Old Bailey Proceedings, 5th April 1827.
Reference Number: 18270405
Reference Number: f18270405-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ANTHONY BROWN, MAYOR.

FOURTH SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on THURSDAY, the 5th of APRIL, 1827, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1827.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ANTHONY BROWN , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt., Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Perring , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; and William Heygate , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Key , Esq.; John Crowder , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justice of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Gee. Goodenough ,

Robert H. Phipps ,

Andrew Anderson ,

Wm. B. Smith ,

Benjamin Slowman ,

Samuel Barker ,

Nicholas Stone ,

Wm. Kingsford ,

Thomas Neestrip ,

John Shaw Holmes ,

James Boafield ,

Joseph Hare .

Second

Joseph Shillich ,

George Killick ,

John Lamb ,

Francis Devereaux ,

Henry Hinde ,

Francis Triest ,

Richard Booker ,

James Baxter ,

Wm. Charlsworth ,

Thomas Parker ,

David Harland ,

John Leuthwaite .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Joshua Penny ,

Wm. Peacock ,

Wm. Perkins ,

Wm. Hen. Palmer ,

Richard Robins ,

Charles Robinson ,

August. Raymont ,

Wm. Rathbone ,

Henry Ridley ,

Thomas Rix ,

Wm. Robinson ,

Samuel P. Rolls .

Second

Richd. Richardson ,

Charles W. Rowe ,

John Rogerson ,

Charles Ryan ,

John Roper ,

George Rhodes ,

Richard Smart ,

Samuel Smith ,

John Stevens ,

Edw. P. Simmons ,

John Saunders ,

Charles Shaw .

Third

John Pewtner ,

Richard Parven ,

James Pickford ,

George Perry ,

Thomas Priddle ,

Thomas Patterson ,

James Poole ,

Wm. Patt. Perry ,

James Parsels ,

James Pilgrim ,

Thomas Parry ,

Wm. Pine .

Fourth

Wm. H. Lucket ,

Hugh McDermod ,

John McLacklan ,

James Moore ,

Wm. May ,

James Mitchenor ,

Isaac Manwaring ,

Thomas Morgan ,

Thomas Morgan ,

John Wm. Norrie ,

James Okey ,

Tho. Philip Payne .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 5, 1827.

BROWN, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18270405-1

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

754. WILLIAM JONES, alias JOHN HARRISON , and WILLIAM WILLIAMS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Thompson , in the night of the 4th of March , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, with intent to steal, and stealing 5 table-cloths, value 10s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 20 napkins, value 10s.; 3 pairs of boots, value 10s.; 6 pillow-cases, value 6s.; 2 towels, value 2s.; 2 pairs of glass saltholders, value 6s., and 1 glass jug, value 5s., the goods of the said James Thompson; 1 umbrella, value 2s.; 1 book, value 1s.; 1 gown, value 8s.; 2 aprons, value 2s., and 1 piece of linen, value 3s. , the goods of Sarah Gough .

JONES pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

WILLIAMS pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18270405-2

755. RICHARD PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , at St. John, at Hackney, 1 sheep, price 2l., and 1 bell, value 6d. , the property of Michael Holmden .

SECOND COUNT, that he 1 sheep, price 2l., the property of Michael Holmden, wilfully and feloniously did kill, with a felonious intent to steal the carcase of the said last mentioned sheep, against the statute, &c.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18270405-3

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

756. JOHN WISE , WILLIAM WALKER , JOHN MANEY , MARY GREEN , ELEANOR COOK , and SARAH JOHNSON , were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Crawley , on the night of the 30th of January , and stealing 1 can, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 30s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 4ozs. of tobacco, value 1s. , his property.

BRIDGET CRAWLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Crawley - we kept the Two Brewers public-house, in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane , on the 30th of January; my husband was in Whitecross-street prison. The house was fastened up, to the best of my knowledge, when I went to bed; the servant who fastened it is not here. The watchman knocked at the door between three and four o'clock in the morning; I looked out at the second floor window- he told me to come down, as the house was broken open; my father and mother went down stairs first - I afterwards went down, and found the back kitchen window open; it looks into a back yard: I went into the bar, and missed some tobacco from a jar, and a shawl out of the kitchen. I cannot say whether I missed a can or not - another shawl and a silk handkerchief were missed.

CHRISTOPHER WARD . I am a watchman. On the night of the 30th of January I was on duty in White's-yard - and at two o'clock I saw the prisoners, Walker and Wise, coming up White's-yard, together - I was sitting in my box; they both passed me, and were stumbling, as if drunk; they were going in a direction from Crawley's - I called my regular hour, and saw Wise again, alone, at four o'clock in the morning - I saw him go towards Crawley's house, and stand opposite to it; I was then in my box, which is about forty yards off; he went up and down the yard - there are two houses and two coach turnings between my box and Crawley's house; I looked out of my box, and saw all down the yard; Barnett, my officer, came up to me - we talked together, and then separated; he went up the yard, and I down, towards the Two Brewers, after Wise - when I got to the house he was gone through Crown-court; I went round Crawley's house, and saw the kitchen window open - I went to call Taylor, and we went and called Mrs. Crawley up; I stopped outside while Taylor went in to search the house; no one was found there - I then called half-past four o'clock, and then went to the watch-house; I found Smith and Barnett there - I went with them, Taylor, and two other watchmen to Parson's-court, Blue Anchor-yard - we knocked at the door of a house there - a woman's voice asked who was there - she was in a room on the ground floor; Smith said, "It is only me - don't be afraid - open the door," which she did directly; I, Smith, Taylor, and another went into a room, and there found the six prisoners - this was between four and five o'clock; they were all dressed - three were laying on the bed, and three were sitting up; we took them all into custody. I was conveying Maney to the watch-house - as soon as I got out of the house, he up with his hand, and threw his arm out, to drive me away, saying, "I am d-d if I am going to be taken by you;" I tore his jacket, but he got from me, and out-ran me. I returned to the house, which Smith was searching - we stopped there a little while, and Maney came into the court - I said, "Smith, here is one of the men we want;" Smith came out, and said, "Oh, I know you" - he said, "If you want any thing with me, I will go with you;" we secured him at last, after a great

struggle; Smith found some things under the bed, upon which three of the prisoner had been laying.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why were you so long just now before you pointed Wise out? A. I only caught a sketch of his face just now, but I had a full view of him that morning; the kitchen window is a casement one, and goes on hinges.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 31st of January I went to the Two Brewers, and called up Mrs. Crawley; I went at five o'clock to Parson's-court, and heard men and women talking very loud - I heard them say, "No nosey - I am the b-r that will make an entry by one way or other;" I went and communicated this to my brother watchmen; I got Smith and other officers, and showed them the house. I assisted in taking Walker and Wise to the watch-house; Maney escaped. I returned to the house, and met Smith, who gave two women to me, whom I took to the watch-house, with a can nearly full of rum.

THOMAS SMITH . I am beadle of the night. I went with Ward to a house in Parson's-court, which Taylor showed us; I found the prisoners all in the room on the ground floor; Walker, Green, and Johnson were on the bed; Ward pointed Wise out to me - I sent the three men to the watch-house, and found this property in the room; the two shawls were between the bed and the sacking - the handkerchief laid in one corner of the room, on the floor, and this tobacco in a plate in the cupboard; Maney was smoking a pipe, and I think Wise was also - I found a can under the bedstead, with rum in it; the things were taken to the watch-house - here they are; I am sure they are the same. Maney came back into the court, and was taken.

BRIDGET CRAWLEY . I missed a shawl, but will not be positive that this is mine - it is very much like it - it has no mark. I cannot swear to any of the things - the handkerchief is something like mine; we give out cans, and do not always get them back - I think I missed one, but cannot be certain whether I gave it out or not; I did not give it out that night - I did not miss rum, but there was a strong smell of it in the bar - I could not tell whether any was missing; my servant had a shawl something like this one; mine cost 38s.; I believe there is the name of "Crawley, Two Brewers, White's-yard," on the can.

Cross-examined. Q. How many cans had you marked in that way? A. I believe two or three.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-4

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

757. JEREMIAH DONOVAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Robinson , about eight o'clock in the night of the 2d of March , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, with intent to steal, and stealing 2 pairs of shoes, value 7s. , his property.

JOHN ROBINSON. I am a shoemaker , and live in Church-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green . On Friday night, the 2d of March, a little after 8 o'clock, I was sitting in my shop, which is part of the dwelling-house - the shutters were not closed; there were several shoes in the window, against the glass - I heard the glass fall; I went out at the door, and looked round, not suspecting it to be my own window; I looked round, and found a pane of my own window was broken quite out - I believe it was slightly cracked before, but not broken. I saw several young boys standing close to the window, laughing, but the prisoner was not one of them. I saw an old shoe laying on the flap of the cellar, close to the window; it did not belong to me; it was taken away by somebody; I missed two pairs of new shoes from my window, I am certain, if not three - they were worth 4s. a pair; I have never found them. I am certain I missed two pairs; some pieces of glass laid outside the window, and some inside.

JOHN HAYES . I am nearly fifteen years old, and live at No. 4, Orange-court. I was in Church-street, near Mr. Robinson's house, on this Friday night, about five minutes to eight o'clock; the bell had not sounded for eight. I was going on an errand, and passed the shop; there was nobody about the shop then; I returned the same way, and heard the window break before I got up to the house, and seeing the glass fall on the pavement I stopped to look; I saw a boy at the window - I think it was the prisoner, but I did not see his face; I saw a pair of shoes pulled out of the window, and I think he is the person who pulled them out; there was a boy there a little bigger than him; directly it was done I saw the one whom I believe to be the prisoner, run away as hard as he could; I had seen him several times before, as I live in the court facing him; there was a light in Robinson's shop, and the gas-lamps in the street were lighted.

ROBERT ROBINSON . I am the prosecutor's son. I know Donovan. At six o'clock on this night, as I was going to school, I met him - he stopped me, and, holding up his right foot, said, "How much would your father make me a pair of shoes for?" I told him I did not know - I knew him before - he lived in the neighbourhood. As I returned from school, a little after eight o'clock, I met him - he rushed by me very fast one door from my father's house; I did not observe any thing in his hand, but I am quite sure he had only one shoe on; I found my father's window broken, and an old shoe on the cellar flap; it was like the shoe he had shown me; it was the same shoe. I told my father I thought it was Jerry Donovan's - after that it was taken away - I do not know who by.

Prisoner's Defence. I know that boy to be a noted thief himself - he has been in the House of Correction.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18270405-5

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

758. JOHN REID was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , at St. Mary-le-bone, being in the dwelling-house of Mary Rebecca Ellis , widow , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 seal, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 10s., and 1 ribbon, value 2d., the goods of William Green ; and that the prisoner, being in the said dwelling-house, as aforesaid, and having committed the felony aforesaid, afterwards, to wit, about three o'clock in the night of the same day, at the same parish, the same dwelling-house feloniously and burglariously did break to get out of the same, and burglariously did get out of the same, against the statute .

WILLIAM GREEN . I live in Hawker's-street, Lissongrove ; I lodge there, in Mary Rebecca Ellis' house; she is my aunt. The prisoner came to lodge there first on Thursday night, the 8th of March, and slept in the same

bed with me. On the Tuesday morning following I missed a silver watch, which I had put under my pillow a little before nine o'clock the night before, when I went to bed; the prisoner saw me put it there, as he went to bed with me. I awoke about a quarter past three o'clock in the morning; he was then gone; I got up, and missed my watch on searching for it, as my aunt had alarmed me; I went down stairs, and found the street door shut; the lock had caught, but it had been unbolted within for I had locked and bolted it myself before I went to bed; the prisoner did not return. I found my watch in pawn three or four days afterwards, at Mr. Kimber's, at Knights-bridge.

MARY REBECCA ELLIS . I am the prosecutor's aunt. My house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone; my nephew and the prisoner lodged with me. On Tuesday morning, about three o'clock, or rather before, I heard a person going down stairs - it was a man's step; I said,"Who is there?" the prisoner answered, "It is me, mistress;" I knew his voice - I heard him unbolt and open the street door, and heard it shut quite close; I called my nephew - there was no other man lodging in the house; I went to bed before them - my nephew went to bed last.

JAMES GURNEY . I am journeyman to Mr. Kimber, a pawnbroker, at Knightsbridge. On Tuesday morning, the 13th of March, this watch was pawned with me, for 25s., by the prisoner - I am certain he is the person; he came again on the Thursday, with another man, to show the watch to him; he produced the duplicate - I granted a fresh one, and took the other back; I believe he sold the duplicate to the other man, but I am not certain - he had it put in the name of John Tipping, Old Bailey, by order of the man who was with him - he had pawned it in the name of John Russell, No. 22, Kensington-gore; there is a ribbon, seal, and key to it; they are worth together 3l. 10s. - they would fetch that at a sale.

WILLIAM GREEN. I know this watch to be mine by the number and maker's name - the ribbon and seal are on it.

ROBERT WILLANS . I am an officer. Green applied to me, and I apprehended the prisoner at Kensington.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18270405-6

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

759. DAVID SKINNER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Hoare , single woman, on the 1st of March , in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 bag, value 3s.; 1 shawl, value 5s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 18d., and 2 keys, value 1s. , her property.

MR. PAYNE conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN HOARE. I live at No. 10, John-street, London-field, and am single. On the 1st of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the London-field , and saw the prisoner there - he was standing exposing his person; I passed on, and took no notice; when I had got fifty or sixty yards he came behind me, and pulled me backwards - I had a child in my arms, which he took from me, and threw it three or four yards from me, on the grass; he pulled me three or four yards along the field - he put his foot against my side, and pulled my bag from me; he did not throw me down; I screamed out, and a young man, who is here, jumped over the hedge, and ran after him; I saw the prisoner run along the field - the young man brought him back to me in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and my bag also. I was in a state of pregnancy, and very much alarmed.

WILLIAM BOROFF . I am a gardener, and live at Mr. Sturts. On the 1st of March I heard a cry of Murder! I looked, and saw the prisoner running between the hedges in the London-field; I jumped over the hedge, and asked the prosecutrix if he had robbed her - she said Yes, and ill-used her; I ran after him about three quarters of a mile, and when I got within about twenty yards of him he pulled the bag from his bosom, pulled out of it a white silk scarf and a white pocket handkerchief, and chucked them on the ground; he then picked them up, and put them into the bag again; I then got up to him, took hold of his collar, and took the bag from his hand; he begged of me to let him go - I would not, but he turned and pulled himself away from me; I caught hold of him again took him back to the prosecutrix, and gave her the bag, which she claimed, with the things that were in it, and gave him in charge; he said he would cut his throat if she would not let him go - he took out a knife, opened it, and put it up to his throat, as if he was going to do so, but the next witness prevented him. I had seen him about an hour before the cry of murder. I took him to the watch-house, with assistance.

JOHN WATTS EVELEIGH . I am a carpenter and joiner, and live at Hommerton. On the 1st of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I overtook the prisoner and Boroff, as I was coming to town - he wished me to assist him, which I did, and took the prisoner to the prosecutrix, who was in the field - he begged her forgiveness, and went on his knees once or twice; when she would not let him go, he said, "If you don't let me go I will cut my throat;" he took a clasp-knife out of his pocket, and said, "Now, I will cut my throat;" I had hold of his collar with one hand, and prevented him with the other. Some gentlemen came by, and desired us to take him to the watch-house - we did so, and gave him in charge.

JOHN GARVA . I am constable of Hackney. I produce a bag, which I received from the prosecutrix, on the 1st of March; also a scarf, a handkerchief, and two keys, London-field is in the County of Middlesex.

MARY ANN HOARE . This is the bag which I had - the scarf and other things are mine, and were in it when he took it from me.

Prisoner. Q. Can you say I put my hand on you, or spoke to you? A. He put his two arms round me, and pulled me backwards.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in a situation in life far superior to what I now am. I have been in his Majesty's service as coxswain. I do not deny that I have done wrong, but I solemnly appeal to God that I never touched her, spoke to her, nor put my hand on her - I do not wish to screen myself from guilt; I wanted bread.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18270405-7

Before Mr. Recorder.

760. THOMAS SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 1 silver tea-pot, value 10l.; 1 silver

basin, value 2l. 10s.; 1 silver cream-pot, value 2l.; 1 mustard-pot, value 20s.; 1 silver mug, value 10s.; 6 spoons, value 15s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 7s., and 1 watch, value 20s. , the goods of George Clark .

EUNICE CLARK . I am the wife of George Clark - we live in Dalston-lane, Hackney , and rent the house. On Monday, the 12th of March, I saw the prisoner come from the back garden; I found he had broken through the fence; I asked what he did there - he said he wanted the old man in the next cottage; I told him he must have known this was not the old man's cottage; he said nothing, but passed me, and went through the gate; our front door was fast, but the back door, leading to the garden, was open; I was in the garden; he went towards the next cottage, but passed the door, without going in, for I watched him. The moment he went out at the front gate I looked through my kitchen window, which is on the ground floor, and missed the mustard-pot, which was safe two minutes before; I sent the servant after him - I went in doors, and missed the rest of this property from the parlour cupboard, which is also on the ground floor. I saw the prisoner at Mary-le-bone Office the next day, and was not quite certain of him. When I talked to him in the garden I thought I should know him in a moment, but I was frightened at the office, and did not look thoroughly at him, but when I saw him before the Magistrate I recognised him perfectly, and am quite certain he is the person. I have found none of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What time of the day was this? A. Somewhere about two o'clock, or from that to three. He was fresh shaved at the office, and appeared to have some pimples round his face, which I had not observed; I said I thought he was not the man, not that he was not; he was popped out of a cupboard in a hurry, and I could not notice him. but when he came to have his hearing I knew him instantly.

CHARLOTTE HARDCASTLE . I am servant to Mr. Clark. I was coming out from the garden, from the right-hand side of the house, and saw the prisoner come from the left side; he was in the front garden when I first saw him - he came from the back garden - I am certain he is the person - he had something in a yellow handkerchief; I spoke to my mistress - a boy ran after him, and I went into the house, and missed the plate; I ran out after him, but he had got out of my sight; I saw him at Mary-le-bone Office the next day, and am certain of him; he had broken through the palings to get into the garden; the wind had first blown them a little about, and he had slipped through. I missed all this property.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him a very short time? A. I stood, and said to him, "Pray Sir, what do you want?" he said, "I don't want you - I want the old man at the next cottage;" I stated at the office that I spoke to him; I went to the Kingsland-turnpike, and asked if they had seen a cart go by with two men, and described the men; they said they had not. The prisoner had a blue coat and blue trousers on.

ELIZABETH WELCH . I live at Lower Clapton-place. I saw a man in Dalston-lane, in a green cart, drawn by one horse about five minutes walk from Mr. Clark's - that man is not here now; I afterwards saw the cart about ten minutes' walk from Mr. Clark's - two men were then in it; it drove furiously towards town, and I could not notice them.

THOMAS GIFFORD . I am toll-collector at the Ball's-pond-gate. About two o'clock on the day in question a green cart, with two men in it, drove through - it was driving gently then. I could not swear to either of the men.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Hardcastle? A. She came to me that afternoon, and asked why I did not tell the boy which way the men went - she seemed frightened. She did not say she knew the men; I did not ask her. This was one mile and a half from Dalston-lane.

ROBERT WILLANS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, in Lisson-grove; I told him it was for stealing some plate in the neighbourhood of Ball's pond; he hesitated a minute or two, and then said it was not him, or that he was not there; he pulled off a pair of blue trousers, and put on another - I said he had better not do so, but he said he thought they would be warmer, as he knew he should be detained. Immediately that Hardeastle saw him she said he was the man - she never doubted about him - she had described him before. Mrs. Clark saw him in the lock-up-room - there was a great many men about, and she did not recollect him. I found 4l. 16s. 6d. in his blue trousers pocket; I found in his room a yellow handkerchief; Mrs. Clark had stated that the bundle she had seen was in a yellow handkerchief.

HENRY STOWELL . I was present when the prisoner was taken, and saw the handkerchief found. Hardcastle saw the prisoner at the Magistrate's bar.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Mrs. Clark look at him? A. I was a little distance from her; she said at first she did not think he was the man. He said he could prove he was in a house in Bell-street, Lisson-grove at the time - I think he said he was in Byrne's house, and Byrne came down to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I told them directly where I was - the officers could have gone that moment, and inquired if they pleased. I was there because I was unwell.

JOHN BYRNE . I am a tallow-chandler, and live in Bell-street, Mary-le-bone. I saw the prisoner in my shop the day before he was taken up, about one o'clock; he came in while I was at dinner - he staid above two hours; he came for me to repair a brown coat, which he wanted directly; Bowen, the butcher, came in while he was there - the prisoner sat down while I mended the coat, as he wanted it, because he was ill; the butcher also came to see about some clothes which I had made him. Webster came to my house the day he was taken - I went to the office, and told Stowell that he had been at my house.

COURT. Q. What day did you go to the office? A. On Monday evening, the 12th of March; I am sure that was the day - he had trousers on, but I did not observe the colour. It was on Tuesday I went to the office - he was at my house on the Monday.

WILLIAM BOWEN . I called at Byrne's house on Monday, about three o'clock - I saw the prisoner there.

COURT. Q. What was Byrne doing? A. He was at work on his shop board; they talked about a coat; the prisoner was without his coat - he had trousers on - I

think they were blue. I live in Davies-street, and am a butcher.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-8

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

761. JOHN HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Kennedy , on the 22d of February , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence , her property.

MARY KENNEDY. I am single , and live with my mother, in Broad-street, St. Giles'. I went into the Artichoke public-house at half-past one o'clock on the night of Thursday, the 22d of February, with Downes and Palmer - we had a glass of peppermint; the prisoner, whom I had seen once before, came in - he had a little doll called Tommy - he asked me to give him a glass of liquor, which I did; he asked if I would go with him to a female's apartment, and he would perform Tommy. I went with the other women, and he made the doll speak; the women came out with me, to the corner of White Hart-yard; I wished them good night: the prisoner said nobody should see me home but himself; he followed me as far as my mother's court, in Broad-street , and he said he would go up-stairs with me; I said he could not, because I lived with my mother; he immediately knocked me down, struck me on the side of my head, and struck my hand, in which I held my handkerchief, with a sovereign, two half-crowns, and 2s. 6d., tied in the corner of it - he took it from me, and ran away; I hallooed out Murder! but nobody came to my help; I went up stairs to my mother. I went to Bow-street in the morning, and described him; I did not know where he lived, and have not found my property. I am quite sure he is the man; he saw I had the money when I paid for the liquor, and saw me put it into my handkerchief. I found him in custody on the Sunday night.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was your father's name Kennedy? A. Yes. I am never called Derry Whistle; I live with my mother - she does not support me altogether. I had seen Downes and Palmer before, but am not acquainted with them; I sometimes take walks at night to maintain myself; I had seen the prisoner once before - he is a ventriloquist - he had performed Tommy at Sarah White's apartment; I did not see her after I was robbed. I never talked of lugging - I do not know what it means; I hallooed out directly I was knocked down.

CHARLOTTE DOWNES . I was with Kennedy at the Artichoke; the house is open all night, for the printers; the prisoner came in, and Kennedy gave him a glass of peppermint; I saw her pay some money: she tied a sovereign, two half-crowns, two shillings, and a sixpence, in the corner of her handkerchief; the prisoner asked if we knew where he could go to play the ventriloquist; we took him to Mr. Wither's, No. 5, the corner of Little Catherine-street; he performed there, and we came out - we left the prosecutrix, but he walked by her side up to Drury-lane Theatre. I did not see them afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have known her? A. I have seen her about three times by Covent-garden Theatre, but never drank with her before; there were a great many women seeing the prisoner play Tommy - it was in a private house.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol of St, Giles, and apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of February, at the King's Arms public-house, Coal-yard, Drury-lane, from the description Kennedy had given; I knew him before, as a ventriloquist; I told him it was for knocking a woman down, and robbing her, on Thursday morning - he said he knew nothing about it, and laughed; I did not mention Kennedy's name. I left him with Furzeman, and fetched Downes - I told her to look round the room, and see if the man was there - she pointed the prisoner out; Kennedy came in afterwards, and pointed him out; there were twelve or fourteen men there. He said, at the watch-house, that he recollected drinking two glasses of gin with Kennedy.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Kennedy? A. I have met her about at night; I never heard any harm of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. When I received the glass of gin I wished them good morning, and returned home. I live in the City. I left three girls together when I came out of the house.

SARAH WHITE . I live at No. 9, Earl-street. On the morning the prosecutrix was robbed I saw her at No. 2, Russell-place, Bow-street, where I was servant; she came by as I was cleaning the step of the door; she said, "I had a pretty trick in the evening - I am going to the Artichoke, on the bounce, to see if I have not lost 1l. 7s.;" she said she had been to the Fountain public-house, in Catherine-street, over night, and she received 1l. 10s., and took two females to the public-house at the corner of the durkey, and then went to the Artichoke; she came into the house two or three times afterwards, fell down on her knees, and said she hoped her mother would not be alive when she went home if ever she rested till she had lagged the man.

COURT. Q. That was before he was taken up? A. Yes - she said she treated him at the darkey, and also at the Artichoke.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-9

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

762. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , at St. Clement Danes, in the dwelling-house of James Dawes , 6 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and four 20l. Bank notes , his property, against the statute.

JAMES DAWES. I live at No. 11, Granville-buildings, Drury-lane, in the parish of St. Clement Danes , and am a coach-plater - the prisoner lodged on my second floor with a man, as her husband, for twelve months off and on - she stood godmother to my child last Whit Sunday - I was ill from Christmas to the 14th of February, and kept my bed all that time, and afterwards. On the 14th of February the prisoner was washing for us - my wife went out - the prisoner assisted me out of bed about ten or twenty minutes before seven o'clock that evening, and I went into the next room - I was undressed - she went into the room to make the bed while I was in the next room - after she had made the bed I recollected I had left my pocket-book in the bed - I went into the room, turned down the clothes,

and missed it; nobody but her had been in the room - I am certain I left it there, for I had opened it just before my wife went out; it was tied up in a blue handkerchief with six sovereigns and a half sovereign - I opened the handkerchief just before my wife went out, about five o'clock, and saw the six sovereigns and half safe - they were in the handkerchief with the pocket-book - I did not open the pocket-book then, but I had seen four 20l. Bank of England notes in it the day before - my wife had taken the pocket-book out of a trunk, gave it to me in the bed, and I kept it there - I gave my wife a sovereign out, and saw her put in a half-sovereign; there were then six sovereigns and a half there - I had the numbers of the notes entered in a copy-book, which is not here - the person who has it is ill - the prisoner was missing.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a master plater? A. I work for myself, and had saved this money - my wife had gone out to a Committee for some flannel for herself and children, which was to be given away.

ELIZABETH DAWES . I am the wife of James Dawes. I went out in the afternoon of the 14th of February - I had left the handkerchief, pocket-book, and money in bed with my husband - there were six sovereigns and a half in the handkerchief, which was wrapped round the pocketbook - I returned about seven o'clock, heard of this loss, and was three days and nights in pursuit of the prisoner; she did not return to the house at all - she had given me no notice whatever of her going - the man, she lived with, is still in our house; his name is William Williams - I found the prisoner in Giltspur-street Compter - my husband had been ill a long time.

Cross-examined. Q. For what purpose did you go out? A. I went for relief, for some money; it was a gift which had been left by some gentleman for the poor.

Q. Then you must have represented yourself as a poor person? A. I could not consider myself very rich, having two children and a sick husband - I did not know what money my husband had got - I took the handkerchief out of the chest the day before - I gave it to my husband about an hour before I went out - I had kept it in my pocket till then, but never opened the pocket-book.

JANE SMITH . I live next door to Dawes - I heard of this robbery, and went to fetch Mrs. Dawes.

JAMES ANDERSON . I am Mrs. Dawes' brother. I was at the house on the 14th of February, and remember Dawes going from his bed-room into the other room - I did not go into the bed-room at all - the prisoner passed me, and went in to make the bed after he was placed in an arm-chair - I was in the front room with him, and went away before the property was missed - I left a little after seven o'clock - he asked me for some tobacco; I had none: the prisoner at that time was sitting at the fire - he said, "Mrs. Williams, have you any?" she said, "No, but I will see if my husband has;" she then went out; this was after she had made the bed - there is a door-way between the two rooms, but no door - I know she made the bed; she put her head in at the door in about half a minute, and said she was going out to get some tobacco; she did not return while I was there; I did not hear her go out at the door; I left in about twenty minutes; she had not returned then - I staid with Dawes.

Cross-examined. Q. She sat by you before she went to make the bed? A. Yes, in the front room; she knew I was there; I did not go into the bed-room at all; I could not see from the front room into the back, as there is a wainscot - she did not offer to go for the tobacco till he asked for it.

WILLIAM WESTBURY . I keep the Queen's Head public-house, Darkhouse-lane, Billingsgate. The prisoner came to my house on the 14th of February, and was taken into custody the same night - I think it was the 14th; she came about twelve o'clock at night, and asked for the Gravesend boat, saying she was going there; I told her there was a boat going about five o'clock; she said she had been robbed of a 20l. note, or had lost one - she appeared rather in liquor; I saw her take a 20l. note from her bosom, and twenty-two sovereigns and a half out of her pocket; I saw them, and counted them in my hand; when she asked for the Gravesend boat, I asked her what was the name of it; she said she wanted to go to an East India ship, and mentioned a name - I knew no such ship of that name, though I have lived at Gravesend twenty years - Manning, the officer, had brought her to my house at first to show her where the Gravesend boats went from, and when I saw she had so much money I told the officer I thought there had been a robbery committed, and we had better take the money from her and have her apprehended in the morning; she went to bed at my house; I got the money and note from her before she went to bed - it was placed in my hands; the next morning I had her taken into custody; my servant gave the money and note to Manning in the morning - he took her in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the name of the ship she asked for? A. The Hogarth, or some such name, an East Indiaman; I knew no such ship lay at Gravesend at that time - she was rather intoxicated; I mentioned my suspicions before her, before she went bed, and took the money from her - we bolted her into the bed-room, so that she could not get out; I left the money at the bar in care of my wife, to give the servant, who gave it to the patrol; they are not here.

JOHN MANNING . I am a patrol. On the night of the 14th of February I saw the prisoner get out of a hackneycoach in Thames-street; the coachman asked, in her presence, if I knew where the Gravesend boats went from; I said from Darkhouse-lane; she asked me to show her the house; I took her to the Queen's Head, and told her they went from there - I left her there - I was called back in a minute or two, and saw her with a number of sovereigns in her hand - I asked where she got all that money, and said I thought she had more money than wit; she said she had more money than that; and putting her hand in her bosom, took out some loose papers, among which was a 20l. Bank of England note; she put her hand in her bosom again, and began to cry, saying she had lost a 20l. note; she said she had four, or more notes - I asked how she came by so much money; she said her father had sent it to her from Coventry, that she might appear decent to see her brother, who was then at Gravesend, at a ship - I counted twenty-two sovereigns and a half, and a 20l. note into the landlord's hands, and he put them away - the prisoner went up to bed before I left - I went in the morning, and took her to the Compter - I then

returned for the money, and the Alderman ordered it into the care of Brand the marshalsman.

Cross-examined. Q. Who did you receive the money from in the morning? A. From the servant - I saw the prisoner get out of the hackney-coach at twenty minutes after twelve o'clock - I was on duty - she accompanied me willingly to the public-house - she told me a different story next day about how she got the money.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalsman. I have a 20l. note and seventeen sovereigns - the Alderman desired me to give the prisoner a half-sovereign, and the Magistrate ordered me to give her five sovereigns, to provide for her defence.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Reference Number: t18270405-10

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

763. GEORGE HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , at St. Andrew, Holborn, 36 yards of carpeting, value 5l., the goods of John Graham , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES WHEELER . I am shopman to John Graham, who lives at No. 294, High Holborn - the shop is part of the dwelling-house, which he occupies himself. On the 12th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was returning home, and saw the prisoner standing close by the door, with his hand on a piece of carpet, which was within the door - he was outside himself - I stopped for a minute, then stepped into the middle of the street to watch him - I saw him take the carpet up on his shoulder, and go off with it - I went over into the shop, and told one of the young men to follow him; I also followed - I did not lose sight of him - I went and took him by the collar, and asked where he was going with the carpet - he said he was taking it for a gentleman - he was secured with it - the young man took the carpet back - here it is - I have measured it; there are thirty-six yards - it cost 3s. 6d. a yard - I took him back to the shop - an officer came and took him - it was within the hinges of the door; we could not shut the door without moving it - there were twelve pieces there.

JAMES PEACOCK . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took the prisoner at this shop - the shop is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, and in the County of Middlesex.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work five weeks - I was looking for work, a gentleman stood at the door, and asked if I wanted a job - and if I would take this carpet with him to the first coach, at the corner of Red Lion-street, he would pay me for my trouble - I took it, and followed him - my hat fell off - I stooped to pick it up, and had not got above four doors when the man took me - I said I was following the gentleman - he said,"Never mind, come back, you will do."

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18270405-11

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

764. JOHN HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 gold watch, value 10l.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 2 seals, value 2l., and 1 key, value 10s., the goods of William Pritchard , the elder, from his person .

WILLIAM PRITCHARD, SEN. I live in New Bridge-street, Blackfriars. On the 17th of March, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Earl-street , and just beyond the Bible Society's house there is a small turning; a man rushe upon me from that turning, and snatched my watch out of my fob - he was alone - I am very near sighted, and could only see him run across the way towards Thames-street - I called out, Stop thief! as loud as I could, but he got away - I cannot speak to his person - I have not found my watch - it was worth about 30l. altogether - I found the prisoner at Guildhall on Tuesday, the 20th.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Were there many people about? A. Only a few.

CATHERINE CAIGER . I live at No. 16, Earl-street; my husband is an auctioneer. I was at my own door, and saw the prosecutor in Earl-street; I saw a man, who is not in custody, shove him, and then hand something to the prisoner; I am confident of the prisoner being the man; it happened nearly opposite our house; I had a clear view of him, and identified him at Guildhall on the Tuesday; Mr. Pritchard called out, and put his hand to his fob, but I could not hear what he said; the prisoner ran up Printer-street, and the other man straight towards Blackfriars-bridge; I did not go after them; a person was taken into custody with the prisoner, who I thought was the other man, but I could not swear it; I am certain of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did both the men go towards the bridge? A. Yes; Printer-street is nearer the bridge than where the robbery was - the prisoner came down again out of Printer-street, and stood still till he saw Mrs. Pritchard join her husband - he then ran again - I did not speak to Mr. Pritchard; but the robbery being committed opposite our house, Mrs. Pritchard called on me, and I told her - my child was playing in the street, and I was at the door.

CATHERINE YATES . I am servant to Mr. Young, of Wardrobe place. I was in Earl-street, and saw the prisoner with another, who is not in custody, go up to Mr. Pritchard - one was on the curb, and the other close against Mr. Pritchard - I did not see them do any thing, but Mr. Pritchard called out, "Oh! my watch!" they both ran up Printer-street, round the Bible Society's house, came into the opening, and ran towards Bridge-street - the prisoner, I fancy, ran up Printer-street, as I lost sight of him - I saw him again in about a minute, in the turning behind the Bible Society's house - he was not secured - on the Monday following I met both the men in Rosoman-street, Clerkenwell - I went home, told my master, and informed Mr. Pritchard - I saw the prisoner in the Compter on the Tuesday, and am certain of him; the other man was in custody at Guildhall, but was discharged - he was nearer to Mr. Pritchard than the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? A. No; I was on the opposite side - their backs were towards me, but I had a good view of their faces when they stood in the opening; I did not see the watch taken; when they were in the opening Mr. Pritchard pointed his stick, or umbrella to them; I am certain that the same men came into the opening - I pointed the prisoner out, from among a dozen others, at the Compter - I did not speak to Mr. Pritchard at the time, because I was confused.

COURT. Q. How long was it, from the time you saw

them close to Mr. Pritchard, till you saw them in the opening? A. About a minute - I am confident they were the same persons.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . On Tuesday, the 20th of March, I had a description of the persons - I went to the White Hart public-house, Fleet-market, and saw the prisoner sitting in company with some others - I secured him- I took another person, who was discharged. I fetched Yates to the Compter, where the prisoner was among about twenty more - I told Yates to look through the window of the door at them - she said, "I will swear that is the man."

Cross-examined. Q. Who gave you the information? A. A lad came and asked Mr. Pritchard if he should know the parties if he saw them - I was there, and took that lad into custody - he gave me the information; he had said he could identify them - he went into the taproom, came out, and said, "They are not there;" but I went in, took the prisoner and another, and at the Compter the lad said, "They are the people, but the room was so dark I could not see them" - the boy's character will not bear to come here.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-12

765. ROBERT LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 dressing-box, value 18s.; 8 glasses, with silver tops, value 3l.; 1 pencil-case, value 1s.; 1 silver knife, value 2s.; 1 silver spoon, value 3s.; 1 deskseal, value 3s.; 2 snuff-boxes, silver mounted, value 10s.; 2 gold seals, value 4l.; 2 ivory handle knives, value 5s.; 2 razors, value 5s.; 2 pairs of scissars, value 5s.; 1 bodkin, value 6s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 6d.; 1 cork-screw, value 1s.; 1 pair of boot-hooks, value 4s.; 1 button-hook, value 2d.; 2 brushes, value 1s., and 1 razor-strop, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Edward Gifford .

LIEUTENANT ROBERT EDWARD GIFFORD. I belong to the 10th Hussars , and now live at Ipswich. On the 24th of December I came, in a chaise, to Hounslow barracks , and put my packing-case into the passage of the barracks, about three or half-past three o'clock in the afternoon - I missed it in about an hour and a half; it contained the articles stated in the indictment - it cost me more than 30l.; I found the case, and part of the contents, in pawn at Guest's - the case, and most of the articles, had my crest on them.

JOHN GUEST . I am a pawnbroker. On the 3d of March this dressing case, with the bottom out of it, was brought to me by the prisoner - I lent 10s. on it - it had been broken open to get the contents, the lock being a patent one - it had a few of the steel instruments in it - the prisoner had brought some of the silver articles to me on the 24th of February - they all had Mr. Gifford's crest on them - I advanced 50s. on them - he stated, on the 24th of February, that the case belonged to an Irish officer, who had lost the key and could not open it, without the servant's breaking it; after he got it open, and got out what he wanted, he had told the servant he might have it for his pains - he said he had not got all the contents with him, but would bring the case. On the 26th of February I wrote to the commanding officer at Hounslow, and advertised it, but heard nothing for a long time. On the 5th of March a woman, who passed as the prisoner's wife, came with two gold seals - I asked where her husband was - she went out and fetched him in - I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge - he said the property was stolen by somebody else, and given, or sold to him - he was remanded till Mr. Gifford came up.

JOSEPH LUMBER . I am servant to Mr. White, an officer of the Lancers. On the 24th of December, I recollect Lieutenant Gifford coming to the barracks - I heard his box had been stolen three days afterwards - the prisoner, at that time, was living at the barracks, as servant to Lieutenant Phillips, at the barracks - I never heard of his master losing a box, or of any other officer losing one, except the prosecutor - the prisoner remained in the barracks for three weeks or a month; I heard him talking in the stable about an officer of the 10th having lost a box - this was the same week as the robbery.

Prisoner. That man would injure me if he could. Witness. I never differed with him - we parted very good friends; he shook hands with me when he left.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge at Guest's. I took him down to Ipswich, as he said he had bought the property of a man belonging to the 10th; he pointed a man out - I took him before a Magistrate, and brought both to London.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the articles from a servant of the 10th of Hussars, a few days before they marched from Hounslow, but he denies the charge, and I have no witnesses to prove it - he trumped up an idle story of my having told him I had lost a cloak belonging to an officer I once lived with - the officer's brother has refuted that charge. I could prove I was in a canteen at Hounslow at the time of the robbery; a person came to town for that purpose, but being poor was obliged to return. One of the men told the Magistrate that I said I supposed the waggoner had stolen the property; another stated, I said I supposed it must be the post-boy, but I did not know the articles were lost, and could not have said any thing of the sort - I have been in the regiment twenty-six years; the servant came to me, and asked if I was not going to be discharged out of the regiment - I said, Yes - he said he had some articles for sale, for his master was going to Portugal, and having lost the key of his case, he had broken the lock open and gave him his case, having bought another - he said he would let me have the whole for 2l., as he was going on the march and could not carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-13

766. ELLEN HALFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 21 yards of printed calico, value 7s. , the goods of Robert Briant .

ROBERT BRIANT. I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Borough . On Saturday, the 10th of February, this calico was about two yards within the door, when I went out about three o'clock - I returned late in the evening, and it was gone - Kilby, the street-keeper, brought it to me on the following Saturday; it has my private mark on it.

EBENEZER RUCKSHAW . I am in Mr. Briant's employ. On the 10th of February, between five and six o'clock, I

saw the prisoner turn the corner of the shop, but had not seen her enter, nor could I see whether she had any thing - she was inside the shop, but had not asked for any thing - I immediately missed this calico, which was safe five minutes before.

THOMAS KILBY . I am a constable of Bridge Ward. On the 10th of February, about a quarter before six o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner on Fish-street-hill with this calico in her apron, in consequence of information which I had received - I asked what she had got there; I took her into a house; she then said she had picked it up in the street, but could not for her life recollect where - it was rumpled up as if snatched off a rail - Mr. Briant claimed it on the following Saturday.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up between the bridge and St. Thomas' Hospital; a woman followed me, and wanted part of it - I said I would not give it her, as she did not cry Halves! a gentleman, who heard us talking about it, gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-14

767. HENRY WATTS and JOHN MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 wooden firkin, value 6d., and 50lbs. of butter, value 35s. , the goods of Edmund Ronalds .

GEORGE PARKINS . I am carman to Edmund Ronalds, of Upper Thames-street. On the 28th of February, about twelve o'clock, I had thirty firkins of butter in my cart, which stood at Gerrard's Hall, Basing-lane - I left the cart three or four minutes, while I went up the gateway, to ask a carman to let me pass; when I returned I received information, and found a firkin had been lifted over the tail rope, and was gone - it was safe when I left the cart. I saw a crowd in pursuit, and before I got up the prisoners were in custody, and the firkin on the pavement.

WILLIAM BIERTON . I am foreman to Mr. Bailey, a carman. I was standing in Bread-street, close to the church, talking to two people; Ronalds' cart passed me, and three men were following it - their backs were towards me; I could see down Basing-lane, and saw the cart turn down Basing-lane; I kept looking, and in less than five minutes they all three returned, one having the tub of butter on his shoulder - that was Watts; the other two eased it a little, as he turned the corner; they went on towards Old Fish-street - I followed, and said, "Stop him!" Watts immediately threw it off his shoulder, but was stopped, without my losing sight of him; Haddow, who was talking to me, laid hold of Moore directly - he was one of the three.

RICHARD HADDOW . I am a linen-draper. I was in Bread-street, and saw three men watching the cart - they returned, Watts having the firkin - Moore and the other cased it on his shoulder; we ran, and Watts dropped it; I secured Moore.

HENRY CASTLE . I am a porter. I was standing in Bread-street, with the witnesses; the cart went by - the prisoners and another were following it; the other was foremost - I saw him beckon to the prisoners; they turned into Basing-lane; I saw them all three come out with a firkin of butter, but I cannot say which had it; the prisoners were secured.

JOHN SMITH . I am a carpenter. I was in Old Fish-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I turned round, and saw Watts running very hard - several persons tried to stop him, but could not - I caught him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WATTS' Defence. The witnesses have sworn false about the others easing the firkin - I know nothing of them; and as to their not losing sight of me, the gentleman who stopped me held me six or seven minutes before any one came up.

WATTS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-15

768. RICHARD TYE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Richard Nelme , from his person .

MR. RICHARD NELME. I am an oil broker , and live in Lower Thames-street. On the 23d of March I was at the corner of Cree-lane, Leadenhall-street , going home, and heard a gentleman say, "I have caught you at last," and on my turning round he had hold of the prisoner, who had my handkerchief in his hand - it was safe ten minutes before; he was within two feet of me, and pretended to be drunk.

AARON GUSH . I am a shoemaker, and live in Lothbury. I was in Leadenhall-street, and saw Mr. Nelme looking in at a window; I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief out of his pocket; I seized him, took it out of his hand, and said, "I have caught you at last;" I had seen him try several gentlemen's pockets, which made me watch him.

JOHN THOMAS GREY . I am an officer, and took him in charge; he resisted very much; it took four or five of us to handcuff him - he shammed intoxication.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-16

769. RICHARD DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 cloak, value 5s., and 4 pairs of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Wightman .

DAVID WIGHTMAN . I am the son of Charles Wightman, who is a baker . On the 24th of March these things were at No. 26, Abchurch-lane , where my father was moving to. I went to the house, and met the prisoner coming down stairs; he had got nothing then, and I did not speak to him; I went up to the second floor, and while I was asking my mother who he was I heard some one on the stairs; I went out of the room, and saw him running down - I ran out, and stopped him close by, with this cloak and four pairs of shoes - he was quite a stranger; I saw him drop them, and lost sight of him for a minute, while he turned the corner, but I am sure of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270405-17

770. DANIEL BISPHAM was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Septimus Sadler (he and others of his family being therein), about the hour of five o'clock in the afternoon of the 20th of February , at St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate, and stealing there in 1 diamond ring, value 4l., and 1 brooch, value 10s. , his property.

SEPTIMUS SADLER. I am a pawnbroker , and live at No. 134, Bishopsgate-street without, in the parish of St. Botolph - I rent the house, and have no partner. On the 20th of February it was discovered that a pane of glass in the window was broken; it was an entire pane in the morning, and had not been cracked, as I had seen it myself - I and all my family were at home when this happened; this property was not taken out of the window, but was entirely removed from the place where it laid; it had been in the centre of the pane adjoining the one that was broken - it was a diamond ring, worth 4l., and a brooch, worth 10s.; the prisoner was secured, and in the custody of Cawood, before I discovered it.

WILLIAM CAWOOD . I am in the employ of Mr. Sadler. On the 20th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening (it was dusky - we had lighted candles, but it was light enough to see a man's features outside the house), I observed the prisoner, in company with another young man, lurking about the window, which induced me to watch; I approached the window - they both went away; they came again, and on my approach went away again; they returned in two or three minutes: I placed myself where they could not see me, and then saw the prisoner's hand at the window, in the act of removing something; they went away in a few minutes; I went out, and placed one shutter up, and as I returned, moved my hand along the window (so that I could not be noticed), and found a wire projecting out of the window - it had removed a brooch and a ring five or six inches from the place where I had put them; part of the glass was broken away, about an inch square - it was large enough to draw them out, if there had been time to have done so; I am certain the pane was intire and perfect in the morning; the prisoner and the other were then in company, on the opposite side of the way - I told our lad to call the foreman, and told him the window had been cut, but he did not understand me; I crossed over to them, caught hold of the prisoner's collar, and said, "My lad, I want you;" I could not make a sure grasp, and he ran away, but fell down, and I collared him; I am quite sure of his person - I had an opportunity of seeing his features at the window for some minutes; here are the articles - I am sure the wire had quite removed them from their places.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was near six o'clock? A. About twenty minutes or half-past five. There is an inner glass to the window - I had two panes to look through; there was some property hanging in the window, which would obstruct my view in some degree. Our shop is very dark - the candles were lighted, but at the time it was done there were some bed-steps at the end of the counter, which prevented the ray of the candle light going on the part of the shop where the prisoner was; it was not quite dusk. The part of the window where he stood is not so full of goods as the other part, and I could fully discover his features. There were some spectacles and other things there.

JOHN LIMAN . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my charge; I had not seen him stopped; I took him to Mr. Sadler's house, and asked if he had any thing about him; I found nothing but this piece of stick in his pocket.

MR. SADLER. Part of the wire was outside the window, and part in, and it was attached to the property.

JURY to WM. CAWOOD. Q. Did you say you moved your hand along as you put up the shutter.? A. Yes, in order to see if there was any thing put through, as I thought they might think I was suspicious; I did not stay to look, but merely felt the wire - I saw it moving in the window before I went out; the hole was an inch or an inch and a half large; I did not know but the wire might have been put through the putty. I did not find the broken piece of glass - I might have trod on it - I saw him moving his hand outside, and the wire within.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his youth, and previous good character.

Reference Number: t18270405-18

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 6.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

771. JOHN GARDNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Blay, about the hour of nine in the night of the 27th of February , at St. Anne, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 4 watches, value 23l. , the goods of the said Henry Blay .

HENRY BLAY. I am a jeweller , and live at No. 6, Princes-street, Leicester-square, in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster ; I rent the house. On the 27th of February, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was at work in my shop, and heard glass break; I jumped up immediately, and seeing a hand in my window, taking watches, I called Stop thief! four watches hung together - two of them were dropped; the prisoner was secured in less than a minute and a half, without getting out of my sight - I saw him drop one watch, and saw the other found in the knee of his trousers; the other two were picked up outside the window; he looked me hard in the face, and said he had done nothing - at that time I saw him shoving the watch down his knee. Here are the watches - they are mine, and worth 23l. - they were all safe just before, and the window quite whole; the one found upon him is worth 9l. 7s.

CORNELIUS O'BRIEN . I am an officer. I was on the spot, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - Blay was following him; I saw him secured, and the watches found; I found one in the knee of his trousers.

Prisoner's Defence. They accuse me of taking four watches, but only one was found on me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18270405-19

772. SARAH RUDDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 8 gowns, value 4l.; 9 bed-gowns,

value 1l.; 5 aprons, value 5s.; 3 petticoats, value 3s.; 4 shifts, value 4s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., the goods of George Henry Ambrose , in the dwelling-house of Ebenezer Day .

JEMIMA ANN AMBROSE . I am the wife of George Henry Ambrose - we lodge in Adam-street West, St. Mary-le-bone , in the house of Ebenezer Day. The prisoner came to lodge in the front garret on the 17th of February, with a man, who passed as her husband. The articles stated in the indictment were in two boxes, which stood on the garret landing, and were locked - I saw every thing safe in them about a week before the prisoner came there - she left on the 2d of March, and on the 14th I missed this property; the hasp had been taken off the portmanteau - the other box had the hasp taken off and put on again. I sent for Buckeridge, and went with him to her lodgings, in Paradise-street, where we found her; he told her there had been a robbery at Day's, and we wished to search her place - she said we were welcome, as there was nothing there but what belonged to herself - in it - she said flannels for her husband; he opened it, and in it I found two of my gowns, a petticoat, and a night gown.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure Day's name is Ebenezer? A. Yes. They had lodged there for a fornight, and I had not been to the trunks during that time.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I found the prisoner at her lodging - I asked her what the bundle contained - she said flannels for her husband; I opened it - there was a flannel shirt and a pair of stockings, and under them the property now produced; she then said she knew nothing about it. I found one hundred and nine duplicates there, but none relating to this property. The husband was afterwards taken, and I found 3s. 6d. on him. She said next day that she had redeemed the things from Mr. Harris', Tottenham-court-road.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the duplicate of the property up on the stairs.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-20

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

773. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for that he, on the 14th of February , at St. Martin in the Fields, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain receipt, for money , which is as follows: (that is to say.)

Mr. Arrowsmith, To J. Braznell, s. d.

To opening a door and plate .......... 2 0

A new key for door .......... 1 6

Nine feet of iron, and screw for truck .......... 8 0

11 6

Settled J. Braznell.

with intent to defraud Harrison Arrowsmith , against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like forged and counterfeited receipt for money, with a like intention, he knowing it to be forged.

HARRISON ARROWSMITH. I am a wine-merchant , and have chambers in Adam-street, Adelphi - several other persons have chambers in the same building. I have known Tierney William Pullen three or four months, or perhaps six months - I knew him before this happened; I understand he is clerk to Mr. Price, an attorney, whose chambers are above mine; I have seen him go up towards those chambers, but never saw him enter them. The prisoner was my porter - he came to me in November, and left about the middle of February; I put money into his hands from time to time, to make small payments for me; he rendered me an account from time to time; I have not got the last account that he rendered, as it is in a book which he kept himself; when the money was nearly expended I examined it, and gave him back the book, with a further sum - the last time he brought it to me to be examined was the beginning of February - I examined it, and returned it to him; I have seen it since, in his hands - it is still in his possession, as far as my knowledge extends; when he brought me the book to examine he gave me vouchers for his payments. When he brought it to me in February there was a charge for money paid to Braznell - he gave me this voucher (producing it) to support that charge; it corresponded precisely with the charge in the book; I had employed Braznell to do some work for me. I have since paid the money to Braznell, myself, about the 14th of 15th of February, which was before the prisoner left; he absconded on the day that Braznell applied for it; I paid Braznell part that day and part the next - I only paid part before the prisoner left, I told him Braznell had applied for it - he stopped the whole of that day, but did not come next morning - he was taken up nearly a month afterwards, I think on the 14th of March; I had not seen him during that time - there was nothing due to him the last time I settled the account.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there no some account running between you and the prisoner? A. Yes; I had struck a balance at the time this voucher was given - I did not owe him any money at the time he went away; there was no book debt due to him; I had not sufficient silver about me when Braznell called, and only paid him part. I had no character with the prisoner - his mother lived as laundress in the house for ten or twelve years. I knew him for three years, and had a good opinion of him.

JOHN BRAZNELL . I am a smith and bell-hanger - I cannot write, nor read writing; I had done some work for Mr. Arrowsmith. The prisoner came to me about the middle of February, and asked for the bill; I told him I could not write, and should be obliged to him to sit down and write it for me, and I would tell him what the materials were - he did so, and I told him to put down a new key to the back door, 1s. 6d. - opening the wine-cellar door, with eight inches of iron, 2s. - repairing a winetruck, 8s., making together 11s. 6d.; he wrote that, as I suppose; he put the bill into his pocket, and took it away; he did not pay me the money. I went to Mr. Arrowsmith for the money, about a fortnight afterwards; he paid me 5s. and 6s. 6d. the next day.

TIERNEY WILLIAM PULLEN . I was fourteen years old last month, and am clerk to Mr. Price. I attend at his chambers in the Adelphi - Mr. Arrowsmith's chambers are

in the same building, below Mr. Price's. I have known the prisoner since November last, and knew he attended Mr. Arrowsmith's chambers - his mother, who is a laundress, and lived in the same building, used to get me my dinner; one day, when I went down to dinner, he was down stairs, and asked me to copy a bill for him, which he produced; he said it was in his own hand-writing, that the man and his wife could neither read nor write, and it would not do for him to give a bill in his own hand-writing, as Mr. Arrowsmith would know his hand-writing; I wrote the bill for him (looking at it), this is all my writing; the words, "Settled, J. Braznell," are my writing.

Q. Was that on it when he gave you the bill to copy, or did he tell you to add it? A. As far as I recollect that was on it - he asked me to write it, and I thought it no harm.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner in Adam-street, Adelphi, at his mother's, on the 14th of March; Mr. Arrowsmith told me he was there.

COURT to Mr. ARROWSMITH. Q. You said the prisoner absconded? A. He did - I was there later on this evening than usual, and saw him; I sent after him, but he would not come in - I sent some people to secure him till I could procure an officer - that was the first time I had seen him after he left me; he gave me the bill produced at the chambers. I saw this amount entered in his book.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at his mother's the night you saw him? A. She is laundress at my chambers.

The forged instrument was here put in and read, see indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. When Braznell asked me to make out the bill I did not do it with intent to defraud Mr. Arrowsmith; I wrote it according to his direction, and went away with it, telling him I would call and pay it on Saturday; I went to receive a cheque of 41l. odd, for my master, and laid the money on the desk, with the book for him to examine, and the bill pinned in it; 1 intended to take the money to the man on the Saturday.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of the smallness of the sum, and his good character .

Reference Number: t18270405-21

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

774. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Cooper, in the King's highway, on the 19th of March , at St. Giles in the Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 5s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 pair of spectacles, 2s., and 2 half-crowns , the property of the said William Cooper .

WILLIAM COOPER. I am a labourer . On the 19th of March, about ten minutes or a quarter past eleven o'clock at night, I was in High Holborn, going home; I was perfectly sober - four or five young men met me, and shoved me about, one from another, telling me not to be in a hurry - they first came to me between Little Queen-street and Newton-street; they kept pushing me about till I got to Newton-street, which is in my way home - I live at No. 10, Charles-street, Drury-lane; I turned down Newton-street , and began to run; two or three of them had continued with me, pushing me about, till I got to Newton-street; the prisoner was one of them; two or three pursued me down Newton-street, and the prisoner kept beating me with a stick, as I ran, till I got very near my own door; he then got rather behind me, and struck me with the stick over the eye and ear, and knocked me down - I do not know where the others were then - my hat and two handkerchiefs which were in it, went off at the same time as I was knocked down; I called out Stop thief! the prisoner ran away; I got up and followed him - he was taken in my sight, by Reardon, the patrol; he had not got far from me, and I did not lose sight of him; he was taken to the watch-house; when I got there I searched, and missed from my coat pocket my spectacles, and from my breeches pocket two half-crowns; I recovered my hat at the watch-house, with one of the handkerchiefs - the other is gone; I am sure I had two half-crowns in my pocket. I am fifty-seven years old.

DANIEL REARDON. I am a patrol. I heard the cry of Stop thief! on the night of the 19th of March - I was in Drury-lane - I went from there into Charles-street, which runs into Drury-lane, and saw the prisoner running towards me, with two or three others, who appeared to be in his company; the prisoner was first - I stopped him; he said, "Oh, let me go - it was not me;" I said, "Stop till the man comes up," as I saw the prosecutor coming up, calling Stop thief! he said then, "Oh, let me go - I have only got his hat;" I immediately took the hat off his head, and there was a handkerchief in it; the prosecutor came up, and said he was the man; I saw Suttie, a patrol, search him at the watch-house, and two half-crown pieces were found in his breeches pocket; Cooper's eye was very much cut, and his face all over blood; the prisoner had a stick when I took him; I went back to Charle-street afterwards, and near the spot where I took him I found the spectacles and case, on the ground. Cooper had not said he was robbed of two half-crowns before the prisoner was searched. I produce the hat, spectacles, and stick.

WILLIAM SUTTIE . I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found two half-crowns on him.

WM. COOPER. This is my hat, handkerchief, and spectacles - there is no mark on the half-crowns.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Charles-street, and saw the prosecutor laying on the pavement; there was a hat six or seven yards from him - I took it up, and put it on, having none of my own. I walked along - he sang out Stop thief! the patrol stopped me, and asked what I had done - I said I had this man's hat; they asked him, at the watch-house, if he had lost any money - he said Yes, a shilling or two - they then asked if he had lost any half crowns - he said Yes, he thought he had - he was quite drunk.

D. REARDON. The prosecutor was very weak, but quite sober.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18270405-22

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

775. ELIZABETH PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 4 gowns, value 25s.; 5 shifts, value 2s.; 1 child's coat, value 2s.; 3 aprons, value 18d.; 1 petticoat, value 18d.; 2 shawls, value 10d.; 6 frocks, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 2 caps, value 5s.; 4 bed-gowns, value 3s.; 4 pinafores, value 1s.; 2 pairs of

stockings, value 3s.; 3 books, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value 18d.; 1 counterpane, value 4s. and 1 umbrella, value 6d., the goods of Sarah Pavett , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Lowe .

SARAH PAVETT. I lodge in Essex-street, Kingsland-road , at Mr. Lowe's - I do not know the name of the parish; Samuel Lowe keeps the house. The prisoner came to lodge with me the beginning of February; she paid me 1s. a week for part of my bed. I went out to nurse the beginning of February, leaving the key with her, as I slept out; I locked my drawers, and am sure every thing was safe; I came home in a fortnight and three days, about eight o'clock in the evening, found the door locked, and the key laying on the floor, by the side of the door - I had been home once in the interval; my drawers were then locked, but I did not look into them. When I came home on this evening the prisoner was not there; I missed some of this property from a box - I did not sleep at home that night; I had lost the keys of my drawers a few days before I went to my place, which was the reason I did not open them; I had them broken open the next morning, and missed the rest of the property. I did not see the prisoner till the 28th of February, when I found her at Hackney work-house, where she received 2s. a week. I had her taken into custody, and she produced several duplicates.

JOHN GARVA . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner - she produced several duplicates, which I have here; she said they were all of Mrs. Pavett's property.

RICHARD LAW . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. On the 12th of February the prisoner pawned a shawl with me, in the name of Perry - a gown and silk handkerchief on the 21st - a frock and apron on the 15th, for 9d. - on the 17th a gown, for 1s. 6d., a pincloth and frock, for 6d. - on the 23d some child's things, for 6d., and on the 15th of February a sheet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Of stealing to the value of 20s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-23

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

776. MARGARET JONES , JEREMIAH ROBINSON , and TIMOTHY CONNELL were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Swann , in the King's highway, on the 2d of April , at St. John, Clerkenwell, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 9s.; 1 watch-key, value 9s., and 1 watch-chain, value 2s. , the goods of the said James Swann.

JAMES SWANN. I am a currier , and live in Berkeley-street, Clerkenwell. On the 2d of April, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell , walking home - the prisoner, Jones, came up to me, and asked where I was going; I made no reply, but walked on - she asked a second time, and followed me several paces, asking me to go home with her; I told her to go about her business, that I was going home; she still followed, and got a little before me, then stopped, as if she was going to speak to me, made a snatch at my watchchain, and got it out of my pocket - I put my left arm round her waist, and tried to take it from her, with my other hand; she extended her arm out so that I could not reach it; she called out Jerry! and immediately the other two prisoners came across the street; I had seen them looking stedfastly at me, while she followed me; they were moving on in the same direction as me, but on the other side of the street; they came across, and she placed the watch in Robinson's hand; he passed it to Connell; I immediately called out Watch! Brown and Hawkins came before the watchman came up; I let go of the woman, to seize the two men; three or four watchmen came up, and they were all secured and taken to the watch-house; the watch was delivered to Tarrant.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Are you quite sure the watch was passed to Robinson first? A. Yes; I never said differently; there was a strong gas-light just there; I was quite sober - I am sure Robinson passed it to Connell.

BENJAMIN HAWKINS . I was in Red Lion-street with Brown, and heard Swann call Watch! we went over the road directly, and found the three prisoners and Swann there, nobody else - we secured the two men; the watchman came up, and all three were taken - I saw the watch after Brown picked it up, not before - I saw Jones pass it to Robinson.

DANIEL BROWN . I was with Hawkins. We crossed over, and I picked up the watch just off the curb-stone, where they stood; I had seen Jones pass it to Robinson, and Robinson to Connell; I took it to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he passed it to Connell? A. Yes; we ran across directly; there was not time for them to get away.

REUBEN RICE . I am a constable of Clerkenwell, and assisted in apprehending the prisoners - I saw Brown pick up the watch.

JONES' Defence. I was walking up Benjamin-street; the prosecutor came up, and asked where I was going; he said he had been to a public-house; I asked him to accompany me home; he hesitated, and said he did not think he had time; he walked down Red Lion-street, and then stopped to look at his watch, which he accidentally dropped; he then seized me, said I had robbed him, and I called out, as he would not let me go.

ROBINSON'S Defence. I was going home from work, and saw a crowd - I crossed over, and the witnesses seized me.

CONNELL'S Defence. I heard a female cry for help, and ran across; the gentleman collared me; I never saw the watch.

JONES - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing from the person only . - Transported for Life .

ROBINSON - NOT GUILTY .

CONNELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-24

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

777. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 writing-case, value 5s.; 1 breast-pin, value 5s.; 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 7 shillings, the property of Robert Forse , in the dwelling-house of William Rogers .

ROBERT FORSE. I am a miniature-painter , and lodge in St. John-square, in the house of William Rogers; it is

in the parish of St. John, Clerkenwell ; Rogers lives at Finchley; the engineer of his factory, lives in the house; I have only one room, which is the first floor back; my wife, and her sister, lodged there with me at the time; we only had one room for all three; the prisoner visited my wife's sister for eighteen months. On the 9th of January we had company at my room, and they all staid all night; the prisoner was one of them; he was there in the afternoon of the next day - I laid down on the sofa to rest, and fell asleep - he was then in the room with my wife and her sister; my writing-case was then on the sofa, with two sovereigns and a half, and seven shillings in silver in it, and also a gold breast-pin - when I awoke, I found them all three in the room - they were awake - I had slept from two till five o'clock - the prisoner said he had been to Bermondsey while I was asleep; I did not miss my case till next morning; the prisoner came in soon after, and I asked him if he had taken it in a joke; he said he had not; I heard of it on the 9th of March; he kept my sister-in-law company up to that time; but there had been a dispute between him and me, and he did not come to the lodging later than a week after the case was gone, as my sister-in-law left then. On the 9th of March Lyles gave me information, and I took the prisoner up on the 10th.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You say your house is in St. John's, Clerkenwell? A. Yes; I believe that to be a parish of itself. Mrs. Watson told me that on the day of the robbery, she saw a man come out of the house with a portfolio; the street-door is generally open, as the house is in a yard; the prisoner lent me 9s. on the 9th, and I have not paid him. I quarrelled with him, because he was impudent to my wife - I did not miss the case till I wanted to use it; I did not suspect him, as he was represented as a man of property.

ROBERT LYLES . I am a servant, and now live with my aunt, in Charlotte-place, Bermondsey, but six weeks ago I lodged in Norwich-court, Fetter-lane - the prisoner once lodged there. About seven weeks from this time, he gave me this writing-case - he said he bought it to keep writings in, but it was no use to him - I went to the Albemale's Head public-house, St. John-square, to inquire for the prisoner, and said he owed me a little money, as he had given me a writing-case, I should set it off against it - Sampson, the landlord, who was present, came to me afterwards, and I took the case to the Albemarle's Head - Forse saw it, and said he could swear to the case, but the ink-stand was gone.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner and writing-case - there is a key to it, which opens only one lock; I know the parish is called St. John, Clerkenwell.

ROBERT FORSE . This is my writing-case. I have a key in my pocket which opens both locks; I know the make of it - here is a white mark in it, and a stain of ink.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not that mark merely a scratch? A. No; my wife is confined; I have not brought her sister-in-law here, because I considered that she knew about it; I accused another person of it, as the prisoner urged me so to do; that person, and the prisoner, had both seen me put the money into it, the night before.

Prisoner's Defence. On the afternoon, that the prosecutor had his party, he asked me to lend him a few shillings to procure refreshments for the company; I lent him 6s.; I was there next day; his wife's sister let me out in the afternoon, and also in the evening.

ANN WATSON . About the time of this robbery I saw a man coming from the prosecutor's premises, with something under his arm, similar to that produced; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner; it was soon after dinner-time, and about Christmas.

HANNAH JOHNSON . I am the prosecutor's sister-in-law. He had a party on the 8th; in the afternoon of the next day, my sister and I were both sitting by the fire, when the prisoner went out, and in the evening I let him out.

R. FORSE re-examined. Q. When did he lend you 6s.? A. On the day of the party; I borrowed it of him, as I had nothing but a cheque - I afterwards received two sovereigns, one half-sovereign, and one shilling for the cheque; the other six shillings belonged to the engineer, but was in my case.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-25

Before Mr. Recorder.

778. JOHN HILL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Maria Farmer , widow , about the hour of eight in the forenoon, of the 20th of January , at St. Mary-le-bone (no person being therein) and stealing 2 tea-pots, value 5l.; 2 forks, value 10s.; 3 spoons, value 5s., and 1 knife, value 5s. , her property.

SARAH HARBUT . I am servant to Mrs. Maria Farmer, a widow, who lives at No. 9, Manchester-street, St. Mary-le-bone ; nobody but her and myself live in the house. On the day of his Royal Highness the Duke of York's funeral, I left the house between seven and eight o'clock in the morning - my mistress, and a young lady who was visiting there, went out before me - I left no one in the house - I locked the door - I returned about a quarter past nine with my brother, whom I sent for the key which I had left at the greengrocer's - I stood at the street-door waiting for him, and heard a man in the passage - I looked through the key-hole, and saw one man there - I tapped at the door with my knockles, and the prisoner opened it from within - I am certain he is the man - another man then appeared - they were both strangers - I said, "Good God, is my mistress come home?" the other man said Yes- I said, "How long since?" he said, "Not long." I said,"Where is she?" they said, up-stairs. I said, "What ill?" they replied, "Yes, very ill." I asked if they had come home with her? they said, Yes. I opened the street door; they both walked out and said they should return presently, but never did. I ran up stairs and found it was all false, for my mistress was not at home, nor any body in the house. I missed a silver tea-pot and silver creamjug from the kitchen, which were safe when I went out; a plated tea-pot from the pantry cup-board, two large silver forks from the kitchen; a salt-spoon, mustard-spoon, and tea-spoon; I missed a silver desert knife from the kitchen - the silver tea-pot was a nice large one, worth full 9l. as old silver; the property was worth 25l. The prisoner was brought to our house on Monday evening last, the 2d of April - I recollected him well - I am quite positive he was one of the two men - I never had a doubt of him - they must have picked the lock, or used a false key.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. At what time did you leave the house? A. At a quarter past 8 o'clock, and returned at a quarter past nine - I never said I was almost sure he was the man - I was always certain of him - I was frightened about my mistress, but took particular notice of the men, as I had never seen them before - we have an area to the house, but no steps - I had not unfastened the area door that morning - it was still fast when I missed the things.

JAMES SMITH . I keep a chandler's-shop. I was coming by on the morning of the Duke of York's funeral, and saw the prisoner standing close by Mrs. Farmer's house; I knew him before, and called to him, saying, "Halloo young man, you don't speak now;" he turned his face half round; I called to him on purpose that Buckeridge, who was with me, might notice his face - he was alone - I saw no more of him that day - this was about ten minutes past nine, and I heard of the robbery a very few minutes afterwards - I saw him again on Tuesday evening last, about nine o'clock, and took him into custody - I was quite certain of him - he wanted me to go into a public-house and have something to drink, to see if we could not settle matters - I said, that was more than I dare do - I had told him it was for a case in Manchester-street.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A trimmer. I gave him to understand he was in custody. I heard the house had been robbed a very few minutes after I saw him.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am a constable. On the morning of the Duke of York's funeral I was returning home with Smith, and passing through Manchester-street, by the Marquis of Hertford's wall, I saw the prisoner standing, and looking up George-street, this was a quarter or twenty minutes past nine o'clock, as near as I can recollect - Smith pointed him out to me - I had a full opportunity of seeing his features - Smith spoke to him to draw his features into my observation - I am certain he is the man - I went to the office, and in a few minutes I heard of this robbery - he was apprehended last Tuesday night, and brought to the office - I went into the lock-up room and saw him - this house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he is the man you saw? A. Yes. I cannot be exactly certain as to the time. I suppose he was waiting for another person.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not bad time to bring my friends here - the servant says she saw me in the passage at the same time the others say I was in the street.

S. HARBUT re-examined. When he was taken he was brought to the house, and begged of me for mercy several times, saying he had a wife and family.

Prisoner. When I was taken to the house she said she believed I was the man, and she believed that was the coat I had on.

W. H. BUCKERIDGE. When she first came to the office, she was positive of him, and mentioned his dress; she never expressed a doubt about him. I heard him ask her to show him mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

Reference Number: t18270405-26

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

779. ELIZABETH FRANKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , at St. Mary, Islington, 1 counterpane, value 10s.; 3 flannels, value 3s.; 12 sovereigns, 4 crowns, 8 half-crowns, 40 shillings, 8 sixpences, and 11 halfpence, the property of Richard Alloway , in his dwelling-house .

LUCY ALLOWAY . I am the wife of Richard Alloway, and live at No. 1, Cross-street, Ball's Pond, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington ; the prisoner lodged at our house for about three months, and was a dress-maker . On a Sunday morning, a little after two o'clock, 1 awoke, and found her standing in my bed-room (I do not recollect the date); my husband was in bed with me. When I went up to bed that night I put my pocket under my pillow; there was a purse in it containing eleven sovereigns and 3l. worth of silver, there was also a sovereign and 24s. in silver, loose in my pocket, and 21/2d. in copper, and a small knife, belonging to my little boy; the bed-room would not lock, but I shut it, and put a chair against it - I did not hear her come into the room; she awoke me by screaming and hallooing that thieves were in the house; my husband said, "Halloo, open the window;" she said, "I can't, I can't;" I answered, "You open the window;" he did so, and called Thieves and Watch! I do not know what prevented her opening it, if she had liked; she said they had stripped her room; my husband went down stairs; the watchmen came in; the prisoner still remained in the room; the watchmen said, "Here is a bundle;" I saw my husband on the stairs with the watchmen, and a bundle wrapped in a shawl, which the prisoner has now got on; the prisoner still remained in the room - she said, that two men had come into her room with black crape over their faces, and come to her bed, litted her head up and took her pocket from under her head, with 2l. in money in it; she said they opened the door, which awoke her, lifted the pillow up, to lift her head easy, and drew the pocket out with the other hand - I then looked for my pocket, which was gone - I then went to the stair-foot and hallooed to the watchman, to tell them I was not worth a farthing, I had lost all, and she kept saying, "I have lost my all, I have lost my all" - she said she saw them go to my press-bedstead, which stood in her room, and open it, and take a counterpane out, a pair of blankets, and all the things which were there; the other things in the bedstead were hers - she said they went to her box and stripped it, and drank nearly a pint of rum in the room, and ale bread and cheese - they had a dark lantern which they put backwards and forwards over her eyes, to see if she was asleep; that she heard the kitchen-door slam after they went down stairs; and as soon as she heard that she came into our room, as she thought she was then safe. After this I went down stairs into the kitchen, leaving her on the top of the stairs, and on the kitchen-table was the bundle which I had seen before; she came down to the kitchen, I said, "These things are all mine," and she said, "Yes, they are;" there was a pair of blankets and a gown of mine, a bit of stuff which I had given her to make a child's frock, and some Irish which had been given her to make shirts; the blankets had been in the bedstead; the counterpane, which had been in the bedstead, was not there. A little after six

o'clock a pocket was brought to me - it was nearly daylight then - I saw Brown, the watchman, find it in the back-yard, between the wall and an old box; the prisoner had said she wished the watchmen to look about, as they might find something; the pocket was the one which had been taken from under my head; the purse was not in it then - the loose sovereign, 24s. 51/2d., and the little knife were still in it, but the purse and eleven sovereigns were gone. I saw my husband find an empty purse afterwards near the same place - she said that was hers.

Cross-examined. Q. Does your husband keep the house. A. Yes. He has no other Christian name.

RICHARD ALLOWAY . I am husband of the last witness. I did not hear the prisoner come into the room; she awoke me, by making a noise, and saying thieves were in the house - I found her standing by our bed side; I called the watchman, who came; I met him on the top of the stairs, with a bundle. I found the kitchen window open; it is a sash window, with an inside shutter, which puts up and down on hinges, so as to form an ironing board - it was still on the hinges - it was down, laying on two chairs; the bolts which fasten it inside were undone - I saw that it was bolted when I went to bed. I could find no marks of violence, as if any one had broken in; I looked both outside and in - this was on Sunday, the 4th of March; the prisoner continued to lodge with us till the Friday night, and then left, as my wife gave her notice.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had she lodged with you? A. Three months; she had the use of the kitchen. It was between two and three o'clock when I found the shutter down - I do not always look to see that it is fastened, but am sure I looked that night, and the night before. Her father took her away on the Friday, to her brother's house, next door. She awoke me to tell me the house was robbed.

WILLIAM BRITTON . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm about ten minutes after two o'clock, and went to Alloway's - the back kitchen window was about three parts open; there is a small gate which leads round the house to that window; the other watchman, Brown, got in at that window, and let me in at the door; I immediately discovered the bundle laying at the bottom of the stairs - Mr. Alloway opened it afterwards, and claimed the contents, which I have here. The prisoner went up into her own room with me - I found a large box there, open, and asked her if any thing had been in it; she said it was full of her clothes, but every thing was taken out; she told me about their taking her pocket from under her head. I examined the kitchen window well, inside and out, with my lantern, before I left the house - there were no marks of violence whatever, either on the windows or door. I produce the property.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present when the purse was found? A. Yes; it was about four feet from the kitchen window, behind an old wooden box.

JAMES BROWN . I am a watchman. I went to this house, hearing an alarm, and got in at the window. I produce a pocket, which I picked up between the box and the wall, about four feet from the kitchen window. There is a back door, which leads from the kitchen to the yard. Mrs. Alloway claimed the pocket; I examined the house inside and out - I could find no marks of violence, or of any one having got in.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any body with you when you found the pocket? A. Yes, Mr. Alloway. There was a sovereign, 24s., 51/2d., and a small knife in it.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I live at No. 10, Essex-street, Hoxton Old-town. The prisoner came to our house on Monday morning, the 5th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock, and brought a counterpane - she asked if I knew where there was a washer-woman, who would do some washing for her; I said the washer-woman next door had left, but as my wife was washing, perhaps she would wash what she wanted; she produced a gown and counterpane, and gave them to my wife. The officer, Hanley, got them from my house; I saw them delivered to him on the Sunday following, and am sure they are what she brought.

Cross-examined. Q. Who did she leave them with? - A. With me and my wife; I can swear to them by a mark on the counterpane, which I observed - it is done with thread - there are many washer-women in the neighbourhood. I did not know the prisoner nor the prosecutor before; I should not have taken them but she said she was coming to live in the neighbourhood, and I thought it might induce her to deal at my shop - my wife does not take in washing.

SARAH LAWRENCE . I live at No. 16, Margaret-street, Hackney-fields - I am a laundress, and take in mangling. The prisoner came to my house on Monday, the 5th of March, towards the afternoon I think - she asked if I took in washing; I said Yes, and she gave me three child's flannels to be washed and mangled - I gave them afterwards to Hanley.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer, and produce a counterpane, which I received from Bennett; the prosecutrix said the gown belonged to the prisoner, and it was delivered to her by Bennett. I received three flannels from Mrs. Lawrence.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I took the gown to the office, and gave it up to the prisoner's father - here is the mark on the counterpane.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you unfold it, to look at the mark, when she brought? A. No, but I saw it half an hour afterwards, and can swear this is the same she brought - it had not been out of my wife's possession.

COURT. Q. Had you any others of that size in your house? A. No, nor any like it.

MRS. ALLOWAY. This is the counterpane which I lost from the bedstead in her room; I know the flannels by the darn, as they were moth eaten, and the prisoner had darned them for me; the pocket is mine. The things found in the bundle are all mine.

JAMES HANLEY re-examined. I first went to this house on Tuesday, the 6th of March, and examined it very closely, but could find no mark of violence, or of any person having got in or out. I saw the prisoner that day, and told her, in her brother's presence, that either she had robbed Alloway, or Alloway was privy to her being robbed, for there were no external marks about the house; she told me, that about two o'clock on Sunday morning, her room door opened, and two men entered, as Mrs. Alloway has stated, and that she saw them take a white counterpane - she gave exactly the same account to me that Mrs. Alloway has stated. I took it down in writing, and have it

here. I went to Alloway's house again on the Friday following, and saw the prisoner - I asked her to produce to me what money she had in her pocket; she produced a sovereign, wrapped up in brown paper; I asked her to account how she became possessed of it - she hesitated very much, and at last said she had sold some things to a person in Rosemary-lane - I asked who it was - she said she thought she should know the person again - then she said she had sold them to some gentleman; I asked who the gentleman was - she appeared so much agitated that my brother officer objected to my questioning her further; I declined, and nothing more passed then. I apprehended her on Sunday night, the 11th of March, in a court in William-street, Harper-street, New Kent-road, at her sister's; I asked if she had any objection to say where the property was; this was before I told her I should take her into custody (I did not say it would be better or worse for her if she told - I make her no threat nor promise whatever) - she said she was very sorry for what she had done - that I should find the counterpane and her gown at a chandler's shop, in Essex-street, Hoxton - she did not know the person's name, and I should find the flannels at a mangler's, in Margaret-street, Hackney-fields - I found them there the same night; I asked her if the sovereign which I found in her possession on Friday, was part of the money she had taken from under Mrs. Alloway's pillow - she said it was. I was about an hour with her - she appeared very ill, and begged I would not take her into custody; I said I was compelled to do it - she stated that she let the kitchen window down before she took the pocket - that she had 8l. from Mrs. Alloway's pocket; I asked her what became of the rest of the money, and after some time she stated what she had done with it - her sister, her brother-in-law, and Mrs. Alloway were in the room all the time.

Cross-examined. Q. How long did you stay on the Friday? A. Perhaps half an hour or three quarters - she also appeared very ill on the Sunday - I was there near an hour, and she got better. I was endeavouring to discover the property. None of the persons in the room either threatened or promised her. I believe, towards the end, her sister said the prosecutor was a very poor man, and she should do what she could to restore his property; he said nothing to induce her to confess. I remember she said she had told Mr. Goupel what had become of the property - one of her relations directed me to her sister's house. - The prosecutor said he suspected she was over in the Kent-road.

Prisoner. I leave my case to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18270405-27

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

780. FRANCIS BOYER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , at Isleworth, 1 waistcoat, value 18d.; 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 5 sovereigns, the property of Edmund Spettigue , in the dwelling-house of Francis Boyer , the elder .

EDMUND SPETTIGUE. I lodged at the house of the prisoner's father, Francis Boyer, at Isleworth , for about ten months - the prisoner lived with his father for the last five months, and slept in the same room with me. On Wednesday, the 21st of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was sent for - I went to the house, found my box broken open, and missed a purse, with five sovereigns in it, which I had seen there the night before; I also missed a waistcoat, a shirt, and a silk handkerchief. I left my box locked when I went out that morning; the prisoner had slept there on Tuesday night, and I dined with him there at one o'clock on Wednesday, but when I was fetched he was gone - I was informed he had been gone about half an hour. I went in pursuit, and found him on the Friday following, in Essex, about sixteen miles off; I detained him, and sent for a constable - he had my waistcoat and shirt on, and the handkerchief he had in his hand, when he came into the house where I was; I saw him put the purse out of his hand, and give it to a young woman, whom he was in company with - I took it from her, telling her it was mine; it was the purse my sovereigns had been in - there was only 2s. in it then.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find any money on him except the 2s.? A. None; the clothes he was wearing had been in my box; I swore to the purse at the office by its being broken at one end - he was out of a situation, and slept in a bed in my room, which a person had left. - I mentioned the sovereigns at the office. I never offered not to prosecute if I received 10l.

CHARLES SMITH . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to Isleworth, and given into my charge. I have the waistcoat, shirt, and purse - they were delivered to me before the Magistrate.

E. SPETTIGUE. This is the waistcoat, shirt, and purse which I lost - my initials are on the shirt; this handkerchief is mine, and has my initials on it. The purse is broken at one end.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270405-28

Before Mr. Recorder.

781. HENRY HAWKINS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of James Macfarlin , in the night of the 13th of January , and stealing 8 packs of cards, value 10s. , his property.

JAMES MACFARLIN. I live in Wilsted-street, Somer's-town , and am a bookseller . On the 13th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I received information, and missed two packs of playing cards, and six of plain ones, from my window - they were safe half an hour before - I have not found them. A piece of glass had been cut out of the window to get them.

GEORGE FREDERICK BROWN . I am apprentice to Mr. Miller, a cabinet-maker, of Marchmont-street. On the 13th of January, between nine and ten o'clock, I was passing through Wilsted-street, and as I crossed the road Edwards called me, and gave me information - I then went into the middle of the road, and saw a tall young man, with his clothes splashed with whitening, opposite a broken pane of glass, at the prosecutor's shop window; the prisoner and two young women were near him; the prisoner was within a yard of him; I saw the tall man put a wire into the broken pane, and pull out some parcels, which he gave to the prisoner; they appeared like cards. About a fortnight after I saw the prisoner in Tavistock-place - he was not taken then - I was confident of him. When I saw this done I ran and told a watchman; he came to the shop, but the prisoner was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You looked very attentively round the Court before you could point out the prisoner? A. I did not look at the bar; the boy, who pointed him out to me in the street, said before the Magistrate, that he did not know whether the prisoner was the person; I have talked to some of my companions about this; I have no recollection of saying I expected any thing if the prisoner was transported; I will not swear I never said I expected money for it; I am sixteen years old.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a brass-founder, and live with my father in Wilsted-court. I saw two young men standing by the prosecutor's window, between nine and ten o'clock at night; I think one of them had a piece of wire in his hands - I cannot say which, as I did not take much notice - I told the witness, and then went on an errand - I could not distinguish their persons, as I did not take much notice.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you point out two boys to Brown? A. I said, "Look over there, at those young men;" I told the Magistrate I would not swear whether the prisoner was one of them or not.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. About the 12th of February, I apprehended the prisoner - he had been described to me; his dress had been described to me.

Cross-examined. Q. You found him in the same kind of dress? A. Yes; he said his name was Hawkins.

JAMES MEDLECOT . I am an officer. On the night, the prisoner was apprehended, he said he lived in Parker's-rents, St. Giles' - he gave his key to a young woman, who was in his company; she took me to his room; I there found this case, with twenty or thirty conversation cards, and a letter directed to Mr. Hawkins.

J. MACFARLIN. Neither the cards nor case are mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-29

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

782. JOHN COX was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Charles Perrott and Thomas Watts , on the night of the 31st of March , and stealing a piece of printed cotton, containing 24 yards, value 30s. , their property.

CHARLES PERROTT. I am in partnership with Thomas Watts - we are packers , and our premises are in Tenter-street, Moorfields ; neither of us sleep there, but our foreman and apprentices do. On Sunday morning, the 1st of April, about six o'clock, the foreman fetched me to the warehouse; I found the first floor window pulled down, and about eighty pieces of printed cotton, and three pieces of fustain taken away; it was light then, and two workmen were on the premises - I found the prisoner in custody, in about an hour, with a piece of cotton, which was one of those stolen, and had our private ticket on it; we had it to pack for exportation.

FRANCIS TIER . I am a watchman. About half-past four o'clock in the morning of the 1st of April, I saw several persons in White-street, which is near these premises; it was twilight - I watched them, and while I was informing my brother watchmen, up came the prisoner, with his coat buttoned from top to bottom; I told him I thought he was about no good, it being Sunday morning; he turned short round on his heel, and ran as hard as possible - I followed, crying Stop thief! and saw him drop this piece of printed cotton; he was not three minutes' walk from the premises; I only lost sight of him in turning the corner, and am certain of him - nobody was before him - I secured him; he said he was stopped for nothing - a watchman came up with the cotton, which he had dropped at the corner of White-court, White-street.

JOHN GAYDON . I am a City constable. About five minutes to five o'clock I was in Moor-lane, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner come out of Sweeden-passage into Moor-lane - I pursued him through White-street, and by No. 8, I saw him drop this print; I told a watchman to pick it up; it was taken to the watch-house, and claimed by the prosecutors - I followed him into Rope-maker-street; I only lost sight of him in turning the corner; no other person was to be seen in the street - I secured him; it was quite daylight; after that I saw three people taking property away from the prosecutors' premises; I took some from one of them.

RICHARD HILL . I am a watchman. I and Tier were at the end of Butler's-alley, which comes from Grub-street into Moor-lane; the prisoner came up; Tier asked what he did out at that time of the morning, and said, "I think you are one of the gang we are looking after;" he immediately turned about, and ran away; I joined in pursuit, and at the corner of White-court I picked up this piece of print - I did not see it dropped; I followed, and came up with the prisoner in Finsbury-square, took him to the watch-house, and delivered the print to Horton.

Prisoner. Q. Is White-court opposite to No. 8? A. Yes.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am an officer. Hill delivered this print to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS WHITE . I am an apprentice to the prosecutors, and sleep in the house the property was stolen from, on the second floor. I went to bed about twelve o'clock; the windows were then entire, and every thing safe - I got up at twenty minutes to six o'clock, hearing a cry of Stop thief! I found the first floor window open; the top sash was pulled down, and a quantity of prints stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up at five o'clock, and was told to go the corner of Redcross-street, where I should find a person waiting for me - a man there said the person who wanted me, was gone to a public-house, opposite Whitechapel-church, and wanted to tell me of my grandmother's death; I was running, and was taken.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-30

783. JAMES HANDS TOVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 45lbs. of steel, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Lambert .

JOSEPH LAMBERT. I am a coachmaker , and live in Jury-street, Aldgate - I had a quantity of steel on my premises - it was old coach-springs; the prisoner was about five weeks in my service - this steel was safe about three o'clock on the 14th of February; I found him at the watch-house with it, at eight o'clock - he said he hoped I would have mercy on him. He could earn 36s. a week.

GEORGE CLARK . I am foreman to Mr. Lambert. These springs were safe about three o'clock - the men leave work at eight - the prisoner left about half-past seven o'clock; I followed, and an officer, who was waiting, stopped him six or seven yards from the premises - he had these steel springs in a basket, which was covered up; he said, at the watch-house, he had bought them, but I had seen him breaking them into old steel, after three o'clock, which made me send for the officer - he begged my master to be merciful.

WILLIAM PLAISTOWE . I am a constable. I was waiting, and took the prisoner with the steel - he begged for mercy - I found some pieces of steel concealed in all parts of his person, in his hat, and his pockets.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-31

784. JOHN STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 6 fishes, called soles, value 6s. , the goods of William Seaman .

WILLIAM SEAMAN. I sell fish at Billingsgate . On the 12th of March, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I missed these soles from my stall - I know the prisoner by his being about the market, but I had not seen him that morning - I have not found them.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am seventeen years old. On the 12th of March, about half-past five o'clock, I was coming down to my father, who sells herrings in the market, and saw the prisoner, whom I knew before, at Seaman's stall - he laid his apron on the soles, then took them up, and dropped them behind the waterman's form; there was a lot of chaps sitting there - they got up, and separated - I do not know what became of the soles; I am sure he took them; I knew him before - I told Seaman; he was followed, and taken in Darkhouse-lane, and denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the market; but as I could get no work, I was returning, but did not touch the soles.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Week and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270405-32

785. SARAH FORRESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Richard Abbey , from his person .

MR. RICHARD ABBEY. I am a tea-dealer , and live in Pancras-lane. On the 8th of March I was in Cornhill , going from 'Change - I was passing a print-ship, seeing a great many people looking at something, I stopped; an officer told me my pocket was picked; I felt, and missed my handkerchief, which I saw him take from under the prisoner's arms - I had not felt it taken.

JOHN GIRTON . I am a constable, and was in Cornhill. I saw the prisoner put her hand into Mr. Abbey's pocket, and take this handkerchief; I took her into a shop, and took it from under her shawl.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270405-33

786. JOHN MAHANE and WILLIAM BLAKE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of Jacob Russell .

JACOB RUSSELL. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Fore-street . On the 4th of March I was returning home, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and saw a boy on his knees in my shop unpinning this waistcoat - there were three of them in company; I watched them, and saw Mahane take out a pin, and return to Blake, who was watching; he went back again, and took another pin out; came back again, returned a third time, took it quite down, and gave it to Blake, who was pretending to be looking in at the window - I pursued Blake; he at last threw himself down in the mud, and I took him with the waistcoat in his hand - a neighbour took Mahane; I am certain of them both.

JOHN SCOTT . I received them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MAHANE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

BLAKE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-34

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 7.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

787. JOHN CARY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , at St. George, Bloomsbury, 1 gelding, price 30l. , the property of Joseph Wan .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, his former character being irreproachable.

Reference Number: t18270405-35

788. EDWARD STEWARD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Reynolds , in the King's highway, on the 4th of April , at St. Giles in the Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 25l.; 2 seals, value 2l., and 1 watch-key, value 1l. , his property.

SAMUEL REYNOLDS. I am a solicitor , and live in Carmarthen-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the 4th of April, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I was opposite the watch-box, by Meux's brewhouse, in Tottenham-court-road , walking arm-in-arm with Mr. Bryant; the prisoner came up to me - he met me very suddenly; he hit me a blow in my stomach, and instantly pulled out my gold watch with great velocity - he gave me the blow with one hand, and then took the watch with the other - I had twisted my watch in the fob, but he gave it such a violent tug that it even shook my friend - he immediately ran away with it - I turned round, pursued him instantly, and was within six yards of him all the time, crying Stop thief! he ran down Bainbridge and Maynard-streets, up another street, and then to the top of Church-street - I gained upon him a little, and never lost sight of him; he carried the watch in his hand all the way; I saw him fling it down a cellar in Church-street; it was found in that cellar, and given to me - he ran into the watchman's hands, without my losing sight of him; I said, "You rascal, you have thrown my watch away;" Mr. Bryant followed with me - here is my watch; it was given to me by Leslie.

ROBERT BRYANT . I was with Mr. Reynolds on the 4th of April, and saw the prisoner dart upon him, instantly give him a blow, and then snatch the watch from his fob;

he ran away - we immediately pursued him down various streets - I did not see the watch in his hand; I am sure he is the man, for I never lost sight of him, except for an instant, as he turned the corner; it appeared to me that he darted from behind the watch-box.

THOMAS LESLIE . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Bainbridge-street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and made towards the cry; the prisoner was running, and came right against me; I seized him by the breast; he tried to get out of his coat-sleeves, but I secured him; he is the first who was running; Mr. Reynolds was following him; the next morning Cantling gave me the watch from the next cellar to the spot where I took him - Mr. Reynolds claimed it.

HANNAH CANTLING . I live in Church street. I found this watch in our cellar, and gave it to Leslie next morning; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, and hearing an alarm of Stop thief! I ran among the crowd; there were about fifty people running.

MR. REYNOLDS. There was no crowd at all.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270405-36

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

789. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1s.; 3 seals, value 30s., and 1 watch-key, value 2s., the goods of Charles Britcher , in the dwelling-house of John Mansfield .

CHARLES BRITCHER. I am a waiter at Oliver's hotel, at the foot of Westminster-bridge; it is kept by John Mansfield, and is in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster . On the evening of Wednesday, the 14th of February, I missed my watch from my bed-room - I left it hanging at the head of my bed when I got up that morning; when I went to bed at night it was gone; I know the prisoner; he came to the hotel on Tuesday evening, the 13th of February, and engaged a bed for the week; I was present when he engaged it for a week - he slept that night in the adjoining room to mine - I did not see him in that room, but no other room was ready for him; I know he was to have that room; I saw him down-stairs, about half-past 8 o'clock on Wednesday morning; he was going out; I asked if he should return to breakfast; he said he should return to breakfast by ten o'clock, but I saw no more of him till I found him in custody on the Thursday week following - he went away without paying.

WILLIAM TARRANT . I live in Great Charlotte-street, Blackfriars-road, and am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of February a watch, two seals, and a key, were pawned with me, by the prisoner for 1l. 15s., in the name of Robert Smith - I am certain of him - I asked if it was his own, he said it was; he returned to the shop a week afterwards, offered another watch in pawn, and produced the duplicate of the first which he had pawned, in order to show me his name and address - I detained the duplicate, and asked how he came by the watch he had first pawned - he said he had bought it for 4l.; I said I had had notice that such a watch had been stolen from the hotel at the foot of Westminster-bridge, and he must wait there till I sent for the waiter - he said he had a gentleman waiting to meet him, and it would be of consequence to him to go - he wished to go, but I detained him, and sent for a constable - I have the first watch here, and produce it - he was taken into custody by Doery - the watch and seals are worth 3l. - I would give that for them.

JACOB DOERY . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge at Mr. Tarrant's; he got away from me just beyond Astley's Theatre, and ran down the lane for a quarter of a mile; I cried Stop thief! and a mason stopt him - I took him to Oliver's Coffee-house, and then to Queen-square Office.

CHARLES BRITCHER . This is my watch and seals - one seal has been taken off; the watch was made for me, and my name is engraved in it; it cost me 5l. 5s.; I have had it five years.

Prisoner Q. Are you positive I am the person who engaged the bed? A. Quite so.

Prisoner. When I went into the hotel you made your how to me, and asked what I would take - I said a glass of ale, and asked if you had any knowledge of me; you said No, and the landlord said the same. Witness. When he was brought to the hotel I did not recognise him at first, in the hurry of business; he was then dressed in a black coat and waistcoat, blue trousers, and a dark green great coat; when he engaged the bed he had a light drab coat, buttoned up to his chin, and the same when he went away in the morning - I could not tell what clothes he had on under it - I am quite positive he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had a drab-coat in my life. I bought the watch, the day I pawned it, of a respectable man opposite the Waggon and Horses public-house, near the Elephant and Castle, for 4l. I had seen the man before, and wanting money I pawned it in my own name.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270405-37

790. ROBERT SMITH was again indicted for stealing on the 22d of February , at St. Margaret Westminster, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 snuff-box, value 30s., and 1 waistcoat, value 10s., the goods of Henry Champ ; and 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; the goods of Francis Lane , in the dwelling-house of Jane Holmes , widow .

HENRY CHAMP. I am waiter at Mrs. Jane Holmes's hotel, in Parliament-street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster ; she keeps the hotel; I know the prisoner; he slept there on Wednesday night, the 21st of February; I saw him that night, and just caught a sight of him the next morning before he was dressed, in the water-closet on the stairs; he slept in the room immediately under the one in which I did; he left the house that morning, without paying - I saw him again at Queen-square Office on the 8th of March. When he came on Wednesday he engaged the bed of me for nine nights, and next morning, after he was gone, I missed a coat, a waistcoat, a watch, a silver snuff-box, and two cravats from the drawer in my bed-room - I had placed the snuff-box there at night, after the prisoner went to bed, and saw the watch and cravats in the same drawer; the value of what I lost is 8l. or 9l.; it cost me more.

FRANCIS LANE . I am porter at this hotel, and remember the prisoner being there - I did not see him till the morning of the 22d of February; I went up to his room about nine o'clock, and took his great coat, his other coat,

and shoes to brush; there was a screw-driver in his coat-pocket, which I took out and put in again. I missed a pair of trousers that morning, about twelve o'clock, out of a box in my bed-room - I slept on the same floor as Champ, but not in the same room. I am sure he is the man.

JACOB DOERY . I took the prisoner in charge at Tarrant's; I think it was on a Thursday, and found this watch upon him - I produce a coat, waistcoat, trousers, and screw-driver, which he had in a bundle; the screw-driver was in one of the pockets of the coat he had on.

HENRY CHAMP. I know this watch to be mine by its general appearance, and the watch-paper that is in it - I have had it nearly five years, and it cost me 3l.; this coat is mine, and cost me 3l. 18s.; I have had it six months - it is my best coat; the waistcoat is mine, and is nearly new; the cloth was given me, I paid 9s. for making it.

FRANCIS LANE . These are my trousers; a gentleman gave them to me about two months ago; I could sell them for 10s.

W. TARRANT. I think it was on a Thursday that he came. Prisoner. I hope you will be as merciful to me as you possibly can.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270405-38

791. THOMAS DAVIES was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Holdaway , on the King's highway, on the 25th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 crown pieces, his monies .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-39

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

792. JAMES WICKS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Robert Hatt , on the night of the 6th of March , and stealing 1 till, value 2s.; 36 penny pieces, and 72 halfpence , his property.

ROBERT HATT. I live in Greycoat-place, Westminster , and keep a green-grocer's shop . On the 6th of March I went out between four and five in the afternoon - my till was then safe; I returned about twenty minutes after seven, and the till and money were missing.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you seen a boy named Taylor about? A. Yes; I charged him with the robbery.

LUCY HATT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went to the till about 7 o'clock in the evening, there was then 6s. or 7s. worth of copper in it - I served a customer, who I think shut the door when he went out, but I am not positive; it goes on a latch. I went into the back-room, and in twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour I went into the shop again, and missed the till; no other customer had been in; it was dark when I saw it safe - I believe the shop-door was shut.

ROBERT HOPKINS . I am an errand-boy at a baker's shop near Mr. Hatt's. On Tuesday evening, the 6th of March, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of Hatt's shop, with the till in his hand, and give it to Taylor, who stood near the door; he said run, and they both ran away with it; the till was made of white new wood, not painted - I heard copper rattle in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. One door from Hatt's shop - I had often seen both the prisoner and Taylor about before, and am sure of him - I am thirteen years old - another boy ran with them whom I did not know - I told Mr. Hatt of it the same night, and saw Cooper next morning.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I live at Westminster. On Tuesday evening, the 6th of March, I saw the prisoner and two more lads running down Horseferry-road, he had a till, or kind of deal box; I did not hear money rattle; they ran down Little Peter-street, which is a very little way from Hatt's. I knew the prisoner before, and am sure of him.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, after searching for him a full week.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you know his parents are very respectable? A. They are honest industrious people.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home at the time, which my mother can prove.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of stealing only. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270405-40

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

793. WILLIAM CHAMBERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 1 watch, value 2l.; 5 shirts, value 2l.; 8 pairs of stockings, value 15s., and 3 sovereigns, the property of Stephen Dennis , in the dwelling-house of George Simms .

STEPHEN DENNIS. I lodge at the Coach and Horses public-house, Westminster - it is kept by George Simms. I had two boxes in my room, which is the front garret - one was at the foot of the bed, and the other (a small one, which was locked and nailed down) was under the bed. - On the 21st of February I found them broken open when I went to bed - I had opened the large box the morning before, and locked it again; there was then three sovereigns in a little purse, a silver watch, and a suit of clothes; I lost the articles stated in the indictment from the two boxes. I went with Mallars and my brother-in-law, and apprehended the prisoner, next day, at a house in Windmill-street, Borough; I went afterwards with Simms, to the house, and found in a drawer in the lower room four shirts, several pairs of stockings, and two or three handkerchiefs; one shirt was taken off his back at the watch-house.

GEORGE SIMMS. I and my sister keep this public-house - we are in partnership, and both live there. The prisoner was our pot-boy and general servant. I missed him about seven o'clock on Wednesday night, the 21st of February, when I wanted him to take out the beer; I went into the privy, and found his working dress, a shoehorn, and an old pair of shoes there; I went next day, with Dennis and the constable three times, and at last found the prisoner at a house of ill-fame, in Windmill-street, near the Cobourg Theatre, in a back room, on the right-hand side of the ground floor - another young man, named Forrester, and three girls were in the room - we afterwards found this property in a drawer there. I saw a shirt taken off his back at the watch-house.

GEORGE MALLARS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at this house - some shirts and things were given to me by Dennis, at the watch-house; I saw this shirt taken off the prisoner's back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-41

Before Mr. Recorder.

794. ROBERT GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 10 feet of copper pipe, value 5s. , the goods of John Frederick James .

JOHN FREDERICK JAMES. I keep the Bedford Arms tea-gardens, Camden-town . This copper pipe was attached to an iron pipe which laid on my premises, but was not fixed at all; I did not miss it till a Tuesday in March, when the officer brought it - we then fitted it to the other part, and it corresponded exactly; it laid in an out-house. I had employed the prisoner, as he was in distress, to dig about my yard, and do a few jobs.

EDMUND WATTIS . I stopped the prisoner in Tottenham-court-road - he had formerly lodged with me. I went to his lodging in Daker-street, Westminster, and found this pipe; he said he lodged there, and I found a woman there, who lived with him as his wife.

JOSEPH KINGSTON . I am a constable. On the 5th or 6th of March I went with Wattis to the prisoner's lodging, which I found by his direction. I found this copper pipe there, bent and doubled up - I compared it with the pipe on James' premises - it corresponded exactly, and fitted the screws.

SOPHIA MOONEY . I live in Daker-street. This pipe was found in my first floor room, in which the prisoner lodged.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the road, tied in a handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-42

798. JEREMIAH HOLLAND and WILLIAM ASHLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 7 yards of silk, value 7s., and 7 yards of ribbon, value 7s. , the goods of William Nevill .

ANN MUSTON . I am shop-woman to Mr. William Nevill, who lives at Brunswick-house, Mile-end-road . On the 9th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, a lady came in for half a yard of silk, which I cut off, and placed the remainder in the window, which was broken, but there was the lid of a box placed against it, with a roller to keep it steady. I went on the other side of the shop, to serve two women, and in ten minutes I heard a noise at the window, as if it was being cut - being alone in the shop I called the young man, who ran out; I went round, and missed this seven yards of black silk, but not the ribbon, although it was taken - a person could reach it after pushing the lid aside. The officer brought the prisoners to the house the next morning, with it. I had not notices them about.

JOHN McWILLIAMS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty on the 9th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, in High-street Whitechapel, where I stopped the two prisoners - I took them into a public-house, and on Ashley I found this seven yards of silk, and Holland threw down this seven yards of ribbon - they told us they had found it under a gas-lamp, at the back of the London Hospital, which is about half a mile from the shop - the silk was rumpled up, under his coat, not in any paper - the streets were dirty, but there was neither dirt nor dust on the property.

JOSEPH NEWSOME . I was present when the prisoners were stopped - Holland dropped the ribbon behind him when I was going to search him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOLLAND'S Defence. I picked it up at the back of the London Hospital, in a blue handkerchief, which I have here.

ASHLEY'S Defence. I was with this lad, and picked the property up - two young men, who were larking before us, dropped it.

J. McWILLIAMS. They did not state this before.

HOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 15.

ASHLEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-43

796. JOHN JAMES HART was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 7 silver spoons, value 1l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 6s., and 1 snuff-box, value 4s. , the goods of Charles Lindfield .

ELIZABETH LINDFIELD . I am the wife of Charles Lindfield - we took the White Swan public-house, Chandos-street, Covent-garden, and left it on the 10th of March; I employed the prisoner to move our goods from there to Dorset-place, Pall Mall East ; he carried this property, which was in a mahogany writing-desk - we then went down to Lewes, leaving the property locked up in our room, in Dorset-place; I received a letter, desiring me to come to town, which I did, and missed the articles stated in the indictment - I had seen the spoons and sugar-tongs safe the morning I left. The door must have been opened by a false-key.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am a clerk, and lodge in the next room to the prosecutor, in Dorset-place. I went home on Tuesday evening, the 21st of March, and the landlord said he suspected a man was concealed in the prosecutor's room - we went up, and unlocked the door, but could not get in, as it was bolted inside; we then heard the window open, and a cry in the street, that a man was getting out; I turned the key, and ran down stairs; the person then got into the room again - in a few minutes the prisoner rushed out at the front door; he must have forced the room door open - he was stopped about one hundred yards off; I am confident of his person - he threw a great coat away as he ran, and that is lost - he got from us again, and was taken in an hour or an hour and a half, at a house in Maiden-lane, Chandos-street. I found every box and drawer in the room broken open - nobody but him came out of the house.

Prisoner. Q. What time was it? A. About a quarter-past six o'clock - we took him about a quarter past eight, coming down the stairs of No. 43, Maiden-lane.

WILLIAM COOMBE . I am servant to Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, of Fleet-market. On the 21st of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned a snuff-box, seven tea-spoons, and a pair of sugar-tongs, for 26s., in the name of James Lingfield, No. 3, Turnagain-lane; I am certain he is the man - I saw him in custody again the next day, at twelve o'clock - he stood close against the gas-light. I am certain of him.

JOHN BIRCHALL . I apprehended the prisoner in Maiden-lane - Allen was with me; we told him it was for a robbery in Dorset-place - he made no reply, but after

wards said he knew nothing about it - Allen said he was the man, and I found the duplicate of this property on him.

WM. COOMBE. This is the duplicate I gave him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-44

797. DANIEL HENY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 clock, value 28s. , the goods of John Brugger .

JOHN BRUGGER. I am a clock-maker , and live in High Holborn . On the 16th of March, about a quarter to eight o'clock at night, I was watching behind my door, having been robbed, and saw the prisoner come into my shop, and take a clock; hearing me behind him he ran out with it, and threw it down near a public-house; I followed and took him, without losing sight of him; the clock was brought back to me.

WILLIAM COXHEAD . I took him into custody - he did not deny the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop. I ran, hearing the cry, slipped down, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-45

798. CATHERINE HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 pillow, value 18s., and 1 sheet, value 2s. , the goods of William Henry Vicary .

WILLIAM HENRY VICARY. I live in Great Windmill-street, Haymarket . The prisoner lodged five or six months with me; this pillow was let to her with the room - the sheet was taken from my club-room on the 8th of April, 1826 - I did not wish her to remain with me any longer, and she left; I found it in pawn about the 15th of April - she was taken about the 12th of March; her husband lived with her, but remained in the lodging ten or twelve days after she left; he had the same opportunity of taking it as she had - whether he was at home when it was missed I cannot say.

CHARLES POOR . I am a pawnbroker. This sheet was pawned on the 8th of April, in the name of Mary Harrison- I cannot swear that it was the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GOOK . I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of March - I charged her with several things - she said,"No, I took nothing but the sheet and pillow, and should wish to make them good."

Prisoner's Defence. We were in distress - my husband desired me to pawn these things, and said he would make them good as soon as he got employ.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-46

799. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Peter White .

WILLIAM KILLO . I am shopman to Peter White. On Saturday evening these shoes hung on the window, within the threshold of the door; I saw the prisoner snatch them down and run away - I had been watching him ten minutes; I ran and took him, within two yards of the house; he threw them down.

FRANCIS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman. I picked the shoes up close to the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270405-47

800. PATRICK KEEFE and TIMOTHY MEALEY were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 stove, value 15s. , the goods of William Barnett .

WILLIAM BARNETT. I am a furniture-broker , and live on Saffron-hill . On the 9th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise, ran down stairs, and missed this stove from the passage, it was safe ten minutes before. I found the prisoners at Hatton-garden Office with it the next morning.

JOHN AVERY . I am a constable. I apprehended Keefe about a quarter before 8 o'clock in the evening of the 9th of March, at the corner of Chistopher-street, Hatton-garden- Mealey, who was lifting this stove on Keefe's shoulder, ran away - Keefe said he was going to take it home, but refused to say where he lived, or where he got it. Mealey was brought back by my brother officer.

PHILIP SWINGLER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was with Avery, and saw Keefe with the stove; they were setting it down - I ran and secured Mealey on Back-hill.(Property produced and sworn to.)

KEEFE'S Defence. This man asked me to lend him a hand with the stove.

MEALEY's Defence. A man employed me on Muttonhill, to carry it to Basing-lane for 1s.

KEEFE - GUILTY . Aged 30.

MEALEY - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-48

801. JAMES LARKIN and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 1 cloak, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Attenborough .

ALEXANDER BURGESS . I am shopman to Richard Attenborough, a pawnbroker , of Crown-street, Finsbury. - On the 23d of February, about two o'clock, the prisoners were brought to our shop with this cloak, which I had hung outside the door two or three hours before.

THOMAS TOOLE . I am a shoemaker, and live in Crown-court, Moorfields. On the 23d of February I was near Mr. Attenborough's, and saw the prisoners on the opposite side, looking into every shop they passed - I saw them stop at the end of a court close to Attenborough's shop - they both went to the door - Brown pulled the cloak, and as it came down Larkin caught it in his arms; they ran down the court; I gave an alarm at the door, but kept my eye on them; I lost sight of Larkin for a moment at the end of the alley, but am certain of him; I never lost sight of Brown; when he got to the end of the alley he put his hands in his pocket, and began to walk; I laid hold of him, and then saw Larkin in custody, and the cloak on the ground, a yard or two from him - they were both given into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Were you never in custody yourself? A. Never - I live with my father.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am a constable. I found the prisoners in custody in the shop, with the cloak.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN'S Defence. That boy does not live with his father.

Brown received a good character.

LARKIN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-49

802. DENNIS LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 shovel, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Willis Blencowe , Esq.

JAMES TOOVEY . I live at Hayes, and work for Robert Willis Blencowe, Esq. This shovel was in his coal-shed, near the house. On the 15th of March I saw the prisoner running across Mr. Blencowe's park with it - I pursued him - he threw it over a hedge into the garden; I picked it up, and saw that it was ours. I pointed him out to the constable in about an hour, and he was taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-50

803. WILLIAM LOFTUS and GEORGE PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 9lbs. of mustard, value 9s., and 1 cask, value 1s. , the goods of Edward Wilkins and John Wilkins .

JOHN WILKINS. I am a confectioner , in partnership with Edward Wilkins - we live in St. John-street . On the 4th of April, between three and four o'clock, I saw a person going out of the shop, and missed this cask of mustard from the counter - I followed, and saw it in the possession of Loftus - the officer stopped him, and he dropped it.

JOHN CHARLES CUMMINS . I am a patrol. I was at the corner of St. John-lane, and saw the prisoners in company with another person - I watched them all up to the prosecutors' shop; they at first looked in at the window, and then went away - Phillips then passed the window, and looked in at the door - he nodded to Loftus, who stood on the other side of the way. Loftus then went into the door, and the third man stood where Loftus had come from; Loftus came out with something in his apron, and followed Phillips, who crossed the road. The other man got away. The prisoners came towards us - Mr. Wilkins came out, and secured Loftus, who dropped this cask of mustard, and I secured Phillips.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a constable, and was with Cummins. I saw these three persons round a chaise cart- we watched them, but I did not see Loftus go into the shop, as my head was turned; I saw him come out with the cask in his apron, he dropped it, and I collared him; he made a great resistance.(Property produced and sworn to.)

LOFTUS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-51

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

804. ROBERT JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 6 pints of the essence of anchovies, value 13s.; 12 glass bottles, value 2s. 6d.; 3 pints of olives, value 3s. 3d.; 3 other glass bottles, value 9d.; 3 half-pints of soy, value 5s.; 3 other bottles, value 9d.; 24 packets of grotts, value 6s.; 3lbs. of isinglass, value 36s., and 1 basket, value 9d. , the goods of William Jones and others, his partners.

THOMAS JONES . I am in partnership with William Jones and others - we are in business as oil-merchants , in Thames-street. On the 24th of March, about half-past four o'clock, I sent this property in a parcel, in a cart, to an inn, by Smith, our carman - I saw the same package at Guildhall on Monday, the 26th, when the prisoner was in custody.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a carman. I had this package to take to the White Horse Inn, Friday-street, but having other things to deliver at the Axe Inn, Aldermanbury , I went there first - this basket was then safe, but while I went up the yard it was stolen out of the cart - I ran to the corner of Philip-lane, and found it on the ground - I stood by it till the prisoner was brought up, and charged with having taken it - he made no answer.

JOHN WALBURN . I am a carman to Mr. Holt, of the Axe Inn. I met Smith in the gateway, going down the yard, and when I got into the street I saw two or three men about the cart - I went up Addle-street, and saw the prisoner with this hamper on his back; I tapped him on the shoulder by Philip-lane, and asked where he was going with it - he threw it down, and ran away; I ran after him, crying Stop thief! Anderson stopped him, before I lost sight of him. I brought him back to the hamper, which Smith claimed.

THOMAS ANDERSON . I keep the Pitt's Head public-house, at Bermondsey. I was coming up Philip-lane about six o'clock, and saw the prisoner drop this hamper- he ran towards me, and I stopped him - he attempted to strike me.

JOHN FOWKES . I am packer to the prosecutors. I packed the articles stated in the indictment in this hamper, and directed it to Mr. Perkins, of Lymington, which direction is now on it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-52

805. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 coat, value 8s. , the goods of Philip Lorton .

CHARLES DAVIDSON . I am in the timber-trade. On the 26th of March I was in Bishopsgate-street, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner take down this coat, which hung outside Mr. Lorton's door - I caught him with it a few yards off, and took him back.

EDWARD GRIFFIN . I am apprentice to Philip Lorton. This coat is his, and hung outside the door.

Prisoner. I have no parents nor friends.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years , to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18270405-53

806. GEORGE PARKER and CHARLES TILLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 pair of trousers, value 15s. 6d. , the goods of Philip Lorton .

EDWARD GRIFFIN . I am shopman to Philip Lorton, of Bishopsgate-street . On the 17th of March these trousers were stolen from the door post - I had seen them safe about ten minutes before the prisoners were brought into the shop with them.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a carpenter. I was standing opposite Lorton's shop, and saw Tilley take these trousers

down, and give them to Parker, who was in his company; I secured Tilley, and gave him to a man to hold; I then ran, and saw Parker stopped; he threw the trousers down- I picked them up, and took both the prisoners to the shop - they denied the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

TILLEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years, to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18270405-54

807. ESTHER WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 1 pair of women's shoes, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Alexander Wilson .

GEORGE NEBBS . I am servant to Alexander Wilson, who keeps a shoe warehouse , on Holborn-hill . On the 22d of February, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came in with another woman, and asked to see some shoes- I took down three or four pairs - they said they were in a hurry, and could not stop to fit them; the other said she could tell by her hand what would fit her - they did not suit, and I got three or four more pairs; Mrs. Wilson came into the shop, and showed them some more; I kept my eye on them, and saw the prisoner put one pair across her arm, and gradually draw them under her cloak; nothing would suit them, and as they turned out of the door I stopped the prisoner, turned her cloak aside, and found this pair of shoes in her hand: she said it was a mistake, and she was sorry for it - I gave her in charge.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am a constable, and took them both in charge with the shoes. The Alderman discharged the other.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was a mistake - I did not intend to take them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-55

808. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 4 sovereigns, the monies of James Murphy , from his person .

JAMES MURPHY. I am a journey man tailor , and live in Warden-court, Rosemary-lane. On the 19th of March, about one o'clock in the night, I met the prisoner in Thames-street; I was neither drunk nor sober; I had four sovereigns loose in my breeches pocket; I went down a court with her, near the water-side, and staid there about ten minutes, as I came out of the court I felt in my trousers pocket, and the sovereigns were gone - I am certain I had them when I met her; she had asked me for no money, nor had I given her any; I said she had taken four sovereigns from me - she denied it, but I held her, and said if she did not return it I would give charge of her - she insisted that she had not got them; the watchman came, and I gave her in charge; they were found in the sleeve of her gown - she said she knew she had them, and that they were mine, but she thought they were shillings.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you married? A. Yes. I gave her no money; I had no silver about me- I struggled with her in the street, to get them from her, and said if she would return three I would give her one - I meant to change a sovereign, in order to give her something - she did not say I had given them to her by mistake for 4s.

JAMES BOWMAN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and Murphy together at the corner of Lambeth-hill - he said, "You know very well you have got my money;" he called me in a few minutes, and gave her in charge for stealing four sovereigns; she said she had not seen a farthing of his money. I took her to the watch-house, and saw the four sovereigns found in the sleeve of her gown - she then said she knew it was his money.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear her say any thing in the street? A. She said at the watch-house that the man had attempted to rob her, and she had her pocket in her hand.

JOHN HOLDISS . I was constable of the night. I found the sovereigns in the prisoner's sleeve - she said before that she had no money belonging to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear her say any thing about shillings? A. When I was taking her to Guildhall afterwards, she said she thought they were shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. He promised me 4s., and I thought they were shillings; when he came out of the court he said, "Now, if you don't return me that money I will say you robbed me of it;" he took hold of my pocket, and I put them down my sleeve.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-56

809. JAMES CARROLL was indicted for embezzlement .

JONADAB WILLIAM HUNT . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Wood-street - the prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money for me. I sent him to receive 3l. 2s. of Mr. Sreadman, of Beech-street, Barbican; his duty was to give it me the moment he received it; he has never accounted to me for it - he had lived eight or nine years with me.

WILLIAM HALL . I am servant to Mr. Steadman, who owed Mr. Hunt 3l. 2s. On the 3d of February I took it to Mr. Hunt's warehouse, and paid it to the prisoner. I think I gave him two sovereigns, two half sovereigns, and two shillings. I am sure there was three pounds in sovereigns and half-sovereigns, and two shillings. He went up to the desk, and wrote a receipt, which he gave me - this is it(looking at it).

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is the desk higher than the floor? A. Yes; I saw him writing the receipt; I swear I paid him some sovereigns, and there were two shillings.

MR. HUNT. The paper produced is in the prisoner's writing; it is a bill for the goods. 3l. 2s. - and at the bottom he has written, "Feb. 3, By Cash, 3l. 2s. Jas. Carroll."

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Hunt never sent me for the money.

MR. HUNT. I sent him for it previous to the 3d of February, and again on the 16th; I found, on the 21st, that it was paid. I am quite certain that he never brought it to account.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18270405-57

810. JAMES CARROLL was again indicted for stealing, on the 23d February , 12 yards of gros-de-Naples, value 40s.; 11 yards of poplin, value 22s. , the goods of Jonadab William Hunt , his master.

JONADAB WILLIAM HUNT. On the 21st of February this

matter was discovered; the prisoner absconded the next day, without any notice. I apprehended him on the 24th, at his lodging, in Golden Lion-court, Aldersgate-street. I have since found this property in pawn; when I took him he said he hoped I would forgive him; I said, I should promise nothing of the kind; he said he had taken these articles, and a variety of others, from the warehouse, and directed me to the different pawnbrokers; he showed me where the poplin was pawned.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say, if I did not tell you every thing, you would immediately take me before a magistrate? A. Never; when I first discovered about the 3l., he said, he had lost it out of his pocket; and not then suspecting any thing else, I told his brother if he would come back, I would look it over.

Q. Are these poplins your bona-file property? A. They were consigned to me for sale, and I am answerable for them.

HENRY CLUMP . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aldersgate-street. I have some poplins, which were pawned on the 23d of February, by the prisoner's wife, in the name of Mary Carroll, Golden Lion-court, for 16s. 4d. - I knew her as a customer before.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know she was my wife? A. You often came together, and talked as man and wife.

JOHN BROWN . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Tottenham-court-road. I have twelve yards of grosde-Naples, pawned in the name of Mary Riley, Bainbridge-street. I believed her to be the prisoner's wife; I had seen them together, and supposed so, by their manner. I know all the family, and consider her to be his wife.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a patrol, and went with Mr. Hunt to the prisoner's lodgings - he asked his master to forgive him; he would promise him nothing - but said he had lost property, and insisted upon his telling what he had taken; the prisoner then told what he had taken; he said he could not find the duplicates for some time; but at last said to his wife."Go and fetch the duplicates of Mr. Hunt's property." I followed her down stairs, and saw her take them out of a hole in the privy.

MR. HUNT. This woman never visited him at my warehouse; she came there once after he had absconded.

Prisoner. Q. On what grounds did you discharge Thomas Hunt from your service? A. Because I discovered he had formed a very improper female acquaintance. I never suspected him to be guilty of any dishonest act - I allowed him to sell goods among his friends. I might have told the female, that such a connexion as hers would bring him to Newgate. I never saw any poplins made exactly like these - I have been seven years in the trade.

Prisoner to H. TURNPENNY. Q. On arriving at my apartment, what did Mr. Hunt say? A. He asked why you did not come to the warehouse - I believe you said you were ashamed. I am certain he made you no promise of forgiveness, nor any thing like it.

Prisoner's Defence. He held out insinuating language to me, by which I might understand he was going to forgive me, if I gave him information. I know nothing whatever of these goods being pawned.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-58

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL, 9.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

811. CHARLES THOMAS and GEORGE KNIGHT were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Ramsey , on the night of the 11th of March , with intent to steal .

JOHN RAMSEY. I am a working-jeweller , and live in Red Lion-street, in the parish of St. John, Clerkenwell . On Sunday evening, the 11th of March, about seven o'clock, I was sitting in the parlour, with my daughters, and heard the alarum bell of the work-shop (which is at the top of the house) ring - I ran out, and found the staple drawn from the shop-window; it was safe at four o'clock, when I attached the alarum to the window - it goes on hinges, and had been wrenched open by a chissel. I put the light out into the gutter, but it was dark, and rained; I could see nobody - I found the prisoners at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do not you know your house is in the parish of St. James? A. No; it is in St. John's.

Q. You say it was a wet night; were there any marks to indicate whether the party had actually got in at the window? A. No; I do not think they had entered.

HENRY RAMSEY . I was sitting with my father, and heard the alarm - I ran out, and found the prisoners at the door of the corner house, which is empty; a piece of candle, a chissel, and a phosphorus box, were found by their side, in the empty house. It was a wet night - there were no marks of their having entered the window; it opens outward, and had been broken outside.

JOHN ROBINSON . I went into the work-shop, but could see no marks of the person having been withing the window.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-59

812. JOHN SMITH , GEORGE FORD , and WILLIAM WICKS , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , at St. Andrew, Holborn, 64 pieces of linen, cut out to make four shirts, value 2l. 2s.; 2 night-gowns, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 12s.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 towel, value 1s. 6d.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 1 pinafore, value 9d.; 1 shirt, value 6d., and 2 pillow-cases, value 2s., the goods of William Edward Frencham , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS TOOLE . I am a shoemaker. I know Mr. Frencham's dwelling-house, it is in Henry-street, Gray's-inn-lane - on Thursday, the 29th of March, I first saw the prisoners in Holborn, about four o'clock - they were all in company, talking and walking together. I knew them all before - I have often seen them in company; I followed them up Holborn, and lost sight of them; I then went down to the Vine public-house, in Laystall-street - stood there, and saw them all three come out of the Vine; they began to lark together, shoving each other about - I kept out of their sight - they went down by Mr. Burge's, the nightman's house. I saw them come up, and cross over to Henry-street, Gray's-inn-lane - they all three walked up and down by the prosecutor's door. Smith then went in - I cannot say how he got in, as I was at the corner of the street - it is a private house - I saw him stand at the door a short time, and then go in; the other two walked up and down by the door - he came out in about five minutes, then they all three went in, and remained there about ten minutes -

Ford came out first, with a lot of things in his white apron- the others came out directly after him - Wicks had some things in his apron - Smith had nothing; they came running up the street by me, as hard as they could. I let them pass, pretending not to notice them - then went over to the house, knocked at the door, and asked the prosecutor's wife if she had lost any thing; she said she did not know - I came away, and ran down Falconer's-alley, Cow-cross, having seen Smith go into a house there once, and just as I got to the corner of the alley, the three prisoners came up the alley; they then had the things in two bags, but still had their aprons on. Ford and Wicks each had a bag - I saw them go into a house in the alley with the things, and shut the door. I ran to Hatton-garden, and fetched Limbrick, and another officer, to Falconer's-alley - they went into the house; I stood at the window, and saw them sorting all the things out upon the bed, and the woman of the house with them.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. Toole fetched me to Falconer's-court - I found the three prisoners in the house, with the things spread out; I took them all into custody, and brought the things away - we told the woman to attend at the office, but she never did - I heard her say, as I went in, "They won't do for me."

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am an officer, and went with Limbrick - I found the prisoners in the room, and the property on the bed, at No. 6, Falconer's-court.

WILLIAM EDWARD FRENCHAM . This house in Henry-street is mine, and is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn - I did not come home till late on this evening - I had seen all this property secure, laying on the table, about ten o'clock in the morning - when I returned it was gone; I found it at Hatton garden the next morning - it consists of the articles stated in the indictment - here they are - they are worth 3l. 9s., the very lowest - the Irish cost me 2l. 2s. 8d. I know nothing of the prisoners - the door has a clasp lock to it - my wife is unwell.

FORD'S Defence. I went to Falconer's-alley, to Mrs. Spencer, to ask if her husband, who is a pork-butcher, was at home - she said, No, but if I stopped a bit I should see him. Wicks came in, and asked if his tea was ready - in a short time in came Smith. As to Toole I have seen him at all the notorious houses.

One witness gave Smith a good character.

- SHORT. I live in Fox-court, Ray-street, Clerkenwell - Wicks was my apprentice; I have known him ten years. I left him at work about eleven o'clock on this morning, and he ought to have been at work all day - he bore a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

FORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

WICKS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18270405-60

813. THOMAS ASSLETT was indicted for feloniously secreting and stealing a certain letter, containing 1 sovereign, which came into his possession by virtue of his employment, as a letter carrier at the General Post-office .

Upon Mr. Gurney's stating the case for the prosecution, it appeared that the asportation had not taken place - he therefore declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-61

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

814. LANCELOT COOPER was indicted for that he, on the 26th of March , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain order for payment of money, which said false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money , is as follows:- (that is to say)

£10. No. 4, Brompton, Grove-place, March 26, 1827.

Please to pay to Mr. Taylor, or bearer, the sum of Ten

Pounds sterling, for value received. JAMES COPE.

To Sir William Curtis, Bart. Bankers, Lombard-street. with intent to defraud Thomas Taylor , against the statute, & c.

2d COUNT, for uttering and publishing, on the same day at the same parish, as true, a like forged and counterfeited order for payment of money, well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with a like intent, as in the first count.

3d and 4th COUNTS, the same as in the first and second counts, only stating the intent to be to defraud Sir William Curtis , Bart. and others.

5th and 6th COUNTS, the same as in the third and fourth, only with intent to defraud Sir William Curtis, Bart. only.

MESSRS. ANDREWS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a bookseller and stationer, and live at No. 4, Brompton-terrace - I keep a subscription library - I know the prisoner's person. I first saw him about a month or five weeks before the 26th of March - I sent to his house, and he subscribed to my library, by the name of Cope - he then lived at No. 4, Grove-place, Brompton - I have sent books from my library there, and saw him frequently - he often came to my shop twice a day to change books. On the 26th of March, at near three o'clock in the afternoon, he came and asked if I was going into the City, as he did not feel very well, he had a pain in his chest, and thought he had caught cold; he asked if I would get a cheque changed for him - he then looked out a book, and directly said, "If you will give me a piece of paper, I will write the cheque;" I gave him a piece; he came round the counter close to me, and wrote it at my side - I saw him write it (looking at it) - this is the cheque - after he had written it, he said, "Perhaps you can give me something, as it may be some time before you return;" I said certainly, and gave him a 5l. note, first writing on it the name of the gentleman I had taken it of - I went into the City, but being detained on business, I had not time to go to Lombard-street, and called on Mr. Ottley, my brother-in-law, in Fleet-street - I gave the cheque to him, and he gave me the cash for it; this was as near five o'clock as possible - the prisoner said, when he had the 5l. note, that he would have the remainder when he came to the shop again, but he never came again- Mr. Ottley brought me the cheque next evening, and gave me some information about it - I then went to No. 4, Grove-place, where the prisoner lived, but he was gone from there - I presented the cheque myself at the banking house the following day, the 28th - it was refused payment - this writing was on it when Mr. Ottley brought it back to me, but not when I delivered it to him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. At what time did you go to Ottley's? A. Within a few minutes of five o'clock - it was too late to present the cheque that day -

I myself know of no presentation, till the 28th - I did not see this writing on it till Ottley returned it to me - I saw the prisoner write the whole of this cheque - he could not write on the other side of the counter, on account of a rail, and he came round to me - I made no mark on it when he gave it to me, nor have I made any at all - I speak to it from the writing and the signature, which I noticed - it is written in the usual form of a cheque.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is the cheque drawn in your favour? A. It is - I kept it in my possession till I delivered it to Ottley.

JOHN OTTLEY . I live at No. 159, Fleet-street. On the 26th of February, about ten minutes before five o'clock, Mr. Taylor asked me to give him the cash for this draft(looking at it) - I have not the least doubt of this being the same - I put it among my cash in my money bag, and kept it till the next day; I then sent my servant Ray with it to the bankers', about three o'clock, or a little after - he brought the cheque back to me, with this writing across the back, which was not on it when I gave it him; I immediately set off to Brompton, and gave it to Mr. Taylor - we went to No. 4, Grove-place, and the prisoner was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. How many other cheques had you in that bag? A. Not any; there was nothing but sovereigns; I put it into my bag as soon as I received it, locked the bag in my desk, and nobody had access to it but me - I did not see it again till next morning, as I had been out all the evening - the desk was locked - I made no mark on the cheque.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you any doubt of its being the same cheque? A. None whatever, from the appearance of it altogether.

JAMES RAY . I am servant to Mr. Ottley, of Fleet-street. On the 27th of March he gave me this cheque(looking at it) - I took it to Sir William Curtis', No. 15, Lombard-street, and gave it to one of the clerks, who took it in to Mr. Curtis, and asked me into the room - I saw Mr. Curtis write this across it - it was then returned to me - I took it back to my master; I am sure it is the same cheque as I received from him.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was it out of your possession, from the time you gave it to the clerk, till it was returned to you? A. About three minutes; I remained in the shop a short time before I was taken to Mr. Curtis; when I went in Mr. Curtis had the cheque before him.

Q. Do you know the difference between a cheque and a bill of exchange? A. I cannot say that I do.

WILLIAM CURTIS , ESQ. I am one of the partners in the house of Sir William Curtis & Co.; Sir William is a Baronet, and the senior partner; I have seen the cheque produced, and have examined our books; no person named James Cope keeps cash at our house - we have no such account- there is no fund in our house, out of which James Cope has authority to draw (looking at the cheque) - I did not write this on it; the witness must have mistaken my person - Mr. Robarts is the person he saw, and this his is handwriting - I was in the house at the time, but not in the room.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been a partner in the house some years? A. I have; I do not keep the books- all the customers of the house come under the observation of every partner - I speak decidedly, on my oath, that no James Cope has an account at our house - the clerks keep the books, but no new customer is taken without the knowledge of all the partners.

Q. Do you know the name of every customer? A. The greater part of them - I say generally I do - I know there is no such name as James Cope in the books - it is possible the name of one customer may escape me; I attend to the business daily, and see the books daily, in which the names of the customers are entered - there cannot be a customer whose name I do not know.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you looked over every book in your house, in which the name of a customer would appear? A. I have, and if such a name had been in the books, I must have seen it - there is no such a name; no account is ever opened without reference to the firm.

COURT. Q. If a person opens an account at your house, does he write his name in a book? A. He does, in what is called the signature book; the clerks always go to that book if there is any doubt about a cheque.

ROBERT MORRIS . I am a clerk to Sir William Curtis and Co, and am ledger-keeper - here is a ledger which contains the names of all the persons who keep town accounts - I have searched all the books, in which the names of persons having a right to draw on the firm, appear - there is no James Cope - I have searched the signature-book, and no such name appears; if we have advice from a country bank, to pay money to persons in town, their names would not be in the signature-book; I have examined all the authorities from country banks - the name does not appear at all, either by authority or from having an account.

Cross-examined. Q. How many years have you searched back? A. The whole of this year, and for a considerable time back - I will not say that I have looked back all the last year.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you looked sufficiently to know whether, on the 26th of March, James Cope had any authority to draw on you? A. I have - he had not.

GEORGE HOLT . I keep the house, No. 4, Grove-place, Brompton; the prisoner came to lodge there on the 13th of February, and went by the name of Cope - he remained with me till the 26th of March, and went out that day, came back, and went away in a hackney-coach, saying he should be back in two days; I think it was about two o'clock that he went - he never came back.

Cross-examined. Q. You have no reason to believe his name is not Cope? A. No; I did not know him before he came to lodge with me.

PETER LINDYMAN . I am a boot and shoemaker, and live in Oxford-street. I saw the prisoner at my house twice; the first time was about two months before the 26th of March, on which day Mr. Cope, the City marshal, and Mr. Gates called - the second time was the day they called; he left his name as Richards on that day - he gave no name the first time he called; he gave some orders to my servant, but I do not know that he said any thing more to me than, "How do you do? I am just come out of the country;" I had an apartment to let, but the conversation about that did not pass with me, nor in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he give you the name of Richards? A. No; nor in my presence.

ANN DUROT . I live at No. 5, Southampton-row, New-road. The prisoner came to my house on the 26th of March, in a hackney-coach, and told me that he had just come from the country, and wanted an apartment; he said he had come from Wales; he took my lodgings, and came into them directly - he gave me his name as Cottage; he gave that name to me personally, and brought his luggage with him - he stopped there nine or ten days, till he was taken away by the officers; he went by the same name all that time, and had his books from the library in the name of Cottage - I asked him his name when he took the apartment.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am one of the City constables. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, the 4th of April, in the second floor back room of Mrs. Durot's house, No. 5, Southampton-row; Mr. Taylor and Mr. Stone were with me; when I put my foot in at the door I called Taylor up; he looked in, and said, loud enough to be heard, "That is Mr. Cope" - the prisoner immediately said, "My name is not Cope," two or three times - I said, the gentleman identified him, and he must go with me - if the gentleman was mistaken I could not help it. I delivered to Mr. Cope, the marshal, a trunk which I found in the room - I believe the one produced to be the same.

MR. THOMAS GATES . I am attorney for the prosecution. I saw the prisoner when he was in custody - I was not present when he was apprehended - I asked him his name; he said, I should find certificates or papers in the box which had been taken from him, which would state who he was - I said, if that was the case, and the box was not there, he could have no hesitation in giving his name; he said his name was Lancelor Cooper - I examined this box, and found two certificates in it, signed John Gore, certifying that Lancelot Cooper had served in two different ships of war.

Cross-examined. Q. He told you, you would find certificates which would identify him? A. I have stated correctly what I said to him; I did not say under all the circumstances he might as well give his name - I used no inducement or threat to induce him to give it.

SIR JOHN GORE . I am Vice-Admiral in the Navy. I know the prisoner - he served under me for several years; the signatures to these certificates are my writing - I never knew him by any other name than Lancelot Cooper - I have not seen him since 1814, to my recollection - I had communication at that time with him - he then used that name.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you now a perfect recollection of his person? A. Perfectly so: I recognised him the moment I came into Court; before I saw the certificate - I do not mean to say positively, that I have not seen him since 1814.

These two documents were here read. One was a certificate of the prisoner having served as a clerk in the navy, under Sir John Gore, from July, 1801, to February, 1806, and his good conduct during that time. - The other, as having served as clerk on board the Revenge, from February, 1806, to the 1st of August, 1808, and of his good conduct during that period.

ABRAHAM WILDEY ROBARTS , ESQ. I am one of the firm of Sir William Curtis' house. The writing across the cheque is mine - I think I recollect the boy bringing it to our house - I wrote this at the time (reads), "No account or knowledge of the drawer." No person of that name had any account with us, or any authority to draw on us.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a bookseller, and live at No. 167, Bond-street. On the 14th of March the prisoner came to my shop, and asked if I let private boxes for Covent-garden Theatre - I told him I did - he asked if I had a box for that evening - I said Yes; and he engaged one; he asked the price, I told him three guineas; he looked down the shop and said, "I bought some books of you last year; there was a copy of Rasselas which I gave to my youngest daughter - I want two more copies of the same book for my elder daughters;" he then saw a complete set of Washington livine - he came to the desk where I do my business, and said, "I have no money in my pocket, will you take a cheque on my bankers?" and from his appearance I agreed to take it - I furnished him with pen and paper, stood by him, and saw him write a cheque and sign it; (looking at one) this is it - it is signed Geo. Crofton.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before, to your recollection? A. No; he was in my shop, I should think, twenty minutes - I was the only person who spoke to him.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you give him any box ticket? A. I gave him this box ticket (looking at it.)

Mr. CLARKSON. Q. What makes you speak to that ticket? A. It is a box which I had to let, and it has my own signature - I never sign two for one night.

MR. GATES. I found this box ticket in the prisoner's trunk.

The cheque uttered to the witness Andrews was here put in and read - it was drawn on Messrs. Praed and Co. Fleet-street, payable to Mr. Andrews, dated the 14th of March, for 10l. 3s., and signed Geo. Crofton.

WM. CURTIS, ESQ. re-examined. Here is our signature book - I have examined it; there is no such name as James Cope in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any other signature book? A. There is one which I have sent for - I have searched through the whole of this, which embraces a period of about twenty years - I have examined the other, which has been very recently taken into use; those two are the only signature books we have.

EDWARD PURDIE . I am assistant to Mr. Austin, jeweller, of Oxford-street. The prisoner came to the shop on the 12th of February last; I did not see him there myself on the 12th, but a few days before that he bought some goods there, and I heard him order them to be sent to No. 39, Claremont-square, Pentonville; he gave a written paper to pay for them - I received this cheque (looking at it) from his own hand; he wrote it in my presence; he said he would call for the change, but never did.

COURT. Q. You said you did not see him at your house on the 12th? A. No; but I took the goods on the 12th to his dwelling in Claremont-square, and saw him write it there.

This cheque was here read - it was dated 12th February, 1827, for 100l. in favour of J. J. Austin, or bearer, on Sir Wm. Curtis and Co., and signed Edwd. Geo. Cook.

JAMES PAUL PERRY . I am clerk to Mr. Hopkinson, coach-builder, of Holborn. The prisoner came there several

times in February last; he called to purchase carriages; he gave me the name of Edwd. Geo. Cook, of Frampton-house, near Leeds, Yorkshire; he did not say what he was; he purchased a carriage, which he was to pay eighty guineas for; I saw him write this paper which I have here; after he had written it, I saw Mr. Hopkinson give him sixteen sovereigns, being the difference of 100l.; the carriage was to be sent to Messrs. Rivis and Co., at Hull, but we did not send it.

This paper was here read, and purported to be a cheque for 100l., payable to Mr. Hopkinson, or bearer, dated the 12th of February, 1827, upon Sir William Curtis and Co., signed E. G. Cook.

JAMES PAUL PERRY re-examined. He wrote this on the day it is dated - I never saw him afterwards till he was in custody.

EDWARD GILBERT . I am the son of Mr. Gilbert, jeweller, of Oxford-street, who is now dead. I saw the prisoner at our house in Oxford-street on the 22d of March last; he bought a diamond ring, the price of which was sixteen guineas, and on the 24th he offered to pay for it by a written paper, which I have here (producing it); I saw him write it - he gave me his name on the 22d, as Captain E. Jackson, Thomas' Hotel, Berkeley-square; here is the direction which I saw him write - I also saw him write the other paper - the goods he bought came to 18l. 15s.; he bought an onyx ring on the 24th, which brought it to that sum; I gave him 1l. 5s. as change.

These papers were here read - the direction was Captain F. Jackson, Thomas's Hotel, Berkeley-square. - The other was a cheque dated from Thomas Hotel, Berkeley-square, upon Messrs. Coutts and Co., drawn in favour of Mr. Gilbert, or bearer, for 20l., and signed E. Juckson.

MR. CLARKSON to JAMES PAUL PERRY. Q. Are you perfectly certain you saw the prisoner write the paper which you have produced? A. I did; I supplied him with pen, ink, and paper, and stood by him all the time he wrote it.

GEORGE WATSON WOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Hamlett, a jeweller. The prisoner came to our shop last September, and purchased goods to the amount of 57l. 7s., and gave a cheque in payment, which I saw him write - I produce it - he wrote it on the day it is dated - he gave no address that day, having previously given one to our shopman, but not in my presence.

This cheque was here read - it was dated Thomas' Hotel, Berkeley-square, the 6th of September, 1826, payable to Thomas Hamlett , or bearer, for 57l. 7s. upon Joseph Dennison and Co., 106, Fenchurch-street, and signed, Thos. Edwd. Crofton.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am employed by Mr. Hawley, a jeweller, in the Strand. I know the prisoner by the name of James Allison. On the 3d of March, 1826, he bought goods at our shop amounting to 64l., and paid for them by a cheque, which I saw him write myself; this is it, it is dated the 3d of March; he came in a hired chariot, without a number, and took the goods away with him.

This cheque, for 64l., was here read - dated the 3d of March, 1826, payable to Thomas Hawley and Co., or bearer, on Messrs. Curries, Cornhill, signed Jas. Allison.

The forged instrument was here put in and read, see indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry to see the evidence so much against me; but I have to say, that I served his Majesty fifteen or sixteen years, and after the peace served in official situations, and acted honourably in them. I was the first person who gave information of Buonaparte's escape, and communicated about it till he arrived in France.

The prisoner also stated, but not in a very audible voice, that he had rendered some service to his Majesty's government, at Venice, Malta, and Gibraltar.

SIR JOHN GORE . He behaved very well while in my service.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 57.

Reference Number: t18270405-62

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

815. LANCELOT COOPER was again indicted for that he, on the 26th of March , at St. James, Westminster, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain order for payment of money, which said false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money , is as follows: (that is to say)

£34. No. 4, Brompton, Grove Place, March 26, 1827. Please to pay to Mr. James Eddels, or bearer, the sum of Thirty-four Pounds sterling, for value received, and place the same to my account. JAMES COPE .

To Sir William Curtis, Bart. Bankers, Lombard-street, London. with intent to defraud James Creed Eddles , against the statute, &c.

2d COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing, on the same day, at the same parish, a like forged, false forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money, he knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with the same intent as in the first count.

3d and 4th COUNTS, the same as in the first and second, only with intent to defraud Sir William Curtis , Bart. , and others.

5th and 6th COUNTS, The same as the third and fourth counts, only with intent to defraud Sir William Curtis, Bart. only.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 57.

Reference Number: t18270405-63

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

816. WILLIAM WILLIAMS and THOMAS FEATHERSTONE were indicted for burglariously and sacrilegiously breaking and entering the parish chapel of St. Luke, Chelsea, in Middlesex, about the hour of twelve in the night of the 1st of February , at the said parish of St. Luke, Chelsea, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 2 brass chandeliers, value 20l.; 3 brass rods, value 10s., and 2 cushions, value 20s. , the goods of the parishioners of the said parish of St. Luke, Chelsea .

2d COUNT, charging ISAAC ISAACS with feloniously receiving, on the same day, at St. Clement Danes, the said brass candlesticks and the said brass rods, part and parcel of the said stolen goods, he well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute, &c.

3d COUNT, charging the said Isaac Isaacs the same as the second count, only stating the goods received to be 156 lbs. of brass, value 5l.

4th COUNT, charging the said prisoners, William Williams and Thomas Featherstone as in the first count, only stating the property to belong to Thomas Hoblyn and Henry Wilmott .

5th COUNT, charging Isaac Isaacs with receiving the same, stating the property as in the second count.

6th COUNT, charging Isaac Isaacs with receiving, as in the third count.

7th COUNT, charging Williams and Featherstone as in the first count, only stating the property to belong to Mary Adams , widow .

8th and 9th COUNTS, the same as the 5th and 6th.

10th COUNT, charging Williams and Featherstone as in the first count, only stating it to be the property of a certain person or persons, whose names are unknown.

11th and 12th COUNTS, the same as the fifth and sixth. MESSRS. ANDREWS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MARY ADAMS. I am a pew-opener at the old Chelsea church, which is now called the chapel. On Wednesday, the 31st of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the chapel - the brass chandeliers were then safe; I left every thing safe. The eastern window was sound and safe - I locked every door, and went again on the Friday, about ten o'clock, and missed the brass chandeliers- the branches were gone; the chains were tied down with ropes, to the stove and pews; here are the cords with which they were tied (producing them) - I also missed the brass curtain-rods and a brass upright from the pews, a green cushion from the church wardens' pew, and another from the overseers' - they have seperate pews; the curtain-rods were taken from those pews; I found every door fast, as I had left it, and had the key in my pocket - I found the south window, which fronts the Thames, was broken - that window was whole and entire when I went away on Wednesday.

Q. On a Sunday afterwards did you see two men? A. A Sunday or two after the first robbery I did - it was neither of the prisoners; it was a Sunday or two before this robbery. I had the care of the church, and kept the keys- the property in it was under my care. Mr. Hoblyn and Mr. Willmott are the church wardens.

HENRY WILLMOTT. I am one of the churchwardens of St. Luke, Chelsea - Thomas Hoblyn is the other. That which was formerly the church is now used as a parochial chapel.

THOMAS WILLIS . I am a lamp-lighter. I know the prisoners Williams and Featherstone - I first knew them about three months ago; I knew Williams by the name of Dick - I became acquainted with him at the George and Ball public-house, Westminster; Dick introduced Featherstone to me there. I had known Dick seven or eight days before that.

Q. What did he introduce you to Featherstone for? - A. I was in the habit of going to the George and Ball; Dick asked me if I would buy a set of carpenter's tools - Featherstone was not present - I said No, they did not suit me - he said, would I buy any thing that did suit me; I said I was out of work, and if I could earn 1s. I would; he did not know where I lived - I told him I occasionally came to my sister's, who lived in Church-lane, Strand, and I could be found there - her name is Lilley - her husband lives with her; I do not lodge there, but go backwards and forwards; Ursula Willis also lives there. When I called there once my sister delivered a message to me, and in consequence of that message I went to the George and Ball, Westminster - it was on a Friday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock - I found Featherstone standing at the door of the George and Ball - he asked if my name was Tom; I said "Yes, and where is Dick?" - Featherstone said inside; I said I had come in consequence of a message from my sister - I went in, and found Dick sitting on a bench in a little box on the right-hand side of the tap-room; I and Featherstone joined him: we all three sat in the box together, and had half-a-pint of gin and a pot of beer - we had it inside the house; I paid for it- while we were there Dick asked me if I would buy any brass - he did not say what quantity, or where it came from - I said I would try to sell it for him as well as I could; after drinking our beer I went away, and went to my sister's. The prisoner Isaacs came into my sister's shop, to buy a herring - I said to him, "Do you keep an old iron-shop?" he said Yes - I said, "Are you in the habit of buying brass, and how much will you give me a pound for it?" he said he would give 5d. if it was good, but if there was bell-metal mixed with it he could not give so much; this conversation was in the presence of my brother, sister, and mother; after he said he would give 5d. I looked at him; he said, "You need not be afraid, for if it was Jesus Christ I would by it, for it would go where hundreds have gone before" - he had not seen it then.

Q. What did you say to draw from him that answer? A. I asked him the price, and was looking at him rather dubiously - he said, "Is it here?" I said No - "Well," said he, "when can I see it?" I said I would have it brought there. Six o'clock that evening was fixed upon for his seeing it, at that place. After this I went back to the George and Ball, and found a horse and cart standing exactly opposite the door of the house, on the other side of the street, where there is some palings; I found Dick, and Featherstone there; I said to them, "It is all right bring your horse and cart, and the brass to the Strand - they knew where I meant, as they had been there in the morning (but I had not seen them there myself;) Dick said, "We will be there" - I said, "Go on first, and I will follow;" I went the back way, round Scotland-yard and Northumberland-street, and came up with them and the cart at the corner of Church-lane - the cart arrived first; both the prisoners were there with it; nothing had been taken out of the cart. I told them to wait there till I went and asked my sister's leave for them to put two sacks in the cellar - I went, and my sister gave me leave; I went back, and told them to bring the sacks into the place - they contained brass - they each brought one sack; they were put into the cellar - I went forward with a light while they put them there. When I got down stairs they asked 2l. 10s. for it - I agreed at last to give them 1l. 15s. and 1s. I had spent - they were to be paid the same day. I told them to go on, and I would follow them - after they were gone I borrowed two sovereigns of Mrs. Lilley, my sister. I then went back to the George and Ball, and gave the money to Dick; I gave him both the sovereigns - Featherstone was present in the room; Dick gave me 5s. change - he gave Featherstone a sovereign of it, and Featherstone gave him some change - I do not know how much; I left them there, and went back to my sister's - it was then between two and three o'clock - Isaacs came at six o'clock; I went down stairs, and showed him the brass - he looked at it carefully, took a

piece out of the bag, like a coronet, and said, "This came from a church" - I said they told me it came from the country; I said I did not think it was all right; Isaacs said, "Never mind about its being all right - if it were Jesus Christ I would buy it," and, laying hold of the cellar door, he said, "If this was gold I would buy it;" he said, "You have no occasion to be afraid, I will take every thing upon myself;" he agreed to give me 5d. per lb. for it. I said, "Shall it be taken away to-night?" he said, "No, because it is dangerous" - because there were people going along the Strand, and he might be stopped, but it should be fetched the next morning, Saturday, at ten o'clock - he promised to come between ten and eleven- he came about that time - I met him there; I borrowed a basket of my brother, to carry the brass in it to Isaacs' place; I took one bag in the basket, to take it to Isaacs' - I went with him; it was carried to No. 22, Houghton-street; I helped him carry it - he led me there; we went backwards and forwards for it twice. Before I moved it he asked how much I thought there was - I said I did not know; he said I might depend upon him about the weight - he gave me 10s. after I delivered it - he said, that in the course of an hour and a half or two hours, he would come back and pay the rest; my brother-in-law and sister were there when the brass was moved; Isaacs came again in the afternoon, and said, "How much do you think the weight is?" I said, "About 130 lbs. I suppose;" he said, "Why it is 128lbs., but as there is iron and other things we will take off the 8lbs., and make it 120 lbs.;" I agreed, and he gave me two sovereigns that afternoon; my sister reckoned it up by a ready-reckoner which she had; she said it came to more - he said he should give no more. I received in all 2l. 10s.; he went away, after giving me the money. I saw a woman named Jane at the George and Ball - she served liquor there sometimes.

Q. On the Tuesday following did you hear some people in Church-lane talking about old Isaacs and the church? A. Yes - that frightened me, and I went to Dick's lodgings at Westminster, near the George and Ball, and told him what I had heard - he said, "I hope you will not take any notice - you know I have got a family, but I don't mind myself - I hope you will be as a man, and not say any thing about it?" I said I would not. I stopped at his lodgings seven or eight days - I cannot say which.

Q. Did Dick's wife come backwards and forwards? - A. I cannot say that she was his wife; Jane came there once or twice, and my own wife came there sometimes. - When I left Dick's lodgings I went to Liverpool, to get out of the way. While I was stopping at Dick's I told him Isaacs had opened every thing about the brass.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You did not know Featherstone before? A. No. I paid Dick the money, and he gave me 5s. out of two sovereigns - Featherstone gave Dick some change out of a sovereign. The cart was open, like a chaise cart, and a very pale lead colour - Featherstone drove it - they were both in it; Dick said nothing about paying Featherstone for the hire of the cart; I do not know how much per day a cart lets for. - Our second meeting at the George and Ball was between two and three o'clock - the property was in two bags; I cannot say whether Featherstone could see what was in them as they lay in the cart, as I did not get up into the cart. I was taken into custody at Liverpool - I cannot exactly say the date.

Q. How soon afterwards did you think of becoming a witness here? A. I did not think about it; I was never examined before a Magistrate. I was questioned at Mr. Harmer's office five or six days ago - there were a good many people in the room; I do not know how many. I am giving evidence for the good of the parish.

Q. Did you not once stand where the prisoners do now, in this Court? A. I am not obliged to answer that; I came here to tell what I am about now; I do not say but what I have stood at that bar.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Perhaps you have been here oftener than once? A. You may say as many times as you like - I never was but once in my life. I knew Isaacs before by his coming to my sister's - he dealt there.

Q. You first said to him, "Do you keep an old ironshop" - it was your object to make a sale to him? A. Yes. I did not know the value of old brass - it was broken brass in pieces; I thought he gave a fair price. I went to Liverpool because I heard the people talk about the church, and mention Isaacs' name.

Q. Do not you know that it was in consequence of what Isaacs said, that you were taken at Liverpool? A. I do not know - my wife told me somebody had been, and in consequence of that I went off. The brass had not been weighed - I left that to Isaacs.

MARY ANN LILLEY . I am Willis' sister, and live at No. 2, Church-lane, Strand. One day somebody came and knocked at my room door, and asked for Tom - I cannot say what day it was; I only saw one man; I should know him - it was the prisoner Williams - he left a message for Tom; my brother came about ten o'clock that morning - I told him what message had been left; it was to tell him, when he came, to come down to them at Westminster- he went, and came back again. Isaacs came in after he returned, for a pickled herring. Tom asked him, in my presence, if he bought brass; Isaacs said Yes; he asked what he gave per lb. - he said 5d. Tom looked at him, and Isaacs said "You need not be afraid, it is all right - if it were Jesus Christ I would buy it, for that will go where hundreds have gone;" that is all that passed that I heard. Isaacs went away - my brother came in the same afternoon, and asked if I would let him put two bags into the cellar - my husband, who was present, gave him leave. Williams and Featherstone brought two bags; I could not see what was in them; they were put down in the cellar. Tom asked me for two sovereigns. I do not know what it was for - I let him have them, and he went away. Isaacs came again that evening about six o'clock - Tom was there; they went down in the cellar where the bags were, and when they came up, I heard them agree that Isaacs was to come next morning to take it away; he said he would come between ten and eleven o'clock; he came about that time. Tom moved the bags - Isaacs was present; the basket was borrowed of my husband.

Cross-examined. Q. Dick and Tom agreed that Isaacs should come next morning? A. No; Tom and Isaacs agreed; I said nothing about Dick.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you know any thing of the bags? A. No. Nobody came to search for my brother at my place.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you use a ready-reckoner while Isaacs was there? A. Yes, Tom thought it was not rightly cast up. I took the book, and found it was 2l. 10s.

MR. BARRY. Q. The 2l. was paid at that time - you know nothing of a previous payment? A. No.

JAMES LILLEY . I am husband of the last witness, and live in the same house - I saw Isaacs there; Tom Willis asked my leave to put some bags in the cellar - I gave him leave; I have seen Isaacs back wards and forwards there. When I came in one morning he was buying a herring.

Q. Did he at any time go into your cellar with Tom? A. Yes: these bags were brought into my cellar - I afterwards saw Tom take them away; I believe Isaacs helped him - the brass was in two bags; I lent Tom a basket; I saw the prisoners, Williams and Featherstone, bring the bags into the cellar - they are the men.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you ever here as a witness before? A. No; I was at the shop when Isaacs came, but was not there all the time - I was backwards and forwards, and talking to my customers outside; I might be five or ten minutes in the shop, but I cannot say; I saw Isaacs go out and leave the place - no customers came in the shop while he was there, that I recollect - I remained there after Isaacs went away; the customers came to the front of the shop, and I was serving them outside while he was there; I heard nothing particular between him and my brother, except that he said he would buy Jesus Christ if he would bring him in, and it would go where hundreds had gone before.

URSULA WILLIS . I am Willis' mother. I happened to he at my daughter's house nursing, her, and remember Isaacs coming to buy a herring; and saw the two prisoners. Williams and Featherstone, bring two bags in on the same day. My son-in-law gave leave for them to be put into the cellar - they were taken away on the Saturday morning; Tom and Isaacs carried them away.

HENRY HANSTEAD . My brother kept the George and Ball - after his death I sometimes went to help his widow; he died on the 17th of January. I know Featherstone and Williams, and have seen them at that house; I have seen Tom Willis there, in company with them, drinking in the tap-room - I cannot recollect what time of day it was.

JANE RICE . I know Dick, that is him (pointing to Williams) - I never heard his surname; he lodged at the corner of the street the George and Ball is opposite. I saw Featherstone there on a Friday morning, as I came into the George and Ball; he and Dick were there, and called for a pot of porter, which I took them - Willis was also there; Dick just came in as I did. I took them two pots of porter, and half a pint of gin - I remember seeing a horse and cart there; I looked into it, and saw a bag - the cart stood five or six houses off, on the other side of the way; it was a middling sized horse, and had a sore on its back - I only saw one sack; I have seen a cart in possession of Pople, but do not think it is the same; I did not observe the colour, but it is broken; the cart I saw had no step to it. I did not hear Tom Willis say any thing about a Jew - I sometimes went to Dick's lodgings for some pots; I have seen Willis there.

Q. While he was staying at Dick's lodgings. have you not heard him say something about a Jew? A. No; I have seen him there - I do not know what he was there for; I heard Tom say he was out out of the way, but I did not know what for.

NICHOLAS CARTER MORRISON . I keep an oil-shop near the old Chelsea church. On a Thursday night, just before I shut up, somebody came in for some penny cords - I should know him again, it was Featherstone - he said he wanted them to lace a bed with; I said he had better have it all in one piece; he said that would answer his purpose very well, and he bought six penny cords, very similar to that produced. I heard of the robbery of the church the next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Is yours a considerable business? A. Yes; it was candle-light, but I knew him well before - he lived within two doors of me.

JOHN BROWN . I am a private watchman near Battersea-bridge, which is two or three hundred yards from the old Chelsea church. One Friday morning I saw a man with a horse; I cannot say that it was the prisoner Featherstone, but I really think it was one of the Featherstone's - one is rather taller than the other, but they are rather alike - he went on towards Millman's-row. I know one of them kept a cart, but where they kept it I do not know; I mentioned what I had seen to Mr. Simkins - I heard of the church being robbed the same morning.

JOHN WILLIS . I work for Mr. Ramsden, a carrier, and live in a yard in Millman's-row, Chelsea. I know the Featherstones; they keep a cart up that yard - I bought a cart of James Featherstone; I have seen the same cart in the hands of Pople - I had new shafts put to it, but did not paint it again; I bought it nearly two months ago, and sold it again to James Featherstone about one month ago- it was after the church was robbed.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Then there are three Featherstones? A. No, only two - they are very much alike; the cart was in my possession nearly a month, but was away for a week, having the shafts put on.

GEORGE POPLE . I produce the brass.

THOMAS JUMPSON . I live in Lawrence-street, Chelsea. I repaired the chapel chandeliers on the 12th of January - I can swear to part of this brass as being part of these chandeliers; I have a piece left behind, which fits it - there are two chandeliers.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How did you get the piece which is left behind? A. Mrs. Adams gave it me

MRS. ADAMS. I gave JUMPSON that piece of the chandelier, which was left behind in the chapel.

MICHAEL GASHION . I am a dealer in marine-stores, and live in Eagle-court, Strand. The prisoner Isaacs applied to me on Friday, the 2d of February. I went into a public-house to have a pint of beer, and he wanted me to buy some metal - I told him I did not deal in it, but I had a son-in-law who was going into business, and he might sell it to him. I did not see the brass that night; he came to me on the Saturday, after eleven o'clock, and said "Gashion, have you a mind to buy this brass?" I said No - he said he had 17l. to make up before one o'clock, to send away in the country. I said No, it would not pay me; he said he would be obliged to me if I would - I at last went to look at it; he took me to No. 22, Houghton-street, Clare-market - it was in two bags; I agreed to give him 61/2d. per lb.; but when I looked at it, I said it would not suit me at that price, and agreed to give him 6d. He asked if I would take it home to be weighed; I said, No. We took it to a

potatoe-shop at the corner of Clare-market, it weighed 156lbs.; I paid him 3l. 18s. Heath, my man, was present all the time; I sent the brass from there to Mr. Bottons by Heath, and received 4l. 6s. 11d. for it. I was taken up on this charge, and gave this account.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes; Isaacs was there, and admitted that he had sold it to me; I bought it for 6d. and sold it for 7d. I saw him about it twice; he was at the public-house on Friday - I suppose six or more persons were present; he made no secret about it; it was weighed in the bags at the potatoe-shop; several persons were about; he made no secret of the matter; the bag was untied, but the brass was not visible. I told the master of the shop I had bought two bags of brass, and would be obliged if he would allow me to have them weighed - Isaacs heard that. I have known him attend different sales, and have known him from a boy. I never heard any harm of him, and believe he bore a good character.

JOHN HEATH . I am Gashion's servant, and was present when he bought this brass of Isaacs - I took the same brass to Botton's.

CHARLES BOTTON . I am a brass-founder, and live in Shoe-lane. On the 3d of February I bought some brass of Gashion; he and his man Heath brought it. I heard of the robbery at Chelsea chapel about three hours afterwards, which led me to examine the brass. I found an inscription on it, and sent notice to the vestry clerk of Chelsea, and gave up the brass to Pople.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What did you give for it? A. 7d. per lb.

GEORGE POPLE . I have brought the same brass here, and have had it ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you apprehend Isaacs? A. No; I saw him after he was apprehended, and in consequence of what he said I went to the place.

JOHN CLARK . I apprehended Tom Willis at Liverpool, in Lancashire, on the 24th of March.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you go to any place in consequence of what Isaacs said? A. No; I went with Isaacs' brother from the 6th to the 10th of February, in search of Willis, but could not find him; and after Isaacs was bailed, I saw no more of the brother. I offered to bail Isaacs on the 12th - I said if they wanted one bail I would - I know he was bailed.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you mean to say he was set at liberty after he was once taken up? A. He was bailed from Newgate on the 12th; he was charged with buying some brass, and I went with his brother to look after somebody.

WILLIAMs' Defence. Willis says I brought the property to his brother's place - I never saw Willis till he was waiting at the George and Ball: and hearing people mention my name, he said to me, "Dick, have you got any place where I can slow myself out of the way?" I said, Yes, and took him to my room; he said the officer wanted him for a firkin of butter. I kept him in my room for a fortnight; his wife came backwards and forwards - she brought him a pair of pistols, and he said no officer should take him away alive. I then said he should not stop in my place any longer, and he went away in two days.

FEATHERSTONE's Defence. On the Thursday evening I went to Mr. Morrison, and asked him for twopenny worth of bed-cord in one piece - he gave me twopenny worth; I said that was enough, and had twopenny worth, and then another twopenny worth - I untied them, and he tied all three pieces together for me. Willis says I carried one of the sacks into the cellar out of my cart - my cart was not out that morning at all.

MR. MORRISON. I have no recollection of his tying them together; I know he undid them.

ISAACS' Defence. I bought the brass of Tom Willis as honest goods, at 5d. per lb. - he did not agree to my price at first, but let me go; but on the following evening he agreed to let me have it. I said I would not take it away that night, as so many officers were about, and if it was wrong they would stop me, but I would come next morning, which I did - he brought it in two different loads to my house, No. 22, Houghton-street. I had no idea of its being come wrongfully by, or I should not have taken it to a public shop to have it weighed. I hope you will consider me as an innocent man, and the witness against me as guilty of the offence.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

FEATHERSTONE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

ISAACS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-64

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

817. BENJAMIN GIFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 1 shilling and 1 sixpence, the monies of William Frederick Searle , from the person of Henry Searle .

HENRY SEARLE, aged nine years, being questioned did not appear to understand the obligation of an oath.

CHARLOTTE SEARLE . I am the mother of Henry Searle, and live in Bell-square, Moorfields. On the 23d of March, at nine o'clock in the morning, I sent him to his father at Billingsgate, to ask for some silver - he returned at a quarter past eleven o'clock, with an officer.

WILLIAM FREDERICK SEARLE . I keep a stall at Billingsgate. I gave my son one shilling and a sixpence to take to his mother, before ten o'clock in the morning - he might have got home by ten; the sixpence was a remarkable one, having "J. T." punched on it, which I noticed when I took it - the prisoner was a stranger.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am a constable. On Friday, the 23d of March, I was in London-wall, and saw the prisoner with two reputed thieves. I followed them into Wormwood-street , and saw the prisoner accost Henry Searle; his companions knew me, and went off; the prisoner enticed the boy down Union-court, which leads to Broad-street, and I saw the boy pull off his hat, and take out a piece of cotton - the prisoner then enticed him as far as Broad-street; he held the cotton in his hand, and opposite the Excise-office, asked the boy what he had in his hand, whether it was a button; the boy said No, it is 1s. 6d. which my father gave me for my mother; he then asked the boy if he wanted a bird, for he had got a very pretty one, and if he could not purchase it, he would give it him - he then asked him to let him look at what was in his hand - I heard all this distinctly; the boy opened his hand; the prisoner took the money out, and said if the bird saw any thing bright, it would hop away; he then wrapped the money up in the cotton, and was immediately running off with it, but I secured him. The little boy called out,

"My money!" I took the money and cotton from the prisoner's hand, but saw no bird; he said he only wanted to take care of it for the boy for fear he should lose it; I took him to the Mansion-house, and then went to the boy's parents; I have had the money ever since; here is L T. stamped on the sixpence.

W. F. SEARLE. This is the sixpence I gave my son.

Prisoner's Defence. A young gentleman came, and asked if I would buy a bird and cage; I said No, I had no money - this little boy stood by, and I asked if he wanted to buy it; he said he should like it, but had no money; he dropped his sixpence; I picked it up, and gave it him- he was throwing it about, and I wrapped it in the cotton that he should not lose it; the constable then came, and took me.

T. HAYLOCK. If any thing of the kind had passed, I must have observed it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-65

818. JOSEPH BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 3 canvas-bags, value 1s.; 5lbs. of volatile salts, value 5s. 9d.; 54 penny pieces, and 132 half-pence, the property of Elizabeth Eycott , from the person of Samuel Eycott .

SAMUEL EYCOTT. I am fourteen years old, and am in my mother's employ - she deals in spice and grocery , and lives in Great Garden-street, Whitechapel-road. On the 26th of February, about half-past four o'clock, I was coming from Somers'-town with these things in a bag - I had collected the money from different shops; the money was in two bags, which was put into a third bag, containing the salts - as I was going up Long-lane, I had got about fourteen yards out of Smithfield, the prisoner accosted me, and asked if I could show him the way to Cripplegate - he was alone; I said I was going that way - he kept in my company for a quarter of an hour - I am sure he is the lad; when I got to Cripplegate he showed me a pocket-book - he laid his bag (which was a blue one) down, and I put mine down on it to look at the pocket-book; while I was looking at it, both the bags were taken away by somebody, not by the prisoner - there were three boys a little behind him, before we came to Cripplegate-buildings - I had not observed them before; I just turned round, and the prisoner was gone also; he did not complain of loosing his bag - a crowd assembled as I called out; I know that the prisoner, and the three all went away; he had the pocket-book in his hand before he went away; he desired me to look at some writing which was in it - my bag was entirely gone. On the 6th of March my mother and I were passing along Well-street, Mile-end, and saw the prisoner talking to another young person - he saw me - he touched the other one on the arm and said,"That is the cove we served last week;" my mother asked if I noticed him, and when I looked at him, I was certain of him - I went after him - he tried to make his escape, and hit me in the face; my mother assisted me in securing him; I told her what had happened as soon as I got home; I am quite sure he is the boy.

Prisoner. Q. Did you say at Guidhall, that there were three more in my company? A. Yes.

ELIZABETH EYCOTT. I sent my son to sell some goods for me - this money was the produce of the goods; he returned about half-past five o'clock, and stated what had happened; I was with him in Mile-end, about a week afterwards, and met the prisoner with another boy - as the prisoner passed he looked at my son, and said, "That is the cove we served last week;" this induced me to notice him; I told my son to look at them; he said the one with the blue bag round his neck (which was the prisoner) was the boy who had robbed him; we pursued - the prisoner ran away, but was at last secured; I held him till Pasque came up; he denied the charge; the other boy went away.

JOHN PASQUE . I am a watchman of Mile-end. I was in Well street on the 6th of March, about half-past ten o'clock in the day, and found the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Mile-end; this boy ran after me, and said he knew I was the boy who had robbed him, because I had a blue bag.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-66

819. JOHN DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 looking-glass, value 5s.; 1 bed, value 3l.; 1 table, value 1l.; 1 bolster, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pillow, value 1s. 6d.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 3 sheets, value 6s.; 3 blankets, value 10s. 6d.; 1 counterpane, value 10s. 6d.; 1 brass candlestick, value 1s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 2s. 6d.; 1 tea-tray, value 6d.; 1 fender, value 6d., and 1 pair of bellows, value 1s, the goods of Sarah Medcraft , widow , in a lodging-room .

SARAH MEDCRAFT. I am a widow, and live in Hart-street, Cripplegate - the prisoner rented my front parlour for a year and a half; I had been ill for six months, and had not been into his room; I lived up-stairs - he had been talking about going to the poor-house. On the 7th of February, as I suspected he was going away, I went out backwards and got an officer; the prisoner was then gone, but his wife was in the room; he owed me 12l. for rent - I missed all these things, which were let with the room - I found them in pawn.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know what is become of a round mahogany table? A. I had one in my own room - when I was ill I got him to pawn some things for me, but never gave him leave to pawn any thing in his room, and did not know that he had done so.

BENJAMIN WHIFFIN . I keep the Jacob's Well public-house. Some duplicates were put into my hands by a man, named Baxter, and I advanced the money to redeem the goods.

ISAAC PHELPS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Colchester-street, Whitechapel. Whiffin sent me to redeem a bed and table - I do not know who pawned them.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. On the 6th of March the prosecutor fetched me; I found Phelps at Bailey's.

WILLIAM HILLIER . I keep a chandler's-shop. I was fetched to Hart-street, and found this furniture gone; the prisoner's wife was there, but I found nothing on her.

ISAAC PUGH . I am shopman to Mr. Bailey, of Aldersgate-street. I have a looking-glass pawned on the 16th of January, and some fire-irons pawned on the 19th, in the name of John Day, by the prisoner; he had pawned them before and redeemed them again; I have delivered up a

tea-tray, a blanket, a fender, and other things, which were pawned in the name of Buck.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a long written defence, stating that the prosecutrix cohabited with a man named Marshall - that he had frequently pawned property for her, and she had given him leave to pawn this property, and let his rent run up to 12l, as she knew he expected to receive 60l. - and that she had frequently said he might pawn what goods he liked.

SARAH MEDCRAFT . It is all false - I did not know he had pawned any thing till after he had left.

SARAH BUCK . I live in Golden-lane, Barbican. Late in July, or early in August, I was in the prisoner's room when Medcraft's daughter came down, and asked for two flat-irons - Mrs. Day said she would send them up presently; Mrs. Medcraft came down herself then and said,"Mrs. Day, if you have not the irons, send up the duplicates;" she knew they were pawned, in fact, she actually redeemed them for her own use; I know there was a great intimacy between them all, and on Christmas day, I heard her ask for the poker to raise up the hatchway; Mrs. Day said, "No, you will break it;" Medcraft made answer, "D-n the poker, I forgot that you had not got it."

SARAH MEDCRAFT. This woman swears false; she is the prisoner's sister; I was never in her company, and I said nothing at all about the poker.

HENRY BUCK. I am the husband of Sarah Buck. I know that Mrs. Medcraft gave the prisoner leave to pawn, or make use of every thing in the place; she has often been in the room, seen the things were gone, and made no complaints about it; she has employed both the prisoner and myself to pawn things.

S. MEDCRAFT. It is all false, I declare.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-67

820. MATTHEW HULL and RICHARD YOUNG were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 3 quarts of brandy, value 15s.; 3 quarts of rum, value 10s.; 3 quarts of port wine, value 12s., and 13 bottles value 5s. , the goods of Nathaniel Laight Stanger Leathes and Thomas Bradshaw .

NATHANIEL LAIGHT STANGER LEATHES. I am in partnership with Thomas Bradshaw - we are wine and brandy merchants , and live in Mincing-lane. Hull was my carman and occasionally assisted in the cellar; Young was head-cellarman ; he had lived about four months with me, and Hull two years; I only know this circumstance from Jeffrey's information.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you a clerk, named Elwood? A. Yes, he is here; he left me on the 24th of March; he had no authority to give the men orders; the orders were always written by myself or my partner, and sent into the cellar; I was present when the prisoners were apprehended; nothing was said about Elwood then; the prisoners requested him to be here afterwards, and we have brought him for them to examine if they like.

RICHARD JEFFREY . I am a wine-cooper, and have been in the prosecutors' employ about seven months. I packed in a wine-hamper four bottles of brandy, four of rum, three of port wine, and one of sherry, also two pints of port; I packed them by Young's direction; Hull was in an other part of the cellar at the time, but he handed me three bottles of port to pack; it was corded, and directed to Richard or Mr. Young, at some buildings in Kennington; Hull took it away on his shoulder; I had no written order to pack it; I gave no information about it at the time; when they took it out of the premises they said it was going to the White Hart public-house, in Tower-street, to be booked for the errand-cart; this was on the 10th of February; I have heard Young say he lived at Kennington; I stated this to my master on the 18th or 19th. and they were taken up; Hull was gone about ten minutes with the hamper.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any concealment about it? A. Only us three were there; Hull and I both act under Young's direction; I did not hear Young order him to take it - he ordered me to draw the brandy and pack it up- it was between half-past eight and nine o'clock in the morning; Elwood was up in the counting-house at the time - he did not come into the cellar, or give any orders respecting it; he very seldom gave any orders.

COURT. Q. Did you ever hear him give a verbal direction about conveying away the contents of the cellar? A. No.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you any wine for a Christmas-box? A. Not by Elwood's orders - it was by Young's orders; I had half a dozen for a Christmas-box, and I packed it up. I told my master about that at the same time as I mentioned this.

SARAH HARVEY . I am nurse at the White Hart public-house, Tower-street; I recollect Hull bringing a hamper there on a Saturday morning - I have the book here; as I cannot write I got him to enter it himself, and saw him do so; it was about a week before he was taken up; the hamper went by the errand-cart I suppose.

RICHARD JEFFREY. I have seen Hull write, and believe this entry to be his writing -(reads) - "Mr. Young, Kennington-lane."

HENRY FOSTER . I am a marshalsman. I apprehended both the prisoners at the prosecutors' counting-house, on the 20th of February - I questioned them separately, but did not threaten or promise any thing; I had Young out of the cellar first, and asked him about the charge; he denied it: I then had Hull up - he also denied it; I said,"Well, I will send round to the booking-offices, and I dare say I shall ascertain where the hamper went to;" he then said, "It is of no use my denying it - I took it to the White Hart, and booked it myself;" he said the direction was tacked on the hamper. I went to Kennington-lane with Mr. Bradshaw, and in the yard of Young's house we found the hamper, which Mr. Bradshaw claimed.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Young's residence, of your own knowledge? A. No. The direction is torn of the hamper, but there is a nail left on it.

R. JEFFREY. This is a hamper of the same description as I packed. I have frequently heard Young say he lived in Kennington-lane.

MR. LEATHER re-examined. I never allowed my men wine for a Christmas-box.

HULL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

YOUNG - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-68

821. BENJAMIN HUGMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 16 pairs of gloves, value 16s., the goods of David Simpson , his master .

PETER PLUMBLEY . I am shopman to David Simpson - he is a glover and haberdasher ; the prisoner was about two months in his service. On the 29th of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning, a young man informed me that a paper of gloves was removed from a recess - I searched, and found them secreted on a form which was suspended from the ceiling of the cellar - there were sixteen pairs in the paper; I marked three or four pairs, and also the paper, and at five o'clock in the afternoon I found they were moved. I found the prisoner in custody at half-past five, with them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Simpson? A. Five months - he has no partner. The gloves were not laid in the recess to see if any body would take them.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. I had been watching this house for two days, by direction of Mr. Simpson. I saw the prisoner come out between five and six o'clock - I pushed him up a passage, and took out of his breeches this parcel of gloves; he said he had picked them up behind the counter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-69

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, APRIL 10.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

822. THOMAS LEACH and JOHN CLARK , were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 16 sovereigns, 3 half sovereigns, 21 shillings, and one 5l. Bank note , the property of William Keene .

JOSEPH HAGG . I am toll-collector at Red-hill turnpike, Denham, Bucks. On the 26th of March I put a 5l. Bank-note, 17l. 10s. in gold, and 26s. in a white cartridge paper parcel, which I tied and sealed, and directed to William Garlick , London, to be left at the bar of the Bell Inn, Holborn, till called for - I gave it to William Keene, the Wickham coachman .

WILLIAM KEENE . I am the Wickham coachman. Hagg delivered me the parcel on the 26th of March, it was directed to Mr. Garlick - I took it to town, and gave it to Chase the book-keeper, at the Old Bell, Holborn, about ten in the morning, and told him if Garlick did not come for it, to send it by the prisoner Leach, who had attended my coach for some years, as a jobbing man - I used to send him with what money parcels I could not deliver myself - I saw Leach about the coach that morning - he was not in the office when I gave Chase the parcel - I came in with my coach next day, and Leach came into the office; Chase asked him if he had said any thing to me about the parcel which had not come to hand - he said he was afraid to tell me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Then he had been speaking to Chase on the subject? A. I do not know - I have known Clark about twelve years - he was once porter at the Old Bell, and afterwards a cad to some of the coaches there; he sometimes had small parcels to carry - I have trusted Leach with 400l. at a time; I did not see Clark in the yard, but he plies there.

WILLIAM CHASE . I am book-keeper at the Old Bell. On the 26th of March this parcel was delivered to me, directed to Mr. Garlick, London - I do not know where he lived - he often had money transmitted to him - I locked it up in my desk till about six o'clock in the evening, when I gave it to Leach - a female had called for it about five o'clock, she asked for a parcel which had come by the Wickham coach, directed for Mr. Garlick - she said she was Mrs. Garlick, but I refused to deliver it to her as she had no written order, and she went away - I delivered it to Leach about six o'clock, and told him to take it that evening without fail - he knew where Garlick lived - I told him about the woman calling for it - I had no doubt from its weight that it contained money, and believe I told him it was money - Clark was not present - next morning Garlick himself called for it - I saw Leach in about an hour, and asked what he had done with the parcel which I had delivered to him over night - he asked if it had not arrived safe - I told him No, and that Garlick had got a man in custody, who had had the parcel to take to him - Leach then said, that he was fearful it had not arrived safe, and he had had no rest all night, and he had come to the office earlier than usual to see Clark and be satisfied about it, for he had given it to him with directions to be sure and deliver it - they were well known to each other.

Cross-examined. Q. Leach had taken parcels for Garlick before? A. Yes, about three - I have since found that it was Mrs. Garlick who called for it - I do not know that Leach came earlier than usual - Clark said, a stranger had met him in the street, as he was going to the toll-house, and said his name was Garlick. Leach did jobs for the coachmen but not for us - I have known Clark nearly ten years.

COURT. Q. They must both know their duty was to deliver parcels no where but where they were directed? A. Certainly.

WILLIAM GARLICK. I am lessee of the turnpike-road, and live in Purim-place, Mile-end-road; this parcel never came to me - Leach has delivered me five or six from this toll-gate - Mrs. Garlick went for this parcel, but could not get it - she had come to town, and, knowing it was there, called for it - I should have approved of its being delivered to her.

Cross-examined. Q. Clark came to your turnpike? A. I was not present.

COURT. Q. Are your parcels delivered at the toll-gate? A. Yes, my house is close by - Leach used to leave them at the gate.

JOHN NORRIS . I am a constable. On the 26th of March, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I was at the Mile-end gate, by accident, and Miller, who had got there just before me, had detained Clark there; Mrs. Garlick and the toll-collector were there; they said Clark had been sent there with a parcel of money, and he came there, saying he had given it to a man about 300 yards from the gate - but being fearful he had done wrong, he had come to see if it was all right. Clark said the parcel was given to him by a man called Biscay (meaning Leach) to deliver at the turnpike; that a man in a rough coat tapped him on the shoulder. and said, "I come from Biscay, your name is Clark; you have got a parcel for me;" that he gave it, having his name and Biscay's so pat. I took him into custody, and as we came along, he pointed out where he said he had given it to the man - I found a 1l. note on him.

Cross-examined. Q. At what o'clock was it that you took him? A. A quarter before eight; he never varied in his account at all - the toll-house is about two miles from the Old Bell. I found a letter on him, directed to Mr. Butler, of Cheapside.

LEACH's Defence. Chase delivered me the parcel; I saw Clark, and asked where he was going - he said into the city; I said, "Then take this parcel and deliver it at the toll-house, and charge one shilling for yourself" - he gave me his word and honour that he would do so.

CLARK's Defence. He gave me the parcel at the Bell. and told me to deliver it safe; a man stopped me and said,"Your name is Biscay, you have a parcel for me - the man who sent you with it is Leach; I sent my wife for it this afternoon;" as such I gave it him - but in a few minutes I thought it might not be right, and went up to the turnpike to inquire.

WILLIAM GARLICK. I really think Clark is innocent - for I have since heard he is a silly sort of fellow, and would he likely to give up the parcel in the way which he has stated it.

- MILLER. I found one shilling on Clark.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

LEACH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-70

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

823. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing on the 19th of February , 12 yards of flannel, value 12s. , the goods of John Saward .

JOHN SAWARD. I am a linen-draper , and live in New-road, St. George in the East . On the 19th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, this flannel stood at my door, tied up in different lengths - it was within the door; I was at the bottom of the shop, and saw the top-piece drawn out. I ran out, and saw the prisoner putting it under his apron; I called stop thief! and he dropped the flannel just before the watchman stopped him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-71

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

824. THOMAS SAMUEL WHITE was indicted for stealing on the 31st of January , at St. James, Westminster, 7 silver candlesticks, value 40l., the goods of the Earl of Aberdeen , Lord Auckland , William Robert Hamilton , Esq., the Marquis of Lansdowne , Edward Booth Wilbraham , Esq. , and Edward Marjoribanks , in their dwelling-house .

2d COUNT, charging SAMUEL SOLOMAN with feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute , &c.

3d COUNT, charging the prisoner White as in the first count, only stating the goods to belong to the Marquis of Lansdowne and others, in their dwelling-house.

4th COUNT, charging Soloman with receiving.

5th COUNT, charging as the third count, only stating them to be the goods of Charles Beloe , in the dwelling-house of the said Marquis of Lansdowne and others.

6th COUNT, charging Soloman with receiving.

7th COUNT, the same as the fifth, only stating them to be the goods of Edward Hurren , in the dwelling-house of the said Marquis of Lansdowne and others.

8th COUNT, charging Soloman with receiving.

MESSRS. ALLEY and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES BELOE, ESQ. I am secretary to the Travellers' Club , which is held at No. 49, Pall-mall, in the parish of St. James - the Marquis of Lansdowne is one of the trustees of the club; there are five trustees, beside the treasurer, who is one; they are invested by the club in trust of their property.

COURT. Q. How do you know they are trustees? A. They are appointed at a general meeting of the club - in the first instance by vote; the Marquis attends the club as a member; the trustees are all members. I have the minute of the transaction - it is in my own hand-writing(reads).

"At a general meeting, held May 13, 1822, Resolved, That all the monies, china, plate, and other effects belonging to the club, as well as the house, business, and premises, and the lease thereof, are abeolutely vested in the trustees, in trust for the club, and are to be assigned and disposed of from time to time, in such manner as the Committee shall direct. - Resolved, That the following noblemen and gentlemen be nominated as the trustees of the Club; the Earl of Aberdeen, Lord Auckland, William Hamilton, Esq., the Marquis of Lansdowne, Edward Marjoribanks, Esq., and Edward Booth Wilbraham, Esq."

PHILIP CHASTENEY . I am waiter to the club. On the night of the 31st of January I placed three pairs of candlesticks in the cupboard of the outer pantry, which is inside the house - they were silver candlesticks; there were two or three pairs there at the time, but I did not count them; I went to bed about half-past five o'clock in the morning. I took some other candlesticks down at that time, and placed them on the dresser in the outer pantry, without putting them into the cupboard; those which I brought down first I placed in the cupboard - they were all silver. I turned the key of the cupboard, and left it in the door; I did not lock the pantry door - I then went to bed.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I am now servant to a gentleman. On the 31st of January I was under butler at the Travellers' Club - a little after seven o'clock on that morning I cleaned the plate, and put it away in the pantry where I slept; it was between six and seven when I first got up to clean it - I put it by in the pantry - I cannot be certain as to the time - I cleaned seven candlesticks, but they were not lost - nothing that I cleaned was lost - I missed seven candlesticks at eight o'clock on the morning of the 31st. - I searched for them in the pantry, and in the front pantry cupboard, which we call the outer pantry - I had not been to that cupboard before eight o'clock.

JOHN CROKER . I am fifteen years old on the 1st of May - I live in Church-street, Bethnal-green, but have now come from the House of Correction - I have a brother named William - I do not know where he is now - I was taken into custody about eleven weeks ago - one day, nearly a fortnight before I was apprehended, I went out with my brother William and the prisoner White, about half-past five o'clock in the morning - White does not live with me - he and my brother William are sweeps - I had never been a sweep myself until this morning - White came to my brother's house about half-past five,

I, my brother William and him, went out - White gave me a chimney-sweeper's cloth, with a brush and scraper, to carry, and some black soot was slapped over my face by White, who said that in getting up the chimney my face would be quite black - we went by the Queen's house which is being built up in the Park - there is a scaffold round it, and through a place where there is all arch-ways which brought us round into a square - White rang a bell - a gentleman came out and asked who was there, and White said the sweeps - we did not get in at that house - we then went up a street and towards the backway of a house; the watchman said, they did not let them in that way - we went round a court where there was archways and came round to the front of the house - White rang the bell and called out sweep; a gentleman came and opened the door, and we all three went into the house - White first, my brother next, and I last - we all went straight down the stairs into a room where there is all tin things - White and my brother took up some cinders and put them into the sack - my brother said to a person who wore a white smock-frock, "Will you give us some beer?" some was given us; we all drank; the person in the frock then said, "Are you done?" my brother said, "No, not yet"- we all went up stairs into a room where there is a tin by the side of the fire - I put my cloth, brush, and scraper down; my brother hung the cloth before the chimney: I went up the chimney about a yard, and then said, "Bill, if you don't fetch me down, I shall tumble down" (my brother had told me to go up the chimney); he said, "Stop a bit;" he afterwards put up his hand, and I came down - when I got down White and my brother were there - White lifted the sack on my brother's shoulder, and told me to go on - my brother William remained with White; I went on till I came to the door - they followed me, my brother tried the door - we could not open the door to get out - he told White to fetch the gentleman to open it - the gentleman came, and said, "Shall I open both doors?" they said, "No, one would do" - my brother had the sack on his shoulder at that time - White had nothing - we all went out together, and I think we turned to the right - we then went up two or three streets which brought us to a square, they went right across the square, up a street where there is a little hill, and that brought us into a road; my brother then said to me, "Jack, do you know your way home?" I said, No; he said, "I will show you the way, go straight on down this road, that will bring you to Charing-cross, and then you will know your way" - White was present all this time, there were houses on one side this road, the other is a dead wall; I followed the direction my brother gave me, and got to Charing-cross - I then knew my way home - when my brother asked if I knew my way home, he meant to his own house - he lives in Pye-street, Westminster - I slept at his house that night, but I did not live there - I went to his house.

Prisoner WHITE. Q. Did you not meet a boy named Hope as you went home? A. When I got home to my brother's, I went out for a light, and met a man named Jem Hope, he asked what made my face so black - I laughed at him and went on.

Q. How came you at your brother's over-night? A. I had no work to do, and had not seen him for some time, he often told me, if I came down there, he would get me some work.

JAMES STEEL . On the 31st of January I was porter to the Travellers' Club; there were three sweeps there that morning - I let them out - while they were there one of them asked for some table-beer, which I gave them - the prisoner White was one of them, I am quite sure - I swear to him.

Prisoner WHITE. Q. Why not swear to me at the office; you saw me at the Green Man public-house, and did not know me? A. I pointed him out to one of the officers in Clerkenwell prison - I did not see him in a public-house to my knowledge.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 28th of March, I, in company with Goddard and Avis, apprehended the prisoner White in Greek-street, Spitalfields - he made a resistance; we at length secured him - on the 30th of March, when he was locked up at the office, he called to me, and asked if he could see his old woman; I said, I would see what I could do; but I had seen her, and his mother too; I did not either threaten or promise him any thing; he then said, "I have seen the Magistrate again;" I said, "Have you?" he said, "He did not seem to want to hear me" - he then commenced by telling me, that, on the night before the robbery, Bill Croker told him, that he knew of a job where they could earn 15s. or 16s. in the morning; that he, and Bill Croker, and Bill's brother, Jack, went to a house in Berkeley-square next morning, and rang the bell to do their job, but they would not let them in; that they came away, and in coming down St. James's-street, Bill Croker said to him, "A friend of mine told me, that at the house where we got the candlesticks, there were some small or little fine clocks on all the chimney-pieces, and I am bush'd (meaning without money), and I want money, and we will go, if you like;" that he consented, and they all three went to the back-door of the club-house, and could not get in; the watchman came, and told them they must go round to the front, that they went round to the front, and were all three let in, without being asked a question; they went into the kitchen and took up some cinders and ashes from under the grate, and put them into the sack, that they saw a number of spoons and sugar-tongs lying on the table or dresser, that Bill Croker gathered them together but left them, they did not take them away, they came out of that room, and saw the porter - Bill Croker asked for some beer, and they had some; that Bill said, there was another chimney to do, and they went up to another room, where a good many candlesticks laid on the dresser - that Bill took up some of them, examined them and put them down again - I should have said, that he stated when they went into this room they put the boy up the chimney, and put the cloth in front; he said, they saw the door of a closet in this room standing open, and some candlesticks in it, that Bill Croker took out one or two of them, and said, "These will do;" he put them back again, took the boy from the chimney and put him outside the door, and told him to look after the waiter, and then he (White) held the sack open while Bill Croker put in seven of the candlesticks out of the cupboard; he put the sack on White's shoulder, who carried it to the door, the porter let them all three out, and then Bill Croker took the sack altogether, on his shoulder, and he (White) went in his company - he then told me the whole of what they had done with them,

and how they had disposed of them - he said, they took them to Solomon's.

Prisoner WHITE. Q. Did you not tell me it would go easier with me if I told you? A. No, nor any thing like it.

THOMAS CHARLES SIRRELL . I am a refiner, and live at No. 54, Barbican. About nine o'clock in the morning of the 31st of January, the prisoner Solomons came to my house, I paid him 29l. 4s. 10d. for seven silver candlesticks - I do not know that he brought them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you any acquaintance with him before? A. He was at my house about two years ago - I am sure he is the man - I will swear to him - he was there at nine o'clock in the morning - he had dealt with my shopman - I was only there while I paid him - I gave him 4s. 10d. an ounce for the silver, which was a full and fair price.

COURT. Q. Did you see the candlesticks yourself before you paid the money? A. I had a glance of them as I paid the money - they were in the scale at the time; I took one out to see for the hall mark - I saw there was a crest on it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you afterwards sell them? A. I sold them to Foligno two hours after I bought them- I sold him the whole seven; he is a dealer in plate.

COURT. Q. Why, you are a refiner; I thought you bought to melt? A. It is usual if we find any thing better, to sell it - I sold them at 5s. 4d. per ounce, and he had them away.

LAURENCE CHILD . I am shopman to Sirrell. On the 31st of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, a person came to master's shop to sell seven candlesticks - I believe Solomon to be the man; he first inquired what we gave for sterling silver; I told him 4s. 10d. an ounce; he then produced them. I examined and weighed them - they weighed 121 ounces - I made a bill of them, and then called master down to pay for them, which he did - he paid the same person who brought them to me. I think I should know the candlesticks again.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you deal for them in a very regular manner? A. Quite so.

EDWARD FOLIGNO . I am a silver-smith, and live at No. 6, Nottingham-place, Commercial-road. I purchased seven candlesticks of Sirrell, on the 31st of January, at 5s. 4d. per oz. I sold one pair to Mr. Wm. Barrett, and kept the other five; I delivered them up to Sirrell after inquiry was made, and do not remember whether there was any marks on them. I delivered the pair to Mr. Barrett just as I received them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you buy them to sell again, or as old silver? A. To sell again - 4s. 10d. is a fair price for old silver; there was one pair, three alike, and two odd ones. I sold the pair to Mr. Barrett.

COURT. Q. How came you to know that Sirrell had them to dispose of? A. I went in quite promiscuously - I had been there several times, and bought plate of him; he had some things in his window exposed for sale, which I had an idea of buying, and went in for that purpose; these candlesticks were not in the window - he asked if I would purchase some, and produced these.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a silver-smith, and live at No. 18, Redcross-square. I bought two candlesticks of Foligno, on the 31st of January; they are not exactly a pair, but nearly so - I believe they had a mark on them; I gave 6s. 3d. an ounce for them - I returned them to Foligno when I found they were stolen.

E. FOLIGNO re-examined. I at first returned but five to Sirrell, but afterwards received this pair, and returned them.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I have seven silver candlesticks which I received from Sirrell, five at his house, and two more at the office afterwards; there is a crest on each of the five, but it has been taken off the two which are polished - I cannot say there has been a crest on them.

T. C. SIRRELL. These are the same candlesticks - I am a silver refiner - I melt silver.

COURT to FOLIGNO. Q. These are old-fashioned candlesticks? A. Yes, but they have been in demand for the last five or six years - every dealer in silver might not know that - new ones are now sometimes made to old-fashioned patterns: these are such as are now sought after.

EDWARD HURREN . I am butler to the Travellers' Club- these seven candlesticks all belong to the club. I missed them on the 31st of January; five of them have the crest on them, which is Ulysses' head, and it was on the other two tall ones - I should think the seven are worth about 60l.

WHITE's Defence. John Croker said at the office that we were half way down the yard, and the watchman called after us - neither of the men can swear that I was near the place, if it had not been for what I told the officer, who said it would go better with me if I told.

Prisoner SOLOMON to L. CHILD. Q. At my first examination, did you swear positively to my being the man who brought the candlesticks. A. I told the Magistrate I believed he was the man.

SOLOMON's Defence. I know nothing whatever of it.

WHITE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutors, on account of the information he gave relative to the property .

SOLOMON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-72

Before Mr. Recorder.

825. JOHN JENNINGS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Chalkley , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 3d of April , at St. Luke, with intent to steal, and stealing 40 lbs. weight of beef, value 15s. , his property.

FRANCIS CHALKLEY. I am a butcher , and live at No. 177, Whitecross-street, in the parish of St. Luke . This beef was in my slaughter-house, which has an internal communication with my house by a door; I saw this beef safe in my slaughter-house on Monday night, the 2d of April, at eleven o'clock; it was two pieces, weighing 40 lbs. - it was cut off a quarter of beef; the slaughter-house was safe at night. I went to the slaughter-house about seven o'clock the next morning, and found the lattice, which was made to let the air in, was broken, large enough to admit the body of a man in - that was quite safe over night. I missed this beef, and found it at the watch-house that morning - I knew it to be part of what was cut from my quarter of beef. I compared it with what remained; it had formed one piece the night before, and was worth about 15s. I

knew the prisoner before, as a brewer's servant, but had not seen him lately.

SWAN BELSHAW . I am a watchman of St. Luke's; my beat is in Banner-street, one end of which leads into Whitecross-street. On Monday night, at half-past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner going down Banner-street, with a great weight on his back; I asked what he had got there? he said it was his master's property. I got nearer to him, and said, I should like to see it - he then dropped it and ran away; I sprang my rattle, calling Stop thief! - and in four or five minutes, found him in custody at the watch-house. I was quite sure of him - I took the meat and carried it to the watch-house - it was beef. I am certain he is the man.

LOUIS MYERSON . I am a constable. I heard the rattles spring, and saw the prisoner running; the watchman was calling Stop thief! I ran and caught the prisoner by the collar, without losing sight of him, and took him to the watch-house; another watchman came and secured him. Belshaw came in, in a very few minutes, with the beef, and said, "That is the person who had the beef." I found a knife on him, with a small piece of raw fat on it, as if it had been cutting meat.

JOHN BROWN . I am watch-house keeper, and was there when the prisoner was brought in. Chalkley came about ten o'clock in the morning, and claimed the beef. I saw it afterwards fitted to the rest of the carcase - it had undoubtedly been part of the same. I saw two small pieces of raw fat on the prisoner's knife.

F. CHALKLEY re-examined. The beef was not cut as a butcher would do it; it had been cut three times and then twisted up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a man to carry it to Shoreditch.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Reference Number: t18270405-73

826. JOHN GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 87 lbs. of candles, value 2l. 5s., and 1 box, value 3s. 6d. the goods of Valentine Wortley ; and JOHN LODGE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, charging it to be the property of Samuel Morgan and Thomas Morgan .

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am in the service of Samuel Morgan and Thomas Morgan; they are tallow-chandlers , and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 13th of February I had a six dozen box of candles in my cart, to take to Mr. Wortley, New-street, Mary-le-bone ; I met the prisoner George in Tottenham-court-road - I knew him before, as he formerly worked for my master. He asked if he should go with me; I said he might, if he liked - and he walked with me, by the side of the horse, all the way to Wortley's. We got there about half-past twelve o'clock in the day; George carried the box from the cart, as I was not very well, and young Mr. Wortley received it from it. I did not tell him what the box contained - he did not ask; he did not see it put into the cart; he would know it was a candle-box, and would know the quantity in it by the size- and would know it was full by the weight of it. I had a bill of parcels with the goods, which I delivered.

WILLIAM NATHANIEL WORTLEY . I am the son of Valentine Wortley, and live in New-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 13th of February Taylor came with these candles; George brought them in, and was in the shop when Taylor delivered me the bill; I did not open them in his presence. George came again about half-past six o'clock, when it was dusk, in a cart, but not the same as the candles had come in; he said he had come for the box of candles, which he had delivered wrong in the morning. I asked him some questions, but what, I do not recollect; and he said the box was to be changed for one in the neighbourhood, and he would bring me back another presently. I believed him, and delivered it to him, having taken 1lb. out, which I told him of; he said that was of no consequence. His cart, standing on the opposite side of the road, raised my suspicion, and I watched him; he said he was going into Park-road, where he was to change the box; but he went to the end of the street, then turned to the right, and afterwards back again to the left-hand side of the street, and stopped there a quarter of an hour, in the middle of the road, with a lad in the cart; he made another stoppage, and at last came to the place he mentioned, which was Mr. Hennett's oil-shop, in Park-road; he stopped there about ten minutes, then went round the back way, to the shop of Mr. Pickman, in the Harrow-road. I followed him six or seven miles; he at last went to Montague-street, Spitalfields, and drew up to Lodge's, who keeps an oil-shop on the right-hand side in that street. I watched for a time, and saw George deliver the box of candles into Lodge's shop; Lodge was standing at the door while George and the boy were helping the box into the shop; they went into the shop together, for a few minutes, before the box was taken out. I then went to the watch-house, and got a constable; and just as we came to the door. George came out of the shop. I said to the constable, "That is the man;" he took to his heels and ran; the constable took him, and brought him back to the shop, and asked him, in the hearing of Lodge, how he came by these candles; George said, "That good gentleman (meaning me) gave them to me. I asked him for them, and he gave them to me without any scruple." The constable said, "A pretty thing that a gentleman should buy candles on purpose to give you;" and then asked him where the money was for the candles; he pulled three sovereigns and a sixpence from his pocket, and said that was the money Mr. Lodge had paid him for them. Lodge was in hearing, and said nothing; the constable then asked Lodge if he had a bill of parcels; he did not say that he had not got one, but did not produce it; the constable then told Lodge he must have the candles; he said "No, Sir, not unless I get the money back;" the constable said he would, and if he refused to deliver them, he would take him as well as the candles; the constable then turned to me, and said, "Can you swear to these boxes?" I said I could swear to the one I had sent out, and pointed it out; the constable wished to shut the door, and retire to the back of the shop. Lodge would not permit it; we brought the candles to the watch-house, with George; Lodge remained at his shop; George said at the watch-house that Lodge would have taken a hundred boxes.

Q. Did Lodge show you a bill for the candles? A. Not that evening; he produced one before the Magistrate next morning; he had not been desired to attend before the Magistrate, but he came and claimed either the money or

candles, and produced a bill of parcels - Mr. Harmer's clerk, (who appeared for Lodge) had it back - the amount of the bill is 3l. 10s.; here is my bill of the candles and box, which is 2l. 5s. 10d., but there were two boxes at Lodge's - George had another box in the cart besides the one I gave him - I had seen him bringing that box out of Mr. Pickman's; they were both taken into Lodge's, and both contained about the same quantity of candles - mine was 88lbs.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. You believed the man when he came to you? A. Yes; I never expected the same box back again.

SAMUEL MORGAN , JUN. I am the son of Samuel Morgan, who is in partnership with my uncle; Thomas Taylor has been two or three years in our service, and took these goods by our order to Mr. Wortley; George had not worked for us for twelve months, and had no authority to fetch candles from Wortley's or Pickman's.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am a constable. Mr. Wortley fetched me; I took charge of George, and took him back to Lodge's shop - I asked Lodge if he had bought the candles of him - he said, Yes - George pointed out the boxes - I said they had been stolen from the other end of the town, and I must take them with me; he said I could not have them unless he had the money back, which he had paid for them - I asked George how much he had received - he said three sovereigns and sixpence - Lodge would not suffer them to go away - I said if not, I must take him also - he said he would have the money - I said he had better attend before the Magistrate next morning, and if it was allowed him I would give it him - he came next day, claimed them, and was charged as being a receiver.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he discharged by the Magistrate? A. Yes.

GEORGE's Defence. The carman told me the night before to come with him, and I delivered these two boxes of candles.

J. TAYLOR. I did not know he was coming, nor did I expect him.

Lodge made no Defence, but ten witnesses gave him a good character.

JURY to N. WORTLEY. Q. Did the cart stop at any other shop to find a purchaser? A. No; it stopped at Pickman's, and obtained another box.

GEORGE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

LODGE - GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-74

827. JAMES SHERVILL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 16th of March , 1 hog, price 4l., the property of William Loader , of which Thomas Peck had been convicted of stealing, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

JOHN FINAL COOK produced a copy of the record of the conviction of Thomas Peck, which was here read.

WILLIAM LOADER . I live at Finchamstead, Berks. I sometimes buy pigs, and fatten them. On the 15th of March I had a full grown hog, which I had fattened - it was kept in a stye in my garden - I saw it safe there between five and six o'clock; I got up about six the next morning, and it was gone; I traced it seven, eight, or nine miles; there was the track of two men having been with it - I there lost that track, and traced the mark of a donkey-cart, as far as a place called Bishopsgate; we inquired there, and met Peck in a donkey cart, at Egham, who gave us information; we came on to Hounslow, and went into a public-house there - I at last found the hog at the prisoner's house at Hounslow; we asked him if he had bought a pig of two strangers out of a donkey-cart - he said, No - I then asked him if he had seen a black and white pig in a donkey-cart, with two men in it - he considered a little, and said he did not know but he might have seen such a thing go along the street - Dearlove, my brother-in-law, who was with me, asked if had bought a pig at all that day - he said Yes, three or four of a neighbour, and mentioned a name, which I do not recollect - he did not say Peck - Dearlove asked to see the pigs; he went to three, which hung up in the shop, and asked me if either of those were mine - I said No - we left his premises, went to a public-house for about three quarters of an hour, made some inquiry, and Gilham took us to the prisoner's house again - Gilham asked him to show us the pig, which he had bought of two men out of a donkey-cart - he made no answer for a little time, and then said,"I have got another pig;" or two or three, I cannot say which he said; he lit a candle, and took us down a passage into a back room, it was nearly ten o'clock at night - some pigs hung there - he took a cloth off one, and it was mine; he said that was the one he had bought of two strangers; there was one or two more pigs in the room - the hair had been scalded off, but the rings were in the pig's nose (which I knew), and it had been a good deal bruised - I have not the least doubt of its being mine; the entrails had been taken out - I told the prisoner not to cut it till I came again, for it was mine - he said he had got some of it bespoke, and he did not know but he should cut it up if it was wanted; his house is about twenty-six miles from mine - we left the house, and returned with the watchman, who said, if he did his duty, he must take him and the pig; but we left it in the house - we then went to Egham - the prisoner was in the other Court when Peck was tried, and was committed.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He was a witness against Peck? A. Yes; he was bound over, and attended - Peck was convicted, and he was committed by direction of the Court for prevarication; the Judge ordered him into custody as a receiver - I cannot tell whether the Jury convicted Peck upon his evidence - he was not the only witness.

Q. When you first went to his house, was not your question whether he had cut up the stolen pig, which he had bought of some man in the road? A. No; another person went with us - I cannot positively swear that he said nothing of the kind - when we went the second time, he was some considerable time before he took us into the back room - I cannot say how long; I will not swear it was as long as five minutes; it was in a room down a passage at the back of the house - there was some blood down under where the pigs hung - he said nobody should take it out of the house till I had sworn to it; the watchman had said he must take it - he said I might leave somebody on the premises with it.

Q. Did he not say, if you would allow it to be sold the money it produced you should have, if you proved it to be yours? A. I do not recollect it - we said we would be there at ten o'clock next morning, or as early as we could, and it was not to be cut up till we came - this was on Friday, but we did not go till Sunday, as we had to attend Peck's examination.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure, that when he was asked if he had bought a pig of two strangers in a donkey-cart, he said he had not? A. Yes.

JAMES DEARLOVE . I am the prosecutor's brother-in-law. I went with him, and asked the prisoner if he had bought a pig of two strangers out of a donkey-cart - he said No - I asked if he had bought any pigs that day - he said Yes, three or four of a neighbour, and mentioned his name - he showed us some which hung in the shop, but did not offer to show us any other; we left, supposing it was not there - we returned in about a quarter of an hour with Gilham, who had given us information at the Lion and Lamb public-house; Gilham asked for Jem Shervill - he came, and Gilham said he wanted to see the pig he had bought that day - he stood a minute or two, then took a candle, and went down a passage, through a sitting room into another room adjoining, and there were three or four pigs, one of which was Loader's; directly he saw the nose he said it was his - Gilham asked if he might cut the rings out of the nose - he said Yes, and gave him a knife - we then went out, and returned with the watchman, who told him not to cut it up - he said he had promised some to his customers, and should like to have liberty to cut it - the watchman said he must not; but it was cut up, for we never saw it again - the prisoner was bound over as a witness - he appeared here, and we were bound over to prosecute him as a receiver - the pig appeared hardly cold, and not fit to cut up - it must have been driven twenty or thirty miles.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not expressly agreed that the pig should not be cut up till ten o'clock the following morning? A. We said we would be there by ten, if we possibly could, but we could not promise - he said he would wait till ten o'clock, but not that if we were not there by ten he must cut it - he said he did not wish to keep it if it was stolen - we told him not to cut it whether we were there or not by ten o'clock - it must have been about nine at night when we first got to his house.

Q. When you went the second time, was there the slightest hesitation on his part to show you the pig? A. He lit another candle - he might be three or four minutes; I did not look for any furniture in the room where the pig was; there was no carpet - it was a room, not a slaughter-house.

Q. Did he not tell the Magistrate that he cut the pig up for the benefit of all parties? A. I did not hear him state that - he said he gave 3l. 7s. for it; I should think 4l. a fair price, and he could then get a living profit by it - we said nothing about a stolen pig the first time.

COURT. Q. Are you sure that when he was asked if he had bought a pig of two strangers out of a donkey-cart, he declared he had not? A. He did; that was the first word he said - he has neither returned the pig nor money.

ROBERT GILHAM . I live at Cranford-bridge, two miles from Hounslow. I saw two persons in a donkey-cart, with a pig - it went down Hounslow, and then returned - I saw them take the pig out of the cart into Shervill's house about noon - the two men were strangers at Hounslow - Peck was one of them - neither of them live at Hounslow, or I must have known them; between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. I saw Loader and Dearlove - I went with them to the prisoner's; he took took us through the shop into the passage, and there the pig hung with two more - I was never there before; he might keep pigs there to get cold - I asked the prisoner for a knife, and cut the rings out, which I gave to the watchman; when the two men had taken the pig into Shervill's, he came over to the Lion and Lamb with them; they said "The pig ought to have been 4l.;" he said, "I have given you 3l. 7s., I think it is a good price; what do you think it will weigh?" Peck said, "I fed it, and it ought to fetch 4l."

Cross-examined. Q. This conversation was in the public-house? A. Yes, seven or eight persons were present; there was no secret about it - I do not think Shervill thought it was stolen; I have known him from his infancy; he is postman of the town, and an honest steady man; I know they took the pig to Mr. Funnel, and then further down, before they sold it to him; I heard all that passed before the Magistrate; Shervill did not say he was willing to pay a fair price for it; as soon as it was ascertained to be his, I said, "Jem, if it is that man's property, he ought to have it;" he said, "I cannot tell that it is stolen, and shall not give it up;" I said, "The watchman had better secure it for both;" they agreed to be back from Egham by ten o'clock in the morning, and he said it should not be cut till after ten; I got there at ten, and stopped till one, but they never came - they said they should come as soon as they could, and told him not to cut it till they did come; the prisoner was examined on Peck's trial, but did not give a good account of himself - he never offered to pay the money for it in my hearing.

JAMES LOCK . I saw Peck going through a ground with this pig; Dearlove made inquiry of me; I went to Egham to appear against Peck, and after it was sworn to, I asked the prisoner for the price of it; he said he would not pay unless the man was convicted; I said he ought to have the money to buy another; he said he would make some sacrifice, but would not pay for it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell him he must pay 5l.? A. No; I said it was valued at four guineas, and if he gave him 5l. it would not pay for his trouble.

BENJAMIN SILVESTER . I killed this pig for Shervill, in the back part of his house, not in a room; he said he had bought it out of a donkey-cart.

Cross-examined. Q. How many have you killed in that place? A. A good many; it is not a private place; it opens into a garden, and they hang there to cool; it is not a slaughter-house nor a furnished apartment; each side weighed 58lbs., and the head 8lbs.; it was not worth 3l. 7s. as it turned out; it was so much bruised, but that could not be told when it was alive.

COURT. Q. What should you have thought the value of it, when it was alive? A. I would not have given more than three guineas for it.

Prisoner's Defence. About a week previous to this, I applied to Mr. Funnel, a butcher, to know who had a fat pig or two to sell, having some customers who wanted

some; he said if he should hear of one he would let me know. On the 16th of March a stranger called at Funnel's in a donkey-cart, and offered one for sale; he sent over for me; I was out, but was sent for, and went to Funnel's, who told me a person in a donkey-cart had offered him one, and he said if he had wanted one he should not have he sitated at buying it; I went, and overtook the cart - they wanted 4l. for it - I offered 3s. 5s.; they would not take less than 3l. 15s.; I was turning away when the tall man came up and said, "The lowest I will take for it is 3l. 10s." I offered 3l. 7s., which they would not take; we separated about one hundred and twenty yards; they returned, and said if I would stand half a gallon of beer I should have it; I said No - they at last brought it down to my house, and turned it into my yard; I had not the least suspicion of its being stolen - I went to the Lion and Lamb, and took a draught of beer with them.

JOHN FUNNEL . I am a butcher, and live at Hounslow. I have known the prisoner from a child; he had asked me if I knew who had a good hog or two to pickle down; a man called at my house on the day in question, to sell one - he asked 4l. 10s. for it - I said it was too small for me; I should think it not worth above 3l. from what I saw of it. I afterwards saw the prisoner's brother standing at his door, and recollected his asking me about a pig- I sent for him, and told him perhaps it might suit him; I thought it was honestly come by; it seemed to be a poor man's pet pig; he left me, in order to go and bargain for it - I do not recollect his asking if I thought it would be safe to buy it.

COURT. Q. If you had been asked whether you had seen a pig in a donkey-cart, that had been offered for sale, what would you have said? A. I should have said I had.

JOHN GOODCHILD . I am a butcher, and live at Hounslow. The man called in the cart, and offered me this pig; I did not want it - there was nothing to lead me to think it was improperly come by; I should think the pig worth 4s. 4d. or 4s. 6d. a stone; fifteen stone and a half, at 4s. 4d., would come to 3l. 7s. 4d.

JAMES HOWSON . I was working in Doctor Taylor's garden on the 16th of March, which is about half a mile from the prisoner's shop. I saw the prisoner come up to some men in a donkey-cart, and bargain for a pig; I heard all they said; the man wanted 3l. 10s. for it - he offered 3l. 7s.; they said he should not have it, and went on about one hundred and twenty yards - they then beckoned him back, and said he should have it if he would stand half-a-gallon of beer; he refused, and they shook hands and agreed at 3l. 7s., which I should think a fair price for it, and said so; Peck, who was in the cart, said, for the sake of a shilling he would not go two or three miles further.

JAMES CURTIS . I keep the Lion and Lamb, two doors from the prisoner's house - he came to my house with two men in a donkey-cart; he paid sixpence towards the beer - they wanted him to pay sixpence more, but he refused. I learned from their talk that he had bought a pig of them.

WILLIAM HALL . I was at the prisoner's house on this night; he came to me at the Red Lion public-house about half-past four o'clock next day, and said, "These men are not come - what am I to do with the pig? it will spoil;" I told him he had better sell the carcase, but to be sure and save the head that they might swear to it - he said he would save the head; Loader came next morning, and said the Magistrate told him he might take the pig - I went to the prisoner's house, and said, "Have you made away with the pig's head?" he said, "Yes, I have sold it." I do not believe there is a man in Hounslow bears a better character than the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-75

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

828. RICHARD SIBLEY and WILLIAM RUDD were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 160lbs. of lead, value 20s., the goods of John Hurst , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, calling it a building.

JOHN HURST. I live in the precinct of St. Catherine's - my house was taken under the Dock Act; a verdict was given me for compensation; before this happened no money had been tendered or paid to me for the house - it was in my sole possession.

JOHN LITTLEDALE . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 22d of February, a little before six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners coming up Tower-hill, about one hundred yards from Mr. Hurst's - one was drawing a truck, and the other pushing behind; something very heavy was in it; I followed the truck to the house of Wilks, a smith and furnishing brasier; Rudd, who had been pushing behind, left the truck before it got there; Sibley took it to the house - he then threw a sack aside, and took out a large piece of lead - he took it into Wilks' back premises- it appeared to be a sheet of lead rolled up; the bag still remained in the truck, which Sibley returned, and fetched in; I went into the back shop, and saw him put the bag down by the side of the sheet of lead - they weighted together 160lbs.; I asked Sibley who the lead belonged to - he said he did not know, but as he was coming along near Irongate-stairs, he saw the truck, and a man employed him to drag it; I asked who the man was - he said he did not know, but that he had left him, and promised to overtake him; I said, "How came you to bring the lead here?" he said the man told him to take it opposite to Nightingale-lane, and that he had seen the man once or twice before; I said he must go with me and point him out; he went down Tower-hill, but no man was pointed out; I asked who the truck belonged to - he said he did not know, and then said he believed it was Mr. Hurst's, for he had had the use of it two or three times; I went with him to Mr. Hurst's, and saw him - he said he had not lent his truck to anybody, but that Sibley worked for him, and he had employed him for the last two or three weeks, to look after the lead in particular, and that the truck was his. I examined the house next morning, and found two sides of the dormer stripped of lead - I applied the three pieces of lead to the dormer - it corresponded exactly with the nail holes and what was left; I have no doubt whatever of its having come from that house; the next day, in consequence of what passed before the Magistrate I went with Lill, and apprehended Rudd - he said he knew nothing about it, but that a slater employed him to push behind the truck; I asked how he came to leave the truck - he said he went to purchase some handles for Mr. Hurst's drawers.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you see Mr. Hurst's foreman with the truck on the road? A. No. I saw Sibley take the lead out of the truck, and put it down by the side of a sheet of lead, which I believe he had first taken in. He said a man employed him to drag it, and in consequence of that Rudd was taken. Mr. Hurst has many servants; several adjoining houses had been pulled down, but this had not been began; the lead exactly fitted the place.

JAMES LILL . I am an officer. I saw Sibley at the handle of the truck, and Rudd pushing behind; he left about two hundred yards before it got to Wilks'. Littledale's account is correct; I saw the lead taken in, and afterwards saw it fitted to the dormer of Hurst's house - it fitted exactly, in every respect.

Cross-examined. Q. Was all the lead taken from the dormer? A. No, the two sides - I fitted it to what was left.

JAMES HEARNE . I am an auctioneer, employed by the Dock Company. On the morning of the 23d of February I called at Hurst's, to know when he could give possession of the house, and found the lead had been taken away the night before; I saw it fitted to the dormer - it corresponded exactly.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the Company exercise any ownership over the materials at that time? A. No. None of the other dormers were covered with lead.

MR. BARRY to MR. HURST. Q. Did you know what your dormer was covered with? A. No. When the next house was being pulled down I drove some persons off my roof. Sibley was working with the rest of my men; I had four moving furniture within the house. I have told him he was welcome to the truck whenever he could earn a shilling with it, but I never allowed any body to take it without my knowledge - the foreman had no authority to lend it. I was at the house from half-past one o'clock till five - it could not have been brought down during that time, or I must have seen it. Sibley was employed that day carrying goods for me - Rudd was employed to fit up the house I was moving to.

SIBLEY's Defence. I wish to ask, as Mr. Hurst says I had the care of the lead, if any more were shown to me than what belonged to the water-closet. I was to set in the parlour to see if any one came to take that, and one night somebody put up a ladder, which I pulled away and kept - I was never up stairs. I am often called from his house to Irongate-stairs, and on this night, as I went home, the other prisoner asked if I wanted a job, as a man wanted this lead taken to East Smithfield - it laid on the pavement; I ran back, and borrowed the truck of Mr. Hurst's foreman - Rudd helped me up the hill with it.

RUDD's Defence. I assisted him up the hill, but never saw him before.

JOHN HURST re-examined. The back of my house is covered with lead - I employed Sibley to watch that, but the dormer was on the roof. The prisoners were both occasionally in my employ, but I do not think they were acquainted.

SIBLEY - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

RUDD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-76

829. HENRY HAYNAM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Nathaniel Smith Machin and Robert Debenham .

JOHN MARSDEN . I am porter to Messrs. Nathaniel Smith Machin and Robert Debenham, at their auction-rooms, in King-street . On the 24th of March we had about one hundred and fifty lots on view; persons are allowed to try clothes on. The prisoner was there - I did not see him take this coat down; I saw it on his back, and he was putting his own great coat on over it; he then took off two strings which it hung by, emptied his own coat pocket, and hung it up where the new one had hung - I followed him to the door, and when he got out secured him, and took the coat off him.

Prisoner. Q. Was I off the premises? A. Yes, he was outside the door, and turning to the right.

CASPER WOLF SCHLESINGER . I was in the auction-room looking at some plate, and saw the prisoner without any coat; he put on a new black one - I told him it was not a good fit; he thanked me, and hung it up; he then took a blue one, and tried on - put his great-coat on over it - emptied the pockets of his own old black coat, and walked out with the new one on; I told the porter of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to attend the sale - I asked for a catalogue, but could not get one; as there was one by the door I walked there to look at it, and was not off the step when I was taken. I intended to exchange the coats again - the paper I took out was an order for admission into the hospital.

JAMES HAYNAM . I am an Imperial-measure manufacturer, and live in Westminster-road. The prisoner is my brother, and is in a deranged state of mind; he has been in several hospitals, and at Bethnal-green.

JOSEPH JOHNSON . I am a private-teacher. I have known the prisoner two years - I believe his brother's statement to be correct.

NOT GUILTY - being Insane .

Reference Number: t18270405-77

830. SAMUEL JONES and THOMAS HEAD were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 fixture,(i.e.) a copper, value 20s., the goods of James Spoor , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JAMES SPOOR. I live at No. 46, Turnmill-street, St. John's, Clerkenwell . This copper was fixed in my kitchen - it was safe on Sunday night, the 19th of February. about nine o'clock; and next morning, about eight, when I went down stairs, it was gone My lodgers go out early in the morning, and might have left the door open - it was full of water the night before, and would take some time to unfix. I found the back door unbolted - it had been taken out that way; I found it about - half-past nine o'clock. at Mr. Pontifex's in Shoe-lane. Head's father and mother lodged at my house, and he often slept there; I was fixing this copper about a fortnight before - he came down and said I had got a troublesome job; I said Yes, and got him to finish it for me. Thompson gave me information on the morning that I lost it; Jones was brought to my house about twelve o'clock on Monday, charged with stealing it; he said, "I am not the person who stole it;" I said"Who was it?" he said a person named Head, and I should find him at some place in Shoe-lane, or at the Bull's Head, in Peter-street; that Head gave him the copper in the

morning at my back door, to take to Pontifex's to sell - I found Head by his account.

MATTHEW THOMPSON . I am a chimney-sweeper. On Monday morning I saw Jones eight or ten yards from Spoor's back-door, with the copper in his possession - Head shut the door, and walked up the yard after him. I informed Spoor.

CHARLES VINCENT . I am a boot and shoemaker. I went with Spoor to Pontifex's, and found the copper. I waited till Jones called for the money for it - I told him he had stolen it; he said it was given to him to sell - I took him to Spoor's.

HENRY DANIEL PONTIFEX . I live in Shoe-lane. Jones brought this copper for sale about a quarter past nine in the morning; I thought the clerk had paid him the money - Spoor came and claimed it in a few minutes. I was not present when Jones called for the money.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONEs' Defence. Head gave it to me to sell - but did not say it was stolen.

HEAD's Defence. I gave it him, but did not take it out of the house.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HEAD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-78

831. JOHN PATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th March , 6 lbs. soap, value 3s., the goods of William Charles Bridgman , his master .

WILLIAM CHARLES BRIDGMAN. I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Cannon-street-road, St. George in the East. The prisoner was on and off in my employ for six or eight years; he could earn 30s. a week in winter time.

DAVID HAZEL . I am packer to Mr. Bridgman. On the 16th of March I was on the watch, as some soap had been taken - I was concealed about twenty minutes after eight o'clock; when the men went to breakfast, the prisoner used to remain, and his daughter bring him his breakfast. I saw him go to the cellar where there was about a ton weight of soap - I saw him take a bar, weighing about 3 lbs.; he put it either into his trousers or pocket- I was obliged to turn my head, being in a confined situation, and did not see him take any more - he went up stairs, apparently to his work; I tapped, and the apprentice called the prosecutor's brother down - he told me to watch him out; he went out in about ten minutes, and when he had got about one hundred yards, we called him back - he hesitated about returning, and asked us to let him go to get shaved; he was brought back; I charged him with stealing the soap - an officer came, and two bars were found in his trousers or pocket; he had asked Mr. Bridgman not to send for an officer - and said he would leave London altogether.

CHARLES ROBINSON . I am an officer, and was sent for; the prisoner unbuttoned his trousers, and pulled the soap out of a kind of large pocket under his thigh, between his drawers and his trousers, it was made to hold two cakes of soap on each side; it must have been a pocket, or the soap would have fallen out at the bottom.

Prisoner's Defence. Owing to my wife having been eight weeks in the hospital, and having three children, it was more than I could support. I earned 30s. a week in the winter, but only 15s. in the summer. It was entirely distress that brought me to it.

C. ROBINSON. His wife was very ill, and I do not think his furniture was worth 2l.; but I do not think he could be in distress.

MR. BRIDGMAN. He left me - I took him back again, and he promised to keep steady to his work. He earned what I have stated.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-79

832. CORNELIUS KELCHAR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Boyle .

THOMAS BOYLE. I keep the Robin Hood public house, Church-street, St. Giles . This coat was in my bed-room drawer; the prisoner came in to drink about ten o'clock at night; I was called by a young man, who caught him in my bed-room. I went up, and met him on the stairs; he knocked me down, and rushed out, leaving his hat and handkerchief behind. Mason took the coat from him; he was taken a fortnight afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you known him? A. Five or six years; I have two daughters - I never knew of his courting either of them - the eldest is only fourteen years old; she has lost one eye, and nearly another; she was in the bar with me when I was called. I never heard of Mason being my daughter's sweatheart - I do not think he would have her - I never desired Mason to write to the prisoner - I found two of my drawers open, and the coat gone.

JAMES MASON . I live at Boyle's - he sleeps in the first floor back-room - I found the prisoner in the front room - I had been watching him, and saw him drop this coat on the floor and put the candle out - I am sure I saw the coat in his hand - he had no business in the room - I tried to lock the door on him, but the key was not there - he rushed out - I called Boyle - he threw Boyle down on the stairs and got out, leaving his hat and handkerchief behind.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you not a suitor to Boyle's daughter? A. I am not - she is only fourteen years old, I am twenty-seven or thirty - I never employed one Sparkes to write a letter for me.

FRANCIS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in charge on the 31st, at a house opposite Boyle's.

MAURICE CONNEL . I apprehended the prisoner; he said if Boyle locked him up he would be the man to bring him out again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking up in Boyle's front room with about twenty-five people - he came up and insisted upon my going out; I said I would as soon as I had finished my beer; he said if I did not go he would kick me down; he knocked my hat off and kicked me - he opened his door between eleven and twelve o'clock and threw me out one handkerchief; I called for my hat and other handkerchief a fortnight afterwards, and he gave me in charge.

T. BOYLE re-examined. He did not call for it, he sent a woman for it, and he was apprehended.

THOMAS DONOVAN . I am a labourer, and live in George

street, St. Giles. I was at Boyle's on the 19th of March - he turned the prisoner out, and said that next time he found him there he would break his neck - I heard nothing about theft.

COURT. Q. How came he to leave his hat and handkerchief behind? A. I know nothing of that - we were in the club-room - there are no drawers there.

ROBERT FITZGERALD . I am a labourer, and live in Fitzroy-market. I was in Boyle's club-room one night when Mason and the prisoner quarrelled - I heard Miss Boyle, who was on the landing-place, tell Mason to hold his mouth, for her father was coming up - I do not know what that meant - I saw Boyle turn the prisoner out of the club room - he charged him with no theft.

COURT. Q. Will you swear he was not charged with going into the bed-room? A. He only told him to go out of the house - I cannot say how long he had been in the club-room - he might have gone into another room without my knowledge - I have seen him in the club-room since this matter happened - I do not know what Mason and him quarrelled about.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-80

833. JOHN TAYLOR and THOMAS YATES were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 pair of trousers, value 30s. , the goods of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN. I live in Upper Rosoman-street. These trousers were in my shop, No. 64, Exmouth-street ; they were safe when I left my shop about half past five o'clock, on Tuesday, the 27th of March; I have not seen them since.

CHARLES TAYLOR . I am eleven years old, and live at No. 7, Wood-street, Spa-fields. About six o'clock, on the evening in question I was opposite Mr. Brown's shop, and saw three men at his window, one, who had a white apron on, took a pair of trousers which hung in the window - I saw him come out of the shop and go down Rosoman-street alone, the other two went away after he came out - Taylor is the man who had the white apron - I saw him in custody at Hatton-garden two hours afterwards and knew him again.

Prisoner TAYLOR. Q. Which side of the way was you? A. On the other side, facing, and when you got to the bottom of Rosoman-street, I met Warboys, and told him.

JOHN WARBOYS . I am a paper-stainer, and knew the prisoner Taylor by sight; I met the last witness at the corner of Rosoman-street, he gave me information about Taylor, who was eight or nine yards off; I went with him towards Liquorpond-street, but lost sight of him for about half an hour; I went with the constable to the Vine public-house, and took him there; the trousers were not found; he was about two hundred yards from the shop when he was pointed out.

Prisoner TAYLOR. Q. Were you not big enough to take me if I had stolen any thing? A. I was not certain that you had stolen any thing, though I saw a bundle in your apron; I followed you till I lost sight of you.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am the prosecutor's son. I was in the shop and saw three men come up to the window; one of them came in and asked for a light - I refused to give it him; he went out and said something to the other two; then they both came in, and one who wore a blue apron, held me with my head in his lap, while I saw Taylor, who had a brown coat and white apron, take something from the window - I saw the two prisoners at Hatton-garden on the Thursday following, and am certain of them - I am certain Yates is the one who held me.

Prisoner TAYLOR. Q. If your head was in Yates's lap, how could you see me take them? A. I got my head on one side. (This witness was a cripple).

CHARLES REDDING . I live in Exmouth-street, about ten yards from Brown's. My father, who is a baker, sent me out on an errand about ten minutes before six o'clock; I met a boy who said, there goes Tom House, the noted thief - I watched, but saw nothing done to Brown's shop- I saw both the prisoners about twenty yards from the shop, and knew them again when I saw them at Hatton-garden.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. About a quarter of an hour after the robbery I was sent for - Taylor and Warboys described the prisoner Taylor to me - I went with them to the Vine, in Vine-street, where they both immediately recognised him - they were also positive to him at Hatton-garden.

Prisoner TAYLOR. Q. What did you say to me? A. I said, "Have you been to Clerkenwell this afternoon?" you said, No.

JAMES MEDLYCOTT . I am an officer. I took Yates at the Vine, at twelve o'clock on the night of the robbery - I said I understood he was concerned in stealing a pair of trousers - he said, if that was the case, it was all right.

TAYLOR's Defence. I met a person at Mount-pleasant about half past one o'clock, I went with him to the Vine, and was not further than the door till I was apprehended.

YATEs's Defence. I went to my aunt's at Islington at four o'clock, and was there till eight at night.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 21.

YATES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-81

834. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 1 jacket, value 14s., and 1 waistcoat, value 6s. , the goods of William Powell .

FREDERICK POWELL . I am brother of William Powell, he is a tailor and lives in Houndsditch . I was in his shop about two o'clock in the afternoon, and, on being alarmed, I saw the prisoner, about ten yards off, running away with this jacket and waistcoat under his arm - I lost sight of him for about two seconds, while he turned the corner, but am certain of his person - he threw the property down before I got up to him - he was secured, and said he had picked it up at the door, but it was hanging within the door post - I saw it safe ten minutes before - he could reach it as he passed.

LOUIS CARR . I work for a dyer, and live in Ironmonger-row. I was passing this shop, and saw the prisoner, with two others, one of them snatched the coat and waistcoat from the door, the other two walked on - I cannot say which snatched them, but the prisoner was with them- they were all about his size - I gave an alarm, and then went to the corner of Plough-yard, where I saw Powell bringing the prisoner back with the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-82

835. JOHN WILLIAMSON , HARRIET, HIS WIFE , and JONES LLEWELLYN , were indicted for stealing, on the 1st March , 1 reticule, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 3 sovereigns, the property of James Wall , from the person of Eliza, his wife .

2d COUNT, stating it to be the property of Eliza Grant , and to be stolen from her person.

ELIZA WALL . I have been married to James Wall - my maiden name was Grant. On the 1st of March, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in Oxford-street , coming out of Regent-street, with my reticule hanging on my arm, it contained three sovereigns, half-a-crown, a letter, with the halves of two ten pound notes, and a coloured pocket handkerchief. A horse had fallen down in a break, and this had drawn a crowd - I went into a shop, and staid there five minutes, to avoid the crowd, and while there I saw the three prisoners looking very hard at me - I am certain of all three. I left the shop with my reticule on my arm, and had not got more than three shops further, when I came to a mews, which the break had gone down; the female prisoner then said, "Here comes the horse again!" I looked down the mews, but could see no horse; I went on about two yards, and then perceived that my reticule had been cut from my arm - nobody but the three prisoners were near enough to have done it. I immediately turned round, and seeing them, the strong impression on my mind was that they must have done it - several persons were behind me, looking very hard at me- I turned round, intending to speak to the female prisoner, but she was gone. I immediately said, "The woman in the red shawl and black velvet bonnet, and the two men, had robbed me;" nobody but them was near enough to have done it - other persons had come near me as the crowd was dispersing. I went to Marlborough-street, and in about an hour and a half, the three prisoners were brought there - the pocket handkerchief, which had been in my reticule, was found.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The prisoners have been indicted for robbing Eliza Grant, and acquitted? A. Yes, it arose from a mistake of the clerks' at Marlborough-street, and I was directed to file another hill. I suppose my name is Wall, till it is proved to the countrary; I live with my friends in George-street, Portman-square - I live there by the name of Grant, as Mr. Wall has been married before. I have left him two years - it was an open shop that I went into to avoid the crowd; another young female also came in, and she was talking to me - my reticule was safe after I left the shop - I did not stand in the gateway; I merely stopped and looked down - seeing no horse I walked on - I looked, and then missed my bag; I then stopped, and looked back - there were only two or three persons about when I left the shop - my handkerchief was found on the female prisoner.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. The prosecutrix came to Marlborough-street, and stated this case - she produced the strings of her reticule; I and Ballard took her into the clerks' office - then she described the persons she suspected. I and Allensby went out into Oxford-street, and in Regent-street we saw the three prisoners in company, and in conversation together, looking into a shop; we went over - took them into custody, and took them to the office. This lady was sent for, and instantly spoke to their being the three persons; they were all sitting on a bench; I desired the female prisoner to stand up - I had observed her moving something under her cloak, and when she stood up I went and looked under her, and picked up this handkerchief; the prosecutrix said, "That is my handkerchief, it was in my reticule;" it must have been dropped by one of the prisoners; nobody else was near - it was immediately under where the female prisoner sat. I have not the least doubt of it having come from her - I found a pen-knife in her pocket, with four sharp blades - she wanted it returned to her.

Cross-examined. Q. Mrs. Wall was in the room before the prisoners? A. We sent for her - she was behind me, and the female prisoner before me - nobody but the clerks and officers were in the room - the prisoner was moving something under her cloak, which excited my suspicion, and when she stood up I saw the handkerchief. Mrs. Wall said the corner of it was torn by a little dog - that it was not hemmed, and she had another like it at home.

COURT. Q. Could that handkerchief have come from Mrs. Wall? A. It was impossible - she had not been near the spot.

MRS. WALL. This is my handkerchief, and was in my reticule - here is a red mark of tooth-powder on it, and a little tear in the corner - I have two others like it.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I went with the other officers, and saw the prisoners in Regent-street, about twelve yards from Oxford-street - they were in company; we crossed the road, and each secured one; we took them to the office, and sent for Mrs. Wall. They sat on a bench in the clerks' office - Clements remained by them; Mrs. Wall came in in about an hour, and identified all the prisoners as being close to her in Oxford-street. I saw Clements stoop and pick up the handkerchief, which Mrs. Wall claimed - she was not near it. Llewellyn gave his name as Jones; Williamson also gave his name as Jones, and afterwards as Davis - each declined saying where they lived, except mentioning the Commercial-road and City-road - they said they were in Oxford-street.

Cross-examined. Q. They never denied being present, and seeing the prosecutrix run into the shop? A. No; I believe the female was searched twice; but the handkerchief was dropped the first time - one of them must have dropped it.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am an officer. I went with the others, and took the prisoners - they sat on a bench in the clerks' office; Mrs. Wall came in; the handkerchief could not have fallen from her - it must have fallen from the female prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she searched twice? A. Yes; first in my presence, and afterwards by a female. Mrs. Wall mentioned several things being in her reticule, but I did not hear her mention the handkerchief.

WILLIAMSON's Defence. When I first went into the office, the lady said it happened about twelve o'clock; we had not gone through the mob, for the pressure was too great - we were pressed back by the horse plunging on the pavement. We walked down Regent-street - there was nobody with me but my wife; as we returned up the street, two men laid hold of us - the other prisoner was taken full twenty yards from us - it is false that we were speaking together. When we got to the office the other

prisoner was sitting at the end of the bench - my wife placed herself within a yard of him, and I on the other side- there was nothing found on us; before Clements searched my wife he pushed her right up in the corner, and in three or four minutes he went and picked up this handkerchief. The prosecutrix snatched it out of his hand, and said it was hers - she put it into her pocket; she wanted to swear to the ring on my wife's finger, and to a lot of duplicates.

H. WILLIAMSON's Defence. I was stripped, but nothing found on me; the prosecutrix said, "What is that ring on your finger?" I said, "It is my mother's;" she said, "Oh, I did not know but what I might have lost one;" I had a long cloak on, it is true, but it was my snuff-box that I had in my hand.

LLEWELLYN's Defence. My brother wished me to call on Lieut. Gee. in Cavendish-street, and I was to meet my brother at half-past one, in Regent-street. I stopped to look at this restive horse - several people came and asked what was the matter, but I do not recollect seeing either of the prisoners. I was waiting for my brother when Ballard took me.

EDWARD LLEWELLYN . I am the prisoner's brother. I sent him to New Cavendish-street, to Lient. G - , who is indebted to me - I was to meet him at half-past one, in Regent-street, but I found him at the office.

MRS. WALL re-examined. The female prisoner had three wedding-rings on her finger; the woman who searched her made an observation about it, but I said nothing - there were some duplicates in my bag, but I never said so, and as such, she must have seen it.

J. WILLIAMSON - GUILTY . Aged 61.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

H. WILLIAMSON - NOT GUILTY .

LLEWELLYN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-83

836. JOHN STROUD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 1 mallet, value 3d., the goods of Francis Cook ; 1 jacket, value 4d., and 1 chisel, value 4d., the goods of Samuel Rolfe ; and 1 chisel, value 4d. , the goods of George Caton .

SAMUEL ROLFE. I am a carpenter . On the 6th of April, at half-past five in the evening, I left my tools in a building opposite the Royal Horse Guards - persons could easily get in at the back. I went there at six o'clock next morning, and missed them - I found the prisoner in custody with them.

MARK QUILLAN . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner outside this building about half-past seven o'clock at night, with this jacket, mallet, and chisel - he said he had been into the building for a necessary purpose, and found them there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this building for shelter, and found them in the room. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-84

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11.

First London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

837. NATHAN COHEN was indicted for feloniously putting off to David Stuart twenty pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, at and for a lower rate and denomination then the same were counterfeited for .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

DAVID STUART. I am a fishmonger , and live in Cross-street. I have known the prisoner about three weeks - he lives in a court in Long-alley. I had some dealings with him, and told Alderson of it; on the 11th of March I and Alderson went to his house - he was not at home; I was directed to the Castle public-house, in Long-alley, where I found him - I told him I had come for a score of shillings, and asked Alderson if he would have a score - he said, "Yes - how much are they?" the prisoner said 6s.; Alderson said he would have a score - we came out of the public-house, and gave him the money; he said, "Put both monies together." I gave him two half-crowns and a shilling, and asked him where we should wait - he said,"Go to the public-house," meaning the Weavers' Arms, which I had gone to before; he went away - we waited at the public-house about twenty minutes - it was then church time, and we went out and stood at the corner of the court; he came to us, and said, "Did you not think me a long time?" I said No; he put both the scores into my hand; I put them into my pocket. Alderson asked him if he was not going to have any thing to drink - he said No; Alderson then said he was an officer, and took him; I then went away, and afterwards gave Alderson the two scores of shillings.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Have you ever been in a Court of Justice? A. No - I never stood at any bar. I have been in this line about three weeks, but never passed any bad money; a young man introduced me to the prisoner. I never bought any money but these two scores for myself. I got some with the young man.

Q. Did not the Magistrate ask you what had become of the other 8s.? A. Yes; I did not say I had passed them - I gave the two scores to Alderson about twenty-five minutes or half an hour afterwards.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you ever deal in any counterfeit money till Alderson directed you so to do? A. No.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am Bow-street patrol, and live in Marshall-street, Golden-square. In consequence of information which I received from Stuart I directed him to go with a young man to buy coin - and on the 11th of March I went with him to the prisoner's house in Angel-court - he was not at home - we were directed to the Castle, where we found him; Stuart called him out, and said he wanted a score - he said, "Very well;" I saw Stuart give him two half-crowns and a shilling; he then asked if I would like a score - I asked how much they were - he said 6s. I put my hand into my pocket to give him 6s., and he said cheese it, which means not to give it to him at that moment; when he got by the archway I gave him two half-crowns and a shilling - he directed us to wait at the public-house, which we did, but at church time we were turned out, and stood at the corner of Angel-place, Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street. The prisoner came and said, "Did not you think me long?" he gave Stuart two brown papers, containing two scores - I held out my hand for mine - he said, "They are both together;" I asked him to go and have some drink - he

said No; I then said I was an officer, and took him into custody - he hallooed Murder! made great resistance, and called for a man named Steel: I put him into a coach, and took him to St. Martin's watch-house; I found Stuart at the gate - he gave me the parcel; I went with him to a public-house in Cranbourn-passage, and found twenty counterfeit shillings wrapped in each paper, with silver paper between them; I had disguised myself, so that I should not be known. I remember the Magistrate asking Stuart what had become of the other eight - that alluded to another score which was bought on a former occasion - Mace had that eight.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to go as far as St. Martin's watch-house before you saw Stuart? A. I had appointed to meet him there. I had seen the prisoner give him the brown paper parcels.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were Dodd and Mace near the spot? A. Yes; I asked the prisoner for a score - he said they were both together. I had marked my half-crown and shilling. Dodd afterwards showed me a half-crown, which was one I had marked.

WILLIAM DODD . On the 11th of March I and Mace went to the public-house - we concealed ourselves; I did not see the prisoner till he was struggling in the crowd to get away - we put him into a coach, and took him to St. Martin's watch-house; I found this half-crown in his breeches pocket. Alderson produced two parcels, each containing a score of counterfeit shillings.

D. G. ALDERSON. This is one of the half-crowns which I gave him; we took him to St. Martin's watch-house to prevent his being rescued.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalsman. The Weavers' Arms is in the City.

RICHARD MACE . I have heard Dodd's account - it is correct.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. - These forty shillings are all counterfeit, and from one die- they are made of brass, and merely washed.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270405-85

838. CHARLES DAY was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-86

839. JOHN ROBINS, alias HORN , was indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-87

840. MARY BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

SUSAN CULLEN . I am the wife of Edward Cullen - we keep a chandler's-shop in Hosier-lane . In February last the prisoner came into our shop, about two o'clock, and had 4 ozs. of soap, which came to 2d.; she gave me a sixpence, and I gave her change; I put the sixpence into my pocket, where I had one more, but that was a good one, and there was a mark on it. She came again in the evening, and bought a penny candle; she gave me another sixpence - I gave her change, and put that into my pocket- I had then three sixpences, but nothing more; Ann Hoare came in, bought something, and gave me a shilling- I gave her one of the sixpences out of the three - it was a bad one; I then gave her another, and that was bad also; I looked for the other - that was good, and it was the one I had in my pocket before the prisoner came; I put the two bad ones back into my pocket, and did not mix them with any other sixpences. The prisoner came next day for a penny candle, and gave me a bad sixpence - I said I could not give her change; she said she had got nothing but a halfpenny - I said, "You gave me two bad sixpences on Saturday;" she said she was not in the shop, but I am certain of her person. I sent for an officer, and gave her in charge - he found 31/2d. in her pocket.

GEORGE THOMAS HARRINGTON . I am a constable. I was sent for, and asked the prisoner if she had any other money; she said No - I then searched her, and found 31/2d. in her pocket. The prosecutrix gave me three sixpences, which I produce.

JOHN FIELD . These sixpences are all three counterfeit, and of one die.

Prisoner's Defence. I only gave her the last one, and did not know it was bad.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months , and find Sureties for Six Months more .

Reference Number: t18270405-88

841. SARAH VINTON was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-89

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

842. HENRY SAINT PIERRE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 waistcoat-piece, value 7s. , the goods of Edward Riley .

EDWARD RILEY. I am a tailor , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the 15th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in my shop - I saw the prisoner come and take a piece of waistcoat toilenet through a hole in the window - I saw his person perfectly - it had been close to the place - I went out, and took him with it about two or three doors off - he was walking.

CHARLES ROBINSON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner with this waistcoat-piece sticking in his bosom - he said he had found it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Some person threw it down by me, and I took it up.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of his youth .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-90

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

843. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 hat, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Fre

derick Woods Ommanney ; and 1 hat, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Orde Ommanney .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BEAK . I am footman to Sir Francis Molyneux Ommanney . On the 15th of March there was a ring at his door about a quarter-past nine o'clock - I went, and and saw the prisoner there - I am certain of his person - he asked to see the cook - I left him in the passage while I went half way down the stairs to call the cook - I heard a walking in the passage, returned, and saw him just leav the street-door, which I had shut; I followed, and called Stop thief! in the course of the pursuit I saw him drop two hats; he was taken by the watchman; I took up the hats; they were the property of Sir Francis Molyneux Ommanney and Mr. Frederick Woods Ommanney - I took them back to the house - he was taken to the watch-house - I had lost sight of him while he turned the corner, but I have no doubt of his person; I believe my master's sons were both at home that evening - the usual place for putting hats is in the hall, but I cannot swear that these were there.

COURT. Q. Was the prisoner a stranger to you? A. Yes; he had but just got from the door when I returned from the kitchen stairs; I saw him drop the hats.

LEDGER GILLMAN . I am a watchman; Norfolk-street is in my beat. On the night of the 15th of March, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Lower Arundel-street; Beak was pursuing him; they were running - I took the prisoner to Sir Francis Ommanney's, and then to the watch-house.

JAMES COX . I was night-constable. The prisoner and these hats were delivered to me by Gillman.

SIR FRANCIS MOLINEUX OMMANNEY . I live in Norfolk-street; this is my eldest son's hat, Frederick Woods Ommanney, and this is my younger son's, John Orde Ommanney.

Cross-examined by MR. MYERS. Q. What age is your youngest son? A. Seventeen; I believe this to be his hat; I cannot say that it is his of my own knowledge.

FREDERICK WOODS OMMANNEY . On the 15th of March I had this hat; I had had it six months, and know it to be mine.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270405-91

844. MARY ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 2 gowns, value 7s.; 1 towel, value 1s.; 1 tea-tray, value 1s.; 1 lb. weight of sugar, value 6d.; 2 ozs. weight of coffee, value 3d.; 1 box, value 1d.; 1 half-crown, and 2 shillings, the property of Mary Daly , spinster ; and 1 shirt, value 1s. , the goods of William McCormack .

MARY DALY. I am single, and lodge in Orchard-street, Westminster , in the one pair front room; the prisoner lodged in the next room; her husband is a labourer - they have two children. I went out about half-past twelve o'clock, on the 8th of March, and returned at half-past five; I had locked my door - when I returned it was forced in, and the lock hanging down inside; my box was broken open, and the property stated taken out - I had left the prisoner at home, but she was not there when I returned; I got an officer, who went into her room, and brought half a pound of sugar, which was mine; then a gown and towel; I afterwards went to a broker's, and got some other articles.

JOHN WARREN . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in her room quite intoxicated; I looked round her and saw something bulky behind her; I told her to give it me, but she would not - I took it from her, and found this 1/2lb. of sugar - I then found a piece of print in a hole in the floor, covered over with a saucepan; I then found a napkin, and another half pound of sugar; she was taken to the office that night, but was so intoxicated the case was not heard till the next day; there was another gown afterwards found up the chimney.

ELIZABETH HAWKINS . I keep a broker's-shop in Great Queen-street. I bought this tea-board for 1s. 3d. of the prisoner on the 8th of March.

CHARLOTTE McALLISTER . I saw the prisoner coming out of the house between four and five o'clock, with this tea-tray.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, charging the prosecutrix with an improper connexion with her husband.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-92

845. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10s. , the goods of William Robert Keith Douglas , Esq.

THOMAS PRITCHARD . I am butler to William Robert Keith Douglas, Esq.; he is one of the Lords of the Admiralty . On the 19th of March the prisoner came with a double knock at the door, and said he wanted to see Mr. Douglas on particular business - I went up-stairs, came down again, and, in consequence of information from another servant, I missed a pair of sugar-tongs from a teatray in the pantry, on the right-hand side of the street-door, about a yard from where the prisoner stood - I rang the bell, and inquired of the footman if he had taken them; he said No - I then took hold of the prisoner, and found the tongs between the lining and the cloth of his coat.

COURT. Q. Had he ever been there before? A. Yes; I had seen him three or four months before when he came for Mr. Douglas to sign a petition; he said he hoped Mr. Douglas would forgive him, as he was a real Scotchman and Mr. Douglas was the same.

JOHN BARNES . I am footman to Mr. Douglas. On the evening of the 19th of March, I saw the prisoner in the passage - I heard the bell ring, and went up-stairs; the butler asked if I had put the sugar-tongs off the tray; I said No; the prisoner heard this; I went with the witness, and we searched the prisoner; the sugar-tongs were found in his coat - they have my master's crest on them- I had put them on the tray ten minutes before.

JOHN CLARKE . I am a constable. I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

T. PRITCHARD re-examined. The pantry is out of the passage - the prisoner said he came for my master to sign a letter.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-93

846. THOMAS SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing,

on the 7th of March , 7 lbs. weight of mutton, value 4s. , the goods of Joseph Newell .

THOMAS JONES . I am a shoemaker; Joseph Newell is a butcher , and lives in Oxford-street . About a quarter past nine o'clock, on the evening of the 7th of March, I saw the prisoner and another person near his shop; Mr. Newell had that moment left the shop - the prisoner stood on the bench, and took down the shoulder of mutton - he put it under his coat, and walked away from the shop - I stopped him, and detained him till the watchman came - his companion got away - I had seen them together for a quarter of an hour or more.

JOSEPH NEWELL . I keep this shop. I was called out, and found the prisoner with this mutton - he was taken to the watch-house - I believe no money was found on him.

THOMAS CONDRE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, but found nothing on him - he said he took it to put it in the scale.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going into the shop to know the weight of it - I was not going away; I wanted it for my cousin, who lives with Lord Grenville.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-94

847. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 1 looking-glass, value 6s. , the goods of William Buist .

ANNE BUIST . I am the daughter of William Buist; he lives in George-street, Grosvenor-square , and is a cabinet-maker . At half-past two o'clock in the afternoon of the 23d of February, I heard some person coming in, and going up-stairs - the child had just gone out to school, and left the door open - I waited till the prisoner came down; he was quite a stranger; I asked him what business he had up-stairs - he said he had been to see for his brother - he had a basket with him; he took this glass out of it, and laid it on the stairs - I knew it to be my father's; it had been in the first floor front room - there was nothing else in the basket.

WILLIAM KIMBERLEY . I am the officer, and took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). I knocked at this door, a man came out, and told me to go into the passage - I knocked at the prosecutrix's door, and asked if one Williams lived there - she said No, and called her mother, saying there was a thief; nothing was found on me - I know nothing of the glass.

A. BUIST. He asked no questions.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-95

848. ELIZABETH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , 3 half-crowns, the monies of Richard Lloyd , from his person .

RICHARD LLOYD. I am a servant to the Duke of Gloucester; I work in his stable. On the 21st of March, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in Engine-street, Piccadilly - I had met with some friends, and was detained, but I was quite sober - the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, came up to me, and asked me to go with her - I went with her into Brigg-street ; it is not a very retired street, but more so than Piccadilly; I had five half-crowns and six shillings loose in my pocket when I got up the street; I felt her hand twice in my breeches pocket, and I pulled it away - my pocket was not buttoned - I then left her, and missed three half-crowns from my pocket; I went back, and accused her of having taken it: I had been with her about five minutes, and given her 1s.; she had not been out of my sight; when I missed my money I accused her of it, and she said she had done no such thing - I charged the watchman with her, and she then gave me two half-crowns; she was taken to the watch-house, and there delivered up the other half-crown and shilling; no money could have fallen from me; I was not undressed.

ROBERT BROWN . I am the watchman. I was on duty; the witness called me, and gave charge of the prisoner for taking three half-crowns; she denied it, and said the money she had about her she had picked up; she then gave up two half-crowns, and denied having any more; on the way to the watch-house she wanted Lloyd to give me something, and she would give me something to let her go and have done with the business; when we got to the watch-house she gave something to the constable, but I did not see what it was.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought in, and I desired her to pull out what money she had, to prevent my searching her; she then pulled out half-a-crown and one shilling; I did not hear her say she had no money; the prosecutor was quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in Park-lane; I went down the mews with him - he gave me 1s., and staid with me about five minutes; he then said I had robbed him of three half-crowns; I said I had only one half-crown; he called the watchman, and said I had given him two half-crowns, and if I did not give him the other he would give charge of me - as we were going along, the prosecutor said if I would give him 3s. he would let me go, that he would give 3d. to the watchman, and should do the same and go away.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-96

849. TIMOTHY DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , 2 seals, value 20s., and 1 watch-key, value 5s., the goods of John Henny , from his person .

JOHN HENNY. I am a gentleman's servant . I came to London on the morning of the 22d of March; I was under the Piazza of Covent-garden between eleven and twelve o'clock that night, and was going home to my lodging, in Brydges-street, Covent-garden - I had been with a friend. I met the prisoner under the Piazza; he came up to me, and snatched at my watch; the chain broke, and he took the two seals, the key and ring. I picked up one of the rings, and the officer the other; he made off across Covent-garden, and was stopped there - he was not out of my sight. I did not see him drop the seals, but I picked up one at his feet; I am satisfied he is the man who took them - I only lost sight of him while he passed the pillar.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where had you been spending your day? A. At different places; I had had two glasses of porter, and a share of two bottles of wine, between four or five of us, after dinner; I had not taken any supper - I considered myself sober; it was the act of an instant - he passed round one of the columns,

and between the coaches. I did not produce my watch before the Magistrate, but I showed the ring and seals.

GEORGE BLACKMAN . I am an officer. I was on duty between eleven and twelve o'clock - I saw the prisoner run from the Piazza, through the rank of coaches, into the carriage-way, where I was standing; I secured him, and heard something fall on the stones. Wilson came up at the time, and I gave the prisoner to him; I picked up this seal and ring - the prosecutor appeared quite sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see it drop? A. No, I heard it - there was not a strong light; it was a very boisterous night, and the gas did not burn strong. I searched him, and only found a handkerchief on him.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I was on duty there; I was called, and took hold of the prisoner - I saw him throw something on the ground, which I believe was these two seals, ring, and key. I saw the prosecutor pick up one seal, and Blackman picked up the others - I saw the prisoner run into Blackman's arms.

Prisoner's Defence. He only told the Magistrate that he followed me, but did not say he saw me throw them down.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-97

850. CHARLES LAING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 watch, value 30s.; 3 seals, value 15s., and 1 ring, value 1d., the goods of Samuel Blackwell , from his person .

SAMUEL BLACKWELL. I am a water-gilder , and live in Little Windmill-street, Golden-square . The prisoner came to lodge in my room on the 13th of February - we slept in the same room, but not in the same bed. On the night of the 24th, when I went to bed, I put my watch under my pillow; I saw the prisoner then in bed - he got up the next morning before I did. I awoke about half-past ten o'clock, and missed my watch; I did not see him again till the 6th of March, when he was at the Coach and Horses, public-house, Carnaby-street; I then gave him in charge. He had not returned to the room again.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. In consequence of information I went to the Coach and Horses, and found the prisoner; the prosecutor gave charge of him - I took him to the office and put him into the lock-up place - one of the witnesses gave me two duplicates, one of which refers to the watch.

GEORGE MENCHENTOR . I keep the Coach and Horses. I gave the officer this duplicate, which I took up from my privy with a pair of tongs; the prisoner had been in my yard, but whether he went to the privy or not I cannot tell. I saw him when he was taken.

ROBERT MARKS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street, Westminster. This watch was pawned on the 26th of February by the prisoner - I gave this duplicate for it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, having a good character, and believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18270405-98

851. JOHN NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Latham , from his person .

THOMAS LATHAM. I am a ribbon manufacturer . I live in Well-street, Cripplegate. About half-past eight o'clock on the evening of the 18th of March, I was in Coventry-street, Haymarket ; I had a pocket handkerchief in my left-hand coat pocket - the officer touched me on the shoulder, and asked me if I had lost any thing; I felt, and missed my handkerchief, which I saw lying on the ground- the prisoner was then in custody.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . On the evening of the 18th of March, I was on duty in Coventry-street, and saw the prisoner in company with five or six others, following the prosecutor; I stood in a door-way, and saw the prisoner put his right-hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take out this handkerchief. I seized the prisoner, and he dropped it from under his coat - his companions all went away.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-99

852. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal, value 14s., and 1 watch-key, value 6s., the goods of Thomas Day , from his person .

THOMAS DAY. I am a carpenter , and am married. I was coming from Kensington about eleven o'clock at night, on the 18th of March; I met the prisoner by Tyburn turnpike - she asked me where I was going; I said to Westminster; she asked if she should go with me; I said I had no objection. We came down Park-lane and went to Wood's mews ; my watch fell out of my fob; I suppose it was pulled out. I did not lay down - I was standing up, but my dress was loose. I picked up my watch, and put it into my great coat pocket; I remained with her two or three minutes after this - there was no bargain made, but I gave her 1s. 6d. - I cannot say whether that was before I dropped my watch. I then missed my watch, and told her she had got it - she denied it, and I gave charge of her; she was examined, and the watch could not be found - we then went to the place where we had been standing, but could not find it. We went to the watch-house again, and found it on her.

WILLIAM KIMBERLEY . I was constable of the night. I received her in charge at the watch-house; the watch was not found on her, and she denied having any thing - the prosecutor said, "If she has not got it, one of the watchmen has;" I searched the watchmen, but none of them had it. I sent the beadle out with a light, but he could not find it; I then searched the prisoner again, and found this watch in the small of her back, under her shift.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Park-lane, and the prosecutor met me; we went down the mews, and he gave me 1s. 6d.; the watch fell from him, he took it up, and put it into his pocket; he gave it me to hold afterwards, and I would not give it him, because he would not give me another 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-100

853. ROBERT EARY and THOMAS GAISFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 cheese, value 7s.; 3 lbs. weight of ham, value 1s. 6d., and 3 lbs. weight of lard, value 2s. , the goods of John Sloane and others, their masters.

Mr. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN AMOR WELLS . I have four partners, we are cheesemongers and live in St. Martin's-lane - John Sloane is one of my partners - the two prisoners were in our employ. In consequence of information, about three weeks ago I called in Avis, the officer, and searched the hay-loft about half-past nine o'clock at night - we found, in a hogshead, part of a Gloucester cheese, which had a mark on it - we left it there, and I afterwards missed a part of it, and went with Avis to Eary's lodging, who was our carman; I found two pieces of cheese there, which corresponded with the cheese I had seen in the hay-loft - I found part of a ham there; I told Eary we had been robbed, and had long suspected it, and asked if that was not part of the cheese which we had found in the hay-loft; he said it was - I had made him no promise or threat - he said he had bought the ham of Procter, one of our men, for 7d. per pound.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where is this loft? A. At the back of our premises - we have three carmen and six porters, our other servants do not go to the warehouse where this cheese was - I was not present when it was marked, but I saw it after it was marked.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you afterwards go to Gaisford's lodging? A. Yes, I found some eggs, bacon, and lard there - he said, he had taken the lard from our premises some time ago, and the eggs he had stopped out of his rounds when eggs fell from eight to ten a shilling - he had delivered eight to the customers and kept two; the bacon he said he had received from his cousin.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I went to Eary's lodging with Mr. Wells - I heard Eary say what he has stated- there was no threat or promise held out to him - he said he had bought the ham of Procter, and he acknowledged to me, before Mr. Wells came, that the cheese in his hat was part of that left in the loft.

WILLIAM PROCTER . I am in the service of Messrs. Wells and Co. I had not sold any bacon to Eary on any occasion.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you ever supply your master's servants with articles? A. Yes, sometimes; but not oftener than once in a month - I had not sold Eary any thing for six months.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. I went to Gaisford's lodgings with Mr. Wells - I found this bacon, eggs, and lard there - he said he took the lard from his masters' premises some time ago, but the bacon he had had from the country - there was no promise or threat held out to him.

CHARLES ARGLES. I am a clerk to Messrs. Sloane and Co. I found this cheese in a hogshead among some haybands on the 12th of March - I marked it, and left it there again.

EARY - GUILTY. Aged 26.

GAISFORD - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor both having a good character .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-101

854. WILLIAM STARR was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 6 lbs. weight of bacon, value 4s. , the goods of John Sloane and others, his masters.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN AMOR WELLS . I am in partnership with John Sloane and others. The prisoner had been in our employ seventeen years. In consequence of information I went to his lodging with Avis, and found this bacon, cheese, and eggs - Avis said to him, "How did you become possessed of this bacon?" he made no answer; I then said, "Who does it belong to?" he said, "I suppose to you, Sir," - there had been no threat or promise made to him - he was taken to our house, and asked where he had taken the bacon from - he said from behind the counting-house, the cheese from the front-board in the shop, and the eggs from the baskets - he bore a good character before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you a partner of the name of Leadham? A. Yes, it was in his house we took the prisoner. I did not see any thing given to the prisoner.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I was present when Mr. Wells had this conversation with the prisoner, and when he was taken to the warehouse he begged for mercy - I cautioned him not to tell any thing - Mr. Leadham said, in my presence, that he was very sorry he was one who had been robbing them as he had offered him 10l. to impeach others - he said, "Take a glass of ale, but I must serve you as I do others."

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his previous good character .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-102

855. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN KIRBY . I am a linen-draper , I live in London-terrace, Knightsbridge. The prisoner was in my service, and received money for me. On Saturday, the 24th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I sent Mr. Pearson (who I had employed as a carpenter) to purchase some goods with two half-crowns and three shillings, which I had previously marked.

WILLIAM PEARSON . I am a carpenter. I received some money of Mr. Kirby - I went to the shop and bought six pairs of stockings, at 1s. 4d. per pair - I gave the same money to the prisoner that I had received from Mr. Kirby- he asked me if I wanted any thing, and I said some stockings.

COURT. Q. Did you want these stockings for your own wear? A. Yes, and I bought them for myself, six pair at 1s. 4d. per pair - I did not give Mr. Kirby 8s.; I received his 8s. on account - I paid the same money to the prisoner - this was about half-past nine o'clock - I took the stockings home for my own use.

MR. KIRBY re-examined. After the stockings had been purchased I told the prisoner that I had been daily robbed, and I thought he was the person; I accused him of having property about him - he denied it; I said, "You can have no objection to being searched;" he said No, not at all; he then drew the two half-crowns and three shillings, with my mark upon them, from one pocket, and five shillings from the other.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You asked him if he had any property? A. Yes, any property of mine. I have three young men in my shop who act as cashiers, and receive money from the others, but the regu

lar cashier was gone to his supper. It was the prisoner's duty to give this money to one of those cashiers directly he received it - about ten or fifteen minutes had elapsed before I spoke to him about it. The prisoner immediately put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out the money; I do not know whether it was all he had; I went to search his boxes afterwards, but could not find any thing which I could venture to swear to.

DAVID EVANS . I am in Mr. Kirby's service. Mr. Kirby deputed me to take money in the absence of the cashier. I was in the shop; Mr. Pearson came in; the prisoner should have called out "Cashier!" as soon as he received the money, but he did not.

Cross-examined. Q. Have not some of your young men objected to act as cashiers? A. There is one young man who has objected to act as such, in the absence of the cashier; the cashier had been gone to supper three or four minutes; I expected him to return after his supper.

COURT. Q. Might not the prisoner have called out Cashier! and you not have heard him? A. No. There was no person in the shop but Mr. Pearson and myself.

RICHARD FORDER . I am a beadle. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the front room up-stairs; Mr. Kirby said he suspected he had robbed him. These are the two half-crowns and the three shillings which I saw there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner's box searched? A. Yes; he gave up the key, but there was nothing that Mr. Kirby would swear to.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Pearson called me, and said he wished to purchase half-a-dozen pairs of brown cotton stockings, at about 1s. 4d. per pair, and he said, "I will pay you for them, because we have had some words about having things set down to me;" I took the money, and put it behind me; I then tied up the stockings, and put them in the window - I thought it was rather strange that he should pay for them, when he had had a piece of linen without paying for a day or two before; while I was thinking of that Mr. Kirby came in, and said, "I want to search you;" "Very well, Sir," I said - he then took the money which I gave from my pocket, and went out of the shop into the parlour; he staid there some time, and then came out, and said that was his money; he said, "You rascal, I will hang you if I can;" our regular cashier was at that time out of the way, and I have frequently called out to the other young men to take money, and they have all objected to take it; when Mr. Kirby has been in the shop I have called out cash, and he has said, "Take it yourself."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-103

856. CHARLES WEST was indicted for embezzlement .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-104

857. CATHERINE BANNISTER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 brooch, value 16s., and 1 frill, value 2s., the goods of Peter Hebert , from the person of Mary Ann, his wife .

MARY ANN HEBERT . I am the wife of Peter Hebert; he is a tailor , and lives in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On Monday evening, the 5th of March, I went out about half-past eight o'clock, to get a pint of beer from the public-house at the corner of Plumbtree-street - I asked the young man for the newspaper, and while he was looking for it I saw the prisoner by my side, looking stedfastly at me - I was surprised at it; I came out of the public-house, and when I got half way home she came up to me, and tore my frill off my neck, which had a gold brooch in it- I called the watchman - he had just got out of his box, and stopped her - I had not lost sight of her; the brooch was found in the passage of the watch-house.

SARAH ROBERTS . I am the wife of the watch-housekeeper - the prisoner was brought there; and about half-past nine o'clock another person was brought in, very tipsy; another person came in with a pane of glass in his hand; the beadle turned him out, and the glass was broken - I asked him to lend me the lantern to pick up the glass, and I found this brooch in the passage.

DENNIS SULLIVAN . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner, and we went through the passage where this brooch was found.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in the public-house. I was going up the street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! the watchman was opening his box, and asked me what was the matter; I said I did not know, and then this woman came up, and said I had robbed her; she made a noise at me, and I said, "Don't make a noise - give charge of me;" there was another girl there, and she said it was either her or me, and then she said she would prosecute me.

M. A. HEBERT. There was another girl who went into the watch-house with her; I did not say it was either her or the prisoner; I can swear positively to the prisoner; I had not lost sight of her. When we were at the watch-house I said, as my brooch was a family one, "If you will give it me you may go about your business." I said there had been other women in the public-house, but it was the prisoner who looked so hard at me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-105

858. JAMES GALVIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 33 glass bottles, value 4s., the goods of Henry Newington , his master .

HENRY NEWINGTON, JUN. I live with my father, Henry Newington - he keeps a Staffordshire warehouse in Whitechapel - the prisoner was his packer . On the 1st of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, we watched him out of our premises, and found thirty-three phials on him; he had got about ten minutes' walk from our house; he had some of the phials on his person, and some in his hat - he had no right to carry them away; he has only to pack them; he went down on his knees, and said it was only the second time he had done it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had he been in your father's service? A. Two or three years - he is married, but I believe has no children.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I followed the prisoner, and took the property on him; I have had it ever since.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-106

859. WILLIAM JUGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 3 handkerchiefs, value 5s., and 1

towel, value 3d., the goods of William Benson , from the person of Eliza Benson , spinster .

ELIZA BENSON. I am the wife of William Benson - we live in Grosvenor-street - I am a laundress. I sent my daughter Eliza with a bundle, containing three handkerchiefs and a towel, to the club-house, to my husband, about a quarter-past ten o'clock in the morning of the 6th of March.

GEORGE AUGUSTUS NORTHEDGE . I live opposite to Benson. I saw the prisoner in company with two other boys - I could not see the bundle snatched, but I saw the little girl crying; I opened my door, and ran out with my son; we caught the prisoner's two companions in Berkeley-square - they had not the bundle, but my belief is that the prisoner was one of the three boys.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not the prisoner's mother bring him up at the office? A. I believe she did.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office by Mr. Appleton and his mother gave me this property - the prisoner said another person gave it to him - I took that person, but he was discharged.

- JUGGINS. I am the prisoner's mother. I gave this property to the officer, which I found in my son's room - I am afraid he brought it there.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-107

860. JAMES BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 20 lbs. weight of coffee, value 20s. , the goods of Edward Sage .

JOHN FOY . I am superintendant of the Police at the West India Docks . On the 24th of February, as soon as we opened the dock in the morning, an officer brought the prisoner and this coffee to the office - he said he had found this large quantity loose in the prisoner's pockets, and this small parcel tied up; I asked the prisoner where he got it - he said from a vessel where he had been employed; I asked at what quay, and he would not tell me; he said he was watching one of the vessels of rum - there was no vessel laden with rum, but I found one laden with coffee - one of the parcels was cut, and some coffee had been taken from it; there was a good deal of coffee scattered on the bottom of the craft - it belonged to Mr. Sage, the lighterman. I took some coffee from the bulk, and it corresponded exactly with that found on the prisoner.

JAMES HESELTINE . I am a Thames Police officer. I met the prisoner at the Commercial-road entrance, at ten minutes past eight o'clock in the morning - he had this coffee loose, and this parcel in his jacket pocket; I asked him where he got it; he said he had brought it in the night before; I asked if he had not been watching coffee; he said No, he had been watching rum for Mr. Sage.

JOHN CLEMENTS . I am a lighterman, in the employ of Mr. Sage. I went into this vessel the night before, and saw the prisoner there - he had no business there; he seemed to have made a mistake and come to the wrong craft; it was my duty to watch them. I went away at one o'clock in the morning, on account of the weather being so cold; I had known the prisoner before, and thought him an honest man; the coffee was all safe when I left; there was no parcel broken, and none spilled about; I cannot say when he came on board - I think it must have been between seven and eight.

GEORGE SAMPSON SAGE . This coffee belonged to my father, Edward Sage; I had seen it put into the barge on the 23d of February - I left it safe in Limehouse-basin. I sent the prisoner to watch a barge at the London Dock, not the West India Dock.

THOMAS POWELL . I am a weigher at the Docks. - This package had weighed 1 cwt. 2 qrs. when it was in bulk; I saw it at Mr. Foy's office on the Saturday morning - it had been opened near the top.

JOHN HARGROVE . I delivered this package in a good and sound condition to the lighterman, at the West India Docks, about two o'clock on the 23d of February.

Prisoner's Defence. I am out of employ - I have a family, and could get no living for them.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-108

861. MARY COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 9 lbs. weight of beef, value 4s. , the goods of Charles Baker .

JAMES BANTOR . I am in the employ of Charles Baker, a butcher , of No. 131, Tottenham-court-road . The prisoner came to his shop on the 16th of March, a little before eight o'clock in the morning; she asked the price of a piece of beef; I said 7d. per pound; she then looked at another, and seemed to be going out; she then pointed to the one she looked at first, said she was going further, and would call as she came back; I then missed this piece of beef, and followed her - she had it under her arm; I brought her back to the shop, and my master came out, and said it was his beef - she said she had bought it in the morning - she then offered to pay for it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you constantly there? A. Not always; there are two persons generally in the shop, and they were there at the time. I cannot say whether there was a shopman nearer the door than I was; there was one on the other side of the door. She had just got out of the shop when I stopped her; she was not speaking to one of my fellow-shopmen - I will not undertake to say she had not been at the shop before.

COURT. Q. How far was she from the shop? A. She was just off the step, turning to the right; there is no way into the shop that way. I am sure she said she had bought this beef in the morning, of a butcher higher up.

HENRY HOWARD . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner to the watch-house; she told me she was going to take it into the shop, to the other man, and she mentioned his name, but I forget it; she said it was the curly-headed man, and she thought she could get it a halfpenny per pound cheaper of him, as she had dealt with him before - she had 6s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to have it weighed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-109

862. GEORGE WICKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , two bundles of paper, value 3l., the goods of David Sydney and Mary Elizabeth Sydney , widow ; and 18 spoons, value 10l. , the goods of the said Mary Elizabeth Sydney.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM PRICHARD . I am in the employ of Mr. and

Mrs. Sydney, they live in Northumberland-street . On Sunday, the 18th of February, between two and three o'clock, I went away, and locked all the doors. I was the last person there; the steam-room and the desks were all safe - our premises communicate with the yard of Mr. Morris, a wine merchant.

SAINT JOHN MURRAY . I am in the employ of Mr. and Mrs. Sydney. On the 18th of February I was going along the street, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and I went down to try if any one was at the premises, as I knew some persons had been at work there that day. I felt the door - it was fast, and I was going away, when a young man came round to me in a white rough coat - he joined another man in a brown coat, and I looked towards them, and saw another person come over the gate of Mr. Morris' yard, and join them - the one who came over the gate said, "Halloo, William!" and they all went up the street. I followed them, and met Mr. Smith, who had the keys - we opened the door, and I saw the inner door was half open, and heard some one run up stairs - but I did not see who it was; I then heard a window break up stairs, and said, "They have got out that way;" the window leads to Mr. Morris' stables, and from thence into the yard. A young man, named Cook, went in with us, and they went up stairs while I stood at the door - we had locked the outer door, that nobody should enter. I saw all the persons who went in; the prisoner was not one. I had known him before.

Prisoner. Q. Had you seen me in the street? A. No; you was neither of the three whom I saw in the street.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a workman in the prosecutors' office. I went away on this Sunday, at ten minutes before two o'clock; the things were all right then; I went again with Murray in the evening - it was dark; I opened the outer-door, and saw a person at the inner door, which leads up to the printing office; he ran up stairs, but I cannot swear that it was the prisoner - I immediately locked the door, and called out, "You are all right!" I then went to the front of the premises, and heard the window break; we went into the premises again, and found many of the things out of their places - the first thing I saw was a box, which had been drawn out of the counting-house - it had been broken open, and was standing in the passage leading to the street door. I do not know what had been in that box; I then saw two bundles of foolscap, which had been removed from the table in the warehouse, and brought down stairs to the steam-room door (a bundle of paper is two reams) - I afterwards found, I believe, four desks broken open; the counting-house must have been broken open, or the box could not have been removed. I sent for the officers, who came in about half an hour - I went over the top of the stables with them - I did not see the prisoner found - I saw the persons who went into the premises - the prisoner was not one of them. I knew him before; he had been a pressman of Mr. Sydney's four or five years ago - I have seen him since then, but he has not worked there for the last four years.

Prisoner. Q. Where did you see me last? A. I have seen you several times in Northumberland-street. Murray, Mr. Morris, his groom, and a person of the name of Corbet entered the premises with me - no stranger went in; I did not speak to a stranger, and tell him to go and watch by the tiles - I kept him out; I gave him a stick - that was the first time, but I did not enter then.

EDWARD COOK . I was with Mr. Smith on the night of the 18th of February, and stood at the door with Murray. I am quite sure the prisoner did not go in.

DAVID SYDNEY , My mother's name is Mary Elizabeth Sydney, she is a widow; I am her partner - we are printers, and live in Northumberland-street. On the night of the 18th of February, I went to the premises, and found two bundles of foolscap paper in the steam-room, they had been brought there from up stairs - the steam-room is about one yard from the street door - the two bundles were worth about 3l. - a box was removed from my private counting-house, in which there had been some spoons - I am informed they were removed from it - they have not been found since. I went in at the inner door, with my brother, Smith, Murray, and Cook - I then desired the door to be shut - I am quite certain the prisoner was not there. I had known him before, he was apprenticed to my father; I went up stairs first, and found the window of the overseer's counting-house had been broken, and was open. I waited at the window till I heard that a person was taken in the yard - I saw the prisoner afterwards at St. Martin's watch-house.

THOMAS HANDFORD . I am a trunk-maker, and live in the Strand; there is a way from Mr. Sidney's premises to our back yard, by getting over the stables. I discovered that some persons were searching for thieves, and I searched the top of our work-shop, and the top of the kitchen. I then saw the prisoner through our glazed door, as I was going from the kitchen - that door is the way out, he tapped at one of the squares of glass, and said, "Here, halloo, let us through!" I asked what he did there - he said he was searching for thieves. I said he had no business there; he said he had, for he was one of Mr. Sydney's men. I left him in custody of my father, and fetched a person from Mr. Sydney's, who said he did not know him; he was then given in charge to the watchman. A person could get from Mr. Sydney's over the stables, and then there was a piece of quartering, down which he got into the yard - there were the marks of his feet on it.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . I am a Bow-street officer. I went to the premises, and found they had been broken open, and the desks likewise. I then went to the watch-house, and found the prisoner there - his hands were very dirty, as if he had got over the tops of houses - his hand was cut, and was bleeding fresh.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I am constable of St. Martin's. The prisoner was given into my charge on Sunday night, the 18th of February; his hands were dirty, as if with rubbing against some wall. I told him I did not want to know any thing at all about the matter, but in the course of conversation, he said he was an unfortunate young man; he had been abroad, and he supposed he must travel again for this - but it was a fortunate thing, he knew it was not a dwelling house, and that would save his life.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home, and had occasion to pass the office, as there was a number of persons there, I went over to see what it was - the door was open, and two or three persons came down the street, and went in at the time I did. Smith told one gentleman to go out and watch by the tiles, and said something about minding his stick - but if there had been no way of getting out but

by the gate, what necessity would there be for any one to watch the tiles. I went out and found the counting-house door open - I went out at the window, and fell down before I got far. I then walked about some time, and a person called to know who it was, and some person made answer that they were looking for thieves - I fell down, and cut my hand with a sky-light. I knocked at the door of a house, which had not the appearance of wanting to conceal myself - some person came, and they said they suspected I was the thief, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-110

863. CHARLES ESSEX was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 2 hair-fronts, value 20s. , the goods of William Edge .

JOHN ROBERTSON , I am a hair-dresser, and live in Shoreditch. On the 7th of March the prisoner came, and offered me two new hair-fronts for sale; he asked 3s. for them - I said he had not asked a quarter of the value - I said I thought he had stolen them - I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge - he had three examinations, and was then discharged.

WILLIAM EDGE. I am a hair-dresser , and live in Aldersgate-street. I lost two hair-fronts from my counter on the 6th of March - I know these; they are my work, and are worth 30s. the lowest price; I lost five or six others on the same day.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a Jew for half-a-crown - I then took them to this gentleman to sell, and he detained me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-111

864. JOHN HARPER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 2 cakes, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Partington .

HANNAH BAKER . I am servant to Thomas Partington, a confectioner of Oxford-street . I saw the prisoner come, and take a melon cake out of the window on the 7th of March; he ran up Bond-street - I followed, and did not lose sight of him; he was taken, and two cakes were found on him; they were worth 7s.

ANDREW VALLANCE . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the cakes; he said he took them for hunger.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-112

865. GEORGE KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 30 lbs. weight of lead, value 8s. , the goods of William Edwardes , Esq. , Lord Kensington, in that part of the United Kingdom called Ireland.

WILLIAM NOBLE . I am a labourer on the estate of Lord Kensington . I met the prisoner on the 28th of March, in Walnut Tree-walk - he had got one of these pieces of lead on his shoulder, and the other piece behind him, in a bag - I told him I thought he had been stealing some lead - he said No, it was some old lead which a man had given him to carry, as his donkey-cart was not able to carry it; I peeped through the bag, and saw it was new lead - I then detained him.

JAMES NOBLE . I am a watchman on these premises. - Noble is my brother. There are a great many houses building by Lord Kensington; I believe this to be the lead which came off the buildings, but I cannot swear to it - I missed seven pieces; the prisoner had worked there last year; he has worked on the adjoining premises - I missed lead of this description from the gutters - it was not fixed down at all.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am a plumber. This is part of the lead left in the gutters to cover the trap-door after the slaters had done work - I believe this is the lead, but I cannot swear to it - it has no mark on it - I am a journeyman to Mr. Benson.

ALEXANDER WARRICK . I am agent to William Edwardes, Esq., Baron Kensington of Ireland. I know those houses, which he is building: I purchased some lead from Mr. George Benson for Lord Kensington.

Q. You purchase the lead in lump to use on these houses? A. Yes; and all that is on the premises is paid for, whether it is used or otherwise.

GEORGE HULL. I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody - I searched him, and found a knife, which appears to have been hammered on the back.

Prisoner's Defence. Between four and five o'clock I was coming down Old Brentford, and found these parcels laying there - I did not know they were lead till I took them up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-113

866. WILLIAM KETTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 3 lbs. weight of feathers, value 3s. , the the goods of Nathaniel Skuse .

PETER COUCH . I am a shoemaker, and live at Mr. Nathaniel Skuse's - he keeps a lodging-house in Wentworth-street . On the 17th of March I saw the prisoner coming through the passage with this bag of feathers; I asked him what he had got - he said it did not concern me - I said it did, for every thing there was left in my care- he then said it was horse hair - I took it from him, and found these feathers; he said he hoped I would let him go as he expected his brother in town from the country, and he would make it all good; we found one bed nearly stripped of feathers.

NATHANIEL SKUSE. This house is mine, and Couch had the care of it. I went and found one bed nearly stripped of feathers.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of sleeping in that house some time, whether I had any thing to pay or not - these feathers I had in my hand when I went there the night before.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-114

867. THOMAS NEWELLS and HENRY MUNDY were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 coat, value 38s. , the goods of John Tritton .

JOSEPH COATSWORTH . I live with Mr. John Tritton, in Gloucester-place ; this coat was lost from my master's stables, at the back of his house; it is a blue box-coat, with livery buttons, and had a horse on the buttons - I had left it in the stable at half-past four o'clock on the 13th of February - I saw one of the prisoners before the Magistrate on the 15th or 16th, and the other a day or two afterwards.

STEPHEN MORRIS . I am servant to Lady Bellingham - I was in Montague-street on the 13th of February between four and five o'clock, and saw the two prisoners - Mundy

asked if I would give him something to drink; I said I had no money; Newells then called him, and they went into Gloucester-mews West - they went without a coat - I was waiting for a friend, who came out, and while I was speaking to him the two prisoners came out at the other end of the mews into Gloucester-street - they then had a blue coat with yellow buttons - I could not see the crest, but I saw there were five capes to the coat, if not more - I did not hear them talk to each other, but I followed them down several streets into Monmouth-street - they went into a clothes-shop there, which I knew, but I do not know who keeps it - they came out again with a coat, which appeared to me to be the same - they then went as far as a street near Long-acre, and there I left them - I was afraid to follow them any further - I had not presence of mind to call for assistance.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who was with you? A. Thomas Evans - they had several examinations before the Magistrate - a man named Emmanuel, who keeps a clothes-shop was examined; he said they were not the men who brought the coat - a man named Cole was also examined - Mundy had a kind of brown frock-coat on - it was not a dark brown - I said at the office it was a long brown frock-coat.

COURT. Q. Did you observe the coat that they were carrying particularly? A. It was a box-coat; it passed close to my arm and I looked at it.

Prisoner MUNDY. Q. If you knew me so well, why did not you stop me at once, as you have given out that I am a thief, and could not keep a place for these three years? A. I said I had seen him out of place for a long time - I followed him so far because I suspected he had stolen it.

THOMAS EVANS . I was with Morris - it was about twenty-five minutes before five o'clock when they went into the shop with the coat - I saw the prisoners come out of the mews - Newells had the coat in his arms, and Mundy turned back to see if there was any body coming out of the mews - he then took the coat, and they went on together - it was a blue coat with a yellow button, they went through Portman-square, from thence through Portman-street, and several other streets, towards the Seven-dials; they took the coat into a clothes-shop, but I do not know the name of the street, they came out with a coat and went into another shop, a little way off, and there I missed them - I was turning a corner, and heard a door shut, but I could not tell where it was - we waited five or ten minutes - in the meantime they came out again with the coat, and Morris said we would not follow them any further.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the owners of the two shops examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes - we did not stop the prisoners because we had no right to do so - I cannot say what kind of coat Mundy had on, because the capes of the coat he was carrying hung very low down his back - it was not a long coat - it might come to about the knees - I have seen Emmanuel and Cole here to-day - I do not know the name of the streets in which the shops were.

JOHN GUDGE . I am an officer. I apprehended Newells on the 15th - I told him it was about a great coat: he said he knew nothing about it - I then went, on the 16th, with the two witnesses to the Duke of York public-house, in Shepherd-street, where I found Mundy; he said he knew nothing at all about it - I asked what he had done with the great-coat which he got from the other man on Tuesday night - he said he had no great-coat - they were examined several times on account of the coachman being so ill he could not attend.

Mr. PHILLIPS called -

MOSS EMMANUEL . I keep a shop at No. 42, Monmouth-street. I was examined before the Magistrate - I heard the two witnesses say they watched the two prisoners into my shop - I remember that two persons did come to my shop, but I was engaged at the time - I did not take notice of them, and cannot say whether they were the prisoners; I would not buy the coat of them.

COURT. Q. Did you notice the coat or the buttons? A. There was a crest of a horse or a lion on the buttons - I did not particularly notice it; my shop is rather dark.

- COLE. I live in Broad-street. I was summoned to attend before the Magistrate - I heard the two witnesses say they saw the prisoners go into Belton-street - I do not remember their coming to my shop - I never saw either of them in my life.

NEWELLS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

MUNDY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-115

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

868. SARAH ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 pair of sheets, value 10s.; 2 shifts, value 8s., and 1 petticoat, value 4s. , the goods of Elizabeth Horwood , widow .

ELIZABETH HORWOOD. I am a widow, and live in Bell-street, Marylebone - I take in a little washing. On the 19th of March I sent my little boy, who is ten years of age, to Mrs. Davis, at No. 11, with a pair of sheets, two shifts, and a petticoat, which I had had to wash, and they were to go there to be mangled; this was a little after seven o'clock - I saw him go into the house, and ran back to iron a shirt; my little boy came directly, which surprised me; he said a young woman met him in the passage, and told him Mrs. Davis was not at home, and she took the things - I ran there immediately and found Mrs. Davis was at home. I have since seen the sheets at a pawnbroker's; they belong to a customer of mine, and have I. H. W. on them.

HENRY HORWOOD . I received the bundle from my mother; I took it to Mrs. Davis, and met the prisoner in the passage; I am quite sure she is the person; I said to her"Is Mrs. Davis at home?" she said, "No, she is not, I will take the things down to Mrs. Carter's till she comes in;" she then took them from my hands.

JAMES HILL . I am a pawnbroker. These sheets were pawned with me on the morning of the 20th of March, by the prisoner. I am certain of her person.

JONATHAN HUNT . I am an officer. I met Mrs. Horwood, who told me of what had happened; I took up the prisoner; I turned her out with six or seven other women, and asked the little boy which was the woman; he pointed her out immediately.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270405-116

869. WILLIAM SHRIMPTON was indicted for steal

ing, on the 18th of March , 3 shillings and 1 sixpence the monies of Benjamin Osborne .

BENJAMIN OSBORNE. I keep the Horse and Groom in the Curtain-road . On the morning of the 18th of March I heard some words between my son and another person; I got up, came down in my shirt, and found the prisoner in my passage; I asked what he had done, he said, "Nothing at all;" I said, "You are my prisoner," and I took hold of him; he resisted, and wanted to go into the taproom - I saw some money in his mouth, and saw him put his hand to his mouth, and then he shuffled about, and I saw a shilling fall from the back of his trowsers; I sent for an officer, who came in about ten minutes, and was going to search him, but 2s. 6d. more fell from him which made 3s. 6d.

JAMES OSBORNE . I am the prosecutor's son. On the 18th of March I got up pretty early, and opened the street-door - I then went into the bar; the prisoner came between six and seven o'clock, he stood by the fire a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - I went up stairs to ask my father a question, and as I was coming down, I saw the prisoner coming from the bar-door; I saw the till half way out - I went and looked at it, and there was only 2s. in it; there was 5s. 6d. there when I went up stairs - I went to the prisoner, and asked what he had done with the money - he denied having any; I told him to give me what he had taken from the till, and he might go about his business - I saw some money fall from him.

GEORGE WILKINSON . I lodge at the Horse and Groom. On the morning of the 18th of March I remember Osborne going up stairs; the prisoner was then standing with his back to the fire-place; he directly went into the bar, and stood near the till with his face towards it - Osborne came down in about a minute, and the prisoner went into the back yard; Osborne went into the bar, and then he went after the prisoner, and accused him of robbing the till.

JURY. Q. Did you see him open the till? A. No; I saw him pushing it too; I was in the tap-room; there was no one went into the bar but the prisoner; there is a passage between the bar and the tap-room. I saw some money fall from the prisoner.

WILLIAM WICK . I saw the prisoner in the bar; Osborne had been gone up stairs about two minutes; the prisoner went out of the bar as soon as he heard him step on the stairs; he came down and went into the bar; he then ran to the prisoner, and I heard him tell him if he would give him the money again he might go about his business - I saw the money drop from the back part of his trousers when the officer came.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to call for half a pint of porter, and was talking to the lad about the ticket of a watch seal; he said he would buy it of me, and get it out unknown to his father - I said he was welcome to the ticket, as no doubt it was stopped; I then went to the bar to give it him, and he was not there; I did not go in at all.

J. OSBORNE re-examined. Q. Did You say that you would accept of the ticket, or have it unknown to your father? A. No; there was 3s. in the till the night before, left to give change; the other was taken that morning. He had a pennyworth of beer after he was taken into custody; he had not called for any thing before that; he said he had no other money but the penny that he paid for the beer.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-117

870. WILLIAM SHIPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 pewter pot, value 18d. , the property of Abraham Ling .

SARAH GROVES . Mr. Ling keeps the Good Samaritan public-house . I saw the prisoner take the pot from the area of No. 19, Turner-street, Whitechapel - he shifted it from one end to the other, then stooped down and took it up - there were wires in some parts to keep cats from the area, and he put the pot along to where it was open. I gave the alarm, and saw the prisoner throw the pot down; Mr. Ling's lad took it up - the prisoner was taken directly.

ABRAHAM LING . I am a publican; I live in Oxford-street, Commercial-road. This is my pot - Groves came to me about four o'clock in the afternoon, and said a boy had taken one of my pots. I went out and ran after the prisoner - I got up to him just as he had throw the pot away. Groves pointed him out as the boy who had taken it - my boy is not here, and the officer cannot be found. I did not see my boy pick up the pot, but I saw him stoop.

S. GROVES. He put the pot into his hat - I afterwards saw him throw it away in New Suffolk-street, upon some bricks. I had lost sight of him - but I am sure he is the lad.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, having a good character .

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270405-118

871. JANE TOMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 pail, value 2s. , the goods of John Clay .

JOHN CLAY. I am a stable-keeper at Kingsland . On the 14th of March I received information. I had seen my pail safe about five minutes before; I came to the top of the street, and saw the prisoner with it on her arm; she was walking, and turned into Union-street - she went nearly to the bottom, when Hunter took hold of her. I came up, she had the pail on her arm; I said, "My good woman that is my pail;" she said, "If it is, take it;" I said she had better come back with me, which she did.

THOMAS HUNTER . I met the prisoner with the pail - I came on to the place, and said I had met a woman with a pail. I then pursued, and took her - she came back, and was taken by the officer.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the pail.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-119

872. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 40 feet of paving stones, value 20s. , the goods of Charles Thomas Depree .

CHARLES THOMAS DEPREE. I am the contractor for paving the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. I had seen some stones in Amwell-terrace a day or two previous to the 8th of March - here are some of them, they have my private mark on them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you not made a sale of them to the commissioners? A. I lay them down, and am paid for them; my men had left work at six o'clock.

WILLIAM HENRY THOMPSON . I live in Myddleton-ter

race, Pentonville. On the evening of the 8th of March I was passing Amwell-terrace - I saw a horse and cart there - the prisoner and another man were moving some stones; and while I spoke to the prisoner, the other man got away - I did not lose sight of the prisoner. I did not see them put the stones into the cart - but when I got up there were six or seven in it; he said he was employed by an Irishman round the corner, to take them into the field. I said it was very strange to do such work at that time of night, and I had him taken into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he allude to the other man who was with him? No; I cannot say I saw more than one stone removed; he did not attempt to go off. I did not go for an officer - I crossed the road and sent a person for one. I did not go above thirty yards, when I returned I found the prisoner still there.

THOMAS MERCER . I am a constable. I was sent for, and went to the terrace; I saw the cart, and a number of stones in it. I asked the prisoner what he was doing with it - he said an Irishman had employed him to carry the stones across the field - it was then about half-past eight o'clock - the name of Inskip was on the cart, and he claimed it at Hatton-garden the next day - he was not detained - he said he had not employed the prisoner.

CHARLES PITT . I am surveyor of pavements for Clerkenwell. I saw these stones safe in Amwell-terrace on the evening in question, and some of them were gone the next morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at work at Holloway and as I was coming home a man asked me to help him to move some stones across the field; he said he had been waiting an hour and a half for the cart.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-120

873. KESIAH ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 2 pieces of woollen cloth, value 8s.; 1 gown, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 2s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 2 bed-gowns, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 3 napkins, value 1s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Thomas .

SOPHIA THOMAS . I am the wife of Thomas Thomas; he is a porter , and lives in Exeter-street, Strand. The prisoner lived with me for six weeks - she was a servant ; when out of place she was in the habit of being with me. I have an aged mother very ill; and as I go out to ladies houses myself it is necessary I should have some one there with my mother. I left the prisoner there on Monday morning, the 12th of March, and desired her to get the dinner ready at twelve o'clock, against my husband came home. I went to Islington, and returned soon after eleven o'clock; I found the room door open: my drawers had been opened, and these articles taken from them; the prisoner was gone. I had seen them all safe the night before - my little girl had this pinafore on the day before - I have seen my property since.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am an officer. Mrs. Thomas gave the prisoner into my charge on the 12th of March, a little before eleven o'clock at night, with this shawl on her shoulder - the duplicates of this property were found on her.

REUBEN RICE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I took this shawl from her shoulders, and the duplicates were found on her person.

EDWARD STORR . I am shopman to Mr. Balfour, pawnbroker, of Chandos-street. I have two remnants of cloth, and a cotton gown, pawned on the 12th of March by the prisoner.

LEWIS HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker. I have two napkins, a pinafore, and an apron, pawned by the prisoner, on the 12th of March.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-121

874. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 7 yards of cambric, value 20s. , the goods of Andrew Chittenden .

ANDREW CHITTENDEN. I am a linen-draper , and live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital . On the 1st of March, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw my window cut, and missed a piece of French cambric, and a piece of linen from near that place.

ANNA ADAMS . I am the prisoner's mother. Between three and four o'clock on the 1st of March, I saw him in Tottenham-court-road with another boy - he took this cambrick out of his hat, gave it me, and said he had bought it - I took it to make away with it.

WILLIAM HOWE . I am a pawnbroker. Mrs. Adams brought this cambric to me - there was a mark on it, but it is difficult to see it by this light - I detained her with it.

GEORGE AVIS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 3d of March - I told him it was for stealing this piece of cambric - he denied it then, but before the Magistrate he acknowledged he had given it to his mother; he was remanded, and I found the mark on the cambric - he then said he had bought it of a boy in Tottenham-court-road for 5s., but he should not know him again.

MR. CHITTENDEN. I cannot find the mark by this light - I saw it before the Magistrate, but it was very faint - it was done with a pencil, but it answers in quality and description with the piece I lost.

G. AVIS re-examined. This is the piece of cambric I got at the pawnbroker's; Mr. Chittenden saw it, and there was a pencil mark on it, by which he could swear to it - I do not see it now.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-122

875. ELIZABETH BARNARD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of Richard Joyce .

RICHARD JOYCE. I keep a laundry in Hackney-road . I lost a handkerchief on the 16th of March - the prisoner was employed by me, and had the washing of this handkerchief; we found it in her basket, in which she brought her provision - my wife asked her how she came to put it there - she said she did not know, but it was her first offence, and she hoped to be forgiven - I gave her in charge - we went to her lodging, and found another handkerchief there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your wife here? A. No, she was not bound over - we have between thirty and forty persons in our laundry; it is my wife's custom to search the people as they go out - I was present when the prisoner presented herself to be searched - I cannot say

whether my wife searched her person or her basket first - she presented her basket to be searched - I have since heard that she had a quarrel with some Irish women who had a spite against her. She had been in our employ eight or nine months, and we had a good opinion of her.

COURT. Q. When the handkerchief was found, did she say any thing about any one having a quarrel with her? A. No; I am sure she said it was her first offence. My wife is in good health, but she is not here.

MARY CHALY . I was present when the prisoner's basket was searched, and the handkerchief found; I heard her beg of Mr. Joyce to forgive her on account of her two children and her health.

Cross-examined. Q. Upon your oath, have you not had a quarrel with her? A. No; none of my country women wished to hurt her - I have heard my master and mistress say they put more confidence in her than in any woman they had - I cannot tell whether my mistress searched her basket or her person first - I cannot say whether she searched her or not - she does rub her women down every night - I am not searched, because I live in the house - none of the women had any quarrel, but there was a little row with them a day or two before - I do not know what it was about.

GEORGE BLAKE . I am a constable, and took up the prisoner - she begged pardon, and went down on her knees - I took her to the watch-house - I saw the last witness and several other women there; I did not see the basket searched - the handkerchief was wet, just out of the tub.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare I had no knowledge of the handkerchief being in the basket - it must have been maliciously put there - I had bound the other round my hand one night as it was sore with washing - I intended to return it - the servant tied it on my hand.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18270405-123

876. HENRY COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 plank, value 4s. , the goods of George Leven .

CHARLES DAWSON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 31st of March I saw the prisoner at the back of some new buildings in Camden-town , with a plank on his shoulder - I called to him to stop - he threw it down, and ran away; I pursued, and took him - he begged me to let him go; he was about fifty yards from the building.

JOHN BALL . I am in the service of George Leven - he lives at Camden-town, and is a carpenter. This plank belonged to him; I had missed two that morning.

GEORGE LEVEN. This is my plank - it is marked with a branding iron.

WILLIAM BIGGS . I am an officer. I took up this plank which the prisoner threw down.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-124

877. NATHANIEL GOULSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 pair of reins, value 5s. , the goods of John Pack .

JOHN PACK. I am a saddler . I lost a pair of reins on the 26th of February, from my shop, No. 85, Old-street-road . I went out that morning, about twelve o'clock, and did not return till between seven and eight - they were then gone; these are the reins - I know them to be mine: I can swear they have never been untied; they are tied with a particular sort of cord, used in whip-making; they were buckled to a set of chaise harness.

ELIZABETH ROBINS . I am a doll-maker. On the afternoon of the 26th of February I saw the prisoner go past my shop once or twice, and look at me - I then saw him go to Mr. Pack's, which is next door - he stopped some time, and I went to see if he could get in; I then saw him go away from the door, putting something under his coat - I called to Thomas Dennis, to tell him his mother had been robbed; we followed, and he dropped the reins on my toes; Thomas Dennis took him.

THOMAS DENNIS . I followed the prisoner. When we got close to him I saw him drop these reins - I had hold of him at the time; he dropped them on Mrs. Robins' toes, and she took them up.

JAMES WILLIAM LANE . I am a harness-maker to Mr. Pack; I made these reins for him - I know they were safe in his shop about half-past twelve o'clock on the day in question.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up these reins in Hoxton-square - I did not steal them.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-125

878. JAMES HAINES was indicted for stealing, on on the 24th of March , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of James Minns .

JAMES MINNS. I am a farmer , and live at Hanger-hill. I was at the Champion public-house, Lisson-grove , on the 24th of March; I left my chaise at the door, in care of Hampton; I was in the parlour about ten minutes, with the landlord, who paid me some money. I heard a cry that my coat was taken from the chaise; I ran out, and followed the thief; he had left the coat in a house, and a woman brought it in about five minutes after I got back - this is the coat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you run after the same men who had taken your coat? A. I did not see him, but they said he had run down the street - that man is not here now. When I came back I found the prisoner in the public-house.

JOHN HAMPTON . I am going on for eleven years of age, I took care of Mr. Minns' chaise about a fortnight ago, in Earl-street, Lisson-grove; he went into the Champion. - The prisoner and another person came up to the gig, and the prisoner said to me, "I will give you 1d. for your chance;" I said No - (I suppose he meant to hold the horse); he then said he would give me 11/4d.; I said No; he said, "I held it once, and they only gave me a drink of beer;" he then said, "What will you take?" I said 2d., which he gave me, and I went to Salisbury-street, to buy some buttons; I saw the prisoner in custody about a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you think will become of boys who play at buttons? A. I do not know; I never sold my chance before. I did not see the other man again.

NOEL PIGGOTT . I am a grocer, and live in Earl-street, Lisson-grove. I saw the horse and gig at the Champion between four and five o'clock - I saw the prisoner and three other young men coming down the street; I had

known two of them before, but not the prisoner - I saw him and one of his companions go to this lad, and stand talking with him some minutes - they offered him money, and then went into the Champion; they then came out, and gave him something; the prisoner then held the horse's head, and his companion took the coat, and went away with it. The prisoner went into the Champion as soon as he saw me go after the man; he said, "Your coat is stolen;" my wife said, "Yes it is, and you are the man who held the horse's head."

Cross-examined. Q. How far do you live from the public-house? A. Opposite, about twenty yards off. The prisoner went into the public-house, and gave the alarm; hardly a minute had elapsed. I pursued the man who took the coat, and the prisoner gave the alarm as soon as he could.

COURT. Q. You said at one time that he went in as soon as he saw you go after the man? A. Yes, so he did - I sent my wife to tell Mr. Minns, and I was crossing the road to follow the man; the prisoner went in at the same time as my wife did, at another door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-126

879. ELIZABETH HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of Patrick Burke .

CICELIA BURKE . I am the wife of Patrick Burke. On the 27th of January, about twelve o'clock, I put out my gown to dry in the court, and missed it between four and five o'clock in the evening; I saw it on one of the witnesses on the 23d of March. The prisoner lives in the same court with me, and sells fish at the end of it; I went to her, and said, "I have lost my gown;" she said,"Bless my soul! it was here five minutes ago."

MARY ALLEN . On the 29th of January the prisoner brought me this gown, and wished me to buy it of her, which I did - she said she had bought it that morning, for 3s., but it was too large for her, and I might have it for half-a-crown, and she would lose 6d. by it.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner - Mrs. Allen was there, and said she had bought the gown of her; I took them both up. Mr. Twyford committed the prisoner, and bound Mrs. Allen over as a witness.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through Petticoat-lane, and met a woman whom I have known some years, and bought things of; she asked me to buy this gown of her, which I did, for 3s.; I found it was too large for me; I then sold it for half-a-crown; the prosecutrix lives in Adam and Eve-court, and I live there also.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-127

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 6.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

880. GEORGE SPRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 wooden till, value 1s.; 5 shillings, 1 sixpence, 4 penny pieces, 2 halfpence, and 5 farthings , the property of Richard Shaw .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-128

881. JAMES SMITH (a deaf and dumb boy ) was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Sibbald , from his person .

JOHN SIBBALD. I was in the Strand on the 27th of February, nearly opposite the Adelphi Theatre - a gentleman told me the prisoner had had his hand in my pocket - I felt, and my handkerchief was gone - it was safe about an hour before; the prisoner was not far from me - I followed, and laid hold of him; I accused him of having taken the handkerchief - he made no answer. A little boy gave me the handkerchief, and said the prisoner had thrown it down in the street.

ANTHONY ATKINSON . I am a trimming-manufacturer. I was coming up Durham-street, into the Strand, and saw this gentleman passing the top of the street - the prisoner had hold of his coat with one hand, and drew the handkerchief out with the other; he put it into his own pocket, and passed by; I told the gentleman, and said that was the boy - he ran, seized hold of him, and said he had robbed him; he then took it out of his pocket, and threw it into the kennel, behind him - a little boy picked it up, and gave it to the prosecutor.

JOHN SHAW . I am an officer at the Adelphi Theatre. The prisoner was given into my charge with this handkerchief, which was wet and dirty.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

The evidence was communicated to the prisoner by signs. - This is his second conviction.

Reference Number: t18270405-129

882. JAMES PALMER and HENRY PALMER were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 truss of clover-hay and oat-straw mixed together, value 3s. , the goods of John Eames .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ANSELL . I am foreman to Mr. Eames, who is the proprietor of the Angel Inn, St. Clements , and has a station at Enfield-highway. On the 24th of March I had some clover-hay mixed with oats, which had grown among the clover, which is a thing we do not often see; I do not think there is such a mixture round the country for ten miles - I cannot say how many trusses I had of it, but I missed one truss on Sunday morning, the 25th of March, about seven o'clock - I had seen it safe at eight the night before - it was laying together in the further loft; I saw the clover littered about the loft window, and missed a truss; I then traced to see where it was gone - I went to the bottom of the yard, and saw clover and oats by the fence, as if it had been put over there; I then traced it over three fences, into the yard of the Black Horse public-house; I got an officer, Wilson, and he went with me; I showed him the spots where it was, and we got to the fence leading to the Black Horse yard; the officer got over there, but I did not; he afterwards came out, and in about two hours I went with him to the prisoners' stable - I know them both very well; we found some clover, which the officer pulled out of a rack - it was the same clover which had been lost. Mr. Eames changes six coaches there every day. I did not see any other clover there; I saw the prisoners there, and told them to bring it up into the loft to match with ours - the of

ficer brought it, and they followed him; I told them it was ours; James said they had it of an ostler at the King's Head public-house, in Kingsland-road, but the direction in which I traced the hay was not that in which they would have gone from Kingsland-road to the prisoners' stables.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it the mildness of winter which caused the oats to spring up with the clover? A. Yes. The prisoners occupy about fourteen acres of ground, and are market-gardeners; they were bailed - they had leave to go home to get bail, and returned; I could not tell how many trusses were in the loft, but could miss one by the manner they laid; I never knew the prisoners in trouble.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did they go before the Justice? A. On the next day.

JOHN WILSON . I am a constable of Enfield. Ansell called me - I traced the hay to the door of the prisoners' stable at the Black Horse public-house - clover and oats were spilt where they had rested - I afterwards saw the clover and oats in the rack in their stable - there might be about a truss there - it was a long rack and quite full - I saw the prisoners in about an hour, and told them Ansell suspected his clover was in their stable - James replied, "Don't take any of that out of the rack;" I saw some clover under some hay in the rack - I asked him where they got it - he said they bought it of the ostler of the King's Head public-house, Kingsland-road - they went with me to Mr. Eames' stable, and compared it - I have no doubt it was the same - the proportion of clover and oats were as near alike as they possibly could be - we let them be at large till Monday morning, when we took them to the Justice - when I first went to the stable the clover was in the rack, and the hay at the bottom of the stable, but when we returned the hay was over the clover.

Cross-examined. Q. You took them on Sunday? A. Yes, about eleven o'clock - Henry told the Magistrate he had nothing to do with the horses, as he was engaged in the garden.

RICHARD WALTER . I am a patrol. I went with Wilson to the stable, and took this clover-hay out of the rack, which I produce. James said he got it from the ostler, at the King's Head - Henry said nothing - I found them next morning opposite their stable-door, and they went with me to the Justice - I compared the clover; it appears very much alike, but I am not a judge of it.

WILLIAM FIELD . I am a farmer, and live at Ponder's-end. I sold Ansell some clover, with oats grown among it - I had seen it daily, and believe this to be the same - it was a two years' old crop.

Cross-examined. Q. If you saw this one hundred miles off, should you have known it? A. I think I should; the prisoners bore a very respectable character.

JOSHUA THOROWGOOD . I was in the prisoners' stable one Sunday morning, about eight o'clock, and saw 10lbs. or 15lbs. of clover-hay in the rack - I pulled a piece out, and said, "Did you buy this of Mr. Ansell?" I had before worked for Mr. Field, and bound some clover-hay for him - James said he had it from a man at the King's Head.

J. PALMER's Defence. I was returning from town about three weeks ago, and stopped at the King's Head - I fed my horse, and asked the ostler if I might have the bit of hay that was in the basket - he said I might.

JAMES BURGESS . I am ostler at the King's Head, Kingsland-road - James Palmer used to call there to water Mr. Mitchell's horse - he came last Tuesday three weeks, and I gave his horse some hay; when he came out he said, "I want a bit of hay" - I gave him what was in his crate; he put it into his cart - it was clover and meadow hay together.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was there any oats among it? A. I did not notice that; I was not before the Justice; my man was there - two or three hundred carts call there every day.

COURT. Q. How much did he take? A. It might be nearly half a truss.

W. ANSELL. All the stable doors were locked.

J. WILSON. I had been at the stable a fortnight before, and saw no hay there then.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-130

Before Mr. Recorder.

883. STEPHEN HOPCROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 35 lbs. weight of lead, value 5s., belonging to Henry Pige , and fixed to his dwelling-house, against the statute , &c.

HENRY PIGE. I am an oilman , and live in George-street, Bethnal-green , and rent the whole house. I saw this lead safe on my roof on the 24th of March, in the afternoon - it was fixed near the chimney - next morning(Sunday), about a quarter-past six o'clock, the private patrol called me - I went, and missed this lead (about 35lbs.); the prisoner lived next door to me - I do not know what he has been doing lately - I believe he has been away from his parents - he must have come into my yard, and got on the privy to get it - I found it at the watch-house - it is of the same kind as mine; it was pulled away from the chimney, not cut.

WILLIAM LOYAL . I am a private patrol - Mr. Pige's house is in my beat. On Sunday morning, the 25th of March, about a quarter-past five o'clock, as it was just getting light; I saw a chap come down a court, leading to the back of Pige's house; I went up there, and found the privy door shut - I asked who was there - the prisoner answered, "It is Hopcroft;" the parish watchman came up, and knocked at the door - he opened it, and this lead was behind the door; no other person was there; I said,"This is your game, is it Mr. Hopcroft?" he said he knew nothing about the lead, and came there for a certain purpose - the privy is common to all the houses in the court; I tried to seize him - he fought very hard, and struck me in the jaw; I got assistance, and took him to the watch-house; I then went to Mr. Pige's, called him up, and asked if he had lost any lead; he looked round, and said he had; I applied this lead to the roof; it fitted exactly, and covered that part of the roof near the chimney, and exactly matched with what was left; I have no doubt of its being the same.

JOHN ABSON . I am a watchman. I came up to the privy when Loyal was knocking; I knocked, went in, and found the prisoner there alone; this lead was behind the door - he fought very hard to get away, but was secured;

I went, and compared it with Pige's roof; it fitted exactly - I am certain it had come from there.

GEORGE WALKER . I am a watchman. I went up, and found the prisoner in the privy with the lead; I saw it compared with the roof, and believe it came from there.

JOHN GORDON . I was officer of the night. I saw the lead compared, and believe it came from there.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up, and went to the privy; the patrol asked who was there; I told my name.

ANN GILDERSTEIN . I live in Red Lion-yard, George-street, Bethnal-green - the prisoner lived next door to Pige's. Between five and six o'clock that morning I saw the patrol at the privy door; the patrol drew his cutlass, and said he would cut his head off if he resisted; I did not see him resist; I called out to him not to commit murder; I was at the window, and he was inside the privy.

W. LOYAL. I did not strike him till he jammed the door too, and struck me; he said, "I will muzzle you;" I then drew my cutlass.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-131

884. JAMES HANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 chair, value 2s. , the goods of William Joseph Cooper .

WILLIAM HENRY DAVIS. I servant to William Joseph Cooper, a tailor , of Sackville-street . On Monday morning, the 26th of February, a little before eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner running up the area steps with this chair on his shoulder; when he had got about three doors off I called to him, and asked what he was going to do with it; he said nothing, but put it down - I brought him back. The area gate is usually open - the chair was in the kitchen.

EDWARD BOOTHMAN . I am a constable, and took him into custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Sackville-street when I was called back.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270405-132

885. JOHN DORY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 3 bushels of grains, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of Simeon Howard , his master; and HENRY FIELDER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

2d COUNT, charging them both with stealing the said goods.

MESSRS. PHILLIPS and BARRY conducted the prosecution.

SIMEON HOWARD. I am a farmer , and live at Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire. Dory was nearly seven years in my service; on the 14th of March, at night, I sent him and Groves with a waggon and four horses, two grey and two brown, to Messrs. Coles and Co.'s brewery, at Twickenham, for one hundred bushels of grains - Mrs. Howard gave them the money. I sent no note with them - my name and address was on the waggon - they returned next afternoon; it is fifteen or sixteen miles.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had Groves committed on this charge? A. Yes, on the day they returned; he was sent to Clerkenwell - he has been nearly fourteen years in my employ. I have not seen him in prison, nor had any conversation with him.

DANIEL WHALE . I am in the employ of Messrs. Coles and Co. Twickenham. I know Dory and Groves; on the 15th of March they came to the brewery with Howard's waggon. I measured them one hundred bushels of grains, which they put into the waggon, and drove off - this was about six o'clock in the morning. I saw Howard's name on the waggon.

GEORGE FRANCIS . I am in partnership with Mr. Cole. Dory and Groves came one morning for one hundred bushels of grains. I do not recollect what day it was; they had one hundred bushels, for which, I believe, Dory paid; I received three sovereigns, and said, "This is just right;" as I thought it was two sovereigns and a half, my sight not being good; he said, "How much are they a bushel?" I then saw it was three sovereigns; I gave them to another man, who, I believe, gave change. I saw "S. Howard, Rickmansworth," on the waggon. There were no horses in it when I first saw it, but afterwards there were four - I think one was grey.

HANNAH STRUDWICK . I am the wife of James Strudwick , and live on Hounslow-heath. Fielder's house is on Hounslow-heath: on the 15th of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning (I think) I saw a waggon with four horses standing at his house. I did not read the name on it - I saw two men with the waggon - Dory is like one of them; I saw him before the Magistrate - he was then dressed like the man on the waggon, but I cannot be certain of him - I believe him to be the man; there were grains in the waggon. I saw a sack nearly full put on the other man's back from the waggon; it was carried round Fielder's house. I did not see Fielder then - I had seen him before, talking to the two men with the waggon - the man on the waggon put the sack on the other man's back, who carried it round the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you live next door to Fielder? A. Yes; his premises are enclosed in front, but open on the side - he is a carman; he does hired work, has a little land, and keeps pigs and horses. I have frequently seen him buying grains of a man who sells them - he generally goes himself to Mr. Palmer, a brewer, for them - but at times people come and sell to him. I am sure I saw him and his son speak to the men. I know a boy named Gritteridge; my husband is a carpenter - there never was any dispute between him and Fielder; my husband was discharged under the Insolvent Act in July, and there was a little difference between them then, but since that they have been friendly. I believe Fielder can neither read nor write.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do people who sell grains at his door come with a waggon and four horses? A. No; a jobbing man comes with a cart and one horse. Two of the horses were brown.

EDWARD LONG . I live at Hounslow. I know Fielder, and I know Dory's person; on the 15th of March, in the morning, I was by Fielder's house, and saw a waggon directly opposite. Dory and Groves were with Fielder, and his son stood close by the waggon, which was loaded with grains - it was a large one - I did not notice how many horses there were. I saw Dory on the waggon - he filled the sack with grains from the waggon - it was taken into Fielder's yard.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was Fielder at that time? A. Standing by the waggon. I swear that he was there at the time the sack was carried in; we did not go away

at all - I saw no money pass - Groves carried the grains in. I am a baker - this was between ten and eleven o'clock, I think - I was out with my bread, and stood there about five minutes.

EDMUND GROVES . I was in Mr. Howard's employ - Dory was my fellow-servant - he kept the nags. On the 14th of March Mr. Howard sent me to the brewery for grains - we got a hundred bushels - Dory paid for them - I do not know how much; we put one bushel into the stable for the horses, and then went towards home. Dory called at a house on Hounslow-heath as we went - he went on before the horses, and called at the house; I came up soon after - he spoke to somebody, but I did not see who it was. When we returned home, Dory went on before, and spoke to Fielder on the heath. Dory got up on the waggon, and bid me come up, and put some grains into one of master's sacks, which we had taken some grains in for the horses. I carried the sack of grains into Fielder's stables, emptied them out, and brought the sack away - Fielder stood by the yard in view of me and Dory. I did not know him before, nor was I ever that road before - we were opposite the house three or four minutes - Fielder said nothing to me - I did not hear him speak to Dory. We all went to a public-house, and Fielder wished me good day - he told us to call again. When we got home Dory gave me 2s. 11/2d., and said that was my share - he did not say what of. We were about ten minutes in the public-house.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. How long are you going to Twickenham and back? A. I was never that road before - master gave us 2s. between us for going; we went away about eleven o'clock at night, and returned before dark next day. Dory went on to Fielder's house before me - I carried the sack in; I have been accused of stealing the grains - master said if I would tell the truth he would forgive me. Dury said nothing to me about it.

COURT. Q. Did Dory call at the same house in the morning? A. I did not see him go in in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How often did you go into the stable? A. Only once; there were about two bushels and a half in the sack - I received 2s. 11/2d. as my share - grains are sixpence a bushel; no explanation was given me by Dory. I was committed as the thief; I saw Cook the constable once while I was in Newgate - he did not ask me to accuse my fellow-servant. Mr. Fellows, the lawyer said, I was to come as a witness, and asked what I knew about it - he said if I would be of use on the trial, I should not be prosecuted; this was the day before yesterday. I heard Fielder say nothing about the grains.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time in the morning did you cross the heath to go to the brewery? A. A little before four o'clock, I think - there was then some hay for the horses on the waggon. Dory did not say what the 2s. 11/2d. was the share of - the waggon stopped on the heath as we went, for three or four minutes, just opposite Fielder's. I was behind the waggon, and saw a man speak to Dory, but cannot say who it was - he came from Fielder's yard.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was dark at four o'clock? A. Yes, rather - it appeared to be a man that I saw.

THOMAS KING . I am tap boy at the Cross Lancers public-house, on Hounslow-heath. I know Fielder - I saw Dory on the 15th of March, in company with Fielder, drinking at our house, about eleven in the morning - I cannot say whether any one was with them; a waggon and four horses was at the door at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was perfectly well known at your house? A. Yes - he bears a respectable character.

S. HOWARD re-examined. I did not examine my waggon to see if any grains were deficient - most of them had been used before I observed it. Dory bears a respectable character.

DORY - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Seven Days .

FIELDER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-133

886. JOHN DORY was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 3 trusses of hay, value 6s. , the goods of Simeon Howard ; and HENRY FIELDER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-134

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

887. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 2 boots, value 15s. , the goods of Edward Vandevelde .

JAMES FINIGAN . I am shopman to Edward Vandevelde, of the Strand . On the 3d of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was in the shop, turned round, and saw the prisoner running out with two boots - I followed - he dropped them in Bedford-street, and was stopped, without being out of my sight.

THOMAS COUSINS . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-135

888. DAVID INGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 2 gowns, value 6s.; 1 pelisse, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 6s., and 2 petticoats, value 3s., the goods of Elizabeth Pomfret , widow ; and 1 cloak, value 2s. , the goods of Mary Alders , spinster .

ANN JOHNSON . I am wife of Thomas Johnson ; I live in Cambridge-place, Cambridge-heath , and am a laundress; Elizabeth Pomfret lives in the same house, and Mary Alders formerly lived there. On the 3d of March, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, a man knocked at my backdoor, and said a man had jumped from my window; I ran up-stairs to my bed-room and missed this property; the bed-room is on the first-floor, and the window was open; there is a foot-path behind my house, and the tiles of the wash-house slope up to the bed-room window. I sent Armstrong out; the prisoner was brought back in about half an hour; the property was all safe at eleven o'clock that day.

MARY ARMSTRONG . I am Johnson's servant. I ran and inquired if a man had been seen with a bundle, and when I got two hundred yards off, a man directed me into the field by the Jews' chapel; I went there, and saw some boys at play; I was returning, when the boys directed me into an empty house; I went and found these articles in the recess; a bricklayer took the prisoner, who was then behind the door.

WILLIAM BROWN . I live in Prospect-place. I saw the prisoner opposite the Hare public-house, with a bundle in his apron - he ran down Jews' chapel field; I saw Arm

strong, and told her where he was. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I am a bricklayer. I saw Armstrong go by a house which I had seen the prisoner pass; I went with her into an empty house, and saw the prisoner behind the door; I secured him, and saw the clothes found in the room.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a carpenter. I saw the prisoner on Johnson's wash-house; he got off; I called to know what he was doing; he gave no answer; I knocked at the door and gave information.

GEORGE BLAKE . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-136

889. THOMAS PECK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 hog, price 4l. , the property of William Loader .

WILLIAM LOADER. I live at Finchampstead, Berks . I fat pigs to kill for myself; this hog weighed about eight score pounds; I kept it in a sty; I saw it last on Thursday, the 15th of March, safe in the sty, close to my dwelling-house; at 6 o'clock next morning it was gone; I traced the footsteps of two persons and a hog, for eight or nine miles, to Wingfield; there then appeared the marks of donkey's feet and a donkey-cart, and of one man, who seemed to have been leading the donkey; I traced the cart about three miles, to Bishopsgate; we then heard it had gone on; we came to Egham, about eight miles from Hounslow, we then met the prisoner returning towards us, in a donkey-cart; we told him he was the man we had been looking for; he said, "What for?" I said we had lost a pig, and tracked it; he said another man came to his house, and hired him to carry the pig to Brentford for him, but the donkey and cart was his own; that he kept it to do jobs for any body; we asked where he had left the hog; he said the other man sold it at Hounslow; that he drew down the Lion and Lamb public-house yard, and there unloaded it; that he was going home, and the other man had come back with him to Egham; we went on to Hounslow, inquired at two or three public-houses; an ostler went with him, and we found the pig at Shervill's; the prisoner had not mentioned Shervill's name.

ROBERT GILLAM . I live at Cranford-bridge. On the morning of the 16th I saw two men and a donkey-cart come through Hounslow with a pig; they went down to Shervill, and sold it to him, then came to the Lion and Lamb yard and had some porter and steaks; they wanted Shervill, to stand a pot - he said No, he thought he had had a hard bargain with the pig, as he gave 3l. 7s. for it; I know the prisoner was one of the men; I should know the other if I saw him.

JAMES SHERVILL . I live at Hounslow, and deal in pork. The prisoner, in company with another person, sold me a pig; they brought it in a donkey-cart; they were both strangers to me; the prisoner was the first who came to me, and he gave me the price of it, and took an active part in it, till the other came up; and the other sold it to me for 3l. 7s. I would not have given 2s. 6d. more to a neighbour; it weighed fifteen stone and a half; I afterwards showed the same hog to Loader.

JAMES DEARLOVE . I live at Wingfield, Berks. On the 16th of March, about half-past twelve o'clock, my master said my brother-in-law had lost his pig; I went with my brother-in-law to Staines, and met the prisoner with the cart.

JAMES LOCK . I am foreman of the works at Windsor-forest. I saw the prisoner on the 15th, about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, with another man, I thought they were coming for work, and said Halloo! the prisoner hung down his head and said nothing; this was about four miles and a half from Loader's house - I do not know who the other man was.

BENJAMIN SILVESTER . I live at Hounslow. I killed this pig before the prosecutor came.

COURT to J. SHERVILL. Q. How long did you keep the pig before it was killed? A. Three or four hours - I do not always kill them so soon, but this was a killing day - if it had come on another day I should have kept it most likely; it was bruised, but I did not know that till after it was killed.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a constable of Isleworth. I went in pursuit of the prisoner above one hundred miles, and found him in custody.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been hired by the other man to carry the pig.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-137

890. JAMES TOBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Philip Tattersall , from his person .

PHILIP TATTERSALL, ESQ. I am a barrister . On my way to chambers last Saturday morning, the prisoner trod on my heel in Bedford-row , and then in a few minutes he passed me; I felt for my handkerchief, and it was gone; I saw a gentleman running after the prisoner - he took from his apron my handkerchief.

THOMAS PEREGRINE TURNER . I was at my dining-room window, and saw the prisoner lift up Mr. Tattersall's pocket, and take out his handkerchief; I ran out and took hold of him in the middle of Bedford-row, and took it from him; another lad was with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys were running; they dropped the handkerchief, which I took up and put under my apron.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-138

891. SAMUEL LENOX and THOMAS GIBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 umbrella, value 5s. , the goods of Sarah Foster , spinster .

CAROLINE SHAKSPEARE . I am housemaid to Mr. Robert Foster, of Tottenham-grove ; his daughter Sarah lives with him; her umbrella was in the passage on the 16th of March, about nine o'clock, when I went out.

JAMES REYNOLDS . I was in West-green-lane - the two prisoners and another person passed me; I watched them, and saw Lenox with a bag in one hand, and a hareskin in the other; a man came by, and I told him I thought they were going to rob Mr. Foster's house - I waited till they passed the house; Lenox came back, to see if I was gone, but did not see me; he then went into Mr. Foster's gate, and came out with the bag, which was

fuller than when he went in; Humphries came up - I ran, and took Lenox with the bag; I left him in charge, and went and took Gibbs, who was about twenty yards off when Lenox went into the house; I had seen them in company.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you lose sight of him? A. Only in turning a corner - he did not cross any field.

Prisoner GIBBS. Q. Did you see me in his company after he came from the house? A. Yes - you spoke to him.

EDWARD HUMPHRIES . I was coming down the lane, and saw Lenox come out of the gateway with the umbrella and basket; we pursued and took him - Gibbs was fifty yards from the gate when I first saw him.

Prisoner GIBBS. Q. Did you see me run away from the place? A. Yes - you then returned.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am an officer, and took them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Lenox received a good character.

LENOX - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

GIBBS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-139

892. JOHN McCABE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 cask, value 1s., and 300 lbs. weight of pork, value 6l. , the goods of James Careless .

THOMAS KIRBY . I am shopman to James Careless, a cheesemonger , of Clare-market . On the 21st of February a cask of pork stood under the window, outside the shop; a person came and gave me information; I went out, and found the prisoner about two hundred yards from the shop, rolling it away; I asked where he was going with it - he said not far. I took him in charge - I had seen him about before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to roll it for a shilling.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-140

893. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 2 books, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Burton .

RICHARD BASS . I am a clerk, and know Burton's shop, in Bell-yard . I saw the prisoner go there, and take these two books from the front of the shop, and put them under his coat - he walked away; I ran after him - he was stopped at the top of the yard, and dropped them; I picked them up.

THOMAS BURTON . I am a bookseller. These books are mine, and were taken from my shop - I was out.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-141

894. JAMES CASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Rogers , from his person .

JOHN ROGERS. I am servant to Mr. Fenwick, of Lincoln's-inn. On the 8th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in St. Giles' - a man said my handkerchief was stolen; I felt, and it was gone; he directed me into Newbury's shop, where I found the prisoner.

JOHN NEWBURY . I live in Monmouth-street. I saw the prisoner and another older than himself - the prisoner took the handkerchief from Rogers' pocket; I ran and took him; he threw it down, and I took it up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home - two boys were behind the gentleman; I heard one say, "If you get the handkerchief give it to me;" I followed them, saw one take it, and throw it to the other; it fell - I took it up to give the gentleman, but this man took me.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-142

895. JAMES PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 coat, value 25s. , the goods of Thomas Wadmore .

THOMAS MORRIS . I am an officer. On the 12th of March, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner turn the corner of Grafton-street, with this coat under his arm; I asked where he got it - he said he brought it from home; I opened it, and found a shop-ticket on it, with Wadmore's address at the back - I secured him.

THOMAS SWINFEN THRESHER . I live with Thomas Wadmore, in Tottenham-court-road . I know this coat to be his, by a private mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up; I saw a woman drop it, and called after her - she said she knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-143

896. WILLIAM RUTLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 saddle, value 2l., and 2 bridles, value 10s. , the goods of John Fullerton .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

HENRY DAY . On the 4th of March I was near Mr. Fullerton's premises, in Upper George-street, Mary-le-bone - I saw Edwards and the prisoner there (I was waiting for some wash, as the servants were not up); they went by me - Edwards turned up the gateway, then came out, and said to me, "Have you seen the groom go in or out?" I said No - he said, "D-n him - I wish he would come - I want him;" I then saw the prisoner go down the gateway, and return with a saddle and two bridles on his shoulder; he turned down Little Queen-street - Edwards followed him; I knocked at a door, and gave information, suspecting them; I did not see the prisoner again till the Wednesday following.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Your conversation was with the other man? A. Yes - I did not know them before. The bill against Edwards was thrown out; I am certain of the prisoner.

WILLIAM SWALLOW . I am groom to Mr. John Fullerton. On the 24th of March, about half-past six o'clock, I went out to exercise the horses - I locked the stable door - I returned about a quarter to nine; the saddle and bridles were then gone - there was a board down over the stable door, to admit air; the hole is about fourteen inches wide, and will admit a person.

JAMES GIBBS . I apprehended the prisoner at Lissongrove, and found two skeleton-keys there; Edwards came in, and we took him; I found no saddle or bridle. The key will not open the stable door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-144

897. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 2 sheets, value 2s., and 1 petticoat, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Parker , widow .

JAMES TERRY . I am a patrol of St. Sepulcher's. On the 27th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in St. John-street, with a bundle, containing this property - he appeared to avoid me; I stopped him, and asked what he had got; he said some thing of his mother's, which he was going to pawn; I took him to the watch-house, and afterwards found the prosecutrix; he was about three minutes' walk from her house.

MARY PARKER. I live in Turnmill-street , on the third floor. These sheets and petticoat are mine; I left them on my bed about half-past seven o'clock. when I went out; I locked the door, and left the key in it; I found it open when I returned. I have known the prisoner in the neighbourhood.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a constable. I received the prisoner with the bundle.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman named Galey had robbed a blind man of a box of clothes; I thought she lived there - I went, and took these things, thinking they were hers.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-145

898. PHILIP SAVAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 22 plates, value 5s. , the goods of George Davey .

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol of St. Giles'. I saw the prisoner with two others, about six o'clock in the evening of the 23d of February, and followed them towards Tottenham court-road; they had nothing then - they went up by Mr. Davey's shop; one of the others took up this lot of plates from the door, and gave them to the prisoner; I took him with them.

JOHN DOOLY . I live with Mr. George Davey - these plates are his, and stood at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-146

899. JAMES WOODROOF was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 4 brushes, value 1s.; 1 spoon, value 3d.; 1 butter-boat, value 3d.; 1 plate, value 1d., and 1 basin, value 11/2d. , the goods of Susannah Castell , widow .

SUSANNAH CASTELL. I keep the Dolphin public-house, Old-street . On the 19th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in my tap-room - he asked if he might go into the yard - I intended to watch him, but a woman came for change, which took off my attention - the prisoner came in again, and as he had been a long time I made some inquiry - he was then gone, and these brushes were missing from a cupboard, which he would pass.

WILLIAM HART . I live at the Dolphin. I saw the prisoner near the wash-house - I went after him afterwards, and overtook him at the corner of Whitecross-street - I asked him to return, but he would not - I followed him as far as Kingsland watch-house - I then had him secured - he said he was sorry he did not go back - these plates were found on him.

WILLIAM JONES . I took the prisoner, and found all these things on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-147

900. SAMUEL BRINDELL was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN ROBERTS WALL . I am a potatoe-dealer , and live in King-street, Seven-dials - the prisoner was my porter , and had 6s. a week; he received money for goods, which he delivered - Eleanor Fisher was a customer of mine. I sent her, by him, one hundred weight of potatoes, which came to 3s. 6d., on the 27th of February - he should have given me the money directly he came home - he never came home, but absconded - I met him two days afterwards in Holborn, and secured him.

ELEANOR FISHER . I deal with Wall. On the 27th the prisoner brought me the potatoes - I paid him three shillings and a sixpence for his master.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-148

901. JOHN BILLING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 1 bag, value 4d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 purse, value 2d.; 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Frances Mackenzie , widow , from the person of William Mackenzie .

FRANCES MACKENZIE. I am a widow. On the 28th of March, about half-past three o'clock, I was in White Lion-street , with two of my children - my son William was carrying my bag containing 4s. 6d., a purse, and handkerchief - all on a sudden I heard him cry - I turned round, and he said a boy had taken his bag - I turned, and saw the prisoner running - I ran - a boy came up, and tried to stop me, but I ran, and called Stop thief! the prisoner was stopped without my losing sight of him - Randall gave me the bag.

WILLIAM RANDALL . I was in White Lion-street, and heard the alarm - I saw the prisoner throw this bag down; it was picked up, and given to Mrs. Mackenzie - I kept him in sight till he was stopped.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and threw the bag to some child.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-149

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

902. RICHARD DEANE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 6 half-crowns, 6 shillings, and 6 sixpences, the monies of Thomas Armstrong , from his person .

THOMAS ARMSTRONG. I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone. On Saturday, the 17th of March, I received my pay in Mary-le-bone; it was one sovereign, two half-crowns, and 2s. 8d. - I had in all 30s. 2d. - it was in my coat pocket - after changing the sovereign, and paying 2s. 31/2d. to Mr. Clark, I went into Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner and another soldier - I asked if they had seen any body selling shamrock - I went with them into the Delawar Arms public-house; I treated them with some porter - the pri

soner was not on the same seat as me - the other went out - the prisoner put his hand into my pocket, and took out all my money but 2s.; he went out instantly; I asked the girl if she had seen him; she said No; I went out, and could not see him; I found him at the barracks on the Monday following; I was quite sober, and am certain of his person; all the soldiers were turned out; I picked out the prisoner from eight or ten others when he was in custody for some military offence; I am certain of him.

Prisoner. Q. Was any one else at the tap-room? A. No.

BENJAMIN GILES . I am pay-serjeant of the 1st Company of Coldstreams. On the 18th of March, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my room, pulled out a quantity of silver in his hand, and said his sister had given it to him; he asked me to take care of some of it for him; I said he had better take care of it himself, but my wife took charge of four half-crowns - he called in three or four hours, and had them back; I heard of a robbery that day, and the prisoner did not attend the parade, but reported himself as sick; he came to the barracks; the prosecutor afterwards saw him among several others, and picked him out.

JANE MURPHY . I live at the Delawar Arms. The prosecutor came there with two soldiers; the prisoner was one of them; they were there some time drinking; the prosecutor did not tell me he had been robbed - I am sure of that - I did not see them go out; no alarm was given in the house - there was no other watchmen there.

Q. You told the Magistrate there were two watchmen? A. I did not know it.

T. ARMSTRONG. I asked this girl which way the soldiers went - she said she did not know; I had been drinking, but was sober enough to know what I did.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the house - two watchmen were there; he hit my comrade, who said he would knock him down; he called for half a gallon of beer - he fell down much intoxicated - his partner called a coach - I heard no more till about a week after when he came to the barracks - he said he did not know rightly which the man was - I was reported by Giles through a little spite and he said, "Is this the man?" he said he did not know'

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-150

903. MARIA RIVERS was indicted for stealing on the 15th of March , 1 purse, value 1d.; 1 shilling, and 18 halfpence, the property of George Pimley , from the person of Eleanor, his wife .

ELEANOR PIMLEY . I am the wife of George Pimley; I lodge at Pentonville. I went out on the morning of the 15th of March; when I returned my husband had some words with me. I then went out, and met the prisoner - I asked her for a lodging; she told me to go with her, and she would say I was her aunt; she went to a door and knocked - I went in and went to bed, and she came about one o'clock to sleep with me, and got into bed. I had not been asleep - I heard her moving, and said,"You have got my money;" she made no answer, but I heard two men in the next room talking to her, and I was afraid to say more; there had been 1s. 9d. and some duplicates in a purse in my pocket. I took the pocket out of her hand, and they were all gone - she said in the morning, it was a pity I had been robbed, and she would get up and make me a cup of tea - but she did not she got up and went into the next room to the two men and a woman, who were in bed there. I told her she had left me destitute of a farthing; I went out, and met her again in the evening, when I had her taken into custody. I had pawned a cloak about a quarter of an hour before I met her in the evening; I went to the pawnbroker's, and found she had taken it out, and pawned it again.

CHARLES PORTER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Bath, pawnbroker, Goswell-street. I have a cloak, pawned by the prisoner on Friday morning the 16th of March, for 3s. I had never seen her before.

E. PIMLEY re-examined. I had pawned this cloak at another pawnbroker's the night before for 2s. - one of the duplicates I lost related to it.

EDWARD BAYNES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the the corner of Whitecross-street - I asked her if she knew any thing about the woman's things - if she did, she had better give them up. The prosecutrix wished for her cloak above all things; she said she had pawned it at Mr. Fothergill's the night before, and that the duplicate was with ten others in the purse, with 1s. 9d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met her much intoxicated; she asked me for a lodging - and as she took out her money to pay for it she dropped this duplicate - I took it up; I went to bed afterwards, and found a gin bottle under the pillow; I told her in the morning I had picked up a ticket of a cloak, and if she would go with me I would give it to her

E. PIMLEY. I was quiet sober.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-151

904. JOHN PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 2 handkerchiefs, value 6s., the goods of John Augustus Holland , from his person .

JOHN AUGUSTUS HOLLAND. I was in Compton-street, Soho , on the 10th of March, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, and felt something pull at my left side coat pocket twice. I was with a female whom I knew very well - I turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; I let go of the person's arm, and followed the prisoner, who was close behind me - he threw it down, and ran into Moor-street, and again into Compton-street - I never lost sight of him, but caught him opposite the Globe, and said, "I have got you;" he said, "You shall not hold me;" two other persons were behind me. I inquired for a watchman - he said it was too soon for one - I dragged him over to a public-house, where he was detained. I lost two handkerchiefs from my pocket.

CORNELIUS KENNEDY . I am a watchman, and received him in charge - this handkerchief was brought to the watch-house the same night by a man (I believe a Bow-street officer) - Mr. Holland identified it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry and ran, but am innocent. I saw the person run down Stacey-street.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-152

905. ELEANOR TILLET was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 washing tub, value 3s. , the goods of Caroline Britten , widow .

The prosecutrix's name being Catherine, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18270405-153

906. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 24 brass rods, value 10s. , the goods of John Adamson .

HENRY SANDERS . I am porter to John Adamson, auctioneer, of Billeter-square. About eleven o'clock on the 12th of March I was at No. 6, Bedford-place , minding some goods which were for sale; there was an alarm that the stair rods were taken. I found the prisoner at Marlborough-street that day with them.

JOHN GREEN . I am beadle. I was on duty in Bloomsbury-square - I received information, and met the prisoner in Russell-street, with these rods under his coat - I had before that followed a man who was running, but lost him; he came down and met me - he shot into a passage, and threw the rods down behind the street door - I had seen them under his coat; I secured him as he came out, he said, "Good God, what caused me to do this?"(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 65.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-154

907. SAMUEL SIDDONS and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 1 shawl, value 10s. , the goods of Peter Jackson .

WILLIAM GOODDAY . I am a boot-closer; I lodge in a back parlour in Phoenix-street, Islington . I was in my room on the 23d of March, about a quarter past twelve o'clock; I heard a footstep in the front parlour - I went out, and saw Siddons running out, with the corner of this shawl hanging from under his coat - I looked out, and saw Brown take it from him at the top of the street, about sixty yards off. I followed them, crying Stop thief! but lost them; I am certain of them; I went with Jackson and found them together in Spafields - the shawl was afterwards found behind some bricks. I knew it to be Mrs. Jackson's by a mark on the corner which hung down.

ANN JACKSON . I am wife of Peter Jackson; we keep this house - my shawl was in the front parlour safe at twenty minutes before twelve o'clock; Goodday alarmed me- I went in, and missed the shawl; I saw two men running - it was an orange coloured shawl, with a blue border.

PETER JACKSON . I stopped the prisoners in Spafields about one o'clock - they both tried to escape. Brown got away, but was secured; I asked them to say where the shawl was, as I did not wish to loose time. Siddons offered me his silk handkerchief, and said he would go to the houses to see if he could find any of the chaps who pawned it, and would bring me the ticket, and leave me his handkerchief, if that would fetch money enough to get it out.

THOMAS MARKHAM . I was waiting in Spafields, and took Brown to Hatton-garden. Siddons was afterwards brought in.

SIDDONS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Four Months .

BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-155

908. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Bailey .

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a carpenter, and live at Hoxton. Between one and two o'clock on the 7th of March I saw the prisoner running across Old-street , about thirty yards from Bailey's house, with these shoes; I ran, and said,"What have you got you rascal?" he threw them down; I took them up, and secured him. He threw himself down, bit my legs, and got the shoes out of my hand, and threw them into the road again. I dragged him after them, took them up, and took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS BAILEY. These shoes are mine, and hung on a rack within the shop - I was out at the time.

SARAH BAILEY . I saw a boy dancing on the shutters in front of the shop - I went out to stop him, and heard a cry of Stop thief. I heard the rack fall, and the prisoner ran out.

THOMAS WALKER . I received him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270405-156

909. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 coat, value 12s., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Tickell .

MR. JOSEPH TICKELL. I am a brewer , and live in Old Castle-street, Whitechapel . On the 16th of March I missed a coat and waistcoat, but I had not seen them for some months - they were in a large trunk; the prisoner was an engineer in my employ - I had him apprehended, and he had the waistcoat on - I wore a buckle to it, but it had been cut off, and strings put to it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had he been in your employ? A. Nine years; I never knew any thing against him. I know he had been ill - I believe he has a family.

LEVY NATHAN . I bought this coat of the prisoner last October.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge - I received this coat; the prisoner said he bought it in Petticoat-lane; I asked him if one Britts was concerned in the robbery, he said, "No, I did it all myself."

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-157

910. JOHN RYALL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 2 saws, value 7s.; 2 planes, value 5s.; 1 guage, value 6d.; 1 square, value 1s., and 1 hammer, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Johnson .

THOMAS JOHNSON. I am a cabinet-maker , and live at Hoxton. On the 28th of February I was working in an unfinished house in Brick wood-place ; I fastened it up at one o'clock, and went to dinner - I left my tools there - when I returned and opened the door I saw the prisoner going out of the parlour, with these tools all packed up in his apron - he was a stranger. I took him into custody.

JOSEPH JENKINS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner with these tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very ill, and in great distress - he cannot swear to one of the saws, because it does not belong to him.

THOMAS JOHNSON . They are all mine except one, which was in my care.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-158

911. ANN NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 2 aprons, value 2s., and 1 pair of ear-rings, value 3s. , the goods of James Joyce .

LOUISA JOYCE . I am the wife of James Joyce; we live in Pancrass-street, Tottenham-court-road . The prisoner is my landlord's daughter, and lives in the lower part of the house. I missed the articles stated on the 8th of March, and asked her if she had entered my room again, as she had done once before in September - she said she had not - I got an officer; she then owned that she had got into the room with a false key, and taken the things, and pawned them at Mr. Wadmore's, except the ear-rings, which she had lost.

JOHN WRIGHT . I took up the prisoner; she said she had taken the shawl, and given it to Elizabeth Lomas to pawn for her.

ELIZABETH LOMAS . The prisoner gave me this shawl to pawn for her two or three days before she was taken up.

THOMAS SWINFEN THRESHER . I live with Mr. Wadmore, the pawnbroker. I produce these articles, but I did not take them in.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 10.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-159

912. JOHN MUSGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March . 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., and 1 shirt, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Holliday .

THOMAS HOLLIDAY. I am servant at the King's Arms public-house, at Green-bank - the prisoner lodged there, and slept with me. On the first week in March he said he was going to leave on the Saturday, and said he had done enough in London to hang him - he went away the next morning, about half-past eight o'clock - I went to clean myself about twelve, and my clothes were gone - he had slept in the same bed with me - my box was in that room - this was on the 11th of March - I had seen them safe on the 4th.

Prisoner. Q. Is your name Thomas Holliday? A. I believe so - I have always been brought up by that name - I never knew my father, but my mother goes by the name of Holliday.

EDWARD RUBERY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce these articles - the prisoner pawned them all with me at different times. I am certain of his person.

JAMES COLE . I took up the prisoner, and found these duplicates upon him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have taken them when I have been in need of money, and my prosecutor knew I did so- I have taken them in the week, and on the Saturday night I have put them back again, as I believe the pawnbroker can prove.

COURT to E. RUBERY. Q. Has he done so? A. Yes, he pawned them several times, and always came for them on a Saturday night, and paid me for them. I believe he would have done so this time if distress had not come upon him.

T. HOLLIDAY. I never knew that he took my things till the night he was taken up. I have lent him my coat to wear but not to pawn, and I have lent him money - he returned my coat again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-160

913. MARGARET MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 watch-key, value 14s., and 1 watch-chain, value 1s. , the goods of James Thomas Evans ; and EDWARD WYNNE was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute.

JAMES THOMAS EVANS. I was walking with Mr. Gold in St. Martin's-court, on Saturday, the 10th of March - the female prisoner and another overtook me - I went up Porto Bello-passage with them; they each took hold of one of my arms - the other person got away, and I missed my watch, chain, and key - the prisoner ran with me - I said I had lost my watch, and she had got it - she denied it; I gave charge of her; she was taken to the watch-house, but nothing was found on her. I saw my watch again on the Thursday following.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Gold here? A. No; he was not sober, and I suppose I was not exactly so; I could walk without any help - I was a little the worse for liquor. but able to take care of myself.

COURT. Q. Then you cannot swear that this prisoner took your watch? A. No; the other prisoner pawned it, but I know nothing against him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-161

914. JAMES KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 2 pairs of shoes, value 14s. , the goods of John Reeve and Henry Reeve .

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am shopman to John and Henry Reeve; they are shoemakers , and live in Leather-lane. On the 13th of March I was coming out of the kitchen into the shop, and saw the prisoner at the counter - I asked him his business; he gave me no answer, but turned round, and was going out. I asked him his business again; he gave me no answer, but ran out - I followed him to the corner of Portpool-lane, and there he dropped two pairs of shoes from under his coat; I took them up, and afterwards took him; I did not lose sight of him, but when he got to Crown-court he made his escape into a house - I got a man to stop at the door while I got a constable, and we went into the top-room; there was no furniture there; but there was a cupboard up high, and the constable found the prisoner in it - I can swear to this property.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a constable. Robinson came to me, and said a lad had taken something out of the shop. I went to an empty garret, and found the prisoner in a place which had been a window, but was used as a cupboard.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to play with some boys, and went there to hide myself. I know nothing of the shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-162

915. MICHAEL KENNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 3 waistcoats, value 6s.; and 1 sovereign , the property of William Norton .

WILLIAM NORTON. I am a bricklayer , and live in Great Ogle-street . The prisoner is my wife's son; he lodged in my house; I had left this property locked in my box on the 21st of February, and it was broken open at night - the

prisoner did not return that night - I apprehended him myself, the next day, in a public-house in Tothill-street, Westminster, he had one of my waistcoats on, and the other property I have found at different pawnbrokers - I have never found my money; there was 4s. 6d. found on him.

GEORGE WRIGHT . I am in the employ of Mr. Baylis, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of trousers pawned by the prisoner in the best of my knowledge, on the 21st of February.

GEORGE McLEOD NORMAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker. I have two waistcoats, pawned on the 21st of February by the prisoner.

JAMES GIBBS . I took the prisoner into custody. I found this waistcoat on him, also 4s. 6d. in money, and two duplicates, by which I found the property - he did not say how he came by the money.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-163

916. JOHN HOLSTEIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 14lbs. weight of pepper, value 14s.; 25lbs. weight of pearl-ashes, value 5s.; 9 weights, value 4s.; 1 ink-stand, value 6d.; and 1 tea-pot, value 1s. , the goods of John Pearce .

HENRY PEARCE . I am the son of John Pearce - he is a tallow-chandler , and lives at No. 13, Pump-row, Old-street . On the 27th of February these articles were taken out of his shop - I did not see the prisoner.

CHARLES KAY . I am a silver-smith, and live in Pump-row. On the evening of the 27th of February, about seven o'clock, I heard a rumbling in Mr. Pearce's house, which is next to mine, and had been left closed at 5 o'clock that afternoon; my wife had been out on an errand, and when she came home Henry Pearce was at the door; we inquired of him if he had been into the house, he said No- I then came out and looked through the key-hole, and saw four lads in the shop, scooping up pearl-ashes into bags - I knocked at the door, and then the light disappeared; I went to my own back yard, but there was no one there - they then went to the front of the house, and went back again and got into another house - I sent round to North-street, to tell the persons there, if they got into their back yards to stop them - I went into the house, and found a hole in the roof - we found they had got up there from the garret cieling to another house, and from thence into the street.

JOHN HOLFORD . I live in Featherstone-street - my father is a turner. On the 27th of February I saw four lads come out of No. 10, Pump-row; they had nothing with them - the prisoner was one of them.

RICHARD WELLS . I am a pump-maker, and live in Old-street-road. I was coming out of my own house, and saw the persons round the door of No. 13; I was informed some thieves had been in that house and got out at the top - I crossed the way to see if I could see them running along the gutters, and saw four boys run along the road by me, the prisoner was one, and I laid hold of him - I took him back to the crowd, and he was recognised as one of the boys who came from No. 10 - he said he was running after a coach.

JOHN VANN . I took the prisoner. Part of the property was found at the door, packed up ready for removal, and some was removed - I saw the property five minutes before eight o'clock.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270405-164

917. THOMAS FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 tray, value 10s. the goods of John Dean Faulkner .

JOHN DEAN FAULKNER. I am a salesman . I keep a shop in Titchfield-street, Marylebone . At half-past five o'clock on the 27th of February, a person came and gave me an alarm; I went out and saw two persons - I pursued the prisoner, and saw him throw down this tray; his companion got away from the person who gave me the information - I did not lose sight of the prisoner from the time he threw the tray down till he was taken, except when he turned a corner - he gave no account, but said he was sorry he had done it, and wished me to let him go - my son took the tray.

JOHN FAULKNER. I am the son of John Dean Faulkner. I took up this tray at the corner of Mary-le-bone-street, near Ogle-street, down which the prisoner turned; he was running at a pretty good pace - I was close to him.

THOMAS GOOK . I heard the cry of Stop thief! I followed, and met Faulkner bringing the prisoner back - he begged for forgiveness in the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. He stated at the office that the tray was outside his house.

PROSECUTOR. Yes, it was tied to the iron rail.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-165

918. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 6lbs. weight of beef, value 3s. , the goods of James Cowell .

JANE COWELL . I am the wife of James Cowell, a butcher , who lives in Clerkenwell . I saw a piece of beef safe in the shop on the evening of the 2d of March, about ten minutes before it was taken away - it was afterwards brought back by Bowden - I know it to be ours.

WILLIAM BOWDEN . I was told this chap had got a piece of beef carrying about the street, to sell - I knew him, and took the beef from under his arm - I said,"Where did you get this?" he said, "My mother sent me out to sell it;" I said, "Where does she live?" he said, "In Dove-court, Leather-lane;" I went there, and she said she did not send him to sell it; I then turned to him, and he said, "Pray forgive me this time - it was not me who took it - it was another person - I will show you where he took it from;" we went to Cowell's, and it was owned.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in Bath-street.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-166

919. JAMES CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 coat, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 9s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 snuff-box, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Badrick .

THOMAS BADRICK. I am in the employ of Mr. Cohen, an iron-merchant. On the 10th of February I lost this property from the stable, in Peacoack-yard - I had seen it safe at half-past nine o'clock on the Saturday night, and it was gone on the Sunday morning - the snuff-box was in my coat pocket; I saw some of them again on the 22d of March, at Union Hall. The prisoner was my fellow-servant.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a watchman, and live at Lambeth. On the night of the 14th of March I took up the prisoner - I found a pair of of pantaloons, quite wet, and a handkerchief in his hand.

SAMUEL SIDEBOTHAM . I was constable of the night on the 14th of March - I searched the prisoner, and found on him a snuff-box, 8s. 6d., and a knife - the watchman gave me these trousers.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-167

920. JANE COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of Henry Smith ; and 2 pewter pots, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Nunn .

HENRY SMITH. I keep the King's Arms public-house, John-street, Limehouse . I have lost seven dozens of pots since Christmas last - these two pots are mine; I was sent for, and saw them - I knew them - they have my name on them.

HENRY NUNN. I keep the Needle Makers' public-house, Limehouse . I lost two pewter pots, which Mr. Saul showed me on the 17th of March.

DAVID SAUL . I was going up Dagger-street on the 16th of March, and noticed the prisoner standing at the corner of Margaret-street - I saw two pots on the window of No. 7, with the name of Nunn on them; the prisoner passed me, and took up these two; I pursued her, and when I got near her she put one into her pocket and one into her basket; she threw the one she had in her pocket at my head; I caught it, and then took her to Mr. Nunn's - the other two were found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the pots - my shoe came untied, and I stooped, but did not take them up.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-168

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 7.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

921. JAMES TATE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 4 saws, value 15s.; 7 planes, value 15s.; 1 stock and 3 bits, value 2s.; 3 screw-drivers, value 1s.; 2 squares, value 1s.; 5 chisels, value 2s.; 2 bevils, value 6d.; 6 guages, value 1s.; 2 axes, value 2s.; 2 baskets, value 2s., and 1 oil-stone, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Dove .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-169

922. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 2 bottles, value 4s. , the goods of John Bowtell .

JOHN BOWTELL. I live in Castle-street, Long-acre , and deal in fixtures . On the 23d of March, about one o'clock, my son gave me information - I went out, and saw the prisoner with these two bottles under his apron - I believe he was in great distress.

JOHN BOWTELL , JUN. I saw the prisoner take these bottles from our house, and I told my father.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-170

923. JAMES BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 desk, value 14s. , the goods of Susanna Jupps .

JAMES HULL . I am a salesman, in the service of Susanna Jupps; she is a widow ; there was a desk put into my shop in Broad-street, Bloomsbury , for sale, which belonged to her. I saw it safe at seven o'clock on the 7th of March, and it was missing at eight.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where was this desk? A. It was partly on the threshold and partly on the step of the door.

JOHN JAMES WILLIE . I was in Broad-street, St. Giles on the 7th of March, about eight in the evening; I saw the prisoner and another young man in company near the shop; the other took down this desk from the door, and gave it to the prisoner, who was close to him, and saw him take it; he turned down Vine-street, and ran; I followed, crying Stop thief! he turned down Thornhaugh-street, and threw the desk at the watchman; I took it into a shop; I did not lose sight of the prisoner till he was in custody. I am certain of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it dark? A. Yes, rather so; but at the door the light shone in his face.

GRIFFITHS JONES . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner coming up to me with the desk; he threw it at me, and struck me on the forehead; I followed; he was stopped when I got up to him.

PHILIP RILEY . I am the beadle. I heard the cry of Stop thief! in George-street, and saw the prisoner running at full speed; I stopped him, and took him into a shop; the watchman came up, and said he was the man who threw the desk at him.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-171

924. SOPHIA ARTHUR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 shawl, value 5s. , the goods of John Veal .

BENJAMIN ARTIS . I am in the service of John Veal, a linen-draper , of Islington . I saw the prisoner in his shop on the evening of the 10th of March, about a quarter-past ten o'clock; she asked for two yards of muslin, at 31/2d. a yard, which I served her with; there was no other customer there; just before she came in I had put two shawls on the counter, and as soon as she was gone I missed one - I jumped over the counter, and pursued her about ten yards; she had the shawl under her arm - she said she took it under her arm, but did not mean to steal it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had she not a basket? A. No; she had some meat in her lap.

THOMAS GRAFTON . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with stealing this shawl.

THOMAS LOVETT . I am the watchman. I took this shawl from the shopman's hands, and took the prisoner to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-172

925. ELIZA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 1 piece of muslin, value 1d.; 28 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the property of James Carter , from his person .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES CARTER. I am a pig-jobber . I was in Smithfield on Monday last, and had about 29l. in sovereigns and half-sovereigns in my pocket; I met the prisoner about nine o'clock, she asked me for drink - I said I was going to the George public-house, and took her there; I have known her some years; I then went with her to No. 8, West-street ; I paid a woman 6d. for the room; that was not with the gold - she sat down; I took my purse out of my pocket, and put it into my hat, which was on the table; she jumped up, snatched my money out of the hat, and got clear off - I pursued, but she got clear off. I found her next morning at Bow-street. I was quite-sober - we had had some gin and bitters. Henley had been with me.

JAMES HENLEY . I had been with Carter, and saw him in West-street with the prisoner, about a quarter-past eight o'clock at night - we all went to the George public-house, had two quarterns of gin and bitters, and two pints of beer; he went out with her, returned in twenty minutes, and said she had robbed him of all his money; I went to Bow-street next morning, and saw her - I am certain of her person - he had told me the evening before, that he had so much money to make up, but I did not see it.

MICHAEL BOWEN . I am a watchman. About ten o'clock on Monday evening I apprehended the prisoner in Pickett-street, Temple-bar, on another charge - I found twenty-five sovereigns and two half-sovereigns, in a small piece of dirty muslin, in her stocking; she said she had it from her bl - y old uncle, and could get forty more if she wanted it - she afterwards said she had sold her mother's clothes, who was dead, and got that money for them.

WILLIAM INGRAM . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I saw her and another woman passing something under the table - she was searched, and the money found.

JOHN BEAN . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Pickett-street - the prisoner and another woman were taken on another charge; I saw her put something into her stocking, and this money was found on the top of her knee.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor - he pulled me about, and asked what I had in my bosom; I said some money, which I had to buy some things for Mr. Ross, who was going abroad.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-173

926. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 1 handkerchief, value 5s. , the goods of Ericus Waring .

ERICUS WARING. I live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. On the 3d of April, in the evening, I was in Milk-alley, Wardour-street ; I received information, and missed my handkerchief - it was produced in a few minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did you see the prisoner? A. Not till my handkerchief was produced; there was a crowd collected.

JOHN ALLEN . I saw Mr. Waring in Milk-alley, and the prisoner drawing his handkerchief out of his coat pocket - he rolled it up, put it under his coat, and ran down the alley; I pursued; he dropped it - Brown picked it up; I only lost sight of him in turning the corner - I secured him.

Cross-examined. Q. How was he dressed? A. In a long blue coat and top boots; he struck me when I took him; another man, who was a head, got away. I am certain the prisoner took the handkerchief; the other got out of the court before the prisoner dropped it - there was no crowd till after he was taken.

THOMAS BROWN . I was with Allen, and saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief from Mr. Waring's pocket - he put it under his coat, and dropped it as he ran - I took it up; I am certain of him. I did not see the other run till we were out of the court.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am an officer. Brown gave me the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-174

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

927. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Hull , from his person .

EDWARD HULL. I deal in pictures . On the 22d of February, between four and five o'clock, I was in Plumbtree-street , and felt something touch my pocket; I saw the prisoner behind me - I still went on, and soon afterwards missed my handkerchief - I turned, and missed the prisoner; a person, who had been with him, passed me at the time; I turned back, and saw the prisoner standing at a shop door - I said I believed he had picked my pocket; the shop-keeper took hold of him; he then took my handkerchief from under his coat, and put it on the counter.

PHILIP RILEY . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner with the handkerchief, which laid on the counter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). I picked it up in the street, where I supposed it had been lost or dropped. I have neither father nor mother, and have been dependant on my uncle and aunt.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270405-175

Before Mr. Recorder.

928. SARAH GATES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 1 gold pin, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Lodge , from his person .

JOSEPH LODGE. I am a servant out of place. On the

2d of April I was in Pickett-street, Temple-bar - the prisoner came up against me; I do not know whether she said any thing to me; she was with another girl; I did not speak to either of them at that time - I was going home at a quick pace - I saw the prisoner's hand go to my handkerchief, in which this pin was; I pulled off my glove and felt, and it was gone; I instantly laid hold of the prisoner, and took it out of her mouth; I was satisfied, and was going away, but I dropped my glove - the watchman called me back to fetch my glove - he asked what had happened, and he fetched them both back - they were taken to the watch-house.

MICHAEL BOWEN . I am a watchman. I saw Lodge scuffling with the prisoner about ten o'clock at night; I came up and parted them; he was going on, but dropped his glove; another watchman called him back to take it; he then said she had taken the pin; I went after her, and she was taken with another woman - she was very abusive.

WILLIAM INGRAM . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with Eliza Smith(See page 533) - she did not deny it, but was abusive.

JOHN BEAN . I am a watchman, and saw the prosecutor take the pin from the prisoner's mouth.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me to walk with him; he said he had no money, but would give me the pin - he would have it again, as I would not act as he wished; he took it from my mouth, and I called him names.

J. LODGE. I was not going with her; I believe I did not speak to her.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-176

929. ANN FRANCES BLUNDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 2 sheets, value 8s.; I pillow, value 2s., and 1 pillow-case, value 6d., the goods of Richard Payne , in a lodging-room, in his dwelling-house .

SUSANNAH PAYNE . I am the wife of Richard Payne - we live in Little Guildford-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . The prisoner took our first floor back room, furnished, at 4s. a week, on the 13th of February, as a married woman, but her husband never came; she left on the 20th, and took the key - I had told her to go as soon as she could suit herself. On Wednesday morning I had the lock forced, and missed all these articles; she was taken on the Thursday following, and said it was through distress.

WILLIAM TOMLINSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wilmott-street, Brunswick-square. I have two sheets, a pillow, and case, pawned at different times, in the name of F. Blundell, by the prisoner - she often pawned articles one day, and redecmed them the next; I believe she was in distress.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found duplicates of the property on her, and 18d., which she had received at the work-house that day.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-177

930. CHRISTOPHER HIGGINS and THOMAS HEWETT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 18cwt, of lead, value 10l., the goods of George Bedford and others, and fixed to a dwelling-house of theirs .

GEORGE BEDFORD. I live in Bedford-row. I am joint owner of a dwelling-house at Acton , which was unoccupied.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the 10th of March, about a quarter past seven o'clock in the morning, I stood at Tyburn-gate, and a cart drawn by two horses came up the Uxbridge-road - the prisoners were with it, and another person was about twenty yards behind. Hewett led the first horse, which was blind; Higgins drove the other; Hewett stopped to pay the toll, and went on - the third person came up and objected to the toll; the load appeared heavy, and was covered with straw and hay very closely - I suspected something, and followed the cart a quarter of a mile down Oxford-street, opposite to Mary-le-bone watch-house - I then went up, and said to Higgins,"If it is a fair question, what have you in that cart?" he said, "I don't know how many cwt. I have got;" I said,"I asked what it was;" he said lead. I produced my staff, said I was an officer, and considered myself right in stopping them - the horses were stopped. I pulled up the cover, and saw it was lead; the third man turned down a street, and got away - "Thomas Minter, Hammersmith," was painted on the cart in white paint; there was 18 cwt. of lead - I asked Higgins where he brought it from - he said from Hammersmith, but he had come the Acton road; Hewett was by, and I suppose heard this. I asked who he bought it from; he mentioned a name, which I have forgotten - he said the man bought old iron, rags, and such things - I said, "I suppose he employed you to move it;" he said, "No, we were sent by our master, whose name is on the cart." Minter was taken at Hammersmith, but discharged - he keeps a horse and cart, and carries turf for sale; he was not the man behind the cart - it was a lad, about eighteen years old. Higgins said they set off about a quarter past five o'clock - they were nearly four miles from Acton; he said he was taking it to the bottom of the Haymarket. I said, "You have come two miles out of your way, and have come a very hilly road." I took the prisoners into the office - I went to them again, and told them I had forgotten who they said they had it from. Higgins then said, "I know nothing at all about it." I went to Acton on the Wednesday following, and found this house which had been robbed of a quantity of lead; and appeared to be fresh cut. I have brought some pieces, which corresponds with that in the cart.

GEORGE WILMOTT . I am a plumber, and live in Seymour-place. I went to Acton with Webster - the house appeared to have two tons of lead taken from it. I have no doubt but that in the cart was part of it - the damage done to the house exceeds 200l.

JAMES GARDNER . I am a cow-keeper. I was over the roof of this house the Saturday before the prisoners were stopped - it was then quite safe - one of the prisoners lives at Turnham-green, and the other at Hammersmith.

HIGGINS Defence. I went to ask Minter to lend me his cart to fetch a load of mould - he said he could not till Saturday; I then got it, and met a man, who asked if I could take a load of goods to the Haymarket, and he would give me 20s. I went to Shepherd's-bush for the load, and it was this lead - he gave me money for the toll, and said he would meet me at the bottom of the Haymarket.

HEWETT'S Defence. Higgins asked me to go and help him with a load of mould - a man came and asked him to take some goods.

THOMAS MINTER . I am a carman, and live at Hammersmith. This cart belongs to me - Higgins came and asked for it on Thursday night to fetch a load of mould - and he had it on Saturday - he did not say who the mould was for - I never lent it to him before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-178

Before Mr. Sergant Arabin.

931. ELIZABETH MAYHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 2 shirts, value 8s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., the goods of the Rev. Oliver Lodge , clerk , her master .

REV. OLIVER LODGE. I keep a school in Russell-square . The prisoner was my servant for about twelve months - I missed property from time to time, and she absconded on the 20th of March. I never gave her leave to pawn things.

JOSEPH KING . I am shopman to Mr. Loundes, pawnbroker, Tottenham-court-road. I have two shirts, and a pair of stockings, pawned by the prisoner on the 9th of August, and the 1st of July. I am not certain of her person.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-179

932. JOSEPH INWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 16 pair of shoes, value 5l., and 7 pairs of boots, value 7l. , the goods of Thomas Miller and others, his masters.

THOMAS MILLER. I have two partners; we are boot and shoemakers , and live in King-street, St. James. The prisoner was our porter for twelve months - I received information, and applied at thirteen pawnbrokers, some of whom returned property.

THOMAS PILCHARD . I am shopman to Mr. Boones, pawnbroker, of Paddington-street. I have two pairs of shoes which the prisoner pawned.

THOMAS DONDERS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street. I have a pair of shoes pawned on the 6th of February, in the name of John Thomas - I have seen the prisoner, but will not he certain of him.

CHARLES POORE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brewer-street. I have two pairs of boots pawned by the prisoner on the 29th of January.

GEORGE WALKER . I am shopman to Mr. Young, pawnbroker, St. Martin's-lane. I have a pair of boots pawned on the 4th of June - I believe by the prisoner.

EDWARD STORR . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of boots pawned by the prisoner I believe - he used our shop.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I have ten pairs of shoes and five pairs of boots, which I got from different pawnbrokers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-180

933. REBECCA BAXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s.; 1 pair of boots, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 6d., and 1 box, value 1s. , the goods of Humphrey Trickey .

ELIZABETH TRICKEY . I am the wife of Humphrey Trickey; he has broken a blood vessel, and has been ill for years. The prisoner was employed as a nurse in my family for four months while I was ill - I sent her out for a loaf, and she never returned - I then missed the articles stated, from the cupboard, where the tea things are kept. She was recommended to me by my nurse. I was not able to go out myself.

WILLIAM READ . I heard of the robbery, and met the prisoner on the Sunday night after she left - I took this pair of boots off her feet - I found a pair of shoes in her bundle, with the duplicate of a flannel waistcoat, which the pawnbroker gave up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270405-181

934. JOSEPH PEGRUM, alias WILLIAM LAWRENCE , and JOSEPH UNCLE were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 200 yards of printed cotton, value 12l., and 10 pairs stockings, value 10s. , the goods of William King .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM KING. I live in Hare-street, Hertford . I am a publican , and have also a linen-drapery shop opposite my house. On the 26th of February the shop was secure, and next morning I found a hole broken in the wall of a neighbour's premises - my shop had been entered and these prints taken off a shelf - they had taken as many as they could reach from the hole - I knew Lawrence, he lived in the neighbourhood till he was about eighteen years old.

WREN KING . I am the prosecutor's son - I secured the shop door on the night of the 26th of February, and next morning missed this property.

DANIEL CORBY . I am a labourer, and live at Hormead. On the 6th of March I met the prisoners at Ponder's-end Middlesex - as I passed them Lawrence said, "I think you know me;" I said I did; he said, "Well, we will have a pot of beer;" we went into the Goat public-house, and had a pot of beer - I drank once, but told them I had no money; I saw a piece of print in Lawrence's pocket - he said, "For God's sake, don't you say you saw me; if you should get to Hare-street" - I afterwards heard King had been robbed, and gave information - before we went to the public-house I saw Lawrence shew the print to a woman; I do not know what he said to her, or what she took away, as I was at some distance - Uncle was close by at the time - there appeared about fifteen yards of print.

LEVY COXALL . I live about five miles from Hare-street. On the 27th of February, a little before four o'clock in the morning, I came through Hare-street, and about a mile from there I saw a man with a bundle - I cannot say who he was; he told me his name was Lawrence.

SUSAN WHEELER . I am the daughter of John Wheeler , and live at Tanner's-end, Edmonton. I know Lawrence, and I knew Uncle by the name of Joe. On the 5th of March Lawrence brought a bundle to our house, and asked if he might leave it there; I said Yes; Joe was not with him then - he called for it in about two hours, and took some pieces of print out, and gave me - he then took the bundle away - I took the print to Mrs. Wheeler, who lives next door - the officers took the same prints from them.

SARAH WHEELER . I live next door to Wheeler - she gave me some prints to see if I could cut her out a gown, and her sister a frock - the officers came on Saturday to search her father's house - they said they wanted prints, and I delivered them what she gave me.

STEPHEN MARKWELL . I am a labourer, and live at Enfield. On the 6th of March I went into the Nag's Head public-house - Lawrence was there - he asked me to drink, and then asked if I would walk with him across Edmonton fields; we went near Edmonton church, and met Uncle with a bundle - they had some conversation, which I did not hear. We had some more beer, and crossed the fields towards Enfield - Uncle opened his bundle in the field, and took out a large piece of print, but we saw Camp the constable coming along, and they put it up again and went on. I had a basket on my shoulder - they asked me to put the bundle into it, which I did. When we came near Enfield town they took the bundle out - we went into the Rising Sun public-house, and had some beer. Camp came in and said, "What is in that bundle?" Uncle said"A piece of cloth;" Camp untied it, and said, "This is print;" Uncle said, "I meant print;" we were all taken into custody. I heard Lawrence say at the watch-house, that if he was asked where he got the bundle, he should say an Irishman gave it them to carry; and he said, "If Mr. King comes down I shall be done;" but they should say an Irishman met them at Eofield highway, and said, "How does trade go?" and he would say, "Very badly;" and he said, "If you will carry this I will pay you." I saw Uncle pull his stocking down, and take out two duplicates from there, and put them under a piece of paper at the bottom of his hat.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable of Edmonton. I met the prisoners in Edmonton fields - I saw them open the bundle - I followed them to the public-house, and took it from them - I afterwards went to Wheeler's, and got this print.

JOHN MEAD . I was with Camp - I found two duplicates in the crown of Uncle's hat, one is for sixteen yards of print pawned at Islington - I saw it, and it is the same pattern as that found at Wheeler's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PEGRUM'S Defence. I saw Wheeler, but gave her nothing - I had no bundle - I only spoke to her brother.

UNCLE'S Defence. I bought the few pieces of print at Islington, of a Jew pedlar.

PEGRUM - GUILTY . Aged 31.

UNCLE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-182

935. RICHARD ALLBERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 5 prints, value 2s. 6d., and 31 sheets of paper, value 2s. , the goods of William Frederick Cloutt , his master.

WILLIAM FREDERICK CLOUTT. I am a bookbinder , and live in Peter-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner was my apprentice - I missed property at different times, and on Sunday morning, the 1st of April, I went up stairs before he went out, and saw a paper sticking out of the coat pocket which he was going to put on. I took it out, and found it was a print of Ely chapel, which I missed from a book I had to bind; I thought he might have taken it to shew his father, who lives near Ely chapel - I said nothing till he returned - it was not put back as I expected - and on Tuesday I got an officer. I took up the book and said, "Richard, I suppose you know what I want?" he said No; I said, "The print of Ely chapel;" he said,"It is not there - I took it, and beg pardon" - that it was a print he thought he should like; he said he had not got the key of his box; the officer said he must break it open - he then produced the key, and said, "Now I am a lost lad;" we then went to his mother's, and he gave us the key of a box there, in which we found the print of Ely chapel, and in another box some paper and plates; he said he meant to have formed a book for his own amusement with them; he was three years and a half with me; I had half the premium from the parish, when he was bound.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not some quarrels with him? A. Yes - I have struck him, and called him names; we were at Clerkenwell together; I believe his father goes to Ely chapel.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer, and found some prints, which the prosecutor said he could identify; and several which he could not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-183

936. WILLIAM SEACOMBE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 2 seals, value 30s., and 1 ring, value 5s., the goods of Arthur Jones , from his person .

ARTHUR JONES. I am a gentleman . On the 22d of February, between 2 and 3 o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Goswell-street - I had my watch ring twisted over the bottom button of my waistcoat; the watch was in my fob-the prisoner came round on my left side, turned round close to my arm, looked in my face, took hold of my two seals, and pulled them up; the watch would not come up, he screwed the seals off and ran away; I gave an alarm, pursued a man, and took him within fifteen yards; I never lost sight of him; another person came up and took hold of him, and said "I swear I saw you attempt to rob this gentleman" - I was afraid, as I thought some suspicious characters were with me - I begged the man to take him round into a house; he took him into a coal-shed; nobody would fetch a constable, but they said, if I would go, they would mind him - I went to three places and could not get one, and while I was inquiring a lad came up, and said the prisoner had escaped - I had a good opportunity of seeing him - I did not see him again till last Monday - I am sure he is the person - I knew him at Worship-street - I have not found my seals.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you swear positively to him at Worship-street? A. I said I believed, to the best of my knowledge, he was the person - I did not say he was like the man.

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I am servant to Mr. Whitbread. I was going down Goswell-street, and saw the prisoner whip round this gentleman take his seals, and run up a court; a gentleman came down the court and caught him - I went in and took him - he wanted to go to a public-house; I took him to a coal-shed, and asked a person to hold him while I moved my horses nearer to the curb - that man took him out to go to a public-house, and he ran away - he had gaiters on.

RICHARD DADDS . I live at this coal-shed. The prisoner is the man who was brought in there.

JOHN VANN . I apprehended the prisoner from information - he was put among a dozen persons, and the prosecutor pointed him out.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270405-184

937. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 muff, value 4s. , the goods of Sarah Winter , widow .

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol. On the 1st of March I took this muff from the prisoner at the end of Berwick-street, as he was offering it for sale; it was folded in a blanket; I asked where he got it - he said the blanket was his master's, but he got the muff from a lady in Edgware-road.

WILLIAM WINTER . I am the son of Sarah Winter, widow, of Edgware-road . I saw the prisoner at our house - Mr. Nash, his master, sent him there, with some furniture in a blanket - he went into the room where this muff was; I opened the door to him. I know the muff to be my aunt's, but it was in my mother's care.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MASH . I sent the prisoner with a pair of bedsteps to this house, in this blaket; as he returned I saw him with the officer - the muff was in the blanket.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18270405-185

938. JOHN FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 7 live tame fowls, price 15s. , the property of Joseph Beacroft .

ELIZABETH BEACROFT . I am the wife of Joseph Beacroft - we live in Princes-street, Islington . On the 20th of March I missed eight fowls from our yard - I found five of them afterwards, and then three more were sent, two of which were mine. The prisoner lived at a public-house opposite some time ago.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I found these fowls at Seaborn's.

ANN SEABORN . I live in Maiden-lane, Battle-bridge. On Wednesday three weeks I bought eight fowls of the prisoner, whom I knew, for 10s. I afterwards heard of the robbery, and sent for the officer.(Heads produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man at a quarter to six o'clock in the morning, selling them - I gave him 9s. for them.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270405-186

939. SARAH GRAYSTOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 2 baskets, value 8d.; 1 jug, value 3d.; 1 cap, value 2d.; 3 spoons, value 3s.; 1 knife and fork, value 1d., and 1 poker, value 1s. , the goods of Samuel Rayner .

ANN RAYNER . I am the wife of Samuel Rayner, and lived at Camden-town. The prisoner was my char-woman - I missed several things, and took an officer to her apartment, where I found all these things except a spoon.

ABRAHAM LORIMER . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodging; the prosecutrix pointed out the things- the prisoner said none of them were hers, for she bought the poker in Hampstead-road; I brought her to town, and she pointed out a shop; I took her in, and they said she had not bought it there.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I live with Mr. Wadmore, a pawnbroker, of Tottenham-court-road; this spoon was pawned in the name of Twister - I do not know who by.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had taken the things home with broken victuals.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-187

939. CHARLES MOORE and SAMUEL MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 1 basket, value 1s. 4d., and 2 live tame pigeons, price 5s. , the property of Philip Castang .

ROBERT NEWMARSH . I live with Mr. Castang, in the City-road - he deals in live fowls . On the 21 of April, between two and three o'clock, I saw a young man in Old-street in a blue coat, with a basket and two pigeons - I knew the basket to be my master's; I had left it at home when I went out - the prisoners were with that man - they were all walking together, about one hundred yards from my master's; I followed them through a court, and at the end of the court I saw Charles Moore take the pigeons out of the basket, and put them into his pocket: Samuel was close to him - they then all ran over to the Duke of Gloucester public-house; the prisoners went in there, and the other man went away with the basket. I fetched an officer, but when I returned they were gone - the officer took them that night, and I knew them to be the men. I knew Charles Moore before.

RICHARD BURT . I live in this neighbourhood. I stood at the end of James-court, and saw three young men come down the court with two pigeons in a basket - Charles was one of them - I knew him before; they were two or three hundred yards from Mr. Castang's; a young man in a long blue coat carried them.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. Newmarsh fetched me, and said Charles Moore had stolen two pigeons; I went to the Duke of Gloucester again about seven o'clock in the evening, and found both the prisoners.

PHILIP CASTANG . I keep this shop. I had three pigeons at my door between two and three o'clock - I heard an alarm, and missed a basket with two pigeons.

CHARLES MOORE's Defence. I saw the officer in the house, and went to see what was the matter - if I had been guilty I should not have gone there.

SAMUEL MOORE's Defence (written.) Early on Monday morning, the 2d of April, I was called to see my mother, who was dying; she wished to see my brother Charles; I, of course, went out, and at last found him at the Royal Oak public-house, and also Joseph Palmer - we remained there till three o'clock in the afternoon; we all left there, with an intention of coming home - we called in at the Duke of Gloucester, and whilst sitting there the officer came in, and called out my brother Charles; I followed, to see what was the matter, and he took me also.

JOSEPH PALMER . I am a journey man silk-dresser. On Monday, the 2d of April, Samuel Moore called on me; I went with him to the Royal Oak, Pitfield-street, Hoxton,

and staid till three o'clock; I first saw him just before two - he called on me at Mr. Stanbridge's. I saw Charles at the Royal Oak; they left at three, leaving me there - I was in their company the whole hour.

Q. What makes you so particular about the hour? A. I afterwards heard this robbery was at half-past two o'clock; I do not know where Castang lives; nobody is here from the Royal Oak - it is two or three hundred yards from the City-road. Sam's wife fetched me to Worship-street, in case I should be wanted; I heard of them being in custody about pigeons; they bore a good character; I never heard of their being in custody before.

Semuel Moore received a good character.

C. MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

S. MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-188

941. JOHN MOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 2 baskets, value 4s., and 10 loaves of bread, value 7s. 8d. , the goods of William Weatherstone .

WILLIAM MURRAY . I am servant to William Weatherstone, a baker , of Pitfield-street, Hoxton. On the 2d of April I left my baskets in the City-road , returned in about a minute, and they were gone; I saw the prisoner in Windmill-street, with one basket on his head, and the other on his arm - they contained ten loaves of bread.

GEORGE ROBINSON . I am a mason. I saw the prisoner going away with the baskets.

DAVID McCRAY . I am an officer, and took him with these baskets.(Baskets produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-189

942. JAMES PRITCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Richard Fitchelt .

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. On the 19th of March, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I went to the Vine public-house, and while there the prisoner and another person entered the door, but directly they saw me they rushed out; I pursued - the prisoner turned into a dark door-way; I took hold of him, and he dropped this coat, in a bundle, at my feet.

RICHARD FITCHELT. I am a tailor , and live in Hand-court, Holborn . On the 19th of March, at a quarter-past twelve o'clock, I missed this coat, which hung in my shop, on a line, with several more. I had not seen the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have a pint of beer - a man came and asked me to pawn the coat for 30s.; I could not get so much; I was going along, and the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-190

943 THOMAS PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 drinking glass, value 18d. , the goods of William Kilpatric .

ELEANOR KILPATRIC . I am the wife of William Kilpatric - we keep a public-house in Queen-street, Seven-dials . The prisoner came in, and had half a pint of beer - I went to the bar; he said, "Take the chill off," which I did - I then looked into the bar, and missed a rummer - I took his beer into the tap-room; he went out - I followed, and said, "You have robbed me of a rummer," and he pulled it out of his pocket; I had splashed it with some pea-soup, which is on it now.

Prisoner. I said I had got a glass, but it was not hers - I brought it from my own house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-191

944. CHARLES ROOTSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 1 tea-kettle, value 15s. , the goods of Henry Selwood .

RICHARD PROCTOR . I am a butcher, and live next door to Selwood. On the 21st of March I stood at my door, and saw a man come out of his house with a tea-kettle - I went in, and alarmed them.

JOB RENDELL . I am servant to Henry Selwood. - Proctor called me - I ran. and overtook the prisoner - he dropped this kettle, and ran away. I took it up, and secured him - it was taken from the window.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going into the shop to ask for a situation; a man asked me to carry the kettle; I saw this witness coming after me, and threw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-192

945. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 umbrella, value 18d. , the goods of John Lacy .

JOHN LACY. I am a cotton-spinner , and live in Tottenham-court-road . We missed several umbrellas; I watched to see who took them; I saw the prisoner come out of the house, and shut the door; I ran after him, into the Orange Tree public-house, and took him with this umbrella, which is mine; he lodged at my father's, and was out of work.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-194

946. SAMUEL SYKES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 pail, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Savage .

BENJAMIN KETT . I live in Mitchell-street. I saw the prisoner and three others in Helmet-town, near Mr. Savage's house; the prisoner and another had hold of a pail; he was afterwards taken - I did not see him take it.

JOHN TWEEDY . I went to Noble-street with Kett, who pointed the prisoner out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-195

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

947. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 gown, value 9s., and 1 gown piece, value 8s. , the goods of Mary Richardson , spinster .

MARY RICHARDSON. I am single, and live in Parsley-court, Islington ; these things were in my box in a room on the first floor - I had locked the box on the morning of the 21st of February, and four days afterwards missed them; the prisoner lodged in the house, and I accused him of it, and told him I should find it out if he did not

tell me - he then threw the duplicate at me; I shewed my box to the officer.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 23d of February the prisoner pawned this gown.

GEORGE STOWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Drew, a pawnbroker; this gown piece was pawned on the 21st of February by the prisoner.

GEORGE GREENING . I am an officer. I found a key on the prisoner which opens the prosecutrix's box.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-196

948. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of Alexander Cowan .

ALEXANDER COWAN. I am a salesman , and live in Clerkenwell . This pair of boots hung on a line at my window - I was in the parlour, and saw two lads come up to the door - one of them spoke to my daughter, while the prisoner, with a pair of scissars, cut these boots down - I ran out, and saw the prisoner stopped - he dropped them.

JONATHAN THWAITES . I was coming up Aylesbury-street, and saw the prisoner take these boots; I ran and saw him drop them - I am certain of him.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A lad ran by me and dropped them - I had no scissars.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-197

949. JOHN CHARLTON was indicted for that he, on the 4th of March , feloniously did rip and cut 50 lbs. of lead, belonging to the overseers of the poor of St. Sepulchre , and fixed to a certain building, being the work-house and poor-house of the said parish, with intent to steal the same, against the statute .

2d COUNT, the same, only stating the lead to belong to, and to be fixed to a dwelling-house, belonging to Peter Dunkley and others.

3d COUNT, stating the lead to be fixed to a building.

JOHN FORBES . I live in St. John-street, and am a constable. On the night of the 6th of March, a little before seven o'clock, I was sent for, and went on the roof of St. Sepulchre's work-house with Mr. Palmer, and saw about twelve feet of lead still remaining there - I was sent for again, and was told by Mr. Palmer that there were thieves on the top of the house; I looked, and saw the prisoner there, stripping off the lead; I said, "Halloo, Jack, is that you?" he said Yes - I said, "Don't you offer to run, for I have placed a patrol to stop you;" he said, "No. I shall give myself up now; I suppose I must go - I suppose I shall have seven years for it." I then went up on the roof, and took him; Mr. Palmer got a ladder, and we got the prisoner down; there had been three rows of bricks on one side of the lead - they were taken up, and placed on the tiles of a shed; the lead was pulled up, but not cut off - the tiles were pulled up on one side, and the bricks on the other; the lead was not separated, only ripped up; I did not see that any part of it was gone; a little hammering would have put it down as it was before.

JAMES PALMER . I am master of St. Sepulchre's workhouse. On the night of the 6th of March I was on the roof; I had given notice to the patrol to be on the alert - I had lost twenty-three feet of lead from there the night before - I met the prisoner that night about twenty minutes before eight o'clock, going to the work-house - I went on the roof a few minutes afterwards, and found the bricks taken off, and the lead raised up - I think nine or ten of the tiles were taken away - one end of the lead was turned up, and there was a cut in it, as if it was began to be cut - I saw the prisoner there, and heard him say, "I know I shall have seven pennyworth, I ought to have had it last time." There are some sloping sheds, by which he could get on the roof - I saw him ripping the lead.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up to get my hat which was thrown on the tiles - two men came there, and I laid down.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-198

950. DAVID BRANDON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 16lbs. of lead, value 3s., the goods of William Ireson , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, calling it a building.

WILLIAM IRESON. I am owner of a house in Silver-street, Stepney . The leaden gutter was safe on the 17th- I missed it on the 19th, in the morning, at seven o'clock- the tiles had been moved - part of the lead has been found, and corresponds with the nail holes.

THOMAS ALMOND . On the 18th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening. I stopped the prisoner in Brick-lane, with three pieces of lead in a handkerchief, and two pieces in his trousers - I took him to the watch-house, and on Monday matched it with this gutter; the nail-holes fitted exactly - he said a man had given it him to carry at the end of Brown's-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Brick-lane, who gave it me to carry to Long-alley for 1s.; he went away when I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-199

951. ELIZABETH COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 15 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and one 5l. Bank note, the property of John Williams , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAMS. I am a sailor . I met the prisoner in Ratcliff-highway on the 16th of March, and gave her some gin - I went home with her, and another girl, with a shipmate - I went up-stairs with the prisoner - I had fifteen sovereigns and a half in one waistcoat pocket, and a 5l. note in the other - I was on the bed, but kept every thing on but my shoes - I fell asleep, and awoke in about two hours - she was then gone - I went to sleep again, and when I awoke she was at my side - I then missed my money and said, "You have robbed me, and if you don't give it me I will have it out of you somehow;" she said she had got up and been and bought a pair of boots - I found nothing but a few halfpence in a corner of her shawl; the landlady came up, and I said she or the prisoner had robbed me - both denied it. I gave the prisoner in charge - I had been drinking, but I knew what I was about.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, but nothing found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. While he was asleep I went to the shoemaker's, but did not rob him; he gave me 2s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-200

952. GEORGE HANNAM was indicted for stealing' on the 28th of February , 1 purse, value 2d.; 2 sovereigns, and 14 shillings, the property of Jane Hunt , spinster , from her person .

JANE HUNT. I am single. On the 28th of February I was on Tower-hill , and went into a show - the prisoner was standing near me in the show - I had my purse and handkerchief in a basket, which I gave to my little girl,(who is five years old) to hold while I tied my patten - I saw the prisoner put his hand into the basket; he took out the purse, and threw the basket at me, saying he had seen enough - he was followed, but got away; he was taken in about a fortnight.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did you see him in the lock-up-place? A. Yes; I did not mistake a young man for him, or hesitate about him - he was not pointed out to me.

ROBERT DAVIS . I apprehended the prisoner, but found nothing on him.

Mr. ALLEY called -

WILLIAM VENNER . I am a labourer at the London-docks - I have known the prisoner some time. On the 24th of February I was with him at the Frying Pan, public-house, in Brick-lane, from half-past eleven till after four o'clock, playing at skittles - his brother was there also - I am certain he was there all that time - it was on a Saturday.

J. HUNT re-examined. It happened on a Saturday; the last day of February - I am sure it was on a Saturday - I live in Allhallows-lane.

WILLIAM RADFORD . I saw the prisoner at the Frying Pan in Brick-lane, on the 24th of February; I was there from one to five o'clock, he was there nearly all the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-201

953. LAZARUS JACOBS and DAVID MOSES were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 purse, value 5s.; 1 crown, 3 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 4 halfpence, the property of Rebecca Bland , from her person .

REBECCA BLAND. I am single . On the 10th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Whitechapel , and lost my purse, containing one crown, three shillings, a sixpence, and twopence; it was in my basket. I was standing still, and received a blow on my back, and before I could turn, another person rushed by me, and nearly pushed me down - I saw Moses running away; Jacobs seemed to be mixing with the people, and walking fast - the people gathered round and told me I was robbed - and I missed my purse; I have not found it. I am sure they are the same persons who had made a similar attempt on me about three-quarters of an hour before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure they are the same men? A. I am, for one of them struck me the first time in Whitechapel, and the other lifted up the lid of my basket. I did not see them the second time till I saw Moses running away - I suppose Moses is the one who took the purse. I have said I could not identify the man who robbed me, and I repeat it, for I did not see it done.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 10th of March I was with Hackwell in Whitechapel, and saw the prisoners together near Petticoat-lane. I kept them in sight for about twenty minutes, and saw the prosecutrix come out of a cheesemonger's-shop - we had followed the prisoners to that shop. Moses stood in front of the shop, and Jacobs up a little court - they joined, and followed her to the corner of a street - Moses let his apron down; Jacobs struck her on the back; Moses put his hand into the basket, took something out, and ran off. I pursued and took him, but found nothing on him - Hackwell took Jacobs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Moses run into the road? A. Between the curb and kennel; he might run about one hundred and fifty yards. I did not lose sight of him.

JAMES HACKWELL . I was with Keys, and saw Moses' hand in the basket; I saw him run away - Jacobs was close to the prosecutrix's back, but did not see the blow - she staggered, and Jacobs run among the crowd, but I took him. I had watched them for twenty minutes - I had not seen the prosecutrix before.

JACOBS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MOSES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-202

954. JAMES LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 cap, value 2s., the goods of Richard Barklamb , from the person of Richard Barklamb , the younger .

RICHARD BARKLAMB. I live in Robert-street, Hoxton. On the 9th of March I sent my son to school, with his cap on - he is four years old. I went out, and did not return the till evening.

ROBERT HILL . I was coming home to tea at a quarter past six o'clock on the evening of the 9th of March, and saw some children at play behind Hoxton chapel - I saw the prisoner running from them - I heard a cry that he had got a cap - I pursued him, and saw him drop this cap, which I took up, and secured him. I saw Barklamb's boy without a cap.

JOHN CLINTON . I was in Robert-street, and saw Hill with the prisoner - Hill was ill used, and struck by the people who were about - I went up, and took him to the office with the cap, which the boy's mother gave me.

JAMES BROWN . I took him into custody with the cap, which the prosecutor described before he saw it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-203

955. JOSEPH WYNCH and JOHN WYNCH were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 set of double harness, value 5l.; 1 piece of wash leather, value 1s., and 1 chopper, value 1s., the goods of Francis Alvin ; 1 pair of overalls, value 2s., the goods of Philip Crouch ; and 1 sack, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Watson .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

PHILIP CROUCH. I am coachman to Mr. Francis Alvin, who lives at Fulham . On the 14th of February, in the morning, I found the coach-house broken open - the lock was broken to pieces, and the door stood open - the harness and several articles were stolen; they were more than one man could carry.

JOHN ESSEX . I am a watchman. On the 14th of February, about three o'clock in the morning, I was on my

beat with Saunders - I stopped the prisoners; I let one of them pass - Joseph had this pick axe; John then passed me - I bid him good morning, but seeing something under his (John's) coat, I said, "What have you in there?" he said a bit of canvas, which he had picked up - I told him to unbutton his coat, and found it was this sack. Joseph went on - I knew them before; I compared the pick-axe with the marks in the door, and they corresponded.

HENRY SAUNDERS . I was with Essex, and asked Joseph what he had under his coat; he said nothing - but I saw the point of the pick-axe, and made a catch at it.

PHILIP CROUCH. I saw this pick-axe compared with the marks in the stable door, it corresponded exactly - here is a notch, which makes a remarkable impression, and the other end corresponds with other marks. This was taken out of the stables.

ROBERT THOMAS . I am gardener to Mr. Joseph Watson, and know this sack to be his - it was in Mr. Alvin's stable.

JOSEPH WYNCH's Defence. My brother was in bed - I called him up, and gave him the sack to carry.

JOHN WYNCH's Defence. My brother called me up.

JOSEPH WYNCH - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN WYNCH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-204

956. FREDERICK TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 1 pig's head, value 2s. 3d. , the goods of William Robinson .

WILLIAM ROBINSON. I am a butcher , and live in Park-street, Camden-town . This pig's head was on my counter - a person came in, and the constable brought the prisoner in with the pig's head - one was missing.

JOSEPH KINGSTON . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner take this head from the shop. I followed and took him - he struck me. GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-205

957. MARY SAWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 chain, value 6d.; 2 seals, value 2s., and 1 key, value 1d. , the goods of Thomas Russell .

THOMAS RUSSELL. On the 31st of March I was in Laston-court, Saint Giles ; I had treated the prisoner, and went there with her - I went into her room, and put my own watch and one of my friend's on the table, with a bundle - the prisoner then let in another woman from the passage; that woman held me, while the prisoner took my watch and ran off with it; the woman said it was only done for a lark, and she would fetch her back - she went out, and I did not see them again - the other watch and bundle was left on the table.

WILLIAM McGREGOR . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner on the 1st of April - she said she had been with this man, and that he had got his watch and bundle; I said, "But you have got the other watch;" she said No; the prosecutor appeared sober, and gave a good description of her.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw him in a public-house with another woman - he went to my room with another woman; I returned to the public-house, and afterwards heard of the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-206

958. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 3 yards of linen cloth, value 3s. , the goods of Charles James .

RICHARD DAINES . I am a shopman to Mr. Charles James, a linen draper , of Whitechapel-road . On the 3d of March this cloth was taken from the shop door - it was safe a quarter of an hour before the officer brought the prisoner in with it, and said he saw him take it from the door.

FRANCIS KEYS . On the evening of the 3d of March I saw the prisoner, watched him, and saw him take this cloth from the door post to which it was tied. I pursued. and he threw it down - I followed him about a quarter of a mile, and secured him.

JAMES HACKWELL . I followed the prisoner, who threw the cloth down - I took it up. I am certain he is the man who took it - I had seen him attempt it before that afternoon.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was done from want.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-207

959. HARRIET HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 seals, value 10s.; 1 key, value 1d., and 1 chain, value 1s., the goods of George Field , from his person .

GEORGE FIELD. I am a tailor . On the 1st of March I was returning from the Seven Stars public-house, and went with a woman to her room; she snatched at my watch and ran out - I thought she would return, and waited a quarter of an hour, when a man came in, and asked what I wanted; I said I would not leave the room till I had my property; he said if I did not, he would knock me down.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPs. Q. Were you not drunk? A. No; the prisoner is the woman.

COURT. Q. Are you sober now? A. I believe so.

ROBERT DAWS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, but found nothing on her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-208

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 9.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

960. THOMAS PIKE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 36lbs. of hemp, value 36s. , the goods of Samuel Clay and others, his masters.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-209

961. THOMAS MILLS was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN POCKNELL . I produce a certificate of marriage which I got at Ely, and another at Bury St. Edmonds; I compared them myself with the registers.

One certificate was here read, and certified that on the 31st of October, 1805, Thomas Mills, batchelor, and Sarah Cuttriss , spinster , were married by licence at Ely Trinity church, Cambridge.

WILLIAM CUTTRISS . I know the prisoner, and was present at his marriage at Ely to Sarah Cuttriss, in 1805 - I saw her alive last Monday evening - I know the prisoner's father - he was not at the wedding - he is living - I went with them to his father's house after the wedding - the

father was present at the dinner, which was provided by his friends at his father's house - Cuttriss had 600l.; the prisoner lived with her about 5 years; he then failed there, and left her with three children in distress - he was a tailor - his goods were taken in execution - she was supported by her friends - he never returned to her that I know of.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Then you do not know of their living together since 1810? A. I do not know that I have - I do not know how old he was when he was married - I have heard he was only eighteen.

COURT. Q. How old was his wife? A. She was under age, I think - her mother is a widow - she was not at the dinner.

RHODA WINNELL . I married the prisoner at St. Mary, Bury St. Edmunds, on the 26th of January, 1813 , by the name of Thomas Miller; I never knew him by any other name - he had no money with me - he left me in 1819, saying he was going to his father's.

The certificate of this marriage was here read - it described the prisoner as single.

JOHN BIRCHALL , I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of March, at St. Martin in the Fields.

MR. BRODRICK called -

ESTHER MILLS . The prisoner is my son; he was born on the 7th of May, 1787 - I knew nothing of his being married to Cuttriss till after the marriage - his father was living at the time - they dined at our house the day they were married.

Q. When did you know of it? A. I received a note between ten and eleven o'clock the same day, and provided for them as quick as I could - I knew nothing about it before - my husband is very ill, and unable to travel here - he was not at home when I received the note, but I carried it to him as quick as I could - he dined with them.

COURT. Q. You took the note to him, where was he? A. He worked for 'Squire Deering, and was not at home - I cannot tell at what time they were married - we live at Denvers, sixteen or seventeen miles from Ely - I took no care of the note.

MR. BRODRICK to WM. CUTTRISS. Q. At what time were they married? A. About eight o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. Cuttriss is well aware my father was applied to for his consent previous to the marriage, and would not give it; and he knews that he went and made the affidavit himself to obtain the licence.

WM. CUTTRISS. I understood the prisoner went to Denvers to communicate with his father - I did not go with him, nor see the father afterwards - I do not know whether his father consented - I went with the prisoner to make the affidavit before the Rev. Mr. Griffiths, at the request of Cuttriss' mother, who was a widow.

E. MILLS. I know the letter was my son's hand-writing - it was addressed to me, not to my husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-210

962. THOMAS MILLS was again indicted for a like offence .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-211

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

963. JOSEPH TWITCHETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 50 yards of silk warp, value 30s. , the goods of George Pleydell .

JOHN PLEYDELL . My son George is a weaver , and lives with me - this silk warp was his - the prisoner was not employed about the premises. On the 23d of February this warp was lost, and we afterwards found it at Gardener's - it must have been taken on Friday night.

JAMES GARDENER . I am a silk-manufacturer, and live at No. 8, Brown's-lane. I gave this warp to George Pleydell to weave on Wednesday, and on Saturday I heard the prisoner was in custody for stealing it - I traced it to Pitt, who delivered it to me.

STEPHEN REDLEY . On Saturday, the 23d of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I called at Mr. Jones's, the White Swan public-house; I saw his brother there; he asked if I would buy a warp - I said I would try to sell it for him - I went to Gardener's brother-in-law, who could not buy it - I returned and told Jones so; he then said, "It is not mine, it belongs to Pitt."

MATTHEW JONES . I saw Pitt, who asked if I knew where he could sell this warp - I took it to the White Swan public-house, and offered it to Redley.

WILLIAM PITT . The prisoner met me in Brick-lane, and asked if I knew who would buy this warp - I took it, and said I would try to sell it - this was on a Thursday or Friday in February.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270405-212

964. GEORGE DALE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 saw, value 6s.; 2 adze, value 5s.; 1 iron driver, value 1s. 6d.; 4 spoke-shaves, value 6s.; 1 vice, value 9d.; 1 cross, value 2s.; 1 bag, value 2s., and 2 knives, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Anderson .

JOSEPH ANDERSON. I am a wine-cooper . These tools were missed from my workshop in Broad-street, Golden-square, about five o'clock, on the 21st of July; the prisoner had worked for me four days, and went away without any notice; I found him, on the 10th of March, working at a cooper's in Hampstead-road, he had then got the adze; I have not found the other tools; he said he was advised to rob me by a person who wanted some tools to take to sea as a cooper.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-213

965. GEORGE HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 50lbs. weight of cheese, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of Charles Beach .

WILLIAM KLING . On the 2d of April, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I was in my back premises in Oxford-street, and heard two whistles - I opened our back gates and looked out - I saw the prisoner and another man in conversation, and saw a bag by the prisoner's side - this was about twenty yards from Mr. Beach's house - I stood still - the other man then left the prisoner and met a man who was coming down the mews, which my gates open into - that man lifted the bag on the prisoner's back - I followed them to No. 28, Parry's-court; they gave three knocks at the door - the prisoner was taken there in about an hour and a half, and the bag and cheese found in his room.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. You did not see the cheese brought from Beach's house? A. No.

CHARLES BEACH. I am an oilman, and deal in cheese , and live in North Audley-street . On the 2d of April, about half-past nine o'clock, I left the shop for half an

hour - the Parmasan cheese was in its usual place - Kling came to me - I then looked and missed the cheese - there are 50lbs. - it cost me 18d. a pound.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was it? A. On a tonguetray at my door - mine is a corner house; it was not in a bag - I can swear to the cut of it, and it is eaten by rats in one place.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my father's, who is coachman to Mr. Hanbury - a gentleman came and and asked me to carry the parcel, which I did - I did not know what was in it; the man asked if he could leave it at my room till Monday, as he was going into Surrey.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-214

966. THOMAS BELLAMY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 1 gown, value 15s.; 2 caps, value 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 10s., and 1 frill, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas White .

HANNAH FINCH . I live at Thomas White's eating-house, in Berwick-street . On the 5th of April the prisoner came to my master's with another person, and dined in the first floor front room - two other persons dined at the same table - they paid for what they had; I left the prisoner and the other person alone for a quarter of an hour, and as I went up again the other man ran by me as fast as he could - the prisoner remained in the room at the same seat as he had dined at; I went into the room, and saw one drawer a little open, and a piece of trimming hanging out of it - I missed these articles from that drawer; I found the gown under the table where the prisoner sat, the rest were quite gone; the drawer could not have been opened without the prisoner seeing it - he sat with his hand down close to where the gown was - I asked what ailed him - he said he had a pain in his side - he had come with the other man, and the prisoner paid for both; I bolted the door, and rang the bell - the prisoner jumped up and opened the door - I went after him, seized him, and held him till master came.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did the other two pay for what they had? A. Yes; they had left - I went down for change - I had not noticed the drawer open before they left.

COURT. Q. The other men did not run away? A. No- the drawers were not above a yard from the table.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and gown.

ELIZABETH WHITE . I am the wife of Thomas White . This is my gown, and was in the drawer which was locked, and the key locked in a cupboard - the prisoner could not have been in the room without seeing the cupboard and drawer opened.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been to the drawers that morning? A. Yes, and put the gown away.

Prisoner's Defence. I fell into conversation with a gentleman there, who asked me to pay for him as he had only a 2l. note - I went down into the yard while I was at dinner, and as I came up, two gentleman left the room - the other then left.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-215

957. ANN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 coat, value 3s.; 1 skirt, value 6d., and 1 spencer, value 4d. , the goods of Thomas Scott .

CATHERINE SCOTT . I am thirteen years old, and live with my father, Thomas Scott, in Macclesfield-street, City-road - he is a glass-painter . On the 8th of March, at a quarter to four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner go away from the house - the street door was open - she got about fourteen yards from the house, and I saw she had got my father's coat - I screamed out for my mother, and she was taken - this coat, the skirt, and spencer, were found on her - the coat had been on the top of the bedstead in the second floor room.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner come down the steps of the house with the coat on her arm - this girl called out, "She has got my father's coat;" I ran, took her, and took this coat, spencer, and skirt from her - she seemed rather in liquor.

ANN SCOTT . This is my husband's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-216

968. JOHN DAVIDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 40lbs. of lead, value 5s., the goods of our Lord the King , and fixed to a building of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to the Right Honourable Charles Arbuthnot , William Dacres Adams , Esq. , and Henry Dawkins , Esq. and fixed to a building of theirs.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am a special constable, and was employed by Mr. Nash to watch the workmen as they left Carlton House . On the 10th of March, at eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming out in company with Wheeler, at the great gate - the prisoner went towards Charing-cross - he had this handkerchief under his left arm, with something which appeared more weighty than victuals; I followed, passed him, and returned; and by a sudden gust of wind, I saw the top of a leaden weight out of his pocket - he turned up the Haymarket; Wheeler left him at the top of Panton-street - I followed the prisoner to the house of Mrs. Wellington, a dealer in marine-stores, in Crown-street, Soho - I stopped at the door, heard a rattling at the seales, went in, collared him and said, "What have you got here?" he said, "What is that to you;" he took this leaden weight from his pocket, and made a desperate blow at me with it - I caught it, or it must have killed me; he made a desperate struggle, and threw me down against a chair; I got up, and threw him down; he took up an iron sash-weight, and struck me with that; I got the poker, and secured him - I saw him throw some other pieces of lead out of his pocket; I took him to the office - I got Elizabeth Grant to collect the lead; it was brought to the watch-house; I went to Carlton House, and compared the lead with some on the premises - this piece of pipe matches a piece which was fixed to Carlton House; here are several pieces; what he said at the office was written down.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was not that because they thought of convicting for a misdemeanor? A. Yes; it is water-pipe; he was detained for an assault.

THOMAS ORGILL . I am clerk of the works at Carlton

House, under Mr. Nash; the prisoner worked there as a carpenter; I compared the lead, and each of the pieces match; there were sash-weights of this description; eight o'clock is the breakfast hour.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear to any piece of lead there? A. I swear it matches.

ELIZABETH WELLINGTON . I serve in my mother's shop, in Crown-street. The prisoner brought some lead there; he had some in a blue handkerchief, and some under his coat; the officer came in directly after him; he tried to throw some away; I picked up some of it, and gave to the officer.

ELIZA GRANT . I was outside the shop; I picked up some pieces of lead.

- HILLVER. Carlton House is now pulling down; it was the residence of the King. The Right Honourable Charles Arbuthnot and others are the Commissioners.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the lead from home in the morning, when I went to work; it belonged to some houses of my own.

- BANKS. I am a plumber. I believe the prisoner had some old houses in Gray's-inn-lane; I have worked for him there three years ago. I cut up an old cistern and some other lead for him; I think these two pieces of lead do not match.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Do you know that he has houses? A. He told me he had Nos. 2 and 3. James-street.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-217

969. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 washing-tub, value 7s. , the goods of John Carpenter .

JOHN CARPENTER. I am a cooper , and live on Clerkenwell-green . On the 10th of March this tub was taken from the front of the house.

JOHN DAVIES . I am an officer. On the 10th of March, between seven and eight o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Turnmill-street, with this tub; he said a boy gave it him; there was a boy with him; I could not detain both.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a boy, who asked me to sell the tub for him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270405-218

970. CHARLES FENWICK and THOMAS HEAD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 12lbs. of pork, value 7s. , the goods of Stephen Warren .

WILLIAM COLTON . I saw the prisoners, with another person, by Mr. Warren's house, at Islington . Fenwick had an apron on, which he gave to Head; he then went and took the pork; both ran off together and were secured with it.

STEPHEN WARREN. I am a porkman ; this loin of pork was in my shop; it was brought back, and I knew it.

EDWARD GRUBB . I am a harness-maker. I saw Fenwick take off his apron, and then take the pork; he had much trouble to get it down.

The prisoners received a good character.

FENWICK - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HEAD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270405-219

971. WILLIAM CHINN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 5 lbs. of beef, value 2s. 6d.; 6lbs. of pork, value 3s., and 1 stone-bottle, value 4d. , the goods of William Potter .

ISAAC LEVESQUE , JUN. I live in James-street, Bethnalgreen . Potter's back premises join ours. I got up about a quarter-past five o'clock on the 3d of April, and opened the back window, to hang out a bird, and saw the prisoner in Potter's back garden, hanging a bottle and bundle on the pales; my father and I went down, but we could not find him then - we went up again, and saw him getting over the fence; I went up to him - he struck me, and got away; I called Stop thief! and he was taken; I am certain he is the man.

ISAAC LEVESQUE . My son called me - I opened my window, but could not see the prisoner; we went up stairs, and saw him in Potter's premises; a bottle and bundle hung on the pales; he was getting over from fence to fence - I am positive of his person.

SARAH POTTER . I am the wife of William Potter. I was alarmed, got up, and found a bundle in my yard, with two pieces of beef, a hand of pork, and this bottle, which was kept in the open yard, not in any cupboard.

THOMAS COOPER . I am a constable, and received him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-220

972. THOMAS BYWATER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 1 crown piece , the money of Ezekiel Gurney .

EZEKIEL GURNEY. I keep a chandler's-shop , in Green-street, Bethnal-green . On the 23d of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I just left my back parlour for a minute, and when I came into the shop again I found the prisoner laying down on the floor, behind the counter; he had the till down on the floor, and was taking the money out; I particularly missed one crown piece, and said,"What do you mean by robbing me?" he said he had not a farthing about him; I said, "Come into the room, and I will search you;" he came in, and deliberately warmed his hands. I got an officer, who found this crown piece in a little pocket at his breast, just large enough to hold it - I had noticed it in my till just before.

PHILIP PARISH . I was sent for, and found a crown piece and a shilling in a small pocket at his breast.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it from the till.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-221

973. WILLIAM SOUTH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 gown, value 5s., and 1 shirt, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Gregory .

MARTHA GREGORY . I am the wife of Charles Gregory - we live in Ann-street, Westminster . The prisoner lodged with me a fortnight, and left without notice; I missed a gown and shirt, which I had to mangle, off a table, which I had seen safe two minutes before, when I left the room for some water; I left him in the room - he was gone when I came back.

JOHN GRINDLEY . I live with Messrs. Courtney and Co., pawnbrokers, of Pimlico. On the 24th of March this gown and shirt were pawned by Elizabeth Doby.

ELIZABETH DOBY . Last Saturday fortnight the prisoner met me as I was coming out of my mother's door, and asked me if I would do him the favour to pawn this gown and shirt; I said, "Why do you not do it yourself?" he said they might take the shirt of him, but not the gown; he told me to ask 6s. for them, but they would lend but 5s. - he told me his wife was in a dying state.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18270405-222

974. WILLIAM SOUTH was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 pair of boots, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2d. , the goods of Francis Howard .

FRANCIS HOWARD. I live in Ann-street, Westminster . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me - he went to bed before me on the 25th of March; when I got up next morning he was gone, and I missed these articles; I inquired, and found him; I told him he had used me very ill - he said he had, and was very sorry - that he had sold my things in Monmouth-street; I have not seen them since.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-223

975. CHARLES OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 1 watch, value 30s., and 1 key, value 6d. , the goods of Obadiah Webb .

SARAH WEBB . I am the wife of Obadiah Webb, and live in Globe-lane, Mile-end . Between ten and eleven o'clock on the morning of the 13th of March I was cleaning my door and went down for some water, leaving the street door open; I heard a noise, ran out, and saw the prisoner at my room door with a basket in his hand; he asked if I wanted any lemons - I looked into the room and missed my watch; I ran after him - the neighbours stopped him; I am quite certain of his person - he threw the watch away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN PURSAR . I was standing in Globe-lane, about half-past ten o'clock, on the 13th of March, and saw the prisoner run, and some oranges rolling about the street - I saw him throw something away with a ribbon to it - I went to the place, and found this watch, which I gave to the officer.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-224

976. ROBERT LOCKWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 32 lbs. of mutton, value 18s. , the goods of Valentine Rutter .

THOMAS WILD . I live with Valentine Rutter, a butcher , of Newgate market . I shut up the shop at one o'clock on the 14th of March, and left this quarter of mutton safe - the shop was opened in about two hours, to put some sheep in, and I suppose it was then taken.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . About a quarter past four o'clock I was in Cow Cross-street, and met the prisoner with two hind-quarters of mutton - I asked where he got it - he said a man named Simons gave it to him to carry at Somers'-town; I let him go, but afterwards found Rutter had been robbed, and took him again. Wild claimed the mutton.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270405-225

977. HENRY DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 bag, value 2d.; 2 lbs. of feathers, value 2s., and 7 bottles, value 10d., the goods of John Groves , and 1 pair of sugar nippers, value 18d., and 1 knife, value 18d. , the goods of Sir Wm. Rouse Boughton , Bart.

JOHN GROVES. I am in possession of Sir William Rouse Boughten's house, in Devonshire-place, Mary-le-bone . On the 30th of March the prisoner and two others came to sweep the chimnies - they were sent by the regular sweep, and swept every chimney - I attended them, but some gentlemen came - I then left them down in the house-keeper's room - I was not away above three minutes- there was a bag of feathers in the room, and some bottles of mine, also the sugar nippers and a knife - they were all put into the stove that they might not get damp; as soon as the men were gone I missed the property; I wrote a letter, and the prisoner was taken in about three days.

JOHN COLLINS . I am a master sweep. I had met the prisoner this morning near Aldgate pump - he asked where I was going, and he went with us - when I got to the prosecutor's house I thought he was going to wait outside, but he came in - and while we were doing the chimneys, he ran up and down the stairs; he saw the feathers in the stove, took them out and put them into his bag - he then took up the soot and put it into the dust-hole while we swept another chimney - he then took seven bottles, and put them into the dust hole - we all came away; when we got to Aldgate pump he sat the bag down; my boy took the bottles and feathers out of the sack; the prisoner bid us good bye; we went out to Mr. Munday, who had employed us, he paid us for our job; I saw Groves when I went in, but not when I left. I did not tell Groves of it.

JAMES SCOTT . I was at work in the house-keeper's room. I saw the prisoner pull a small bag out of the stove - I do not know what he did with it.

JOHN WALLER GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. In consequence of a letter written by Collins and his mother, I took him with me to find the prisoner - we took him at a gambling-house near Wentworth-street. I said, "You go to sweep chimnies at the west end of the town?" he said No; I said, "Did you not last Friday?" he said No; I said, "Did you not go with this lad?" "Oh, yes (said he) he was my fellow apprentice;" he said the feathers were at his lodging. I found them there - he said he never saw the other things.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Collins, and went with him as he asked me; the soot went down the stove chimney - I put my hand in, not knowing what was there, and put the feathers in with the soot. I saw some bottles in the dust-hole and took some, which I had forgotten when the officer came.

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270405-226

978. SOLOMON GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 31/2 bushels of wheat, value 28s. , the goods of Henry James Stevens .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of John Austin .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN AUSTIN. I am a miller , and live at Hillingdon . On the 5th of February, in the morning, I examined my premises, and found a hole made through the boards of my warehouse, which was bricked inside - it was on the side next the canal, and about a foot wide - some corn was stacked against where the hole was made; three sacks had been cut, and about three bushels and a half taken out. I did not examine the sacks till about the 14th of March - it was Dantzic wheat, which I had received from Mr. Stevens, to be ground at my mill - it had been there five or six weeks, and was safe before the 5th of February.

COURT. Q. Did you find near the hole any marks of wheat on the ground? A. Yes, and I traced it for nearly a quarter of a mile - it appeared as if there had been a hole in the bag; and every time the person carrying it moved, it had fallen; it went along by the side of the canal up to Long-bridge, in the way towards the prisoner's house. It was evident on the 5th of February that grain had been taken from the sacks, but I did not ascertain how much till the 14th of March. I sent a sample of the grain to an adjoining mill - Jennings was aware of my loss; he called on me, and brought a sample of corn, which we compared with that in the sacks. I have no doubt of their corresponding - I produce a sample of each.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How far from your place does the prisoner live? A. About two miles and a half - Jennings lives about a mile from him, and two miles from me; the prisoner said he received it from one Carter - we got a warrant out, but he has not been taken - he has a son; there is a great deal of Dantzic wheat imported. Carter lives about two hundred yards from my warehouse.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did the tracing extend in a direction to Carter's house? A. Yes; to Carter's house, and past it - he lives nearer to me than the prisoner - he has absconded. I have no doubt but two persons carried the sack - I went to the prisoner's with a search-warrant, but found nothing. I went a second time, but the next morning the prisoner surrendered himself to the constable, and came to my house; he then said Carter was the person who had the corn, and he had it to get ground for him. I said, "Where is it?" he said at Jennings' - I said it was strange he should take it to Jennings' mill, two miles off, when mine was close by; he said he could not tell much about it - we asked the prisoner what corn he had in his house; he said Carter had brought no more than the bushel which had been taken to Jennings'. I asked if he had any more in his house, he said that was the whole.

Q. In consequence of further information, did you search the prisoner's house a second time? A. Yes, on Friday, the 16th, and I found buried in his orchard, in a bag, one bushel and one peck of corn - there was a small hole in the bag - he was then in custody - we saw the prisoner at the Magistrates' a few hours after, and he seemed to say that very likely Carter might put that there - I am sure, that when he surrendered, he said Carter only brought a bushel - the orchard is thirty or forty yards from his house.

DANIEL STACEY . I am servant to Jennings. I know the prisoner - his son came to my master's on the 13th of March, and brought one bushel of Dantzic wheat to be ground - it was not ground, but is here now.

ROBERT JENNINGS . I am a miller. Stacey; (my servant,) showed me a bushel of Dantzic wheat, which came to be ground, and in consequence of information I examined it. I took a sample of it to Mr. Stevens, and in consequence of what I heard there, I went to Mr. Austin's warehouse, and compared this sample with the very sacks which were cut; it corresponded exactly. I sealed up the bushel; it is that now produced - here is a sample from the sacks and the bushel; and here is one of the sacks which is cut.

COURT. Q. You have been acquainted with grain all your life, perhaps? A. Yes; I have no doubt whatever they are all the same wheat.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is not Dantzic wheat much of the same quality? A. No, there is a great deal of difference in it - it is smaller than English, but there is a difference besides - here is a wild tare in the bulk and in the sample, we call it cockel - it will show exactly the same.

COURT. Q. Then not only are there the same sort of tares in it, but is it in the same proportion? A. Yes, there is no doubt of their being from one bulk.

WILLIAM REID . I am a constable, and live at Hillingdon. I went to the prisoner's house on the 16th of March, and was present at his examination before the Justice; nothing he said was taken down; he was asked if the bushel taken to Jenning's, was all he had - he said that when Carter came to grind some tools in the morning, he(Carter) brought the bushel of wheat. On the 16th I went to the prisoner's premises, found his wife, and said I was come to search; she said I was welcome; when we were in the orchard Mr. Austin said, "Look here, Read"- and we found about five pecks of wheat buried there in a bag, which I produce - he had another examination afterwards; I asked him who brought that wheat; he said Carter, and that he had divided the bushel from the big bag, and put it into the small one - he is a master carpenter, and lives at Iver; I searched for Carter, but cannot find him.

Cross-examined. Q. Has that bag been washed since? A. No; I mended this hole; I could not get into Carter's house; it was locked up - I got into the privy, and found some corn; I have not brought it here; it was down on the soil - I do not know Dantzic wheat; there might be half a peck that I saw; there might be more lower down.

JURY. Q. What will the bag, found in the orchard, contain? A. I should think it would hold three bushels more.

MR. AUSTIN. I saw the wheat in Carter's privy, and have no doubt but it was Dantzic; I lost about three bushels and a half, as near as can be; Carter's house lays a little out of the road - I traced it perhaps the eighth of a mile beyond his house.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. If a man was carrying it, and threw it up to relieve himself, a little would come out? A. Yes; I think two men must have carried it, unless one man went twice.

Prisoner's Defence. Philip Carter brought this to me to get ground for him - he worked for me some years, and I allowed my boy to take it.

WILLIAM CARTER . I am the son of Philip Carter ; he took some wheat to Gibbs, in a bag of this description, one

Saturday morning, he took it from our house - Gibbs was taken on the Thursday - I was with my father when he took it to him to be ground; we left it there - I saw nothing of it afterwards.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How much wheat was there? A. There might be a bushel and a half, perhaps a little more; my father called out, Gibbs was not up, he came down and said, "I thought you were to bring it last night," my father said, "I thought it would be better in the morning," Gibbs said, "I don't know but it was" - I then went and turned the stone to grind my father's tools - my father left his house on the Wednesday night - I have not seen or heard of him since.

COURT. Q. On what day did he take the wheat to Gibbs? A. On a Saturday, I think it was in March, but am not certain - I do not work with my father - I was subpoeaaed here.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-227

979. SMITH ROBINSON and ROBERT BOON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 40lbs. of lead, value 5s., the goods of Sampson Hanbury and others, and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of theirs .

2d COUNT, calling it a building.

3d COUNT, for ripping and cutting the same with intent to steal it.

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I live in Spicer street, Spitalfields; the back of my premises come against an empty house in George-street , belonging to Hanbury and Co. On the 20th of March, about ten o'clock at night, I went into the yard and heard some tiles rattle, supposing something wrong, I went to Hanbury's and gave information: one of their watchman came with me; I stood on the steps of a public-house nearly opposite, and saw two men on the house; one of whom was on his knees - I went afterwards to the door of the house, and saw two men rush out with speed, I followed, crying Stop thief! Johnson knocked down one, which was Boon, and secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long was this after you heard the tiles rattle? A. An hour or more, perhaps; I could not identify the men on the tiles - several officers were there when they rushed out; the gates were open when he came out; others had gone in, but they belonged to the brewhouse.

WILLIAM READER . I am one of Messrs. Hanbury's watchmen: Young fetched me; I went with him, and waited about a quarter of an hour: after some time I saw three persons on the roof; I went to to the brewhouse and returned with Shakspear and Johnson, and found Almond and Smith there; I heard the officers call, "Stop them at the door, they have run out;" I saw two men running out, Shakspear took one, but could not hold both - the house belongs to Sampson Hanbury and Co.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see them come out of the door? A. Not exactly out of the door, but I saw them run from the persons who were found the door.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am inspector of the watch. I heard an alarm, and went with Smith to the door; they are folding doors; one seemed open, but was tied with a string; I broke the string, and went in; I then went up a step-ladder, and heard several men escape down through a hole in the partition; I called out "Stop them at the door"(Shakespear afterwards brought Robinson to the watch-house.) I went on the roof, and found two sides of the lead turned up from the gutter, and cut across, in two pieces; some wall-hooks, which fastened it, had been drawn out of the wall. I found no tools there; here is the lead - it was rolled up, and cut off.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search Robinson? A. Yes; I found nothing on him. The lead was quite severed from the roof.

ADAM SMITH . I was with Almond. I saw four men on the premises. I saw Robinson run from the door; Shakespear took him, without my losing sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were the four men? A. In a room on the premises; I did not see them on the roof.

BENJAMIN SHAKESPEAR . I stopped Robinson, who was making the best of his way through the people.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am in Messrs. Sampson Hanbury's employ. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran to George-street; I saw Boon running from a cry of Stop thief! I knocked him down, and delivered him to the watchman.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BOON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-228

Second London Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

980. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 1 pair of boots, value 30s. , the goods of Charles Sully .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270405-229

981. WILLIAM McLEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 7 pairs of trousers, value 3l. 10s., and 7 waistcoats, value 25s. , the goods of John Clark .

ROBERT WILD . I am a warehouseman to Mr. John Clark, a wholesale slopseller - the prisoner had been in his employ, and was discharged about August, 1826, but frequently came there. On the 20th of February he called - we afterwards missed some property; he came again on the 24th, and asked me to allow him a piece of cloth to cut a coat; I told him to come to Mr. Clark in the evening, to see if he had heard of a situation for him - before he came again I missed a flannel waistcoat and a jacket; I told Mr. Clark; when he came I and Mr. Clark took him into a private room - Mr. Clark said, "I have reason to suspect you have robbed me;" he at once said, voluntarily, that he had, and was very sorry for it, and said he had eight duplicates at home but had destroyed the others - he appeared to think that we knew more than we did; he sent one of our men to his lodging for the duplicates, and selected what belonged to Mr. Clark's property. I I know these trousers and waistcoats to be his.

JOHN CLARK. I told the prisoner my suspicions - he immediately acknowledged, voluntarily, that he had taken a large quantity of garments; we have recovered two or three hundred garments. I held out no inducement to him. While he was with me he never wronged me.

MICHAEL FOX . The prisoner sent me to his lodging, where I got the duplicates by his direction.

GEORGE STOWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and have se

veral garments, which were all pawned by the prisoner, at different times.

DANIEL STEPTO . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a waistcoat with me on the 21st.

CHARLES PORTER . I have a number of articles pawned with me. I cannot be certain of the prisoner's person.

PETER BOSTON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge; he conducted himself in a very proper manner.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated that he had undergone the greatest deprivation, for want of food, having five children, and had taken these things to supply a craving appetite, and had given every information to lead to the recovery of the property, and expressed his sincere contrition.

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270405-230

982. ELIAS ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 chain, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 3l.; and 1 key, value 7s., the goods of Allen Lambert , from his person .

ALLEN LAMBERT. On the 2d of March, about eight o'clock at night, I was in Eastcheap ; a person suddenly crossed the street, and drew my watch from my pocket; it was nearly dark. I turned round, collared the prisoner, and said, "You rascal, you have taken my watch;" he made no reply, and I offered him a glass of grog to restore it; he made no reply; I then said, "I will give you a bottle of wine," and then offered a sovereign; three or four persons surrounded me; he then said he had not got it; I endeavoured to persuade him to give it me, as I wanted to get home by the mail to Bromley, in Kent; I am sure nobody else was near me; only a few seconds passed before others came up. Kilby then came up and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you very much in liquor? A. Not till afterwards; I swear that it happened in Eastcheap, not in Gracechurch-street; I did not accuse two other persons; I did not hear the prisoner send for the watchman - he might be sent for.

Q. Did not this gentleman give you in charge? A. He did, after we had been in the watch-house; Kilby did not advise him to give me in charge.

Q. Did not one Myett come up and say, "It is of no use taking this gentleman; I have seen this man charge two other persons, who shook him off, and said 'Get along, you drunken vagrant?" A. No; I dined at the Belle Savage with some friends, and had some wine, but I was sober at this time - but by the suddenness of this transaction and my treatment at the watch-house, I got tipsy; I took no more liquor. I was taken to the Compter, and kept there all night; I might have said it happened in Cannon-street, as both are in one line; I now say it was in Eastcheap; several persons came round us in Eastcheap. When I was in the watch-house I offered 1l. to have my property back; a person there said it was not enough; I then said I would give 2l.; this person then accused me of collaring two or three other person; I denied it, and then he said to the prisoner, "Give him in charge for disorderly conduct;" I was then given in charge.

THOMAS KILBY . I am an officer. I heard a noise up a court in Gracechurch-street, which leads to Gye and Balne's printing office; I went up, and saw the prosecutor and three or four others; he was calling Watch! I said, "What's the matter?" he took hold of the prisoner, and said,"This man has robbed me of my watch;" the prisoner said he would go any where with me, and walked quietly down the hill with me; the prosecutor followed, and fell two or three times on my back in going along; he was so much intoxicated I searched him, thinking he might have his watch, but not know where it was.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270405-231

983. THOMAS SHOES SMITH, alias CHARLES SMITH, alias JOHN SHOE SMITH , and EDWARD JAMES PLOWMAN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Boyer , about the hour of eight o'clock in the night of the 17th of February , at St. Mary Magdalen, Old Fish-street, with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house then being burglariously to steal .

GEORGE TUNNICLIFF. I am servant to Mr. George Boyer, a cheese-factor , of No. 16, Old 'Change, in the parish of St. Mary Magdalen, Old Fish-street . On the evening of the 17th of February I locked up the house a little after seven o'clock; I and my fellow servant, John Lees, were the last persons in the house; we left it together when I locked up; I slept in the house that night, and always sleep there; I returned a little after eight o'clock, and found the two prisoners in the counting-house; I found the door on the single lock; I had left it double locked; Plowman had a dark-lantern, and Smith was rummaging my master's desk; I instantly went out of the warehouse, and called out "Thieves!" I locked the street-door, and locked them in; I cannot say whether they had seen me; unfortunately I had taken the key out of the lock, and they came out at the door by means of a skeleton key; the watchmen and patrol were off duty, as they were then just changing, but Charles and Edward Hitchings came up at the time; I had secured Plowman, and they secured Smith; they had a scuffle at the end of the street, Smith turned back; I secured him also, and gave them both in charge of my neighbours and Benison, an officer, who came up; I found the warehouse dog dead a few hours after; he was well when I left the warehouse; we had given him his supper. I observed the prisoners' features distinctly through the window by the light of their dark-lantern, in the counting house, and could swear to them any where; they were taken to the watch-house, and then to the Compter; no property was taken away that I know of; I had left the desk locked; I had seen that it was locked; my master locked it; the papers were a good deal rummaged about - the dog was poisoned, the poison was found in his stomach.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Are you speaking of the night or the morning of the 17th? A. The night: it is a large warehouse - there are rooms on the first floor - it is a dwelling-house two stories high - there are five distinct rooms - there is only one room below - the counting-house is parted off; the goods are kept in the warehouse on the ground floor; there are two rooms on the first floor, one is to store goods in, and the other a sleeping room - I sleep there, as Mr. Boyer's servant, and receive wages - he has no partner; I had not been out of the

warehouse before I left it at seven o'clock; the door is left open in the day time; Lees, Mr. Boyer, and the clerk, are there in the day time; Mr. Boyer and the clerk had left about an hour and a half or two hours - Lees remained with me till I fastened the premises - I had been working in the warehouse till then - I was in the counting-house the last thing, when I went to fasten up; I had just got in at the street door when I saw the prisoners in the counting-house - I looked through the counting-house window, which is just on the left hand, and saw them, and undertake to swear to them from the view I then had of them - they rushed out upon me, and I caught Plowman - Smith got by me; I just saw his back, and saw his face afterwards - I never lost sight of him; I gave Plowman to others to hold, and went after Smith - he came back towards me, and I knocked him down into the kennel; I was then ten or twelve yards from the warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. At what hour did you leave the warehouse? A. A little after seven o'clock - I am certain it was seven - it was as dark as it usually is at that time - I could see a man's face in the street without a lamp: it was quite dark - not twilight; there was no light except what was from the gas-lamps.

CHARLES HITCHINGS . I am a butcher. I was in Old 'Change on the 17th of February, I think it was between eight and nine o'clock, but am not certain - I came down Carter-lane into Old 'Change, and had not passed Mr. Boyer's warehouse many yards, when I heard a cry of Thieves! and Murder! I said to my brother, "Let us go back" - I went back, and saw Tunnicliff, who said, "There are two thieves in the house - I have locked them in;" he had no sooner said so than I heard the noise of a key inside, the door burst open, and out came Plowman - Tunnicliff grasped him on the neck, and with the force he came out with, he reeled round to me: I had a tray in my hand - I struck him, he fell, and Tunnicliff on the top of him - I turned my head and saw Smith rushing forward - I took up my tray and tried to hit him, but he jumped over it, and ran to my left - my brother was then on the opposite side, I called to him, "Ned, here is the other going;" he and I pursued him - my brother overtook him, and got hold of him - I saw them struggling together, and I went to assist him; I am certain he seized the man I had first seen, for I had not lost sight of him; when I came up to them my brother slipped down, I caught hold of Smith and hit him with my tray, he leaned forward and got from me, and ran up the street towards the warehouse again; I got up as soon as I could, and run up the street - Tunnicliff put out his arm and caught hold of him - he resisted very much; my brother and others assisted, and the officer took him.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did the second man come out of the door at the same time as the other? A. Plowman came first and Smith after, close following each other, perhaps a yard and a half after each other - I just turned my head, and he came out; Plowman and Tunnicliff fell together - I think they falling at the time Smith came out - it was all in a minute; I did not turn so as to have my back to Smith, while I struck at him; I never lost sight of him till my brother got hold of him, which was fifteen or sixteen yards off, I will not swear to the time, it might be about nine o'clock; if I was quite close to him I might see his face, but not by the light of the heavens, without the gas.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was it light or dark at seven o'clock? A. I should think it was quite dark; I saw Plowman quite plain; I said at Guildhall that I struck him, and was the means of his falling, I suppose.

EDWARD HITCHINGS . I was in Old 'Change with my brother, between eight and nine o'clock (I think), on the 17th of February - I heard a cry of Watch! my brother said "We will go back" - I said "You had better not;" but we did go back, and Tunnicliff said, "There are two thieves in the house;" my brother said, "Well, you stand hard, and I will give him a crack with my tray;" he stood behind Tunnicliff, and I stood in front of the door - I saw Plowman rush out - I could see his face distinctly by the gaslight on the opposite side - I do not think the twilight was sufficient to enable me to see his face - he fell at my feet in the kennel, and Tunnicliff upon him - Smith rushed out at the instant, and my brother struck at him - he jumped over the tray, and I ran after him; I caught him about twelve yards off - he ran in a slant direction across the street; when I stopped him, he stood back, and asked what I wanted with him; I said I would let him know - he gave me several blows, and was going to return - we closed, and I caught hold of his collar; we both stumbled, as it was icy, and I lost my hold. I never lost sight of him; he then ran back towards the warehouse, near the place he started from, and just as I got hold of him again, Tunnicliff held out his arm, and stopped him; there was blows between them - another witness and the officer came up, and two or three others were round him - he made great resistance, but was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Can you tell how long it had been dark? A. No, I did not take sufficient notice.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . On the night of the 17th of February I was in Old 'Change, about half-past eight o'clock(I think): I heard a cry of Stop thief! I went up, and Tunnicliff desired me to lay hold of Plowman, while he pursued Smith, who was secured. I went to the watch-house, and saw them both lodged there.

JAMES BIRCH . I was in Old 'Change on the evening of the 17th of February, it was after eight o'clock, but I cannot say how long. I heard a cry of Thieves! and Murder! I ran up, and saw Smith and Tunnicliff struggling together - I knew Tunnicliff, and had seen Smith before. Tunnicliff asked me to help; I took hold of Smith, and said to Tunnicliff, "You had better go and see who is at the warehouse door," and he did so. Smith struggled with me, and used had language, threatening me if I did not let him go; I said, "I am as good a man as you, and will not let you go;" we fell together into the kennel, but I kept him, and we went to the watch-house. I had seen Smith about the neighbourhood before.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Were they both in custody when you came up? A. Yes.

WILLIAM GEORGE GREEN . I was in Old 'Change on the evening of the 17th of February. I saw a great crowd - Tunnicliff said he had lost the key of the warehouse door, and would I look for it; I searched, and in the kennel found

a dark-lantern, and several skeleton-keys, which I took to the watch-house, where the prisoners had been taken to.

LEWIS FACHE . I am a constable. I heard an alarm, and helped to take the prisoner to the watch-house; on searching Plowman I found a piece of wax, and a phosphorus-bottle.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where was that wax? A. In his waistcoat pocket; it dropped out, and he put his foot on it; I caught it falling from his pocket, when it dropped from my hand, and he put his foot on it. I did not drop the phosphorus; I found a ludicrous picture and snuff-box on the floor.

GEORGE BELLAMY . I am a constable. I produce these skeleton-keys and a dark-lantern, which were brought in by Green. I have not tried the keys to the door.

G. TUNNICLIFF . I found one key on Sunday mornning, it exactly matches the lock of the door, and opens it.

JOHN LEES . I am porter to Mr. Boyer, and saw Tunnicliff lock up the warehouse a little after seven o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Will you swear it was latter than six o'clock? A. Yes; I had no watch; I looked at the clock when I got home to Friday-street, it was then ten minutes past seven o'clock. I do not know whether it was twilight or dark: it was dark; there are large piles of cheese and butter in the warehouse; a man could not easily hide himself behind them. Mr. Boyer lives in Nelson-square himself, but his dwelling premises are in Old 'Change. I never knew him sleep there; persons could not slip in and hide themselves in the day-time; there was a large dog chained inside the door, and there are always people in the warehouse; the dog was alive and well when I left - I gave him some meat.

COURT. Q. Did you examine the premises before you left? A. Yes; I went all round with a candle; I found nobody there.

MR. BRODRICK to TUNNICLIFF. Q. How long have you slept there? A. About ten months; Mr. Boyer never slept there; I do not cook there.

COURT. Q. Do you get your meals there? A. Sometimes; there is convenience for cooking, but I never use it. I was there to protect the property and premises; the bed-room is on the first floor; I sleep there; there is a fire place and stove in the bed-room. I dine on the premises once or twice a week.

SMITH's Defence. I was passing along Fish-street, and turning into Old 'Change, I heard a cry of Fire! or Thieves! which induced me to run up to see what was the matter; a man caught me in his arms, and gave me in charge, without saying on what grounds. I was taken to the watch-house, but no property, except my own, was found; nor was any thing suspicious found near me. Do you suppose if I was the man, after making my escape, I should return to the spot? as to the person being positive of my identity, after losing sight of the man, I leave to your judgment; I was frequently passing in Old 'Change on business. I have not the slightest knowledge of Plowman. I solemnly protest my innocence of being the man who escaped.

PLOWMAN's Defence. What has been sworn against me I positively disavow; I know nothing of the prisoner or witness - I was passing the Old 'Change, and standing against the wall when I heard the cry, and saw three or four men rush by me; one man struck me on the shins, and knocked me down; as to the men who came out of the house, I declare I know nothing of them.

Three witnesses gave Smith a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

PLOWMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18270405-232

984. ANN HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 2 silk gowns, value 40s.; 1 shawl, value 20s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 17 yards of linen cloth, value 17s.; 11/2 yard of flannel, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s. 6d.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 2 silver table-spoons, value 20s.; 3 toher spoons, value 1s.; 1 silk bag, value 1d.; 1 pocket-book, value 1d., and 25 sovereigns , the property of Priscilla Morley .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the property of Francis O'Neil .

3d COUNT, stating them to be the property of a certain person or persons, whose names are unknown.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. WALKER WILLIAM WILBY . I am steward of St. Bartholomew's Hospital . On Saturday evening, the 10th of March, I was applied to, to attend at the hospital - some property being lost - I went, and saw the prisoner and her box was examined; Priscilla Morley, who is dead, was sister of one of the wards - they have three persons under them, and the prisoner had been one - it was stated that some property belonging to the deceased was found in the prisoner's box - there was a silk purse, twenty-five sovereigns, and a silk gown - I thought it right a further search should me made, and her box was brought into the deceased's room - I had the things taken out, and some shawls and other things were found - the prisoner said they were her property, that she had the silk gowns made at Loughborough, and the piece of cloth she had bought - she said the sovereigns were her own - she had been saving them from the time of her husband's death. I believe she had 6s. or 7s. a week and her food.

ANN ELDEN . I am nurse and matron of St. Matthew's ward. I saw the prisoner's box opened, and some bundles laying on the top, about a fortnight after Morley's death - two silk gowns were in it, and the rest of the articles stated in the indictment - the prisoner had been in that ward about five weeks - she had borrowed 6d. of me, and had every appearance of being poor - she said she had saved this money - that the gowns were made for her at Loughborough; but when she was first examined, she said Morley gave her the gowns.

JANE LOW . I am a nurse in St. Luke's ward, and saw the property found in the prisoner's box - I had seen the two table-spoons, silk handkerchiefs, and shawls, in Morley's possession.

WILLIAM GATES . I am a beadle of the hospital, and produce the property.

ELIZABETH GARRATT