Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th January 1827.
Reference Number: 18270111
Reference Number: f18270111-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ANTHONY BROWN , MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 11th of JANUARY, 1827, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1827.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ANTHONY BROWN , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Alexander , Knt., Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; and John Atkins , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Key , Esq.; John Crowder , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City: and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Thomas Thorn ,

John M. Sunley ,

Richard Noble ,

Wm. T. Schofield ,

John Payne ,

Thomas Castles ,

Wm. Codd ,

James Thompson ,

Lawrence Ingram ,

John Tookey ,

Wm. Rd. Starkey ,

Henry Gosling .

Second

Wm. Croggan ,

Francis Jones ,

Thomas Muston ,

Andrew Moore ,

Wm. Bond ,

Nathaniel Rutt ,

Wm. Charlwood ,

Thomas Newman ,

John Crossley ,

Jas. D. Thompson ,

James Phillips ,

Wm. Trull .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

George Clark ,

Henry Carr ,

Clement Cheese ,

John Crofts ,

James Cooke ,

Thos. W. Downes ,

Thomas Cox ,

Henry Davis ,

Thomas Dodd ,

George Daw ,

Richard Daniel ,

Charles Douglas .

Second

Tho. H. Dallimore ,

George Davis ,

Joseph Deacon ,

David Dewar ,

John Darnford ,

James Edmonds ,

Charles Edwards ,

Wm. Eustace ,

Wm. Dovey ,

Chas. Wm. Elton ,

Charles Cameron ,

Wm. Elliott .

Third

James Cavalier ,

Wm. Cutbush ,

Wm. Cooke ,

Wm. Carter ,

Geo. Cruikshanks ,

Wm. Cawley ,

Wm. Clarke ,

Henry Carles ,

Wm. Corney ,

Wm. Comfurth ,

John Cooper ,

Mark Cooke .

Fourth

Charles Belt,

Joseph Barber,

Wm. Butler,

Wm. Bailey,

John Burbidge,

John Cross,

Edward Coleman,

Thomas Chadwick,

Thomas Clarke,

Randal Chatterton,

Daniel Collier,

Edmund Chapel.

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 11, 1827.

BROWN, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury.

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

Reference Number: t18270111-1

279. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Rudduck , about the hour of six in the night of the 29th of December , at St. Anne, Westminster , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 4 yards of cloth, value 24s. , his property.

WILLIAM RUDDUCK . I am a tailor , and live in Greek-street, Soho . On the 29th of December I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon - this cloth was then in the window, which was quite whole. I returned at eleven, and found the shop window broken in at the bottom, and missed this four yards of cloth; it had evidently been drawn through the hole in the glass. Here is the cloth (looking at it) - I am certain it is mine.

HENRY GODDARD . I am a constable. On the 29th of December, about six o'clock in the evening. I was in Greek-street, Soho, and observed the prisoner and two others standing at Mr. Rudduck 's shop window - I walked up the street, a little way above the house, suspecting them; I crossed over, and when I came opposite the house I saw the prisoner run away, with something under his arm; his two companions followed him - I pursued, and saw them all three stop at the corner of Frith-street; at the top of Queen-street I observed the prisoner standing against the rails, and his two companions standing before him, hiding him. I pushed them aside, laid hold of the prisoner, and asked him where he got that coat, which I thought it was then, it being dark - he said, "It is my coat;" I asked where he got it - he said it was his coat, threw it at me, and said, "Take it" - he ran away; I pursued; he said to one of his companions, "Trip him up," which he attempted to do. I still followed - he was never more tham two or three yards from me; I caught him in Dean-street - he was never out of my sight; there was a handkerchief with it, which he was trying to wrap it in when I went up - it was very dark; Mr. Rudduck's shop window was not lighted.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me break the window? A. No, nor did I see him take the cloth out of it; he ran down Frith-street, across Compton-street, into Dean-street, which is only two streets from where he drew it at me; I caught hold of him two or three times - he was never more than three yards from me - it was very light in Compton-street; I had the cloth in my hand, or I should have taken him before; I kept calling Stop thief! but nobody offered to stop him.

Prisoner. I am not the person whom he took with the cloth; I never saw the handkerchief that was round it in my life. I was taken four streets from the place. Witness. I took no person but him - he threw the cloth at me - and as I was going to the office he told me that when he had the cloth in his hand he thought it d - d coarse stuff. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18270111-2

Before Mr. Justice Burrough .

280. JOSEPH FINCH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bryant , about ten o'clock in the night of the 31st of December , at St. Mary-le-bone , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 hat, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., and 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Edmund John Galton .

EDMUND JOHN GALTON . I am assistant to John Bryant , a surgeon , who lives in the Edgware-road , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On the 31st of December, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was in the parlour adjoining the surgery, and heard a weight fall off the lock of the door - we had placed it there to give an alarm when any one entered; the door was shut, and the catch had fastened; I did not hear the door open, but heard the weight fall; I immediately went into the shop, which is part of the dwelling-house, and missed my hat and gloves. I found the door open. I went out, and saw the prisoner turning the corner about thirty yards off, with a hat in his hand; I followed him across Nutford-place - I had lost sight of him for about a minute and a half, when he turned the corner - nobody else was near; I went directly to the corner, and saw him cross Nutford-place into Little Queen-street - he had still got the hat, and is the same person; I followed him across Great Queen-street into Newland-street - I called Stop thief! there - two other persons were standing a few doors down the street; they made no attempt to follow him, and about fifty yards before I caught him he threw the hat away - I still followed; he ran right against a dead wall, stopped short, and turned round towards me, walking, and I collared him - I am quite positive he is the person; I asked what he had done with the hat which he had taken from the shop - he denied all knowledge of it; I called to Poole, the watchman, who took him - a person brought me my hat and gloves immediately after I took him. When we got to the watch-house he said he was sick - we said it was no such thing; he then said, "I am not sick - I am drunk," but he was not so. I returned home, and missed my great coat from the same seat the hat was taken from - I have not found that. I saw nobody but him when I first went into the street. I went to the shop about three minutes after I heard the weight fall.

BENJAMIN POOLE . I am a watchman. Mr. Galton delivered the prisoner to me - I took him to the watch-house. I produce the hat and gloves.

MR. GALTON . They are mine, I am positive.

Prisoner's Defence. I turned the corner, and was coming down Newland-street - I met the prosecutor coming towards me - some voices out of a window said, "That is him;" when I had passed him about thirty yards he turned round, and collared me, and said I had been to his shop, and taken his hat, but I had not. I was rather intoxicated, having been with a few friends. Mr. Bryant said he would give me a good character, having known my friends for fifteen years. The prosecutor refused to see my mother on Monday.

MR. GALTON . That is false - I was at Clerkenwell on Monday, all day. I believe Mr. Bryant has attended his mother in illness, but I know nothing about him. It is by Mr. Bryant 's wish that I prosecute him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18270111-3

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

281. HONOR (THE WIFE OF JAMES) BALDWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , at St. James, Westminster , 1 writing-desk, value 2l.; 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 silver star, value 1l.; 1 wafer-seal, value 10s.; 1 portrait, value 1l.; 2 purses, value 2s., and 1 pair of compasses, value 1s., the goods of George Hamilton Chichester , Esq. , commonly called Earl of Belfast , in his dwelling-house .

HON. EARL OF BELFAST. I live in Pall Mall , and keep the house - it is in the parish of St. James; my names are George Hamilton Chichester. On the 21st of December, between seven and half-past seven o'clock in the evening, as I was going out to dinner, I went into the library, on the first floor, and missed my writing-desk off the table; it was dark - I made inquiry about it, and saw it the next day at Marlborough-street Office; it was then broken open, and a gold watch was missing from it; I missed nothing else from the library; there was a seal and other things in the desk, but they still remained there- I had seen the watch in the desk within a week at least - the desk had a spring lock; I know nothing of the prisoner, but I have heard she is a very honest woman.

WILLIAM DE COURCY . I am steward and butler to Lord Belfast. On the 21st of December his lordship inquired for his desk - I could not find it; I got an officer, and about nine o'clock that night the door bell rang; I went to the door, and found the desk on the step of the door. I saw a man go by - in consequence of what passed between me and the man I followed the prisoner; when I first saw her she was walking quietly on the opposite side of the way - the man whom I had spoken to went away without accompanying me; I had never seen the prisoner before; I said I thought she was the person who left the desk at the door - she said she knew nothing of it, and told me to let her go; I asked who she was - she said her husband was a servant out of a situation, and he had lived at Lord Belfast's; I did not ask her name, but took her back to the house - she was not out of my presence till she was taken up to Lady Belfast; Avis, the officer, whom I had fetched, told her he could make her no promise, nor did I promise or threaten her; the officer and I wished her to see Lady Belfast - I took her up to her ladyship, and she stated to her that she got in at the area steps, with a view to borrow some money of the housekeeper, but not seeing her she went up the back stairs, and meeting nobody she went into his lordship's library, and took this desk - that she came down the front stairs, and one of the footmen let her out at the hall-door - she acknowledged that she took it to the house of Lilly, got it opened there, and took the watch out, which she pawned in Tottenham-court-road, for 35.; she produced 30s. of the money, and said she had given a girl, who went to the pawnbroker's with her, the other 5s., for her trouble, and had destroyed the duplicate; she seemed extremely sorry for it, and begged for mercy, saying the devil had tempted her.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I went to Lord Belfast's about half-past eight o'clock on this night, and about nine o'clock the butler fetched me down stairs - I found him with the desk and the prisoner in custody; I took her up to her ladyship, who knew her; I asked her name and address, which she gave me - I asked her what had become of the property out of the desk - she told her ladyship she was the person who had taken it, but she had taken nothing out except the watch, which she had pawned for 35s., in Tottenham-court-road, and she gave me 30s. of the money; there were some books, a portrait, and several other things in the desk, which I gave up; I went to Mr. Lowther's, the pawnbroker's, where she said she had pawned the watch, and found it there, pawned in the name of Smith, for 35s., as she stated; she told me where she took the desk, and I went and apprehended Lilly and Owen - she said she came there to borrow a few shillings of the housekeeper, as her family were in great distress at home, and had no bread to eat, and that seeing nobody down stairs the devil tempted her to go up into the library, and take this desk, and she was very unhappy till she brought it back, and put it at the door; she said she had given Owen 5s. for her trouble, and when I apprehended Owen she gave me the 5s. piece again.

HANNAH OWEN . I left my situation on the evening in question - I and my aunt were going out about half-past seven o'clock, and the prisoner, whom I knew, sent a little boy to say I was wanted; I went over to her, at Mrs. Rogers', in Archer-street, where she lodged - she asked me if I could keep a secret - I said, "What have you done?" she said, "You see what I have got - it is a box;" I asked where she got it - she said she had found it; I asked where; she said, "Never mind - I found it on the stop of a door;" it was this desk, and was not open then; she asked if she could go any where to open it - I called my aunt, and she asked her if she had got a room where she could open a box - she brought it over to the house; William Lilly , my uncle, had just come in - she asked for a hammer - he said, "It is a pity to deface it, there will be a reward offered if you have found it;" she said she would have it opened, and he took the hammer with a view to raise it open, but did not open it; I was in the room - it was opened, but I could not see by whom; it was done with my uncle's hammer - I saw it after it was opened, and saw her take a watch out of it. I accompanied her to Tottenham-court-road, where she pawned it for 35s. - I did not know it was stolen, but after she came

away she said, "Ann, here is 5s. for your trouble," and said, "if you won't tell, I will tell you where I got it" - that she got it from Lord Belfast's; I do not remember making her any answer, but I got 1d. worth of string, and some brownpaper to tie the desk up again, and accompained her as far as Waterloo-place, and then left her with it - I did not see her again till I was taken to the watch-house myself; I waited for her in Waterloo-place three-quarters of an hour, but as she did not come I went home. His lordship's house is in Pall Mall East.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I had got a box? you asked where - I said, "Never mind, it is not my own, I must return it, and you said you would see the contents? A. No - I did not strike it twice with the hammer myself.

WILLIAM LILEY . I am a stone-sawyer, and live in Archer-street - Owen is my wife's neice, and had left her situation that evening. I came home about half-past seven o'clock; she went out on an errand, and returned in five minutes, with the prisoner, saying, in her presence,"Here is Mrs. Baldwin, who has found a little box, will you give her leave to open it?" - I examined it, and said,"Have you found this?" she said, Yes, on the step of a door, and would I be so good as to try and open it - I took the hammer, and struck the brass-work in front, but it not coming open I put down the hammer, and begged her to let it be, as she would get a better reward if it was not opened; she said, "No, I am determined to see what is in it, as I have found it," and opened it herself - her back was towards me, and I did not exactly know how she opened it. I saw the watch in her hand; I kept my seat, and did not get up to look in the desk; she asked Owen to accompany her to raise something on the watch - they went out, returned, and told me what they had got for it- I began to think things were not right, and begged her to take the desk home again from where she got it, and as I persuaded her, she packed it up in brown paper, and asked Owen to accompany her; the prisoner took it out under her cloak, as she had brought it in.

Prisoner. Q. Did she not give it two blows with the hammer, and I did not touch it? A. No; you asked me to open it, and you opened it yourself.

BENJAMIN REEVE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Lowther , a pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road. On the 21st of December the prisoner pawned this watch - Owen was with her - I am certain of her person. As it was a gold watch I asked if it was her own; she said she was sent with it by a lady named Miller , residing at No. 3, Thornhaugh-street - I gave her 35s. on it; I am certain both of her and Owen. The prisoner stated that her name was Smith - I put both names on the duplicate. - The watch was in Mr. Lowther's stock till he produced it at Marlborough-street.

GEORGE LOWTHER. I took this watch to Marlborough-street - it has been in my possession ever since, till this morning when I gave it to Reeve.

LORD BELFAST. This is my watch - I have had it several years - this is my crest on it; I saw it about a week before the loss. The things altogether are worth more than 40s. certainly.

WILLIAM DE COURCY . The prisoner could get to the back stairs through a passage which leads to the kitchen; she could avoid the kitchen. The area-door had been left unlocked longer than usual, but there are two doors before that in the passage - I cannot say whether they were fastened - they might be ajar; if so she could get to the library without opening any door, but there is a door on the top of the stairs, which has a spring-lock - it is possible that might have been open.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down the area, not intending to steal, but I was in great distress - my children wanted bread; I thought I should find the housekeeper in the nursery, but as I went up stairs, seeing this door open, in an evil moment my distress tempted me to take it; the moment I got out I regretted what I had done, but the area was closed, and I could not return.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering .

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, believing she was in distress, and had borne a good character.

Reference Number: t18270111-4

Before Mr. Justice Burrough .

282. THERESA DAVIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Graham , about two o'clock in the night of the 10th of December , at St. James, Westminster , with intent to steal, and stealing 1 coat, value 10s. 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 15s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 1 half-crown, 3 sixpences, and 1 halfpenny, the property of William Henry Edwards ; and 1 towel, value 3d. , the goods of the said John Graham .

WILLIAM HENRY EDWARDS . I lodge at John Graham 's, in Crown-court , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. On the 10th of December I went home about half-past twelve or one o'clock at night, and went to bed; I got up at seven next morning, and found that my bed-room window was forced open - it had been nailed up; I found the nails inside were broken; a piece of paper had been pasted over a broken pane - that was turn away; a hand could then be put in, and reach the nail; I missed a frock-coat off a nail in the room, and a pair of trousers from the foot of the bed, which I had pulled off the night before; there was one half-crown, three sixpences, and a pair of gloves in the trousers pocket; I also missed a black waistcoat; they were all safe the night before - I found them that morning at the watch-house - nobody else slept in the room; the window opens inside, on hinges - I found it wide open when I awoke - it was light then. The prisoner was a stranger.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not meet me that evening in Crown-court, and take me into your apartments? A. I never saw her till she was at the office; she was never in my room to my knowledge; I had left my father's house about half-past ten o'clock, then went, and drank two or three pots of half and half among six of us; I was perfectly sober, and was not in any woman's company.

SILAS LEACH . I am a watchman of St. Ann's. On Monday morning, the 11th of December, about half-past three o'clock, I was on duty in King-street, three or four hundred yards from Crown-court, which is in the parish of St. James - the prisoner passed me on the other side of the way, and turned own Hayes-court; seeing something concealed under her shawl I stepped up to her, and said,"What have you got here, mistress?" she said a coat

and trousers; as I took her to the watch-house she desired me several times not to take her, and said if I would not it lay in her power to do me some good; when we got to the watch-house I found she had this coat and trunsers tied in a handkerchief, in a rumpled manner, and also a towel; there was a half-crown, three sixpences, and a halfpenny in the trousers pocket; she said a man named Rusby gave them to her in Crown-court, and three minutes afterwards she said his name was Burn; I do not know any persons of those names.

WILLIAM HENRY EDWARDS . This coat and trousers are mine; the gloves were in the pocket; the towel was in my room, but it belongs to John Graham, my landlord - there is some blood on it, which came from my nose.

Prisoner's Defence. He met me in the court, and took me up to his room; he tied up these things, and gave them to me, saying he was going into the country, and should return in six weeks, and would call for them - that he had earned but 3s. 6d. that week, and was going to the country. I desired the watchman not to take me, not being accustomed to such things.

WILLIAM HENRY EDWARDS re-examined. Mine is a first floor back room; there are some long leads lead along under the window; I do not know how anybody could get on the leads, except through the window of another house, or out of the yard; I could get on the leads - they run up close against the window. Mr. Graham let me in that night, and saw me lock my room door.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Reference Number: t18270111-5

283. JOHN PIZZY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 ram, price 4l. , the property of Joshua Kirby Trimmer .

WILLIAM GEORGE . I am shepherd to Mr. Trimmer. On Thursday afternoon, the 21st of December, between three and four o'clock, I had seven score and fourteen of his sheep safe in an enclosed meadow, belonging to Mr. Tinder, and on the next morning, between nine and ten o'clock, one was missing - I searched all round the ditches and about the meadow, but could not find it - it has not been found; it could not have strayed.

SARAH HARRIS . On the 21st of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, my mother sent me for a loaf; I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Tinder 's meadow, with a sheep on his shoulder - Mr. Trimmer 's sheep were there; it was a dark sheep, like the rest: when he passed me, I said, Halloo; and he said, Halloo, in a very gruff manner - he had hold of the two fore-feet, the head hung before and the legs behind; I stood in the gap-way, and saw him go into his grandmother's with it; he lives just above my mother, but he took it into his grandmother's - I was so near him, that the sheep's head brushed against me - I have known him for three years; it was not quite light.

Prisoner. Q. How could you tell whether it was a sheep or not, when I had it on my shoulder in a sack? A. It was not in a sack, but naked on his shoulder.

Prisoner's Defence. It was a sack of clumps, which I had got for my grandmother's fire.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-6

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

284. SAMUEL WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , at St. Martin in the Fields , 2 watches, value 7l.; 1 seal, value 15s.; 1 watch-key, value 3d., and 4 sovereigns, the property of Francis Clark , in the dwelling-house of William Sitch .

MARTHA CLARK . I am the wife of Francis Clark - we live at No. 1, Seymour-court, Chandos-street , in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields. My father rented the house at the time this happened, which was on the 16th of June, 1822, but we lived there as well - my father is now dead; his name was William Sitch ; he died in May, 1825, and was the housekeeper till then; my mother keeps it now. I have known the prisoner for ten years; he is a brass-founder , and lodged in the house four years ago last June, for three months, and he had lodged with us before. On the evening of the 16th of June, 1822, he left the house without any notice whatever; we employed an officer to search for him, but could never find him till he was apprehended. At six o'clock in the evening of the 16th of June, 1822, I placed a metal watch and a silver watch, a metal key, a gold key, and four sovereigns, in a drawer - I went out, leaving the prisoner in the house; I returned in twenty minutes; he was gone, and this property also; it has not been found - it was in a drawer in the first-floor front room; he had no business in that room, but could go there - I saw them safe two minutes before I went out - the drawer was shut, but not locked; it was all my husband's property; I had left the prisoner in the first-floor back room, where he lodged - my mother and father were in the house, and nobody else - I saw the prisoner in his room five minutes before I went out, and spoke to him: the two watches were worth 7l., and there were four sovereigns and a seal.

DAVID GEO. ALDERSON . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 26th of December, I apprehended the prisoner in St. Martin's workhouse - I asked Mr. Clark, who was with me, if he was the person - he said, Yes; I told him I apprehended him for stealing four sovereigns and two watches from Mr. Clark - he said he was very glad of it, for he had suffered a great deal ever since he had stolen the articles. When we came out of the workhouse, he said I had no occasion to lay hold of his arm, for he would not run away - that he told some of his shopmates that he had done the robbery, in order that Clark might hear of it, and nobody else be accused.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18270111-7

Before Mr. Justice Burrough .

285. JAMES LAWRENCE was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Joseph Cross , in the night of the 20th of December , and stealing 1 copper pump, value 25s., and 1 leaden cistern, value 25s. , the goods of John Appleton .

JOSEPH CROSS . I am a dyer , and live at Bromley, in Middlesex . My premises are all enclosed, with my dwelling-house, by a brick wall. About September, Mr. Appleton requested leave to put a garden-engine and pump on my premises - they remained there till the 20th of December, within the enclosure; I missed them about half-past seven o'clock in the morning of the 21st of December, from the dye-house.

JAMES SHIELDS . I am a Bow-street officer. On Thursday morning, the 21st of December, I was on duty, and saw the prisoner in a lane leading from Bromley to Stepney, about half-past eight o'clock; he was coming in a direction from the prosecutor's, and walking very slow, with a basket and a copper pump on his shoulder. I asked what he had got - he said it was a pump which he was going to repair; that he was a carpenter, and was going to make a box for it, and that he had brought it from Mr. Miller's, at Bromley - I asked what part of Bromley - he said he could not tell me, but he was a gentleman, and kept two servants and a gardener; that he (the prisoner) lived in a court in Brick-lane, but he could not remember what court, or the number of the house. I found part of a leaden cistern in the basket - as we went to the watch-house, he said he had received it from Mr. Miller's gardener; I asked if he could take me to Miller's; he said he should say no more about it - I delivered the property to Daintry.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I received this pump and cistern from Shields. I found on the prisoner a chissel and a knife, which appeared to have been cutting lead - Mr. Appleton's servant delivered me a piece of lead, which matches with the cistern - it appears to have been cut with a knife.

JOHN APPLETON. This is part of a copper pump and leaden cistern which are mine, and had been put in Mr. Cross's premises - I saw them there about a week before; I consider the engine worth 2l. 10s.; it was in a tolerable state, except part being broken - there is a particular mark on them both, by which I knew them; the cistern was complete, and had been separated from the pump on the premises that night.

JOSEPH CROSS re-examined. My wall is seven feet high; but there was a small hole made for a water-spout, which was broken away, large enough to admit a man through.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that an acquaintance named Lovejoy had told him he had a pump to repair, took him to the premises, and desired him to carry them to town for him.

GUILTY. Aged 51.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of burglary .

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-8

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

286. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Moses Desse , about seven o'clock in the night of the 10th of December , at St. George , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 6 shifts, value 30s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 5 gowns, value 3l.; 12 handkerchiefs, value 20s.; 2 table-cloths, value 6s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 7s.; 1 coat, value 20s.; 2 shirts, value 14s.; 1 box, value 5s.; 9 rings, value 4l.; 2 tooth-picks, value 1s.; 1 buckle, value 1s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 40s.; 1 stock, value 2s. 6d., and 1 sovereign , his property.

MOSES DESSE . On Sunday, the 10th of December, I lived in Henry-street, Back-church-lane , and rented the whole house; it is in the parish of St. George in the East ; I left there on the 14th. On the 10th of December I went out, about five o'clock; I tried the door, and it was double-locked - I put the key into my pocket; I did not return till about eight o'clock, when a little girl fetched me, saying that my house was robbed - I had left nobody at home, nor any light in the house; it was quite dark when I left; I found the street-door open on my return, and a man minding the house; the backyard door, which I had also locked, was open; I cannot say how the doors had been opened; I found three drawers opened, and some things hanging out of them. and others laying about the floor - I missed the articles stated in the indictment - I found the tea-caddy at the office, which I had left on the top of the drawers when I went out; a box of rings was also found on the prisoner, that was inside my drawer, and a paper which was taken off it was thrown on the floor - the box is worth 5s., and the rings about 4l.; I had only bought the tea-caddy four days, it was worth two guineas.

MARY ANN LONG . I am twelve years old. I was coming by the prosecutor's house between seven and eight o'clock, saw his door open, and informed the neighbours.

JOSEPH DEFRIES . Long gave me information between seven and eight o'clock - I went over and searched the house, but found nobody there; the door was open, and the things strewed about the floor; I sent for Desso and minded the house till he came.

JOHN McWILLIAMS . I am a patrol. On Sunday night, the 10th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Bell-lane, Spitalfields - the prisoner came along the lane with something under his arm - Tyrell. my partner, stopped him with this tea-caddy under his arm, covered with a white dimitty petticoat - he asked where he was going with it; he said that a gentleman met him at Whitechapel church, and gave him a shilling to carry it to Shoreditch church, where he was to meet him, and that the gentleman told him to go the back way with it - I assisted in searching him, and found a crow-bar in his left-hand inside pocket, and a handkerchief; he had a great coat on, which we thought was his own; we took him before the Magistrate on Monday, and he was remanded for us to find the owner. When he came up for a second examination, he had made away with the great coat; but from the description Desse gave, it was his.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 10th of December, between seven and eight o'clock, I was in Bell-lane with two other officers - I saw the prisoner running up the lane with this caddy and petticoat - I stopped him, and asked where he brought it from; he said that a man met him by Whitechapel church, and gave him a shilling to take it to Shoreditch church - I took it from him, and produce it - Newsom searched his breeches pocket, and took out a little box with nine gold rings - we took him to the watch-house, and found a sovereign and some silver on him.

JOSEPH NEWSOM . I am a patrol. I was with the other officers, and found a box, containing nine gold rings. in the prisoner's breeches pocket; also a steel brace-buckle, and a silver and a bone tooth-pick; I found a sovereign, a crown, a half-crown, and a cotton shirt on him - he said the same gentleman gave them all to him to carry to Shoreditch church.

MOSES DESSE . This tea-caddy, box, the rings, the shirt, and every thing else is mine; they were safe in the morning before I went out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing Whitechapel church, and heard some gentlemen, as I took them to be, talking loud - I thought they were quarrelling, and stopped to look at them; one said, "Do you want a job? take this caddy and things for me to Shoreditch church, and I will give you a shilling; if you are there before me, go into a public-house opposite, and get a pint of beer, till I come;" I told the officers that I was a journeyman baker, where I lodged, and where I had been formerly employed; I have no friends, not expecting to be tried to-day.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18270111-9

Before Mr. Justice Burrough .

287. THOMAS DUGGAN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Isaac Richardson and others, on the night of the 31st of December , and stealing 2 boxes, value 40s. , the goods of Mary Coleman .

MARY COLEMAN . I am servant to Isaac Richardson , who lives in Castle-street, in the parish of St. Martin . On the 31st of December, between three and four o'clock, I went out, and returned at ten minutes after seven; it was then dark - I went into my room, and missed two boxes; I alarmed my family, and Mr. David Carr went outside on the leads of my room; I found both my boxes on the joists of the door of the next house, which is being rebuilt.

THOMAS CARR . I am in partnership with Mr. Richardson, David Carr , and others. On the alarm being given, I went out at the street-door, and three men ran out of the next house; I ran partly across the street, and the prisoner ran out after them; I followed, and secured him; I saw him come out of the door of the next house.

JOHN GROOM . I was coming from St. Martin's-court, about half-past five o'clock on this evening, and saw the prisoner and two others (whom I knew) standing in Castle-street; there are some new buildings near the shop: I saw the prisoner go up the court, and by a house which is just rebuilt - one of the party pressed against the hoard, which raised my suspicion - I followed them for some time, and at last thought they observed me; they went round Rupert-street; I placed myself in Bear-street, and saw them come down to the prosecutors' house once, and go away again - I afterwards found the prisoner in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-10

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

288. THOMAS HOARE and WILLIAM READ were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 75 lbs. of lead, value 12s., the goods of William Brooks , and fixed to a certain out-house in the yard of his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a brass-founder , and live in New-street-square, in St. Bride's parish . On the 6th of December, I received information that some lead was stolen from the gutters of an out-house which is in my yard - I had not noticed the gutters for six weeks - the prisoners were apprehended on the 9th; I then found a quantity of lead taken from the gutters. There is a cow-house adjoining the out-house; persons could get to my premises from there - I found about 75 lbs. of lead of the same description in the cow-house, but more has been taken - I saw it applied to the gutters, but cannot say whether it matched.

BENJAMIN CREW . I am nearly ten years old, and live in Robinhood-court, Shoe-lane - I am in the service of Mr. Smith, a cow-keeper, whose premises join Mr. Brooks' out-house. About a quarter to eight o'clock, on the night before the prisoners were apprehended, I saw them both come in at our gate with the horse and cart; they work for Mr. Dupree, whose horse and cart stood on our premises - they went to the shed, and unharnessed the horse; I heard Hoare say to Read, "If anybody comes, whistle;" he was then up the cow-house ladder, by the shed - Read stood by the ladder, watching him; my mistress came out, and then he whistled to Hoare, who was up in the loft - my mistress went in-doors, and fastened the door; Hoare then called Read up into the loft, and when he had been up there about five minutes, he came down, and then Hoare threw down some lead; he then came down, took the lead, and covered it with some straw, a little higher up the shed than where I was (they could not see me; I was laying in the cow's manger, and could see what they did) - they fetched a pail of water for the horse, then put out the light, and went away - before they went away they stopped up in the shed a little while: I got out of the manger, and went and told my master, who went for the officers; this was after they put out the light - they were gone when the officers came. I saw Hoare again about six o'clock in the morning, in the shed, and he went up into the loft, and I saw lead thrown down, but cannot say that he threw it down - he got a great stone and beat the lead, and then covered it up in the same place: he was taken on the premises, about nine o'clock that morning - Read was taken that day at his master's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did they leave the premises that night? A. Yes; they could have carried the lead away then, if they chose; I cannot say that they carried any away - there was a penny candle lighted at the end of the shed; there were ten cows there; I looked under two cows' bellies, through their legs, and saw them - the manger is a trough on the ground; I knelt down - part of the shed and loft belongs to Dupree; he keeps his hay there; but they were on Mr. Brooks' premises: the shed is rather longer than this Court - I saw them throw the lead down, and after they were gone, I went and showed it to master. I said nothing to my mistress when she came out. I could see them plainly, but they did not see me - nobody but their master and his men have access to the shed.

COURT. Q. Who had the care of the cart and horse? A. Hoare; Read was not often employed about the horse. Dupree's other men are employed at plumbing; he is a plumber.

GEORGE SMITH . Crew is my servant; the prisoners were in Mr. Dupree's employ. On the evening of the 8th of December, as the wet came through the ceiling of a room in my house, I went on the roof, and I went on Brooks' premises to get to my roof; this was on the Wednesday before the Saturday on which the prisoners were

examined - I saw the lead was cut from Brooks' gutters. Crew gave me information on Friday night, between six and seven o'clock; it was after dark - I had not seen the prisoners come in - I went with two constables that evening, and found a roll of lead in the horse-stall, covered with straw; it was in Mr. Dupree's part of the shed - it was fresh cut; the edges were bright - the officers stood outside the door with me that night, and we saw the prisoners come out of the cow-house door; they were suffered to go away, as I had not found the lead then: I was in the shed next morning when Hoare came; the officer took him; I was not near enough to hear what he said - he had the care of the horse.

Cross-examined. Q. On what day was Hoare taken? A. On the Saturday. The lead was not too heavy for one man to carry away - there is no division in the shed - both the prisoners had velveteen jackets on; there did not appear to be any thing about them; Hoare came to his business as usual the next morning; we had not spoken to him at night - I do not think that he saw the constable.

THOMAS WEAVELL . I am an officer, and live in Dean-street, Fetter-lane. On Friday evening, the 8th of December, I happened to be in Smith's dairy, which is near this cow-shed - Crew ran into the dairy, and informed me that something was going on wrong; I waited in Robinhood-court, and saw the prisoner come out of the premises; Read came out four or five minutes before Hoare - I afterwards went into the shed, and Crew, in my presence, discovered the lead in Mr. Dupree's horse-stall - my brother-officer put his mark on it, and put it in the same place: next morning I was waiting outside, and Crew came and said that another roll was thrown down - I went into the shed and took Hoare; he asked what I took him for - my brother-officer told him he knew what it was for; I found another roll added to the lead which was there the night before - I went on Mr. Brooks' premises, and about sixty feet of lead had been taken from there - I found a knife on Hoare with marks of lead on it; only 75 lbs. were found - the largest quantity was thrown down on the Saturday morning - I took Read in Mr. Dupree's shop; he said he was innocent.

Cross-examined. Q. Both the prisoners were in Mr. Dupree's service? A. Yes; I do not know that it was their duty to have knives, but I found one on each of them.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a constable. I was called to Smith's premises, and saw both the prisoners come out before we searched the cow-house - Crew found the lead in our presence; we marked it, and left it covered up as we had found it. Next morning, at six o'clock, I met Hoare about fifteen yards from the cow-house door - I called Weavell, we waited some time, and as Read did not come; we went in and took Hoare - he asked what it was for; I said, "You know what is under the manger, don't you?" he made no particular answer; I searched him at the Compter, and Weavell found the largest knife on Read - there was much more lead added to the quantity in the morning, and that was quite wet; it was a rainy night.

HOARE's Defence. The place is open for any one to go into - there are three doors, one of which is opened, and more is carried on there than you are aware of; there is dog-fighting and gambling of all description.

HOARE - GUILTY . Aged 33.

READ - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-11

289. HENRY GASCOIGN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 16 oz. of whalebone,value 1s 6d the goods of George Martin Brown , his master .

GEORGE MARTIN BROWN. I live in Bell Square, Broker Row, Moorfields , and am a whalebone manufacturer . The prisoner was nine months in my service. The workshop behind my house was broken open about four months ago - I suspected him, and brought him to the Mansion-house; he was dismissed, and I discharged him; I have since taken him again - I told Smith, my other boy, to watch him; he gave me information, and I sent for an officer, who found this whalebone in his trousers and inside his stockings - there was 1 lb. of it; he said nothing; it is part of my stock; I never sold him any.

JAMES SMITH . I am fifteen years old. My master told me to watch - the prisoner told me, if I could get any thing, to take it to his mother, as she would receive it - he wanted me to thieve as well as himself; this was on the evening he was taken; I told my master, and was present when the officer took the bone out of his stockings.

Prisoner. He had some about him, but his master told him to take it away. Witness. That is not true.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I was sent for on the 15th of December - I found this bone on the prisoner, four pieces in one stocking, and three in the other; I searched Smith, by the prisoner's request, but found none on him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-12

290. JOSEPH PARLETT was indicted for embezzlement .

SARAH BRINE . I live in Abbey-place, Bethnal-green, and was nursing Mrs. Rogers, of Sweden-court, Bishopsgate; she dealt with Rice, the baker; the prisoner used to bring the bread. On the 26th of September, I paid him a bill of 4s. 11d.; I gave him two half-crowns, and he gave me a penny; he wrote a receipt to the bill, which I gave to Rice afterwards, as the amount was charged in the next bill.

JOHN CARTER . I am in William Rice's employ - the receipt to this bill is in the prisoner's writing (read) - I included the amount in the next week's bill, and Brine brought me the receipt - he never accounted for the money, but absconded on the day he received it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-13

291. TIMOTHY HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 150lbs. of iron, value 5s. the goods of our Lord the King .

2d COUNT, stating it to belong to William Taylor .

3d COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Thatcher Baker .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

ANDREW GERMAN . I am an iron-merchant in partnership with Mr. Hill; we live in Tooley-street. On the

23d of December, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner brought three pieces of wrought iron for sale - they were cramps and bolts; he put them down by the scale - I looked at them, and suspecting they belonged to some public building, I said I hoped he had come by it honestly - he said, Yes, and that he had some more; I asked where it came from - he said, from the Custom-house, and that it belonged to Mr. Taylor, of Holborn, the smith employed there; I said, "You may fetch the rest, and then we will talk about it" - he went, and brought three more pieces of the same sort - I then said, "My man, we can't buy this iron without a note from some gentleman of authority at the Custom-house;" he faltered, and said, "If you don't like to buy it, I will take it away;" I said, "No, I shall send somebody to the Custom-house to ascertain if you came by it honestly" - he agreed to that, and Lyon went with him, leaving the iron behind. Lyon returned in five minutes without him, and I gave information at the Custom-house. The iron weighed 2 cwt., and was worth about 11s. as old iron; but it was useful, and worth much more.

MATTHEW LYON . I was present when the prisoner brought this iron, and went with him by Mr. German's direction - when we came to London-bridge, he said he had come by it wrongfully, and would go no further with me; he went away - I did not try to catch him, but returned home.

THOMAS THATCHER BAKER . I am foreman of the carpenters employed at the Custom-house - the prisoner was a general labourer there, and had access to the iron; he had been a smith's labourer , but had no authority to take iron away - I have occasionally sent him to Mr. Taylor's with some to be re-worked. On the 23d of December, I saw this iron at Mr. German's; it had been taken out of the old work at the Custom-house - I called the men over to receive their wages; we call them by numbers; when the prisoner's number was called, he did not appear, but his wife did - she was not paid: Jefferies brought him in very tipsy, as I was leaving the premises.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am master smith at the Custom-house - I never authorized the prisoner to take any iron away.

SAMUEL JEFFRIES . I was present when the men were assembled on the 23d of December - the prisoner did not appear - I afterwards took him into custody, quite intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Publicly Whipped on the Custom-house Quay .

Reference Number: t18270111-14

292. CHARLES POOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 great coat, value 7s. , the goods of Jonathan Taylor .

JONATHAN TAYLOR . I live with Mr. Pullen, a butcher, of Davies-street, Berkeley-square. On the 16th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, my cart stood in Newgate-street , and the coat lay over the horse's back - while I was taking some meat off the porter's shoulder, Griffin came and said that my coat was gone; I ran by his direction down Warwick-lane, and saw the prisoner running with it under his arm; he threw it away; I pursued, and he was apprehended - he said he had just come out of the market, where he had earned 1d. - a man gave me the coat in Warwick-lane.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN . I attend the carts in Newgate-street; I saw Taylor's great coat on the horse's back - the prisoner and another boy stood talking at the corner of Warwick-lane some time - I saw the prisoner go over towards the cart, but a person passed, and he returned; when Taylor went to take the meat from the porter, he went and snatched the coat - his companion went off directly, before he had taken the coat - I called Taylor, who ran after him, while I minded the cart; he was brought back with the same coat - he earns his living in the market.

JAMES GIBBONS . I am a beadle. I found the prisoner in Taylor's charge; the coat was brought up by another man.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 23.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270111-15

293. GEORGE AVORY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one 10l. Bank note , the property of Benjamin Goodman .

BENJAMIN GOODMAN . I am a farmer , and live at Wormlayton, in Warwickshire. On the 15th of December, I was going up Aldersgate-street ; a person walked before me, and dropped something like a pin-case - the prisoner, who was behind, passed me; he picked it up, and called out Hey! to the person: they had some conversation, and two prisoner overtook me and asked if I would give him two 5l. notes for a 10l. note; he was a stranger to me - I pulled out my pocket-book to give him two, and the first note I laid hold of was a 10l. note; he pulled it out of my hand and ran away with it - I ran and caught him; he had turned down a street to the right, then to the left, and up a court which is no thoroughfare - I asked what he had done with the note; he said he had not got it - I asked him again for it, and he made no answer; he was searched, but no note at all was found on him. I have not recovered it.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you pursue him immediately? A. Yes; I did not keep very close to him; there were two or three others came up and held me, to prevent my starting for some time, so that he got about twenty yards a head - I kept him in sight till he turned up the court; he was not above a minute out of my sight; I did not see him drop the note, or give it to anybody - he was not searched till the officer took him - I did not make any bet, nor deposit any money; I heard nothing about a bet till he was gone, then somebody said something about betting 5l.

JOSEPH WALKER . I am porter at the Flower-pot public-house, in Bishopsgate-street. I was in Aldergate-street, and saw three or four men round the prosecutor - I saw the prisoner grasp something out of his hand; he said he had lost a 10l. note - two or three took hold of him, and kept him from running - I ran after the prisoner to the court, and finding it no thoroughfare, I ran for an officer; when I returned, the prosecutor had hold of him; the prisoner offered him 10l. not to appear against him.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am a street-keeper. I happened

to be passing, and found the prisoner in custody in the court - I could find no note on him; I asked him where the 10l. note was; he said he did not know.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had turned up the court for a necessary purpose, when the Prosecutor came and accused him of this robbery; and that several people around said he was innocent.

The prisoner received a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-16

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1827.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

294. CHARLES PEARCE and HENRY HITCHMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone , 2 reticules, value 15s.; 1 bottle, value 5s.; 8 pairs of shoes, value 30s.; 18 glass candle ornaments, value 20s.; 24 pairs of gloves, value 30s., and 1 trunk, value 4s., the goods of Henry Sansom , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

FREDERICK HOSTLER . I am butler to Mr. Henry Sansom , No. 47, Bryanston-square . On the 19th of December, this trunk stood in the passage, between the area and the kitchen - I saw it safe between twelve and one o'clock at night - I did not see it again till the officer brought it in a day or two afterwards; I knew it to be the same trunk; I have not the least doubt of it - the area door was open about seven o'clock in the morning of the 20th of December; I had not seen the prisoners near the house.

MR. CHARLES SANSOM . I am son of Mr. Henry Sansom - I saw this trunk at Mary-le-bone office on the 20th of December, the day it was stolen, and knew it to be my father's property; it contains the articles stated in the indictment(enumerating them) - they are worth 5l, 4s.; I know nothing of the prisoners - the house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. On the 20th of December, at eight o'clock in the morning, I was at the end of Circus-street, turning into York-street, and met Pearce with this trunk on his shoulder - Hitchman, who was four or five yards behind, smiled, and said,"How do you do, Webster?" I knew them both before, and think I have seen them together, but am not positive; they were both going in one direction. As soon as Hitchman spoke to me, I seized Pearce with the trunk - Gibbs came up directly, and Hooker took charge of Hitchman - Gibbs took hold of Pearce, and I kept the trunk, which Mr. Sansom himself claimed in two or three hours; we found Miss Sansom's name on the corner of a little trunk inside, which led us to Bryanstone-square.

Prisoner HITCHMAN. Q. You did not see me in conversation with him? A. No.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer, and was with Webster, who seized the trunk - I assisted in securing Pearce; I had not seen them talking together - Mr. Sansom claimed the trunk.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone, and was with Webster - I secured Hitchman - I saw the trunk opened; there was a box in it, with Miss Sansom's name on it; Mr. Sansom claimed the trunk and contents.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PEARCE's Defence. My feelings will scarcely allow me to enter into a defence on a capital charge, but it is a duty I owe to my wife and sister, and to my late employer, to assert my innocence; if I should fall into any infirmity or error I hope you will not impute it to any negligence. Only a few years since I was surrounded by friends, and every necessary supply, but unfortunate West India speculations entirely brought my father and family to ruin - he lost 1500l. or 1600l., which was confided to a supercargo; he remained in the country till he became insolvent, and was then appointed master of a school at Knightsbridge; I remained with him till his death, and finding I was impoverishing him, I procured a situation at Mr. Nicholson's, in Bond-street, where I was for six months, and then removed to Mr. Stiff's of Jermyn-street; after that to Mr. Slade's of Hanover-street, and after being there two years I went to Mr. Richardson's, of High-street, Bloomsbury, and after sixteen months he recommended me to Mr. Willis, whom I was with six months, when he went to Dorchester; it is only a few months that I have been in this situation; though obliged to work hard to obtain subsistence I was comparatively comfortable, compared to this disgraceful situation. I had on this morning sold a duplicate of wearing-apparel for two half-crowns; I had for three months been unable to gain the least employ - I went to market, and bought a little butter; I went round to different customers to sell it. On the morning in question I went to search for a young man living as footman in Gloucester-street; he owed me a small sum; I was passing down Adam-street into Seymour-place, when I overtook two gentlemen, in one of whose employ I had been - the other was his brother, and in crossing Adam-street I took possession of this trunk from a person. who no doubt had taken it from Mr. Sansom's premises. I solemnly declare, as I hope for mercy here and hereafter, that I never saw it till I received it from the individual in question, who pointed out to me the road which led to my ultimate imprisonment, and made me the dupe of artifice and design; I had not got into York-street when I was apprehended; if I had been conscious of its being stolen I had plenty of opportunity to prevent my going into the midst of the officers - had they not known Hitchman, no doubt I should have passed unnoticed. I was taking the trunk to where the person who gave it me desired me - had I been guilty I would have thrown myself on your mercy, and have stated my distress which led to the commission of the deed, and should have hoped you would have afforded some asylum to an unprotected young man. I have served my different masters with satisfaction. I hope you will consider what I have said as emanating from my heart; my sufferings since my imprisonment have been acute; I am sorry my feelings should so far overcome me - I have struggled against them as long as I could. At the time this occurred I was depriving myself of every comfort - my little resources were exhausted, and I was in a state of destitution, but I have borne it with all the firmness I could, having been promised by a gentleman a situation after Christmas. I now leave my case to your serious consideration, and instead of consigning me to the horrors consequent on incarceration in the cells, and the suspense of waiting for the report, I hope you will

restore me to liberty instead of a lingering imprisonment, and probably the loss of life by my sufferings.

THOMAS HOOKER re-examined. I searched Pearce, and found on him an apron, a bunch of keys, two of which are latch-keys, and a knife - he had two half-crowns, which I returned him.

Prisoner PEARCE. Two of the keys open a trunk left at my lodgings, No. 18, Park-street, New-road - one of the latch-keys opens that house; the other opens the door of another house in the same street; here is a letter which was found upon me, which will prove I was endeavouring to procure a situation; I called on Mr. Careless about a situation, who was obliged to refuse it on trivial grounds. I swear, so help me God, I never had the least idea whose property the trunk was, or where it came from.

HITCHMAN's Defence. I was going to see my uncle, and in York-street I met Webster; I spoke to him - he left me, and ran after Pearce, and said, "We don't want you, you may go;" I could have got away, but I had no inclination, being innocent.

Four witness gave Pearce a good character.

PEARCE - GUILTY - DEATH .* Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

HITCHMAN - NOT GUILTY .

*The prisoner Pearce, immediately on being removed from the bar, inflicted a wound in his intestines, with a knife, and was consequently unable to come into Court to receive sentence.

Reference Number: t18270111-17

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

293. MICHAEL SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously cutting and stabbing Thomas Evans , with intent to kill and murder him, or to do him some grievous bodily harm .

THOMAS EVANS . I am a porter . On the evening of the 29th of October, I was in Kingsland-road; there was a riot at a public-house - I staid there a little while, when three or four officers summoned me, in the King's name, to aid and assist in taking a man to the watch-house; I went with them, and placed three or four men in the watch-house; as I returned some children and women were screaming Murder! in Red Lion-passage , opposite the public-house; I went down there with the officers - the riot was all over then; somebody said there was an Irishman in the privy, with a knife in his hand - I went there, and found the door fast; I said, "Come out - nobody will hurt you;" he said something in Irish, which I could not understand; I then kicked the door, and it opened - he pushed it to, but I thrust my leg in, and received a wound in my face, from a knife, and another in the hand - I fell from the loss of blood, and was taken to a surgeon's.

The Court ruled that this offence did not come within the meaning of the statute, as, had the prosecutor died from the wound, the offence would not have been murder.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-18

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

296. JOHN LUTMAN & ANN LUTMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , in the dwelling-house of James Stevenson Blackwood , Esq. , Baron Dufferin and Claneboye in Ireland , 4 chairs, value 1l.; 1 table, value 3s.; 1 bed, value 35s.; 1 counterpane, value 7s.; 3 blankets, value 10s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 carpet, value 5s.; 2 window-curtains, value 5s.; 1 glass, value 4s.; 1 set of fireirons, value 3s., and 1 fender, value 2s. , his property, the said Ann Lutman being in his service.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I took charge of Lord Dufferin's house by desire, and while there the male prisoner came; I asked who he was - he said he was brother of Ann Williams , and asked what was the matter; the female prisoner was at that time in custody - I told him Ann was in custody for robbing the house of some books; he was much alarmed, and went away. After that I went to his house, No. 72, Castle-street, Oxford-market - I said, "I understand you have got some property belonging to Lord Dufferin;" he said he had, and pointed to a bed, which was turned up, four chairs, and a round table - he said, "That is all I have got - I meant to have sent them home this morning, and have sent for a truck for that purpose;" I asked whose the carpet was which laid on the floor; he said that was Lord Dufferin's, but he had nothing else; I asked whose the curtains were which hung at the windows - he said they were Lord Dufferin's, and four looking-glasses, which were in the room, and the fire-irons and the fender; I sent for a truck, and took the things away - I left him there, but the Magistrate told me to apprehend him, and I went next morning to him, and said, "Mr. Lutman, I understand you are the husband of Ann;" he said he was, that they had been married four or five years, but she wished to keep it a secret.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. When did he come to the house? A. On Wednesday night, about ten o'clock; the woman had been three or four hours in custody. When I went to his house next morning I hired the truck which he had sent for before; he never absconded; he said Ann had ruined him, that she had brought the things there for his use, not that it was against his will; I know that they are man and wife now. When I went to his house on Friday a man named Dennis was present, who was afterwards discharged. I believe, as we were going away, a woman put her head into the parlour door, and spoke to him - Dennis was taken because he had been found in his lordship's house the night before the woman was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-19

297. ANN PARTINGTON and ANN LUTMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , in the dwelling-house of James Stevenson Blackwood , Esq. , Baron Dufferin and Claneboye in Ireland , 1 counterpane, value 15s.; 4 table-cloths, value 20s.; 22 curtains, value 3l.; 10 sheets, value 50s.; 1 quilt, value 20s., and 5 books, value 50s. , his property, the said Ann Lutman being his servant .

HENRY SMITH . I am a butterman, and lives in South-street, Manchester-square. On Wednesday, the 20th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, Partington came to my house, with a quantity of books, and asked if I bought waste-paper - I bought two of her; they were journals of the House of Lords; I then watched her to Mr. Softley's, a butterman, of High-street, and then followed her to Lord Dufferin's; after that I gave information to the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Had she a bonnet on? A. Yes- I saw her again in half an hour, and am sure of her. I went with the officer to Lord Dufferin's, and took her. I gave her 2s. 2d. for the books.

EDWARD SOFTLEY . I keep a cheesemonger's-shop in High-street, Mary-le-bone. On Friday, the 15th of December, the two prisoners came to my shop together - I am positive of them; they asked if I bought waste-paper - I said Yes; Lutman said, "I have got some to sell, and I will bring it or send it by Partington in a day or two;" on the Wednesday evening Partington brought four books, without covers - she said she had brought some waste-paper, and I gave her 3 1/2d. a pound for it - it came to 3s. 6d.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. On Wednesday evening, the 20th of December, I went to Lord Dufferin's, with Smith; Partington opened the door- I told her I came about the paper she had sold to Softley and Smith; she said she was sent by Ann Williams , that it was waste-paper, and there was nothing the matter; she went to the head of the stairs, and called "Williams"- Ann Lutman came up, and said it was all right, she had sent her, and it was waste-paper, which his lordship gave her to dispose of; I said I did not believe it, and desired her to show me his lordship's library - she said there was no library; we went with the two prisoners to a lumber-room in the garret; she said she got the paper from there - I said it was of no use, I would find the library; and, after much hesitation (and Partington having attempted to slip away) we got into the back parlour, where I found a quantity of bound journals of the House of Lords; these volumes were deficient - they lay on a bureau; I asked her what she had done with the covers of those she had sold; I went into the kitchen - she gave me some covers out of a cupboard - the binding corresponds with what are left. I took the prisoners to the watch-house, and then went to Mr. Newton, his lordship's agent, the next day - I opened the porter's-hall table drawer, and found Lutman's marriage certificate, with fifteen duplicates - twelve of which refer to his lordship's property.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Smith present when you questioned her about the books? A. Yes. I am sure she said they had been given to her.

VICE ADMIRAL SIR HENRY BLACKWOOD . I am brother to Lord Dufferin - his names are James Stevenson Blackwood , commonly called Lord Dufferin in Claneboye - I am well acquainted with his house; there is no room called the library - he keeps these journals in his dressing-room; there are shelves fitted up for them; his servants are all in Ireland - Lutman was left in care of the house; I believe, she always conducted herself well, and came to them with an excellent character. I know his lordship always preserved these journals.

ROBERT NEWTON . I am an upholsterer. Lutman was Lord Dufferin's house-maid - she lived there two or three years, and was in charge of the house.

LUTMAN - GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

PARTINGTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-20

298. ANN PARTINGTON and ANN LUTMAN were again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 8 curtains, value 35s. , the goods of the said Lord Dufferin .

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am shopman to Mr. Burket, a pawnbroker, of Paddington-street. On the 16th of December the two prisoners came to the shop together with eight curtains; Lutman pawned five of them for 10s., and three for 10s., and had separate duplicates - she carried them; Partington was merely with her.

ROBERT NEWTON . I am upholsterer to Lord Dufferin. I paid Lutman her board wages every fortnight; the duplicates of these curtains were found in the porter's table drawer - I know them to be his lordship's.

LUTMAN - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

PARTINGTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-21

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

299. CHARLES LEWIS , JOHN CRANLEY , and EDWARD WEBSTER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Purdey , about six o'clock in the night of the 23d of December , at St. Andrew, Holborn , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 20s.; 2 seals, value 70s.; 1 ring, value 18s.; 1 watch-key, value 10s.; 3 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 8 crowns, 16 half-crowns, and 60 shillings , his property.

WILLIAM PURDEY . I live in John's-mews, John-street, Bedford-row , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, and am a hackney-coach master - I have stables there, and sleep there - it is my dwelling-house. On Saturday morning, the 23d of December, I went out between eight and nine o'clock, leaving the stables in the care of Goatley, my nephew, who is my hostler; I returned about eight o'clock at night, and found the bureau in my bed-room broken open, and three sovereigns, 7l. in silver, two gold seals, a gold ring and key, a silver watch, with a steel chain and seal, gone from it. I found the watch in the possession of the watchman when I came home, and on searching the coach-house I found two seals, the ring, and the key- an 18d. piece was taken from the bureau, and found laying about.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When did you come home? A. Between seven and eight o'clock - the prisoners were then in custody. I had been out all day.

JAMES GOATLEY . I am nephew and hostler to Mr. Purdey - he lives over the stables. On the 23d of December, about a quarter-past five o'clock in the evening I left the premises; the up-stairs premises were then locked safe and bolted, and I am sure the coach-house door was shoved to. I returned about half-past six o'clock, and found a number of people in the stable - the lock of the stair-foot door had then been forced open by some instrument, and when I got up-stairs the room where the bureau was was forced open, and the bureau also was open; the lid was forced open, and the drawers all laying about - the lock of the front sitting-room had been attempted, but they had not succeeded. When I went out that evening I had seen the three prisoners standing opposite the Yorkshire Grey public-house, in the King's-road; I had known Cranley six months; he once lived with my uncle - I am sure of him; I knew the others by their dress, which they had on at Hatton-garden; I had not seen them before; I found them the same evening, at

half-past six o'clock, at Hatton-garden, and am sure they are the same; they looked me in the face as they went by- I passed close to them, and noticed them. I found my uncle's gold seal, ring, and key in the further coach-house that evening, when I returned from the office, and on the Sunday morning I found a bundle of phosphorus matches, among the straw in the coach-house - they appeared not to have been used.

Cross-examined. Q. You know the faces of the other two men? A. Yes; I was right opposite the light from the public-house, and I saw them - it was then dusk, and getting dark; Cranley kept his face from me.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I am a carman to Mr. Matther, of High Holborn. On the 23d of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in this mews; I was going to put my horse up for the night, in the stable opposite Purdey's; I saw the prisoners, Lewis and Webster, enter Purdey's coach-house door - I did not know them before- they were very near me, dressed in dark coats, and Lewis had white cotton stockings; within ten minutes afterwards I opened the coach-house door, and they attempted to escape; I suspected them, there being no light in Purdey's room - I always go there to get a light, but finding no light in the room I went to the stable-door, peeped through the key-hole, and saw the three prisoners in the stable, with a light - Lewis and Cranley were stooping down - Webster stood before them; I saw his person when he turned round; he attempted to walk towards the stable-door; I saw them all three then, so as to swear to them - I then alarmed Mr. Swaine at the next stable to mine; I got a light there - I then rapped at the stable-door two or three times; no answer was made; some neighbours had come to my assistance by that time, as Swaine had given an alarm - I then opened the coach-house door with the lantern in my hand, and saw the three prisoners there- Webster stood at the right-hand of the coach-house, nearest the stable, with a light in his hand; Lewis was on the left side, and Cranley was inside the second coach-house gate by the wicket-door; they stood still about a minute- Lewis then made a rush out, and I caught hold of him; he resisted very much, and I was obliged to quit my hold, and my lantern was knocked out of my hand; but a gentleman's coachman, named Stratt, secured him; several surrounded him - Cranley came out, and ran down the mews; he was taken at the bottom, and secured; Webster stopped in the coach-house, and did not attempt to escape; I did not see him taken; I am positive of all their persons; after they were taken to the watch-house, the watchman and men, who took them, returned and looked over the premises; I had been in sight of the premises all the time they were absent, and nobody entered till they came; I saw a silver watch without a case, laying at the head of the stairs, facing the bed-room door; the case was about a foot from it.

THOMAS STRATT . I am a coachman, and live at No. 5, John's-mews. I was doing my horse up in the stable - about six o'clock I heard a cry of Thieves! and Murder! I instantly rushed out, and saw Lewis knocking Matthews down with the lantern in his hand - I secured him, and held him till I got him to Hatton-garden - I am sure he is the man - I saw Cranley make three attempts to rush out of the coach-house; he got out at the fourth attempt, and was stopped within fifty yards of the place by several people - I am sure of his person.

THOMAS HOLDER . On the 23d of December, at six o'clock in the evening, I was at my door, No. 4, John's-mews, talking to a friend, and heard a cry of Thieves! I ran out, and saw Cranley running from the coachman - I put my hand out to seize him; he struck me on the shoulder - I seized, and kept him till the watchman came; he was running from Purdey's premises.

SAMUEL SHACKELL . I was in the mews, and saw Holder secure Cranley - I found some keys on the spot where we stopped him after we had taken him to Hatton-garden - I searched the place with a candle, because I heard something drop when we were struggling with him at the end of Doughty-mews - they are not pick-lock keys; but I have tried them, and found one of them opens Purdey's drawer; but not the bureau-drawer.

WILLIAM PURDEY . My clothes are kept in the drawer which this key opens; but they were not taken; I did not notice that the chest of drawers were disturbed.

THOMAS GAMAGE . I am serjeant of the watch, and live in Brook's-court, Brook's-market. I was called to the place after the prisoners were in custody, and searched the premises about a quarter to seven o'clock that night - I found the watch with the case on the top of the stairs, and a phosphoras-box with the lid off in the same place; I went into the room, and found the bureau broken open and all the drawers taken out; six silver tea-spoons were in one drawer, and a pair of ear-rings and a gold brooch were left on the bureau; an attempt had been made to open the other room - I found one shilling on the top of the stairs.

JOHN BAILLIE . I am a watchman, and live in Portpool-lane. I was called to the spot, and found some people scuffling with Cranley in James-street, near the mews; he was secured - I went down the mews, and found Lewis struggling with the coachman - I took Webster in the coach-house - he said, "Watchman, did not I come in with you?" but he had not come in with me - I found an 18d. piece at the bottom of the stairs and a piece of wax-candle - I saw Goatley find two gold seals, a key, and a ring.

JAMES JENKINS . I was up in my rooms over the stable at No. 11, John's-mews - I ran out, hearing an alarm, and found Lewis struggling with the coachman; Cranley bolted out at the coach-house door - I followed, and he was secured at the bottom of the yard; I knew him before.

ANDREW LLOYD . I searched Webster at the office, and found on him a purse with 20s. in silver, and 18s. 2 1/2d. loose; also a knife, a silver tooth-pick, and a silver segartube - Goatley delivered to me two gold-seals and a key; also some phosphorus matches, which have not been used, and were not made for the box.

WILLIAM LEE . I found on Lewis 25s. 6d. in silver, 7 1/2d. and a knife; and on Cranley, 33s. and 1/2d., a knife and latch-key.

WILLIAM PURDEY . This watch and case, two seals, ring, key, and 18d. piece, are mine; they are worth 5l. - I lost 7l. in silver, and 4 sovereigns - I will not swear to the 18d. piece.

LEWIS' Defence. I was not in the stable, but standing

by it for a necessary purpose; the men threw the gates open and seized me.

CRANLEY's Defence. I pass there every night about that time. I have often been out with a coach - I owed Purdey's nephew some money, and went to pay him.

WEBSTER's Defence. I was passing the end of John's-mews, and hearing the cry of Watch! I went down to ascertain what was the matter; the coach-house door was pulled open, a livery-servant said he would go in with any one; the watchman went in, and I went with him - a person crossed the mews with a candle, which I took out of his hand over the bar at the door - I went to the foot of the stairs with the watchman; somebody said,"I dare say that is one;" and they collared me; the gentleman's servant said, "Be careful what you are about, I think I saw that young man come in."

Two witnesses gave Crawley a good character.

LEWIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

CRANLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

WEBSTER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Cranley was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, who had employed him seven years, and believed him to be the support of an aged mother .

Reference Number: t18270111-22

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

300. ALEXANDER DAVIES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ezekiel Levy , on the King's highway, on the 12th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 4 half-crowns, 7 shillings, and 3 sixpences , his monies.

EZEKIEL LEVY . I am a confectioner , and live in Field-lane, Holborn. On the 12th of December, about a quarter before twelve o'clock at night, I was going for a quartern loaf, about four doors from my own house; two men stood at the corner of West-street - I had my hands in my pocket - they rushed forward at me, and the prisoner struck me a blow; I was stunned, and could not speak - I knew him by sight; he lived in the neighbourhood - he struck me a second blow - when I was on the ground, and while I was hallooing out, I was robbed; I had a sovereign wrapped in paper in my pocket, and 18s. 6d. loose. I was senseless, and did not feel their hands in my pocket - it was safe a moment before. When I came to my senses, it was gone; a witness came and picked me up, and I said I would go and see for the man who had knocked me down.

GEORGE ROGERS . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of December; Levy informed me of the robbery on the night it happened.

THOMAS MARTIN . On the night in question, I was purchasing something in Levy's shop, and heard a person round the corner screaming; I went round the corner, and saw Levy just getting off the ground; I lifted him up, and he said he was robbed.

ABRAHAM COHEN . I was going up West-street, at a quarter before twelve o'clock, on this night, and saw the prisoner give Levy a blow on the jaw; he fell to the ground; I saw the prisoner's hand in his pocket; I cannot say whether he took any thing; he ran away directly afterwards; I did not follow, but assisted Levy.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, the particulars of which will be detailed by the following evidence.

RICHARD BRADSHAW . I am a letter-founder, and live at No. 3, West-street. On a Monday or Tuesday night, a fortnight before Christmas, I was standing outside the door, about twelve o'clock, and saw this wooden legged man (the prosecutor) come out of the chandler's-shop, No. 3, where I lodge - he had been there for a quartern loaf; he said he was killed, he was dead - he went to his own shop, which is about twenty yards further, and asked his wife for a knife, saying."That d-d Alexander has killed me; I will die under him this night" - during this time the prisoner went a contrary way towards Smithfield; he was in the chandler's-shop when Levy went out - I saw him leave the shop while Levy was gone for the knife - I saw nothing more; but Levy returned and pushed the shop door open, saying, "Where is that d-d rogue?"

Q. How could you hear him ask his wife for the knife? A. I heard him hallooing all the way he went.

STEPHEN MELVILLE . I have lived at a cheesemonger's, but am out of place - I live in Crown-court, Goswell-street. I was in the chandler's-shop - this young man came in, and the wooden-legged man; they had some words, and he said, if he was a young man he would knock his head off - Levy called the prisoner some names, and he struck him in the face with his open hand - I opened the door, and advised Levy to go out, which he did - I followed him a few paces, and saw him turn the corner; he was hallooing out, that he was killed, and that he was dead - I heard him ask his wife for something, but I could not tell what; I returned to the chandler's-shop - he came back afterwards, and looked in at the shop door - I said, "Old man, you had better go home;" he said, "I don't want you" - he went away, and I saw no more.

JOSEPH PATERNOSTER . I live in Peter-street, Saffron-hill. I and Bradshaw stood against the chandler's-shop; it was either on Monday or Tuesday, I cannot say which: I saw Levy come out, calling out "Murder! Alexander has killed me" - he went home to his wife and asked for a knife, saying he would die under Alexander that night; when he came back, the prisoner was gone - when he found he was not in the shop, he went away.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. Levy applied at the office for a warrant to apprehend the prisoner - the Magistrate did not consider it a felony, and ordered an assault warrant, upon which I apprehended him: he stated the same to the Magistrate that he has here to-day.

E. LEVY re-examined. I knew the prisoner before - after I was knocked down the second time, I was going to call the watchman, who was not in the way; I went into the chandler's-shop to look for the prisoner, as he had ran in there - the watchman said, "Is the man here?" I said, No - I did not see these witnesses there; seven or eight persons were in the shop, and I made an excuse to go in for a half-quartern loaf - the watchman said it was dangerous to go in there.

GEORGE ROGERS re-examined. When I came from the watch-house, Levy told me that he had been knocked down and robbed, and described the prisoner to me - I went to the chandler's-shop by his desire, Melville looked up, and asked who I wanted - I said, not him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-23

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

301. MARY ANN SULLIVAN and MARTHA BELLAMY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Ortega , on the 16th of December , at St. Giles in the Fields , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 ring, value 20s.,; 1 umbrella, value 9s.; 3 sixpences, and 6 halfpence , his property.

JOSEPH ORTEGA . I live in Arthur-street, Somers-town. I am a native of Spain , and am a teacher of languages . On the 16th of December, about a quarter past six o'clock at night, I had been to a coffee-house to see the newspaper, and as I was going home, the prisoner Sullivan came up to me in Soho-square, and asked me to go with her - I said No; being a stranger, I could not find my way home if I had gone with her - she said, "Come with me, I will give you a direction to Somers-town;" I went into her house, not knowing the character of such women; I do not know what street it was in - she took me into a back room, on the first-floor; she shut the door, and then said she wanted my money - I said, "I have no money;" she said, if I would not give her my money, I should not go home that night; I said, if she would open the door I would go home - she said she wanted my money first, and after that she beat me - I said that I would give her 1s., which I did; she said I had more money than that - I said, No; she said, "Let me see your pockets;" I said I would not; she said, "If you will not, I will kill you;" I then gave her 9d. - she then said that I must let her see my pocket - I said I would not. There was then a knock at the door; Bellamy came in and said, "What is the matter?" Sullivan said, "That gentleman will not give me his money;" Bellamy said, "If he will not give you his money, take the poker, and kill him" - I said I had no money; Sullivan said, "Let us see your pockets" - I said I would not; she said, "Well, if you won't, we will kill you to-night" - I had a watch in my pocket, and did not wish them to find it - I then said, "I will show you my pockets myself" - I turned them out, and Bellamy said,"Very well, if you have no money, give me your umbrella," and she took it out of my hand herself - I had a diamond ring on my finger, and Sullivan said I must give that to her - I said I could not get it off my finger; she told me to prove that I could not get it off - I tried, and could not, and she tried, and could not - she then said that I must put my finger into her mouth; I did so, and while I was doing that, Bellamy pushed my arm against the wall, and Sullivan pulled her head away with the ring in her mouth - she had got it off my finger against my will; she took it out of her mouth, and put it on her own finger - Bellamy then said, "Let him go;" she took my umbrella, and went away - Sullivan blew the candle out, took hold of me by the coat, and went away - I went out, and met the witnesses in the next street; I told them what had happened, and they accompanied me to the place - I never saw the prisoners before, but am quite sure they are the women; they were not there when I went back.

Q. What made you go to their room? Did you know your way home? A. I did not know where I was; I went with her, as she promised me a direction home; that was my motive - I thought her a bad woman.

JOHN TOFFT . I am beadle of St. Giles. On the 16th of December, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening, the prosecutor came to me in High-street, and gave me information - I went with him to these women's lodging, in Maynard-street; I was going up to the room, and I met a man at the door, who gave me some information, and we went down High-street, where we met the prisoners together - Ortega said, "Those are the two women who robbed me" - they denied it, but did not deny having seen him; we took them in charge, but found nothing on them - I never went up into the room.

WILLIAM BELL . I am a beadle, and was with Tofft - the prosecutor said he was certainly with the women.

SULLIVAN's Defence. I never saw him till he came and took hold of this young woman, and then he said, "I don't think this is the girl" - he let her go, took hold of me, and said, "I believe this is one," and we were taken - he went up to Bellamy and said, "If you will tell me who robbed me, I will let you go" - she said she could not tell him, and he said, "I will punish you for it."

BELLAMY's Defence. He took hold of me, then let me go, and took me a second time.

TOFFT re-examined. I was with the prosecutor - he pointed them out six yards before they came up, and had no doubt about them.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

BELLAMY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy .

Reference Number: t18270111-24

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

302. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 10 lbs. of pork, value 6s. , the goods of George Bowles .

GEORGE BOWLES . I am a salesman , and live in Newgate-street . On the 1st of January, I saw this pork hanging outside my shop, about six o'clock; it was taken at seven.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am a constable. I was in Newgate-market about seven o'clock in the evening of the 1st of January, and about twenty yards off I saw the prisoner, with this long fork lifted up in his hand - I saw him hook this pork down with it, after three attempts - I stopped him with it about five yards from the shop; Mr. Bowles' man claimed it - I found no money on the prisoner, but a small centre-bit and a bad shilling.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Month and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270111-25

303. WILLIAM SHEPPARD and THOMAS BRILLOW were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 41 dead fishes, called Dutch plaice, value 6s. , the goods of James Thomas Laby .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-26

304. JOSEPH RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 3 shoes, value 5s. , the goods of George Goodeve .

GEORGE GOODEVE . I live in Fenchurch-street , and am a shoemaker - these shoes were in my window. On the 9th of December, about half-past four o'clock, my son rung the bell, hearing the glass break; it had been cracked for six months, but was secured with putty - I came down and found it broken in; I went out with my son, but not

seeing the person, I came back, concealed myself behind the door, within two or three yards of the broken window, had the light put out, and in two minutes I saw the prisoner come and turn his back towards the glass which had been cut; he put his hand in - I instantly opened the door, and jumped upon him - he had then got the shoes out, and dropped them; he threw me into the kennel; I recovered myself, and we both ran, calling Stop thief! - I caught hold of his coat, and the tail came off in my hand; I secured him in the middle of Mincing-lane - the three shoes were picked up; they are worth 5s. - two pairs were taken.

GEORGE MUNRO . I took charge of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up the street, and the gentleman laid hold of me and shook me; I got away and asked him what he took hold of me for - he ran, and hallooed out Stop thief! I stopped immediately, and he took me into his shop.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-27

305. MARY CLIFTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 pair of blankets, value 6s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 2s. 6d.; 1 knife, value 1d., and 1 glass, value 6d., the goods of Owen Kelly , in a lodging-room .

JOHANNA KELLY . I am the wife of Owen Kelly - we live in Holborn-place, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . On the 3d of January, the prisoner took our second floor, front room, furnished, at 5s. a week - this property was let with the room. She said she had come from Brentford to receive a legacy. I went out about ten o'clock in the morning of the 6th of January - I returned about eleven, and found her in custody; I missed these articles - I never gave her leave to take them. I found this note in my table-drawer (note read).

MADAM, - I am sorry to say I have had a letter, and must go to Bath before I can get any money. I have no money left, and am forced to pawn your sheets and blankets to get money to go down - I did not like to ask you for money, or I would have done it before you went out. I will send you the tickets, and money to redeem them, and also my rent, on Saturday; and most heartily wish you health and happiness. M. CLIFTON .

THOMAS GREEN . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge about a hundred and fifty yards from Kelly's house - Kelly's husband brought the blankets and sheets to me, and charged the prisoner with taking them, which she acknowledged, and said that she meant to pawn them and redeem them again, and that she had left a note to that effect.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress - I intended going to Bath, and to send her the money to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-28

306. MARY CLIFTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 2 pillow-cases, value 4s., the goods of Catherine Birch , in a lodging-room .

CATHERINE BIRCH . I live in Acorn-court, Rolls-buildings - I do not know what parish it is in. I let the prisoner part of my room on the 23d of December; she had the use of these pillows with her bed; we both slept in one bed - she left on the 3d of January, while I was out, without giving me notice, or paying me: my pillows were gone, and this note left on the table.

This note was here read, and was to the same purport as the one produced in the last case.

THOMAS GREEN . I took the prisoner in charge, and found twenty-three duplicates on her, one of which is for these pillows - I do not know in what parish Birch lives.

JAMES PALMER . I am servant to Mr. Mulcaster, a pawnbroker; I have two pillows, which were pawned on the 3d of January by the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-29

307. HENRY VALENTINE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 reticule, value 6d., 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1d.; a smelling-bottle, 6d.; 1 purse, value 1d., and 1 half-crown, the property of William Jones , from the person of Caroline , his wife .

CAROLINE JONES . I am the wife of William Jones - we live in the Strand. On the 1st of January, between three and four o'clock, I was in Fleet-street , going from home; my reticule, containing this property, hung on my arm - a gentleman came up to me at the corner of Water-lane , and said that I had lost something from my muff - I then found the strings of my reticule had been cut - I did not perceive it taken. I found the prisoner at the watch-house, with it, in about ten minutes - the contents were still in it - I had felt somebody run against me, and on turning round, he asked my pardon. Mr. Burman came up immediately.

MARK BURMAN . I live in Middleton-street, Spa-fields. I was in Fleet-street, and saw a number of people apparently together, shoving about, or hustling, at the corner of Water-lane, close to Mrs. Jones - I saw the prisoner run forcibly against her; he almost shoved her down. I had my family with me - my suspicion was excited; I watched him, and the moment he left her, I asked if she had lost any thing from her muff - she at last missed her bag, the strings of which still hung on her arm; I saw the bag in the prisoner's left hand, five or six yards down Water-lane - he was trotting away; I overtook him, and told him to stop - he immediately turned up Crown-court; I called Stop thief! and he was stopped by another person; he dropped the bag a few seconds before he was stopped; it was picked up by Bidmead, and taken to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. You found no knife or scissars on me? A. No.

WILLIAM BIDMEAD . I am a printer, and live in Shipyard, Temple-bar. I was in Fleet-street, and saw several persons turn the corner of Water-lane - there was a cry of Stop thief! and seeing a young man, far beyond the appearance of a thief, turn up Crown-court, I went to the other end of the court - the prisoner ran out, and several persons after him; I followed, and got nearly up to him he made a bit of a slip in Shoe-lane, and finding himself closely pursued, he put his hand into his pocket, pulled out this green reticule, and dropped it - I told a boy to pick it up - I pursued, and caught him at the corner of

Harp-alley; the bag was brought to the watch-house; Mrs. Jones claimed it, and produced the other part of the string.

JAMES CHICKELDY . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge. I found him in the custody of several people in Shoe-lane - the bag was produced at the watch-house, and claimed by Mrs. Jones.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran with the people, and in Shoe-lane the gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270111-30

308. THOMAS BURNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 6 lbs. of mutton, value 3s. , the goods of William Griffin .

WILLIAM GRIFFIN . I have the care of a cart which stands in Newgate-street , near the market. On the 1st of January, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, seventeen legs of mutton were put into the cart to go to Manchester-square, and about a quarter-past seven I saw the prisoner put his hand over the hind part of the cart, take out a leg of mutton, and put it under his coat; I had seen him there an hour before - he crossed over - I went and took him by the corner of Warwick-lane; he said he had got nothing - I said I must look - he then pulled it from under his coat; he was not employed about the market - I had watched him for a fortnight before.

JAMES GIBBONS . I took him in charge - he tried to get from me.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up between the cart wheels - he never saw me before.

WILLIAM GRIFTIN . I saw him take it out of the cart.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-31

309. WILLIAM HICKIN was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS BLEWETT MEAD . I am a farmer, and live in Essex. The prisoner was clerk to Mr. Hopkins, the vestry-clerk of St. Dunstan in the West , whom I have been in the habit of paying money to for sixteen years, for a person in the country. On the 30th of August, 1825, I paid the prisoner, at Mr. Hopkins' office, in Fetter-lane, 17l. 10s. - I am sure I paid him two sovereigns, but will not be certain that it was all in gold - it was on account of Mr. Samuel Hosler , for money due to the parish - he gave me this receipt, which I saw him write - (read.) About the 3d or 4th of December last I had a letter from Mr. Hopkins, to get the three last receipts of Mr. Hosler's rent, which I did.

MR. JOHN HOPKINS . I am vestry-clerk of St. Dunstan's . The prisoner was in my employ, and was bound to account to me for all money he received. I have never received this 17l. 10s. from him; I inquired of the tenant why it was not paid, and after hearing from him the prisoner acknowledged to me that he had received it, but never till it was discovered; it was his duty to pay it to me the day he received it; he kept the books, and there is no entry of this having been paid - he was the nephew of the late vestry-clerk.

Prisoner. I trust to your mercy, and leave myself entirely in your hands.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-32

310. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 piece of handkerchiefs, containing 6 handkerchiefs, value 33s., the goods of Thomas Bunn , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BUNN . I am a haberdasher , and live at No. 8, Cheapside . On Friday, the 8th of December, between 12 and 1 o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop, alone, and asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs - Miss Lambert showed him some; I should not hesitate to swear to his person out of five hundred men. I stood on the right of Lambert - she took down a parcel of handkerchiefs - they were not the shade he liked; he wished a blue-black; she took down another parcel, and immediately on her opening that he selected a piece, from which he wished one to be cut - she cut it off; he immediately said, "Cut another off the same piece," and while that was being done he took the first piece, which he had objected to, and took his own handkerchief off his neck, and measured the width with it, covering the first parcel with his handkerchief; my back was turned, to hold the handkerchiefs for Lambert to cut, and, I suppose, at that time this piece was taken; after the handkerchief was cut off he saw another coloured one on the counter, which he bought, and said, "Now, I have bought more than I intended - lay them by, and I will come back with the money in a few minutes, and while I am gone cut me off some shoe strings;" he left the shop - he was the only customer there, and in two minutes after he was gone Miss Lambert missed this piece of handkerchiefs; he never returned for what he had bought. This was on Friday, and on Monday, in consequence of information, I went out, and saw him in Paternoster-row - I have every reason to believe his eye caught me, for he altered the direction he was going; he was coming straight, as if to come into Cheapside, by my house, but he turned round, by Mr. Dunnet's, towards Newgate-street - finding no officer, I got before him, and came in contact with him at the corner of Newgate-street; I laid my hand on him, and said, "My good man, you forgot to call for those handkerchiefs;" he trembled like a child, and said,"Handkerchiefs; Sir - I don't know what you mean;" I took him into my shop, and he said I was quite mistaken in his person, that he was as respectable a tradesman as me, and lived in Ratcliff-highway - but before he left the shop he gave four different names and addresses. I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. At what hour was he at your shop? A. I think as near half-past twelve o'clock as could be - I was standing still in the shop, waiting for customers. My errand-boy came in on Monday, and said he was in Parternoster-row - I went, and found him about thirty yards down the row, and when he came to the end he turned towards Newgate-street; I believe he did not see me then; he made no resistance: Lambert was in the shop, and said she was sure he was

the man; she said he had been shaved since, but not that he had shaved his whiskers; I said the person had a long beard, and she said the same; we neither of us said any thing about his whiskers being shaved; his beard wanted shaving when he came for the handkerchiefs. I had his hat put on once, for Lambert to be sure about it - she had no doubt of him before, but when he was in the officer's hands he took his hat off, and I asked him to put it on - he did not say his name was Evans, nor that he was a potatoe-dealer, living in Back-lane, Whitechapel.

Q. Do you mean to say he did not say that? A. He said a great many things before he said that - he said he was a potatoe-dealer, but when I delivered him over to the officer he said, "No, I am not a potatoe-dealer, my wife's mother is one;" he did not say he was a potatoe-dealer, living in Whitechapel, in my hearing; I heard nothing of his mother-in-law, living in South-street, Spitalfields - I declare I never heard it. I did not hear him give his address to the officer - he had a pair of garters with him, which he said he had bought at Mr. Fisher's.

COURT. Q. What names did he give you? A. I was so agitated I do not recollect, but the first he gave was John Davis.

MARY ANN LAMBERT . I was behind Mr. Bunn's counter; the prisoner came in about one o'clock, and inquired for black silk handkerchiefs - I am certain of him. I showed him a parcel of handkerchiefs; he did not approve of them - they were a blue-black, and he wished them without a fringe; I left that piece on the counter, and showed him another parcel - each piece contains six; I then showed him some bandanas, and cut him off one; he said he would take another, which I also cut off - he then asked the price of a coloured bandana, which had been cut off before, and said he would have one - he then said he would go and fetch some more money, and we were to keep them till he returned; I had seen him take his own handkerchief off, but did not observe what he did with it - he was a few minutes in the shop, and had not been gone two minutes before I missed the piece of handkerchiefs I had first shown him; no other customer had been in the shop - he never returned. On the Monday Mr. Bunn brought him into the shop - I was then quite certain of him; he is a very tall man - he said he was never in the shop before; he gave his name as Davis, and said he lived in Ratcliff-highway, and then in Whitechapel; I do not recollect his giving any other name - I never had the least doubt of his being the man.

Cross-examined. Q. When he was brought into the shop did you not remark about his beard and whiskers? A. I said he had a longer beard on the Friday, but not that it was black, and I thought his whiskers were rather longer - I said that was all the difference I saw, but never expressed a doubt about him. I did not perceive that Mr. Bunn was agitated. The prisoner said he lived at some place in Whitechapel, which I do not recollect - as he went out of the shop he said he meant to say his wife's mother kept a potatoe-warehouse; I did not hear him say where she lived - he was in the shop about five minutes before the officer came; Mr. Bunn, the boy, and Mr. Wilkinson, who lives next door, were in the shop. When I was told to look at him he immediately took his hat off; Mr. Bunn told him to put it on, as I had never seen him without his hat. I never expressed the least doubt of him- I have talked this over with Mr. Bunn once or twice, and have heard him mention it to others.

CHARLES BUNN . I am twelve years old, and live with Mr. Bunn, who is my second cousin. I was in the shop when the prisoner came in; I am certain he is the man - I staid all the time he was there; he asked for black-silk handkerchiefs, which were shown him - he then wanted them without fringe; he was shown some, and bargained for one first, and then for another - they were cut off - he then bought a bandana; he desired they might be put by, saying he would return for them directly with the money - I did not see him again that day; but on the Monday I saw him in Paternoster-row - I recollected his person, and ran back to master - he came out with me; before master took him, he turned round to go to Newgate-street; when Mr. Bunn brought him back, I heard him say he kept a potatoe-shop, but I forget in what street - as he was going out of the door, he said he meant to say his wife's mother kept a potatoe-warehouse; I have never doubted about him; he took his neck-handkerchief off in the shop, and measured it across a piece, which has not been found since.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you serve in the shop? A. No; I take out parcels - I saw him close by the Chapter coffee-house, coming towards Cheapside - I do not know whether he saw me - when I returned with master he had got out of Paternoster-row, and was crossing over to Newgate-street - when he was brought into the shop, Lambert said something about his whiskers - I think he said he lived in Back-lane, St. George in the East; it was between 11 and 12 o'clock that the handkerchiefs were stolen.

SAMUEL NEALE . I am a constable. I was fetched to the shop, and took the prisoner in charge; and as I came out of the door he said his name was John Evans .

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you where he lived? A. In Back-road, Whitechapel; it is always called Back-road, and leads to Shadwell; the prisoner said nothing to me about his mother-in-law - I went to Mr. Fisher's and found he had bought the garters there, and paid for them.

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying the charge, and stating that he could prove an alibi.

MARIA ANDREWS . I am fourteen years old, and was in the prisoner's employ last December - I mind the child - he keeps a potatoe-warehouse in Back-lane, which is in St. George in the East; but they give it two or three names. On the Friday, before the Monday on which he was taken, he was at home washing potatoes all day; he got up between nine and ten o'clock on Friday, for my mistress sent me up between nine and ten o'clock to ask if he was coming down to take the shop-gate off; he then had his breakfast, and was washing potatoes all day, and putting them into binns and baskets - he was working in the back part of the shop - he had pork-sausages for dinner, and after dinner he went to the potatoes again and was washing them till eight o'clock that night - he was not out of the house all day; his wife was with him; Mr. and Mrs. Baker called there between five and six o'clock, just as we were going to tea; they stopped about an hour, and I was sent for a quartern of gin; I dined with his wife between twelve and one o'clock.

COURT. Q. Where did Baker live? A. In Market-

street, St. George in the East; I do not know Mr. Lane; on Friday I always help him to wash the potatoes, as there are so many, and fill the baskets - the children play about in front of the shop; I am in the shop from morning till night - I know master shaved himself, for he sent me out of the room while he did it, that was about twelve o'clock on the Wednesday; he went out, and came home on Wednesday night very tipsy; I do not know that he shaved afterwards; he shaves when he is going out on particular business - he did not shave on Sunday nor on Monday - I did not notice that he had a long beard; I have heard mistress say that her mother lived somewhere in Spitalfield-market; she does not deal in any thing; master always washes the potatoes on Friday, and could not have gone out without my knowing it - I went to Guildhall two or three days after he was taken up, and was examined before the Magistrate, and said the same as I have now - my master had small whiskers, but no beard; he used to shaved all his face, but did not shave from Wednesday until he was taken up - I told this story in a room at Guildhall, where the clerk took it down - I am not certain it was at Guildhall, or whether it was to an attorney I mentioned it.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see Mr. Baker go out with your master? A. Yes, after he had shaved, and it was on that day he came home tipsy; it was the day before master washed the potatoes; I do not know how the days of the week go, but I know on Friday he washes the potatoes that they may be ready for Saturday.

SAMUEL BAKER . I live in Market-street, St. George in the East; the prisoner took the shop, in Back-lane, of me about the middle of November; it is called Shadwell, or St. George's - it is in Shadwell parish - I never heard it called Whitechapel; I heard of the prisoner being taken on the Monday, and went before the Magistrate with the last witness on the Thursday following - on the Thursday, before the Monday that he was taken, he called on me respecting making an appeal against the taxes of the shop he took of me - we went to the British Union school-room - he was in his working dress, but was certainly decent; he was clean about the face - I did not notice whether he was shaved; I should not suppose he ever had a very strong beard. We went from the school-room to the Ship public-house, in Shakespeare-walk, kept by Mr. Scott - I left him there about eight o'clock, rather fresh, and am told he went home in liquor. On the Friday, the day of the robbery, I and my wife were passing his shop, and called in about six o'clock in the evening - his binns and baskets were full of potatoes, which were fresh washed - I staid about one hour with him.

COURT. Q. When you kept the shop, did you wash your potatoes? A. Almost always; the general day for washing them was on Friday - Back-lane cannot be called Ratcliff-highway; his mother is a potatoe saleswoman, and lives in South-street, Spitalfields; that is about one mile from Back-lane; Shadwell, and Ratcliff-highway is all in one street - Back-lane runs parallel with them northward.

- BAKER. I am wife of the last witness. I remember the prisoner being taken - I had called at his shop about tea time, on the Friday evening before he was taken - we staid there about an hour; there was a quantity of potatoes in the shop washed; the baskets and binns were full, and a great deal of Christmas holly about the place - we generally washed our potatoes on a Friday when we lived there, as there is a great demand on Saturday; I never observed that the prisoner had any beard at all; I should suppose he never had occasion to shave.

JOHN SCOTT , JUN. My father keeps a public-house in Shakespeare-walk; the prisoner and Baker were there on the 7th of December; the prisoner left about eight o'clock; I did not observe that he had drank too much.

COURT to SAMUEL BAKER . Q. Will you swear there was holly in his shop when you called there on the Friday? A. Yes; he had it hung about the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-33

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 13.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

311. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Shirt , he and others being therein, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 26th of December , and stealing 1 watch, value 25s. , his property.

WILLIAM SHIRT . I am a watch-maker , and live in the City-road . On the 26th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was called from the back garden into the shop by my daughter, and found the prisoner there - I asked what business he had there; he said he wanted a Mr. Jones - no such person lived with me; Starke, who had come into the shop with some work, then said he had been round the counter - I took him into the back parlour, with a neighbour, in whose presence I found this watch, in his right-hand jacket pocket - I had seen it on the work-board, behind the counter, a quarter of an hour before - he asked me to excuse him, but I took him to the office.

MIRA OLIVIA SHIRT . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I had left the shop about two minutes, and gone into the kitchen behind the parlour, and on returning I found two boys in the shop; I asked the prisoner (who was the eldest) what he wanted; he asked for Mr. Jones - I said I knew no such person, and I asked how long he had been in the shop - I then turned to Starke, who had come in with some work; he said the prisoner had been round the counter; I asked what he had been doing there - he said, Nothing; I laid my hand on him, and my father came, secured him, and found the watch on him - my father, my mother, and myself were the only persons in the house - we have no servant.

WILLIAM STARKE . I had just come into the shop, and saw the prisoner behind the counter; the door was ajar - I called Miss Shirt, and he was secured - I did not see the watch taken from him.

DAVID BROOKE . I am a cheesemonger. I saw Mr. Shirt take the watch from the prisoner - he begged to be excused.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-34

312. WILLIAM HARDEN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Gibbon and David Evans (the said Thomas Gibbon and others being therein), about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 22d of December , and stealing 1 handkerchief, value 4s. 6d. , their property.

RALPH NEWTON BROADBENT . I am in the employ of Thomas Gibbon and David Evans , who are linen-drapers , and live in Marchmont-street ; only one of them resides in the house. On the 22d of December, about half-past two o'clock, I was folding some prints at the door, and heard the window break; I ran out, and saw the prisoner with this silk handkerchief in his hand, which had been in the window just before, and the window was quite whole - two other boys were running with him; I followed him down Compton-street - he turned on seeing me, and dropped the handkerchief, which was taken up, and given to me; he was stopped, without getting out of my sight, and given in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is the person here who picked it up? A. No. I had seen the prisoner at the window twice before on that day, and recollected him.

MICHAEL WHITTY . I am street-keeper. I received him in charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-35

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

313. WILLIAM DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , at St. Giles in the Fields , 1 silver tea-pot, value 7l.; 2 silver candlesticks, value 10l.; 43 silver spoons, value 20l.; 12 silver forks, value 5l.; 1 silver nutmeg-grater, value 5s., and 1 silver label, value 1s., the goods of Barbara Knox , widow ; 1 watch, value 2l. 10s.; 1 cloak, value 20s.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 2 seals, value 20s.; 1 watch-key, value 5s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s., the goods of William Knox , in the dwelling-house of the said Barbara Knox ; and CATHERINE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, 1 silver tea-pot, value 7l.; 1 silver nutmeg-grater, value 5s.; 10 silver forks, value 4l., and 10 silver spoons, value 1l., the goods of the said Barbara Knox , part and parcel of the said goods, she well knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

CAPTAIN WILLIAM KNOX . I was in the East India service , and live at the house of my mother , Mrs. Barbara Knox - she is a widow , residing at North-crescent, Bedford-square , in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields. On the 28th of November the prisoner Davies had been three weeks and three days in the service of the family - on that day we had a dinner-party, and it was his duty to wait at table - he was missing at dinner time, and I did not see him again for more than a month afterwards, when he was in custody. On the day he left we missed the articles stated in the indictment (enumerating them) - the coat, cloak, waistcoat, seals, watch, key, and a pair of shoes, were mine; the other articles were my mother's - we missed every thing that night, and the plate was missing at dinner. I found the plate at Bow-street, on the 26th of December, in the possession of Bond.

WILLIAM BOND . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 29th of November I was desired to search for Davies. I found him at Bristol on the 15th of December; I said I had a warrant to apprehend him for robbing Captain Knox - I saw another officer find this watch in his fob, and two seals, and in his trousers pocket six duplicates of property pawned at Bristol; he gave them to me immediately. I found a silver bladed knife in his waistcoat pocket; I went to his lodgings in Bristol - he told me he lodged there; I found under the head of his bed a cloak; and in the room a black waistcoat, a pair of shoes, a great coat, a jacket, a silver Port wine lable, and a red waistcoat. I found six more duplicates there.

GEORGE KNAPP . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, a pawnbroker, of Brewer-street, Golden-square. I have four silver table forks, and a silver nutmeg-grater, pawned on the 28th of November, by a woman, in the name of Mary King , but I cannot identify her.

EDWARD DANIEL DORMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Tate, a pawnbroker, of Cambridge-street, Golden-square. I have eight silver tea-spoons and five silver forks, pawned on the 28th of November, by the female prisoner, in the name of Catherine Williams - I had seen her before, and have no doubt of her person.

JOHN BROWN . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, of Tottenham-court-road. I have a silver tea-pot, two spoons, and a fork, which I took in of the female prisoner, on the 28th of November; she pawned them all at once, but in different names; I have no doubt whatever of her person - she said she brought the spoons and forks for a friend, and gave the name of Mary Mansfield - she pawned the tea-pot in the name of Mary Davies ; she was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour in the shop.

JAMES WITHERS . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Bristol. On the 30th of November two table-cloths and four desert-spoons were pawned with me - on the 6th of December six tea-spoons, and on the 9th of December a silver shaving-box and stand, and six more tea-spoons; they were pawned by two females, to whom I gave duplicates; one brought the property, and the other accompanied her; neither of them was Williams. (Looking at four duplicates) - these are what I gave the persons.

WILLIAM BOND re-examined. These are four of the duplicates which were found on the prisoner. Williams was given into my custody on the 10th, in town.

RICHARD WESTON . I know both the prisoners - they both lived in my service once, and at the same time; Davies entered my service in December, 1824, and left in the middle of September last; Williams was only a few weeks with me, towards the latter end of his time, and remained after he quitted.

JOSEPH TUCKER . I live in Cumberland-street. Middlesex Hospital. Williams lodged in my house in November last, and left on the 28th of November; she had lived there three weeks, during which time Davies came to see her and his wife, who also lodged there - they both lived in one room. The last rent I received was from the prisoner Davies.

Prisoner WILLIAMS. Q. Did he come to see me, or his wife and sister? A. Williams slept with Davies' wife all

the three weeks they were there; they went away together in a coach, on the night of the robbery - Davies went with them; I did not see them get into the coach, but Davies brought it to the door, and when it went away they were all gone.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVIES' Defence. I did not go in the coach.

Three witnesses gave Davies a good character.

DAVIES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-36

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

314. JAMES COURT was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Isaac Corney , on the night of the 18th of December , and stealing 19 lbs. of tea, value 4l.; 11 silver spoons, value 45s.; 2 silver cruet-tops, value 1s. 6d., and 3 table-cloths, value 22s. , his property.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am a constable. On the 19th of December, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in Goulston-square, Whitechapel, and saw the prisoner walking with another man, whom I supposed to be in his company - I stopped the prisoner with a large bag on his back - he said he did not know what it was, but he had found it: I found it contained a quantity of tea, loose, and 2 ozs. of tea in a paper; the other man walked away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was quite light? A. No - it was getting light; he was a mile and a half from the prosecutor's.

ISAAC CORNEY . I am a grocer , and live in the Commercial-road . On the 18th of December, at eleven o'clock at night, I locked and barred the house up myself, My man servant called me at six o'clock in the morning, and I found the kitchen door, which opens into the yard, had been pierced through by some sharp instrument, and a square piece taken out, large enough to admit a person through; another door, leading from the back kitchen to the stairs (and which I had bolted at night) had a hole pierced in it, large enough for a hand to be put through it, to undo the bolt - the lock of the door between the parlour and the shop, was wrenched off. I went into the shop, and found three cannisters of black and green tea empty - the tills were both taken out of the counter; one of them had been locked the night before - I found one in the yard, and the other in the shop - some silver and copper was taken from them. I missed 19lbs. or 20lbs. of tea. The other articles were taken from the parlour cupboard.

Cross-examined. Q. What time were you awoke? A. I guess it was about six o'clock; the servant had a candle; it might be break of day; the bag contains black and green tea mixed - I cannot swear to it; the bag is not mine.

CHARLES ARKILL . I am fourteen years old, and have been six weeks with Mr. Corney, on liking. I had folded up this 2 ozs. of tea the evening before the robbery, and put it into the black tea cannister - I know it to be the same I had folded, as I am only on liking, and cannot do it neat.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked this tea up, and had not been in possession of it three minutes when I was stopped.

HENRY GREEN . I am a silk-dresser, and live in Spencer-street. On the evening of the 18th of December I was at a raffle with the prisoner, at the Ship public-house, from seven o'clock till half-past eleven; I walked home with him - he lives next door to me - and about half-past six the next morning, as I went out to go to work, I saw him come out of his own house - he had no bag, or any thing then - I walked into the Commercial-road with him, and left him at the corner of Bedford-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-37

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

315. DANIEL BURNS and WILLIAM JONES , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , at St. Clement Danes , 1 wooden-bowl, value 3d.; 8 half-crowns, 35 shillings, and 11 sixpences, the property of Thomas Anderson , in his dwelling-house .

PATIENCE ANDERSON . I am the wife of Thomas Anderson ; he is a baker ; we rent a house in Clement's-inn-passage, Haughton-street, Clare-market , in the parish of St. Clement Danes. On the 8th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I went down-stairs from the shop; I left the till shut; there were about 7l. in silver in a bowl in the till; I cannot say in what coin - I came up in a minute, and found the till open and the bowl of silver taken out; I went to call the man up from the bakehouse; I went out and alarmed the neighbours, and then went up to the corner of Clement's-inn-passage, where we live; I saw a crowd standing at the end of the passage; somebody in the crowd said, "It is all right;" I returned into the shop, having left nobody there, and the bowl was brought to me and some silver in it; after seeing it counted by Parrott, I gave it to the officer; there were then eight half-crowns, thirty-five shillings, and eleven sixpences in it; the coin was muddy as if it had been on the ground; several people entered the shop; I do not know from whom I received the bowl.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you locked the till? A. No; I left it closed, but the key was in it; my husband was out, and nobody but me served in the shop - I saw the money safe not a minute before; I had served a customer, and put the money I took into the bowl.

WILLIAM GEORGE PARROTT . I live exactly opposite Anderson in the same court, which is about six yards wide. On the 8th of January I was standing just by the side of my own door, about eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner, Jones, on the counter in Anderson's shop - I saw him throw himself across the counter and open the till, and the moment after I saw him come out at the door with the bowl in his hand - I followed him about two doors to the corner of Haughton-street, where I saw him give the bowl to another boy, about the size of Burns, who ran up Haughton-street with it directly - I followed him, neglecting Jones, and as I crossed the way the bowl and money fell; I heard it chink; I still followed calling out, Stop thief! he turned up New-inn-passage into Holles-street and Stanhope-street, then into Newcastle-street, and turned to the right by the Olympic theatre, in Wych-street; and as soon as I turned down there, I saw him stopped by some

person; it was Burns - I lost sight of him twice for about a second, and cannot swear that the boy I followed was stopped, as I was rather too far from him in turning Newcastle-street, but I think it was him; I counted the money which was brought back into the shop; I had not picked it up, but I saw it thrown down; and as I returned I saw a crowd stooping down on the very spot; I believe they were picking it up; I swear to Jones, for his head was close to the gas-light, and I was not far from him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you outside your door? A. No; I stood just within my door, which is very wide; I did not see him enter the shop, but I saw him open the till - I am certain of him, for I looked particularly at him, and had never seen him before - I heard the money fall, but did not look on the ground for it.

THOMAS ELIAS . I live in Milford-lane. On the 8th of January I was watching the prisoners from half-past six to eight o'clock; they were both together; I did not know them before - I was standing talking to a butcher at the corner of Haughton-street, and suspected them because I saw Jones snap his fingers, and come away from Anderson's window about six times and go up to Burns; I then saw Burns move away up to the corner of a wine-vaults at the corner of Haughton-street, two doors from Anderson's - Jones went into the shop - I saw him run out with a bowl, and his two hands on it; he gave it to Burns by the wine-vaults; he ran a little way up the street with it, and a man hit him on the arm and made him drop the bowl - I was following Jones, and caught him before he got to the end of Haughton-street - I took him to the watch-house; Burns had run off when the bowl was knocked down; it was just dropped at the time I caught Jones; I am certain of them both, as I had been near them before; Jones went into the shop - I walked down from the butcher's and looked at them.

Cross-examined. Q. When was this? A. Last Monday night - I was at a butcher's three or four doors off, at Joseph Lawrence's; I had done work and had nothing to do; I never had a doubt of either of them; I was about five yards from Anderson's; I saw Parrott run; I did not see Burns struck on the arm, as I was pursuing Jones, but I understood he was struck.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON . I am a day-patrol. I was on duty at the Olympic theatre; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran down, and rushed in among a mob; I received Burns in charge; I did not see him stopped - Mrs. Anderson delivered me the money.

JOSEPH LAWRENCE . I was standing talking to Elias, from about half-past six till eight o'clock; I saw Jones looking into the shop-windwo five or six times; he crossed over every time and spoke to Burns, who stood at Mr. Parrot's; and the last time he went back, I saw him enter the shop and come out with a bowl, which he gave to Burns, who ran away with it; Jones also ran; when Burns got opposite an oil shop, somebody struck him on the arm, and the bowl fell; I picked it up with some of the silver; Mr. Morris brought out a candle and helped us - he and I took it to Mr. Anderson's, where Parrot counted it - there were eight half-crowns, thirty-five shillings, and eleven sixpences; it was delivered to the officer - I then went to the watch-house and saw the prisoners, whom I knew to be the boys.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known Elias? A. Nine or ten years; I saw Jones stopping by the next shop to Anderson's, and thought something was wrong; I fell down in endeavouring to follow him, and then I did not pursue, but picked up the bowl.

BURNS' Defence. I was not near the shop; I turned down by the Olympic theatre for a necessary purpose; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and a man caught me; I had not been running.

BURNS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Reference Number: t18270111-38

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

316. CATHERINE ANN JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 cruet-stand and castors, value 5l., the goods of John Henry Davy , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MARY FOREMAN . I am servant to Mr. Davy. On Sunday morning, the 7th of January, while I was cleaning the brass-plate, outside the door, my mistress called me away; I went up-stairs, leaving the door ajar; I came down immediately, and saw the prisoner sitting in the parlour; she said she wanted to speak to Mr. Davy; I ran up into the drawing-room to my master, and told him the person, who had broken the windows before, wanted him - she had broken our windows a long time ago - I came down-stairs before my master - the prisoner was then gone, and had left the street-door wide open; I found the book-case door open, which had been shut before, and I missed a cruet-stand and castors out of it - I had seen it there ten minutes before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is your master here? A. Yes; the prisoner broke the windows three months ago.

Q. Has she not had a child by your master? A. I do not know that; I have heard so - she told me she had had a child by him, and wanted something from him to maintain it; she said she was but fifteen years of age when it was born; I was rather agitated when I saw her, as I knew her - she caught hold of my hand and said, "I had a child by him when I was sixteen years old;" she said nothing to me about the parish having provided for it till it was seven years old.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What message did she give you for your master? A. All she told me to say to him was that she wished to speak to him; he did not give me any answer to deliver to her.

COURT. Q. Had she ever been in that room before? A. Not to my knowledge; she has been at the house twice while I have been there, and used very abusive language; and the second time she broke the parlour-windows - I then heard what had happened between master and her.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer of St. Giles. Before this happened I heard Mr. Davy had had a child by the prisoner; he settled with the parish officers about it ten or twelve years ago; I believe it is still provided for - I believe it is with the prisoner's sister. Last Sunday I went in search of the prisoner, for stealing this cruet-stand, and found her at the Black Horse public-house, in George-street, St. Giles, six or seven hundred yards from Mr. Davy's house - it was six or seven

o'clock in the evening - she was not sober; I told her the charge - she said, "D - n the thing, I know nothing about it," but as we went along I said, "You had better let Mr. Davy have the cruet-stand;" she said, "Yes, I will let him have it, if he will send me back my - ."

Cross-examined. Q. You know nothing of the provision of the parish officers? A. I know he paid a certain sum of money to the parish; I am sure they would not turn it adrift at seven years old; Mr. Davy was before the Magistrate, but the clerk said there was no occasion to examine him - she had the child eleven years ago; she is now twenty-seven years old, she says; she has been an unfortunate woman for some time; she has been before the Magistrate several times, for breaking windows, and her story has always been that she had a child by him; I cannot find the cruet-stand any where - I certainly did not say she had better tell me where it was - it was a slip of the tongue.

MARY DAVY . I am the wife of John Henry Davy - his house is in St. Giles parish.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been married? A. Four years.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not expect to be tried till Monday, and have no friends here. I am certain Mr. Davy would hang me if he could.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-39

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

317. THOMAS BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 20 sovereigns, the monies of William Haycock , in the dwelling-house of William Leapard .

WILLIAM HAYCOCK . I am a servant . On the Friday before Christmas-day, I saw the prisoner at the Three-tuns public-house, Oxford-street , where I lodge - William Leapard keeps the house. The prisoner came to lodge there that day - we slept in the same room, which has three beds in it; he slept alone, the landlord and his son slept in one, and a young man slept with me. On the 30th of December I left my room, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock; my box was then safe; there were twenty sovereigns in it, wrapped in a piece of paper, and two or three Bank notes, wrapped in another paper - I returned about half-past twelve o'clock that morning, and went to my box for some money - I found the moulding split off the top, so that it could be opened without breaking the lock; the twenty sovereigns were gone - I came down and mentioned the robbery, then went and gave information at Bow-street; I made inquiry at the White Horse Cellars, and from information I received there, I found the prisoner drinking with the coachman at the Star and Garter, Kew Bridge - I told him I had been robbed, and he must return with me, and make his own case good - he said he was going to Hampshire, and if he did return, he would make somebody pay for it - he had a bundle, which he wanted to send on, but I would not let him - I brought him back; he said, on the road, that he had only two or three shillings to pay his way with; he was searched at my lodgings, and a sovereigns found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not tell you, the day before, that he was going to see a friend at Brentford? A. That was in the Christmas week - he said he had lived with a lady in Hampshire; he returned with me without an officer, and threatened me with an action for taking him off his journey.

MARY ANN JONES . I was visiting at Leapard's on Saturday morning, the 30th of December. About ten o'clock the prisoner came and asked me what was due for lodging- I sent the servant to ask; she came down, and said 2s.; he gave her half-a-crown, and told me he was going to Epping, in Essex, and that he had got a job there as a gardener, at 12s. a week - he used to pay for his lodging nightly, till the Tuesday, when he agreed to pay weekly, as he said he was short of money.

Cross-examined. Q. Anybody might have gone upstairs while he was waiting with you, and seen the things were right? A. Nobody was up-stairs but Mr. Leapard; he was very much agitated when he paid me.

JOHN KELLY . I lodge in his room. On the morning of the 30th of December, I got up a few minutes after Haycock; I closed the door, and left the prisoner alone in the room - when he first came, he had just left a situation at Mr. Owen's, where he said he had received 15s., and it must last him till he got another place. I met him in the passage about twenty minutes past nine o'clock that day, going into the tap-room; he had a pint of beer, which he paid 2 1/2d. for, and said it was the last money he had got - he told me he had met a countryman of his, and was going to Essex, where he could have 12s. a week as under gardener, and the countryman would pay his way down, as he had no money himself - I saw him go away, with two small bundles in a handkerchief - he had some old clothes in the room, but no new ones.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you intimate with him? A. No; he told me he had no money, and I gave him part of my breakfast; the servant locks the room when she makes the bed.

MARTIN SULLIVAN . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Monmouth-street. On the 30th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner bought a pair of top-boots of me, and paid me 11s. in silver; he took them out of his pocket-book, and I swear I saw seven or eight sovereigns there - I have seen the boots since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he bargain close for them? A. Yes, he cheapened them.

RALPH COTTERELL . I am a clothes-salesman, and live in Monmouth-street. On the 30th of December, I sold some clothes to a man for 25s. 6d.; I cannot be certain of the man, but the clothes are in Court - he paid me a sovereign and 5s. 6d; he turned his back when he paid me; I do not know where he took the money from.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge - I found a sovereign in his fob, and 1s. 4d. in his pockets; he had a bundle containing two waistcoats, a handkerchief, and a pair of breeches - he had the boots on.

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-41

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

318. JOSEPH WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Wesson , on the King's highway, on the 26th of December , at St. Andrew, Holborn , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his

will, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 1 hat, value 4s. , his property.

JAMES WESSON . I am a sawyer , and live at No. 9, Isabella-street, Lambeth - I rent the house, and work for Mr. Pearce. On the 26th of December, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was coming down Field-lane , and met two young men, who knocked me down - I had been with some friends, but was not at all intoxicated; they said nothing to me, but knocked me down immediately, with a blow on the forehead; they beat me violently after I was down, and kicked me - two or three girls came up, and the men came and said, "Pitch into the b - y b - r," and they beat me likewise; I had done nothing to them, but was walking quietly along - when I was down, after they had beat me, my head was cut open - I suspect it was done with one of the women's pattens; this was while I was on the ground: I was beat so violently that I was almost senseless, and cannot say whether I was picked up, or got up myself - I had a handkerchief in my hat - I do not know what became of my hat and handkerchief; I did not see them after I was knocked down - somebody had taken them away; I asked for them, but they would not give them to me - I could not identify the women, but the prisoner at the bar is the man who struck me down - he was taken by the watchman; he did it with his fist - I cannot say whether I should know the other man, or the women; they were girls seventeen or eighteen years old - the watchman took the prisoner in a few minutes - the first time I saw him after I was knocked down, was in the watchman's hands; the watchman came up and asked who had knocked me down; I pointed to the prisoner, and said, "That is one of the gang;" he then tried to make his escape, but the watchman took him before he got out of my sight.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not first insult my sister, a little girl twelve years old? A. No, I spoke to no one, man or woman; nor did I touch any girl, or speak to one; it is false - I was sober.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not strike me first? A. I did not strike him.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a watchman of St. Andrew, Holborn; Field-lane is in my beat. On the 26th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was on duty in Holborn, near Field-lane - I heard a confusion, like people wrangling; I ran to the spot in Field-lane, and observed a number of people standing, and the prosecutor in the middle of them, without his hat; his head was cut, and bleeding profusely - there were about twenty people round him; I asked him what had happened; he said he had been knocked down by a party, and been ill-treated, and pointed to the prisoner as the first who struck him - he then said he had lost his hat and handkerchief; I could find neither of them on the ground - I then attempted to take the prisoner; I do not mean to say that he ran, but he sidled away; I stopped him, and took him to the watch-house - he said nothing when the prosecutor charged him with knocking him down; he said nothing to me about the prosecutor having insulted any female, but when he had been two or three minutes in the watch-house, he said he had been taking liberties with his sister.

Q. Did he point out where his sister was? A. He did not - I looked out at the door for the person, and there was a woman of loose character at the watch-house door, but when I opened it, she ran away - his brother followed him down to the watch-house, and was about to name something of the kind, but no sister appeared; the brother said he had not seen it done, and no attempt was made to bring forward the sister - I understood that his mother, sister, and brother were all at Guildhall; but they did not offer to give evidence, nor interfere.

Q. Did you see the person who was represented at Guildhall as his sister, in Field-lane, when this happened? A. No, my Lord; the prosecutor complained of being hurt about the body with kicks - his head was cut, and bleeding very much; I did not examine the wound; it was on the back part of his head - I never saw the hat or handkerchief.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the prosecutor in liquor? A. He appeared to have been drinking a little, but was perfectly sensible - he gave his statement to me very clearly.

LOUISA HAYTER . I lodge at No. 1, Peter-street, Saffronhill, and go out washing - I was going down Field-lane, about a quarter or half-past ten o'clock on this night, and saw the prisoner knock the prosecutor down; three or four girls stood by, who appeared more like prostitutes than any thing else - I saw no other man; when he was knocked down, the girls fell on him, and beat him - one of them said, "Pitch into the b - y b - r;" his head was cut, and his hat knocked off; it could not be found afterwards; he was got up by the assistance of some persons who came round; his head was cut very much, and bled very much - he appeared almost senseless; he asked for his hat, but it was not to be found.

Q. Had you seen him walking before the prisoner gave him the blow? A. No; I came by at that moment; he appeared to have been drinking a little, but very little - when he was lifted up, he was able to give an account of himself, not as if he was stupified with liquor - the prisoner said he would go and fetch his brother; a young man came up, whom he called his brother, and inquired into the case, and the watchman came up and took him - I saw no man by at the time the prisoner knocked the prosecutor down; I did not see him take liberties with any girl - the girls went away when the prisoner was taken; neither of them said that the prosecutor had been insulting them, or I must have heard it - I think I have seen the prisoner about that quarter before; I know none of his family.

THOMAS GREEN . I am an officer of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - Wesson was bleeding very much from behind his head, and accused the prisoner of knocking him down, and said his hat and handkerchief were taken away while he was on the ground; the prisoner denied the charge; he denied striking him; no female came into the watch-house - a man, who called himself his brother, came in, but nobody else - his mother, brother, and a young woman, who he said was his sister, were at Guildhall, but were not before the Alderman; the young woman made no complaint against the prosecutor to me.

Prisoner's Defence (written). The prisoner is fourteen years old; he has been employed by Mr. Brittle, of Denmark-street, Soho, glass-blower. On Tuesday, the 26th of December, about ten o'clock, the prisoner was going to his place of residence, Richard's-buildings, Field-lane,

in company with his sister, a young girl, twelve years of age, they met the prosecutor coming from Saffron-hill down Field-lane, towards Holborn-hill - he was very much intoxicated, so much so, that he could scarcely stand; he began to take very unbecoming liberties with the prisoner's sister, which induced the prisoner to interfere, and, after remonstrating with the prosecutor for such gross behaviour, the prosecutor made no more ado but knocked the prisoner down, and in the scuffle the prosecutor's hat fell off; some person on the spot picked it up, and ran away with it; it is most likely some person belonging to the Jews' shops in Field-lane had ran away with it. The prosecutor caused the prisoner to be taken to the watch-house, and he was committed for trial. After having the prisoner taken, he could not find his hat, nor could he prove that the prisoner was in company with any other boy that evening, as he was merely going with his sister. The only person who can prove having seen any thing of the affray, is a woman, who says she saw it as she stood at the bottom of Holborn-hill, near the end of Field-lane; the situation of which does not run immediately in a straight direction, and it is impossible the woman can speak the truth. The prisoner's late master can give him a good character, and, if the Court will discharge him, will take him into his service immediately.

LOUISA HAYTER re-examined. I was close against them all the time, not so far from them as I am from your Lordship.

THOMAS GREEN . The prosecutor gave a very clear account of the transaction.

SOLOMON WHITEHEAD . I am the prisoner's brother. I live at No. 1, Richard's-buildings, Field-lane, and get my living by crying things in the street. I was not with my brother when this happened, but he ran home to me before he was given in charge; he came to me about five minutes before ten o'clock, and said, "Come, for a drunken man is ill-using your sister."

Q. This was before ten o'clock? A. Five minutes before ten. My sister is twelve years old - she was coming home with my brother to my house, it being boxingday; she lives over the water, in Christ-church parish - he did not bring her with him when he came to complain. When I came up, I heard a man crying out that he had lost his hat - this was before ten o'clock; he was very much intoxicated, and could scarcely stand; he was reeling about - I asked him what was the matter; he said he had lost his hat, and that was all he said, and all that I perceived.

Q. On your oath, did you not see him streaming with blood? A. No, not at the time I saw him, he was not, as I perceived - the watchman came up, and took my brother.

Q. Will you swear his head was not cut, and streaming with blood at that time? A. I could not see it - I will not swear it was not so; I saw it bleeding in the watch-house, when he showed it, but not before - his hat was off when I came up, but Field-lane is a very dark place, and there are no lamps: when I came up, my sister was in Field-lane, several spaces from him; I sent her home; I did not attend the examination at Guildhall - I was at work; my sister did not go - she was over the water - I am sure she was not there.

Q. Did she complain before a Justice of this man having ill-used her? A. No - my mother lives at No. 2, Brunswick-place, Brunswick-street, Christ-church - my sister lives with her - I heard her give an account of what happened that night; I did not take her to the watch-house to state it; they would not let any one in - they shoved me out three times - my sister followed me and my wife; I heard her tell the people outside the watch-house door, of the prosecutor having taken liberties with her - she did not tell the watchman; she was about as far from him as I am from your Lordship; there was no time to complain, for he was dragged away like a dog - she could have called out that he had insulted her, but I do not think she could have been heard at that distance, because there was such a tumult of people and such a bother - I did not hear her say any thing; I was following my brother - I saw the watchman ill-use him very much; he shoved me out of the watch-house - I was afraid to speak, for fear of being locked up myself.

LYDIA WHITEHEAD . I am the prisoner's sister, and am in Christ-church school - I was twelve years old last September. I and my brother were coming up Field-lane on boxing-night; the prosecutor met us, and began indecency with me, he being so much intoxicated with liquor; I had hold of my brother's hand - my brother asked what he did it for, and he struck my brother - he was terribly drunk - indeed, he reeled up against me, and began to maul me about: he laid hold of the bottom of my petticoats.

Q. He struck your brother; did he knock him down? A. No; but by his striking my brother, he fell down - he did not fall from any blow; nobody struck him at all he fell from his drunkenness; he fell into a door-way on his back - he got up, and struck my brother a second time - I did not see my brother strike him; I was then crying from his ill-usage - he fell down again, and hit his head against the side of the door-post; he got up again, and said he had lost his hat.

Q. Then nobody touched him? A. No; my brother went to fetch my eldest brother from Richard's-buildings - I staid by the prosecutor; I did not fetch my brother - it was the prisoner who did; I stood by the prosecutor the while.

Q. Then there was nobody to take care of you, if he had chosen to be impudent again? A. There was a moltitude of people round; I waited till my eldest brother and the prisoner came back - he did not touch me when the people were there; they were not women of the town who were round; there was only one young woman there besides me, she was a stranger.

Q. How came you out so late at night? A. I came out at six o'clock, and had been getting my Christmas-boxes - I had no other time, because I was at school before - I got the Christmas-boxes over the water, where my mother lives; I have been in Field-lane at night before, and was never insulted - I went to the watch-house with my eldest brother, but they would not let either of us in; I saw the watch-house door open, but could not get in - I saw the watchman lay hold of my brother, but was not near enough to tell him I had been ill-used; I was as near to him as I am to your Lordship; I could not tell him for the multitude of people and the noise - I said, "Please, sir, that gentleman insulted me first" - many people heard

that; my eldest brother was with my younger brother then - I told the people he had taken liberties with me, and many people spoke to him.

RICHARD BROWN re-examined. I did not see this witness there when I took the prisoner - I did not notice any woman there, but I was intent on taking the prisoner; no complaint was made of the prosecutor having taken indecent liberties with any woman - if the witness had complained when she was as near to me as I am to your Lordship, I must have heard her.

LYDIA WHITEHEAD re-examined. Q. Now, will you persist in this story, after what you have heard? A. Yes- I swear it is true. I did not go before the Magistrate the next morning, for I was ill at home, at my mother's - my mother and sister-in-law went, but I was ill, from the ill-usage of this man, and the blows I got from the multitude.

Q. Who struck you? A. The prosecutor did; he struck me about the head three times, and knocked me down - he gave another young woman a black, eye thinking it was me; I did not know her - she went away, and I did not hear her complain. I did not tell any Justice or watchman that the prosecutor had struck me, or behaved indecent - he struck me on the back of the head, with his knuckles; I had a low-crowned bonnet on, and it hurt me - I had a sick head-ache the next day, and could hardly get out of bed; I laid in bed till three o'clock in the afternoon - I had no bruises - the place could not be shown.

Q. Did nobody interfere in seeing a man like that strike a little girl? A. There was nobody there then; the watchman was almost the first who came up, and when he came I was crying - my brother went up to him.

Q. You said just now, there was such a crowd he could not hear you complain? A. Yes - the people in Field-lane were all at their doors, but nobody interfered.

SOLOMON WHITEHEAD re-examined. Q. Did your sister, that night, when the watchman had hold of your brother, complain that the prosecutor had struck her three times? A. I did not hear rightly what she said; she has complained of it since, scores of times - the first time I heard her mention it was when I went home from the watch-house; I did not hear her mention it at the watch-house door, but there was such a mob there; I do not know that I saw her when I followed my brother to the watch-house - I did not walk home with her; she walked a great distance behind, with my wife; when she got home she said she had been much ill-used by the prosecutor, and he had struck her; I did not attend to state this to the Justice, because my only dependence is on my business. The prisoner had been about a fortnight out of employ, and got his living by selling things in the street. which his mother bought for him; he worked at Mr. Holmes' glass-house three years, and he also worked in St. Giles.

MARY WHITEHEAD . I am the wife of the last witness, and live in Richard's-buildings. The prisoner came to fetch my husband about five minutes before ten o'clock, and said his sister was being ill-used by a man - my husband went out, but I did not follow till after he was in the watch-house; I found my sister outside the watch house door; she did not go there with me - my husband was then in the watch-house.

Q. This was very late for a young girl to be out? A. She and the prisoner were both going to sleep at our house that night. She told me the prosecutor had taken indecent liberties with her, and struck her - she did not say where; I saw no mark of her having been struck - I blamed her for not giving him in charge. They would not let me into the watch-house; I called out to some of the watchmen who were coming out, that he had struck my sister, but they pushed me out; that was not the watchman who is here; I called out loud enough to be heard in the watch-house, but they would not hear me - she did not tell me where she had been struck. She went home with me that night, and slept at our house - I am sure of that; she did not sleep at her mother's that night; she got up early in the morning, went home, and went to bed again, as she tells me. I was at Guildhall when the prisoner was examined, but they would not let me in, nor yet my mother-in-law - I asked to be let in, and said I could give evidence, but they would not hear us; I said it was my brother who was in custody, but they would not suffer us to go in; my sister was at home, at her mother's, at that time - I did not go home to see how she was that afternoon, for I had business to attend to- I did not know she was ill till I saw her the next day, or two days afterwards; I heard my mother say she was ill, but did not ask what was the matter with her. I recollect now she did say to my husband she was unwell, before we went to Guildhall, when she called for me.

Q. You have said you did not hear of it till the next day? A. I did not hear my sister mention it till the next day. My mother called for us to go to Guildhall, between ten and eleven o'clock - I think my husband was at home then - he sells baked-potatoes about. I saw nobody at Guildhall, to tell them the prosecutor had struck my sister; I said I had come to speak for him, but not that I came to complain of the prosecutor having struck her.

LOUISA HAYTER re-examined. I did not see the prisoner till he had got up to the prosecutor. I saw no girl in his hand - there were three or four girls together, and I think one of them was like the witness - he did not appear to be leading any of them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Reference Number: t18270111-42

319. JOHN HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 8 lbs. of brass, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Carlile .

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. On the 9th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was coming through Fleet-street , close to Richard Carlile's shop, and saw the prisoner looking through the window - I suspected him, crossed over, and watched him; I saw him very busy, as if he was wrenching something from the window - he then turned his back towards the window; I saw him take something away in his hands, and turn down Bouverie-street; I sent Carter to follow him, while I went to see what he had taken - I found part of the brass-work had been torn away - it appeared fresh torn; when it was found I matched it to the place - it matched. I have no doubt of its being part of the moulding of that window. The prisoner had it under his coat, in three pieces - I went after him, and found Carter had stopped him. I know Carlile's name is Richard.

RICHARD CARTER . I was with Fogg, and saw the pri

soner at the window; I went after him, and took him, with three pieces of brass under his coat, which I fitted to the window, and they corresponded - they weighed about 8lbs.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18270111-43

320. AARON SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 12lbs. of loaf-sugar, value 11s. , the goods of George Colebeck .

JOHN KIRK . On the 6th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and another person walking along Fenchurch-street; a boy was dragging a truck with a large basket in it - I saw the prisoner cross to the truck and take out a square paper parcel; he crossed to the opposite side of the way, and delivered it to his companion, who went over to him - he crossed to the truck a second time; but the boy saw him, and he went away - the boy called Stop thief! I followed him, and never lost sight of him till the officer took him - I am certain he is the person that took the parcel - his companion got away with it.

CHARLES JARVIS . I am in the employ of Mr. George Colebeck ; he lives at Hatton-wall, and is a grocer ; the boy was sent out with tea and sugar in a basket, on the 6th of January; I packed the sugar in square parcels - he had to go to Lower Shadwell; there were 12lbs. of loaf-sugar in one parcel.

JOHN MUNDER . I am in Mr. Colebeck's employ, and had these goods in a truck - I turned my head, and saw the prisoner coming towards the truck - he crossed the road, and I missed a parcel which I had to take to Shadwell - I called Stop thief! and the prisoner was stopped before he got out of my sight.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you never saw me? A. No: I saw him run from the truck.

EDWARD CROSS . I am a cooper. The prisoner passed me in Fenchurch-street much out of breath; he was running from the cry of Stop thief! and was stopped within three yards of me.

BENJAMIN FIGGINS . On the 6th of January I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran into Fenchurch-street; I met the prisoner, and stopped him - I took him back, about fifty yards, and met Munder, who said he had robbed him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running, it being cold; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and the officer caught me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-44

321. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 24 1/2 yards of cambric, value 29s.; 2 pieces of braid, value 2s. 6d.; 24 yards of ribbon, value 15s.; 3 1/2 yards of silk, value 7s. 6d.; 3 1/2 yards of woollen cloth, value 39s.; 1 veil, value 20s., and 3 pairs of gloves, value 5s. 4d. , the goods of William Griffin .

WILLIAM SHRUBSOLE . I am a linen-draper, and live at Kingston-on-Thames. On the 25th of November I packed the articles stated in the indictment in a bundle to go to Greenwich; they are worth about 6l. - I sent them by Harris, the Kingston carrier; they were directed to Mrs. Cockle, at the Rev. Dr. Burney 's; I found part of the contents at Guildhall early in January, and the prisoner was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You feel assured the property is yours? A. Yes; I have the piece it was cut from.

WILLIAM FINCH . I am proprietor of the Saracen's Head yard, Friday-street. I received a parcel from Harris, the Kingston carrier, directed to Mrs. Cockle, at the Rev. Dr. Burney's, Greenwich; I delivered it within two hours afterwards to Griffin, the Woolwich carrier.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you find that the parcel was delivered by your books? A. No; I can speak with confidence of it from my memory, as it was inquired for three days afterwards; it was on the 25th of November; I looked at my books on the 27th; I may, perhaps, have one or two hundred parcels every day.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN . I am a carrier from London to Woolwich . Finch delivered this parcel to me at the Saracen's Head, and it was in my cart when I got to the White Horse inn, Cripplegate - the prisoner was in the habit of minding the carts there, and was at the cart when I left the White Horse; when I got to Mr. Southgate's, in London-wall, it was gone - I looked after the prisoner, but could not find him; he was taken about the end of November, or beginning of December.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear him say any thing? A. I found him at the White Horse, but did not remain with him.

JOHN BARNES . I am an officer. On the 25th of November, about half-past nine o'clock, I was in Fore-street, near Cripplegate church; the prisoner passed me with something under his arm, and his wife was following him- she went to the watch-house door, called for an officer to take him in charge, saying he had got stolen property; the officer took him with this parcel; he said he had it from a waggoner, who put up in Wood-street, that the waggoner had brought it to town on purpose for him to sell - I was at Guildhall when Mr. Shrubsole claimed it as part of the goods he had lost.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know this was his wife? A. She said, "Take my husband, he has stolen property;" I knew her before, by seeing her about; it was very light, as there are good gas-lights by the watch-house; I could see to pick a pin up - I knew them both before - I do not know the woman to be a bad woman; he did not say she was not his wife - he was not so intoxicated as not to attend to what was said.

JOHN TUCKER . I am inspector of the watch. A woman knocked at the watch-house door, and in consequence of what she said I went and took the prisoner - the woman gave me this property and said she had taken it from him; he heard that, and did not deny it; when I took him he said,"I will go with you, but I know nothing about it;" the woman said he had robbed somebody of it - he did not deny her being his wife - they walked arm-in-arm together as I took him from Guildhall to the Compter, and she asked what she should bring him for breakfast; and he told me to tell his wife what time to bring his breakfast.

Cross-examined. Q. After accusing him of the robbery, she offered to bring his breakfast? A. Yes; she is outside the Court now - she appeared a working woman; she walked to and fro with him at all the three examinations, and she treated him with porter.

MR. SHRUBSOLE. I saw this property before the Ma

gistrate; it is a piece of coloured cambric - here is the piece it was cut from - it agress with the original measure.

JOHN BARNES re-examined. I saw the property on the prisoner's arms; but after the woman knocked at the watch-house door she ran after him, and then she had got it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-45

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 15.

First Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

322. JAMES WILSON and CHARLES MOORE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Jury , about the hour of seven in the night of the 8th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 pelisse, value 50s.; 1 tippet, value 5s.; 5 shirts, value 20s.; 9 kandkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 1 pillow-case, value 2s.; 1 bolster-case, value 4s.; 2 nightcaps, value 6d.; 1 pair of drawers, value 2s.; 1 frill, value 6d.; 1 pair of wristbands, value 6d.; 1 ham, value 8s., and 1 sack, value 6d. , the goods of the said William Jury .

ANN JURY . I am the wife of William Jury : we live in Baker-street , in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell; my husband is a bricklayer . On Friday, the 8th of December, I was at home all the evening: I fastened the house up a little before five o'clock, it was nearly dark then - my husband was out; I went down-stairs into the back-kitchen, a little before seven o'clock; all was secure then - I thought I heard a noise on the stairs about seven o'clock - I went down again a little after seven, and found the back-kitchen window broken open - the glass was not broken - it opens on hinges - I am sure I had shut it close and secure; but the shutters were not shut; I missed the property stated in the indictment; it was all taken from the kitchen, except the ham - I found the prisoners in custody afterwards.

JOSEPH PINE . I am an officer. On the 8th of December, about ten minutes before 8 o'clock, I saw the prisoners in company together in Wellington-street, half or three-quarters of a mile from Jury's house; Wilson was carrying a bag - Moore was four or five yards behind him - I heard Moore say to Wilson, "Here are the officers behind us;" and he directly walked across the road away from Wilson - I laid hold of Wilson, put him into Mr. Upton's hands, and went after Moore; I secured him - he immediately said, "I don't know any thing about it;" I had not accused him of any thing - I produce the property and the bag - I did not find the prosecutrix for four days.

JOHN UPTON . I was with Pine - his account is correct - I did not hear Moore say any thing.

MRS. JURY. This is all my property; the articles stated in the indictment are here, but they are not half of what I lost - the value of what I lost is nearly 10l.

WILSON's Defence. I know nothing of Moore; I did not see him till I crossed Wellington-street - he did not say a word to me.

WILSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

MOORE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-46

323. RICHARD HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , at St. Giles in the Fields , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 ribbon, value 2d., and 1 watch-key, value 6d., the goods of William Walter Jones , in the dwelling-house of John Jones .

JOHN JONES . I live in Wild-court, Lincoln's-inn-fields , in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields; my son, William Walter Jones , lives with me. On the 3d of November the prisoner took a lodging in my house, at 2s. 6d. a week - he slept with my son that night - he got up at twelve o'clock in the day, on the 4th of November, and went out - he came home between five and six o'clock, and said he had an opportunity of going to the play, and would I let him in at a late hour if he came - I let him in at two o'clock in the morning, and gave him a candle - he went up to bed - he had not been in the room two minutes before he came down-stairs, and said he had left a small parcel at a public-house, where he had supped, and must go for it and would return in ten minutes; but as he did not return. I went up to the room and missed my son's watch - I had gone into my son's bed-room, before the prisoner came in, to see the time; the watch was then on the mantel-piece - the prisoner never returned - nobody but my wife and son were in the house.

WILLIAM WALTER JONES . I went to bed about eleven o'clock on this night - I put my watch on the mantelpiece, by the bed-side - I did not hear the prisoner come home, and knew nothing about it till my father awoke me, and asked where my watch was - it was then gone - I have never found it - the prisoner did not return - I did not see him again till the 12th of December, when I met him in Princes-street, Drury-lane, and gave him in charge - my watch was worth 5l.; I gave seven guineas for it twelve months ago.

PHILIP PARISH . I took the prisoner in charge - he denied all knowledge of the parties.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 50.

Reference Number: t18270111-47

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

324. MARY COCKHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 6 shirts, value 3l.; 5 towels, value 15s.; 18 spoons, value 9l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 2l.; 3 table-cloths, value 30s.; 3 waistcoats, value 1l.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 9s.; 2 pairs of sheets, value 3l.; 1 gown, value 30s., and 50 yards of sheeting, value 4l., the goods of John Housman , her master , in his dwelling-house .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HOUSMAN . I live in Frederic-cottage, Goswell-road - the prisoner entered my service on the 10th of August; and in October I gave her some linen to make into towels, table-cloths, and sheets. On the 20th of December, in consequence of suspicion, I went into her bed-room with my servant boy and sister; the room was locked, but I found an old key which opened it; and in her drawer I found sixty or seventy duplicates, about fifty of which relate to my property - she was out then - I called her up, and when she came in, I told her what I had found - she said voluntarily that she was sorry for it, and that they were duplicates of my property; when I searched her room, I think if the sheets had not been on her bed, I should have noticed it - I took the duplicates from her, and told her to go about her business; she left that evening, and I soon after sent a constable after her - he brought her back, and I told her, as I had missed things which

there were no duplicates for, I had made up my mind to prosecute her; she said she hoped I would think better of it.

CHARLES WALTON . I am in Mr. Housman's service. I went to the prisoner's bed-room with him, and saw him find the duplicates - when she returned, master told her, in my presence, what he had found; she acknowledged pawning the things, and that they were his property - he asked why she did it - she gave no sufficient reason, and in the evening he sent her away - I went with the constable to Parr's-place, Goswell-road, and found her coming out of a house there.

JOHN KINGSBURY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Parr's-place, and brought her to Mr. Housman, who told her he was determined to prosecute - he gave me some duplicates, and she gave me some from her pocket.

THOMAS REDPATH . I am apprentice to Mr. Walter, a pawnbroker of Goswell-road. I have a silk gown, a pair of silk-stockings, 2 sheets, 2 handkerchiefs, 2 shirts, a gravy-spoon, a table-cloth, a pair of trousers, and 2 spoons, which were pawned at different times by a woman, but not the prisoner; the duplicates I gave the person are among those produced.

ROBERT MOSS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a table-spoon with me for 5s. on the 19th of December.

WILLIAM BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker. I have six spoons, a table-cloth, two pieces of sheeting, a piece of linen, and several other articles pawned by the prisoner at different times, from the 22d of August up to the 22d of November - I am certain of her person.

MR. HOUSMAN. This property is all mine - no one article is worth 40s.

Prisoner's Defence. My master is a single gentleman , and I do not think he knows much about housekeeping - he sometimes gave me a sovereign a-week, and I have gone twelve days without money - he kept a table like a gentleman - I was expected to supply it, and pawned these things to procure what was necessary.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-48

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

325. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 2 coats, value 30s.; 8 waistcoats, value 10s.; 3 shirts, value 12s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 4s.; 4 pairs of trousers, value 12s.; 1 silver band, value 6d.; 1 pair of braces, value 6d., and 1 jacket, value 2s., the goods of Edward Stephens , his master, in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD STEPHENS . I live at the Freemason's-arms, Downshire-hill, Hampstead - the prisoner worked for me. On the 24th of December, he went out with me, with a carriage which I let out, and as it was too late for him to go home, he slept with me that night; we got up together next morning; he went away about eight o'clock, and about eight o'clock on the morning of the 26th, I missed this property out of my chest. He had come into my room with a light about four o'clock that morning, and got into bed with me - my landlady called me at eight o'clock, and said that a pair of my boots, had been found in the garden - the prisoner jumped out of bed, and stood kneeling on the chest which had contained my clothes; he appeared much frightened - I asked him to look into my chest, which he did, and said there was nothing there, but no doubt I should have my clothes again - he said,"Never mind, they are all right" - he then left me, and went to drive a chaise for Mr. Norman; I went to him at Norman's in about an hour, and begged of him to give me my clothes - he said he did not know much about them, but no doubt I should have them again - he went to London with the chaise about twelve o'clock, and while he was gone, I received information: when he returned, I and another man went to the chaise which he had driven; he was then cleaning the harness - I saw a pair of breeches and two pairs of trousers under the seat of the chaise. I fetched an officer, who took him - he had got my shirt on his back: 2l. 11s. was found on him - he said that was what he had sold my clothes for - I found the braces and the waste pieces of some shirts which were taken from my chest, on him.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. From where were they stolen? A. It is a separate building from the public-house - I live there constantly; the door is not kept open in the day-time; the chest was not locked - I saw nobody but him enter the room. I had been making myself comfortable on Christmas-day - I cannot say whether he drank with me; I was with four or five people, whom he brought there - he did not put me to bed. I have got back three pairs of boots and a box from the landlady - I am sure it was my shirt he had on; but when he came to the office a second time, he had got another on.

WILLIAM HENRY NORMAN . The prisoner drove my father's chaise on Christmas-day, and next day I saw a bundle in the chaise, and asked if it belonged to him - he said he had to leave it in town for a person.

Cross-examined. Q. Has your father any other servants? A. No; the chaise was in the chaise-house all night - I saw Stephens on Christmas-day; he was not drunk.

CHARLES ADAMS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge. I found a pair of braces on him, some remnants of linen, and 2l. 11s.; he said, as he went to Hatton-garden, that he had sold the property.

EDWARD STEPHENS . Here are the trousers which were found in the chaise - they are mine.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been drinking with the prosecutor on Christmas-day, and was obliged to put him to bed, he was so overcome with liquor - he denied having put the clothes into the chaise.

GEORGE PEARCE . I know the prosecutor. On the 25th of December, I went into his room in the morning; his watch was hanging up there - I put it into my pocket, to keep for him, as he was in liquor; and in the afternoon he was drinking with a man and woman; they were all intoxicated, and next night a man and a woman slept in his bed with him - the prosecutor said he would not swear to the shirt.

EDWARD STEPHENS . I said I would not swear to a handkerchief, but the shirt was mine.

CHARLES ADAMS . He said he would not swear to the shirt, without he saw it off - I did not like to leave the

prisoner without one - he said the one the prisoner had on at the office was not his.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-49

Second London Jury - before Mr. Baron Alexander.

326. DANIEL DAVIS was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the first eight counts of this indictment, here in after mentioned, was a person employed by and under the Post-office of Great Britain , in certain business relating to the said Office, that is to say, in delivering letters and packets brought to the General Post-office in London , to wit, at St. Mary Woolnoth ; and that, on the 23d of November, in the said parish, a certain letter, then lately before sent by the post, to wit, by the post from Leicester, in the county of Leicester, to the said General Post-office in London, to be from thence sent by the post for and to be delivered to a certain person, by the description, name, and address of Mr. Poole, 10, Bird-cage-walk. Hackney-road, London, that is to say, to one Hugh Poole ; and containing therein I promissory note for payment of and value 10l., and I promissory note for payment of and value 5l., came to the hand and possession of the said Daniel Davis , whilst he was so employed as aforesaid; and that the said Daniel Davis afterwards, to wit, on the same day, at the same parish, being such person so employed, as aforesaid, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said promissory notes , the property of Benjamin Payne , against the statute.

2d COUNT, the same as the 1st, only instead of for secreting the letter, charging him with stealing the notes from and out of the letter.

3d and 4th COUNTS, like the 1st and 2d, only inserting the word packet instead of letter.

4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th COUNTS, like the former four, only stating the notes to be the property of Hugh Poole .

9th COUNT, for stealing, on the same day, at the parish aforesaid, from and out of a certain Post-office there situate, a letter sent by the post from Leicester to the said General Post-office in London, to be from thence sent by the post, for and to be delivered to the said Hugh Poole , and one other letter, against the statute.

10th COUNT, the same as the 9th, only inserting the word packet instead of letter.

MESSRS. GURNEY and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN PAYNES . I live at Leicester, and correspond with Mr. Poole in London. On Wednesday, the 22d of November, I had occasion to remit him 15l., for which purpose I handed to Atterburys, my foreman, a 10l. note, payable at Messrs. Pears and Heygate's, and a 5l. note payable at Messrs. Williams, Deacon and Co. (looking at two notes) - I believe these to be the same, from their appearance.

MICHAEL ATTERBURYS . I am foreman to Mr. Paynes. On the 22d of November he handed to me a 10l. and a 5l note (looking at them) - I have a memorandum in my cash-book of them - the numbers and amount of these correspond - I believe they are the same - after taking the numbers, I enclosed them in a letter, which I sealed, directed to Mr. Poole, No. 10, Bird-cage-walk, Hackney, London - I put it into the Post-office myself before seven o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is that the book in which you made the memorandum at the time? A. Yes; the letter never went out of my hands till I put it into the post - I have only written Poole's name in the cash-book without the direction - I always direct to him at No. 10, Bird-cage-walk.

DOROTHY TOMLINSON . I am assistant to the postmistress at Leicester - the box closes at seven o'clock - a letter, put in before seven, would go to London that night. On the 22d of November I was in the office: the London bag was forwarded as usual - here are my figures on the letter-bill, which shows I was in attendance.

JOHN WOODLEY STILES . I am employed in the General Post-office; it is my duty to open the bags when they arrive. On the 23d of November I remember the Leicester bag arriving in the usual way, tied and sealed.

WILLIAM BROWNINGS . I am a clerk in the Two-penny post department of the General-post; letters brought from the country-office, for delivery by the two-penny carriers, are brought to our office in a box; and account is taken of the postage before they are sent out. A letter put in at Leicester on the 22d would arrive in town on the 23d, and would be delivered that morning; the postage of a single letter from Leicester is 9d. - it is my duty to separate double and treble letters from single ones; an entry is made of them in the North East division. The prisoner is one of the persons employed in the delivery of letters in that division.

Q. Look at this book, is there the entry made on the morning of the 23d, of the double and treble letters for delivery? A. Yes - there are fifteen letters in number; the persons to whom these letters are delivered, sign their names against those they take charge of - three of these letters were delivered to the prisoner, which he is charged with the postage of; here is the entry - (reads) - William Horton , post-mark Ryde, 1s. 4d.; another, Mr. Poole, No. 10, Bird-cage-walk, Hackney-road, 2s. 3d., without any post-mark; another, Mr. Francis Praler , Prospect-place, Cambridge-heath, post-mark Swansea, 11d.; the prisoner has acknowledged, by his signature, that these three letters were delivered to him: 2s. 3d. would be the postage of a letter from Leicester, containing two bank notes; the post-mark on this letter was imperfect - I could not read it; he would have many other single letters to deliver; this is a security we take from the carrier, to acknowledge what double letters they receive - this rule at that time was only applicable to that division.

Cross-examined. Q. How many years have you been in the office? A. Seventeen; a great many persons are employed there - there are six carriers in that division.

Q. Irregularities have crept into the office, which led this new regulation? A. Yes; I am not aware of any men being suspended - I believe some have been - I have heard so, but that circumstance does not come to my knowledge; mistakes certainly do occur in sorting letters for delivery. I did not hear the prisoner give any account of this matter; I heard him examined before the Magistrate - he was bailed, and has surrendered here today; the letters are sorted in a large room - I should think from fifty to sixty persons are employed there, in and out - In the out parts the General letters are delivered by the two-penny postmen; I cannot say how many General letters he would have - they would be in addition to the twopenny ones; this regulation of signing the

book has been made about six weeks - the entry is in my writing; after entering them I lay them on a desk, and send for the letter-carriers respectively - he would be in the carrier's office, not in the office where I enter them; I send only for the carriers of his division, which would be five or six; the letters remain before me - he would then take the letters, see the amount was right, and then sign the book, which he has done - he does not bring his bag with him, but takes them away in his hand; he signs the book after taking the letters, to see that they belong to his delivery.

Q. Has it not often occurred, since this regulation, that the carrier takes your word, and relies on your accuracy, without comparing the letters with the entry? A. No - I always order them to examine them with the entry, and think I can safely swear they never sign the book without comparing them, for I always order them to examine it.

Q. Have you never seen a degree of negligence in the men which has surprised you? A. I have seen it, but I always say, "See what you have got before you sign;" I only know that he had the letters which he has signed for; the carrier always takes the letter before he signs it - I never knew them sign first - complaints have been made before of the non-delivery of letters - in this division there are six persons who deliver.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Was that complaint the cause of this regulation? A. Yes. I cast up the postage after entering them; a sub-sorter sorts them for me to enter - his name is Burt - I cast the postage myself, and the men account for the postage to Mr. Barret; I give to the Presidents' assistant a paper, called a docket, charging the carriers with the postage, and the carrier accounts to Barrett for the money; it is the carrier's duty to look at the letters, to see that they are within his walk, as he can tell better than the sorter. I now understand that Bird-cage-walk is not in the prisoner's walk - it is his business to see they are in his delivery before he signs - they are not delivered to him with the single ones, but separately.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I received from the prisoner the postage received by him on the 23d of November - he paid it to me on the Monday following, the 27th; they account every Monday morning; I received from him, as the postage of three double letters, delivered on the 23d, 4s. 6d.

Q. Before the carriers go out in the morning, do they bring you an account of the double letters they receive? A. I have a docket - they report to me verbally, and if that report agrees with the docket I put it down; he reported to me, on the 23d, that he had three double letters, amounting to 4s. 6d. His is called the Bethnal-green walk - I believe that adjoins Bird-cage-walk, Hackney-road, but his walk does not include that.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say it is not in his particular walk? A. I believe not; the account I have is what the carriers are responsible for, for the double letters.

Q. Whether he had the letter or not you would expect to received that sum? A. Yes, but he reports to me, whether he agrees with the account - if there was a mistake, my docket would not be correct; I receive that from another person, but compare it with his verbal report; if his report was not accurate it would not agree with my account; I expect him to pay the amount on the docket, he having reported it to be correct.

Q. If he had afterwards told you he had not received this letter, through some accident, would you not expect him to pay for it? A. I expect him to pay according to the docket.

MR. GURNEY. Q. The charge is made and a check given to you, the carrier comes and says how many he has, and if it agrees with the docket, you mark it? A. Yes, and not without; if a man says there is a mistake it would be inquired into - if he had stated nobody would take the letter in, and he could not find the man, the postage would have been allowed him.

JUSTINIA CLARK . I was employed at this time in delivering letters in the North East division; my walk adjoins the prisoner's - Bird-cage-walk is in my delivery.

Cross-examined. Q. There are six men attached to the division? A. Yes - I am one of them.

HUGH POOLE . I live in Bird-cage-walk, Hackney-road. I expected a remittance from Mr. Payne, of Leicester - I received no letter from him, enclosing a remittance, on the 23d of November, nor at any time that mouth; my wife and son are the only persons living in my house. I wrote to Leicester on the 28th, in consequence of not receiving it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is yours a private house? A. Yes - I have no lodgers.

MRS. POOLE. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 23d of November I took no letter in, directed to him.

GEORGE POOLE . I am the son of Mr. Poole. I received no letter from the postman on the 23d.

PHILIP DAVIES . I am clerk to Messrs. Pears and Heygate, bankers, London - they have an establishment at Leicester, called the Leicestershire Bank; the promissory notes are payable at our house in town; I paid the 10l. note produced on the 23d of November, but have no recollection of the person who brought it.

CHRISTOPHER FREEMAN RAINE . I am clerk to Messrs. Williams, Deacon, and Co. The notes of the Leicester and Leicestershire Bank are payable at our house - I made an entry on the 24th, of the notes which came in on the 23d; I have entered the 5l. note produced as having been paid on the 23d - I do not pay them myself.

ROBERT SMITH . I am a President in the Twopenny department of the Post-office. In consequence of an inquiry respecting this letter; the prisoner was called before me on the 1st of December, when Mr. Poole applied - I went into the sorting-office, referred to the book, and found an entry made of this letter; I then sent for the prisoner, and asked him if that letter came to his hands - I do not think I showed him the entry, but asked him if he had a letter for Mr. Poole, Bird-cage-walk, Hackney-road; his answer, to the best of my recollection, was, "No, it is not my delivery - I don't go into Hackney-road;" I said, "Are you sure the letter did not come to your hands" - he still said, No; I said, "Have you no person of that name in your walk, where you could have delivered it, supposing it to have come to your hands;" he said No, but I do not think I showed him the book; he still said he had not received it. I allowed him to go out of the office, but not out of the building; I went and reported it to the solicitor - he was taken before him, and the book produced - when he was shown the entry of the letter which he

had signed - he said if he had signed it, it must be a mistake - he did not know any thing about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Upon your receiving an intimation that it had not been delivered, you had the means of discovering in whose hands it had been, from the book? A. Yes; I knew his signature acknowledged the receipt of the latter - I did not question him with a view to catch him, but that he might recollect himself if he had made a wrong delivery; I knew it was not in his walk, which made me question him more minutely.

Q. Was not your object to detect whether he had stolen it or not? A. Very probably - it was my duty to discover whether he was guilty or not; I was certainly anxious to discover the guilty person; if I had told him he had signed the book, he might have gone away for what I knew; I meant that the conversation between us should be given in evidence, but in every inquiry I make I do not immediately think of coming here; the questions suggested themselves from the nature of the business; I cannot sayy what impression I had on my mind then - I did not commit this conversation to writing - I trust to my memory.

MRS. TOMLINSON re-examined. In November last the Leicester stamp was rather worn, and made a bad impression.

MR. ANDREWS to JUSTINIA CLARK . Q. You have been in the North East division ever since this regulation has been adopted? A. Yes; I receive my letters before I sign the book - I do not recollect an instance of any carrier having signed the book first.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord, the case I am now charged with I am innocent of. I have been in the employ two years, and deliver General-post letters in several walks in town and country, and had many opportunities of committing robberies, without signing my name.

Prisoner. The day before I entered on this walk there was a letter lost - it was sent into the East division, and belonged to the North East: the carriers saying it did not belong to them, took it into the clerk's-office, and got it changed; it was lost, and when the gentleman applied about it the note was found to have been received at the Bank; this was the day before I went to that division - it belonged to Mr. Blundell, of Bethnal-green.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his good character .

Reference Number: t18270111-50

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

327. WILLIAM HOWARD & FREDERICK LANGLEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Shorey , about ten o'clock in the night of the 9th of December , at St. James, Westminster , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 2l., and 1 watch-key, value 10s. , his property.

DANIEL SHOREY . I live in Rupert-street , in the parish of St. James. Westminster, and rent the house; the prisoners both lodged with me. On the 9th of December, at half-past ten o'clock at night, my wife gave me information; I went up-stairs to my bed-room, and found the door wide open, and the alarm-bell wire, which had been attached to the door, cut - on entering the room I missed a silver watch, two gold seals, two gold rings, and a gold key - they were attached to the watch, and are worth more than 40s.; I had been up into my bed-room at six o'clock that evening, and left them on the drawers - the alarmbell was not cut then. I went down-stairs, and saw Howard in the kitchen, within five minutes of my going down - he had lodged with me three weeks; I told him he had been into my bed-room, which he denied; I said I suspected him of stealing my watch - he denied it. Langley came in in about a quarter of an hour. I sent for a watchman, and gave them both in charge.

ELIZA LUDLOW . I live with Mr. Shorey, who is my uncle. The prisoners had lodged there for three weeks. On the 9th of December, at half-past 9 o'clock, I went to bed in my uncle's room, which is on the second floor, and saw my uncle's watch on the drawers; the prisoners sleep on the third floor, and would pass my uncle's room door to go to theirs; when I went into the room I shut the door, and fastened it; after I was in bed I heard a noise like the wire of the alarm-bell being cut - I then saw Howard come in at the door, with the candle in his hand; I did not see him do any thing, or take any thing - I said, "William, what do you want here?" he gave me no answer, but ran down stairs - I got up, and alarmed my aunt.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He had his back towards you? A. No. I was in bed.

THOMAS WHITE . I am servant to Mr. Shorey; the prisoners lodged there for three weeks. About ten o'clock on the night in question I saw them both in the kitchen; Howard went up-stairs with a candle in his hand, and Langley went up directly after him - about half-past ten o'clock I saw Howard come down-stairs into the street - he went about twenty yards down the street, and returned in four or five minutes, into the kitchen; in about a quarter of an hour Langley came into the house; he had followed Howard into the street, immediately he went out; I saw them in the street, about twenty yards from the house, and saw something pass between them, but cannot say what - they put their hands to one another - they came into the kitchen again, and were soon afterwards taken. I heard master charge Howard with stealing the watch - he denied it.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable of St. James. I was sent for on Sunday night, the 10th, and found the prisoners in the watch-house; I fetched Langley out of the cell first; a friend had come to see him, who said he thought all Mr. Shorey wanted was his watch back again; I said, "Recollect, I don't promise any thing" - I did not use either a threat or promise to him - I searched him, but found nothing relating to this prosecution; after he had denied several times knowing any thing about it, I was about to lock him in another cell, and he said he wanted to speak to me - Howard was not within hearing; Langley said a person, (whom he mertioned) had told him he had taken the watch, and planted it under his (Langley's) father-in-law's kitchen-stairs - he described the spot very minutely; I went there, and after searching some time, found it in the place he mentioned; I then returned to the watch-house, and brought Howard out of the cell - I asked him twice where the watch was - he denied all knowledge of it, and as I was returning him to the cell I pulled the watch out, showed it to him,

and said, "Have you ever seen this before?" he said No; I was then about to lock him up - he said, "It is of no use to deny it any longer; I did take it," and he mentioned a person who cut the wire while he held the light, and said that he went into the room, took the watch, and gave it to that person, who went and planted it. I afterwards went into a room with Mr. Shorey, and found a pair of shears, which appeared to have been employed against some hard substance.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain no promise or threat was held out? A. Quite so. I have known Langley about a year, and considered him very honest.

MR. SHOREY. This is the watch and seals which I lost that night; I showed Gook into the prisoners' room - he found these shears in the room where they worked - they are tailors; nobody else worked there.

Two witnesses gave each of the prisoners a good character.

HOWARD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

LANGLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of their youth and character .

Reference Number: t18270111-51

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

328. ROBERT YOUNG was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Burnell , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 31st of December , at Feltham , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 14 tea-spoons, value 4l.; 5 snuff-boxes, value 3l.; 2 spying-glasses, value 1l.; 2 guns, value 11l.; 1 key, value 1s., and 1 coffee-biggin, value 3l., his property; and 4 keys, value 4d., and 1 ring, value 1d., the goods of Harriet Young ; and 1 coat, value 3l.; 1 hat, value 15s., and 1 handkerchief, value 7s. , the goods of Henry Thomas Curtis .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOS. BURNELL . I live at Feltham-hill, in the parish of Feltham, and rent the house. Between six and seven o'clock in the morning of the 1st of January, I was awoke by my servant - day-light had not appeared - I got up went down-stairs, and found my house had been entered at the scullery window, next the fields, by taking down a bar of the window; several pieces had been cut out of the kitchen-door by a centre-bit - the bell had been then taken down, and the bolts undone. I proceeded to the butler's pantry, where the plate in common use was kept, and missed fourteen silver tea-spoons, and a plated coffee-biggin; six of the spoons were worth 14s. each. I went to the library, which was open, and missed two guns, three great coats, and three hats - one of the hats belonged to Mr. Curtis: I missed five snuff-boxes and a flute from the drawing-room.

HARRIET YOUNG . I am housemaid to Mr. Burnell. The family retired to rest about eleven o'clock on the 31st of December - the doors and windows were all fastened, and the places which were broken in the morning were fastened; the dairy key was kept hanging over the dresser; I missed that on the morning of the 1st of January, also a bunch of keys from the dresser drawer.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you the last person up? A. The servants all went up-stairs together soon after the family.

CHARLES JONES . I am footman to Mr. Burnell. On the morning of the 1st of January, when I got up, about six o'clock. I found the pantry had been rifled; both the closet locks were picked open, several things taken out and put on the pantry table, and several things of my own were taken - I found the dining-room closet had been entered by holes being bored through, and all the drawers in the sideboard were opened; the kitchen door had two holes bored through the pannel, a hand could then be put through to undo the bolt and lock - several things were taken from the drawing-room, and put in the scullery - some work-boxes had been opened and rifled, and left in the scullery. I missed fourteen tea-spoons, a great coat, a waistcoat, a pair of breeches, a hat, two pairs of gloves, a handkerchief, and a coffee biggin; and several snuff-boxes, two guns, a great coat, and other property, were taken from the library.

JOHN FINAL COOKE . I am high-constable of Isleworth. On Wednesday, the 3d of January, about noon, in consequence of information, I went to the prisoner's house, and saw him there - he lives at Witham, about four miles from Feltham; I told him I had a warrant to search his house, but should first search his person, for goods stolen from Mr. Burnell's - Hill, in my presence, found on him a very large bunch of keys, most of them skeleton-keys; I found another key, which Mr. Burnell claims as belonging to his dairy; and a small bunch of keys, which Mr. Burnell's servant claims - I found two centre-bits on his person, which I have compared with the holes in the pannel of the kitchen-door; they correspond exactly - I have brought the pannel here. I searched his house, and found this snuff-box, either on the mantel-shelf, or a shelf by the side of the fire - we also found several other things, which Mr. Burnell does not claim. I had searched the house before, and know that he lived there with his wife; I do not know of his having any lodgers - it is a cottage with only two rooms and a loft.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Pray what does the family consist of? A. I think I saw two or three children there - I believe he is a labourer when he has work - I have been a carpenter myself; I believe there are about twenty-five centre-bits in a set; there may be a hundred the same size as this.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a constable, and live on Hounslow-heath. I accompanied Cooke to the prisoner's house, and found on him the skeleton-keys and two centre-bits; and in his waistcoat pocket, a large key and a bunch of keys - I found in the back room, a hat, a hat-box, and a three-foot rule.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Does anybody else live in the house? A. His wife, and I believe he has two or three small children.

MR. HENRY THOS. CURTIS . On the 31st of December, I slept at Mr. Burnell's. The hat produced is mine - the maker's name is now defaced with ink, and my initials, which were printed on the paper, are taken out - it was left in the library.

HARRIET YOUNG . The small bunch of keys are mine, and was taken out of the kitchen drawer; this large key hung over the dresser.

MR. BURNELL. This is one of the snuff-boxes which were taken out of my library - here is some Prince's-mix

ture, which I had left in it, and it has a particular inscription on it. I am almost positive that the rule is mine.

ANN COLLYER . I live at Feltham-hill. I remember the night that Mr. Burnell's house was broken open. On the Saturday before that, the 30th of December, I saw the prisoner in the lane going up to Feltham - he asked me the name of the place; I told him; and he asked me the names of the people who lived in the different houses which he pointed out; he asked me who lived at Mr. Burnell's - I told him; and he asked if he could go across the fields to it - I said, not without going over the hedges and ditches.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Had he a hat on? A. Yes; he was about a minute with me - I am sure he is the man; I saw him at Bow-street last Thursday; he had a hat on then - I was always sure of him.

ANN HAWKINS . I carry out the post letters. On the 31st of December, at half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I went to Mr. Burnell's to deliver his newspaper, and as I came out of the iron-gate, four men passed me; they entered into conversation with me - I knew one of them, that was John Stevens.

GEORGE GRIST . I keep a public-house at Hanworth - I know the prisoner. On Sunday, the 31st of December, I saw him pass my door with three men, named Stevens, Young, and Steers - Steers was walking with the prisoner, and the others fifteen or eighteen yards from them; they were walking two and two, each talking to the person he was walking with - just as they got opposite my house, the first two asked the others if they were going to give them any beer; Young and his friend said, "No, it won't do; it is no go there" - they all four joined together, and consulted for about half a minute, and then turned down towards the Swan public-house; this was a quarter before ten o'clock in the morning.

JAMES PALMER . I keep the Swan at Hanworth, and know the prisoner by sight. On Sunday, the 31st of December, about ten minutes before ten o'clock, he came into my house with Steers, Stevens, and another man.

CHARLES LITTLEWOOD . I am a labourer, and live at Feltham. On the 31st of December, between four and five o'clock in the evening, I saw a cart, with a grey horse, coming from Hanworth to Hanworth-green - you can go that way to Feltham - it is a convenient way to the fields; there were four persons in the cart - I thought I knew three of them, Young, Steers, and the prisoner; I was walking along by the side of the ditch; they came by me at full trot, but did not speak - I will not swear that the prisoner was one of them, but I think so.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18270111-52

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

329. ROBERT BURFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 gelding, price 10l. , the property of our Lord the King .

ROBERT DRYLIE . I am a private in the 7th Dragoon-guards. On the 13th of December, at nine o'clock at night, I was sentinel in the St. John's-wood barrack-stable yard, and saw the prisoner return from town to his barracks - he went to his own stable, and immediately he opened the door a mare ran out loose - she got by me, and I went after her - I was driving her back, and saw the prisoner go out at the gate, at the other end of the stable-yard, mounted on another horse - I asked where he was going - he said to catch the mare that was loose - I saw no more of him - I had not then been able to drive the mare back - the prisoner is a private in the 15th Hussars - it was a bay-gelding belonging to 3d Dragoon-guards that he rode away with - the same gelding came back about a week afterwards - I did not see him again till he was brought back by an escort.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you known him? A. Seven months - he had been sent to learn a new sword exercise, in order to instruct his regiment, which is in Ireland - he was not perfectly sober when he came from town.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a private in the 3d Dragoon-guards. On the 19th of December I was sent to Hussgreen - I found this gelding there at the Queen's Head public-house on the 21st of December, and brought it away on the 22d, and took it to the St. John's-wood barracks - it belonged to a corporal of the 3d Guards, and was a regimental horse.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose before you got to Hussgreen, you made inquiries? A. Yes; I did not hear of its having been offered for sale on the road - I believe he gave information where the horse was to be found.

DANIEL VOUSDEN . I am hostler at the Queen's Head, Huss-green. On the 15th of December, between one and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came there on a bay-gelding, which he tied up in the front of the house; he came in, and seeing he had spurs on, I asked if he wanted his horse put into the stable; he said, No, it would do where it was - a serjeant of the 8th Hussars, who was there, said, "Why, you belong to the 15th Hussars, which are laying in Ireland; what brings you here?" he said he had got an officer on leave of absence, at Roberts'-bridge, which is two miles off, and was going to see him - he then said he should walk to Roberts'-bridge, and should leave his horse - he desired me to feed and clean it - he said he should be back in an hour or an hour and a half, if he could get his business done, and should get back eight miles nearer town to sleep that night - he followed me out, and told me to take great care of the horse, for it was very malicious, and might hurt me - he went away, and never returned - Williams took the same horse away on the 22d of December.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he in his military dress? A. In a sort of undress - the serjeant went towards him, as if he took him for a deserter; he then said he had an officer at Roberts'-bridge - Huss-green is in the direct road, between town and Hastings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated; but remember going to the stable-door, and the horse ran out - I immediately mounted another horse to catch it; but not succeeding, I went to see my relations - if I had wished to have sold it, I had plenty of opportunities - I immediately told the officer where the horse was.

CHARLES BURFIELD . I am the prisoner's uncle, and live in the Paragon, New Kent-road; I am a merchant - his father and mother live at Hastings. On the 13th of December, about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner called on me on horseback - he was very much intoxicated, and almost in a mad state - I could scarcely understand

what he came for - when he left me, he rode round the Pargaon very fast - the horse seemed to trip, and he fell off - he returned, and borrowed a few shillings of me - I reprimanded him, for he was very drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-53

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

330. THOMAS SALCOMB and HENRY HITCHMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 pair of boots, value 15s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 dressing-case, value 10s.; 1 pair of pistols, value 10l., and 2 pistol-cases, value 2s., the goods of Henry Sansom ; and 1 pair of boots, value 15s., the goods of Daniel Magniac , in the dwelling-house of the said Henry Sansom .

SEBASTIAN GAHAGAN . I am a green-grocer, and live in George-street, Bryanston-square. On the 9th of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, Salcomb, come out of Mr. Sansom's house, in Bryanston-square , and down the steps with a pair of boots in his hand - Hitchman was in company with him - he had an apron full of things - Mr. Sansom is a customer of mine - I took no particular notice at that time; but delivered some parcels in George-street, then returned - and as I was taking some things to No. 30, Bryanston-square, I still saw them loitering about Mr. Sansom's door, which was ajar - this was a quarter of an hour after I first saw them - I watched them as I went up the square, knowing the family were out of town - they saw me; and when I went down the area of No. 30, Salcomb went up Mr. Sansom's steps - I told the cook, at No. 30 - I then ran back to the house; the door was then shut - I rang the bell, and told the woman, who was in care of the house; but could not then see the prisoners; I saw no more of them till last Sunday week, when I found them in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. This is a public place? A. Yes; I saw nobody standing about but them - seeing them confused made me suspect them - the boots were in Salcomb's hands; they were high long boots, without tops - Hitchman had an apron full of things; I swear positively to both the prisoners - Mr. Sansom sent for me when he came to town - I described them to the officer, who apprehended them.

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I was in care of Mr. Sansom's house. On the 9th of November, about noon, Gahagan gave me information - I looked about and missed two pairs of boots, and a parcel off the bed, containing a shirt and waistcoat; one pair of boots belonged to Mr. Daniel Magniac - the pistols were not missed till Mr. Sansom came to town, which was in about a fortnight; and a dressing-case was missing: I had cleaned the door in the morning and shut it, as I suppose; but I am not sure of it- Mr. Magniac is Mr. Sansom's brother-in-law.

FREDERICK HOSTLER . I am butler to Mr. Henry Sansom : Mr. Daniel Magniac is his brother-in-law. I had left town on the 19th of October; Mr. Magniac had left a pair of hessian-boots in Mr. Philip Sansom 's dressing-room - Mr. Sansom left some pistols in the dressing-room; but I do not know their value, as I never saw the case opened - I came to town on the 11th of November, and heard what had happened - I found Salcomb in custody about a fortnight ago; he was a stranger, and had no business in the house - the property has not been found.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I went with Gahagan, on the 7th of January, to a coffee-shop in Circus-street, and saw Salcomb there - Gahagan pointed him out- I told him I apprehended him for stealing (in November last) some boots, a pair of pistols, worth sixty guineas, and other property, worth nearly 100l.; he denied it; none of the property has been found - Hitchman had been taken before on another charge.

SALCOMB's Defence. I know nothing of it.

HITCHMAN's Defence. It is useless taking up your time, as the witness identifies me, which he can easily do, when the officer has described my dress to him - I had looked him in the face in the yard for a quarter of an hour before, and he said I was not there.

SALCOMB - GUILTY. Aged 21.

HITCHMAN - GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-54

331. WILLIAM GLOVER was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of James Camper and William Butland , on the night of the 29th of December , and stealing 1 pearl ring, value 40s. , their property.

JAMES CAMPER . I live in Whitechapel-road , and am in partnership with William Butland ; we are pawnbrokers ; we both live in the house, and pay the rent jointly. On the 29th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in the room behind the shop, and was called; it was quite dark - I went into the shop, and found the patrol there, with the prisoner in custody; he said the window had been cut, which I found was the case - it was safe a quarter of an hour before; I minded the prisoner while the patrol went out, and brought in a wire; a small piece was taken out of the glass, and I missed a pearl ring, worth 40s., which was safe a quarter of an hour before, when the glass was entire - a person could have drawn it out with that wire - it has never been found; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Would you not sell it for 40s.? A. No; it was worth 50s. to sell; I had looked at every pane in the lower part of the window a quarter of an hour before - I did not offer to take 4l. to make this matter up.

JOHN DUNGATE . I am a watchman. On the 29th of December, I saw the prisoner and three others at the prosecutor's window; the prisoner had a piece of wire in his hand, putting it through the corner of a square of glass - I secured him; two of the others were on his right hand, and the other on his left - they went away immediately - I took him into the shop, returned, and picked up the wire which dropped from his hand, and gave it to Camper.

Cross-examined. Q. How near were you to them? A. I was at his shoulder when I saw him with the wire - I took him in the act; two other persons saw this - they are outside - I believe Jarrett was one of them - they might have seen me if they liked; the prisoner's back was towards me.

RICHARD JARRETT . I am a box-maker, and was in Whitechapel a little after six o'clock - I saw the prisoner and three others at this window, doing something which I

could not perceive, as they stood close together - I saw the patrol go, and look over the prisoner's left shoulder, then seize him, take him into the shop, and give him to Camper - he said nothing to the charge; the patrol came out, and picked up the wire under the window; it was crooked at each end; a person could reach any thing out with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him give any thing to the other men? A. No; they ran away - no ring was found on him.

JAMES CAMPER re-examined. The ticket, which the ring was attached to, was drawn close to the hole, and then separated from it - it had two on it, and one was left there.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-55

332. THOMAS VANDERA was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , at St. John, Hampstead , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 1s., and 5 sovereigns, the property of Thomas Pearce , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Ansell .

THOMAS PEARCE . I am a journeyman baker , and live at Mr. Thomas Ansell 's, High-street , in the parish of St. John, Hampstead; this property was in a box in my bed-room on the third-floor; the prisoner lodged in the same room; I had seen my watch and money safe on the evening before this happened; it was a silver watch, with two seals, a key, and ring, and five sovereigns; it was all locked in my box. On Tuesday afternoon, the 9th of January, at a quarter past five o'clock, I was in the house; my box was then quite safe; I came home again about half past nine o'clock, and went to bed in the dark - the prisoner had lodged there about four months; I never heard from him that he was going to leave; I was called up at eleven o'clock, found my box broken open, and the property gone - the prisoner did not sleep there that night - he was taken into custody next morning; nobody but him and me lodged in the room, nor were there any other lodgers in the house - I saw my watch at Hatton-garden; there had been another seal added to it since I had lost it - I had had it about six months - when I went out about five o'clock, I left the prisoner in the bake-house; he was employed by me at Ausell's, who is a baker; when he was apprehended, five sovereigns were produced - my watch is worth 2l.; it cost me 3l. 10s. six months ago - two gold seals cost me 25s.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any other Christian name? Q. No; I am in Ansell's employ, and have been so for three years, and know his name - he has no partner - nobody lives there but him - he is church-warden, and therefore must be the housekeeper - he always signs his name Thomas - the last time I saw the prisoner was at a quarter past five o'clock; he was then in the bake-house; my box was safe then, for I went up to my room within a minute of the time of my seeing him; I then went out, leaving him in the house, and never saw him afterwards - we work at night; he was not in the house that night; nobody else had business in the room, except the servant - I do not know whether he knew I had the money and watch in the box - he knew I had something there; no wearing apparel was taken - we were not at all intimate; I have seen the name of the parish in letters, but they were not directed to Mr. Ansell.

CHARLES ADAMS . I am a constable of Hampstead. Ansell informed me, on Wednesday morning, that his servant had been robbed; I went in search of the prisoner, and found him at the Plough public-house, in Wilmot-street, Smithfield; I searched him, and found on him five sovereigns and two half-crowns - I asked him where the watch was - he said at Mr. Harmer's at the Plough, where I had taken him; I went there, and Mr. Harmer gave it to me - I was present at the office when Pearce claimed it, and two of the three seals which were attached to it; I know the house is in the parish of St. John, Hampstead; I produce the watch.

THOMAS PEARCE . This is my watch; it is No. 1791; the two seals, key, and ring are mine, and I lost five sovereigns.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his former good character .

Reference Number: t18270111-56

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1827.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

333. CAROLINE PURCELL was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Addison , on the night of the 11th of December , and stealing 3 yards of calico, value 1s.; 2 yards of flannel, value 1s.; 1 gown, value 7s.; 1 cloak, value 10s.; 1 coat, value 8s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.: 2 aprons, value 1s., and 2 caps, value 1s. , her property.

ELIZABETH ADDISON (a prisoner , see p. 139). On the 11th of December I lived in Windmill-street , in the ground floor, back-room; the landlord does not live in the house - it is let out in tenements - I am an unfortunate girl - I went out at nine o'clock that night, and believe I locked my room, but cannot be certain - I came back at half-past ten o'clock, found the door wide open, and all the things missing out of my box - no other unfortunate woman lodges there - I have known the prisoner some years; but did not know where she lived - she used to frequent the next room to mine, and I saw her there on the Saturday.

JAMES MARLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Castle, a pawnbroker of Church-street, Shoreditch. On the 12th of December the prisoner pawned a coat, a cloak, a gown, two yards of flannel. three yards of calico, and a cotton handkerchief, for 15s., in the name of C. Purcell , Old Nichol-street; Addison came the same morning and claimed them.

WILLIAM HALL . I apprehended the prisoner in the yard of a house in Anchor-street, Bethnal-green; she was denied to me by the people of the house - I went to Nichol-street, and found she did not live there.

ELIZABETH ADDISON . These things are mine - the coat belonged to a young man who visited me.

Prisoner's Defence. I used to work in the next room; and as I came out one morning, I met a young man who said he would give me 6d. to pawn these things.

JAMES PURCELL . I am the prisoner's brother; the people, who have got her in custody, took her away on the 5th of December - she was a good girl till then.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-57

334. RICHARD HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , at Edmonton, 1 ox, price 14l. , the property of John Keene .

Mr. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN KEENE . I am a farmer and cattle-dealer , and live at Glastonbury, in Somersetshire. On the 20th of July, 1824, I had seventy-two or seventy-three oxen to take to Brentwood fair - I employed the prisoner to help me; I accompanied him all the way, and at Edmonton, in the night, we missed a lame ox; somehow or other we passed by it. I proceeded to Brentwood, and sold twenty-eight of the oxen to Mr. Mansfield, who lived at Ougar - I believe the prisoner was present - I arranged to sell the stray ox to Mansfield: I sent the prisoner with the twenty-eight to Mansfield - I ordered him to go and find the stray ox, and take that also to Mansfield. I did not see the prisoner again till about the middle of last year, when he was at Wells, in Somersetshire - I asked him where he had been, and what he had done with the stray ox; I did not hold out either threat or promise to him - he said he had found it, and taken it to Mr. Mansfield, who refused to take it in, and he had sold it: I asked who to, and I think he said he did not know - I had not at that time traced it, and did not then give charge of him; he said he had sold it for twelve guineas; I had given him no authority to sell it to any one, but to deliver it to Mansfield, who was not to pay him; in consequence of information, I had him apprehended about six weeks ago - I pointed him out to the officer, but did not hold out either threat or promise to him; he was then in employ as a drover - he said he had 3l. or 4l. coming to him, which he would give me, and he thought he could get his master to make up the rest. The last time I had seen the ox was in Edmonton parish, in the evening; it was missing in the morning - we had brought all the drove to where they rested; it was with the rest of the herd when they were put up to rest at night at Edmonton, and in the morning, when we were going to proceed on the road, it was missing.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a cattle-dealer? A. Yes - I buy a good many in the course of a year - I sometimes keep them a good while, and sometimes sell them directly; this was a fine red Devonshire ox - a great many Devonshire oxen are red. I put them up at Edmonton on a high land, at the side of the road - it was in July, 1824. I inquired all I could about it, and inquired about the prisoner, but did not seek him much, as I thought my case was not strong enough till I had found where the ox was. I have seen him several times in Somersetshire since July, but never exchanged a word with him, except when I asked what he had done with the ox. I was before Mr. Alderman Wood on the 18th of December, and before another Magistrate afterwards; I do not know what the Magistrate said, but remember he would have admitted him to bail, if he could have got it - he was apprehended in the open market in Smithfield.

COURT. Q. Did he leave you before his work was finished? A. I had ordered him to take the beast to Mansfield; there was no particular agreement as to how long he was to be with me, but when he had found the ox, he was to have met me at Romford market on the following Wednesday, and he did not - it was a red ox, of the Devonshire breed.

THOMAS MANSFIELD . I live at Abridge, near Ongar, in Essex. I was at Brentwood fair in July, 1824 - I am a farmer - I bought twenty-eight head of cattle of Keene at the fair, and I heard him give directions to the drover who brought the beast (I do not know who the man was), he was to go and seek the ox that was lost - I was to give 13l. 10s. each for some of the twenty-eight, and if I liked the stray one, I was to give the same - it was described to me as the same as part of what I had bought; they were Devonshire breed, and pretty fine cattle; the man delivered the twenty-eight at my place at Abridge; I never received the other, or saw the man any more.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not Keene another drover? A. He has several - the directions were given at Brentwood.

JOHN KEENE , re-examined. I had one more drover with these cattle - he never left me; I took him to Colchester with me - he did not leave my employ.

JOHN WHITBREAD . I am a farmer, and live at Edmonton. About the latter and of July, 1824, I recollect buying an ox of a person at my house at Edmonton - I cannot swear positively to the man, but I do believe it was the prisoner; he was very much like the prisoner: I gave 12l. 10s. for it; it was a red Devonshire-bred ox - I did not notice its age minutely. I grazed it till October, then stall-fed it till January, 1825, and sold it for slaughter, for 20l.; I think it was four or five years old.

Cross-examined. Q. You see a good many oxen, of course, in a year? A. Yes. I have a very strong impression that the prisoner is the man - I have a general impression that he is like the man.

JOHN ROW . I am an officer - I apprehended the prisoner in Smithfield on the 18th of December - he wanted to make the matter up with Mr. Keene, by paying something by instalments: I did not hold out any threat or promise to him - he stated to me that he had sold the ox, and kept the money for his master two or three days at a public-house, but his master did not come to him.

JOHN KEENE . I first employed him at Glastonbury - he knew where I lived very well; he was brought up in the same neighbourhood.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18270111-58

335. MARY ANN HILL CHRISTMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 cloak, value 30s.; 1 dress, value 30s.; 1 spencer, value 10s.; 1 petticoat, value 10s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., the goods of Sophia Trust , in the dwelling-house of Charles Johnson .

SOPHIA TRUST . I have been married - I heard of my husband twelve months ago; he went into the country;

I have since heard that he is dead, but I cannot say he is dead.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-59

336. ELIZABETH ADDISON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 basket, value 3d.; 1 bottle, value 3d.; 1 piece of foreign gold, value 3l.; 2 sovereigns, 1 crown, and 5 shillings, the property of Juan Lluch , from his person .

The prosecutor (a Spaniard ) who had been to a house of ill-fame with the prisoner, where he stated he was robbed, gave a very indelicate account of the transaction.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-60

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

337. JOHN WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 fur tippet, value 28s. , the goods of George Poland , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-61

338. WILLIAM PHEBE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of James Gwatkin .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-62

339. CHARLES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , 1 sofa, value 3l.; 2 tables, value 1l.; 6 chairs, value 36s.; 1 carpet, value 3l.; 1 bedstead and furniture, value 25s.; 1 fender, value 1l.; 2 sheets, value 10s., and 2 blankets, value 18s. , the goods of Mary Ann Price .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-63

340. SARAH HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 coat, value 5l. , the goods of Henry Strecker .

HENRY STRECKER . I lodged at the prisoner's husband's house, in Vine-street - I missed my coat about twelve o'clock on Sunday, the 13th of November, 1825; I had seen it safe in the room on the Tuesday before, hanging on the back of a chair, and some other things over it; I had a strong suspicion of the prisoner, as she had the key of the room. I went with an officer to Mr. Norman's, the pawnbroker, in July last, and found it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you take me up twice to Marlborough-street? A. Yes - I had my witnesses there the first time, but I did not bring them forward, not understanding the nature of it. I summoned her husband, and they told me to go Marlborough-street; it was some months after her confinement; I had seen her in the room several times - the key of the room was put into a place, where my bed-fellow and me could find it. The prisoner and her servant cleaned my room.

THOMAS BURKIT . I live with Mr. Norman, a pawnbroker. I took in this coat on the 14th of November, 1825, from a female, in the name of McDonald - I have lost the duplicate. I have not the books here, but I am certain it was on the 14th of November.

SARAH COOMBS . I am married. I received an affidavit, in lieu of a duplicate, from the prisoner in July last; it was for a coat, pawned for two guineas - I gave it to Timbrell.

Q. What occasion had the prisoner to give the affidavit to you? A. I lent her 14s. 6d., and she left it with me as a security - I was going to the Theatre, and I gave it out of my pocket to Timbrell, to take care of for me - this was in July last; it was for a coat, pawned in the name of McDonald, but the prisoner said it was her husband's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JANE TIMBRELL . I received the affidavit, but it was lost by my children.

MARY BERRY . I was at Mrs. Coombs at the time the prisoner left the affidavit there.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it - the man who gave me the ticket owed me 14s., and gave me the duplicate and 3s.; I lost the ticket, and got the affidavit.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-64

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

341. RICHARD RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 1 umbrella, value 2s. , the goods of John Harvey .

JAMES BAKER . I am a Bow-street patrol, and attend the Vice-Chancellor's Court, in Lincoln's-inn - I was there on the 11th of December, and saw the prisoner come in without an umbrella; I watched him, and saw him go out; I followed him - he ran across the yard, and dropped this umbrella; I secured him, and found on him forty duplicates; ten for umbrellas, one for a parasol, and the rest for coats, waistcoats, and other articles; most of the umbrellas have been claimed.

JOHN HARVEY . I am a solicitor. On the 11th of December I put my hat and this umbrella on the bench, and in a short time it was gone.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-65

342. BARTHOLOMEW MORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles Dalton , from his person .

CHARLES DALTON , ESQ. I was in Piccadilly on the 5th of January, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and felt something at my left side pocket - I turned a little to the right, and caught the prisoner passing by me, against the rails of Burlington-house; he said, "What do you stop me for?" a gentleman came up, and said, "You rascal, you have picked that gentleman's pocket;" I then saw my handkerchief on the ground.

CHRISTOPHER TUTING . I saw Mr. Dalton going along - the prisoner was close to him, and drew the handkerchief from his pocket; the prosecutor turned to the right,

and pinned him up against the rails; as he was passing the handkerchief was dropped on the ground.

EDWARD BOOTHMAN . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-66

343. THOMAS ALDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of Edward Thornley Bond .

EDWARD THORNLEY BOND . I live at Stoke Newington, and am a surgeon . On the 7th of December, about twenty minutes past four o'clock, I left my gig in the care of Clarke, whom I did not know, while I went into No. 71, Euston-square; I was in the house about twenty minutes, and when I came out I missed my great coat from the gig; Clarke was gone, but a boy named Payne, who had been in company with him, was about ten yards off. as if waiting for my coming out; he told me he knew where Clarke lived, and I took him in my gig to Clarke's house; I found Clarke there, who gave me information. I apprehended the prisoner within an hour and a half, in a stable in a mews in Hampstead-road. I have not found my coat.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am ten years of age, and live with my parents, in North-place, Somer's-town - my father is a weaver. Mr. Bond gave me the care of his gig, at No. 71, Euston-square; there was a great coat in it, When he had been gone in about ten minutes the prisoner came up - I had often seen him before, and knew him; he said he would give me 4 1/2d. for my chance, and the gentleman would not give me more than 2d. - I said No; he then said he would give me 5d., and then 6d.; he at last gave me 1s., which I took. and he told me to go and get change at the corner of Charlton-street, and to give the other boy, Payne, 3d. - I went and got change, and gave Payne the 3d. - the prisoner was to take care of the gig instead of me; Mr. Bond came afterwards to me, and said he had lost the coat; I said the prisoner lived down Church-way.

Prisoner. Q. Where have you seen me before? A. Up and down the New-road, and in the Church-way - I thought he lived down the third turning, but it was the first turning; there were two or three boys in the Churchway, who showed me where he lived; I know his brother - his name is Twydey - he is less than the prisoner a good bit; the prisoner had a coat on like the one he has now - his brother had a jacket and knee-breeches.

SAMUEL PAYNE . I am thirteen years of age, and live with my father, in Seaward-street. I was with Clarke when Mr. Bond left the gig for him to mind; I had not seen the prisoner till that day - he came up to Clarke, dressed as he is now - I am quite sure of his person; he said, "I will give you 4d. for your chance," and at last he got up to 1s.; he said the gentleman would not give him above 2d.; he gave Clarke the 1s., and told him to give me 3d., which he did; the great-coat was in the gig at that time; I was going by afterwards, and saw Mr. Bond come out.

WILLIAM CLULOW . I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of December, in Roberts'-mews.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it; they took me because I had this coat on.

JANE JOHNSON . My husband keeps a hackney-chariot; we live at No. 3, Roberts'-mews, Hampstead-road - the prisoner is our weekly servant , and cleans our horses and carriage. I was at home when he was apprehended; he came that day a little after three o'clock, and he never left but to go and get a pint of gin; he returned instantly, and he did not leave again till the watchman came at half-past five o'clock.

Q. What induces you to believe that it was only after three o'clock, and not after four, when he came? A. I know by the milk-woman that it was not four o'clock - she comes at half-past three. I know the prisoner's brother; they are very much alike - his brother wears a coat like the one the prisoner has on; they both wear kneebreeches, but he is not so tall as the prisoner - I should think there is two years difference in their ages; his brother had a coat on like the one the prisoner has on, and when the prisoner was taken, he pulled it off - the prisoner was taken up for his brother once, but I do not think he was tried.

WILLIAM CLULOW re-examined. Q. Did you take the prisoner's brother? A. We took them both, and brought them to the two lads; they said it was not the brother, but the prisoner - his brother is now in custody for attempting to steal a coat in Piccadilly.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-67

344. CHARLES SMITH and SAMUEL AUSTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Deeble Dutton .

JOHN GROOM . I am a constable of St. Martin's-court. I was there about seven o'clock in the evening of the 2d of January - I saw the two prisoners in company: Smith took up an umbrella at a shop, but a person came into the shop, and he put it down again - they went away, and I saw them attempt several other shops; they then came to Mr. Dutton's - I went ten yards off, and watched them - I saw Smith go into the shop and return; he then pressed Austin forward into the shop; they came away very quick; I ran round another way to meet them, and stopped them - I found the boots on Smith, but I believe Austin took them; I took them into the public-house, and secured them - Austin was running so fast, that he ran against Smith, when I stopped him.

JOHN FERRY . I live with Mr. Thomas Deeble Dutton , a boot-maker , in St. Martin's-court - these boots are his property; I saw them safe about seven o'clock - I did not see the prisoners at all.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

AUSTIN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-68

345. ELIZABETH GILLAM was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 2 pieces of cotton, containing in length 7 yards, value 10s.; 1 apron, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 2s., and 1 flat-iron, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Terry .

SARAH TERRY . I am the wife of Thomas Terry - we live in Strutton-ground - the prisoner lodged with us for three weeks in August, 1820; she represented herself as

married, and lived with a man of the name of Steel, a bricklayer - I missed the pair of sheets, the flat-iron, and the window-curtains, from the room which she lodged in, and the other articles from my own room - my shawl was red, with a black flower, and one of my gown-skirts was similar to this pattern. She paid me up to one Saturday at the end of August, and left me on the Tuesday following, without notice; I then saw the door open, and missed the articles.

MARY LOVEGROVE . I was a neighbour of Mrs. Terry's; I had formerly lodged in her house. I know the prisoner perfectly well - I was there one Monday afternoon; Mrs. Terry went out, and asked me to remain in her room - the prisoner came into the room, and took the shawl and the gowns from there - I asked no questions, as I knew she lodged in the house, and thought she had a right to them; I never saw her again till I saw her in custody.

Prisoner. I met this witness two or three years ago, and she told me to keep out of the way. Witness. No, I have never seen her since.

BENJAMIN WEBB . The prisoner had been discharged for another offence, and I told her I wanted her for robbing Mrs. Terry; she said it was not her; that it was Steel took them, but she would pay for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I used to work for her, and had two gowns to make; I was out with her, and we had something to drink - when I came home, the man I live with said I was tipsy, and he tore the work in pieces.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-69

346. DAVID DAVIDSON and GEORGE HAINES were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Terence Cullen .

TERENCE CULLEN . I am a watchman of St. George, Hanover-square . I lodge at a public-house in Thomas-street, Golden-square - I was in the tap-room about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of December - I put my coat down there; the two prisoners were there sitting together, and I believe drinking together; I had seen Haines there once before, but not Davidson - I went into the back-yard, and left my coat in the tap-room, a considerable distance from them - when I returned, they and the coat were gone: the boy told me that Davidson had taken it - I went in pursuit, and saw Davidson three streets off, with the coat on, and Haines was with him; I went up and demanded it - Davidson said, if I took it from him, he would knock me down, and swear a robbery against me - the officer then came up, and they were taken; Davidson had been drinking, but he could walk and talk very well.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am an officer. I was talking to a person, and saw the prisoners going along - Davidson had the coat on, and was drunk; I thought he was one of our watchmen; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and went up; I saw the prosecutor with the prisoners - I took them- Davidson was certainly drunk, but he made great resistance.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVIDSON'S Defence. I was very drunk, and some person put the coat on me in the tap-room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-70

347. ANN BRACKEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 6s. , the goods of Joseph Beanham .

SUSANNAH BEANHAM . I am the daughter of Joseph Beanham ; he lives in George-court, Piccadilly . On the 28th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop to look at some shoes - my sister showed her six or eight pairs, but she did not buy any; I saw a pair of boots under her shawl; I went and told my father, and when I came into the shop again, she was gone - I went after her, with my father, and we found her in Mr. Frazer's yard - I went into the privy, and found the boots. I did not see the prisoner go up the court, but I saw her coming out - I am quite sure I saw the boots in her possession in the shop; she had taken them from the door, where I hung them.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought to me on the 28th of December; she begged of Mr. Beanham to forgive her, and said she would pay for the boots. I found nothing on her but two farthings. When Mr. Beanham went away, she begged of Susannah Beanham to take her shawl, or any thing, to pawn, to get some money.

J. BEANHAM . These boots are my property - I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and she asked forgiveness.

Prisoner's Defence. I thought I had two half-crowns in my pocket, but I had not; I have four children, who have the small-pox - I begged of them to let me go to my children.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, supposing it her first offence, and that she was in distress .

Reference Number: t18270111-71

348. HENRY BROCKSOPP was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 half-crown , the money of Ellis Jones , his master .

ELLIS JONES . I am a grocer , and live in Old Compton-street, Soho - the prisoner was my shopman , and had been with me nearly four months; he had 22l. a year, with board and lodging. I suspected him, and on the 26th of December I marked two half-crowns and four shillings, which I gave to Ann Tanner to purchase some goods. In consequence of what I heard, I took the prisoner the next morning, and found 4l. 3s. 6d. in his pocket; amongst it was one half-crown which I had marked - I made no promise or threat to him; he at first said that it was what I had paid him in his wages, a fortnight before - I said that he had taken it out of the till; he at length said he had, but it was the first time.

ANN TANNER . On the 26th of December, Mr. Jones gave me two half-crowns and four shillings - I did not know it was marked: I went and bought some articles, which came to 8s. 9d.; I gave the prisoner the same money that Jones gave me; he put it into the till, and gave me 3d.

JOHN PROCTER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner the next day at his master's house - I found 4l. 3s. 6d. on him, and among the rest this half-crown.

ELLIS JONES . This half-crown is one which I marked; it has a small E over the head.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, from the respectability of his friends, and former good character .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-72

349. JAMES McLAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 11 loaves of bread, value 4s. , the goods of Alexander Todd , his master .

ALEXANDER TODD . I am a baker , and live in Queen-street, May-fair - the prisoner was my weekly servant , and lived in my house. On the 3d of January, Mr. Gunter sent for me - he said he thought all was not right with my man, and asked me to bring the returns of the bread which the prisoner left with him for three days - I took this memorandum from the book, of what the prisoner directed me to set down, and took it to Mr. Gunter's on the Friday evening. The account is, "Wednesday, 5 quarterns; Thursday, 6 quarterns, and Friday, 6 quarterns" - I told the prisoner there was some mistake in the account, and we went to Mr. Gunter's together; he was at dinner, and the officer took the prisoner in charge.

WILLIAM ROWLING . I live with Mr. Gunter. The prisoner used to bring bread to our house. On Wednesday, the 3d of January, he left one loaf; on Thursday, two; and on Friday, three: I am certain he delivered no more; I had been particularly desired by Mr. Gunter, to take in the bread on those three days, and I did so.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On Friday, the 5th of January, I went to Mr. Todd's at six o'clock - he called in the prisoner to give an account of his bread - he came in, and Mr. Todd took the account down; I heard him say, "To Mr. Gunter, 6 loaves to-day, and 6 yesterday" - I was sitting in the room at the time: we then went down to Mr. Gunter's, but he was not there - I took the prisoner to the office, and in going along, he said he should not have set down so many, if the cook had challenged him: but some servants allowed them to make a loaf or two. I asked what he did with it - he said he sold it to people in the street for 1d. or 2d. less than the value, and sometimes gave them to persons in the trade who were out of work.

Prisoner's Defence. It was a mistake - it must have been stolen out of my basket; my master knows what my character has been.

ALEXANDER TODD . His character has been very correct till this happened - he had been twelve months with me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-73

350. ISABELLA KIRK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 watch, value 15s., and 2 silver spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Roberts , her master ; and ELIZABETH DRISCOLL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am a clerk in the Excise-office , and live in Armitage-place - Kirk had been in my service five or six weeks. On the 2d of January she came into the parlour, while I was at tea, and said she was going to get some milk for Mr. Gilbert, who has my first floor - she was gone some time - my wife went down, and missed a tea-spoon - I then went, and missed a tablespoon and a shawl - on the Friday following, Kirk came and gave herself up - I was sent for, and found her at my house - she acknowledged she had stolen the spoons and a watch, and said the duplicates were at Driscoll's; she said that Driscoll had prompted her to do it; my wife is not here.

FRANCES WILD . I live with Mr. Gilbert. I went to Driscoll's on Friday, the 5th of January; I asked if she knew a person of the name of Isabella Kirk; she said she did not know any such person, or any thing of such a person - her husband then came in, and said there was a duplicate belonging to such a person, and he reached a parcel of duplicates - Mr. Driscoll looked at them, and gave me the duplicate of the watch; I asked if she had any more, and whether she would give them to me; she said she had not; but told me to call again in half an hour, as her husband would not look at her with any countenance again for having them. I went again, and she gave me a duplicate of a table-spoon; she offered me another of a spoon and a gown of Isabella Kirk's, and said she would give me that, if I would promise to give her the gown which Kirk had got on; but I could not promise that; she said Kirk had left them with her, saying she had left her place and taken no wages, and that her brother Thomas had given her these things, to make a little money of.

SAMUEL JAMES WOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a table-spoon pawned by Driscoll for 4s., on the 2d of January - she said it was not for herself; I had known her some time.

EDWARD BULLWORTHY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch pawned by Driscoll on the 3d of January, and a spoon by her son Jeremiah Driscoll on the same day - I was at breakfast when she brought the watch - my young man came to me, and asked if I could lend 10s. on it to Driscoll - I told him to ask if it was her own property; I looked through the window and saw that it was her.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I took the two prisoners on the 5th of January - I found Driscoll at her own house - her husband appears like a tradesman; I told her I wanted her on suspicion of being concerned with Kirk in a robbery - I found a duplicate of a spoon and a gown in a little brass pepper-box over her mantel-piece - I got the other two duplicates from the servant.(Property produced and sworn to.)

KIRK'S Defence. I took the things from my master's, I asked Driscoll to pawn them and make me a little money, and to keep the duplicates for me - she did not know they were stolen.

DRISCOLL'S Defence. I am quite innocent of any guilty knowledge - she came to me in distress, and asked me to pawn them for her - Wild asked if Kirk was at my house, not whether I knew her.

COURT to FRANCES WILD. Q. Did the Magistrate ask you respecting Driscoll's knowing Kirk? A. I do not recollect that he did; but I am quite sure she denied knowing her, and took her oath to it several times - I went to her by the desire of Mr. Roberts - I found her at her house, No. 3, School-house-yard - I said, "Do you know such a person as Bella Kirk ?" she said, No; I had a direction on a bit of paper, which Kirk had written for me;

I said, "Look at that;" and she replied, "I can't read;" I said Bella Kirk had written that, and asked if she knew such a person; she said, "No; I have not room here for my own family;" I am sure I did not ask if Kirk was there; because she was at Mr. Roberts'.

KIRK - GUILTY . Aged 22.

DRISCOLL - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-74

351. ELIZABETH EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 scarf, value 12s., and 2 table-cloths, value 10s. , the goods of Sarah Bent , widow .

SARAH BENT . I am a widow, and lived in Gloucester-street, Clerkenwell, at my sister's - the prisoner was her servant . I left some boxes and some drawers there - the property stated was in them - my sister is not here - there was no other servant.

JOHN SCOTT . I am one of the governors of the poor of Clerkenwell; the overseer took the prisoner into the workhouse. I looked over her box, and found some duplicates; and among others, one for this scarf, and one for this shawl - I knew it was the prisoner's trunk; because I saw it come into the house, and she claimed it - I went into the wash-house and asked her for the key of it, which she gave the matron; who looked over the box, and I stood by.

WILLIAM HAM . I received two duplicates from Mr. Scott, and went to Mr. Ramsey's, the pawnbroker - I got these articles out of pawn.

WILLIAM CLUNES . I am servant to Ramsey. This property was pawned in the name of John Coss , Leather-lane; but I was not present.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-75

352. GEORGE McCARTHY & MICHAEL CRAWLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 11lbs. of copper, value 5s. 6d., belonging to the St. Catherine Dock Company , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house belonging to them .

2d COUNT, calling it a building.

3d COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Cook , and fixed to his dwelling-house.

4th COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

DANIEL DAVIS . I keep a chandler's-shop in St. Catherine's. On the 27th of November, about one o'clock in the day, I was informed somebody was on the top of No. 9, opposite me; I went through No. 8; Lee went up the stairs of No. 10 - I got on the roof of No. 9, and found the copper gutter removed; the tiles and mortar appeared to have been fresh moved; Lee came to me, and we heard some persons in the top rooms - we got in at the trap-door, and found the prisoners there; McCarthy was doubling up a piece of copper with his feet; we secured them, and the officer took the copper.

WILLIAM LEE . I live at No. 10. I went on my roof; Davis went up No. 8 - we got on the roof of No. 9, and missed the copper gutter; we found the prisoners in the upper room; McCarthy dropped a piece of copper as I entered. I saw the copper fitted to the house, and it corresponded exactly - there was about 11lbs. of it.

JOHN JAMES JONES . I am an officer. I received them in charge, and brought the copper away - it fits exactly with what remains on the premises.

HENRY POPKIN . The house in question belonged to a Mr. Freeman, who is dead - William Cook is his executor- it was sold to the St. Catherine's Dock Company.

ROBERT PICKERS . I am a broker, and have the care of this property - I disposed of it for William Cook , to the Dock Company - the agreement was signed on the 22d, but the money is not paid.

McCARTHY'S Defence. The landlord employed me to move his goods to the water-side. I had never been on the roof.

McCARTHY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CRAWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-76

353. ELIZABETH LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 11 yards of lace, value 2s. , the goods of William Rotherham and John Grinsell .

RALPH SMITH . I am in the employ of William Rotherham and John Grinsell , who are linen-drapers . On the 11th of December the prisoner came in with another woman, who brought some muslin; she then looked at lace, but we could not agree about the price; she had a child in her arms, which dirtied the counter - one of them wiped it down with a handkerchief; they then went away.

JOHN DRUMMOND . I am in the prosecutors' employ. I saw the prisoner and the other woman in the shop; the prisoner wiped the counter with her handkerchief, and I saw her, at the same time, draw a piece of lace from the counter; she then dropped her handkerchief, took the lace up with it, and put it under her arm. I went to tell Mr. Rotherham - she was just gone out when I returned; I followed, and told her I wanted what was in her handkerchief under her shawl; she shook the handkerchief, and this lace fell from it - she said she did not know it was there; it was quite concealed with the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Have you seen her before? A. Yes; she dealt with us - she drew it down from the counter; there are some pins in it- they could not have caught in the handkerchief; it was half a yard from the place which she wiped. I did not say the innocent should pay for the guilty.

CHARLES CORNISH . I received her in charge, and found nothing upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. How it came into the handkerchief I cannot tell; the handkerchief fell - I took it up, and put it under my arm.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-77

350. ELIZABETH FLINT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 shawl, value 17s. , the goods of Robert Prettyman .

GEORGE TENNANT . I live with Robert Prettyman , a linen-draper , of Regent-circus. On the 14th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, with a girl about seven years of age - I came down, and the person who was showing her calico left me to attend her; I was turning to look for the measure, and saw her take this shawl off the counter, and put it into her basket; I folded her calico in paper, and asked if I should put it into her basket; she said No. She gave me 1s. - I gave her 3d., and then asked her to let me see

the basket - she refused, but I opened it, and found the shawl; she begged forgiveness.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I received her in charge with the shawl; I found 6s. 2d. on her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was done accidentally by the child.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-78

355. THOMAS CORDWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 chain, value 6d.; 1 key, value 1d.; 1 half-crown, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Benjamin Batt , from his person .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN BATT . I am a gardener . On the 1st of December, I was at the Wheatsheaf public-house, at Percy's-cross, near Fulham . I have known the prisoner all his life; after drinking there I fell asleep in the tap-room - nobody was there then; I did not see the prisoner that evening; this property was in my pocket - two persons came into the room about half-past ten o'clock, and in consequence of what they said I missed my money and watch; I went home, and found the watch in pawn, at Lawton's, in three or four days.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not several persons in the room? A. No, they were all gone when I fell asleep. I met the prisoner, and told him I did not know who robbed me.

JOHN MERCER . I am a labourer. On the 1st of December, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was at the door of the Wheatsheaf, and saw Batt pull out his watch to see the time; he put it into his pocket, and went into the house - I went away, and at half-past ten I went to the Wheatsheaf again - Batt was asleep there, in a settle; nobody else was in the room; I saw a corner of his shirt was drawn out, and thought it was by some one pulling his watch out; his breeches pocket was drawn up to the top; the waiter and I awoke him - I did not see the prisoner there.

JAMES CHURCHER . I am the waiter. I left Batt asleep in the tap-room when I went to supper - the prisoner and Babb were also there - I did not notice whether Batt had a watch; Babb came and called me from supper; I went and met the prisoner coming out of the tap-room, saying he had napped the bl - y thimble; Mercer came in, and we awoke Batt, who missed his watch and money. I did not see the prisoner again till he was taken.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you drink with me, and want me to take the watch, but I said I did not get my living by thieving? A. No. I did not know what his expression meant, or I would have stopped him.

JOHN BABB . I lodge at the Wheatsheaf. I saw the prisoner and Batt there on the 1st of December; Batt had a steel chain hanging out of his pocket when he sat down, at the corner of the table, asleep - only the prisoner and I were in the room; I went into the passage, and called the waiter; I went to bed, and did not hear of the robbery till the next morning.

THOMAS MARCHANT . I am shopman to Mr. Lawton, a pawnbroker. I have a silver watch, pawned on the 2d of December, by a man, but cannot say by whom - it is now in the same state.

WILLIAM MELLISH . I am a stage-coachman. On the morning of the 2d of December the prisoner brought a watch to me at Fulham-bridge, and asked what I would stand for it; I said I would not have it at all - I noticed that it had a bit of a steel chain to it; it was similar to this watch, but I did not take it in my hand - he did not say how he got it. I think napping the thimble means taking a watch.

SOPHIA FISH . On the morning of the 2d of December, I was in Mr. Kimber's (the pawnbroker) shop - the prisoner came in to pawn a watch; I am sure of him - he wanted 1l.; they would not take it in; I knew him before - it had part of a chain and a piece of dark ribbon on it, the same as the one produced.

JAMES GURNEY . I am in Mr. Kimber's employ. On the 2d of December the prisoner came to offer a watch, but as he was in liquor I would not take it in - I did not look at it.

RICHARD CUFF . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270111-79

356. THOMAS BYET was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 4 pewter tops, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Nicholas Winton .

THOMAS BUCKERIDGE . I am a street-keeper. On the 1st of January I was in Euston-square, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran up, and saw the prisoner running - he threw away two quart pots; a man stopped him; I took him and the pots to Winton's - he then said he had two more, and I found two pint pots in his jacket pockets.

NICHOLAS WINTON . I keep the Euston Arms . These pots are mine - I do not know the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-80

357. JOHN REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of James Hare .

WILLIAM WILLIS . I am a servant. On the 29th of December, at half-past seven o'clock at night, I was in Long-acre, and saw a hackney-coach standing by the George public-house; I saw the prisoner get up, and take this coat off the box - he ran away; I pursued, and took him about fifteen yards off; I took him into the George, where I found Hare.

JAMES HARE . I drive the coach; I went into the George - Willis brought the prisoner in with my coat, which I had left on the box a few minutes before. The prisoner is a stranger.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it hanging between the wheels; I was going to put it on the box when he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-81

358. WILLIAM RYDER was indicted for stealing,

on the 14th of September , 4 leather traces, value 30s. , the goods of Samuel Roberts .

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am a stable-keeper , and live in Oxford-street; the prisoner was employed to mend my harness on the first or second week in September - I had then some long traces in my harness-room - I missed them in a fortnight or three weeks after; I at last found them at Clark's; I am sure they were in the room while the prisoner was there - the last money I paid him was on the 14th of September.

JOSEPH CLARK . I am a saddler, and live in St. James'-place, Hampstead-road. On the 14th of September the prisoner brought these traces, on his arm, to my house; I had seen him several times before - he asked if I would buy a bargain, and wanted 16s. for them; I bought them for 14s., and asked how he got them; he said his name was Wm. Ryder , of No. 13, Henry-street, Hampstead-road, and he had them from a friend; I entered his name in my book, and when Roberts came I told him about it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you know I lived in Henry-street? A. I think I had heard so.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who appeared to be a gentleman - he sold them to me for 12s.; he said he was going abroad the next day - I had seen him before.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-82

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

359. JOHN STACK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 pig's-head, value 3s. , the goods of James Benwell .

JAMES BENWELL . I keep a pork-shop in Carburton-street. The prisoner was brought in by the officers with a pig's-head - he told the Magistrate he was in distress; neither of the officers are here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-83

360. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 spoon, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Partington .

HANNAH BAKER . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Partington , a confectioner , of Oxford-street. On the 18th of December, at two o'clock, the prisoner was in the soup-room - I took him a basin of turtle-soup, with a silver spoon in it - he paid me 1s., and went away; I found the silver spoon gone, and a metal one left in place of it; my mistress went out, and brought him back.

MARY PARTINGTON . I went out, and told the prisoner to walk back - he returned, took off his hat, and gave it to me, saying it was his first offence.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer, and took him in charge- he said he did it from poverty.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been a respectable tradesman, but was reduced in life, which fact two witnesses testified.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-84

361. ANN WILMOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 8 basins, value 10d., and 6 saucers, value 6d. , the goods of George Davey .

GEORGE DAVEY . I keep a china-warehouse . On the 11th of December I stood in my shop, and saw the prisoner stooping down in a recess under my window, where these basins and saucers were - I went out, and took her about a yard off, with them in her apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against them, took them up, and was going to take them into the shop when he came out.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-85

362. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 2 shirts, value 10s. , the goods of George Wallis .

GEORGE WALLIS . I live at Beaver's-town, and am a labourer . On the 14th of December, at half-past five o'clock, I missed two shirts from my garden; I saw them hanging there that afternoon.

ELIZABETH WALLIS . These shirts were on the line at five o'clock - they were gone at a quarter-past; the garden is walled all round. The patrol brought them back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SPRINGFIELD . I am a patrol. On the 14th of December, in the evening, I met the prisoner about fifty yards from Wallis' house, with a basket - I followed him and called a watchman; he was taken, and these two shirts found in his basket - he was not running.

WILLIAM JONES . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the shirts in a basket - he said he found them.

JAMES BUTCHER . I am a watchman. I assisted in securing the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-86

363. WILLIAM BOND was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 trowel, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 1 coat, value 2s., and 1 hammer, value 1s., the goods of Richard Charlonger ; and 1 brush, value 6d.; 1 trowel, value 1s., and 1 pair of pinchers, value 3d., the goods of Thomas Whitehair ; and 1 brush, value 1s., the goods of John Russell ; and 1 axe, value 2s.; 1 chisel, value 1s., and 12lbs. of nails, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Dawson .

DANIEL McDONALD . I am a bricklayer's labourer. I had the charge of these tools for Richard Chaloner , my master, who was working at Finchley - the tools were safe in the building on Saturday night - the doors and windows were secure; I left the key at my lodging to be given to Whitehair.

JAMES LINCOLN . I am a constable, and live at Finchley. On the 19th of December I was sent for by Wilson, and found on the prisoner the axe, mallet, chisel, hammer, and nails - he said he was a bricklayer, and was going to work in London; and that the carpenter's tools belonged to his brother - he had this coat, and these shoes on.

THOMAS WHITEHAIR . I am a plasterer , and was working at this place. These pinchers, trowel, and brush are mine - I had locked them up in the house on the Monday night.

JOHN RUSSELL . This brush is mine.

ROBERT DAWSON . This chisel and axe are mine - I lost some nails of the same sort from the building.

RICHARD WILSON . On the morning of the 19th of De

cember, about half-past four o'clock, I was looking after my master's horse, and met the prisoner coming from these buildings with something - I saw him step aside, and put what he had under a hedge - he came up, and spoke to me - I then went to the hedge, and found all this property - I staid there some time, and he came back and said,"Don't meddle with my things; I am going to work in London."

ROBERT RENTON . I was with Wilson - his account is correct - we detained him.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am a constable, and received him in charge - he told me where he got the axe and chisels; I went and found the parties.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-87

364. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 shirt, value 3s., and 1 pair of breeches, value 12s. , the goods of William Boyce .

WILLIAM BOYCE . On the 26th of December the prisoner was drinking at my house with me; and while he was there I saw my wife put my shirt and breeches under the bed; and soon after he left, we missed them.

ELIZABETH BOYCE . I know this property to be my husband's - the prisoner came home with him on this evening, and I put the things under the bed - my husband afterwards went out, and I stepped over to my brother's, leaving the prisoner there - when I returned he was gone, and we missed them - I went with my brother, between nine and ten o'clock, and found the prisoner in a public-house with them under his arm - I took them from him- he attempted to hit me - I dropped them, and my brother picked them up, and gave them to me - I went out with them; the prisoner ran out after me, and cried Stop thief! and gave the watchman charge of me.

JOHN JUPP . I am the prosecutrix's brother, and am a brass-finisher. On Tuesday, the 26th of December, I was spending the day with my mother; and when we came home in the evening, Boyce came and tapped at our window - I let him in; we had some porter; he said he had bought a shirt and a pair of breeches for 1l.; his wife came soon after, and we had some beer and spirits; she then went to fetch the things; she returned, and said they were gone - I went with her to the Horse and Groom public-house - she saw Clarke there with a bundle under his arm - she seized it, and it fell - I took it up, and came out with her - the prisoner came out and called Stop thief! after her; I took it home, and soon after Johnson and an officer came, and I gave them the things; they marked them.

JOHN JOHNSON . I received the property from Jupp.

SAMUEL MARNS . I live at the Horse and Groom; the prisoner came in; the prosecutrix came in and took a bundle from under his arm; there was a scuffle between them.

JOHN RENSCH . I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and caught hold of the prosecutrix; Marns came and said the prisoner had stolen the things, and I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN FROST . I saw the prisoner at the Old Crown public-house, Curtain-road, about 10 o'clock on this night, he wanted to pawn or sell this property there; but no one would have them.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-88

365. SAMUEL MAINWOOD and WILLIAM BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 watch, value 20l., and 4 seals, value 20s., the goods of Hugh Clark Ronalds , from his person .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

HUGH CLARK RONALDS . On the 14th of December, at a quarter past nine o'clock at night, I was going through Brentford , where I live - I had come from my father's - I did not notice the prisoners till I fell down - I then saw them helping me up - they took hold of my arms - I had fallen over a loose stone; I had my watch safe when I fell; I am not certain that they are the men who helped me up - they went to my own gate, which is forty or fifty yards off, with me - I then thanked them for their kindness - I had not felt my watch taken - I missed it in about an hour - I had it cried two or three days afterwards, and the beadle produced it before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long before you fell had you seen your watch? A. I cannot say, the persons, who picked me up, paid me every attention - my watch could not have fallen from my fob.

SAMUEL CHERRY . I was at Brentford on this evening, standing at Mr. Sextant's door - I saw the prosecutor fall- the prisoners went up to him - I followed them, and one of them said, "He is down;" they ran up, raised him up, and I saw Baker fumbling at his fob, and take something from his pocket; it was moonlight - I was about six yards off - they conducted him home; Baker on his right side, and Mainwood on his left; I do not think he knew what Baker had done; the watch was cried, and I stated this to the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say what was taken? A. No.

WILLIAM DURBAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners at Strand-green - Baker said if I went to Brentford and asked for Hill, the hatter, and looked into his mother's coal-hole and moved two bricks, I should find the watch in a stocking, which I did - here it is.

JESSE FULLER . I was with Durban - his account is correct - Mainwood cried and begged of Baker, if he knew any thing about it, to tell where it was; which he did.

Four witnesses gave Baker a good character.

BAKER - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

MAINWOOD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-89

366. MICHAEL CORFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 23lbs. of lead, value 3s. 10d., the goods of Isaac Darby , and fixed to a building of his .

ISAAC DARBY . I am working at some building at St. Pancras - the lead there is mine. I missed lead repeatedly, but not on the 20th of December, till the officer came that evening - I then missed a large quantity which was there the day before; this, which was found, corressponds with what is left - there are thirty-six houses; I would not say the lead fitted to any particular part.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate it matched? A. Yes; it matched as near as possible.

THOMAS KNAPTON . The prisoner has been twelve months in my employ. On the 20th of December he had a quantity of my lead in his possession of different descriptions - whether this is part of it I cannot say; he had had it about two days - I do not know how much he had; but I gave him some of this description, and some of the same size pipe as this; I believe it to be the same; I had bought 1 cwt.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there much pipe among it? A. Yes; I gave it him to take care of; I am working at the same row of buildings as Darby; what I gave him was to be melted down; I bought it in Homer-street.

COURT. Q. On your oath, do you believe this to be part of what you gave him? A. I can only say I gave him lead of this description; it was of the same appearance.

JOHN LINCOLN . On the 20th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner by the Yorkshire Stingo with a small basket; I went up to touch it, and he threw it down and ran off; I pursued, and took him in Harcourt-street; I asked who he worked for; he said he would not tell me, for then I should be as wise as he was; a person was with him, who got away; this was about a mile from this building.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say any thing to him before he ran? A. No.

WILLIAM ECKET . I was with Lincoln; who put up his umbrella to the basket, and the prisoner ran away.

THOMAS KNAPTON . He might go down Stingo-lane to my yard; what lead I had beside, had been melted down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-90

368. JAMES DENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 cloak, value 6s. , the goods of Hannah Stubbings .

JAMES GREEN . I am a shoemaker, and live Tunbridge-street, St. Pancras , opposite to Stubbing's. On the 28th of December, about three o'clock, I stood at my door, and saw the prisoner unpin a cloak at Stubbing's door, and walk away; I went up, and asked what he had under his coat; he said, Nothing; I took this cloak from under his coat.

MARY STUBBING . I am the daughter of Hannah Stubbing. This cloak hung at my mother's door; I know it be hers.

MICHAEL WHIETY . I am a headborough. I took him in charge with the cloak.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-91

368. ELEANOR DOBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 1 saucepan, value 2s.; 6 plates, value 1s.; 4 cups, value 6d.; 4 saucers, value 6d.; 1 teacaddy, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Bell .

JOSEPH BELL . I live in Crown-street, Soho . On the 2d of December, the prisoner came to borrow a frying-pan; she came again next day, between ten and eleven o'clock, and staid about five minutes, then went away - I went out, and locked my room; I returned about twelve o'clock, and missed every thing out of my cupboard; I had put the saucepan there, while she was in the room.

PATRICK McCARTHY . I took the prisoner in charge, but the property has not been found.

MARTHA DAVIS . I lodge in the prosecutor's house. On the 3d of December, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner there - Bell went out soon after she left, and shortly after, I opened my door, and saw the prisoner at this cupboard, which is in the passage - I heard the plates rattle; I saw her go down with a saucepan in her hand, and some things in her apron - I told Bell when he came home.

Prisoner's Defence. He met me, and asked me to his room; he said he was very sorry he had no money to treat me - he gave me the frying-pan, which I sold for 4d., and we drank some gin together - he called me next day, and asked if I would live with him; I refused.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-92

369. JAMES ROWSON and JAMES SHILLICK were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 3 prayer-books, value 6s. , the goods of John Jones .

ELIZABETH JONES . I am the wife of John Jones , who is a stationer . On the 11th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard the bell ring - I went through the parlour into the shop, and saw a man reach his hand over the counter, and take three prayer-books off the shelf; I ran out, calling Stop thief! I returned, but my little girl followed him - Rowson was taken soon after - I am certain he is the man whom I saw in the shop; he had a brown coat on; he has been in my shop before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If you knew him before, why did you tell the Magistrate it was a tall man man in a brown coat? A. I did not recollect him till I saw him again at the office - I did not see his face while he was in my shop.

ELIZA MARIA JONES . I and my sister were in the shop; a tall man came in and said, "Have you got any brown paper?" before I had said Yes, he put his hand over the counter and took some books - he ran out and shut the door; I and my mother followed; she returned, but I went on, and soon saw a crowd - a person called me into the road and said the man was caught, and gave me one of the prayer-books, covered with mud - they asked me if Rowson was the man - I said, Yes, for I then knew him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was your mother? A. She had just got into the room; I rang the bell for her - she was turning round as he came in - I do not think she could see his face while he was taking the books.

WILLIAM BASSETT . I was on Tower-hill, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned round and saw Rowson running, and Shillick running about one hundred yards from him - when Rowson came up, I struck him with my umbrella; I and a friend kept him till some persons came up - he resisted very much - Shillick then came up, and took hold of Rowson by the collar and said, "You are mistaken," and endeavoured to get him away, but we would not let him go - several persons came up and took our parts; we separated the prisoners - somebody called out, "There are two books on the ground" - I then saw

Rowson working his arm about, and I saw one book drop from his arm on his feet; the girl came up and said that he was the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. No resistance was made till you struck him? A. No.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Shillick was about one hundred yards off? A. Yes; the persons calling Stop thief! were behind them both.

ALEXANDER HARRIOTT . On the 11th of December, I saw the prisoners on Tower-hill - I saw Rowson running; he was stopped - Shillick came up and said he had done nothing - I said we had better take them both to the watch-house - I saw Rowson drop two books, and as I was picking them up, another dropped; this little girl came and said, "That is the man who robbed my mother's shop."

THOMAS OBORN . I took them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROWSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

SHILLICK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-93

370. JAMES RUSS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 2 hats, value 17s. , the goods of John Hill .

JOHN HILL . I keep a shop at Old Brentford . On the 23d of December, at half-past ten o'clock, I was in the parlour, and heard a footstep in the shop; I got up, and saw the prisoner going out with two hats in his hand - I pursued; he ran up a turning about fifty yards off, and I lost him. I found him in custody on the following Wednesday, but have not found the hats.

ANDREW VALLENCE . I am a patrol. I found the prisoner at the King's-arms public-house, Brentford, and asked where he had been on the Saturday evening - he said he was at Drew's till eleven o'clock.

JAMES DREW . I keep the King's-arms - Vallence came to my house for the prisoner; he had been at my house on the Saturday, but left before ten o'clock with a young woman.

THOMAS BACON . I am a constable. I went to Mr. Drew's about ten o'clock on this night. I did not see the prisoner there, but while I was there, I heard a cry of Stop thief! outside.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday evening I was at Drew's.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-94

371. ELIZABETH HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 9 yards of silk ribbon, value 2s. , the goods of William Venables .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-95

372. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 130 lbs. weight of lead, value 30s., the goods of William Smith , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, calling it a building.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am owner of some dwelling-houses in Prospect-place, Bethnal-green . I found the prisoner in custody, and found six houses out of ten had their gutters stripped.

JOHN WARD . I am a patrol. On the 11th of December I was in my box in Cambridge-street, and received information - I went to No. 8, Prospect-place, and found some pieces of lead doubled up in the wash-house, and a bag at the foot of the stairs; I went up, and found the prisoner in the back room, laying down; I took him to the watch-house, and saw two bags, a pair of shears, and a box of grease found on him. I saw the lead matched; it fitted the house exactly.

JOHN USHER . I am a private watchman. On this night I was near Prospect-place, and in the wash-house of the house No. 8, I saw two men bending some lead - I told Ward; we went to the house, and found the prisoner upstairs; I brought the lead away - it was more than one man could carry.

WILLIAM WHITTENBURY . I was in Prospect-place; a person on the opposite side called me, and said a man had jumped out of the window of No. 8 - I ran, but could not overtake him; I then informed Usher and Ward - we found the prisoner in the house, and the lead.

WILLIAM DISCOMB . I am a headborough. I found the prisoner at the watch-house with the lead.

AMBROSE IND . I was with the others, and took the prisoner.

JAMES HANDLEY . On the 14th of December I compared this lead with what remained - it fitted exactly; I found two large holes in the ceiling of No. 5, which a man could get through, and the back door of No. 8 was broken in.

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to sleep, but never saw the lead.

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-96

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 12.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

373. WILLIAM MULLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 60 lbs. of lead, value 12s. , the goods of James Cadwalleder Parker , his master ; and ROBERT BARON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JAMES CADWALLEDER PARKER . I live in Spur-street. On the 3d of January, between nine and ten o'clock, I went to my plumber's-shop, and saw several persons there; Mullins, who was my servant , was there - I went in, and saw two plumbers and two labourers there; Mullins was one plumber , and one Bayley the other; I saw some lead in the scale, and asked what job it was for; Mullins said, "It is for my job in Charles-street, St. James'-square;" I said, "For what part of the job?" he said, "For the bridge of the cistern;" I said it was too large; he said the carpenter had made it wider, and that was the proper size; I then saw a smaller piece - he said that was for another part of the job. I went into my counting-house, leaving them in the shop. Mullins and the labourer took this lead in the truck, and went down Whitcombe-street. I went out, to go to Panton-street, but changed my mind, and went along the Haymarket; when I got there I saw my truck stopping, nearly opposite the little Theatre - Mullins held the handle while the labourer took this roll of pipe-lead out of the truck, and this small roll - he put one on each shoulder; they

then nodded to each other, and Mullins turned the truck to go into Charles-street; the labourer walked towards Pall Mall, keeping the opposite side to Charles-street- it did not strike me that it was a robbery; I thought it might be for another job. I watched the labourer up Suffolk-street, across the mews, into St. Martin's-lane - I lost sight of him at the corner of St. Martin's-lane. I began to think I was robbed, and did not wish to follow him so close. I went to a plumber's-shop in St. Martin's-lane - it is a kind of warehouse, with double doors; the prisoner Baron carries on a plumbing business there; I looked through the window, which was very dirty, and saw my labourer lay down the pipe and piece of lead close to the mould in the shop; I had not been there long when I saw a man in the shop, and the labourer looking stedfastly towards the door; I did not know it was Baron then, but it turned out to be him - I immediately flew from the door, to hide myself; I crossed the road, then went over again, and hid myself in a door-way, about two houses off, and in about five or six minutes I heard the latch of a door pulled - it proved to be the private door of the house belonging to the shop, and I saw a person's head put out at the door, whom I did not know at the time, but from circumstances since I think it was Baron - I would not wish to swear it, but if I did I should say Yes. After looking up and down the street, as if to see if anybody was watching (or for what purpose best known to himself) the labourer, whom I have not found, was coming out at the private door (this was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning); I stepped forward, fearing he might make a rush, and run away; I had seen nobody in the shop but him and the man whom I suppose to be Baron; the labourer saw me, drew in, and the door was shut with violence; that door communicates with the shop; I immediately went to the shop, and the labourer, whose face was towards the door, turned to look into the mould, putting his back towards me; upon coming near him I said, "Pray what do you do here?" he said, "I am come to look for a labourer;" Baron was in the shop, and they stood near each other; I said, "Pray what have you done with the pipe and piece of lead which you stole from me?" he hesitated, and made no answer, but pointed to the scale, where the pipe and lead were; I scolded Baron - I believe I called him a thief, and worse than a thief; I used very strong language; I said, "You thief, you are a receiver of stolen goods - where is your master, where is Mr. Baron?" he made no answer; I repeated the question several times; I was very much agitated at the time; the labourer then said he came to ask for a labourer, and said to me, "You know you wanted a labourer - I came in to ask for one;" I asked Baron if he would go for a constable, or get me one to take the man up; he made no answer till it was repeated several times; then the labourer said, "You may get a constable - I am not afraid - I shall not run away - I have done nothing;" I said I would take care he should not till I had got a constable, but I moved a little way from him; I again begged Baron to get a constable, or assist me in taking him - the labourer escaped while Baron and I were talking: Baron was in front of him, and made no attempt to stop him; he either said he could not or would not assist in taking him; he got out at the private door.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long has Mullins been in your service? A. Three months - I know such lead as was put into the truck was wanted in Charles-street; there is this weight of lead entered in my book for that job, but the entry is dated the 2d instead of the 3d. The prisoners were both admitted to bail, and have surrendered to-day; no person out of my employ was admitted at Charles-street - I have a porter there; I wanted another labourer and plumber; I did not hear Mullins say the labourer was to give the lead to the man he was to fetch, to allow him an introduction to the works.

COURT. Q. You are the master, and employ people to work under you? A. Yes; the men enter all the lead they take out, before they go out - they have no right to sell it - it remains my property.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you saw your man go into the shop, you peeped through the window? A. Yes; I did not see him go in - I saw him deposit my lead by the mould; I could not see what was going on in the shop after I crossed over - I was there five or six minutes; I do not recollect saying at Bow-street that it was but a minute or two; there was nobody else in the shop when I went in. I have often looked out into the street myself, to see if my men were coming.

Q. Directly you entered the shop you began an attack on Baron, supposing him a journeyman? A. Yes; he said he was Mr. Baron. and master of the place, but that was after the man had escaped. I did not say at Bow-street that he gave me that answer directly I asked for his master - I said there that he hesitated in answering my questions; my journeyman was a strong man, six feet high.

THOMAS CUSS. I am an officer. I was sent for, and apprehended Mullins, at work, in Charles-street, St. James', between ten and eleven o'clock. I went and found Baron in his shop; Parker said, "I have come to demand my property;" Baron said, "There it is," pointing against the mould, where it stood; Parker said, "You need not take him - he is to be found at any time." I only took the lead.

JAMES CADWALLENDER PARKER . I cannot swear to this lead, except by seeing it at Baron's - I cannot say I ever saw it till it was in the Haymarket - I had not watched it from my house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-97

374. GEORGE MAYO was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 3lbs. of horse-hair, value 3s. , the goods of John Waller and others.

SAMUEL COTTON . I am coachman to Mr. Brown, who had hired a carriage of Mr. Waller, of Long-acre - he has other partners. I live at Mr. Brown's premises, Gowermews, Bedford-square . On the 29th of December, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I looked through the hay-loft window, and saw the carriage in the mews - the horses were in the stable; by the light of the lamp over the door I saw the prisoner inside the carriage; I thought at first he was the man who drove it - I came down, knocked at the carriage door, and said, "Is that you, Ned?" the prisoner looked out of the window, and said, "It is only me - I came to get a night's looking here - I am very much in distress - let me out;" I said, No,

and called for assistance - he then got his head and legs out, and got away; I pursued, and took him - we found the cushions were cut, and the horse-hair taken out and put into a bag. I gave him in charge. The tuffs had been cut of the other cushions.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-98

375. WILLIAM MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 coat, value 24s. , the goods of James Rowland .

JAMES ROWLAND . I am in the employ of Messrs. Broadwood, piano-forte-makers . On the 9th of December I was out with their van, and left my coat on the box, while I went into the Barley-mow public-house, Dorset-street; I received information, came out, and it was gone - I have not found it.

GEORGE BOSPIDNICK . I am a butcher. I was in Dorset-street, and saw this van at the Barley-mow. The prisoner and another stood on the opposite side; I saw them come over, and the other man took the coat off the box; I had seen them talking together - the other ran off, down the mews, and the prisoner after him - he had seen him take it; he came over to me, and told me not to say any thing about it - I knew him before.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. Bospidnick described the prisoner to me - I found him in custody on another charge, on the following Saturday.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Guildford at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-99

376. WILLIAM PLUCKROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 goose, value 6s. , the goods of John Symes .

JOHN SYMES . I keep a poulterer's-shop in Lamb's Conduit-passage . On the evening of the 19th of December, about nine o'clock, I was in my back-room, and saw the prisoner come into the shop, take a goose, and run out with it; I ran out, calling Stop thief! and saw him drop it - I saw him stopped, without losing sight of him; I am certain of him - two or three persons were round him.

JAMES BENSON . I am a watchman of Red Lion-square. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and found the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I had drank too much - one of my companions took the goose, and threw it at me; whether it was any design at me, being a tailor, I do not know- I took and threw it at him, but it was only a lark.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-100

377. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2 pewter pots, value 2s. , the goods of Wilkinson Moore .

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 13th of December, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was coming down Norton-street, New-road, and saw the prisoner running, with something under his coat; he ran into Nassan-street, and shifted it into his apron - I secured him, and found it was a quart pot. I took him to the watch-house, and found another in his hat - they had Moore's name on them.

WILKINSON MOORE . I keep the George and Dragon public-house , Buckingham-street . These pots are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270111-101

378. SAMUEL WELLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 14 lbs. of pork, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Darvill .

EDWARD SIMPSON . I am son-in-law to Richard Darvill , a cheesemonger , of Cock-hill, Ratcliff . About eleven o'clock in the evening of the 30th of December, I saw the prisoner take this pork off a hook in front of the window, and walk two or three hundred yards with it - I gave an alarm, and saw him taken with it.

ROBERT CRIPER . I am watchman, and took him in charge with the pork.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his distress .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-102

379. CLARA SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 pelisse, value 20s., the goods of John Bacon , from the person of Elizabeth Bacon .

JOHN BACON . I am a copper-plate engraver , and live in Chancery-lane. On the 14th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I sent my daughter home with a pelisse to Mr. Pitt's, No. 3, Helmet-court, Strand; I had borrowed it: she returned afterwards, and gave me information: the pelisse was then in my care; I have paid for one in lieu of it. The prisoner wrote a letter at the office, stating that some things were at Mrs. Holmes', and I there found the duplicate of this pelisse.

ELIZABETH BACON . I am eleven years old . My father sent me to Mr. Pitt's with this pelisse - I met the prisoner at Temple-bar - she asked if I was the little girl whom she gave 6d. to the day before; I said, No; she then asked if I would go on an errand - I said, Yes; she took me down the Strand , and told me to go to No. 8, Wellington-street, and tell the servant that a young lady at the bottom of the street wanted to speak to her - when she had showed me the house, she went down the street a little way, and said, "I will hold your bundle while you go" - she took it - I went and told the servant, who said, "Tell her to come to me;" I went back, and she was gone with my bundle. I did not see her again till she was in custody; I afterwards saw the pelisse - I am sure of her person.

GEORGE COOPER PAGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I have a pelisse pawned on the 16th of November, by a female, in the name of Sutton - I cannot identify her.

EMMA HOLMES . I live with my husband, in Castle-street, Long-acre. The prisoner lodged in my front room, with some people named Sharp, for five nights - she left on the 23d of November, and left some duplicates in the room, which I gave up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18270111-103

380. CLARA SUTTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 bag, value 3d.; 1 frock, value

3s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of stays, value 4s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 9d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 1 pair of mittens, value 6d., and 1 apron, value 8d., the goods of Samuel Spratt , from the person of Dinah Spratt .

SAMUEL SPRATT . I am a watchman of St. Brides , and live in Black-horse-court, Fleet-street - my daughter Dinah belongs to Bridge-ward School , and she received her bag of clothes from that school on the 18th of November - the duplicates of these goods were afterwards found, and they were redeemed.

DINAH SPRATT . I am eleven years of age, and belong Bridge-ward School. I received the bag containing the articles stated - I was going home down Ludgate-hill , and met the prisoner, who told me to go to Hatton-garden, call at a house, and tell the cook that a young lady wanted to speak to her - she said she would take my bag, as it would look so to take it to a lady's house; she took it off my arm, but she did not take my bonnet; as, she said, it would look so for a lady to hold a bonnet in the street, I might take that - I went to the house she described, but the cook said she knew no young lady.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am master of the Bridge-ward School - I got the duplicates and this property from Mr. Wells, the pawnbroker, of Broad-street, Bloomsbury, and Mr. Baker's.

EMMA HOLMES . The prisoner lived with some lodgers of mine, and left some duplicates in an old pocket-book - Mr. Martin took some of them, and got this property out of pawn; I went with him.

JOHN WENTWORTH . I am assistant to a pawnbroker - I delivered up this stays and petticoat to Martin.

DAVID TRAIL . I am in the service of Mr. Wells, the pawnbroker - I gave up part of this property to Mr. Martin; it was pawned on the 18th of November - I cannot say by whom.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

There were three other indicements against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18270111-104

381. JAMES OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 chain, value 1s., and 1 key, value 4s., the goods of John Madden , from his person .

JOHN MADDEN . I am a shoemaker , and live in Bird-street, Manchester-square. On Christmas-day, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was at the Royal-oak public-house, Paddington - I fell asleep in the tap-room; there were three or four persons in the room, but nobody near for me to speak to - I believe the prisoner was one of the persons there - when I awoke, he was gone, and I missed my watch; I found it at the watch-house that night.

JOHN GURTEEN . I keep the Royal-oak - I saw Madden there about half-past seven o'clock, but did not notice his being asleep - I was in the cellar, my wife called me, and he missed his watch; I pursued the prisoner and Riley (who had just left my house) across the fields - I called to the watchman, but I got up to them first; just before I overtook them, I saw the prisoner put his hand into his pocket - I did not see him pull any thing out; but I brought them both back - they were searched, but nothing found on them - I then took the lantern, and found this watch as near the spot where I took them as possible.

Prisoner. Q. Riley was with me? A. Yes.

KEZIAH BATHE . I am servant to Gurteen. Madden, the prisoner, and two others, were in the tap-room - I saw the prisoner and Riley come to the bar and say to mistress, "What measures have you got?" she said, "I do not understand you;" Riley and him then went out of the house. Madden complained of losing his watch - my master went out and brought them back - I went and held the lantern, and saw master find this watch in the fields.

FRANCIS BRADBURY . I am watch-house keeper, and received him in charge with the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. Several people were there - I and Riley were going home - Mr. Gurteen called Stop! and we stopped directly; but I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-105

382. GEORGE HUTCHINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December, 3 yards of woollen cloth, value 30s, the goods of John Beaumont and William Taylor , his masters.

JOHN BEAUMONT . I am a coach-maker, in partnership with William Taylor - we live in Lower Brook-street; the prisoner was four years in our service. On the 25th of December, he was working in the loft where the cloth was kept, but had no business with it - he bears a good character.

JOSEPH LAZARUS LAWRENCE . I keep a sale-shop in Broad-street, St. Giles. On the 25th of December, the prisoner came to sell me some broad-cloth for 2l.; it was cut in a curious manner, and I gave him in charge - I had offered him 1l.; he said I must have it.

THOMAS KERSWELL . I am an officer, and have the cloth.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. The prisoner said at the office that he had been but two months in London, and that the cloth had come from Devizes for him to sell- I found the prosecutors out - I went to the prisoner in the New Prison, and he denied working for Mr. Beaumont, but afterwards acknowledged that, but said the cloth was not his - I brought a piece from Mr. Beaumont's; they match exactly.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-106

283. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 1 watch, value 2l.; 10 shirts, value 30s., and 2 waistcoats, value 5s. , the goods of David Brown , his master .

DAVID BROWN . I am master of a vessel , which lay at Hermitage-stairs, Wapping , on the 29th of May - the prisoner had been brought to me by his mother two days before, to serve as a cabin-boy - I left the vessel that day; my watch hung in the cabin; my shirts and clothes were in my chest - on my return, I missed him and the property - I could not find him, and sailed in two days for Portugal.

ANN HILL . I lodge in Farmer's-buildings. The prisoner and I were brought up together - he brought me

this watch, which he said was his father's, who was dead; I pawned it for him for a guinea, at Mr. Neat's, in the name of Smith, his mother's name - I gave him the money and ticket.

FRANCES PEARCE . I lodge with the prisoner's mother. On the 1st of June he asked me to pawn a shirt for him, which I did, at Mr. Morris', in York-street, for 4s. - I gave him the money and ticket; he said he had bought it a few days before, for 8s., but now wanted money.

GEORGE POILE . I live with Mr. Neat, a pawnbroker. On the 1st of June this watch was pawned, in the name of Sarah Smith.

WILLIAM HARDING . I live with Mr. Morris, a pawnbroker, of York-street, Westminster. On the 1st of June a shirt was pawned in the name of Pearce, for 4s.

JOHN WARREN . I took the prisoner in charge on the 2d of June, and found the duplicate of the watch upon him. The prosecutor was then at sea.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men came on board and eat, and then took me ashore - one of them gave me the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-107

384. GEORGE BEESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 15lbs. of cheese, value 10s. , the goods of William Gearey .

GEORGE SHARP . I am in the employ of William Gearey , of Broad-street, St. Giles. On the 15th of December, about nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner take this cheese from the window - I pursued, and brought him back with it.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270111-108

385. ELIZABETH GASKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 pair of sheets, value 10s., the goods of William Emmett , in a lodging room .

WILLIAM EMMETT . I live in Earl-street, Seven-dials ; the prisoner lodged in my house; I did not let her the room - my wife is not here. On the 28th of November I heard a noise in her room, went up, and missed the sheets off her bed - she said they were safe and she would produce them next morning - I gave her in charge - she produced the duplicate at the office.

DAVID FRAIL . I live with Mr. Wells. These sheets were pawned by a woman, whom I do not know.

DAVID GRIFFITHS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and next day the duplicate was brought to the office by somebody.

Prisoner. I did not take the lodging.

WILLIAM EMMETT . I cannot say she took the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-109

386. ANDREW BEVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 2 half-crowns , the monies of Thomas Waterfield .

ROBERT ALLENOR . I a am bricklayer. On the 19th of December I was at the Adam and Eve public-house, Pancras-road , between nine and ten o'clock; I went there to breakfast, and was sitting in the tap-room, facing the bar door - I saw the prisoner (whom I knew by having worked with him) get up, go into the bar, and open the till - he put his hand in, and I asked what he was doing; he said he was looking for a bit of tobacco; the landlady had left the bar. I inquired for Mrs. Waterfield, who came forward; I told her the prisoner had taken something out of the till; the prisoner heard this. Mrs. Waterfield looked, and missed two half-crowns, which she said she had taken of the prisoner that morning; he was taken into the parlour, and Waterfield wished him to give up the money - he said he would not, he would stand search first - an officer was fetched, who took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not he been drinking? A. Yes; he was very tipsy indeed. I was very near him; he did not well know what he was about.

SARAH WATERFIELD . My husband keeps this house. The prisoner frequented the house for about a week; I changed two half-crowns for him that morning, and put them into a wooden bowl in the till. I had been out of the bar about a minute and a half; my husband asked if I missed any money; I looked, and missed the two half-crowns - 8s. 4d. was found on the prisoner, and two half-crowns among it - he was very tipsy.

JAMES WELLS . I am an officer. I took him in charge- he was much the worse for liquor; I do not think he knew what he did - I found two half-crowns on him - I have known him some time; he is an industrious man.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you think he knew right from wrong? A. I do not think he did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-110

387. ISAAC BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 2 shillings, and 4 sixpences , the monies of Sarah Turner .

SARAH TURNER . I am single . On the 8th of January I lived at Mr. Burrows', at the sign of the Strong Man, public-house, Lower East Smithfield . I had put two shillings, and four sixpences into a drawer in my room; it was not locked; one of the sixpences was an old coin, which I had had six months, and can swear to - the prisoner had lodged at the house ten nights, and slept on the third floor; I missed my money, and mentioned it in his presence; he said he had not been in my room; the officer was sent for, and searched him; I was called in, and saw the two shillings and four sixpences on the table; one was the old coin sixpence.

STEVEN BURROWS . My father keeps this house. I saw the prisoner searched in the tap-room; he said he had no money; but it was found in his fob. Turner was called in and identified the sixpence.

FRANCES TURNER . I saw the prisoner in the prosecutrix's room, brushing his clothes, on the morning the money was missed; he stood near the drawers, and I heard some money chink, but did not see him take any.

JOHN BURROWS . I keep this house. My son's account is correct.

JAMES WITNEY . I am an officer. I was fetched, and found this money on him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-111

388. WILLIAM BROAD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 10 shillings and 1 sixpence , the monies of Charles Hall .

ELIZABETH HALL . I am the wife of Charles Hall ; we are green-grocer s, and live in Edgware-road . On the 30th of December I came into my shop from the parlour, and saw the prisoner behind the counter at the till; he said he wanted a halfpenny-worth of apples; I said I thought he had taken the silver out of the till; he said he had not; I was going round the counter, and he ran out; I ran after him, stopped him, and found ten shillings and a sixpence in his hand; I returned, and missed that from the till.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I took him in charge. He said an elder boy sent him into the shop.

Prisoner. If you let me out, I will never do it again.

GUILTY . Aged 9.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-112

389. ELIZABETH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 2 blankets, value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 3s., and 1 counterpane, value 2s. , the goods of William Baron .

ELIZABETH MOORE . I lodge on the second floor at Mr. William Baron 's, in Peter-street, Saffron-hill . On the 27th of September, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner coming down-stairs with a bundle; being a stranger I asked what she had got; she said some washing; I detained and gave her in charge; she had this property; the counterpane was on my bed.

JOHN POTTENGER . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took charge of her with the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person sent me up-stairs. I told Moore that the person was outside.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-113

390. PATRICK CALLANAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of Dennis Sullivan .

DENNIS SULLIVAN . I keep a shoe-shop on Saffron-hill. On the 31st of December the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for some water; I sent a person for it - he drank it, and as he went out he took off his hat - I directly missed these boots. I pursued and took him with them in his hat.

JAMES ISAACS . I took him in charge with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-114

391. JOHN HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 4 shillings, and 7 halfpence , the monies of George Harris .

JAMES HARRIS . I live with George Harris in Great St. Andrews-street, Seven-dials. On the 23d of December the prisoner came to the shop, and told me to bring half a bushel of coals and change for a 5s. piece to No. 16, Queen-street, on the first floor - master sent me with them and the change; they came to 8 1/2d.; when I got three doors down Queen-street, I met the prisoner, who asked me to give him the change (I did so), and if I had brought any wood - I said, No - he said, "Well, go on with the coals; I'll go and get the wood;" my master having some suspicion had followed me - he came, and asked if he had given me the 5s.; I said, No, and he ran and took him.

GEORGE HARRIS . I followed this boy with the coals; he was not to deliver the change till he got the 5s.; I saw the prisoner speak to him, and from what he told me I went to the prisoner and said, "You have got the change from my boy;" he said he had not - I took hold of him; he then said, "Oh, here is your money; I don't want it;" I called the officer, who took him, and I found he had never lived at No. 16, Queen-street.

JOHN TOFFT . I took him in charge, and found the change in his hand; but he had no 5s. piece, nor any other coin.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-115

392. WILLIAM GODDARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 gold brooch, value 15s. , the goods of Robert Taylor .

GEORGE FITCH . I am a jeweller, and live in Old-street-road. On the 26th of December the prisoner came and offered a gold brooch for sale - he said his mother, who was in the country, had sent him to sell it - I asked where he lived - he said in Liquorpond-street, Lower-road, Islington - I told him to go home and send his father - he said he was at work; but he would send him when he came home - I kept the brooch. Taylor and an officer brought the prisoner to me, and asked if I had seen him before - I said Yes, and gave the brooch to the officer.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I lodge with the prisoner's father, in Catherine-street, Old-street-road . On Christmas-day this brooch was in my room - I missed it next day, and spoke to the prisoner about it; he at first denied it, but at last said he had taken it, and took me to Fitch, where I found it.

WILLIAM LATHAM . I am an officer, and have the brooch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-116

393. MARY HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 2 gowns, value 1s. 6d.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 quilt, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 6d.; 1 frock, value 3d., and 3 pincloths, value 6d., the goods of George Limmings ; and 3 pincloths, value 1s.; 1 frock, value 1s., and 2 shawls, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Dudley .

MARY DUDLEY . I am the wife of Samuel Dudley ; we live in Great Earl-street, Seven-dials ; the prisoner lodged three weeks with us; her husband did not live with her; she had given notice and was going away on the 23d of October - she came that evening, and asked if I would give her a character for three months; when she had been gone a few minutes we missed all this property; there had been two or three persons in the house after she left, but nobody had gone out - we went and found her in an hour and a half, in King-street, Seven-dials.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I am an officer, and took her in charge at a quarter-past nine o'clock that night; she was discharged in about a fortnight, as we could find none of the property; but about three weeks afterwards I heard she was in the Mary-le-bone Infirmary, where I found

this shift and petticoat; and the matron found this shawl up-stairs - the prisoner was detained there.

ELIZABETH CHITSON . I am a nurse at the Mary-le-bone Infirmary; all the inmates' clothes are taken off when they come in, and are ticketed for them, and other clothes are given them; the prisoner came in; the officer and prosecutrix saw these articles, which the prisoner had on when she came in - I went up, and found this shawl with the prisoner.

SARAH LIMMINGS . This shift and petticoat are mine. The prosecutrix had them to mangle.

DANIEL REARDON . I was sent for, and took the prisoner at the Infirmary when she had recovered; she said the property was hers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The shawl was lent me by Dudley- the other things are my own.

MARY DUDLEY . I lent her the shawl, but she returned it before she left.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-117

394. JOSHUA BALLARD was indicted for embezzling 1 half-crown and 1 shilling, which he had received on account of Charles Leach , his master .

The prosecutor's name being Charles James Leach , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18270111-118

395. THOMAS WEST and HANNAH WEST were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 3 blankets, value 10s.; 1 bolster, value 7s.; 1 pillow, value 2s. 6d.; 1 quilt, value 2s. 6d.; 1 sheet, value 2s. 6d.; 1 coal-scuttle, value 20s.; 1 tea-kettle, value 10s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s. 6d.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s.; 1 looking-glass, value 2s. 6d., and 1 candlestick, value 1s., the goods of John Jeffreys , in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH JEFFREYS . I am the wife of John Jeffreys ; we live in Essex-street, Battle-bridge . I let my back-parlour to the prisoner, Thomas, on the 8th of November, at 4s. 6d. a-week; the articles stated in the indictment were let with it; in about seven weeks I gave them notice to quit, but they did not go - the man worked for Mr. Lewis, a dyer - he came home late on the night of the 29th; we heard them quarrelling; he came to my door and said he had come home to sleep, and his wife had parted with all the things; we did not get up - next morning early my husband asked him what was gone; he said every thing, and that they had slept several nights with only a carpet over them - we gave them till the following Thursday, as the woman said she would get money to redeem them; she went out and got very drunk, and was about the streets with a sailor; at eleven o'clock that night, she came home very drunk; and next morning we gave them in charge.

WILLIAM WARD . I am servant to Mr. Brown, a pawnbroker, of North-place. I have a bolster, pillow, and two blankets, pawned by the female prisoner, between the 16th of November and the 8th of December.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brewer-street, Somer's-town. I have a coal-scuttle, sheet, and quilt pawned by the female prisoner.

JOSEPH COTTON . I live with Mr. Blakey, a pawnbroker. I have a table-cloth, two irons, and a sheet pawned by the female prisoner.

RICHARD COOPER . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; the duplicates were found and given to me.

Prisoner HANNAH WEST . It is true I pawned the property, but they knew it; and I asked Mrs. Jeffreys to come into the room - I pawned them through necessity, and did not mean to leave till they were made good; but they would not grant me another week.

ELIZABETH JEFFREYS . She never asked me into her room. I never knew of it till her husband told us.

H. WEST - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

T. WEST - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-119

396. CHARLOTTE HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 coat, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 1 razor, value 6d., and 1 bag, value 1d. , the goods of Edward Carroll .

EDWARD CARROLL . I am a labourer , and lodge in Buckeridge-street (I have not been long in town) - I had been there two days; my wife and I went to bed - these things were hanging up safe; I had seen the prisoner in the day-time - when we awoke in the morning, they were gone.

GRIFFITH JONES . Early on the morning of the 16th of December, Carroll came to me to apprehend the prisoner. I found her in the house, with this gown on her back, a coat buttoned round her neck, and all the other property in a bag under her arm - she said she had robbed him of them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-120

397. JAMES HEFFERING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 1 fowl, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Rouch .

WILLIAM ROUCH . I am a poulterer , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 3d of January, about one o'clock in the day, I missed a fowl off my stall-board; it was safe a few minutes before.

RICHARD ASGINTH . I live opposite Rouch. About one o'clock, on the 3d of January, I was in my room, saw the prisoner loitering about, and in a few minutes I saw him go into the shop and take a fowl - he ran down Tavistock-street - I went and asked Rouch if he had sold one; he looked, and missed it - I described him to the officer, who took him that day; I have known him a long time, and am quite certain of him.

PHILIP RILEY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner on the 3d of January, from Asginth's description; but have not found the fowl.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-121

398. WILLIAM HUMPHRIES and JAMES HAINES were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s. , the goods of Frederick Westley .

ELIZA PEARCY . I am servant to Mr. Frederick Westley ,

who lives in the Strand - Haines is the son of our laundress; his mother lived at Bayswater. On Christmas morning, he came home with the linen, and I gave him a bundle of dirty linen, which contained, amongst other things, two handkerchiefs - they were all pinned up in a sheet.

Cross-examined by MR. J. H. ALLEY . Is there any mark on those two handkerchiefs? A. No - I know them by putting them into the box; they were dirty - there is no mark whatever upon them.

GEORGE TOFFT . I am a jeweller - I was going home on Christmas-day, and in consequence of what Mr. Shearman said, I followed the prisoners to two or three shops - I at length had them detained, and these two handkerchiefs were found on Humphries.

WILLIAM SHEARMAN . The two prisoners brought a bundle of linen to my house on Christmas morning; Haines asked me to take them into the back parlour, and buy them - I said I did not buy linen, and sent them away - I could not leave my shop, but I saw Mr. Tofft, and told him to follow them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-122

399. THOMAS INETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 copper tea-kettle, value 10s. , the goods of George Pettinger .

GEORGE PETTINGER . I keep the Bear and Ragged Staff public-house , in Smithfield . I lost this kettle from off my tap-room fire, on the 23d of December - I had not seen the prisoner there.

PHILIP SWINGELER . I am a patrol. I was in Cow-cross-street on the 23d of December, about six o'clock in the evening - I stopped the prisoner there on suspicion - he had this kettle in his right hand; he said it belonged to his mother, and had been repaired in Barbican - he afterwards said it was in Chiswell-street, by a Mr. Brasher.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-123

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

400. WILLIAM LAKEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 3 pieces of wood, called quartering, value 2s. , the goods of Lewis England .

JOHN PROVIS . I am foreman to Mr. Lewis England . On the 8th of January, I missed three pieces of quartering from a building behind the Haberdasher's Alms-houses; here they are - I know them to be his.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. At half-past six o'clock on Sunday evening, I was in the City-road, and stopped the prisoner in Featherstone-street, with this timber - he said he found it in a field behind the Alms-houses - he made no resistance.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-124

401. JAMES McDOUGAL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January, 1 pair of shoes, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Burgess .

HENRY BURGESS . I am a shoemaker , and live in Clerkenwell . On the 6th of January, about seven o'clock, I was in my back room, and heard a call of Watch! I ran out, and found the prisoner in custody - my window had been cut, and these shoes taken out - it was cracked before; I saw one shoe drop from him; here it is - I have not found the other.

ABRAHAM LEVISON . About seven o'clock on this evening, I was in Albemarle-street; I saw the prisoner and two others at Burgess' window - the prisoner was most active in cutting the window - I saw him put his arm in, and bring a shoe out - I ran up and seized him; Burgess came out; we took him into the shop, and found on him a pocket knife, which was open, and the blade was wet, and the point appeared fresh broken off - I saw the mark of a knife round the glass. He tried hard to get from us - another knife was found in his pocket, which he tried to get his hand into.

REUBEN RICE. I am a constable, and took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270111-125

402. JAMES MORLEY and JAMES SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 2lbs. of German sausage, value 4s. , the goods of William Perry .

JAMES CATERMOUL . On the 12th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners, with another person, attempt several shops - they went up to Mr. Perry's, in Oxford-street ; Smith made four attempts to go into the shop; when the shopwoman turned her back, he went in the fifth time, reached over the brass, and took something from the window - Morley was at the door, as if to receive any thing - I ran over, and saw Smith drop something in the shop - I did not see it found - they ran, and were taken; I had watched them for three quarters of an hour.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was with Catermoul, and saw the prisoners at the window - Smith put his arm over the guard, and took something; I did not see him drop it.

LUCY LLOYD . I am in Wm. Perry's employ - I was in the shop, but did not see the prisoners till they were taken- I afterwards found a sausage in the shop, about two yards from the door; it was taken from the window.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-126

403. DAVID SEAR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 12lbs. of pork, value 5s. , the goods of Walter Morgan .

WALTER MORGAN . I keep a chandler's-shop at Islington . On the evening of the 9th of December, the prisoner came and bought 1/2oz. of tobacco - another person followed him in, and also asked for tobacco, and said I need not be in a hurry - while I was serving him. I saw the prisoner take this pork, and go out; I followed, but could not overtake him, and have not found it - I am certain he is the man.

THOMAS EATOUGH . I am a constable. On the 10th of December, I went to Morgan's, and heard this account; I then went and found the prisoner at the Coach and Horses public-house - I had passed him before I knew of this.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-127

404. JAMES WAKE SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 table, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Trevillion .

THOMAS TREVILLION . I am a cabinet-maker , and live

in Old-street . This table stood in front of my house when I went in to dinner, and in a few minutes a witness called me - I went out, and met the prisoner with it under his arm - he said he did it from want.

JOHN JOSEPH GILES . I saw the prisoner take the table, and followed with the prosecutor.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-128

405. JOHN SMITH and HENRY WILLIAM were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 chaisecushion, value 10s. , the goods of William Peek .

JOHN WHITMORE . I am a coach-maker, in the employ of William Peek , of Shoreditch. On the 15th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoners about the door; I saw Smith take this cushion out of a chaise, and both of them ran off. I followed, and saw him give it to Williams.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I was on duty, and saw the prisoners turning into Clifton-street, running - I stopped them; Williams had got this cushion - I gave him to Mills, and took Smith.

RICHARD MILLS . I was with Waddington, and took the cushion from Williams.

WILLIAMS' Defence. Smith did not take it - I took it.

SMITH's Defence. I met Williams, and was talking to him near the prosecutor's - I shook hands with him, and went up Clifton-street; when I was taken I did not know Williams was behind me.

JOHN WHITMORE . I saw Smith take it.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-129

406. JUDITH SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 coat, value 12s. , the goods of Cornelius Harrington .

CORNELIUS HARRINGTON . I am a labourer , and live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . This coat is mine - I missed it from my box, which stood in my bed-room on the 18th of December; the box was still locked. The prisoner had lodged there three weeks.

MICHAEL MAHONEY . I was sent for, and took the prisoner on the 19th - a woman searched her at the watch-house, and found this duplicate on her; she said she had taken it, but another woman had given her a false key to open the box.

HENRY CAMPION . I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of December this coat was pawned by a woman - I cannot swear to her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-130

407. JOHN SMITHERS and WILLIAM JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 set of harness, value 30s.; 1 saddle, value 30s.; 1 pair of hames and traces, value 5s.; 1 back and belly-band, value 5s., and 1 pair of reins, value 7s. , the goods of John Fancourt .

JOHN FANCOURT . I keep the Green Man public-house , at Harlesdon-green . On the 6th of January, at eight o'clock at night, this property was all safe in my stable. I was called up about seven o'clock in the morning, and missed it, but found it at the watch-house.

JAMES PURCELL . I am a watchman of Paddington. - I was on duty in the Harrow-road on the 7th of January, and saw the prisoners together, both carrying this harness; I stopped them - they said they were going to Belton-street, to harness a horse; I took them to the watch-house, and they both gave the same account there; Smithers asked me to go to Kensington Gravel-pits, to tell his father where he was; I went according to his direction, but could find no such person; I returned, and told him so; he said he did live there, and asked me to go to his brother, No. 47, Charles-street, Lisson-green; I went there, but could find no such person; there are not forty-seven houses there.

PETER HOLT . I was at the watch-house. The prisoners were brought in, and said they got the harness from Kensington - I searched them, and found two keys on Smithers, and a bunch and some odd keys on Jackson; I found Fancourt's stable window had been forced in, and as such did not try the keys.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITHERS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-131

408. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 2 shoes, value 10s. , the goods of Joseph Moore .

HARRIET MOORE . I am the wife of Joseph Moore , a shoe-maker - we live in Chichester-place, Gray's-inn-road . On the 6th of January, between three and four o'clock, while I was in the parlour, the prisoner came into the shop - I went in, and he said he came from Captain Cross - a lady named Cross lodged with me; I told him to go to the private door, and immediately he left the shop door I missed these shoes; I opened the door, and saw he was going away without knocking at the private door; I called to him to come back, but he did not - I ran and took hold of him, with this pair of shoes under his jacket.

RICHARD COOPER . I am an officer. I was in Gray's-inn-lane, and saw this lady calling the prisoner - she took the shoes from him, and I secured him.

Prisoner. I was very drunk, and did not know what I was doing.

RICHARD COOPER . He was perfectly sober.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-132

409. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 14lbs. of mutton, value 6s. , the goods of John Basham .

JOHN BASHAM . I am a butcher , and live in Wardour-street, Soho . On the 6th of January, about a quarter to seven o'clock, the officers came, and I missed a fore-quarter of mutton, which was taken from outside my shop; I went with them to a public-house, where I found it, and matched it with the quarter I had cut it from - I am certain it was mine.

HENRY YATES . On the 6th of January I saw the prisoner go into the shop of a dealer in marine-stores, with a

quarter of mutton; I stopped him, and asked where he got it - he said from a shop at the corner of St. Anne's-court, Wardour-street - that he was out of employ, and did it through distress.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I was with Yates - his account is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no victuals nor money.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270111-133

410. JAMES THOMAS and JOHN GOODING were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 4 pairs of pattens, value 3s. 4d. , the goods of William Burchett .

ROBERT THOMAS . I am shopman to William Burchett , a shoemaker , of Crown-street, Finsbury . On the 22d of December, about half-past five o'clock, the constable called out that these pattens were gone from the door - I ran out, and saw Thomas with them in his hand; I pursued, and he dropped them - I took them up, and saw him secured. When I returned to the shop I found Gooding in custody.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am headborough. I was in Crown-street, and saw Gooding come out of a linen-draper's shop, and join Thomas - the shopman looked out after them; I then watched, and saw them go to Burchett's shop - Gooding took the pattens from the door, and gave them to Thomas; I called out, pursued, and took Gooding; I saw Thomas drop them.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

GOODING - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-134

411. FRANCES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 3 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Nash ; 2 pewter pots, value 18d., the goods of James France ; and 1 pewter pot, value 9d. , the goods of John Denny .

THOMAS NASH . I keep the Weymouth Arms public-house . On the 11th of December my three pots were brought to me.

JAMES GALLEY . I live with James France , of the Portland Arms public-house, about two hundred yards from Nash's - here are two pots of his.

JOHN DENNY . I keep a public-house at Mary-le-bone- here is one pot of mine.

GEORGE KAINES . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner in Bentinck-street, with two pots in her apron, and found two more in each pocket; she would not tell me her name, or wher she lived.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270111-135

412. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 2 bed-sackings, value 7s.; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 coat, value 3s. , the goods of James Higgins .

JAMES HIGGINS . I am a bedstead-maker , and live in Princes-street, Paddington. The prisoner is my apprentice . I lost this coat on the 20th, and took it from the prisoner in Mary-le-bone-lane - he said he was coming to bring it home; we had lost two bed-sackings and an apron as well - he had left that morning.

JAMES MANNING . I was with Higgins, and stopped the prisoner at a rag-shop door - he had the coat on his arm, and had offered it to me for sale.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-136

413. GEORGE WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 4lbs. of beef, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Kent .

JOSEPH CLARK . I am in the employ of George Kent , a butcher . The officer brought the prisoner in with this beef, which I had cut off about an hour before, and knew it.

WILLIAM PRICHARD . I am an officer. I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoner running down Bloomsbury-court, with a bundle; I asked what was in it - he said some bread and butter - I found it was this beef; I at last found the prosecutor - he said he found it under the the block.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-137

414. JOSEPH DIGBY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 18 shillings, and 4 sixpences , the monies of William Aston , his master.

WILLIAM ASTON . The prisoner was in my employ. On Saturday, the 6th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I sent him with eighteen shillings and four sixpences to pay to Mr. Hudson, who goes to market for me; I then went to market myself, and returned about eight o'clock; the prisoner had not then come to open the shop, which he ought to have done; I did not see him again till the next Saturday; I asked what he had done with the money - he said he had spent it.

JOHN HUDSON . I purchase goods for Aston. On the 6th of December the prisoner brought me no money.

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. On the 13th of December I received the prisoner in charge at Aston's - he said he had spent the money.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-138

415. GEORGE PUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 oil can, value 2s., and 6 quarts of oil, value 9s. , the goods of William Slark , his master .

THOMAS EDENSOR . I am servant to Mr. Slark, of Cockspur-street; I know this can to be his by a mark on it - the prisoner was his servant , but had no right to take oil.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am an officer. The prisoner passed me in North Audley-street, on the 31st of December, in the evening, with this can - I asked what he had there; he said, Oil, which he had brought from the King's-mews, Pimlico - that he was in Mr. Slark's employ - I detained him, and took him there in the morning; Mr. Slark claimed the can, and said he never allowed him to take oil from the premises, except to light the lamps; he said they were the droppings which he was allowed to take.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, the oil droppings were his perquisites, that he had been compelled to use some to trim the lamps, and had taken this instead of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-139

416. SARAH STRATFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 3 tea-spoons, value 6s., and I

pair of sugar-tongs, value 4s. , the goods of David Humphreys , her master .

SARAH HUMHHREYS . I am the wife of David Humphreys - we live in Edward-street, Battle-bridge , and sell milk - the prisoner was about a fortnight in our employ. About five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 13th of December, I missed a tea-spoon from the tea-board - I ran up stairs, and missed two tea-spoons and a pair of sugar-tongs off the drawers - they were all safe on the 11th; I asked if she had not mislaid them - she said, "Do you mean to say I have got them?" I said, No, we could not find them; she said she would go away; I sent for one Marks; I saw the prisoner take a key from her bosom and put it under the ashes - I found it would open my drawers where the spoons were kept.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she not conduct herself well? A. Yes, very well - I never asked her to pawn any thing for me; she stood by the cupboard when I missed the spoon; I was sober, and had not been drinking except at dinner - I might have had a glass of gin in the morning; I swear I did not give her the spoons to pawn; I swear I was sober.

Q. Will you swear you was not at a public-house drinking gin from twelve to seven o'clock? A. I was not.

SARAH DAY . I live at Pentonville. On the 13th of December, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner brought me three tea-spoons and a pair of sugar tongs, to pawn for her; she said she was in distress and wanted a pair of shoes and stockings - I had not an opportunity to pawn them, and on Friday I heard she was in custody; I took the spoons to Humphreys.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew her before? A. Yes; there was no concealment about it - she said she lived at Humpreys.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am an officer, and took her in charge - she said the key was her own; Humphreys was perfectly sober, but the prisoner was not.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. About seven o'clock; the prisoner said she knew nothing about it; not that she had been desired to pawn them.

Prisoner's Defence. The day before this happened, she was very drunk indeed, and on this day she told me to pawn these spoons in my own name, unknown to her husband; we went to several public-houses, and she sent me out for several glasses of rum.

The prisoner received and excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks ,

Reference Number: t18270111-140

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1827.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

417. EDWARD MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 rummer glass, value 10d., the goods of Ralph Horner , and 1 other rummer-glass, value 10d. , the goods of William Greyatt .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-141

418. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 24lbs. of lead, value 34s., the goods of the Rev. Thomas Barneby , Rector of Stepney , and fixed to a certain building there .

SECOND COUNT stating it to belong to William Ashley , Robert Willis Hall , Francis Dexter , and Mathew Breden , churchwardens of the said parish ; and Thomas Turner , John Seaborne , John Gardner , Simon Latter , Thomas Hussey , and Harmer Stenneck , overseers of the poor of the said parish .

TWO OTHER COUNTS varying the charge.

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BEECLIFF . I am a watchman. On the 7th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Stepney church-yard, on the north side of the church, and heard something fall very heavy, I looked round to the back of the church, and saw a man going to pick up a piece of lead; I said, "What are you up to?" he immediately ran off very fast - I sprung my rattle, and ran after him, but lost sight of him entirely; I returned, and saw three pieces of lead just over the rails, and one piece on the pavement - I went round the church and saw a man sliding down the water-spout at the north side of the vestry - I ran after him, he turned the corner of the church very quick, and I lost sight of him - I turned back, and in two or three minutes the prisoner was brought up by Dickinson and Gibbs - he is the man who dropped from the water-spout - I knew him by his dress and size; he was not in my sight above three minutes; he had fustian or barragan trousers on, and a smock frock.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is not that a common dress? A. Yes - I saw his face, but do not swear to his features - it was dark; he was brought back in two or three minutes.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am a patrol. I was going towards Stepney church-yard, and, about two hundred yards off from the church, heard a rattle spring - I ran, and met the prisoner running from the church-yard, about thirty yards from it I stopped, and asked what he had been doing - he said. Nothing, that he had come from the Angel - he could have come that way - I took him round the church; Beecliff said he was very much like the man, and the prisoner said, "I have not been here;" I got on the roof of the vestry, and found two more pieces of lead rolled up - the prisoner's hands were very dirty - I saw the lead compared next day, and it fitted exactly; I had seen nobody running but him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he was not in the place, and was not the man? A. Yes: he afterwards said he had come from home - I went and found that was not so - the church-yard is a thoroughfare; nothing was found on him; the dirt on his hands looked like mortar, the same as was on the lead.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a patrol and was with Dickenson, and took the prisoner - he might have seen us before- we took him in White-horse-lane - he said he had come from the Angel, but afterwards said he had only looked in there; we took him into the church-yard, and Beecliff said he was the man who came down the spout - his hands were dirty, as if with lime; mine appeared the same when I had handled the lead; there are eight or ten gas-lamps in the church-yard.

Cross-examined. Q. On your oath did not Beecliff say he was like the man? A. He said he was the man, and then

that he was like him - I did not search behind the tomb stones.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I know that the church-yard is well lighted with gas. I received the prisoner and lead in charge, there are 217lbs. of it; I saw it fitted on the roof.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not many tomb-stones there? A. Yes; a man could have hid himself there.

ROBERT WILLIS HALL proved the names of the Rector and Churchwardens.

Prisoner's Defence. I looked into the Angel and Trumpet with a man, but he would not go in - as I came along I was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-142

419. JAMES CUSER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 wooden till, value 1s; 14 penny pieces; 114 half-pence, and 23 farthings , the property of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT . I live in York-street, Mary-le-bone , and am a stationer . On the 12th of December I was at tea in the parlour, my shop door was open, and I saw a tall young man looking into the window - I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner run out with something in his hand - I ran out, and saw him drop the till about five yards off; I immediately stopped him; it contained about 6s. in copper, which was picked up in the street - I am positive he is the man.(Till produced and sworn to.)

JAMES GIBBS . I received him in charge with the till and money.

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the road and kicked against this till, but it was never in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-143

420. CHARLES DYER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 bushel of oats, barley-meal, and bran, mixed together, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Catley .

CHARLES CATLEY . I live at Enfield , and deal in corn ; the prisoner and I have the use of Mr. Long's barn between us - he is a neighbour. On the 26th of December, about nine o'clock in the evening, I went to the barn, and gave my horses about a bushel and a half of oats, barley-meal, and bran, mixed, and in consequence of suspicion I laid down in the barn; in about ten minutes I saw the prisoner come in with a candle - he looked round, then went up to my horses, fetched a tub, and took out all their food from the trough; he was taking it towards his own horse - I jumped up and said he had been robbing me in that way for a month - he said he never took any but once before; he set the tub down - what became of it afterwards, I do not know, but he says he put it into the trough again - I went away, leaving him there.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have the barn between you? A. Yes, he has one end and I the other - he only has one horse; I never gave him corn - I quarrelled with him about two months ago; I did not threaten to get him turned out of the barn - I never gave him leave to use my corn - I did not take him that night, as he was a strong man, and I knew him - I was afraid to collar him.

JOHN WILSON . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner on this day at his own house; I told him the charge - he said there was no barley-meal amongst it - I said there was about a bushel of it; he said there was not so much - I knew him before; he bears a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

The prisoner received a good character.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-144

421. JAMES AYERS and JOHN WOODMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 2 bushels of coals, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Napper .

JOHN TRIMMER . I am a brick-maker, and live at Brentford. I was at work at the lock of the canal, and saw the prisoners about a mile from Napper's barge, with two bags of coals at their feet - I heard them drop them: I went up; they said they had brought them from Napper's barge, and were going to take them to his bargeman - I secured them.

WILLIAM DURANT . I am a bargeman in the employ of Mr. Napper - Ayers was my servant - I never authorized either of the prisoners to take the coals; I cautioned Ayers not to take any.

AYERS' Defence. He got me to take coals to his house several times.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-145

422. JOHN DODD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 sheet, value 4s., the goods of John Emerick ; and 1 coat, value 6s., and 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of William Brown .

JOHN EMERICK . I keep the Fox public-house , Sherrard-street . On the 15th of December, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner came and slept at the house - next morning he paid and left - I went up, and missed a sheet - I went after him, took him back, and found it in his hat - he pulled the coat off his body, and the waistcoat was in his pocket.

WILLIAM BROWN . I lodge at the Fox, and slept in the same room. I left this coat and waistcoat in the table-drawer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-146

423. THOMAS DODSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d January , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Downes .

ROBERT DOWNES . I am a boot-maker , and live in Portpool-lane . On the 2d of January, about two o'clock in the morning, the prisoner and two others came to my shop; one of them said, "What do you want for this pair of boots;" I said 5s.; but they were too small - I turned to reach another pair, and saw the prisoner and another taking something, and said, "What, are you robbing me?" they ran off - I pursued, and the prisoner dropped this pair of boots - I secured him - the others got away.

ONESIPHORUS TOLDEROY . I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and saw the prisoner crossing Gray's-inn-lane - another pair of boots then fell from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-147

424. GEORGE EARLY was indicted for stealing, on the 23 of December, 3 bushels of oats, value 12s. , the goods of Samuel Williams ; and OWEN LINGE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I live at Reading, and am a horse-keeper - my horses stand at Hanley; Early was my horse-keeper , and kept the key of the stable; but had no right to sell or give corn away.

JOHN MASON . I live at Hounslow. On the 23d of December, Godliman called me about five o'clock in the morning, to see what he called a "corn rig." I went, and saw a man getting over a gate, at the Marquis of Granby public-house, opposite Williams' stables, with a sack - I do not know who he was - Godliman said it was Linge- I called out, "Linge! put that down;" but he got away with it.

JOHN GODLIMAN . I live at Hounslow. On this morning I met Linge with an empty sack and a bag under his arm - I watched him - he went round the corner, and soon after I saw him go into the stables, and come out with the bag, containing three bushels of something; Early came out first, and said all was clear - Linge then came out - I cannot say what was in the sack - he went away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-217

425. ANN YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Ambrose Colley .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270111-148

426. THOMAS ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 5 pecks of coals, value 1s. 6d., and 3 pieces of wood, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Farrant .

JOHN FARRANT . I am a carpenter , and live at Hanworth. On Sunday morning, the 10th of December, I missed some coals - I got a warrant, and searched the prisoner's premises next day; I found three pieces of quartering, which I am certain are mine - they are of a particular kind, and these coals have shavings among them, which belong to wood I had been working on shortly before.

GEORGE GRIST . I keep the Bear public-house, near Hanworth. Early on Sunday morning I was awoke by my dog barking - I went to my window, and saw the prisoner come to opposite my house, with a sack on his back- I levelled my gun at him, and said, "If you don't stop I will shoot you;" I called up my carters - he then said,"I have only got about a bushel and a half of coals." I went down, and secured him with them; he said he brought them from Sunbury; I at last found Farrant's coal-house had been opened, and saw where they had been lifted over the pales; there was a number of shavings among them - Farrant produced some of the same sort.

THOMAS WHITTINGHAM . I am a constable. I found this wood on the premises.

Prisoner. I am poor, and have twelve children; a man gave me the wood, to help make a shed.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-149

427. GEORGE FLOWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 3 pewter pots, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Walls ; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Bennett .

JOHN AYRES . I am servant to Mr. Gawley, of the Swan public-house, George-street, Foley-place. On the 10th of December the prisoner passed the house with another man; I watched them, and saw the prisoner take four pots off the rails at No. 30, Mary-le-bone-street - I ran after him; he put them down, and ran - I caught him in Riding-house-lane; he struck me several times, and made my nose bleed - we secured him, and informed the owners; he said he would not mind being at the bl - y Bailey; he would have a good turn-up with us, and give us all a good quilting - he wanted to fight us.

SAMUEL WALLS . I keep the Horse and Groom public-house , Great Portland-street. Three of these pots are mine; I found the prisoner at the Swan, with them - he was very insolent.

JOHN KING . I am servant to Joseph Bennett , at the Globe public-house, Upper Mary-le-bone-street. This quart pot is his.

JOHN MARTIN . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the pots - this man struck me, and I then struck him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-150

428. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL SMEETON . I am a baker , and live in James-street, Lisson-grove. The prisoner was in my employ four or five months, and boarded with me - he received money on my account, for bread, and settled his account every evening. On the 11th of December, about three o'clock, he accounted for some money he had received, but paid me none on account of Elizabeth Talbot , who is a customer; I asked him, about six o'clock that evening, if Mrs. Talbot had paid him - he said No; he then went out, and locked the stable-door, as usual, but did not come in; he absconded. I found him at his friends', at Leamington, Hants, on the Monday following; he had given me no notice.

ELIZABETH TALBOT . I deal with Smeeton. On the morning of the 11th of December the prisoner brought the bread - and about five o'clock that afternoon I paid him seven sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and 21s. 9d. in silver and copper - he wrote this receipt, in my presence (read.)

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer, and received him from the high-constable of Leamington. I found seven sovereigns and a half on him, which he said were part of his master's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-151

429. MATTHEW GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2 shirts, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Anderson ; 2 stockings, value 6d., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s. , the goods of William Beadnell .

MARTIN FROST . I am a gate-keeper at the London Docks . On the 13th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the gate to go out, and as he looked bulky I stopped him, and found on him this

property - he said they were his own, and that he belonged to the Fairy.

THOMAS ANDERSON . I belong to the Fairy . I know nothing of the prisoner, but these two shirts are mine; I missed them from the forecastle.

WILLIAM BEADNELL . I belong to the Fairy . This waistcoat and stockings are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-152

430. JAMES JEFFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 11 lbs. of paper, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Flindell and John Brunton Flindell .

THOMAS FLINDELL . I am a printer , in partnership with John Brunton Flindell - we live in St. Martin's-lane. The prisoner was our warehouseman for three or four months; we missed paper, and went to his lodging with an officer; I found his wife there; this paper was in different parts of the room - it is parts of what would make valuable books to us - I had a good character with him.

JAMES LEDGER . I am an officer. The prosecutor's account is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutors owed me 15s. 8d. for over-time and working on Sundays; I knew I could not legally charge them for it, and took this paper to remunerate myself.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his character .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-153

431. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 8s. , the goods of William Newby .

JOHN BENJAMIN KNOWLES . I am shopman to William Newby , a pawnbroker , of Drury-lane . On the 15th of December I received information, ran out, and saw the prisoner and two others running; I took the prisoner in Charles-street, with these boots in his hand, which he had taken from just within the door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270111-154

432. MICHAEL LEARY , THOMAS MORAN , and JOHN GILMORE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 9 lbs. of beef, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas George .

GEORGE MITCHELL . I am a cabinet-maker; my master lives in Cold Bath-square. On the 28th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was near Mr. George's, the butcher , and saw the three prisoners - I watched them for a quarter of an hour, loitering about and playing; I saw Gilmore go to the corner of Bath-street , which is Mr. George's shop - he stood one house from the other two, and waited a few minutes; they then went up to the window, and I thought Moran was going to take some mutton, but Leary reached over his shoulder, took hold of a piece of beef, and gave it to Moran; they all ran off - I pursued, and caught Moran, with the beef, in Warner-street, and took him back. Gilmore was secured; I took Leary on Saffron-hill.

THOMAS GEORGE . I keep this shop. I came home just as Moran and Gilmore were brought into the shop - Leary was not taken then.

THOMAS MARKHAM . I am a constable. I went home with George from the office, then went with Mitchell, and took Leary on Saffron-hill.

LEARY's Defence. I asked a boy the way to Fleet-market - he sent me down Saffron-hill, and I was taken.

MORAN's Defence. Leary was not with us.

GILMORE's Defence. I was asking Moran the way to Islington.

LEARY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

MORAN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

GILMORE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-155

433. MARY McKENZIE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 2 caps, value 4s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 collar, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 4d., the goods of Catherine Hearly , spinster; 2 jackets, value 18s., and 2 pairs of trousers, value 12s. , the goods of John Hair .

CATHERINE HEARLY . I am single . I live at the Nag's Head public-house, Oxford-street - John Hair keeps the house . On the 9th of January the prisoner came in with a man - I went up-stairs, to wait in the club-room, and saw her and the man on the stairs, going up higher; I said, "This is the way to the room;" the prisoner said,"My dear, my husband is going to put on a pair of shoes;" I said, "Come down;" they came down, and went into the room. I went up again soon after - they left the room, and the man went away - I have not seen him since; I saw the prisoner coming down stairs from my room, with something - she wanted to go out the back way, but I followed her, and saw the sleeve of a jacket hanging out of her bundle - I saw D. Jones' name on it; I said, "Where did you get these?" she said they were her children's. I pulled her back, and threw the bundle into the bar, to my mistress; I pushed her into the bar, and at the watch-house my things were found on her; she was quite a stranger to us.

MARY HAIR . I am the wife of John Hair . Hearly brought the prisoner to the bar; she was quite a stranger - the two pairs of trousers and jacket are my husband's.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I took her in charge, and at the watch-house found the servant's clothes about her.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the man in the street - he took me to the house, and said he lived there; he told me to come up, and then he wanted me to stay all night - he took these things, and gave me to clean, saying they were his wife's.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-156

434. CATHERINE ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 coat, value 20s.; 4 gowns, value 20s.; 1 shawl, value 5s.; 1 bonnet, value 4s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of James Cavanagh .

JAMES CAVANAGH . I live in Angel-court, King street, St. James . The prisoner lodged with me on the 12th of February; she got up early in the morning; my wife

and I called out to ask where she was going - she said to the City, to see her sister; we got up about six o'clock, and went out to work; I locked the door, and had the key in my pocket; the prisoner came to me about two o'clock, and asked for the key, which I gave her. I came home about six in the afternoon, found the door locked, and the key left in it; I opened it, went in, and missed this property; she never returned, and was not found till a month ago. I know all the property was safe when I went out.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . On the 16th of December the prisoner was brought to the office, on another charge - Cavanagh had her detained. I found thirty duplicates on her - two for this gown and shawl.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Shadwell. I have a gown, pawned on the 8th of April - I do not know who by, but this is the counter-duplicate.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am shopman to Mr. Morris, of York-street, Westminster. I have a shawl, pawned on the 23d of February; this is the counter-duplicate, but I cannot say who pawned it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The shawl I bought at Mr. Thompson's, in Paul-street.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18270111-157

435. CATHERINE ROBINSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 sheet, value 3s., and 1 flat-iron, value 6d., the goods of Frederick Strube , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house .

FREDERICK STRUBE . I live in Pine Apple-court. - The prisoner took a furnished room of me, on the 29th of November - she went away on the 16th of December, without giving notice; I then missed my property.

JOHN NICHOLS . I am shopman to Messrs. Graham and Stock, pawnbrokers. I have a blanket and sheet, pawned by the prisoner.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am shopman to Mr. Morris. I have a sheet and flat-iron, pawned on the 29th of November - I cannot say by whom.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-158

436. WILLIAM SAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Dynan .

MARY DYNAN . I am the wife of Robert Dynan - he keeps a shoemaker's-shop , in Field-lane . On the 9th of January I saw the prisoner and three others come to our shop window - he took a pair of shoes from the window; I sent my girl after him, and he was taken.

ANN DYNAN . I am the prosecutrix's daughter; she told me a man had stolen a pair of shoes - I ran out, and saw the prisoner running; he was taken, but I did not see the shoes found.

SAMUEL COLES . I am a wheel wright, and live within two doors of Dynan; I saw three or four boys at his door- the prisoner ran by me, pursued by Ann Dynan; she took hold of him, and said, "Where are the shoes?" and just at that time I saw one shoe drop from some other boys who stood there, and had been by the window; the prisoner had ran close by them.

JAMES ISAACS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and this shoe.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy stole a pair of shoes and dropped one.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18270111-159

437. MICHAEL TOY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 trowel, value 3s. , the goods of Alfred Chapman .

ALFRED CHAPMAN . I am a bricklayer . The prisoner was employed at an unfinished house, by my father, in Clarendon-square ; I hid this trowel under some dirt there, at eleven o'clock on the 27th of December, and about two it was gone.

WILLIAM PYATT . I am servant to Mr. Hutton, a pawnbroker, of Warner-street. On the 27th of December the prisoner pawned this trowel.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18270111-160

438. JAMES WATERS and JOSEPH PARROTT were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Phillips .

JOHN POTTENGER . I am an officer. On the 30th of December, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoners in company, in Turnmill-street; Waters had a pair of shoes under his arm, tied in a handkerchief; he said it was a pair of shoes, which his father had sent him home with; I sent for his mother, who said he had been out some time, and she did not know where.

JOHN LOADSMAN . I am an officer. I found Waters in custody, and was going to lock him up - he said, "Pray don't lock me up, and I will tell you where I got them;" he took me to Phillips', who owned the shoes.

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I live in Whitecross-street . These shoes are mine, and were safe half an hour before.

WATERS' Defence. This other boy took them off a nail, and gave them to me to carry.

WATERS - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged.

PARROTT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-161

439. DAVID DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 2 shawls, value 20s.; 1 1/2 yard of silk, value 8s., and 1 1/2 yard of quilting, value 7s. , the goods of James Robert Shaw , his master .

The prosecutor not being able to identify his property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18270111-162

440. WILLIAM SHARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 4 loaves of bread, value 2s, 6d. , the goods of John Dearlove , his master; and SUSAN JENKINS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I was applied to by Mr. Dearlove, of Peter-street, to watch Sharman; and on the 22d of December, a little before eight o'clock in the morning, I saw him come out of the shop with a batch of bread on his head; he went towards Great Windmill-street, and there Jenkins came up to him; he turned round, and said something to her; he stooped, and she took two loaves

off the batch; he went round the corner to Ensworth's shop; she crossed the way, and threw a blue handkerchief over the two loaves. Sharman came out of the shop where he had left the bread, and went home. Jenkins went and stood by a picture shop in Crown-court. Sharman brought out another batch of bread, and went to Mrs. Duncan's, in Crown-court; he left all there except two loaves, which he brought out under his arm; he then passed Jenkins, and gave her a slap on her back with his hand; they went on together to Mr. Walwyn's wine-vaults, in Compton-street; they went in there, and staid some time; I saw Lovegrove and asked his assistance, and when they came out Jenkins had two loaves in her hand, but Sharman had none; they walked a little way together and then parted; Jenkins went on to Coventry-street; I tapped her on the shoulder, and said, "You have got some stolen property;" she said,"I have not." I asked where she got those loaves; she said from her husband, the baker; I said, "Are you sure he is your husband?" She hesitated and said, "No, he is a bit of a sweetheart." I sent her to the watch-house, and marked the loaves; I went to Dearlove's shop, where I found Sharman; he denied all knowledge of the woman, or having seen any loaves but what he took to the shops; I took him to the watch-house, and said to Jenkins, "Which is the man who gave you the loaves?" She said, "That is him." Sharman made no answer. I know Jenkins has borne a good character for years.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I am an officer, and was with Gook; I saw the prisoners come out of the wine-vaults; Sharman had no bread then, but Jenkins had two loaves; Gook stopped her in Coventry-street, and asked what she had got; she said her husband had given her these two loaves. Gook left her with me, and as we went to the watch-house, she said, "I am certain they cannot hurt me, for what is given by love, cannot be gotten by law."

JOHN DEARLOVE . Sharman had been four or five weeks in my service. Ensworth is a customer, and Duncan another; he was to take twenty loaves to each of them; he did so; but must have taken twenty-two out each time; I had directed Gook to watch him; I have seen the four loaves, and I am quite certain it is my bread.

ELIZABETH ENSWORTH . I received twenty loaves from the prisoner.

ELIZABETH DUNCAN . I received twenty loaves on the 22d December.

ELIZABETH GLANVILLE . I live at Walwyn's wine-vaults. The prisoners came in there on the 22d of December; Sharman asked me to let him leave two loaves, which a young woman would call for; I gave them to Gook.

SHARMAN's Defence. I gave this woman two loaves; and left two at the wine-vaults for a person I knew in distress; I meant to pay for them on Saturday night.

JENKIN's Defence. I did not know they were stolen.

SHARMAN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

JENKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-163

441. JOHN PARK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 13 dwts. of silver, value 3s. , the goods of Benjamin Smith , his master .

BENJAMIN SMITH . I am a silversmith , and live in Duke-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields - the prisoner was my porter ; having been robbed, I suspected him. On the 10th of January. I gave him in charge of an officer, whom I saw search his box, in which was 13 dwts. of silver, partly manufactured.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer - I searched his box, and found this silver.

GEORGE HOLMES . I work for Mr. Smith, and know this silver to be my workmanship.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it among the sweepings of the shop, and put it into my box, intending to take it to the factory, but I forgot it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-164

442. JANE HYDE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 set of fire-irons, value 2s.; 1 blanket, value 1s.; 1 iron, value 6d., and 1 sheet, value 1s., the goods of William Kilsby , in a lodging-room .

ANN KILSBY . I am the wife of William Kilsby ; we live on Saffron-hill - I let the prisoner a first floor back room, ready furnished; these articles were part of the furniture - she did not leave till she was taken.

THOMAS LINSCOTT . I am shopman to Mr. Cross, a pawnbroker, of Turnmill-street - I have a blanket, a sheet, an iron, and a set of fire-irons, pawned by the prisoner, between the 21st and the 28th of December.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer, and took her in charge; I found the duplicates of the property on her.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-165

443. JAMES JORDAN and SARAH LINZELL were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 3 sheets, value 4s.; 2 blankets, value 5s.; 1 bolster, value 5s., and 2 pillow-cases, value 2s., the goods of James Messman , in a lodging-room .

SUSANNAH MESSMAN . I am the wife of James Messman ; we live in St. Anne, Limehouse - we let the prisoners a furnished room, at 4s. 6d. a-week, and they were about eight weeks with us - they absconded on the 22d of January, 1826, and owed me 24s.; I found the duplicates of my property in the cupboard.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Dickens, a pawnbroker, of Limehouse. I have a bolster, sheet, and pillow-case, pawned at different times in January, 1826, by a woman; but who I cannot say.

JAMES MESSMAN . I received information, and found the prisoner Jordan - we afterwards found Linzell.

LINZELL'S Defence. The man is innocent - I was driven to it by distress.

LINZELL - GUILTY. Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

JORDAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-166

444. MARIA DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 18 yards of ribbon, value 13s., the goods of Samuel Cater and Thomas Wood , privately in their shop .

JOHN HOLMES . I am shopman to Samuel Cater and Thomas Wood , linen-drapers , of Chiswell-street. On the 5th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came, with another person, to look at some ribbons, but bought none - they then bought some black

ribbon, which the other paid 6d. for; they went out, and in consequence of having seen her take up a piece of ribbon and put it back, I followed them, and took a ribbon(which I had shown to them) from under the prisoner's arm, under her shawl - she offered me 5l. to let her go; I gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was she sober? A. I am almost sure she was.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I took her in charge, and found 13s. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young woman, and went with her - I was very much in liquor; as we came out, she said she had found something, and put this under my arm - before I could see what it was, I was taken; I said I would give 5l. rather than it should have happened.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-167

445. RICHARD FERGUSSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 shawl, value 12s., the goods of Elizabeth Northover , from her person .

ELIZABETH NORTHOVER . I am a widow , and live in Smart's-buildings, St. Giles . On the 4th of December, I went to see a friend in Belton-street; I heard several children making a noise in the shop or parlour - I opened the door and said to a woman, "I wonder you have all this noise," and told them to leave the room - the prisoner was there, and said he would not; I took hold of him to put him out; some others went out with him - I shut the door after him, and then missed my shawl off my shoulder; it must have been snatched, but I do not know who by - the prisoner put the light out, or I should have seen who took it; it has not been found.

SAMUEL CHESHIRE . I am a watchman - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and took the prisoner, who was running.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-168

446. SUSANNAH HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 1 purse, value 6d., and 12 sovereigns, the property of John Budd , from his person .

JOHN BUDD . I am a bricklayer , and work for Mr. Mann, of Vauxhall-road - I met the prisoner in Tothill-street on Christmas-night, about half-past eleven o'clock; she was a stranger - I was quite sober; she took my hand, and asked me home with her - I went with her to No. 3, Old Pie-street , to a second floor front room, and went to bed - I was there about an hour and a half; I had twelve sovereigns and an old guinea in a purse in my left-hand trousers pocket, which was on a chair by the bedside - I heard her going out of the door, and asked where she was going; she said, to the yard, and would return in two minutes; in about five minutes, as she did not come, I got up, and found my trousers half-way down the stairs - the twelve sovereigns and the purse were gone, but the guinea was left in the pocket; I had felt my money safe as I walked with her, but not afterwards - I gave her 2s. from another pocket - the door was bolted inside; nobody could have entered the room - I dressed, and called a watchman, described her to him, and saw her on the following Sunday morning, but have not found the money or purse - when she was taken, she said, "Phillips, give me my old stays which were left in the room."

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. On the 26th of December, at one o'clock in the morning, I saw Budd at the door of this house, calling Watch! he said he was robbed of twelve sovereigns and a purse, and had found his trousers on the stairs, and an old guinea in them - we looked about, but could not find the prisoner; she had left her bonnet, shawl, and stays in the room - I took them to the landlady, and locked the door - Budd appeared quite sober.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner in Parker's-rents, Old Pie-street - Budd was with me, and identified her. I found on her 3s., three duplicates, a pair of new stays, and a new shawl - I returned to the room where I took her, and found several articles of new furniture (which were there when I took her) were removed - there were two other women in the room.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sleeping in Little Dean-street that night.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18270111-169

447. THOMAS ROBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 6 turkies, value 21s., and 1 basket, value 1s. , the goods of Patrick Ryan .

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. On the 10th of January, I was at the end of Back-hill, Leather-lane, and saw the prisoner with another person - the prisoner had a basket on his back; I said, "What have you here?" he said, "Six turkies, and they are all hens" - the other person then ran away; the prisoner said he got them from Leadenhall skin-market - I went there, and found Ryan.

PATRICK RYAN . I am a labourer - I bought seventeen turkies on the morning of the 10th of January; I put six of them into a basket, and left them at the top of a flat - I went to buy some meat, and when I returned, they were gone; I can swear this is the basket I left them in.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am a constable; Waddington's account is correct.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am servant to Mr. Marsh, poulterer, Leadenhall market - Ryan bought seventeen turkies of master; he left six of them in a basket, I saw the prisoner pass the place two or three times - I left them about twenty minutes past ten o'clock, and when I returned they were gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in the skin-market.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-170

448. JAMES OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 16 loaves of bread, value 12s.; 1 half-peck of flour, value 1s. 8d.; 2 sacks, value 2s., and 1 basket, value 1s. , the goods of Benjamin Taylor Nelson .

WM. McKEY . I am servant to Mr. Benjamin Taylor Nelson , baker , of Paddington-street. On the 2d of January I left a basket of bread at the corner of Dorset-street for about ten minutes, and on my return I met the prisoner and another man opposite No. 20, Baker-street - the prisoner had the basket on his shoulder, and the man one loaf in his hand - I said to the man, "You have got my basket;" he stepped up to the prisoner, put the loaf into the basket again, and ran away - the prisoner remained,

and was taken; he said the man had given him something to carry it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man with a wheelbarrow; he took this basket out of it, and rested it on a lamp-post; he asked me to carry it - I dropped a loaf, and he took it up.

W. McKEY . There was a barrow near there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-171

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

449. ANTONIO CASTELLO was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 purse, value 1s. 7d. , the goods of John Wells .

EDWIN AUGUSTUS WITHERS . I am shopman to John Wells , hosier , of Oxford Street . On the morning of the 15th of December, the prisoner came in, and gave me to understand that he wanted some purses - he took me out and showed me them in the window; he selected four, for which he offered 7s. 6d. - while I was turning to the window, I saw him with two other purses in his hand, which, on my turning round, he threw on the counter - I was looking again, and saw him put something up his sleeve; I got down from the window, and continued to serve him; we could not agree, and he was going out - he took up his umbrella, which I caught hold of, and of the arm which had the purse up it - he immediately pulled out a purse from his sleeve, it was one he had rejected - I collared him; my mistress came out; he fell on his knees, and offered his purse and watch, if we would let him go; he then pulled out another purse - we gave him in charge.

GEORGE AVIS . I received him in charge, and found 9s. 6d. and a gold watch on him.

Prisoner's Defence (through an interpreter). While I was agreeing about them, I happened to take one in my hand which I did not approve of - I then thought I would have them, and took three more - the man snatched three out of my hand, and said I had stolen them - I was alarmed and offered them my watch.

E. A. WITHERS . He had it up his sleeve, and his coat was buttoned.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-172

450. TIMOTHY CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 10lbs. of soap, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Wildman Goodwyn and Robert Bulcock .

THOMAS WILDMAN GOODWYN . I am son of Thomas Wildman Goodwyn , who lives in Goodman's-yard, Minories , in partnership with Robert Bulcock. On the 12th of December, the prisoner worked on the premises - we could not miss this quantity of soap; our men leave work at six o'clock; but if they have nothing to do, they leave before - I have no doubt this soap is ours.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose there is a quantity of this description in London? A. No doubt of it - he has worked for us several years.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames-police surveyor. I was at the corner of Blue-anchor-yard on this evening, a short distance from Mr. Goodwyn's, and saw the prisoner - I asked what he had got; he said, only a little soap; I asked where he took it from - he said from the prosecutor's yard - as I took him to the watch-house, he said that somebody gave it to him - I asked who; he said he did not want to bring other persons into trouble.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was he sober? A. He appeared so.

Prisoner. I had been drinking, and do not know how I got it.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-173

451. DANIEL GILLUNY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 1 cheese, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of John Atkins .

CHARLES OTTERY . I am servant to John Atkins , a cheesemonger of Ratcliff-highway . On the 3d of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I was returning to the shop, and saw the prisoner slip this cheese from the board under a handkerchief - he walked on - I called Stop thief! he ran behind a cart, and was stopped at the corner of Butcher-row by a man - I am certain of him - I went up to him, and he pushed me backward.

HENRY BRAMAN . I am a baker, and live in Broad-street, Ratcliff. I was coming by, and saw the prisoner run from the window - Ottery cried Stop thief! and the prisoner ran behind a cart, and then to Butcher-row - I staid till he was brought back.

JOHN LEEMING . I am an officer. I was called by Ottery, who said a man had stolen a cheese. I went, and took the prisoner - I asked him where the cheese was; he said he knew nothing about it - I brought him back, and some person said he had thrown it into a cart.

Prisoner's Defence. So help me God, I know no more of it than any of you do - I was going home from my work.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270111-174

452. THOMAS GOATE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 jacket, value 2s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 2s. , the goods of James Johnson .

JAMES JOHNSON . I am an ostler , and live in Wellclose-square . My jacket and trousers were on a shelf in the stable on Cristmas-eve, and next morning, at seven o'clock, they were gone.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to Whitechapel office, on the 28th of December, about one o'clock, on another charge, and he had this jacket and trousers on him. I told him there was a charge against him for stealing them - he said he bought them of a man in Petticoat-lane on the Tuesday.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Petticoat-lane, and saw a Jew with some clothes. I gave 1s. 6d. for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-175

453. THOMAS GOATE was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 set of harness, value 5l.; 1 bridle, value 1l.; 1 martingale, value 5s.; 1 pair of stirrups, value 4s.; 1 pair of stirrup-leathers, value 2s.; 1 pair of reins, value 4s., and 1 padlock, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Walker .

RICHARD CANE . I am servant to Mr. Charles Walker ; he lives in King's-place, Commercial-road . On the 28th of December I was called up, about three o'clock in the morning, by my master, who said the stable had been broken open; I got a light, and found the lock was taken off the door, and these articles were laying packed up ready to be taken off - I had left them all safe at ten o'clock the night before, and had locked the door - I know them to be my master's.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 28th of December I was going round the beat, between two and three o'clock, I missed the padlock off the gates - I heard a noise inside the stable - I called another watchman, and we pushed against the wicket; but it was fastened inside - he put his stick under and forced it open - I went in and said, "Who is here?" the prisoner answered, "What do you want?" I said, "Who are you?" he said, "I belong here;" I said, "Who do these premises belong to?" he said, "To a butter merchant on the other side of the way;" I then took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . On this morning the prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found on him a padlock which had been on the stable the night before.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man in the gate-way, who asked me to mind the place till he returned, and told me to go in and fasten the door.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-176

454. SILVESTER BEST and EDWARD EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 furcap, value 1s. 8d. , the goods of Henry Heath .

HENRY HEATH . I am a hatter , and live in Oxford-street. On the 10th of January, about nine o'clock, the officer brought this cap in, which was safe a few minutes before.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . A little before nine o'clock. on this evening, I saw the prisoners in front of Mr. Heath's shop. I saw Best go in, and come out with this cap; which I took from him as he was putting it under Edwards' apron.

BEST - GUILTY . Aged 13.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-177

455. THOMAS WYBRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 6 cheeses, value 5l., and 2 sacks, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Woolley .

THOMAS WOOLLEY . I am a cheese-factor . These cheeses were in a warehouse over my stable, in President-street East, City-road . I lost them on the 30th of December; but did not miss them till the 1st of January, when I found them at Guildhall. I know the sacks and six cheeses.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner in Golden-lane, on the evening of the 30th of December, with one of these sacks on his back; another person was with him, who had the other sack on his back; each sack contained three cheeses; the other man got away - I found out Mr. Woolley, who claimed them - I found a key on the prisoner, which opens the warehouse door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was merely engaged by two men to assist in carrying the property - and the two men, who engaged me, absconded the moment I was detained.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-178

456. JAMES CARR and ALEXANDER McCAULEY were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 10 lamp-glasses, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Jacobs , their master .

MOSES JACOBS . I am the son of Henry Jacobs , of Mansel-street - our manufactory is in Phoenix-street, St. Giles - the prisoners were both in our employ - these glasses are my father's - I can swear to six of them by some white spots in them, which arose from an accident in making them - we missed them when the officer came - McCauley worked near to where they were kept - three men make about one hundred and sixty or one hundred and sixty-five every six hours - I examined the book, and missed these glasses - the prisoners did not work at these glasses - they were safe between two and three o'clock last Saturday morning.

JOHN FROST . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 9th of January I stopped McCauley in Saffron-hill with ten glasses in a handkerchief - he said a man had hired him to carry them to a Mr. Smith in Holborn, and that he did not know the man.

JAMES CONNER . I am a constable, and was with Frost - we met the prisoners together - his account is correct; Carr had two bottles of spirits, and said he knew nothing about the glasses - McCauley said he brought them from his master's.

McCAULEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

CARR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-179

457. ELIZABETH BALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 11 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of Edward Stanton Meyrick , her master .

EDWARD STANTON MEYRICK . I am a linen-draper , and live in the City-road - the prisoner was my servant ; I suspected her, and an officer was sent for - we found these handkerchiefs in her box, of which she gave him the key, and said my apprentice had given them to her, but afterwards contradicted it - I had only missed one at first.

FREDERICK STANBRIDGE . I am apprentice to Mr. Meyrick. I never gave the prisoner any handkerchiefs.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I asked the prisoner for her key, which she gave me - I found the hankerchiefs - she said Frederick gave them to her for kindnesses she had done him - I asked when; she said, "Last Sunday week;" Frederick was called up and said, "Can you look in my face, and say I gave them to you;" she hesitated, and said, "No, I cannot."

Prisoner's Defence (written). In an evil hour I took them; and hope that what I have suffered will be a warning to me through life.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Strongly recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. & Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-180

458. SARAH SPARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 brooch, value 27s. , the goods of John Few Royle , her master .

JOHN FEW ROYLE . I am a fancy stationer , and live in King-street, Holborn. The prisoner came into my service on the 21st of October; on the 23d I laid this brooch on my bed-room table; and next morning, when I went up to dress, it was missing - I asked if she had seen it; she said she had not; she left us six weeks afterwards; and Mrs. Royle sent for her again; I asked her about some spoons and this brooch; she denied it, and was insolent; but one day we found it in pawn.

JOHN TYLER . I am a pawnbroker. The brooch was pawned by the prisoner on the 27th of October. I am certain of her person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18270111-181

459. JOSEPH HARWOOD was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES HOW . I am a hay-salesman , and live at Wilsden. The prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money which he should bring me. On the 16th of December, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, I sent him with a load of hay to Mr. Dolan, in Hill-street, for which he was to receive 4l. 9s. 6d., - I did not see him again till the following Wednesday, when he was in custody; he never brought or sent me any of the money.

DANIEL DOLAN . On the 16th of December I bought a load of hay of How, in the Haymarket; the prisoner brought it home; I saw my daughter pay him 89s. in silver, and 6d. in copper; it consisted of crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; I live in Hill-street, Regent's Park.

JOHN TOMLINS . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, at Edgeware, and found him there on the 20th of December; he said he was willing to go with me; that he had been robbed of a sovereign and a half, and the rest he had made away with.

The prisoner put in a petition soliciting a lenient sentence.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270111-182

460. HENRY WAYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 brass roller, value 5l. , the goods of John Few Royle , his master ; and CHARLES FLINT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FEW ROYLE . I live in King-street, Holborn. My manufactory is in Leather-lane. On the 25th of October I missed a brass roller; I went, in consequence of information, on the 27th of December, to Mosher, who lives at Hoxton; he produced it to me; I then went to Marlborough-street, and got two officers, who accompanied me to the factory, where Wayman was at work; I called him up, and told him I had a serious charge against him - he appeared flurried, and asked what it was; I said I had reason to suppose he had been robbing me some time; he had lived two years with me; I said, "Henry, I am sure you have taken that brass roller;" he positively denied it; he said he knew nothing of it; I said, "You have - for I have found it;" he changed colour, and he was much agitated; I said I was sorry to tell him he was in custody; I knocked for the officers, who came in; I said I was very sorry, and should have been glad to have made him a witness, but could not; I did not hold out any promise or threat to him; he then said, that he had taken it - that Flint had asked him to give him one of my embossing rollers; he said he would - and he did give him one; some other conversation took place, and the officers took him. We then went to Messrs. Smith and Summers', Tabernacle-walk, where Flint was at work; I saw him there, but said nothing to him; he was taken to Marlborough-street; Mosher was there with the roller; it had been taken from a room where I keep my machinery; nobody had access to it but my family and Wayman; - a person must go through my parlour to get to it - it is worth 5l.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I went with Schofield to Mr. Royle's, and found Wayman there; no promise or threat was held out to him - he said that about two months ago he did take the roller, and gave it to Flint, who gave it to Mosher; we then went to Smith and Summers', and took Flint; I staid in a coach while Schofield and Royle went into the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was no promise made him? A. No; Mr. Royle said, "Now, Henry, I should like to have made you a witness, but must be led by the officer - now, you can tell me a great deal about my paper;" he at first said he could not, but afterwards stated about the roller and paper.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I was with Clements. I went and took Flint - he was taken to the office, where Mosher was.

WILLIAM MOSHER . I live in New Glo'ster-place, Hoxton. I am a silver-beater, and make ornamental-paper. Flint owed me 18s. in November last, for some goods of mine, which he had to sell; he brought me this roller as a sort of pledge, on a Monday; I think it was the 6th of November; I was to keep it a month, and if no one came for it, to sell it; nobody came, but I still kept it; I had shown it to a person, but had not sold it. Mr. Royle came to me on the 27th of December; I showed it to him; I took it to Marlborough-street, where he claimed it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What had Flint had from you? A. Some silver paper ornaments; I had not asked him for the 18s. - he did not tell me to keep it a secret; he brought it in his pocket.

CATHERINE SOPHIA MOSHER . I was present when Flint brought this roller to my husband; he said he was sorry he had taken my paper - as he could not get money for it, and would leave that roller; Wayman called for it one day when my husband was out - he said he came for the roller, and would not go away without it; I would not give it him - he said he would send for an officer - I said he might if he thought proper.

WAYMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

FLINT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-183

461. HENRY WAYMAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 4 reams of paper, value 3l. , the goods of John Few Royle , his master ; and CHARLES FLINT was again indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN FEW ROYLE . I had a large stock of paper,

which I have been missing since November, 1825; when I spoke to Wayman about the roller, he told me, voluntarily, that Flint, who had formerly been a workman of mine, had asked if he could give him a little of my paper - he said Yes, and gave him at first five or six quires - he then asked if he could give him more, and he gave him ten quires, and it went on till he had given him in all four or five reams. We went on the 27th of December and took Flint; Schofield asked if he knew what he was taken for- he said, Yes, he had robbed me of four or five reams of paper, and had not been happy since; I have not recovered this paper.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he say he had robbed you? A. I beg your pardon - I did not mean to say "robbed;" I was rather agitated; his words were, I believe, that he had had four or five reams; he was five or six months in my service, at the factory where I colour paper, but could not get at this.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I apprehended Flint; I brought him to the bottom of the stairs, and said, "You are charged with receiving paper from Wayman, Mr. Royle's porter;" he said, voluntarily, that he was very sorry - he had received five reams, and paid him 7s. - he knew it to be worth 14s. - that he sold it at different places, and had never been happy since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Mr. Royle hear this? A. He was talking at the time; I do not think he heard it as we were up nine or ten stairs.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I went to apprehend Wayman - he said Flint told him he was out of work, and asked him to give him a little paper to sell.

WAYMAN's Defence. My master promised to admit me an evidence if I would tell him.

MR. ROYLE. I did not - he told me no more than I was in possession of. I received information of it from an anonymous letter, from Mr. Gold, who afterwards came forward, but the Magistrate thought he need not be here.

WAYMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

FLINT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-184

462. HENRY WAYMAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 13 reams of paper, value 9l. , the goods of John Few Royle , his master ; and JOSHUA JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN FEW ROYLE . In consequence of a conversation with Mosher I went to Sowerby's and Castle's, the pawnbrokers, who promised to examine their stocks for my paper, and on the day Wayman was taken I said to him,"Henry, I have found a great deal of paper, which you have been robbing me of;" he at first denied it - I said,"I have seen some of it - don't deny it;" he then trembled, cried very much, and confessed he had taken a great deal, some of which he had taken to Jones, who had pawned it at the rate of 9s. for two reams, and gave him half of it; he said some was pawned at Sowerby's and some at Castle's; he was taken to Marlborough-street, and next day I went to Jones', with the officer, and asked if he knew Wayman - he declared he knew no such person, but, after pressing him some time, his wife said, in his presence, "It must be Henry Wayman," who had been there the night before; Jones then said he had; we took him in charge, and went to Castle's, who produced seven reams of paper, which I can swear to - I had two hundred reams, and have missed a large quantity; I knew it by the marks on the covers; it is a particular sort, used for colouring; six of the reams have the Excise mark on them, which answer to my bill.

Cross-examined by MR. QUIN. Q. You cannot swear to a sheet of paper? A. No. I told Wayman I was sorry I could not make him a witness - those were my words; I had only then talked about the roller.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I went to the pawnbrokers with Mr. Royle.

CHARLES WORLEY . I am foreman to Mr. Castles. - Royle and Schofield came to our shop - I remember Jones pawning two reams of paper in December, 1825, and three in January, 1826 - I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen him since? A. Yes, once or twice; when he first brought it I inquired if it was his own - he said Yes, that he was a printer, and if I did not like to take it he would leave it while I went to any stationers', to make inquiry - he left it, but I did not inquire. I delivered the paper to the officer.

PETER FAULKNER . I was in Mr. Royle's service at the close of 1825, when we had two hundred reams of paper; this seems to me to be part of the same - I took particular notice of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not they accuse you of taking some? A. No, not this paper - it was not Mr. Royle who accused me.

THOMAS BENJAMIN SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker. - In January, 1825, four reams of paper were pawned with me, and two in February - I cannot say by whom.

Jones received a good character.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

WAYMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18270111-185

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 15.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

463. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 knife-tray, value 18s. , the goods of Charles Wilmott .

CHARLES WILMOTT . I live in Oxford-street , and am a turner . This knife-tray was in some pails at my door, and about half-past three o'clock a boy came and said an old woman had taken something; I went out, and saw the prisoner about thirty yards off, with it; she said if I would let her go she would never do the like again.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor old woman, and was starving at the time.

GUILTY. Aged 71.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18270111-186

464. SAMUEL HEADHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 1 coat, value 4s. , the goods of William Mote .

WILLIAM MOTE . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Clerkenwell. On the afternoon of the 3d of January,

about three o'clock, I was turning my eye towards the window, and saw a lad looking through a hole, where an attempt had been made to take some handkerchiefs the night before; I jumped over the counter, and missed a blue coat from near the door; I went out, and at the corner of Baker's-row I saw the prisoner and a lad - I asked what they had done with the coat which they had just cut down; I saw the prisoner tucking it under his great coat- when I spoke to them they looked each other full in the face; he threw it down, and ran away - I pursued - he was stopped in Coppice-row, in about four minutes; I am certain he is the person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running - he was stopped by a man, in my sight.

Prisoner's Defence. The coat was given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-187

465. THOMAS LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 70 lbs. of lead, value 12s., belonging to John Crump and another, and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN SHAW . I am agent for Mr. John Crump - he holds the house in question, as joint executor , with others. On Friday morning last the watchmen came, and said they had a man in custody at Worship-street. I went to the place, and found four houses had been stripped of the lead; they were all Mr. Crump's. The lead produced is, I suppose, the gutter of two houses - it was also stripped from a fifth house, but not taken away.

RICHARD DALFORCE . I am a private watchman in Bethnal-green. On Friday morning last I was in Collingwood-place, and saw the prisoner and two others standing very near Mr. Crump's houses; I and two other watchmen ran up to them; they turned into a court, and the others dropped this lead, and got away, but the prisoner remained, and was taken; the court might be one hundred yards from the houses. We went on the top of the houses, and found a piece of lead, which corresponded with part of what they dropped; there was about one yard of lead left on the house, No. 22. The prisoner did not attempt to run.

JOHN HOZIER . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and two other men in the passage; I followed the others, who dropped the lead, which I compared with what was left - it corresponds. They were not more than ten yards from the house at first.

PETER HATCH . I was with the watchmen, and took the prisoner, who did not attempt to run.

Prisoner. I went up there for a necessary purpose, and did not see the lead.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-188

466. NATHANIEL FOULCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 18 lbs. of cheese, value 9s. , the goods of John Loveridge .

ROBERT JACKSON . I am shopman to Mr. Reading, who lives in Cromer-street , opposite Mr. John Loveridge 's. - On the 4th of January, in the evening, I saw the prisoner take this cheese from Mr. Loveridge's door; I followed him, and gave an alarm; he dropped it, and the watchman stopped him, in my sight - the cheese was picked up. I am certain he is the man - the lamps were lighted.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there not a set of drunken men about the shop? A. Not that I am aware of; the prisoner did not appear drunk.

JOSEPH PAUL . I am servant to Mr. John Loveridge . On the evening in question we lost this piece of cheese, which was safe at eight o'clock; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and it was brought into the shop; a man had come in, and asked for something, but I did not see the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not outside the window? A. No, inside; and the window was shut - I thought him sober.

JAMES GIBBS . I received the prisoner in charge with the cheese.

R. JACKSON . He put both his hands in, and took it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-189

467. JOHN DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 basket, value 2s., and 9 loaves of bread, value 4s. , the goods of Adam Glen .

THOMAS BLAND . I am journeyman to Adam Glen , a baker . On the 12th of January I left a basket of bread in Harley-street - I returned in ten minutes, and it was gone. I saw the prisoner in St. Giles, with it on his back, in about half an hour; he said he had met a man in Oxford-street, who gave it him, and told him to go and get a pint of beer, and wait for him.

MORRIS NICHOLS . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-190

468. MARY CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 table, value 10s. , the goods of Edward Burden .

ELIZABETH JACKSON . E. Burden is my son-in-law - he lodges with me in Wellington-court, Strand . On the 11th of January, in the evening, I heard a noise on the stairs - I went and met the prisoner coming down with this table in her hand - she laid it down - I said, "What are you doing with the table?" She said, "It is the man's up-stairs;"- I sent for a constable, who took her - it belongs to Burden.

JOHN SHIELDS . I took her in charge. She said it was her first offence. I find she bears a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270111-191

469. JOHN COLE and JULIA COLE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 table spoon, value 10s.; 2 tea spoons, value 3s.; 1 pair shoes, value 3s.; and 1 saucepan, value 2s. , the goods of William Elphinstone Maclagan .

WILLIAM ELPHINSTONE MACLAGAN . I am an officer in the East India Company's service . I live at No. 8, College-street, East, Camden Town . The female prisoner was occasionally employed at my house as a charwoman ; when she left the house on the 18th of December, I heard these articles were gone; I had seen the shoes safe the day before, but had not seen the spoons that I know of - I did not see the female prisoner at the house that day, but heard she had been there.

MARY GORDON . I am in the service of Mr. Maclagan.

Julia Cole came to the house as charwoman, and was there on the 18th of December - the man came there that evening at eight o'clock; Julia was then in the front kitchen by the window - I told her he was there - she went out of the kitchen into the area - took a chair with her, and gave the key to her husband - she then took up the shoes and gave them to him; I was in the front kitchen, and saw through the window that it was John Cole who took the shoes - he came to her for the key of their lodgings - she gave him that out of her pocket - I had opened the street-door to him, then went down and told her he was there - she went into the area and gave him the key - I was in the front kitchen when she gave him the key and shoes; I then went into the back kitchen - I heard the woman knocking the spoons about - I went and said she should not knock them about so - she then took one of the saucepans and gave it out to her husband - she then took up a silver table spoon and gave that to him - I had then gone into the front kitchen, and remained there till it was all over - I then returned to the back kitchen - she came and asked me not to tell, and said she would give me a cotton box - the shoes were my master's and had been up in his room.

Prisoner JULIA COLE . I was not in the front kitchen - there was no fire there. Witness. There was no fire - but you were there. There was a knock at the door - I went up, but nobody was there - but afterwards John Cole knocked, and I went up again.

WILLIAM JOHN THOMPSON . I am apprentice to Mr. Smellee, a pawnbroker; here is a pair of shoes pawned by the female prisoner, on the 19th of December. I am sure of her person.

Prisoner JULIA COLE . He is not the person I saw when I pawned them. Witness. This duplicate is my own hand writing, and I am certain I took them from her.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I went and took the prisoners at their lodgings, in Pratt-street - I found a duplicate of the shoes on the female prisoner, but cannot trace the spoons.

Mr. MACLAGAN. Gordon did not tell me of this till next morning - I then looked and missed a table spoon, two tea spoons, and the shoes.

JOHN COLE 's Defence. I have a witness to prove that I was not near the place.

Prisoner JULIA COLE . We were both at the Maidenhead public-house, and there we bought the shoes - if I had known they were stolen, I should not have kept the duplicate about me - I gave it up to the officer - he did not take it from me. I declare I never stole the plate- I went up to my mistress and took what plate I could find, and said, "Have the kindness to count it," which she did, and said, there was a fish-slice, two tea and a table spoon missing - I went down and found them - I took them all up - she counted them, and said they were all right.

JAMES BROWN . She did not give it me till after I had searched the place very minutely.

JAMES WILKINS . I am a carpenter, and live in King-street, Camden-town - John Cole was my journeyman. He was in my company on that Monday, from half-past seven in the morning till half-past ten o'clock at night - he was at work with me at a house in Stoke Newington - we worked by candle-light, and left work at half-past six o'clock, then went to the Maidenhead public-house, Battle-bridge, and there we remained till half-past ten; there were several other persons in the house, but no one in our company - I do not recollect seeing the landlord - I saw the waiting-maid - it is a house I chiefly use - Cole and I used to go there when he worked for me.

Q. Why are you so sure it was Monday, the 18th of December? A. Because I keep an account in my book of the work I do - I have no doubt that was the day - we worked there the day following and the Saturday before; I had been working there two months only - my apprentice, John Bond, worked with me; he is not here - he is eighteen years old - there is nobody here from the public-house.

MR. MACLAGAN. My Lord, this witness called at my house and merely stated that Cole was a very honest man, and he had known him a long time - he did not state a word about his being at work with him.

COURT to J. WILKINS . Q. Did you call at Mr. Maclagan's? A. Yes; after I heard what had happened I called on Mr. Maclagan's, and told him he had worked with me the whole of Monday - I went on the Wednesday evening - I heard that evening there had been a robbery, but did not know when it had been committed.

Q. And yet you told him he had worked with you the whole of Monday? A. He worked with me the whole of that day - I told Mr. Maclagan he had worked with me the whole of Monday; I told him so at his street door; I remember particularly telling him so there; no one was present.

Q. Did you tell him he had worked with you on Saturday? A. No; I do not know that I had any particular reason for telling him he had worked with me on Monday, but I knew the man could not be at the place he was at, and the other place too.

Q. Now I again ask you on your oath, whether you knew the charge was on the Monday? A. No.

Q. Do you expect the Jury to believe you should mention that the prisoner was with you on the Monday; and yet you did not know the robbery was on that day? A. No, I did not - I only know that on the Wednesday morning I sent my boy to call him as usual, and he put his head out of the window and said he would follow us - we went on, he did not come, and in the evening I heard of the robbery when I came home; but I did not hear when it was.

J. BROWN . When I apprehended the prisoner, I asked him if he was at work - he said he had been out of work a good deal, and that on the Saturday night before he had had 5s. of his master and had not gone to him since.

MR. MACLAGAN. When this witness called on me, he came into the passage - my sister was at the parlour door at the time.

COURT to J. WILKINS . Q. You say you told Mr. Maclagan at his door that the prisoner was at work with you on the Monday? A. Yes, I did - I did not see Mr. Maclagan's sister there - there was nobody there - Mr. Maclagan opened the door - I stood, and spoke to him - I did not go there more than once on any occasion.

CATHERINE MACLAGAN . I was at the parlour door when Wilkins came to our house; he gave a loud knock at the door, which alarmed us - he came into the passage and I heard all that passed between my brother and him - he did not state that Cole had worked with him on the

Monday - he spoke in a very rude manner - he said he came to give the prisoner a good character - he did not say a word about where he had been on the Monday.

Prisoner JULIA COLE . Q. Did not you send the girl down for the spoons, and I went and asked you to count them; and when I had got them all, you said they were perfectly right? A. It is not a word of it true; I never sent for them; you never asked me if they were right.

JOHN COLE - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

JULIA COLE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-192

470. SAMUEL CUMMINGS and CHARLOTTE FULLER were indicted for feloniously putting off, to James Newton , 20 counterfeited shillings, at and for a lower rate and value than they did by their denomination import, and were counterfeited for (i.e.) for 5s.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES NEWTON . I live in Boar's Head-yard, Petticoat-lane. On the 20th of November, about nine o'clock, in consequence of a conversation with Lee and Foster, I went to the Flying Horse public-house, Lambeth-street; Foster searched me in Lee's presence - I had no money - Foster then gave me two half-crowns, and one shilling to stand something to drink - I had seen the prisoners before - they lived in Cobb's-yard, Petticoat-lane. I went there directly with Miles - I found the prisoners and a little boy there at tea - they sent the boy out of the way, and both prisoners said that I should be cocked for passing bad money - they said some person had been to Lambeth-street about it, and laid information against me, and I should get six months if I was found out - I said there was no fear of that, they could not find me out - they asked if I wanted any more - I said, "Yes, a score of shillings." I gave the two half-crowns to Cummings - he gave them to Fuller, who left the room for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; while she was gone, Cummings was talking to Miles; when Fuller came back she gave me this paper, containing twenty counterfeit shillings - I put them into my pocket - we had two pots of beer, which I paid for with the shilling - they had asked me, on the 17th of November, to stand some beer - I said I had no money, but would the next time. I then went straight to Lambeth-street, and saw Foster and Lee - Foster took the shillings from me, marked every one of them, and handed them to Lee in my presence. On the 27th I saw Cummings at the Coach and Horses public-house at night - he said I had given information of him - I denied it - I went to Lambeth-street, and left word for the officers to come - they came about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock; I went with them to Cobb's-yard and found Cummings - I entered into conversation with him - Fuller came in, touched me on the shoulder, and told me to get out of the house, for I had brought the Lambeth-street traps down - the officers then came in, and took them.

BENNET MILES . I introduced Newton to the prisoners in Cobb's yard; I was with him on the 20th of November; Lee searched me, and Foster searched Newton - I had no money; I went with Newton to the prisoner's house - I heard Cummings tell Fuller to go and fetch a score of queer; Newton had asked them for a score of queer; they were given to Newton, who gave two half-crowns for them, and sent for two pots of beer, which he paid for - we then went to the Flying-horse public-house, Lambeth-street; Foster took the shillings and gave them to Lee.

Prisoner CUMMINGS. This man is a reputed thief. Witness. I had three months for some old rags of my uncle's.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 20th of November, I saw Newton at the Flying-horse, Lambeth-street - Foster (who is since dead) was there; he searched Newton, and gave him two half-crowns and a shilling - Newton brought me twenty counterfeit shillings in a paper, in about an hour; Foster marked them in my presence; here they are. In consequence of information, on the 27th of December, I went to the prisoners' house, and apprehended Cummings, who was just coming out of the room; Fortune was with me - Cummings said, "I know all this is Ben Miles' doings." On the following day I went into the lock-up-room - he said, "I shall only get a twelvemonth for it;" I had followed the witnesses from the Flying-horse to the prisoner's house, and saw them go in.

THOMAS NEWTON . I am Newton's uncle. On the 20th of November I was at the Flying-horse, and saw him with Lee and Foster - I saw Miles and my nephew go out; Lee and I followed, and saw them go into the third house in Cobb's-yard - I watched till they came out, and followed them to the Flying-horse; I saw Foster take this money out of Newton's pocket, and mark it.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of coin - these shillings are all counterfeit, and from the same die - it has never been in circulation.

MOSES FORTUNE . I was with Lee when he took the prisoners - the woman said."All this is spite and malice."

CUMMINGS' Defence. The officer said he had a warrant against me; I went with him - I saw Newton at a public-house, and happened to put my pot against his mouth; he said he would cut me down, and ever since that he has had a spite against me - I am not guilty.

CUMMINGS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

FULLER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18270111-193

471. WILLIAM HAMMOND and JOHN TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 2 beds, value 2l.; 3 gowns, value 5s.; 1 caddy, value 2s.; 2 tea-trays, value 5s.; 3 cushions, value 3s.; 1 basin, value 2s.; 1 waiter, value 3s.; 48 watch-keys, value 3s.; 1 cape of a coat, value 4d.; 2 pillows, value 4s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 1 counterpane, value 4s.; 2 blankets, value 5s.; 2 pairs of sheets, value 6s.; 2 curtains, value 1s.; 4 coats, value 3l.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 7s.; 2 shirts, value 4s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 3s.; 1 cloak, value 3s.; 1 frill, value 2d.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 2 caps, value 4d.; 1 yard of calico, value 1s.; 3 table-cloths, value 3s.; 1 bag, value 6d.; 1 yard of toilenette, value 3s., and 1 yard of corderoy, value 6d. , the goods of Daniel Buckley ; and SAMUEL BENJAMIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Merritt .

WILLIAM MERRITT . I live in Tibberton-street, Newing

ton-causeway, and am a paper-stainer . On the 23d of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, Limbrick came to my house, and put me in possession of Mr. Buckley's house, next door to me - I continued there till the 29th, at half-past eleven o'clock, when I left; every thing was then perfectly safe: I then double-locked the door and went home, and next morning, about nine o'clock, I found the house had been forced open; the lock was taken off, and the door bolted inside - I looked through the keyhole, and saw that a large dining-table and the carpet were gone - I found the back door open - I went to Limbrick, and then to the landlord - when I returned, the officer had been, and Edwards also - I then went into the house, and found it nearly stripped; Hammond lived opposite to me, and keeps a go-cart at the Elephant and Castle.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you responsible for the property? A. I consider so - I had the key.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am a constable. On the 23d of December, I put Merritt in possession of this property - he came to me on the 30th; I sent some officers there.

Cross-examined. Q. What house was this? was it used for coining? A. There was no coin there - Buckley, the proprietor, was in custody; it was I who put Merritt there. Mrs. Buckley was present when I gave him charge- I asked if she was willing for him to take charge of her house; she said she had no objection.

MARY ANN BUCKLEY . I know this property to belong to my husband, Daniel Buckley - it was left in Merritt's charge.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer. On Saturday morning, the 30th of December, I went with Vann and Brown to No. 214, Whitecross-street, which is kept by the prisoner Benjamin; it is a clothes-shop, and he deals in goods as well - the shop was shut, as it was his sabbath: I saw a go-cart thirty or forty yards from the house - it was afterwards claimed by Hammond in my presence; I went with Van up a passage into the back room, placing Brown at the door to prevent an escape - we found the prisoners all nearly together; I said to Benjamin, "Where is the property just brought in?" he pointed to three large parcels on the floor; two of them were beds and bedding, and the other contained a variety of articles; three chair-cushions and a tea-caddy were on the floor - all this property was there, except two tea-trays, which were afterwards produced from the parlour. We asked Benjamin who brought it there; he said, "These two men," pointing to Taylor and Hammond; Taylor denied it - we then questioned Hammond, who admitted bringing it there in company with Taylor, who still denied it, and said to Benjamin,"You are a pretty fellow, to say I brought it; you will say any thing, if you say that." Benjamin and his sister, who were present, both persisted that they had brought it there - Van then asked Hammond where he brought the property from; he said that Taylor and another man engaged him near the Elephant and Castle, and that his name was on his go-cart; which we found to be so - Taylor refused to tell his name - we asked Benjamin what they were to have for the property - he said they asked 10l., but they did not want such things. We took them all three into custody, and in three days after we compared these three cushions with three others found in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Hammond was the driver of that go-cart? A. Yes, I found he was so.

MARY MERRITT . I am the wife of William Merritt - I went with the officers, and found the lock off the door.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer. I went to the house on the 30th of December, found it open, and the property gone.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I went to the house, and found it open.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a grocer, and live with my father, in Tibberton-street. On the 30th of December, I saw Hammond in his cart, about eight o'clock in the morning; I think another person was driving; he often had another person to drive - he was in the cart, and the other driving.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was not unusual for him to have another person to drive? A. No - he generally went out about that time; I live six doors from the house.

CHARLES SMITH . I am the last witness's father. Between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I was disturbed by some persons about to break into my own premises - I heard my dog bark, and looked out of my window; I heard some persons in the street, three or four doors off, but could not see them, it was so dark - I heard them whispering together; I saw no cart - Hammond's cart usually stood in a recess in the road, about where the persons stood.

JAMES SMEE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 30th of December, I saw a cart come to Benjamin's premises, about five minutes to nine o'clock- Hammond drove it up to the passage leading to the back door; he and Taylor got out the goods; Taylor came down the passage - this was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before the officers came.

Cross-examined. Q. What was done after they were unloaded? A. Hammond drove the cart to the Cherry-tree public-house, and then returned to Benjamin's house.

HAMMOND's Defence. I was hired by two men to take the goods to Benjamin's house.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I did not hire him.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

BENJAMIN - NOT GUILTY .

HAMMOND - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-194

472. SARAH BAKER and JANE HEWITT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 3 gowns, value 9s. , the goods of Sarah Bennett .

SARAH BENNETT . I live in Barrett-court. On the 29th of December I missed a gown from a line, and two from a box - I never gave the prisoners leave to take them - I went lodge with the prisoners when I left my situation, unknown to my friends; I did not know she owed any rent, and never gave her leave to pawn my things.

Prisoner HEWITT. She gave us leave to pawn these things to pay 9s. for rent, and 1s. for victuals.

GEORGE LAW . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Duke-street - these three gowns were pawned with me by Hewitt, on the 29th of December, in her own name.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I was sent for, and

took Baker in charge - she denied all knowledge of the articles - the prosecutrix said to her, "You know you said they were pawned;" I then searched her, and found a pocket-book with the duplicate in it; the next day I found Hewitt.

HEWITT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

BAKER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-195

473. CHARLES BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Rebecca Gibbons .

JOHN FISHER . I am shopman to Rebecca Gibbons , who lives in Shoreditch . On the 10th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I missed a pair of shoes from the door - I saw the prisoner putting them under his coat - he ran, and I followed him - he dropped them, and I saw him stopped.

ANDREW CLARK . The prisoner passed me in Shoreditch, running with the shoes under his arm.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. I heard an alarm, and secured the prisoner, who was dodging Fisher round a cart.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-196

474. ELIZABETH EUSTACE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 3 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 3 shillings, the monies of John Walker , from his person .

JOHN WAKER . I was coming from Ramsgate to receive my pension, and saw the prisoner near Maidstone. I came to town, and received three sovereigns, one half-sovereign, and three shillings; I then went to a public-house in Oxford-market , and met her there - I had not seen her since I left Maidstone - we had two glasses of rum each - her boy was under the bench - I felt his hand under my pocket- I also felt her hand on the top of my pocket, and her other hand round my middle, she was coaxing me to go and cohabit with her in the country - I said, No, I meant to go to Worcestershire - I got up to go for a pint of beer, and missed my money - she and her boy were then gone - I went on the 8th of January with an officer and found her - he found half a sovereign on her - her boy said his mother had got my money safe.

WILLIAM WINKS . I am a constable. Walker came to me on the 8th of January - I went with him to the prisoner's lodging; a man was in bed, and she sat on the bed; she denied the charge - I found a half-sovereign, ten shillings, and some halfpence on her.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18270111-197

475. MARY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 bag, value 1d.; 1 pocket-book, value 6d.; 7 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 1 crown, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of Francis Mather , from his person .

FRANCIS MATHER . I am a pensioner , and received my pension on the 10th of January. I met the prisoner at an eating-house, at Battle-bridge ; we were eating together; I felt in my pocket and missed my purse, containing this money - it was wrapped in paper; nobody else was near me; I said, "You have robbed me;" and detained her; my purse and money were found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you been drinking with her? A. I was at a public-house with her; she sat by the fire, and I by the window; she came, and called me by my name; but I had never seen her; we went to the cook-shop; she was to bring some pork for me.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. The prisoner and two men were brought to me by the prosecutor; nothing was found on her; I returned to the public-house, where they had been, and behind the outer-door I found this purse with the property in it; the prisoner was not far from there when I took her; there was a scuffle near the door; I do not know who dropped it.

SAMUEL CAGER . I went to the public-house, and found the bag.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-198

First London Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

476. ROBERT JELF was indicted for embezzling 217l., which he had received on account of Charles Brook and others, his partners .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-199

477. SAMUEL CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, and a sixpence, the property of Charles Freke Smith , from the person of Sarah Smith .

SARAH SMITH . I am the wife of Charles Freke Smith . On the 2d of January I was in Cornhill ; the prisoner and two others followed me from the 'Change; I was crossing to Leadenhall-street ; the prisoner came from my right side, put his hand into my basket, and took out my handkerchief, containing a sovereign and a sixpence; he passed it to another boy, who ran down Bishopsgate-street; I followed and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I got behind a coach; the lady came and said, "Did you not take my handkerchief?"

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-200

478. HENRY WHITTENBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 1 bag, value 2d.; 1 sovereign, 3 half-crowns, and 5 shillings , the property of James Munday .

JAMES MUNDAY . I live at Reading, and am a mason . I came to town for my pension, and went to sleep at a house in Cato-street , on the 2d of January; the prisoner slept with me; this money was in my jacket-pocket; I took it out, and put it into my breeches pocket, and felt it safe when I went to bed; when I awoke in the morning, my clothes were moved, and the prisoner gone.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 7th of January in the City, and found this bag on him, with one sovereign, three half-crowns, and a shilling; he said he was the man, and supposed he should be hung for it.

J. MUNDAY . This is my bag.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-201

479. JAMES SHERIDAN , JOHN SHORT , and JOHN FURSEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 3 fowls, value 6s. , the goods of Mathew Carter .

MATHEW CARTER . I am a poulterer , and live in Great Distaff-lane . On the 30th of December, while I was out, these three dead fowls were stolen. I have since seen two and the head of another.

WILLIAM COWLING . I am a whitesmith. I was in Distaff-lane, and saw the three prisoners each take a fowl; Sheridan put his in his hat; Short put his in his jacket; they all ran off together; I followed them home; they live together; I sleep at the same place as them; I told of this next morning.

WILLIAM NEIGHBOUR . I bought a fowl of Sheridan on the morning of the 31st of December, for 2s. 6d.; my mother cooked it; he told me they were given to them, and they had no bread to eat.

JOHN HASLAM . I am a milkman. I went with Carter to a sand-house, in a brick-field, at Holloway, and found the prisoners there with another man - I asked if they knew any thing of the fowls, or had been in the City - they said No; I looked about, and found one fowl in a handkerchief under some hay, and the head of another.

DAVID OWEN . I went with Carter and found one fowl, which had been boiling in a pot, in the sand-house.

SHERIDAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

FURSEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Four Months .

SHORT - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-202

480. ANN GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 2 sovereigns, 1 crown, 1 half-crown, 4 shilings, and sixpence, the goods of Lewis Williams , from his person .

LEWIS WILLIAMS . On the 8th of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in St. Martin's-le-grand - she asked me to go home with her - I refused - another woman came and asked me the same question, and immediately I found the prisoner's right hand in my left hand trousers pocket; she drew it out; I said, "You have robbed me;" I took her down to a baker's shop; the patrol came in; I told him I had lost two sovereigns and some silver; he took her to the watch-house, and found two sovereigns and some silver on her, in another room - she came out of the room, and took hold of me as if to ask for mercy.

CHARLES HOLLAND . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner in custody - the officer found two sovereigns, and some silver on her.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am an officer. I searched her - I found two sovereigns and some silver on her.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he had lost 12s. 6d. - I met two gentlemen who gave me this money.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-203

481. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of John Hodges .

JOHN HODGES . On the 23d of December I bought a coat in Covent-garden, at a sale; I tied it up, and sent my boy home with it in a truck, while I went another way - when I came home I heard it was stolen; I have not seen it since.

ROBERT BURKE . I am in Hodge's employ. I had this coat in a truck, to take to No. 39, Old-street. I was coming out of Cow-lane - the prisoner and another lad followed me, and both pushed behind the truck; I put it down, and thanked them, but wished them to go away; they said they were going further, and would push on. When I got to the pig-market I saw the other running with the bundle, and the prisoner just after him, about three yards from the truck; I ran and collared him - he knocked me down, but I still followed, and had him taken.

HUGH DEVELIN . I was in Bartholomew-close, saw the prisoner running, and Burke just after him; he caught hold of him - the prisoner knocked him down, and struck him when he was on the ground; I went up, and struck him with a cane, and said, "What, are you going to kill the boy?" as soon as Burke could recover he said he had been robbed - I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran; a man said, "There goes the man," and he took me, but I was not with the other.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-204

482. JOHN COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 great coat, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Forshall .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Daniel Camm .

THOMAS FORSHALL . On the 23d of December my servant lost a great coat. The prisoner was brought to me, and I gave him in charge; the coat had been mine - he said he had taken it from the hall, as he had no employ.

DANIEL CAMM . This coat hung in my master 's passage, No. 19, Crutched-friars; I did not see it taken; it was safe at twelve o'clock - I saw the prisoner going out with it, and stopped him.

JOSEPH HUNT . I am an officer, and took him with the coat.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18270111-205

483. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 basket, value 8d.; 6 1/2lbs. of pork, value 4s. 4d.; 5lbs. of lard, value 4s.; 1lb. of filbert-nuts, value 6d.; 1 cake, value 6d.; 1 1/2 yard of lace, value 6d., and 4 shillings , the property of Richard Spinks .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Brown .

GEORGE WYLDE . I am foreman at a slaughter-house, down the yard of the Bear and Ragged Staff, Smithfield. About seven o'clock on the morning of the 29th of December, I went to the slaughter-house, and saw a van standing in the yard - the prisoner jumped down from the back of it, and hopped away as fast as he could; he had a blue coat coat on, and something bulky under his coat, under his arm; I have known him for years, and am certain of his person; I got out, and saw him pass the corner of the pig-market; he had not then got the blue coat on - I had a lantern in my hand.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Whose van was this? A. Mr. Finch's; it is an open yard.

RICHARD SPINKS . I had the care of this van; I had received the parcel from John Brown, and put it on the foot-board in front - it was a small frail basket.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you many parcels? A. Only one. I bring calves to market.

GEORGE ALBRIDGE . I am guard of the Boston waggon. I saw the prisoner outside the gate, just after seven o'clock, with a long blue coat on.

JOHN BROWN . I live at Shenfield, Essex. I gave a basket to Mr. Spinks, to take to town, containing this property, on the 28th of December.

JOHN ROE . I apprehended the prisoner - he denied having been down the yard.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-206

484. JOHN OSBORN and GEORGE GARRATT were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 2l.; 1 key, value 1d., and 1 ribbon, value 1d., the goods of William Gutteridge , from his person .

WILLIAM GUTTERIDGE . On the 16th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was passing through St. Paul's Church-yard ; a person, whom I believe to be Garratt, pushed against me, and, at the same instant, snatched my watch, and ran down King's Head-yard - Osborn instantly came up, and pushed against me again; I pursued them, and saw them taken; the seals and ribbon were taken from one of them, and the watch-case was found at the top of the court; I am certain of them, for I never lost sight of them.

THOMAS TOOLE . I live in Baynes'-buildings. I was in St. Paul's Church-yard, and saw the prisoners together- I watched them for an hour and a half; I saw them shove up against Mr. Gutteridge, and Garratt took the watch; Osborn then gave Mr. Gutteridge a shove, and they ran down a turning - I saw them stopped.

Prisoner GARRATT. Q. Where was you? A. Looking at you; you were walking up and down on the Ludgate-hill side, for a long time.

BARTHOLOMEW SCANDLAND . I was in the Old 'Change between seven and eight o'clock, and saw the two prisoners there; I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoners were coming along, both crying Stop thief! but nobody was before them - the prosecutor was following them up; I stood by at the corner of a lane, and when they came up I sprang out, and grasped both of them in my arms; they said twice, "Where are the thieves?" I said, "I am afraid you are them." I secured Osborn - Garratt got from me, but Lyon took him.

MICHAEL LYON . I took Garratt, who broke from Scandland.

WILLIAM TURNER . On this evening I assisted in stopping Garratt, and went with him to the watch-house; I returned in about ten minutes, and picked up these two senls, within about two yards of where I stopped him.

LIONEL MENCE . I was at my master's, next door to the court which they ran up (King's Head-yard); I heard a noise, went out, and found the watch-case - I gave it to the officer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

OSBORN's Defence. I was passing in Watling-street, and heard the alarm; I pursued, and was stopped.

GARRATT's Defence. The court is very dark - it is impossible to recognise any person's features there.

OSBORN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

GARRATT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-207

485. RICHARD MARKET was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 turkey, value 4s. , the goods of John Bewley .

HENRY BEDFORD . I live with my father, in Newgate-market . I saw the prisoner take a turkey from John Bewley 's stall, at ten o'clock in the morning - I went and took him with it.

HENRY HONEY . I received him in charge - he has been to sea, and his Captain will take him again.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18270111-208

486. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 12lbs. of cheese, value 4s. , the goods of John Titterton .

CHARLES JAMES SALMON . I am warehouseman to Mr. John Titterton , of Newgate-street . On the 11th of December we missed a cheese; the officer brought it back about seven o'clock that evening.

HENRY HONEY. I am an officer. On the 19th of December I saw the prisoner take this cheese from the prosecutor's window; I went and took him with it - I am cerof his being the man who took it.

Prisoner. It was found in the road.

H. HONEY . He dropped it directly I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-209

487. ROBERT JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 3 1/2 yards of woollen cloth, value 1l. , the goods of George Samuel Blunt .

CHARLES COCKERINA . I am apprentice to George Samuel Blunt , a tailor , of Copthall-buildings . On the 29th of December, at night, I saw a person at the window - I went out, and saw the prisoner running, with a piece of cassimere - he dropped it; I took it up, and followed him; I caught him at the corner of the court.

GEORGE SAMUEL BLUNT . This is my property, and was safe at one o'clock.

WILLIAM PAGE . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-210

488. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 table-cloth, value 3s. , the goods of John Mayne .

JOHN MAYNE . I keep the Golden-lion public-house , in West Smithfield . On the 8th of December, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came in; I saw him go into the coffee-room, lean over a table, and take a glass and go away - I pursued and took him; the duplicate of this table-cloth (which was stolen in April) was found on him.

PHILIP EATON . I am a pawnbroker, and have a tablecloth pawned on the 28th of April - I cannot say who by.

Prisoner. I took it instead of money which a person owed me. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-211

489. THOMAS JONES was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 glass rummer, value 1s. 6d. the goods of John Mayne .

JOHN MAYNE . On the 8th of December, I saw the prisoner go into my coffee-room, lean over to a place where there were some glasses - he went out; I missed one, followed, and overtook him in the market - I asked him to step into a house, and asked why he came into my house without having any thing; he said he came to look for a friend - I said I missed a glass; he made no answer; an officer came and found it in his hat.

JOHN GAYDON . I am an officer. I found the glass in his hat.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-212

490. JOSEPH EMMERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 16 taps, value 18s.; 5 pairs of connectors, value 15s.; 6 pairs of screw-tools, value 18s.; 1 frame-saw, value 8s.; 1 corner, value 6s.; 2 pairs of tongs, value 5s.; 6 chisels, value 5s.; 24 pieces of steel, value 5s., and 1 square, value 2s. , the goods of Alexander Galloway , his master .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HUMBLE . I am a patrol. I went to Green-dragon-court to make a search, by desire of Mr. Galloway. I found the prisoner at Mr. Galloway's, and he took me to his lodging - I brought a box, containing the articles stated in the indictment, away from his bed - all he said was, that Mr. Galloway might do as he liked; he could not hang him, but transport him, and he could live as well in another country as in this.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where did you find him? In the counting-house; it was the day before Christmas-day - I think he pointed his bee room out to me - the box stood in a chair; I saw no signs of his working there.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was there any vice or bench there? A. No.

GEORGE THOMAS HANNINGTON . I was fetched to the watch-house on the evening of the 23d of December, and found the prisoner and box there.

MR. RICHARD HODSON GALLOWAY . I am son of Alexander Galloway . I have seen all these tools - they are all my father's; here is the workman's name on one - the prisoner was in his employ, and worked at the manufactory , not at his lodging - they are worth about 6l.; he had no authority to take them; he was an out-door apprentice.

Cross-examined. Q. What name is on that tool? A. Flynn, and I know it by the form of the tool - I believe Flynn has been convicted here; my father keeps a retail shop for the sale of tools; we never sold a saw finished in the manner this is - it was finished for our own use; we finish them better for sale; we have a number of tools under the care of the store-keeper, who gives them out as the men require them - he is not here. The prisoner never had to take work home; he could not work at home - he had no lathe or vice; I saw the box found; I think it was under a chair, but cannot be certain. I know these taps by the figures on them - we have never sold them with figures for the last two years.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you any doubt of any of the property? A. No.

Prisoner. I worked at home because I had not work enough, according to my indentures - I have a vice in the room.

MR. GALLOWAY. He always had work, if he would do it - he frequently stopped away, and said he was ill - he was not to work at home.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-213

491. CHARLES UPTON and JOHN JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 comb, value 12s. , the goods of William Sharp Hutchinson .

WILLIAM SHARP HUTCHINSON . I am an ivory-turner , and live in Wood-street, Cheapside - this comb is mine - I know nothing of the prisoners.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am apprentice to Mr. Hutchinson. On the 13th of January I was in the cellar, about one o'clock, and heard a footstep in the shop; I came up, and saw Johnson in the shop with his hand on one of the glass-cases - I asked what he wanted - he said some ivory-combs - I showed him some - he bought none, but went away; I then missed a tortoise-shell comb, which I had seen shortly before - I went to the door, and saw him just turning the corner; I gave an alarm - he and Upton were brought back to the shop; I saw the comb taken from Upton's hat.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a carpenter. I saw the two prisoners together, about one o'clock; Johnson went into Mr. Hutchinson's shop; Upton was then looking in at the window; Johnson came out; I saw him take something from his jacket and give it to Upton, who put it into his hat; I did not see what it was; I heard the alarm, ran out, laid hold of the two prisoners, and took them back to the shop; I took this comb from Upton's hat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHNSON's Defence. I was passing, and saw this prisoner pick up a comb and put it into his hat - this gentleman came out of a house and seized us - he said I must give him something to let us go - I said I would not.

UPTON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18270111-214

492. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Stevens , on the night of the 15th of December , and stealing 1 pair of ear-rings, value 2l. 10s., and 1 brooch, value 30s. his property.

GEORGE STEVENS . I live in Newgate-street . On the 15th of December, at six o'clock in the evening, the corner of my window was broken, and a box containing a pair of ear-rings and a brooch, were taken - they could not get the box out on account of the guard, but the ear-rings were got out of it - I saw a boy's fingers in the window, drawing the box towards him - the window was cracked a few days before, but the piece was then forced out - I had put

the guard up half an hour before, and it was safe - I run out, pursued the prisoner, and took him, without losing sight of him - I took him to the watch-house; the officer returned, and found this pair of ear-rings down Mr. Dix's area.

JAMES GIBBONS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found three half-crowns and one shilling in his shoes, and this knife, which is ground to cut glass - I then went to look for the property - the ear-rings had been got out - found them down Mr. Dix's cellar - the box could not be got out.

HENRY HOWES . I went and found the ear-rings.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of Stealing only .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18270111-215

493. JOHN McLANNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 2 yards of kerseymere, value 14s. , the goods of William Creed and another.

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18270111-216

494. BENJAMIN SARSON was indicted for obtaining money under false pretences .

MORRIS EMANUEL . I am in partnership with Michael Emanuel . The prisoner had been in our employ, but had left us before May last - we never authorised him to receive any money from Mr. Ogle Hunt - he never gave me any account of money received since he left.

WM. OGLE HUNT . A person called on me for 6l. 16s., for Messrs. Emanuel, in May last; but if it was the prisoner, he is so much altered, I do not know him - I knew him when I paid him the money, as having been in their employ - I paid him, and he wrote this receipt.

MORRIS EMANUEL . This receipt is in the prisoner's hand-writing. My partner was not in town in May - he left town in March, and could not have sent him.

THOMAS BICKFORD . I am clerk to Messrs. Emanuel - this receipt is in the prisoner's hand-writing.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .


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