all; I showed them to my drover; I counted them in the field, both night and morning, and was the first person who missed them.

ROBERT PEARMAN . I am drover to Mr. Rogers, and saw the sheep three or four times a week; I took the hundred and fifty sheep to market on Wednesday; I do not exactly know how many I took, but am sure these six were among them; I saw them again on the 18th at the stables; Mr. Rogers showed them to me; I knew them all again; they are part of the sheep which I took to market on Wednesday.

Prisoner's Defence. Butt swore before the Magistrate that I had these sheep shut up in the house, and that he was to kill them, and take five to market; that is not what I said; I told him to inquire if the market was up, and let me know, and as he did not come on Thursday evening, I thought the market was not up; my brother-in-law's name is Reeves; he lives at Woburn, near Beaconsfield; I had taken their shop to open as a butcher's; I had saved a little money while working with Mr. Arnold, and took this shop and parlour of Green; it was not ready to be opened, but Green persuaded me to open it on the 9th; I set off on Sunday to go to buy some sheep of my brother, who is a dealer; I got into conversation with a man on the road, near Southall; he said he had some sheep to sell, and could suit me without going so many miles; he said if I would go to a public-house at Hayes, he had some sheep; I went, and stopped till nine o'clock; it was quite dark, and I did not know the road before; he took me to a field where he had some sheep, which he said were his own; he had six in a fold in the corner, which he wanted to sell for 30s. a head; I gave him 28s. a-head, and brought them home; I had plenty of time to have put them out of the way if I had known they had been stolen, but I drove them home through the open street, and kept them from Thursday till Friday without altering any marks; I entirely depend on Divine assistance to instruct me in the way to go on; I have been teacher in a Sabbath-school, where I lived in great joy and peace; but I have lately failed in business, and have not attended a place of worship as I ought to have, and through backsliding from the Almighty I have been suffered to fall. Butt has done this more to injure Green than me; the man I had the sheep of said if I was asked who I had the sheep of, I need not tell; I told Armstrong, on the second examination, how I had been led away; I did not know they were stolen; these things are facts; my friends are twenty-eight miles from town.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18270531-79

1092. MARGARET RYAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Bradley , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 5l. , his property; and JAMES HICKEY HINDS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES BRADLEY. On Sunday night, the 20th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was in Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane - I was sober enough to know what I was about - I was going in search of two men belonging to my vessel, at some of the taverns. I fell in company with a young woman, and while I was talking to her two young women and the prisoner Ryan came up and asked me to give them some drink - I said Yes, if they could find the men I wanted - presently Ann Clisset came up and said, "Bradlay, is that you?" I said Yes - I asked her to go and have something to drink, and we all six went into a public-house; they were all women but me- I treated them with some gin, and had a pipe of tobacco myself; they all stood at the bar; I knew none of them but Clisset; we came out of the house together; I walked a few paces from the door - Ryan then clapped her hand to my watch, to take it out of my fob - I caught hold of her hand, and said, "Don't do that again" - I had not moved her a minute, before she seized it, and got it out of my pocket - they all set off running in different directions - I followed one to a house, and told the watchman - he took her - I am positive of Ryan's person, for I talked more to her than any person.

ANN CLISSETT . On the 20th of May, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw Bradley in Rosemary-lane - I have known him these twelve years; four women were talking to him, and Ryan was one of them - I said, "Is that you Bradley?" he said Yes, and we all went into the public-house together; he had a pint of beer at the bar; we came out - Ryan kept very close to him; she snatched his watch out, and ran round the corner with it - I am sure she is the girl - I knew her before - we were all sober.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. On the Tuesday night after the robbery; I went to Hinds' house in Rosemary-lane - I asked him where the watch was which he had on Monday; he said he had no watch - I asked him where the pawnbroker's ticket was; he said he had none - I said I was informed he had, and should take him into custody; he then said he would not be taken innocently, and he would tell all about it; that a young women who lived with him had brought the watch, and he had pawned it in Holborn, but did not know where - he had given the ticket to the young woman's brother, and that she was in the corner house; a bonnet and a shawl laid in the room - I went to search this house, and there was an alarm that a woman had ran out of the house, without a bonnet and shawl;(this was at one o'clock in the morning;) I took Ryan to the watch-house; he said I should find the woman who had run away, at a house in St. Giles' - I took Hinds with me, and about two o'clock, found her by St. Giles' church without her bonnet and shawl - Bradley who was with me, said she was the woman, the moment he saw her, and at the watch-house the claimed the bonnet and shawl which I had brought from Hinds' room - Ryan said it was not her who took the watch, but another woman.

WILLIAM WARRE . I am shopman to Mr. Muncaster, a pawnbroker, of Skinner-street. On the 21st of May, the

prisoner Hinds pawned this watch for 21s., in the name of Hinds', No. 7, King-street - I am positive he is the man.

JAMES BRADLEY. I am certain that is my watch - she took it in an instant - I had not time to resist.

RYAN'S Defence. I was not near him; this girl stood by him, and took the watch; she said he was her husband; she gave it to me to hold while she went up a court, and I gave it this man in return to her.

HINDS' Defence. This woman gave me the watch, and said it belonged to a young woman, and being intoxicated I went in and pawned it.

RYAN - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

HINDS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-80

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1093. MARY ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , at St. George, in the dwelling-house of Henry Ayer , 1 Bank note for payment of and value 10l., the property of the said Henry Ayer, against the statute , &c.

MARGARET AYER . I am the wife of Henry Ayer, and live in the parish of St. George - the prisoner is a married woman, and lodged in our house ten weeks - her husband came with her first, and a little boy - her husband went to sea as a ship's carpenter - she was in distress, and I bought her a pair of stockings and a dress for her child to be christened in, on the 22d of April - I went to bed that night about half-past ten o'clock, and while I was undressing I put my pocket on the bed; it contained two sovereigns, three dice, a medal of the Duke of York, and a pocket-book, with a 10l. note in it - the prisoner came up and sat in the chair by the bed side talking to me, while I pulled off my clothes; she slept up one pair of stairs - she came and kissed me, and said, "God bless you, you have done more for me than my own mother in getting my child christened;" she took hold of my pockets, and said,"Where shall I put them, at the head of the bed?" I said Yes, and the servant girl came in at the same time. I said, "Yes, at the head of the bed;" she afterwards went up to bed - in the morning the servant brought me down a sovereign, a dice, and the Duke of York's medal - I was then in bed - I got up and examined my pockets, but did not open the pocket-book - I missed the sovereign, the dice, and the medal which the servant had brought me- the next night, (Monday,) I opened the pocket-book and missed the 10l. note - the pocket-book had not been out of my pocket all that time; I said, "Oh, Mrs. Allen, you have taken my 10l. note; now give it me, and don't let me be in any more trouble;" she said she had not got it, and then, after a bit, she said she had got it, and swore she would not give it me till morning - Taylor, the servant, and my son were present - I went up-stairs early next morning, and said,"Now, Mrs. Allen, do pray give me my 10l. note, for I have had no sleep all night;" she said, "Oh, I am sure I don't know where I have put it; I can't find it;" and pretended to seek for it; on the next day, (Wednesday,) she persuaded me that the servant girl, who had been eight years with me, must have taken it - on the Thursday she went out, and said she was going to beg her passage to Scotland; she came home in the evening with a black steward, said she had got her passage for nothing, and was going - she had got a bottle of whiskey - on Sunday she brought in a large band-box, with a Leghorn bonnet and blue trimming, a gown made up and another unmade - I asked where she got them - she said from a woman named Davidson, who had removed to No. 23, King-street, and that she was to take them to Scotland; she said that woman owed her 10l., and gave me a bill to get the 10l. from her; Mr. Gibson wrote it for her in my presence - I sent my son to Mrs. Davidson with it - he came back and said, in her hearing, "It is all wrong, mother, about Mrs. Davidson; she says she has not seen her for six weeks, and the prisoner has stolen your money;" the prisoner said he was a liar; I then went with her to Davidson, carrying the box in my hand, but did not see her - the prisoner then asked me to go into a house, and she would tell me all about it; she said my servant took the 10l. note, and gave her 2l. of it, and she had bought the things with it; my son said, "Mrs. Allen, I will warrant it you have got all the rest of the money at the smack, and I will go and see;" she stood against the door to prevent him, but he got out of the window; we then had her taken into custody.

CHARLES WALLACE . I am the prosecutrix's son-in-law, and slept with her on this night; I awoke when my mother was coming to bed, and saw the prisoner with my mother's pockets in her hand; I had been in bed about two hours; she asked my mother where she should lay them; my mother said at the bed head, and I saw her lay them there in about two minutes; I saw her rather rumpling about them; she went up to bed. On the Sunday, about nine o'clock, she went out, and about eleven or twelve my mother sent me to Mrs. Davidson's - I returned, and saw the prisoner, and said, "You have not been to Mrs. Davidson's;" she said she had - I said she had not; she said I was a liar. I said the things in the bundle she had bought with my mother's money, and that Mrs. Davidson had not moved; she said she had. We set out to go to King-street - she wanted to go to the smack, but I would not let her. I went to No. 23, King-street, where she said Davidson had moved to, but could not find her - I then called the prisoner a thief, and said she had stolen my mother's money; she told me to hold my tongue, and asked my mother into a public-house, and she would tell her all about it; she told my mother to give me a penny to get some cakes - I went out, but stood by the door, and heard her say the servant had given her 2l. of the money, which she bought the things in the band-box with; my mother called in the landlord; I said I dared to say there were more things at the smack; she went to the door, to prevent my going out - I got out of the window, went to the smack, and got a trunk full of clothes, a piece of linen, and a shawl; I showed them to the prisoner - the officer asked if she had the key of the box - she produced it, and he opened it, in her presence; there was some linen, a new hat, and other things in it. I had been on board the smack before with the prisoner. There were two sovereigns, 7s. 6d., and 7d. in copper in the box.

JAMES BOLAS . I am a Thames Police officer. On Sunday, the 29th of April, Mrs. Ayer called me into the Ship and Green Dargon public-house; the prisoner was in the passage - Ayer gave her in charge, and said she had robbed her of a 10l. note; she said she had not, that

Martha Taylor had robbed her of it. Wallace delivered a box to me, which I took to the prisoner, whom I had left in custody in Maidenhead-court, and asked if it was hers - she said it was, and gave me the key from her pocket; I opened it, and found two sovereigns, 7s. 6d., 7d. in copper, and a quantity of linen-drapery; I left Cromarly to examine it - she had a hand-box in her hand, with a Leghorn bonnet, six yards of cotton, and a new gown - she said Taylor had bought it her, and if I could find Taylor I should find eight sovereigns about her, as she had given her two - she was dressed in a Scotch cloak- I do not think it was a new one. I apprehended Taylor on the Monday.

SAMUEL CROMARLY . I am a Thames Police officer. - Bolas left the prisoner in my care - she said Taylor had robbed her mistress, and given her two 1l. notes - she afterwards said it was two 2l. notes, and afterwards that she did not know rightly what she had, but she hoped to God they would find Taylor; Mrs. Ayer and Bolas brought the box - she said the things in it were hers, and Taylor had made her a present of them - it contained a hat, three pieces of lace, two pairs of boots, two yards of calico, two yards of linen, two yards of marone, a shawl, and two yards of plaid; she said to Mrs. Ayer, "Pray forgive me, and I will make it all right;" Ayer said,"Leave the things, and here is 2l. for you;" I would not allow that, and took her before the Magistrate; she told me she bought the box in Ratcliff-highway - I went there, but could not trace the note. I apprehended Taylor at Mrs. Ayer's - I searched her box - there was nothing in it.

MARTHA TAYLOR . I have been more than eight years in Mrs. Ayer's service. On the night in question I took the prisoner's child up to bed, as she complained she was so much in liquor, she could not carry it - she was in mistress' bed-room when I went in, and when I came back she was sitting by mistress' bed-side; mistress called me down to look for the tinder-box, and I went up-stairs directly. I slept with the prisoner - I went up to bed in ten minutes; she had then undressed her child, but laid on the bed, pretending to be tipsy; I undressed her, and when I got her into bed I pulled down the quilt, and found a sovereign and a dice on it; I laid them on the mantel-piece, and in the morning, when I got up, I found a Duke of York's medal on the floor; I took them all down to mistress before she got out of bed; my mistress afterwards asked her if she had got the 10l. note, and said if she would give it her she would forgive her - she at last laid all the blame on me. I never had a farthing of the money, or ever gave her a farthing in my life. I never bought her any thing.

WILLIAM JOHN PHILLIPS . I am servant to Mr. Brown, a linen-draper, of High-street, Shadwell. I cannot be posilive of the prisoner being the person who came to our shop; I have seen Taylor there occasionally, but she did not buy the goods mentioned.

The prisoner delivered a Defence in a very inaudible tone, the substance of which was, that both she and the prosecutrix were intoxicated; and she supposed her child must have taken the sovereign up to the bed-room in its hand.

MRS. AYER re-examined. I lent her the things, because her husband had left her without a penny - I kept her and her child in victuals and drink for nine weeks, because she had no money. My house is in the parish of St. George.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18270531-81

1094. JANE CROCKET was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 4 bonnets, value 7s.; 5 yards of satin, value 1l.; 25 yards of ribbon, value 16s. 6d., and 1 piece of gimp, value 2s., the goods of John Jackson , her master, in his dwelling-house .

JOHN JACKSON. I live in High-street, Shadwell ; the prisoner was about two months in my service. On Sunday, the 28th of April, she gave notice to leave - she assigned no reason, but wished to go in a fortnight or less, if convenient - the next evening, in consequence of suspicion, I fetched Drummond, the beadle. I called her up, and told her I suspected she was dishonest, and wished to see her boxes; she expressed her surprise, but consented immediately. She went up stairs with us; Drummond unlocked her box with the key which he got from her, and found in it a new beaver bonnel, and a basket, with a quantity of new satin ribbon in it. I asked her who they belonged to, she said to me, she had taken this bonnet out of the shop, and cut the ribbon off a whole piece. I am a batter and tailor; the hat has my private mark in the lining, and is worth about 7s.; the property altogether is worth about 40s. or under; she showed great contrition and begged forgiveness.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She bore a good character? A. Yes; and expressed all the sorrow she could - she is an orphan.

JOHN DRUMMOND . I am an officer. Mr. Jackson fetched me. I found the property in the box - his account is correct.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Strongly recommended by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270531-82

1095. WILLIAM COURT and JOHN MURRAY were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Francis Dymock , on the night of the 7th of April , and stealing, 9 pieces of calico, value 4l. 10s. , his property.

FRANCIS DYMOCK. I am a dyer , and live in Brick-lane, Old-street . On the 6th of April, at twelve o'clock at night, I was alarmed by my dog barking - I looked out of my window, and saw one of my men, (who had been detained at work,) come out of one of stoves. I went to bed again, thinking the dog had been barking at him. I was alarmed about six o'clock in the morning, by one of my men, and found the back premises open, and these goods taken from the racks in one of the drying sheds, which is part of my premises - but not under the same roof, as my dwelling-house, but within the enclosure.

ROBERT LOCK. I live in Chequer-square, Bunhill-row, and am a constable. On the 7th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to a house in Gravel-walk, Twister's-alley, with Brown, and knocked at the first floor front room, but could get no admission - we heard the window lifted up - I ran down stairs, and saw the two prisoners with another man, who has escaped - throwing this calico out of window, I told the prosecutor to stop there

while I went up-stairs - I forced the door open, and took Court out of the room. Murray and the other got out of the window - I knew both the prisoners before - I found one piece of calico on the bed; I have delivered all the goods to Mr. Dymock, keeping the ends which I have torn off, as it would have spoiled the goods to have kept them in that state.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who lived in that house? A. Murray; I seized him, but was obliged to let him go.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer, and went with Lock to this place - hearing of things being thrown out of window, I ran down and saw the calico falling - Moore came down afterwards; Murray and another man instantly got out at the window - I caught them both, but the other got from me - I detained Murray with the property; Lock brought Court down-stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Who lodged in the room? A. Murray, for he has been taken from there before.

DAVID BURNS . I work for Mr. Dymock. On the 7th of April I hung these goods in the gallery or shed. I returned at six o'clock in the morning, and they were gone - it was daylight then.

Cross-examined. Q. The shed is completely separated from the dwelling-house? A. Yes.

HENRY CORY . I am in Dymock's service; I left at ten o'clock - these goods were then in the drying shed. I nailed up the shed door and put a screw to it. I went next morning at five o'clock, and found it forced open, and the calico gone.

JOHN REED . I am a headborough. I went to Dymock's and examined the place - three knots were given to me, which were left behind; I compared them with the goods found at the prisoners' - and they correspond.

FRANCIS DYMOCK . The goods were returned to me next morning, as they were to be shipped - the fag ends which I cut off are hare; I can swear to the ends by marks on them.

HENRY CORY . I also know the goods.

COURT'S Defence. I was in a coffee-shop, and a man came and asked if I would go out palming - we went up to ask Murray to go with us, and the officer came - he then said "Throw these things out of the window."

COURT - GUILTY. Aged 21.

MURRAY - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-83

1096. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bosley Throp , about eight o'clock at night, on the 2d of April , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 30s.; 2 waistcoats, value 8s.; 2 shirts, value 2s.; 2 shifts, value 2s.; 2 window-curtains, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s., and 1 petticoat, value 6d. , his property.

JOHN BOSLEY THROT. I live in Harrison's-buildings, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel . On the 21st of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, leaving my wife and daughter at home. I returned a little before eight - it was not then quite dark; I knocked at the door and nobody answered. Cole, the next door neighbour, came out, and gave me my key - I unlocked the door and went in, without shutting it after me; my son-in-law came in, in two or three minutes - and while talking to him I heard a noise at the up-stairs window; I immediately ran out, and saw a person struggling with Mr. Carter, he got from him - Carter immediately called Stop thief! and my son stopped the man, who was the prisoner, - I never lost sight of him; we secured him. I immediately said "I will go up stairs to see if any body else is there," and at that instant a person rushed down-stairs, ran out and got away; my wife went up-stairs. I followed her, and we missed some property.

SUSANNAH THROP . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went up-stairs to the first floor, after the men had escaped, and found my clothes taken out of the box - I found them down-stairs, tied up in a bundle, ready to be taken away, the box was not locked - I had seen all the things safe that day - the bundle was brought down to the ground floor, and put on the ironing-board; they are worth much more than 40s. at a moderate estimate; my husband had left me and my daughter at home - we both went out at half-past seven o'clock, locked the door, and left the key with Mr. Cole.

GEORGE LOADER . On Saturday, the 21st of April, between a quarter and ten minutes to eight o'clock, I went to the prosecutor's house - he is my father-in-law; in a very short time he said something - I ran to the door directly, and saw the prisoner scuffling with Carter; he got away, - Carter cried Stop thief! and I caught him in my arms, - a scuffle ensued; he hit me, but I detained him, and took him to the watch-house.

ROBERT CARTER . I live next door but one to Throp. On the 21st of April, a little before eight o'clock in the evening, I was coming out of my own door, and saw the prisoner falling out of Throp's first floor window; it was light enough to see him; he fell on the ground - I attempted to collar him; he tried to trip me up, and got from me - I called Stop thief! and Loader stopped him, without my losing sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a young man to help him move some goods; some people were coming into the house, and he said "I must get away, or we shall both he taken." GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

Reference Number: t18270531-84

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1097. JOHN DIEGAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Scott , about the hour of two o'clock in the night of the 19th of May , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house feloniously and burglariously to steal .

REVEREND EDWARD SCOTT. I am a Catholic priest , and live at No. 85, Norton-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone . On Sunday morning, the 20th of May, between two and three o'clock, I was alarmed by a loud knocking at my street-door; it was quite dark - I ran to the front window, opened it, then went down stairs, and let in two officers and two watchman - I gave them a light - I went up, to put on my cloak, and on coming down I found the prisoner in their custody in the ground floor front room - I knew him before very well; he had been apprentice to a hair-manufacturer, and enlisted in the East India Company's service - I said "How could you think of robbing

me, who have been so great a benefactor to you?" he said,"I met a person in Covent-garden, who advised me if I had a friend to rob him" - I said, "Who is that person?" he answered, "A thief."

JOSEPH BUTLER . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, the 20th of May, between two and three o'clock, I was on duty in Portland-road, and heard some glass break - I went and climbed up on some rails, and saw a man trying to wrench Mr. Scott's back-door open - the fan-light was broken - I fetched three watchmen, and placed them there, while I ran round with another watchman to the front door, and alarmed Mr. Scott; two officers came by - Mr. Scott came down and let us in; he gave us a light; the officers found the prisoner in the garden, and brought him into the back room.

WM. ECKETT . I am a Bow-street patrol. I heard a knocking at this door, and went up - Mr. Scott let us in - I entered first, and proceeded backwards, and while we unlocked the inner door, which is about a yard from the back door, I saw the prisoner going out at the back door, which was open; he was within the house in the passage; I seized him about a yard from the door, and said, "Halloo my friend, I want a word with you" - he had a knife in one hand, and a chisel in the other; his coat was off, and I found it laying by the garden door; the fan-light was broken; it was a large square glass, a man could have got through there - I searched him, and found a pair of gloves, a handkerchief, and two skeius of silk; the handkerchief was wrapped round his wrist, which was cut, and there was blood on the fan-light.

FRANCIS GOODSON . I was with Eckett, but did not see the prisoner till he got into the garden; a square was broken in the fan-light, and a whole square taken out, and laid down very carefully - I found near the inner door in the passage, a hammer; the lock of the inner door had been attempted to be wrenched off; the back door, which was open, must have been unbolted by somebody inside; he must have got through the fan-light to have done it.

Prisoner. Great distress drove me to it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18270531-85

1098. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, 50 yards of silk, value 10l., the goods of Jonathan Orme , in his dwelling-house .

ANN ARITH . I live with my father, in Wick-street. On Thursday, the 31st of May, about half-past one or two o'clock, I was in Mr. Orme's shop in Russell-street , and saw the prisoner there purchasing some things; I did not know her before - Frances Tokely was serving her - she left her twice, went to the top of the shop, and I saw the prisoner draw a piece of silk from the division where they are generally kept - she stood it down by the counter, and hid it with her dress - I told Tokely of it - she watched her for a minute - she then moved herself to conceal it under her shawl - she was going out of the shop when Tokely detained her, and charged her with it - she immediately gave it from under her shawl, saying she was only going to look at it at the door - she had bought something, and was leaving the shop with her basket; she had not got out of the shop - I am sure it is the parcel which I saw her take.

FRANCES TOKELY. I am shopwoman to Mr. Orme. On the 31st of May the prisoner came into the shop, and asked if we sold white Persian - she bought a quarter of a yard, and gave me half-a-crown - I had to go the top of the shop for change,leaving her alone - when I returned Arith gave me information - she asked for something else - I placed myself behind her, and she appeared much confused - she was tying up her change, and I heard the end of the roll knock against the counter - she had gone about a yard and a half from the counter - I said, "You have a piece of silk under your shawl;" she produced it from under her shawl, and said she was going to look at it - I had seen it safe at twelve o'clock, wrapped in paper, and it had not been unfolded at all - she was given in charge, and I delivered the silk to Mr. Orme.

JONATHAN ORME . I am a haberdasher and silk mercer, and live in Russel-street, in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields - the shop in part of my dwelling-house. On Thursday, the 31st of May, about half-past one o'clock, I was called into the shop, and informed by Tokely that the prisoner had stolen a piece of silk - she said nothing, and I had her taken into custody - this silk is mine; it measures fifty yards, and cost 4s. a yard.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 64.

Reference Number: t18270531-86

1099. JAMES DUXBERRY was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Thompson , in the night of the 28th of May , and stealing 1 shift, value 2s., the goods of Mary Hollett : 3 caps, value 2s., and 2 frills, value 1s. , the goods of Charles Catchpole .

MARY HOLLETT . I lodge in Herford-street, Lissongrove - Mr. Cole rents the house, but does not live in it - there are other lodgers. On the 28th of May, about nine o'clock at night, a piece of cloth cut out for a shift, but not finished, was taken out of my room with some things of Mrs. Catchpole's - I had seen them safe just before; I found the shift at the office.

SARAH CATCHPOLE . I lodge in the same room, and lost some caps and frills.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I live at this house. About twenty minutes before ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner and another man run round the corner of the street into Union-street - I followed, and took the prisoner with a quantity of wearing apparel - the officer, who has them, is not here - there was a shift among them, but I cannot say whether it was the same that was shown to Mrs. Hollett at the office.

NOT GUILTY .

First London Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18270531-87

1100. GEORGE BALL was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-88

1101. SARAH BROOKES and JANE GIBSON were indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD CRIPPS . I am a brush-maker , and live in Duke-street, West Smithfield . The prisoners came into my shop on the 14th of April, about twelve o'clock; I do not know which spoke, but they asked for a hair-brush; I showed them some - they fixed on one at 2s., which I put in paper - Brooks put down a sovereign, which I weighed

as usual, and found it good - I was getting change, but Gibson said, "You need not change, I can lend you" -"Very well," said she, "do so," and I returned Brookes the sovereign: Gibson felt in her pocket and said, "No, I can't, I have got but one shilling and a few halfpence;" Brookes said, "Well, I must change," and put down a sovereign; my suspicions were awake - I weighed it, and found it a different weight; I then said, "This is not the sovereign you gave me before;" she then threw down the other and said, "Take which you please, I have but two; I took them just now, and did not know which I gave you." I kept them both in my hand, and asked where she got them; she would not tell me - I then questioned them both; they refused to give any account of themselves - I sent for a constable, and gave them in charge, with the sovereigns, after marking them.

Cross-examined by MR. GORDON. Q. Did they come into the shop together? A. Yes; Brookes asked for the brush; one asked the other, "Will this do?" they both fixed on it - I marked both sovereigns.

GEORGE TABER . I am a constable, and was sent for - I questioned the prisoners; they said they would give no account of themselves - Cripps gave me these two sovereigns, which I saw him mark; I have kept them separate from any others.

JOHN FIELD . I am an officer of the Mint; one of these sovereigns is counterfeit - made of copper, and not worth a farthing. BROOK - GUILTY .

GIBSON - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and find Sureties for Six Months more .

Reference Number: t18270531-89

1102. ISABELLA ANN KEEN was indicted for a misdemeanor . NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-90

1103. WILLIAM TYRRELL was indicted for a fraud .

SAMUEL BILLS . I keep the Blue Posts public-house, in Holborn, and book for the Kentish-town coach. On the 17th of April the prisoner (who was a stranger to me) came to the office and produced a brown paper parcel with this ticket to it (looking at it); the parcel was to be sent to Kentish-town; the ticket purports to be from the Angel, St. Clements, and charges 1s. 8d. carriage, and 6d. porterage; it was directed to Mr. Sheen, Kentish-town; I understood it had come from the country to the Angel, and was to be forwarded to Kentish-town; he demanded 2s. 2d., which I paid him; the brought another parcel about three o'clock the same afternoon, and had a ticket with that, purporting to come from the Angel, and charging 2s. 2d., which I paid him, believing it to be correct.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you know where they came from? A. No; the ticket only denotes that they came from the country; the parcels were found to contain nothing but brown paper.

JAMES PHIPPS . I am a coachman. I took the parcel to Mr. Sheen, of Kentish-town, but it was a hoax.

JOSEPH WERRETT . I took a parcel to Hampstead, but could not find the person it was directed to.

JOSEPH WALTERS . I am porter at the Angel, St. Clemeats; we often send parcels by the short stages, and a ticket like these, with our charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is this one of your tickets? A. We used these about two years ago; the prisoner was employed at the Angel about four years ago.

SAMUEL HOPSON . I took the prisoner in charge; he said poverty drove him to it, and that he had a wife and three children; I believe he was in great distress.

MR. BARRY addressed the Court on behalf of the defendant, and called several witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-91

1104. GEORGE SANGSTER & GEORGE KNIGHT were indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOHN SLAN . I am a stationer , and live at No. 5, Inner Temple-lane. On the 31st of May, at a quarter-past nine o'clock at night, I locked up my shop, and brought away the key; I was fetched there in about a quarter of an hour, and found a mob round the door, and a strange key stuck in the lock, which would not turn; William Clifford is my partner - there have been various depredations of this sort committed, and I am obliged to remove my stamps every night.

GEORGE MARSHALL . I am apprentice to a law-stationer, in Chancery-lane. On the 31st of May, about half-past nine o'clock, I was in Inner Temple-lane, and saw two men dressed in dark clothes, trying to put a key into the lock of this shop-door; I watched them under an archway for about five minutes - they continued at the door; then Sangster came up and stood for about five minutes before the one who was at the door; I called the watchman - we stood under the archway - I then went up Hare-court, came up and saw four at the door; Knight was the fourth; I went and told Mr. Slann; I believe the key was put into the door before I saw either of the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where were you going? A. Home to Lambeth; I spoke to nobody in Temple-lane; the shop is at the corner of Churchyard-court.

RICHARD JONES . I am a watchman. I was in Inner Temple-lane - Marshall called my attention to this shop; I went up and saw four men standing there, three of them stood conversing with Knight, who was at the door; I went and stood some time looking in at the next shop; I saw they were twigging me, and went under the archway; I saw Sangster turn round Churchyard-court; he came round and turned his back to the door - I went over - Mr. Hemlock came out of the Seal Office, and said (quite loud enough for them to hear) that he had been watching them some time- they ran away - I found a key in the door - I ran after them, and called Stop thief! Knight dropped two bags, a dark-lantern, and two picklock keys, which I picked up - he pulled them out of my hands, but I got them again, and took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you hear Sangster ask somebody for some place in the Temple? A. No; I had not got my watchman's coat on - I took Sangster, and saw nothing fall from him.

JOHN WITHECOMB . I have got the bag, picklock keys, and dark lantern, which Jones brought to the watch-house.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I was going through the Temple to Whitefriars - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran with the mob, but I know nothing of the charge.

SANGSTER - GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

KNIGHT - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-92

1105. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for a fraud .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-93

1106. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MARTIN ALLIES . I have a warehouse at No. 3, Newgate-street, in the parish of Christchurch . On the night of the 27th of April I was informed it was broken open.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Whose house is it? A. Mine - it is a warehouse - I am an ironmonger.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am a constable. On the night of the 27th of April I saw the defendant at the corner of Ivy-lane, about ten minutes after nine o'clock in the evening; Mr. Allies' warehouse is at the corner of the lane - I passed by him, and turned round; two gentlemen passed me, coming down Newgate-street; I saw the prisoner stoop down, and enter the house; I watched between two and three minutes, saw him come out, and seized him at the corner of the lane - he got away, and I lost sight of him - I followed, calling Stop thief! I caught his coat tail, and by some means fell down, and he got from me into a public-house; I got up in half a minute, and caught him in the public-house; I saw him sufficiently to swear to him, and have no doubt of his being the man - I saw his features after he came out. I searched him at the public-house, and found on him some half-pence, a pencil-case, and a piece of wax. While I was tying his hands, to take him to the Compter, I said, "Take care that he drops nothing from his pocket;" a man behind him immediately lifted up a bunch of keys, and said,"These keys I found" - the prisoner was dropping them from his pocket; the prisoner said he did not drop them. Nothing disturbed him in the house; he came out quietly.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. It was a dark night? A. Yes; he was about six yards from me when he went into the house; I saw him before at the corner of the lane; I will not be certain that I have seen him before; I only saw his back as he entered the house; he was inside two or three minutes, and when he came out I was about as far from him as I am from you; I seized him immediately - I lost sight of him afterwards for about half a minute or a minute - he turned the corner of a court, going into the public-house - he was stopped by three or four persons in the public-house; it is called the Hope; he was taken in the public-house - I do not know who keeps it; I saw no Mr. Jones there. I swear positively he is the man - the keys are not skeleton ones.

COURT. Q. How did he appear to let himself into the house? A. He stooped down - his head and body were nearly to his knees - he opened the door, but I do not know how.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a constable. I was at the public-house with the last witness and the prisoner; I searched the prisoner, and found a skeleton-key on him - in trying it to the lock of the house I broke it - it went into the lock, and appeared to fit it; I tried it, and in getting it out it was broken; I cannot recollect whether I told the Magistrate that I tried the key, and it fitted. The prisoner was a stranger to me; I have been at the public house, but do not know any of the people who frequent it.

MR. ALLIES. The prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

WILLIAM BIRDSEYE . On the 27th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I locked the warehouse door, and put the key into my pocket - I had it in my possession till I returned, at half-past six o'clock next morning; I found the door open, and the officer in the place.

MR. ANDREWS addressed the Court and Jury on behalf of the prisoner, and called -

CHARLES JONES . I am waiter at the Hope public-house - Mrs. Wright, who keep it, has left; I remember seeing the defendant there on the night of the 27th of April; he used to come there for a glass of grog; he came about eight o'clock that evening, or rather before - I am sure of that; he had his refreshment in the parlour; there were other persons there, but they went away; there were three or four bookbinders, who live in the market. I remember some persons coming in and taking the prisoner out about nine o'clock.

Q. Had he been out of the house from the time he first came in? A. I never saw him out; he could have gone out while I was in the tap-room, but I never saw him out; I heard a cry of Stop thief! when I was in the parlour - I did not see the prisoner there - several people came into the house, and ran right through into the parlour.

Q. When he was taken did he appear out of breath? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any men run in at the time you heard a cry of Stop thief? A. Several people came in, and one man ran through the house, opened the back door, and went away; Mrs. Wright took and shut the door after him.

Q. At the very time the cry of Stop thief! was raised? A. Yes. Our house has two fronts, one in Ivy-lane, and another in Turk's Head-passage; after that man ran away the prisoner was taken.

COURT. Q. He might have gone out while you were serving? A. Yes.

Q. How long before the person came in can you swear you saw him in the place? A. About three minutes before - there was not a soul in the parlour at that time - there was when first the prisoner came in; they were gone before the alarm; I went into the parlour to stir the fire, and as I came out I heard the cry of Stop thief! he was not in the parlour when I went in to stir the fire - I saw him three minutes before that, standing at the bar; nobody was in the bar but my young mistress, Miss Wright - she is about twenty-seven years old.

Q. Then somebody reshed through almost immediately after you had seen him at the bar? A. Yes, and the constable followed.

Q. He got in at one door and out at the other? A. Yes; there were about six people in the house - they were all booksellers, who carry books about.

Q. Well, I suppose you told the constable a man had run through the house? A. No, for they collared this gentleman - they never asked me a question; when they collared the gentleman I thought he might be the one - I did not know whether he was the person they had come after.

Q. How could you doubt about that if you had seen him at the bar? A. I had no doubt about it; the gentleman asked me to fetch a coach for him, as they were pulling him about - I went, and in the mean time he was gone.

Q. When they were pulling him about why not say the right man had run through the house? A. I did mention that a man had run through - I told the witnesses James and Jackson so. Our house is about one hundred yards from Mr. Allies'.

Q. Did you know what they seized the prisoner for? - A. No; I heard a person say, "I have picked up a lot of keys," and those keys I had seen Mr. Sadler take out of the bar two or three days before; I heard the cry of Stop thief!

Q. Could you doubt about what they took him up for? A. No. I told Jackson and the other gentleman about a person running through the house.

WILLIAM JAMES . He did not say a word to me about a person running through the house.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I heard him say nothing of the sort, I am quite certain of it - he never said a word; when I went into the house, the man's hands were tied, and he said he would not be searched; I said, "You won't be searched, won't you?" I immediately put my hand into his pocket, and took the keys out.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Will you swear he did not say, in your hearing, that a man had run through the house, in at one door and out at the other? A. I never heard an observation of the kind, made by any person whatever.

CHARLES JONES . Mr. Wright told him so.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270531-94

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1107. JOHN COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 1 pair of drawers, value 3s. , the goods of Moses Moses .

MOSES MOSES. I am a salesman , and live in East Smithfield . These drawers hung at my shop door about seven o'clock in the morning of the 29th of March; I went in doors to prayers, as is customary amongst our people, and while I was there Mr. Whyte brought in the prisoner with them.

JOHN BALLINGAL WHYTE . I was standing at my own door, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw the prisoner running with these drawers, which he was attempting to conceal under a round-frock; I took them from him - he appeared very ill.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-95

1108. THOMAS HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Vickery Broughton , from his person .

JOHN VICKERY BROUGHTON. On the 21st of April I was in Piccadilly , about seven o'clock in the evening - I had a handkerchief in my pocket; I felt something behind me - I turned round immediately, and took my handkerchief out of the prisoner's hands - I know it to be mine; there were several others in company with him.

EDWARD BOOTHMAN . I am an officer. I have the handkerchief, which was brought to the watch-house with the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, and saw a boy pick the gentleman's pocket - I was going to tell the gentleman of it; he threw it down, and I took it up to give it to him.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to he his first offence, and his friends being respectable .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-96

1109. EDWARD VICKERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Philip Davy Scott , from the person of William Scott .

PHILIP DAVY SCOTT. I live in Ryder-street . I lost a handkerchief on the 28th of April, off my son William's neck; I had seen it safe between three and four o'clock - I saw him go out of the cutting-room into the passage; he came in in a few minutes, and said a boy had stolen it from him; I went out, but did not get it; I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM LARDLER . I saw the prisoner at the step of No. 3; he went up to the child and played with him a few minutes, then took off the handkerchief, and ran away; I pursued him, but he got out of the street, and I lost sight of him; I am certain of his person; I had watched him, as I thought he was going to take the top which the child was at play with; I informed Mr. Scott's servant, and described the prisoner; I saw the child at the office, from whom the prisoner took the handkerchief.

EDWARD BOOTHMAN . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house a few days after this by Mr. Scott and Lardler.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-97

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1110. THOMAS DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Graham , from his person .

THOMAS GRAHAM. I am shopman to Messrs. Halling, Pearce, and Stone, of Waterloo-house. On the 17th of May, about 9 o'clock at night, I was in Titchbourne-street , or between there and Mary-le-bone-street, in company with a friend - I felt something at my pocket, and turned round immediately; I saw two persons running - the one who took my particular attention was on the opposite side of the way- that was the prisoner; I pursued him, and found my handkerchief concealed under his coat; the other got away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not see who took the handkerchief from you? A. No; the prisoner did not tell me he had picked it up - he said he hoped I would forgive him, as it was his first offence.

RICHARD TOWNSEND . I am an officer. I have the handkerchief which the prosecutor delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-98

1111. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , 20 yards of printed cotton, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel Belcher and William Jones .

ROBERT JONES. I am a boot-maker, and live at Charing-cross. On the 23d of May, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner running, and a crowd following him, calling Stop thief! he had something under his great coat - I pursued, and he threw out this print - a boy took it up and gave it to me; the prisoner was secured at the same time; I am quite certain it was him who threw it down.

SAMUEL BELCHER. I am a linen-draper , in partnership with William Jones - we live at Charing-cross. This property is ours. I was standing behind my counter about eight o'clock in the evening, and a person called out that a man had run away with a print; I went out and endeavoured to pursue, but I fell down in the street, and lost sight of him; I cannot say whether the prisoner is the man - he was brought back in about five minutes; the print had been just inside the shop, by reaching his hand in; I had seen it safe about five minutes before.

DAVID HERRING . I am the officer; I have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along to the play, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-99

1112. WILLIAM MESSENBIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 40lbs. weight of hay, value 2s. , the goods of Lawrence Gwynne ; and THOMAS MALLETT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS VAUGHAN . I am a cow-keeper, and live at Tottenham. I know both the prisoners. On the 19th of May, a little after nine o'clock in the evening, I saw Mallett go past my house with a truss of hay, in a direction from Dr. Gwynne's, and about a hundred yards from his house; I never heard that Mallett has any land, but I know he keeps a horse and two or three cows.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long had you known him? A. I think he had lived in the neighbourhood six or seven years.

DR. LAWRENCE GWYNNE. I am a Magistrate , and live at Tottenham . On the 19th of May Messenbird was in my service; I had missed hay for a long time, and I missed some that day; the prisoners were taken before Mr. Morees; I was present; there was no threat or promise held out to them - what they said was taken down - I saw them sign it; they were charged with this felony; one was examined against the other. (Deposition read.)

WILLIAM MESSENBIRD being charged with having purloined and robbed his master, Dr. Gwynne, the complainant, of hay and corn, says, "On Saturday last I gave nearly a whole truss of hay to Thomas Mallett, of Tottenham, who keeps a horse and some cows, and about a fortnight before that I gave about half a truss to the said Thomas Mallett; and a little before that I gave him about half a bushel of oats, which I put into a sack for him, and for which I told him tocome in the evening, which he did, and took the same away; I gave him the hay and corn about three weeks ago, as a recompence for the loan of his horse, which Mallett promised to lend me when I left my service, he go to see my friends." W. MEASENBIRD.

THOMAS MALLETT says, "On Saturday night last I carried a blackbird and cage to Dr. Gwynne's servant; I do not know his name - between nine and ten o'clock, and he gave me part of a truss of hay - I think about 40lbs., which I took home to my house - he also, about a week or ten days ago, gave me half a bushel of oats in a sack, which he told me to come for about nine o'clock - I took the same home - he gave me hay twice - I keep a horse and two cows, but have no land." T. MALLETT.

May 22, 1827, Taken before me, E. R. MOREES.

DR. GWYNNE. I never gave him authority to give away my hay.

JOHN CAMP . I am constable of Edmonton. I had no conversation with the prisoners before they were brought before the Magistrates - I read the warrant to them, but did not threaten or promise them any thing; Mallett said"I had a bit of hay - Messenbird went with me to my house."

Cross-examined. Q. Then they both went before the Magistrate, and before any evidence was gone into they made a confession of their crime? A. Yes; they did.

MESSENBIRD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

MALLETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-100

1113. JOSEPH SMITH and JOHN NORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Darby , from the person of Clara Darby .

JOHN DARBY. I am a coal merchant , and live in Mileend-road; my daughter Clara is five years of age. On the 3d of May she went out with her sister - she had a handkerchief on; I afterwards received information, and went to a groupe of chimney-sweepers and asked who had stolen the handkerchief; the two prisoners were pointed out to me by my daughter, and I seized them both; this was in the Mile-end-road, about one hundred yards from my house - I found nothing on them, and have never seen the handkerchief since.

CHARLES GARDNER . I am ten years of age; I know Clara Darby and her sister - I saw them in Mile-end-road - Clara had a handkerchief round her neck; the two prisoners went up; Smith untied the handkerchief, and Norris was standing by - they ran into the mob. Mr. Darby came up in about ten minutes, and I told him what I had seen; I am quite sure the prisoners are the two boys.

ELIZABETH DARBY . I am nearly ten years old. I was going to school, about two o'clock, with my sister, who is five years old; we had handkerchiefs on - the prisoners came up; Smith untied the handkerchiefs, and Norris took it and threw it among the mob - there were a great many persons looking at the chimney-sweepers; I am quite sure the prisoners are the boys; my sister had a slate in her hand; they first took hold of that, and then took off her handkerchief.

NORRIS' Defence. I was looking at the sweeps, and the first gentleman came and took me.

The prisoners received a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

NORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270531-101

1114. WILLIAM WRENN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 buckle, value 5s., the goods of Catherine Longley ; and 1 gold pin, value 2s. , the goods of John Gower .

JOHN McCARTY . On the 18th of May the prisoner came to me near the turnpike-gate, at Battle-bridge; he asked me if I would buy a gold pin, which he showed me - I said No, and handed the pin to the toll-man; he showed me a buckle, which I did not take in my hand.

JAMES WEBB . I was collector of the toll at Battle-bridge. On the 18th of May McCarty came up to me with the pin; the prisoner was near him; he said, "This little boy wants to sell this pin, and he has got something else"- I said, "Where did you get these things?" he said,"My mother gave them to me." I challenged him with it; he said he would go and fetch his mother; he ran away, and did not come back; I gave the articles to Eason; he was taken in three or four hours.

WILLIAM EASON . I assist at the turnpike. I heard the conversation which Webb has stated correctly; I received the pin and buckle; I saw the prisoner some time afterwards looking round the corner of a street; I ran, and caught him.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am an officer. I produce the articles.

CATHERINE LONGLEY. I am single , and live at No. 17. Thomas-street, Curtain-road - this buckle is mine. On the 18th of May I had it in a box, which I opened, and put on a table; the prisoner was standing by at the time; he had come to my house on the night before, and asked me to let him sleep with my lodger, which I did, as it rained very fast; I have known him all his life; he always had a good character.

JOHN GOWER. I lodge with Longley. This pin is mine - I know it was safe on the Thursday afternoon; I did not miss it till I heard of the loss; it had been in a glass on the shelf; the prisoner slept with me - I never gave him leave to take it away.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, believing to be his first offence .

Confined Nine Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-102

1115. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 3lbs. weight of bacon, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James Holland .

JAMES HOLLAND. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Drury-lane . On the 17th of April, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came and asked the price of some pieces of bacon; she took hold of a piece, put it under her apron, and went out with it; she got just off the step; I took it from her; there was 5lbs. or 6lbs. of it; this is it; she had a basket with a loin of mutton, and a piece of beef in it.

Prisoner. I am a widow, and was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-103

1116. ELIZABETH DERRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 12 lbs. weight of becon, value 5s. , the goods of James Holland .

JAMES HOLLAND. On the 14th of April, about two o'clock, the prisoner came to the window, and took this piece of bacon from a pile of cheese; I followed her about one hundred yards, and took it from her; I had seen it it ten minutes before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Clare-market; a woman came up and said, "Be so good as to hold this bacon while I tie my apron;" she must have run into one of the houses; I was in distress, and have three children.

COURT to JAMES HOLLAND. Q. Did she say this at the time she was taken? A. No, my Lord, she did before the Magistrate; she said she was very sorry, and begged pardon.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-104

1117. JOHN FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Frederick Henry Pratt .

FREDERICK HENRY PRATT. I live in Brydges-street, and am a marker at a billiard-room - my coat was laying on the bench on the 28th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning - the prisoner was a stranger. I had occasion to go out, and on my return I met him going out with my coat under his arm. I followed him about twenty-yards, and asked where he got it from - he said a person had sent him in for Mr. Jones' coat. - I told him it was mine, and he must come back with me; there is no Mr. Jones in the house.

JOSEPH WORMALD . I received him into custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent in by a gentleman, and there was a carpenter at work there. I asked for Mr. Johnson's coat, who was outside - the carpenter opened the door, went into the billiard-room and gave it to me. I went out to go the gentleman, and this young man came running after me, and said I must go back with him. I said I had been led into the snare, and told him I was going to give it to Mr. Johnson, at the corner of York-street. I have been a respectable tradesman.

COURT to H. PRATT. Q. Did the prisoner say the same thing before the Magistrate? A. Yes; and the Magistrate put it off till the evening for the carpenter to come - he said he never saw him; the prisoner said the man's name was Jones in the morning, and Johnson in the evening.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-105

1118. CORNELIUS LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 deal board, value 4s. , the goods of William Davis .

WILLIAM RICHARDS. I am a baker . Mr. Davis has a building in London-street, close by the Grand Junction water-works . On the 2d of May, between four and five o'clock, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner get a board out of that carcase and take it on his shoulder; I was standing in my back yard - I went round and called Mr. Davis, who saw him with the board - but he had got it off his shoulder at that time. I had been watching him some time; there was no other man near him.

WILLIAM DAVIS. I am a carpenter ; these boards were in the carcase of the house. I had put them there to keep dry - Richards came to me about four or five o'clock on the 2d of May, and I saw the prisoner with the board, which is mine; it was twenty-seven feet long; it was six or

seven yards from the house - there was no other man near- I took hold of the prisoner and kept him till the officer came.

Prisoner. Q. Are there not thousands of persons go there? A. I do not know - but they do not take boards from the place - you was standing still; not five yards from the board.

JOHN BAYS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to a public-house and went into this place, as I was coming out the gentleman touched me on my shoulder, and said I was going to steal a plank, which I was not.

COURT to W. RICHARDS. Q. What distance were you from him? A. About six yards; he had got the board on his shoulder - it was very long and the ends of it touched the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-106

1119. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 56lbs. weight of hay, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Welch ; and CHRISTOPHER SEWELL was indicted for felonously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES GIBBS . I am a Police officer. On the 3d of May I received information, and went with Webster to Bayswater, to Mr. William Welch's, he lives at Southwell, and sends hay to town; we met two cart loads of hay in one waggon - Smith was the waggoner , and a boy named Tomkins was with him, it was coming to town, and stopped at the Swan, at Bayswater , about a quarter after six o'clock in the morning - we had got there a quarter before four. I stood about one hundred yards from where the waggon stopped - the boy turned up the tarpaulin and pulled down the truss of hay, and Sewell, (who was the hostler there), took it up, and carried it away into the yard; it appeared, in my judgment, to be a truss of hay, and was taken from the middle of the waggon - the waggon drove on and I followed it. Smith was by the side of the horses - but I cannot tell whether he saw what the boy did, though I think he could not avoid seeing it. When the waggon had got about one hundred yards I went to see whose it was, and I said to Smith, "Does your master allow you to leave hay in that way?" he said "No; he does not;" I said, "I shall take notice of it, and let your master know;" he said "I hope you will not take any notice of it." I said I certainly should; but he might go on with his waggon, which he did - he said it was the first time he ever left any. I am sure he used that expression. I went back to the hostler, and said I should certainly take him into custody for that hay that was left there; he said, he had some hay left, and he went and brought a small bundle out - which I am sure could not be the one I saw him take in. I then took him into custody - he said he would give me a crown, or anything I chose, to let him go - he said it was a busy morning, and no one knew anything about it but ourselves. When the hay was dropped he took it up and carried it in immediately - they waggon stood by the road-side. I took him to the office. I came on to Tyburn-gate, and took Smith as he was returning. I let the boy go home with the team.

JAMES GRIFFIN . I am foreman to William Welch; he lives at South well, and sends hay to town - Smith was his carter, and Tomkins was his assistant - I sent two loads of hay to town in a waggon; there were seventy-two trusses in it - I saw it loaded, but did not see it set off on Thursday morning - I had seen it between seven and eight o'clock that evening - I did not see the turpauling put on- I left Smith to do that; there was exactly two loads of hay cut, and no more - I saw him have what was proper for the horses; we give our horses corn, not hay; there was a small parcel of hay for one horse - there was no appearance of any more hay being cut. On the Thursday evening, when the lad came home without the man, he said the officers had taken him, for leaving a truas of hay at Bayswater; the load of hay had been sold to go to a wharf at Paddington; my master received a note for the amount of the two full loads; it was sold for 5l. 8s. a load.

JURY. Q. Did you miss any hay from the stack the next day? A. No; I seldom go into the loft - it was impossible for me to miss it from there.

JAMES TOMPKINS . I live with Mr. Welch. I saw two loads of hay in the waggon, on the morning of Thursday - Smith and I sat off early; there was not a word said about the hay as we went along; there was a tarpauling on I - rode on the top of the waggon, from this side of Acton: when we got to the Swan public-house at Bayswater, he told me to chuck a bit of hay down, which I did - Sewell came out of the yard, but I cannot say whether he heard what was passing; I cannot tell how much I threw down; I cannot guess; it was bound up, and had the regular bands on - Sewell took it up, but I do not know where he carried it; there were seventy-two trusses altogether; we took it to Paddington, and sold it to Mr. Allen - I saw it anloaded, but I did not halp - I did not see it paid for - there were seventy-two trusses when Mr. Allen bought it; it is always counted over; there must have been seventy-three with the bit that I gave; it was all pretty much alike; it must have been all brought from my master's farm - I did not see him take any up on the road.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When the trusses were taken out of the waggon, where they were put? A. Into the barn - I did not carry them in, nor count them - I cannot say there were seventy-two, there might have been but seventy-one or seventy, for what I know, but the man always counts them where we take them to, and I think he would have objected to it if there had not been seventy-two.

COURT. Q. Was this hay delivered in the usual way, as it is to any person who buys it? A. Yes - Smith threw it out of the waggon, and Allan's men carried it into the barn - I was in the barn, but did not hear the man count them; he made no complaint that there were not seventy-two.

Q. Did you go up into the loft before you set out with the waggon? A. Yes - Smith told me to go up, to put the truss of hay down which we left on the road - I did not know what he was going to do with it.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of a thing was it, was it a truss? A. There was not a truss - I said it was like the others, but it did not weigh so much; I did not tie it up: it was not quite so big as the other - I am sure it was not a truss; it was the one that was got out of the

loft that was thrown down - I know it was not a truss of hay; they were all tied with two bands; no one saw us leaye the premises with the hay; the foreman was at Southend - I have often been with the hay carts to Paddington, and we stopped at the Swan every morning regularly to bait - I have never known hay borrowed of the hostler, except once, that was when master was there, and he told us to bring him a bit again, which was done; it is usual for our horses and carts to stop there, as we go back, but the first tier does not stop for the other; they stop about half an hour, and then go on again - I do not know that hay is ever left to be eaten by the horses on their return- I do not remember hay being left for that purpose.

MR. PRENDERGAST to J. GIBBS. Q. You say you got some bay from the premises? A. Yes; the hostler brought out a small bit of hay, which appeared to me to be a lighter colour than the one I saw taken from the waggon - I did not make that observation at the time; he said, "This is the hay I had from the waggon" - I took him into custody, but did not search the premises - I was satisfied in my own mind, it was not the hay - it appeared to have two bands on it, when the man took it up; it was as like the other trusses as possible; the hay he produced was not like the trusses at all; it was taken to the office because he said it was taken from the waggon; it was taken to be the hay till Mr. Griffin said it was not, but I thought it was not before that, and I said so to Webster, my brother officer - I did not tell the Magistrate so.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I was about one hundred yards on the other side of the Swan public-house - I saw the boy throw the tarpauling back, and when they stopped there was a truss of hay thrown down - I did not see who took it - I did not go into the stable, as there were two dogs there, and one of them nearly bit me.

JAMES GRIFFIN . I had a note from Mr. Allen, to say he had received two loads.

SEWELL'S Defence. I never offered the man a crown - I said it was an awkward morning, and I would rather have given a crown than be taken from my business.

MR. PRENDERGAST to MR. GRIFFIN. Q. Have you not borrowed hay of the hostler? A. Yes; about three weeks before - I told the carter to take it back, and he said he did so, but I did not see it - I gave it the man to return.

COURT. Q. There was some hay taken to the Police-office? Yes, but that was not master's.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

SEWELL - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-107

1120. JOHN TAP was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 1 tea-pot, value 5s., and 1 spoon, value 10s. , the goods of John Edward Brand .

HENRY EVANS . I am a gardener, and live at Kensington-gravel-pits. On the 23d of April, about ten o'clock, the prisoner and another ran past me; the other had a basket under his arm - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw Mr. Brand running after them - I ran and overtook them in Elms-lane - I detained the prisoner till Mr. Brand came up; a witness said they had thrown the things over a hedge - I went and got them, and gave them to Mr. Brand; there was a tea-pot a spoon, and a basket with some sharings over them.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you see any one else? A. Yes, another man close by him; they were walking when they passed by me, and then they set off running, when they got about two hundred yards. - The prisoner did not try to make his escape; I held him ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

WILLIAM TURNER . I saw the prisoner and another man in company together; the other had a basket - they were both running. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw Evans stop the prisoner, who said he had done nothing. I saw the other man throw a basket away, just as he got by me. I heard the prisoner tell him to do so twice.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure you heard that? A. Yes - they were not more than three yards from me; I was in the road - they had turned a corner, and were running towards me, as I was delivering some beer.

SUSANNAH BRAND . I am the wife of John Edward Brand - we live at Bayswater . I saw the prisoner waiting by my gate till the other man came out with a basket - they joined together instantly, and walked down the lane; I went out of my back garden, and called the witness to pursue them - they were quite strangers to me; the property was taken from my scullery - they opened the gate, came down a long garden, and went in there.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. I was coming towards my own gate, and saw the other come out, and the prisoner waiting there; I do not know whether the prisoner touched the basket; there were some shavings in the basket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-108

1121. JAMES PIDGEON , RICHARD CLEMENTS , and THOMAS STARLING were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 635lbs. of lead, value 5l., belonging to George Worrall , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SEVEN OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to other persons.

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

HENRY POPE . I am a farmer, and live at Kingsbury, in Middlesex . I occupy a farm of Mr. George Worrall - I missed some lead from the force-pump and some from the roof, on Saturday, the 21st of April; I set Giles and another man to watch - the lead had been fixed to the dwelling-house, some on the roof, and some on the garret window; some part of it was gone, and some was left rolled up on the roof; it is a large mansion, which I have the care of; no person lives in it. I know nothing of the prisoners. I afterwards saw some lead fitted, which corresponded with the remains of lead on that house, it fitted the sink, and every thing else.

COURT. Q. Are you able to say whether one person might have cut and removed this lead? A. One person might have cut it, but there must have been three or four to carry it away; there was 500lbs. and more. That from the top was cut and rolled up, and put into a room; the tearing away, rolling, and removing, would have required at least three men - they had removed the keys, and we found them in the drawing-room, near the window, with a chisel; this was on the Saturday - I saw the lead safe on the Wednesday.

GEORGE POPE . I am the son of Henry Pope. Giles

and another were set to watch on the Sunday night; Giles came to me about half-past ten o'clock - I got up, and went to the lawn facing the house; I heard a knocking about in the house several times between ten and three o'clock, and just as the clock struck three, one man pushed the window up, and one said, "Don't let us get up yet - we cannot see - let us lay half an hour longer;" soon afterwards I heard them coming out, and Giles stepped forward - they heard him walking on some gravel stones, and one of them said,"Here are some men;" they were then either in the house or in the balcony, just coming out. We stopped the three prisoners, and asked what they did there; they said they were going water-cressing - I told them it was a very queer place to go to for water-cresses. I had been over these premises on the Tuesday, and all was right then; we found 6 cwt. and 3 qrs. of lead, I think that was all - some of it had been taken from the balcony and put into a cupboard, and some in other places; some keys had been taken out of the locks of the doors, and put into the water-closet.

Cross-examined. Q. You say the keys were found in a room? A. Yes, and one of the rooms in which the lead was, was locked by one of those keys; I had been on the premises on Sunday - there was no chisel or keys there then.

COURT. Q. Are you able to say whether any of the lead had been removed on the Saturday? A. No.

GEORGE GILES . I am a labourer, and live at Kingston. I watched on the Sunday evening with a young man who is not here - I was there about eleven o'clock at night, and saw three or four persons come past me; we were waiting in a little water-closet outside the house; they went round behind me, and got on the balcony; I then heard the sash come down, and the bar of the window fall; I then heard the sash put up again, and the shutter opened very easily; I waited some considerable time, and heard a knocking about in the room; I then slipped out, and called Mr. Pope- when we came back I heard a noise in the room; we got over a fence to go on the lawn, and the sticks snapped under our feet, which I suppose gave an alarm, and we heard no more for some time; we stood there till about three o'clock - no person got up to the house after we got there; when the clock struck three one of the persons said,"It is two o'clock - let us get up;" another said, "No, it is too dark - let us lay half an hour longer - we shan't see the cresses;" the other said, "Let us get up, I am so bl - dy cold;" one of them then said, "There is somebody below," and they called out, "Halloo, mate, what is it o'clock?" I said, "You know the clock - you heard it strike;" the three prisoners then came down, and we said we had lost some lead - they said they knew nothing about it. This is a large gentleman's house, but is not now inhabited.

Prisoner PIDGEON. Q. Did not you say it was half-past ten o'clock when we came there? A. No; we had been waiting about an hour, and you came at eleven o'clock- there was no lead in the room where you were; there was 6 cwt. 3 qrs. 5lbs. in all.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you first see a chisel? A. In the morning, after we took them; I had been there the day before, and there was no chisel there then; they could get into the room adjoining the balcony.

MR. BRODRICK to MR. H. POPE. Q. Had you been into the room before they were taken? A. Yes - there was no chisel there then and no keys; I could not get into the water-closet that day.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I received some lead at Mr. Pope's premises - I compared it with what remained on the premises; it fitted exactly; this piece fitted the pipe of the force-pump; these marks of the wall-hooks correspond exactly with the marks in the wall - I have no doubt whatever that it came from that building.

PIDGEON'S Defence. We set out to seek for watercresses - we went round Watford, and were coming back through Edgware; we staid all day, and asked a woman where we could lie down - she told us there was an empty house in a field; we went and looked in an open shed, which was very wet; we went round the house, and saw this balcony - we got up there, and staid till three o'clock; we counted but two, and I said to Clements, "There is two o'clock, let us get up" - he said, "No, let us lie half an hour longer - we shan't be able to see the cresses;" we got up, and heard some men; they said, "Come down" - we came down, and they took us into custody; we said we would go, as we had done nothing - they have the watercress bag I suppose now.

JURY to MR. POPE. Q. When were the keys first missed from the doors? A. On the Saturday, when we first found the lead had been cut.

PIDGEON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

CLEMENTS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

STARLING - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-109

1122. JOHN BURCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 ring, value 9s. , the goods of Mary Turney ; and JOHN AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

MARY BLAKE. I live at No. 4, King's-road, Sloane-square . Turney was an assistant to me. Burchell came on the 3d May, about 1 o'clock to look at my lodgings for a lady, he said he wanted a wine and coal cellar and the first floor - he went down stairs to look at the house, and was in the front kitchen, he opened a closet, and asked me for some paper to put down the terms - I said I thought he could recollect twenty-five shillings a-week, he still asked for paper, and I gave him some - he placed the inkstand on a shelf which the ring laid on - he went away, and in about an hour I missed it - he did not hire the lodgings, and was quite a stranger. I saw him again that evening, and asked if he was the person who had been to my house - he said he had never seen me before.

Prisoner BURCHELL. Q. Did not you take the inkstand off the shelf? A. I cannot say; but you put it up - the ring was by the side of it; I had seen it safe that morning - nobody but him had been to the house.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. Burchell was brought to the watch-house on this charge, about nine o'clock at night, by Blake and Frazer.

JOSEPH FELL . I am servant to Mr. Thompson, a pawnbroker, of Chelsea. On the 3d of May Austin pawned this ring.

MARY TURNEY . I am acquainted with Blake. I left my ring on the kitchen shelf, close by the inkstand - Burchell came there, and after writing the terms down he put the inkstand on the shelf - he looked very hard at me

in the face; I am certain of his person - this is my ring.

JAMES THOMAS FRAZER . I am a nurseryman. Blake and the prosecutrix came and told me they were robbed. Burchell came up - and they said "There is the very man going to my gate." I went over and asked who he wanted - he said Mr. Saunders. I said two ladies over the way, wanted him, (Austin was with him). I brought them over - the ladies identified Burchell positively - and he was taken to the watch-house.

BURCHELL'S Defence. I had not been near the house at all; there are several queer houses there, which they call lodging houses.

BURCHELL - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

AUSTIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-110

1123. SUSANNAH WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 1 table cloth, value 2s. , the goods of John Cooke , her master.

SARAH COOKE . I am the wife of John Cooke - we live in Duke-street, St. Giles. The prisoner had some needlework to do for me, which she took home - she used to take her work home in this table cloth - I missed it and found it in pawn.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you pay her on Saturday? A. No; I was at the theatre, and left her money with a woman; but she was not paid - I believe she was very poor.

ROBERT MARKS . I live with Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker, of Tothill-street. The prisoner pawned this table-cloth with me.

DAVID HENRY . I am an officer, and took her in charge; I found the duplicate on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY Aged 29.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, it being her first offence .

Confined Nine Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-111

1124. GEORGE NEVILLE APPLEBY was indicted for stealing, 8 knives, value 10s., the goods of James Chesterman , his master .

JAMES CHESTERMAN. I live in Great Earl-street, Blackfriars , and am a lamp maker ; the prisoner was my apprentice about two years, and lived with me. On the 9th of April I missed some knives - I got an officer, and he told us where he had sold them; we went and found them there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is not his father a respectable man? A. Yes; I had 15l. with him; I had a good opinion of him.

WM. SMITH. I am an officer. The prisoner told me where he had sold the knives. I found one in possession of a girl at the next house, and the rest with other persons.

JAMES GRADY . I am a labourer - the prisoner asked me to buy a knife of him; I bought this one for 4d.

THOMAS CROCKSON . I bought two knives of the prisoner for 6d.

JOHN SHERWOOD . I bought two knives of him for 1s.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

The prisoner received a good character. - Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-112

1125. CHARLES HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 8 gallons of brandy, value 12l., the goods of John Toppin and another, being in a barge, in the Port of London; the same being a port of entry and discharge .

JOHN SUTTON . I am a Thames police constable, stationed at the West India-docks - it is in the Port of London , and a port of entry and discharge - the prisoner is a lighterman . On Thursday morning, the 5th of April, about half-past five o'clock, I saw him in Mr. Toppin's barge in the basin - he had no business there, not being employed by any body; I saw him again soon afterwards on the side of the basin, walking towards the gate where I was stationed; when he came within about thirty yards of me he made a balt; I mentioned my suspicions to the foreman of the lock-gate; the prisoner would not come up towards me, but loitered about, and in a few minutes he went to assist in opening the lock, which is not part of his duty - he then went on board another barge, called the Jeffrey, No. 549, which was laden with twenty casks of brandy - he appeared to want to get out, and instead of coming to the gate he got on board another barge, which was going into the river - I went on board, secured him, and found in his hat this bladder, containing about a quart of brandy - I had asked if he had any thing in his hat, and he said No - I then asked what craft he had been watching - he said a craft in the basin - I said, "Is it that one with the brandy?" he said Yes, and that he was employed by Mr. Toppin - I said, "I suppose this brandy is part of what you had charge of?" he said, "Yes it is; for God's sake don't say any thing about it; it is only a small drop, make away with it; don't make a noise about it, you will get me into a serious trouble;" I said I could not think of that, and gave him in charge of the patrol - I then went on board the Jeffrey, and found two casks had been plugged and spiles put into them, and some dirt rubbed over the spiles - there was some brandy under the casks, it had run down the side of them; they were marked B. A Nos. 2 and 9 - I found a skin near the barge; it had evidently burst after being filled - it corresponds exactly with that found in his hat - I could find no gimblet - I then went, and asked if he had got the key of the cabin- he said No, but I found three padlock keys on him; he begged hard that I would return them to him, and I did; I then took him to the Thames Police-office, where we saw Mr. Toppin, who desired me to search him again for those keys, but he had then made away with them - he said did I think he should be such a b - y fool as to have the keys about him then: that he knew better if I did not.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you find any implement that could have bored the casks? A. No; he did not say he was watching Mr. Pedley's barge; he said afterwards he was watching Herring's barge - there was no barge of Herring's which he could have got at - there was none in the Import-dock.

MICHAEL BURROWS . I am a delivery foreman at the London-docks. On the 20th of April I delivered twenty casks of brandy into Mr. Toppin's barge, the Jeffrey, Nos. 1 to 20 - the import mark was 1. A. - I am certain they were all in good condition.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am a Custom-house officer. I was appointed to guage these casks - the import mark was

I. A.; the export mark B. A C. Nos. 1 to 20 inclusive - Nos. 2 and 9 were quite full to the bung.

JOHN HENRY TOPPIN . I am the son of John Toppin, who has another partner, and is a lighterman - the Jeffrey is their barge - the prisoner was not employed to watch it; it had twenty casks of brandy on board - the export mark was B. A C. and Nos. 1 to 20 - I made it fast at five o'clock on the morning of the 4th of April; the casks were then all secure.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you undertake to state that not one of these casks had been spiled? Yes; I examined all that were to be seen; some were covered with a tarpauling.

WILLIAM HALLETT . I am a foreman of the gates at the Dock. I saw this barge come into the basin on the 4th - the prisoner was in the habit of working there, though I did not know his name - I saw him come away from the barge about five o'clock on the morning of the 5th - I saw the officer take his hat off, but I did not hear the conversation.

Cross-examined. Q. Had there been a barge belonging to Mr. Pedley in the Dock? A. There might have been a dozen without my knowing it.

EDMUND ARROWSMITH . I was a watchman at the Dock. On the 4th of April, a little before ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner on board the Jeffrey, as I was going my round - I asked him what he had got; he said brandy, and that he was watching for Mr. Toppin.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether he had been working there before? A. I have seen him working there for different lightermen.

MATTHEW DALTON . I am a Custom-house guager. I went on board this barge on the 7th of April; I examined the casks, and saw Nos. 2 and 9 marked B. A C. were leaky from being spiled - there appeared something like dirt covered over the spile. I guaged them, and missed six gallons from No. 2, and two gallons from No. 9; the brandy would be worth from 3s. to 3s. 6d. a gallon without the duty.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the brandy found in the bladder? A. Yes; it was nearly one per cent. weaker than that in the casks, but it was similar in quality; I can account for that, it was the same colour, but in so small a quantity the alteration would not appear - a tea-spoonful of water would have made the difference - I will not swear it is the same as that in the cask - evaporation would cause the difference in the strength; I believe it the same.

COURT. Q. What do you call one per cent.? A. One gallon in the hundred.

JOHN TOPPIN . The brandy is my property; the prisoner was not in my employ, and had no right in my barge - I am in partnership with I. E. Toppin.

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to say that Sutton ought to stand where I do for perjury.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-113

1126. WILLIAM HOUSE and WILLIAM ASHTON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 skewer, value 15s., and 8 lbs. weight of beef, value 3s. , the goods of John Element .

JOHN ELEMENT. I keep the British coffee-house, Cockspur-street, Charing-cross . On the 7th of May, about half-past ten o'clock at night, the prisoners and another soldier were in my front parlour; the bell rang - I came up, and my niece said, in their presence, that the soldiers had stolen some beef from the larder, and she had sent for the watchman - House had gone; they fought the watchman very much; he could not secure them - I sent for a file of men, and they were taken away.

Cross-examined by MR. WILLIAMS. Q. Have you ever seen Ashton at the house before? A. I do not recollect him; the other soldier behaved pretty well, and was dismissed - House was brought back in about a minute - Ashton was rather in liquor; the skewer was stuck in the beef; they called for beer, which they did not drink.

GEORGE GOUGH . I am waiter at this house. I did not see the soldiers come in - Coventry rang the bell - I ran up, and saw her pulling Ashton back from the door - I kept the door fast; she bolted it, and I rang for master, who sent me for the watchman - I went out, and saw House about a hundred yards off, packing up a bundle - I collared him, and called the watchman.

Cross-examined. Q. Was House drunk? A. I think not.

MARIA COVENTRY . I live with Mr. Element; three soldiers came in together, and called for beer; the beef was then in the room, in the show-larder - Ashton took it, and gave it to House, who went out with it - I was in the bar, behind a curtain; the meat was brought back with House, and my uncle gave it to the prisoners at Bow-street.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is the larder from the bar? A. Two or three yards - Ashton was tipsy; he remained behind with the third man, who offered to pay for the beef; the skewer was stuck quite in, but could be seen.

(Skewer produced and sworn to.)

Mr. WILLIAMS called -

WILLIAM MARK . I am sergeant of the 1st Guards; the prosecutor sent for me to his house - Ashton was beastly drunk - House was drunk, but not so much as the other.

PETER CANNON . I am in the 1st Batalion of Grenadier Guards. I had been drinking with the prisoners in the canteen for two hours; they were quite drunk when they went out, and I should think did not know what they were about.

JAMES BROWN . I am a private in the same company and was drinking with the prisoners at the canteen, and then we went out to this public-house; they were drunk, and I was not sober - Ashton was very drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-114

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1127. RICHARD TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 15 sovereigns, the monies of Joel Tilke , his master .

JOEL TILKE. I live in St. Martin's-lane, and am a baker - the prisoner was in my employ in December 1824, and had been so for about six months. On Saturday, the 11th of December, I counted up 5l. worth of silver, and gave him to take to Mr. Child; he returned in about ten minutes, with a 20l. note - I endorsed it with Child's name, and gave him ten sovereigns, and my wife gave

him a 5d. note to make up 20l.; he said he would rather have five sovereigns; she got the note changed, and gave him five; he went out with the fifteen sovereigns, and never returned - I could never find him, though six officers were in search of him.

EDWARD CHILDE . I live in St. Martin's-lane; the prisoner brought me 5l. worth of silver on the morning of the 11th of December 1824; I gave him a 20l. note, but he never brought me the sovereigns.

JAMES LEDGER . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of May - I could not find him before.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I had warning to leave, and being so much in liquor, and intrusted with so large a sum, I knew nothing of it till next morning, when a ange man awakened me, and asked what I had done all my money - I found it was all gone, and was 1d to return.

TILKE. He was perfectly sober.

WARD CHILDE . He was quite sober.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270531-115

18. WILLIAM PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 2 sheets, value 12s.; 1 quilt, value 6s.; Vipillow-case, value 1s., and 1 brush, value 6d., the goods of William Daniel , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM DANIEL. I live in Osnaburg-row, Pimlico . I let the prisoner a furnished lodging about the 16th of May; he left in four days; after he was gone I missed this property; on the Wednesday following I saw him in the Park, and took him - I found my brush on him; he said he had bought it to brush vencers with, and that he knew nothing of the linen.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I say, "Let us go to a Magistrate and clear it up?" A. Yes - and you said at first that I was not an officer, and had no right to take you.

ELIZABETH DANIEL . I am the prosecutor's wife; the prisoner took the room as a single man; he breakfasted with us on Friday, and said he had engaged a person to bring his boxes from Bird-street, but they never came- I have inquired at Bird-street: he never lived there - I heard him go out on Saturday, about six o'clock, and heard him speak to the dog - I went in about an hour up to the garret, where he slept, and missed the articles; the brush was in a box in the room; he pulled the door after him - nobody could open it without a key.

HENRY PANTSON . I am an officer. I took him in charge; he said, "Take me before a Magistrate if you like."

Prisoner's Defence. Is it consistent for a person who robbed a place, to go within three hundred yards of it. I intended to go home that very night - I had been over to Hackney, to my brother, who was very ill, and is since dead - I bought the brush at Hadley.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-116

1143. CORNELIUS GLANDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Edwards , from his person .

THOMAS EDWARDS. On the 26th of May, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was on Tower-hill , and stopped to look at some birds - I felt something at my coat-pocket, and missed my handkerchief, looked round, and saw she prisoner going towards the ditch; he sat down - I got through the rails to follow him; he saw me, got up, and ran - I called Stop thief! and saw him drop it - I took it up; he was stopped by an officer.

THOMAS CARTES . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running; he was stopped in getting through the rails.

JAMES FOGG . I took the prisoner in charge, and asked if any one was with him; he said he thought his father had turned him out of doors - that he saw Mr. Edward's handkerchief in his pocket, and took it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-117

1130. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of William Daft .

HANNAH DAFT . I am the wife of William Daft, but we have been separated many years. I have a shop in Oxford-street . On the 8th of May, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner take these shoes; I watched him into a house, where he was taken by the constable; I went in after the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM KIMBERLEY . I took the prisoner in Hart-street, on the garret stairs, and found the shoes behind a clothes-basket in that garret.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-118

1131. WILLIAM FREEGO was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of William Alexander Balfour .

EDWARD STORR . I am servant to William Alexander Balfour, a pawnbroker , of Chandos-street, Covent-garden . On the 14th of April, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard some twine breaking at the door; I went, and missed three handkerchiefs, which had hung there; I saw the prisoner running down a passage, with the handkerchiefs hanging at his side - another was with him - they got into the Strand, and at the corner of Hungerford-street the other got first - I knocked the prisoner down - he dropped the handkerchiefs - I took them up - our shop-ticket was still on them.

MARK HUNTLEY . I am street-keeper. Stror called to me to stop the man - he gave the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting in the court to rest - a young man came and threw these articles into my cap - I ran and called after him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-119

1132. CHARLOTTE FERGUSSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 gown, value 20s.; 1 bonnet, value 12s., and 1 scarf, value 20s. , the goods of William Chapman .

ELIZABETH CHAPMAN . I am the wife of William Chapman. I am in service. On the 11th of April I left a trunk at Mr. Hardey's, in Lancaster-court, as I had another to carry - I went for it, and the prisoner offered to help me to carry it - we each held one handle - I offered to go with her and get her box from on board a vessel, and after that asked her to tea, and we drank tea in the room my box

was in - I sat on the bed, and being ill, I fell asleep, and on awaking these articles were gone, and she also - I went to her lodgings and found these things concealed; she was in bed; I said, "I have not found the scarf;" she said it was in the next room, and I found it there.

WILLIAM KIMBERLEY . About half-past five o'clock on the morning of the 12th of April, the prosecutrix brought the prisoner to the watch-house - this bonnet was on her head - the prosecutrix had the other things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-120

1133. ALEXANDER YOUNGER was indicted for embezzling a sovereign, which he had received on account of Daniel Callard , his master .

DANIEL CALLARD. I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ, and received money on my account, which he should pay me at the close of the day. On the 14th of March he paid me 15s. on account of Mrs, Bayley - he remained with me till the 7th of April.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he not call on you afterwards? A. Yes? on the 18th of April - I believe my wife had said he had better come forward.

MARY ANN BAYLEY . I deal at Mr. Callard's. On the 19th of March I paid the prisoner a sovereign on his account, and took his receipt.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-121

1134. EVAN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 1 set of fire-irons, value 10s.; 1 set of fire-brasses, value 10s., and 1 tea-tray, value 8s. , the goods of Uriah Bryant .

URIAH BRYANT. I am a tin-plate worker , and have a shop in Finsbury-place . I received information from my daughter-in-law.

ELIZABETH ARKINSTALL . I am Bryant's daughter-in-law. On the 22d of February, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner came in - he had formerly lived with us - he selected a set of fire-irons, brasses, and a tea-tray, and said he would send the money for them if his wife liked them, or he would return them - the boy went with him and the goods - I have not seen them or the money since.

JAMES PAYNE . I am in Mr. Bryant's employ. I went with the prisoner, and carried the goods; he took me into a public-house in High Holborn, called for a pint of beer, and told me to sit and drink while he went and showed them to his wife, and said he would bring back the money for what she kept, and return the others - I staid there three quarters of an hour - he did not return - I did not see him again till he was taken.

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . On the 14th of May Mr. Bryant, who had taken the prisoner, sent for me - I took him- I believe he had been begging.

Prisoner. I did not steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-122

1135. MARY MALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 20 yards of ribbon, value 10s. , the goods of Griffith Humphreys .

JOHN THOMAS . I am shopman to Griffith Humphreys, a haberdasher , of Oxford-street . On the 19th of May, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came in - I sold her two yards of ribbon, at 7d. - I missed a piece - I saw her handkerchief on the counter - I took it up, and found the ribbon in it - she said she did not know it was there - it was in the drawer which I showed her - there was another piece missing - our young man came and asked if she had seen it - she said No; he told her to look into her bag - she opened her bag and produced it, but said she did not know she had got it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you tell this story before? A. Yes, to the best of my recollection - it is not a very large shop - several persons were ther - she laid three sixpences on the counter, but I did take them up, as I missed this.

MOSES ROBERTS . I am shopman at this house. Th came to me - I went to the prisoner and said we had piece of ribbon, and told her to look about for it in her.; she said, "Very likely it might have fallen into the," it possibly might be so.

J. THOMAS. She took the money from a purse in t ag.

WILLIAM REDDINGS . I am an officer, and too r - she said, "Oh! my God, what shall I do!" and ged hard to be let go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-123

1136. MARGARET McCORMICK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , 4 pillows, value 10s., and 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of John Allcock .

MARY ALLCOCK . I am the wife of John Allcock - we live in Cross-row, Ratcliff . The prisoner's father has lodged with us about three years - he asked me to let her sleep with my daughter - she was there about three weeks - I missed four pillows and a sheet on the 26th of April, and charged her with it - she made no reply, but afterwards said the devil put it into her head to take them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Commercial-road. I have two pillows and a sheet, pawned by the prisoner, on the 26th of April - I am certain of her.

JOHN BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Broad-street, Ratcliff. The prisoner pawned two pillows with me on the 26th.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer. On the 27th of April the prisoner was given into my charge. I asked her where the duplicates were; she said I might find them; I searched her, and found them.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-124

1137. JOHN SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 1 fixture, (i.e.) 1 copper, value 10s., the goods of Jane Jones , widow , and fixed to her dwelling-house .

JANE JONES. I am a widow, and live in Nelson-street, St. Matthew, Bethnal-green . This copper was fixed in the wash-house, which is in my yard - it is part of my premises - it does not join the house; the yard is mine, and the wash-house is part of the house; it was safe at six o'clock in the afternoon of the 6th of April, and next morning, at six, I missed it.

GEORGE MORRIS. I am a watchman. On the 7th of April, at a quarter-past five o'clock in the morning, I was going home, and saw the prisoner coming down Nelson-street, with the copper on his head; I took hold of him, and asked what he was going to do with it - he threw it down, and got from me; I took him - he got from me again; I called Watch! and he was secured; I compared the copper with Mrs. Jones' wash-house - it fits exactly in every part.

GEORGE SMITH . I received the prisoner at the watch-house. I matched the copper with the brick work - it fitted every part exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I tried to get from him because he almost choked me; he said he would choke me to death.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-125

1138. ABRAHAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 10 live tame fowls, price 10s.; 27 eggs, value 2s., and 1 fork, value 1s. , the property of Richard Weekly .

RICHARD WEEKLY. I live at Harmondsworth, near Uxbridge . On the 12th of May I lost ten fowls - they were brought back after the prisoner was taken.

WILLIAM HESTER . I am a husbandman, in Mr. Weekly's employ; I saw my young mistress fasten up the fowls about eight o'clock at night of the 11th of May, and next morning, about five o'clock, the patrol came; I found the boards wrenched down from the hen-house, and nine fowls, one chicken, and a quantity of eggs gone; he produced the fowls - I know them all, as I used to feed them.

JOSEPH SAWYER . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 12th of May I met the prisoner near the thirteenth milestone, with a sack on his shoulder, and a dung-fork; I said,"What have you got here?" I laid my hand on the bag, and said, "What have you got, fowls?" he said "Yes, I I bought them at Maidenhead - I have been walking all night, and am much fatigued;" I asked how many he had; he said seven or eight; he afterwards said he got them from Mr. Weekly's - I took him there.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-126

1139. CHARLES OSBORN , JOSEPH STEPHENSON , and THOMAS OSBORN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 saddle, value 7s.; 1 bridle, value 4s., and 1 pair of reins, value 4s. , the goods of Bennett Barrell .

Charles Osborn and Stephenson, (both aged 14,) pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

BENNETT BARRELL. I am a milkman , and live in Mountzion, Clerkenwell - I have a stable, which is walled round. On the 9th of April I found the door open - I waited a minute, and saw Thomas Osborn getting over the wall; I ran, and asked what he was doing - he said he was only sitting on the wall; I did not see him do any thing. I lost a saddle, bridle, and a pair of reins; I found where they were sold; I cannot be sure whether it was Thomas or Charles who I saw on the wall.

THOMAS CAMP . I am a watchman. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house; Thomas confessed to me that he had carried the harness to his brother and Stephenson - that it was Mr. Barrell's, and had been sold in St. John-street-road - that he took it out of the yard, and when he saw Mr. Barrell he said, "It was your harness - I carried it to my brother and Stephenson, and they sold it;" I did not understand him to say he took it from the premises, but from their own house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-127

1140. GEORGE SYNNOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 3 brushes, value 7s. , the goods of James Ewen .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-128

1141. EDWARD CUMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 axe, value 3s. , the goods of John Ledwick .

THOMAS LEDWICK . I am the son of John Ledwick; he lives in High-street, Shadwell , and is a broker . On the 12th of May an axe was taken from under the window ledge; I heard of its being taken; I caught the prisoner with it under his arm; I asked where he got it; he said he bought it of a man for 1s. I said it was my father's; he said it was a lie, and he would kick me if I did not go along; the publican came, and we secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BALL . I am a bricklayer. I saw the prisoner take the axe, put it under his jacket, and run away.

ADAM HIGH . I am an officer, and received him in charge; he said he bought the axe.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-129

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, JUNE 1.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1142. THOMAS BROAD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 half-crown, 1 sixpence, and 5 shillings , the monies of Charles Smith .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am the wife of Charles Smith we keep a chandler's-shop , in Lisson-grove . On the 4th of May I was in the room behind the shop, heard a noise, an saw the prisoner laying across the counter, with the t partly out - he was taking something out with his righ hand, and putting it into his left; he saw me, got up, an ran away; my husband caught him - I had lost sight o him. I missed 8s. 6d. from the till.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see the money in my hand? A. No, but I saw you throw it away as you ran; he was taken in an hour.

WILLIAM RAWLINSON . I am a butcher. I heard a cry of Stop thief! ran out, and a girl gave me 2s.

JOHN WATSON . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Great James-street. On the 4th of May I was at work, and saw a boy turn the corner of Grove-mews, and put his hand on some dirt; several people came up, and took the prisoner afterwards; I said I thought he was the boy; we went there, and found a half-crown and shilling.

HENRY RAINSFORD . I am a butcher. I went and found this money in the dirt.

MRS. SMITH. I had been to the till two minutes before, and saw the money safe; I can swear to him by the silk handkerchief round his neck.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-130

1143. JOHN BYWATER & ROBERT BYWATER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 axe, value 4s.; 1 adze, value 4s.; 1 chisel, value 1s., and 1 guage, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Rowe .

RICHARD ROWE. I am a carpenter . On Good Friday, the 13th of April, I left these tools in a new house at the corner of Grafton-street, Fitzroy-square , between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and missed them next morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

LAVINIA CATLEY . The prisoners lived with me in Peter-street, Soho. On Good Friday, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw them come in, and put down these tools; Robert had an adze and axe; John had the guage and chisel; they went and put them on the dust.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time did you say it was, at the office? A. Between eight and nine o'clock; I did not swear it was seven. I went out soon after, and it wanted twenty minutes to nine.

MARY CATLEY . I am the witness's mother. On Good Friday evening I found these tools on the dust; I took them up, and gave them to Webb next morning.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am an officer, and received the tools. I apprehended the prisoners.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

WILLIAM BYWATER . I am the prisoners' uncle. On Good Friday Robert came to my house soon after six o'clock in the morning, and went to work with me in Rupert-street; he staid with me till after seven o'clock in the evening - I am sure of that. I then went to my shed in Carnaby-market, and sent him to Mr. Bennett's; he came to work next day.

COURT. Q. What work were you about? A. Painting; I worked till half-past ten o'clock in the morning, and returned after church time.

- BENNETT. I am a bricklayer, and live in Chapel-street, Soho. The prisoner Robert came to my house on Good Friday evening, to order a cart; I cannot swear that I saw him, but think I did - it was about eight o'clock in the evening.

MRS. BYWATER. I am the prisoners' mother. Robert came home to tea about eight o'clock or a few minutes after- he went to bed about nine o'clock; he had been out for about half an hour.

JOHN BYWATER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBERT BYWATER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-131

1144. RICHARD EASTERBY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 4s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 7s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 stock, value 2d. , the goods of Richard Moseley .

RICHARD MOSELEY. I live at Mr. Coates', George-street, Bethnal-green - the prisoner lodged in the same room, and generally got up before me. On the 12th of April, when I got up, he was gone; a man who slept with me missed his watch; I then missed my boots, and next day, (which was Good Friday,) the other things from a box, of which I had lost the key, and taken the lock off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

STEPHEN HUTLEY . I am son-in-law of Mr. Coates. - On Good Friday evening, between eight and nine o'clock, I found the prisoner at the Crown and Anchor public-house, Somer's-town, with Moseley's clothes on - he has a wife and child I understand.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am an officer, and found the clothes on the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-132

Before Mr. Sergant Arabin.

1145. WILLIAM GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 4 pieces of wood, value 4s. , the goods of William Dodsley .

WILLIAM DODSLEY. I deal in timber , and live in Old-street-road . On the 9th of May I saw the prisoner going out of my yard with these four pieces of wood on his shoulder - I followed, and took him about a hundred feet off - he was quite a stranger - he said a person had sent him there - I know the wood to be mine.

HENRY LARA . I saw the prisoner with this wood - Dodsley took him - I ran over, and heard him say Mr. Atkinson sent him for them.

Prisoner's Defence. A man named Atkinson sent me for them.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-133

1146. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 coat, value 12s. , the goods of Samuel Gillis .

SAMUEL GILLIS. I live in Fox and Goose-street, Shadwell. On the 7th of May I was at work at St. Catherine's-dock , and put my coat on a wall, about seven o'clock in the morning - I heard a cry of Stop thief! looked round, and missed it - I saw the prisoner with it, and a man secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for employment there, and protest I never saw the coat until it was shewn to me.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-134

1147. NOAH REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th May , 1 half-crown , the money of John Pearson .

JOHN PEARSON. I keep the Duke's Head public-house, St. Martin's-street . On the 27th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in with another coachman and two females - I served them with drink - I cannot say who paid for it - while they were there my waiter brought down a half-crown and 2d., and laid it on the bar - I was drawing some beer, and said I would take it up in a moment - the prisoner stood there, and took up the half-crown - I thought it was only a joke, and when I had drawn the beer said, "Come, give me that half-crown"- he abused me, and said he had not taken it; he went

to the door, and came in in a minute; I again asked for it- he persisted that he had not got it; I said I should send for an officer if he did not give it up - he was very abusive- I went for an officer, and returned in five minutes; he said, "Do you accuse me of taking your half-crown; I said, "Yes, but you have changed your coat since I have been gone;" he had changed coats with the other man, but I am positive he is the man; he was searched, but it was not found - I have seen his companion once or twice since.

WILLIAM HOOL . I was at Pearson's, and saw the prisoner with two females and a man - I saw the waiter put half-a-crown and four halfpence down - I saw the prisoner take up the half-crown - Pearson afterwards charged him with it; he denied having it; they all went to the door and returned - while Pearson was gone for an officer the prisoner exchanged coats with the other man - he had a drab coat on, but changed it for a black one.

Prisoner's Defence. A man named Revers was with me - he accused one of us of taking the half-crown; we were searched, but nothing found on us - I changed my coat, because I did not wish to go the watch-house.

JOHN PEARSON . The other was not searched.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-135

1148. DENNIS COLLINS was indicted for stealing' on the 20th of April , 2 saws, value 16s., and 1 rule, value 4s. , the goods of William Emery .

WILLIAM EMERY. I am a carpenter . These tools were in a house in Stockbridge-terrace, Pimlico ; I lost them while I was absent for a few hours; I believe the door was left open.

JOHN EMERY . I am the prosecutor's brother. A man who was at work opposite, brought the prisoner to me on the 20th of April; I saw the handles of the saws sticking out of his trousers, and he gave me the rule.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who accused me of having the tools, but he had them himself.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-136

1149. GEORGE LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 coach-glass, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Holt .

THOMAS HOLT. I drive a hackney-coach , No. 227. On the 29th of April, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, my coach stood in the rank in Charles-street, Covent-garden ; about half-past twelve o'clock I was fetched to the Union Club-house, and while waiting there I missed my glass, which might have been taken on the stand; I returned to Charles-street, received information, and found the prisoner at the watch-house with it.

JOHN HUTCHINGS . I am a watchman. Between twelve and one o'clock I saw the prisoner go into Portugal-street, at a quick pace, with something under his arm; I followed, and asked what it was; he said it was his coach-glass - I asked his number, which he mentioned, but I do not recollect it; he said he was going to Mount pleasant, and that his coach was broken down; I asked why he saved only one; he said this was a plate-glass, and the other was a common one; he wished me to go to Mount-pleasant with him, but I took him to the watch-house - he was quite sober.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-137

1150. JOHN PALLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 2 shawls, value 25s., and 3 handkerchiefs, value 5s. , the goods of John Michael Webster .

SARAH KENNEDY . I live at Mr. Webster's, at the Quadrant, Regent-street; he deals in baby-linen . On the 25th of May, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was in the back parlour, and saw the corner of a shawl come off a line; I ran to the door, and saw a man in a white coat walk off the pavement - I ran to the corner, and desired a man to pursue him; we ran to the corner of Air-street; I said, "That is the thief, pursue him;" he did so, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then all you swear to is the coat? A. I lost sight of the man.

TIMOTHY CONNELL . I close the shops in the Quadrant; I was at the corner of Air-street; this lady came, and told me to follow that thief; I saw a man running with a speckled black fustian coat on; it was rather black; it was all colours; he seemed to have something under his left arm; I did not see him drop any thing, but I picked up the goods in the street; I saw him taken, and one of the handkerchiefs was then round his left leg; I took it off; I lost sight of him as he turned the corners, but not for a minute.

Q. How was the handkerchief about his leg? A. It clung round his leg as if he had dropped it; he might be a hundred yards from me at one time.

WILLIAM NADAULD . I live in Sherrard-street. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner turn the corner, and throw something from under his coat; I seized him instantly, and saw Connell pick up what he threw down; there was a handkerchief round his leg.

JOHN PRESLAND . I saw the prisoner throw down this property.

JOHN MICHAEL WEBSTER . These are my property, and have my private mark on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent, and being in constant employ had no occasion to steal.

GUILTY. Aged. 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-138

1151. THOMAS ARNOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 pianoforte, value 20l., the goods of Muzio Clementi and others. Also, for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 pianoforte, value 20l. , the goods of Sarah Dennis .

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-139

1152. THOMAS ARNOTT was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 harp, value 70l. , the goods of Francis Tatton Latour .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES OLIVIER . I am in the employ of Francis Tatton Latour, a musical-instrument dealer , of New Bond-street. On the 6th of March, the prisoner came to hire a harp - he left it to me to select a good one; he gave his name, Mr. Arnott, No. 22, Crescent, Euston-square, and said the instrument was for the use of his brother who he ex

pected in town from Shrewsbury, in a few days. I know we have a customer of that name at Shrewsbury - but do not know his person. I delivered an instrument to Tucker, to carry it there that evening; I did not see it again till the 27th of April, when it was at Mr. Shegan's. Clipston-street, Mary-le-bone - it is worth full 70l.; he only hired it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you send a note with it, addressed to me? A. No; it was addressed to Mr. Arnott - not to Mr. Thomas Arnott.

ROBERT GODFREY . I am an auctioneer. I was formerly in partnership with Mr. Bousfield. I live in Chiswell-street, Finsbury. I knew the prisoner first twelve or eighteen months ago - he then lived in the Crescent, Euston-square, I believe; I knew nothing of him as a resident there, but he came to me in Chiswell-street, and said he had an instrument to sell, and would I sell it - he said"Mr. Godfrey, you recollect buying some furniture of my mother." I said, "Who was she?" he said "Mrs. Arnott," he said he had something in the musical line to sell. I looked into my book and found the name, and recollected the circumstance.

Q. You never took the trouble to go and see where he did live? A. No; I knew nothing of him, except for selling goods for him at my auction-room. I had sold two instruments for him before, one of Golding's and one of Clementi's - his mother kept a very respectable private house - I bought some furniture of her; the prisoner represented himself as a musical dealer I found the harp on my premises at nine o'clock - I believe Mr. Bousfield took it in - it came about six in the evening - it was not dark - it was darkish. I saw the prisoner there and gave him 12l. on it; it was sold on the 29th of that month by public auction in the evening, for 32l., to Mr. Paine. I paid the prisoner 16l. more; 4l. was the auction duty, commission, and trouble - the duty was 32s.; we sometimes sell by printed catalogues - this was not in a printed Catalogue. I told him at the time, that till we had a respectable sale, we should not get a good price. I have an auction every week - it was regularly advertised.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever sell any instrument besides these for me? A. No; only these three, but I have sold many without a catalogue.

COURT Q. Have you not heard that this was worth 70l.? A. I did not know the value.

JURY. Q. Who generally pays the duty? A. The seller always does at respectable sales - it was advertised in the Times.

JOHN PAINE . I live in Cornhill. I bought a harp, by Hurrard, at this sale. I shewed the same afterwards to Mr. Olivier.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ARNOTT . I am the prisoner's brother. I never authorized him to apply for this instrument for me.

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly deny that I ever obtained it for my brother's use, or even used his name - but as a respectable individual, with whom the prosecutor was acquainted. A note accompanied it charging me two guineas a month for the hire - if it was for my brother's use, why send a note to me - I have lost the note. I had been totally out of employ for twelve months, and much reduced. Being arrested for 65l. I was induced, by the persuasion of a friend, to dispose of this instrument to relieve me; I got released the very night it was sold. The law I believe, requires I should have a felonious intent at the time; I was assured by a friend, that it should be purchased and he would give me his acceptance for it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-140

1153. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 3 aprons, value 6d.; and 1 towel, value 6d., the goods James Goodwin ; 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d., and 2lbs. weight of butter, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Jones .

MARY GOODWIN . I live in Nelson-street, Hackney-road . On the 7th of April these aprons and towel hung down-stairs, in the wash-house. I saw them safe at eight o'clock at night, and missed them at seven in the morning, The prisoner is a stranger - whoever took them must have got in while I was in bed; the door has only a latch.

HENRY LARD . I am a watchman of Shoreditch. On the 7th of April, about a quarter-past five o'clock, I was coming off duty and saw the prisoner running with a bag at his back, about one hundred and forty yards from Mrs. Goodwin's - I and my partner pursued him, he ran down a very bad place, and we lost sight of him for a short time. We found the bag over a fence and his shoes near it - he was taken in the chimney of an empty house. When he came to the watch-house, he said "These are not my shoes- I shan't have them." I said "You had better put them on," he did so - he said a cap, which I picked up, was not his. I said he had better put it on, which he did; they both fitted him well - the bag contained two quartern loaves, a plate, some butter, three aprons, and a towel.

GEORGE BANKS . I pursued the prisoner, and found him up a chimney, without shoes, in a house in Crabtree-row. The shoes and cap both fitted him.

JAMES PEACOCK . I was with my brother watchman, whose account is correct.

ELIZABETH JONES . I am the wife of John Jones. I lost two pounds of bread and two pounds of butter, from my safe. I live next door but one to Goodwin.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the brick fields and found the bag in the ditch; these men followed me - I was frightened and ran away - neither the shoes or cap are mine. I had left my shoes in the sand house.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-141

1154. JAMES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 copper, value 25s. , the goods of Anthony Read .

GEORGE PAINE. I am a watchman. I was in Welbeck-street, about a quarter-past nine o'clock, on the 25th of April, and received information. I went down a street and took the prisoner with this copper - he told me to make no noise and he would go quietly. I took him to Read's.

ANTHONY READ. I live in Great Barlow-street . This copper is mine, and was taken from my area railings. I am a broker .

Prisoner's Defence. A tall gentleman said he would give me 6d. to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-142

1155. CHARLES DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 watch, value 14l., the goods of Robert Joseph Whalesby , from his person .

ROBERT JOSEPH WHALESBY. I am a linen draper and live in Crawford-street. On Good Friday, between ten and eleven o'clock at night - (I had left some friends and was going home,) two females accosted me and led me into some intricacy in St. Giles' . I was convinced they had got something from me, but I said nothing, being intimidated, I was then going home; the prisoner came up and appeared to console me, and offered to see me home. I said I had nothing then but my watch, and as we were going along Oxford-buildings, she snatched my watch - (that is not my way home, but she wished me to go there;) she snatched my watch and broke the guard. I called Stop thief! she was taken and the watch picked up- I had been drinking that evening. I did not know her before.

THOMAS MOLSON . I am a watchman. I was on duty a few minutes before one o'clock - and saw the prisoner and prosecutor together - he appeared a little in liquor, and seeing the prisoner enticing him into these buildings, I went down Woodstock-street, and saw a scuffling between them in the passage of No. 21; she got up and ran past me; the prosecutor said he was robbed. I pursued, and saw her throw the watch over some high fence - I still pursued, and sprung my rattle. Partridge caught her - and we took her back to the place. Partridge got over; and found the watch - she said it was her first offence, and wished to be let go.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner running, and stopped her - I got the watch from over the rails.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him much in liquor - he asked to go with me - I walked with him; he gave me his watch in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270531-143

1156. WALTER MINTER and THOMAS HEWITT were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 96lbs. of lead, value 15s., the goods of Elizabeth Humbert , widow , and fixed to her dwelling-house .

EDWARD EDGSON . I am constable of Hammersmith. I received a note from Mr. Burrage, and went to watch at his shop on the 19th of April - he deals in marine-stores. Between eight and nine o'clock in the morning I saw Hewitt go into the shop with a sack - Burrage went in after him; some time after I saw Minter go by, on the other side of the way, with a sack - I went over and took him; I took them both into custody at Burrage's shop, and saw both sacks emptied - they contained lead - I heard them say they found it that morning, while bird's-nesting - I went and saw the lead fitted to the top of Mrs. Humbert's house - it matched exactly - I have known Minter a long time, and have seen Hewitt before.

JOHN BURRAGE . I deal in marine-stores, I directed Edgson to attend my house on the morning of the 19th - at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon of the 18th the prisoners came and sold me an axe and spade; one of them asked if I bought lead - I said Yes; they said, "What do you give?" I said, 12s. 1cwt. - one of them, with an oath, said, "In the Dover-road we can get 16s." - I asked who from; they said, with some hesitation, "Mr. Homer, a lead-melter;" they went away, and at half-past seven o'clock in the evening they came with another person, and asked if I would give any more; one of them said, "We heard there was a stoppage at your shop;" I said that was immaterial to me, if the property was honestly got, there was the money; next morning, about seven o'clock, they came and said, "Master, we have got 1cwt." - I asked when they would come; they said, "In about an hour;" I said"Make it nine" - I then informed the officer, who came.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. What is lead worth? A. I sell it for 14s. per cwt. in the market - my house is a quarter of a mile from Mrs. Humbert's.

THOMAS WESCOMB . I am a plumber. I fetched the lead to Mrs. Humbert's house - it tallied exactly - I firmly believe that it came from there.

ELIZABETH HUMBERT. I am a widow, and live in Church-lane, Hammersmith - I saw this lead safe on the evening of the 18th, and missed it about eight o'clock the next morning - there were about 93lbs. - it was fixed to my dwelling-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see some young men about there? A. No.

HEWETT'S Defence. We got up about half-past seven o'clock, and found these two sacks in the fields - we took it to this man. HEWETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

MINTER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-144

1157. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 bed, value 25s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 pillow, value 1s. 6d.; 2 blankets, value 4s. 6d.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 2s. 6d.; 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 1 looking-glass, value 1s. 3d.; 1 candlestick, value 4d.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 2d.; 1 smoothing-iron, value 9d., and 1 wash-hand-stand, value 6d., the goods of Elizabeth Mitchell , widow , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH MITCHELL. I am a widow, and live in St. Luke's parish. I let the prisoner a room on the 2d of January, with the articles stated in the indictment, at 5s. a-week - he continued there eight weeks, but has only paid 14s. - he left one Sunday, without notice, and locked the door - I had it forced open in nine days, and missed the property.

NATHANIEL BENJAMIN JUDGE . I am servant to Mr. Clark, a pawnbroker, of Old-street. I have a bed, blanket, five coarse sheets, and a pillow - the bed was pawned on the 2d of January, by a man in the name of Baker; the others were since brought by a woman.

WILLIAM WHILEY . I am servant to Mr. Gilham, of Old-street. I have a quilt, blanket, and sheet, pawned by a female, in the name of Ann Baker.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am an officer, and took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent - it was done by the woman without my knowledge or approbation - I sent word to the prosecutor of what had happened, and that I would get the duplicates from the woman when I

could find her, and pay all demands, if she would wait a short time, and after my apprehension the woman sent her the blankets - I did not miss the bed, as there was another there.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-145

1158. JAMES FEATHERSTONE and CHARLES THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Henry Stead , from his person .

JOHN HENRY STEAD. I am a coach-lace weaver . On the 29th of April, about nine o'clock at night, I was in New-street, Covent-garden - a woman came and asked if I had lost my handkerchief; I felt in my pocket, and said I had; she produced it, and said it was taken from Feather-stone, who was then near me - he could hear that - I did did not see Thomas myself till next day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not deny taking it? A. Yes; the woman is not here - she is the officer's wife.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer. I was in New-street with my wife - I saw Thomas take a handkerchief from Stead's pocket, and give it to Featherstone, who crossed over to me, and I caught him in my arms - the handkerchief dropped from the side of his coat - he was then about six yards from Stead; my wife crossed over - I went over also, and left the handkerchief with her, while I pursued Thomas and secured him - I knew him before, and am certain of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was Featherstone at the time the gentleman was robbed? A. Close behind him; I caught the handkerchief as it fell - it was never on the ground.(Property produced and sworn to.)

FEATHERSTONE'S Defence. I was going on an errand; the handkerchief was picked up twenty yards from me.

THOMAS'S Defence. I was sitting on the step of a door- I know nothing of the other.

FEATHERSTONE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-146

1159. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 35 sovereigns and 2 half sovereigns, the monies of Jonathan Randall from his person .

JONATHAN RANDALL. I am a sawyer , and live in Hertfordshire. I came to town on the 10th of April, and on the 11th, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I received thirty-five sovereigns from Mr. Akers of Richmond, and I had two half sovereigns before - I put them in part of an old handkerchief, and put it into my fob, which is a deep one - I received it at the George and Gate public-house, Gracechurch-street - I only had two penny worth of gin there - I then went down to Shoreditch-church, and on the road some man overheard me, and began talking about farming and the country; I never saw him before, I slipped down and dirted one of my knees - I went into a public-house, to scrape of the dirt; the man came in, and called for a pint of beer or ale, and asked me to drink, which I did - I then went on to Shoreditch: he followed, and asked me into a public-house, and we did go into the Green Gate public-house; we had not been there long, before another man came in, and then the prisoner came in, one of them then said, he had got a great deal of property about him, and he hoped we were all gentlemen, and would not rob him; it was then about eleven o'clock- the man who talked of his money, then pulled out some sovereigns - I do not know how many; the man who had gone in with me, then pulled out some money, and then the prisoner pulled out two or three sovereigns, and after that I pulled out some money - I did not show it all - I then put it into my fob again safe, and felt it safe after I got out of that house; we all came out together; we only had one pint of beer there; the man who said he had this property, said he wished to get into a bettermost house; they at first seemed to be strangers, but they all talked about money, and all shewed some; we then went to the Bird Cage public-house, as they told me - I do not know what street it was in, they said it was Hackney-road, I think, but it was not; it is about a quarter of a mile from the other house; they talked of having a beef-steak, and the gentleman who said he had the property ordered some; we all eat together, and had a pot of beer - I know my money was safe when they were going to have the steak cooked - I left there between one and two o'clock I should think; after we eat the steak, they called for some brandy and water, and then the prisoner said, "I must go out, I have to attend to a shop" - this was between one and two o'clock, I think; he went out, and came back again (we sat at a large table; the prisoner sat at my right hand, and the man who joined me in the street, on my left; my money was in my fob); the prisoner sat down again, at the same place as before - I believe; he staid some minutes, and went out; he returned again in about ten minutes; we were an hour and a quarter in the house altogether; after I had drank the brandy and water it made me stupid - I do not know what was done, but I am told we all went out together- I did not go to sleep - I came to my recollection about eight o'clock in the evening, and found myself somewhere at the west end of the town - I know I had left the house with them; I walked, or they led me - I was found somewhere in Mary-le-bone, as I am told - I felt there for my money, and it was gone - I should judge that I had my money safe when I left the Bird Cage public-house - I have recovered no part of it, or seen any of the men, except the prisoner; he was taken on the 14th - I had informed an officer - I described their persons - I did not know either of their persons, so well as the prisoner's - I knew him again the moment I saw him, and swear most positively he is the man - I was sober when I felt for my money - I lost the half-sovereigns and all.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you been in London before? A. Yes; I had only two-penny worth of gin - I had no more spirits till after dinner, and after drinking the brandy and water I was stupid - I do not know that they gave me any thing more - I was not drunk but insensible, and have no recollection of any thing that passed after two o'clock - I believe the three men went away with me, but I had lost my senses then - I know they went away with me - the last thing I recollect is that there was a step at the door; whether I fell down I do not know - some of them led me away - I know nothing more.

Q. Did not you tell the officer you should not know any

of the persons? A. I do not know that I did; I cannot tell whether I was in any woman's company after I came out, nor whether I went into any public-house - I had not sense enough to know; I do not know whether the prisoner is a sailor.

COURT. Q. Was he dressed like one? A. No, he had a blue coat, and a ring - I should have taken him for one from his appearance.

THOMAS FAULKENER . On Wednesday, the 11th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw Akers pay the prosecutor thirty-five sovereigns - he wrapped them in part of an old handkerchief, and put them into his fob - he was then quite sober.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Wednesday, the 11th of April, I saw the prosecutor going down Hackney-road, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, two gentlemen were with him - the prisoner was not there then - one had hold of his arm, the other was close by - they went on into the Green Gate public-house, remained there some time, and came out - I saw the prisoner come out last - I had not seen him go in, but am confident he is the man - they went up Crabtree-row, to the Bird Cage public-house, at the corner of Bird Cagewalk, Bethnal-green - I followed them; the prisoner walked behind them within a few yards - I did not see them go in - I was close behind, but they turned a corner- there are two doors to the house - I turned, and supposed they were gone in; I went into a house opposite, and staid some time - I saw the prisoner come out; he went in again in a short time - I then sent a woman for Newsom, my brother officer, who came - I told him to go in, and have a pint of beer in the same room with them - when he went in, the prisoner had gone out a second time; he returned shortly after, and went in - Newsom directly came out; we waited, and after some time they all four came out together - we watched them on to Brick-lane - this was about two o'clock; the prisoner was pretty close to them, a little distance behind - the prosecutor seemed to walk steadily - I did not consider him intoxicated - they all turned down a street out of Brick-lane, except the prisoner, who went straight on - we then lost sight of them, and went to several houses to look for them - I found them in a house in Brick-lane - I think it is called the Tap public-house; they all went out together - the prisoner was then with them - it might then he half-past two o'clock, I cannot be certain; we went up, and said they were after something, and told them to leave the countryman - they then went away from him, and as we had to be at Bow-street by four o'clock we went away - next morning I heard the prosecutor had been robbed - I went, and asked if he should know them; he said No - I said, "But we know them, and no doubt we shall find them;" I knew one of the others before, but not the prisoner - I have not seen the others since. On the Saturday night we went to a certain house where the other two had promised to meet us - they did not come, but I saw the prisoner walking on the other side of the way, and looking into a house - I went to him and said, "You are one of the men who was with them - the countryman has been robbed, and I shall take you; your companions promised to be here, you had better come in" - we went in, and staid there some time; they did not come. I said it was our duty to detain him - he said, "I should not like to be locked up, here are two sovereigns;" I certainly took the two sovereigns, and took him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. The other two men and the prosecutor came out of the Bird Cage first? A. Yes; the prisoner might be six or seven yards behind - I think they went separate ways when we spoke to them; the prosecutor seemed to walk on very well - he appeared to have had a drop, but knew very well what he was about. I did not see him again till next morning myself - when I took the prisoner he said he knew nothing of the robbery: he said if we would not lock him up all Sunday, he would come before the Magistrate on Monday; that he did not care about it on the Monday. I have heard he was steward to Captain Parry in his last voyage.

JOSEPH NEWSOM . I am an officer of Bow-street. About one o'clock Tyrrell sent for me. I went to a house opposite the Bird Cage, and afterwards went into the house, where I found the other two men talking with the prosecutor, about the country and farming, and in about ten minutes the prisoner came in - I left just as he went in - he did not seem to speak to them while I was there, but I left and went to Tyrrell, to watch them; they came out about two o'clock, all in company together; they went on down to Brick-lane - nearly facing Hanbury's brew-house we lost them for a short time, and then we found them in the Tap opposite the brew-house; I went into the house, and saw them- I do not know whether they were drinking; they had not been there long. Directly they saw me they came out; I had seen the prisoner once or twice before; I am quite certain of him: I came out - Tyrrell and I went up, and spoke to them, and they dispersed. The prosecutor appeared to go away; he called on me next morning, and said he had been robbed; I asked if he should know them again- he said he thought not; I said I should know them, and would try and find them. On the Saturday morning I met the other two in Chiswell-street, and said, "You are the men that drew the countryman the other day;" they denied it, and offered me a sovereign; I said, "Go with me to the old man, and clear the case;" they said No, they would not do that, but they would give me a sovereign; I proposed to meet them the same evening, down in Shoreditch - we went- they did not come. The prisoner came, and was taken into custody - he gave Tyrrell two sovereigns.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not take the two men? - A. No. The prosecutor could not tell where he lost his money. They dispersed about three o'clock - I went into the Bird Cage that I might know them again; the prisoner went up to the table, and sat there. I was not there above a minute after he came in.

JAMES ALLBROOK . I am servant to Mr. Jones, of the Bird Cage public-house, Bird Cage-walk, Bethnal-green. On the Wednesday in question I remember seeing the prosecutor there; three gentlemen were all in his company - I served them with a pint of brandy, some water, and sugar; I did not stop in the room to see if they all drank together; one of the gentlemen paid me - the prisoner was one of them - he was not dressed like a sailor.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it one of the others who paid you? A. Yes.

MARY MOURNE . I live with Mr. Jones, at the Bird Cage. I cooked the beef steaks for the four gentlemen;

the prosecutor and prisoner were two of them; they were all in company, and dined together. I received the money - one paid for all. I am certain of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see them come in? A. No. I did not see the prosecutor go out alone.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the Green Gate, and saw the prosecutor and two others sitting together; they appeared to be friends. I had a glass of gin and bitters, and the paper; the prosecutor told me he had a great deal of money, and that the others had also; he pulled out his money first, and then the other men, and with a great deal of persuasion I pulled out a sovereign or two; I was invited to go and have some steaks, and after some time I left them to go to Brick-lane, to look for a person who I was to meet about a shop; I said I would come back and be a glass of brandy and water with them; I did so, and afterwards we went to another house. I never saw the prosecutor again for nine days, and he asked which was the man, though I stood close to him in the office. I have been out with Captain Parry.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I keep the Lord Tyrol public-house, High-street, Mary-le-bone. I saw the prosecutor in my house about five o'clock on the 11th of April; he was brought in by two men as I heard, but I did not see him brought in; when I went in he was left there, in a corner, quite drunk.

JAMES WEDGERY . I am a servant out of place, and lodged at this house. I saw the prosecutor brought in by two gentlemen, about five o'clock - neither of them was the prisoner - he did not appear very tipsy, but a little so; he had a pint of beer there - I was in the tap-room about three hours; he was in the parlour; I only saw him at five o'clock, and again about eight.

COURT. Q. Did the two gentlemen leave the house? - A. One did - the other remained with him some time, I do not know how long. One of the gentlemen came to me, and said, "Don't give those men any more beer or spirits."

HENRIETTA BROWN . I keep the Nottingham Arms, public-house, Mary-le-bone. There was an elderly countryman led into my house by two young men, between four and five o'clock; I should not know them - they were going away some time after, and I made them take him with them.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270531-147

1160. ANDREW DAYMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Hall , from his person .

WILLIAM HALL. I am a saddle-tree maker . On the 8th of May, about half-past five o'clock, I was in Penton-street, opposite White Conduit-house ; the constable came, and said I had lost my handkerchief; I turned, and saw it laying between me and the prisoner; the officer seized him.

JAMES ORFORD . I am a headborough. I was on duty, and saw the prisoner go and take a handkerchief from Hall's pocket; I went up - he threw it down, and I took him.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-148

1161. WILLIAM HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 1 purse, value 5s.; 3 sovereigns, 10 shillings, and 10 sixpences, the goods of Thomas Kinnear , from his person .

THOMAS KINNEAR. I am a packer , and live at Edinburgh. On the 15th of May, about half-past four o'clock, I was in Bond-street , and on getting near the corner of Clifford-street, a person called out that I had been robbed; I turned round, and saw George, who said I had lost my purse and handkerchief; the prisoner had just passed me; I ran and took hold of him till the officer came - my purse had been in my coat pocket, and contained some sovereigns and silver. George said she had seen the prisoner drop the purse, and another person take it up; I know it was all safe about two minutes before; he was not above a yard and a half from me.

MARTHA GEORGE . I live in Stamford-street. I was in Bond-street, and saw the prisoner and another walking before me; I saw Mr. Kinnear put a green purse into his coat pocket - I saw the prisoner put his hand into the pocket twice, but he did not take the purse; he put his hand in a third time, pulled out the purse, and dropped it - the other took it up, and ran away; I told Mr. Kinnear, and he was taken. I am certain he is the boy.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-149

1162. JOHN WALSH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 4 sheets, value 20s.; 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 20s., and 1 piece of cotton, value 2s. , the goods of William Butler .

WILLIAM BUTLER. I keep a public-house at Brentford . The prisoner came to my house, and asked if I could let him a bed, as he was going to work for a tailor opposite - he slept with a boy.

LUCY BUTLER . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Saturday evening the prisoner came in, and went up-stairs; he went out with a bundle; I did not know but it was his own - he was taken next night; this property was missed from another room - my bed-room door was broken, but not opened. This property was taken from two boxes in another room, which were broken open.

DAVID JOHNSON . I am an officer. I was on duty between one and two o'clock in the morning, and stopped the prisoner in the road, with this property in a bundle; he told me where he worked.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a shopmate, and got drunk - what I did I do not know.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-150

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1163. JAMES REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 40lbs. of lead, value 6s., the goods of John Early , and fixed to a building of his .

JOSEPH EARLY. I am the brother of John Early, who has fifty-five house in Norton-falgate . On the 16th of May I heard some lead had been taken; I found it at Kemp's - we took it to the office; I saw it fitted to the top of the house; the prisoner's friends live near there; I took him myself next day, and said, "You are a pretty fellow to steal lead;" he began crying, and said he had seen his father, and he would do any thing to make it up; I said if he

came, quietly perhaps we might settle it; as we went along he ran away from me, but I secured him.

GEORGE KEMP . I am a watchman of Shoreditch. On the 16th of May, about a quarter-past five o'clock in the morning, I went to look after some of my pigeons; I turned round, and saw the prisoner on the top of a house, with a piece of lead in his hand; I went out after him - he got through a hole in the roof; I took the lead home, and kept it till he was taken; I am certain of his person. I afterwards saw it fitted to the top of the house, and it matched exactly. I have known him two years - the lead was rolled up in three pieces.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 17th - I saw the lead fitted.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-151

1164. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 1 coat, value 25s. , the goods of John Fowler .

JOHN FOWLER. I am a glass-coachman . On the 1st of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was waiting at Covent Garden Theatre for a party - I stood by my horses; my coat was on the box; I heard the coach creak, turned round, and saw the prisoner, who ran off, with it in his hand, and threw it to two companions, between Hart-street and Bow-street. I pursued, and seized him - he struggled hard, and bit my knuckle very much; some girls came up, tried to get him away, and said he was not the man, but I had not lost sight of him; I held him till the officer came.

THOMAS MORRIS . I am an officer. I found the prisoner struggling very much with Fowler; I secured him; he said, "I have not got his coat."

Prisoner's Defence. I was running, for fear of being shut out - two men came and said they would give me a ride home; this man came, and said I had taken his coat.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-152

1165. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 1 lb. 11 ozs. of tobacco, value 5s. 10d. , the goods of Robert Jago .

ROBERT JAGO. I keep a tobacco-shop , in Crown-street, Finsbury - the prisoner was in my employ. I know this tobacco, from its peculiar quality - a larger quantity has been taken from my stock; I was not present when it was found. I charged the prisoner with taking it; he did not deny it, but gave no account of it.

THOMAS LAMB . I am servant to Mr. Jago - the prisoner was employed in stripping tobacco . On the 3d of May, at eight o'clock, as he was going to breakfast, I called him back, and said I wished to search him; he pulled of his hat, in which was his victuals - he then held up his arms; I rubbed him down, and found a lump at his stomach; I asked what it was - he said nothing that he knew of; I found it was tobacco, which I believe to be master's, and had been taken from a chest in a room, not where he worked- the door was not locked; he gave no account of it.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am an officer, and took him with the tobacco.

ROBERT JOHNSON . I was in Jago's house, and heard Lamb call out; I ran up, and saw him and the prisoner scuffling; the prisoner was throwing some tobacco from him, and said Lamb had put it upon him.

THOMAS LAMB . I was holding him because he wanted to go and put it back into the room he took it from.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been driven from home by a step-mother, and after being a long time out of employ went to the prosecutor's, at 7s. 6d. a week, and was driven by want to commit the offence, and that he resisted because the prosecutor had struck him.

ROBERT JAGO. I did not beat him at all.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-153

1166. JOHN TWYFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 8 bushels of chaff, peas, and oats, mixed together, value 20s. , the goods of John Eames , his master; and RICHARD MILLER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM CRAFTER . I am employed in John Eames' granary at the Angel-inn, St. Clements - Twyford was in his employ at a farm at Kelsal-green, Middlesex - I did not know Miller. I used to give Twyford a sack of chaff, peas, and oats every week; I received information from Warren on the 24th of May, and applied at Bow-street; Harrison and I followed the cart which Twyford drove from the Angel at half-past nine o'clock in the morning - when he got over Paddington-bridge to the Red Lion public-house, I went opposite the house, and the officer went and stood at the house, reading the paper; so that he could see me; I then saw Miller and Twyford take down the tail-board; they drew out a sack of this mixture; Twyford helped it on Miller's back, who carried it into the stable; I gave a signal to Harrison; he seized Twyford - I ran into the stable, and met Miller coming out; I went, and saw the same sort of mixture in the bin as what had been in the sack; we took up the sack, which laid by the bin, and put the mixture into it; it exactly filled it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you see this mixture put into the cart? A. No; it had no business there; the cart was loaded with manure, and they had got the two sacks which they should have besides.

JAMES WARREN . I am in the employ of Mr. Eames at the Angel. On the morning of the 24th of May I saw Twyford put these two sacks of mixture into the cart, under the manure; one behind and the other before - he afterwards put on the top of the manure two sacks which he ought to take.

Cross-examined. Q. Could he see you? A. I should think so; nobody has a right to give him orders except Crafter.

JOHN HARRISON . I was with Crafter, and stood at the Red Lion. I secured Twyford, and charged him with having another sack under the dung; he denied it, but we found it there, and a sack in the stable; the contents had been emptied into the bin, and among the mixture I found some pieces of paper, which Crafter identified; Miller said it belonged to a person whose horse he had at livery.

Q. He showed you the stable readily? A. No, he did not show it us.

WILLIAM CRAFTER . I had put my own name on these pieces of paper.

Cross-examined. Q. How many people work in the yard? A. Perhaps a dozen; the granary key is always put under the door; I always give out the grain; I am foreman of the granary.

TWYFORD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-154

1167. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Cove .

CHARLOTTE COVE . I am the wife of Thomas Cove, a shoemaker ; we live at Uxbridge . On the 3d of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take these shoes off a ledge outside the window; I followed, and stopped him; he put them down.

WILLIAM GRAINGER . I am a labourer. I saw him drop the shoes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was real poverty caused me to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-155

1168. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 5 lbs. of pork, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of John Grant .

JOHN GRANT. I keep a pork shop in Portpool-lane . On the 23d of May Skilbeck alarmed me; he pointed the prisoner out; I ran, and found this pork in her apron; it was in my window, which was open ten minutes before.

GEORGE SKILBECK . I saw the prisoner pull this pork from the window.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Nine Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-156

1169. JOHN WILLIAM SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Simpson .

JOSEPH SIMPSON. I am the prisoner's father. I bought this coat on Monday, and told him to after the buttons; he is a tailor, and works at home. I put it into my drawer, and next day it was gone.

JAMES HILL . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of May this coat was pawned for 15s.; I do not know by whom.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner; he said he had pawned the coat, and given the duplicate to a man.

Prisoner's Defence. My father said he did not want it till Friday; I had no shoes, and pawned it to get some; I meant to redeem it.

JOSEPH SIMPSON . I did not deliver it him to alter.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-157

1170. SUSANNAH SIBLEY and JOSEPH SIBLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 boiler, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Gardener .

JOHN GARDENER. I have an unoccupied house in Portland-terrace . On the 12th of May I missed this boiler, which was not fixed - I found it at Mary-le-bone office, and am certain of it; I had seen it safe four days before.

SOPHIA LEWIN . I keep a pawnbroker's shop in lissongrove. I have known Susannah Sibley about four months; she came and bought an iron on the 11th of May, and told me she knew a respectable person who had a steamer to sell for 10s. if I would buy it - she brought it on the 12th; I said I could only give 5s. for it, as it did not suit me - she took the 5s. On the Tuesday following she left word that she wanted to speak to me; she came again to my house, and told me to hide it till after Monday for God's sake, for she believed it was stolen; I said, "I cannot think of that; where was it stolen from?" she said from Wilson-street, Portland-town - an officer's wife came up, and told me what to do.

JAMES GIBBS . I took up Susannah Sibley for selling this boiler - she said, "For God's sake try and do away with it.

ROBERT INWOOD . I went with Joseph Sibley to a street near St. John's-wood chapel - we went down a road; he got over a wall, and said there was some copper pipe to the house - he began to pull it down; I helped him; he put it into the coal-hole; I went with him to No. 4, Lissongrove, and then he got over a wall of another house, opened the gate, and shewed me a steam-boiler; he took it to pieces, and put it into the corner of a room; he said he should take it some night. I do not know whose house it was.

JOHN SIBLEY'S Defence. He took the pipe himself, and sold it for 8d.

SUSANNAH SIBLEY'S Defence. On Saturday morning my son brought the boiler to me; he said a person wanted to sell it, and would give him 1s. I went and sold it to this woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-158

1171. THOMAS SMITH and GEORGE SPIERS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 ladder, value 4s. , the goods of George Harris .

GEORGE HARRIS. I am a lamp-lighter . On the 26th of April I lost my ladder from Harewood-place, Oxford-street - it was padlocked to the wall. I found it at the watch-house.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a headborough of St. Luke's. On the morning of the 27th of April I was in Ironmonger-row, and saw Spiers at the corner of a street; he saw me, and ran away; I suspected him; I turned to the right, and saw Smith at the corner of a house with this ladder - he stood there about ten minutes, then took it away on his shoulder - I followed him; he put it over the rails of the work-house; I went, and asked what he brought it there for - he said a man told him, and that Spiers was the man- he said it was for a lark; I told him to carry it to the watch-house, but at the corner of Whitecross-street he threw it down and ran away; I caught him, and secured him; Spiers was taken that morning.

JOHN FELLS . I took Spiers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I never had it.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days .

SPIERS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-159

1172. GEORGE ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Zachariah Popp .

HENRY SMITH . I am footman to Zachariah Popp. On the 18th of April, we were going to the theatre to fetch master home; I was on the box, and saw the prisoner shut the coach-door in Orange-street , and the coat was in his apron; I got down and pursued; he was taken in Leicester-square; I lost sight of him for about half a minute, while he turned the corner, but am positive he is the man; we were going on the trot; he opened the coach-door with his right hand; he threw it down directly I got down; I am certain of him; he also threw away a light drab coat, which he claimed afterwards.

WILLIAM DAVY . I was standing at my master's door, Jones' Hotel, Leicester-square; I saw the prisoner run by; I ran and took hold of him; there were no persons running before him, but some after him, calling Stop thief! he resisted, and got from me, but I followed and took him again; he was secured.(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD COULSELL . I was driving the carriage, and saw the prisoner at the near side door, opposite a lamp; I am certain of his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw some men running, and hearing a cry of Stop thief! I ran after them.

WILLIAM DAVY . He did not state this before.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-160

1173. VENUS NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 watch, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 30s., and 2 keys, value 10s. , the goods of George Chalton Elderton .

GEORGE CHALTON ELDERTON. I am master of the Endeavour of Shields . On the 16th of May, I went into the Coach and Horses public-house, Shadwell ; I was not quite sober, but am sure I had my watch; I laid my head on the table, being fatigued - I had more drink there, and fell asleep; when I awoke, I found the prisoner fawning about me, and felt her draw the watch out of my pocket - I did not see it in her hand; she ran out before I could get round the table; an officer was sent for who took her.

MARGARET THOMPSON . I was at the Coach and Horses, I saw the prisoner take the watch, and run off with it.

GEORGE DEVERELL . I am a beadle. I was sent for, and received information; the prisoner came into the Coach and Horses about an hour after - I took her and searched her, she said, "Don't be indelicate" - I made her loosen her clothes; 9s. 6d. was found in her bosom; she said at the watch-house, that she had taken the watch to the North Pole public-house, and given it to one Ryan for this 9s. 6d.; she was quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my own money.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-161

1174. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 1 coat, value 2s. , the goods of John Offer .

JOHN OFFER. I live in Compton-street, Clerkenwell . I left my coat safe in the afternoon of the 1st of May, and was fetched between four and five o'clock; it was produced that evening.

JOHN JACQUES . I live in Compton-street. On the 1st of May, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner; she came to my house (which is two doors from Offer's), went along the passage, and opened the yard-door; my wife asked her what she wanted; she said she was taken ill, and wanted to go into the yard, which she did; she afterwards went away; in about ten minutes I saw her come down the street, with this coat - I stopped her with it; she said it was her husband's, who had been drinking at a public-house, and had sent her to fetch it; there was another woman with her - I let the prisoner go; she returned and peeped round the corner, to see if I was looking after her - I went and took her again; she confessed taking the coat, and offered us any thing to make it up, and said she had no husband.

WILLIAM CRUMP . I am a constable, and took her in charge; she said she was guilty, and begged forgiveness.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from work, and met a woman, who asked me to go with her, and fetch this coat - I waited while she went up for it.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-162

1175. WILLIAM DUGGAN and THOMAS GIBBONS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 48lbs. of lead, value 8s. the goods of William Aldus , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

DUGGAN pleaded GUILTY .

WILLIAM ALDUS. I live in Grub-street ; some lead was stolen from a house of mine.

EDWARD JONES . On the 30th of April I sat up all night with Snelling, in Type-court, Grub-street - between two and three o'clock I heard a knocking on the top of the opposite house; we sat quietly, and in the course of the night, we saw Gibbons get up once or twice, and while he was away the knocking ceased; between six and seven we went out and met the prisoners coming down Grub-street together, with a basket in their hands, and in about half an hour we saw them go into a house in the court - between seven and eight o'clock I saw Gibbons come out of the house - we then went down-stairs, went into the house, and met Duggan coming out with a basket of lead- we afterwards matched the lead with the top of Aldus' house; it was fresh cut, and a great quantity gone - what we took exactly matched the cuts, but more was gone - we detained Duggan, and about eleven o'clock I found Gibbons in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you give any alarm when Gibbons came out? A. No, because we suspected that Duggan was inside - he brought nothing out that I saw.

SAMUEL SNELLING . I was with Jones; his account is correct; I saw Gibbons in the court several times that night; there were two or three in the party, but I knew Gibbons before, and heard his voice several times distinctly - between six and seven o'clock in the morning we met them in Grub-street, with a basket; we went into the Red

Lion public-house, and saw them both enter the house with a basket; Gibbons came out alone, very dirty, as if he had been over some ruins; we went in and took Duggan in three minutes, with the lead in the basket, ready to start.

Cross-examined. Q. How was he ready to start? A. He was near the door, coming out; I did not follow Gibbons, because we went to see who was in the house; he walked quietly away.

JOHN BEE . I am a headborough. I found Gibbons at a public-house in Whitecross-street on the morning of the 1st of May - I found nothing on him; I said I wanted him about some lead - I asked him at the watch-house, who was on the top of the house with him; he said, nobody- I applied the lead to the roof; it matched exactly.

EDWARD JONES . A knife was found on Duggan; they had made a hole through a ceiling to get to Aldus' house; the hole was fresh broken, and the rubbish lay there.

GIBBONS' Defence. I had occasion to go into the house, but took no basket in.

GIBBONS - GUILTY .

Both Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-163

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JUNE 2.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1176. THOMAS ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 pair of trousers, value 7s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pin, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s., and 1 shirt, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Webber ; and 1 pair of trousers, value 14s. , the goods of Christian Podzus .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-164

1177. THOMAS CHASE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 5 pieces of wood, value 10l., and 22 veneers, value 8l. , the goods of John Kenenmore , his master.

JOHN KENENMORE. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Featherstone-street, City-road . The prisoner was in my service. On the 5th of May Seims, my servant, gave me information, and I went to a side-board, in which I found a quantity of veneers - I took them out and marked them- I did not count them, but am certain there were ten, or more; I put them back, and fetched an officer, then went up to the shop, and said, "Who put those veneers in the side-board?" the prisoner said, "Not me;" I said, "Nobody else could," and gave him into custody - he fell on his knees and begged for mercy, and said he did not know he was doing any harm - they are not worth above 10s. - we then went to the front room floor of a house in Baldwin-street, City-road, and found a great quantity of mahogany veneers and rose-wood, which I can swear belong to me, and are worth about 10l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did not the side-board stand in a yard? A. Yes; I have three apprentices and four journeymen; they all had access to it, but nobody but the prisoner had come that morning when they were found; I do not know when I had seen them last - Seims is a pretty good boy - I have had him before a Magistrate three times, but not for dishonesty.

COURT. Q. How do you know the wood? A. From its quality and particular grain.

JOHN CHRISTOPHER SEIMS . I am apprentice to Mr. Kenenmore. The prisoner has worked there for three or four months. I sleep in the house. On the morning of the 5th of May I let the prisoner in about five o'clock; he went into the work-shop with me, and soon after Southey, an apprentice, came into the shop; I saw the prisoner take some pieces of wood out of his chest; I had occasion to go down-stairs; I rattled the latch of the door, and the prisoner thought I was gone into the house; I then saw him come down with a cloth in a bundle; I do not know what was in it - I looked into the side-board soon after, and found some veneers in it; I went up again, and in a few minutes a man, who was coming to work, rang the factory bell, and while I was down, the prisoner brought down some clothes-horses - he went to the side-board, and took the cloth off the veneers - I went and told master, who got an officer, and took him - he begged pardon, and I think said he thought there was no harm in it; I had let him in on the 3d, and he went into the veneer-room and cut some veneers, and put them into a cloth in the side-board; I cannot say these were the the same.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been an apprentice? A. Four years. I quarrelled with the prisoner several days before - but we had made it up and spoke together.

WILLIAM COUZINS SOUTHEY . I am apprentice to Mr. Kenenmore. I was there on the morning of the 5th, and went into the work-shop; the prisoner came a little after five o'clock. I went to get some saw-dust, and saw the prisoner bring down a bundle, and put it on the sideboard - he went up again. I went and opened it, and found some veneers in it - another man came; Seims let him in - the prisoner took out some uprights for clothes horses, and said "The old b - g - r shall not see this till I am gone" - he took them down stairs. I saw him bring the cloth up in about half an hour - I was there when Vann came with master, who said "Who put those veneers on the sideboard?" the prisoner said "It was not me;" master said "That is your prisoner;" he then went on his knees and begged pardon, on account of his wife and children.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see this by accident? A. Yes; quite - he could not see me, I was behind some wood - he had been making the clothes horses for himself.

THOMAS VANN . I was sent for, and took the prisoner with the veneers. Mr. Kenenmore said, "Who put the veneers into the old sideboard?" the prisoner said "Not me." "You did?" said Mr. Kenenmore, "and somebody saw you" - he went on his knees and asked pardon twice.

Cross-examined. Q. He said, "Don't send me to prison for the sake of my wife and family?" A. No; he asked forgiveness - and when down-stairs he again went on his knees, and said, "Now sir, for the last time, I ask you to forgive me."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said what they state, but it was on account of not wishing to go to prison, having a wife and family.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-165

1178. HENRY DALTON was indicted for stealing on the 3d of May , 1 fender, value 3s. , the goods of James Bentley .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-166

1179. JOHN CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 1 plane, value 1s.; 1 square, value 1s.; 1 chisel, value 3d., and 1 gimblet, value 2d. , the goods of William Dalley .

WILLIAM DALLEY. I am a labourer , and live in Little Brook-street ; the prisoner lodged two nights with me - I missed these tools in the morning, about a quarter of an hour after he left, and about eight o'clock I found them in his basket, at a public-house; he had denied having them.

MARY DALLEY . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I heard the tools rattling, and when the prisoner came down I said, "I hope you have not taken any of my husband's tools?" he said "No."

WILLIAM JAMESON . I am an officer, and took him.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had borrowed the tools of the prosecutor's wife.

MARY DALLEY. I had not lent him any of them.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-167

1180. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 6 caps, value 3s. , the goods of Elizabeth West .

ELIZABETH WEST. I live in Baldwin's-gardens . Six caps hung in the garden - I missed them about nine o'clock in the morning - the prisoner is a stranger - my lodger lost a gown.

MARY DAVY . I live near Mr. West. The prisoner frequently came to my house. On the 20th of April, about nine o'clock, she came to me to sell a gown, which she had in her basket. I would not buy it; she then said she had some caps and showed me one. I said I had but 3d., she said "Well, take that for 3d.;" and wanted me to look at the others, but I did not. - Mrs. West came and claimed the one I bought.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer, and took her into custody; she said she took them through distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman who gave me them to sell for her.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-168

1181. ANN BRAGG was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 bed, value 20s.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 2 blankets, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 3s.; 3 chairs, value 4s.; 1 chest, value 14s.; 1 wash-hand-stand, value 8s.; 1 stove, value 6s.; 1 fender, value 1s., and 1 bedstead, value 20s. , the goods of John Samuel Carrew .

SARAH CARREW . I am the wife of John Samuel Carrew, (who is at sea,) and live at Mrs. Chamberlain's. I knew the prisoner on board a ship - my property was at Ratcliff-square, Stepney . When the ship was going to sea, she asked if I had any commands to London. I gave her some letters, money, and my ticket. I came home with Mrs. Chamberlain, from Rio Janeiro, in September, and missed the property.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did your husband go to sea? A. Two years ago. I have not seen or heard of him since. I did not tell her to take charge of my furniture to prevent expence. I saw her in September, selling oysters in the street, and went home with her; but did not see my things there; she said they had been taken away by a neighbour. I have received a box and 25s.; I did not drink tea with her afterwards - I did not go before the Justice till April - I tried several times before that to get money from her. I have not said if she could raise 5l. I would not appear.

COURT. Q. Did you know your property was gone when you got 25s.? A. Yes.

ANN SMITH . I was left in care of this property - the prisoner came with a letter about the 4th of July, saying she was authorized to take the goods away and pay the rent - she paid the landlord part of the money, and in consequence of the letter I gave her the key.

MRS. CARREW. I cannot write - I employed a person on board the ship to write for me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-169

1182. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 2 sovereigns, the monies of John Venning , from his person .

JOHN VENNING. The prisoner was a mate of mine, on board a vessel. On the 24th of April I went to his lodging, James-street, New-Cut, to go to receive our money, we went to the Bull, public-house, Leadenhall-street, about one o'clock; where I received 3l. 5s. I shewed it to him, and put it into my right hand waistcoat pocket - we went to a variety of places - he said he had no money, and I must stand treat - and, in the Minories, I lent him 2s. 6d.; and about three o'clock, he told me to say nothing about it. We then went to the Flying-horse, public-house, Wilson-street . My money was all right there - I had two sovereigns and a half; I laid down and went to sleep for half an hour - and he came hustling me about, and lifting me up - I was then on the floor - I was not drunk, but fresh; my money was then gone - this was about four o'clock. I accused him of it, he denied it - he was searched, and one sovereign, and 17s. 6d. found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you dined? A. Yes; in the Minories. I dropped some money which he picked up, and gave the landlady for me - nobody else was in the room - he told me he was quite stumped - and had not a halfpenny.

RICHARD MANNING . I am an officer. I was fetched - the prisoner was rather intoxicated. I found a sovereign, 17s. 6d. and 101/2d. on him. The prosecutor said if he would give him 1l. it should be made up. I do not know whether I asked him if he had any money about him.

Cross-examined. Q. If he had given 1l. out of 1l. 17s. 6d. he would have let him go? A. That was mentioned.

MARY ADCOCK . I keep the Flying-horse, public-house- these men came in about half-past three o'clock, both nearly drunk; the prisoner was the most sober - the prosecutor laid on the floor and was very drunk - Clarks picked him up two or three times, and picked up 2s. 6d.

and gave me to keep for him - he got better, and missed his money; we sent for an officer. Clarke had changed a sovereign at the bar about four o'clock - the prosecutor was asleep then.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not what he calls "hustling," picking him up? A. Yes; there was nothing to prevent the prisoner going out - he offered to let him go if he would give up 1l.; the prisoner refused.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-170

1183. JAMES WYATT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 plane, value 8s., the goods of William Bentley , and 2 planes, value 4s. , the goods of Edward Davis .

EDWARD DAVIS. I am a carpenter , and lost some tools on the 19th of May, from a building in New Chapel-road, Bethnal-green - I left them safe over-night, and missed them between six and seven o'clock next morning; the door was fastened with a latch inside, but not locked; other things were stolen and this plane was among them - I have known the prisoner two years.

GEORGE CARTER . As I was going to work, about a quarter before o'clock seven in the morning. I met the prisoner with some tools over his right shoulder; It was not twenty yards from the building; he looked hard at me, but did not offer to sell the tools; he said he had given 7s. 6d. for them - I said Davis had lost some tools; the prisoner said a man saw him buy them - I ran for Davis as fast as I could, and be fetched a constable, who took him.

JAMES ESSEX . I am a constable, and took the prisoner with the tools.

WILLIAM BENTLEY . These are my tools - I left them at the same building.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tools at Mile-end-turnpike. If I had stolen them I should not have come so near the building.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-171

1184. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Mary Elliot .

CHARLES LEWES . I am a French polisher. On the 9th of April, I was in Goodge-street - Mrs. Elliot lives in Spitalfields-market - I saw the prisoner go into a shop in Goodge-street - I went over, and a person went for an officer, who took her with these shoes; at first she said she lived in Compton-street, and then in Monmouth-street.

MARY ELLIOTT. I live in Fitzroy-market . On the 9th of April the officer brought a pair of shoes, which were mine - I have seen the prisoner at my shop, but not that day, to my knowledge.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270531-172

1185. JAMES BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 24 yards printed cotton, value 30s. , the goods of Ericus Robinson , Thomas Robinson and William Wilkinson .

ERICUS ROBINSON. I am a packer , and live in Hill-street, Finsbury . I am in partnership with Thomas Robinson and William Wilkinson; the prisoner was our porter , About a week before the 16th of May I discovered a piece of printed cotton in a box by the corn-bin, covered over with rubbish - I marked it, and left it there; it had been removed from a part of the same room - I kept watch for about a week; and on the 16th of May I saw the prisoner coming in a direction for that room, with a sack on his arm; he went into the cart-lodge; I waited and did not see him come out; before that, he had asked me if he should go next morning with the cart down to the wharf; I said Yes; I kept watch that night, and when the men were gone I went into the cart-shed, and found this print covered with a sack - I left there, and told Garton and Armstrong to be there early in the morning- at five o'clock the prisoner came; I was up, and saw him come in; he went into the stable, and waited about a minute, then went into the cart-house, and brought out the harness, which he put on the horses; he went in again; I saw the straw move; he came out and brought his cart to the gate; he then fetched out the tilt and went out; I went into the shed and missed the print - I ran out, and gave a signal to the officer, who stopped the cart, and found the sack in the tilt, with the print in it; it is the same as I had seen in the trunk.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was it he asked? A. When I came up, I heard him say, "I have got a tilt in my cart;" he got up and touched it - he did not throw it down; he has been nine years in our employ; he had not quarelled with the other men. I believe many of my men are Catholics - I know nothing of the prisoner having conformed to the Established Church.

THOMAS GARTON . I was employed to watch - I saw the prisoner drive the cart out; Mr. Robinson took off his hat as a signal - I stopped the cart, and said to the prisoner."What have you got there?" he got up, and began knocking the tilt about; I got up, and found this print in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not going to throw it out? A. No.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I was with Garton, and confirm his account.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am an innocent man; some men in the factory unknown to me have done it.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-173

1186. WILLIAM GIBBS and WILLIAM GROVES were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Smith , from his person .

JOHN SMITH. I live at Brighton. On the 18th of May I was in Little Newport-street , and felt a slight motion, and saw Gibbs pass on my right side, and Groves on the other - I seized Groves, and an officer close by seized Gibbs, and took my handkerchief from him.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner following Mr. Smith along Newport-street - Gibbs took the handkerchief from his pocket - I took him, and took it from him - Groves was close to him at the time - I had seen them in company before; they followed him twenty or thirty yards; they were close together, and walking together - Groves took off his hat, and two handkerchiefs were in it.

GROVES' Defence. I was not in his company, and know nothing of him - I was rather in liquor, and reading a bill, when I was taken; the two handkerchiefs I had got from Ashford's, in the Strand, where they had been pawned, as I was in distress.

GIBBS' Defence. The officer took the handkerchief off the rails; it was not on me.

GIBBS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

GROVES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-174

1187. DENNIS HAGAN and JAMES LOVELL were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Robert Jollie from his person .

ROBERT JOLLIE. I live at Edinburgh. On the 23d of May, between four and five o'clock, I was in the Strand ; a gentleman came up, said I had lost my handkerchief, and pointed out the prisoners who were twenty or thirty yards from me, walking away - I seized one of them, and he the other - Sewell had got my handkerchief tied round his neck, though I had used it but a few minutes before.

WILLIAM GROMET . I was in the Strand, and saw the prisoners walking together, following Mr. Jollie - Lovell took up his coat-tail, and pulled the handkerchief out a little way; he then pulled again, and got it out completely; he crossed over, and Hagan went under the gateway of Somerset-house; they crossed and joined again - I went and told Mr. Jollie; we went and took them at the corner of Holywell-street; we found the handkerchief round Lovell's neck; his own, which appeared to have been round his neck, was in his pocket; they were close together when he took it.

WILLIAM RAVENS . I belong to Hatton-garden Office- I took the prisoners with the handkerchief.

HAGAN's Defence. I never saw my fellow prisoner before.

HAGAN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LOVELL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-175

1188. GEORGE DESUMERY BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , 2 gowns, value 8s.; 3 gown-bodies, value 3s.; 3 petticoats, value 3s.; 12 towels, value 2s.; 2 waistcoats, value 1s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 3d.; 2 caps, value 6d., and 11/2 yard of lace, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Pearse .

ELIZABETH COX . I live in Bell-street, Mary-le-bone . I had the care of this property for Henry Pearse, who lodged next door to me. On the 14th of May, at half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner on the landing-place of my room - the property had been in a bundle in my box, but he had got it in a handkerchief which was only tied at two corners - he asked me if Mrs. Williams lodged there; I said No; he came downstairs - I went up and found my door open and the bundle gone - I ran down, clapped him on the shoulder, and said,"I want to speak to you;" he said, "Me!" I said, "Yes; walk up;" he went up-stairs before me - I opened Wallis' room door, told him to go in, and I ran down to look for a man, and he got away - he was taken in about an hour - he was quite a stranger, and had no right in the house - I had gone out at eight o'clock in the morning, and left my door locked - it was not broken open.

ANN WALLIS . Cox called me. I went into the room with the prisoner - he put down the bundle, took off the handkerchief, and put it into his pocket - he then ran downstairs and threw six picklock-keys into a tub of water which stood at the door - I tried to stop him - he knocked me down nine steps, and much hurt me - an alarm was raised.

JOHN PINDAR . I was going along Harrow-road, and heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and several people after him; I caught him, and he threw down two keys into the drain; and as I picked them up, he tripped me up, and got away - I ran and took him again, and found a picklock-key on him, which opens the room-door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work thirteen weeks - a young man, who promised me a job, took me to this house, and gave me this bundle and the keys; he said they were for Mrs. Williams. GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-176

1189. WILLIAM CRISP was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 jacket, value 10s., and 1 shawl, value 5s. , the goods of John Cocksholt .

JOHN COCKSHOLT. I am a lighterman , and live in Brunswick-street, Blackwall . On the 28th of May, about two o'clock, these things were in the front kitchen; we were at dinner in the back kitchen; my little girl came and said there was a man there - I ran out - he had got up the area-steps and locked the gate after him - I went up, and a boy described a man to me as having a hairy cap and a basket; I caught sight of him, and ran, but lost him; I returned home; went out again in a few minutes, and saw the prisoner; from the boy's description I made a grasp at him; he threw this basket at me, and broke from me, but was stopped immediately; my jacket and shawl were in the basket, under some shavings.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-177

1190. THOMAS MINIFIE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 2 books, value 9s. , the goods of Thomas Cosby Howell .

WILLIAM GARNER . I am an upholsterer, and live in High Holborn. On the 22d of May the prisoner (whom I knew before) brought me these two books to take care of, and said they were lent to him by a gentleman at whose house he was at work.

THOMAS COSBY HOWELL. I am a bookseller , and live in High Holborn . The prisoner had painted the front of my house about a week before this - Garner showed me these books, which are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Do you recollect his asking you to lend them to him? A. Never; nothing has been done to alter them.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to read, and then return them.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to mercy .

Confined Nine Days

Reference Number: t18270531-178

1191. HENRY MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 2 books, value 6s., the goods of William Beharrell , and 3 books, value 11s. , the goods of John West .

JOHN HARDING . I am a carpenter, and was employed, on the 28th of April, at the funeral of Dr. Hamilton, at the City-road chapel - I saw the prisoner there - he was accused of stealing some prayer and hymn-books; I was an officer last year, and he was given into my charge; I saw him take these books out of his pocket.

DAVID McCRAY . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took possession of the prisoner; he took six books out of his pocket, also a turn-screw and a pebble-stone, which would assist as a wedge to open a drawers or closets.

JOHN WEST. I attend this chapel, and keep my books locked in a drawer under the seat - these two hymn-books and a prayer-book are mine; I had locked them up on the Sunday before.

WILLIAM BEHARRELL . I attend this chapel, and keep my books in a cupboard in my pew - I left them safe on the 22d of April, and on the 29th missed three - these are them.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18270531-179

1192. THOMAS HAYES was indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT LEDLIE CRITCHER . I am a poulterer , and live at Staines. The prisoner was employed by me to carry out goods to sell, and was daily to bring me what money he received - he was about three months with me - I took him in great distress - Mr. Furnival is a customer of mine.

MARY FLOYAD . I am servant to Mr. Furnival, who lives at Egham. One day in April I bought some poultry of the prisoner, for which I paid him 5s. 6d. - I am sure there was one sixpence in the money - I cannot say on which day it was.

GEORGE LAYTON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner.

MR. CRITCHER. He never accounted to me for this 5s. 6d. - he said he had given Mr. Furnival trust for 6s.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-180

1193. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , 1 shawl, value 7s. , the goods of Francis Cotton .

CHARLES PADDON . I am a servant to Francis Cotton, a pawnbroker , who lives in Shoreditch . On the 27th of April I was informed a shawl was stolen from the door - I went out, and overtook the prisoner, with it secreted in a bonnet, which she had in her hand.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I am an officer, and took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 64.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-181

1194. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 7lbs. of lead, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of the Honourable Charles Arbuthnot , William Dakers Adams , Esq. and Henry Dawkins , Esq.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY. I am an officer, employed by Mr. Nash, at Buckingham-house . On the 23d of May I saw the prisoner coming out of Spring-garden gate very bulky - I watched him into the house of a dealer in marine-stores, in King-street, Seven-dials - he offered this piece of lead for sale; the man said he did not buy it - I went and asked the prisoner where he got it; he said, "From Buckingham-house," he fell on his knees, and swore by the Virgin Mary it was the first time, and if I would let him go, he would never do the like again.

WILLIAM ROLES . I am clerk of the works at Buckingham-house. The prisoner was employed there. On the 23d of May there was lead of this description about there.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am gaoler at Marlborough-street. The signature to this examination is Sir George Farrant's writing, (read) "The prisoner Saunders says, 'I took this lead from some rubbish at Buckingham-palace."'

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-182

1195. ABRAHAM REUBEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 sovereign, and 1 purse, value 1d. , the property of Edward Fitzgerald .

DIANA FITZGERALD . I am the wife of Edward Fitzgerald - we live opposite the Jews' chapel, Bethnal-green. On the 19th of May, in the evening, I was out shoping in Whitechapel - I had my purse, containing a sovereign and a half-crown in my basket - I stood some time looking at a new linen-draper's shop in Whitechapel - I did not see the prisoner do any thing - I went on further and turned back to buy some cotton at the shop - I felt for my money, and it was gone - I seemed confused, and said I had lost my money and purse - while I was talking to the shopman, the master told me to go to the officer, and saw Keys, who had got it.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty in Whitechapel, and saw the prisoner with another person go up to the mob at the new linen-draper's shop, at the corner of Essex-street; I saw them both very active at the baskets and reticules - they went close up to the prosecutrix - the prisoner was nearest, his companion closed behind him, and all in a moment he turned back and bolted up Essex-street - I followed, collared him, and said, "I know you have got it, tip it up;" he said, "I have done nothing - I picked it up" - I said, "Give it me;" and he gave me this purse; Fowler came up - I gave him to him- I went to the shop and gave notice that I had found a purse - the prosecutrix came that evening, and claimed it.

JAMES FOWLER . I was with Keys, and saw the whole- his account is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-183

1196. DAVID ROCHE and ELIZABETH MITCHELL were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 3 sheets, value 7s. 6d; 2 pillows, value 5s., and 2 pillow-cases, value 1s., the goods of James Ayres , in a lodging room .

ROCHE pleaded GUILTY . Aged 69.

Transported for Seven Years .

ANN AYRES . I am the wife of James Ayres - we live

in Upper Chapman-street - we let the prisoner a back garret furnished, at 10s. a week, on the 10th of May - we missed all these things from their room, except one sheet, which was taken from another room - they went away in one week without paying any rent - there was no key to their door - they were taken the same day.

JAMES DOWGATE . I am an officer. Roche was given into my custody at Deptford - I found Mitchell at the Thames Police - I went with them to Law, a pawnbroker, and found one sheet.

GEORGE GILES . I am a shopman to Mr. Law. I have a sheet pawned by Mitchell on the 12th of May.

JAMES DOGGETT . I am an officer. I received a pillow-case and two sheets from a pawnbroker named Rowe in Wentworth-street, and a pillow from one Williams.

MITCHELL's Defence. I am a pauper, and very poor.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-184

1197. JOHN STOCKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Driver , from his person .

JOHN DRIVER. I am servant to Mr. Abdy, of Seymour-street. On the 28th of April, about a quarter to nine o'clock at night, I was looking into a pork-shop, in Oxford-street - the prisoner came up, and took my handkerchief out of my pocket - I turned round, took hold of him, found it under his jacket, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Did you see him take it? A. No; there were two or three others, who appeared of his party - he at first said he had not got it - another boy was taken, but not detained; I do not remember his friends talking to me about it - the prisoner's father came to me on Sunday, and said his son did not take it - I told him I wished to get the money and not attend, for fear I should lose my situation; the Magistrate asked if I had received 10s. for my handkerchief; I told him I had; I value it at 4s.; the man said he would give me 1l. or 2l. - I said I wanted nothing.

JOHN LACY . I am a constable, and took him in charge at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you say to him? A. I said, "You have got your father into a nice disgrace, by taking this handkerchief;" he said, "I did not take it, it was a boy named Doyle, who put it into my bosom, in Oxford-street" - in a short time the prisoner's brother came to the watch-house; I asked if his brother knew Doyle - he said he did - I and the brother went to Oxford-street, and found that boy - he said the same when he saw him - the prisoner's father is an industrious man - I know nothing of the prisoner.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270531-185

1198. MARY DEVLING was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 curtain, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 5 knives, value 1s.; 6 forks, value 1s.; 2 wine glasses, value 2s.; 1 cup and saueer, value 2d.; 2 towels, value 2d.; 2 caps, value 1s.; 1 frock, value 2s., and 1 frock-body, value 1s. , the goods of Read Parson , her master.

ELIZABETH PARSON . I am the wife of Read Parson, a solicitor - we live in Hanway-street - the prisoner came into my service in April - she was leaving me - I missed two silver forks, and spoke to her - she denied knowing any thing about them - I had given her warning, because she broke my child's arm - when she was leaving I asked to see her box - she said it was gone, and was at another place - I said I would go and see it - she took me to a place near the Middlesex Hospital; it was not there - I insisted on seeing it - she then took me to a most horrible court, and wished me to stay down-stairs while she went up - I staid some time; she did not come, and I had resolution enough to go up-stairs; I saw her take something from a box; it was dark, and an old woman was holding a candle to her - when I went up the candle was put out, and she ran away with a bundle, but I could not see what it was - I would wait till the candle was relighted, and presently she returned - I again charged her with having the things - she said she could not bear to be searched, and then ran out of the house; I pursued, but could not find her - I then spoke to a watchman; we returned to the house in a short time, and just as we entered the court we met her, and took her into the house - we found nothing there - I asked if she had any other room; she said No, but a woman said, "She has got a child at nurse, two or three doors off;" we went there and inquired, but the man of the house denied having any bundle - we however found one under the table, containing some of my property- I think that is the bundle she ran out with; I had a very good character with her.

ROBERT LLOYD . The prisoner had a child at my house in Dudley-court, for about fourteen months. Mrs. Parson and the watchman came and took up this bundle; I cannot tell who it belonged to - I know the prisoner had brought it into my place not a quarter of an hour before.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol. I went with the watchman and prosecutrix into Dudley-court, and met the prisoner running from one of the houses - we found this bundle at Lloyd's; it contains the articles stated in the indictment.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-186

1199. ANN SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 1 watch, value 1l., the goods of Robert Cleaver , from his person .

FRANCIS GOODSON . I am an officer. On the 15th of May, between seven and eight o'clock, I was in Osnaburgh-street, Regent's-park; I saw the prisoner walking with the prosecutor, who appeared very drunk; her left arm was under his right, and her hand in his waistcoat pocket - I passed her a short space, and saw her, with her right hand, draw a watch from his pocket - I did not take her directly, thinking she might take something else; but in a minute the prosecutor stopped and said, "I have lost my watch, where is it?" she said, "I know nothing about it;" he then came to us, and said he had lost his watch; I said, "Yes, I know who has got it;" we took her, and found it under her arm.

WILLIAM ECKETT . I was with Goodson; his statement is correct - the prosecutor was in liquor; I found the watch under her arm; she said she was a respectable

tradesman's wife, and on the way to the office offered me any thing to let her go - I found nothing else on her but two bunches of keys; she appeared to have been drinking, but knew what she was about.

ROBERT CLEAVER . I am a gentleman's coachman. On the 15th of May I had leave to go out to look for my wife, who had run away - I went to Pentonville and had two glasses of gin and water; being agitated it took effect on me - I remember some woman coming to lead me a long; she wanted me to go into the Park with her; I would not- I found myself giddy, sat down on the stones, and missed my watch; I complained to the officer, who said she had got it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no recollection of seeing the watch at all.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-187

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1200. JAMES NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 leather-case, value 10s.; 2 bottles of blacking, value 5s., and 3 brushes, value 4s. , the goods of Francis Russell , Esq., commonly called the Marquis of Tavistock .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-188

1201. JOHN SHERWOOD , CHARLES MASON , and ROBERT JUDD were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Robert Staig , from his person .

ROBERT STAIG . On the 23d of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I was walking with two gentlemen in Piccadilly; an officer tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I had lost my handkerchief; I felt, and it was gone - he then showed it me. I have no mark on it, but I have every reason to believe it is mine; it is the same pattern.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Were there many people there? A. Yes, a considerable crowd and many boys about - the mail coaches were going off. Judd appears to have had a good character.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a painter. I was in Piccadilly, and saw the prosecutor there - Judd took the handkerchief from his pocket; there was a great crowd, and the other two prisoners were close behind covering Judd - I had seen them together five or six minutes; I saw Judd throw the handkerchief on the ground; we showed it to Mr. Staig.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far were you from them? A. About a yard behind them; they stood one behind the other.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I am a constable. I was in Piccadilly, and saw the three prisoners talking together just before they went after Mr. Staig; I saw Judd take this handkerchief out of his pocket - Roberts secured Judd and Mason, and I took Sherwood; I took the handkerchief from the ground.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there many people between you and the prisoners? A. No; they were all three abreast behind the gentleman; I cannot tell whether they were covering Judd.

SHERWOOD's Defence. I was behind the other prisoners with my hands in my pockets.

Judd received a most excellent character.

JUDD - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

SHERWOOD - NOT GUILTY .

MASON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-189

1202. WILLIAM PAUL and EDWARD EADES were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 coral necklace, value 8s., the goods of Thomas Hardman , from the person of Sarah Hardman .

SARAH HARDMAN. I am the wife of Thomas Hardman. On the 17th of May I was going down Great Sutton-street , with my daughter Sarah; the prisoners crossed the road, and Paul took the necklace from my daughter's neck - I took hold of Eades, as I thought he had taken it, but my child said he had not taken it - I then saw it in Paul's hand - I seized him; he struck me and my child, and ran away - two gentlemen stopped Eades, who said he saw Paul's hands round the child's neck.

GEORGE BELDAM . I am eleven years old, and go to St. Luke's school. I saw the prisoners cross the road; Paul took the beads off the child's neck - Mrs. Hardham took hold of Eades; I saw Paul taken, and he dinged the beads to Eades.

JAMES CLIFFORD . I am an officer. Paul was given into my charge.

JAMES GLIBBERY . I apprehended Eades - he denied the charge, but acknowledged being there.

PAUL's Defence. I know nothing about it.

PAUL - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, having a good character .

Confined Two Months .

EADES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-190

1203. GEORGE SMITH , GEORGE MASON , and HENRY STEVENS , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s., the goods of Jonathan Gundry ; 1 dish, value 11s., and 1 wine-glass, value 1s., the goods of James Pett ; 1 curtain-lining, value 1s. 6d., and 1 shawl, value 3s. , the goods of Michael Dailey .

JONATHAN GUNDRY. I am a shoemaker , and live at Hampstead . This pair of shoes is mine - I did not miss them till the officer produced produced them on Wednesday - I had seen them on Monday.

ELIZABETH PETT. I am the daughter of James Pett. who keeps a china-shop , at Hampstead. This dish and wine-glass were in the window on Monday evening, the 21st of May - the three prisoners came in about nine o'clock that evening, and asked for some marbles; I said we did not sell them; they then asked for some mugs, but had not enough to pay for them; they were in the shop a quarter of an hour, and left together; I then missed the glass - they were at the shop two or three evenings before.

WILLIAM WATERS . I am a watchman of Camden-town. On Tuesday, the 22d of May, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I was in a stable near the canal - I found Smith there, with a shawl round his shoulders, and the other two prisoners were laying down, asleep. I gave them to the patrol, and in the stable I found a bundle, containing all these things; they said they did not belong to them.

MICHAEL DAILEY. I am a dyer . This shawl and curtain were taken from my shop.

CHARLES DAWSON. I am a patrol, and assisted Waters in stopping the prisoners, who were going out of the stable - no other boys were there.

MASON's Defence. The bundle was not ours - it belonged to some other boys.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 9.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 10.

STEVENS - GUILTY . Aged 9.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-191

1204. GEORGE GRAYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 pair of spectacles, value 5s. , the goods of Vincent Cutmore .

VINCENT CUTMORE. I keep an eating-house . On the 16th of April the prisoner came in; I left my spectacles on the newspaper, while I cut him some pudding; he went out, and I missed them - nobody else had been there.

JOHN TEMPLE . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this pair of spectacles with me on the 16th of April.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner; he denied the charge, and said he had no duplicate. I searched him, and found this duplicate on him.

GUILTY. Aged 78.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined Nine Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-192

1205. JOHN HURST was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 9 lbs. of cheese, value 6s. , the goods of Caleb Lewis .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-193

1206. CATHERINE McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 2lbs. 10ozs. of bacon, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of Henry Harben and Henry Harben , the younger.

HENRY WHITE . I live with Henry Harben and Henry Harben, the younger, of High-street, St. Giles . On the 9th of April, about half-past three o'clock, a woman told me a person had taken this bacon; I ran out, and took the prisoner in Middle-row, with it under her arm.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer, and received her in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman let it fall - I took it up to give her - she nodded her head at me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Nine Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-194

1207. ALEXANDER YOUNGER was indicted for embezzlement . (See page 450.)

DANIEL CALLARD . I am a baker - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 6th of April I sent him to Mrs. Bayley's, for a bill, but he brought me no money back; his duty was to pay me money directly he received it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you not sworn before that he brought you 15s. from her? A. That was on the 19th of March; I have a book in which I enter all I receive; I received none from him that day on her account. I have not the book here, but a copy of it.

COURT. Q. Then, except from the book, you do not know that he did not bring you 10s. from her that day? A. My book tells all I receive. I have a letter which I received from him on the 16th of April.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was not that letter delivered to you on condition that you should receive a bill of exchange for the amount? A. No - my wife had seen his sister; I received it on no condition; he said he was very sorry, and gave me a list of sums he had received from different people, amounting to 12l. or 14l.; he left me on the 7th of April, without notice; the note is his hand-writing; If he had staid till Saturday 23s. would be due to him; sometimes when he has paid money on Saturday I have said, "Take your 23s." (note read.)

SIR, - It is with the deepest regret I have to acknowledge my improper conduct, but I entreat you not to make public my disgrace, as in a few days I will make every thing good; there is a sum deficient, which I will forward you. I have enclosed the account of my day's bread. Circumstances would have enabled me in a few days to make all deficiences correct if I had continued till then, &c.

ALEX. YOUNGER .

MARY ANN BAILEY . I deal with Callard; I paid the prisoner, on the 6th of April, four half-crowns for his master, about twelve o'clock; he wrote it off this bill.

Cross-examined. Q. How can you say it was half-crowns? A. I had changed a sovereign, and received all half-crowns.

JOHN HARPER . I received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave my master an account of the day's bread; I trusted several customers, by whom I lost.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-195

1208. JOHN MARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 watch, value 20s.; 2 rings, value 5s.; 1 chain, value 2s., and 1 key, value 1d., the goods of Thomas Allen , from his person .

THOMAS ALLEN. On the 14th of April, at a quarter to five o'clock, I was passing Sparrow-corner, Tower-hill , and had my hand on my watch; the prisoner and another man rushed against me - the prisoner said, "Well, let us pass;" I was just going to say, "You don't seem to want to pass, or let me pass;" I did not feel my watch go, but they separated, and the prisoner turned to the left so quick I suspected something, and missed my watch; he jumped over some clothes, which laid in the street, and fell, and the watch fell on the clothes; he was secured in a few minutes, and Row gave me the watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was in Rosemary-lane? A. Yes. The prisoner's face was very familiar to me; several persons were there - nobody but them were near enough to me to take it.

COURT. Q. How near to where your watch was taken did the prisoner fall? A. About three yards.

HANNAH ROW . I set in Rosemary-lane, with things in the ground. Several persons run, and jumped over my things; this watch fell on the things from somebody.

Cross-examined. Q. How many people might ran over your things? A. I dare say one hundred - who dropped it I cannot say.

GEORGE BRADFORD . I heard a cry of Stop thief! run after the prisoner, and took him about fifty yards off; some people brought him out of a yard - the prosecutor came up, and said that was the man; he endeavoured to bite him. I kept him till an officer came.

JAMES ROBERTS. I am an officer, and received him in charge. Row gave me the watch.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a watch-house-keeper, and received him at the watch-house.

THOMAS ALLEN . Not a soul ran over the clothes but himself; I was next to him - other people ran over them after he got up, and ran away - I was going to seize him, when he fell, but somebody pushed me; I got up, and pursued.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along, heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran with the people; I did not fall down.

JOHN CASTLES . I am employed to sell-clothes at Sparrow-corner. I have known the prisoner a long time. I was standing there when this happened; there was a rush, and the prosecutor rushed among them; two of them fell down by Row's things; a man struck another man; the prosecutor came up, and said, "There is the man who took my watch;" I looked into the crowd, and did not see the prisoner - I should have known him if I had.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-196

1209. FRANCIS HILLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of James Trundell , from his person .

JAMES TRUNDELL. On the 29th of May, about one o'clock, I was in St. James'-park , seeing at the gums fired; the officer came, and produced my handkerchief - it was safe that morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD CUFF . I saw the prisoner and another take this handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket; the prisoner put it into his bosom - I took him in half a minute, and he dropped it from his bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. I stood behind the gentleman - a boy was before me; he threw the handkerchief against me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-197

1210. JOHN WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 3 books, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Branch .

JOHN BRANCH. I am a bookseller , and live in Kingsland-road . On the 10th of May I was at a public-house opposite my shop - Mrs. Mason, my lodger, alarmed me; I came out, and and met the prisoner running from my house, with the books, which had been on a shelf at the window.

THOMAS MASON . I lodge with Branch. On the 10th of May I went home to tea, and saw the prisoner standing at the window; my wife got up soon after, and ran out; I ran out, and pursued the prisoner; I saw him drop the books when he was taken.

MARY ANN MASON . I saw the prisoner take the books from the window.

GEORGE SMITH . I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-198

1211. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 20 yards of printed cotton, value 15s. , the goods of Edward Mills .

AMBROSE BONNER . I am servant to Edward Mills, a linen-draper , of Parliament-street . On the 29th of May I was informed a woman had taken some print; I went out, and saw the prisoner drop it; I secured her - it hung over a bar at the door; she said she did it from distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was quite distressed, and picked it up at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-199

1212. JOHN SMITH and WILLIAM WITH were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 24lbs. of brass, value 36s. , the goods of George Clark Cheap .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-200

1213. JOHN STUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 spade, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Edward Gibbs ; and 1 iron-pot, value 1s. , the goods Samuel Brander .

SAMUEL BRANDER. I am a horse-hair weaver , and live in Church-row, St. Luke's. On the 27th of May, about eight o'clock in the morning, I lost this pot.

SARAH GIBBS . I am the wife of Edward Gibbs - we live in Herbert-row. I lost this spade from the cupboard.

SAMUEL CARELESS . I live next door to Brander. On the 27th of May, about seven o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise in my passage, and saw the prisoner coming out with this spade; he returned, and went into Brander's house, and brought out a pot; I went, and overtook him in the City-road.

JAMES BUNN . I was called, and pursued the prisoner, and found him with this property.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am an officer, and took him in charge - he said he did it through distress. I went to his lodging. and certainly there was every appearance of distress; three children laid on the boards; they are now in the work-house.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Nine Days .

Reference Number: t18270531-201

1214. MARY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 7 shirts, value 30s., and 7 handkerchiefs, value 7s., the goods of William Withers , and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of Jane Harris .

WILLIAM WITHERS. I live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 21st of May, about two o'clock, I lost seven sheets and seven handkerchiefs from my box, which was at the top of the house. I know nothing of the prisoner - she was quite a stranger.

JANE HARRIS . I live at this house. I saw this woman on the stairs with a bundle under her arm - she was a stranger, but thinking she might have been to mistress on business, I did not speak to her. - I described her person, and in about an hour mistress saw her pass the house, and called me - I recognized her; she still had the bundle, and was secured - this property was in it.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD , I am an officer, and took her with the property. Some of the handkerchiefs were under her stays; the shirts and stockings were in the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him a man gave them to

me - they brought a man to the watch-house but he was not the man.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . No man was brought there.

GUILTY . Aged 71.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270531-202

1215. JOSEPH JASPER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 4 gallons of brandy, value 30s., and 1 cask, value 5s. , the goods of John Anderson .

JOHN ANDERSON. I am in partnership with Mr. Leader.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-203

1216. CHARLES HART was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 38 pantiles, value 3s. , the goods of James Knightly .

JAMES KNIGHTLY. I live at Enfield-wash , and am a bricklayer . On the 15th of April, at half-past 4 o'clock in the morning, the officer called me up and I missed these pantiles from my yard. Next morning I went with the officers to the prisoner's premises, where we saw some which, I have every reason to believe were mine.

RICHARD WALTER . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 15th of April, at four o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Enfield-highway, with a sack on his back, with fourteen pantiles in it - I asked where he got them - he said out of a brook. I said they were quite dry - he then said he bought them of one Scagg. I asked where - he said he did not know - he had never seen him before. I went into the next premises to his, and found twenty-four more.

JAMES SHEPHERD . I was with Walter, and heard the prisoner say he bought them of Scagg; before them of said he got them from a brook.

JOHN WILSON . I was with the witnesses - their account is correct - he told the Magistrate he bought them of Higgins, but told us he bought them of Scagg.

Prisoner's Defence. I own to what was on my back. On Saturday night I met a man in a cart who said he had fourteen pantiles for me - I told him to put them down by the side of the brook, which he did, as I had my child with me. I forgot to fetch them until early next morning. Mr. Swain, my neighbour, had his tiles blown off, and I had the twenty-four to cover over his privy. I told the men' they were there - they had been there for two months before.

RICHARD WALTER . He did not say this when he was taken - there is one Huggins lives near him, but not Higgins; he said afterwards, that he had them from Higgins of Cheshunt; I asked if he meant Huggins - he said "No;" - he afterwards said he did not know whether his name was, Huggins or Scagg.

JAMES SHEPHERD . The twenty-four tiles appeared to be the same sort as the fourteen.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-204

1217. RICHARD GADD and FRANCIS HAYES were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 boy's dress, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Riley .

RICHARD RILEY. I live in Hackney-road , and am a salesman - this suit of clothes hung outside my window. On the 18th of April I saw it safe at half-past eight o'clock, when I went out - I returned between ten and eleven, and missed it - also a coat. I had seen Gadd pass the shop two or three times, but do not recollect Hayes.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. I found this dress in Gadd's house about twelve o'clock - he lives with his father and mother. I had been out that morning and saw the two prisoners going to and fro, past Riley's shop. I saw Hayes pull the dress down - Gadd followed him immediately; they went down a turning. I went down another turning to meet them, but could not get that way, About eleven o'clock, I was in Shoreditch, and met the two prisoners in company and took them. I then went to Hayes' house and found the property rolled up in the corner of the stairs.

EDWARD MOODY . I lodge with Gadd's mother. On the day in question his father and mother were out. The officer came - he knocked at my door, which I opened - it threw a light on the landing-place, and he found the clothes in the corner.

GADD's Defence. I never saw the clothes.

GADD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

HAYES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-205

1218. CHARLES LAMBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 shawl, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Lodge and Henry Lowman .

GEORGE HAWKER . I am shopman to Richard Lodge and Henry Lowman, linen-drapers , of Regent-street. On the 27th of May Still came in and gave information. I pursued, and overtook the prisoner near Maddox-street, and asked if he had taken a shawl - he said not. I took him back - he fell down and begged pardon. I found this shawl under his apron.

HENRY STILL . I am a soldier. I saw the prisoner take the shawl from the shop door, he poked it down with his stick.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-206

1219. BARNEY GORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 1 snuff-box, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Sweet , from his person .

JOHN SWEET. I am a harness-dealer and live in Islington. On the 27th of April, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was in the City-road - the prisoner came and held back my right hand, another held my left hand, while a third took from my inside coat pockets, my snuff-box, pocket-book, and handkerchiefs; as soon as the prisoner let go of my arm I seized him, and held him till the watchman came up. I have not found my property - I was perfectly sober.

CHARLES CHATTEL . I am a watchman of Islington. I saw the prisoner and prosecutor tussling - the prosecutor gave him in charge. I saw nobody else near - the prisoner said, as we went to the watch-house."It was not me who robbed him; but I know who it was."

THOMAS GRAFTON . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he said he did not take the property, but he knew who did.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in Spitalfields' parish - we were walking along, and he gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-207

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JUNE 4.

Fourth London Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1220. HANS OLSEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 snuff-box, value 4d., and 7 sovereigns , the property of James Thorn .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-208

1221. JOHN MAINE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 1 live pig, price 4l. , the property of John Green .

JOHN GREEN. I live in Church-street, Hackney . On 20th of April, about ten o'clock at night, I went home and missed a large white sow from my yard. I found her at Dudman's, at Limehouse.

THOMAS DUDMAN . I am a constable, and a butcher, and live at Limehouse. Two persons, named Parker and English took me, pointed this sow out to me, and I took possession of it - they gave charge of the prisoner at the same time; Parker said, in his presence, that he had seen him driving the sow a long way, and suspected it to be stolen - when they cried Stop thief! he ran, but was pursued, and secured by four or five people, one of whom he knocked down - I asked how he got it; he said a person in the road asked him to mind it while he went to speak to his master; the witnesses are not here.

ROBERT ENOR . On the 20th of April, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner and another driving a sow down Hackney-wick; I did not speak to them; I am sure the prisoner is one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You cannot say this was the sow? A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-209

1222. THOMAS WIGGINTON and WILLIAM BRADBURY were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Robert Gilles , from his person .

ROBERT GILLES. On the 29th of April I was passing up Holborn , and near Gray's-inn coffee-house I missed my handkerchief, which was safe ten minutes before; I turned round, and saw it on the ground; the prisoner were in custody.

THOMAS WHITTINGHAM . I am an officer. On the 29th of April, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw the two prisoners behind Mr. Gilles - Bradbury took the handkerchief from Mr. Gilles' pocket, and handed it to Wigginton, who threw it down three or four yards from the spot - I secured them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BRADBURY's Defence (written). I had been to Turnmill-street for my father, and was returning to No. 47, Wardour-street, where he works - a man seized me, and said I had taken a handkerchief, but I never saw it.

BRADBURY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

WIGGINTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-210

1223. THOMAS DAY , THE YOUNGER, was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 14 spoons, value 5l.; 1 tea-pot, value 10l.; 1 sugar-basin, value 8l.; 1 milk-pot, value 3l.; 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1l., and 2 seals, value 1l. , the goods of Sarah Wheeler .

SARAH WHEELER. I am a widow , and keep a public-house in Crutched-friars. On the 8th of January I delivered the articles stated in the indictment to the prisoner- they were in a box with others - he is my nephew, and was to take them to his father's in Tyson-street, Clerkenwell, as I did not think them safe on account of my lodgers. I did not tell him what was in the box.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not delivered him some spoons? A. Yes, the day before - he brought them back.

RICHARD WILD . I live with a pawnbroker in Chiswell-street, Middlesex. The prisoner pawned two table-spoons and twelve tea-spoons with me on the 22d of January, in the name of Jane Wheeler; a tea-pot, sugar-basin, and milk-pot on the 23d, and a gold watch, chain, and seak on the 24th, in the name of Sarah Wheeler - he said she was his mother.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. On the 21st of April the prisoner was delivered into my charge.

MATTHIAS PEARCE . On the 7th of April I received a letter from the prisoner's father giving information, which I communicated.

THOMAS DAY , SEN. I am the prisoner's father. I knew the box was at my house - I gave him no authority to pawn the articles - my sister asked leave to send some plate to my house - I saw the box there and concluded that it contained plate - I opened it and the hasp came off; I opened it because my son had left the house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years . (See page 409.)

Reference Number: t18270531-211

1224. JOSEPH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of John Barnes .

JOHN BARNES. I am a coachman , and live in Mount-street . My boots were taken from Gibbs' stable in that street.

THOMAS GOOK . On the 25th of April I saw the prisoner and three other boys, whom I suspected; I saw them go into a pawnbroker's shop - I went in, and took the prisoner with these boots in his hand - he said his father gave them to him to sell, and then that the others gave them to him to pawn.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met three boys in Bond-street; one of them said he would give me 1s. to pawn them.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. & Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-212

1225. CHARLES CAVANAGH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Foley .

HENRY FOLEY. I keep a cellar in Monmouth-street , On the 23d of May, between two and three o'clock, the officers brought the prisoner to me, with these shoes, which I had seen safe two hours before.

FRANCIS JOHN GATES . I was in Monmouth-street, and saw the prisoner take these shoes from the cellar-flap - I secured him with them in his hat.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-213

1226. JAMES BINFIELD and JOHN PAUL were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 9 iron scrapers, value 6s. , the goods of Stevens Norman .

ANN AYRES NORMAN . I am the wife of Stevens Norman, who is a cooper and lives in Sweeden-passage, Moor-lane, Cripplegate ; these scrapers stood in a washing-tub, near the step of the door - I saw them safe about four o'clock, and missed them in about ten minutes.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. On the 11th of May I and Tweedy were in Golden-lane, and saw Binfield with these scrapers on his shoulder; he gave them to Paul who went into a shop, and offered them for sale; we went and secured them.

JOHN TWEEDY . I was with Fordham. I saw Binfield meet Paul, and give him the scrapers, about four o'clock; I had not seen them together before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BINFIELD's Defence. A man came to me at the end of Tenter-court, and gave them to me to sell; he said I should have half of what I got.

PAUL's Defence. Binfield came and asked me to sell them for him.

BINFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

PAUL NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-214

1227. LUKE BOND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 4 planes, value 6s.; 1 plough and 7 irons, value 10s.; 1 bevil, value 11s.; 1 guage, value 6d.; 1 spokeshave, value 1s.; 1 brace and bits, value 9s.; 3 saws. value 12s.; 2 gouges, value 10d.; 1 chisel, value 6d.; 3 brad-awls, value 3d.; 1 file, value 2d., and 2 waistcoats, value 1s. , the goods of John Stanley .

JOHN STANLEY. I am a carpenter . On the 11th of April I lost these tools from a shop in Northampton-row, Holloway - I locked up the shop, and a desk which was in it, about seven o'clock; I was called up next morning. about half-past five, by Taylor, and found the prisoner at the watch-house with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 11th I stopped the prisoner about two miles and a quarter from Northampton-row, with these tools in a basket; he said he was going to work at Saffron-hill, for one Colson - I said I knew him, and he had had no work for two years - I took him to the watch-house, and found Colson, who said he was not to work for him.

JOHN WILES . I am an officer, and received him in charge. GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-215

1228. THOMAS WARD LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 watch, value 50s.; 1 seal, value 6s.; 1 ring, value 4s.; 1 key, value 6d., and 1 glass, value 1s., the goods of William Latham , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES HENTON . I am servant at the George Inn at Acton - it is kept by Mr. Latham. On the 14th of April the prisoner was in our parlour, and when he was gone a glass was missing - I went out and found him about one hundred yards off, with the glass on his person- I took it from him, and let him go; but in about two hours we missed the watch - I went in pursuit again, overtook the prisoner, and found it on him; he had only got about a mile, but he is lame, I told him it was master's - he said nothing - I took him back; some other things were found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you known him before? A. No; I had made no observation as to the state of his mind.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable, and produce this watch - I think him deranged - he behaved very strange.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM LODGE . The prisoner was brought to me; I searched him; he then said, "Well, now you have done with me, I shall go" - I said "No, I shall detain you" - he said, "If you do, I will punish you;" this was on Saturday; on Sunday I had a good deal of conversation with him, and thought him very strange; he talked of indicting me, and then said I was so very kind he should send me a fine salmon - I thought he was playing with me at first.

Cross-examined. Q. If you had not had that suspicion, would you have thought him insane? A. Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS called -

JOHN OVER . I have known the prisoner six or seven years, and am fully satisfied he is insane - I live with Mr. Campbell, a surgeon - I have seen several letters which he has written, and recommended to his friends to have him taken care of - I have no doubt of his insanity.

NOT GUILTY, being insane .

Reference Number: t18270531-216

1229. WILLIAM TAPRELL and MARY ANN TAPRELL were indicted for stealing, at St. James, Westminster, 1 snuff-box, value 5l.; 1 box, value 5s.; five 10l., and ten 5l. Bank-notes, the property of Richard Parish , in the dwelling-house of Richard Freeman and James Scott .

RICHARD PARISH. I live at Long's Hotel, New Bond-street. On the 22d of April, I was at Stevens' Hotel, and lost a writing desk from there, containing 100l. in bank-notes, and a silver snuff-box; it was locked up - I saw it safe on the Saturday, when I put the notes into it, and missed it next morning; the desk has been found there; but the notes are gone; there were ten 5l. and five 10l. notes; I received them in a letter which Bergen brought me, and put them into the desk.

JOHN HOLGATE . I am a clerk in the Bank. On the 21st of April I paid a cheque, drawn by Mr. Parish, for 100l.; I gave five 10l. notes, Nos. 2528 to 2532 inclusive, dated the 10th of March, and ten 5l. notes, Nos. 2502 to 2511, dated the 4th of March.

RICHARD SAMUELS . I am a ticket-porter. On Saturday, the 21st of April, I received a letter from Mr. Young to take to Mr. Parish - I delivered it to the servant at Steven's Hotel.

WILLIAM BOOTH . I received the letter from Samuels, who said there was property in it, and I delivered it to Mr.

Parish's servant - James Scott and Richard Freeman keeps this hotel; it is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square ; the male prisoner used to come there to see the servant - I never saw the woman there.

JOHN BERGEN . I received the letter from Booth, and gave it to Mr. Parish.

REBECCA MILLS . I am a stay-maker, and live in St. Clement's church-yard. On the 18th of May I received this 10l. note from the female prisoner, who bought a pair of stays for 12s., and gave her name as Mrs. Lee, 5, Dean-street, Westminster - I gave the note to Doran to get change - I should take the prisoner to be the woman - she very much resembles her.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear she is the woman? A. Yes, she is - I noticed her going the contrary way from Westminster - I have no doubt of her; when I went into the office I said I supposed her to be the woman - I never saw two people more alike; I watched her some distance, fearing I had done wrong in taking the note of her - I wrote her name on it, while she was there.

ANN DORAN . I am assistant to Mrs. Mills; she gave me the note to get changed, on Friday evening, the 18th of May - I saw the female prisoner give it to her - I have no doubt of her - I took the note to Messrs. Todds, cheesemongers, to get changed, and when I went out I saw a man waiting for her.

Cross-examined. Q. Where there other customers at your shop? A. No.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am a constable. On Thursday last I and Goddard went with a search-warrant to No. 15, Grafton-street - I found the female prisoner there; I said I had come to search for some notes, which had been stolen from an hotel; she appeared to be going to faint. I proceeded to search, and soon found these stays; I said,"Where did you get these?" she said, "I bought them at Mills';" I said, "Do you mean in St. Clement's church-yard?" she said Yes - that she gave 12s. for them; I said,"How did you pay for them?" she said in silver. I went into the bed-room, and between the bed and mattress found this silver snuff-box; I called her into the room, and said,"You seem to be a respectable woman - I expect you will be candid, and answer me - how did you become possessed of this box?" she said, "I know nothing about it;" I said,"Now - when you went to Mrs. Mills', to buy the stays, did you not give her a 10l. note to change, and tell her to write 'Mrs. Lee, No. 5, Dean-street,' on it?" she said, "Yes, I did;" I then said, "Now, was not your husband standing at the window at the time?" she said he was - and just after this the male prisoner came up, opened the door, and went into the front room; I said, "Your name is Taprell, is it not?" he said, "It is." I took him into the back room, where his wife and Mrs. France were, and said, "I have found this snuff-box between your bed and mattress, and expect you will tell me how you came by it, and there is a 10l. note your wife passed at Mrs. Mills', and you stood outside;" he then said, "Three weeks or a month ago I went to Exeter, to my mother, and she gave me this snuff-box and 20l.; the 10l. note was part of the money;" I found some promissory notes - he said he knew nothing about them. We then went in a coach; he said on the road, "If there was a boy standing at my side at Mills' window, he was not in my company;" I said, "Then you were alone"- he said Yes.

HENRY GODDARD . I went with Clements, and saw the female prisoner - we told her our business, and I saw her make a snatch at the top drawer of a chest, and pull out this red Morrocco case - I snatched it from her, and put it into the drawer again; I afterwards returned to the room, and brought the case away.

JAMES PRICE . I am a clerk in the Bank. This 10l. note, No. 2528, was paid in on the 22d of May, from Messrs. Willis and Co.

FRANCIS ADCOCK . The male prisoner was recommended to me as a person having a little property - I applied to him, and next morning he and his wife called on me; this was on Wednesday last, the 30th of May; I proposed to them the terms on which I wanted to borrow some money; I told the man he should have 1-3d of the profits of a business in which I wanted to engage, or 5 cent., and a guarantee for the payment in three or four years; he then gave me three 10l., five 5l. notes, nineteen sovereigns, and 20s. in silver; they then went with me to Mr. Pool's, where I paid the notes.

MR. PARISH. This snuff-box is mine, I am certain - it was made for me; this case belonged to a gold snuff-box which I had in my pocket.

MRS. MILLS. This note, No. 2528, is the one the female prisoner gave me.

JOHN HOLGATE . This is one of the notes I paid on the 21st to Mr. Young.

MR. YOUNG. I received the value for this cheque; I saw the notes euclosed in a letter and given to Samuels, to take to the hotel.

WM. TAPRELL - GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

M. A. TAPRELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-217

1230. JOHN LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 20lbs. of lead, value 3s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to the Right Honourable Charles Arbuthnot , William Dakers Adams , Esq. , and Henry Dawkins , Esq.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am a special constable. On the 25th of April I was employed at Carlton Palace . The prisoner was a stone-mason working there. About a quarter to twelve o'clock I told him and some others not to take any lead, as there was a good deal about; on coming down-stairs afterwards I saw the prisoner with something resting on his arm; I asked him what it was - he said a bit of lead which he was going to take to get a drop of beer - I cautioned him not to take it out of the gate, as he would be stopped; some time after I stood near the gate, watching the men out, and while I was looking after another man, who had something, I missed sight of the prisoner; I ran out, and called out, "John, come back;" he was about thirty yards from the gate; I said, "It is of no use - you cannot pass out with property;" he said, "I hope you won't take me for this bit of lead;" I said he could not pass; he said he had no more, but I found two other pieces in his pockets.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever

given the men permission to take any of this lead away? - A. Never; they often asked me, but I never would. I put the lead which I took from him, into a closet in the lobby at Carlton House, and it was lost, but I found part of it afterwards, and it has my mark on it - it is the same. I found two pieces in a water-closet; I swear it is what I found on him - he had it in a blue handkerchief, which was lost with it - it is now in my handkerchief, which is blue also. I found nine pieces on him, but I have only found five.

WILLIAM MANDERSON . I am a stone-mason, employed at Carlton House. On the morning of the 5th of April, at six o'clock, I cautioned the workmen not to take lead - the prisoner was there; I said if they took any, and I countenanced it, I should very likely be displaced; I went before the Justice the same evening. This lead is similar to what was produced; I saw Allensby find it in a drain in the front area; he said he thought it the same.

Cross-examined. Q. He said nothing about a mark? - A. Not in my hearing.

ALEXANDER DRUMMON . I am gate-keeper at Carlton Palace. I saw the prisoner brought back, and some lead found on him - it was like this.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not many pieces of lead like this? A. Some thousands.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-218

1231. THOMAS CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 brass-cock, value 1s., and 7 lbs. of lead, value 1s., the goods of William Shine , and fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM SHINE. I live at Bethnal-green . On the 24th of May, in the morning, I lost this cock and pipe from my tub in the yard; I had seen them both safe on the 23d, at night; the prisoner could get to my premises through an empty house, and over the wall.

GEORGE ANDREWS . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner about ten minutes past four o'clock on the 24th of May, in a field, about three hundred yards from Shine's, in a hole, with this cock and pipe. I had seen him walking towards me before this.

JOHN PERCY . I am a watchman. I was with Andrews - I saw the pipe compared to the house - it fitted exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a young man going to this hole with two bundles; he came out in about two minutes; he left this behind him. I followed him a short way, then turned back, and saw them in the hole.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-219

1232. THOMAS BOSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 1 boy's dress, value 20s. , the goods of John Walter and William Taylor ; and THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN WALTER. I am a tailor , in partnership with William Taylor. On the 25th of May I lost a boy's dress from a drawer. The officer produced it - it was safe the day before.

EDWARD STORR . I am shopman to Mr. Balfour, a pawnbroker, of Chandos-street. Williams brought me this boy's dress on the 25th of May - he asked 8s. for it; it was buttoned up, as if it was just finished from a tailor's shop; I asked him whose they were - he said his mother's, Mrs. Quick's; I sent a person to his mother's - she had not sent him. I then gave him in charge.

JOSEPH PRICE . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found Williams - I asked him where he got the dress from; he refused to tell, but said he would give me every information before the Magistrate, and there he said he had it of the other boy, and told me where he lived - he said he had it from him in the Strand, and then in Heathcote-court, which is near Mr. Walter's side door; Bosworth was in Mr. Walter's employ, and he said he took it from the drawer in the shop.

WILLIAMS' Defence. I am sorry it should have happened, but I did not know it was stolen.

BOSWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-220

1260. JOHN HICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Smith , from his person .

JOHN SMITH. On the 19th of May I felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket - I turned round and seized the prisoner with it in his hand.

WILLIAM OXLEY . I am a constable. On the 19th of May a watchman and the prosecutor brought this person into the watch-house - he said he picked the handkerchief up at the prosecutor's feet, and on the Monday after he said a young man gave it to him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief laid at my feet.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-221

1234. ELIZABETH CHRISTMASS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 3 sovereigns and 1 half-sovereign, the monies of John McElligott , from his person .

JOHN McELLIGOTT. On the 19th of April I was coming from Astley's. I had got to No. 11, Tottenham-court-road, and I asked the watchman for a lodging - the prisoner came up and said she had a good lodging - I went with her - she showed me into a room - I went to bed - she did not go to bed in that room - when I went to bed I had three sovereigns and a half, and a small Spanish piece, in my pocket - I said to the prisoner, "Take away the light"- I had left my clothes on a chair, and as soon as I was in bed I saw her put her hands into my pockets, and take out the money from a purse - the light was then gone, but I could see that; I was quite sober - I said, "What are you about?" she went out, and said she would be back in a minute - I then went to my clothes, and missed my money - I put my clothes on, and told a watchman that the woman had robbed me - we took her the next night - I am certain of her person.

THOMAS LESLIE . I am a watchman. I was examining the doors and windows of the next house, and I saw the prisoner go out of this house - the prosecutor came to me in a minute or two, and said he was robbed by the girl just gone out - I had seen them walking together past my box a few minutes before - I could not find the prisoner that night, but I found her the next night - I found on her

6s. in silver, and 11/2d. - the prosecutor appeared quite sober.

JURY. Q. How were they walking when they passed your box? A. Very close together - I cannot say whether they were arm-in-arm - when I took her I asked what she had done with the money, and she said she had only taken one sovereign and a half from him.

Prisoner. I never told him any such thing, nor ever saw the prosecutor before.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-222

1235. JAMES UPCRAFT and JOHN LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 5 weights, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Penman .

JOSEPH PENMAN. I am a cabinet-maker and broker . I live in Church-row, Bethnal-green . I lost five brass weights off a table outside my door; I had seen them an hour before. I went out and a lady pointed out the two prisoners to me. I got my weights from Lawrence.

ANN HAMMERSLEY . I saw Upcraft take the weights off the table, and put them into his pocket. Lawrence was close by, but I cannot say that he saw him, they had not gone many yards when they were taken.

CHARLES PENNY . These boys were brought to the watch-house. I found the weights on Lawrence; he said the other put them into his pocket.

LAWRENCE's Defence. I saw the other prisoner - he asked where I was going, we walked together; he saw the stool and gave the weights to me to put into my pocket and I would not.

Prisoner UPCRAFT. It is false my Lord.

UPCRAFT - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

LAWRENCE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-223

1236. EDWARD TOPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 3 pocket-books, value 4s., and 1 book, value 1s. 9d., the goods of Nathaniel Mead ; and 1 book, value 3s. , the goods of William Philpot .

NATHANIEL MEAD. I live in Whitechapel High-street . I missed three pocket books off my counter when I came home on the 4th of April I had seen them safe an hour before - these are the books.

ALICE PHILPOT . I missed this book from a table outside my door on the 4th of April. I had seen it safe the day before. My husband's name is William.

LEWIS MYERSON . I am a constable. I found these books on the prisoner between one and two o'clock on the 4th of April; he said at first, that he bought them in St. Paul's Church-yard, of a person who sells them there - I went and inquired; it was no such thing; he then said he bought them of a Jew.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said he could not say any thing about the property, but he would send his sister up - she came and could not swear to it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270531-224

1237. MOSES SAMUEL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 5 handkerchiefs, value 10s. , the goods of Mark Rushmer .

MARK RUSHMER. I am a linen-draper , and live in King's-terrace, Commercial-road . On the 2d of May I was coming out of the shop, and saw something dark put into the window; I had had the window repeatedly cut, and thought it adviseable not to have it mended, but to have a handkerchief nailed there - I went to the door, and saw the prisoner's hand in the window, taking out the handkerchief - he had forced away the nails - I seized him, and be dropped these five handkerchiefs, partly in the window and partly out - they cost me 10s. - he had moved them entirely from their place.

JOHN SEAGROVE . I was near the spot, and saw a mob - I went and found the prisoner in the shop, and had these goods delivered to me - I was taking him to the watch-house, and with a desperate effort he made his escape - he was taken a short distance off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-225

1238. WILLIAM ROBINSON and ANN, HIS WIFE ., were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 7 shells. value 3s.; 2 pieces of silk ribbon, value 3s.; 1 piece of silk, value 3s.; 1 cap, value 2s.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 2 chimney-ornaments, value 2s.; 1 piece of lace, value 1s.; 1 habit-shirt, value 2d.; 1 basin, value 3d.; 2 cups, value 2d.; 2 saucers, value 2d., and 2 cruets, value 2s. , the goods of Samuel Everard .

ELIZABETH EVERARD . I am the wife of Samuel Everard. On the 19th of April I missed this property out of a box, at Mrs. Blundell's, Potter's-row, Cambridge-heath - it had been sent there the latter end of February, and came back on the 19th of April, and then I missed the articles.

RICHARD CARTER . I am a constable. On the 19th of April I received information, went to the prisoner's house, in Salisbury-square, Hoxton, and found all these articles; both the prisoners were there; the man said he did not know how they came there; the woman said she had been to the house where the box was; that there was a hole in the lid, and having a nurse-child with her about three years old, she might have taken them out - I found the duplicate of a shift, and got it out.

COURT. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate so? A. Yes; she said so at the house, and repeated it before the Magistrate - she said nothing else at the house.

Q. You stated in your deposition, that she said, "I am very sorry for what I have done; my husband knew nothing about it;" and why do you say she said nothing else? A. She did say that - it was not in my hearing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How came you to say she did not state any thing else at her lodging? A. I might not be correct for a word or two; she did say she was sorry for it - I beg pardon for omitting it.

ELIZABETH BLUNDELL . In February last this box was brought to my house; it was nailed down - the female prisoner lodged with me at the time, and had a child.

JOHN BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shift and gown pawned, but I do not know who by.

ELIZ. EVERARD . There was a hole in the box.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-226

1239. JANE KENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 shawl, value 3s., the goods of George Felts, from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-227

1240. JAMES McPHERSON was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD TWYNEHAM . I am a newspaper agent ; the prisoner was in my employ on the 10th of April - he received money for me, which he was to pay immediately he came home. On the 10th of April he paid me no money, but said he had lost 7s. out of his pocket, which he had received from Cliff - I gave him in charge.

SAMUEL PIGGOTT CLIFF . On the 10th of April I paid the prisoner 7s. and a farthing on account of Mr. Twyneham; I am sure there was one half-crown and one shilling among it - I generally pay every Saturday; the prisoner brought the bill on Saturday; I offered him a sovereign; he had no change I gave him what silver I had - on Monday he brought the bill again, and the balance was not down - he said he would call on Tuesday morning, which he did about ten o'clock, and I paid him the 7s.

JOHN LACEY . I took him in charge. He said he had lost the money; I said, "Where from?" and he showed me a hole in his pocket - he said he had got no money, but I found a sixpence and some copper on him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270531-228

1241. JEREMIAH MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 boot, value 4s. , the goods of Dennis Sullivan .

DENNIS SULLIVAN. I am a bootmaker , and live on Saffron-hill . On the 28th of May, about eight o'clock in the evening, I missed a boot; and seeing two boys near the door (one of whom was a bad character). I went out and pursued - a man brought them back, but neither of them had it - soon after another man, whom I had sent out, brought in the prisoner with the boot.

JAMES HALL . I was sent for an officer, and saw the two boys run away - the prisoner stood at the corner of a court with the boot buttoned in his jacket; I took him back to the shop - I had not seen him near.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-229

1242. JAMES FITZPATRICK and HANNAH, HIS WIFE , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 13 plates, value 1s. 1d.; 3 dishes, value 6d.; 1 salt-cellar, value 1d., and 3 spoons, value 6d. , the goods of Daniel Larter .

DANIEL LARTER. I keep the Gun public-house, Shoreditch . On the 13th of May, about two o'clock, I was in the cellar; an alarm was given; I came up, and missed these things from the kitchen; I went to the prisoner's room, which is about thirty yards off, about eight o'clock at night, and found them all - the man said he did not know they were there; he had handed me a candle to look for them, but I found them out on the stairs - the woman said she had brought them there.

Prisoner J. FITZPATRICK. Q. Did I not say to her, "What business had you to bring them here?" A. Yes; the woman had been drinking, but knew what she was doing. I had seen them both at my house that afternoon; they were customers.

J. FITZPATRICK's Defence. I had some friends from Ireland, and got intoxicated - I did not know what I did.

HANNAH FITZPATRICK - GUILTY. Aged 26.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, being pregnant .

Confined Nine Days .

JAMES FITZPATRICK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-230

1243. JOHN DOUBLEDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 2 pair of stockings, value 2d., and 3 handkerchiefs, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Longes , and 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of John Black .

HANNAH LONGES . I am the wife of Thomas Longes, we live at Islington . On the 13th of April I hung these articles in the back garden - I saw them safe at six o'clock, and missed them at eight - I found them in Key's possession next morning.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. Between eight and nine o'clock on the night of the 13th, the prisoner came up to me with the property in a bundle, and inquired his road - I suspected something wrong, and followed him down Vittoria-street; he went to jump over a ditch - I ran and jumped over also, we both fell into the ditch - I secured him.

FRANCES BLACK . I lodge with Longes; this is my husband's night-shirt; his name is John.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person threw away a bundle in the street, he was running, but there was no cry of Stop thief! it being dark I fell into the ditch; somebody came up with this bundle.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270531-231

1244. THOMAS CLARK and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 1 table, value 16s.; 1 bed-cover, value 1s. 6d.; 2 blankets, value 2s.; 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 comforter, value 9d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 jacket, value 6d. , the goods of John Lewin .

JOHN LEWIN. I live in Charles-street, Bromley , and am a chimney-sweeper . On the 24th of April, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I lost this property, which was safe just before - I had taken Clark to my house the day before, to assist me to move.

JAMES DARBY . I am a sweep. On the 24th of April I and Fetch were helping to move Lewin's things in a cart - I had sent Clark there the day before; while we were loading, I missed the table.

RICHARD FETCH . I am a carman. I was moving the goods - Clark was there, and while we were moving the things, the table was taken.

JAMES FORREST . I live at Bromley. On the 24th of April, I was getting up between eight and nine o'clock, Williams came into my room with a bundle, and asked me to let him leave it, saying that a poor man with ten children had been seized on for rent; he left the bundle, and came up again, and asked me to let him leave this table - I gave him leave - one Kennedy who is now dead, was with him.

JANE FORREST . On the 25th of April the officers came to my house, and took these things from my son's room, of which I gave them the key.

JOHN TWEEDY . On the 24th of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, Lewin and Darby came and gave me information - I went and found Clark in the privy of a house; the door was fastened - I said, "You may as well come out," which he did - I took him to the watch-house - Lewin came and tapped him on the shoulder, and

said, "My lad, you have got my jacket on" - he said,"You gave me that" - Lewin replied, "We will see about that by and by" - I received information, and found the goods at Forrest's.

JAMES FORDHAM . I was with Tweedy, and found the property at Forrest's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARK's Defence. I understood Lewin expected to be seized on, and took the things to Forrest's.

JOHN LEWIN . I never gave him the jacket - I said perhaps I might give him one when he had done.

WILLIAMS' Defence. Clark asked me to let him leave the things with me - my room being small I asked Forrest to mind them. CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270531-232

1245. THOMAS CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 18 shillings , the monies of William Wilkins Wilton .

WILLIAM WILKINS WILTON. I am a bookseller , and live in Holborn. The prisoner was about three weeks in my employ - I gave him 18 shillings to take to St. John's-square, to buy some books at Mr. Dove's.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am a painter, and live in St. Martin's lane. I was in Wilton's shop on the 16th of May, and heard of the prisoner being sent out - I was going to my lodging the same evening, and saw him in a cook-shop; I gave him in charge; he said he had spent nearly all the money, with three more boys.

WILLIAM LEMON . I am a constable, and took the prisoner - I found only a half-crown on him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270531-233

1246. JAMES BOLTON , JAMES STILES , and JOHN ASSITER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 pair of plough-chains, value 4s.; 1 chain-bow and pin, value 6d., and 1 plough-hammer, value 6d. , the goods of John Draper .

ROBERT COX. I work for Mr. John Draper, a farmer , who lives at Hillingdon . I had been ploughing with this plough, at two o'clock on Friday, the 27th of April, and left it with these other things in the field; the next morning I came back to work, and missed them.

EDWARD SWEENEY . I am a constable. On Saturday, the 28th of April, I saw a horse and cart with these artiticles in it - I took possession of them - the prisoners were afterwards brought by another witness.

WILLIAM COLLETT . I am a butcher, and live at Harefield. On the 28th of April, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the three prisoners were at Harefield, about six miles from Hillingdon, I followed them, and saw in the cart, which they had with them, two old iron hoops - when I got to Ryeslip I saw these things all taken from the cart, and gave the prisoners into the constable's hands - they said they had bought them at Drayton, which is two miles and a half from Uxbridge - when they saw me in pursuit of them they gallopped as fast as they could.(Property produced and sworn to.)

STILES' Defence. We bought these plough-chains for 6d. of a poor man.

ASSITER'S Defence. I was going about Drayton, calling for iron and bones - a man called and asked me if I would have these chains.

WILLIAM BOLTON . I am uncle of the prisoner Bolton. Assiter and him worked for me - I sent them out every day to collect these things - I keep a marine-store shop - Stiles never belonged to me, but came to them in a morning to go with them.

BOLTON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

STILES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Weeks .

ASSITER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks and Whipped .

There was another indictment against Bolton and Stiles, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18270531-234

1247.