Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th February 1827.
Reference Number: 18270215
Reference Number: f18270215-1

SESSIONS' PAPER. THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ANTHONY BROWN, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 15th of FEBRUARY, 1827, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 21, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1827.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ANTHONY BROWN , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir John Perring , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; John Birch , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; and William Heygate , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Wm. Patey , Jun.

Robert Eades ,

Philip Dowdney ,

John Myers ,

George Anderson ,

Charles Dugard ,

George Battey ,

Josiah Nobes ,

George Dimsdale ,

Matthew Dixon ,

Robert Davey ,

Wm. Read .

Second

Wm. Taylor ,

James Taylor ,

Richard King ,

Henry Corston ,

Wm. Mitchell ,

James Middleton ,

Wm. Serjeant ,

Frederick Jones ,

Charles Green ,

Thomas Townley ,

Thomas Robertson ,

James Adam .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Thos. Robertson ,

Richard Streets ,

John Kirk ,

James Pays ,

Charles Powell ,

John Linton ,

James S. Metcalf ,

John Smith ,

Thomas Sharp ,

Wm. So therden ,

John Morley ,

Charles Stevenson .

Second

John Saunders ,

John Thornton ,

Henry Pledger ,

James Powell ,

John Stokes ,

Samuel Searl ,

Dennis Schutz ,

John Skinner ,

John Pearson ,

Henry Parry ,

Thomas Smart ,

Joseph Watson ,

Third

Thomas Page ,

Skinner Turner ,

Richard Mitchell ,

Abraham Skipper ,

Moses Taylor ,

Robert Stretham ,

Michael Phillips ,

George Smith ,

John Porte. Lee ,

John Railton ,

Wm. Tozer ,

Samuel Monk .

Fourth

Thomas Scurr ,

Thomas Sandes ,

Thomas Carr ,

Wm. Slark ,

Joseph Tickel ,

Robert Langdon ,

John Rolerson ,

Joshua Paterson ,

Richard Sheldrick ,

Philip Snewin ,

John Musgrove ,

Wm. Williams .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 15, 1827.

BROWN, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18270215-1

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Littledale.

495. WILLIAM COX JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 mare, price 50l. , the property of John Tilbray .

MR. PHILLIPS (on behalf of the Prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-2

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

496. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 till, value 6d., and 13s. in monies numbered , the property of John Beale .

JOHN BEALE. I live in Union-street, Hoxton , and am a baker . On the 3d of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the parlour; no one was in the shop, and the door was shut - I heard a rustling in the shop, and saw the prisoner going out; I ran, and secured him outside the door - he then threw down my till, which had 13s. in copper in it; he must have come into the shop on his hands and knees - he lives in the neighbourhood, and is apprenticed to a brass screw maker: an officer came and took him.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am a headborough. I took charge of the prisoner, and found four bottles of blacking on him; I asked how he came to do this - he said he had no other means of getting his living. The till was then on the counter, and contained 13s. in copper.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-3

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

497. JOSEPH CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , at the Liberty of the Rolls, 1 mahogany desk, value 2l.; 1 gold ring, value 10s.; 1 silver-gilt vinegarette, value 10s.; 2 precious stones, to wit, 2 topazes, value 2l.; 4 engraved portraits, value 10s.; 1 other Russia leather travelling desk and case, value 1l.; 1 topaz shirt-pin, value 1l.; 1 patent silver pencil-case, value 10s.; 1 silk purse, value 1s., and 1 pocket-book, value 1s., the goods of John Curwood , in his dwelling-house .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CURWOOD, ESQ. I am a barrister , and live at No. 24, Chancery-lane, in the Liberty of the Rolls ; it is my dwelling house, and is in the County of Middlesex. I came to town on the 22d of January, and went into my library that evening; I saw my mahogany desk in its usual place there, and, I think, I saw the travelling desk in the window, where it usually stands - in the travelling desk was a small red silk purse, with a steel clasp; it had been made by my daughter's governess, and given to me; it had been in my desk ever since my return from the circuit - I never carried it in my pocket, but it was regularly kept in my circuit desk, and I was quite familiar with it; the mahogany writing-desk cost me three or four guineas. ans was in a perfect good state - it was worth 30s. or 40s.; there was a gold mourning-ring in it, worth, I suppose, as the value of the gold, half a guinea; a silver-gilt vinageret, worth 10s.; two unset topaz stones, which I brought from Lisbon, and, I should think, were worth 2l. - these were in a small secret drawer in the desk; there were also four portraits of friends at the Bar, worth 10s. they cost 30s. - there were several trifling articles, my private papers, and family accounts, and a banker's cheque-book in the same desk. The travelling desk was locked, and the key of it was in the mahogany desk.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Whether these things were in the desk on the 22d, when you came home, you cannot say? A. Not from having seen them, but as the desks had been locked ever since I saw them there, I infer that they were there - it might have been a month since I opened the travelling desk, as I only use it on the circuit.

COURT. Q. Then you had not seen the silk purse since October? A. I saw it when I came from the circuit in October; I then left it in the desk, and had not seen it afterwards. I had seen the other things within a fortnight.

PHOEBE HYDE . I am cook in Mr. Curwood's family. On the morning of the 23d of January, about half-past 7 o'clock, the dustmen came for the dust; while the street door was open for them I saw the prisoner in the passage - I am certain of him; he said, "Good morning;" I asked what he wanted; he said he wanted the clerk; I replied he was not up, but I would call him; he said, "No, don't call him, I will call again in half an hour - my name is Rogers;" he then went out of the door, and down the steps; the door continued open. I went into the library, and staid there less than five minutes; I then went down into the kitchen, leaving the street door still open - I came up again in about a quarter of an hour. I saw nothing more of the prisoner - he did not call again. I am in the habit of answering the door - nobody called half an hour afterwards - Mr. Curwood was unwell at this time, and did not use his library; I had seen the mahogany desk in the library

when I met the prisoner in the hall that morning - my candlestick stood on it; I saw the travelling desk there the morning before. I attended at Bow-street on the 1st of February, when the prisoner was in custody, and had not the least doubt of him - I am confident of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is the dust-hole? A. The men had to go down through the kitchen to it; there were three dustmen - I kept my eye on them all the time, and am confident they did not take the desk; I could see them sufficiently to be certain that they did not go into the library - they had to pass near the library door, which is about three yards from the stairs, and was ajar - the stair-case is dark; I might be down stairs a quarter of an hour. We had ten chaldrons of coals in that morning - I cannot say how many men came with them; they had to go through the library with the coals. The prisoner had nothing when I saw him go out, for I was in the hall; I did not see him return - I was up and down stairs occasionally while the dustmen were there; they were there half an hour after the prisoner went, and the street door was open. The coals came nearly two hours after the dustmen - it took a long time to deliver them; it was light enough in the passage for me to see the prisoner's features; he was not with me longer than this conversation passed - I never saw him before, but am positive of him.

MR. LAW. Q. You talked to him? A. Yes. I could not see from the kitchen into the library; I was a quarter of an hour in the kitchen, but still watehed the dustmen sufficiently to see they did not take the desk.

GEORGE GREEN . I am clerk to Mr. Curwood. On the 23d of January, at ten o'clock in the morning, the coals came; I went into the library to turn the carpet up, and push the table aside, to make room for the men to go through, and then I missed the desks; the men had not been into the library before I missed them. I know nothing whatever of the prisoner - he did not call to see me that morning.

JAMES BARRIER . I am a constable. On Monday, the 29th of January, I apprehended the prisoner inside the passage of Mr. Selby's house, No. 15, Howard-street; there was a dust-cart at the door at the time, and I took him in consequence of information which the dustmen gave me. I searched him, and found in his breeches pocket this purse, containing 6s.; he was dressed in a blue coat, not as a dustman.

Cross-examined. Q. This was not near Chancery-lane? A. No.

MR. CURWOOD. As far as a man can speak to a thing of this sort, I believe this purse to be mine - I have no doubt of it in my own mind; it is dirtier than when it was in my desk - it was then clean; it was not so tight on one side as the other, but it appears to me that since the constable has had it, it has been stitched up a little; it is the same sort of clasp, the same coloured silk, and opens familiarly with my hand - if it is not the same, it is like it in every particular.

Cross-examined. Q. There may be other purses made of the same coloured silk and texture? A. I suppose so.

JAMES BARRIER re-examined. Nothing has been done to the purse since I have had it.

MISS ELIZABETH ANN CURWOOD . I think I know this purse by the work; I have no doubt about the work of it - I saw my governess make it; she made another one of the same silk - that is at home; I saw it to-day. I have no doubt of this being my father's.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen your governess make other purses? A. Only the two I have mentioned - she knits them; I have seen this one in my father's desk.

GEORGE GREEN re-examined. I have been in the silk trade. I have examined the other purse, and this is precisely the same silk; there is something peculiar in the make of it - it is silk-twist and sewing-silk knitted together, and this silk-twist is woven, which is peculiar.

Cross-examined. Q. How long is it since you were in the trade? A. Six years; the peculiarity is its being made of twist and sewing-silk together - I believe it to be the same I have seen Mr. Curwood use; I feel certain of it.

Prisoner's Defence. At the second examination the female servant said the desk was safe after I left the house, as she had left her candlestick on it, and she saw it there.

MARY ANN CLARKE . I am the prisoner's sister. I made him a present of a purse about four months ago, as near as I can recollect - it was more of a maroon colour than red, and had a steel snap; it was made of sewing-silk, I believe - I think I should know it again.

MR. LAW. Q. Had it a yellow tassel? A. It had no tassel at all; the clasp was arched over a little; I saw it at Bow-street. [The purse was here shown to the witness] - this is the purse I gave my brother; it has a tassel at the bottom of it, but I could not tell whether it had one or not.

Q. Do you mean to swear that this is sewing-silk? A. I do not know; it is silk - I did not make it; it was made a present to me by a young man.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270215-4

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

498. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 shoulders of mutton, value 3s. 9d.; 1 towel, value 6d., and 1 basket, value 9d. , the goods of William Rastall .

WILLIAM RASTALL. I am a butcher , and live in Ebury-square, Pimlico. On the 26th of January, about ten o'clock at night, I went into a public-house in Soho , and put down a basket, with two shoulders of mutton in it, on a cask, between the bar and the window; the prisoner stood within two or three yards of it, with a basket of nuts; in about a quarter of an hour some one said my basket was gone - I looked round, and just saw it going out at the door; I went out immediately, but could see no one - I went up to Warbis'-court, and met the prisoner with two baskets, one of which was mine, and had my mutton in it; she said it was her sister-in-law's - I gave her in charge.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I am a watch-house-keeper. Rastall and Evans brought the prisoner to the watch-house with the basket; she said she thought it was her daughter-in-law's, and had taken it by mistake - and in the morning she said it was her sister-in-law's. I only found 1/2d. on her.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am a patrol, and took her in charge

- she said she thought the basket was her daughter-in-law's, and she had been tossing at the public-house.(Basket and Cloth produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My sister-in-law came into the house with a basket - she went out, and I, being in liquor, thought she had left this basket.

W. RASTALL. There were two or three women there.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270215-5

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

499. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 2 live pigs, price 4l. , the property of James Scratton .

WILLIAM COWLING . I am a constable of Hackney. - On the 5th of February, about a quarter past four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in Church-street, Hackney, driving two pigs; I asked where he brought them from; he said from Waltham Abbey - that he received them from a man named Williams, who met him, and asked him to drive them to Spitalfields; I asked what part of Spitalfields he was taking them to - he could not inform me; I said that was singular; he then said he was to meet the person at Cambridge-heath, and was to have half-a-crown for driving them there; I asked at what time he left Waltham Abbey; he said about three o'clock, or between two and three; it is more than ten miles from Hackney. I said I must take him into custody - he said if he was allowed to go to Cambridge-heath he should meet the man - that he was a butcher, and he had known him a long while; I locked him up, and went to Cambridge-heath in about two hours; I inquired of the turnpike man if any person had been inquiring about two pigs, but could not learn that any one had - I also inquired at the Clapton gate, but could get no intelligence. I did not inquire at the public-houses. Marsh claimed the pigs, as his master's, next day. Snaresbrook is six or seven miles from Waltham Abbey, and not in the direct road; he said he met Williams at Waltham Abbey, at three o'clock that afternoon, and it being impossible for him to have come so far, made me stop him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I received them in the Lea-bridge road, which is in the direct road from Waltham Abbey? A. He said they were given to him in the middle of Waltham Abbey town - that he knew Waltham Abbey perfectly well, and received them there; I asked which way he came; he said through Lea-bridge turnpike; I inquired, and found he had come through that gate, and left his apron to pay the toll, and had stated that he had driven them from Waltham Abbey.

BENJAMIN MARSH . I am coachman to Mr. James Scratton, of Snaresbrook , which is about five miles from Hackney. On the 5th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed two of his pigs - I had turned them out on the forest, and saw them safe between nine and ten o'clock that morning; I found them in Cowling's possession next day; they are master's, I am certain; we have had them twelve months.

THOMAS WHITFIELD . I keep an inn at Snaresbrook, which is not in the direct road from Waltham Abbey to Hackney. I know Mr. Scratton's two pigs; I drove them out of my yard on to the forest at ten minutes before eleven o'clock on the 5th of February. I saw them in Cowling's possession next day.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man at Lea-bridge, who appeared to be a butcher; he said his name was Williams- that he was going to Spitalfields, and would give me 2s. 6d. to drive them, and he would meet me at Cambridge-heath, and if any one asked where I was going I was to say to Mr. Williams, of Spitalfields; they were delivered to me between two and three o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-6

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

500. JOHN HARGRAVE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 coat, value 6l. , the goods of Robert Ellice .

JOHN LUCAS . I am coachman to Colonel Robert Ellice, who lives in Seymour-street, Portman-square. On the 2d of February, a little before six o'clock in the evening, I left my box coat on the carriage box, in the mews; I put the carriage into the stable when I had cleaned the horses, and do not know whether the coat was then on the box - I fastened the stable, and next morning, about nine o'clock, missed the coat - it was nearly a new drab coat, and had six capes - the buttons had master's crest, which is a hand and snake, on them - it has not been found.

GEORGE DODEMEAD . I live at No. 29, Mitchell-street, Mary-le-bone - the prisoner lived in the next room to me for about a week. On the 2d of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, he came up to his own room door, and knocked - finding nobody answer him he knocked at my room door, and asked me if he could leave his coat there till he or his wife came home; I said Yes; he said, "I should not say it is mine, for it is master's;" his master belongs to some Paddington coaches; he left the coat in my room, and went away. I gave it to his wife about half-past ten o'clock, when she came in; it was a gentleman's coachman's drab box coat, with six capes; the bottom one being a kind of half cape- I noticed a hand and snake on the buttons, the same as is on Lucas' coat now; there were two buttons missing on the side - it had three loops and three buttons on them - I observed it particularly, as I suspected it was stolen, and I showed it to Robinson, my landlady. I saw the prisoner on the stairs next day - I gave information, and he was taken on the 5th.

LETITIA ROBINSON . I live at No. 28, Mitchell-street; the prisoner lodged at No. 29 for a week, and had lodged at No. 20 for seven months before. On the 2d of February Dodemead showed me a drab box coat, with a hand and snake on the buttons - it was nearly new, and some of the buttons were off, near the centre.

JOHN LUCAS . My coat had six capes - one was not a whole one - I can only recollect one button being off, as I used only to button the top one; it had three loops.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-7

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

501. JOHN MORETON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 pair of overalls, value 6s. , the goods of John Robert Wilmot Horton .

JOHN GILLAM . I am coachman to John Robert Wilmot Horton, who lives on Richmond-terrace, Whitehall - our horses stood in White Horse-yard, King-street . On the 6th of February, about eleven o'clock at night, I left these overalls in the stable - they were my master's; I went at eight o'clock the next morning, and they were gone. I had seen the prisoner there on the 6th, when I was dressing my horses.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I am a constable of Oxford-street. On the 7th of February, at nine o'clock in the evening, I took the prisoner in charge - I told him it was for stealing a pair of overalls and a coat - he denied knowing any thing of them; I searched him, and among other duplicates I found one on him for the overalls, and as I took him to the watch-house he said, voluntarily, that it was the duplicate of the overalls which he had taken that morning, and it was of no use to deny it.

MICHAEL TAYLOR . I am shopman to Mr. Norman, a pawnbroker, of Princes-street, Leicester-square. On the 7th of February the prisoner pawned these overalls for 2s. 6d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-8

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

502. MICHAEL McDONALD and JAMES PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 tea-caddy, value 10s. , the goods of Matthew Putnam .

HANNAH PUTNAM . I am the wife of Matthew Putnam, a broker - we live in Swinton-place . On the 3d of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Pritchard came by, and gave me information; I then missed this tea-caddy, which had been safe half an hour before; she pointed Phillips out to me, who was going towards Bagnigge-wells - I overtook him, and asked him to give me information about the person who offered him the caddy; he said he knew nothing of him - I secured him, and gave him in charge; in five minutes an officer brought McDonald up; I was at the back of the shop; they must have come inside to take it - it is an open shop.

ELIZABETH WARREN . I live in Bagnigge-wells-road, and can see Putnam's shop from my house. I saw the prisoners lurking about there for above an hour - I passed them several times; they stood talking together at the end of the shop.

SARAH PRITCHARD . I live in Swinton-place, and saw the prisoners near Putnam's shop - they kept looking about, and I thought they were after something in the shop; I stopped for about a minute, and saw McDonald bring the caddy round from the shop, und offer it to Phillips, who, seeing me looking, would not take it - one went down the road, and the other towards Bagnigge-wells; I informed Mrs. Putnam - they both saw me looking at them.

HENRY HINKSMAN . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was passing about half-past two o'clock, and saw both the prisoners standing by this shop; I looked at them, and by the time I had got to the end of Gray's-inn-road McDonald came up, with the caddy under his arm - I secured him, and asked where he was going with it - he said to Bagnigge-wells-road; I took him into the shop, and Mrs. Putnam claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

McDonald received a good character.

McDONALD - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-9

503. CHARLES PITMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 truss of hay, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of George Mash .

JOHN PARKER . I am servant to George Mash, a cow-keeper , at Hackney-wick . On the 16th of January I bound some trusses of hay, and put them on the stack again, behind my master's house - I laid behind the stack, and watched at night; I saw the prisoner come and take a truss on his shoulder, and walk out of the yard - I followed, and stopped him about one hundred yards off, and asked what he was going to do with it; he said, "Take it." I have known him two years - there was no road through the yard.

WILLIAM COWLING . I took the prisoner in charge with the hay.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-10

504. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 iron saucepan, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Biggs .

JOHN BIGGS. I live in Bath-street, City-road , and am a tin-plate-worker . On the 27th of January, about nine o'clock at night, I was in my parlour, and heard a noise; I ran to the door, and missed this saucepan; a boy was pointed out to me, who dropped it - I pursued, and took the prisoner about three hundred yards off; he was running: I lost sight of him two or three times, and would not swear he is the boy, but I believe him to be so.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS JONES . I live in Radnor-street. The prisoner ran by me with this saucepan; I followed him, and he dropped it; I kept very close to him, and did not lose sight of him for above two seconds, while he turned the corner - I am certain he is the boy.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-11

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

505. JAMES READ was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 6 tea-spoons, value 20s.; 1 mustard-spoon, value 2s.; 2 other tea-spoons, value 4s.; 14 napkins, value 21s., and 1 tablecloth, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Lovegrove .

MR. SAMUEL LOVEGROVE. I keep the Horns tavern ; the prisoner was an occasional waiter . In consequence of information which I received from Messrs. Cameron and Co., pawnbrokers, I went to their shop about a week ago, and found six napkins and a tablecloth - part of them have my name at full length; I cannot say when I had seen them safe. I received some duplicates from McKee, and went to Messrs. Lamb and Co., of Stanhope-street. where I found six tea-spoons of one pattern, two of an

other, a mustard-spoon, and some napkins - some of them have my name on them, but it has been picked out from the others; the tea-spoons are marked "Horns tavern," with my name; the marks have been obliterated, but there is enough left for me to identify them, as I have a private mark on them as well. The prisoner was in my employ three or four times a week, till within a day or two of my finding the property. McKee is a perfect stranger, and was never employed in my house.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am shopman to Mr. Cameron. - I have seven napkins and a breakfast-cloth, pawned on the 25th of January, by McKee, for 6s., in the name of Ann Eve - Mr. Lovegrove claimed them on the 29th.

Prisoner. Q. Is the tablecloth marked "Lovegrove?" A. No. only S. L.; two of the articles are marked at full length.

JAMES HOPPER . I am servant to Messrs. Lamb and Co., of Stanhope-street. I have six tea-spoons, pawned on the 11th of January - two tea and a mustard-spoon on the 24th - and seven napkins on the 27th; McKee pawned them all; the marks are taken off them all.

MARGARET McKEE . My husband is a compositor - we live in Craven-buildings, Drury-lane. I have known the prisoner a long time - I pawned some napkins at Cameron's; I bought the duplicates of them of the prisoner's wife, who had pawned them; she said she was distressed, and I bought the duplicates of her at different times; I gave her the money - she got them out; I pawned them again, and gave the duplicates to Mr. Lovegrove; I pawned some more napkins at Lamb and Co.'s, in Stanhope-street; his wife had sold me the duplicates of them also, and I redeemed and pawned them; his wife brought me four tea-spoons one night, saying she was in such misery, would I buy them of her - I gave her 17s. 6d. for them; I bought the duplicate of two more - she got them out, and I pawned them again, at Gideon's, with a mustard-spoon. I cannot say whether the prisoner knew of my having them.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever know me in any other situation? A. Yes - I knew him keeping a tavern at Leith once.

MR. LOVEGROVE. I never saw his wife at my house but once, that was seven or eight months ago, when she called to say he was engaged; she only came into the counting-house, and had no access to the property.

JOSEPH PINE . I am a constable. On the 6th of February Mr. Lovegrove gave the prisoner in charge, at his lodgings, No. 47, Mary-le-bone-lane; Mr. Lovegrove claimed a decanter, a cut glass, and a knife, with his name on it, which were in the room; the prisoner said he could give me no account of them, and he knew nothing of the things.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I admit the napkins are his - they always gave me a supper to take home, and I took them to wrap it in, when I had no glass-cloth of my own, and, as I did not go there every day, I must have forgotten to return them; as to the glass and rummer, they are mine; I never remember taking a tablecloth. I have kept a tavern, and had 160l. worth of plate in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-12

506. JAMES WOOD and THOMAS HUDSON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 2lbs. weight of silk, value 40s., the goods of Thomas Bache , their master .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to George Smith and others.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SIMPSON ENSOR . I am clerk to Messrs. Reed and Knowles, silk-brokers, of Austin-friars. I was at the East India-house when three bales of silk, Nos. 4591 -4592, and 4593 were bought; they were to be sent to Messrs. Smith and McDonald's, silk manufacturers, at Manchester; silk was 20s. 6d. per lb. on the 6th of February.

BENJAMIN BACON . I am delivering commodore at the East India warehouse. I delivered to Newton, Mr. Reed's porter, these three bales of silk.

RICHARD NEWTON . I received three bales of silk, Nos. 4591 - 4592 - and 4593, from Bacon, at the India House, and took them to Mr. Bache's warehouse, in Moor-lane, Cripplegate; one bale had a tear in it, which I helped to sew up - I could see that it contained Bengal silk.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw a tear in it? A. It fell off the cart, the string broke, and the bale burst. I know Bengal silk when I see it - this was on the 5th of February.

WILLIAM HAYNES . I am employed at Thomas Bache's premises; I weighed these three bales while Newton's cart remained; 4591 weighed 1 cwt. 1qr. 17lbs.; 4592 and 4593 each weighed 1 cwt. 1qr. 181/2lbs.; this was about eleven o'clock in the morning; I saw them again about four o'clock, in the lower warehouse - Nos. 4591 and 4593 had then each been opened at the corner - I re-weighed them, and found them each 1lb. deficient.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you weigh with a patent-machine? A. Yes, and sometimes use a small weight to turn the scale. I have the book here in which I enter the weights.

RICHARD DICKENSON . I manage Mr. Bache's business in town; he is a carrier. When these bales came in I determined, for particular reasons, to have them watched; they were put into the lower warehouse, so as to be seen from two trap-doors in the upper warehouse. The prisoners were in Mr. Bache's employ, in the lower warehouse; there was a man named Goff worked there in the course of the day, but he was backwards and forwards; the warehouse is about eight yards by five, and quite light; Mr. Bache is accountable for goods in our care. - I saw the bales re-weighed - there was no break in them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Goff still in your employ? A. Yes.

STEPHEN HAYNES . I remember these bales being placed in the lower warehouse, and about half-past eleven o'clock I placed my son James, to watch, in a loft in the upper warehouse, so that he could not be seen; no workmen were in the lower warehouse then. The prisoners immediately came in, and went to the lower warehouse - no other man was there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see them come in? A. Yes. My son was fourteen years old last April; I have been fifteen years in Mr. Bache's service. I did not watch myself, as my business is downstairs, to receive goods, and enter them. I had nobody

to watch but my son, who is an acute lad - he is not in the prosecutor's service; I never had a misunderstanding with the prisoners; we had been robbed a day or two before, and I thought I would endeavour to find the thieves - I placed the bales so that the boy could see if anybody touched them; he has left school twelve months, and has been about the premises, but had no occupation there.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Why not set your eldest son to watch? A. He was out; I had not arranged to set a watch till the bales came in, and then I thought I would place my son in the loft. I saw Wood go out as I stood at my office door; Hudson remained there an hour after that; my son was locked in the loft, and could not come to me till I let him out.

JAMES HAYNES . I live with my father and mother, at Mr. Bache's. On the 6th of February, at a quarter-past twelve o'clock, my father placed me in the loft to watch; the trap-doors were open, and three bales of silk immediately under them; I was to see if any one touched them; I saw Wood and Hudson there in about a quarter of an hour - Wood put his fingers into one of the bales, opened it, and took some silk out, which he put into his left-hand breeches pocket; a cart came up the yard, and Hudson stamped his foot, as a signal for Wood, who pinched up the hole in the bale, as well as he could, and then left it; they then went away to the cart - they returned in five minutes, and I saw Wood go to another bale, open it, put his fingers in, and take some silk out; he put that down the flap of his apron; Hudson, who was watching at the same place as before, then went to the crane, got a woolhook, and hung it on the bale, to assist Wood - Hudson then asked Wood if he had got any silk handkerchiefs; he said No, and Hudson said he might have some made - I went to the front of the place, and beckoned to my father, but could not make him see me, and being locked in, I could not get out, or I should have gone down immediately. As soon as I saw my father I beckoned to him, and he let me out - the prisoners had left the warehouse before that. (Looking at some silk) this looks like the sort of silk - it was made up in the same way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many of your family are in Mr. Bache's employ? A. Only my father and brother, who is twenty-one years old - I am not in the service. I went to Mr. Tate's, a baker, in Holborn, on liking, for a short time, but left in two or three months, as I did not like the business; we did not quarrel; I have used a gimblet to make rabbit-hutches with, but not for any other purpose - I never bored a hole in a cask.

Q. Did you not bore a hole in a cask of spirits, and treat the men with it, saying, "This is the first time, but it shall not be the last by many hundreds?" A. Never. I was in the loft when these men left the warehouse; they were out of my sight for an hour and a half - I did not call out. because I was told not; I came down from the loft before Wood left the premises; I saw Wood put his hand into one of the bales, and then go away - Hudson remained behind; he went out of the warehouse before Wood; I was coming down stairs, out of the loft, during the five minutes they were absent - I was beckoning to my father when they were taking the silk out, but he was signing a man's book, and could not see me. I do not expect to be employed in the concern.

Q. How long after the men left the bales the first time, did they remain in the yard? A. About five minutes - they went to take some tea out of the cart, and then came back to the silk; they staid at the bale again about five minutes, and then Wood went home to his dinner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you give an alarm? A. When he went out at the gate I called to my father, and said he was going out; he went to dinner - it was his dinner time.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is the dinner hour? A. One o'clock; I was put into the loft about half-past twelve. The first time Wood left the warehouse was to get the tea out of the cart; Hudson went with him. I did all I could to make my father see me - if he had come up to let me out they could have left the place the while - the men were going down the yard when I told him; we went in pursuit of them immediately, but could not see them; my father could not find an officer - they came back in about half an hour. I was never accused of using a gimblet for a dishonest purpose.

HENRY FOSTER . I am a marshalman. I took the prisoners into custody on the 6th, at Mr. Bache's premises; I found nothing on them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you search their lodgings the same day? A. Yes - I found no silk; they had no notice that their lodgings were to be searched.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-13

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

507. CHARLES SEWARD was indicted for that, at a Special Session of the delivery of the gaol of the County of Kent, holden at Maidstone, on the 2d of January, in the 6th year of his present Majesty's reign, the said Charles Seward was, in due form of law, tried and convicted on an indictment against him, for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Nugent, and was thereupon ordered and adjudged to be hanged by the neck until he should be dead, but his Majesty having been graciously pleased to extend the Royal mercy to him, on condition of his being transported for the term of Fourteen Years; and afterwards, to wit, on the 15th of January last, feloniously was at large, without lawful cause, within his Majesty's dominions, to wit, at St. Clement Danes, before the expiration of the said term, for which he was so ordered to be transported, as aforesaid, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting to set out the caption of the Session, and the indictment.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18270215-14

508. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Hamilton Townsend , on the 12th of February , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 watch-chain, value 2s.; 2 seals, value 2l., and 2 watchkeys, value 5s. , his property.

RICHARD HAMILTON TOWNSEND. I am clerk and warehouseman at a gold and silver manufactory in Old-street. On Monday night, the 12th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I was coming from the coach-office in Lad-lane, home to my master's, and in Golden-

lane, opposite the end of Ball-yard , a man seized me by my arms, and a boy then ran against me, and snatched my watch - the chain broke off close to the watch, and he went off with the seals and chain; I had no opportunity of seeing who the man was then; the boy ran away with my seals; I do not know what what became of the man. - I turned round and saw him, but not so as to give a description of him. I followed the boy, crying Stop thief! five or six men joined in the pursuit - they said the boy had ran that way, which was up a parcel of courts - I ran too, about thirty yards, I suppose, and when I could get no further, as the court was no thoroughfare, one of the men said, "Are you sure you have got your watch safe- you had better see if you have;" I was in the act of putting my hand into my fob, to see if it was safe, and while I was lifting up my waistcoat some of them seized me behind, held my arm, tore open my waistcoat, and snatched the watch out of my fob, by the watch-guard which was round my neck; I cannot say who that man was, as he came behind me; they all ran away, and I pursued them.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the five men? A. He is one of the men who ran away with them, but it was almost dark in the court; I am sure he is one of the men who ran away; I followed them, and somebody attempted to trip me up; I pushed that man down - they were all round me; I was between them; I called Stop thief! and the prisoner fell down; some of them pushed by me, but I kept close to the prisoner; the man who pushed past me went and took something out of the prisoner's hand, which I believe to be my watch - the man ran away, and got off. The prisoner got up - several people assisted me, and he was taken into the public-house - I am sure he is the man.

JOHN CAVE . I am a chair-carver. I was going up Golden-lane; Townsend hallooed out Stop thief! I saw the mob run with him; I followed, and lost sight of them when they went up a turning to the left; I was coming back again, and Townsend was running after the prisoner, who fell - he was secured immediately; I am certain he was running with the men - I have not the least doubt of him.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a headborough, and live in Golden-lane. I took the prisoner into custody - he was all over mud, as if he had been down.

CHARLES GAMBLE . I am a constable, and assisted Edwards in taking the prisoner, who was all over mud.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Golden-lane, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw a great many people going along, and went up to see what was the matter; I fell over a little boy who was going along, and hurt my arm - a young man picked me up, and this man said I was with the people who robbed him; they took me to a public-house, and found nothing on me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18270215-15

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

509. WILLIAM QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 2 watches, value 3l. 10s.; 3 seals, value 35s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 4 yards of cloth, value 2l.; 1 pelisse, value 10s.; 1 shirt, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 pair of ear-rings, value 4s., the goods of John Quin , in his dwelling-house .

ANN QUIN . I am the wife of John Quin - we live in Castle-place, Castle-lane, Westminster - we only lodge there; Mr. Wood rents the house, and lives there; the prisoner is my husband's brother. On the 27th of January I went out at six o'clock in the morning - I returned at nine in the evening, having got the key of the door from my husband, who was at the Stag public-house, Castle-lane; when I got home I found the door open - I had left my husband at home in the morning, and left the keys in the drawer. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were all safe in the drawers the day before; I then went in search of the prisoner - I found him at the bottom of Lamb's-place, Castle-lane - I accused him of taking them; he said he knew nothing about it - he lives in Crane-court, Castle-lane, not a hundred yards from us; I followed him to the top of the lane, and then gave him in charge; he was taken to the watch-house, but nothing was found upon him - as we were going to the watch-house I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and give something to a boy named Stirrup, but I do not know what it was.

JOSEPH MILLS . I am a watchman. I was calling ten o'clock, and the prisoner was given into my charge - I saw him take something from his pocket and hand to a boy.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not 3d. to get me something to eat? A. I do not know what it was.

ANN POLGLASS . I live opposite Quin's, and know the prisoner by sight. On the 27th of January I saw the prisoner go into the house where John Quin lives; he had nothing in his hand; he came out in about ten minutes, with a large bundle under his arm - it was tied in either a blue handkerchief or apron. I was standing at the window - it was in the afternoon, before dark.

ROBERT FRANKLIN . I live at No. 6, Crane-court, Castle-lane. One Saturday, about a month ago - I do not know what month it was in, for I do not know the months of the year - it was about a quarter or half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in Castle-lane, with a bundle; I did not notice what it was covered with - I was just turning out of Isabella-row, and saw him going down Castle-lane.

WILLIAM STOTT . I live in Great Peter-street, Westminster. I have known the prisoner three or four months - I saw him on a Saturday, three weeks ago - he came to me on the canal in the Park, about four o'clock, and asked me to come with him - I asked where - he said not far - I came out of the Park with him; and when we got out at the gate a biggish boy called him - he went to him, and told him to wait there - he came out in about two minutes, and asked me to go with him - I went with him into a public-house, in High-street, Bloomsbury - he called for a pint of beer - we sat there talking - he said he had got some things to pawn - I asked him who for - he said he had them to pawn for somebody, and he should be satisfied for his trouble - he asked if I would go and pawn them; he gave me one article at a time - I asked why he did not pawn them himself - he said it did not matter who went - I said I would go, and he might wait there till I came back - I went and pawned the cloth for 16s.,

and then a watch with a chain and three seals to it; another watch, a pair of black breeches, a shirt, a waistcoat, and a pelisse - I pawned them at five different pawnbrokers - he went with me when I took the pelisse - I received all the articles from him, and gave him the money; I offered him the duplicates - he told me to put them into my pocket a bit - we then went towards home - I asked where he was going; he said he was going to take the money to the chap he got the things from - I went into the Coach and Horses public-house in York-street, and saw no more of him - I afterwards went to see him in Tothill-fields - he said the young chap, who he pawned the things for, had told him to burn the tickets as they were not wanted - I burnt them; I went to him next day and told him so; he said that was right - I pawned the things in the name of George Smith, No. 21, King-street, except the pelisse, which Quin told me to put in Eliza West's name; the pawnbroker asked my name, and put down William Stott for Eliza West - I have been in custody ever since last Monday, as I did not find bail for my appearance here; my master would have bailed me if I had chosen.

Prisoner. Q. Who was the young chap who was with me? A. I do not know; I left the prisoner about eight o'clock.

Q. You told the Magistrate you burnt the tickets the same night? A. I did not.

GEORGE SHEPHERD . I am servant to Mr. Wood, of High-street, Bloomsbury. I have a watch, three seals, and a key pawned on the 27th of January for 25s.; two persons brought them, but I cannot be positive of either.

WILLIAM NATHAN . I am shopman to Mr. Hawes, a pawnbroker of High-street, Bloomsbury. I have a silver watch pawned on the 27th of January, in the name of George Smith, No. 21, King-street; I do not know who by.

DAVID JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On the 27th of January, two remnants of cloth and a silk handkerchief were pawned with me for 16s. in the name of George Smith, No. 21, King-street, by Stott.

DAVID TRAIL . I am shopman to Mr. Wise of Broad-street. I have a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, and shirt, pawned on the 27th of January, in the name of George Smith, No. 21, King-street; I believe Stott to be the person.

FREDERICK CHESTERMAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker of Holborn. I have a pelisse pawned on the 27th of January by Stott for Eliza West, of King-street - another person was with Stott, whom I do not remember.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LEWIS BATHGATE . I am a constable - the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on Saturday night, the 27th of January; I found nothing on him but a few halfpence.

W. STOTT. I know these to be the things that I pawned; I received them all from the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Where had I got them? A. When you came back from the young chap, you had a bundle; you went down towards Castle-lane with the young chap; the pawnbrokers intimated that I had stolen the property, and I said I did not know they were stolen; he told me what money to ask on them, but to take what they offered.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home about a quarter before nine o'clock; I saw my sister, who said she was going to fetch the key to go home; I went home in about half an hour, and my father said my brother had been looking for me - I went out and met my sister, who gave me in charge - Stott came to me, and said if I knew any thing about it, why not tell, as my brother would let me go.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-16

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

510. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Long .

MR. PRICE JAMES EVANS . I am a surgeon of Hanwell. On the 14th of January I was first called to attend the deceased at Hanwell; he was in the service of the prisoner, who lives at Hanwell, and is a chimney-sweeper ; I found him completely insensible, which I understood to be from a fall which he had received the day before; the prisoner said he had fallen from a chimney at Norwood-green; he was quite insensible and in danger - his situation might doubtless be caused by such a fall; I endeavoured to to bleed him, but could not from his fainting state - he continued so some hours before I could give him medicines; I afterwards gave him medicines for four or five days, and he recovered; I attended him from Sunday to Thursday; I examined his head minutely on the Sunday; there was no cut or fracture whatever - I considered his symptoms to arise from concussion of the brain; when he got better he told me that he had had a fall; he was perfectly recovered, and went to his usual business. I was called in again on the 27th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, and sent a message for them to put him into a hot-bath immediately, as they said he was in a fit; I went down in about half an hour and found him dead; there were no external marks of injury perceivable; I considered him, on the Saturday, to have died from apoplexy, which I then thought might have been occasioned by the wound he received on the 13th of January, and on the 30th of I was present when his head was opened.

MARY DARBEN . I live at Hanwell. The deceased was at my house on Monday morning, the 22d of January, a quarter before nine o'clock; he came and asked if I would have my chimney swept; I said No, it was too cold; I had not sent for any body to sweep my chimney - I knew he was in the prisoner's service; he asked me to give him a piece of bread and butter - I cut him a thick slice, and stood him by the fire to eat it; his master came and asked if he was there, and before I could speak he collared him, knocked him down, and beat him violently with a stick, which was rather thicker than my middle finger - he struck him over the loins and shoulders; and when he was knocked down, the left side of his head came against the wall; there was a sooty mark on the wall where his head had been; the child then went out - he laid hold of him by the collar and dashed him on the grating in front of my door; the poor boy cried, but said nothing; he struck him four or five times after he went out of the house, and struck him while he was on the ground; the

poor child ran home; he repeated the blows till the stick broke, and I saw no more.

Prisoner. Q. How long was he in your house? A. He might have been there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; you said something about "How long you have been gone," and hit him - he fell on his side in front of my house; his head did not touch the grating.

ELIZABETH MAN . I am the deceased's mother; he was eleven years old on the 9th of January, and had been three months with the prisoner - he generally had a pretty good state of health; he had a fit about five years ago, which was occasioned by falling off a chair; he always told me that the prisoner used him well.

THOMAS VARNEY . I am a labourer, and live at Hanwell. On Monday morning, the 22d of January, I saw the prisoner pick the deceased up out of the kennel, and hit him across the shoulders with a stick - he ran away, and I saw no more.

MARY VARNEY . I am the wife of the last witness, and live next door to Darben - Long came to my house about nine o'clock, on the 22d of January, and asked if I wanted my chimney swept; I had not sent for him; I said, No; he remained in my house about ten minutes warming himself, and then went to Darben's; in about ten minutes, I was up-stairs, and heard a noise; I looked out of the window and saw him laying on the grating; he got up, and the prisoner beat him down, as far as the cage, across the back with a stick.

MR. G. J. R. J. DICKENSON. I am a surgeon, and live at Ealing. On the Tuesday after this boy died, I, Mr. Evans and Mr. Hutchinson examined his body; I opened his head, and on removing the scalp there was a mark of extravasation over the right temple bone, on the pericranium, another over the frontal bone, another at the back part of the head, inclining to the right - on removing the skull-cap there was a corresponding mark with that on the right temple bone within the scull; the whole brain was gorged with blood, and the frontal stylus ruptured; and in the ventricles there was a larger quantity of serum than there should naturally be; there was no appearance of disease whatever in the body; I attribute his death decidedly to the rupture of the frontal stylus; a blow, however inflicted, might occasion that, but the injury was decidedly very recently inflicted; his fall from the chimney could have nothing to do with it; he could not have lived an hour after the injury, nor could he have died on Saturday from the injury received on the Monday, or there would have been a very different appearance on the brain; his death could not have been occasioned by either of the transactions mentioned; I understand he swept three chimneys on the morning he died, and the injury must have been subsequent to that, for this is a very large vessel that was ruptured; he was a poor half-starved boy, as we found from dissection, and his vessels would not go on very actively.

MR. EVANS. I was present on the 30th of January, and agree with Mr. Dickenson's statement; I attribute his death to the rupture of the stylus, which could not have been occasioned by either of the circumstances mentioned- when I saw him on Saturday he appeared to have been dead about half an hour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-17

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

510. WILLIAM BLACMAN and GEORGE CULLUM were charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with killing and slaying John Diggory .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

The prisoners and the deceased were paupers in the workhouse of St. Ann, Soho - the deceased, who was between sixty and seventy years of age, (and had long been afflicted with a stricture), was sitting on a form before the fire, and the prisoners, in order to remove him, had pulled the form from under him - the injury received in the fall produced inflammation in certain parts, and finally caused mortification, of which he died.

BLACKMAN - GUILTY . Aged 31.

CULLUM - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-18

511. WILLIAM BLANCHARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Cory , about one o'clock in the night of the 27th of January at St. Luke, with intent to steal, and stealing 10 live tame rabbits, price 14s., and 9 live tame fowls, price 18s. , his property.

JOHN CORY. I live in Brick-lane, in the parish of St. Luke, Middlesex , and rent the house - I am a publican . On the 27th of January I was called up about six o'clock in the morning by the watchman, whom I let in - we went into the back yard and found my rabbits gone, which were safe the night before - all the doors of the hutches were open - I then went to where I had put my fowls the night before - I found the padlock wrenched off and the door wide open - on looking in I discovered my ten fowls were gone - they were all alive and safe at seven o'clock on the evening before; it was then dark, and so it was when the watchman called me - I kept the rabbits in a wooden shed in the yard - it joins the dwelling-house and has a door to it - that door was not locked - there was no latch to it - a push would open it - the fowls were kept in a place adjoining to the rabbits - that place is brick-work about eight feet high, and then wood - the door of that place was locked the night before- a hole was cut in the bottom for the fowls to go out - I found the staple drawn - the places all joined one another, and are built against the house - the rabbit-shed joins the house - both places are in the yard, and cannot be entered without going into the yard, which belongs to my dwelling-house only - the staple of the padlock was wrenched off and laid with the padlock locked on the ground - it was locked and on the door at seven o'clock the evening before - I had ten live fowls there - when I came into the yard I perceived two of the fowls' heads laying on the ground, and the watchman had picked up three more - there was a good deal of blood close to the shed where the fowls were kept - the rabbits were tame - I had bred seven of them, the other three were given to my son, who is quite a child - they were mine - by the foot marks in the snow on the ground our attention was drawn to a wall which joins the street, and we found two ladders placed against the wall - they were not there the night before - I then went to the watch-house, and found four live fowls and three dead ones, an old rabbit and seven young ones, which I could swear to - I then returned to my yard, and the first thing I saw in going to my rabbit-shed was a small

iron crow-bar, which I gave to the constable - I value the three large rabbits at 3s. each, and the young ones at 9d., and the fowls at 3s. each.

EDWARD KENDALL . I am a watchman - Cory's house is in my beat. On the 27th of January, at half-past one o'clock in the morning, I heard something fall very heavy from Cory's wall, and presently I saw two men go from that spot - they looked from the corner of Cory's house right and left to see if any watchman was there; they then came back to the dead part of the wall, and I distinguished them under the gas-lamp, at the corner of the house - I saw them go from there by the gas-lamp, with something on their persons - I immediately followed and came up with the prisoner, who was one of them, and asked what he had got in his apron - he then threw them all out of his apron - they were rabbits, but I could not tell the number - this was about fifty yards from Cory's house- I found two dead fowls at his feet, which must have come from the apron, and a bag containing four fowls, one old rabbit, and a young one, which I suppose the other man, who had made his escape, had left behind - the bag was close to the prisoner - I called my fellow-watchman, who assisted in securing the prisoner - I sprang my rattle, as the rabbits were running in all directions - two other watchmen came and picked them up; we took them to the watch-house with the prisoner - we came back, and about four o'clock found another rabbit, and another before five o'clock - Waters, the constable of the night, found another fowl opposite Cory's wall, and in the morning Cory found three fowls' heads - five heads were found in all - the padlock laid on the ground - we took the rabbits and every thing to the watch-house.

JAMES FARLEY . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 27th of January, about half-past one o'clock, Kendall called me - I was about fifty yards from Cory's house - I saw the prisoner, and collared him - the rabbits were running about - he had nothing about him then - we picked up what we could find - they were close to the prisoner, and at his feet was a bag with some fowls - Wicks, the watchman, carried the bag to the watch-house, and I assisted in taking the prisoner there - I returned to the place, and the officer of the night picked up a fowl under the wall, which he took to the watch-house.

WILLIAM LEEKEY . I am a watchman. On the 27th of January, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I was called - Farley had the prisoner in charge - the rabbits were running about the street - I saw six, but I could only catch two, which I took to the watch-house, and delivered to Waters - I returned to the spot and saw Waters find a dead fowl, which he took to the watch-house - I saw another rabbit run into a dark hole - Kendall picked it up, and took it to the watch-house.

THOMAS WICKS . I am a watchman. On the 27th of January I heard the rattles spring, and found the prisoner in Farley's charge - the rabbits were running in all directions - I picked up two - I gave one to Waters, and when I got to the watch-house I gave him the other - Kendall gave me the bag, which I also took to the watch-house, it contained four fowls and two rabbits, all alive - some dead fowls lay at the prisoner's feet when I came up.

GEORGE WATERS . I am an officer of the night. I met four watchmen coming to the watch-house at half-past one o'clock on this morning, and the prisoner was in their custody - Wicks had the bag and two rabbits - I took one from him and carried it to the watch-house - the other watchman had two rabbits, and the bag contained two live rabbits, four live fowls, and one dead one without a head; I took possession of them all - I searched the prisoner, but found nothing on him but a few halfpence - there were spots of blood on his shoes - I went back with the watchman to the spot, and found a dead fowl without a head, laying in the kennel close under Cory's wall; another rabbit ran into a dust-hole, and was picked up and taken to the watch-house - Kendall brought another in about five o'clock - I returned them all to Cory after the examination - there was one old rabbit, seven young ones, four live fowls, and three dead ones.

THOMAS WALKER . I am watch-house-keeper. On the 27th of January the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - he had an apron on, which was bloody; I went to Cory's in the morning - he gave me a piece of iron, and I saw a ladder in his yard - I produce the apron and iron.

GEORGE WATERS . The live rabbits have been in Cory's possession - I produce the padlock, five fowls' heads, which were found on the premises, and the bag, which the fowls and rabbits were brought to the watch-house in - there were only three dead fowls found - eight rabbits have been found out of ten.

JOHN CORY . This is my padlock - the five fowls' heads are black, and those I lost were black - I picked up two of them myself within a yard of the door - I have got back three dead fowls, two of them are black, the other is a speckled cock - the four live ones are also black - I cannot swear to the heads, but can swear to the fowls which I have got back - they are a smaller breed than the generality - I bred three of them myself, and two of the dead ones - all the rabbits are alive, but two are missing - here are the rabbits - I am quite certain of them - I have a mark on the old one, and have no doubt of the seven young ones - I received them all from Waters after the examination - I have no dog.

E. KENDALL re-examined. I cannot say how many he had in his apron, as he let them fall - the old rabbit was in the bag and the four live fowls.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Brick-lane, and saw a man at Cory's door, with the things on the step - he asked me to help him down to John's-row with them, and he would give me 1s. I accordingly took the bag - the watchman laid hold of me, and the man ran directly off.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, in consequence of his good character, and believing him to have been distressed .

Reference Number: t18270215-19

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

512. THOMAS HUBBACK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 14lbs. of mutton, value 8s. , the goods of Ann Phillips .

ANN PHILLIPS. I am a widow , and keep a cook-shop in St. Martin's-le-grand . Last Friday night, about seven o'clock, this mutton was safe inside the shop - I was told it was gone in about half an hour, and James brought the prisoner into the shop with it - he is a stranger.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am a constable, and live in Shaftes

bury-place, Aldersgate-street. I saw the prisoner and another young man lurking about Aldersgate-street, and watched them - I went into Noble-street, and returned in ten minutes - I saw them crossing Falcon-square - the prisoner had a bundle; I said, "What have you got here?" he said some mutton which his master had purchased in Newgate-market - I took him to three butchers who did not own it - he then said it was of no use to deny it, it came from the cook-shop - Mrs. Phillips claimed it - his companion escaped.

Prisoner. It hung in the passage, and the street-door was open.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270215-20

513. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 14lbs. of tapioca, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Haines and another.

HENRY HARRINGTON . I am carman to Thomas Haines, who has a partner - they live in Watling-street . On the 10th of January, about half-past seven o'clock, I left the cart at the door for about two minutes - there were two 14 lbs. parcels of tapioca in it; as I returned I saw the prisoner take one out of the cart, and seized him going away with it - he begged hard to be let go, and said he was not the man - I gave him in charge.

ARTHUR WEBB . I am a constable - I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-21

514. JAMES DEMPSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two 10l. Bank notes, the property of Thomas Bilson, from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-22

515. WILLIAM WARD and WILLIAM HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 2 shillings and 1 sixpence, the monies of William Williams , from his person .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I am a licensed hawker , and live in New-street, Cloth-fair. On the 30th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock at night - (I had been spending the evening with some friends, at the Three Tuns public-house, in Redcross-street, but was quite sober - we had three or four pints of beer) I was going home, and a friend asked me to go into Golden-lane, and have a glass of gin; when I came into Barbican again I met a respectable gentleman, drunk, with two girls about him, who I thought were going to rob him - I got them from him, and in about five minutes I was in Golden-lane , and eight or ten men came along, opposite the gin-shop; I endeavoured to pass them, but they surrounded me - some of them held me while the others went to my breeches pocket, where this money was - Ward was one of those who surrounded me, and Harris went to my breeches pocket, from which I lost two shillings, a sixpence, a piece of ginger, and a piece of sealing-wax. When I got loose I ran away towards Barbican, and went home as quick as I could. I gave information the next morning, and about twelve o'clock that day we took Ward at the Lamb and Lion public-house, in Golden-lane - I am quite sure he was one of the party who surrounded me; I described both their persons and dress to the officers. Harris was taken between nine and ten o'clock that evening, at a public-house in Moor-lane; I was quite certain of him - they were strangers before.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who had you been with? A. Mr. Hurst and two young men who use the house; neither of them are here. I was alone when I was robbed. Hurst had gone with me to the Brittania public-house, to have a glass of gin - I was as sober as I am now - I missed my pocket-book the following morning; I generally carry it about with me, but whether I had it that night I cannot tell - it was found the next day, at the public-house, and I know I had it at the public-house in the afternoon. I might have dropped it in the house; I found it in the hands of a person whom I frequently see there - I do not know how it got out of my possession. I did not have that man taken up - there was nothing in it but my licence. The prisoner Ward was holding me - he was dressed in a long blue coat, a hat, and, I believe, a yellow handkerchief - it happened between twelve o'clock and half-past.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are just as sure of one person as the other? A. I swear more positively to Ward, if any thing - I could pick him out from a thousand. I am certain of Harris also - he is a man of colour - I was not five yards from two lamps; I am certain I was robbed when they surrounded me; I was quite sober, but frightened. There is nobody here to swear I was sober - I had a witness at Guildhall, but the clerk said it was not necessary; I called for a watchman, but none came up, and I went home. I met the officers between nine and ten o'clock the next morning, and told them I was robbed of 2s. 6d., my pocket-book, and licence; I thought I might have lost the book in the scuffle, but was certain they robbed me of 2s. 6d., as they went to my breeches pocket - I kept my pocket-book in my side pocket, and have dropped it before now, when I have been sober. If I had not found it I should have thought that they had got it; I would not have sworn that they had stolen it. I felt the man's hand in my breeches pocket. I paid 5d. as my share of the beer - I am sure I did not take my pocket-book out of my pocket- I generally sleep at this house when my brother has not got a bed for me. I am not certain whether I told the officers I was robbed of my pocket-book, or had lost it.

JOHN ATTERWELL . I am a letter-founder, and have been a constable. On the 30th of January, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I was with the new street-keeper of Cripplegate - the prosecutor was with him; the street-keeper asked me if I knew the parties; the prosecuto described several to me, one as having held his arm, and another as taking the money. I went with him, and we apprehended Ward, whom he had described as having a long blue coat, with pockets at the side - he said he held his arms; Ward's dress corresponded with that description; I took him at the Lion and Lamb, in Golden-lane, about twelve o'clock that day - the prosecutor went in first; he then fetched us, and said, "This is the man who held my arms, I am certain, and we secured him; he told me he had lost 1s. 6d., or half-a-crown; he did not exactly say half-a-crown; he mentioned something about a pocket-

book, which he thought he had lost at the same time: Ward denied the charge. We were all day looking for Harris, whom I knew well, by Williams' description - we took him at the King's Head public-house, Little Moorfields; when Williams saw him he said, "That is the man who took the money out of my breeches pocket" - he denied it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long were you a constable? A. Two or three months - I was only an extra man; I suppose others had more interest than me - I am now on the extra duty, but have done nothing. I was with the new street-keeper, as I know the neighbourhood better than him. I heard the prosecutor say that Ward pinioned his hands; he has not said so to-night- I think Ward had a Belcher handkerchief on when I took him; there are two or three colours in a Belcher - it was not yellow.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you going to work when you met the prosecutor? A. I was going on my master's business; I dare say I should have gone to my master if the street-keeper had not beckoned me over. I go to work at what hour I like, and my master is satisfied, as I am only paid for what I do; Williams told me he had lost the pocket-book in the scuffle - I rather think he said he had lost it at the same time as he lost the money.

JOHN GAYDON . I am a City officer. I saw Williams, who told me he had been robbed of half-a-crown, and had lost his pocket-book - he said he was in Golden-lane at half-past twelve o'clock, outside the gin-shop, and was pinioned by a short man and a man of colour - that the short man field him while the man of colour picked his pocket - he did not describe their dress to me; when we took Ward, Williams said, "That is the man who pinioned me while the other picked my pocket;" Harris was taken at half-past nine o'clock that night, and Williams said he had taken half-a-crown from his pocket - they both denied the charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. If he had described Ward's dress, must you not have heard it? A. He did not describe the dress to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not collect from him that he had lost his pocket-book and money in the same kind of scuffle? A. He said he had lost his pocket-book and 2s. 6d., whether he meant at the same time I cannot say.

The Prisoners' Counsel called -

MRS. WOOLMAN. I live in Tabernacle-walk. Ward married my daughter - they have lodged with me for the last three or four months. On the night before he was apprehended he came home about ten o'clock - he sleeps on the second floor, and so do I; I went to bed about eleven, and left him and his wife up, as they sleep in the sitting-room - he could not have gone out without my hearing him.

Q. Why not? A. He had no occasion to have gone out - I heard him talking to his wife at twelve o'clock, and saw him at nine the next morning; he was not out of doors.

MRS. HILL. I rent the house where Mrs. Woolman lives; Ward came home about nine o'clock on the night in question, and, I believe, he was not out afterwards - my bed-room is on the first floor, and I certainly must have heard him if he had.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-23

516. MICHAEL COTTON and THEOPHILUS COTTON were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 wicker-basket, value 1s., and 72 glass bottles, value 19s., the goods of James Penny Hillman , their master .

Mr. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SMITH . I am a street-keeper. Mr. Hillman is a bottle-merchant , and lives in Old Swan-lane, Upper Thames-street . On the morning of the 12th of January I saw Theophilus Cotton about eighty yards from Mr. Hillman's warehouse, coming in a direction from there, with a prickle basket (which bottles are carried in) on his shoulder - he was alone, and went up Great Bush-lane; the prisoner Michael then passed me, and wished me good morning, and he joined Theophilus in Chequer-yard; I saw them go into Kennet's, on Dowgate-hill, both together - Michael assisted in taking the basket off Theophilus' shoulder; I saw Kennet at the door, taking it in; I informed Mr. Hillman as soon as I could see him. Michael was at Mr. Hillman's when I went there, and at first denied assisting him down with the basket till I recalled it to his mind.

Q. What did he say? A. He asked if I wanted to implicate him; I said no further than that he assisted in taking the bottles off the man's shoulder, which he admitted; he said he did not rightly know the man, but thought he should if he saw him; I went to Kennet's with Mr. Hillman - he was not at home; I found him at Tower-hill: when I went to his house a second time I saw several baskets; he hesitated about the matter; the basket was never produced in my presence. I took Michael into custody the same day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What basket Theophilus had, you cannot tell? A. It was a prickle - there are a great many in London. I did not see Michael near him till he got into Chequer-yard, which is about one hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Hillman's. I knew Michael before - he knew me to be a street-keeper; it took him a minute or two to get to the place after he passed me - I was about five yards off when he helped the basket down - I do not know whether he saw me; I did not hide myself; it was about a quarter-past eight o'clock, and daylight; Mr. Hillman spoke to him first, and then sent for me, and asked me about it - I asked if he did not assist a man to take a basket of bottles off his shoulder, at Mr. Kennet's - he rather equivocated at first, and neither said Yes nor No, but, "What, do you wish to implicate me in it?" he said he certainly did assist in taking it off, but at first said he might assist for what he knew, but he denied it at first. Kennet is a wine-cooper and bottle-dealer. The prisoners both know me perfectly well.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you on duty? A. Yes - I go on duty at half-past six o'clock in the winter. I do not think Theophilus saw me. I did not stop them, but went to Mr. Hillman's.

MR. JAMES PENNY HILLMAN . My warehouse is in Old Swan-lane, in the City. On the 12th of February the prisoner Michael was in my employ - Theophilus is his cousin; I have heard Michael call him cousin - they have

both worked together in my warehouse; Theophilus sailed one voyage in a ship of mine, and worked in my warehouse as well; as he was badly off Michael asked me to employ him, and I sent him a voyage. I deal in bottles. In consequence of Smith's information I went to Kennet's house, and saw a prickle and some bottles - it is such a prickle as I have in my warehouse, and is bound round with spun-yarn, as I generally do mine - Theophilus was not in my service that day, and was not employed to carry any basket from my warehouse - Michael was in nobody's employ but mine: he has been my foreman for three years, but has been in my service longer than that - I sent for him into the house on this morning, and told him the street-keeper had informed me some bottles had been taken from my warehouse to Kennet's, and that his name was mentioned, but I could not believe it - he said he was going up to be shaved; I said, "You helped the man down with the basket?" - he said he did not, but afterwards that he did; I asked if he knew the man - he said perhaps he might; he afterwards said perhaps he might have helped the man down with it - I then sent for the street-keeper up, and said, "Is this the man who helped the man down with the basket?" he said it was - Michael then said, "Can you swear I am the man?" or words to that effect - I still had so good an opinion of him that I could not believe it. I told him to go to work, and I would see further into it; I did not go to Kennet's place till after we found him on Tower-hill - I then found my basket there; Kennet pointed out six dozens of bottles, in a prickle, but they had been washed. I went back, and gave Michael in charge. The bottles were worth 19s. 6d., and the prickle 1s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many does a prickle hold? A. Six dozens, but it will hold six more. I bind my prickles all round with spun-yarn - they are usually bound in three or four places - I never saw any bound like mine. I know all the bottle-merchants in London - there are about thirteen of us; I do not believe there are more. I found Michael at work as usual - there was nothing to prevent his escaping; I gave him to understand that I wished to punish Kennet, and of course he would get off, if he became a witness. I merely said I would punish the receiver - he did not refuse to become a witness; he said he was innocent.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was Theophilus present during any part of this conversation? A. No. Michael gave me to understand the person was unknown to him. The bottles would weight about 120lbs.; it would require assistance to be got off his shoulder.

WILLIAM KENNET . I live at No. 13, Dowgate-hill, and am a wine-cooper and bottle-dealer. I know Michael Cotton, and have seen the other prisoner before, I think, but not to know any thing of him; I think I have seen him before, but am not sure. On the 12th of January, about twenty minutes or half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was up at breakfast, and thought I heard a ring at the bell; I live on the first floor - I threw up the sash, and there was the man at the door, with a basket of bottles; I saw Michael helping them off some other man's back - I went down, and opened the door; the man who brought them said there was a parcel of bottles for me; I took them in, and said I would look them over. The man went away, and I went up to breakfast.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you hear this case opened to-night? A. Yes - I heard the gentleman say if I did not swear what was expected of me, I might go into some place not quite convenient - I understood him to mean Newgate. I have come to speak the truth; I dare say the gentlemen would send me to Newgate if they could, but I do not think they can send me there - I have no doubt Mr. Hillman would prosecute me if he could; I did not know the things were stolen; when baskets get old it is very common to bind them with rope-yarn. I should think there were more than thirteen persons in the wholesale bottle trade, but I do not know how many. I had about ten gross of bottles in my place; a great many were washed; these were the same as other bottles. I have seen many hundreds of prickles bound with spun-yarn in this manner.

COURT. Q. Did you point out any bottles to Mr. Hillman? A. He asked what bottles had come in that morning, and I showed him six dozen which had come in that prickle. The prickle that Mr. Hillman claimed stood among forty or fifty others - it was bound completely round; he said he thought it was his, but he could not swear to it; I do not know that any of the others were bound - it is not here.

MR. LAW. Q. In whose possession is it? A. I think it is in mine; I was not asked by any body to bring it here - I was never asked to deliver it up, or I should have done so - I think it is in my place now.

THEOPHILUS COTTON - GUILTY . Aged 28.

But not being a servant. - Transported for Seven Years .

MICHAEL COTTON - GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-24

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

517. GEORGE PALMER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Molloy , in an open field, near the King's highway, on the 31st of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 seal, value 2s., and 1 key, value 1s. , his property.

THOMAS MOLLOY. I have been a pilot, and now belong to the Trinity alms-houses . On the 31st of August, at twelve o'clock in the day, I was walking through Bishop Bonner's field, at Bethnal-green , and all of a sudden two men rushed upon me, one on each side, and the one on the right snatched at my watch; the ribbon broke, and they got the seal and key - they ran off with them: I saw but two men - neither of them held me; I called Stop thief! two or three men ran up, and asked if I had been ill-used, and asked my address, which I gave them - I cannot say how either of the men who robbed me were dressed. I was so flurried I cannot say whether I put my hand down to protect my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the prisoner taken before the Magistrate in December, on this charge? A. I believe he was there in December - I do not know whether he was discharged.

JAMES PURSER . I live on my property, at Bethnalgreen. On the 31st of August I was close to Bishop Bonner's field, and saw the prisoner and five others; I watched

them for a quarter of an hour, at the bottom of the north side - they were sitting and tossing on the grass, about three hundred yards from where the prosecutor was robbed; they were all in company together - I am positive the prisoner was one - I had seen him a hundred times before. In about a quarter of an hour they all got up, and came close past me - I watched them, and when opposite some buildings in Bonner's field the whole six changed their dresses; three took their coats and hats off, and gave to the others - three then went round to the left - the other three remained opposite the buildings, and in about two minutes the three returned to the others, and then changed dresses again. The prisoner was one of the six, but I cannot say whether he was one who went round the building; when they came back there was a cry of Stop thief! and I ascertained that Molloy was robbed; I took his address. I was in front of the buildings, and the robbery was committed behind, within fifty yards of where they changed dresses.

Cross-examined. Q. You will not say that the prisoner went behind the building? A. No.

GEORGE HALL . I am a cabinet-maker. On the 31st of August, about twelve o'clock, I was close by Bonner's field, and saw six persons crossing the field; I saw Molloy turn down the side of Bonner's buildings; the six all followed him; three laid down in the grass, and changed dresses - three then went round to the left, to meet Molloy- the other three got up in a few minutes, and turned to the right hand; I heard a call of Stop thief! and saw the whole six running away together, within a minute or two of my hearing the cry; Molloy was robbed not more than thirty yards from where they changed dresses. The prisoner was one of the six, and one of those who went round the building, meeting Molloy.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at Worship-street in December? A. I believe it was in December that the prisoner was there, but no witness being there but Molloy, he was liberated, and taken again in two or three days.

LEWIS MYERSON . I am a constable. On the 31st of August I was close by Bonner's fields, and saw Molloy; I saw six persons divide themselves; three stood on one side the buildings, and the other three went on the other side, but by the time I got up the robbery was committed- the three who went behind the buildings came to those in front; I saw them change their dresses both before and after the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. What were the three doing behind the building? A. I cannot say - I saw them come back in a very few minutes, and the robbery was then done; I was about one hundred yards off at first - they changed their dresses before I got up - they changed them the second time while they were running. I know the prisoner was in custody at Worship-street, and was at liberty for a day or two after that.

PHILIP PARISH . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of December, in Church-street, Bethnal-green.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present at his first examination? A. He was examined on a Monday, remanded till Wednesday, and then discharged. The Magistrate sent word to me to apprehend him again, but somebody else took him on the Thursday night, I believe.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-25

518. WILLIAM RUST was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 mare, price 23l.; 1 saddle, value 10s.; 2 horse-cloths, value 10s.; 1 rollar, value 2s.; 1 hood, value 2s.; 2 bridles, value 15s., and 1 martingale, value 2s. , the property of Hugh Stacey Osborn .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18270215-26

First London Jury - before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

519. SHARPE ENGLAND was indicted for that he, on the 3d of October , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain order for payment of money, which said false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money, is as follows: (i. e.)"No. 60, Lombard-street, London, 3d of October, 1826, Messrs. Hanburys, Taylor, and Lloyds, pay Mr. W. Wright, or bearer, three hundred and forty-five pounds, Charles Sewell, 345l.," with intent to defraud Osgood Hanbury and others , against the statute.

2d COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, on the same day, at the same parish, a like false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with the same intent as stated in the first count.

3d and 4th COUNTS, the same as the two first, only stating the intent to be to defraud Charles Sewell , against the statute.

MESSRS. BOLLAND, ANDREWS, and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BOONE . I am clerk to Messrs. Osgood Hanbury, Osgood Hanbury, Jun., Henry Lloyd, and Corban Lloyd, who are bankers , living in London. In October last Mr. Charles Sewell kept an account at our house; on the 4th of October his balance was between 700l. and 800l., to the best of my recollection. I produce the ledger, which is kept by James Raper - on the 4th of October I saw this draft (looking at it) presented at our counter - I paid it, and I find, by the book, which is in my hand-writing, that I gave for it a 300l. note, No. 6957, dated the 20th of September, 1826, and 45l. in gold; I have no recollection of the person to whom I paid it; I have been in the constant habit of seeing the prisoner coming to our house, from Mr. Sewell, but whether I paid it to him I cannot say - since I have paid the cheque I have examined it more carefully, and do not believe that it is Mr. Sewell's writing, but I would not swear that it is not; I only examined it in the general way of business when I paid it; I should pay no more attention to a cheque presented by a stranger than by a person whom I knew; there is a stiffness about this signature, not common to Mr. Sewell's writing - his account has since been credited for the amount paid; that appears in the ledger now before me.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Whose hand-writing is that entry? A. Raper's; at the time I paid the cheque I believed it to be genuine; I was told it was forged before I looked at it again. Mr. Sewell brought

his book back, saying he had never drawn such a cheque- he stated this to the partners, not to me - I saw him at the house - I do not know whether his brother, the attorney; was with him; it was paid on Wednesday; I think I first saw Mr. Sewell about it on the following Saturday, when he applied for his pass-book, and I gave it him. I have none of Mr. Sewell's cheques here.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When did Mr. Sewell have his book from your house? A. On the Saturday - he did not open it, but put it into his pocket; he returned in an hour or an hour and a half, and I was informed that the draft was forged.

GEORGE SHEPHERD . I am assistant to Mr. Hawley, a jeweller, of No. 75, in the Strand, and was so in October. I know the prisoner's person. On Wednesday, the 4th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, and wished to look at a gold watch - I asked what price; he said one about twenty guineas - I showed him some; he selected one, also a chain, two seals, a key, and watch-guard - they came to 44l. together; he paid me 41 sovereigns, which were all he had in his purse - the other 3l. was paid the next day - he had the purse in his pocket; he also took from his pocket a 300l. Bank note, and said he must take care of it, for he was going out for the evening, and should not like to lose it - I told him it was a great sum for him to carry about, and asked if he had no friend whom he could leave it with - he said not near at hand, and would I have the goodness to take care of it for him till next morning - I said I had no objection, and asked for his address - he gave me, "William Parker, Princes-place, Kennington;" I told him, as he was a stranger, I would take down his address in the book, and the number of the note, which was 6957, dated the 20th of September, 1826, 300l.; he put the watch into his pocket, and went away; he came again next morning, about ten o'clock, and said he had called for his 300l. note - he said, as he was going into the country, to see his father, mother, and sister, he should like to take a present to his sister, down to Northumberland - I asked what he would like to have - he said he should like to take her a gold watch; I showed him some- he selected one at twenty guineas, with a gold chain, three small seals, and a key - also a ring for his own finger; they came to 34l. odd, together; he proposed to pay for them out of the 300l. note; I said, as my employer, Mr. Hawley, was not come to town, I could not give him change till he arrived. I directed him to call in an hour or an hour and a half; he called, and I told him it would be impossible to get change for so large a note in the neighbourhood; he said, "We had better go to the Bank;" we did so, and got the 300l. note changed for four of 50l. and a 100l.; I wrote on the back of the note, by the prisoner's desire - I merely wrote his address - his name had been previously written on it, when he left it with me.

CHARLES EDWARD WALLER . I am a clerk in the Bank, and produce this 300l. note - when we change notes we always require the name and address to be written on the back, by the person who brings them.

G. SHEPHERD re-examined. This is the note on which I wrote the address - it is No. 6957, dated the 20th of September, 1826; I have written on it "Mr. William Parker, Princes-place, Kennington," with my initials, "G. S., 4th of October, 1826;" I wrote the name and the date on it the evening before, but the address at the Bank.

Q. Did you go back to the Strand? A. I did, but the prisoner did not - he said he had got his lodgings to pay for, and if I would give him some sovereigns he would call again in the afternoon, and settle the account - I gave him five sovereigns out of my pocket, and carried home the whole 300l. with me - he did not call in the afternoon, but came next day, and I paid him the difference out of 100l.; there was 3l. deficiency on the first transaction, 5l. I had lent him, and 34l. odd for the watch; I deducted that out of 100l.; the other notes were left in my care till he should return from the country, which he said would be in ten days or a fortnight. I was to engrave one of the seals which he bought the first time, and I gave him that when we settled on the 6th - he never called for the 200l.

Cross-examined by MR. ERLE. Q. The prisoner was an entire stranger to you? A. Yes - I never saw him till the Wednesday. Mr. Hawley was in the shop when he first gave me the 300l. note, and showed him watches - Mr. Hawley did not interfere about the 300l. note, but saw it - all that is on the note is in my hand-writing.

Q. Were you yourself charged with any offence respecting this 300l. note? A. Yes, both me and Mr. Hawley.

Q. Did you make your escape from a house which you were in on that charge? A. I did not - I was detained in a house by Mr. Cope, and went out of it without his knowledge. I tendered the note to the clerk at the Bank, and received the money - I kept it without giving it over to the prisoner; he left four 50l. notes with me - he had none of the notes which came from the Bank; the notes he left with me were one of 100l. and two of 50l.; I put the four 50l. notes into circulation - the 100l. note was not circulated at all.

COURT. Q. Did you say that Mr. Hawley was present at night, when the prisoner first came? A. He was. I was detained by Mr. Cope and Mr. Gates about a week afterwards - they came without a warrant, to apprehend me and Mr. Hawley - I left the house, and returned home to the Strand.

Q. Did you introduce the prisoner to the clerk at the Bank, or did you appear as the person doing the business? A. I passed the note to the clerk, and he sent me to another - the prisoner was with me all the time, and I asked him what notes he would have - he said, "Get what you like." I did not introduce him to the clerk. I asked him, in the clerk's presence, what notes he would have, but the clerk could not hear that.

- HAWLEY. I am a jeweller, and live in the Strand. I was in the shop on the 4th of October, when a person called, but I have not recollection enough to know the prisoner.

Q. Well, but you saw him again the next day, did not you? A. I saw him several times; I was going out at the time - I cannot swear to him; he asked to look at some watches - Shepherd attended to him, and he purchased a watch; I heard their conversation - he was asked what price watch he would have, and said one about twenty guineas - he was shown one or two, and chose one at twenty guineas; he would not go to more: he bought a chain, two seals, and a key; I think they came to 41l.,

but there was something afterwards - he paid for them in sovereigns; I heard him remark that he did not know whether he had sovereigns enough, but on counting them he had just enough, I think 41l.; he had a guard, and ordered a seal to be engraved, which made the transaction 44l., but he did not pay that that night - he had a note in his hand, and said, "I must take care of this - this is my yearly allowance - my father allows me so much a year, and I must take care of this;" he said it was a 300l. note- Shepherd observed to him, "Are you not afraid of being robbed of it?" I think he said he had got to go Kingston - he had given a name for the engraving of the seal, and Shepherd asked for his name and address - he said, William Parker, in some square up at Kennington; the seal was to be engraved W. P.

Q. After Shepherd observed to him, "Are you not afraid of being robbed?" what was done? A. He said,"I am almost afraid of carrying so large a note about with me - will you take care of it for me till to-morrow morning?" Shepherd said, "If you have no friend about here who will take care of it for you, I will;" he left the note, and Shepherd wrote his name on it - that is all that I recollect; I did not come to the shop till after eleven, or between eleven and twelve o'clock the next morning - he was just going away as I got in; Shepherd said the young man who was there last night, had purchased a watch; the prisoner was then gone - he came back in, I think, about an hour - he wanted change for this 300l. note - I told him we could not change so large a note; he said,"I will go to the Bank and get it changed;" I said,"Shepherd, you have a little business in the City - you had better walk with this young man, and he will pay you for the watch out of the note," and they went - I saw him the day following, when he called, and settled the account with Shepherd; I was standing in the shop - Shepherd asked him how he would have the change; he said, "I wish you would give me the change of 100l., the difference of what I owe you, and I will leave 200l. with you till I come back, which will be in ten days or a fortnight - if you will be so good as to take care of it," and he did leave it; I did not see him again.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How many interviews had you with the person? A. I think I saw him three times, but the time was so short I scarcely noticed him.

JAMES RAPER . I am ledger-keeper at Messrs. Hanburys and Co.'s; the entries in this ledger are my writing; I make the entries from the cheques - the cash entry is made in another book, but I enter in the ledger from the cheques.

Q. Turn to Mr. Sewell's account - is that account composed of entries made by yourself? A. Yes, entirely; the cheques paid are debitted to Mr. Sewell; the cheque is paid at the counter - it is then passed down to me, and I enter it in the ledger, from the cheque itself, which is before me when I make the entry; I compare the pass-book with the ledger - it is my duty to see that they agree- the pass-book goes between the house and the customer; that is made up by different persons; none of those entries are my writing - I have the pass-book here, and remember it being delivered to Mr. Sewell on the 6th of October - it then contained an account which agreed with the ledger - I saw it delivered to Mr. Sawell on the Saturday; there are now subsequent entries in it, but still it will show plainly, by the dates, what the balance was on the 4th of October - (looking at it) I find cheques that had been paid for, perhaps, a fortnight previous, are written off under the date of the 6th of October; the entries in the ledger are made daily, but those in the pass-book on the day it is left, but still the amounts will agres; we first got the pass-book on the 6th; all the accounts in the ledger are my writing; I make the entry from the cheque, which lies before me; there was a balance on the 4th of October, due to him, of 738l. 4s. 2d., before this cheque was paid; credit has since been given to Mr. Sewell for this cheque; I did that myself, by order of Mr. Lloyd, one of the partners, and credit has been given him in the pass-book also.

A release, which had been previously executed, by Messrs.

Hanburys', was here delivered to Mr. Sewell.

CHARLES SEWELL . I am a hop and seed merchant, and live in the Kent-road - my business is carried on at No. 3, Three Crown-court, Borough; the prisoner lived with me a little more than 12 months, as clerk. I had occasion to leave town on business on Monday, the 2d of October; I intended to be absent about a fortnight - the prisoner was in the counting-house, when I left - I do not remember whether I told him how long I might be absent, and cannot say whether he knew that, or where I was gone - I went to Halstead, in Essex, on Monday night - slept there at my father's, and went to Braintree on the following morning; and selling more hops than I expected, I had occasion to come to town on Wednesday, and arrived about eight o'clock at night, on the 4th of October - I did not go to the counting-house till the next morning - I then saw the prisoner there - I made some observations to him about some samples being thrown about, and complained to him of their not being tied up while I was absent - I did not go to my bankers till Friday, the 6th of October; I had no particular reason for going; but Saturday being pay-day, I like to see how my account stands - my bankers are Messrs. Hanburys' and Co.

Q. Did the prisoner remain with you on the 5th of October? A. He was there on Thursday morning, the 5th, about half-past 9 o'clock, when I went to the counting-house- I went into the market, and when I returned I believe he was there - I went out a second time, and when I returned the door was locked - I had a key in my pocket as well as him - I opened the door, went to my desk, and found a note laying on it - he had made no communication to me before that he was going away. This is the note; it is in his hand writing (read).

MR. SEWELL. - Sir, In consequence of a little difference between my mother and myself, a night or two back, we parted; and as your salary is inadequate to my support, I thought it best to make inquiry for something better, and have met with the wished for success, and have now gone to it - I will send in my account to-morrow morning.

Yours respectfully, S. ENGLAND.

October 5, 1826.

MR. SEWELL. Till I received this note, I had not the least idea of his being about to leave me; I only gave him 26l. a year - he had been a little more than twelve months with me, and was recommended to me by a medical gentleman, who attends my family; he never returned, nor

did I receive any account the next morning - I went to my bankers on Friday, and inquired for my pass-book; they told me it was not there - I returned home, found it in my desk, and took it to them; I got it from them again on Saturday morning, with the cheques, which purported to have been paid; I happened to call, on my way back, at my solicitors, Messrs. Hall, Thompson, and Sewell, at Salter's-hall - I looked at my pass-book in the clerk's office, and finding an entry, which I did not expect, I looked for the voucher, and found a cheque for 345l., which I was debited for, in the pass-book. This is the cheque (looking at it) - it is not drawn by me; I have no doubt of the body of it being the prisoner's hand-writing; I never authorized him to draw any cheque.

Q. Did you expect him to fill up any cheque for that amount? A. Certainly not. I do not speak to the signature, except that it is not my writing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The prisoner was in your employ at Three Crown-court, Borough? A. Yes; that is in Southwark; I left the counting-house about half-past two o'clock on Monday, and left London about three or four; I returned to town on Wednesday night, about eight o'clock; I got on the coach at Braintree; I did not go further than Halstead, which is seven miles from Braintree; I intended to have been absent a fortnight; I took with me samples of, perhaps, one hundred and twenty or one hundred and fifty pockets of hops.

Q. Who did you meet with at Braintree? A. I find, by my sale-book, I sold two pockets to John Cartwright , fifty-seven to Mr. Satch, of Colchester, ten to Mr. Walton, of Chelmsford, and, I believe, I sold two more to my brother; I sold no more; I intended to go to Norwich, where I had left my horse and gig, to resume a journey, and I went subsequently; I meant to go to Yarmouth; I should not have returned home, had I not made the sales I have mentioned; I had made an appointment with a gentleman, and, I believe, I wrote to him from Norwich, stating that I should meet him probably on my next journey; I sold these hops at Braintree fair; I had returned from Norwich on the 27th or 28th of September to supply myself in the market, ready for the fair; the hops I sold were all Kent, except two pockets; I had no more Kent left, and was obliged to return to town for more samples, as the people there seldom buy Sussex hops, which was all I had left.

Q. Then, why take them there? A. It is impossible for me to tell what people may fancy.

Q. Where did you leave your cheque-book, on going from town? A. In a separate drawer, by the side of my desk; I believe I locked it; I have no recollection of having found it unlocked; here is my cheque-book and the margins; I never had any conversation with the prisoner in my life, on the subject of my balance.

Q. You never communicated to him the state of your affairs? A. No, not the particular state of my affairs; I never told him the amount of my balance; all I say of the signature to the cheque is, that it is not mine.

Q. Look at the turn at the end of the l, does it not appear to have been added to the original signature? A. It appears to have been tipped up with a pen; I do not believe it has been added; I have turned my l's something like it at times.

Q. Have you ever said that, but for that you should not have known it not to be your hand-writing? A. I never said any thing of the kind - I never said so to Mrs. Amey England, nor to any body.

Q. Look at your cheque-book, and refer to the margin of a cheque, dated the 2d of October, and see if it is not torn out? A. There is the remains of a cheque having been torn out clean - I do not recollect ever finding the drawer open - I sometimes put a short dash with a pen at the bottom of my name - it is very probable that I have torn cheques out at the end of my book to take with me when I am going to travel, and sometimes I tear it out completely to the margin; but when I come home I take off the following cheque, and write on the margin of that the particulars of the one I have used.

Q. Did you, at any time, subsequent to the discovery of this supposed forgery, advise Mrs. England not to go to Messrs. Hanburys'? A. I did; it was before the prisoner was in custody - I did not state to her that I had paid in 900l. or 700l., shortly before this cheque was paid; I might have said that I had paid in money, but not those sums; I have no recollection of having said any thing to her - I never heard Mrs. Sewell say so to her.

Q. Did you state to her that England thought he had ruined you in drawing out that amount, because he was not aware that you had paid in 700l. or 900l. shortly before? A. Certainly not; this calls to my recollection something of what did pass - I might have stated to Mrs. England that he thought he was drawing nearly, or quite, all the ready money I had there; but he was not aware of the sums I had previously paid in.

Q. Do you recollect Mrs. Sewell saying, "He thought he had overdrawn 14l. or 15l., did not he?" addressing you? A. Certainly not; nor did I say, "Yes, but I had paid in a sum of 900l. shortly before," or any such a thing - I did not tell her that I was the nominal prosecutor on this charge, or give that as my reason for advising her not to go to the bankers.

Q. Now, on the solemn oath which you have taken, between Almighty God and the prisoner, is not that signature your hand-writing? A. Certainly not; decidedly not - not one iota of it.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Nor was it written by your authority? A. Certainly not.

COURT. Q. You found your pass-book at home? A. Yes; it was in my desk, which was locked.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am in Mr. Sewell's service, and was so while England was there - I have seen his handwriting frequently; to the best of my belief the body of the cheque is his writing - I seldom saw Mr. Sewell write, and do not know his hand.

IDEN GOBLE . I live in Kentish-buildings, Borough, and am perfectly well acquainted with Mr. Sewell's handwriting - I frequently receive cheques from him - I correspond with him, and have seen him write - I have looked carefully at this cheque, and know that no part of it is his hand-writing; I do not consider it a good imitation.

ISAAC SEWELL . I am Mr. Charles Sewell's brother, and am a solicitor. I am well acquainted with his handwriting; no part of this cheque is his writing; there is some resemblance, but not so much as to deceive me -(The cheque was here put in and read. See indictment.)

GEORGE EDO . I am shopman to Mr. Edell, hosier, glover, and tailor, in the Strand. Somebody came to my master's shop on the 6th of October, and bought goods to the amount of about 10l. - he paid for them in sovereigns; I cannot say the prisoner is the person - I have not any knowledge of him.

Q. Look at this bill, is it the one you gave the person? A. Yes; he gave me the name of Parker; it was in the day time - I have not the least idea whether the prisoner is the person or not.

JOHN FIRMWOOD . In October last, I was master of the coach, which runs between Reading and London - the prisoner went down with me; I do not know the month, nor the day of the month - I took him up at Hamersmith - he was in a hackney-coach, which I overtook - he stopped me, got up on the front of my coach, at Vale-place, Hammersmith, and went to Reading - we entered into conversation, as people generally do.

Q. Look at this paper, is it your hand-writing? A. Yes; this is dated the 11th of October - he went down with me about two days before that - he said he should like to buy a coach - I said I would sell him mine; I asked him five hundred guineas for the whole; he said he could not purchase the whole, but should like a stage of it- I asked him two hundred guineas for the stage, between Belfont and Bracknell - he said he would give me 200l., and I said he should have it - he gave me 12l. to bind the bargain - he rode up with me the day after this paper was drawn up the 12th of October - he gave me a watch-chain and seals, as a present - I delivered them up to the officer at Reading.

WILLIAM MEDHURST . I am a waiter at the Saracen's Head, Friday-street. The prisoner was there in October last - he first came on the 7th of October, about four o'clock, by the Reading coach - he left on the 9th, at half-past ten in the morning, by the Reading coach - it was Firmwood's coach - George Chinnock was the driver of a Reading coach, but is not now - the prisoner was backwards and forwards at our house for about three weeks - he passed by the name of Parker, and he gave his name as William Parker - he seemed very low in spirits when he was at our house - I found his name out by the initials on his trunk - I never heard him say where his father lived; he seemed to have sufficient money to pay his way; he had plenty of money - on one occasion, when he had been with us about a fortnight, I asked him for a bill, which was above 1l. - he said he would go out and call on a friend in the Strand, and bring me the money in the evening, which he did - I do not know why he left our house at last, as I was absent.

GEORGE CHINNOCK . I am master of a Reading coach. In October I saw the prisoner at the Saracen's Head, Friday-street; I drove a coach backwards and forwards then; he went to Reading once with me; I occasionally stopped down at Reading; and about the 19th of October, or the latter end of that month, I had some conversation with the prisoner at Reading; I recollect telling him, about eight o'clock one morning, that I fancied he had been doing something wrong, as I had seen him with a gold watch, and understood he had another - I said I had heard of a forgery in town, and thought he might have been concerned in it; he said he did not know any thing particularly about that; perhaps he might, but he did not say he was concerned.

Q. Did he deny being engaged in it? A. No; in fact. I did not press it - he said he thought he should go away somewhere, and talked of going to Oxford or Southampton - he said he hoped I should not detain him, or stop him; this was after I had told him what I had heard of a forgery in London - I said I thought if he had done it he had better be off - he took the nails off his portmanteau, which formed the initials, W. P., and left the portmanteau with me till he should come or send for it - I produce it; here are the marks of the W. P.; he did not say where he was going, and never came or sent for it; I saw Mr. Gates, the solicitor, open it, and take out some papers, which I put my initials on, with the date, the 25th of October - these are them. After seeing an advertisement I went, and made a communication to Messrs. Hanburys'.

Among the papers identified by the witness, was the hosier's bill, spoken of by the witness Edo.

WILLIAM RHODES . I keep the Stag and Hounds public-house, at Binfield. I have a gold watch, which I received from a young man named Parker, at the Saracen's Head, in Friday-street; the prisoner is that person - he told me it was for sale; I said I thought I knew a person who would buy it - he left it with me to sell; I was either to return the watch or 20l. to him. I have not seen him since, but when I got home to Binfield I found this letter from him.

J. THOMPSON. This letter is in the prisoner's handwriting - (read.)

SIR, Please not to deliver my watch to any body but myself, and I will call for it to-morrow. W. PARKER.

Reading.

G. SHEPHERD re-examined. This is the first watch I sold him, for twenty guineas; it then had a gold chain and two seals.

WILLIAM GOLDING . I am a constable of Reading. I gave Mr. Cope a chain and seals, which I received from Firm wood.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am one of the City Marshals. Golding gave me a chain, which I produce; I have also a watch, chain, and seals, which I got from Mr. Walter's, a pawnbroker, at Reading. I took the prisoner into custody on the 20th of January, at Messrs. Hanburys' banking-house, in Lombard-street; he told me had presented that cheque at Messrs. Hanburys', and got the money for it - I said nothing to induce him to speak to me; I begged of him not to say any thing to me, and I do not think he said any more; he was taken to the Compter immediately.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What led to this conversation? A. I had not made an observation to him - he began, and, I believe, was going to tell me the whole history of the thing, but I stopped him.

HENRY LLOYD , ESQ. I am one of the partners in the banking-house of Messrs. Hanbury and Co. On Saturday, the 20th of January, the prisoner came into the inner counting-house of our banking-house, No. 60, Lombard-street, and asked for Mr. Lloyd; I said my name was Lloyd; he said, "My name is Sharpe England;" I replied, "Who is Sharpe England?" not, at the moment, recollecting the name; he said, "I am come to surrender myself;" Mr. C. Lloyd, who was sitting at the desk, turned

round, and said, "Oh! he is the young man who committed the forgery;" I said I hoped he had well considered the matter, and the step he had taken - that he had nothing to expect from us, us it was out of our hands, and in those of the Bankers' Association; I think he said, "I suppose you won't let me go now;" I said, "Certainly not," and asked him to step into another room; he said, "I hope you will consider my case as leniently as you can." I sent for Mr. Gates, and went myself to the Mansion-house, for Mr. Cope.

Cross-examined by MR. ERLE. Q. When you said you could not let him go, did that appear to alarm him? A. He was as collected as possible,

G. SHEPHERD re-examined. This is the seal, the chain, and watch that I sold the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence (written). May it please your Lordship, I am fully aware of my awful situation, but of the charge, I, in the presence of Almighty God and the Court, declare myself innocent; my father was a respectable tradestman, well known and esteemed, and in the early part of his life was in the service of one of the worthy Aldermen of this City; he was in bad health, sustained great losses, and died insolvent, leaving a widow, a younger brother, and myself, without the means of support - I was only four years old; my mother was reduced to poverty and distress; under these circumstances I became acquainted with Mr. Sewell, who took me into his service, at 8s. a week, and after being with him a year he increased my wages to 10s., which continued to the time I left him; I will not enter into the particulars of the transaction, as it cannot be confirmed, and I shall be charged with having impeached others. I hope you will consider well before you find me guilty. I solemnly state my declarations are true, and, in the presence of all the world, and the Almighty, declare myself innocent.

Nine witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth and good character .

Reference Number: t18270215-27

520. EVAN JONES was indicted for that he, on the 15th of February , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeited, a certain bill of exchange, which said false, forged, and counterfeited bill of exchange , is as follows: (that is to say)

Llandorery, 15th of January, 1827.

Two months after date, pay to Mr. J. Williams, or bearer, the sum of three hundred pounds, for value received.

D. JONES and Co.

To Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co., Lothbury, London. with intention to defraud David Jones , against the form of the statue, &c.

2d COUNT, for uttering and publishing, as true, on the same day, and at the same parish, a like false, forged, and counterfeited bill of exchange, he, the said Evan Jones, well knowing the said last mentioned false, forged, and counterfeited bill of exchange, to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with a like intent, as in the first count.

3d and 4th COUNTS, the same as the first and second, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Lewis Lloyd and others.

5th and 6th COUNTS, the same as the first and second, only calling the instrument an order for payment of money instead of a bill of exchange.

7th and 8th COUNTS, the same as the fifth and sixth, only stating the intent as in the third and fourth counts.

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, like the former eight, only setting forth the signature to the forged instrument, as follows, viz."David Jones and Co., or So."

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, like the first eight, only setting forth the signature to the forged instrument, as follows, viz."David Jones and Co., or Son."

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES WOOD . I am clerk to Messr. Jones, Lloyd, and Co., bankers , Lothbury. This bill (looking at it) was left for acceptance at our house on the 16th of January - and, in consequnce of an observation which I made on it, I spoke to the other clerks about it; on the following day the prisoner came, and said he had called for a bill of 300l. left for acceptance; he did not say who had left it; I looked into the box, and found no such bill there - I then recollected the circumstance of the bill that we had looked at the night before, and that it was in the hands of a clerk behind me; I turned round to that clerk, and the prisoner was then taken into the parlour. The bill remained with Mr. Drake; I did not give it to the prisoner - he could not hear what I said to Drake.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is this bill drawn in the usual way? A. Not as the parties usually draw them. I have seen a bill drawn at so many days after sight, pay to the bearer, but never to such a person or bearer. I should think no banker would accept such a bill without inquiry.

JOHN TABOR , ESQ. I am a partner in the house of Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co - Mr. Lew is Lloyd is one of the partners. On the 17th of January the prisoner came to the banking-house, and was shown in to me, by my desire. I asked him his name - he said John Jenkins - I showed him this bill, and asked where he got it; he said it was given to him by a friend of his, Mr. Williams, a man of fortune, in Wales, who occasionally came to town - that Mr. Williams desired him to leave it for acceptance, to call for it again, and deliver it to him back at 12 o'clock that day - he said he had had it the previous day from Mr. Williams, to leave for acceptance - that Mr. Williams lived at No. 342, Strand, while in town - I took a memorandum of what he said his name was, and the name of the person whom he said he had the bill from; he said he himself lived at No. 42, Aldersgate-street, and I think he said he had lived with a Mr. Levett, a shop-keeper, in the Borough.

Q. Look at this paper, do you know whose hand-writing it is? A. No - it is not mine; I do not know whether it was written in my presence - I wrote his address down as No. 42, Aldersgate-street. I know David Jones, of Llandovery, in Wales - he is a banker, and carries on business as David Jones and Co.; he does business with us - he had many thousands of pounds in our hands at that time; the hand-writing on the bill is not his; I know no writing that resembles it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you ever been to Llandovery? A. No. I have seen David Jones write; I cannot say whether any other David Jones and Co. carry on business there; the bill is

very clumsily drawn; persons must be very little acquainted with bills to draw one in this manner.

MR. THOMAS GATES . I am a solicitor. On the 17th of January I was sent for to Messrs. Jones and Lloyd's, in Lothbury - I found the prisoner there. I procured and officer; when I entered the banking-house, Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Tabor, and the prisoner were there; Mr. Tabor stated this was a bill of exchange which the prisoner I told him it was a very serious case, and he was not obliged to answer any question I put to him unless he chose; he said he had only done what Mr. Williams had desired him, and he should have no objection to state the facts; I then asked him where Williams lived - he said at No. 342, Strand, that he was a gentleman of property, residing in Wales, and came to town three or four times a year, for amusement; I asked him to accompany me to Mr. Williams, which he expressed his willingness to do; I took the bill, and showed it to the prisoner, and asked him if he was quite certain that was the bill Mr. Williams had given him - he said it was, and that in pursuance of Williams' direction he himself had left that bill for acceptance, at Jones, Lloyd, and Co.'s, on the previous day, and had just called for it, as he had promised to take it to Williams at twelve o'clock; it was then about eleven. I sent for an officer, and accompanied him and the prisoner in a coach, to the Strand; I requested the prisoner, on the way, if he should meet Williams in the street, to point him out, which he said he would do; I desired him to tell us where 342, Strand, was, that we might direct the coach; on arriving at the corner of Catherine-street, at a baker's-shop, he pointed to the house, and said that was the house - we got out - he went up to the door, and observing that he could find neither knocker nor bell, I said the door would not open - (it was a sham door;) I asked him if he was quite certain that was the house he had seen Williams at: he said it was, and that he had knocked at that door that very day - it was not a door, but a blank; we then went into the shop, and, on inquiring of the landlord, we found no communication had been had at that door for some time; in fact it was the side of a room - we inquired if Mr. Williams was known there, and was informed he was not. I said, as he had told us one falsehood, he need not give us any unnecessary trouble, and did he reside at No. 42, Aldersgate-street, as he had told us; he said he did, and we desired the coachman to drive there - on arriving within a few doors of No. 42, he said it was of no use to pull up there - he did not live there - that he lodged at No. 136, on the opposite side of the way; we went there, and found he lodged there; his boxes were opened - there was a copper-plate card, with "E. Jones" on it, and the name of a public-house on it, which he had just taken, and he said that was his name.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. There was no number on the door of the house he took you to in the Strand? A. No, but there was on the shop door - he said he had gone through that door the day before. I am quite positive about what he said as to his leaving the bill for acceptance, because I asked him for a distinct object; I cautioned him not to say any thing unless he chose - he said Mr. Williams frequented the Angel, St. Clement's; we went there, but could hear nothing of him.

JEREMIAH HERBERT . I accompanied Mr. Gates and the prisoner to the house in the Strand, and Alderagate-street; Mr. Gates' account is correct. I asked the prisoner if he had been in the habit of meeting Williams at any public-house; he said Yes, at the Angel, St. Clement's - we took him to the Angel, and inquired, but could hear nothing of any such person.

JOSEPH FLOGDELL . I am a baker, and live at No. 342, Strand - I have lived there ten years. No Mr. Williams ever lived there, or frequented my house; I had a private door, but it has been nailed up these three years - there is no other No. 342.

DAVID EVANS . I live at Llandovery, in Wales, and am clerk to David Jones and Co.; Mr. Jones is the only person in the firm. The bill produced is not drawn by him.

Cross-examined. Q. Does it bear the least similarity to his signature? A. Not the least; there is no other David Jones and Co. there to my knowledge, nor any David Jones and Son - Jones and David are very common names in Wales - I think I ought to know if there is such a firm - I know no David Jones and Co. at all, in any business.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long have you been in this Bank? A. Six years; I never heard of such a firm.

STEPHEN RIDGE . I live at No. 57, High-street, Borough, and am in partnership with Mr. Levett; we are haberdashers. The prisoner lived with us; I had an opportunity of frequently seeing him write; I believe the whole of this bill to be his hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. How long is it since he left you? A. On the 23d of November, 1826. I have seen him write with a pen within the last six months; and have seen him make out invoices with a pen; I have certainly seen him write with a pen ten times while he was with us- I know the character of his hand-writing.

HENRY BROOKS . I know the prisoner, and am acquainted with his hand-writing; I believe this bill to be his hand-writing; I have frequently seen him write with a pen.

- HALL. I live at No. 136, Aldersgate-street, and am a watch-maker. The prisoner lodged with me at the time of his apprehension; he came to my house about the middle of November, and went by the name of Evan Jones.

- SUTTERBY. I keep the Pewter Platter public-house, in White Lion-street, Norton-falgate; the prisoner was in treaty about a month ago for that house; he did not come into possession; and never told me how he meant to pay for it.

JOSEPH TICKELL , JUN. I live with Mr. Tickell, a brewer, who is owner of the Pewter Platter public-house. The prisoner applied to me about the house in the early part of January; I asked what property he had got; he said about 300l.; I asked if it was his own, and he said it was; he said nothing further about it.(The bill was here put in and read.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence entirely to my counsel; I have several friends to character.

Nine witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Of uttering, with intent to defraud Lewis Lloyd, and others.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of his apparent ignorance .

Reference Number: t18270215-28

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

521. ROBERT ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 sovereign, 4 half-crowns, 7 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Joseph Harris .

JOSEPH HARRIS. I live in Joiner-street, Lambeth-road, and am a fringe weaver ; on the 21st of January; the prisoner, who was ill at a public-house next door to me, sent for me - I had known him about three weeks; he said he had a proposition to make, and if I would come tomorrow he would let me know all about it - I went on Monday to the public-house; he said he had a parcel at a person's house whom he owed 3l. to, and if I would raise the 3l., and fetch it away, and give him 2l., I should have the parcel; I said I could not well spare it, but I had got as much laid up for my landlord, and I would advance him 3l.; he took me that evening to Duke-street, Aldgate, where he said the parcel was, and told me to wait at a public-house within a few doors of the house, while he went to see about it - he returned, and said it could not be settled that night; he took me again the next night, and made another excuse; on Thursday, the 25th, he took me to the same public-house, in Duke-street - he went away, and came back and said the things were all ready, but we must go to a public-house in Leadenhall-street first; he took me there, and said, "Now give me the money, I will get a receipt, and we will go for the goods" - I said No - I would leave the money with the landlady till I had got the goods; he then took me to the door of the house - I gave him the money; he went up stairs, and came down in five minutes, and said I must wait in a public-house for ten minutes, and then the thing would be settled - I expected him to bring me the goods.

COURT. This is obtaining money under false pretences, but no felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-29

522. THOMAS CURREY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 chaise, value 20l. , the goods of Thomas Ball .

THOMAS BALL. I am a coach-maker , and live in Aldersgate-street; on the 1st of February, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop in Goswell-street, and said he wanted a chaise for Mr. Murphy, of Moor-lane, who is a customer of mine - I asked if he knew where my chaise shop was; he said Yes- and I said if he would go over, I would follow him directly; he went - I could not go directly; I got there in half an hour; the chaise was then gone, and I have not seen it since - I did not know the prisoner before; my man had attended to him; it was worth above 20l. - I would not have lent it to him; he was to deliver it to Murphy - he said it should be returned between five and six o'clock the same evening; I apprehended him on the 3d of February, in Cow-heel-alley, at twelve o'clock at night - I charged him with stealing the chaise; he said he knew nothing of it; Murphy was with me.

HENRY WHITE . I am in Mr. Ball's employ, at Aldersgate-street - on the 1st of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came, and said he wanted a chaise for Michael Murphy - that he had seen my master, who said he was to have one; Murphy lives in Moor-lane, and has had two or three chaises of master; I delivered him a chaise worth 20l., and have not seen it since.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 3d of February, by Ball and Murphy.

MICHAEL MURPHY . I live in Moor-lane, and am a stable-keeper; I also keep a potatoe shop; I have known the prisoner about three years; he waters the street for me in the summer time - I never sent him to borrow a chaise; it was unknown to me; Ball sent to me on the 2d of February, to know what had become of it; I afterwards assisted in taking him at his lodgings - I asked him what had become of it; he said he would not answer me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Tranported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-30

523. WILLIAM STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , at St. John the Evangelist, 1 wooden chest, value 1s.; 12 hair bracelets, value 8s.; 2 mahogany work-boxes, value 10s.; 36 rows of glass beads, value 2s. 6d.; 63 boxes of water colours, value 12s. 9d.; 6 snuff-boxes, value 3s. 9d.; 2 puzzles of Paul Pry, value 5s.; 78 cushions, value 1l. 2s. 10d.; 48 velvet toys, value 13s. 9d.; 1 pair of card racks, value 3s.; 3 ornaments, value 7s.; 12 fire boxes, value 2s. 6d.; 24 plated pencils, value 2s.; 432 pairs of hooks and eyes, value 3s. 9d.; 196 toy books, value 18s. 3d.; 6 hair brushes, value 4s. 3d.; 12 valentines, value 3s.; 6 pair of steel bracelets, value 1s. 9d.; 7 lbs. of Windsor soap, value 7s.; 1 lb. of sealing wax, value 2s.; 72 tooth brushes, value 5s.; 12 pin-cases, value 1s. 9d.; 12 rattles, value 3s.; 12 other cushions, value 3s. 6d; 3 paper work-boxes, value 10s. 6d.; 24 slates, value 6s.; 12 paper boxes, value 3s. 6d.; 3 leather purses, value 4s.; 144 ivory combs, value 17s.; 18 pocket-books, value 1l. 7s.; 3 York cushions, value 1s. 9d., and 3 needle-books, value 2s. 7d. , the goods of John Sewell .

JOHN SEWELL, JUN. My father, John Sewell, is a wholesale toyman , and lives in Fore-street, Cripplegate; on the 3d of February, a case containing the articles stated in the indictment, was put into a truck, of which Cadwallader had the care; they are worth 10l. or 11l.

JOHN CADWALLADER . I am porter to Mr. Sewell. On the 3d of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I had three chests in my truck, to convey to the Bell, in Friday-street; when I got about half way up the Bell inn yard , they were all safe; a waggon prevented my getting the truck closer to the booking office - I took one chest off the truck, and carried it to the office; I put it down, and returned directly to the truck, and missed one of the others; I was not absent above three or four minutes - the waggoner wanted to drive out, and told me to push my truck out; when I got it out of the inn yard, I made inquiry - I had seen nobody about the yard; I carried the other chest into the office, and as I got in, the prisoner was brought up by Hughes, with the stolen chest - I am certain of it, by the direction that was on it.

GEORGE HUGHES . I am a porter. About six o'clock on this evening, I was in my master's warehouse; our bell rang gently - I ran out, and saw the prisoner collared by two gentlemen, who asked if we would have a chest put into our warehouse, or carry it back to the Bell; for they said, in his hearing, they had stopped him, and seen him run with the chest from the truck - that there were three in the gang, but two had escaped; the prisoner said, that

the two who ran away asked him to give them a lift up with it, which he was going to do - Cadwallader claimed it; I carried it to the Bell, and the gentlemen took the prisoner there.

MATTHEW CARTER . I received the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-31

524. MARY COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 dead fowl, value 2s. , the goods of George Bowles .

GEORGE BOWLES. I am a poultry salesman , and live in Newgate-street . I was informed the prisoner had taken a fowl from my shop; I went, and found her two doors off - brought her back, and found a dead fowl under her cloak; I had seen it shortly before in the middle of the shop; she said it was not mine for she had bought it of a strange man for 2s.

MOSES COHEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; she was crying; she told the alderman she had bought it, but did not say so before.

JOHN GEARING . I sell fowls and rabbits, and live in the Borough. I was in Mr. Bowles's shop - I saw the prisoner come in and take this fowl from a lot, and go out without paying; I told Mr. Bowles, who brought her back with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought this fowl of a woman for 2s. 3d., meaning to make a person a present of it - I went into the prosecutor's shop to ask the price of a pig.

MR. BOWLES. I had no pig in my shop.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-32

525. MARGARET MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 4 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the monies of William Tricker Baker , from his person .

WILLIAM TRICKER BAKER. I am a music collector , and live in Davied-court, Monmouth-street. On the 25th of January, about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock at night, I was opposite Mr. Stap's, a cheesemonger's shop on Holborn-bridge ; I had four half-crowns, three shillings, and two sixpences loose in my right hand breeches pocket; I saw the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, coming from Fleet-market - I did not speak to her; she caught me round the waist, and said, "My love;" I had not noticed her till then - I could not shake her off; she pushed me against Mr. Staps' shop-door; I told her to go along - she still kept hold of me for I suppose three minutes; I did all I could to get rid of her, but kept my hands in my pockets; she put her hand down, and laid hold of me indecently, and as soon as I drew one hand out to remove hers, she thrust my hand against the door, and put her own into my pocket, and got my money out; I perceived it was gone, and pursued her; she was taken immediately, and my money found on her. I am servant to Mr. Morees, the violin player, and had been assisting him at a party that night; I was perfectly sober, and was going straight home; I had taken no liberties with her.

PATRICK CARTY . I am a watchman. I was calling twelve o'clock in Skinner-street; the watch was called - I went up, and saw the prosecutor and prisoner together; he charged her with having robbed him of better than 14s.; she said nothing to the charge; I took her to the watch-house, and the inspector found four half-crowns, three shillings, and two sixpences on her. Baker described the money as being in those coins.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am inspector of the watch; the prisoner was brought in; Baker said he had lost four half-crowns, three shillings, and two sixpences; I asked what money she had about her; she hesitated, and at last said she had 9s.; I asked her to produce it - she took from her bosom one half-crown, three shillings, and two sixpences, and 5d. from her pocket; I desired her to loosen her clothes, which she did; I shook them, and three half-crowns fell from them; I found no more on her; she said,"Recollect, I told you at first I did not know how much I had about me;" she had said so at first.

Prisoner's Defence. He met me, and took me up a turning, and gave me this money, not knowing what it was; I said I would sooner go home with him than go up there; I said, "You go up the turning, and I will follow you;" but I ran away, and he accused me of the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-33

526. TIMOTHY HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 6 lbs. weight of lead, value 1s., the goods of John Charles Horne , his master .

FRANCES HORNE . I am the wife of John Charles Horne - he is a bricklayer ; the prisoner was above nine years in our employ, but we had forbidden his coming within the house. On the 16th of January, the servant brought this old lead up to me in the parlour - I marked it with my name on it; doubled it up in the same way, and put it under the counting-house stool, where it had been found - I missed it on the 17th of January, and sent for the street-keeper - I saw it again at half-past three o'clock; it weighed 61/2lbs. I stood at the top of the counting-house stairs, and saw the prisoner go out of the counting-house; I immediately missed the lead; the street-keeper (who is since dead) was there watching him, and brought him in; nobody but the prisoner could have taken it away; he had taken a plaster of Paris box out with him, which was brought back; the lead was found in the celler of the next house, which belongs to us.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you put the lead into the box? A. No, under the stool; my husband is ill; we have entrusted the prisoner to receive bills - he has not accounted for some of them; I never told his brother that I would hang him if I could, or any thing of the kind - we employed him in the house till I found him dishonest.

SOPHIA HOUGH . I am servant to Mr. Horne. I was ordered not to let the prisoner inside the house. I let him in on Tuesday evening, the 16th of January, about six o'clock; he fetched the coals up, and I said I would follow him down to shut the door - he said he would shut it himself; but I followed him down, saw him peep into the counting-house, and put this piece of lead under the stool - I carried it up to my mistress, who marked it; it was there the next day, at half-past three o'clock, when I showed it to the beadle; the prisoner came in at that time, and when he went out, we missed the lead; we folowed him into the next cellar, where the beadle stop

ped him; he had then put the lead on a heap of bricks in the cellar; I did not see him put it down, but I saw him go out, and immediately missed it - nobody could have moved it but him; there was nobody in the house, but me and my mistress; I saw him come out of the cellar; I immediately went in, fetched the lead out, and he was secured; it had my master's and mistress's names on it, and was all over plaster of Paris; but I had wiped it clean with a towel when it was in the counting-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him cover it with plaster of Paris? A. No; I saw him put it under the stool the day before; the counting-house has plaster of Paris in it; five or six men have access to the place, but there was nobody there but him; my master is confined to his bed - I saw the lead in the counting-house the very instant he came in; nobody could have moved it but him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-34

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

527. WILLIAM JARMAN was indicted for that he, having in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 48l. 14s., the said bill of exchange having a forged acceptance thereof in the name of J.W. Jones; feloniously did utter and publish the same as true, he knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud John Walpole .

JOHN WALPOLE. I live in Fitzroy-street, St. Pancras; I have known the prisoner nearly two years. On the 17th of December, 1825, he applied to me to discount him a bill, which he produced; I gave him a cheque on my banker for it, deducting the discount; this is the bill(looking at it) - I paid it away, and it was returned to me dishonoured - the prisoner then kept a lodging-house in Thayer-street, Manchester-square, and continued to live there till lately - I saw him after it was dishonoured, and asked him where Jones, the acceptor, was; he said he should be able to find him by and by; he represented him as living at Deal; I went to Deal on the 20th of January, this year, and could find no person of that name; I found Walmer-cottage, at Walmer, which is three-quarters of a mile from Deal, but no Mr. Jones lived there.(The bill was here put in and read).

London, Dec. 26, 1825.

Two months after date, pay to my order the sum of forty-eight pounds fourteen shillings, for value received.

W. JARMAN.

To J. W. Jones, Walmer cottage, Deal - Accepted, J. W.

Jones; payable No. 136, Regent street.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. At the time you received this bill, you were supplying the prisoner with goods? A. Yes; I believe a great many persons came to board at his house, and left quickly - I made no inquiry at Deal till last Monday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-35

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

528. GEORGE AVERY , THOMAS FOWLER , HENRY IRONMONGER , and ROBERT JONES were indicted for feloniously assaulting Walter Hunter, in a certain field, near the King's highway, on the 5th of February , at All Saints, Poplar, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; 2 watch-keys, value 6d., and 1 sovereign , the property of the said Walter Hunter .

WALTER HUNTER. I am an engineer , and live at St. Mary, Stratford, Bow. On the 5th of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, as I was returning home from Mill-wall, Poplar , to Bow , I was going through the fields, at the back of the Eel-pie house; it was nearer three o'clock than two; I saw a great crowd of people across the foot-path, which I was walking in; I walked up, and turning a little out of the footpath to pass them, I looked over the heads of some of them to see what was going on, and was immediately hustled; I found a person put his hand on my watch pocket; I tried to get back, but could not; and several of them called out immediately, "Keep him in;" one said, "I have hold of it, but he has hold of it himself;" I had my hand on my watch pocket; I called out, Robbery! I was hustled about, till they got my watch out of my pocket, and then one said, "Let him go;" as soon as I got out I left the field, turned round the outside of the field, and came in again at the small gate; I spoke to a friend, named Ralph Ruddick, who was standing there; he is not here; and, in consequence of what passed, I went to find an officer, but could not. I had some gold taken out of my left-hand trousers pocket; it was from I sovereign to 3; four men walked out of the field, and I followed them into another field; they went out of the footway across the field, when they saw me following them; I believe the prisoners to be those four men.

Q. Where had you first seen them? A. When they left the crowd, and went out of the field; that was after I had gone out of the field, and come in again; I thought they were the same party who were round me when I was robbed; I had not observed their faces, but I thought they were the same; they looked like the same men; I did not observe the faces of any body to recognize them.

Q. How long after you were robbed, did these people go out of the field? A. It might be from two to five or ten minutes; it did not exceed ten minutes.

Q. Are you sure these are the four men who left the crowd, and went into another field? A. I think they are the men; they were taken in about an hour; I went from that field up the road, till I met some Bow-street officers, and gave them information of them.

Q. After you were robbed, did you see the spot, where the mob was, sufficiently to say whether any body joined them after the robbery? A. Certainly; numbers might have joined them.

Q. You felt somebody's hand on your watch pocket: did he take hold of your pocket? A. The hand was laid on my pocket, nothing more - they crowded close round me - I received no blow; one put his hand on my pocket, another caught hold of me by the side and pulled my arm and hand from the top of my pocket, and at the time they did this, somebody shoved my hat right over my face and over my eyes, which prevented my seeing - Ruddick had not seen me robbed, but referred me to the witness Kain.

FRANCIS KAIN . I am a clerk, and live in Paradise-row, Bethual-green. On the afternoon in question, I was com

ing over the fields, and saw the four prisoners hustle Mr. Hunter - I saw Avery put Mr. Hunter's hat over his face; Hunter came out of the mob; I heard an outcry while they were hustling him - I stopped there for five or ten minutes after it was done; I saw Mr. Hunter - he and I went round the field to look for an officer, but found none- we saw the men go out of the field - they went into another field; and across the footpath, into the middle of the field, three of them laid down; Avery stood up, and was watching us out of the field - Hunter and I were together; we went down Mile-end-road, and at the turnpike saw four Bow-street officers, whom we informed of it - I described the prisoners to them; I knew Avery before; Hunter and I then went into the White Hart public-house, Mile-end - Hunter went out to inquire the names of the officers - I was standing at the window, and saw the four prisoners go by - I immediately ran out, and told the officers, who took them directly - there might have been a thousand people in the field where the prosecutor was hustled, as there was a fight going on; but about the spot, I suppose there were twenty or thirty - the field is at the back of the Eel-pie house, and in the county of Middlesex - I had also seen Fowler once before - they were secured about an hour, or an hour and a quarter, after the robbery; and about three quarters of a mile from where it was committed.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How far from where the men were fighting was Hunter hustled? A. About thirty yards or more; I knew none of the men who were fighting; the prisoners laid down about two hundred yards from where the fight was - I did not see the mob disperse from the fight; Hunter was hustled about a mile from the road, and near the water side - the White Hart is close to the turnpike, and about three quarters of a mile from where it happened - the prisoners are the four men who hustled Mr. Hunter; it lasted three or four minutes; I was about two yards from them at the time; when they passed the White Hart, they were going towards town all four together, and quite in a public place- I was crossing the field, and stopped to look at the fight - I noticed some persons there, who were looking at the fight - I saw Avery there, and knew him - I told the officers I knew some of them, and spoke of Avery as one; I swear that the prisoners are the men who hustled Mr. Hunter - I took a good view of them - they were searched as soon as they were taken, but none of the property has been found.

COURT. Q. How long had you been looking at the fight, before you saw Hunter hustled? A. Five or ten minutes - I saw Avery three or four minutes before, close against Mr. Hunter, before he was hustled.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How soon after it happened, did you speak to Hunter? A. Five or ten minutes - I did not like to say any thing to him in the field, for fear of being ill-treated; the men might have ill-used me - after Hunter got out of the field, I asked him if he knew the parties - he said, No; I said I knew them; he then said if he could get the watch again, he would give the men three guineas for it - he did not say he would give me three guineas to get it back - he left the field three or four minutes after it happened - he was out of the field about four minutes, and I told him what I had seen in about two minutes afterwards; I might have been five minutes near him in all, before I told him.

COURT. Q. How far was he from you, when he got out of the field? A. About twenty yards; I did not know what had happened till he came back; while he was going round the field a friend had made a communication to me, and that was the first time I knew he had been robbed.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 5th of February, in the afternoon, I was with Vann, Keys, and Newsome, at the Mile-end turnpike-gate - about four o'clock, Hunter and Kain came up to us - Hunter said he had been robbed; Kain described the parties, and said he knew one of them, Avery - they left us shortly - we stood by the Black Dog public-house a short time; they came back again, and Kain said, "The four men have all gone by" - we immediately rushed out - I took Avery, my brother officers took the others - they were all in company; Fowler said they had been to the fight; I searched Avery, but found nothing on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When Kain spoke to you, were you walking along? A. We were standing at the Mile-end gate - he told us where the robbery happened - he mentioned Avery's name, but no other at that time - he wanted us to go round with them to look for them, but we said there was a house these men frequented, and he had better leave it to us; I did not know Kain before - Hunter complained then of losing nothing but his watch; Kain said he knew the men, and described them - I should have apprehended the prisoners from his description - I stopped them going towards Wentworth-street, in their way home; Fowler said, "We have been to the fight."

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. I searched Fowler; I found some silver and a watch-chain on him, which I returned to him as it was not identified; Hall's account is quite correct - we apprehended all the prisoners.

W. HUNTER re-examined. I first missed my money, about seven o'clock; I cannot say how much I had about me; I had two or three pieces of gold; but whether they were sovereigns or half-sovereigns I cannot say; nothing was left in the pocket I had my money in.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When you called out, Robbery! did you observe any body near you, besides the four men? A. Yes, there were several; I did not observe Kain; I said I would give three sovereigns if I could get my watch back, and would ask no questions.

FOWLER'S Defence. When I was first taken into the public-house, Kain said he could not swear we robbed the man, nor that we were the only four persons near him: now he says quite the contrary - at the first examination he said he could not swear either of us robbed the gentleman; but he believed we were the persons.

IRONMONGER'S Defence. I went, alone, to see the fight - the ring was broken in. I met these young men, and went home with them.

JONES' Defence. I was looking at the fight - I saw these persons, and came home in company with them; the witness said he would not swear either of us took the watch, but he saw us near him; Hunter said he did not think he saw either of us before, but he believed he saw Avery near him in the field.

JURY to W. HALL. Q. Did the witness give such a description of the prisoners, that you should have taken all of them at any time? A. He did.

AVERY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

FOWLER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

IRONMONGER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18270215-36

Second London Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

529. JOHN EAGLES was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the first eight counts of this indictment mentioned, was a person employed by and under the Post-officer of Great Britain , in certain business relating to the said office, that is to say, in collecting and facing newspapers brought to the General Post-office in London, at the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth, - and that, on the 1st of May, a letter lately before sent by the Post, from York, to the said General Post-office in London, for and to be delivered at London, aforesaid, to a certain person, by the name, description, addition and address, of A. W. Robarts, Esq., M. P., London, that is to say, to one Abraham Wildey Robarts , and containing therein one promissory note, made for the payment of five pounds and five shillings, and value 5l. 5s.; one other promissory note, made for payment of and value 5l. 5s.; one bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 5l.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 40l.; one other bill of exchange, for payment of and value 30l.; one other bill of exchange, for payment of and value 7l. 12s.; one other bill of exchange, for payment of and value 12l. 1s. 9d.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 30l.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 20l.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 20l.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 50l.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 84l.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 20l.; one other bill of exchange, made for payment of and value 80l.; one Bank note, made for payment of and value 1l.; one other Bank note, made for payment of and value 1l.; and one other Bank note, made for payment of and value 5l., came to the hands and possession of the said John Eagles, whilst he was so employed, and that he, on the same day, and at the same parish, being so employed, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said promissory notes, bills of exchange, and Bank notes, the same being in force, and the property of Thomas Wilson and others, his partners, and the money payable upon, and secured by the said promissory notes, bills of exchange, and Bank notes, being unsatisfied, against the statute .

2d COUNT, the same as the first, only instead of charging the prisoner with secreting the letter, charging him with stealing the notes, &c. from and out of the letter.

3d and 4th COUNTS, like the first and second, only charging the notes, &c. to be contained and sent by the Post, in a packet instead of a letter.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, like the former four, only stating the notes, &c. to be the property of Sir. William Curtis , Bart, and others, his partners.

MESSES. BOLLAND and SHEPHERD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HALL . In April, 1826, I was principal clerk in the house of Messrs. Thomas Wilson , Tweedy, and Wilson, bankers, of York. On Saturday, the 29th of April, we had occasion to send a remittance to London; I copied the particulars of the remittance into a book, counted the notes and bills, and put them into two packets; I have a copy of the numbers of the notes which I enclosed, and the private marks I put upon them; I enclosed in the two packets, bills and notes amounting to 547l. 8s. 9d. - I cannot tell what amount I enclosed in each; here is my remittance-book.

Q. Look at this 1l. note, and see if you find a number in your book corresponding with it? A. Yes - that is in another book which I have here; I find on this note a private number, 446, which tallies with the entry in the book, which is in my hand-writing; this book only contains an entry of the Bank notes remitted on the 29th of April.

Q. Do read the entry? (Reads) - "29th of April, C. and Co., (meaning Curtis and Co.) No. 446, 1l.;" I find, by the other, book, that the number of that note was 32,286, dated the 29th of December, 1825 - our private number being 446; this entry is in the hand-writing of Barreclough. I enclosed this note in one of the packets which was sent to Messrs. Curtis and Co. on the 29th of April; we also sent up a letter, containing a power of attorney; I wafered the two packets containing the remittance, and addressed them to A. W. Robarts, Esq., M. P., London - and put them on the counter - it is another person's business to carry them to the Post.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have a book in which you enter all remittances? A. Yes - the entry in that book is my writing - that is "Bank, 7l.," which means that part of the remittance was 7l. in Bank notes - in order to find a description of this 7l. I refer to the Bank note book - the entry there is in my hand-writing; I have there entered the private number of this Bank note to be 446; the private number on the note is not my writing, but I can swear to it, as I examuned the note itself, to see that 446 was on it, and I have entered it in the paid Bank note book, as being remitted to Messrs. Curtis.

Q. What time of day did you enclose these notes? A. From three to four o'clock; I did not write the letters - I made them up, and sealed them. The whole remittance was enclosed in two packets, both of which were directed to Mr. Robarts. After wafering the letters I put them on the counter, to wait till Barraclough took them to the Post - they were wafered, and sealed with wax; I always wafer them, but Barraclough sometimes seals them; I never knew it happen that notes selected to be remitted had been left behind by accident; immediately they are entered I put them into their respective envelopes - I never leave them loose on the desk; it is my general practice to enclose them directly. I have no distinct recollection of having enclosed these immediately, but it is my firm belief that I did.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Does the book contain the whole account of the 547l. bills and every thing? A. It does.

COURT. Q. Is the whole of this book entrics of remittances sent to Messrs. Curtis only? A. Yes. I took the No. 446 from the note itself, but Barraclough wrote

the number on the note; the 7l. in Bank notes was put in to make up the sum.

JOSHUA BARRACLOUGH . In April last I was in the house of Messrs. Wilson and Co., bankers, of York. - (Looking at the note) this note was paid into our house on the 28th of April; the No. 446 was made on it by me that day, and entered in the book; it is my duty to put the letters containing remittances into the Post-office. On the 29th of April, between eight and half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I remember putting three letters into the Post-office, directed to A. W. Robarts, Esq. - I cannot say whether I had sealed the letters that day. The post leaves after ten o'clock; I heard, three or four days afterwards, that one of the letters had not arrived.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How do you so well recollect that it was about eight o'clock? A. Hearing one of the letters had not arrived brought it to my recollection; I put the No. 446 on the note, and entered that number in the received note book, at the same time - we put a progressive number on all our notes; if it had been a 5l. note we should have put the same number.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What is the entry you have made? A."446 - 32,286, 1l., 29th of December, 1825;" this is the note from which I made that entry.

JOHN CLIFFORD . I am a clerk in the Post-office at York. The mail left about half-past ten o'clock on the 29th of April last - a letter put in before nine o'clock would have gone to London that night. I made up the London bag on the 29th of April - it was properly made up. I heard of this letter being lost about a week afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Can you be certain you made it up? A. Yes - I have never missed doing it for the last seven years, on any occasion.

JOSIAH SMITH . I was a clerk at the York Post-office in April. It was my business to despatch the London bag - I either did so, or saw it done on the 29th of April - it was regularly sealed, and properly despatched.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are there any other clerks? A. Yes. I either sealed the bag, or saw it sealed.

HENRY MEHEUR . In April last it was my duty to receive the York bag at the General Post-office; I received the York bag of the 29th of April - it arrived quite safe, tied and sealed, with the York stamp, at eleven o'clock on Sunday night, the 30th of April; I opened it on the 1st of May, about ten minutes past six in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When the bag is opened, what is done with the letters? A. They are thrown on a table - there would be no others on the table at that time - other bags had been opened before, but all the letters were cleared away; they would be sorted for delivery four hours after the bag was opened - they would be mixed with other letters; only two persons would have to come to that table, the first stamper, and a messenger to clear the franks - I have been in the office two years and three months.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were there newspapers in the bag as well as letters? A. Yes - the letters would not remain on the table more than five minutes - they are taken away by the messenger and stamper, over to a large table to be sorted.

GEORGE NEALE . I am clerk in the office of the superintending President of the Inland-office. The prisoner was in the service of the Post-office on the 1st of May, as a collector and facer of newspapers - facing is putting the directions all one way - I find by the book that he was on duty that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is that book kept by you? A. No; but I know his writing - he has signed the book, which states that he was on duty that morning - his duty commences at six o'clock; the book don't state that.

Q. If a man was taken ill, and came at a later hour, would the book tell that? A. No; but there is a book which will tell about his attendance - I think if he had not come in proper time his duty would have been performed by another person, who would have signed the book - if he had been taken ill after he came, a person might take his duty - but in that event, I conceive that person would have signed the book as having done the duty - I cannot say that I know a case in point.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What is the signature for? A. To show that he did that duty, and entitle him to be paid for the same.

JOHN DEACON . I am in the service of the Post-office, and was employed on the 1st of May in facing newspapers, and examining them - the prisoner was employed in collecting papers, and assisting in facing them - there are seven tables, and two baskets attached to each table, which the clerks of the tables throw the newspapers into - he would collect those baskets from all the tables - he would go to the York table - it often happens that franked letters and packets get into the baskets, and sometimes bundles of letters - I was never there but what there were three or four such mistakes, or at times eight or ten - it would be the prisoner's duty when that was discovered, to take the letters back to the several tables.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he not an extra man? A. No - a regular man; I sign the book as an extra man - a regular man signs his name as extra, if he was extra duty - his name is under the word extra, but you will find it also under the head of collector and facer.

Q. Show me his name in the book under that head? A. He should have signed it there - but it don't appear, except as an extra man - he ought to sign the book at the beginning of the duty - I cannot account for its not being signed in both places; no other person would be employed in collecting newspapers but him - there would be two clerks and two messengers to each of the seven tables - I do not swear that I saw the prisoner at the York table - it would be his duty to go there - I will not swear that I saw him in the office - in the hurry of business letters are often thrown among the papers, and papers among letters - I have known a man taken ill, and another coming on duty for him - I have been in the office eleven years - how many times that has happened I cannot say.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Was the prisoner on duty that morning? A. He should have been; and he has signed his name - he would have gone to the York table for the newspapers.

COURT. Q. What is the usual hour for signing the book? A. Six o'clock when our duty commences - if a man is taken ill, and another comes in his place, that person should sign the book as well; but whether that has been done I cannot say.

GEORGE KNIGHT . I am employed in the early delivery of general post letters - a letter directed to A. W. Robarts, Esq., London, would be sorted to the Lombard-street walk, which is my delivery - I deliver letters directed to A. W. Robarts, Esq., at Sir W. Curtis and Co.; they receive all their letters by the early delivery - I delivered on the 1st of May all that were entrusted to my care.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where is Mr. Robarts' private house? A. I don't know - a letter might go there, but I should not deliver that - I deliver all letters sorted for Lombard-street.

SAMUAL SAYER . I am a sorter of franked letters in the tenth division of the letter carriers' office, and am a carrier - my signature is in the book, by which I find I was so on the 1st of May; letters addressed to A. W. Robarts, Esq., London, I should sort to the Lombard-street delivery.

GEORGE MOULES . I am a clerk in Sir William Curtis's banking-house. On the 1st of May two covers were received from York - one contained 126l., and the other merely a power of attorney - I have the book in which I entered the 126l.; no other remittance was received from the York bank that day - here is the letter which contained the 126l.; finding only that amount, I sent to the Post-office that one cover was missing - our letters come by the early delivery; those directed to A. W. Robarts, Esq., would come at the same time.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where is Mr. Robarts' private house? A. In Hill-street, Berkeley-square - I believe I got to the office at nine o'clock - letters sometimes come before I arrive - they are never touched till the corresponding clerk comes, and sometimes he opens them - I opened the York letter, containing 126l.; it arrived some time after I came - I made the entry immediately, from the contents - I opened it in the presence of Mr. Oldfield; he does not assist in marking the entry.

GEORGE OLDFIELD . I am clerk to Sir William Curtis and Co. On the 1st of May I was present when the York letters were opened - there were only two; I remember on one being read, that one cover was missing - I wrote to York that night about it.

WILLIAM HALL . The letter produced is the one I sent up in one of the parcels - I cannot say in which.

This letter was here read, and stated, among a variety of other matters of business, "We enclose a remittance, value 547l. 8s. 9d., in two covers."

JOSEPH RICHARD WADESON . I am a clerk to Sir William Curtis and Co. On the 1st of May it was my duty to enter all remittances in the country remittance book - there was a remittance of 126l. from Wilson and Co., of York; it consisted entirely of country bank notes - no letter arrived from York that morning containing any Bank of England notes.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who would take in the letters? A. Mr. Moules - they are brought into the Country office.

ABRAHAM WILDEY ROBARTS , ESQ., M. P. On the morning of the 1st of May I received no remittance from York, except this one of 126l.; my letters are invariably delivered at the banking-house in Lombard-street - our firm are, Sir William Curtis, myself, and Mr. William Curtis.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you at the banking-house at the time the letters were delivered? A. Not for some time afterwards.

JOSEPH DAVIES . I am clerk at Elliot and Co.'s brewery, at Pimlico (looking at the 1l. note produced) - I received this note from Mr. Evans, of Guildford-street, Borough, on the 3d of May, 1826.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You speak from your memory? A. No - from my book - I have an entry made here, "May 3, cash 24l.;" and I have written Evans' name on the note - I collect from him monthly - I received cash of him twenty-eight days before, and twenty-eight days after; I can only say that I received this note from him, but cannot swear when.

WILLIAM EVANS . I keep the Queen's Arms public-house, Great Guildford-street, Southwark. I know the prisoner very well - he is a customer; I received this note from him on the 1st of May, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - I have written on it, "Eagles, postman, 1st of May, 1826;" I took it in payment of 2s. 71/2d., which he owed me, and 2d. worth of gin which he had - I know that I paid it to Davies - it is my constant habit to indorse on notes the name of the persons who pay them me - I never changed a note for him before.

JURY to DEACON. Q. How many collectors of newspapers are there? A. The prisoner was the principal - but if they were heavy, another might help him; I cannot say whether he was helped that morning.

NEALE re-examined. I know the prisoner's hand-writing; I find, upon examining the book, that his name is signed to the particular duty as facer of newspapers - it is his hand-writing, to the best of my belief.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Will you swear these two signatures are both written by the same individual? A. I do - both are written by one person.

JURY. Q. At what time would these two signatures be made in the book? A. Both on the same day; they ought to be made at the same time - one shows that he was employed on his regular duty, and the other the extra duty; I cannot say whether I was on duty that day.

COURT. Q. What is your opinion of both the signatures? A. That they are both written by Eagles - I have seen him write his name frequently - he would have just the same opportunity of taking this letter whether employed at one or both duties - his regular duty was a letter carrier; the extra duty he has signed to was a collector of newspapers.

JOHN DEACON re-examined. The book would be signed at six o'clock in the morning - I have signed it; here is Eagles' name twice - but I don't swear to the second signature being his writing, and that made me say, I did not see it there; I cannot swear to his hand-writing - but the name on the left side bears a strong similitude to his handwriting.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Reference Number: t18270215-37

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaxelce.

530. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , at Enfield, 33 sheep, price 40l. , the property of William Walker .

WILLIAM WALKER. I live at Enfield-wash , and am a farmer . On the 1st of February I saw my sheep safe in the field about four o'clock in the afternoon - there were sixty of them - they were south-down sheep; I went to look for them again on Saturday morning, the 3d of February, and found only twenty-seven - most of them were marked J. C. on the near hip, with a black mark; I thought they might have strayed out of the field - but could find no gap; I went to the gate, and found they had gone out there - it had frozen hard on the Friday night, and if they had gone out on Friday night, there would have been no marks; but the foot marks were very plain, and a man's foot mark after them - I went all round the neighbourhood to inquire, but could hear nothing of them; I sent my son off on horseback on Sunday - he came back about twelve o'clock, and finding something in the newspaper about sheep, I immediately sent him up to Queen-square - he came back to me that evening (Sunday) and gave me information; I went up to Queen-square on Monday morning, and found twenty of my sheep in the slaughter-house of a butcher named Peek - there were no others there - they remained there till Friday, when the magistrate ordered them to be given to me.

RICHARD PALMER . I am the prosecutor's son-in-law, and know his sheep - I saw them safe on the 1st of February - they were missed on the 3d; I came to Queen-square on the Sunday - Pople took me to Peek's, where I found twenty sheep, which I knew to be my father-in-law's.

JOHN WELLS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Rochester-row, Westminster, near Queen-square, On Friday, the 2d of February, the prisoner came, in company with a man named Skipper, who recommended the prisoner to me as having known him, and I let him my shed at 2s. 6d. per week; I gave him the key at ten o'clock that morning - he was dressed like a regular butcher, with a blue apron, shoes, and gaiters; and his hands were smeared with blood, as if he had been killing - he told me his name was Williams, and he lived at Vauxhall, or Vauxhall-road - about three o'clock that afternoon he brought a horse and cart, tied up four sheep, and put them into the cart - he must have brought the sheep there between ten and twelve o'clock, for about twelve I looked through the window of the shed, and counted them in a careless manner - I made about twenty - they were loose in the shed, and the door was closed - at three o'clock, when he had put the four into the cart, Pople came and took him; the four sheep were let loose with the other sixteen - they remained in my shed about an hour and a half afterwards, when Pople took them away - the prisoner had come two days before in company with Skipper, and Skipper said he knew a person who wanted a shed, and I then agreed to let it to the prisoner - he wanted possession immediately, but I could not give him possession till Friday, as I had not got the key; I told him I expected it the next day, and he came next day (Thursday) in company with one Coney - I told him he should have the key as soon as I could get it - he came again on Friday at ten o'clock, and I gave it him; I knew Coney - his father keeps an oil shop near me - the prisoner was dressed very respectably on Wednesday and Thursday, but on Friday he was dressed like a butcher - I never saw him before.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On Friday afternoon, the 2d of February, between three and four o'clock. I went to the back of Rochester-row, and saw the prisoner with a horse and cart, inside some gates; within those gates was a shed - I saw him tying the legs of some sheep, and putting them into the cart - he put four in- the cart being too small, would not hold more; he was going to drive away - I went to him, told him to stop, and asked where he was going with those sheep; he said he was going home - I asked where he got them from; he said he had bought them that morning at Smithfield - I asked how many? he said "Twenty, I believe." I said "What is the salesman's name? and what did you give a head for them?" - He did not answer but seemed to hesitate; I pressed him to answer the question - he said he did not know that he should answer me, or words to that effect - I said I was an officer, and suspected they were stolen - I asked where he lived - he said, "You need not trouble yourself to ask me any more questions, for I shall answer none" - I then said, "If you bought these sheep at Smithfield this morning, how came you to go over Vauxhall-bridge, to Rochester-row with them" - as it was a great distance out of his way; he said he generally went the way that suited his purpose best - Pace, another officer, came in at the time - we secured him, took the sheep out of the cart, and put them into the shed, where there were sixteen more - he had got "G. Williams, Bermondsey, 16,516," chalked on the cart - we took him before the magistrate; he refused to tell the magistrate who he was, where he lived, or to give any account whatever of himself - on the Monday, Walker came and claimed the sheep, as twenty of the thirty-three which he had lost - they were not advertised, but I requested a reporter in the office to name the circumstance; we searched him, and found two sovereigns, and about 2s. on him, with one turnpike ticket of the Vauxhall-gate, one of the City toll bar, and one of the Marsh-gate - they are not dated.

Q. What made you ask why he came over Vauxhall-bridge? A. I had received some information, before I found the tickets. I found eight sheep' skins at Kentish-town last Thursday - the person who had them is not here.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am certain the sheep were mine - there was no mark but the I. C. on them when they left, but when I found them they were marked with ochre down the back, and across the loins, but my mark still remained.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday morning, the 2d of February, I was in Smithfield, and bought twenty sheep of a man named Thomas Wood, for 31l.; I paid him thirty-one sovereigns, and drove them home; I had not room in my slaughter-house for them, and took them to the shed, which I hired of Wells. I have a witness named Portwine, who saw me buy and pay for them.

- LUCE. I am the door-keeper of this Court. - At ten o'clock this morning a woman, who said she was the prisoner's wife, brought a man to the door, saying that his name was Portwine, and he was a witness; I said I would call him when he was wanted. I saw him in the

yard since two o'clock, and when this case came on somebody said the prisoner's wife had been gone ten minutes.

- WELLS. I am the wife of John Wells, the witness. When this trial was called on I told the door-keeper I would fetch the prisoner's wife, as I had seen her over the way at the public-house, but when I went for her she was gone.

His Lordship postponed summing up this case to the Jury until after the subsequent trial, which occupied till past five o'clock - Portwine being then called did not appear.(See the Fifth Day.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Reference Number: t18270215-38

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

531. HENRY SMITH and JAMES BARNES were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Dockerell , on the King's highway, on the 26th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 chain, value 6d., and 1 key, value 2d. , his property.

ROBERT DOCKERELL. I am a gardener , and live at Finchley. On the 26th of January, about twenty minutes after seven o'clock in the evening, I was just on this side the eight mile-stone, between Finchley and Whetstone ; a young man came up on the right side of me, and grasped me tight round the waist - he said, "You b-r, your money or your life;" he threw me on the ground - he was on the top of me, and kept on with the same language; I said I had no money - he ran his hand into my pocket, and finding I had none, he said, "You must give me your bl-y ticker, you b-r, or else I shall smash you;" he pulled at my watch, and broke the chain off - he ordered me to give him the watch; I pulled it out, and he grasped it out of my hand; he then got off me, and I saw him walking away; he had dark trousers and a light jacket on, but I did not see his face, and cannot speak to him; but about five minutes before this happened I saw the two prisoners turn up Lodge-lane, out of the road - one of them has the same dress on now - the other had a dark coat and trousers. I knew Smith before; I think the man who robbed me was too heavy to be Smith - the man came behine me.

NOT GUILTY .(See the Fifth Day, New Court.)

Reference Number: t18270215-39

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

532. GEORGE FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 12 ozs. of opium, value 15s., the goods of David Taylor and others, his masters .

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 16th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was employed to watch Messrs. Taylor's premises, in Cross-street, Finsbury; I saw the prisoner come from the house - I followed him above three hundred yards, into Sun-street, which is in the City - Herdsfield stopped him; I felt outside his pocket, and asked what he had got there - he said, potatoes; I said I must see what it was - he then said it was a little opium, which a friend had given him. I took it out of his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You were directed to watch? A. Yes.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I was with Forrester, and stopped the prisoner in the City; Forrester's account is correct.

MR. JOHN TAYLOR . I am in partnership with David and John Taylor. The prisoner was in our service, and had no authority to take this opium - it is worth 12s.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has he lived with you? A. Fourteen years. We have missed 15lbs. since the 1st of January; he bore a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-40

533. SAMUEL SHOREY and MARTHA HENLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 sack, value 2s. 6d., and 8 bushels of oats, chaff, and beans mixed together , the goods of William Wiggins and another.

WILLIAM WIGGINS. I am a horse-dealer , and have a stable in Fan-street, Goswell-street . The male prisoner was my servant , and had the care of the provender; my orders were for him not to lend any provender to any body; Henley's husband occupies a stable adjoining mine. On the 14th of February, at six o'clock in the evening, I went to the yard in Fan-street, and saw the woman standing at the corner of a dung-hill - as I approached her she coughed three times, which excited my suspicion - I looked round, and saw Shorey bring a eight-bushel sack out of my stable, and take it into the female prisoner's husband's stable; she immediately followed him into the stable, and said, "Sam, Sam, here is your master;" he said, "Where? where?" I seized him, and said, "Here"- I took from his hands this bag, filled with oats, chaff, and beans, mixed; he said it was the first time - I asked how he came to do it - he then said the woman had nothing for her horse to eat that night, and he had lent it to her - it was worth 20s. I gave charge of them both, and found another sack of mine in Henley's stable, and some hay, which I feel certain was grown on my father's farm. I found one sack full, and another half full of the same mixture in the loft, and am certain that was also my chaff.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you cut the chaff yourself? A. No, but I know it by its corresponding with the rest: I have samples of my own here, and have compared it; Shorey said at first that it was the first time - he afterwards said he had lent it to her. I gave him particular orders not to lend provender, having missed a good deal. I have forty workmen, and had less suspicion of him than any one. I never borrow provender - our stables are both in the same range, but do not communicate - the yard is common to us all. I believe Henley is a hard-working industrious woman.

Prisoner SHOREY. Q. Have you not sent me to borrow straw? A. Never. I have one partner.

THOMAS WATTS . I am a constable, and took the prisoners in charge - I saw the sack laying in Henley's stable. I found some provender up in the loft.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the woman say any thing? A. No. I have known her about fifteen years; she and her husband bear honest, respectable characters.

SHOREY's Defence. We have been in the constant

habit of borrowing one of another in the yard. I lent her this, for that in her stable was not fit for a horse to eat.

The female prisoner received an excellent character.

SHOREY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

HENLEY - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-41

534. THOMAS BURTON and JOHN RICHARDSON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 11 yards of oil-cloth, value 30s. , the goods of William John Harwood .

WILLIAM JOHN HARWOOD. I deal in oil-cloth , and live on Holborn-hill. On the 26th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the officer and Grumett came into the shop, and asked if I missed any thing - I examined, and missed this oil-cloth from the doorway. The officer had got Burton at the watch-house, with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it outside the door? A. It was without the inner door, and had a chain round it, to keep it from falling.

WILLIAM GRUMETT . I am a porter. On the 26th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw Richardson taking a piece of oil-cloth from Mr. Harwood's door, and put it on his shoulder; Burton was standing at his side; they ran down Fetter-lane, which is three or four doors off, with it - I followed them down New-street, into Poppin's-court, and across to Bridge-street, where I detained them both; Burton had then got it on his shoulder - they both carried it at times. Richardson struck me two or three times - they both struggled, and Richardson got away. I took Burton and the cloth to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was this after dark? A. Yes. When I was at the corner of Bridge-street, Richardson, seeing me close to him, said to Burton, "I will give you 2d. to carry this cloth," and he gave him 2d. with it; they had both carried it by turns before that - they both saw me, and knew I must have seen them. Burton was just at the side of the door when it was taken.

ALEXANDER JOHNSON . I am a constable. Burton was delivered to me with the property - he said a person gave him 2d. to carry it, and I found 2d. on him. I apprehended Richardson next day in Giltspur-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BURTON's Defence. As I came by I just happened to look in at the window; a young man said, "Which way are you going?" I said, over Blackfriars-bridge; he said he was going that way, if I would wait, his mistress was buying some oil-cloth in that shop, and in a few minutes he came to me with the cloth; I assisted him in carrying it.

BURTON - GUILTY. Aged 15.

This prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy, supposing him to have been seduced by the other. - Judgment Respited .

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-42

535. SILAS BROOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 40 lbs. weight of amber, value 20l., the goods of Joseph Colebatch and Godfrey Alexender Cohen , his masters .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH COLEBATCH. I am in partnership with Godfrey Alexander Cohen; we live in Lower Thames-street, City. The prisoner was in our employ last year. and in consequence of something which occured we discharged him; we subsequently examined a quantity of amber which was entrusted to our care - it weighed 99lbs. when it came to us - we found it 40lbs. deficient. I caused the prisoner to be apprehended by King, who brought me this paper, which is in the prisoner's hand-writing; he had access to the cask of amber while he was with us - he was occasionally employed at coopering - he had left us about six weeks - the amber is worth 12s. a pound.

JOSEPH PHILIP KING . I apprehended the prisoner by Mr. Colebatch's directions, and took him to Giltspur-street Compter. I neither threatened nor promised him any thing - he asked if I would take a note to his master; I said, Yes - he said he would get it ready in the course of the day, and I was to call for it at four o'clock; when he delivered me this paper. This was before his examination (read).

"January 19, 1827. - This is to certify, that I, Silas Brookes, do hereby admit that Mr. Barnett, of Savage-gardens, Rosemary-lane, did buy of me a certain quantity of amber at 2s. per lb.; he had bought some at 1s. per lb., in pounds and half pounds at a time, knowing the same to be stolen Mr. Colebatch's warehouse. I am ready to testify from the same in evidence; additional evidence can be given."

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Cohen came to me before I was examined, and said if I knew any thing of the fact he would admit me as evidence, if I would tell him what it was - I said I would let him know by letter; King came twice, and I gave him the letter; I obtained the property from a person, who is now at sea; but I did not know it was stolen.

MR. COHEN. I went to the house of one Jeremiah Nathanson, in Mansel-street, Goodman's-fields, and there found a quantity of amber; he told me where he got it - I never made the prisoner any promise; I did not see him till he was examined.

DANIEL JELLIMAN . I am foreman to the prosecutors. On re-weighing this cask, it was 40lbs. deficient.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-43

536. ELIZA BROWN and ELIZA JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 gold watch, value 8l.; 1 steel-chain, value 6d., and 1 seal, value 10s., the goods of Matthew Gibbs , from his person .

MATTHEW GIBBS. I am an officer of the Customs , and live in the Old Bailey. On the 29th of January, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was on London-bridge , going towards home - I was rather in liquor - the prisoners met me, and asked me to go home with them - I refused; they turned back with me, and walked to the middle of the bridge - they asked me to treat them; I said I had no money, and there was no house open; they left me, and in less than a minute (before they had got three yards from me) I missed my watch, which I am sure was safe before I met them - I went after Johnson, caught her, and gave her in charge - Brown ran away, but was brought into the watch-house by an officer, about a quarter of an hour afterwards - my watch was found on her; I am quite

sure of her, for they stood under a gas-light on the bridge - I was not insensible, but rather in liquor.

Prisoner JOHNSON. Q. Did I not pick up your umbrella? A. No; I had one, but never dropped it.

Prisoner BROWN. Q. Did you not throw your arm round my neck? A. No; I used no familiarities with either of them - I did not go back with them, or treat them at all.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a constable of London-bridge. Gibbs brought Johnson into the watch-house on this charge, and said another woman was in her company - he had been drinking, but was not insensible; I went out, and took Brown on the bridge, going towards the City; she denied the charge - I found the seal in her pocket, and the watch dropped from her.

JOHN SMITH . I was coming over the bridge, and heard Gibbs say he had lost his watch; I saw a woman run across the bridge, and followed her, but I could see nothing of her; I returned, and saw Brown looking at the watch in her hand - I went to the watch-house, and told them - they went out and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN's Defence. He gave me the watch to hold for a sum of money.

J. BAILEY. She said nothing about this at the watch-house. BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-44

537. WILLIAM CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 64 lbs. weight of veal, value 2l. 2s. , the goods of William Guy Hill .

WILLIAM GUY HILL. I am a salesman , and live in Newport-market. On the 14th of February, I packed up half a calf in a cloth, and sent it next morning to Newgate-market by my young man.

GEORGE PUTNAM . I am servant to Mr. Hill. On Thursday morning, about five o'clock, I took five sides of veal to Newgate-market - the cart stood in Warwick-lane - I carried four sides to the salesman, and on returning, Lockwood gave me information, and I missed it - I followed the prisoner, and kept him in sight with it all the way - I secured him in Newgate-street with it on his shoulder.

THOMAS LOCKWOOD . I work in Newgate-market. On the 15th of February, about six o'clock, while Putnam was gone up the market, I saw the prisoner take the tailboard of the cart down, and take this veal out - I ran, and told Putnam - we followed, and secured him with it - he is a stranger to me.

THOMAS BOND . I am a constable, and received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman asked me to carry it down Fleet-market.

T. LOCKWOOD. Nobody was near him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270215-45

538. WILLIAM DRAPER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 sheet, value 2s., the goods of William Painter , from the person of Louisa Painter .

LOUISA PAINTER. (This witness appeared perfectly aware of the obligation of an oath.) I am eight years and a half old, and am the daughter of William Painter; I live with my mother, in Love-lane, Aldermanbury. On a Wednesday evening, about three weeks ago, I was in London-wall, bringing a sheet from my aunt's, in Cross-key-court, London-wall; she could not wash it, and I was taking it home again - the prisoner came behind me, and snatched it away from me; I had seen him before; I ran after him, crying Stop thief! somebody stopped him, and he was given to the constable; I am sure he is the person.

RICHARD MELSON . I am a coal-dealer. I heard this child call Stop thief! I turned round, and stopped the prisoner with this sheet under his arm - he said nothing - I gave him to the constable.

JOHN SALTER . I took him in charge.

- PAINTER. I am the wife of William Painter, who is abroad. This sheet is mine; I had sent the child with it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270215-46

539. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 great-coat, value 3l., the goods of Richard Southee , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD SOUTHEE. I live in Mark-lane . On Friday last, this great coat was in my surgery; I saw the prisoner leave my door with it under his arm - I followed, and overtook him within six yards - I saw him drop it; two other persons were about; I had had it five or six weeks - I think the lowest value of it is 3l. - I have lost three within the last year.

JOHN COCKBURN . I am servant to Mr. Southee. I hung this coat in the surgery, not ten minutes before it was taken; I saw the prisoner go out with it; I went out, and saw him drop it.

JOHN BISSET . I am a constable, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-47

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

540. HENRY SPIZEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , at St. George, Bloomsbury, 1 silver tea-pot, value 5l., the goods of Thomas Hodgkinson , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE NICHOLS . I am footman to Mr. Thomas Hodgkinson, who lives at No. 27, Bloomsbury-square - I am not certain of the parish. On the 7th of February, rather before ten o'clock in the morning, I heard a ring at the street-door bell, and went up, leaving no one below; I found a person there, who came on business; and on going down, as I entered the kitchen, I saw the prisoner run out of the outer door, which was unlocked, and up the area steps - he was carrying a basket - I followed, and took his basket from him at the top of the steps - I asked him what he had been up to - he pulled the basket from me; it got entangled with the gate - he pulled to get it - I threw it down the area, then went and caught him within a hundred yards, without losing sight of him. I am sure he is the man - I found seven lemons in the basket, and

my master's silver tea-pot, which I had left in the kitchen when I went up to answer the bell - it is worth 5l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had he taken the basket out of the house? A. Yes.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am constable of St. George, Bloomsbury. All the square is in that parish.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18270215-48

541. WILLIAM AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Marsh , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 23d of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell, (Mary, the wife of the said John Marsh, and one Hannah Bunn , being therein), and stealing therein, 1 hat, value 14s.; 1 pair of boots, value 1l. 1s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of Richard Bohden .

MARY MARSH . I am the wife of James Marsh, who rents a house in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell - Richard Bohden lodged in our second floor front room. On the 23d of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at home with Hannah Bunn; I went up to make Bohden's hed, and locked the door at four o'clock, bringing the key with me - every thing was then safe in his room; I went down into my own room, on the ground floor, and in half an hour I heard some one come downstairs - Bunn was with me; I called to know who was there - no one answered; I opened the door, and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, with the boots in one hand and the hat in the other; he was walking through the passage; Bunn ran out, calling Stop thief! George Bunn was just coming from his work - I alarmed him - he ran, calling Stop thief! the prisoner threw the property down, and was secured immediately by an officer, who happened to be passing - I found Bohden's door open and the property gone.

GEORGE BUNN . I lodge at this house. On the 23d of January, about four o'clock, I was coming home, and heard Mrs. Marsh give an alarm; I saw the prisoner run out of the house with a pair of boots, and something tied up in a handkerchief; I kept him in sight all the way, and saw him throw the property down - an officer, who was going by with the van, jumped down and caught him; the property was picked up.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer. I heard the call of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running; I jumped off the van, and secured him; I took him into a public-house, and found on him a key, which opens Bohden's room door; I found these shoes in his coat pocket; he claimed the handkerchief the hat was tied up in.

RICHARD BOHDEN. I lodge in the second floor front room. This is my hat, boots, and shoes; I left them in the room, between six and seven o'clock that morning; the hat was in a box under the bed, and the shoes were under the bed; they are worth 2l. 1s. together.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent in by a person, which one John Davies can prove - I was to get the property off the stairs; I never went up-stairs.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18270215-49

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

542. JOHN OLIVER , JOHN HOWARD, alias JOHNSON , and EDWARD LAYCOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , at St. Sepulchre, 1 mare, price 30l. , the property of William Maides .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JAMES PORTEOUS . I am servant to William Maides, who keeps the Bell Inn, at Smithfield . On the 9th of January, he had a bay mare in the stable - I attended her - I shut her up about half-past eight o'clock that night - I locked both the door-lock and the padlock; I went next morning, between eight and nine o'clock, and found the door ajar - I looked in, and missed the mare - I saw her again on the 10th of February, when she was brought back - I am quite sure she is the same.

WILLIAM MAIDES . I keep the Bell, at Smithfield. On the 9th of January, I had a dark bay mare; I bought her the latter end of July, and lost her on the night of the 9th, or morning of the 10th of January - I found her on the 8th of February, at the Three Kings Inn yard, Thomas-street, Bristol - my stable is in the county of Middlesex; I was not present when the prisoners were apprehended; I have seen Howard before - he is a drover, and went by the name of Johnson.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How can your stable be in Middlesex? A. My house is in the City, but the stable is in Brewer's-yard. I am certain it is in the County; I rent it of a person, named Wade; I rent the house of the Corporation.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you any specific knowledge of the City boundaries? A. I know it is in Middlesex - I do not pay any rates for the stable; the watchman of the County has the stable on his beat; my house is the boundary.

HENRY FOSTER . I am a marshalsman. I know Mr. Maides' stable is in Middlesex - I have been a City officer nearly ten years.

WILLIAM CROCOME . I am landlord of the Three Kings, Thomas-street, Bristol, and take in horses to bait. The prisoners, on several occasions, brought horses to my stables - the first time was about two months ago - I have my stable-book here (looking at it) - I find the mare claimed by Mr. Maides, was brought on the 17th of January - Oliver and Johnson came with her; they remained there till the 23d of January - Oliver then left the mare in my care, desiring me to take care of her till he came again, unless a person, whom he had been speaking to, came to purchase her; that I might sell her for 26l., but if I could not get more than 24l., to take it - while she was there Johnson rode her at times; I do not know that Oliver rode her - several people came to look at her; Johnson showed her in the yard, and Oliver attended also; they both left on the 23d of January, and both returned on the 1st of February - Laycock was with them then; Oliver came first, about eleven o'clock in the morning; the other two arrived about half-past five or six, and brought four more horses.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Laycock was not with them at first? A. No; I considered Johnson as Oliver's servant.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You do not attend to the stable business? A. No; I leave it to the ostler, who is not here. I had seen Oliver twice before the 11th of January.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What did Oliver say when he came about eleven o'clock? A. He said he expected

four or five horses that day; I was to provide stabling for them. I frequently go into the stable-yard - Oliver always paid me.

DAVID MORGAN . I am an officer of Bristol. In consequence of information I took the prisoners into custody, on the 1st of February, about seven o'clock in the evening - Oliver was in the parlour at the Three Kings public-house; the other two were in the stable, feeding the horses, which appeared very much out of condition, as if they had been rode very hard. Mr. Maides claimed a bay mare that was there.

OLIVER's Defence. I bought the mare on the 13th of January, at the Wheat-sheaf public-house, kept by Mr. Noon, for eighteen guineas - Laycock can prove it; I slept in Noon's house on the night of the robbery.

JOHNSON's Defence. Oliver hired me to go to Bristol with him, to take these horses down - I took three and he one.

There being no evidence against Luycock, the Jury here found him Not Guilty.

THOMAS NOON . I keep the Wheatsheaf public-house-, at Rotherhithe. Oliver first came to lodge at my house about six months age; Laycock joined him three days before Christmas, and continued to lodge with him; they spent the Christmas week at my house; Oliver had stables at the top of the street, but lodged and boarded at my house, and the boy, Laycock, with him. I remember a man offering him a mare for sale - to the best of knowledge it was about the 13th of Jan. on a Saturday; I saw the mare in the street for half an hour before it was bought; it was a bay mare, about fifteen hands high; there was nothing remarkable about it, only I have one about the same sort, and they said it would match mine very well - it had a nagtail; it was rode up and down before my house for half an hour, and then they came to a bargain; he put her into his own stable, and went away the next day, leaving Laycock behind; I did not know that Oliver was going - Laycock continued to lodge with me, and left last Friday three weeks; I am sure that was the time he left - I did not see him go away. Oliver passed all his evenings at my house while he was in town; I never knew him miss one night; he went very regularly to his bed, about ten or eleven o'clock. I do not recollect his being absent one night or morning while he was with me.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you go to Oliver's stable at the top of the street? A. I went twice - he had no horses there then. Laycock came three days before Christmas; that would be twenty days before the mare was bought - the stable is better than one hundred yards from my house. Nineteen sovereigns were given for the mare, and 2s. returned; Oliver went away next day - I did not see him go, and cannot say whether he rode the mare away; it was not left in the stable. I never saw any other horses there - Laycock was there when the mare was bought, and rode her about, to show it, while Oliver stood and looked at her - it was between eleven and twelve o'clock, before twelve, I think; it was before dinner - I never saw the man before who sold it; I have seen him once since - he called at my house last Thursday three weeks.

Q. When did you hear of Oliver being taken? A. Mrs. Hall came down and informed me of it - I think it was the week before last. The person who sold the horse came last Thursday three weeks, to inquire for Oliver - he did not leave any address.

Q. Why, last Thursday three weeks was the day before Laycock went away? A. Yes - the man saw Oliver; he had come back again, and was at my house - he slept at my house last Thursday three weeks, and went away on Friday, with Laycock.

Q. What time on the Thursday did Oliver come? A. Between six and seven o'clock; the man who sold him the mare called to see Oliver on the Friday.

Q. You said before it was Thursday three weeks? A. It was Friday three weeks, about eleven o'clock, the day Oliver went away - Oliver had come the night before, about seven o'clock - they might be together for an hour; Oliver and Laycock went away in the afternoon - I understand they both left together, but I did not see them go.

Q. Then they might have gone earlier - how late did you see them? A. About two o'clock.

EDWARD LAYCOCK (the prisoner). I was Oliver's servant. I went to live with him at Noon's, on the Sunday as Christmas came on the Monday. I was present when Oliver saw a mare at Mr. Noon's; I tried her - Noon was present; it was brought between eleven and twelve o'clock, I think, by a tail fresh-looking man; I knew him by sight, but cannot say whether my master knew him; I came by, and saw my master paying some money for the mare, but do not know how much. I took her into master's stable - she remained there till Sunday afternoon, when Howard took her away, as I was not well, and could not take her; while I was at Noon's with my master he regularly slept at home every night - we did not sleep in the same bed - he always passed his evenings there. I never knew him out after six o'clock.

MR. BOLLAND. Q, You went on the Sunday before Christmas day, which was Monday, now understand my question before you answer - how soon after you had been at Noon's, with your master, did the man come and sell the mare? A. I cannot say - I suppose it might be a fortnight; my master was in the house when the gentleman brought it - it was shown out before the house; I rode her: the man stood by the side - it was about an hour before master bargained for her. The man went away soon after he was paid. I think she staid in the stable nearly a week - I think it was a week after she was brought; Howard took her away because I was not well, and could not ride; master went away at the same time, leaving me - I do not know what day of the week this was. I staid until my master returned - I do not know what day that was.

Q. How long did you stay after your master returned? A. Several days, before we went into the country; my master staid several days, and we went away together, on a Monday morning, about nine o'clock. I did not see Howard when my master returned at all.

Q. Before you went away, on your master's second return, did any one call on your master? A. Not that I saw.

Q. Did you see the man who sold the mare afterwards? A. Yes - nearly a week afterwards he came to Mr. Noon's house one morning - my master was there then; he staid with him an hour or so - the man did not come again at

any time - the man came on Friday morning, and we went away on the Monday following - I had seen him two or three times before he brought the mare, but have not seen him since the Friday he called on my master at Noon's - I do not know his name - I did not hear him give master any name.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you and your master continue to lodge at Noon's every night till you went away? A. Yes.

HARMAN CUTHBERT . I am a butcher; I live three or four doors from Noon's. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, or about twelve one day, I saw Oliver looking at a mare, which was shown backwards and forwards by my house for half an hour; there was a man on it - Oliver had a boy with him as a servant - whether the boy was there then I do not recollect - this was about the 13th of January - Oliver went into the house with the man, and I saw him paying some money - I never saw the man before nor since.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. When were you applied to about this? A. Last Wednesday, I think - it was a bay mare; I have not seen the one which Mr. Maides claims, and cannot say whether it is the same - I should know it if I saw it - it might be another.

MR. ANDREWS to E. LAYCOCK. A. Is the mare which was brought from Bristol the one which your master bought? A. Yes.

COURT to T. NOON. Q. On what day did Oliver leave your house, after he bought the mare? A. On the Sunday - I saw him again last Thursday three weeks.

OLIVER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 31.

HOWARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-50

543. JOHN OLIVER , JOHN HOWARD, alias JOHNSON , and EDWARD LAYCOCK , were again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , at Edmonton, 2 geldings, price 80l. , the property of Isaac Walker .

JOHN GRANT . I am coachman to Mr. Isaac Walker. who lives at Farmer's-green, near Southgate, in the parish of Edmonton . On Monday evening, the 29th of January, I locked his two geldings in the stable at ten o'clock - we usually go to bed about half-past ten - I went to the stable about half-past six the next morning, and found a piece sawed out of the window, so that a person could get in - the staple of the door, which was inside, was drawn - the door open, and the geldings gone; in consequence of information, I went to Bristol on the Sunday following - I got there at nine o'clock in the evening - and about half-past eight next morning found both the geldings at the Three Kings public-house, in Thomas-street; they are my master's - the prisoners had then been apprehended - the geldings were in a very low state then, from being rode hard - they were very fresh before they were stolen.

WILLIAM CROCOME . I keep the Three Kings public-house, at Bristol; I first saw Oliver before Christmas - Johnson came there first on the 7th of January - Laycock had come with Oliver before Christmas; they were all three taken into custody at my house about seven o'clock on the evening of the 1st of February; I saw Oliver about eleven o'clock in the morning of that day - he said his men were to bring some horses - I think he said there would be four or five; I am sure he said four - he desired me to get stabling prepared for them, which I did; I do not know what time the mail comes in, but our London letters are delivered about twelve o'clock; Laycock and Johnson arrived about half-past five or six that evening; I did not see what they brought with them - but I afterwards saw them with two mares and two geldings - I saw them within half or a quarter of an hour of their coming; the horses appeared to have been rode very hard; the geldings were coach horses, and appeared to match - the other two were nags; the officer took them into custody within an hour or an hour and a half of their arrival; Grant came some days afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Laycock and Johnson acted as Oliver's servants? A. Yes.

DAVID MORGAN . I am an officer of Bristol. On the 1st of February, about seven in the evening, I apprehended the prisoners at the Three Kings; Oliver was in the parlour - the other two were in the stable, feeding the horses, which were much out of condition, as if they had been rode very hard indeed - Bristol is one hundred and twenty miles from town; the mail arrives about half-past nine in the morning; we have several day coaches come to Bristol - one leaves at seven o'clock in the morning, and gets there at nine at night - Grant saw the horses, and claimed the geldings; Mr. Maides, of Smithfield, came on the Thursday, and another person claimed two more.

OLIVER's Defence. I never saw the horses till Wednesday morning, and they were lost on Monday; the first time I saw them was at Marlborough, about eight o'clock.

LAYCOCK's Defence. I never saw the horses till Wednesday morning.

JOHN GILES . I keep the Duke of Wellington public-house, at Twyford, in Berkshire; it is thirty-four miles from Hyde-park-corner. Oliver slept at my house on Monday night, the 29th of January - it was three weeks ago yesterday; he came about seven in the evening - he had a lad with him, whom I think was Laycock - but I did not see much of the lad; I cooked them a beef-steak - they had three horses with them; they went away about seven in the morning, without taking breakfast.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did Oliver frequent your house? A. He has been there three or four times within the last twelve months; I know it was the 29th, because I had been selling some dung for a farmer in the neighbourhood, named Simmonds - I have no doubt that I saw the lad, but I cannot identify him.

COURT. Q. Did you observe what horses they had with them? A. No; I was employed in-doors, and do not know that I saw the horses.

RICHARD MELLIT . I am a blacksmith, and live at Twyford, exactly opposite Giles.' On Monday, the 29th of January, I was at the Duke of Wellington with a few friends, and saw Oliver come in - I was in-doors, and did not see whether any body was with him - he said he was tired, and very cold - I asked him to take a glass of ale, which he refused, saying he would have something to eat first - I went home to supper, and returned about half-past eight; Oliver was still there, and had just finished his supper; I went into the tap-room, and staid about an hour - he was in the bar - I went and bade him good night before I left; Simmonds and Giles were bargaining about some dung that evening.

COURT. Q. Do you know how Oliver came there? A. He had spurs on; I saw no horses.

Two respectable witnesses gave Laycock a good character.

HOWARD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

LAYCOCK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

OLIVER - NOT GUILTY .

Laycock recommended to Mercy on account of his youth and good character .

Reference Number: t18270215-51

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

544. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Brill , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 15l.; 1 chain, value 3l., and 2 seals, value 2l. , his property.

Mr. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BRILL. I am an attorney . On the 5th of September I had hired a horse at the Moon public-house, King's-road, Chelsea, of Mr. Steed; I returned the horse a little before nine o'clock - I staid there, and had some brandy and water; I left the house to go home about eleven o'clock - and just before some houses, which were building, a man, whom I believe to be the prisoner, came up to me; there was a gas light opposite Steed's door, by which I could see him - he was dressed in a rough great coat - I had said nothing to him - he came up, and said,"I should like to punch your head:" I said, "For what?" he said, "And I will do it too;" I then retreated into Steed's house - when I came out again, he was gone; I proceeded down King's-road, and down Beaufort-row , where I live - a man passed me, and we walked down the row together, till I came in contact with a basket in the middle of the footpath, and injured my shin against it - just as I was exclaiming about its being placed in that situation, a man jumped from behind a tree, and bit me a most desperate blow in the jaw; I was knocked down, and reeled into the road - I was seriously hurt, and my teeth all loosened; I believe the prisoner to be the man, but it was a dark night, and I will not speak positively to him; my watch and chain were taken from me while I was down - I resisted as much as I could, having a 50l. note in my pocket; but the blow had taken away my senses; next morning, Brown, the watchman, gave me the watch - the chain and seals were then gone from it; the ring which attached them, was very likely to break; Leeper, the watchman, came up immediately I was knocked down - a man named Sleet, who was in my company, stood by, and never called out for assistance.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you seen Steed, the publican, here to-day? A. I have subpoenaed him in case it should be necessary to call him; I had spent the day beyond Hounslow, at Mr. Manchester's - I was certainly tipsy, but had my recollection perfectly - Sleet had passed me in the road; I said he might as well walk home with me, as I knew him - I asked him to see me home; I knew him by sight, and may have spoken to him when I have met him; but merely said, "Good morning!" I considered him a respectable man.

Q. Is it true that you passed by your own house this night? A. I did, with a view to treat him at the Hole-in-the-Wall, which is nearly opposite my house; but I did not go into the house, for I was knocked down within two or three doors of it - Sleet was walking by my side, and must have seen me knocked down - I stumbled against the basket, but that did not throw me down - I was knocked down by the man who rushed out - a man named Fuller was there; I did not fight; I began to abuse him about the basket, but made no blow at any one; I believe the prisoner to he the man, from my recollection of having seen him in the rough great coat; and I saw him run away - he was taken about three weeks ago.

JAMES LEEPER . I am the watchman of Beaufort-row, Chelsea. On this night, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prosecutor before this happened; I afterwards saw him with Sleet - I was two or three doors off, when I saw a man in a white coat rush out on Mr. Brill, who certainly fell from the force of that man; I am sure the prisoner is the man, for I knew him before; I ran on - the prisoner was then leaning over him in rather a stooping position - I said, "What is the matter?" the prisoner straightened himself up, hit me in the face, and then ran away; he appeared to have his hands about Brill's middle; next morning I saw Brown pick up the watch in the kennel where Brill had lain.

Cross-examined. Q. When you first saw him, were not he and Sleet arm-in-arm? A. Yes; I did not see Sleet when Brill was knocked down, as it was a very dark night - I swear to the prisoner because he had a white coat on, and he remained there till I got up to them - I asked Brown who it was that had run round the corner, in the white coat, as I considered he ought to know as well as me.

JOHN BROWN . I am a watchman. I did not see Brill; I saw the prisoner run down Beaufort-row into Lindsey-row, where I was - I am sure of him; next morning I found the watch, with the swivel broken, near the Hole-in-the-Wall, in Beaufort-row.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Sleet? A. Yes - after the affray; I heard of no fight - I was not near enough to Brill to tell whether he was sober; I am certain of the prisoner - there was a gas light facing him as he ran.

JOSEPH SMITHERS . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th of January, in Love-lane, Wandsworth; he was sitting by the fire-side - I said, "Tom, I want you" - he said, "What, about that job of Mr. Brill's?" I had not mentioned Brill's name - he said, "Mr. Brill cannot make any more than an assault of it, can he?" - I said I did not know, but Brill charged him with robbing him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate all this? A. No; I was not examined.

W. BRILL re-examined. My watch was drawn from my pocket while I was on the ground; I had it when I stumbled against the basket, and missed it shortly after I was knocked down.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

JAMES SLEET . I am a cordwainer, and live at Battersea. I have known Brill about a year and a half: I saw him about a quarter past eleven o'clock on the night of the 5th of September; he said "Halloo, is that you, Battersea?" meaning me - I said, "Yes, sir;" he said, "I mean Mr. Sleet" - I said, "Yes;" he said, "I will indict you for walking so fast; why not accompany me down the road?"

- seeing him very much in liquor, I said I would - I walked with him opposite his own house, and I said, "You have passed your house, you had better cross the way;" he said, "No, I will go to the Hole-in-the-Wall, and treat you with a glass of brandy and water;" I said I did not require that, as I considered he had had quite enough - that it was late, and we should not get in; he said,"Oh, d-n their eyes; I will fetch them down - they'll serve me, I know;" and when we came to the bottom, to turn up to the door, a basket stood in the road - he tumbled over it while he held my arm, and said, as he lay down, "What the hell is that I have tumbled over?" - I said it appeared to be a basket - six or seven people stood by the public-house door, and as he got up, one of them said, "It is my basket," begged his pardon, and said he hoped it had not hurt him; he said, "D-n your eyes, you scoundrel, you put it there on purpose for me to fall over;" he collared the man, and shook him - the man pushed him away, and he would have fallen if I had not caught him - I could not keep him from the men - he said, "D-n their eyes! I will floor the whole of them;" and struck right and left at them; one of them struck him, and being intoxicated, he fell into the kennel; three or four of the party ran away; I saw nobody hanging over Brill; I helped him out; I then saw Leeper, the watchman; nobody attempted to touch Brill, till he struck right and left at them.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Was Brill bleeding or not? A. He had a tremendous blow, either by falling or bitting at the men; he certainly was in a gore of blood; I gave Brill my card that night, promising to call on him next morning at nine o'clock, which I did.

Q. What was the reason of your giving him your card, when you were going to call? A. He being in liquor, I thought he might not recollect, and I gave him the card to satisfy him; I was sober; I do not know the prisoner; I certainly have been to see him in prison; having been waiting here five days, I called there yesterday; I knew one Featherston, who was outside the public-house, and a baker, whose name I do not know; they both live somewhere at Chelsea; I attended at Queen-square; the Magistrate would not bind me over; I attended there by Mr. Brill's desire.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Brill accuse you of not having done your duty by him? A. Never; I stated to the Magistrate, in Brill's presence, the same as I have here; I heard he had lost his watch almost directly he got up; I was sober; I saw nobody in a white coat. to my knowledge.

- STEED. I am a publican. Brill was at my house on this night; he was tipsy; he subpoenaed me me here yesterday, and told me I need not come to-day.

J. LEEPER re-examined. I knew the prisoner before, and knew where he lived; but did not apprehend him, as he never came in my way; I told Brill that night that it was the prisoner who ran away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-52

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

545. GEORGE WILLIAMS was again (see page 208) indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster, 1 gelding, price 4l. , the property of John Rattey .

JOHN RATTEY. I am a butcher , and live at Wormley, in Hertfordshire , which is near twenty miles from town. On the 28th of January, I had a dark brown gelding in my stable; I shut the stable up myself, and fastened it about 8 o'clock at night; it was then safe; the stable is in my yard; the door was only pinned, and the yard gate, which is a 5 barred one, was shut and pinned; the next morning, about 8 o'clock, I went to the stable, and found the gelding was gone, and also my harness - the stable door was open, but the yard gates were still pinned; I went down to the turnpike gate, and made inquiry, but did not find it till last Thursday, the 15th of February, when Pace, the officer, showed it me, in a stable near Queen-square, Westminster - it is a dark brown colour, and blind on the off side - it is now in Pace's possession; I am certain it is mine - I have had it two years and a quarter. I lost my cart and harness at the same time. I do not know the prisoner.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 2d of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the back yard of No. 29, Rochester-row, Westminster, and saw Pople, my brother officer, in conversation with the prisoner; there was a horse and cart in the yard, and four sheep in it - Pople asked him his name - he said it was George Williams, but refused to tell where he lived; we took him into custody, and found about 2l. 4s. in money on him; he said, after we had handcuffed him, "Take care of my horse and cart, and likewise the sheep;" we took the horse and cart with us- when we left him at the watch-house he asked what was done with his horse and the sheep; I told him we had put the sheep at a butcher's named Peek, and the horse and cart at a livery-stables in Great Tothill-street. When we came to the examination on Monday he asked me if his horse was taken care of; I told him it was, and when he was fully committed for trial he asked Mr. White, the Magistrate, if he would deliver up the horse and cart to him before he went to Newgate; Mr. White said, "Certainly not." On Thursday morning last Rattey came to the office, and described the sort of horse he had lost; I took him to the stable, and he claimed the same which we took from the prisoner - I do not know where the prisoner lived - he refused to tell us, or the Magistrate.

JOHN RATTEY. It was my horse, and the one I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the horse at Romford-market, on Wednesday, the last day of January, for 3l. 15s.

WILLIAM FRANKLIN . I was at Romford-market on the last day of January, and saw the prisoner buy a brown horse there - it was a blind one; he gave 3l. 15s. for it - it was in the forenoon - I cannot say the hour.

COURT. Q. Where do you live? A. In Essex, in the parish of Vans; I am a labourer, and work for different farmers. I now work for Mr. Cole, of Vans' hall - Billericay is the nearest town to it - I have worked for him about six months; I was working for him last Saturday; I have known the prisoner about two years, by seeing him about - he is a butcher, and lives in Princes-street, Lambeth; he has a shop there, and is a married man; I went to Romford with half a score of pigs for Mr. Cole - that is about twelve miles from Billericay; I do not know who the prisoner bought the horse of, or what he did with it; he lived in Princes-street at that time; I was not intimate

with him - I knew him by seeing him at market at different times - I did not go any where with him after the horse was bought. I have been in town about a week, and have been lodging in West-lane, Smithfield, at a private house, kept by Jones.

Q. What day did you come to town? (Prisoner "Last Monday.") A. Monday, Yesterday week - I have been here ever since - I was working for Cole last Saturday week. I came up here merely to see a friend, named John Griffith; Mr. Cole knew of my coming - I asked his leave to come for a week, or a day or two more if I liked; Griffith is a carpenter, and lodges in Long-lane. - I was here yesterday - I came by myself about two o'clock, and left about half-past three; I saw the prisoner's wife; I did not go away with her - I do not know of any other man being here with her; I do not go by any other name - I did not speak to any officer here yesterday. Mr. Cole lives sixteen miles from Romford.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Reference Number: t18270215-53

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

530. HENRY JOHN FARLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Sheldrake , on the afternoon of the 1st of February (no person being therein), and stealing 1 hat, value 1s.; 2 shirts, value 3s.; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 pair of breeches, value 2s. ; his property.

ELIZABETH SHELDRAKE . I am the wife of John Sheldrake, who is a bricklayer ; we lodge in Crown-court, Shoreditch - the house belongs to Mr. Walker, but he never lived in it; nobody but us have lived there for the last three months. On the 1st of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner called on me, to let me know that a daughter of mine, who is an unfortunate girl, was in trouble - I did not know him before, but I am sure he is the man; he said she wanted me to send to her; I said I did not wish to know any thing about her, or have any thing to do with her; he went away. I went out about two o'clock in the afternoon, leaving nobody in the house - I locked the room door, and shut the street door when I came out; I went home about ten minutes before four, and found the street door wide open, and on going upstairs the room door was open, and the lock broken; we have only one room on the first floor. I saw a strange hat laying on a chair, and my husband's hat was taken out of the box, and carried away. I went down and told the neighbours I was robbed. I missed all this property, which I had seen safe before I went out that afternoon; the hat that was left behind, was the prisoner's, I believe, but when he called in the morning it had a piece of black crape round it, which was not on it then - I cannot say it was his hat, but he was apprehended with my husband's hat on, which then had a piece of crape round that; I am sure it was the prisoner's hat, by a mark which I had noticed on the side of it in the morning - it was a cut down the side; I have found nothing but my husband's hat. I took the crape off, and found the band which my husband used to wear, was taken off; there was no crape on my husband's hat before; I gave 4s. for the hat six months ago - it was not new then; 1 value it at 1s., and the other things at 5s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You never saw the prisoner before? A. No - he did not stop a minute with me, and did not take his hat off; I had the keys of all the rooms in the house, to show them, as they were to be let.

JOHN SHELDRAKE . I went out about seven o'clock on the morning of the 1st of February; I came home to dinner, went out at one, and returned at six. I know this hat to be mine perfectly well, by a greasy spot on it, and the lining is stained with tobacco - it had no crape on it, but a small band round it, when it was lost.

ANN ROGERS . I live in Crown-court, and have known the prisoner about two months - I have not seen him above two or three times. About nine o'clock in the morning of the day Sheldrake's house was broken open, he came to our house, and told me to tell Maria Sheldrake's mother that she was in trouble; I did not notice his hat; I knew he was acquainted with Maria, but did not know where he lived.

ELIZABETH ROGERS . I am the last witness' mother. - I never saw the prisoner till the 1st of February, when he came to tell my daughter that Maria was in trouble - I have not seen him since; I am sure he is the person; I noticed his hat having a cut down by the side of the crown, and a bit of narrow crape round it; it was very different to the hat found on him - it was very shabby;(looking at the hat left in the prosecutor's room) this is it, I am positive - here is the mark; there is only a bit of narrow ribbon round it now - I could not see that before; the crape was over it; he was about five minutes with me.

THOMAS CHESHIRE . I am headborough of Nortonfalgate. On the 1st of February I was called to this house, and found this hat laying on a chair, by the side of a box - I have had it ever since.

JOHN BEE . I live in Grub-street, and am headborough of St. Luke's. I desired a person to apprehend the prisoner, and he delivered him to me, at the watch-house, on the 2d of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - I searched him, and found 7d. in copper on him, and the hat produced on his head.

MRS. SHELDRAKE. This is my husband's hat - I went to the hat-box just before I went out, and saw the property safe.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Monday night before the robbery I was going to Portsmouth, but returned on the Tuesday, and met a young man, who keeps company with this woman's daughter; I went to sup with him, and an officer took him, me, and this woman's daughter, to the watch-house; they were charged with robbing a room of some stoves - I was discharged, and the man asked me to go and tell this woman her daughter was in trouble; I went - she came out and said Mr. Sheldrake was at home, and if I would go to Rogers she would come up to me, and hear about it; I went - the daughter took me upstairs; I told them about it - Mrs. Sheldrake came up while I was there. I wished them good morning, and went straight from there to Red Lion-square; several people were there, getting tickets for the Mendicity society; I was directed to Mr. Sykes, of Queen-square - the beadle said if I waited in the square I might hear of a ticket; a woman came up, and said she would give me one, but it was too late, that I must come at half-past two o'clock; I went and stopped in Davies-court, and at half-past two o'clock I went to Red Lion-square, and after that went

with a young man to the Refuge for the Houseless - I was going to Gravesend next day, when I was taken.

JOHN STEVENS . I am an officer of the Mendicity Society. We enter in a book all applications for relief - here is the book, and it has the following entry, in my writing, (reads) "John Farley, ticket, 79,730, states he lodged at Kingston the preceeding night, and was a native of Godliman;" being a sailor, I ordered him food, and recommended him to sleep at the Refuge at Wapping - I cannot say the prisoner is that individual, but I have certainly seen him at the office at some time.

COURT. Q. Does the position in which that entry stands enable you to form any judgment at what time he presented himself? A. It was certainly in the after-part of the day; we examine females before any men; he must have been there after two; we disposed of one hundred and thirty-four cases that day, and perhaps a young lad of his description might be detained there two or three hours.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 11d. only.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270215-54

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

547. JAMES TYRER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 100 books, value 10l., the goods of Barton William Hughes , in his dwelling-house .

BARTON WILLIAM HUGHES. I am a bookseller , and live at Islington . The prisoner used to work for me. On Saturday, the 31st of January, I missed a book, and, upon examining my stock, I missed at least six Bibles and Prayer-books; I questioned my boy Henry about them. The prisoner came on Monday morning, and I watched him; thinking he saw me I bounced out upon him, challenged him with robbing me, and insisted on his telling me what he had taken - he said he would take me to the pawnbrokers, where I found several Bibles, Prayer-books, and Watts' Hymns, which had formed part of my stock; I could not have found them except from his information. I believe his family were in distress.

FRANCIS BYAS . I am journeyman to Mr. McLachlan, a pawnbroker, of Islington. On the 23d of January the prisoner pawned three volumes with me, for 1s. 6d.

ROBERT WILD . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, of Chiswell-street. I have a Bible, pawned on the 30th of December, and five books, pawned on the 26th of January. I am confident the prisoner pawned the last lot, and think he did the other; he said he dealt in books, and kept a shop in Rosamond-row.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am shopman to Mr. Peachy, of Goswell-street. On the 27th of January the prisoner pawned a Bible and two volumes of Hill's dialogues - I knew him before.

JOSEPH JOHN GOOD . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Goswell-street. On the 18th of January the prisoner pawned a Bible.

PHILIP EATON . I am servant to Mr. Walter, of Holborn. I have a Bible, Prayer-book, and the Panorama of England and Wales, which Mr. Hughes claims. I believe the prisoner pawned them.

FRANCIS RAMSEY . I am shopman to Mr. Ramsey, of Liquorpond-street. On the 19th and 25th of January the prisoner pawned a Bible, a Prayer-book, and two Watts' Hymns.

THOMAS REDPATH . I am shopman to Mr. Walter, of Goswell-street. I have five books, pawned at different times, by the prisoner.

THOMAS COPE . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-55

548. WILLIAM HENRY BATTISCOMB was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Price , on the King's highway, on the 15th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 2s. , his property.

THOMAS PRICE. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Queen-street, Seven-dials. On Monday, the 15th of January, about five minutes after six o'clock, in the afternoon, I was in a street at the back of St. Luke's church; one end of it is called New-street , and the other Fountain-terrace - I was quite sober, and going to Shoreditch-work-house - the prisoner met me about the middle of the street - he was in company with another, taller than himself - I had never seen them before, and said nothing to either of them; the prisoner, without saying a word, struck me in the mouth - the other, at the same time, struck me behind; they knocked me off the curb stone into the road, beat and kicked me while I was down - I grappled with them; I held the prisoner with my right-hand, and the other with my left - somebody hallooed out that I was being murdered; a man, with three bundles of laths, came up - I then let go of the other one, and got up, still keeping hold of the prisoner; he never got more than a yard from me before he was secured; I lost my hat in the scuffle; nobody could have run away with it, but one of the two persons who attacked me.

Prisoner. Q. Were you insulted before you attacked me or not? A. I did not attack him; nobody insulted me, but him and the other man.

RICHARD BAXENDEN , JUN. I live in Pear-tree-court, Clerkenwell - my father is a porter at the Castle and Falcon; I am fifteen years old. I saw the prisoner, and the other man, attack Price, and begin to fight with him; the prisoner hit him in the mouth; he had not spoken to them; he was knocked down, and both kept kicking him while he was down, and hitting him; when he got up his hat was gone; nobody was near enough to take it, but these two - the prisoner was secured before he got out of sight.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not run after me, and take my cap off my head, and call me names? A. No, quite the reverse; he called me bad names; he had taken my cap, and I asked him for it.

Q. Did not Price interfere on your account? A. Why, he says he saw my cap taken, but he did not interfere till he was attacked himself; I was following them to get my cap when Price was attacked.

JAMES BARKER . I live in Bishop's-court, Aylesbury-street, and work at a glass-cutter's. I was with Baxenden.

I saw the prisoner, and another young man in a long-tailed blue coat; one ran before, and the other behind Price, and began whapping him; he fell down, and they were both on the top of him; they kept fighting in order to get from him; he had not touched them; he held them till a man came by with a load, and then let one go, but held the prisoner; nobody but them were near enough to take his hat; it was not found.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Price catch hold of my shirt, before I touched him? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down John's-row; three lads stood by the wall, a young man took off one of their caps; they followed, and abused me - Price caught hold of me while I was intending to hit them, for saying I stole their cap; he said, at Worship-street, that the other man took his hat.

T. PRICE re-examined. The man who came up with the laths, helped me to secure the prisoner; I had seen the tallest man snatch a cap off one of these boys' heads; but I did not interfere.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-56

549. WILLIAM HENRY BATTISCOMB was again indicted for stealing, 1 cap, value 2s., the goods of Richard Baxenden , the elder, from Richard Baxenden , the younger .

RICHARD BAXENDEN, JUN. I am fifteen years old. This cap was mine; my mother paid for it; but it was given to me.

The Court ruled this cap to be the property of the witness.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-57

550. JOHN DUXBERRY and WILLIAM FOX were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Willingham , about twelve o'clock at noon, of the 22d of January , at St. Mary-le-bone (no person being therein), and stealing two Bank of England notes, for payment of and value 10l. each; 5 sovereigns; 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 coat, value 3l.; 1 shawl, value 5l.; 1 pelisse, value 5l.; 5 rings, value 16l.; 1 shirt-pin, value 1l.; 2 brooches, value 3l.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 3l.; 4 necklaces, value 8l.; 2 neck-chains, value 2l.; 1 miniature-picture, value 5l.; 1 child's gold coral, with bells,(one of the bells being deficient), value 3l.; 1 other child's coral, value 3l.; 2 table-spoons, value 3l.; 9 silver teaspoons, value 12l., and 2 pairs of sugar-tongs, value 2l. , the property of the said George Willingham, against the statute; and REBECCA MULLINS was indicted for that she, before the said felony was done and committed, at the same day and place, unlawfully and feloniously did comfort, aid, abet, assist, counsel, hire, and command the said prisoners to do and commit the said felony, against the statute , &c.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH WILLINGHAM . I am the wife of George Willingham. In January, 1826, we lived at No. 13, Park-road, Regent's-park, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone - we rented the house; I had known the prisoner Mullins, for twelve months before that, and knew her daughter, Mary; she and her daughter, had access to our house, from Michaelmas till December - they took care of a cottage next to it - her daughter Mary frequently came to play with my child - the mother came for money, which I lent her, and the linen to wash. On Sunday, the 22d of January, 1826, I had no servant, as she had left me for a week, having lost a friend; she was to return on Monday- we went on that Sunday to Christ church, Stafford-street, Lisson-grove; it is four or five minutes' walk from our house - I, my husband, and child, who is in her twelfth year, went to the morning service, and left no one in the house; I fastened all the doors myself, and took the keys with me - I fastened the kitchen window down the last thing; we returned from church about ten minutes or a quarter-past one o'clock; I put the key into the door; it opened as usual, so did the garden gate in front of the house; there was nothing amiss with them; we had a Newfoundland dog inside the house; when I got in, I found the back parlour door wide open; I had left it shut when I went out; there are folding-doors from that room to the front; I went in, and saw papers scattered about; I then went up to the drawing-room, and found that door open; the drawers were rifled, and a great deal of wearing-apparel scattered about - I found the next room door open, and every cupboard and lock forced open; I went down, and called my husband out of the garden; I then went into the kitchen, and found the dog tied up to the dresser with a silk handkerchief: he was loose when we went out, and had the range of all the stairs; he was tied up very tight with a handkerchief put under his collar, and tied to the leg of the dresser; my husband cut the corner of the handkerchief off to get the dog loose; it was our own handkerchief; a fore-spring of pork, which I had left on the dresser, was thrown down to the dog, who was tied up too tight to get at it; there was a slop of salt and water on the tea-tray on the table - the tray was quite clean and wiped up when I went out; my husband went to look for an officer immediately, and brought Gibbs in two hours after; we then proceeded to examine the house with him; I found the kitchen window, which I had fastened the last thing before I went out, was broken open; it was large enough to admit three men; we had lost two 10l. notes, five sovereigns, nearly 20s. in silver, a watch, a coat, a shawl, a brown silk pelisse lined with white, five rings, a shirt pin, two brooches, a pair of earrings, six necklaces, two neck-chains, the miniature of a man in soldier's uniform, set in gold, a gold coral, which wanted one bell, two silver table-spoons, nine tea-spoons, and two pairs of sugar-tongs, one of which was twisted in an old-fashioned way; we only lost one coral; the property, at a moderate calculation, including the money, was worth full 100l.; we obtained no intelligence of the robbery for a long time; we had several hundred bills printed, offering 40l. reward; my husband afterwards received this anonymons letter (looking at it) - we received it, I think, the first week in February - I cannot positively swear to the hand-writing - I have seen Mary Mullins' writing, but never saw her write; I heard nothing more till the beginning of this year, when I found some persons who gave me information.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you found any of your property? A. I think I saw the brooch at the office the beginning of this year; I think I have seen two small coins.

MARY MULLINS . I shall be thirteen years old the beginning of November. (This witness appeared perfectly aware of the obligation of an oath.) The female prisoner

is my mother; I had a brother named George, but he has left the country - I know the two male prisoners very well- when this matter happened my mother lived in Stamford-street - my brother George lived at home the beginning of last year, and Duxberry lived in the same house with us - Fox came to the house almost every day; he and Duxberry were intimate with my brother and mother - about a week before this robbery happened, my mother said to my brother George, and the prisoners, that now would be the time to rob Mr. Willingham's house, as the servant was gone away into the country; she was coming back and would be blamed for it; I heard no more conversation between them before the robbery. On the Sunday afternoon following, my mother, my brother George, and the two prisoners, were together - my brother said they had robbed the house, and had got the things - Fox gave my mother five sovereigns into her hand; she said she would put it away, but did not say where - nothing more was said then - I did not see any thing else given to my mother.

Q. Did your brother, or any of the parties, complain that they had been hurt? A. They did not complain then; they were all there together again on the Monday afternoon, and my brother gave my mother a pelisse and shawl; he complained of his leg being hurt - the pelisse was a brown silk - I did not notice whether it was lined - she put it into a bundle with the shawl; I had seen that pelisse before on Mrs. Willingham's back - John Duxberry gave my mother two silver table-spoons that afternoon; my brother gave my mother the rest of the articles, the rings, trinkets, and a watch; my brother said his leg was very bad from the bite of Mr. Willingham's dog; they all said the dog had flown at them, that they had tied him up, and given him some meat - nothing more passed then.

Q. Were the prisoners together again with your mother and brother? A. Yes, on Tuesday night, the next day; they were talking together, and sent me out on an errand - I did not hear what passed.

Q. Look at this paper, and tell me whose writing it is? A. Mine, and so is the direction - my mother told me to write it.

Q. Did you ever at any time, find a coral that wanted one bell? A. No - nor did I ever tell my mother that I had, nor any other coral at all - my mother never beat me about stealing a coral.

Q. When did you first tell any thing you knew about this matter to Mr. or Mrs. Willingham? A. I was put into the workhouse on a Saturday, a week after last Christmas, and Mrs. Willingham came to me on the Monday. I was afterwards examined before a Justice at the Police-office. I gave the same account that I have now. I saw a coral in my mother's possession; it was red, and the mounting was a gold colour. I also saw a man's blue coat in her possession - I do not recollect seeing her with any thing else.

COURT. Q. At the time you saw these things, did you live next door to Mr. Willingham? A. No, in Stamford-street, which is two or three minutes walk from there.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you been to school? A. Yes, to two or three; the last was Mr. Prior's, in Crawford-street; it is a private school. My brother George is eighteen years old next March; he was at home when this house was robbed. I have no father; I heard my brother say the house was robbed on the Sunday afternoon on which it was done, which was the 22nd of January; I knew five days before, that it was to be done when Mr. Willingham was at church; no other robbery but this had been talked about. I saw Fox give my mother five sovereigns on the Sunday afternoon that it was done; I do not know that that was from the robbery. I wrote this letter about three weeks after, by my mother's desire - I should not have wrote it if she had not desired me; I did not suppose that I was in any danger, or that she was - I did not like to do it at first; but I did not say I would not do it, but I did not like to do it.

Q. Was that because you might bring her into trouble? A. Yes; I did not tell her so - I should have concealed it if she had not told me to write - I never said a word about it to any body - I do not know how they came to know that I knew of it.

Q. Who first spoke to you about it? A. Mrs. Willingham came to me at the workhouse - my mother was then in custody; I had heard the officer say that on the Saturday, as he was taking me to the workhouse; I had not, at that time, told any body that I knew any thing of the robbery - I knew when I wrote the letter that there had been a reward of 40l. offered. Mrs. Willingham came to me at the workhouse on the Monday, and said, if I did not tell her about it, she would have me locked up. I said, at first, I did not know any thing about it; she said if I did not tell her she would have me locked up among the rats and mice, to frighten me. I said I did not know any thing about it - that was a lie; but I said so because I did not wish my mother to be hurt - I know my mother's life is in danger by this trial, and knew it at that time.

Q. Who was present when Mrs. Willingham talked to you? A. The matron of the workhouse, a little girl, and Mr. Willingham's clerk - Mrs. Willingham said it would be better for me to tell the whole truth - the clerk wrote down all I said.

Q. Did Mrs. Willingham tell you your mother would be saved if you told the truth? A. Yes; she told me that several times. Fox did not lodge at my mother's - he lived at Kilburn. I should not have said a word about this if Mrs. Willingham had not frightened me. I told her all the truth: she asked how many persons committed the robbery - I said I could not tell who they were, only I saw them with the property afterwards; she then again said, if I did not tell her she would have me locked up. I heard Fox and my mother quarrel about a fornight after the robbery; she said she would be a match for him; he said "You can do nothing to me - you have nothing to lay to my charge." She charged him with being one of the party who robbed Mr. Willingham - he denied it, and said "You know better" - he did not come to my mother's place again for a long time. I went before the Justice the day after Mr. Willingham came to me. I saw the account, which Willingham's clerk had taken down, in the Justice's hands - he read it. My mother went out to market during church-time on the Sunday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the expression your mother used - that as the servant was in the country it would be a good time to rob the house?

A. Yes. I have been a good while at school: there are thirty-one days in January and in March. I do not think my mother can write; my father has been dead eleven years; my brother could write - he and I are the only children living; he remained at home six or seven months after the robbery.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long did you read about the reward before you gave information to Mrs. Willingham? A. We had the paper in our parlour the day after the robbery was committed; I never said a word to any body about it. The quarrel between Fox and my mother was before I wrote the letter.(The letter was here read as follows:) -

To Mr. Willingham, Solicitor, 13, Park-road, Regent's-park. - "My conscience won't let me keep it a secret concerning that robbery that was committed at your house; and I will tell you the names of the three who committed that robbery - Thos. Duxberry, Portland Town; Wm. Sturdy, Little James-street, and Wm. Tonks, Devonshire-place, No. 1."

Q. Your mother never told you to name Fox in the letter? A. No. Fox came to our house after the quarrel - it was a long while after; before the summer was over, my mother and he were as good friends as before. He came to see my mother again before my brother left home.

Q. Was what Mr. Willingham's clerk wrote down read over to you, to refresh your memory, or did you give an account to the Magistrate yourself? A. I read it over myself - I gave evidence to the Justice by my memory - I was then on oath.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had Duxberry a brother named Thomas? A. Yes; that brother was taken up after the letter was written; I do not know how many times he was examined. Nobody had been taken up till I gave information to Mrs. Willingham; it was after I had given the account to Mrs. Willingham that Thomas Duxberry was taken up. I do not know how many times he was examined; I did not see him taken up or examined, and do not know when he was taken - I saw him after he came out again; both he and his brother John lived with their mother - John remained at home, at his mother's, after Thomas was taken up, and he was taken there - he had time to have run away if he chose.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When you consented to write the letter, had you reason to believe that Fox was one of the men who had robbed the house? A. Yes; I did not write his name because I was not told. I knew Tonks; Sturdy's mother lodged with us - I had no reason to believe either of them were concerned - I wrote their names because my mother told me. I have been living at the workhouse ever since she was taken.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were just turned eleven years old when you wrote this letter? A. Yes. John Duxberry was lodging at my mother's when I wrote it."Thomas Duxberry, of Portland Town." meant his brother - I know nothing of Thomas Duxberry being taken up, except what I have heard. I have not been out of the workhouse since I went there, except to go to the office - Thomas Duxberry never came there to see me.

Q. Then, when you speak of his being out of custody, was that before you went to the workhouse? A. Yes, a great while before - I did not tell Mrs. Willingham about this till after I was in the workhouse. I saw Thomas Duxbury last night, as I was going home.

MARY ANN CULL . I live at No. 9, Stamford-street, next door to Mrs. Mullins; she offered to sell me a coral, and produced it to me; it had seven or eight bells, but one was broken off - the bottom of it was coral - it was a gold colour - I did not examine it particularly - she asked me to give her 2s. for it, and told me not to buy it for gold, for it was not gold; and she put it to her ring, which was on her finger to compare it. I took it into my mother to ask her for the money - she had not got it, and I returned it to Mrs. Mullins. My mother gave me the money, two or three days afterwards, to go in and get it - I went, and Mrs. Mullins said, "Thank God you did not buy it, for if you had it would have got me into trouble; for, instead of Mary finding it, she has stolen it from a little girl" - that she had given her a good walloping, and sent her back to the place - here she had taken it from - she did not say where that was - this was the latter end of January, or the beginning of February, 1826. She had told me at first that Mary had found it, coming home from a place where she had been to play with a little girl - she asked me afterwards to direct a letter for her, and also to make a bill out to go to Mrs. Willingham - she asked me at one time if my mother could give her change for a 10l. note - this was a good bit after I saw the coral - she had the note lying on the table by her - I told her my mother could not change it - she asked if I knew where she could get it changed - I said No. Fox and John Duxberry were in the room at the time; but I rather think Duxberry was asleep. I did not take the note up, but I saw Ten on it, as it laid on the table. I went in a few days after, and asked her for 2s. 9d. which she owed me - she said she could not let me have it: after this I saw her wash her hands, and saw her pull three rings off - one was very broad, with thread twisted round it, as it was too large - I have not seen those rings since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She asked you once to direct a letter for her? A. Yes, but I did not do it; I was once charged with an offence, but I was not guilty. I had a handsome sum of money paid me by the person who took me up, to prevent prosecution, and also an apology advertised in the newspapers.

COURT. Q. Did you frequently visit Mrs. Mullins? A. Yes - I never noticed rings on her fingers before; the first time I saw her with rings was when she compared them with the coral - one was a broad gold one, with little dots round it, another a small one, and a keeper.

ELIZABETH JONES . I live at No. 11, Little Princes-street - I lodged at Mrs. Mullins' in the beginning of last year; John Duxberry lodged there, and Fox used to come frequently - George Mullins and John Duxberry appeared intimate with him; they were always together. I remember one Sunday coming down, and hearing a fight, about two o'clock; John Duxberry and Fox were in liquor; hearing a noise I ran down; Mrs. Mullins and Duxberry were beating Fox in a very cruel manner; they struck him several blows - Fox accused them of robbing him of two sovereigns and a dollar. I begged of him to go into the back room till all was quiet. I was once scolding Mrs. Mullins about getting in at a window - she

said George was a very bad boy, but he robbed nobody but her - that he had robbed her of a watch and a box of trinkets; this was about the beginning of February.

GEORGE WILLINGHAM . I am master of this house. - Almost immediately after receiving the anonymous letter I caused Thomas Duxberry to be apprehended - he was examined only once, I believe - there was no proof against him, and the Magistrate discharged him. I heard nothing about the prisoners till the first week in January - that was before my wife went to the workhouse.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This discovery happened full eleven months after the robbery? A. Yes. I have no other Christian name.

JAMES GIBBS . I am a constable. I was called in to examine the prosecutor's house in January, 1826 - every thing was in confusion; Mrs. Willingham has given a correct account. I apprehended the two male prisoners nearly twelve months afterwards; I met Fox in a lane near Maida-hill; I asked his name - he said Fox, and I took him. I took Duxberry in his mother's house, in Portland-town, and Mrs. Mullins at her house in Cochrane-terrace, Portland-town - I was with Morris when he apprehended Thomas Duxberry - it was about a year ago - he was examined once.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose house were you going to after Fox? A. I do not know that it was his master's; I met him coming up the lane.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You took John Duxberry twelve months after you had taken Thomas, did you take them both on the same charge? A. Yes - John came very willingly with me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. There was no charge against him when you took Thomas? A. No.

JOHN DUXBERRY'S Defence. Every thing the witness has said is false.

FOX's Defence. I am sure every thing they have said is really false.

MULLINS' Defence. It is false what my child and Miss Cull have said - I never had such things in my possession- I believe my boy to be innocent; he has not left the country on that account.

Four witnesses gave Duxberry a good character, and two deposed the same for Fox.

FOX - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 44.

DUXBERRY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

MULLINS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Reference Number: t18270215-58

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

551. GEORGE TAYLOR and THOMAS HILLIER were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Ann Bignell , on the night of the 15th of January , and stealing 4lbs. of sausages, value 2s.; 2ozs. of sweet-meats, value 2d.; 12 penny pieces, and 12 halfpence , her property.

LETITIA HARRIS . I live with my mother, Ann Bignell, at Uxbridge - she keeps a fruit shop, and sells sausages . I was up last on the 15th of January - every thing was safe; I got up about eight o'clock the next morning, and found the sky-light, over the shop broken, so that a boy could get through, and let himself down - they must have entered that way, as the doors were still fast. I do not know how they could get out that way; the sky-light is above my reach. The prisoners live in the neighbourhood.

JAMES HARRIS . I am a labourer, and live at Cowley, near Hillingdon. On Tuesday morning, the 16th of January I walked into Mr. Osborn's yard, which is about three-quarters of a mile from the prosecutrix's; the prisoners were there, toasting sausages, and eating them; they asked me to have some, which I did; I asked where they got them - they said they bought them for supper, but had been to the play, and were locked out, and came there to cook them.

JOHN BIRCH . I am headborough of Uxbridge. I heard of this robbery between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and having been informed that these boys had been up all night, I went and took Hiller - I asked what he had done with the sausages - he said, voluntarily, that he Taylor, and Green had eaten them; I asked where he got them - he said from Mrs. Bignell's - that he and Green had got through a sky-light, took some sauges, a half-penny worth of oranges and sweet-meats, and Taylor stood in the market-place while they got them; I heard them examined before the Magistrate - no threat or promise was held out to them; the signature to this paper (looking at it) is Mr. Clarke's writing. (Read)

" John Green , William Taylor , and Thomas Hiller were brought before me, and admitted, before me, that they had committed the above mentioned theft.

T. T. CLARKE."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-59

552. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , at St. Mary, Islington, 1 gelding, price 20l. , the property of William Heath .

JOHN LLOYD . I am a watchman. On Wednesday morning, the 14th of February, at half-past five o'clock, I was on my beat in the Back-road, Islington, and saw two persons on horseback, riding together; I went between the horses, and said, "Where are you going with those horses?" one of them rode off, and the prisoner, who was the other man, said he was going to Dixon's repository; I asked who the horses belonged to; he made no reply, but jumped off, and run away as hard as he could; I pursued, gave an alarm, and secured him, without losing sight of him; I kept the horse till I put it into Price's stable; I found Mr. Heath, who claimed it; he lives at Palmer's-green, seven miles from Islington; the horse had a bridle on, and I followed him with it in my hand; it had neither saddle, halter, nor cloth; it shyed when the rattles sprung; Mr. Heath saw the horse this morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The horse shying must have taken your attention off him? A. No; I I never had my eye off him; I did not mount the horse; it was darkish - but the gas lamps gave me light enough; he did not run above ten or twenty yards - and nobody else was near.

ROBERT BOWLAND . I am a watchman. I was at Islington. and heard the rattles spring; I went into the road, and saw the prisoner coming on the opposite side of the way; when I met him, he was walking; he said he was not the person - but the man whom I had seen go by

on horseback was the person; I secured the prisoner; he had a bundle under his arm.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was Lloyd from him? A. About two lamps off, coming as fast as he could with the horse; I did not see the prisoner run at all.

WILLIAM HEATH . I live at Palmer's-green, Edmonton , about seven miles from Islington. On Tuesday night last I had some horses in my stable; my servant was there last; I lost two out of the stable that night; the one found is one of them; I have seen it this morning; the other was left behind in another man's field; I have found both; I do not know the prisoner.

EDWARD HOLDEN . I live with Mr. Heath. I locked the stable up on Tuesday night, but did not look in at the horses; I went again about half-past three o'clock in the morning; I found the stable broken open, and two horses missing; the staple of the lock was drawn; I have rode the horse up this morning.

WILLIAM ARNOLD . I am a plough-boy. I saw the horses safe in the stable about six o'clock in the evening, and next morning, about six o'clock, when I went, they were gone, and the staple drawn; the horse brought here is my master's.

THOMAS GRAFTON . I am headborough of Islington. Lloyd and Bowland gave the prisoner in my charge about half-past five o'clock in the morning; I found 5s. 6d., and a handkerchief, containing bread and meat, on him; and a halter in the crown of his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Hornsey, and met two men in Hornsey-lane, on horseback; they asked if I would have a ride; and said if I would take the horse to Dixon's, they would give me half-a-crown; and the man said I was to take the bridle, and he would meet me at the Still public-house, as he was going to see his brother at Islington. I wanted to keep straight on the road; but he said, "Cross the lane, you will save a turnpike." When the watchman stopped me, the man was walking on the path, and said, "Jump off;" I did so, and ran after the man who was on the other horse, directly; the watchman sprang his rattle; I called back the man; I did not run to get away, but to stop the man who was with me; there is a public-house called the Still, opposite Dixon's repository; I have had a situation in the East India Company's service for five years.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18270215-60

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

553. GEORGE NOTTAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , two cows. price 25l. , the property of John Brett ; and WILLIAM COULSTOCK was indicted for feloniously receiving 2 cow hides, value 2l.; and 220 lbs. of beef, value 6l., part and parcel of the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BRETT. I am a horse-dealer , and live in Mason-street, Old Kent-road. On Thursday, the 28th of December, I had two cows in calf, in a field in Dun Cow-lane, Bermondsey ; one was black and white, and the other red and white; on Sunday evening, the 31st of December, I saw the hides of those cows at Mr. Crookenden's, in Russell-street, Bermondsey; they are here; I am certain they are the hides of my cows; the cows were worth 25l.; I would not have taken 30l. for them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How can you venture to swear to the hide of an animal? A. By the marks; I had had one nearly a twelvemonth; she had particularly long hair growing from her ears, and was very long and rough in the forehead; I swear to them by these marks, and several others; I had put no mark on them myself; I had had them sufficiently long to know them - I saw them in the field towards the morning part of Thursday - and on Friday night was informed they were gone.

SAMUEL JEEVES . I am in the employ of Mr. Brett. I saw his two cows safe last about eight o'clock in the evening of the 28th of December, and missed them about three o'clock the next afternoon, when I went to look for them; I swear that these are the hides of his two cows - they were both in calf.

Cross-examined. Q. In what state were the hides when you saw them? A. It was about a week after they had been stolen; they had been to the tanner's - and I believe had been salted; the black one was white under her belly and about the loins; I am sure they are the hides; I had made no mark on them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Used you to milk them daily? A. Yes; and can speak to them positively.

JAMES MOORCROFT . I am a watchman. I saw Mr. Brett's cows on the 19th of September, at half-past five o'clock in the morning.

Q. What month - how long ago is it? A. It was the week after Christmas; I do not know what day is Christmas-day, nor what day of the month Boxing-day is; I am thirty-four years old; I saw the cows in a field at Bermondsey about half-past five o'clock on a Friday morning.

MARY ANN STIEBER . My father is a pork-butcher, and lives at 19, Cable-street, Wellclose-square; I know the prisoner by sight; on a Friday morning, about half-past eight o'clock, somebody knocked at our door, and asked if two cows could be let in to be killed; I did not see either of the prisoners; the cows were taken in - and that is all I know.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see the man who came with the cows? A. Yes - it was two men - I saw them both; the prisoners are neither of the men. I know Nottage by sight - I did not see him that morning.

PHILIP STIEBER . I live in Cable-street, in the County of Middlesex. I found these cows in my premises about nine o'clock in the morning, when I came home - it was the Friday after Christmas day; between nine and ten that morning Nottage called, and asked if I had two cows belonging to him; I said I did not know whether they were his; I showed them to him, and he said they were - that they were sent by a friend of his out of the country, to make the best he could of them for him; he said he must go and look for a man to kill them; I recommended him to Hawes, who generally kills at my house for people, and they were killed; I cannot say whether they were in calf. I saw Nottage again about nine o'clock that night, with Banks and Wainwright; he sold the body of one cow to each of them, as I understood; one was a black cow, and the other red, with a white back - I did not notice any

particular mark on the black one. Nottage brought a young man next day, with a truck, which the hides were put into, and taken away. I have known Nottage several years - he is in the cheesemongery line, and was so before Christmas, when he kept a cheesemonger's shop in Rosemary-lane - I have known him several years buying beast in Smithfield, and slaughtering them at my house; he had slaughtered none at my house for twelve months before this, nor any where else, that I know of; he was in the butchering business before he commenced cheesemonger - the last place he lived at, as a butcher, was at Ratcliff-highway, twelve months ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him slaughter cattle for people? A. He has killed for several people at my house, but never sold any of his own before.

HENRY JOHN HAWES . I am a butcher. On the 29th of December, between nine and ten o'clock, Nottage came to my house, No. 37, Chapple-street, St. George's East, and asked me if I could go and kill him two cows; I said Yes - he said they were at Stieber's; I went there and killed them; one was a brown and white pole cow - the other was black, with horns, and there was some white about it - the black one gave milk, the brown one was dry; they were both in calf - it is not unusual to kill them in calf; we cannot always tell till they are killed; most beast have a Smithfield mark, which is the hair trimmed off the tail; the hair was still on these, as if they had come from the country; I flayed them, and left the hides at Stieber's - I should know the hides again.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you to be particular, and dress them well? A. Yes - he said they were for market; he did not say where they came from; I could tell one was in calf before I slaughtered it.

THOMAS BANKS . I am a butcher, and live in Rosemary-lane. On the 29th of December, at night, Nottage called on me, and said he had got a body of beef that would suit me; I and Wainwright went with him to Stieber's; I bought one body, at 2s. 8d. a stone - Wainwright looked at the side of another body, but I was not present when he bought it; Nottage did not say how he came by the beasts; I knew he had been a butcher about nine months before, but he was then a cheesemonger, and lived two doors from me; I did not know him do business in cattle while he was in the cheesemongery trade.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it uncommon for a man who slaughters cattle, to buy and sell them? A. Not at all; I always understood he was a man of property, and had two shops, but know nothing of his slaughtering cattle for the last nine months.

EDWARD WAINWRIGHT . I am a butcher, and live in Wellington-place, St. George's East. On the 29th of December I went to Stieber's with Banks and Nottage, and saw four sides of beef; I bought one, Banks two, and Coulstock the other side; I gave 2s. a stone for mine - I did not see Coulstock there, but I met him, and he said he had bought the fellow side to mine, and asked if I would let my porter take it to my shop, as he had none, and it would be more easy for him to take it from there - he came the next day, and cut it up, to sell it to customers; he is a butcher, lives in a private house, and carries meat about for sale.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. There was no secret about it? A. No.

CALEB CROOKENDEN . I am a tanner, and live in Russell-street, Bermondsey. On Saturday, the 30th of December, Coulstock brought me two cow hides, and laid them on the floor; I bought them of him. Brett afterwards came and claimed them; as Coulstock was going away he said, to the best of my recollection, "You are not going to let them lay there long, are you?" they were quite exposed, near the door; I said, "No, but why?" he said, "Because I don't know much of the person" or "chap I had them off." I gave him 2l. for them, which was quite their value.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-61

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

554. BENJAMIN SANDERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Price , on the King's highway, on the 10th of January , at Isleworth, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 5 shillings, and 6 half-pence, his property; and WILLIAM WASLEY was indicted for that he, before the felony and robbery aforesaid was done and committed, in manner and form aforesaid, on the same day, and at the same parish, feloniously and maliciously did command, hire, counsel, and procure the said Benjamin Sanders to do and commit the felony and robbery aforesaid, in manner and form aforesaid .

Mr. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM PRICE. I am a pensioner of the Royal Hospital, at Chelsea . On the 9th of January I had been up and received 4l. 19s. 9d. as my pension - I was going to Radnorshire, in Wales, to see my father - when I got to the Castle public-house at Isleworth , it was within a very few minutes of eight o'clock in the evening - I went in and had half a pint of purl - I saw both the prisoners there in company drinking - another man was with them; they seemed very jovial, which made me stop an hour longer than I should- I drank some porter there - I went away at ten o'clock- I paid for what I had as it came in - I had silver and half-pence together in my left-hand waistcoat pocket - I took them out more than once to pay my reckoning, and put them back again. When I was going out, the two prisoners and the other man were still in the tap-room - I am not acquainted with that part of the country; I meant to sleep at Hounslow if I could get a bed; if not, I meant to have gone on all night in a waggon. As I went away I asked the landlady the road to Hounslow - she directed me, and I went away; after I had got about two hundred paces on the road I heard the voice of somebody saying, "You are going the wrong road, man" - I turned directly to the right about, and took the opposite road, which turns towards Brentford - I was before in the open country, in an open road; it was a fine moon-shiny night - when I turned back I got into an enclosed part, under a dead wall, and was then attacked by two of the men who had been drinking with me in the tap-room, one of whom is here now - that was Sanders; they came up and struck me two blows at once; both struck me at once a violent blow on the same temple with their fists - the blow knocked me down - Sanders pulled up my smock-frock, and rifled my pockets, while the other knelt on my breast,

holding me down, with his hand on my breast - one said to the other, in a low tone of voice, "Mind the left-hand pocket, that is the pocket the money is in;" they felt all round my fob, and could not find any more; and one said to the other,"Come along, let us go, he has got no more money; he is dead; he will never rise any more." I had put my gold where they could not find it; they lifted up my head and let it down again; they then left me - I fainted afterwards, and recollect nothing more till I found myself in the hands of Whitehouse, the parish beadle - I had been in the tap-room from between seven and eight o'clock till ten - I am not certain whether it had struck ten, as there is no clock in the tap-room.

Q. Had you, at that time, such means of knowing the persons of Sanders and the other man, as to be sure of them? A. Yes, they are the two men, Sanders and Manning, who is not yet taken - Whitehouse asked me about the persons; I described them to him immediately - Sanders had either a light-coloured flannel or fustian jacket; the other had a coloured plush waistcoat, with fustian sleeves - I did not see the prisoners before the Justice till about a fortnight after - I was in the workhouse in consequence of my blow, but not confined to my bed - when I saw them before the Justice I stated directly that Sanders was one of the men who had robbed me - Wasley has a wooden leg.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is not a white jacket a very common dress? A. Yes; before I went to this public-house I had called at the Black Bull, at Brentford, about three or four o'clock, and drank a share of a pot of beer there, nothing more; I did not dine at all; I had a glass of gin at Kew-bridge, about half or three quarters of an hour before I got to the Black Bull - I had come from London, but took no refreshment in town; I slept at Chelsea the night before; I paid away about 30s. of my money, and had about 9s. in silver left when I left London; I paid 2d. at Kew, and 6d. or 9d. at the Black Bull, as I had some bread and beef with the share of the pot of porter; I drank nothing more on the road, nor any thing in London - I had been to no public-house in London, or at Chelsea; I had a share of two or three pots of beer at the Castle, or it might be three or four; but I drank very little out of them, and half a pint of purl - I do not exactly know how much money I paid - I dare say I paid 3s. or 4s., but not for what I drank myself - I will say we had four pots of porter, that was 1s. 8d. - I could not have paid more than 2s. for my share - that was for the porter and purl, which is gin and beer.

Q. You were knocked down by a large dead wall? A. Yes, that threw a shade; they knocked me down the instant they came up; they were desperate blows; they stunned me and frightened me. I had my gold in my watch-fob - I cannot say whether Sanders was handcuffed when I saw him in the Justice-room - I did not notice; he had handcuffs on when he went away - I had not seen them put on.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you perfectly sober when you left the public-house? A. Sober enough to walk any where, or see any man's face and know it again - I suppose I was knocked down ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after I was called to - I had no opportunity of seeing them till they attacked me.

CHARLOTTE STONE . My husband keeps the Castle, at Smallborough-green, in the parish of Isleworth; the two prisoners were at my house on the night in question; they came in together before the prosecutor; when Price came in he called for half a pint of purl; there might be two or three more people in the tap-room, but I was not in the room; the servant collected the reckoning. I remember Price going away; he asked his way to Hounslow, and I directed him; he seemed perfectly sensible - directly after he was gone, the prisoner Sanders, and a person, who is not here, left the tap-room; that person lodged at my house at that time, and generally sat there in the evening, and went to bed about half-past ten, or a quarter to eleven o'clock; he came home that night five minutes before eleven; we were shut up and going to bed at the time; his father and mother live close at the back of our house; he went out early next morning before I was up, and I have not seen him since.

Cross-examined. Q. That man's name was Manning? A. Yes; half a pint of purl comes to 3d. - I cannot say what beer was drank - we call it porter, but it is country beer - it is good strong liquor - 1s. 8d. would pay for four quarts.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whoever the prosecutor shared it with (if he had it) you say that he was sober? A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS to W. PRICE. Q. Did you not swear that 2s. was the share of what you drank? A. No; I said I might have paid nigh 2s.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many persons shared the beer with you? A. We were drinking in company; I believe Wasley paid for one pot - I paid at separate times, when I was asked - I believe I paid for all that was drank between us four, except the one pot.

THOMAS WHITEHOUSE . I am beadle of Isleworth. On the night of the 9th of January, I was going from home to Smallborough-green, and saw the prosecutor laying across the footpath, quite senseless and dead to all appearance - I stopped with him, finding he was not dead - as soon as he could speak, I said to him, "Come, my man, try to get up, or you will be robbed;" the first words he said were, it was not to be done, for it was done- I went to Smallborough-green, and sent two people to carry him - I kept him in the toll-house during the night- he gave me an account of the robbery - he was quite sensible as soon as he recovered from the blows, but fainted away two or three times in the course of the night, and I thought he was dying.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoners in the Justice room? A. Yes - I do not know whether they were handcuffed - I was not near enough to see, but I believe they were - I know they were brought there handcuffed together, and went away so - there were no other prisoners there but them - if a person faced them, he could see whether they were handcuffed.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did the prosecutor, on the night of the robbery, give you an account of it, and a description of the persons? A. Most distinctly - he said he had never seen them before that night, but he was some hours with them at the public-house, and mentioned their dress.

THOMAS MUNGO . I am an ostler at the Castle. On this night Price came there, and had half a pint of purl in the tap-room; the prisoners were in the tap-room, also two

other men and a boy - Price sat down along with them, and drank his purl - a pot of beer was ordered, and they drank it together - I did not hear him order more than one pot - I took the money for what I brought - he paid me some money, which he took out of his left hand waistcoat pocket - I did not notice what money he had - I cannot say how much he paid in the course of the evening - I saw him go out of the tap-room, and heard him ask mistress the way to Hounslow - I was in the tap-room when I heard that - the others there could hear him as well as me he was not in liquor at all - Sanders and Manning followed him out directly - Sanders went out first, and Manning directly after him - Wasley stopped in the house, and said to me, "Tom, you see I am here;" I did not take any notice, and he said so a second time - I then said, "Yes, I see you are" - he asked what a clock it was - I told him it was just gone ten - he said, "Then if there is any thing done to-night, I shall be blamed for it" - that was all - Manning came home about ten minutes before eleven o'clock- he went away in the morning - I have not seen him since - I went by Whitehouse's desire, and helped to carry Price to the toll-gate.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not ten o'clock a very usual hour to leave a tap-room? A. We shut up at twenty minutes past ten - I received no money from Manning, as he lodged in the house - I do not recollect receiving any thing from Wasley - Price had a pot of beer and half a pint of purl, which would be 8d. - he paid for it as I brought it in - I believe he did not order more than one pot in my presence, and paid me for only one pot and the purl - I am sure of that - I cannot say how much the other men paid - there was money paid between them.

Q. Are you sure Price did not pay nearly 2s.? A. No, he did not - I believe something was set down to Wasley- he had a score.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Wasley staid behind after the others left? A. Yes, half an hour - the boy slept in the house - I merely received Price's money as he paid it, and handed it to my mistress - I let Manning out at six o'clock in the morning - I did not see Sanders or Wasley again till they were at the Justice room.

EDMUND GODIN . On the night of the 9th of January I was at the Waterman's Arms public-house, Isleworth, and saw the two prisoners there a few minutes before eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is that from the Castle? A. Nearly a quarter of a mile - I did not hear of the robbery that night - I heard a word spoken in the Waterman's Arms that night by one of the prisoners, about a man being knocked down and having his pocket picked- Sanders said that publicly - they were sitting there drinking.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had any body charged him with a robbery? A. No - a young man in the tap-room said to him, "You have robbed some one to night, or you would not be so flush of money;" there was a talk about some money.

COURT. Q. Did the young man say this before, or after you heard of a man being knocked down and robbed? A. Before - and Sanders replied, "You fool, I have knocked a man down and picked his pocket" - I had not seen Sanders with any money - they continued at the house till within a very few minutes of half-past twelve o'clock - William Gadley keeps the Waterman's Arms - it is not usually open so late - this conversation passed soon after they came in.

JURY. Q. Was the young man an acquaintonce of the prisoners? A. Yes - but not particularly so.

SANDER's Defence. I have a witness to prove the contrary.

WASLEY'S Defence. I was at the Castle, and scored six pots of beer there - Price took a share of it; when I got to the Waterman's Arms I laid down, and went to sleep - I had no money to pay for beer - when the officer took me I had no money - I wish him to be examined.

W. PRICE. I lost between 7s. and 8s., as well as I can guess; the prisoners were taken next morning, but I did not go before the Justice for a fortnight.

PRIMROSE DOUGLAS . I am a Bow-street horse patrol. I saw Price on the night of the robbery, about a quarter-to ten o'clock - he seemed very much injured by a blow on the temple - he was on the road groaning - I asked him what was the matter - he said he had been robbed and nearly murdered - he did not seem intoxicated at all; I apprehended the two prisoners in bed next morning, about seven o'clock - Sanders at his father's house, and Wasley at a house, which he has to himself - I was present at their examination, on the 16th - Price appeared then - they were taken into the room handcuffed - Price had described them to me before he saw them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search Wasley? A. Yes; I found no money on him, and only 9d. on Sanders - I took them both at Isleworth, which is about a quarter of a mile from the Castle - Price did not appear till the 16th, on account of a doctor's certificate of his illness.

MR. DAY. I am a surgeon. I was called to see Price on the morning of the 10th - he was too ill to attend the Magistrate, but would have been able to go on the Tuesday; but the Magistrate does not sit daily; he was only under my care till the following Sunday. The prisoners called -

MARY GADLEY . My father keeps the Waterman's Arms - I attend as bar-maid. I let both the prisoners into the house about a quarter before eleven o'clock; they staid till a few minutes past; this was on the Tuesday night; I heard of the robbery next morning.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then they did not stay till near twelve o'clock? A. Certainly not; several people were in the house; they are not here; we shut up a few minutes past eleven o'clock, and not a soul was there after; Sanders comes to our house about once a week, or once a fortnight; our house was shut up, and every body out of it, a few minutes after eleven o'clock.

Prisoner SANDERS to W. PRICE. Q. How much money had you altogether? A. I received 4l. 19s. 9d. I spent 30s. in town, and nothing more, except what I paid on the road; I had two sovereigns and a half in my pocket; on calculating at the workhouse, I thought I might have nearly 10s. left, but cannot say to a shilling or two.

SANDERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

WASLEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-62

555. JAMES LENNOX was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Moses Lindo , on the af

ternoon of the 8th of February , ( Frances Westmacott and Susan Garland being therein) and stealing 6 silver spoons, value 45s.; 1 salt spoon, value 2s., and 1 salt-holder, value 10s. , his property.

FRANCES WESTMACOTT. I am servant to Mr. Moses Lindo, who lives in Church-street, Stoke Newington . On the 8th of February, about half-past two o'clock, I was in the kitchen with three other servants - I heard a ring at the front gate - I went up, and as I passed the pantry door, I saw a man getting out at the window into the area; I opened the door, and ran out, calling "Stop thief!" - he ran up the area steps, and through the front gate - I followed him down Lordship-lane about a quarter of a mile, but did not overtake him; other people were pursuing - I cannot say that I saw him stopped - I became so frightened, I went back when I saw two or three men following him - a strange basket was left behind in the pantry, with oranges in it - I had left this plate on a tray - and before I returned, it had been taken out of the basket, and re-laid on the tray.

SUSAN GARLAND. I am wife of William Garland. I was in Mr. Lindo's kitchen about half-past two o'clock, and heard a noise in the pantry - the bell rang, and Westmacott went up - she gave an alarm; I went into the pantry - the window was wide open, and this basket on the floor - I found these spoons in it, with some oranges - I took the spoons out, and put them on the tray which they were taken from - it was Raine who rang the bell; I cannot say whether the area window had been fastened.

ESTHER RAINE . I am servant to Mr. Friend, who lives next door to Mr. Lindo; I went there with a message - I rang the gate bell, then pushed the gate open - and when I got on the steps, I heard a noise in the area - I looked down, and saw a man getting out of the window - he ran into the street - Westmacott pursued him - I delivered my message, then walked up the street the same way as the man had run, and saw him coming down the lane with a constable; I was about four yards from him when he ran up the steps, and am certain he is the man, from his dress and appearance; he was dressed in a close jacket and blue trousers.

Cross-examined. Q. This is a public street? A. Yes; he ran very fast; he had an apron on - I cannot say whether it was black or blue - I saw him getting out of the window, and thought he was a workman there - the servant followed him within a minute.

F. WESTMACOTT re-examined. I had been in the pantry ten minutes before, and put these spoons on the tray; the window was then shut and hasped - I cannot say whether I left the pantry door shut - the window must have been opened from within - I did not see the prisoner when the constable brought him back, and cannot say he is the man - he had blue trousers on, and a light close jacket.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you fasten the window? A. Yes; none of the glass was broken - there was seven of us in the house - there is an area door - I cannot say whether that was open or shut - it was not wide open, but it might not be latched.

JOHN LLOYD . I am a butcher, and live in Church-street, about one hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Lindo's. About two o'clock on the day in question, I passed a person in the street - he wore a waistcoat with sleeves, and dark trousers, and had a frail basket in his hand; the prisoner is that person - I saw him the night he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. You merely think the prisoner's features resemble the man? A. I really think him to be the man whom I passed in the street; he does not look exactly the same now as he did then.

JONATHAN MOUNTAIN . I live at Mrs. Snaith's, on Stamford-hill; my wife lives in Lordship-lane, about one hundred yards from Mr. Lindo's. On the 8th of February, between two and three o'clock, I was in Church-street, Newington - Westmacott ran after me, and told me to stop the man - I asked what man, as I could see none; she said he was gone down there, pointing down Red Lion-lane; when we got into the lane, she pointed to a man who was coming from behind the gardens of Lordship-terrace, apparently to see if any body was following him - the instant he saw me running, he turned back, and ran across the field - I followed, and Shepherd took him; he had been out of my sight a few minutes - I will not speak to his features; but by his dress certainly the prisoner is the man; I told him he was wanted in Church-street, and understood him to say, he was sure he could not be wanted - he was much agitated at the watch-house, and said he hoped the constable would do what he could for him.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am gardener to Mr. Allen, of Church-street; I was in the garden, and saw Mountain and several others running-down Lordship-lane, crying"Stop thief!" the prisoner was running across the field; I jumped over, and when I got within ten yards of him, he turned round and said, "Don't take me; it is only for a child - let me go" - I secured him.

F. WESTMACOTT re-examined. I had seen the man run down Red Lion-lane; he was not out of my sight till he turned the corner of the lane - I then saw Mr. Mountain; the man who turned down the lane is the man who ran from the area - I saw him when he was secured; he appeared to be the same person from his dress.

ROBERT FELL . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me - he was very much agitated - I found two sovereigns and 4s. 6d. on him; I went to Mr. Lindo's; and when I returned, he said he hoped he should get out of the scrape - I produce the basket and plate.

S. GARLAND. These are the spoons; I do not know the value of them.

J. LLOYD. This looks like the basket I saw the person with.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-63

556. MICHAEL COSGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 gowns, value 10s.; 2 shifts, value 4s.; 2 shawls, value 8s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 4 caps, value 4s.; 2 pairs of gloves, value 2s.; 4 collars, value 1s.; 5 pieces of ribbon, value 4s., and 2 shillings, the property of Ann Lyons , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Michael Moore .

ANN LYONS. I am servant to Michael Moore, who keeps the Three Compasses public-house, in Drury-lane . The prisoner was at the house about three weeks after Christmas; he was there all day - he came into the kitchen about five o'clock, and said my master wanted me to put the child to bed; I went to my master in the bar; the prisoner was there then, and I found I had not been sent for - I went up to put the baby to bed, returned in ten minutes, and one of the children asked me for an orange- I went to my trunk, which is on a shelf over the kitchen cupboard; I found the lock broken, and every thing taken out - I had put them into the box after the prisoner came into the kitchen - he was gone before I came down.

Prisoner. Q. How many people were there in the taproom? A. Not many; it is even with the kitchen; the lodgers have their meals in the kitchen, but they were not at home.

ELIZABETH MOORE . I am between seven and eight years old; my father kept this public-house at the time in question; the prisoner lodged there - he came into the kitchen, and told Lyons my father wanted her to put the baby to bed - she sent me to tell my father she would be up directly; Cosgrove pushed me back as I was going, and went into the bar himself; Lyons afterwards went to put the child to bed; I went up to the lodgers, and came down in three minutes, and saw people dancing in the tap-room; I rapped at the kitchen door - nobody answered - I looked through the key-hole, and saw Cosgrove on the table; he came out in about five minutes, went and staid in the bar for about half an hour, and then went home - I had not seen him take any thing. I heard of the loss in about an hour, and told what I had seen; I did not see him take any thing, or see any thing about him.

The Court, upon referring to the witness' deposition, found she had there stated that she had seen the prisoner take the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-64

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

557. THOMAS BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 47 sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, 10 shillings, 5 sixpences, and one 5l. Bank note, the monies of George Henry Squire , his master .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HENRY SQUIRE. I am a salesman at Newgate-market , and live at Charing-cross. The prisoner was my servant . On Saturday, the 13th of January, after business was over, he came, by my desire, to Charing-cross, to take some cash to Mr. Porch, and Mr. Smith; I was not quite ready when he came, and told him to go to the Shades; I went there to him, and paid him 42l. 7s. in sovereigns and silver, for Porch, and a 5l. note and 5l. in gold and silver for Smith, with an invoice of Messrs. Carrington's; I did not see him again till he was taken at Datchet-bridge, on the 24th; I have since paid the money to those persons- he had been in the habit of paying them money every week. He bore a very honest character, and lived six years with me.

EPHRAIM HILLARY . I live at the Shades. I was there on the 13th, and saw Mr. Squire give the prisoner a yellow bag and a roll of paper; there appeared to be money in the bag.

RICHARD PORCH . I am book-keeper to my father, who lives in Lime-street. I frequently received money from the prisoner, and expected to receive some on the 13th of January, but he did not come - I was there all day; he has paid nothing since.

THOMAS HART . I am book-keeper to Mr. Smith, of the Three Cups Inn; we received money on account of Carrington and Co.; the prisoner usually brought it on a Saturday; he brought none on the 13th of January, nor since.

WILLIAM BECKLEY . I am a fishmonger, and live at Charing-cross. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of January; near Datchet-bridge, and gave him in charge - he said he had spent all the money but 6d.; he had got a watch.

WILLIAM GOLD HAWK . I am a constable, and received him in charge. I found an old watch, a chain, a seal, and a sixpence on him; he said he had no more, and that he knew he had done wrong; he said the watch was his father's, who has since claimed it, but not the chain and seals.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-65

558. JOSEPH CHISLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 4 sovereigns , the monies of David Lewis , his master.

DAVID LEWIS. I am a builder , and live at Stamfordhill - the prisoner was my servant . On the 7th of February I gave him four sovereigns to take to Messrs. King and Co., of Norton-falgate; he was to bring back some glass - he never returned; he was taken on the 14th.

THOMAS ATKINS . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner, at the White Hart public-house, Old Gravel-lane; the persons from Messrs. King and Co. are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-66

559. CHARLES GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 11lbs. of copper, value 11s. , the goods of Richard Kepp and Edward Kepp , his masters.

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD KEPP. I am a coppersmith , in partnership with my brother - we live in Chandos-street. In consequence of suspicion I stopped the prisoner (who was in our employ) just as he left the shop, and kept him in conversation till a constable was fetched; I then asked if he could account for any copper which was missing - he said No; Cuss then searched him, and found some pieces of copper in every pocket, about 7lbs.; I knew it to be ours; we then went to his lodging, and found some more- he earned from 36s. to 40s. a week.

THOMAS CUSS. I am a constable. I found this copper on the prisoner, in seven different pockets; he said, "I am a ruined man."

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy, having a family .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-67

560. RICHARD PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 10s.; 2 pieces of silk, value 3s., and 3 yards of printed cotton, value 6s. , the goods of Francis Ellison , his master.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-68

561. WILLIAM COX was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Harmen Stennick .

ELIZABETH STENNICK . I am the wife of Harmen Stennick, a publican - we live in Dunk-street, Mile-end . The prisoner came for relief, my husband being church-warden - my husband, who was ill, sent him a shilling; he stopped and warmed himself - a person in the tap-room gave me information - I went after the prisoner, and found one pot in his hat, and another in his pocket; I had given him an order to go to the workhouse.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-69

562. ELIZABETH CAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 piece of printed cotton, containing in length 24 yards, value 24s. , the goods of James Pincott .

RICHARD OLDBERY . I am shopman to James Pincott, a linen-draper , of Oxford-street . On the afternoon of the 16th of January, a lady, who was passing, gave me information - I went out, and saw the prisoner running; I pursued, and found this piece of printed cotton under her arm; I had seen it within an hour in the shop; I asked her what she was going to do with it; she began to cry, and said she was going to take it to her mother.

JOHN PIZZEY . I was sent for and took her - she said she took it from want; at the office she said a girl who was with her took it and gave it her to take home.

Prisoner's Defence. Another girl took it from the door and gave it to me; my mother went after the girl, but cannot find her.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-70

563. THOMAS HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 watch, value 20s., 1 seal, value 4s., 1 watch key, value 6d., and 1 watch chain, value 6d. , the property of Thomas Wintle .

THOMAS WINTLE. I am a soldier ; I was at the Duke of York's funeral, at Windsor , on the 20th of January - I had not seen my watch for three or four hours before, but I felt it in my pocket, just before I missed it in the crowd - I suspect the prisoner, because he was drinking with some soldiers on the Tuesday following, and appeared to have more money than usual - I had seen the prisoner in the same rank, on duty, near the street leading to the White Hart public-house, by the barracks - there was a very great crowd there, and the soldiers and people were intermixed - we were sometimes pushed into the crowd - the prisoner stood three or four men from me - I believe we were about a pace from one another - I cannot say how far he was from me - we came to town on Monday.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker - I live in Tothil-street. This watch was pawned with me on the 22d of January, by the prisoner; he said it was his own, and went very well, and he had given 4l. for it - I lent him 20s. - he came in the same dress as he rode from Windsor in.

ELIZABETH HOUSE . I live in Little Chapel-street, Westminster. The prisoner called on me on Tuesday, the 23d of January, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning - he said he had the ticket of a watch pawned at Mr. Williams's and the ticket of a seal and key at another place to dispose of - I gave him 10s. for the two tickets - he said the watch was his own - I went with People to the pawnbroker's.

ROBERT MARKS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street. I have a seal and key, which were pledged on the 22d, by the prisoner, to the best of my belief; he was in his undress uniform; he said they cost 30s.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer, and got the property from the pawnbroker's; I took the prisoner at the barracks on the 24th; he said he knew nothing of it, and denied having sold the duplicates.

Prisoner's Defence. I was holding a flambeau one hundred yards from the prosecutor - I was not within twenty men of him - I came to town, and had a pint of beer at the Bull public-house, on Monday evening - a grenadier there asked me to buy the duplicate of a watch seal, and key, for 7s. - I gave him 5s. for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-71

564. THOMAS ELLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 4 dozen of brushes, value 18s. , the goods of Francis Holles Brandram , and others, his masters.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ALLT . I am warehouseman to Francis Holles Brandram, who has three other partners; the prisoner has been in their employ since February, 1825. In consequence of information from Mr. Wright, I took stock of the brushes on the 31st of December last, and again on the 6th of February, which was the day after he was apprehended - I missed above 44 dozen of brushes - Wright and Dunnage supply us with brushes - I have often seen the prisoner leave the premises about seven o'clock in the evening; he always had, apparently, a great coat under his arm; I should not have suffered any other man to leave with a coat; but he was so strongly recommended I had no suspicion of him.

ROBERT DRAKE . I am in the employ of Mr. Clarke, pawnbroker, Old-street. I have frequently seen the prisoner - the first time was about the 2d of August - after he had pawned a quantity of brushes, I asked if they were his own; he said, Yes; and the name, S. Wright, which was on them, was his name - they were all pawned in that name. On the 5th of February, he came with a coat - I had given information to Mr. Wright, the maker, (and two officers were in attendance near my door) - the prisoner produced forty-eight brushes from an old coat,

which was under his arm - I asked whose they were - he said, his own; that he lived at No. 10, Helmet-row - I said, "if they are your own you will not object to my calling there" - he said No - I said, "Will you wait while I go now" - he said No, "I am in a hurry" - the officers came in and took him.

WILLIAM READ . I heard some of the conversation between Drake and the prisoner on the 5th of February - he has related it as I heard it - I apprehended the prisoner, and got the brushes; I afterwards went to Helmetrow - he said he lived at No. 4, and then No.10 - I went to both the places, and found he did not live at either; on going to the office he gave me another direction.

Prisoner. I said my residence was in Grub-street - I never said any thing about No. 4, Helmet-row.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I heard the prisoner say something about No. 10, Helmet-row; I went to 41, Grub-street, and found that to be his lodgings; this is an old coat I took from him, and it is in the same condition as when I got it - I have done nothing to it (the coat was much torn.)

RICHARD FRINNEBY . I am in the employ of Wright and Co., of Hatton-wall; Brandram and Co. deal with them - the brushes are all packed in dozens - these brushes are our manufacture; the maker's name is stamped upon them - we never send them out without - the different workmen have their own stamp; these are stamped by the maker - my master's stamp is in all these; we have them stamped by the different men to detect bad workmanship.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say - and throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-72

565. RICHARD HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; and 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Benjamin Bransgrove .

BENJAMIN BRANSGROVE. On the 1st of this month I left two waistcoats and a pair of trousers in my room, at No. 2, Market-street, Bloomsbury-square - I went out about six o'clock in the evening, and stopped till nine - I did not discover that they were gone till the morning following; I shut up the shop myself at ten; the prisoner worked for me that day - he was there when I left at six o'clock. On the Tuesday in the next week I went with the officer to the prisoner's lodgings, and part, if not all the property, was found under the bed - a bundle of duplicates dropped out, part of which related to my property; one of the waistcoats had been made for sale - the other was bespoken; the prisoner worked by the piece - these garments are the same that were taken away - he had worked for me two months.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer, and went to the prisoner's house; he told me where he lodged - I turned the bed down, and found a waistcoat under it - I saw the duplicates relating to the waistcoats and trousers, pledged for 15s.; I told him I had found out where the things were - he said, "I cannot help it."

BENJAMIN COGSWELL . These trousers were pledged with me on the evening of the 1st of February, and I gave this duplicate to the person. I am in the employ of Hedges and Co., of Drury-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-73

566. GEORGE LIDDIARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 200 lbs. of lead, value 14s., belonging to the Governors of the London Hospital , and fixed to a certain building of theirs .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE AYERS . I am apprentice to Mr. Lanbury, of Whitechapel-road. On the 15th of January I went near Percival's-buildings, to call a carman, between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner walking to and fro - I saw two men on the top of the hospital buildings - I am sure the prisoner is the person I saw walking backwards and forwards; the London Hospital wall is near Percival's-buildings - the building is close to the wall - it is built against it - I saw the two jump down - there were three small carts near the building - the prisoner took some lead from under the cart, and went towards the White Raven public-house; the other two went the same way - the prisoner picked up the lead, and put it on his shoulder - I met the other two at the corner of Percival's-buildings; when I went back I told the men in my master's shop of it directly; I did not know where to go to find the persons belonging to the Hospital - I had seen the prisoner several times before - and I know he is the man; he passed me quite close, within two or three feet; there was light enough for me to know him.

ARTHUR RUDDALL . I am a carpenter belonging to the London Hospital; I examined the building called the carpenter's shop on the morning of Wednesday, the 17th of January - the wall forms one side of the street, and Percival's-buildings forms also part of the wall near the shop; I found some of the gutter lead missing; on the Saturday or Sunday preceding, there had been no rain, or I should have discovered it, because it would have come down into the shop; there was no rain on Monday or Tuesday.

L - HACKWELL. I belong to Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th; I received information from the watchmen; I then went to Ayers, and in consequence apprehended the prisoner from his description.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed on that day till nine or ten o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE AYERS. I saw the prisoner again the same morning about half-past eight o'clock, in Whitechapel-road; but I did not take him up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-74

567. WALTER WITH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 2 dead fowls, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Hollis .

JOSEPH HOLLIS. I live in Cleaveland-street . On the 20th of January these two fowls were outside my window; I saw them safe about half-past three o'clock; I was apprised they were gone by a person, and he brought the prisoner back with them; I took him off to the watch-house - he did not make any defence; he said a boy gave them to him.

NATHANIEL DELACOURT . I saw the fowls lay, and the prisoner standing in front of the board of Hollis' shop; a

lad was standing at the left-hand side; the prisoner had his apron up; he put the fowls into it, or the other boy did; I cannot say which, it was done so dexterously - I was only ten or twelve yards from them. I collared him with them in his apron.

Prisoner's Defence. You did not - they laid on the ground; I did not take them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-75

568. THOMAS BRADFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 4 bottles of wine, value 16s., the goods of John Jones , his master .

JOHN JONES, ESQ. I live in Harley-street - the prisoner was in my employ. He came to me in July - I discharged him on the 17th of January without notice - his box was searched in my presence - there were six or seven bottles of wine, some books, and a few trifling articles belonging to me in it - he said the wine was from the lees I had given him; I had some time before bottled off a cask of Madeira, and gave him leave to take what he could, after I had got all I could - the wine found consisted of sherry, white wine, and Madeira - I should think he could not get much out of the Madeira lees; perhaps three or four bottles - the wine found in his box was drinkable, and better than that from the lees could possibly be - a key was found on him, which answered to the lock of the cupboard-door, where the cellar key was kept sometimes - I kept Hermitage, Sherry, and Madeira wine in my cellar - the bottles were corked with a peculiar kind of patent cork, two pieces of cork joined together with a kind of composition at the top.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had not you many of these corks in your possession? A. Yes, but not many new ones - I never gave him any lees of wine before - I kept the corks in the cellar locked up - I gave him lees of the Madeira; I had drank some of the wine - my wine is generally decantered in the cellar, and the bottles left there.

JOHN PALMER . I am a watchmaker. On the 30th of November last the prisoner came to my shop about a watch - he called the week after to take the watch away - he said he had got some port and sherry - I asked him where he got it; he said from his brother at Kensington, who was a butler - I asked him the price; he said half-a-crown a bottle - he came again on the 7th of December for the watch, and brought four bottles of sherry; he paid for the watch; I paid him half-a-crown to make up the difference - he said he lived with Captain Jones, of Harley-street. He brought four bottles of wine on the 7th of December - I drank them; I did not observe any difference from other corks.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the bottles sealed up? A. No; he gave his right address.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of January, in Piccadilly, at the Swan public-house, the corner of Dover-street - I told him I had a warrant against him for robbing his master - he said his master had forgiven him.

J. PALMER re-examined. I gave Captain Jones the bottles which the prisoner brought to me - the seals were put on afterwards.

CAPTAIN JONES re-examined. I put the seals on to prevent their being changed - I drew the cork of one of the bottles of sherry, and tasted it; I believe this to be my old Madeira - It would be impossible for such wine to come from the lees - It is excellent wine - I should know my own Madeira as well as I should know my own coat - it is fifteen years old - I gave a very high price for it; as far as I can positively say, I believe it to be my own wine; I would swear to it as I would to the identity of my coat; this basket marked R. P. is mine; it was sent with some game and fruit from the country.

J. PALMER re-examined. I believe this basket is the same I received with the wine, but I cannot swear to it; I gave Captain Jones the same that was brought by the prisoner - the prisoner brought other bottles of wine in this.

CAPTAIN JONES. One of the corks I could identify now if I was to draw it; it was the sherry bottle which had the peculiar cork; I think I tasted from this bottle, but I am not sure; this one I know I opened; I mean to the best of my knowledge; it is by the corks that I judge it is my wine.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Now, Sir, will you swear that to be your Madeira, or is it sherry? A. As far as I can judge from the taste, this is sherry.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-76

569. THOMAS BRADFORD was again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 10 bottles of wine, value 2l.; 1 vice, value 1s., and 1 basket, value 2d., the goods of John Jones , his master .

JOHN PALMER . The prisoner brought me four bottles on the day named, and I drank the wine; he brought them in his coat pocket as before; he brought me other wine at different times; after the 7th of December he brought me forty-seven bottles, part white and part red; I drank the whole, except two bottles which I returned to Captain Jones, two I accommodated a lady with, who lived in my house - these two (producing them) were out of the last lot which he brought on the 15th of January; I know it was on the 15th, because I drank the wine as it came in; I gave half-a-crown a bottle; he brought it, and took articles in my trade for it; he said his brother had some property left him.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took up the prisoner on the 22d of January, in Piccadilly; I told him it was for an affair of Mr. Palmer's that I wanted him; I took a watch from him, and these seals were attached to it; he said, "Will you take my word till next morning? if you will let me go, I'll tip you a crown;" I got the key of his box, and found a hand vice, which was identified by Captain Jones.

CAPTAIN JOHN JONEL. On the 17th of January I discharged the prisoner; something was then found in his box, but I did not think it sufficient to proceed against him; in consequence of something I heard afterwards, I employed Buckeridge to apprehend him; a key was found upon him, which opened the cupboard where I kept the key of my cellar; I do not know that I ever left the cupboard open in my life; this vice is mine, and I have had it a number of years; I inquired for it repeatedly after I lost it; it was kept in my study.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is the cupboard

key a patent one? A. No; I swear to this vice, because I have had it a number of years.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was in the service of Captain Jones, there were plenty of corks in a paper, and I picked many up myself; there were plenty about.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing the vice only . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-77

570. ANN GRATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 7 blankets, value 14s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s., and 2 sheets, value 4s., the goods of Nathaniel Rogers Hewitt , her master .

NATHANIEL ROGERS HEWITT. I am a schoolmaster , and live at St. John's-wood ; the prisoner came to me as a cook on the 7th of November last. On the 22d of January the beds were to be made up after the vacation, and I found 7 blankets less than there ought to have been; she was the only servant in the house at the time; I spoke to her about it; she denied all knowledge of the robbery. In consequence of what I afterwards heard, I went to a pawnbroker's in the neighbourhood, but did not find my property there; on the Thursday, I got another account, and told the prisoner she must leave, but I would not turn her out on the Saturday night, but let her stay till Monday - the new servant found a quantity of duplicates in a napkin, which I looked over; the prisoner was out at the time; I did not see any more of her till she was brought by an officer; this was on the day after the duplicates were found; I told her I was not satisfied with her conduct, and had got an officer to search her, and that she had better give the duplicates up; she said she had none, except some out of date; the duplicates found by my new servant were not locked up; I took a copy of them, and told the new servant to put them in the same place - this mark on the table cloth was made by me.

MARY ANN JONES . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. I found the duplicates on the Monday under the bed, and took them to my master, who had an opportunity to take down an account of them; I put them again under the bed in the same place as I found them - I went afterwards to look for them, and they were gone; when the officer came, the prisoner denied knowing any thing about them.

RICHARD FAIRLAM . I am a pawnbroker. This tablecloth was pledged in the name of Mary Williams; I do not know who by; I gave this duplicate to the person.

THOMAS RILEY . I am a pawnbroker of Mary-le-bone. On the 1st of January, the prisoner brought a blanket to pledge.

ROBERT WILLIS . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. I apprehended the prisoner, and asked her what she had done with the duplicates; she pretended to know nothing - she said she had only two or three old ones out of date.

MR. HEWITT. This is the paper made out by me as a counterpart of the duplicates brought by Jones; they correspond with the property.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-78

571. JOHN BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 2 cheeses, value 20s., the goods of Agnes Aked , privately in her shop .

AGNES AKED. I keep a chandler's-shop , in St. Pancras parish, and am a widow . I missed these cheeses about half-past ten o'clock in the day - a neighbour came, and asked me if I missed them; they were brought back to me in a quarter of an hour.

THOMAS SPARKS . On the 7th of February I saw two other persons (not the prisoner), who looked suspicious, lurking about the premises; I went and asked Mrs. Aked if she had lost any thing; (I saw the prisoner receive the cheeses from the others - I did not see them taken;) she said she should have three cheeses, but only one was left.

WILLIAM JAMISON . I produce the cheeses, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the New-road, and a man asked me if I wanted to earn 6d. - I said I did; he said, "Take these cheeses to Charlotte-street," and then a man came up, and said, "You are my prisoner."

T. SPARKS re-examined. I saw one boy following him, and the other behind; I had my eye on them in Fitzroy-place, before they got into the New-road.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-79

572. JOSEPH CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 coat, value 12s. , the goods of John Arbuthust Harvey and Timothy Waddington .

TIMOTHY WADDINGTON. I live in High-street, St. Giles' , and am in partnership with John Arbuthust Harvey. A little boy told me that a coat was taken away by another boy - I went out, and found it gone; I saw an officer, and told him; he went and brought back the prisoner, but not the coat.

JAMES MINGAY . I am twelve years old next November. On Monday last I saw the prisoner near Waddington's shop; he took a coat away, and ran with it down Charlotte-street, into a house; the officer and I went to the house he took it to - I do not know what he had done with the coat.

WILLIAM BALL . I am an officer, and went with the last witness to a house in Charlotte-street, and found the prisoner - Mingay pointed him out; there was a woman and another boy in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-80

573. THOMAS PINKNEY and JOHN CAIN were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 156lbs. of lead, value 1l., the goods of James Page , and fixed to his dwelling-house , against the statute.

JAMES PAGE. I am a grocer , and live in Mile-end-road - I have a shop there, covered with lead; there is some here, which I believe to be my property; it was fixed at the top of my shop; I missed it on the morning of the 1st of this month - it was safe on the evening before; it had the appearance of being cut away.

DANIEL PALMER . I am a watchman of Mile-end Old-town; I was calling the hour on the morning of the 1st of February; I passed Mr. Page's house, and saw two rolls of lead - it was rolled up, and laying there; I sent for Falconer - he had not been there three minutes before he called for assistance; I saw two men making their escape- we followed them till we got to Globe-lane, and then they ran across the field; I knew one of them - I had never seen Cain before that morning; I am sure he is one

of them. I saw the lead before they came for it - when I came back it still laid there.

JAMES FALCONER . I am a watchman at Mile-end. I was with Palmer on the morning of the 1st of February, about one o'clock; I saw some lead in the corner; I was not there more than a minute before the two prisoners came to the place where it was placed; I had a full opportunity of seeing them; I looked round by the shop window, and saw the lead taken up; when I got near them one looked over his shoulder; I was about to take them both, but they ran away - I took my cutlass, and struck Cain on his hat; before I could get up close to him he made his escape; I called to Palmer - they ran up Globe-lane, and escaped into the fields. The next morning I saw them, and knew them to be the persons - as such I took them up.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a constable of the night. The watchmen brought some lead to me; I fitted it to the prosecutor's house. I found a hat, which was left behind. On searching the prisoner Cain I found a chissel and two bundles of matches in his pocket. When I went my rounds at twelve o'clock I saw nothing particular - I did not miss the lead then.

PINKNEY's Defence. I bought the chissel going down Whitechapel-road.

CAIN's Defence. The watchman cut my hat.

PINKNEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CAIN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-81

574. DAVID SAMUEL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 2 books, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Edward Rainsford .

WILLIAM BUSH . I am in the service of Mr. Edward Rainsford, who is a bookseller , and lives in Red Lion - passage . About ten minutes past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take two books off the shelf, and run into Red Lion-square; I followed, and called out Stop thief! somebody tried to stop him, and he fell down, but got up again and ran a little further; I then saw him throw the books away - I picked them up.

JOSEPH POPE HAMMET T. I saw Bush running after the prisoner, who had two books in his hands, which he dropped.

RICHARD STIGELL . I am a watchman, and received the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor young man, and have been out of work three months.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-82

575. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 ass, price 25s.; 1 cart, value 2l., and 1 set of harness, price 30s. , the goods of William Freeman .

WILLIAM FREEMAN. Last Tuesday week I left an ass and cart in James-street, Covent-garden , about a quarter-past five o'clock in the morning; I afterwards saw the cart in Oxford-street, about a quarter to seven - the prisoner was in the cart, and driving it, alone; I asked him how he came by it, but he said nothing; I took him to the watch-house.

EDWARD BOOTHMAN . I took charge of the prisoner - he said his parents lived in St. Giles, and sold matches - that they sent him out to beg, and if he did not get money they used to beat him - he said he did not sleep at home the night before, but in St. Paul's watch-house; he said Dick (alluding to another boy) put him into the cart, and told him to drive off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-83

576. PHILIP COHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 2 shillings, the monies of Nicholas Frederick Mullin , from his person .

NICHOLAS FREDERICK MULLIN. On the 12th of February I was on the stairs of the 1s. gallery at Drury-lane , going in; I felt the prisoner's left hand in my pocket; I had three shillings there - I collared him; I found only one shilling remaining in my pocket; two were missing - the officer found them in his hands.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I was on the stairs on the 12th, and the prosecutor said he had been robbed of 2s. - The prisoner took two shillings out of his waistcoat pocket, and put it into my hands.

Prisoner's Defence. I had changed half-a-crown, and had 2s. 2d. left.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-84

577. JOHN JOB was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 14 pieces of leather, value 5s., 4 pieces of lasting, value 6d., 3 pairs of upper-leathers, value 2s. 9d., 18 yards of galloon, value 1s. 3d., and 1 pair of lasts, value 5d. , the goods of Edward John Scott and William King .

EDWARD JOHN SCOTT. I am in partnership with William King, of Castle-street , Holborn - we are shoemakers - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 7th of February I called him into the counting-house, and told him I had strong reasons to think that he had been selling some of my property; he said he had not, and said something about a search, and he took me to his lodgings - I saw some property of mine there, and requested the key of his trunk - I found some property of mine among his clothes, which I can swear to - before I got to the trunk, I found two pairs of my lasts, and some leather; the remainder of the property was in the trunk - a variety of articles, consisting of leather, of goats' skin, and some galloon; he said, "If you will forgive me, I'll tell you all about it" - I said, he had been robbing me for a considerable time, and that he had better tell me who his accomplice was - I made him no promise; he appeared very much agitated, and said, he hoped I would forgive him, and said his cousin had some duplicates of some shoes, which had been pledged - we went to his cousin, and found one.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The cousin was in your employment? A. Yes; but he had no opportunity of coming further than the passage - he could not steal shoes from the warehouse; this man never took work home - the prisoner did not work at home occasionally for other people; it is unlawful in our business to work for another - it is not regular to take cabbage out of leather delivered out - I know the writing on this piece of leather, it was signed by a person named Swift, who was my foreman, but not now, nor is he here - there is no private mark of my own on this leather; there is nothing

here in the state in which he should take it from my hand to make up; no leather is delivered out in this state for that purpose - none of it is in a fit state to make into shoes; it ought to be closed - we give work to different work people.

THOMAS WINGROVE . I was sent for by the prosecutor, and took the prisoner into custody.

GEORGE PERKINS . I am foreman to Scott and King - I was present when the prisoner's lodgings were searched - the patterns are my own cutting, and I can swear to this piece as their property - this is a piece of basil skin; no mark is on it - I cannot swear to that, nor these; I will swear to this, because it is a peculiar sort of leather - there is no private mark on it - this peculiar sort of leather is made by a person in Golden-lane - I cut these soles about a month previous to their being missed - I did not hear him say the property was his own, when taken before the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for myself before I went into their employ, and then bought the property now in Court.

PROSECUTOR. It is possible he might have had these lasts with work, which he had to do at home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-85

578. ELIZABETH GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 brooch, value 4s., 2 rings, value 10s., 2 pins, value 8s., and 1 thimble, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Johnson , her master.

THOMAS JOHNSON. I live in Lisson-grove - the prisoner was in my service. I missed these articles, and spoke to her about them; she said she had taken no more than two rings and a brooch.

FRANCES JOHNSON . I am the wife of Thomas Johnson; the prisoner came into my service on the 17th of January, and lived with me about a fortnight - I charged her with having taken this property; she said she had only taken the brooch and two rings.

SARAH WHITELOCK . I live at Chelsea, in the same house with the prisoner's mother. On the evening of the 17th of January, the prisoner came there, and showed me a brooch - she said it was worth 8s. 6d., and she was going to take it to Cadogan-place; I told her, if her employer had sent her to carry it there, she should wrap it up - the next morning she had it open again, and I said she would break it, and then have to pay for it - the same evening I saw her at a pawnbroker's, in Sloane-street, and heard her say she had brought a ring, and she wanted a brooch- a girl, of the prisoner's acquaintance, brought these articles to where I live, and gave some account to the prisoner's mother, and said, "A pretty piece of work your daughter has brought us into - there is fourteen years transportation for us, and seven for your daughter."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-86

579. CHARLES CULLENDER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 2s. 6d., and 1 piece of chain, value 1/2d. , the goods of Robert Woolstenholm .

HENRY BLYTON . I am shopman to Mr. Robert Woolstenholm; he lives in Crown-street, Finsbury ; I hung a pair of trousers at his shop-door over a rail; on the morning of the 18th of January they were tied to the rail - I believe these are them - I do not perceive any thing different in them; I was up-stairs, and was called down about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and heard a pair of trousers had been stolen - I saw them afterwards at the office.

GEORGE REYNOLDS . I live in Spitalfields. On the 18th of January I was in Clifton-street in the evening, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a person running; I pursued him, and saw him throw something over a wall - he then turned, and I lost sight of him; Monteith stopped a person - and I believe it was the same person whom I had seen running - I cannot positively swear it was the prisoner- I went with the officer to the premises of Mr. Masters, in Earl-street, who gave these trousers to the officer in about half an hour.

THOMAS RUTHERFORD MONTEITH . On the night of the 18th of January I was in Earl-street, nearly two hundred yards from Mr. Woolstenholm's shop, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw the prisoner running, pursued by the witness - he crossed the street, and I followed, and stopped him near Mr. Masters' premises; I did not see any thing in his hand.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am a headborough. I went to Mr. Masters' premises, and he gave me these trousers.

HENRY WILLIAM MASTERS . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and in about half an hour the officer came, and I gave him these trousers, which I found in my back premises - they must have been thrown there by some one from Earl-street, or from my own premises.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry; I ran as other people did.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-87

580. MARY RHODES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 sheet, value 6s. , the goods of Elizabeth Taylor , widow .

ELIZABETH TAYLOR. I live in Coles-yard, Drury-lane . I left a sheet in my room on the 30th of January, and missed it a little before one o'clock; there are other lodgers in the house.

FREDERICK CHESTERMAN . I am a pawnbroker. This sheet was pawned with me on the 30th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman I know came and tapped me on the shoulder; she said, "Will you take this sheet to pawn for me?"

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-88

581. SAMUEL BRINDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 shift, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 20s., and 1 China cover, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Noyes .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-89

582. WILLIAM COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Halifax .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-90

583. JOSEPH RAINSBURY was indicted for steal

ing, on the 31st of January , 15 lbs. weight of copper, value 11s. , the goods of William Curling and others.

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-91

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

584. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 4 knives and 4 forks, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Goodwin .

MARIA GOODWIN . I am the wife of Robert Goodwin, who keeps the Red Hart public-house, in Shoe-lane . On Tuesday, the 6th of February, just before nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our house, which he has frequented for the last twelve months; there were four knives and forks on the tap-room table - I saw the prisoner and another person come along the passage - that person took the knives from the prisoner's pocket; I took the four forks from him myself - I do not know what the prisoner was, nor where he worked.

WILLIAM BEVEDEN . I was at the public-house on the night in question - the prisoner came in, and stood behind me - the knives and forks laid there; I turned round, and saw him putting them into his pocket; he got up, and was going out - I laid hold of him, and said, "You have got something that is not your own;" he put his hand into his pocket, and drew out the knives - the landlady took the forks from him.

CHARLES FINCH . I was at the public-house, and saw the prisoner go out of the room - Beveden took hold of him, and said, "Stop till you have put down what is not your own;" he appeared quite sober - when he had put them down, some man said, "Cut your wind" - but the waiter said, "No - that won't do;" the landlady came, and took the forks out of his pocket in the passage.

ALEXANDER JOHNSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not have the knives in my possession. GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-92

585. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 great coat, value 20s. , the goods of Richard Morris .

RICHARD MORRIS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Skinner-street, Somer's-town. I lost a great coat on the 5th of February, at a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, off the back of my horse, in Old Fish-street , while I was in a warehouse - when I had been in there ten or twelve minutes, I heard that a thief had ran away with it - I went out immediately, and pursued him with the warehouseman and another person; they ran faster than I - and the prisoner was brought back.

EDWARD CROSIER . I was coming down Friday-street at a quarter past three o'clock that day - I met the prisoner and another young man; the prisoner was running, with this coat - I followed - he fell down - I took hold of him - he threw down the coat, and got away; I took it up, followed, and saw him taken.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran; and the witness came and said I was the thief.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-93

586. ALEXANDER HAYDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 41/2lbs. of ham, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Mary Stevens .

THOMAS STEVENS . I am in the employ of Mary Stevens, who is my aunt - she lives in Fetter-lane . On the 27th of January, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came across the road, leaned over, and took the ham from the back of our window - I pursued, and brought him back with it - he said he was glad of it, as he wanted a night's lodging; he had run about one hundred yards.

JOHN KEARNS . On Saturday night, the 27th of January, I was going my rounds, and was called to take the prisoner - as we were going along, he said he was glad of it, he wanted a night's lodging.

Prisoner's Defence. It is quite false; I took the ham to look at - the witness came to the window, and took it from me; I had not got above twenty yards from the window - and he said he would give me a night's lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-94

587. JAMES CHIPPERFIELD was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM ORAM . I am a coal-dealer , and live in Huggin-lane, Thames-street. The prisoner was employed to carry out coals for me; I gave him 10s. a week; he was to take the money for coals if people paid him, and return it to me directly he came home; if he came back without it, he was to tell me, and I put it down; Ann Moore generally paid ready money; I hardly ever knew her omit - on the 31st of January I sent a bushel of coals to her house by the prisoner, between three and four o'clock; he came back, and said, in the evening, that she had not paid, and he had put it down on the slate; they came to 1s. 4d. On the 2d of February a lady came to pay me for a sack of coals - I said it was a sack and a half; the prisoner heard that, and ran away; he lived a few doors from me; I took him when he came home at night, and accused him of it; he said he had only taken 2l. 5s., and hoped I would let him come back and work it out.

ANN MOORE. The prisoner brought me a bushel of coals on the 31st of January; I gave him 1s. 6d., and he sent a little boy with the 2d.

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to pay my master again.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-95

582. WILLIAM DAVIES and CHARLES DAVIES were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 2 profiles, each in a frame, value 5s., the goods of James Martin ; 9 other profiles, each in a frame, value 22s. 6d., and 1 bag, value 6d., the goods of John Fowler ; 1 pair of stays, value 12s., and 1 cap, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Henry Eastman , from the person of James Eastman .

JAMES EASTMAN. I live with my father, who is a leather-dresser , and lives in Dover-road; his name is Henry; my uncle's name is John Fowler; I am twelve years of age. On the 1st of February my uncle sent me with a parcel, in a blue bag, to Goswell-street; it contained eleven black profiles, which my aunt does, a pair of stays, a cap, a bit of ribbon, and three letters. When I got to Cannon-street, Charles Davies came and asked where I was going; I told him to Mr. Stanbridge, the cooper, in

Goswell-street; I asked him where he was going; he said to Clement's-lane; and when we got there, he crossed over, and I think he went down Clement's-lane; I had not seen William Davies at that time - but when I got to the top of Cannon-street, and was going down Walbrook , he came to me, and asked whether I was going to Mr. Stan-bridge, in Goswell-street - I said "Yes;" he said he was going there too, opposite the Roebuck public-house, and we need not both go - and I was to go home, and say, Mr. Simmonds wanted to see my uncle - he sent me back, and said he would take the bag, which he did - I did not see Charles Davies at that time; I saw the bag again before the Magistrate.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I produce this property. On Thursday, the 1st of February, about three o'clock, I saw the two prisoners coming up towards Fish-street-hill, in company together; and I saw them accost two or three different lads; and at last Charles Davies accosted the witness, and accompanied him down Cannon-street; I then saw him go and speak to William Davies; I went on, and saw William Davies go up to the witness; they spoke together; and I saw him take the bag from him; the other prisoner passed by at the time; and I saw the two prisoners go on together to Bucklersbury, where I took them, and took the same bag from William Davies - it contained this property.

MARY MARTIN . My brother's name is John Fowler; Henry Eastman is my sister's husband. These profiles and stays are mine; I had sent them by James Eastman to Mr. Stanbridge, in Goswell-street.

WILLIAM DAVIES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

CHARLES DAVIES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoners, which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18270215-96

589. MARIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 14 lbs. weight of bacon, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Toms .

CHARLES TOMS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Bow-lane . On the 23d of January, this piece of bacon was on the board; I only know it to be the same.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Toms. I saw the bacon lay on the board; the prisoner came there for1/4lb. of 1s. butter, which I served her with; she did not go away, but stood by the side of the bacon board; she had an apron or cloth in her hand, which she put on the board, and I saw her put her basket by the side of the board, I then left her, and served some other person on the other side with an ounce of tea; I then looked round, and missed her and the bacon; I then went after the prisoner, and took her in Queen-street with it.

FRANCIS DYER . I am a baker. I was at the shop; Toms begged me to go with him to take the prisoner; we took her in Queen-street, with the bacon.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing her to be in distress . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-97

590. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , at Allhallows, Bread-street, 9 pieces of calico, containing 28 yards each, value 2l. 15s., the goods of John Lainson and another, in the dwelling-house of the said John Lainson , there situate .

THOMAS LEE . I am a carpenter. I know Mr. John Lainson's house, No. 43, Bread-street, Cheapside - I had eight or nine men at work there on the 19th of January. I was passing the premises between eight and nine o'clock that morning, and saw the prisoner against the street door- knowing there was no door open, except Mr. Lainson's, I walked up as far as Star-court - I then turned my head, and missed sight of him; I turned back again from the corner of the court, and went to Mr. Lainson's; (not half a minute had elapsed since I had seen him at the door;) I then saw him in the lobby, on his knees - he had these pieces of calico partly in his hand, but the side of them was on the ground; they had been up in the corner of the passage, on the right-hand side; and he was then in the further part of the passage, with the goods; they lay on their side, and his hands had hold of them. I went into the passage, and said, "Halloo, what are you about?" he said he was going to look for employ, and was going to tell the gentleman of these goods laying in the dirt; I took him into custody, and sent for an officer; the prisoner had this knife, which he gave me himself.

Prisoner. The witness stated that the bale was cut and open, and the goods taken out; I wish to know whether there was time for me to cut the bale, cut the ropes, and take the goods out? Witness. I do not know; it is very easily done; here is one piece cut in two places with a knife, as it appears to me.

THOMAS COVELL HANSON . I am an officer. I produce the property; I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I found this knife on him, which would have cut the calico in this manner.

MR. JOHN LAINSON . I live at No. 43, Bread-street, Cheapside, in the parish of Allhallows, Bread-street, and rent the house. This calico is the property of myself and my brother, who is in partnership with me; it was in a bale in the lobby, about six feet from the door; the bale was ripped open, and this taken out; I should think it would take a very little while to take it out of the bale; it had been in the bale before, and was removed from it. I think the value of it is 3l. My warehouseman is here, who had seen it about five minutes before.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the bale well secured with ropes? A. Yes.

JOHN LUTMAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Lainson. I know these goods to be part of that bale of goods. I came in about nine o'clock, and wiped my shoes on some straw by the side of the bale - it was complete then - if it had not been I should have seen it; that was about ten minutes before the prisoner was brought into the warehouse - I think it was two or three minutes after nine o'clock.

COURT to THOS. LEE. Q. What was the time when you saw him? A. It was about nine o'clock - I cannot tell to a minute or two. The property was quite out of the bale, and the side of it on the ground - the prisoner had hold of it in his hands; no part of it was near the bale.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left home to seek work, and seeing this warehouse I went in to ask for work; I went into the passage, and saw the bale cut, and this laying in the

passage - I had to move it to get to the door; the instant I moved it the witness collared me. I have worked for several masters in Bread-street, and for a master-weaver in Steward-street, but I have not had time to let them know. I have worked for Messrs. Herring and Douglass, in Bread-street, who are weavers.

COURT to MR. LAINSON. Q. How many bundles were there in the bale? A. Six, and this was one of them - it contains nine pieces - they were tied up as they are now.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, his friends being respectable, and believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18270215-98

591. FREDERICK JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Whitehead Reid .

MR. THOMAS WHITEHEAD REID. I am a merchant . - I was going into Messrs. Spooner and Atwood's banking-house, in Gracechurch-street , on the 27th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, with a tin-case in my hand; the officer came in with the prisoner, and asked if I had lost any thing; I said I believed not, but he produced a silk handkerchief, and asked if it was mine; he said he had found it on the prisoner; I found it was mine; it had been in one of my pockets. I did not see the prisoner till he was brought in.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBEATER . I am a marshalsman. I was coming out of Plough-court, and saw the prosecutor going along with a cash-box; the prisoner and another were close to him - the other went away, and when they got to the corner the prisoner left the gentleman; I stopped the prisoner, turned him round, and said, "What are you about?" I saw this handkerchief in his waistcoat pocket, and his coat was covering it. I went into the banker's, and Mr. Reid identified it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and saw a handkerchief fall - I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-99

592. JOHN WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 looking-glass, value 19s. , the goods of Thomas Standage .

THOMAS STANDAGE. I live in Chancery-lane, in the City , and am a furniture-broker . On the 22d of November I saw the prisoner come, take this glass, and give it to another, who was tried and convicted here; it was about six, or a quarter past six o'clock in the evening; I was about the middle of the shop; the looking-glass was in the front, on a table - the prisoner ran away, and made his escape; I had known him before by seeing him pass; he was not taken till about a month ago; I positively swear he was the man who took it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know where he lives? A. No; I had seen him often before, but had not spoken to him - I can pretty positively swear he had a brown frock-coat on; I will not posively swear it - my shop is rather dark - I ran out immediately, but the man that took it got away.

COURT. Q. Was it dark on the outside of your shop? A. No; I knew the prisoner before - he did not come into the shop - it is an open shop; I could not find the prisoner till January.

BENJAMIN SIMMS . I am porter to Mr. Standage. I saw the prisoner pass his door frequently that evening - I saw him take the glass, and give it to William Atkins; I ran across; the man, who had got it, dropped it, and the other got away - I am sure the prisoner is the man; I have frequently seen him before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why did you turn round and look at him now, if you have seen him before? A. To make sure of him; he had a brown frockcoat on - I did not tell my master so; he was inside the shop, and could distinctly see his coat - I was within ten yards of him - I thought he was going to take something, and I would stop on the other side of the way to watch - I secured Atkins, and took the glass from him.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-100

593. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 pocket-book, value 7s., the goods of John Wright , from his person .

JOHN WRIGHT. I live in the Tower. On the 1st of February I was in the Poultry , and felt my pocket-book safe in my coat pocket, three minutes before Herdsfield came and asked if I had lost any think; I then missed it, went to the Old Jewry, and took the prisoner and another - my book was found in his hat.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 1st of February I was in Cheapside, and saw Mr. Wright going along; the prisoner, who was close behind him, was putting something under his waistcoat; I crossed over and asked if Mr. Wright had lost any thing; he missed his pocket-book; we went to the Old Jewry, and found it in the prisoner's hat.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-101

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

594. GEORGE PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 pocket-book, value 5s., the goods of Michael Edwin Fell , from his person .

MICHAEL EDWIN FELL. On the 18th of January, between 2 and 3 o'clock, I was endeavouring to get into the Palace to see the Duke of York lay in state; my pocket-book was in my left hand trousers pocket - I passed the barriers to get into the gate - I then felt for my book, and it was gone - I had not noticed the prisoner - I afterwards found the book at Marlborough-street - I am sure I lost it in that crowd.

DANIEL REARDON . I am an officer. I was in the crowd at St. James's on the 18th of January; I saw the prisoner there, in company with several others; suspecting them, I watched them for near half an hour; I then lost sight of him and one of his companions for about five minutes, when I saw them rush out of the crowd, and rush up Pickering-place; I ran - and Yates took the

prisoner; I took another, but seeing the prisoner get from Yates, I ran and secured him; I saw him throw down something, and this pocket-book was on the ground; he said, "Do away with the pocket-book, for I have a wife and small family; if you don't do away with it, I am a dead lag;" I saw Yates find some money on him, which was returned; he had a purse, a gold watch, two 10l. notes, a double sovereign, some sovereigns, and other property, amounting to about 30l.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were not all these things returned to him? A. I believe so; they were sealed up at the first examination. I am a patrol. - Gook was with me - he is a parish constable; there was a great crowd. I first saw him in St. James'-street; I saw him throw his hand out, and immediately the book fell.

MR. FELL. This is my book - it contained memorandums, which were in it when it was found, and here are some marks on it, by which I know it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was there any thing in it besides papers? A. No.

THOMAS GOOK . I was in St. James'-street about a quarter to three o'clock, on duty with Reardon; Yates came up - I had seen the prisoner about an hour before, and lost sight of him for ten minutes or a quarter of an hours; I then saw him come out of the crowd with four or five others; they went up Pickering-place; Yates and Reardon went after them - I attempted to take hold of two of them; Reardon took another, and Yates took the prisoner; I saw the pocket-book fall from the prisoner, but did not see Reardon pick it up, nor hear the prisoner say any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you once prosecute the King's postillion? A. No - it was a helper in the King's stable; I was prosecuted myself afterwards, and acquitted. Several people were up the court - I will not swear how many; there was no pressure from the soldiers - the soldiers were in the road - this was on the pavement; I stood without pressure; there was no particular crowd there. I was engaged with the other men, who ill-used me.

COURT. Q. Where is Pickering-court? A. On the right hand of St. James'-street; the book fell four or five yards up the court, in the narrow part.

HENRY YATES . I saw this pocket-book dropped, five or six yards down Pickering-place - I was holding the prisoner, who tried to get from me; he said nothing then; but when we put him into a coach, he said, if we could do away with the pocket-book it would be all right - he said this two or three times as we went up St. James'-street - I was knocked down in the court, and did not see it picked up.

Cross-examined. Q. There were a great many people there - I suppose forty or fifty? A. I dare say there were; the court was choked full of people, who were getting away from the trampling of horses.

COURT. Q. Was there a great pressure besides that, from the persons who endeavoured to rescue the prisoner? A. Yes - he said nothing about his wife and family in my hearing.

DAN. REARDON . The prisoner said what I have stated, in the court, and he said it again in the coach - I heard something drop, and looked, and saw the book - he spoke about his wife and family two or three times in the coach - his conversation was addressed to me, but I think Yates must have heard it.

Prisoner's Defence. What they have stated is false - was pressed into the crowd, and could not get away - this man never picked up the book at all - it was brought up to them.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270215-102

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

595. GEORGE CLEEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 122 yards of silk hat-shag, value 45l., and 1 umbrella, value 2s. , the goods of William Haynes ; and JOSEPH MORRIS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

Mr. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOS. HARRIS. I am servant at Mr. Haynes', shag-manufacturer , Kettering, Northamptonshire. On the 30th of January, I packed up seven pieces, containing 1223/4 yards of shag, and fastened an umbrella on the top of the parcel, which I directed to William Haynes, 22, Lawrence-lane, Cheapside, to be left till called for, and sent it by coach.

ROBERT HOOK . I am book-keeper at the George and Blue Boar, Holborn . On the 30th of January, about nine o'clock at night, I received this truss, with an umbrella outside; it was directed to be left at the Cross Keys, St. John-street, but it was brought on to us - Cleeves called next morning, about half-past seven o'clock, and said, he had come for Haynes', his master's, truss; that he had been to the Cross Keys, and they sent him here, saying, it was brought to us - he had been there several times before, enquiring for a truss, but never got one before; I said the office could not be opened till eight o'clock; he called at eight; I saw the truss delivered to him; he paid the carriage.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did not more than one person call about this truss? A. No; I am certain of the prisoner's person; the yard was lighted up- I knew him before - I saw him twice that morning.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am employed at the George and Blue Boar. On the 31st of January, Cleeves came and enquired for a truss for Mr. Haynes; my father put it on the counter; I saw the prisoner take it - I am certain of him.

JOHN BECKWITH SIMPSON . I am John Simpson's father. I saw Cleeves come at eight o'clock in the morning; he asked for Mr. Haynes' truss; I put it on the counter, but did not see him take it, as my back was turned - I am certain of him.

GEORGE FORSTER . I am in Mr. Haynes' employ; Cleeves worked for us; when he was apprehended he did not work in the house, but had shag to make up. One morning a parcel came from the George and Blue Boar; and when the man was gone, Cleeves asked me where they came from; I told him - this was about three months ago - Mr. Haynes' parcels always went there, or to the Cross Keys.

JAMES DURANT . I am a silk weaver, and live in King-street, Bethnal-green road - the prisoner Morris is a silk

weaver; he came to me one Wednesday (I believe it was the last day of the month), between two and three o'clock, and asked if I could find him a market for some hat-shag, which he had an opportunity of buying; he produced a sample of about three quarters of a yard, and asked if I could get 7s. a yard for it - I said, I thought I could get him a customer; he came again between six and seven o'clock in the evening, he said he had made the purchase; he and his wife came again next morning, between nine and ten, with five pieces of hat-shag; he came again that evening to see if I had sold them; I said I could not get his price; he came again on Friday, and said I must do the best I could with it - on Saturday I took them out for sale - met Padbury, and gave him three pieces to sell - I returned the others to Morris.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was 7s. a fair price? A. It was too much, but I did not know that till I offered it - he did not say he was to buy them of one Jones - I have heard of Jones, of Swan-street, but am not acquainted with him; I saw him about two months ago - I hear he has absconded - the prisoner did not consult me about buying them; manufacturers often sell goods about in the distressed state of trade - his wife delivered the goods into my wife's hands, in his presence - he did not caution me to be careful where I showed them.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Do you know James Cleeves or S. Sadler? A. No.

WILLIAM PADBURY . I am a carrier. On the 2d of February, I received from Durant, three pieces of hatshag, which I sold to Mr. Heath, in Oxford-street, and paid the money to Durant.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you offer them to other people? A. Yes - I was not desired to be secret about it.

HENRY HEATH . I am a hat manufacturer. On Saturday, the 3d of February, I bought three pieces of hat-shag of Padbury, at 5s. 6d. a yard - I gave it up to the officer, having heard that Haynes had been robbed; I gave a fair price - I can buy nearly as good now at 4s. 6d.

WILLIAM HAYNES . Cleeves was formerly in my employ, and has lately worked out of doors for me - I never authorised him to fetch this truss; I made inquiry about it, as I did not receive it - I afterwards saw Morris - Durant said, in his presence, that he had it of him; Morris said he had not had any shag from him - I am certain of that - the value of the whole seven pieces is 45l.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did not Morris immediately afterwards say, "I got some shag from Jones?" A. No, not for several hours - he said he had not had any shag; not that he had had none of mine - I went to Jones, and saw him - he asked leave to go downstairs, and escaped - he is a publican and lived in Swan-street - Morris pointed out Jones as the man he had the goods from - but he had denied having any.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. When did you go to Jones? A. About the 6th; it was in consequence of Durant's information - I afterwards went to Cleeves and found him at work.

THOMAS GOODING . I am a constable, and took Morris. I went with Durant to Morris' house - he was called down from work and Durant said, "Morris, I want to know where you got that shag from, which I had from you; "he said, "You have had no shag from me;" Durant said, "Why, I returned you some on Monday, and the rest was sold - it is stolen;" he said, "No, you have had no shag from me;" and denied all knowledge of any shag at all.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK Q. When then did he say that he had some from Jones? A. That was between two and three o'clock, as we were going to the office; he had been in the watch-house two hours; as we went to the office he said, "I won't have it any longer;" I said, What - he said, "I won't have it on my shoulders; I had it from Jones;" I said, "What Jones?" he said, " Thomas Jones , I believe his name is; he keeps the Swan" - I said,"Why not tell me that before?" he said he had sent his wife to tell Jones of it, and Jones said he would not be a halfpenny towards it - we then went to Jones, who was having beer in - he denied all knowledge of Morris, and said he had never seen him; he then asked leave to go down-stairs and disappeared.

COURT. Q. He said, "Durant never had any shag from me" - was that before he knew it was stolen? A. Before and afterwards - I found none in his house.

RICHARD GOODMAN . I am a weaver, at Mr. Haynes' manufactory, in Northamptonshire. Here is a rip in the selvage of this shag, which I tore in trying to save myself as I was falling out of the loom - I know it by that, and its general appearance, and by my own work.

CLEEVES' Defence. I was at work at the time.

MORRIS' Defence. The persons coming on me by surprise, I thought it a very curious thing, and very imprudently said, he had none from me, but at last I said who I bought it of; I was foolish, but it was no bad intention; I did not conceive that he had received it from me, because I sent my wife to Jones, to know if he would let me have the shag we were talking about, and he sent it down. When I had the sample from him in the morning, he asked if I would buy it at 7s. a yard; I said I did not know what it was worth, and I went to Durant, who said, "If you can get it for less, I will find a market for it, and we will share the profit;" Jones being a respectable tradesman, I did not consider there could be any thing wrong in it; he said a friend of his, who was a manufacturer, had it to sell, and wanted to make up some money.

GEORGE COOPER. I live in John-street, East-lane, Old Kent-road, and have known Cleeves nearly five years; I saw him last Wednesday fortnight, in the morning - the day of the month I do not know; I went to his house at twenty minutes past seven o'clock, and remained with him till half-past eight - as I went along Brick-lane I heard the clock strike half-past seven.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you in his company every morning? A. No - I called there, having been sent into Brick-lane; his wife and child were there - he was at work all the time; nobody else was in the room; I had not been there before for two years.

COURT. Q. Did you hear of his being apprehended? A. Not till yesterday, when he sent for me to come here.

ANN MORETON . I live in Anchor-street, Bethnal-green, on the first floor; Cleeves lived on the second floor. On the 31st of January I did not see him at home, but heard him get out of bed, and go into his room, between seven

and eight o'clock; I heard him speak to the baby about five minutes after he went into his room.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you not his mother-in-law? A. Yes. I heard his wife blowing the fire; I heard somebody go up to him, but did not hear them talking; I do not know Cooper.

CLEEVES - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy, having a good character .

Confined Eighteen Months .

MORRIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-103

596. JOHN HADLOW was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN SHENTON . I am a stable-keeper , in Green-street, Grosvenor-square. The prisoner was three months in my employ, as a post-boy , and settled with me every Sunday morning - I paid him 5s. a week; he only accounted to me for 18s. as received from Lee - I have his book here, in which he states that he only went to Stanmore; I discharged him when I heard of this.

HUGH LEE . I am valet to James Bradshaw , Esq. On the 12th of December I paid the prisoner one sovereign and 1l. 5s. 6d. for driving me to Watford.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-104

597. ALEXANDER BOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of John Eddels .

BENJAMIN POULSON . I am shopman to J. Eddels, tailor , of the Strand. The prisoner frequently called at the shop, and was once in Mr.Eddles' service; he came there on the 24th of January, about half-past four or five o'clock- I found him in the shop when I went in; I saw him putting something in his hat, and sent for master; I asked him to stop till Mr. Eddels came, but he went out; I pursued, and brought him back - I charged him with having the trousers - he took off his hat, and produced them; they were left for repair.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-105

598. JOHN BURCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; 1 glass salt-holder, value 5s., and 1 shoe-brush, value 1s. , the goods of John Moore .

JOHN CLIFT . I am servant to John Moore, who lives in Red Lion-street, Holborn . On the 13th of January the prisoner came in with another man; he looked out three ham bones, and said he should want other things; he went to different corners of the shop; my wife came in when they had just left; I went out, and saw them running - I pursued - the prisoner was taken, and these articles were found on him.

RICHARD STIGELL . I am a watchman. I found these boots on the prisoner.

GEORGE STAPLING . The prisoner gave me the saltholder at the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met one Harris, and we drank together; I was nearly inebriated; he said he had to buy some things for his Captain, and it must have been him who put the things into my basket.

JOHN CLIFT . The prisoner had a basket; they bought nothing - he was quite sober.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-106

599. JEREMIAH DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 1 coat, value 4s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 purse, value 4d., and 1 sovereign , the property of William Gelwey .

WILLIAM GELWEY. I lodge in Oxford-buildings, Oxford-street . On the night of the 25th of January the prisoner came to lodge in the same room with me, and another young man. On the morning of the 27th that young man found the room door open, and as I was getting up I missed my clothes, and two sovereigns off a chair by my bed side; I have seen the purse since, but nothing else; the prisoner had slept there that night, but he was gone; the master and mistress of the house were in the room at the time.

MARY KEEFE . I am the mistress of this house. The prisoner and the witness slept in the same room; the prisoner paid for his bed on the 25th, but not on the 26th - he went out on the 27th, between three and four o'clock in the morning - he was taken a few days afterwards.

CHARLES ROCHESTER . I took the prisoner on Sunday, the 28th of January, on another charge. I found this purse on him, which Gelwey swears to.

WM. GELWEY. This is my purse - it had two sovereigns in it, which I was saving to buy some clothes with.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the purse two days before.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another Indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270215-107

600. JANE GALE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 counterpane, value 6s.; 2 table-cloths, value 20s.; 3 waistcoats, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 5 towels, value 2s. 6d.; 1 toilet-cover, value 1s.; 1 brooch, value 5s.; 2 rummers, value 4s.; 3 wine-glasses, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 napkin, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 night-cap, value 6d., and 2 china cups, value 10s. , the goods of Abraham Wildey Roberts , Esq. , her master.

JOHN SIMS . I am butler to Abraham Wildey Robarts, Esq. - he lives at No. 26, Hill-street, Berkeley-square - the prisoner was upper housemaid for about nine months; property was missing at different times. On the 16th of January Mrs. Robarts said the things were missing, and she wished her box to be searched; she opened her box herself, and wished me to look into it; I found some things there with master's name - she then objected to my looking any further. An officer was sent for, who found more things, and several duplicates of Mr. Robart's property.

JOHN LACY . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr. Robarts, and found the prisoner in her bed-room; her box was open - Sims said he had found some property in it; I searched it, and found two china cups, some table linen, and duplicates.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gilbert-street. I have a counterpane, pawned by the pri

soner, on the 30th of November, in the name of Mary Wright - here are two table-cloths and other articles, pawned in the same name, but I do not know who by.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-108

601. THOMAS CULLIMORE was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES STAINFORD TUCKER . I live at Laytonstone, and am a farmer . On the 28th of December the prisoner carted some potatoes for me, to Mrs. Mahoney, at Poplar - I told him if I did not meet him at Poplar, he was to receive the money for them, and take care of it for me; I had not entrusted him with money before. I found the team left at the Coach and Horses public-house, with a man, and he had absconded; he was apprehended in about a month - he was my weekly servant.

LUCY MAHONEY . I bought a load of potatoes, and paid the prisoner two sovereigns, and two half-sovereigns, and he gave me 2s. change; the man was like the prisoner, and said he came from Mr. Tucker's - he gave me this receipt.

MR. TUCKER. This is the receipt I gave him.

THOMAS PEAKE . I am an officer. I found the prisoner at a lodging-house at Stratford - he said he fell in with a tinker at the Bird-in-hand public-house, at Bow, who robbed him of the sovereigns, and swallowed them.

Prisoner's Defence. I put the money into my fob, and at Stratford I missed two half-sovereigns; I met a man, and asked him to take my team home - I went back, and met a man, who advised me to see if the money was not in my shoe; I took it off - he took up the two sovereigns, and swallowed them directly.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-109

602. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 saw, value 4s. , the goods of Peter Pige .

PETER PIGE. I live at Bethnal-green , and am a pawnbroker . I saw the prisoner come and take this saw from a board in front of my window; I pursued, and took him with it, about five yards off.

PHILIP PARISH . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked it before me, picked it up, and put it by the window; the gentleman came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-110

603. SARAH CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 shawl, value 7s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. , the goods of Sarah Hill .

SARAH HILL. I am a shirt-maker , and work for Mr. Lloyd, of Bond-street ; the prisoner and several other women assisted me in the trade. In consequence of suspicion, on the 19th of January, I proposed to search all the women, as I missed a shawl; I took them, singly, into another room; the prisoner was the only one who objected- she was told to take her clothes off; I saw her drop her hand, and a duplicate fell from some part of her dress - she tried to put her foot on it; I took it up, and said,"Here is the duplicate of my shawl;" I gave her in charge - the officer found the shoes and handkerchief in her trunk.

WILLIAM PARKER . I am shopman to Mr. Cottle, a pawnbroker, of Oxford-street. This shawl was pawned in the name of Sarah Jones - I do not know who by, but this is the duplicate I gave the person.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's trunk, at Strutton-ground, and found the handkerchief and shoes; the key of the trunk was in her pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-111

604. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Nathaniel Smith Machin and Robert Debenham .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be his first offence, and having received a good character.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-112

605. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 rug, value 5s. , the goods of Ann Shaw .

ANN FEENEY . I am servant to Mrs. Ann Shaw, of Woodstock-street . On the 12th of February I saw a man going out of the door, with this rug; he wore a long drab coat - I went out, saw him stop, and look back; I ran back, and alarmed Beach, who ran after him, and stopped the prisoner with it, but he is not the man who took it, as that man had a long drab coat.

JOHN BEACH . I was at work at the house, went out, and saw the prisoner several streets off, carrying the rug; I called Stop thief! he ran, and dropped it, but was secured in my sight.

THOMAS LAW . I heard the alarm; the prisoner ran down a place, and endeavoured to conceal himself in a door-way - he said, "I have done nothing."(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-113

606. JOHN ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 3 coats, value 3l., the goods of Thomas Skey ; 2 pairs of stockings, value 5s., the goods of John King ; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 jacket, value 2s, and 1 pair of overalls, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Alexander Mackinon .

THOMAS SKEY. I keep livery-stables , in Cumberlandmews - Mr. Mackinon's horses stand at livery with me; this property was in a seperate stable; the prisoner was my helper - he went away on Monday, without notice, and on that evening a gentleman came and put two great coats into my harness-room; we missed them shortly after; the prisoner was gone then, and was not taken till Sunday - he had his wages daily, as he was very poor; he left some of his own things in the stable, where Mr. Mackinon's things were.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner

at Gibbs' livery-stables, and found on him a duplicate of a great coat; he had these overalls and jacket on.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I live with Mr. Bellis, a pawnbroker. I have a great coat, pawned by the prisoner, on the 29th of January.

JOHN KING. I am coachman to Mr. William Alexander Mackinon. I lost a jacket, a pair of overalls, and two pairs of stockings from the stable. The prisoner has the jacket on now.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-114

607. RICHARD ROE was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS PALMER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Little Grosvenor-street. The prisoner was my apprentice , and received money for me, which he should pay to me directly he came home; I work for Mr. Lloyd, and sent the prisoner to him on Friday, the 2d of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, to take the work home, and make haste back; I gave him a bill of 5s., which Lloyd was to pay him - he returned in half an hour, and said Lloyd was busy, but he had sent half-a-crown, and would settle the rest the next evening; I went there myself, next night, with work, and heard what he had received; I came home, and told him - he was going to run away, up-stairs; I ran after him, and he threw down half-a-crown, saying, "Here is your money, Sir."

JAMES LLOYD . I am a shoe-maker. On Friday evening I paid the prisoner this bill of 5s., in half-a-crown and 2s. 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Reference Number: t18270215-115

608. RICHARD ROE was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 3 gold rings, value 26s. , the goods of Sophia Palmer .

SOPHIA PALMER. I live with my brother Thomas. On the 31st of January I locked three gold rings in my box, and on the 4th February I missed them - the box was still locked, but had been rummaged - I had left my keys in the house.

THOMAS PALMER . When the prisoner was in the watch-house, I went and asked him if he had taken the rings; and after some time, he gave up these two rings, and a half-crown.

JAMES SLATERS . I am a grocer, and live in Little Grosvenor-street. The prisoner brought me a ring on the 1st of February, and asked if it was gold; I said I did not know - he left it with me for two or three days, and frequently called to know if it was gold; he said he had found it in Grosvenor-square, that his master wished him to sell it, and buy a waistcoat with the money - I at last bought it of him for 5s.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-116

609. THOMAS LAW and JOHN JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 4 pewter-pots, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Corby ; and 4 pewter-pots, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Aistrop .

JOHN CRICK . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners in Aistrop's house in company, on the 25th of January - these pots were on a table in a handkerchief - I took them in charge with them.

CHARLES AISTROP . I keep the King's Head public-house, Hungerford-market. My wife called me from the cellar, and said the prisoners were concealing some pots; I came up, and stopped till they came out - I met them in the passage - Jones had this handkerchief of pots in his hand - I stopped them, and took them into the tap-room; four of my pots were in the bundle with others - I had not seen them come in.

BENJAMIN BARFORD . I live with Thomas Corby, who keeps the Ship public-house, in Craven-court, Strand. I saw the prisoners drinking in our tap-room on this evening - they left together - these four pots are my master's - they had a pint of beer, for which Jones paid.

LAW's Defence. I was not going out with Jones - I had met him at the Ship.

JONES pleaded distress.

LAW - GUILTY . Aged 26.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-117

610. HENRY DUNCOMB was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 stock, value 1l.; 3 pairs of dies, value 3s., and 6 taps, value 6s., the goods of Benjamin Howell , his master .

BENJAMIN HOWELL. I am an ironmonger , and live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital - the prisoner came to me as a journeyman in May, and left without notice on the 13th of January. I have since found some dies in pawn - before he was taken he acknowledged taking the property, and gave me up three duplicates.

JOHN JOHNSON . I live in Charles-street, Fitzroy-square, and am a smith. I know these dies and taps to be Mr. Howell's.

THOMAS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street. On the 14th of July these six taps and three pairs of dies were pawned in the name of Williams - I cannot say who by, but the duplicates are in Court.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took the prisoner in charge, and received these duplicates from his master.

Prisoner's Defence. I arranged it with my master to pay for them at 5s. a-week, and told him where they were pawned - I told him I did not pawn them myself, but a person who was in great distress did it.

B. HOWELL. I asked him if this was all that was pawned - he said it was; and I said I would not prosecute; but if I found any thing else, I could not tell what I should do- I afterwards found I was debited for goods I had not had, and found he had had them.

GUILTY Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were six more indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270215-118

611. ELIJAH FITZER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , part of a watch-chain, value 5s.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 key, value 1s., the goods of Edward John Spry , from his person .

EDWARD JOHN SPRY. I am a surgeon , and live in New North-street. On the 19th of January I was in St. James'-street trying to see the Duke of York lay in state - I could not pass the first barrier, and was forced to return - as I turned, the prisoner seized me by my right arm - I turned,

and he seized my left and said, "Sir, you can't pass here"- I said, "So it appears; let me go" - I followed a friend who was just before me, and on arriving near the edge of the crowd, I felt a pull at my watch; I turned, and saw the prisoner throwing his arm out, and he dropped my chain, seal, and key, on the ground - he immediately raised his arm and said, "It was not me, Sir;" but I saw him drop it - the chain had broke, my watch and part of the chain was in my fob.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did you not give a very different account at Bow-street? No - the crowd was not more than eight or ten persons at that part - I had buttoned my coat - nobody but him could have taken it.

JOHN GALE GARRETT . I was with Mr. Spry - I was before him - on our return from the crowd, I heard him say, "This fellow has picked my pocket;" I turned, and saw the chain and seal on the pavement under the prosecutor's hand; he threw up his arm and said, "It was not me, Sir;" but it was impossible for any other person to have done it from the position he stood in; he said afterwards, "I hope you won't hurt me, Sir."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see his face at the same time as you saw his hand? A. Yes.

JOHN WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street officer. I saw this gentleman collar the prisoner - he had a white coat on and livery buttons.

Prisoner's Defence. I never spoke to the gentleman.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined 18 Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-119

612. JAMES KELSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 3 pairs of shoes, value 1l. , the goods of John Thomas , his master; and THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN THOMAS. I am a shoemaker , and live in Great Russell-street - Kelsey was my errand-boy . About seven o'clock, on Saturday evening last, Goddard came in and showed me three pairs of shoes; he waited till Kelsey came in, and then took him.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. Last Saturday, between seven and eight o'clock, Mr. Harrison, the pawnbroker, sent for me - I found Walsh there, who had offered a pair of shoes in pawn - I took him in charge; the Magistrate admitted him a witness - I found a duplicate of another pair of shoes in his watch pocket; and from his information I went to Mr. Thomas, who claimed them - Kelsey came in, and I took him - on the way to the watch-house he gave me information of a boy, whom he called Thy, but said his real name was Williams; he said I could find him at the Cock public-house - I went there, and found a pair of shoes in his pocket, which Thomas claimed; Cocklan was with Williams, and also had a pair of shoes - I took them all to the watch-house.

MICHAEL ASHBURNE . I live with Holdsworth and Co., pawnbrokers, Theobald's-road. I have a pair of shoes pawned by Walsh on the 10th.

PHILIP WALSH . I am a stay-maker, and have known Williams six or eight weeks. On Saturday evening he gave me a pair of shoes to pawn at Holdsworth's; I gave him the 2s. and put the duplicate into my fob - he and Cocklan were together at the Cock public-house, Tottenham-court-road, and told me they were going to receive shoes from Kelsey, who was to steal them from Thomas - I know I did wrong - I never did it before - I pawned another pair at Harrison's (which Cocklan, gave me) and was stopped - Williams said they were to wait about the door, and Kelsey was to bring the shoes out - I told the officer where to find them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you not confused? A. Yes; because I knew it was not honest - I was to have the duplicate; I intended to take them out to sell; the Magistrate said if I told the truth I should be forgiven.

PATRICK COCKLAN . I work for a plasterer in King-street, Bloomsbury; Walsh and I had a pint of beer at the Cock - Williams came in and said, "Is it time to go and see about the shoes?" I said I did not care; and he went with me to the shop; he whistled, and Kelsey came out and gave us each a pair of shoes in Russell-street - we went there again; Williams whistled, Kelsey came out, went down George-street, and gave Williams another pair.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you tell this to save yourselves? A. I was put on my oath; I expect to be saved by it; I did not put Kelsey up to it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-120

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

613. EDWARD STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 18d., the goods of John Thomas Wiffin , from his person .

JOHN THOMAS WIFFIN. On the 13th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was in Tottenham-court-road ; I felt a hand put into my pocket, and take my handkerchief; I turned round, and the prisoner was the nearest person to me; I saw his hand coming from my pocket, but could not see my handkerchief, and have not found it - the prisoner was in the midst of several others taller than himself; they walked a short way then turned back; the prisoner then tried to run, but I gave him in charge; he got away, but was taken in Percy-street; I was not intoxicated.

JAMES CUMMINGS . I am a watchman. I saw a mob; the prisoner was running from Wiffin; I took him; he got from me; I took him again; the prosecutor was quite intoxicated, and could hardly give charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-121

614. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 tea-kettle, value 8s. , the goods of John Stewart .

JOHN STEWART. I live Cable-street, Wellclose-square . On the 18th of January, about twelve o'clock, I missed this kettle, which I saw safe on a shelf, about two yards from the door, at ten o'clock.

JACOB WHITMORE . I was passing this shop; the prisoner ran by me from the shop with this kettle; I saw him put it down, and stopped him.

JOHN LAKE . I took him in charge; he asked Mrs. Stewart to let him go, and he asked me also.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-122

615. HENRY STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 till, value 1s.; 17 shillings, and 2s. in copper monies , the property of Richard George Spice .

RICHARD GEORGE SPICE. I am a ham-dealer , and live in Drury-lane . On the 1st of February I was in the parlour behind the shop, and saw somebody come into the shop; I ran out, and the prisoner was in the act of drawing out the till; I seized him, with it in his hand, at the end of the counter - it had seventeen shillings and 2s. in copper in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to buy a saveloy, and saw a man taking the till; he rushed by me, and put it on the counter - I had not got it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-123

616. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 2 chimney-ornaments, value 5s. , the goods of James Green .

CHARLES ROBERTSON . I live with James Green, who keeps Willis coffee-house, Searle-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields . On the 10th of February, as a lady and gentleman came in, I saw the prisoner in the passage - he asked me for some name, and then, if this was the York hotel - I said No; I cast my eye into the sitting room, and missed two chimney-ornaments; he had got out - I went and collared him - he denied the charge; I took him in doors, and he took them out of his pocket.

CHARLES JONES . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing - a man came and put them on the gateway; I took them up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month , and delivered to his master.

Reference Number: t18270215-124

617. BENJAMIN RAY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 fixture (i.e.) a copper, value 6s., the goods of James Renney , and fixed to a certain out-house belonging to his dwelling-house .

MARY ANN RENNEY . I live with James Renney, at the Golden Heart public-house, Phoenix-street, Spitalfields . This copper was set in his wash-house; I saw it safe on the evening of the 20th of January, at five o'clock, when I locked the door - next morning it was gone.

ADAM SMITH . I am inspector of the watch. On the evening of the 10th of January I stopped the prisoner in White's-row, Spitalfields, with this copper on his head, doubled up so that he could hardly get his head out - he said it belonged to his master, and he was taking it to Quaker-street.

THOMAS ALMOND . I was with Smith; his account is correct.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-125

618. WILLIAM MERRITT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 8s. , the goods of George Evans .

SARAH EVANS . I am the wife of George Evans, a shoemaker ; we live in Whitechapel . On the 8th of February I saw the prisoner take these shoes, which hung outside the window; he buttoned them in his bosom; I followed, and took them from him.

CHARLES JEFFERYS . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

Prisoner. They lay on the pavement; I being in distress, took them.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-126

619. ROBERT HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 22th of January , 1 cake, value 4s. , the goods of George Daw .

GEORGE DAW. I am a confectioner , and live in Wimpole-street . I was in a room behind the shop, and heard a bell ring, which is attached to the door; I looked, and saw the prisoner pass the window, putting something into a handkerchief; I ran out, and caught him in Welbeck-street - he threw this cake out of his hand - it was picked up; I did not lose sight of it.

GEORGE CULL . I took him in charge; he said a man in a blue coat offered him a penny to go in, and take the cake, and gave him a handkerchief to fold it in.

Prisoner's Defence. A man sent me for it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-127

620. JOHN DENNERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 6 lbs. of pork, value 4s.,; 1 bag, value 1s.; 56 lbs. of potatoes, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 shawl, value 1s.; 4 lbs. of bread, value 7d., and 1 bundle of greens, value 6d. , the goods of William Hughes .

WILLIAM HUGHES. I am a watchman . On the 15th of January I went into a public-house with these articles all in a bag; I had just bought them - the prisoner stood by the fire; I put the bag down by my side - I waited there for Cullen - then went out to look for him, and saw him in the street; I put the bag at the door; and while I was talking to Cullen, the prisoner came out, took hold of it, and said "I'll give you a lift;" I said, "I can lift them myself;" Cullen went in; I just turned my head, and missed the prisoner and bag; I found the prisoner two hours after in another public-house, between two women - I asked what he had done with my bag; he said if I would go with him he would give it me - he had only put it down; we went with him to several places - but have not got any of the property.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the landlord turn you out of the house, bag and all? A. No; I was as sober as I am now. The street-keeper was sent for.

TIMOTHY CULLEN . I am a shoemaker. Hughes said he had been robbed - I saw the prisoner standing by the fire - he came to the door; I saw Hughes with this bag; I went in, and the prisoner ran off with the bag; we found him in a public-house; he said it was all humbug, and took us to a chandler's shop, and several places, and wanted to leave us - the street-keeper took him - Hughes was sober. - (Both these witnesses were evidently much inebriated when giving their evidence.)

GEORGE PRATT . I am a patrol, and took him. The prosecutor was drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-128

621. JOHN DAVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 12lbs. of horse-hair, value 12s. , the goods of Jeremiah Quin .

JEREMIAH QUIN. I am a coach-maker , and live in Red Lion-yard, Clerkenwell . My coach stood in the yard - the coachman called me up about six o'clock in the morning: I found the cushions cut, and the horse-hair gone from them - I found the prisoner at the watch-house with it.

JOHN PILGRIM . I am a watchman. On this morning I saw the prisoner go down Red Lion-yard with something in his hand. I took him soon after coming out of the yard with this sack full of hair - he said he had bought it, and was going to take it to Field-lane; I called Quin up, who found his coach lining cut to pieces.

THOMAS UNDERWOOD . I took the prisoner into custody, and found a knife and four duplicates on him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-129

622. ELIZABETH FORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 pair of stockings, value 10d., and 3 yards of lace, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Hopkins .

THOMAS WHITAKER . I am in the employ of John Hopkins, a haberdasher , who lives in Shoreditch . On the 12th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop with her daughter, who is a woman - I had seen her there before, to the best of my belief; I have since found that she resided at No. 6, Paradise-row, Bethnal-green; she asked to see some lace, and chose a piece, desiring me to cut three yards and a half at 9d., which I did; I rolled it up, and think I laid it on a box behind me, and put the rest into a box; she asked to see some half-stockings - I shewed her seven or eight pairs in a paper; she bought none, but said she had bought better for the money, and did not like them; while she was looking at them, I saw her take a pair with her left hand, and put them into her muff - she was sitting with the muff in her lap, below the counter; she did it while she was saying she would not take any - I then asked if I could show her any thing else - she said No, and took out her purse, and paid me 2s. 7d1/2. for the lace - I did it up in paper; I did not like to leave her, and called a young woman to give her change for a 6d.; I then said, "You will excuse me, Ma'am, but you have a pair of stockings in your muff;" she said she had not; I reached my hand across - she then took them out of her muff, and put them on the counter - I laid my hand on them, and she said, "I will give you 10d. for that pair of stockings if you like." I said "No, you shall not have them, Ma'am;" and expressed my surprise at a person of her appearance doing such a thing, and said I hoped she had got nothing else; she shook her muff with her left hand, her right hand was below it; I looked over, and saw a card of lace laying on the floor where she had been sitting; I then said I could not let her go - I sent for Mr. Hopkins down, who asked her to give her name and address, but she would not; an officer was sent for, who took her.

Q. Did you hear any thing fall when she shook her muff with her left hand? A. No; she shook the muff between herself and the counter.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you not now know that her husband is in a good situation? A. I have learnt so since. She did afterwards give me her card; I am almost certain I had seen her before; she put the stockings into her muff, not upon it; when she took her hand from her muff, I saw part of the stockings out of the muff.

Q. When you said she had got the stockings, was not her answer, "I think not?" A. She might say so; I had asked 1s. a pair for them - I did not offer them for 1s. after she produced them; she sat on a stool, the height of which is about a foot below the counter; her muff was not quite so high as the counter; I saw the lace in her hand at the time she chose the other piece - I think she put it on the counter again; I went to the office that evening; she was not admitted to bail till Monday.

COURT. Q. Was she a ready money customer? A. All our business is done for ready money. I did not know the lace was left out of the box; I put the box away from the counter, and did not see the lace afterwards; I put all into the box except one piece, which was laying under the daughter's muff - I took that piece, and then thought I had got all the lace (but I could not have put this piece in), and then shewed the stockings; I saw nothing in her right hand when she was shaking her muff.

JURY. Q. How could she shake her muff between herself and the counter? A. She moved her knees to do it, but still kept sitting; our counter is about two feet and a half wide; there were people on the other side of the shop; we have fourteen or fifteen servants.

JANE ELLIOTT . I am in Mr. Hopkins' employ. I stood at Whitaker's side, and heard him ask the prisoner for a pair of stockings from her muff; she said "I have not got them." I saw them in her muff - the end of them was rather out - she then offered 10d. for them; I saw her shake her muff - I cannot say which hand she shook it with; I did not see what fell from it - I have no doubt but she shook it with her right hand - her left hand was on the counter.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you say at the office that nothing could have fallen from the muff? A. I said I saw nothing fall.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I was fetched to the shop, and found the prisoner there - she gave me her address - I took her to the office - I found some money on her, and the lace which she had bought.

BERNARD JEFFRIES . I went with Armstrong.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

ALICE YOUNG FORMAN. I went with mother to purchase the lace which was for me, and a pair of socks for my brother; we have been at the prosecutor's shop several times; she sat on a high stool at the counter - I was by her side; several cards of lace were scattered about the counter - her arm was sometimes on the counter, and on her muff - if she had taken up the stockings, and put them into her muff, I must have seen it; I know nothing of the lace.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-130

623. BAPTIST THOMAS was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN MURRAY . I am a venetian blind-maker , and live in Piccadilly . The prisoner was in my service, and received money on my account; he paid me no money on

the 12th of December from Mr. Clough; I sent him for it that day - he was to account to me at the end of every week - he never paid me this account - he paid me other monies.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have a book there - what is it? A. It contains all his entries up to the 31st of December - he left me on the 20th of January; I did not ask him to render me any account before he left; I went to a public-house with him on the night I discharged him - here is an account of monies received, in another book, in my writing; I called over this book with his; here is an account of monies owing me on the 1st of January, and here is Clough's account put down by the prisoner's direction, as not being paid - he took this statement from my book of monies owing; (reads) "Mr. Clough, Manchester-square, 25 of September, 4l. 9s.;" the prisoner made out his account early in January.

JOSEPH TOTON . I am butler to Mr. Clough. On the 12th of December I paid the prisoner four sovereigns and nine shillings for Mr. Murray. Here is the receipt he gave me (read.)

COURT to MURRAY. Q. Show us a statement of your account with him on the Saturday after the 12th? A. Here it is; this amount is not down.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How came this leaf cut out of this book? A. It was not made out right, and I cut it out - this amount was not entered there.

COURT. Q. Is any amount entered to Clough on the 30th? No; nor on the 23d or 16th - he sometimes paid me monies on other days, but it was put down on Saturday.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid this money to him - that an I some others were put down on the last leaf, which is cut out; it is a malicious prosecution; it was usual to keep a little in hand for disbursements; his books will show that the accounts are so confused, no one can understand them - I told him I had other entries to make.

COURT to MURRAY. Q. Where was he when you called the account over? A. At my side; we settled every Saturday.

Prisoner. Q. Shew me any one account that is balanced? A. Here is one; I did not allow him to keep money back on Saturday - I at times had cash from him in the course of the week - he kept a small book, and the balance was struck every Saturday - he has paid money for me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-131

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Serjeant.

324. BAPTIST THOMAS was again indicted for embezzlement .

MR. QUIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MURRAY . The prisoner was in my employ, and received money on my account Mrs. Alice Jones owed me 2l. 12s. on the 22d of December; the prisoner never accounted to me for that sum, which he should have done on the Saturday; here is his book, and an account of monies owing to me - he should cross out those which are paid - Jones' name is not marked out - it is entered forward and as cash due on the 1st of January.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whose handwriting is that entry? A. Mine - we sometimes settled on other evenings besides Saturday - I heard of its being paid two or three days after he left me - the account of debts remaining due on the 1st of January was made about a fortnight after - we examined it together - that is the only balance we ever made; I collected from the book what appeared due, and he put it down.

Prisoner. Q. This is not the list that was made from the books, it is a copy? A. There was another - I wrote part of that myself - this is a copy of it.

ALICE JONES. I live at the British Hotel, Jermyn-street. On the 22d of December the prisoner brought a bill of 3l.; I paid him three sovereigns; here is his receipt; (read) Murray, after Christmas, brought me a bill of 2l. 12s.; which surprised me.

WILLIAM SOLEY . I was in Mr. Murray's employ - the prisoner settled his accounts every Saturday evening - I was generally present - he used on Saturdays to write on a paper what he had received in the week, for Murray to enter it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever receive money? A. Yes - I generally paid it on the day I received it; and he sometimes has asked the prisoner for 10l. or so, on account; he entered what he received in a memorandum book - I sometimes paid money for Murray, and gave him the balance.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no account kept of what I paid - he would not allow me to keep an account; so I was forced to keep one in a small book.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-132

326. BAPTIST THOMAS was again indicted for a like offence .

The prosecutor's books were in the same confused state as in the former cases.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-133

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

626. SAMUEL WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 40lbs. of beef, value 20s. , the goods of William Shorter .

CHARLOTTE SHORTER . I am the wife of William Shorter - we keep an eating-house in Queen-street . On the 13th of January, about nine o'clock, I saw a man take this beef from our passage; I ran out - my husband came in, and went in pursuit - it hung on the knocker.

DAVID MURPHY . I am a watchman. I caught the prisoner about a hundred yards from Shorter's house - he had got nothing.

WILLIAM SHORTER . I was coming home, and saw a man running with the beef - he dropped it; I cannot swear it was the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-134

627. HENRY BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 leg of mutton, value 3s. , the goods of John Claridge .

JOHN BALDOCK . On the 12th of January I was passing Claridge's shop, and saw the prisoner take this mutton; he ran towards me - I called Stop theif! he threw it down, and I collared him; I believe another man was with him.

ROBERT BLARNEY . I am a watchman. About nine

o'clock I heard a cry of Stop thief! and Baldock delivered the prisoner to me; a boy took the mutton up, and gave it to me; the prisoner said distress caused him to take it.

JOHN CLARIDGE . I am a butcher, and live in James-street, Mary-le-bone. This leg of mutton belonged to me - I was in my parlour when it was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-135

628. JOHN POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 cloak, value 8s. , the goods of Francis Cotton .

FRANCIS COTTON. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Shoreditch . I saw the prisoner in the road, running from my house, with this cloak, which had been hanging at least five yards within the shop - he dropped it, and I took him.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-136

629. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 purse, value 2d.; 1 crown-piece, 7 half-crowns, and 7 shillings, the property of Andrew Lesley , from his person .

ANDREW LESLEY. I am a smith . On Sunday morning, the 11th of February, between one and two o'clock, I was returning home, to Ratcliffe-highway; I had taken a glass with a friend, but was not the worse for it; I fell in with the prisoner, who asked me to go home with her; she took me to a house in Bluegate-fields , into a room down stairs - I staid there nearly a quarter of an hour - I then went to a public-house, and gave her something to drink, and in turning out of the public-house I missed my purse, containing a crown-piece, seven half-crowns, and seven shillings; it was in my pocket when I was in her room; I did not undress - I had nothing to do with her whatever; I went home with her again, to look for the purse, but could not find it - I then gave charge of her, and saw the watchman find the purse and money behind the stove in her room - I had not put it there; no other person had been in the room - I was sober.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a watchman. Lesley gave the prisoner into my charge - he was not drunk, but quite sensible; she asked me first if I would allow her to lock her door - I said, certainly. I then took her to the watch-house - the prosecutor and I then went to her room; I got the key from her, and found the purse behind the stove, which was not fixed.

STEPHEN SPENCER . I am constable of the night. I went into the room, and found this purse, containing a crown-piece, two half-crowns, and 4s. 6d.

A. LESLEY. This is my purse - there is 13s. deficient.

Prisoner's Defence. He took all his clothes off, and his money fell out of his pocket - I took up some, and gave to him; another young woman came in - I went out for ten minutes, and when I returned he said he had lost his purse, and gave charge of me.

A. LESLEY. I have known her three months; no other woman was there; I took off none of my clothes - I left the room before she locked the door - she could then have taken the money out of the purse.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270215-137

630. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 21/2d. in copper monies, the monies of William Coleman , from his person .

WILLIAM COLEMAN. I am a sailor . On the 12th of February I slept at the Refuge for the Houseless, at Wapping ; the prisoner slept next to me. I had two shillings, a sixpence, and 21/2d. in my right-hand waistcoat pocket - it was safe when I went to sleep; I awoke between twelve and one o'clock, and it was gone - I spoke to the prisoner about it - I thought he had it, because he had asked me to lend him 1d. before he went to sleep; he denied having it, but the officer came in and found it on him.

JOSEPH ALLEN . I am the officer of that establishment. I heard Coleman say he had lost his money; I took the prisoner into the next room, and asked if he had any money about him - he said not a farthing; he was searched, and 2s. 81/2d. was found in his pockets; he was taken to the watch-house, and there he said he had found it among the straw.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-138

631. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Robert Mann Blackett Botcherby , from his person .

ROBERT MANN BLACKETT BOTCHERBY, ESQ. I am a member of St. John's College, Cambridge . On the 25th of January, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, I was near Museum-street, Bloomsbury , and felt something at my pocket - I turned round, and missed my handkerchief, which I had used just before; I charged the prisoner(who was behind me) with it - he denied it, but I took it out of his breast.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a constable, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270215-139

632. SAMUEL WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 5 hare-skins, value 3s. , the goods of Judah Joseph and Joseph Joseph Joseph .

JUDAH JOSEPH. I am in partnership with Joseph Joseph Joseph - we are furriers . The prisoner occasionally worked for us; as he was going out I suspected him, as his hat hung over his head - I followed him, took it off, and three skins were in it; I gave him in charge - he got away, but was secured, and two more were found in his trousers; he said, at the watch-house, that we had not paid him, and he was determined to pay himself; we had lent him 2l. to go into business, and he was to work it out.

JOHN MORBON . I am a watchman, and took him in charge - two skins were found in his breeches; he said he was in distress.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-140

633. WALTER TITE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 cloak, value 2l. , the goods of Henry Henrichson .

HENRY HENRICHSON. I am clerk to a sugar-refiner. On the 23d of January, I lost a cloak out of the warehouse- a pane of glass was broken in the window, to admit a boy through, between the Sunday and Monday morning.

MARY TAMER BERRY . I keep a marine-store shop. - The prisoner offered me a cloak for sale - I think it was on the 29th of January, not on the 23d; I said I did not understand its value, but I would take it to Mr. Marshall, who lives near me, to see what it was worth - he was not at home, but his wife took it in. The cloak remained at Marshall's, and the prisoner was to call again.

ELIZABETH MARSHALL . I live next door to Mrs. Berry, and my husband is a broker; Berry brought a cloak to our house between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, for my husband to value it - it remained there.

ROBERT MARSHALL . I am Elizabeth Marshall's husband. I have had the cloak in my possession ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday morning I met a chap, who asked me to take it for him; I went to this shop, and left it - I did not go again for the money.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-141

634. MICHAEL MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 deal board, value 5s. , the goods of James Hendrey .

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer, stationed in St. Martin's-lane. On the 2d of February I met the prisoner with a deal plank; I asked where he was going with it; I had seen him watching about for some time - he said he was going to Chandos-street; I said, "I will go with you and see the building;" he then said, "You may carry the plank yourself."

WILLIAM LOFT . I am foreman to James Hendrey, who is a builder , and lives in Vauxhall-road. This board is my master's property. On the 2d instant it was at a building at the corner of Cranbourne-street .

THOMAS PENTONE . I worked for the prosecutor at the new building, on the 2d instant; I used this plank for three weeks, daily; it was down in the back kitchen - it was left there when I left off work. The prisoner had no business with it. GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-142

635. ELIZABETH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 eye-glass, value 20s., the goods of John William Jarrett ; and 1 shift, value 6s. , the goods of Teresa Ann Jarrett .

JOHN WILLIAM JARRETT. I live in Rosoman-street, Clerkenwell, and am an engraver . The prisoner was employed as our char-woman ; we occasionally left the house in her care - I missed an eye-glass in May; she continued to work for us till the 16th of January, when she was taken.

WILLIAM MOTE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Warner-street. I have an eye-glass, pawned on the 12th of June, and a shift on the 1st of January, both by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270215-143

636. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 milk-pail, value 10s. , the goods of Rees Price .

JAMES TERRY . I am a patrol. On the 2d of February I was in Peter's-lane, St. John-street, and heard somebody say to the prisoner, "I don't think it is your own;" I turned round, and saw her with this milk-pail in her hand- I went up to her, and asked where she got it; she said a woman gave it to her, for 2s. which she owed her; she could not tell where the woman lived.

CATHERINE PRICE . I am the wife of Rees Price, a milkman . This pail was taken out of our yard, in Crown-court, Portpool-lane ; I washed it at five o'clock on the 2d of February.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-144

637. GEORGE SPICER and WILLIAM SPICER were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 6 candlesticks, value 10s. , the goods of John Packwood .

HANNAH WILLIS . I live in Playhouse-yard, St. Luke's, and keep a sale-shop. On the 17th of January the prisoner, William Spicer, brought me these candlesticks for sale - I asked how he came by them; he said "Never mind, it is all right" - he said his name was William Spicer, of No. 7, Grub-street, which I put down; he wanted 4s. for them - I told him to come again in half an hour, and if it was all right I would give him that - I sent for an officer, who went to Grub-street; the two prisoners ran into the shop some time after, and George put his hand over the wooden guard and took hold of five of them - I caught hold of him as he was going out, and held him - the officer came and took them both.

SAMUEL WATTS . I am warehouseman to Mr. Packwood, of Wood-street, Cheapside. On the evening of the 16th of January, about six o'clock, I heard a noise at the window - I ran out - the window was broken, and this property was gone - I called on Willis and got information - I had not seen the prisoners.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer, and took them.

WILLIAM SPICER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

GEORGE SPICER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-145

638. ELEANOR ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 1s. 5d. , the goods of Richard Lane .

JOHN LANE . I am a watchman; my son Richard keeps a cheesemonger's shop , in St. Giles . About a quarter past nine o'clock, on the 5th of February, I went into his shop, and saw the prisoner with this bacon under her shawl, concealed - she was having another piece weighed - I secured her, and she pulled it from under her shawl, fell on her knees, and begged pardon - it was under her arm, under her shawl.

RICHARD LANE . I was serving in the shop, making out a bill, and saw her produce the bacon from under her arm - she fell on her knees.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I was serving another customer - the prisoner came in and asked me the price of a piece of bacon; she brought it in to be weighed; Lane came in, and she produced this from under her shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. The night constable did not lock me up, till they said I had stolen some before.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-146

639. JAMES RUMBALL and MICHAEL COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 200 penny pieces, and 320 halfpence , the monies of Margaret Black , widow .

WILLIAM MORGAN , JUN. I and my father, on the 7th of February, were watching at Mrs. Black's shop, in Cow-cross-street, Smithfield - I saw the prisoner and two others walking and talking together for about ten minutes; Rumball then went into the shop, the others were by the window; he came out, and then Collins went in - I could see nobody in the shop - I saw Collins knock on the counter two or three times; I then saw him go round the counter and take something off the shelf, but cannot say what; I then called my father; I ran and secured Collins as he came out of the shop, with six papers of copper; Rumball ran off, but was taken soon after; the others two got away, but I afterward saw one playing on Clerkenwell-green, and had him taken - he is in the House of Correction.

HENRY MORGAN . I was opposite this house looking out of the up-stairs window, and saw four boys in company - I saw Collins go in and take the halfpence from the shelf.

WILLIAM MORGAN , SEN. My son called me; I seized Collins as he came out at the door.

JOHN FURBES . I am street-keeper. I saw Rumball running, and hearing an alarm, I took him back to the house, where I took Collins with the money.

MARGARET BLACK . On the 7th of February I was at home. I heard an alarm, and went into the shop; the prisoners were brought in, with these papers of copper, which had been behind my counter; I had tied them up.

RUMBALL - GUILTY . Aged 14.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-147

640. GEORGE PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 jar, value 3d., and 9 lbs. of honey, value 6s. , the goods of George Okey Pater and John James Pater .

GEORGE OKEY PATER. I am in partnership with John James Pater; we are grocers , and live in St. Andrew's, Holborn . About six o'clock in the evening of the 30th of January, the prisoner came into the shop - I saw him take a pot of honey from the window, over the guard - I ran, and secured him a few doors off with it; he threw it down, and struck me violently in the face.

ANDREW LLOYD . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. He came and took hold of me - I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270215-148

641. RICHARD MORRISEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 2 loaves of bread, value 18d. , the goods of John Klos .

JOHN PETER KLOSS . I am nephew of John Klos, a baker , of Great Marlborough-street. I was out with his bread on the 1st of February; I left my basket at Mr. Ponsonby's, St. James'-square , while I went into the kitchen; when I came up I found the prisoner in custody, with two loaves.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I was passing the end of George-street, and saw the prisoner go to the basket, and take two loaves; he ran off - I secured him about fifty yards off with them.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-149

642. SAMUEL LANGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 saw, value 24s. , the goods of David Thomas .

DAVID THOMAS. I am a journeyman sawyer . On the 18th of January, the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to my room in Coleman-court, Bunhill-row. I had been out of work some weeks; he said he wanted a mate, with a good saw, to go with him to a four months job - I asked about the job; he said they were good three-feet logs - I said I had no saw that would cut them, but could borrow one - I gave him money to get a pint of beer, while I had my breakfast, and got the saw; we then went on to Bow-church; he went into a public-house there, where he said he was known, and said "Leave the saw here, and step with me;" he took me down a turning, and told me to wait while he went into a house and got his things - I waited some time - he did not return - I went down the court, and found it lead into the street again; I ran to the public-house for the saw; they said the man who left it had taken it away; I went to Old Ford, where he said the job was; but there was no job there; he was taken a few days after.

JAMES ALCOCK . I am a sawyer. The prisoner came to me at the Anchor and Hope public-house, Mill-wall, on the 18th of January, and said he had got a saw to sell - I asked how he got it; he said his brother (who had three of that size) gave it him to sell - he asked 15s.; I gave him 4s., and was to give him the rest when I had got it.

CHARLES HUDSON . I was informed of the robbery, and took the prisoner at Bow a few days afterwards.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-150

643. RICHARD KEOSELL and THOMAS JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 jar, value 1s., and 15 lbs. of honey, value 16s. , the goods of William Liddell ; and ROBERT HIGGS was indicted for feloniusly receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

HENRY LIDDELL . I live with my brother William, a chemist , in Chichester-place, Battle-bridge . On the 15th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went out, and on returning, I missed four jars of honey (three large and one small one) - next day two boys came to say some honey had been offered in Charlton-street; next evening I was at tea, and heard somebody crawling into the shop, and found Keosell with a small pot of honey under his coat; I seized him and gave him in charge - he had taken it off the counter.

DANIEL FOX . I am fourteen years old, and live with my father in Charlton-street. On the 15th of January, at seven o'clock in the evening, I was going home along

Chichester-place; I saw Keosell and Jones, with another lad named Hobbs, opposite Liddell's shop - Keosell and Jones crossed over; Jones stood by the turnpike; Keosell went into the shop - Hobbs looked into the window; Keosell brought out a large jar in about two minutes, which he gave to Hobbs, who took it to the turnpike, and gaveit to Jones - I only saw one jar - I saw nothing more - I am certain of them - I followed them into Weir's-passage - Keosell and Hobbs went into a house on the left-hand there, where they sell pigeons - Jones stopped outside; I did not wait till they came out - Jones had given the pot to Hobbs; next evening I was playing in Charlton-street, and told some boys of it; we went and told Mr. Liddell.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. Did you not mention the name of Patterson before the Magistrate? A. No; I said I saw them take it to a shop next night(Tuesday) - I had none of the honey - one Mears keeps the pigeon shop in Weir's-passage - I said nothing about it that night - the name of Patterson was on the shop, in Charlton-street - I saw the prisoners there next night, and saw Higgs take it into that shop - I was never in Mears' shop.

COURT. Q. What happened on Tuesday night? A. I saw Jones and Higgs come into Charlton-street - Higgs went into Patterson's shop and sold it for 3s. 6d. - some other boys were with them - I heard a whistle when he came out of Patterson's, and then they all ran off together.

GEORGE ROOKER . I am a butcher. I was playing with Fox on Tuesday - I saw Higgs and some other boys in Charlton-street - Higgs went into Patterson's shop, and Jones, one Harris, and some others, stood outside; when Higgs came out, he whistled. and all ran up the street together.

GEORGE MEARS. I live with my father, in Weir's-passage. Hobbs and Keosell brought a jar of honey into the shop on Monday evening, and asked if I would have a bit - they gave me some - they then said would I let them leave it - I said, No, as my father was out, and, he would blow me up - they said they would - they put it down, and ran away - Hobbs came alone about eight o'clock, and fetched it away.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of a jar was it? A. A dark one, with white letters on it - I did not think it was stolen; but I thought my father would think so.

ELIZABETH PATTERSON . I am the wife of James Patterson , of Charlton-street, a grocer. Higgs came in, on Tuesday evening, the 16th, and offered a jar of honey for sale - I had seen him before - he dealt in lozenges and other things - I bought it of him for 3s. 6d. - he said there were from 8 lbs. to 10 lbs., and promised to call again, but did not - I gave the jar to the constable.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you first tell him you would be glad to receive articles of him? A. I said I would buy lozenges of him - I can buy white honey at 9d. per lb. - this is not a good colour.

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner.(Jar produced and sworn to.)

Higgs put in a written defence, stating that he had met Harris in Charlton-street, who had given him the honey to sell, and promised him 1s. for his trouble.

KEOSELL - GUILTY . Aged 11.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 13.

HIGGS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

There was another indictment against Keosell.

Reference Number: t18270215-151

644. FRANCIS HAYS and RICHARD GADD were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 2 gowns, value 7s. , the goods of Daniel Folkard .

WILLIAM LATHAM . I am a headborough. On the 6th of February I saw the prisoners and two others, in Pitfield-street, at twenty minutes to eight o'clock in the evening; the prisoners made a stop - I went up, and asked Gadd what he had got under his jacket - I saw it was a gown - he said that Hays gave it him - I took them to the watch-house, and there Gadd said his mother sent him to pawn it - I could not find the owner - they were discharged and retaken.

THOMAS FLOOD . I live with Mr. Folkard, of Providence-row - this gown was stolen, with another, from the front of the shop - I know nothing of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-152

645. MARY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 pelisse, value 8s. , the goods of Jacob Russell .

JOSEPH BUCK . I am a headborough. On Monday, the 29th of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Norton-falgate with this pelisse under her whittle - I watched her a little way, and saw her take an umbrella - I then secured her.

WILLIAM BUDD . I am shopman to Jacob Russell, a pawnbroker of Shoreditch. This pelisse was stolen from inside our shop - it was safe on Monday, and I missed, it on Tuesday.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Petticoat-lane about half-past four o'clock on Monday.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-153

646. HENRY GAYWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 7s. , the goods of William Jackman .

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am a labourer. I was passing Jackman's shop about six o'clock on the 5th of February; the prisoner and another were looking about; I saw the prisoner put his hand into the shop, and take these boots; he let one fall from under his arm - I secured him about two hundred yards off with the property.

WILLIAM JACKMAN. I am a shoemaker , and live at the corner of Denmark-street, St. Giles - these boots are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-154

647. JAMES FRESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 6 rugs, value 6l. , the goods of James Leigh .

JAMES LEIGH. I keep a carpet-warehouse in Whitechapel-road. Gilchrist is my servant, and had six rugs to take to Leadenhall-street and Fenchurch-street on the 3d of January.

ROBERT GILCHRIST . I had five rugs in one parcel, and

six in another. I felt them heavy, and put them down by a fish-stall by Whitechapel-church - I asked the fishmonger to help me to carry them - he said he would find me a man - the prisoner came up and said, "Shall I carry one?" which he did - I walked rather before him - he came up and said, "There are a number of coaches passing;" I turned round in a minute, and he was gone - I have never seen the rugs since, and am quite sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you say you were sure of him at the office? A. Yes.

GEORGE LANGLEY . I am a fishmonger. Gilchrist asked me to help him - the prisoner offered to carry one load - I helped it on his shoulder - I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you swear to him at the office? A. No; I did not like to swear positively, but I felt confident he was the man.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I apprehended him on the 17th of January, and found on him two gilt farthings, a brass ring, a bad shilling, and a needle-case, with a needle in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was ill at home with the tooth-ache all that day.

JOHN DAWS . I am a porter, and live at the Weaver's Arms public-house, Baker-row. On Wednesday, the 3d of January, the prisoner was there from eleven to seven o'clock, when I went to bed - he never left the house.

Q. Does he lodge in the same room? A. No; he had the tooth-ache and bowel complaint; we were talking together; I did not attend before the Magistrate - I cannot speak to any other day, but I was blooded that day - we were in the tap room.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-155

648. JANE EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 7 lbs. of beef, value 3s. , the goods of John Jenner .

JOHN JENNER. I am a butcher , and live in Lisson-street . On the 5th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I lost this beef - I had not seen the prisoner in the shop.

WILLIAM MAYNARD . I am a baker, and live in Lisson-street. On Sunday morning, the 6th of February, about a quarter-past ten o'clock, this beef was brought to me to bake - I gave the ticket No. 1, for it - the prisoner came for it - the officer was there, and took her - I cannot say that she brought it.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I was at Maynard's, and told him not to bake the beef - the prisoner came with the ticket No. 1, in her hand - she said it was given to her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-156

649. DANIEL CHING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 weighing-machine, value 25s. , the goods of William Ellis .

SAMUEL CARGER . I am a watchman. On the 11th of January, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Laystall-street, Holborn, which is about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Ellis', and saw the prisoner with this weighing-machine in an apron under his arm - I secured him - he said nothing.

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I was with Carger.

WILLIAM ELLIS. I live in Great Warner-street . This machine belongs to me - I missed it off my counter on the 11th of January, about five minutes to seven o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-157

650. GEORGE BLACKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 deal-box, value 7s. , the goods of Edward Elliott .

EDWARD PENTON . I am a butcher. On the 6th of February, about half-past three o'clock, I saw Elliott's cart standing oppositite my master's door, in Bishopsgate-street without - it was loaded with boxes - I saw the prisoner come out of an alley, go to the tail of the cart, take one box, and walk off with it - the carter was in the next shop - I informed him, and the prisoner was taken in ten minutes.

EDWARD ELLIOTT. I am a carman , and was answerable for what was in this cart. I went into a shop to leave a box - Penton alarmed me - I ran down Union-street, and saw the prisoner with this box on his shoulder - I stopped him with it.

HENRY BURNARD . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it from the cart; a man on horseback asked me to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-158

651. HENRY BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 5 lbs. of ham, value 10s. , the goods of John King .

ANN KING . My husband, John King, keeps a cheesemonger's shop , in Wellington-street, Goswell-street . On the 30th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I just turned my back to go into the parlour - the prisoner came in, and took this ham off the window - I pursued, and he dropped it at my feet, four doors off - he was taken without getting out of my sight.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Your back was turned? A. I was just going into the parlour; I had seen him before - the window was shut. My husband has left me this eighteen months.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a carpenter. I saw the prisoner take the ham, and come out with it - another man stopped him - I took him to the watch-house - I am certain of him.

THOMAS WALKER . I took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-159

652. DENNIS BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 56lbs. of iron, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Stoddart .

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am a labourer. On the 12th of January, I was in Crown-street, and saw the prisoner with a quantity of iron - I followed him into King-street, to a shop - he went in at the private door, to the back premises, and put the iron into the scale - I asked how he got it - he said his master gave it him to get beer for the men - that his master was Mr. Wantin, of the New-road, which I found was false.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure he did not say "Pontin?" A. No, it was Wantin; Mr. Pontin lives in John-street.

SAMUEL STODDART. I live in John-street. I employed the prisoner and other men to take down some buildings; this iron is mine; I have a foreman named Pontin.

GUILTY Aged 37.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-160

653. EDWARD ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 11 lbs. of bacon, value 6s. , the goods of John King .

ANN KING . I am wife of John King - we live in Wellington-street . On the 9th of February I was in the back room - my child said some bacon was taken - I ran out, and pursued the prisoner, whom I saw drop the bacon.

JOHN HOUSE . I met the prisoner with the bacon under his arm - he dropped it, and I saw him taken.

EDWARD BROWN . I saw him with this bacon.

The prisoner appeared in distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-161

654. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Jones , from his person .

WILLIAM JONES. On the 25th of January I was coming from Drury-lane Theatre , and about ten yards from the portico I felt a slight pull; I turned, and found my handkerchief was gone - I saw the prisoner near me - the officer had him in charge.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was outside the theatre - I saw the prisoner with a lad, following Mr. Jones and a lady from the box door; the lad took the handkerchief, and gave it to the prisoner, who was putting it into his pocket, when I seized him, and took it from him - I had heard him talking to his companion.

Prisoner. It was thrown on my arms.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-162

655. ELIZABETH ADDISON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 5 shirts, value 28s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 8s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 8s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 3 shillings, and 9 sixpences, the property of Thomas Bardwell , from his person .

THOMAS BARDWELL. I am a bricklayer . I came from Suffolk, and was in town on Friday the 9th of January; I fell in with the prisoner about four o'clock in the afternoon, nearly opposite to Whitechapel-church - I never saw her before - she said she thought she knew me; I said no; she asked me to give her a glass of gin - I gave her and a woman, who was with her, some - I drank about half of a glass - the prisoner then asked me home with her, as she had something particular to say to me - she took me to an up - stairs room in Wentworth-street - the other woman came in in about ten minutes; the door was left open; I had not then lost any thing; I had the articles stated in the indictment in a bundle, and a pocket-book, with 1l. 9s, 6d. in it, in my breeches pocket - when the other woman came in the prisoner went away, put on another dress, and came in in a quarter of an hour, with a candle- we had no light before - the other women then went away; the prisoner sat down - I said I must be going; I immediately felt her hand in my left-hand breeches pocket, where my pocket-book was; she drew it out - I caught at her arm to get it; she put it into her left hand - there was a scuffle - the other woman came in - the prisoner threw the book to her, and she ran away with it - I was knocked down - the prisoner put out the light, and got away - I do not know who took the bundle, but it was there when I got up to go. I staid in the house some time - a strange woman came in - I told her - she lighted a candle, and we found the pocket-book in an hour, but no bundle; I went and stood in the street - I saw two boys, and asked them the name of the street - I then found a watchman, and we found the prisoner that night; I have found none of my property - I was quite sober - I had walked to town - I am sure she is the woman.

THOMAS SMITH . I am beadle of Whitechapel. I went with the prosecutor and took the prisoner at the Three Compasses, Brick-lane, in company with about fourteen other women and men; he described her person before - she did not deny it - but several girls said she had been there a long time - I took her to the watch-house, and she gave up 10s. 31/2d.; I went to search her, and a piece of paper fell from her, which she picked up, and swallowed. Bardwell described the other woman, but I have not seen her since.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270215-163

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

656. JOHN DAY was indicted for stealing. on the 31st of January , 2 loaves of bread, value 18d. , the goods of John Closs .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-164

657. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 book, value 2s. , the goods of William Houghton .

WILLIAM HOUGHTON. I live in Moor-street, Soho , and am a bookseller - I was in the parlour - an officer brought this book in, which was safe a few hours before.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was in Moor-street, watching the prisoner; I saw him go to this shop window, and take a placard down - I went up to him, and he dropped this book; I took him back with it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-165

658. CHARLES CALLAGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of George Shea .

SARAH SHEA . I am the wife of George Shea, a tailor , who lives in Monmouth-street . This coat was pinned outside our place - I know it by a tear in it.

THOMAS TAULE . I am a shoemaker. On the evening of the 25th of January, I saw the prisoner and another lurking about Shea's cellar - they made several attempts at this coat; at last the other got it down, and gave it to the prisoner - I ran and took him with it under his arm - he kicked and scratched me; the other got away; several persons tried to get him from me.

DANIEL REARDON . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-166

659. JOHN DURWART was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 printed book, value 2s. , the goods of John Wilton and William Wilton .

JOHN WILTON . I am a bookseller , in partnership with my son William - we live in High-Holborn ; I was returning home on the 3d of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, and when within ten yards of my own house, I saw the prisoner take this book, and put it under his coat - I took him, and carried him back to the shop-it stood just outside my window.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270215-167

660. JOHN EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 23 sacks, value 40s. , the goods of George Farr .

JAMES WHITTICKS . I am servant to George Farr, a miller , at Hatfield. On the morning of the 12th of February I left twenty-three sacks in his waggon, near the Windmill public-house, Smithfield ; I returned in ten minutes, and they were gone - the prisoner had assisted that morning to take some sheep out of the waggon.

HENRY RICHARDSON . About a quarter past seven o'clock on this morning I saw the prisoner unhooking the back of Farr's waggon; he took out a bag of sacks, and went towards Smithfield - I told Whitticks.

JOHN FORBES . I am street-keeper - I took the prisoner last Monday, from Richardson's description.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I have the sacks, which I got from Mr. White.

THOMAS WHITE . The prisoner came to my house, in Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross, between eight and nine o'clock last Monday morning, and showed me a sample sackseeing a name on it, I said, "I think you have stolen them" - he said "What is that to you?" I sent him about his business - in the afternoon I heard he was in custody, and found these twenty-three sacks in my loft; they are the same as the sample he produced, but how they got there I cannot say.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-168

661. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 dressing-case, value 1s., and 2 books, value 2s. , the goods of John Bennett .

JOHN BENNETT. I lodge on the ground floor in Old Pye-street, Westminster ; the prisoner lodged in the house for twelve months, and then, being poor, I let him sleep in my room for a week - on the 8th of January, while I was out, I lost these things - I had left him in the room with his sister at eleven o'clock - I came home about five, and he was gone also; I found him on the 13th, and he said he had sold them - here is the case.

THOMAS GRANT . I live in Lawrence-street. I bought this dressing-case for 18d., about the 8th of January, but do not know who of.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I received him in charge. He said he sold the dressing-case to Grout, and that he had eat nothing all day. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-169

662. ROBERT HINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 1 watch, value 30s., and 1 key, value 2d. , the goods of Joseph Moore .

SARAH MOORE . I am wife of Joseph Moore; we live in Gee-street, Goswell-street - this watch hung in the parlour behind the shop - two boys came in, and asked if I sold sugar-candy; I said No; the prisoner came in directly, and said he wanted some pigeon traps; I got some - he did not like them - the others then came in again - I went to fetch more traps, and saw him and one of the others coming from my parlour; I looked, and missed the watch - the others ran off - the prisoner remained, but nothing was found on him; I did not see him in the parlour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-170

663. CHARLES KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 ham, value 10s. , the goods of Daniel Gunston .

JAMES HARVEY . I am servant to Daniel Gulston, cheesemonger , St. John-street-road . On the 1st of February I saw the prisoner come into the shop about three feet, take this ham, and run off; 1 pursued, and took him - he threw it down.

THOMAS TAPNER . I saw him take the ham - I afterwards picked it up.

THOMAS GARNER . I took him in charge. His father is a respectable man.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-171

664. THOMAS LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 fixture, (i. e.) a copper, value 15s., the goods of William Jeffray . and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN JEFFRAY . I am the son of William Jeffray; we live at Hackney . On the 3d of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, a copper was missing from the wash-house, which is attached to the dwelling-house - it was safe the night before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RACHAEL JEFFRAY . The prisoner came to look at our house, which was to let; he looked at the copper, sounded it, and said it was a nice one - this was three weeks before.

ELIZABETH SHEARMAN . I am a broker, and live in Bethnal-green-road. About a quarter-past ten o'clock on the 3d of February, the prisoner brought this copper to sell, saying his wife was ill, and he was in distress; I bought it in the evening.

MARY ANN SHEARMAN . I was present when the prisoner sold the copper to my mother, for 8s. 81/2d. Fitzpatrick took away the same.

JAMES FITZPATRICK . I am an officer, and have the copper.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had found the copper in a field.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-172

665. FREDERICK MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 8lbs. of beef, value 5s. , the goods of Nicholas Harwood .

ANN HARWOOD . I am the wife of Nicholas Harwood, a butcher - we live in Peter-street, Westminster. I saw the prisoner take this beef from the board, and give it to another person - they walked away; I went and collared the prisoner - the other ran away with it.

ELLEN CLARKE . I saw the prisoner take the beef, and give it to the other.

WILLIAM SCHOFIELD . I am an officer, and took him in charge; he said he did not know the man he gave it to.

Prisoner. I saw the other man take it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-173

666. JOHN MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 3 sheets, value 20s.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 6 napkins, value 6d.; 3 stockings, value 6d., and 3 shifts, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Wiley .

ELIZABETH WILEY . I am the wife of Samuel Wiley; we live in Crown-street, St. Pancras - I am a laundress. These articles I had to wash - they were safe at twenty minutes past six o'clock, in my wash-house. I went into my kitchen, and on returning they were gone.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a watchman. On the 11th of January, in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of King's-mews, with a bundle under his arm; I received information of another robbery, and went up to him; he ran across the road, and threw the bundle down, for me to fall over it, but I picked it up, and sprang my rattle; he turned a corner - I lost sight of him; Jennings followed, and took him. I believe him to be the man, by his dress.

GEORGE JAMES JENNINGS . I followed the prisoner into Portpool-lane, and took him; he said, "I picked up the bundle in Gray's-inn-lane;" he gave me his proper address, and I find he bears a good character.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I was coming down Elm-street, and picked up the bundle - in about ten minutes I heard a cry of Stop thief! and threw it down, not knowing the contents.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-174

667. WILLIAM REASON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 bedstead, value 6s.; 1 pickaxe, value 3s.; 1 shovel, value 1s. 6d., and 2 bird-cages, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Hunt .

RICHARD HUNT. I live at No. 43, Duck-lane, Westminster - these things were at No. 37, Duck-lane , which is my house; I missed them at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, from the first floor room.

ANN FORD . I found a little cart in the prisoner's sister's room, and gave it to Hunt - it had been stolen with these things.

JOHN DEMSNEY . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in charge; he acknowledged that the cart was in his room, but said he did not bring it there.

ELIZABETH HAWKINS . I keep a broker's-shop. The prisoner came with a young woman on the 31st of January, and sold me a bird-cage and shovel, which I gave up to Hunt - I cannot tell which received the money, but he carried the things; they sold me another bird-cage a few minutes before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I saw the prisoner and a girl come to my mother's - I do not know which took the money.

R. HUNT. This cart was with the other property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-175

668. DANIEL RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of John Vivan , the younger.

JOHN VIVAN, JUN. I live at Pancras; this coat was in the office of the clerk at the Imperial gas-works, Fulham , at four o'clock, and at half-past four it was missing; the office door had been broken open.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it not a kind of shed? A. It is a small office built in the yard; the prisoner had worked there about eighteen months - I saw the door locked.

WILLIAM NEWDLE . I am clerk of the works. I left the office about four o'clock, and locked the door; in three-quarters of an hour I returned, found the door broken open, and the coat gone - the prisoner was missing.

FREDERICK KING . I am apprentice to Mr. Debenham, a pawnbroker. On the 23d of January the prisoner, I believe, pawned this coat, between four and five o'clock - I gave him a duplicate; our shop is a mile and a half from these gas-works.

RICHARD COOPER . I received information of this robbery, and left word for the watchmen to take the prisoner if they saw him.

ROBERT TEASDALE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the morning of the 24th; I found the duplicate of the coat on him and 4d. - he was very tipsy.

Cross-examined. Q. Is he married? A. Yes, and has three children.

F. KING. This is the duplicate I gave him - he was sober then.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-176

669. WILLIAM KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 pair of scales, value 6s., and 1 powder-machine, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Hyatt .

SAMUEL HYATT. I live in Store-street, Bedford-square , and am a chemist . On the 21st of January, at four o'clock, these things were safe in the shop - I missed them about half-past seven; Ward, my lad, brought them into the shop.

JASPER PARROTT . I am a chemist, and live in High-street, Mary-le-bone. On Sunday, the 21st of January, about seven o'clock, I was in Store-street, and saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Hyatt's, with a pair of scales partly concealed under his arm - I asked what he had there; he threw them into the middle of the road, and ran off - I followed, and took him thirty yards off, and took him into the shop.

JOHN WARD . I am errand-boy to Mr. Hyatt. I went out, and found these scales in the road - I brought them in, then went out again, and found the powder-machine about the same spot.

JAMES CUMMIN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner - he said he hoped Mr. Hyatt would forgive him, as it was his first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-177

670. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 watch, value 6l. , the goods of Henry Olley .

HENRY OLLEY. On the 20th of January I lost my

watch from the brig Beccles, which laid off Union stairs, Wapping - it was safe in my chest, which I locked, and put the key among the bed-clothes. The prisoner was a passenger in the vessel - on the evening of the 20th I got leave to go ashore, and on going to my chest I missed it; I know nothing more. The other witnesses are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-178

671. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 writing-desk, value 10s.; 2 teaspoons, value 10s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 1 caddy ladle, value 5s., and 57 sovereigns, the property of William Henry Mitchell , in the dwelling-house of John Cuthbert .

WILLIAM HENRY MITCHELL. I am a carpenter , and live at Knightsbridge ; I lodge at John Cuthbert's. I went out with my wife about half-past ten o'clock on Tuesday morning, the 23d of January - I locked my room door, and had the key in my pocket - I left there a writing-desk, with fifty-seven sovereigns, and the other articles stated in the indictment in it - we returned about three o'clock in the afternoon, and found the door single locked- I had double locked it - I did not miss the desk till about eight the next morning, when I wanted a sovereign out of it; I found the spoons in pawn, but nothing else - the prisoner is a distant relation of mine; he called to see me on Monday, the 22d, but I was out; I had seen him on the Saturday, and told him I had some relations coming, and he could not stop there; he has seen money in my desk; I do not know where he lived.

ROBERT BLACKBURN . I am shopman to Mr. Wood, pawnbroker, Clerkenwell. I have two tea-spoons and a pair of sugar-tongs, pawned on the 23d of January, by the prisoner, between one and two o'clock, in the name of William Mitchell, 28, Swan-alley; here is the duplicate which I gave him; I am certain of him.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am a Bow-street patrol. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 27th of January - the house is in St. Margaret, Westminster.

WILLIAM GEE . I am a fishmonger, and live in Peter's-lane. I met the prisoner at Islington on Tuesday, the 23d, by the turnpike; he stopped me, and said, "Thank God I have got my business settled;" he had told me, about a fortnight before, that his cousins were going to get him some money which had been left him; he said he had got it, and gave me something to drink - he said, "Will you take care of this for me?" and gave me forty sovereigns; this was about half-past two o'clock - I met him the next morning, and he said, "If you will go and buy me some things, instead of going to work, I will give you 5s. for your trouble;" we had something to drink - I found myself rather giddy, and went to the Artichoke public-house, and sat down - I was there beat and cut about, and lost all his money, and all my own - I went and told him of it; he said it was a bad job - it would be his ruin - I wanted him to go for an officer about it - he said it was of no use, as I could not swear to them.

WILLIAM HENRY MITCHELL . I had received this money at the Bank, for a dividend, not for a legacy - the spoons and tongs are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I called on my cousin about a fortnight before; he counted out eighty-four sovereigns from the desk, and said, "Joe, how would you like this - it would make a man of you;" this was completely a temptation.

W. H. MITCHELL. I showed him some sovereigns; I had not got eighty; he is a printer; John Cuthbert lives in the house.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing the spoons and tongs only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-179

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

672. JOHN CROW was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 horse-collar, value 4s.; 1 saddle, value 6s., and 1 set of traces, value 20s. , the goods of Isaac Coppen .

GEORGE GOODLAD . I keep a broker's shop in Red Lion-street, Spitalfields. On the 2d of February the prisoner came to sell me a collar, saddle, and traces; I asked how he came by them; he said he picked them up at IIford, near the Rabbits' public-house; suspecting they were stolen, I sent for an officer.

THOMAS HALE . I am headborough, and took him in charge with this harness.

ISAAC COPPEN. I live at Great Warley, in Essex, and am a farmer . This harness is mine; I missed it from my stable on the 3d of February - I had not seen it after the 1st; the prisoner once worked for me, and lives near me; he knew my premises well.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-180

673. RICHARD GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 200lbs. of lead, value 30s., belonging to John Laidlay and Charles Mawhood , and fixed to a building of theirs .

JOHN RAY . I am a messenger. On Sunday, the 28th of January, I was in Leman-street, Goodman's-fields, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning; two men passed me, heavily loaded; and in moment the prisoner and another passed, heavily loaded also, with something covered with a mat; I lifted the mat up, and said, "What have you here?" - the prisoner threw down this lead, and ran away; I secured the property, and gave it to the officers, telling them I should know the men again; I was sent for to the prosecutors' in a few days, and saw the prisoner - I am certain he was one of them - the other three got away.

ROBERT DAVIS . I apprehended the prisoner at the Four-awls public-house, Four-awl court, Rosemary-lane; Ray had described his person to me; I have compared this lead with the prosecutors' gutter; it corresponded even to a nail-hole.

JOHN LAIDLAY. I am in partnership with Charles Mawhood; we are soap-makers , and live in Well-street, Wellclose-square ; I saw our premises about the 20th; the lead was then all safe; I have seen this lead fitted to the roof; it fits exactly - I know nothing of the prisoner.

SAMUEL SWAN. I am in the prosecutor's employ. I saw the lead safe about the 21st of January, fixed to the premises.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 28th of January these three persons came into a public-house where I was, and said they were going up Leman-street with a load of lead, and a man stopped them; I was not with them.

MICHAEL DUNN . I live in Crown-court, White-yard, Whitechapel, in the same house with the prisoner's father. On a Saturday night, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was in bed, and heard him coming in and going up stairs; I cannot say the date of the month; I met him next morning, between eight and nine, coming out of the back-yard; I do not know how long ago it was.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am a watchmaker, and am the prisoner's father; he was in bed when this deed was done.

Q. Why, when was it done? A. About a quarter to six o'clock in the morning; the chaps who did it told me so; I know them well; I took one of them before a Magistrate - he was liberated; he told the neighbours he was the thief, and they told me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-181

674. EDWARD HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 sheet, value 2s. , the goods of Alexander Gilland .

ANN GILLAND . I am daughter of Alexander Gilland, who keeps a public-house in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square ; the prisoner and his wife lodged there from November till January; and on the morning of the 18th I missed two sheets from his room, and nearly all the feathers out of the bed; but the sheet in question was taken from another room, which was not let to them.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Nichol's, a pawnbroker, of Gray's-inn-lane; I have four sheets; some of them were pawned by the prisoner's wife; he was present on one or two occasions, I am certain.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS THOMPSON . I apprehended the prisoner in Tash-street; he gave me the duplicates of these four sheets from a bag.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not give him the duplicates; he took them from a bag; they belong to the woman whom I lived with.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-182

675. JOHN SHEFFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 2 printed books, value 5s. , the goods of John Wilton and William Wilton .

JOHN WILTON. I am a bookseller , in partnership with my son - we live in High Holborn . I know these books, by the labels, which are partly torn off; I did not see them taken - they were just inside the window.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. On the 8th of February, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock, I was near the prosecutors', and saw the prisoner and two others walking backwards and forwards by their shop; they then crossed over to me; I secured the prisoner, and found six books in his hat - these are two of them; he said, "Waddington, you know I am a bookbinder - they are all my own;" my partner took the other two, but the bill is thrown out against them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a bookbinder ; there are a thousand of these books - I sell books in the street, and bought these at the corner of Fleet-street.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another Indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270215-183

676. WILLIAM STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 101 lbs. of iron, value 3s., the goods of a certain person or persons, unknown .

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . I am an officer of St. George, Hanover-square. This iron belongs to that parish - I stopped the prisoner with it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-184

677. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of James Blake .

JAMES BLAKE. I am a haberdasher , and live in Grafton-street - I sell shoes. On the 22d of January, about four o'clock, in the afternoon, I was in my parlour, and saw the prisoner pass the shop once or twice; he then came up the steps, took these boots, and ran away; I pursued - he threw them down, and I secured him; while I was running somebody picked them up, and they are gone; he said if I would forgive him he would pay for them - I am certain he took them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-185

678. CHARLES SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 till, value 6d.; 13 shillings, 7 sixpences, and 1 half-crown , the property of Francis Evens .

JOHN CARNEY. I live in Denmark-street. On the 24th of January I saw the prisoner (whom I knew before) at the top of Denmark-street - he kept looking at me, and walking to and fro; he then went into Evens' shop, and came out in two or three minutes; he stood at the top of Denmark-street again, then crossed, and went into the shop again, and came out with something under his coat - he went up Cannon-street-road; I went and told Evens, pointed him out, and he was taken in three or four minutes - I am positive he is the man.

FRANCIS EVENS. I am a grocer , and live in Back-road, St. George's East. Carney pointed the prisoner out to me, between one and two o'clock; I pursued, and gave an alarm, but lost sight of him; I found him in Fogg's possession in a few minutes, with my till, which contained 19s. in all; there were some shillings among it; it was within another till in the middle of my counter.

JAMES FOGG . I heard the cry of Stop thief! I turned round, and saw the prisoner running; I took him, and held him till Evens and Carney came, and said he was the man; as I took him back he said, "I have thrown away the till - here is all the silver - I am sorry I did it - I was in great distress."

DAVID JESSOP . I saw him throw the till away, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-186

679. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 dead goose, value 5s. , the goods of Edward Allwright .

CHARLES HAINES . I live with Edward Allwright, a poulterer , of Little Newport-street . About ten o'clock at night on the 13th of January, my master said a goose was gone; I ran out, and stopped the prisoner, and in taking him back the goose fell from his side, from under his coat.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am a constable, and took him in charge.

Prisoner. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-187

680. WILLIAM PASSINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 7 iron-strikes, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Musto .

HENRY MUSTO. I am a wheelwright , and live at Harlington . The prisoner is a sawyer , and lives there - he formerly worked for me; I missed seven iron-strikes from my shop door on the 8th of February - I received information that the prisoner had been seen with some; I went and found them that day, at Mr. Christmas' shop, at Hounslow, and know them to be mine.

WILLIAM CHRISTMAS . I live at Hounslow, and am a dealer in marine-stores. On the 8th of February these strikes were bought into my shop, by my servant, Mary Tilley, but not in my presence; they were thrown among a quantity of others; Mr. Musto picked out these seven from them - I cannot say they are the same as were bought that day; my servant was before the Magistrate, but is not here; I never bought any of the prisoner myself, nor was I present when he sold any - he called at my shop about a month ago, and asked the price of different things, which I bought; he said he was out of work, and was going to collect strikes and other things, and would I buy them; he said he knew where there were some, which he could get; I asked where he lived - I did not ask where he was to get them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-188

681. JAMES ERWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 bed, value 3l. 10s.; 1 bolster, value 6s.; 2 pillows, value 5s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 5s.; 1 quilt, value 1s. 6d.; 2 flatirons, value 1s.; 1 footman, value 1s. 3d.; 1 shovel, value 1s.; 1 pair of tongs, value 1s.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 1s. 3d., and 1 trivet, value 10d., the goods of Peter Reasley , in a lodging-room .

MARY REASLEY . I am the wife of Peter Reasley - we live in York-street, Hackney-road . I let the prisoner a ready furnished lodging on the 26th of December, at 5s. a week; he has a wife and child - these articles were let with the room; they went away suddenly on the 24th of January, without notice, and owed two weeks' rent; they left the door locked, and the key put under it, inside the room - he was taken on the 5th of February; I do not know how he got his living.

CHARLES ISAAC LEPLARTRIER . I am apprentice to Mr. Cassell, a pawnbroker, of Church-street, Bethnalgreen. I have a blanket, a sheet, two pillows, and a bolster, all pawned by the prisoner, at different times.

JOHN GODDARD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

WILLIAM LOVITT . I am a broker, and live in Hackney-road. I bought this glass of the prisoner about three weeks ago, for 4s. or 4s. 6d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his wife and children, and believing it to be his first offence .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-189

682. RICHARD MARGARETS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 coat, value 3l. 14s.; 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 snuff-box, value 2s.; 1 crown, and one 5l. Bank note , the property of John Simms .

JOHN SIMMS. I am master of a vessel which laid off the New Crane-wharf on the 2d of February. The prisoner was my cabin-boy - I went on shore for three quarters of an hour that day, leaving him and two other boys on board; when I returned the prisoner was gone, and I missed this property; the Bank note, the crown, and snuff-box were in a desk in the state room - it was locked, but the key was left in it; the coat and jacket hung there- I have never seen them since. The prisoner had been but eight days with me. I could not swear to the Bank note.

MARY HODGES . I live at the Rose and Crown public-house, Star-street, Shadwell, which is kept by my cousin. The prisoner (whom I knew) came to the house on the 2d of February, in the evening, and asked for change for a 5l. note; I asked who it was for - he said, "For Captain Simms, of the ship Anna;" I did not recollect the name, and told him I had not got it; he said he would take it in copper, or silver, or in any way; I said I had not got it: he came again in a quarter of an hour, and said he would leave the note, and take 2l. or 3l., as the vessel was to sail next day - I took the note, but gave him no change - here it is; he had it in a snuff-box; and had apparently a new black coat on, much too large for him.

EDWARD SOUTHWOOD . I am an officer. I was going through St. Giles' on the morning of the 3d of February, I saw a crowd, and found the prisoner behind a door in Hampshire-hog-yard; I asked what he had been doing - he said I might be b - d, he would not come out for me - I took him in charge.

JOHN SIMMS . My note had four names on the back, and so has this.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-190

683. JOHN BARR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 waistcoat, value 12s. , the goods of Henry Hart Hart , his master.

HENRY HART HART. I am a tailor , and live in Monmouth-street. The prisoner was my apprentice - I suspected him, and found this waistcoat in pawn.

PETER W. RAY DIXON . I am servant to a pawnbroker, in High-street, Bloomsbury. This waistcoat was pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of January, for 1s. 6d., in the name of Anderson.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . On the 16th of January I apprehended him - he said, at the office, that he did pawn the waistcoat.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined 1s. , and delivered to his friends.

Reference Number: t18270215-191

684. JOHN SMITH, alias CLARKE , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 100 lbs. weight of lead, value 1l., the goods of Henry Potter , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN DAVIS . On the 29th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Rumball-place, Peter-street, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Potter's premises, which are in New-street, Tothill-fields , I saw a young woman pass my window - the prisoner and another then passed with some lead - I heard the woman say, "You have got a fine night's work; a fine lot of lead;" I followed them down the street - they pitched the lead against a wall - I was afraid to go up alone, as there seemed a gang of them - I waited some time, and saw Yates - I then went up, and met the prisoner with this piece of lead under his coat - I seized him and said, "What have you here?" he said, Nothing - he pulled the lead from his coat, and tried to throw it on my toes - I collared him, and took him to the Elephant and Castle public-house, and gave him to Cooper - I am sure he is one of the men who passed with the lead.

FRANCIS YATES . Davis called me. I took the prisoner to the Elephant and Castle, and saw him throw the lead down; it was brought into the public-house - the landlord refused to take charge of him for us - he attempted to get away, and struck at me.

HENRY POTTER . This lead was taken from a house, which I am building, in New-street - I saw it safe, about a week before - two padlocks were put on the loft-door - I found them both torn off on the 30th, and the lead ripped off the roof - I have seen this compared - it corresponds exactly, but more is gone.

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a plumber, and laid this lead on the building - it was fixed - I have compared it, and know it to be the same.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer, and took him. I found a large nail in the end of the lead, and in his fob I found a knife, which appears to have cut lead - the edge is turned; I went to where he was stopped, and found two more pieces.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys with some lead; I went towards the spot - they ran away - I took up a piece of lead, and Davis took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-192

685. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 bag, value 1d.; 3 sovereigns; 1 half-sovereign; 8 half-crowns, and 20 shillings, the property of John Harrold , from his person .

JOHN HARROLD. I am a hosier , and live in Whitechapel . On the 19th of January, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked to see some silk stockings; I had just tied up a bag containing the coins stated in the indictment - it could be seen from outside the shop, I think - the door was open - I turned round, with the bag in my hand, to get the stockings - he snatched the bag from my hand, and ran out with it - I got out, and just caught sight of him crossing the road; he ran down Red Lion-street, and was stopped near the bottom of that street by a person - I had called Stop thief! and did not lose sight of him; I said, "You rascal, you have robbed me; what have you done with my money?" he said, "I have given it to the man, who I gave my hat to" - he had no hat then, but had when in the shop.

Prisoner. Q. Have you any goods from Romanis? A. At times - my counter is about twenty-four inches wide - the shop is four or five yards wide, I am sure you are the man - it is a very public street, but I never lost sight of you after I got out.

SAMUEL RAVEN . I am a patrol. On this evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I heard a cry of Stop thief! followed down Red Lion-street, and at the bottom I saw the prisoner in custody, and several others - the prosecutor said he had robbed him - I heard the prisoner say he had given the money to the person he gave his hat to.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated, that this was a base, malicious prosecution, and contended on the utter impossibility of the prosecutor not having lost sight of the offender, considering the crowded state of the streets.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270215-193

686. ROBERT DAVIE , ELIZABETH CASTLE , and SOPHIA COLEMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 watch, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 20s.; 1 key, value 20s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 4 half-crowns, and 22 shillings, the property of William Tipper , from his person .

WILLIAM TIPPER. I am a seaman . I was returning home to Great East cheap, between eight and nine o'clock, on the 9th of February - I met Castle, who asked where I was going - I said I had lost my way, and after some time I went home with her to Chequer-alley ; there was a large fire, but no candle in the room; I gave her 1s., and she fetched some rum and water; I sat and smoked my pipe, and gave her 5s. to remain there all night; before I went to bed I took out the money stated in the indictment and put it into my glove - there were four quite new half-crowns among it; I put my watch into another glove- she went to bed with me, and seemed anxious to get me to sleep; I dozed a little, and hearing a noise, I got up and put on my trousers; I then saw Davie and Coleman in the room - Davie was at the drawer which I had put my watch and money into before I went to bed. I seized him with the two gloves, containing the watch and money in his hand; Coleman was close to him, and had a pot of beer in her hand, which she wanted me to take and let the man go, but I held him fast; Coleman put her hand up to him, but I held him tight till the watchman came, so that one of the women must have taken the watch and money from his hands - he was taken to Bunhill-row watch-house - here are two half-crowns that look like mine - they were quite bright and new like these.

JOHN COMPTON . I was constable of the night. I heard a complaint from the watchman, and went to his house with him - I found only Tipper and Davie there - he gave Davie in charge for this robbery - he was quite sober; I found nothing on Davie; he then wanted to give charge of the prosecutor, saying, it was his room, and he had no woman belonging to him - but Castle does live with him- she was brought to the watch-house next morning; I found on her 10s. 61/2d. - she was taken to Worship-street;

Coleman brought her a bonnet there, and Tipper gave charge of her as the other woman.

JOHN McLANE . I am a watchman. I was calling nine o'clock, and saw the prosecutor and Castle go into a house in Stone-alley, Chequer-alley; I saw Castle come out soon after and then return; I heard a call of watch between eleven and twelve o'clock - I went for assistance, and I found Tipper in the room - he gave charge of Davie - I took Castle in that house about five o'clock next morning.

JAMES HAMILTON . I am a watchman. Tipper described Castle to me, and we took her on the second floor of the house, with several men.

JOHN BROWN . I searched Castle - she resisted being searched very much; I found two very bright half-crowns on her, and 5s. 21/2d.; I took Coleman when she brought the bonnet to the office.

DAVIE's Defence. I went home to my room and found this man there, with the table-drawer in his hand - no other person was there - he said he had been robbed, and would not leave the room till he had found his property - he sat down and smoked his pipe - some time after the watchman came up and I was taken.

CASTLE's Defence. He wished to get up; I went out for some drink - and as there was a confusion in the room, I did not go in again.

COLEMAN's Defence. I live in the house - Castle sent for her bonnet.

DAVIE - GUILTY. Aged 22.

CASTLE - GUILTY. Aged 22.

COLEMAN - GUILTY. Aged 44.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-194

687. JOHN CAVENAGH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 4 caps, value 4s., the goods of Edward Phillips and Charity Land , from the person of Alfred Bannister .

ALFRED BANNISTER. I am ten years old, and am errand boy to the prosecutors. On the 30th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, I had a basket with caps in it to take to Holborn; I ran behind a coach - the prisoner took the basket off my shoulder - he was sitting behind the coach - he untied the string, took the caps out, and put them into his hat; I gave an alarm - he jumped down and run towards Bloomsbury - it fell down and the watchman took him.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a watchman, and saw the prisoner sitting behind the coach, pulling the basket - he took something out, and put it into his hat; he jumped down - I pursued; he fell, and I took him - his hat fell off with the caps in it; he was in liquor.

FRANCIS GATES . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner's hat fall off, with three caps in it - he dropped another on the road to the watch-house - he claimed the hat.

MARY ANN PHILLIPS . I am wife of Edward Phillips, who is in partnership with Charity Land - these caps are theirs.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUITTY - Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-195

688. WILLIAM HOWELL and JANE HOWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 4 sheets, value 6s.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 quilt, value 4s.; 1 blanket, value 3s., and 1 set of fire irons, value 4s., the goods of Charles Stephenson , in a lodging room .

LOUISA STEPHENSON . I am the wife of Charles Stephenson - we live in Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . In December the prisoners took our front garret furnished, at 5s. a week; they left on the 10th of February, without notice - I broke the room open, and missed these articles; I found them in bed together in St. Ann's-street.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . On the 13th of February I was sent for to apprehend the prisoners - they dented the robbery; the woman gave me the key, and said she detained it, as she could not pay the rent - I found a blanket and some knives in the room.

CHARLOTTE ANN WARD . The prisoners were taken in my room, which they took on the 10th, and brought a bundle; this blanket was put on my bed, and my own (a new one) taken away.(Blanket produced and sworn to.)

WM. HOWELL'S Defence. This woman is not my wife.

JANE HOWELL's Defence. The blanket is my own - it is a house of ill-fame.

WILLIAM HOWELL - GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

JANE HOWELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-196

689. SAMUEL STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 saucepan, value 4s., and 2 pairs of hinges, value 4s. , the goods of Noah Stone ; and PHILIP GOMMON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

NOAH STONE. I live in Leader-street, Chelsea . Gommon lives next door to me, and deals in marine stores ; the prisoner Stone is my son; I was confined to my bed; he and my elder son had the care of the property - this property was for sale in my shop - on receiving information from my son, these things were found at Gommon's.

ELIZABETH STONE . I am the prosecutor's wife - I missed these things on the morning of the 12th of February; Samuel was at home then, and went away that morning; my husband sent for Gommon - he came and said he bought the things of my son, who told him we were in distress.

JAMES HUMPHRIES . I am an officer. I was sent for; I went to Gommon's, who had the property in his window.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-197

690. MARGARET KANE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 3 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 1 six pence, the monies of William Jewis , from his person .

WILLIAM JEWIS. I am a tailor , and live in Clarges-court, Strand. On Wednesday morning last, between two and three o'clock, I met the prisoner in Drury-lane ; she wanted me to go home with her; she came and passed her hand into my left-hand breeches pocket; I seized her hand in my pocket, and kept her till the patrol came - she drew her hand out, and some money fell, which we could not find - the patrol took 6s. out of her hand - I had 11s. 6d. in all.

WILLIAM BRACKNER . I am a patrol. Jewis ealled out Watch! I came up - he had hold of the prisoner by the wrist - I took 6s. out of her hand - she struggled to get away, and said he had given her 3s.; they seemed both sober.

Prisoner's Defence. He wanted to go home with me, and gave me 6s.; I said that was too little - and he said I must give it up again - I refused. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270215-198

692. MARGARET GOULDING was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 sovereign, and 1 half sovereign, the property of Benjamin Biddle , from his person .

BENJAMIN BIDDLE. I am a tailor . About half-past eleven o'clock on the evening of the 14th of January, I met the prisoner at the foot of Bridge-street, Blackfriars; I was going home to Parker-street, Queen-street, Holborn - she accosted me - we walked to Holborn-hill; she took me down Bull and Gate-court to a house; I gave her 5s. in the room; I had been drinking - I had a sovereign and a half sovereign in my purse, which I put into my left hand trousers pocket - I said with her about a quarter of an hour, and as soon as we got down to the door, I felt my pocket, and missed my purse; I accused her of taking it; she denied it - the patrol came up and took her - she denied having a sovereign, a half sovereign, or a purse - it was found in her hand; I had been on the bed, but was not undressed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure she did not say she had no money of your's? A. She said she had no money; I was not drunk at all - I and another had four glasses of gin and water - nothing else - I had been drinking tea with a friend.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol. I was in Holborn between twelve and one o'clock, and heard a cry of watch in Bull and Gate-yard; I went, and saw the prisoner, who first charged the prosecutor with assaulting her; he said he was robbed of a sovereign, a half sovereign, and a purse; I took her to the watch-house, and found a few shillings on her - I said I would get the watch-house keeper's wife to search her - she then dropped the purse at her feet - I then said "Where is his money?" she said "Here," and then gave up a sovereign; she had denied having any sovereign for twenty minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not she say it was not his money? A. No; they both called watch - the prosecutor was never near the purse.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him with three other females; he went and treated us all - he and I went to this room, and as we came out he wanted me to go back - he struck me, and gave me in charge, as I would not return the 5s. GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270215-199

692. THOMAS WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 6 pairs of pattern ties, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Clarke .

JOSEPH CLARKE. I live in Queen-street, Soho , and deal in patten ties . On the 29th of January the prisoner came and bought a pair of ties, which came to 2d.; I missed a bundle off the counter, and followed him - he denied having them; I found them under his arm.

GEORGE KERTLAND . I received him in charge; he begged for mercy, saying it was his first offence, and he had been in great distress for ten years.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-200

693. JOHN SHRODER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 pair of trousers, value 8s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Matthew Trattles .

THOMAS MORGAN . I am an officer of the West India Docks . On the 7th of February, about half-past two o'clock, as the prisoner was going out at the dock gate, I asked him what ship he belonged to; he said none; I asked what he had got about him - he said Nothing; I took his hat off; he then said "I have a pair of trousers there which I bought to work in," and that he had nothing else but I found this waistcoat buttoned in the waistband of his trousers.

MATTHEW TRATTLES. I belong to the Eddleston , which lay in the Docks; these things are mine; I saw the prisoner on board another ship about a week before; he said he was hungry.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to ask for work, and a man gave me these things.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270215-201

694. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 quilt, value 3s. , the goods of Abraham Collis .

LYDIA COLLIS . I am daughter of Abraham Collis; we live in Denmark-court, Soho . On the 1st of February, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner on the stairs - I thought that she was going to some of the lodgers - I was coming down; and in a few minutes I heard my little brother call out Stop thief! I ran up stairs, and caught her on the stairs; this quilt was on the stairs - it was not there when I came down; it had been taken from the front room first-floor bed; she said she was going to Mrs. Parker - no such person lives there.

DAVID COLLIS . I am fourteen years old. I was coming down, and saw the prisoner going down; I took hold of her, and she dropped this quilt - I called out Stop thief!

ABRAHAM COLLIS . I was in the second floor room at work - my son called me, and I went down, and found the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see Mrs. Parker - the child said I had taken the quilt - a woman ran by me as I went up.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-202

695. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 sovereign; 1 shilling; 3 shirts, value 6s.; 2 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s. 6d.; 1 cap, value 1s.; 1 pocketbook, value 1s.; 2 razors, value 1s., and 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s. , the goods of Alexander Hepburn .

ALEXANDER HEPBURN. I an a chaise driver , and came to town to get a ship - a man promised to get me a place, and was to meet me on Monday morning - I was at the Refuge for the Houseless, and met a man whom I told that I had left my clothes at the Strong Man Public house, East Smithfield; he told me to get them away, and he would get me a cheaper lodging; I said I would not; I afterward went to my lodgings, and my clothes were gone - the man had told me to go to the One Crow public-house,

and wait for him, but he never came - I was asked if I had sent for my bundle; I said, No; I had sent nobody for them.

SARAH TURNER . I live at the Strong Man. Hepburn left a bundle of clothes at our house - the prisoner came, and said they were going out as ship-mates - he went away, and called again about four o'clock, and said he came for Hepburn's bundle; I said, "Where is he?" he said, at the One Crow, and it was all right - I then gave him the bundle.

THOMAS JUDD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 1st of February; he said he had sold the prosecutor's things, and spent the money with another man - I found this shirt on him.

A. HEPBURN. This is my shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw him at the Refuge for the Houseless; he said he had his things at the Strong Man, and told me to come to him there - I took his things there, and he was not there - I gave them to a man who belonged to the Vansitlart, which ship he said he was going in.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-203

696. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 planes, value 2s. , the goods of William Oxley .

WILLIAM OXLEY. I am a carpenter , and live in New Round-court, Strand. On the 26th of January the prisoner worked for me for about an hour; I was to give him 2d. and some victuals to hold the candle to me - a man called me out for a few minutes; and when I went back I saw this plane under his jacket; the other was found on him at the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270215-204

697. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 9 loaves of bread, value 3s. 4d. , the goods of John Mann .

WILLIAM GAULT . I am servant to John Mann, a baker . On the 13th of February I left my basket at the corner of Keppel-street - I returned in a quarter of an hour, and missed nine half-quartern loaves.

SAMUEL ROBINSON . I was in Keppel-street, and saw the prisoner, with another man, looking down the areas: the other man took five loaves from this basket, and the prisoner took four - I ran, and called Stop thief! - he dropped them, and I took him.

THOMAS WALLEY . I am a labourer. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner drop the loaves - I took them up.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a baker whom I knew; he asked me to carry some loaves; he then said,"There is a cry of Stop thief! you must run;" he threw his loaves down and ran.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-205

698. BARNARD HART was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 book, value 4s. , the goods of Peter Wright .

PETER WRIGHT. I am a bookseller , and live in St. Giles' . A person came and told me a man had stolen a book - I ran out and took the prisoner, with it under his coat; he begged me to forgive him.

WILLIAM SMYTH . I was in Broad-street, and saw the prisoner take this book from the stall, and walk away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on the ground.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-206

699. WILLIAM GOLDSMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 10lbs, of mustard, value 10s., and 1 cask, value 1s. , the goods of Paul Hack .

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a constable. On the 5th of February I stood at my window, in Britannia-row, Islington - I saw the prisoner pass with a cask, covered with a dirty apron; I followed and overtook him - he said he had brought it from Pentonville, to take to Mr. Jackson, in Chiswell-street, who had given him a shilling - I found he had no shilling.

GEORGE HILL . I am eleven years old, and live with Mr. Hack - I know this cask to be his.

SUSAN HACK . I am the wife of Paul Hack. This is our property, and stood about five feet within the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it to me to carry to Mr. Jackson's.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-207

700. HENRY FREEMANTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 2 pails, value 3s., and 2 tubs, value 3s. , the goods of John Digby .

JOHN LOADSMAN . I am an officer. On the 18th of January, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner on Clerkenwell-green, with two other boys, whom I knew - I secured him with these pails and tubs - the others got away.

RUBEN RICE . I was with Loadsman; the prisoner said he had found the property.

JOHN DIGBY . I live in Butcher-row, Hoxton. I lost these pails and tubs out of my cart, which stood in St. John-street .

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had found the property; and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-208

701. GEORGE DAVIDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 2 shirts, value 2s. , the goods of James Warren .

WILLIAM COLLINS. I live at Enfield. On the 24th of January, I was near Warren's house, at Edmonton , and saw the prisoner about ten poles from the house, with two shirts in his hand; I took him, and said, "Well, George, how are you?" as I knew him - he said, "I hope you won't say any thing about it, Will, but I have taken these shirts, and I think they are your brothers;" I said, "You shall take them back;" we went back, and my sister said they were Mrs. Warren's, who came up and owned them.

CATHERINE WARREN . I am the wife of James Warren. I hung these shirts in the garden - I saw the prisoner pass the place twice while I was hanging them up; I saw him pass again afterwards - I then went out and missed them.

JOHN SAMS . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-209

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

702. JOHN DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 copper kettle, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Matthews .

JANE MATTHEWS . I am the wife of Thomas Matthews - we live at Shadwell ; this kettle was under a bench in my back yard on the 18th, and on the 20th I missed it; the prisoner's father's yard joins ours.

GEORGE DEVERELL . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge; he sent to me in about an hour, and said Daniel Money had taken the kettle, and sold it for 1s. - he showed me where it was sold.

MARY BERRY . I live in Cable-street. I bought this kettle on the 19th, of the prisoner; he said it belonged to his father, who was ill; I refused to buy it, but at last gave him 3d., and told him to send his father for it in the morning; he came himself next day, and said his father was still ill, and begged a few halfpence - nobody was with him; he said he lived in Thompson's rope-walk, and his father was a coal-dealer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-210

703. THOMAS COLLINS and WILLIAM CATER were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 11 fowls, price 16s., and 3 ducks, price 6s. , the property of Joseph Judd .

MARY JUDD . I am the wife of Joseph Judd - we live at Timberall, in Hertfordshire . On the 30th of January, at nine o'clock at night, these fowls were locked in the hen-house - next morning, at seven o'clock, we found the door broken open, and they were gone; Cater lived in the village, and has cut chaff for us. I found them on the Monday - I lost thirteen fowls and three ducks.

CHARLES JUDD . I know these fowls by marks on their heads, which are here - I saw the fowls, and knew them.

JOHN POMFRETT . I live at Tottenham, and am a poulterer. On Wednesday, the 31st of January, Cater came to my house, and asked if I would buy any fowls - it was about nine o'clock in the morning; I said perhaps I might; Cater said they had some to sell; I said I was going out, and would look at them in the afternoon; he said,"Oh, you may see them now;" he went out, and beckoned to Collins, who came in, and shot them out of a sack; they had not been fattened - they were dead, and I said they were worth nothing to me; he said "They are worth 1s.;" I then sent for an officer, and gave them in charge.

JOHN CAMP . I received them in charge. I have kept the fowls' heads.

CATER'S Defence. I bought them.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

CATER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-211

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

704. ISAAC SIMPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th January . 5 lbs. of feathers, value 12s. , the goods of John Adams , his master.

JOHN ADAMS. I am a feather-dresser , and live in George-street, Spitalfields. The prisoner was three Years in my employ. In consequence of consulting Skillern, the officer, I put some tickets which he gave me among a heap of feathers in the warehouse, where the prisoner worked; about five o'clock in the evening of the 15th of January, I went out, leaving him there, and about six o'clock he was apprehended with a bundle of feathers - I had a good opinion of him - he earned about 18s. a week.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I gave Adams some tickets to put among the feathers. I stopped the prisoner as he came out, with a bag of feathers, among which I found the tickets; he said his master gave them to him, to get a little money - there were 51/2lbs. of them - the tickets are my own writing.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-212

705. JESSE COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1lb. of candles, value 6d.; 3 lbs, of soap, value 1s. 6d., and 2 lbs. of currants, value 2s. , the goods of James Douglas , his master.

FRANCIS MARR . I am servant to James Douglas, of Oxford-street . The prisoner was in his service. On the 12th of February I went into the kitchen, and stopped the prisoner going up-stairs; I found in his pocket these candles and the soap cut into pieces - I said, "What did you go out for before?" he at last took off his hat, and showed these currants, and said, "This is what I went out for;" he bears a good character.

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-213

706. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 5 shillings, and 1 farthing, the monies of Henry Cooper , from his person .

HENRY COOPER. Last Wednesday the prisoner slept in the same bed with me; my money was in my trousers pocket, which laid on the table - he came to bed between two and three o'clock; I got up before him, and missed my money - I got an officer, who came and made him put on his clothes; he found five shillings, a penny, and a farthing on him - before that he was asked if he had any money; he said Yes, his own, but he could not tell how much silver he had; there was a mark on each of the shillings and the farthing, which I knew them by - here it is.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am an officer. I made the prisoner get up; he said he could not tell how much money he had; I said I must search me - he squared at me, and said, "You shall take me before your betters first;" I then tied his hands, and found this money on him; he began to cry at the office, and said, "If the prosecutor will let me go, will you?" I said I could not; he said, "It is hard I should be transported for stealing a shilling or two - if you will let me go I will go on board an Indiaman this very day." I find he bears a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing but not from the person . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-214

707. MARY FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Thomas Ditton , from the person of Lucy Ditton .

TABITHA DITTON . I am the wife of Thomas Ditton. -

On Thursday, the 15th of February, I gave my daughter Lucy half-a-crown, to get change, about one hundred yards from home - she did not return, and I went to look for her; and as I came home I heard she was at Bow-street; it was then about eleven o'clock; I went, and found her and the prisoner at Bow-street - I know nothing of the prisoner.

GEORGE HARTLEY . I keep a liquor-shop, near Longacre. This girl came to me for a quartern of gin, which I gave her, and one shilling, two sixpences, and 2d.; she left my shop.

JOSEPH WALKER . I live in Hanover-street, Long-acre. I saw this child crying in the street, and the prisoner running from her; I went and asked her what was the matter - she said, "That woman has got my sixpence;" I ran, and caught her in Bow-street, and said, "You hussy, you have robbed this child;" she said she had not; I caught hold of her hand - she resisted; I found 41/4d. in her right hand, and a shilling and a sixpence in her left; she said it was her own. The child said, in her presence, "That is the woman who took my sixpence."

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270215-215

708. THOMAS REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 4 sovereigns; 14 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of James Element .

MARY ANN ELEMENT . I am the wife of James Element - we keep a public-house , in Buckingham-court, Charing-cross. On the 31st of January, the prisoner, who was our pot-boy , went out with his beer - he came back, and asked me for change of a 10l. note for Mr. Campbell, in New-street - I gave him the money stated, and never saw him again till he was apprehended.

WILLIAM TYLER . I live with Mr. Campbell. I went to pay 5s. 6d. to Mrs. Element, with a 10l. note - she had no change, but said she would send it at night; and the next day the prisoner came with the beer at one o'clock; I told him he need not bring me change for 10l., as I had got it, but to bring me change for a sovereign at night, and I would pay him.

JAMES FURZMAN . I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of January, and at the watch-house, he pulled out six sovereigns, and 8s. 3d. - he gave me no account how he got it.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoner told me he had bought a hat, and changed the sovereign, and had changed the 5l. note - no promise was made to him.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Element promised to forgive me, if I would give him back some of the money.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-216

709. JAMES BURCKE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 100 pieces of wood, value 10s. , the goods of John Hickmott and others.

JOHN HICKMOTT. I have two partners. This wood was attached to a building, which we had bought.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-217

710. JOSEPH WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 25lbs. of brass, value 25s. , the goods of Thomas Edge .

WILLIAM GREEN . I am in the service of Thomas Edge, a gas apparatus maker , of Westminster - the prisoner was in his employ. On the 15th of February I placed myself in the store-room, and saw the prisoner look into a room where this brass laid - he unlocked the door, went in, and took out three pigs of brass in his arms - I had marked Edge's name on them - he was secured putting it into his bosom; he earned 22s. a week.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer, and took him in charge. He said he was going to sell the brass to Abrahams, the Jew, in Tothill-street.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-218

711. JOHN TONKS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 5 lbs, of sugar, value 4s. , the goods of Letitia Johnson , spinster, and Bell Johnson , spinster .

BELL JOHNSON. I am in partnership with my sister Letitia - we are grocers , and live in Earl-street, Lissongrove . On the 26th of January, about half-past one o'clock in the day, I was in the parlour behind the shop; the prisoner came in - I went in, and he asked if I sold glue - I said, No - he went out, and shut the door very quick - Mr. Bell came in, and asked if I had lost any thing - I looked on the desk, and missed the sugar - I am certain of his person - he was brought back.

CHARLES BELL . I was standing in front of my house, opposite this shop; a person said he thought that shop was robbed - I saw the prisoner and another person running down the mews - I crossed to Johnson, who missed the sugar; I pursued the prisoner down Devonshire-street, and stopped him in James-street - I asked if he had not been into that shop; he said, Yes; I said, "You have not paid for what you had - come back;" the other did not go back, but the prisoner did, after being abusive - Miss Johnson said he was the boy who was in the shop.

BELL JOHNSON. Nobody else could have come into the shop, or I must have seen them; I did not leave the shop after he went out - it was a loaf of sugar.

CHARLES RASSELL . I saw the prisoner go into this shop; another person stood outside - the prisoner came out, and handed something to that person, who put it under his coat, and they went away together very fast - I told Mr. Bell - I am sure the prisoner was the one who went in.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-219

712. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 cloak, value 22s. , the goods of Richard Robson .

JEREMIAH WRIGHT . I am shopman to Richard Robson, a linen-draper , of Oxford-street . About half-past six o'clock. on the 13th of February, Bidgood brought in this cloak - it hung at the door a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I was in Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner and another trying to get this cloak - I waited opposite, and at last saw the prisoner take it from within the door - I went, and took him - he threw it into a door-way.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I saw the prisoner throw the cloak down, and I picked it up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It laid at the door, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-220

713. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Sweet Hart .

SWEET HART. On the 17th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was in a chaise; the poney fell down, in Hunter-street , and my coat was stolen out of the chaise - I found it at the watch-house.

WILLIAM SIMSON . I am a watchman. The prisoner passed me about ten o'clock, with this coat on his shoulder he went towards Compton-place, and in about five minutes, I heard of this loss - I went, and took him.

JOHN HART . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and said the coat was at his father's - I went, and found it on the bannisters.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-221

714. DENNIS MANNING and CATHERINE, HIS WIFE , were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 2 quilts, value 2s.; 1 frock, value 6d.; 1 cloak, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 gown, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Martin Hayes .

MARGERY HAYES . I am the wife of Martin Hayes - we live in Neal's - passage, Seven-dials . On Wednesday morning last, between nine and ten o'clock, I went out, and left these things in my first floor room - I returned in a few minutes, and missed them all.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am shopman to Messrs. Townsend and Co., pawnbrokers, of Little Russell-street. This silk handkerchief was pawned on the 14th of February, between twelve and one o'clock, by the male prisoner - the woman was with him.

GEORGE McKEE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners on the 14th - Dennis was concealed among some dust in a cellar - I found nothing on him.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am a shopman to Mr. Newby, a pawnbroker, of Drury-lane. The prisoner Catheriue, pawned a gown and quilt on the 14th, about eleven o'clock- there was a man waiting outside with a child in his arms - I believe it to be Dennis.

JAMES MURRAY . I was in Drury-lane on the 14th, and saw the prisoners going towards Newby's - the man had a child in his arms.

DENNIS MANNING'S Defence. I declare I had no concern in it.

CATHERINE MANNING 'S Defence. I met a woman, who asked me to pawn these things.

D. MANNING - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

C. MANNING - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-222

715. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 2 cart arms, value 20s., and 1 sack, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Walker .

HENRY WALKER. I live at Enfield . I saw these things safe about the 4th of December, in the wheeler's shop in my farm yard.

JOHN KING . I am a wheelwright, in Mr. Walker's employ; I saw these articles safe about three weeks before Christmas, when I left to work elsewhere - I returned on the 2d of January, and missed them - I found them at Worship-street, and am quite certain of them - they are now at home; I fitted them to the cart they were taken from.

WILLIAM BIRDSEVE . I was constable of Islington. On the 24th of December, I was near my own door; I saw the prisoner and another man with something in a sack; I asked what it was - they said a pair of arms; that they had found them, and were going to take them to Mr. Scott's - they then threw them down and ran off, but I secured them - they were discharged, as we could not find the owner; I afterwards took the prisoner, whose person I knew.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up at four o'clock in the morning, to go to my brother's - I met the other man who said he had found a pair of arms, and was going to ask Scott to buy them.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-223

716. JAMES LOVELL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 3 sheets, value 10s. , the goods of John Maley .

JOHN MALEY. I live at Islington , and am a brickmaker . On the 31st of January, these sheets hung in my garden to dry - they were missed about seven o'clock- I had seen them ten minutes before - I found them about six doors off shortly after.

JOSEPH DIXEL . I am a carpenter, and live in Cottage-lane, City-road. On the evening of the 31st of January, I was in Brooksby-mews, Islington, and saw three persons, who I watched, and soon saw the prisoner come out of the mews with a bundle; I followed, and took him in Barnsbury-street, and asked what he had got - he said he had picked it up in the fields; I sent for Maley, who claimed the sheets; his back premises come into the mews.

JAMES CHILDS . I am a watchman, and took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them down the turning.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-224

717. WILLIAM JOHNSON , THOMAS PEARCE , and WILLIAM CLAYTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Archer .

ANN ARCHER . I am the wife of Thomas Archer - we live at Hampstead ; I am a landress - fourteen shirts hung in my yard to dry about ten o'clock, and about half-past two, one was missing - the constable, who has it, is not here, but I saw it, and am certain of it.

HARRIOT COLLINGWOOD . I went to take in these shirts off the heath, and missed one; I saw the three prisoners there, close to the linen; I saw Johnson take a shirt off a bush - the others were close to him - I called to a boy who was minding the linen; I am sure the prisoners were all together.

THOMAS CANNON . I was on Hampstead-heath, and saw Collingwood calling Stop thief! the prisoners were

running; I had seen Johnson take a shirt; I pursued; I took Pearce and Clayton; I saw Johnson taken, without losing sight of them.

JOHNSON'S Defence. Pearce picked up the shirt and put it into his pocket - we were heaving at some distance - and thought they were following us for that.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CLAYTON - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-225

718. HENRY HOFNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 dead fowl, value 2s. , the goods of David Morse .

EDWARD UHR . I live with my mother in Cannon-street, St. George's East; I was passing Morse's shop on the 15th of February; I saw the prisoner with two others - the eldest took this fowl from the window, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it under his apron; I gave an alarm - the servant came out and took him - he threw it away.

ANN FAULKNER . I am servant to David Morse, a cheesemonger ; Uhr called me - I ran out by the prisoner, and saw him throw the fowl down.

CHARLES ROBINSON . I am a constable, and took him in charge - he said he was hungry, and took it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270215-226

719. DENNIS COYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 gown, value 12s., and 2 shifts, value 8s. , the goods of William Wallis .

WILLIAM WALLIS. I keep the old Chester Arms public-house, Shepherd's-market - the prisoner lodged with me; I told him to leave, as I had lost some property - he did not go till Saturday night; next night I found two trunks were broken open, and missed two shifts and a gown; I went with Ellis to the prisoner's room, and saw him find this duplicate in a pocket-book - the prisoner was there dressing.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, pawnbroker, Jermyn-street. This gown and two shifts were pawned by the prisoner, I believe - I gave him a ticket in the name of John Deacon, for Mr. Walker; this is the duplicate.

MARY WALLIS . I missed several articles from my room - the prisoner had been some months with us - I saw the property safe on the 16th of January - the prisoner was at our house about two o'clock on the Sunday after he left.

Prisoner's Defence. My things lay about the room; somebody might have put the duplicate into my pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-227

720. ANN BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 pelisse, value 1l. , the goods of Hannah Simpkin , spinster .

HANNAH SIMPKIN. I am single, and live at No. 37, Cromer-street . This pelisse hung in my room, which is on the first floor. On the 10th of February the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to the room, and asked for a lodging for her sister; I agreed to take her sister at 2s. a week; I saw the pelisse when she came in; she had told me to go to a house in Euston-square, to clean it; when I got there, I found it was all a trick; when I returned she was gone, and I missed the pelisse - I went out, and saw her crossing Skinner-street, and took it from her.

SARAH SIMPKIN . I am the prosecutrix's mother - the prisoner came and inquired for a lodging for her sister; when my daughter had gone some time, she went away; I left her in the room.

WILLIAM COLLIER . I took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-228

721. JAMES BRENECK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 spoon, value 2s., and 9 yards of silk, value 30s. , the goods of James Newland .

ELIZABETH NEWLAND . I am the wife of James Newland; we lodge with the prisoner's parents. On the 3d of February I missed a spoon from the table drawer, and have not found it.

CATHERINE READ . I was at work at this house - I saw a boy come out of Newland's window with a spoon in his hand; I cannot say who he was.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-229

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

722. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 rummer glass, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Shaw ; and 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Noah Nichols .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-230

723. EDWARD FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 blanket, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Chappel .

CHARLES CHAPPEL. I am a broker , and live in Baldwin's-gardens . On the 9th of February I came home about six o'clock, and missed this blanket from the shop.

ELIZABETH CHAPPEL . I saw this blanket safe about half-past five o'clock, and soon after the prisoner's mother came and sent me up Gray's-inn-lane - I found the prisoner in custody, with it.

WILLIAM COULTON . I am an officer. I met the prisoner and another boy running; the prisoenr had this blanket, and said it was his mother's, and he was going to pawn it; as I took him to the office, he said another boy gave it to him to pawn.

Prisoner's Defence. C. Sullivan promised me 3d. to pawn it.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270215-231

724. WILLIAM TEBER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 4 lbs. of cheese, value 2s. 4d. , the goods of William Clarke .

WILLIAM CLARKE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Aylesbury-street . On the 15th of January, at eight o'clock, I just turned into my parlour, and the prisoner was brought in with this cheese - I had put it at the door just before.

CHARLES ELDERTON . I was passing the shop, and saw the prisoner take the cheese; I stopped him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-232

725. JOHN SLAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 writing-desk, value 20s. , the goods of William Smith and Jonah Smith , his masters.

The prosecutors did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-233

726. WILLIAM BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown, from his person .

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 19th of January I was on duty at St. James' palace , and saw the prisoner and another pushing into the crowd; I went close behind them, and saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket; I pushed his companion aside, and took the handkerchief from the prisoner as he was putting it into his pocket - I called out, but lost the gentleman in the crowd.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I received the prisoner from Waddington - I saw him draw the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I called to the gentleman myself, but could not make him hear.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-234

727. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 20s., the goods of Charles Jenkins , privately in his shop .

CHARLES JENKINS. I am a shoemaker , and live in Chandos-street . Last Friday evening I was returning to my shop, and saw the prisoner going out with a pair of boots; I asked what he wanted - he said he came from Mr. Brown, of Windmill-street; I let him go, and then spoke to my lad, who missed something; I gave an alarm, and the prisoner ran away, through a passage which leads into the Strand - I saw him in the custody of Miles in three minutes; the boots were dropped in the court - I heard them fall just as he turned into the court - I picked up one.

THOMAS MILES . I saw the prisoner running down the court, and several people pursuing; I took him, and Jenkins said he was the man, and produced one of the boots; I had not seen him drop them - Mr. Jenkins came up directly - he was running from the cry.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry, ran, and was taken in Vere-street, not in the court. I hope you will look over it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270215-235

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

728. HENRY SMITH and JAMES BARNES were indicted for feloniously and maliciously assaulting James Carter , on the 26th of January , with intent, his goods and monies from his person, and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal .

SECOND COUNT, with intent to rob him.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES CARTER. I am a farmer , and live in Coneyhatch-lane, Finchley. I have known Smith twelve years; on the night of the 26th of January at half-past seven o'clock, I was stopped by two men; Smith, who was one, came up and gave me a nudge on the arm; I rather turned round to get from him; he presented some fire arms (it was bigger in the nozzle than a gun) to my face. and demanded my money; the other was close at his side - I said I had hardly enough to buy a pot of beer; the other then said, "Deliver up your watch and all your property, or else I will blow your brains out;" they both took hold of my handkerchief, and swore that if I spoke one word they would blow my brains out. Smith kicked me very hard on the left shin, and tried to throw me down - I then heard two waggons coming; I told them I would soon fix them - they then ran away; I saw several men - and called Murder, and Stop thief! it happened very near Mr. Gale's house; I went out afterwards to the spot, and picked up my handkerchief there in Collard's presence.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Can you swear to Barnes? A. Yes. I only knew him by his dress - Smith was taken to Gale's house that night - I swore to him there as the man who presented the fire-arms; he was let go, as I did not want to appear against him; Barnes made his escape over a hedge; it was dark.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What dress had the man who accompanied Smith? A. A very dark blue or black coat, and dark trousers - the figure of the man was like Barnes.

SAMUEL COLLARD . I am an officer. On the night of the 26th of January, Carter pointed out a spot - I saw him pick up his handkerchief; and on that spot I found a large case-knife.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take Smith that night? A. Yes, at Gale's - I let him go, as neither of the men who were stopped could identify him; Carter said at first,"Harry, you are the man that stopped me;" he afterwards seemed to deny it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was this? A. About a quarter to eight; I did not find Barnes that night; he was taken at his father's.

WILLIAM CARTER . I keep a public-house on Finchley Common, about half a mile from Gale's; I know Smith, and have seen Barnes once or twice; on this night, about six o'clock, they came to my house together; they left about seven, or a little after, together - I believe this knife to be mine; I lent them just such a one with some bread and cheese - I am certain of Barnes being with Smith; he had a dark coat and dark trousers.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

BARNES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life . (See page 209.)

Reference Number: t18270215-236

Before Mr. Recorder.

729. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 brass bottle-jack, value 14s. , the goods of Charles Wright .

CHARLES WRIGHT. I live in Rathbone-place , and sell furniture . On the 29th of January this jack was stolen from the side of my door - I saw it about two o'clock when I went to dinner; and in three minutes my little girl came running down, and said, there was a thief - I ran up, and the lad whom I had left in the shop was gone - I pursued into Oxford-street, but the prisoner escaped; and

the same evening I saw the jack in a broker's shop in Great St. Andrew-street - I am certain of it - my private mark is on it. In consequence of a description of the man I went and saw the prisoner about two hours after, going into a broker's shop, in Little White Lion-street, and he was taken.

SARAH HARLGOOD . I live opposite Mr. Wright. I stood at my window, and saw the prisoner take this bottlejack from a tin screen - I am certain he is the person - he ran off as quick as possible - I saw him again on the Friday following, and am quite sure of him - he was alone.

JOSEPH TILLEY . This jack was brought to my mother for sale on Monday afternoon, between two and three o'clock; the person who brought it did not stay three minutes - I do not remember his person.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol, and was sent for, and took the prisoner - I told him it was for stealing a jack - he said he knew nothing about it - I had not found Wright then - I asked him what part of the street it was left in; he said, "Mr. Wright can tell you that, for I told him" - he said he left it at the shop with the boy till the woman came in - I then went to No. 29, Great St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials, and found it - the prisoner afterwards said a boy gave it him to sell.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man, who asked me to earn 1s., and gave it to me to sell - I left it at this shop - when I was taken the lad was behind me, but ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-237

730. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 lamp, value 7s. , the goods of Benjamin Hyet and William Hughes .

BENJAMIN HYET. I am in partnership with William Hughes; we keep a coffee-house in Grafton-street - this bracket lamp was kept in the passage leading to the coffee-room. On the 26th of January I stood in the bar, talking to Stiles, who said a man had come into the passage, and that he had stuck up a bill under the lamp - I went out and the lamp was gone - I went to the door, and saw the prisoner running - I followed and collared him with it under his coat.

JOHN STILES . I was in the coffee-room - ran out, and saw the prisoner taken with the lamp.

JOSHUA IVORY . I am an officer, and took him into custody - he had a herring and 41/4d. (Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-238

731. JOHN HANCOCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1500 bricks, value 4l. , the goods of John Falkus .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FALKUS. I live in Adam-street, Edgeware-road, and am a builder . The prisoner has not been employed by me since October - he had been about a month in my employ. On the 15th of February I went to Nottingdal - I knew the prisoner was building a cottage there - I saw from 1500 to 2000 bricks by the side of that cottage; I examined their quality - I had a quantity of bricks at some building in Sovereign-street; I took a sample of those bricks to the prisoner's premises, and they corresponded in every way; none of them had any initials on them - they were all of one colour, and what are called seconds, such as are put in the fronts of houses - it is usual, when builders buy bricks, to receive a ticket with them, and sometimes we have two; one of which we sign and send back - I had a conversation with Beal, and, in consequence of that, went to the prisoner, and said, "Hancocks, where did you get those seconds from?" and asked him where the tickets were - he said he had none, nor never had any; but he could take me to the man he bought them off; he took me to a man at the corner of Polygan-street, about two hundred yards from his own place, and said to him, "Did not I buy those bricks of you?" - the man said, "Yes; you gave me 35s. for the lot;" nothing was said about the quality; I asked where he bought them - he said, of a respectable man in St. John's-woodgrove, and he brought them home in his own horse and cart - it would take two large carts to hold them - I directly fetched Wabster, the officer, who took the man who said he had sold them, and then went back and took the prisoner - the Magistrate committed him, and discharged the other man.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You told the same story to the Magistrate about the man? A. I believe I did - here is a sample of each lot of bricks - I swear they are both from one kiln; I believe it is a general custom to have a delivery-ticket - bricks have been brought without a ticket.

Q. If you bought them of a person who had bought them from the clamp, would you have a delivery ticket from that person? A. No. The prisoner would not want seconds for this cottage, but he has used some of all sorts at it; we do not usually go to different makers for bricks to build a small cottage; I had missed bricks about a month or two before - mine were in a stack before my own buildings. The cottage is about two miles and a quarter from my buildings. My carpenters begin work at break of day; they cart bricks much earlier; his building is in a bye road.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you missed a large or small quantity of bricks? A. I missed a few at a time, but more than 1500 in all. I have seen the prisoner's cart; I never bought so small a quantity as that would hold; I always have a ticket with every load.

DAVID BEAL . I am in Mr. Falkus' employ. I did not know the prisoner previous to the 15th of February - I saw him about a quarter past six o'clock that morning, in Frederick-street, which joins Sovereign-street, with his horse and cart loaded with bricks; he was fifty or eighty yards from Falkus' premises; I followed him about three hundred yards - he stopped; I did not speak to him, but took particular notice of the bricks; I saw no reason for his stopping - he stopped, and looked steadfastly at me; the bricks were the same sort as Falkus had in Sovereign-street, as near as it is possible to speak - they are seconds. I went and told Falkus; the prisoner was going towards Edgware-road, which was the way to his cottage.

Cross-examined. Q. It would not be unnatural to take a load of bricks at that time? A. No - but it is unusual

to use seconds with rough-place bricks. I cannot point out which of these two bricks produced came from master's premises; I cannot say that any of the bricks in the cart have been found, but they were bright ones, of this description. There are bricks called cutters - I cannot tell them from a second, nor a paviour from a front; I speak to the colour of these bricks - they resembled these in colour; I saw the man who said he sold them; it was said he had been carter to the prisoner; I do not know that he has absconded.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are these the same kind of bricks as your master has? A. Yes. I went to the prisoner's cottage.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner last Friday morning, at half-past eight o'clock - I asked how he came by the bricks - he said his man bought them for him; I understood him to mean the man I had in custody; I told him I had that man in custody; he said the man took them up by the side of the road, at the foot of Primrose-hill; I asked what he gave for them - he said 34s. for the lot.

JOHN FALKUS re-examined. I asked the prisoner where he got the bricks - he said he bought them in the grove, meaning St. John's-wood-grove; I asked him again, and he said, in St. John's-wood-road - that is a quarter of a mile distant; he afterwards said they came from the foot of Primrose-hill - that is about a mile from the grove; he afterwards named the Uxbridge-road; he said at first that his man bought them for 35s., and then that he gave 35s. for them. This is one of the bricks brought from his premises - 2000 would come to about 6l.

Cross-examined. Q. In what progress is your house? A. The first story is on. I missed some bricks that day - he said he bought them himself at last; and that is why I took him, because he prevaricated; he said he bought them himself, at Primrose-hill.

ANN YOUNG . I live in Polygan-mews. I know nothing about these new bricks; but on this morning I saw the cart loaded with old bricks; there was not a new one among them, to the best of my knowledge; I saw it loaded about seven o'clock the night before (Wednesday), and it was taken away in the morning - I did not see it go away - I believe it was the prisoner's cart; I do not know what became of it - I saw no name on the cart, nor the person who was with it. I know the prisoner - he lodged a year and a half with me. I was at my window, which was open.

COURT. Q. Could you see where the bricks came from? A. Yes, a person who was digging a sewer wheeled them from the side of a pig-sty. I saw the same cart come back next day, and it was loaded again with old bricks, about the middle of the day. I live about one hundred yards from Sovereign-street; I saw nobody with the cart either time - I think it was the prisoner's cart - I believe he owns it.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the prisoner? A. A carman; I knew he was building a cottage; he kept his horse and cart on my premises; I believe it was his horse and cart that I saw - I saw it return the next day. I can swear they were old bricks - the cart was fifteen yards from me.

COURT. Q. Now, do you know whose cart it was? A. I believe it was the prisoner's.

MR. CLARKSON called -

JOHN FRY . I am a labourer, and live at Nottingdale. On Thursday morning, the 15th of February, I saw the prisoner, about seven o'clock, with a load of old bricks in his cart; they were not like those produced, but old ones, and some were not cleaned from the mortar - I saw none of this description; I was going for a load of bricks myself, which made me notice his - I knew him. There are piles of bricks where he is building; I do not know who they belong to - I have seen them there for about three months, as near as I can guess.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? A. Six or seven years; I live about two hundred yards from his cottage; I never examined to see whether he is building it of old bricks; I believe there are some new; there might be two or three loads of new ones there on the 15th of February; I was intimate with him; I never asked where he got them; he generally drives his own cart - I have seen a man walking with him. I did not speak to him on this morning, nor stop at all.

COURT. Q. Do you know the other man who was taken up? A. No.

THOMAS VANN . I am a labourer, and live at Nottingdale, about twenty-five feet from the prisoner's cottage. Last Thursday morning I saw him with his cart, about seven o'clock, close to Notting-hill gate, about a mile from his cottage, going towards his cottage, with a load of old bricks - all that I could see were old; it is usual to use old and new bricks in building cottages; he had a pile of new bricks there; I have seen them there full three months. I have a cottage of my own.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you build it? A. It was built for me; I bought my bricks from Shepherd's-bush; I might not be able to produce the person I had them of. The prisoner may have a thousand new ones; he has some seconds; I call these very bad seconds; I stopped and said, "John, have you got another load of old bricks" he said, "I have;" I knew he had bought three or four cottages, and thought these came from there; he had several men once; he may have a carter for a day or so; his wife asked me yesterday to come here - I did not know before that he was in custody.

COURT. Q. Did you see these new bricks there from time to time, for three months? A. I saw them most days, as he asked me to attend a little when he was away.

Q. On your oath did it appear to you that for three months there was the same quantity of bricks there, or were they increasing from time to time? A. They did not come altogether, but were all put there in the course of a week; I saw some of them there about four months ago; none of them were used in the building.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a labourer, and live at Nottingdale. I have known the prisoner about six months - I met him last Thursday morning, at a quarter to seven o'clock, at the first mile-stone, by Bayswater, on the Uxbridge-road, with a load of old bricks - I stopped, and talked to him - I knew it to be his horse and cart - I looked in, and saw nothing but old bricks - I saw none like these - there are some by his building - I have seen them there this three months, I am certain.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How came you to examine the cart? A. He stopped and spoke to me; there are not many new bricks in his building - there are new and old; any one could see that, the front is new bricks.

COURT to T. VANN. Q. Is not the front of the building new bricks? A. Yes, but they are more common than these - I have not compared them; the lot, which stands before the cottages, is to build another house - he had two sorts of new bricks, new stocks and seconds - the front was built before any seconds were there - I do not think there are any of this sort in the building - I will not swear it; if there are any, it must be just over the windows; the rest of the house is of old bricks.

SARAH MILLINS . I am the wife of Stephen Millins. I saw the prisoner at our cottage last Thursday morning, near seven o'clock, within a few minutes of it - it is about one hundred yards from the cottage he was building - he had a one horse cart with old bricks; I saw them shot from the cart; they were all old; I saw a pile of new ones there, when the gentleman came to measure them.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long has the cottage been building? A. I do not know; I have not been there above a fortnight; the old bricks were to build another cottage; I did not see the cart till seven o'clock; I have seen nobody at work there for the last fortnight.

J. FALKUS re-examined. I have minutely examined the front of his cottage; I suppose there are 200 or 300 bricks of this description in the arches and other places; it is stocks mixed with seconds - I have been a builder from a boy; the front would take 300 or 400 bricks; the rest is old and new bricks together; stocks are easily distinguished from seconds, by people who understand building- I examined it last Friday, about four o'clock, with my bricklayer and Mr. Royal, a mason.

- SHEPHERD. I am a bricklayer. I went with Falkus to view the prisoner's cottage; there are seconds in the arches and in different parts of the front; a builder cannot mistake stocks for seconds.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Will you swear there were fifty seconds? A. Yes; I will not swear to one hundred nor to sixty; I did not count them; I sold the prisoner some bricks about three months ago.

Q. Look at this voucher, and say is it not the memorandum you gave for the settlement of the bricks? A. Yes; they were my own bricks: (read) "August 26th, received of John Hancocks, for bricks, 2l. 5s." I sold him 2000; I never sold him any others; I had them from Berkshire; I was then in business for myself.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What bricks did you sell him? A. Stocks, not seconds.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-239

732. EDWARD FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 1 cap, value 3d. , the goods of Thomas Knight .

THOMAS KNIGHT. I live with Mr. Davies, at the Hoop and Grapes, public-house, in Queen-square . On Saturday afternoon, I saw this property folded up in the tap-room; I had fetched them from a parcel, which had been sent to me from Rochester - the prisoner was in the tap-room - I put them down in a settle, which he afterwards went into - this was between four and five o'clock - I went out to get a penny loaf, and when I came back, they were gone - I did not know him before, but Corporal Baker was sitting in the same box, where the prisoner had been - about eleven o'clock next morning, a person came and tapped at the window - he said, "Here is the man that took your things away;" there was no other person in the tap-room but four soldiers.

JAMES BAKER . I am a corporal of the 56th regiment. I was in the tap-room when Knight brought his bundle, and saw him put it on the table, in the box on the side where the prisoner was, not the side I sat on - soon after Knight went out, I saw the prisoner take the bundle with his left-hand, and go out at the door; it did not strike me at the moment that it was not right, till Knight came in, and inquired for the bundle - I saw the prisoner next day when they sent for me to go down to the watch-house - I have never seen any part of the bundle since.

JOHN GEE . I am a coachman. I saw the prisoner in the public-house - I was in another box - I left it before him; he was sitting by the side of the table, where the bundle stood, and the corporal was in the same box.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly sat down; but as to the bundle, I did not see it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270215-240

733. ROBERT FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 hat, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of John Higginson .

GEORGE DAVIS . I am in the employ of John Higginson, a hatter , who lives in Crawford-street . I saw the prisoner near the shop, about eight o'clock on Saturday evening, with this hat - it had been near the door, but inside the shop - I had seen it about half an hour before - I had been out, and on returning home. I met him running round the church with it - I stopped him with it in his hand - he had been loitering about the shop the whole evening - he had it under his arm; the shop mark was on it - he threw it down, and said he had no hat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not have it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years , to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18270215-241

734. JAMES CORD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 2 umbrellas, value 8s. , the goods of John Coventry .

JOHN COVENTRY. I live in Oxford-street , and keep an umbrella shop . On the 13th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was up-stairs at breakfast; I was sent for by King - the umbrellas were safe the evening before.

ROBERT KING . I live with Mr. Coventry. Last Tuesday morning I was cleaning the shop; I was behind the counter, and my back towards the door - I just saw the prisoner going out; these two umbrellas had been on the counter, six or seven feet from the door, and I saw that he had two - I did not see any body with him; I rang the bell for my master, and ran out, but could not find him - I saw him in about ten minutes afterwards in a public-house, and am certain of his person - he had not been stopped; my master went in with me; the prisoner had the two

umbrellas under his seat - I believe these to be my master's, because he had wrapped them up in papers, as these are - we lost four.

JOHN EDGERTON . I attend at the bar of the public-house - I saw the prisoner come in with these two umbrellas, in a black bag, under his arm; Coventry came in, and claimed them in a few minutes; nobody but the prisoner was there.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-242

First London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

735. RICHARD COLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 shawl, value 6s. , the goods of George Clamp , and another.

GEORGE CLAMP. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 3d of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was behind the counter, and saw this shawl taken from within the shop; I ran out, and took the prisoner with it round his neck, in Long-lane.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am an officer, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in Long-lane, and put it round my neck.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-243

736. JOSEPH MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 12 cocoa-nuts, value 6s. , the goods of Jacob Nunes Castello .

LAWRENCE BARRY . I am in the employ of Mr. Castello, a nut-merchant , who lives in Bevis-marks ; the prisoner was in his service, and had 12s. a week, with his victuals. On the 17th of January, he asked if I was going to dinner- I said, Yes; he said he would put a shilling in my way, and in his own way too; he asked me to take twelve cocoa-nuts to his house; he selected them, counted them, and told me to take them; I told my master of it, and he told me to take them; I then took them to his house, and left them there.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Your master told you to take them? A. Yes, as the prisoner asked me - I knew it was wrong; I did not get my shilling.

JACOB NUNES CASTELLO. The prisoner was my servant - I paid him weekly; Barry told me the prisoner had desired him to take some nuts to his house - I then went to the Mansion-house, and got an officer, who followed Barry to the house - these nuts are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. You told him to take them, if the prisoner desired him? A. Yes; the prisoner lived with me about six months - he was formerly in the trade; he was in distress when I took him; I never told him to take what he liked and I should be satisfied if he gave me an account of them - I never gave him leave to sell any.

Q. Did you never go to his house, and say, "Sell those nuts for me?" A. Yes, - that was before he was in my employ; I always paid his wages regularly - he once bought two dozen dry nuts of me.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I was fetched by Castello; I followed Barry to Petticoat-lane, to the prisoner's house; I went in afterwards, and the prisoner's mother said there were no nuts, but under the counter I found thirty-one in a basket - twelve of them have milk, the others are all dry.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived with him twice - I gave him an account of all nuts; he told me to take what I pleased, provided I gave him an account of them; I told Barry to take these, but not to steal them - I meant to sell them to some Jew boys.

MARY AULT . I was servant to the prosecutor. The night before the prisoner was taken I heard the prosecutor say he might take as many cocoa-nuts as he chose, and have them drawn off from his wages at the end of the week - he often said so - he said it every evening when they were talking - I do not live there now; he was to take as many as he could sell, and account for them at the end of the week; I am sure this was said the night before he was taken. Mistress and I fell out, and she gave me warning - I was not before the Lord Mayor.

J. N. CASTELLO. There is no truth whatever in what she says - we parted with her as we thought her intimate with a boy.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-244

737. JOHN MURRAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Patton , about the hour of six o'clock on the night of the 21st of January , with intent to steal .

JOSEPH PAGE . I am a patrol of Cripplegate. On the 21st of February, a little before six o'clock, I saw two men near the parlour of Mrs. Patton's house, Well-street ; I went up, and they walked away - I found the window open, pulled it down, and knocked; I heard somebody coming up-stairs; I called out "Don't open the door, but bring a light;" a light was brought - I then went into the room, and found the prisoner; I found nothing on him - he said nothing.

MARY ANN PATTON . I rent this house. The prisoner was found in my room; I was up-stairs - he is a stranger; I had not been in the parlour for three hours; the window was then shut, but not fastened; I had been out since that - my servant is not here; whether she had been in the room I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270215-245

738. JOHN SLANEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Paul , from his person .

JAMES PAUL. I am depository of a Society for Promoting Religious Knowledge . On the 14th of January I was coming out of Finsbury chapel, and missed my handkerchief; I saw the prisoner running away; I followed and accused him of it; he abused me, then gave it me, and tried to strike me.

WILLIAM MARKWELL . I took him in charge, and found six duplicates on him; four of them are for handkerchiefs.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up on the steps, and asked several people if it was theirs.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270215-246

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

739. MARY MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 child's coral, value 5s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 5s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 1 table cloth, value 2s.; 1 miniature painting, framed, value 20s.; 3 spoons, value 20s.; 1 cloak, value 5s.; 1 neck-chain, value 20s.; 1 pair of stays, value 1s., and 2 brooches, value 11s. , the goods of Edward Sayers , her master.

JUSTICE SAYERS . I am the wife of Edward Sayers; we live in Claremont-place, Rotherhithe - my husband is in the West Indies - the prisoner was my servant for a week- she was hired by the year - she left on the 5th of February, without notice, between five and six in the morning, and I missed the articles stated in the indictment - the miniature, chain, and brooch, were taken from my dressing-glass drawer, and the rest from different parts of the house - she was taken on the 11th, when a waterman gave me information.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. I received information, and was looking for the person on Sunday the 11th; the prosecutrix came and said she had received information where she was; I went with her to Goden-place-court, Minories; I found her laying on the bed with the prosecutrix's cloak round her; I said "Where are the other things" - she said "I will give them to you;" I found several of these articles in the room - she gave me two duplicates, which led to the rest of the property.

JOHN COOKE . I am servant to Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker, Minories; I have a petticoat and table-cloth, pawned by the prisoner, on the 10th of February.

JOB VALENTINE WATKINS . I am shopman to John Allen, pawnbroker, Sparrow-corner; I have two spoons and a broach, pawned by the prisoner on the 5th of February.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270215-247

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

740. MARY CALLAGHAN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MARGARET JEWELL . I am bar-maid to Mr. Bates of the French Horn, Beech-street, Barbican ; the prisoner came there about the 26th of January, and had half a quartern of gin - she gave me a sixpence, which I sent to Mr. Bates, who said it was bad; I took the gin from her - she took the sixpence and went away; she came again on the Friday following and had half a quartern of gin, and gave me a shilling, which I put into the till; as soon as she was gone, I recollected her, and took it out - it was a bad one - there was no other shilling in the till- Mrs. Bates came down and gave it to a butcher; I made no mark on it, but should know it, as the bottom of the head was larger than usual; I am sure it was bad - she came on the Monday week following - I recollected her - she had half a quartern of gin, and gave me another bad shilling - I asked how she could come again with bad money - she said she had never been there before - she was detained, and I delivered the same shilling to the officer, with the one the butcher had returned me; I am certain she paid me two bad shillings before.

MARY BATES . On the 26th of January I came down into my bar, and gave Wynn change for half-a-crown; I gave him one shilling out of the till, and there being no other, I gave him a shilling out of my pocket - he brought one back as bad - I was not at home when it was given to the officer - it was kept on the mantle-piece; I cannot say whether the one produced is the one I took from the till, or from my pocket.

WILLIAM WATKINS WYNN . I am a butcher. Mary Bates gave me two shillings in change; I had no others; I went to Whitechapel in about three hours, and there found one was a bad one; I returned the same to her - it had not been out of my possession - the other was a good one; I had no others about me.

JOSEPH HOUGHTON . I am a constable, and produce two shillings; one was given me from the counter, and one from the shelf - Jewell marked them; I have had them ever since - I apprehended the prisoner - she would not tell me where she lived.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin - these shillings are both counterfeits, and from one die.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Of the single offence only.

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties .

Reference Number: t18270215-248

741. JAMES HARTWELL was indicted for obtaining, by false pretences, 1 hat , the goods of Charles Edward Hick and Richard Filstone .

The firm being Messrs. Charles Edward Hick, John Richard Tilstone , and Richard Mersh , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18270215-249

742. HENRY PADWICK was indicted for a fraud .

MR. LEA WILSON . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Wood-street, in partnership with Stephen and Edward Wilson. On the 20th of January the prisoner came and presented this order to me, saying he came from Mrs. Badham, for two black silk handkerchiefs - I gave him two in con