Old Bailey Proceedings, 7th December 1826.
Reference Number: 18261207
Reference Number: f18261207-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ANTHONY BROWN , MAYOR.

FIRST SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 7th of DECEMBER, 1826, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET

1826.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ANTHONY BROWN , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and John Garratt , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; John Key , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

James J. Arnold ,

Geo. Titterton ,

Wm. Scorer ,

John W. Cundy ,

Wm. Clark ,

John W. Greaves ,

Effingham Wilson ,

Thomas Middleton ,

Wm. Neat ,

James Barber ,

Chas. F. Stradling ,

John Pottle .

Second

Wm. Mounsey ,

Henry Ed. Swift ,

James Jones ,

Joseph Weatherley ,

Robert Burchall ,

Thomas Thorn ,

Thomas Gilson ,

Frederick Clark ,

Henry Humbey ,

And. M. Anderson ,

Wm. Bunney ,

Wm. Byerley .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

David Anderson ,

James Fred. Blake ,

Thomas Bamford ,

George Branburgh ,

Thomas Brown ,

Richard Blunt ,

Benjamin Biggs ,

John Biggs ,

John Bone ,

Thomas Booth ,

Peter Contensin ,

Wm. Crawley ,

Second

John Cheshire ,

James Clack ,

Wm. Clark ,

Charles Ewins ,

George Emmett ,

Edward Fielder ,

John Friar ,

John Foxwell ,

George Flint ,

Edward Franks ,

John Fisher ,

James Collins .

Third

Wm. Gurrier ,

James Hoole ,

Clutterb. Hawley ,

John Hope ,

Samuel Harding ,

Thomas Hawkins ,

John Hughes ,

Saml. Holehouse ,

Geo. Hazlewood ,

Thomas Harding ,

John Horler ,

Thos. Kitchener .

Fourth

Henry Jones ,

Richard Morgan ,

Thomas Manley ,

Wm. H. Browning ,

Wm. Stockham ,

Wm. Nichols ,

Robert Kirby ,

John Horvil ,

Matthew Bell ,

Charles Holmes ,

David Evans ,

Wm. Brook .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 7, 1826.

BROWN, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

Reference Number: t18261207-1

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1. THOMAS DEAN , ELIZABETH DEAN , JOHN DEAN , WILLIAM DEAN , and ANN COX , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Poynton , on the 28th of September , and stealing 1 coat, value 30s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of boots, value 2l.; 2 pairs of gaiters, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 3 watches, value 3l.; 1 hat, value 2s.; 1 umbrella, value 10s.; 1 bed, value 1l.; 2 blankets, value 15s.; 1 coverlid, value 1l.; 6 chairs, value 30s., and 1 table, value 1l. , the goods of Ann Allen , widow .

The prosecutrix not appearing, and notice of trial being proved, the prisoners (who had surrendered) were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18261207-2

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

2. ROYAL KEATES and WILLIAM KEATES were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , at Hayes , 5 sheep, price 6l., the property of William Welch ; and 2 sheep, price 2l. , the property of John Lamb .

THOMAS DURLEY . I am drover to Mr. William Welch. On Wednesday, the 22d of November, soon after 3 o'clock in the afternoon, I put one hundred and six sheep into a field of Mr. Welch's, called the Lair, by Southall ; they were sent to him for sale, and were all in his possession. - Twenty-eight of them belonged to Lamb, and the rest to Mr. Welch; I went there again soon after seven o'clock next morning, and missed five of Mr. Welch's, and two of Lamb's; two of Welch's were marked with a stroke on the side - one had a stroke between the ears, and a C on the hip; one had a dot line and M. C.; one had a ring and the letter W., and a spot on the hip. Lamb's were marked on the shoulder, and one had a little pitch on the head. - I saw them afterwards, on Friday, the 24th, at the shop of Goodwin, a butcher, in Tothill-street, Westminster - I can swear the five are master's, and the other two are marked the same as Lamb's. The gate of the field was not locked, but was fastened with a spring latch. I have seen Royal Keates before, at Southall market.

THOMAS WOOD . I am drover to Mr. Welch. I delivered to Durley one hundred and six sheep last Wednesday fortnight, near the Red Lion public-house, Southall; seventy-eight belonged to Mr. Welch, and twenty-eight to Mr. Lamb; I assisted in taking them out of the pens - seven were missed on Thursday, and on the Friday I saw seven at Goodwin's; that was two days after I delivered them to Durley; I knew them again - five belonged to Mr. Welch, and two to Lamb; they were part of what I had delivered to Durley - I knew them by the marks, which I had particularly noticed - one was marked between the ears, and had a C. on the hip - one had a dot on the loin, and M. C. on the hip - one, a W. in a circle - two were marked across the shoulder; they were Lamb's; and two were marked on the near side.

WILLIAM FLOWER . I am a butcher, and live at Brentford. On Wednesday fortnight, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night, I saw Royal Keates and another person with seven sheep, coming in the road from Southall to Brentford - I do not know the other person - I knew Royal Keates well; I had seen him a number of times; they were about three miles from Mr. Welch's fields, which are near Southall.

WILLIAM ATKINS . I keep the toll-bar at Kew-bridge, and know Royal Keates. Last Wednesday fortnight, between 11 and 12 o'clock at night, I saw him pass through the gate, with a person, whom I did not notice; they had six or seven sheep, and were going over from Middlesex into Surry. I know Mr. Welch's fields.

JOHN WARREN . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Thursday, the 23d of November, at ten minutes past two o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners on the road leading from Barnes-common; I did not know them before, but am certain of them; they were coming towards Putney, with seven sheep; I stopped them, and asked where they were going with the sheep at such an unusual hour; they said they were going over Vauxhall-bridge, to Vauxhall-row; I asked if they had any ticket, to show to that effect - Royal Keates said No; I then asked where he brought the sheep from; he said from a grazier's at Windsor-park, that a countryman came out, and gave him the sheep at ten o'clock at night; I said, "Did you take no note down for the sheep?" he said, No, but Mr. Mills had purchased them some time ago; I asked what he was - he said he was a drover; I asked where his badge was - he said he had left it at home; he walked on a little way, and then said he had pawned his badge for 1s.; I asked William Keates what he knew about the sheep - he said his brother had spoken to him on the Wednesday, to go down into the country with him to fetch the sheep - that he went down with his brother by the coach, to Brentford, and being tired he stopped at the Castle public-house, at Brentford - that his brother left him, and returned in an hour and three-quarters, with seven sheep; I said it was impossible he could go to Windsor, fetch

the sheep, and return in an hour and three-quarters; he then said he knew nothing about it, it certainly was impossible for him to go to Windsor and return in that time. Royal Keates said three of the sheep were marked W. B. - I let them go on, but kept close to them, and followed them over Putney-bridge, leading towards the King's-road - I followed them five miles in all, and at half-past five o'clock, as it was getting day-light, I looked at the sheep, and said, "I don't see any W. B.;" there was no such mark; both the prisoners said, I might depend upon it all was right - that Mr. Mills had sent them to Windsor for the sheep - that Mills was a butcher, living in Vauxhall-row, over Vauxhall-bridge. I told Young, my partner, to remain with the prisoners and the sheep, which he did, while I went to Vauxhall-row; I knocked at Mills' door, and heard a man's voice within answer me, but I did not see him - I returned, and told Young, in the prisoners' presence, that Mills had sent nobody after any sheep, and therefore I should take them both into custody; on searching William Keates I found a key in his pocket, which I afterwards found belonged to a little shop in Vauxhall-row, four doors from Mr. Mills' - I put the prisoners into the watch-house, and the sheep into the pound at Rochester-row.

JURY. Q. They did not offer to run away? A. No; William Keates was rather getting off - he was stepping aside, to go off, but I collared and handcuffed him - he had not ran off.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am an officer, and was with Warren. We first saw the prisoners about ten minutes after two o'clock, on Thursday morning, the 23d of November, near Barnes-common, on the road leading towards Putney, with seven sheep; we stopped them, and asked where they were going with them; they said to take them over Vauxhall-bridge, to Mr. Mills, who had bought them some time before, and he had sent them to Windsor for them, and had given them 5s. to fetch them - that they met a man near Windsor-park, with the sheep, about ten o'clock; they said Mills was a butcher living in Vauxhall-row, on the other side Vauxhall-bridge; we asked if they had any note with the sheep; Royal said No; I asked if there were any marks on them - he said there was W. B. on three - it was too dark for as to see whether they were marked; they turned over the bridge, and we followed them to the King's-road, and at daylight we looked and could see no mark like W. B.; they went on then. Near Vauxhall-bridge we stopped them, and I detained them while Warren went over the bridge to Mills - he returned, and told me, in their presence, that Mills had not sent anywhere for any sheep; we then handcuffed William Keates, and drove the sheep into the pound; on the road, as we were taking the prisoners to the watch-house (we did not hold out either threat or promise to them), Royal Keates said, "To tell the truth, the sheep are stolen;" I told him I did not wish to hear any thing, if he had any thing to say to state it to the Magistrate; I then went to Mr. Goodwin's, in Tothill-street, Westminster, and, with his permission, I put the sheep into his stable; I put a mark on them, and they are the same that we took from the prisoners; I went frequently to see the sheep while they were there; they were killed by Goodwin. I took the skins into my possession, and have kept them ever since; I have them here. William Keates said nothing to me.

EDWARD MILLS . I am a butcher, and live at No. 1, Vauxhall-row. I have frequently seen Royal Keates about the neighbourhood of Vauxhall, where he resided, but never had any dealing or transaction with him; I never sent him for any sheep to any place, or employed him in any way - I do not know William Keates; I never sent either of them any where for sheep, nor did anybody in my employ; I never spoke to either of them.

WILLIAM WELCH . I am a salesman, and live at Southall. I have a field called the Lair, about a quarter of a mile from Southall, and have several fields adjoining it. Durley and Wood are my drovers. On Friday, the 24th of November, I saw seven sheep at Goodwin's, in Tothill-street - five were mine, and two Mr. Lamb's; the officer pointed them out to me - I knew them by the marks- one was marked C., and ruddled between the ears - one was marked M. C. - one with the letter W. in a circle, and two with large strokes on the side - I knew them by those marks, and had seen them on the Wednesday before, at Southall-market - they were consigned to me for sale.

JOHN LAMB . On the 26th of November I went to Goodwin's, the butcher, and saw seven sheep, two of which were mine; one had a stroke on the shoulder and a dot between the ears; the other had a dot on the shoulder - I swear to them by those marks; I had seen them on Wednesday, the 22d of November, at Southall market; (looking at two of the skins produced), these two skins belonged to my sheep, and are marked as I described; they belonged to the sheep I saw at Goodwin's.

WILLIAM WELCH . Five of the skins produced are the skins of my sheep, and are marked as I described - they belonged to the sheep I saw at Goodwin's.

THOMAS DURLEY . Five of the skins produced belonged to Mr. Welch's sheep, and two to Lamb's - I can swear to them; they are the skins of the seven sheep I missed, and have the same marks - they belonged to the sheep I saw at Goodwin's; I had put them into the field on Wednesday, a little after three o'clock, and missed them a little after seven the next morning; the field is about a quarter of a mile from Southall, and in the County of Middlesex.

THOMAS WOOD . I have seen the skins; five belong to Welch's sheep, and two to Lamb's - they are part of the one hundred and six sheep which were in the field - I had assisted in taking them out of the pens; they are the same I saw at Goodwin's last Friday, and last Friday week also.

ROYAL KEATE'S Defence. I had been to Windsor, and on the road I happened to pick up these seven sheep in the middle of the road, between ten and eleven o'clock at night - at that time of night I did not know what to do with them; I went through Brentford, over Kew-bridge, and the officer stopped me at Barnes-common, with them, and asked where I was going; I said to Mr. Mills, over Vauxhall - they cross-questioned me so, I did not know what to say, but afterwards I said I found them, and was going to take them there, to be owned, and if they were not owned at the market I was going to advertise them. I lived close by Mills, and knew no other place to put them; immediately afterwards, as they were locking me up, one of the officers said, "You had better say whether you did take them or not?" I said I did not - he said,

"You had better tell me, and deliver yourself up, and I will see what I can do for you;" I said I had not stolen them, but picked them up on the road; my friends did not expect my trial to come on till to-morrow, and are not here.

WILLIAM KEATE's Defence. My brother asked me to help him drive some sheep; I said, Yes, having nothing to do, and we rode down to the Castle public-house; I stopped there, saying I should go no further, it being late - he was gone about an hour and three quarters, and came back with seven sheep; he said he was going to take them to Mr. Mills; I did not ask where he got them, nor did he tell me. After our first hearing, Warren said,"You had better tell me the truth, and I will try and get you through it" - I said I knew nothing of it at all. I could have an excellent character - I have had a great deal of property in my care, to take to Goldsmith's-hall, from Mr. Thompson, of Air-street, Piccadilly.

ROYAL KEATES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 31.

WM. KEATES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

The prisoner, William Keates, was Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, thinking he might have acted under the influence of his brother.

Reference Number: t18261207-3

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

3. RICHARD ARNOLD and BENJAMIN BROWN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Samson , about three o'clock in the night of the 15th of November , at St. Pancras , with intent to steal, and stealing 3 coats, value 3l., his property .

RICHARD DEYKIN . I live in Grenville-street, Somer's-town, and am a constable of the night. I did not know the prisoners before this circumstance. On the 15th of November, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I was on duty at Kentish-town - one of our watchmen came and gave me information; I went, and saw the prisoners in a field, at the back of Mr. Samson's house, which is in the parish of St. Pancras; I got into the field within fifteen or twenty yards of them - they were walking slowly down by the side of the hedge; there is no foot-path there; I met them, and presenting my pistol at them, said, if they did not stop, I should fire; they stopped directly. It was a moonlight night; I told them we did not like persons hanging about the fields at that time in the morning. I took them to Kentish-town watch-house; I had no previous acquaintance with them. I found, as I went to the watch-house, that Arnold had a great coat on his back, under his own coat; I found a wet table-cloth in his hat, a pair of boy's gloves, and a pair of worsted stockings; I think they were also in his hat. I searched the field twenty minutes afterwards, and found a book.

GEORGE BROWN . I am watch-house keeper of Kentish-town. On the morning of the 15th of November I heard of a robbery; I went out of the watch-house about three o'clock, and met Deykin with the two prisoners in custody; I searched Brown, and found two coats under his arm, and in his hat there were two children's frocks, and a window curtain, wet - he had a book in his hand.

EDWARD SAMSON. I am a schoolmaster , and rent a house at Kentish-town , in the parish of St. Pancras; the school-room is joined to the dwelling-house, by the garden wall - it is in the garden, about three yards from the dwelling-house, but is inclosed with the dwelling-house, all in one curtillage; I cannot get from the street to the school-room without going through the house; the garden is quite surrounded, partly by a wall, and partly by a high paling; there is no door from the school-room except into the garden. On the 14th of November I left the school-room about five o'clock in the evening; the servant, who is here, fastened it up; I was alarmed by the watchman about five o'clock in the morning, and on going into the school-room I missed three great coats and several books, which I had seen safe at five o'clock the previous evening; nobody had a right to take them; the coats belonged to my pupils, who are boarders, but were in my care (looking at three coats) - this one, which was on Arnold's back, I know was in the school-room - I saw all three hanging there.

ALEXANDER WOODMAN . I am a pupil at Mr. Samson's. This is my great coat - it was in the school-room on the 14th of November - I have had it about a year and a half, and know it by a mark, and one of the buttons is uncovered. I am certain it is mine.

EDWARD SAMSON . This book, which was found in the field, is a Virgil, and is worth 2s.; the other book belongs to a pupil; I saw them both on the desk on the 14th; the other two coats I know by their appearance. I went to the school-room about five o'clock, and found the door shut, but the watchman had been there before me.

HANNAH CRANHAM . I am servant at Mr. Samson's. On the 14th of November, about ten o'clock, I shut the school door, but did not lock it - I left it on the hasp; I merely went to see if it was shut; it is usual to lock it, but it was difficult to lock; I do not know how the windows were; I know these two coats - one belongs to Charles Stunt, and the other to Anthony Brown - one is marked C. S.; I have known them about three months, and often brushed them; I saw them safe about seven o'clock on Tuesday morning, the 14th, in the school-room.

RICHARD DEYKIN re-examined. I saw the prisoners in the field which belongs to Mr. Samson, and adjoins his house; they might be one hundred yards from the school-room; I went to the house as soon as I could get in, which was about five o'clock in the morning; I could find no marks of violence on the window or door; I do not know whether the door was shut, as the watchman, who is not here, went in before me.

HANNAH CRANHAM re-examined. I went to the school-room with the watchman; I cannot say whether the door was shut or not.

ARNOLD'S Defence. On the week before this happened I was working with my father at Barnet - he told me to come to him on Wednesday, and he would give me more work; I met this prisoner in Tottenham Court-road, by accident - he asked where I was going - I said to Barnet, and he said he was going that way; we went together; I got over the gate, to go there for a necessary purpose, and saw three or four men; I called him over, pointed them out, and said, "They have dropped something" - he said,"Oh! let them go about their business;" I picked up a coat - it was a wet night, and I put it on; this young man picked up the other coats, and carried them.

BROWN's Defence. I was apprenticed to Mr. Pooley,

a chimney-sweeper, and lived thirteen years with him; having been three months out of employ, I used to job about - Mr. Dawson, of Southampton-mews, told me to go and meet a waggon which was coming to town; I met this young man - he got over there for a necessary purpose; I waited for him - he called me, and I saw three or four men running across the field; I picked up these clothes, and then found the coats - the constable of the night came - I told him I had seen three or four men in the field, and picked these things up.

ARNOLD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18261207-4

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

4. JOHN GARLAND , THOMAS FREESTONE , and JAMES COURT , were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Dunn , on the night of the 25th of November , and stealing 3 watches, value 23l., and 1 watch-case, value 2l., his property .

WILLIAM DUNN. I live at No. 1, Lower-street, St. Mary, Islington , and am a watchmaker . On the 25th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was alarmed by a crash at my window; it was dark; I immediately ran down stairs, having just finished my tea, and my boy was trying to get out at the door; but I found it was tied with a rope. I gave the watchman a knife, who cut the rope; I went out, found a hole in the window, and missed a gold watch, two gilt ones, and a gilt case, which I had seen safe three minutes before - the hole was scarcely big enough for a person to get his hand in - it was jaggy - it was plate-glass: I could not tell what it had been broken with, but should think with a hammer - the glass is so very thick, it must have been done with some instrument; a person would certainly cut his hand by putting it through - the fragments of the glass were inside the window. The watches and case are worth 25l.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you left your boy in the shop? A. Yes, it was his duty to remain there- he alarmed me. I have occasionally seen the prisoners opposite the house - the gold watch was about eleven inches from the hole, and the others about eight.

CHARLES WENT . I am near thirteen years old. On Saturday, the 25th of November, just as it had struck six o'clock, I was alone in the shop: it was dark - I heard a noise, and thought it was some children playing at the door; I went to the door - there was nothing the matter with it then: I saw nobody there - I shut the door, and was going to put some coals on the fire; I then heard a very great noise, like a large piece of timber falling - I ran to the door, and found it was fastened with a cord; the handle was tied to the kitchen bars - I could see nobody in the street - I called out, and Mr. Dunn came down. I had seen the watches safe three minutes before; the window was then safe - I saw a gold watch, two gilt ones, and a silver gilt case; they were gone: when I heard the noise, I got outside, and found a hole in the window; a person could hardly get his hand through the hole - the gilt case was about an inch from the hole, two watches were about eight inches, and the gold one about eleven - the hole was large enough for a watch to be got through. When I first heard the noise, I was in the shop putting coals on the fire - I am sure the shop-door was shut.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Dunn? A. A year and a half. There was a lamp burning in the shop - I found the window broken about a minute and a half after I heard the noise at the door - there is a glass case to the window - I think if a hand had been put through the hole, it must have been cut - the watches had no chains to them - there was a great alarm when we got the door open, and a good many people collected: I saw no girl outside who spoke to me.

COURT. Q. How high was the hole from the watches? A. Three or four inches from the bottom of the pane.

ELIZABETH COOPER . About six o'clock, on the 25th of November, I saw the three prisoners at Mr. Dunn's window, and in a few minutes I saw Freestone take a string out of Garland's pocket, and give it to Court, who tied it to the knocker or knob of Mr. Dunn's door, and then to the scraper - they then all stood round the window - I was coming across the road, and heard Dunn's window smash; I got across, and the three prisoners came against me, and pushed me rather aside - they ran down Britannia-row; I saw nothing in their hands; I saw them all three together about an hour afterwards, just by Mr. Rhodes' farm, which is about a quarter of an hour's walk; they asked me if I had heard of the watches being stolen- I said, "Yes, I have, and you have got them;" Freestone told me not to say any thing about them; I said I would not; they wished me good night, and we parted.

Cross-examined. Q. Who do you live with now? A. With my parents - my father is a watchman and special constable - his beat is in the Lower-road, a good way from Dunn's. I knew the prisoners before as neighbours, but never had any talk with them, except saying "How do you do?" I had not seen them that night till they had committed the robbery - I have been at home one year and a half, and was in service before that - I had gone out for some tea and sugar for my mother; I stopped opposite Dunn's house a quarter of an hour, while the prisoners were lurking about - I was going to get some meat when they said this to me - I saw Court tie the door - when they ran away, I went straight home, without going into Dunn's: I never went to tell Dunn of it - I told my mother of it that night.

Q. Why did not you remain there to see the thing out? A. I had been waiting so long, I wanted to get home - they were running away when I went away - I told nobody till I got home; I was offended at their pushing against me.

MARY COOPER . I am the last witness's mother - I only know what she told me when she came home.

Cross-examined. Q. Has she always lived at home? A. She lived eighteen months at Mr. Phillips', in the Strand; she was gone out nearly half an hour the first time, on an errand - she could have gone in twenty minutes.

WILLIAM COOPER . I am the husband of the last witness. I know all the prisoners; I apprehended Garland on the 27th of November, in Taddy's-rents - I found nothing on him - he said he had done nothing, and would go with me.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you employ your daughter? A. In doing what is necessary at home - she has not been in place for eighteen months.

THOMAS COPE . I am a constable. On the even

ing of the 25th of November I went to Dunn's shop, having heard of the robbery. Somebody said, "Run up Taddy's-rents;" I went with the lantern, but found nobody; I found a piece of cotton in the road. On the 27th, I was coming down Lower-street, and saw Freestone; he said, "I understand you want me for the watches" - I took him to the watch-house - he spoke to me first.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you apprehend anybody else? A. No; I saw Garland in Taddy's-rents about twenty minutes after the robbery; he went with me to search; I had not then heard who was suspected.

WILLIAM PIZZEY . On the night of the 27th of November, I saw Court looking through the key-hole of the watch-house door - I went up and said I wanted him on suspicion of the robbery at Dunn's - he said it was not him.

GARLAND's Defence. I was not within fifty yards of the place.

FREESTONE's Defence. I was in Taddy's-rents when Cope came to look for the thieves.

COURT's Defence. I was not within two miles of the place.

JAMES NOON . I am a plasterer, but am out of work. I live at the Half-moon public-house, Lower-road, as potboy at present. On the 25th of November, I was near Dunn's house when the alarm of robbery was given - I saw one man run away, whom I should know again; it was neither of the prisoners - I saw Freestone in Taddy's-rents half an hour after the robbery, but not earlier - Taddy's-rents is about fifty yards from Dunn's house; I was not there when Cope was - I saw all the prisoners there about seven o'clock.

Q. How soon after the robbery did you see a man run away? A. I heard a crash like a window cracking, and saw a man run across up Taddy's-rents, and run right against a wall.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-5

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

5. JOHN ANDREW MEEK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Don William Nathaniel Tuck , about six o'clock in the night of the 25th of November , at St. Martin-in-the-fields , with intent to steal, and stealing 1 gold snuff-box, value 9l., and 1 silver snuff-box, value 4l., his property .

CHARLOTTE TUCK . I am the wife of Don William Nathaniel Tuck, who is a silversmith and jeweller - we live at No. 13, Castle-street, Leicester-square , in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-fields. On the 25th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I stood in the shop with the door open - it was dark, the gas was lighted- I could not distinguish a person's features in the street at that time; our lamps had been lighted about half-past four o'clock; I heard a smashing of glass, and saw two men, one short and the other tall; the hand of the tall man was in the window taking out two musical snuff-boxes, which I had put into the window on a tray, about an inch from the glass, half an hour before; the glass was smashed to pieces - a person must have put his hand in to get them - I saw his hand in, and saw him take hold of the boxes as I passed the window before I got out; one box was gold and worth 9l., the other silver-gilt, worth 5l. - I saw them taken out of the window; the two men walked deliberately from the window; the tall one turned his head round, saw me, and they both ran; I ran to the door, and pursued, crying, Stop thief! and the tall man was taken; the prisoner is that man; I never lost sight of him, and am certain of him; the boxes have not been found; the prisoner was brought into the shop; I could not identify his features, but am sure he is the man whose hand I saw in the window, who was followed from the window, and whom I saw taken; they walked close together; I do not know what became of the boxes; the glass was whole before, for I had only cleaned the window about an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you been into the shop from the time you cleaned the window till this happened? A. I had been in the parlour adjoining the shop for a short time only, but no where else - the prisoner was apprehended in about five minutes, in St. Martin's-court - our house is two doors from that court - the first thing I heard was the glass smash - I went out within half a minute - I saw a hand through the window; it was not light enough to discern a person's features - they ran when I cried Stop thief! which was the moment I got out - the street was clear; there was nobody near the shop but them when I got out - I saw them go from the window when I went to the door - I followed them so close, I did not lose sight of them - they walked deliberately from the broken pane; when I got out the prisoner was close to the window - I have not heard that he is the son of a respectable tradesman - he said at Bow-street he was the son of a tailor.

COURT. Q. When you went to the door, the two persons were just turning from the window? A. Yes; I did not lose sight of them for a moment - I was very near them, and am sure he is one of them.

THOMAS MILLS . I am a tailor, and live at No. 58, Poland-street, Oxford-street. On the 25th of November I was going through Cranbourn-alley - I turned down Castle-street, and about ten yards before I got to the prosecutor's door, I saw the prisoner and another standing at the window - I saw the prisoner smash his hand through the window and take something - I directly ran after them - the prosecutrix rushed out of the door just before me, crying Stop thief! she interrupted my progress, or I should have taken him at the window - he turned down the court, and I secured him there without losing sight of him at all - he ran against a man who stopped him, and I instantly seized him - I am confident of his person - I do not know what became of the other.

Cross-examined. Q. Castle-street is a considerable thoroughfare? A. No; there is a great thoroughfare across the street, but not by this door - he was taken six or eight yards round the corner - they went a few paces gently till Mrs. Tuck called Stop thief! and then they ran - she came out directly the smash was made - nobody else was within twenty yards of the shop - nothing was found on him - I saw nothing fall from him - I think he might have thrown property away without my seeing him - I did not notice his hand throwing any thing away or hear any thing fall - I never expressed a doubt about his identity to the Magistrate, or to anybody.

COURT. Q. Was it dark? A. The gas was lighted - I could not distinguish a man's features without the gas.

WILLIAM MACKLEY . I live at No. 22, St. Martin's-court, and am shopman to a grocer. On the 25th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I heard Mrs. Tuck hallooing, Stop thief! our shop is twelve or fourteen yards from hers - I went out, and saw the prisoner run by the door - I saw Fox apprehend him about six yards from our door; as soon as he was stopped, I saw him throw out his right-hand as if he threw something away; but I did not hear any thing fall - there was some wood and rubbish about there, as they were building a house - in the situation he was then, what he threw away might fall on that rubbish - I saw a man stoop and apparently pick something up off that rubbish; I looked for that man soon after, and he was missing - he had passed our door after the prisoner running, and two more followed him - he asked what was the matter, and then went away.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were running? A. The prisoner and two more - nobody else, except myself and Mrs. Tuck - the prisoner and two more ran before me - I did not know Mills before - I thought the man had picked something up, and when inquiry was made for the property, I said it was picked up by a gentleman - I looked for him, and he was missing - the rubbish has been searched, but nothing found - I do not swear that the prisoner threw any thing away - if metal had fallen on the stones it would have sounded - there were no bricks there - it was the rubbish of a house which was repairing - I did not attempt to take the man whom I thought picked something up - I know nothing about the prisoner.

CHARLES FOX . I live at No. 10, Bedford-court, Chandos-street - I am a labourer - I open and shut Tuck's shop. On the night in question, between five and six o'clock, I was in the narrow part of the court, going to shut up the shop, and heard Mrs. Tuck cry, Stop thief! I immediately came in contact with the prisoner, who was running towards me, and secured him - he said he had been doing nothing, and desired me to let him go - I saw his right hand move, but for what purpose I cannot say - I heard nothing fall; the rubbish might prevent that; several other persons were there assisting in securing him.

Cross-examined. Q. How many did you see running? A. I cannot say; several were running, but the prisoner was foremost, and two others ran a little way behind him; the rubbish might prevent my hearing any thing fall - I should think I must have heard if any thing had fallen.

JOHN GROOM . I am street-keeper. I was at the bottom of the court - I was drawn to the spot, and found the prisoner in custody - I searched him in Mrs. Tuck's parlour, and found 1 1/2d. on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him before? Witness. I had rather not answer that question.

MRS. TUCK. I had the boxes in my hand shortly before, and am certain they were taken from the window.

Prisoner's Defence. About half-past five o'clock, on the 25th of November, I was going down Castle-street, and passing Tuck's window, when Mrs. Tuck came out and cried, Stop thief! I heard nothing, but saw two persons pass me and cross the road - it being cold, I was rubbing my hands, neither running nor walking - Mrs. Tuck sung out, Stop thief! and Fox stopped me; this gentleman came and held my hand, and said, "I will see that you throw nothing away;" they took me back - I made no resistance - Mrs. Tuck gave quite a different account before the Magistrate - she said she could not swear I broke the window, but that I was near it; I have worked with my father and mother ever since I was seven years old; I had been to see my aunt in Vere-street, and was returning.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18261207-6

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

6. EDWARD SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Samuel Outram Bacon , from his person .

SAMUEL OUTRAM BACON. I live in York-place, City-road. On the 17th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Fore-street - I did not feel my handkerchief taken, but know it was safe shortly before; Herdsfield gave me information when I got into Basinghall-street, and it was gone - I had not noticed the prisoner near me - Herdsfield had Grainger, who has been convicted, in custody with my handkerchief, which I immediately recognized.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a constable of the City. On the 17th of August I was in Fore-street, and saw the prisoner with Grainger in company, who was tried here in September; I saw them together, close behind Mr. Bacon - I watched them, and at the corner of Aldermanbury-postern, the prisoner took the handkerchief, and went towards Aldermanbury with it - Grainger crossed over into Moor-lane, and the prisoner went into Moor-lane with him- they went up a passage in the lane, and I saw him give it to Grainger - they looked round, saw me, and then separated in different directions - I laid hold of Grainger, and took the handkerchief from his pocket - I had seen him put it there; I took him with me into Basinghall-street, and Mr. Bacon claimed it - I afterwards found the prisoner in the House of Correction, and took him into custody, when he was liberated from there, on the 10th of November - I am certain of his person; I knew him well before; I found but one handkerchief on Grainger.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). I assure you I am entirely innocent - I have been brought up to reverence the laws of God and my country - I entreat you to look well to the evidence, and hope you will remember the paths of youth are slippery.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261207-7

7. THOMAS FORDYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 12 martins'-skins, value 40s., the goods of William Row and others, his masters .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS COOKSON . I am in the employ of Mr. William Row, who has other partners. On Monday last I found a martin's-skin at the bottom of the warehouse-stairs - Hazle picked it up, and the men were collected to be searched.

THOMAS HAZLE . I am foreman to Messrs. Row and Co. On the 4th of December, Cookson showed me where

he had found this skin; I called the men together, there were six in all, the prisoner was one of them - he seemed reluctant to come forward, and therefore I searched him first and found eleven martins'-skins stuffed into his waistcoat and trousers - they were about half way into his trousers, but his apron quite concealed them - he said it was his first offence, and he hoped I would look over it; he has been three years in our service; we have missed property for some years past - they are worth 4s. or 5s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-8

8. THOMAS EMERY was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD PINFOLD GANTHONY . I am a watchmaker , and live in Cheapside . The prisoner was in my service, and entrusted to receive money for me; he was nearly twelve months with me, and I had a good character with him - Mr. Bryan is a customer of mine.

HENRY RICHARD SHARPE . I am servant to Mr. Bryan, a wine-broker. On the 16th of October I paid the prisoner 2l. 3s. 6d. on account of Mr. Ganthony; I gave him two sovereigns and a half, or three sovereigns; I am sure I paid him two sovereigns - he wrote a receipt in my presence, which I produce (read).

MR. GANTHONY. When he received money he should account for it the moment he returned; he never accounted to me for this money. I applied for it early in November, and finding it was paid I had him apprehended.

HENRY SAVORY . I am foreman to Mr. Ganthony. - The prisoner never accounted to me for this money - I asked him several times about it - he said they had promised to pay it, but he had not received it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been struggling some time with misfortunes, (arising from embarrassments prior to his entering the prosecutor's employ,) which had induced him to use the money in question, not with any intention of defrauding, as he intended to refund it - that he had a wife and seven children dependent upon him.

MR. GANTHONY. He has a wife and seven children - he had 40s. a week, and could earn 5s. more.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-9

9. JOSEPH LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 coal-sack, value 4s., the goods of Michael Pearson and Charles Fellows , his masters .

MICHAEL PEARSON. I am a coal-merchant , in partnership with Charles Fellows. The prisoner was employed by us on Tuesday afternoon, the 5th of December, but was not in our regular service; about five o'clock that evening I was coming down the lane to our wharf, which is in Upper Thames-street, and met the prisoner coming up - he appeared to have something under his coat; directly he passed me I called to him to stop - he leaned towards the wall, and dropped this coal-sack from under his coat; he was coming from our wharf; the sack is marked M. P., and is worth about 4s.; I am certain he dropped it.

NATHANIEL MINES . I am a constable, and took him in charge.(Sack produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Five Weeks .

Reference Number: t18261207-10

10. DANIEL GLEESON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 40lbs. of lead, value 5s. , the goods of our Lord the King.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to William Taylor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH CHESHAM . I am inspector of skins in the Port of London. On the 23d of November I met a person on St. Dunstan's-hill, who appeared to have something heavy about him in a blue apron; I went towards the surveyor's office at the Custom-house , and met Jefferies, whom I informed of it.

SAMUEL H. JEFFERIES . I live in the Commercial-road - I am an officer, and attend at the Custom-house. On the morning of the 23d of November, in consequence of information, I went up St. Dunstan's-hill, and saw the prisoner with an ingot of lead concealed under his apron; he was putting it on his shoulder; I asked where he was taking it - he said to Mr. Piper, of Tower-street, but he was going in a contrary direction: I said he must return with me to the Custom-house - he at first refused, but at last consented; I took him back, and asked where he got it; he said a man gave it to him in the street; Mr. Piper's people were at work at the Custom-house, and said in his presence, that they had not sent him with it; I took him to the Compter. I found the door of a room on the first floor in the Custom-house, broken open, where there were eighty-seven ingots of lead, correspond with this, in size and make - it is marked W. T. Mr. Taylor saw it at the Mansion-house.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I have been employed in taking down the iron work at the Custom-house; there was a quantity of lead among it, which I kept in a room there; I had the key. On the morning of the 23d of November I found the door broken open - I had nailed it up the day before, having eighty or ninety ingots of lead there; I have the mould in which this ingot was cast, and it has my initials on it.

THOMAS PIPER . I am a stone-mason, and supply the lead for the mason's work at the Custom-house. I authorized no one to bring it from there.

THOMAS PIPER, JUN. I am in partnership with my father. I never authorized the prisoner to bring the lead from the Custom-house.

JAMES SIMMS . I am foreman to Messrs. Piper. I never authorized the prisoner to bring this lead from the Custom-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out, and found this lead under a plank; seeing it marked W. T. I thought it meant William and Thomas Piper; I thought it belonged to them, as I never saw any thing like it in the Custom-house; I was unable to lift it up, having met with an accident, and was trying to carry it in my apron. I declare I did not know where it was kept.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261207-11

11. SAMUEL WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 mahogany work-table, value 1l. 6s. , the goods of Henry Matthews .

HENRY MATTHEWS. I live in Budge-row . This table stood in front of my shop, but inside; I had been out

about an hour, and as I came home I met the prisoner in Watling-street, about one hundred yards off, with it; he was a perfect stranger, and as he was running I ran over and collared him; I asked where he was going with it - he said, to Hammersmith; I said I thought he had not paid for it - he said it was all right; he went back very quietly with me, and my man said, in his hearing, that he had not sold it; when he got to the watch-house he said it was his first offence, and that he was a cabinet-maker.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a beadle. I received the prisoner in charge, and found 11d. on him; he said he was very sorry for what he had done, but he was out of work.(Property produced and sworn to.)

One witness gave the prisoner a good character, and engaged to take him into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261207-12

12. JAMES FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 brass-guard, value 30s. , the goods of Edward Ellis and others.

ROBERT JOHNSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Edward Ellis - he is a merchant , and lives in Leadenhall-street . On the 27th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, this guard was safe on the door of our counting-house, which is six feet within the house. The officer came about a quarter before six o'clock, and I missed it - he brought it the next morning, and it fitted the door - I have no doubt it is the same.

GEORGE FITCH . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Ellis' passage with this guard, and place it on the foot-board of a Hackney-coach, and he went behind; I followed the coach - he got off, and turned down St. Mary-axe, with the guard; I secured him, and he said a lad had given it to him to carry - I asked where he was to take it - he said he did not know. I fitted it to the door next morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-13

13. WILLIAM FAIRBROTHER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods Isaac Bawden , from his person .

ISAAC BAWDEN. I am a merchant's clerk , and live at No. 23, St. Mary-axe. On the 29th of November, about half-past four o'clock, I was at the corner of Bishopsgate-street and Cornhill , returning from 'Change; my handkerchief was safe ten minutes before - I stopped at the corner to let a cart pass, but thinking I could pass I went forward quickly, and felt a strong pull at my pocket; I immediately turned round, and my handkerchief was gone. I saw the prisoner about a yard from me, and secured him - I said I should have him searched - he appeared alone; he took the handkerchief from his trousers, and gave it me - he said a boy had picked it up, and given it to him, and he was to have given it to me. When I got him a little way he said he would fall on his knees and beg my pardon. I gave him in charge to Philpot, with the handkerchief, which is marked K., my mother-in-law's initial.

JOHN PHILPOT . I took him in charge with the handkerchief. I found nothing but an old handkerchief and 1d. on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up two or three yards from the corner, and put it into my pocket, as another person might do.

MR. BAWDEN. He was the nearest person to me, and about one yard from me, looking steadfastly at me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-14

14. ROBERT FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 112lbs. of canvas wrappers, value 15s.; 4 pamphlets on the silk trade, value 4s.; 1 printed book, value 18d., and 2ozs. of thread-leish, value 9d., the goods of Thomas Davidson , his master .

THOMAS DAVIDSON. I am a silk-manufacturer , and live in Star-court, Bread-street . The prisoner was my porter . On the 25th of November two officers called, and I found him in custody, with a quantity of wrappers, weighing 112lbs.; they are worth 15s., and most of them have my mark on them; I had examined the packages, which they had formerly enclosed, and numbered the wrappers; he had no authority to take them; they were kept in the lower warehouse with the silk which they had formerly enclosed; the prisoner slept on the premises; and in a closet behind his bed, of which the officer produced the key, I found four pamphlets on the silk trade, and another book, belonging to my child, and several skeins of thread-leish. The prisoner had possession of that cupboard - he lived four years and a half with me.

JAMES TOMKINS . I am a patrol of Cripplegate. - About ten minutes before six o'clock on the evening of the 25th of November, I was in Milk-street, and saw the prisoner come into Robinhood-court; he pitched a load down, which I took up, and Henman secured him; we asked whose property he had got - he said it was his own - Henman took him to Mr. Hayter's, the beadle, in Milk-street; we afterwards went to Mr. Davidson, in Bread-street; we showed him the wrappers, at Hayter's house, and he claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He said it was his own? A. Yes at first - I did not hear him give any other account.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a patrol, and was with Tomkins - I took the prisoner in the court, and asked what he had got - he said, "Some wrappers" - I asked if they belonged to him; he said they did - I asked if they were his perquisites; he said they were - I asked how long he had had them as perquisites; he said about six months - I took him a little way, and said I did not believe his statement, and asked who he lived with - he said, with Messrs. Davidson and Perks, of Star-court - I said I should send for Mr. Davidson, as I thought it was a robbery - he immediately asked what Mr. Davidson would say if he came - I said I could not tell; he then said they were his master's property, and not his - he said he would give me the whole of it, if I would let him go - I refused, and took him into Hayter's - I found a purse containing two sovereigns and 5s. 6d. on him - I went to Mr. Davidson, who saw the wrappers and claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a City constable? A. I am a ward-officer, and have been ten months in office.

I thought it my duty to question him - it was not with a view to convict him; but if the property was his own, he had a right to go about his business - he said they were his perquisites at first, but I doubted that, and questioned him to judge whether I was right in detaining him - I did not say that what he said would be given in evidence - he gave no account before the Magistrate, that I heard, but said he deferred it till he came here; no witnesses were offered in my presence - I and Tomkins were close together.

MR. DAVIDSON. I have examined the wrappers; they are mine; they are not allowed as perquisites - the prisoner never understood so, for they are always made into bags again - they are my sole property; Mr. Perks has been dead four years.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner been with you? A. Four years and a half. Wrappers of this description are made into bags, and there is also a common sort, which the people make the bags of; they are all made up into two sorts of bags, new and old - this was all good, and was packed up to be sent to the workhouse next day, to be made into bags, and the prisoner would have to deliver it out. I have two apprentices - they were not examined before the Magistrate - thread-leish is used in making harness - the greater part of this is excellent wrappering, and would all make good bags - I never allowed any thing of the sort as perquisites, nor has it ever been claimed - it has never been considered that damaged wrappers are perquisites.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

15. ROBERT FISHER was again indicted for stealing on the 7th of December , 1 crape scarf, value 20s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 piece of silk handkerchiefs, containing 5, value 20s.; 7 handkerchiefs, value 20s., and 3 leather wrappers, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Davidson, his master.

WILLIAM SPINSLEY . I am warehouseman to Mr. Davidson, and have been so for three years and a half; the prisoner was porter there all that time; he slept in the house, but was not boarded. When the officers gave me information, I went with them to his father's house - they searched three boxes which stood in the fire-place, and found this property; the keys found on the prisoner opened the boxes - in one of them was found a silk damask shawl, worth 10s., which had never been worn - it has no private mark, but corresponds with similar articles in Mr. Davidson's possession; the prisoner was not present - in the same box were three leather wrappers, which came from a silk throwster whose initials were on them - the same person supplies other people, but these wrappers had been missed, and the prisoner was asked several times if he had returned them to the throwster; he said he had - I asked him myself if he had returned them, and he said he had; this was at least six months before - there were seven silk handkerchiefs in the same box, which I believe to be Mr. Davidson's - there is the mark where the ticket had been gummed on them - they were folded in a paper, with the mark of our house; it is in the hand-writing of the manufacturer - a crape scarf was found in another room in a drawer which was not locked.

Cross-examined. Q. The constable produced the keys which opened the box? A. Yes, the prisoner was in custody at the time - he did not lodge at his father's. When goods are sold, we seldom take the ticket off; it seldom comes off, unless it has not been sufficiently gummed, and then it would not leave the gum mark which is on these handkerchiefs.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I attended this search, and opened three or four boxes with some keys which I found on the prisoner; one box containing the property was opened by one of these keys - he did not know I was going to search his father's house.

Cross-examined. Q. Which is the key that opened the box? A. One key opened all the boxes - I cannot say which; I found three of the keys in the prisoner's cupboard at his master's house - I do not conceive them to be common keys.

MR. DAVIDSON. The goods produced are such as I have in my possession; I never sold the prisoner or his father any thing of the sort - his father sells wood about the street - these were my property, but may have been sold.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-15

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

16. WILLIAM STEVENS and THOMAS BRAHNEY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Webb , in the King's highway, on the 23d of November , at St. John, Clerkenwell , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 purse, value 2d., and 1 sovereign, his property .

ROBERT WEBB. I live at Staines, in Middlesex, and keep a chandler-shop . On the 23d of November, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was in town, and intended to sleep in town, as I felt unwell in my back - being a stranger here, I inquired of the witness Bowden if she could recommend me to a public-house where I could get a comfortable bed - I do not know what street I was in: while I was inquiring of her, the prisoner Stevens came up to me, and said he knew me very well - I had told Bowden that I had come from Staines, and wanted a bed - Stevens then came up and said he knew me very well, and that I came from Staines; I did not know him; he said he could recommend me to where I could have a bed - both him and Bowden were strangers; he took me to a public-house close by; I do not know the street; I went into the public-house; they could not accommodate me - he stood at the door, and then said he would find me a bed and a comfortable one - I had not seen the other prisoner at this time - we walked a little farther, and he said, "Go down this alley, and you will have a comfortable bed, I will be bound" - I said, "No, I am not going down there, that is not my way;" he immediately seized me by the coat - his arm went against my breast, and he pushed me against the wall - two more men immediately came up; I cannot say who they were, as I did not remark them - one of the three thrust his hand into my left-hand breeches pocket - I put my hand down as soon as I could, and said, "No, that won't do;" but I was not soon enough

- he snatched his hand out of my pocket very hard, while I had hold of the bottom of the pocket, and then let me go - Bowden came up and asked me what was the matter - I said they had picked my pocket of a purse and a sovereign - it was a leather snap purse; I had felt it in my pocket just before - one of them must have taken it - one of the men went away directly - Stevens stopped near the place for a bit; I do not know what became of the third man; I went to the watch-house, and gave information - the constable went to look for them. I said, in Stevens' presence, that he had robbed me of my purse - he asked how I could think of any such thing - I said, "I felt your hand go into my pocket and come out" - he kept abusing me, and I went away to the watch-house.

MARY ANNE BOWDEN . My husband is gone to Bengal, in the Rose East-Indiaman - I am a nurse at St. Bartholomew's Hospital. This happened in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell - the prosecutor came and asked me where he could have a lodging, as he had come from Staines, had hurt his back, and could not go home: the two prisoners came out of the Horse and Groom public-house just then, and heard him say he had come from Staines - Stevens said, "I have often brought horses to Staines, and have seen you there; I know you; do not go with that woman, I will take you where you can get a comfortable bed" - he took him down Peter-street, by the side of the Bull public-house; they both went in together, but Brahney was not within a yard of them; he did not go in - Stevens and the prosecutor went in; Stevens left the prosecutor at the bar, and another man came out with a brown coat on - Brahney went on first till they came to Paradise-court - I followed, and Brahney threatened to kick me if I watched him; I said I should see what they meant to do with the man. Brahney went up the court first, and when the prosecutor and the other two got to the court, Stevens said, "I will take you up here" - he said, "I will not go there, that is not my way" - he was rather bending forward, having a pain in his back - Stevens seized him with his left hand, and held him against the wall - they were all three about him; Brahney held him with his right arm, and the other one received what was taken out of his pocket; I saw something pass to him, but what they took from him I cannot say; I saw the other man receive something from Stevens, and he went away directly. The prosecutor said he had lost his purse and a sovereign - Stevens said, "Search me, I have not got your money," and abused him: there was a great mob collected, and I took the prosecutor to the watch-house - Stevens was taken in about seven minutes, and I saw Brahney in custody on the Friday week following - I have seen them both before many times, as I live opposite where the robbery was committed, and have seen them standing there together - Brahney was taken at the Horse and Groom public-house.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a constable. I was informed of this robbery at the watch-house, and immediately afterwards apprehended Stevens at the door of the house he first took the prosecutor to - I took Brahney that day week (Thursday) - Bowden had described him, and I knew him; I had been looking for him all the week - I think I saw him once between those times, but he had a different dress on: when I took him, I went into the public-house, and he came in at the door; I told him what I wanted him for; he denied it, but seemed much hurt - when I took Stevens, he saw me, and turned away to a young man - I said, "I want you" - he said, "What for?" I said, "About that countryman;" he turned round to his companion, and said, "It is about that old fellow's purse."

STEVENs' Defence. I was going for some supper; the prosecutor and that woman stood at the corner of the court - I heard him ask for a lodging, and I said, "You can get one at the Bull's-head public-house, in Peter-street" - he said, "Where is it?" he leaned on my arm all the way along, as he had a pain in his side - the landlord could not give him a bed, and I told him to go to the Ram inn, in Smithfield - he asked me to take him there, but I could not, as my supper was ready, and soon afterwards he said he was robbed - I offered for anybody to search me. I am as innocent as a child.

BRAHNEY's Defence. I had just come out of the public-house - this woman kept talking to me, and I said, "If you don't let me alone, I will kick your -." I told her to go on - she would not - I said again I would kick her -, and after the man was robbed, she had me taken on suspicion.

STEVENS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

BRAHNEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18261207-16

Before Mr. Justice Burroughs.

17. JOHN AMBROSE was indicted for the wilful murdur of Mary Ann Perry .

CHARLES THOMAS . I am a book-binder; the deceased, Mary Ann Perry, lodged on the second floor, at No. 4, Lilley-street ; I lived in the adjoining room; she took in needle-work , and lived with the prisoner; I have known them living there about eight months; I only occasionally passed her on the stairs, but was not acquainted with either of them. On Saturday, the 9th of September , I went home about half-past ten o'clock at night, and went up to bed; I soon afterwards heard a great quarrel between them; I heard him say he wished her to go to her brother and leave him; after this I heard several blows or pushes given, I cannot say by which; at the time of the blows I heard the deceased say, "You have got a nice dinner for to-morrow, I suppose you want your woman to come and cook it for you;" I cannot exactly tell whether she was sober; I heard him accuse her of being tipsy, but I never saw her so; after she spoke of the dinner, I heard either a blow or push, and she appeared to me to fall on the ground, against the door of the room; there is no raised wood-work to the door; I went to bed after this, and heard no more, except the prisoner talking to himself and swearing to himself; such as saying, "Go to your bl-d brother;" and he called her a d-d b-h; I did not hear her speak during all this time; he continued to talk for about a quarter of an hour; I then fell asleep and heard nothing further. I had often heard them quarrel, and did not think it necessary to interfere, as their quarrels were very frequent; I could not judge who provoked the quarrel, it was before I got upstairs; she always appeared to me to be a woman of easy temper, from what I heard of conversation which has passed, when I have been in my room. I got up at seven o'clock on Sunday morning, and heard the prisoner walking in the room and talking to himself, which was cus

tomary; I went out about half-past ten o'clock without seeing him; I returned at eight, went to bed at half-past eight, and hearing a noise, I suppose he was in the room, but I cannot say; on the Monday morning I got up between seven and eight o'clock; I heard him walking in the room; he went out two or three times, locking his door after him, and came in again - I went out, and did not return till ten o'clock at night; I heard nobody that night; about a quarter to seven, on Tuesday morning, Mrs. Jay, the landlady, called me down-stairs; I was then getting up, and heard Robinson and Jay come up-stairs- Robinson went into the prisoner's room and called out,"O, there she lays!" I went in afterwards, and saw two chairs placed at the side of the room, with a sack hung over the backs, and then I beheld the body of the woman laying on the floor at full length against the wall, at the side of the door; I suppose it was three yards from where I heard the fall; it laid on the right side, and a deal of blood appeared to flow from the head; a flannel, or dishcloth laid under her head to sod the blood up; she appeared very much bruised on both temples, and looked very black on the neek; and from the door, to the place where the body lay, there appeared blood; there was also blood against the wall; I am certain I heard her fall against the door, as the lock made a noise; and after that fall I heard nothing more from the woman; I heard no other blow afterwards; there are only two rooms on the floor.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You had lived there some time? A. About a year and a half; I heard frequent quarrels between them, and often heard him charge her with being tipsy; it was previous to the fall that I heard him say, "Go to your brother."

WILLIAM ROBERSON . I am a bookbinder, and live on the first-floor in this house. I knew nothing of this affair till the Sunday morning; I saw the prisoner between nine and ten o'clock; he brought a flat-iron down to my room, which I had sent my son up for; I asked where his wife was; he said she had been out all night, and was gone to her brother's; that he was going to dine at his son's at Hampstead, and had got a piece of pork and some French beans, which he would sell me cheap; I said I was provided, and did not buy it; he went up, and brought down the beans, and asked if I would accept of them, which I did; he went up-stairs again, and afterwards went out; I believe he was out all day, for I was at home all day; I saw him between six and seven o'clock on Sunday night going up-stairs; and heard him moving about in his room on the Monday morning; I went out about nine o'clock that morning, and did not see him afterwards; I went into the room on Tuesday morning, about seven o'clock, in consequence of what I heard from Mrs. Jay; I went up to call Thomas, but instead of knocking at his door, I put my elbow against Ambrose's, and it opened; I held the door in my hand, put my head in, and saw a bonnet and shawl on a table; I saw nobody in the room; I went down and told Mr. Jay I thought all was not right; we went up into the room; I turned round, and behind the door stood a table cross-ways, and a sack over two chairs, and there I saw the body laying straight; Jay fetched Barnsley, the beadle; I went up again with them; I know nothing more.

JAMES JAY . I am landlord of this house. I heard nothing on Saturday night; I went into the room on Tuesday morning, about half-past seven o'clock, and behind the chairs lay the dead body of a woman; I immediately went for an officer, and Mr. Shepherd was called in; the prisoner had come to my door on the Sunday morning, and said he was going to Hampstead; I did not see him afterwards.

MR. JOHN SHEPHERD . I am surgeon, and live in Hatton-garden. On Tuesday, the 12th of September, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was called to see this body; it lay in the room, with one chair placed at the head and another at the feet, and a sack hanging from one chair to the other, before the body - there appeared a great many bruises about the head, face, and temples, and some small ones on the body - some were recent, and others appeared old - those on the head appeared recent; there were several on the back part of the head; they were bruises, but I cannot say whether they were inflicted by blows or falls, one is as likely as the other - a person receiving a blow, or push, and falling against a hard substance, might occasion them; or falling down and moving about afterwards. I examined the head and found no wound in the scalp, or fracture in the bone; there was no blood from any wound, but a morbid fluid appeared to have run from the nose and mouth, but that had flowed since death - it certainly might be the effect of a violent blow beating the body down and stunning it - it might be occasioned by a fall as well as a blow; I could find no mark of any particular blow, for the face was discoloured, both from bruises and dissolution; I opened the head, there was no fracture.

Q. When did you open the head? A. On the same day - we found some extravasated blood between the scalp and the pericranium; on removing the skull-cap or bone, we found a quantity of extravasated blood on the brain, and some on the ventricles of the brain also; we thought that sufficient to cause death; and, in my opinion, the extravasation was caused from ruptures in the blood vessels of the brain.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The fluid you saw on the floor, might have passed from the mouth and nose after dissolution? A. Yes, as it generally does; it is called dead purges by the common people - a discharge from the mouth. In cases of apoplexy the extravasated blood will in some cases flow from the small vessels; persons who are in the habit of drinking a great deal, or have a full habit of body, are subject to apoplexy.

SARAH JAY . I am the wife of James Jay . On the 10th of September I called on Ambrose, and he said his wife was gone; it was nearly one o'clock in the day; he said she was gone to live with her brother, and had left him; this was all that passed at that time; I saw him again about four o'clock in the afternoon; he asked me if his mistress had been in during the time he had been out; I told him I had not seen her. About half an hour afterwards he brought a geranium-tree, which he said came from Lord Mansfield's - he took it away, and I saw no more of him till Monday, at one o'clock; he then asked me if his mistress had been at home - I said I had been out, and had not seen her. In the afternoon he came and asked if she had been at home; I said No; he said he

would be d-d if she should come any more - she had robbed him quite enough; he said she might live with her brother, for he would have nothing more to do with her; this conversation was on a Tuesday - I did not see any thing more of him.

HANNAH MAYES . I did not live in this house. On Tuesday, at two o'clock, I went down to No. 4, Lilley-street, to see Mrs. Jay. I went up in the deceased's room, with Read, the officer, of Hatton-garden. I saw the deceased laying on her right side, between sacks. I did not see the prisoner - this was before the Magistrate came; the body had not been touched. I washed the body - she was very much bruised about the head, body, and shoulders; there was a piece out of her arm, and marks of teeth on her left arm; it appeared to be a fresh mark - there were bruises, as if she had been beaten with a rope or stick, all about her arms, shoulders, and body; there was a piece of flesh out of her left thigh; I could not tell whether it was bit or not - it was about as large as a shilling; I did not look whether there were marks of teeth there; it might have been the mark of rats, but I could not tell. I went up with the surgeon. I washed her with soap and water.

MR. SHEPHERD re-examined. I observed these marks, and it appeared as if rats had been at her - this is no uncommon occurence; there was a case the other day, when a rat was obliged to be killed - it got up the body.

JOHN BARNSLEY . I am the beadle. I know nothing about the prisoner - I summoned the Jury.

WILLIAM BETTY . I apprehended the prisoner; I found him in a cottage at Portland-green; I told him I wanted him - he said, "I'm glad - it's only an accident;" he never made any resistance: he told me that he and the deceased went out on Saturday evening, to get something to drink, and something for dinner - that he wanted mutton and she wanted pork - she parted with him, and then went to receive some money for waistcoat-making; he said he proceeded to Leather-lane, where he bought some pork and French beans, which he took home with some porter for Ann Perry 's supper and his own - he said he had been at home some time when the deceased came home, and began to abuse him, and called him very foul names, which he could not mention to me - she told him that he had got the foul disease, and was lousy, and that he was a d-d rascal - he said he then struck at her, and her head came in contact with the door - he said he removed her from there to the corner, where she was found laying on the floor, being the place where he used to put her when she got tipsy. I asked him, when he awoke in the morning whether he found her there - he said that when he awoke he found that she was gone; I said, "Where was she gone?" he said he found she was dead - he said he stopped in the room from Saturday night till Monday night; he told me, on taking him to Clerkenwell prison, that he had been trying to make away with himself two or three times, but he could not do it - he knew he should be hung.

Prisoner's Defence (Written.) I had lived with the deceased for above eight years; at times she was in the habit of getting most beastly drunk - she was then very abusive and violent in her temper; to procure drink she would take my wearing-apparel and articles of trade, and pawn them. I very often wanted her to leave me, and from time to time changed my lodging, but she found me out, and when drunk she would insist on living with me, and was very abusive, accusing me of being connected with other women, of being diseased and lousy; she died on a Saturday night - on the evening of that day I went out, and bought a piece of pork for our Sunday's dinner; when I returned home she was out; she shortly after returned home; I told her I had bought a piece of pork, on which she said that I had been out with other women, and they might cook the pork, for she would not - this caused words and a quarrel, and the deceased coming up to me, I gave her a push; she fell, and her head struck against the door; I thought she was in liquor, and, expecting more abuse, I went to bed; on the following morning, when I got up, I found her dead - I was much alarmed, and not knowing what to do I concealed the body with the bed-clothes, and on the Monday morning I left my home; although this circumstance may appear most strange, and I must admit it is; yet, in my distressed state of mind, I knew not what to do, and I do most solemnly declare, before my God and you, that what I have stated is true.

GUILTY. Aged 64. Of killing and slaying only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261207-17

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

18. JAMES HILL and GEORGE ANCLIFFE were indicted for the wilful murder of Henry Tyers , - and charged on the Coroner's Inquisition, with killing and slaying the said Henry Tyers.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am servant to Mr. France, the landlord of the Portland Arms public-house, Great Mary-le-bone-street. I have known Henry Tyers for two or three years - he was four years and a half old. I know the prisoner Hill. On the 29th of November I went to him between three and four o'clock, at General Clinton's stable - I went to take a quartern of gin to him - I will not say that Mr. or Mrs. France ordered me to go; the gin was ordered by Hill; on getting to the mews I found the prisoner and the child (Tyers) there - Ancliffe was cleaning bridle bits, and the child was playing about; I poured out a glass of gin, and gave it to Hill; he drank it, and I then poured out a glass for Ancliffe, and he drank it; there was a small portion left at the bottom of the measure, about the third of a half-quartern, so small a portion I scarce knew that there was any left - Hill said,"Bill, do you take away the gin to drink?" I poured it out in the glass, and the child drank it; the glass was nothing like full; if the glass had been twice filled the two prisoners would have drank the quartern - it was about a third of being full. I asked the child if he would have any gin, and he answered, Yes - I gave it to him, and he drank it; Ancliffe was dressing a horse when I first went- Hill ordered me to bring another quartern, and I did so; I returned immediately - I had to go about one hundred yards, and was not long gone; when I got back I poured out a glass as before, and gave it to Hill; I then poured out another, and gave it to Ancliffe, and they drank it - there was nearly the same portion left as before, and the child was asked, either by me or Hill, whether he would drink it, and he again said Yes - I then poured it

out - it was near the same fulness; the child drank it. Hill then said, "Bill, bring another quartern;" I fulfilled the order, and went back again; I disposed of it as before, to Hill and Ancliffe; the child was asked, as before, by me or Hill; I cannot swear that the child answered Yes - the child took the remainder of the third quartern out of my hands. I went away after this - the three quarterns were paid for by Hill - I had the money each time. I did not take any more that afternoon; I saw the child after that - he came up to France's for another quartern; I saw him at the bar - he ordered it to go down; it was carried by William Garratt, my fellow-servant; I never saw the child after he ordered the fourth quartern. On neither of these occasions did I see the child's father with the coachman. When the deceased came to order the fourth quartern he did not seem affected by the gin he had drank; Mrs. France said to the child, "I hope you have not been drinking gin?" he said he had been having a little; she asked him how old he was; he said three years and a half; the gin was sent in an Imperial measure.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Hill is servant to General Clinton? A. Yes - he was not wet that I know of; he was cleaning bits and bridles; he took no further notice of what was going on - it was the same with Ancliffe - he was cleaning horses; I suppose it was five minutes after the third quartern that I saw the child. It was I who first asked the child to have the gin - Ancliffe never proposed it.

WILLIAM GARRATT . I am servant to Mr. France. I was employed to carry some gin to Mary-le-bone-mews, about four o'clock - I took a quartern; I was present when the child, Tyers, ordered it; we went both together - when we got to the mews I saw the prisoners - I said to Hill, "Here is a quartern of gin;" I poured it out and filled the glass - I gave it to Hill, and he gave it to the child; he asked the child if he would have any - the child said Yes, and drank it all - the whole glass; upon the child saying Yes, Hill gave it to him; Hill drank a trifle out of the second glass; I then filled it up again: the second glass is the quartern. When I filled up the second glass again Hill gave it to the child. I do not know that he said any thing, but merely gave it to him - the child drank it; when I had disposed of it, Hill ordered a further quartern, and I fetched it; I asked if he would pay for it; Ancliffe had no share or part in that - I shaped it out in the same way as the other - the glasses were not quite full; I do not know that at this time he said any thing to the child; I am sure the child drank the glass; the other part was poured out into the glass, but I cannot say whether Hill or the child drank it - I mean the last glass of the second quartern which I took; I think the child drank the first glass I poured out; I do not know that the last was given to the child; the child got a little out of the second quartern - to the best of my knowledge Hill drank the first glass; Hill paid for both quarterns - I went away. It appeared as if the child had drank more than sufficient; he rolled about, and fell down - it appeared to be in misery, and could not help itself - it fell down before the mother came in, and laid on the ground; no person attempted to assist or take it up; its mother called, "Henry" in the stable - he was laying about the middle, and said, "Yes, mother." The father came in - the prisoners were there at the time; the mother said, "What have you been giving the child, some gin?" they made no answer at first; there was then a conversation between her and the prisoners - Hill spoke first. The father began to swear and say, "What have you given the child gin for?" Hill said he did not care a d-n for Mr. or Mrs. Tyers. The mother took the child out of the stable; when she took him up in her arms he cried; I do not know what was said by Hill at the time, but he used abusive language; I do not remember any thing more: I do not know that Hill said any more. I had seen the lad before that day; during the time I was there Ancliffe did not say any thing that I know of; I did not see that he shared any part of the gin.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When the mother called out, the child answered immediately? A. Yes- it was then able to say, "Yes, mother;" during the time he gave him the gin the child said very little. He remained stupid and confused, as if he had been drinking a good deal.

COURT. Q. Who appeared stupid? A. Hill. I had seen Hill before this - he appeared more stupid than usual that night, as if he had been affected with liquor.

JOHN BURNETT . I am a surgeon, and live at No. 7, Great Mary-le-bone-street. I was called in to visit the child about seven o'clock in the evening - I found it in a kind of stupor; it had very much the appearance of a person having taken a large quantity of liquor; the arms and limbs were contracted; they hung down, and there appeared a sort of listlessness about the child; the pupils of the eyes were contracted - the appearance was that of a person who had taken a quantity of narcotic drink; I could not tell what it was. The effects of gin upon the human constitution would act as a narcotic. The child attempted to vomit; he appeared evidently dying, and there were symptoms of blood in the head; I stopped with him half an hour - I had no previous knowledge of it; I saw it three times within an hour or an hour and a half; I stopped about twenty minutes each time; when I left the third time I said it would not live many minutes, I smelt the liquor ejected, and it smelt strong of liquor; excess of liquor will destroy a child, or any person; this appears to be the cause of the child's death; I know what a quartern of gin contains - half a quartern would not kill the child.

HENRY TYERS . I am father of the deceased child. I saw him about a quarter to four o'clock, when he went to the carriage-house; he was in good health according to appearance.

JOHN GIBBS . I only know that I apprehended the prisoners.

HILL's Defence. I never forced the child to take gin; I asked him if he would have it; I had no thought of hurting him.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Year .

ANCLIFFE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-18

19. HENRY KIRKMAN was indicted for the wilful murder of James Sullivan .

DANIEL PETTIT . I am a drover. On a Wednesday evening in the last month, about six o'clock, I was in East-street Marylebone , and saw the deceased child there run

ning across the road, bringing back a candle - I heard the noise of a cart coming - I saw the child near the curb-stone, and the cart run over it; it was going at the rate of about eight miles an hour; it was gallopping; it was a square, open cart, and the prisoner was sitting in it, with the reins in his hand - there were not many people about the street at the time - he was on the right side of the street, which is wide - there was room enough for two or three carts - I never saw him before the accident - I heard him hallooing out Stop! and calling to his horse; he cried Oh! three times; this was after he ran over it - from the state of the night, I will not say whether the prisoner could see the child or not; I did not take notice of the gas-light - the wheel went over hardly any distance from the gutter, about two feet I think - there were no other carriages in the street; the people cried out as well as him - he hallooed out, Stop the horse! I saw the child afterwards - a woman took it away; it screamed out for its mother - I saw the wheel of the cart go over it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The child had just run out of a shop? A. Yes, and ran immediately into the road; there was but one horse in the cart - I was about half-way down the street - the child ran into a man's arms; the horse stopped and flew back - I do not drive horses, or know what pace they should go; I cannot tell whether it was a gentle pace; it was about eight miles an hour - I told the Coroner so - the Jury there returned a verdict of Accidental Death - the horse was gallopping when I saw it.

MARY JONES . I was in East-street about half-past six o'clock, when the accident happened - I saw the cart coming at a very moderate pace; it was not gallopping, I am sure - the prisoner's horse was inclining towards the curb; I saw the child against the kennel; the wheel went over its body; it got up again, and the hind part of the cart knocked it down again; it then ran into a man's arms, and a woman took it away.

Q. The accident happened instantaneously? A. Yes, I heard the prisoner cry out, and saw him backing the cart - I cannot say whether the wheel went over by his backing. The prisoner was anxious about the child, and said he would pay all expenses - he said, "Will not the child be better at home?" the doctor said it would be better to take it to the hospital. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and I consider it purely accidental - I swear the horse did not gallop.

JANE JORDAN . I was in East-street; the cart was coming very fast towards me - I heard it, but did not see it till the accident happened - I saw the child after the accident - when I first heard the cart coming, it was going very fast, so much so, that I could not go across the street.

Cross-examined. Q. You judge of its going fast or slow by what you heard? A. Yes.

ELEANOR SULLIVAN . I am mother of the deceased child; I knew nothing till after the accident, when I found it in the street - his name was James - he died about one or two o'clock next morning.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was entirely ignorant of the child being near the cart, till after the accident occurred, and that it was entirely unavoidable - he was drawing towards the curb-stone to call on a customer.

ROBERT TREADWELL . I am a porter, and was in East-street at the time of the accident - I saw the prisoner coming with his cart, and heard him halloo out - the child was getting up after the cart went over it - by the exertion of the prisoner in pulling back the horse, the cart went over the child; it got up, and ran into my arms - the mother came and said, "Oh! it is my child!" upon my oath, it was purely an accident.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-19

20. JAMES WINGFIELD was indicted for a rape .

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18261207-20

Second London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

21. HENRY BAYLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Emmens , about seven o'clock in the night of the 26th of February , at St. Botolph-without, Bishopsgate , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 2 gowns, value 5s.; 2 tippets, value 6d.; 2 shifts, value 4s.; 2 night-gowns, value 1s.; 1 cloth-pelisse, value 15s.; 1 quilt, value 1s.; 1 skirt, value 1s.; 1 locket, value 6d.; 1 ring, value 6d., and 1 brooch, value 6d., the goods of Jane Perkins .

JANE PERKINS. I now live at No. 4, Foster-street, Sun-street, Bishopsgate. On the 26th of February I lodged in John Emmens' parlour; I went out between 12 and 1 o'clock that day, and returned between eight and nine; it was then dark; I found the street-door had been opened, and my room door was opened with a picklock-key; I am sure I had locked my own door and taken the key with me; I found a bundle of things moved from the drawers and laid on the table tied up ready to be taken away; there were two gowns, two night-gowns, a cloth-pelisse, two tippets, two shifts, a quilt, and a skirt; the locket, ring, and brooch were taken away; I have not seen them since; the other things were tied up ready to be taken away; this was on the 26th of February; I have not seen the prisoner till to-day; he was not in custody when I came home.

THOMAS SHROPSHIRE . I live at No. 29, White Cross-place, near Moorfields. On the 26th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was walking through Foster-street - it was dark - I saw a man, whose name is William Blacket , standing at the corner of the street - Emmens' house is in the middle; I went further up the street, towards Emmens' house, and saw two men, one of whom I recollect - I do not see him here; I saw two of them before the Magistrate, they were William Blacket and Robert Lyall - I am not positive that the prisoner was one; he was not in custody with Blacket and Lyall; I did not see him in Foster-street; I went further up the street, and saw a fourth man at the corner of the street, at the same end of the street as Blacket, but at another corner; I cannot say that that was the prisoner; I saw the two men standing against Emmens' door, doing something to the key-hole, apparently - Edwards, who is gone to sea, was with me; we went up to the top of the street and watched them - the first time we went up, we saw them do something to the key-hole; and when we came down the street again we saw them two or three yards off the door; and the third time we went down the street, we went to the officer's house; we then found the door of Emmens' house was open, and the persons at the

corner of the street walked away; we went and told the officer, who came and saw two men coming up the street; he went to the house, knocked at the door, and inquired who was there; a man came out and said, "Me, Sir;" the officer laid hold of him; he struggled in the street, and got away from him; I cannot say whether that was the prisoner or not; the officer went into the house, found the parlour-door open, and it had been robbed; the things were packed up ready to be taken away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Somebody said,"It is me," and came out? A. Yes; that person got off; the officer and I went in as soon as we could; the man coming out might take about a minute; I could not see his face.

Q. How long might the officer have had an opportunity of seeing the man? A. I do not know; I do not suppose we were above a minute before we went into the house; the man ran off immediately; I could not swear to him; Blacket and Lyall were acquitted on this charge- I gave evidence.

COURT. Q. Only one person came out of the house? A. No.

JOSEPH WALTON . I live at No. 98, Long-alley, Finsbury. On the 26th of February, a few minutes before seven o'clock, I was informed of this robbery at Emmens' house, which is in the City, and in the parish of St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate; I went to the spot, and as I turned the corner of the street, I saw two persons, who saw me and knew me; they came towards me - I knew them, and they passed me; they were coming in a direction from the house - I then went towards Emmens' house; I looked towards the shutter and saw a light in the parlour, which is Perkins' room; the street-door was open - I went into the passage, pushed against the parlour-door, and said, "Halloo, who is here?" a person said, "It is me, Sir;" he peeped out into the passage, and drew the parlour-door too; he came into the passage - I made a grasp at him, and caught hold of him; but the passage was dark and I could not see his features at that time; it was too dark; I continued my hold of him till we got into the middle of the street, and there we had a struggle; I was ill at the time; he twisted his head under my arm, left his hat with me, and got away.

Q. While you were struggling with him in the middle of the street, was there a gas-light to enable you to distinguish his features? A. There was; I am certain of his person - it was the prisoner; I have known him ten years, and recognized him as soon as I saw his features; I declare positively he is the person - I did not see him again till I found him in Clerkenwell prison, about three weeks ago; I was certain he was the same person; I am quite sure of him - on going into the prosecutrix's room I found all the clothes taken out of the drawers, and in the street-door I found a skeleton key, which I produce; it is exactly in the same state now - it has been strained in getting it out.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear you took the key out of the hole in that state? A. Yes, I do; it was with great difficulty we got it out - we strained it in doing so; it has not been at all altered since - I was not more than five minutes struggling with him - I am sure it was not ten - it was at least five - it was about five, I cannot speak to a minute.

Q. If any one has sworn from the time the man came out of the house till you and he went in again it was not more than a minute, is that truth? A. It was five minutes from the time he came out of the room, till he got from me; if anybody has said it was not a minute, it is not true, but they might err - I say it must have taken nearly five minutes - I would not tell an untruth - the other men were tried in the New Court; I was examined and swore to the other men, for I knew them well before.

Q. You must have been a little agitated when you were struggling? A. I was not frightened; I had an abscess in my neck, or he would not have got from me; I saw his face, but not all the time; it was five minutes after we left the parlour that he got from me - he twisted from me in a moment; I do not know that I ever experienced such a dexterous act; he kept struggling all the time; I had him by the collar, but he twisted under my arm and got away; it is a common way of getting off, but it was never done to me before; he did not throw me down.

COURT. Q. You gave evidence against two other persons; did you state them to be at some distance, or at the house? A. At a distance.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 27th of February I received information that Blacket, who was tried last April, was wanted - I know nothing of this prisoner.

MR. PHILLIPS to JANE PERKINS. Q. You left home between twelve and one o'clock? A. Yes; it is the dwelling-house of John Emmens; he has no servant; he was out at the time with his wife and three children at the Tabernacle, which is a place of worship; I cannot tell whether any of them were in the house after I left; he has no servant; I saw them that night; nobody but myself has a key of the parlour-door to my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. He says he had hold of me five minutes, and has known me ten years; if so, why not mention my name; nobody ever came to my father's house till the Tuesday evening; I have been in the parish of St. Luke ten months - besides, that man is not fit to have his oath taken; he is a Deist, I understand.

JURY to WALTON. Q. Did you know where the prisoner lived? A. Yes; and I put a watchman in at the window to search after him, thinking he was there, and another officer put a watchman in at the window to look for him; we have been searching for him ever since.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18261207-21

22. WILLIAM MULLINS and HENRY MORLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Francis Brentnell , from his person .

FRANCIS BRENTNELL. I live at Derby, and am clerk to a person there. I was in town, and lodged in Oxford-court, Cannon-street. On the 30th of November, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was going through a court from Cornhill to Lombard-street; I had left home about half an hour - my handkerchief was then safe; I felt nothing, but an officer came and asked if I had missed my handkerchief; I felt, and missed it from my outside coat pocket- I saw it in his possession; I saw him lay hold of the prisoners immediately afterwards - they were in company together; he charged them with taking it; I did not hear

what they said - they were quite strangers to me; it is a silk handkerchief, and worth 2s.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners in company together in Cheapside; I watched them, and when they got into Cornhill they went up to Mr. Brentnell - he went through Pope's Head-alley; Mullins was nearest to him, but they were in company; they turned into Pope's Head-alley , after Mr. Brentnell; the moment they got into the alley I lost sight of them for a minute; when I got into the alley Morland was tucking something into his breast, between his coat and waistcoat - Mullins was still following the prosecutor; I followed, and directly the prosecutor got into Lombard-street Mullins ran back, in the direction he had come, and joined Morland; I went and spoke to the prosecutor, who missed his handkerchief; I went and laid hold of them in Cornhill, about twenty yards from the alley; the prosecutor was close behind me - we watched Mullins, and saw him join Moreland. I then saw Morland take a handkerchief from his breast, and put into his hat; I seized them both, and took the handkerchief from his hat, and Mr. Brentnell claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MULLINs' Defence. I went to work that morning; my sister asked me to go and see another sister, who was lying-in at Whitechapel; I did not know my way, and asked this boy to show me - I lost him, and went back to look after him - he told me the way, and I was going when the officer took me.

MULLINS - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years , to the Prison Ship .

MORLAND - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261207-22

23. DAVID MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 canvas bag, value 1d., and 32 pairs of silver spectacle-frames, value 7l., the goods of Edmund Taylor , from the person of William Bradfield .

WILLIAM BRADFIELD. I am twelve years old, and live with Mr. Mumford, and have worked for Mr. Edmund Taylor for four months - he is an optician , and lives at No. 15, White Horse-yard, Drury-lane. On Friday, the 24th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I took thirty-two silver spectacle-frames, in a bag, to Goldsmith's hall; I fetched them about half-past four o'clock, and then went to 'Change: I was in Fleet-street about a quarter-past five, coming home with them; the prisoner caught hold of me by the two shoulders at the corner of Johnson's-court, while another one took the bag away; I turned round, and called Stop thief! they went up the court - the prisoner is the person who had hold of me - he was a stranger before, but I am positive of him; he ran up Johnson's-court. I went up the court, and only lost sight of him for a short time - he was stopped almost directly, by Mr. Taplin - we have never found the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Whose property were they? A. Edmund Taylor's. I was christened by the name of Henry William, but go by the name of William only; the prisoner came behind me - I could not see him well then - he ran away directly the bag was taken, and I went up the court after him - he was stopped almost directly; I did not see his face till he was stopped.

Q. Did not you say that night, that the prisoner took the bag, and the other held you? A. I believe I did, but he is the one who held my shoulders; the one who took the bag had a fustian jacket on; I went into a newspaper-shop directly he was taken. I believe I said there that he was the man who took the bag. I turned round, and saw him take his hands off my shoulder.

COURT. Q. How came you to say he took the bag if he held your shoulder? A. I am sure he held my shoulder while the one in the fustian jacket took the bag.

JOHN TAPLIN . I am a plumber, and live in Greystoke-place, Fetter-lane. I was coming down Johnson's-court, towards Fleet-street, and heard the boy cry out - I saw the prisoner running from the boy, towards me - he was pushing himself out from the mob, and met me on the steps of Johnson's-court; the boy cried out, as if he was hurt; I laid hold of the prisoner - the boy immediately accused him of being the thief; he said he was not the person, but the man who had committed the act had run up the court; I saw nobody running up the court - if there had been, I must have seen them; I went into the newspaper-shop with the boy, but did not hear what account he gave there. An officer was sent for, who took him.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner said he was not the person? A. Yes. The boy did not say whether he had seen his face; he said one held him, and the other took the bag. I heard him say the prisoner was the thief - that was all.

GEORGE DUNBAR . I am a bookseller, and live in Wych-street. I was going towards Temple-bar, and met the prisoner and another person coming towards me, arm-in-arm, just about Johnson's-court; I was about four yards from the court - they were coming towards Fleet-market, meeting the boy - when they got opposite to me they turned back again, and I saw the prisoner go behind the boy, leaning over his shoulder - the boy had a kind of parcel; he hallooed out directly, and I saw the prisoner and another one leaning over him - the other made off, up Johnson's-court; the prisoner was up to the top of the steps, and Taplin stopped him; I am sure he is one of them: I did not see the parcel taken, but the other ran up the court with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Then it is true that the one who took the parcel ran up the court? A. Yes; the prisoner said, "There goes the man who has got the property, up the court," but I know he was in company with that man; Taplin was coming down the court - it was a dark court; the man had very likely passed him - I went into the newspaper-shop, and said the prisoner was the man who was leaning over the boy's shoulder. The constable was in the shop. I am sure I accused him of being the man; I was loaded with goods; I did not go to Guildhall the next morning; both the persons leaned over the boy's shoulder, and were both behind him; I had never seen the prisoner before; there was a mob after the boy hallooed out. Taylor was not in the newspaper-shop; the master of the shop asked if anybody knew about the business; I did not go forward, as the prisoner was being searched, and he was writing a parcel of names down. I told the master of the shop afterwards that I had seen it; it was in Flemming's Express-office; the prisoner was

in the shop when I said I had seen them arm-in-arm, and had seen it done.

EDMUND TAYLOR . This boy was in my service; I had sent him to the Assay-office with thirty-two pairs of spectacle-frames - I expected him home a little after five o'clock. I have not seen the property since - it was worth 7l.; he stated he had been robbed of them.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I belong to the Assay-office. - On the 24th of November this boy brought thirty-two pairs of spectacle-frames, weighing 16ozs. 9dwts. - I delivered them back to him, at half-past four, or a quarter to five o'clock, in a bag.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am the street-keeper. I received the prisoner into custody - he said nothing to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the boy say, in the shop, who took the bag? A. No. There was a boy said something about the prisoner not taking it; I did not hear any-body say the prisoner was not the man, but that might be said. I did not observe Dunbar in the shop, but I was not sent for till afterwards, and I dare say there were twenty people there.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I have sent to get this boy up - his mother has sworn she will kill him, and has sent him out of the way, that he should not come here.

GEORGE DUNBAR re-examined. I did not speak loud enough in the shop for every body to hear me.

GUILTY. Aged 23. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-23

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

24. MARY BARRETT and MARY O'BRYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 watch, value 6l.; 7 shifts, value 20s.; 1 scarf, value 20s.; 4 gowns, value 5l.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 brooch, value 3s., and 1 whittle, value 15s., the goods of Amelia Matthews , in the dwelling-house of Austin Rochester .

AMELIA MATTHEWS. I am a servant . I had just left my situation in Duncan-place, Leicester-square - I went to lodge at Mr. Rochester's on the 13th of October, and did not know either of the prisoners before that; Barrett lodged there, and I put my trunk into her room, it contained the articles stated in the indictment - it was not locked; I did not know her before, but my fellow-servant had recommended me to lodge there; I would not have taken 50l. for my property. I went there on the 13th, but did not miss all the property till the 16th. O'Bryan was there on the 13th, when I went in; she was also there on the 14th and 15th. On Monday night, the 16th, I gave charge of Barrett - she was searched at the watch-house, but nothing was found on her; I was taking her gown off her on Sunday night, in her own room, and a duplicate of some of my property dropped from her. On the 17th I saw the officer find a silk handkerchief, locked up in her box, and my gold ear-rings were found on the mantelpiece. I saw O'Bryan on Sunday night, in St. Martin's-lane, opposite Chandos-street, with my bonnet and whittle on; the whittle was taken from the box, but not the bonnet; I found a brooch in her pocket when she was searched.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you not very intimate with them? A. No; I never gave them any thing to pawn; a man named Basterfield came to visit me there; I represented him as my brother, but he was not so, and that Barrett knew; I did not wish every one to be as wise as myself; no other man visited me till after I lost my property - then my fellow-servant came; I was never intoxicated; I did not have warning to leave the house. A watch was found at a pawnbroker's, which I claimed.

Q. Did not a lady come forward, and swear it was her watch, and that she had sent her son to pawn it? A. Yes; I could not give the number of it, and Mr. Halls, the Magistrate asked me to open it, but I was not able to do so, being flurried. I told him I had opened it but twice; I did nearly open it, but I was all in a tremble - it was given to the lady, because she gave the number, and I could not- she appeared like a poor, working woman; I had bought it three years ago, at a watchmaker's at Charing-cross - I do not know his name; Mr. Rigby now lives at the shop - I gave 10l. for it - I was house-maid at an hotel in Spring-gardens at that time. I never wound it up, for I was not in the habit of using it; I bought it because I was going out one Sunday, and wished to be back to my time - I did not wind it up after I first had it - my mistress has seen me with it, and offered to come, but the Magistrate did not wish to see her, as she could not identify it; I described the inside works to Mr. Halls, but there were three of the boy's friends to swear against me - Mr. Halls told me to bring somebody else to identify it, but the family I lived with are gone to Spain - the boy had been stopped when he offered it in pawn, and the mother swore it was hers, and she had sent him to pawn it.

Q. Have you ever said you had no charge to make against Barrett, calling her the little b-b? A. Never, nor did I ever use such words; I know Mary Brian by sight; I never told her I had nothing to allege against Barrett - I gave an alarm in the house on the 16th, that I had lost my property - Barrett was taken that day in her own room, and O'Bryan on the Wednesday.

COURT. Q. Did you lose from your trunk a watch worth 6l.? A. Yes, and all the other articles stated in the indictment. I never allowed either of them to take the things to pawn them, or to wear them - they were quite strangers - I believe the watch now to be mine, and it had a key like mine to it.

EDWARD STORR . I am shopman to Mr. Balfour, of Chandos-street. I have a silk gown and a shift, pawned about half-past seven o'clock on Saturday evening, the 14th of October, by Barrett, in the name of Anne Barry , Bedfordbury; she had two duplicates of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the prosecutrix swear to the watch at Bow-street? A. She swore to the best of her belief. The woman who claimed it appeared like a hard-working woman; she was dressed like a servant: I have no doubt but the boy gave her the number of the watch - Mr. Halls gave it to her after some hesitation.

ROBERT DUKE . I am the officer. The Magistrate sent me on Tuesday to search Barrett's lodging, and in her box I found a silk handkerchief, which the prosecutrix

claims, and half a sovereign - I found a pair of gold earrings in a goblet on the mantel-piece; I was informed of the watch being stopped at Queen-square, and I took her there; she described it to Pople, who had it in his possession - the boys who had offered it in pawn were remanded until Saturday, and then sent to Bow-street - the watch was brought there, and she described to the Magistrate the mark of a snake inside the cap, which the woman could not do - she also knew the key, and the string attached to it; she described it before she saw it, but she did not know the number; the number was on the face - it appeared to be a poor tradesman's wife who claimed it. When I apprehended O'Bryan, I found on her the gold setting of a cornelian brooch.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before Mr. Halls? A. Yes; she told him of the mark inside the watch, and she opened the glass cover, but could not open the inner case- I believe the watch now to be hers.

AMELIA MATTHEWS. I believe the setting of this brooch to be mine - the handkerchief, gown, and shift, are mine; also this silk dress; here is the gown I took off Barrett's back.

BARRATT's Defence. She told me she had only two shifts, but she had stolen a pair of sheets from her mistress to make herself some - she asked me to cook a dinner on Sunday for some friends of hers, and told me to put her gown on, that I might not stain my own - she borrowed my lace frill, as she was going to meet a gentleman in the Park, and lent me her handkerchief instead; she gave me the ear-rings.

O'BRYAN's Defence. A woman who works with me at Millbank trod on this brooch, and bent it; she gave it to me - I went to this house on Sunday, and Barrett told me to put on this shawl and old bonnet, as I was going to Chandos-street; I did not like it, but she said it made no difference; I returned, and gave them to her.

JAMES LEMON . I am a watchman of Bedfordbury. The prosecutrix came to me, and said she had been robbed of considerable property - I went to the house; she pointed Barrett out, and said she had seen the watch and gown in pawn in Chandos-street; but at Bow-street next day, she said she had not seen the watch, it had only been offered her there; but the night before she said she had seen it, and that it was pawned in the name of Barrett, the pawnbroker's boy had shown it to her. Barrett said she had pawned the gown at her request, and had given her the six shillings.

WILLIAM ROTTENBURY . I was with Lemon. The prosecutrix said she had been and seen her watch, and that it was pawned for 4l. 10s. in Chandos-street; and she said to Barrett, "Give me the duplicate, and I will give you a sovereign" - she said at the office that she had not seen the watch; Barrett said she had ordered her to pawn the dress.

CAROLINE ROCHESTER . I am landlady of the house. The prosecutrix came and lodged in Barrett's room. On Saturday night they were getting tipsy together; she and a man whom she called her brother remained all night with them, but I did not know it till the morning: I did not give her warning to leave the house; she was to have moved to the third-floor, as the rent of the first was too high - she fetched me up on the Monday night, and said that her brother was robbed of a sovereign - I asked how it happened; she said it was taken out of his trousers - I said to her brother, who was there, "Were your trousers off?" he said Yes - I asked if he had been there all night; he was going to say No; but she said she and him were in bed: she went out in the course of the day, and said she had seen her silk gown and watch in pawn for 4l. 10s. in Barrett's name, and afterwards she said she thought the watch was hers. I had lent the prosecutrix 3s. 6d. that week, and yet she says she had a 10l. note.

FRANCES BALL . I lodge in Rochester's house, with my husband, on the second-floor. I heard the prosecutrix say she had seen her watch in Chandon-street, pawned for 4l. 10s. She said -

- EMISSARY . My husband is a labourer. I work with O'Bryan in a garden at Millbank - I felt something hurt my feet when I was in the garden; I took off my shoe, and found this brooch sticking to my heel; I gave it to O'Bryan.

COURT. Q. Did you go before a Magistrate about this? A. No; I found it this winter, when I was weeding spinnage - I do not know whether it is gold; there was a little dirt on it; we did not clean it, but I can swear it is the same.

BARRETT - GUILTY . Aged 37.

O'BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-24

Before Mr. Justice Park.

25. FREDERICK WILLIAMS , THOMAS WILLIAMS , HENRY DOVER , WILLIAM QUICK , and SAMUEL BASSETT , were indicted for the wilful murder of Sarah Hood .

MR. HENRY SEYMOUR CASEY . I am house-surgeon at Westminster Hospital. On the 9th of November , about half-past eight o'clock at night, the deceased, Sarah Hood, was brought there; she was in very great pain, but I did not observe that she was intoxicated - I have now reason to believe that was the case; she was put to bed, and on examination I found her right thigh bone broken; it was set that night - she appeared to be between sixty and seventy years of age, but I understand she was only forty-five - every attention was paid to her; she died on the 29th. I attribute her death to the sudden and great shock her constitution received from the sudden and great fall, being in a very debilitated state of constitution; she told me she did not think she should ever overcome it - this was sixteen or seventeen days before her death - she never appeared to mend - she never spoke about her death more than at that time; she said she was thrown down by some boys.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. She died from debility of constitution, arising from a shock which she received? A. She certainly died from the injury - her constitution not being sufficiently good to overcome the shock, I judge the immediate cause of her death to be the fall.

ROBERT WATTS . I live at No. 12, Charles-court, Strand . I knew Sarah Hood by sight - she lived in the same court- I do not know what she was. On the 9th of November, about half-past seven o'clock at night, I was in the court, and saw her there, coming from Hungerford-street; I saw

the five prisoners, and other boys whom I did not know - I knew the prisoners well before - I heard Thomas Williams and some of the strange boys say, "Here comes the old Scotch b-wd, let us have a lark with her" - she gave them no offence at all - after saying that, they took her by the head and b-m, and ran her down the court towards her own house; when they pushed her to her door, she fell down sideways on her hip; she groaned bitterly, and said, "Oh! my thigh is broken!" Wilson, who was with me, brought out a light, and the boys tried to blow it out, but he would not let them. Thomas Williams had some mud in his hand; he went round by another boy, and kept throwing it at her as she lay in the gutter.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You were among the boys? A. No, I was not - I saw it done - I was eating some fried fish; I had not been playing with them that day - some of them live in the same court - they did it for a lark; they often played with her; I did not observe that she was drunk; I never saw her in liquor.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am thirteen years old - I live in Charles-court, and know all the prisoners; I had just come home from working at a printing-office, and saw them all there in company together - old Mrs. Hood came along, and Thomas Williams said, "Let us have a lark with this Scotch b-wd;" Frederick Williams instantly laid hold of her, and they all helped to shove her down to her own door, by her head and b-m. My mother, who keeps a shop in the court, called me in, and I did not see her fall - I heard her groaning, and crying "Oh! my thigh is broken" - I brought out a candle, and they tried to blow it out - Frederick Williams helped to pick her up - Thomas Williams got behind a boy, and was pelting her with mud - I saw them laughing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-25

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

26. GEORGE HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , at St. George, Hanover Square , 1 chronometer, value 50l., and 1 waistcoat, value 5s., the goods of Edward William Corry Astley , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am shopman to John Wells , pawnbroker, High-street, Kensington. I know the prisoner. On the 30th of October he came into our shop, between five and six o'clock in the evening; I had never seen him before; the shop was lighted with gas - he offered a chronometer in pawn; he was about ten minutes in the shop - I asked how much he wanted on it; he said, 1l. - I asked where he got it from, as that was a very low value; he said he gave eight guineas for it, eight years ago, and bought it of a groom, who was his fellow-servant; but he did not want more than 1l. on it, as it would be easier to take it out again - that his name was Samuel Clarke, and he lived at No. 5, Turnham-green, in a gentleman's service - I said he might have had a great deal more on it - he said he knew that he could have more on it in town - I gave him 1l., and it has been in my possession ever since: I should think he was ten minutes in the shop; I am quite certain of him.

CAPT. ED. WM. CORRY ASTLEY. I live in Green-street, Grosvenor-square , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. The prisoner was an occasional helper in my stable , but not regularly employed; he was so in November, and was sometimes employed in the house. On Monday, the 6th of November, I received information from the housekeeper, and upon searching the house, missed a chronometer, which had been kept in a drawer in my bed-room, with my confidential papers - the drawer was locked as usual - I missed nothing else; the box of the chronometer was left; it is worth fifty guineas; it was made on purpose for me - I had not been to the drawer for a month, therefore had not seen it for that time - I am certain the one produced is the same; I have had it ten years, as a Captain in the Navy, to ascertain the longitude; I know the number and the maker's name, Earnshaw - the key which is now to it is mine, but not the ribbon.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on this charge - I said nothing to induce him to confess; he said voluntarily that he had taken the chronometer and pawned it at Kensington - I asked him where the duplicate was - he said I should find it in the lining of a sedan-chair over the Captain's stables; I went and found it there; here it is - he also said there was a waistcoat of the prosecutor's at his mother's, at Brook-green - I went there the next morning, and his mother gave it me.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . This is the duplicate I gave the prisoner.

CAPTAIN ASTLEY. I believe this waistcoat to be mine.

The prisoner made no Defence, but four witnesses gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18261207-26

Before Mr. Justice Park.

27. WILLIAM HOWARD HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of Adeline Williamson , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Frederick Smith .

ADELINE WILLIAMSON. I lodge at Mrs. Smith's, No.3, Crescent-street, Euston-square ; her husband's name is Frederick; he is out of town at work, but sleeps there occasionally - there are other lodgers - I am not married - I did not know the prisoner till Thursday, the 26th of October, when I met him in Regent-street, Oxford-street, about half-past two o'clock in the day; he spoke to me first, and asked for my address, which I gave him - he said he should call on me in half an hour's time - I went home, and he came about half-past three o'clock; there was a silver-watch in my room - it was my own - it was on the mantel-piece at first - he remained there till half-past ten o'clock at night - he examined the watch between five and six, or it might be earlier - it was wrapped up in my pocket-handkerchief, and put into the cupboard after he examined it by the person who waited upon me - I took it out of the cupboard and looked at it, and asked him whether he was going to remain, or was going home - I took out of the watch then, and saw that it was half-past ten o'clock, and let it fall on the hearth-rug; he said he should not remain there that night; I took the watch up and laid it on the table, and took up the candle to let him out - I walked on before him, leaving him in the parlour; I thought he was waiting behind to put on his gloves; his umbrella stood by the fire-place; he went away with his

umbrella; there had not been a soul in the room besides him, except my servant - I had not been out of the room at all - directly I had shut the street-door I went up-stairs and missed the watch off the table - I did not go in pursuit of him; but saw him again on the Saturday night, about half-past nine o'clock or a quarter to ten, at the end of Regent-street, by the Haymarket; he looked up and smiled at me; I went up, took hold of his arm, and asked how he was - he said, "Very well;" and tried to run away from me; I said, "O, don't go now" - he said, "I will meet you again in a quarter of an hour down by the County Fire-office;" I held his arm as long as I could, but he forced it from me and ran away - I ran after him hallooing, Stop thief! and a watchman took him.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. He came to you at half-past three o'clock and remained till half-past ten; what had you to drink? A. He asked if I would have any thing to drink; I said, No - he said he was thirsty, and my servant got him some ale - I only know of two pots being got, but I was not awake all the time; I sat on the sofa by the fire, and slept between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. Did you show him the watch, or did he take it up? A. When he came in I said, "You are pretty punctual;" he took the watch off the mantel-piece, and said I could not be in great want of money having such a valuable watch by me - he had told me that he had no money; I had had the watch about four months, I should think; I told him how I came by it; he complained of having no money, and that brought up the statement; I told him it was a bad debt.

Q. Did you not tell him you were walking in Regent-street on Tuesday evening, and met a genteel boy, about thirteen years old, and that he gave you the watch, having been with you that night, and having no money? A. I said a gentleman had been with me, having no money, and said he would leave the watch - I do not know his age, he was quite a young lad; I did not take much notice of him- he was with me all night, and gave me the watch to keep till he could redeem it; he has called for it since it has been missing; I did not ask him for the watch, he gave it into my hand.

Q. Then it was the price of your prostitution? A. Yes; I never promised to compromise this matter if the prisoner would pay 30s. for expenses and 3l. for the watch; I have neither seen him nor sent to him; nothing of the kind has ever passed - he said he did not know me when I met him; he valued it at ten guineas when he was in my room; I missed it while he was in the room, and afterwards found it was in the cupboard wrapped up in the handkerchief - when he was leaving the room I did not say I was going to dress to receive another visiter - I was quite sober; I had but three glasses of ale and some filberts; I do not think he could be very sober; I had neither dinner nor tea, for as soon as I got home he knocked at the door.

ELIZABETH GARNER . I attended on the prosecutrix at the time in question; I was there all day, but did not sleep there - I saw the prisoner at her lodging on the day the watch was missed - I let him in, as near as I can recollect, at half-past two o'clock; they had a little ale and some nuts; two pots were fetched while she was up; the prisoner paid for both ale and nuts; I cannot say whether he was sober or not; they had no tea; I found the watch hanging over the fire-place; while she was asleep the prisoner went out, and while he was gone I wrapped it up in a handkerchief, or part of a white petticoat, and put it into the cupboard; he came in again in five minutes, and said he had ordered some oysters, for he was hungry, and they were brought; he asked the prosecutrix to take some; she said she was too ill; I went home after the oysters came and know nothing more; I did not see the watch after I put it into the cupboard.

Cross-examined. Q. How was she ill? A. She had had no dinner when the prisoner came, and she fainted away with the heat of the room; she drank ale about three times; I suppose she had a glass altogether; I fetched two more pots afterwards, but she drank none of that, and she did not know of its being brought; the prisoner handed the watch over the back of the chair to me, and said, "Here, Mary, go and pledge it for your mistress; it is a pity she should be so short of money, and have such a beautiful watch in the place;" but I did not take it; this was after I had wrapped it up; I do not know how it got into his possession.

COURT. Q. When you would not pawn it, what did he do with it? A. Mistress took it out of his hand, saying,"No, I would sooner want a shilling than pawn it, when it is not my own" - it was not in the handkerchief then, but I am sure I had wrapped it up before that.

JAMES CRUTCHLEY . I am a watchman of Air-street, St. James's. On Saturday night, the 28th of October, an alarm was given of Stop him! or Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and laid hold of him - the prosecutrix came up and gave him in charge for stealing a watch.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a constable of Marlborough-street; the prisoner was brought to the office, and gave his address at Brunswick-terrace, Hackney-road - I afterwards went to the lock-up room, and asked him if that was correct; he said he did not wish to give me trouble, that it was not correct, nor would he tell where he lived, let the consequence be what it would - I afterwards got his proper address from his wife at the office; but the watch has not been found.

ADELINE WILLIAMSON re-examined. It was a silver hunting-watch; I never ascertained the value; the lodgers in the house are married people; I have seen Frederick Smith there; he passed as the landlord.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been twenty-six years in town; I have kept my situation entirely from my friends; I declare most solemnly I know nothing of the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-27

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

28. WILLIAM THORN and SARAH GRAY , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Thomas on the King's-highway, on the 11th of November , and taking from his person, 1 coat. value 20s., and 1 hat, value 7s., his property .

THOMAS THOMAS. I live in Marchmont-street, Burton-crescent, with Gibbons and Co., who are linen-drapers. On the 11th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from the City; I had been to Sun-street, and had left there about half an hour: I was sober; I went up to the City-road to see for a stage; but as there was none,

I returned; I met a female in Golden-lane, and asked her the way to Smithfield; she directed me through a court, which led out of Golden-lane ; I went into the court, and there were three men there - they all pushed me about, and at last knocked me on the forehead with a stick and cut my forehead - they knocked me down; two of them laid me on my face on the pavement, and while they were beating me the third man put his hand into my right-hand trousers pocket and took three sovereigns and some silver - they beat me cruelly about the head while I was on the ground, and took off my hat and a great-coat, which Harris had lent me; they tried to take my clothes off, but could not; I tried to get up, but they struck me again under the left ear with their fists, and that stunned me - as soon as I recovered I hallooed out, Murder! and Stop thief! I had not called out before, except when I was on the ground; but my face was so close to the ground that I could not be heard - on recovering, I was all over mud, and they were just running away in different directions; I cannot swear to either of them; but when they were brought to the watch-house I said it was as much like them as possible; I cannot say that Gray is the woman who directed me down the court; a watchman came to my assistance and took me to the watch-house; I was all over blood and dirt; I described the great-coat and the men as well as I could, and in a short time the coat was brought to the watch-house; I have not recovered the hat or money.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did you come out of Golden-lane into the court? A. It led out of Golden-lane, I believe, but I do not know much of the neighbourhood.

ELIZABETH TURNER . I live in Bell-alley, leading into Goswell-street - I am married. On this day five weeks, about one o'clock at night, I was going home with my husband, whom I had met; I go out to wash and mangle at Peerless-pool; I was going through Green Arbour-court and saw a gentleman with a light coat on; three men were on one, side of him, and a female on the other; they were all four pushing him about backwards and forwards; I did not know the men, but by the woman's voice I thought it was Sarah Gray - I saw her, but did not go up to look at her face, but know her voice; I have known her some years - I said to her, after they had run away,"Oh! for shame, Sarah Gray - I am afraid you are one of those who helped to rob that poor man."

Q. When you first saw them, did you hear her say any thing? A. No - but I am convinced it was her, because she had no bonnet on, nor had she when I spoke to her - I was within three yards of her. When I spoke to her she used a bad expression, and asked how many I had robbed in my time; I know it was her I spoke to - the man they were pushing about had a light-coloured coat, with mother-o'-pearl buttons behind - I saw that, as it was a very moonlight night; I only saw them push him about as I went in doors, but when we heard him cry Murder! my husband and I went to his assistance; they were all gone from him then, but I met Gray coming down the steps, and said I was convinced, by her person, she was the same woman; I am quite sure, by her person, that she is the same woman; she went down Crown-court when I spoke to her, and I saw no more of her; the prisoner was just under the gateway by Green Arbour-court, without hat or coat - I went with him to the watch-house, as the watchman said he had got the coat.

Cross-examined. Q. Where does the court lead to? A. Golden-lane; it is Turk's Head-court - I thought the three men were rather tall - I am sure there was a woman with them when I first saw them, but I did not speak to her then; I judge, from her height and voice, that it was her.

JOHN POULSTON . I am a baker, and live in Golden-lane. On the 12th of November, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I stood at the end of Basket-alley; I saw two men enter the alley - one man without a hat had a bundle under his arm - the watchman followed them; he sprang his rattle in a few minutes, and I went up the court, and picked up this great coat in Basket-alley, which leads into Golden-lane - I cannot say whether it is what the man had under his arm - I picked it up in the way they had gone, but had then lost sight of them; whether they went over that precise spot, I cannot say - I carried the coat to the watch-house, after marking it.

JOSEPH SIMONS . I am a watchman of St. Luke. On Sunday morning, the 12th of November, at near two o'clock, I was coming from the watch-house; I came down White's-yard into Basket-alley, and there saw the prisoner Thorn with something under his arm - I said, "I do not think this is right," and he dropped it; he was not above five yards off, and could hear what I said - he ran up White's-yard, and I after him, springing my rattle and calling Stop thief! Poulston picked it up - just as he turned the corner into Whitecross-street, the watchman stopped him- I only lost sight of him for half a minute, while he turned round the corner - I had seen him before, but did not know his name; he is the man who dropped the bundle - Poulston came up in two or three minutes - we all went to the watch-house, and he left the coat there - I am sure Thorn is the man who dropped it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. This was nearly two o'clock? A. Yes. I did not see him stopped, but was close behind - he had got about six yards from the corner; there was nobody running but him and me - the watchman who stopped him was coming towards us, hearing the rattle. I have no doubt of his being the man.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. On the 12th of November Thorn was brought to the watch-house by Simons and Yates - two more persons were brought in about that time. Poulston gave me the coat.

SAMUEL YATES . I am a watchman. I heard the rattle spring at two o'clock in the morning; I was at the corner of Banner-street and Whitecross-street - I ran to the spot, and met the prisoner coming out of White's-yard - I caught him in my arms; Simons was three or four yards behind him - he came up directly, and said, "That is the man" - nobody else was running.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not running towards Golden-lane? A. He ran towards me - he must have turned back to go to Golden-lane: I took him within fifteen or twenty yards of White's-yard - he had a cap on, which he threw away just before he got to me: I saw that cap at the watch-house.

JOHN BROWN . I am watch-house keeper. In consequence of information I went to Gray's lodging, in Nag's Head-court, Golden-lane, at three o'clock in the morning; I knocked at the next house, but she looked out at the

window of the adjoining house, and asked who I wanted - I thought I knew her voice, and on holding up my lantern, recognized her; I went up to her room, and said I wanted her; she had no bonnet on; she said she had been there three hours - she was quite dressed.(Coat produced and sworn to.)

MR. BRODRICK to JOHN POULSTON . Q. They were coming out of the alley? A. No; they were going in; I was talking with the watchman when I saw them; I cannot say what they were carrying; I went into the alley in about two minutes, and took up the coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-28

Before Mr. Justice Park.

29. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 coat, value 50s., the goods of William Walker , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WALKER. I keep the Six Bells public-house, at Willsden . On Sunday, the 1st of October, about one o'clock, the prisoner came, and asked if he could have a dinner; he stopped there all the afternoon - he dined with a gentleman named Cornwell, whom I knew - he is a respectable man, and lives in Mary-le-bone-street; they paid the reckoning between them, and Cornwell said if I could accommodate the prisoner with a bed he would tarry all night; he came down before eight o'clock in the morning, and asked for a small bundle, which he had left at the bar - I gave it him, and he took it up-stairs with him - he came down in about a quarter of an hour, and asked what I thought of the morning - I said I thought it would be fine, and went to milk my cows, leaving him at the door; when I returned he was gone; I went after him, in consequence of what my wife stated, but did not overtake him; nobody but him slept in the house, except my wife and child; he had not paid for his bed. I missed my coat, and have not seen it since.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. The prisoner was apprehended on another charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-29

30. WILLIAM BROWN was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 coat, value 50s,, and 1 waistcoat, value 10s., the goods of William Wetherall , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WETHERALL. I keep the Lamb public-house, in Hertford-street, Fitzroy-square . On Thursday, the 26th of October, about one o'clock in the day, I found the prisoner in my parlour, with a pint of ale before him; when I came in he recognized me as having lived in part of the same family as himself, seven or eight years ago, and I recollected him; I asked what he was doing - he said he had come to town with his master for a week, to get some things - I asked who his master was - he hesitated, and I asked where his master lived; he paused, and then said his master was Mr. Rayne or Raynard, of Maidenhead Thicket; he said he would come and smoke a pipe some evening before he left town - he came next evening, and had a pipe in the parlour; he came to the bar about eleven o'clock, and asked if I could accommodate him with a bed, and the servant made him up a bed in the club-room - there were three or four suits of clothes in that room; he supped with me in the bar, staid all night, and came down about eight o'clock in the morning, saying that he had slept too long by an hour, and should get great anger, for his master would be up; he had a pennyworth of gin, and went away, saying he would come back to lunch, but did not. After he was gone I went upstairs, and missed my coat and waistcoat - I did not observe that he had any bundle; I have not seen them since - I did not see him again till the 17th of November, when he was apprehended; it was a blue coat, worth 40s. - I had had it twelve months, but had not worn it much; I would have given 1l. for the waistcoat - I had worn them the day before.

SOPHIA SIMPSON . I am servant to Mr. Wetherall. I made the prisoner up a bed - I moved my master's clothes off the table to another table at the further end of the room; I missed them half an hour after the prisoner was gone - my master had missed them before me; another man slept in the house that night, but not in the same room - he went out before six o'clock, and had lodged there some time.

MR. WETHERALL. The other person slept at the top of the house; his name was Andrews - he had lodged twelve months with me; I never doubted his integrity.

JOHN HILL . I am a chair-man. I took the prisoner on the 17th of November, at the Weymouth Arms public-house, Portland-place - he asked where I was going with him; I said to High-street Office; he refused to go with me, but I made him.

GUILTY. Aged 36. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-30

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

31. EDMUND LITTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 5 bobbins of silk, value 30s., the goods of William Underhill , his master .

The prisoner pleaded. GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-31

32. JAMES SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 pair of scissars, value 6d., and 1 towel, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Keating and others, his masters .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-32

33. CHARLES COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 15 1/2lbs. of beef, value 9s. 4d. , the goods of Ambrose Sowter .

JOHN ATTERWELL . I am a letter-founder, and live in Silk-street, Grub-street. On Saturday evening, the 2d of December, about a quarter before nine o'clock, I was within six yards of Sowter's shop, and saw the prisoner take this beef off the board in front of the shop, and put it under his coat; I went up, and asked what he had got - he said Nothing; I said I knew better, and took it from under his coat; 1s. 10 1/2d. were found on him; I had asked how much he had got, and he pulled out 3 1/2d.

AMBROSE SOWTER. This beef is mine.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 73.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-33

34. WILLIAM LAYTON, alias EDEN , & GEORGE JONES , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of Novem

ber , 4 pieces of printed shawls, containing 112 shawls, value 6l., and 2 pieces of printed cotton, containing 48 yards, value 4l., the goods of William Haigh and James Clarke ; 1 pen-knife, value 2s.; 1 pencil-case, value 2s.; 1 gold seal, value 2l., and 1 medal, value 6d. , the goods of James Stiff .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JAMES STIFF. I am in the service of William Haigh and James Clarke, who occupy the ground-floor warehouse of No. 12, Bucklersbury . On the 12th of November I left the warehouse at half-past seven o'clock in the evening; I believe every thing was safe - the packages were all complete; there was a pen-knife, a pencil-case, a seal, and a medal in my desk. I was sent for the same night; I found the desk broken open, and my things taken away; the packages were not as I had left them. - I have found every thing but the seal. William Nicholson locked the premises up as I came away, and took the key with him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You were not the last person there? A. We left about the same time; I had locked my desk about three minutes before, but did not notice the articles.

ANN WATKINS . I live at No. 15, Size-lane, and have the care of the house, No. 12, Bucklersbury; it is let out in offices. I have the care of the upper part, over Mr. Haigh's warehouse, and keep the keys; I go there every evening to see that all is secure, and to fasten the outer door. I went there on the 25th of November, about half-past ten o'clock - I was going to open the door, but there seemed an obstruction inside; I tried to open it three times; hearing a noise in the passage I turned the latchkey down, to prevent anybody coming out, and then called, through the key-hole, "Is anybody inside?" I received no answer - nobody sleeps there. I then called the watchman three times; Willsher, the officer, came over, and waited outside - I got several persons to assist; I entered the house at the private door, with two or three officers; Willsher stood at the private door - I heard glass break, and when I got in I saw Mr. Haigh's warehouse-door open - it ought to have been shut; the first-floor window was open, and four panes of glass were broken in the sky-light, which is under it - they were quite safe that morning; the leads by the sky-light lead from the window to a small yard of the house - persons could let themselves down from those leads into the yard.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How high are those leads? A. As high as the first-floor, but there is a projection where they could have rested.

JOHN WILLSHER . I am an officer of Cheap Ward, and live in Little Bell-alley, Coleman-street. On the 25th of November, between ten and half-past ten o'clock, I heard Watkins give an alarm; I immediately went to the door of No. 12, Bucklersbury, listened, and heard persons in the passage - I went to the warehouse door, and held it fast; I found it shake - they were endeavouring to get out there; I went over to the Green Man public-house, and called Hawkins to assist, and then went to the watch-house, for further assistance, returned, and heard two distinct smashes of glass; Hawkins went to the door of No. 11, and got admission; the prisoners were taken - their hands were cut, as if by glass - I went into the premises, and found Mr. Haigh's door was broken open by great force - I found a bag there, containing four shawls, with printed borders, and two pieces of cotton print - the desk and a trunk were also broken open, and I found a phoshorus box, a dark-lantern, and a jemmy or crow-bar.

BENJAMIN HAWKINS . I am an officer of Cheap Ward. I went to No. 11, Bucklersbury, which has a window communicating with the leads of No. 12, and on opening that window I saw the two prisoners in the yard, by those leads - the sky-light of No. 12 was broken, and Jones' hands were bleeding; the prisoners were in a stooping position, and when I opened the window they rose up - I pulled them into the window, and secured them - they could not have entered that yard except by coming through No. 12.

Cross-examined. Q. Why, how did you get into the yard? A. I did not get in - they arose up, and I pulled them in at the window - I had another person with me.

JOHN HODDY . I am waiter at No. 10, Bucklersbury, which is an eating-house. I went with Hawkins into No. 11, and on the ground-floor is a window, which looks into the yard of No. 12 - we found the two prisoners there, standing close to the window; I do not think they could get out, except by coming through No. 11. I pulled Jones through the window.

Cross-examined. Q. You live at the dining-room? A. Yes. Nos. 10 and 11 are both dining-rooms - there is no communication to the yard from No. 10. I suppose we dine one hundred and seventy persons every day.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect either of the prisoners dining there? A. No; Jones' hands were dirty and bleeding - he said, "See what a condition I am in;" the window I drew him through was not broken. I did not go into the yard to see if any glass was broken.

ROBERT HARRISON . I am beadle of Cheap Ward. I took the prisoners from the watch-house to the Compter. I afterwards went to No. 12, Bucklersbury, and found an empty black bag - I found some skeleton and picklock-keys in the yard where the prisoners were taken, and a piece of whalebone - they were covered over with a handkerchief: this was on the Monday morning. The skylight is on the leads, and there were marks on the wall, down the leads, of plaster having been scraped off, as if persons had let themselves down into the yard. The window of No. 11 opened into that yard. The prisoners were asked what they had to say, and refused to say any thing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go on the leads? A. No - they are eleven or twelve feet high: I could get down easily.

JOHN WILLSHER . I produce the print and shawls, the dark-lantern, the phosphorus-box, and the crow-bar - the bolt was forced off the inner door of the warehouse, which opens into the passage - I found the implements in the warehouse.

JAMES STIFF. These goods are the prosecutors', and were on the premises that night, but were not in this bag - neither of the bags were there, and are not ours - I picked up two skeleton-keys on the premises that night. I had left the warehouse door safe - Nicholson might have locked it a moment after I left. The shutter of the door was broken open.

LAYTON - GUILTY . Aged 58.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-34

35. JOHN BUNYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , at the Precinct of St. Bartholomew the Less , 1 mare, price 3l. , the property of John Berryman .

JOHN BERRYMAN, SEN. I have a son named John Berryman - I live in Kent-street, Borough, and am a costermonger - I sell saw-dust . On Friday, the 8th of September, I had my mare in Smithfield , for sale, and asked the prisoner to run her down for me, and show her for sale, as I am lame - this was between three and four o'clock. I knew him before - he was with me on the Friday before: he was away ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - I saw him then, and told him to put her against the rails, and I gave it my little boy to mind while I went round the market. I have never seen it since - I lost it entirely: it was worth 3l. I saw the prisoner next day- he saw me, and ran away. I found him in custody afterwards, last Session.

JOHN BERRYMAN, JUN. I am between fourteen and fifteen years old. I was in Smithfield-market - my father gave me the mare to mind while he went round the market. The prisoner came, took it away from me, and told me to go to my father - he cut me with a whip, told me my father wanted me, and told me to go to him - I went to my father, and when I came back I saw neither the prisoner nor the mare: I have not seen it since. I saw him again when he was in custody, not before.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not seen me several times since? A. I saw him once at the corner of Catherine Wheel-alley, where he lived - he asked me if my father was at home, and said he was ashamed to come down to him - that was all. I had a basket on my head, and did not try to have him secured.

JOHN GROSSMITH . I am a constable of Union-hall. I apprehended the prisoner in Great Dover-street, at the back of Kent-street, and told him it was for stealing Berryman's horse; he said he had sold it, and meant to take the money to him, but all on a sudden he lost it out of his pocket in the market - this was on the 29th of October: I had been a long time looking after him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming over Blackfriar's-bridge, and met this man with an old horse - he said,"You may as well come and run the horse for me, as you often do" - he said, "Take this, and try to sell it - ask 40s. for it:" I ran it about the market, and he sent the boy to say he had bought another one. I went back to the father, who gave me the mare - a man came, and asked what I wanted for it - I said 3l.; then he came and asked if I wanted to change it - I said No, to sell it; he said if it would go in harness he would buy it - I put it in harness, and he offered 45s. for it; another man offered me the same. The prosecutor said, "It cost me 50s., and the lowest you can take for it is 56s., and if that man bids you for it, I will come up and bid more;" a man came up and bid me 56s., and I sold it to him. While I was looking about for the prosecutor I lost the money.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, as it was not taken from any stable or field.

Reference Number: t18261207-35

36. WILLIAM DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , the carcases of two pigs, value 2l. 15s. , the goods of William Rhodes the elder.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of John Swan .

WILLIAM RHODES, JUN. My father, William Rhodes, is a cheesemonger , and lives in Oxford-market - he deals in pork. On Friday, the 10th of November, I bought these carcases at Mr. Swan's, a salesman , in Newgate-market , about six o'clock in the morning - I was accompanied by Boulter, whom I employed to carry them to the scale, where I saw them weighed, and paid for them; he then hung them on some hooks in Swan's shop - I came back in half an hour or three quarters, with our porter for them, and they were gone; I have not seen them since - I gave 2l. 15s. for them. The prisoner was a neighbour of ours.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. His father is a poulterer? A. No, he is a butcher - the prisoner assists in the business in Oxford-market - he was taken up on Monday evening, the 13th of November - I saw him in his father's shop on the Saturday; the witness Harman was not with me; I showed Harman the shop on Friday evening, but I did not point out the prisoner to him - I was not in Harman's company, I merely pointed out the shop; I went to the corner of the place, and told him where the shop was - I was sixty yards from the house, and could not say whether the prisoner was in the shop or not; I never pointed the prisoner out to him; I never said to Harriet Jones, that if Mr. Davies would pay me for the pigs, there would be an end of it, and the proceedings would be dropped.

WILLIAM HARMAN . I am a butcher. On the 10th of November, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, Mr. Rhodes bought two pigs - I saw the carcases hanging opposite the scale in Swan's shop; I had weighed them. Mr. Rhodes gave his name as belonging to them - he paid for them, and went out with Boulter, who had come with him - the pigs hung there about ten minutes - the prisoner then came into Swan's shop, and said, "I want two pigs in the name of Rhodes;" I saw no one with him - I pointed them out, thinking it was all right, and let him take them away on his shoulder; I had seen him before, but did not know whether he was a porter in the market, or what: Mr. Rhodes had said he would either call or send for them - he brought Clarke, the porter, in about half an hour for them; I said that a person had fetched them - on the Friday evening Mr. Rhodes pointed out the house where the prisoner lived, which is his father's shop - I walked by about nine o'clock that evening, saw the prisoner walking about the shop, and was perfectly satisfied that he was the person who called for the pigs; I am quite certain of him. Mr. Rhodes was not with me then. On the Monday evening, I took Gibbons and another constable with me, and he was taken - I did not go into the shop myself, and did not hear him say any thing.

Cross-examined. Q. When did Rhodes point out the house? A. About six o'clock on Friday evening; he had received information - I had not seen the prisoner after six o'clock that morning - I walked by the shop two or three times, to be sure about him, but did not go for a constable till Monday - I was positive about him - he was taken at his father's on Monday: I never said I had no

recollection of the person who came - I said, if I saw him I should know him again.

Q. Have you not said, in the presence of Frederick Boulter , that you should not be able to swear to him? A. Never at any time - I have said that I thought he had a smock frock or an apron on, and I could not be positive of that, but I should be sure to know his face - I have never said to anybody that I did not know the man to whom I gave the pigs. Mr. Rhodes did not point him out to me; he was eight or ten yards from me.

JOHN GARNER . I am assistant to Mr. Swan - he is a salesman at Newgate-market. I sold these pigs to Rhodes; Harman was down at the scale, weighing them - I did not see them taken away.

JOHN GARLAND . I am journeyman to Mr. Shankster, pork butcher, of Oxford-market. On Friday morning, the 10th of November, about a quarter before seven o'clock, I met the prisoner with two pigs on his shoulder, on Holborn-bridge, going towards Holborn-hill, in a direction towards Oxford-market - he said, "Good morning" - I knew him perfectly well: when I got home, about nine o'clock, I went to his father's shop, and asked the father where the two pigs were - the father, being deaf, did not hear me; and the prisoner, who was in the shop, held up his finger, and said, "Hush!" by which I understood that I was not to say any thing more to his father - he came out of the shop, and told me that a man at Islington had bought four of those pigs, and that he had carried two of them home for the man to Islington - he after that came to me and said that a man had given him 1s. to carry the two pigs to Thompson and Fearon's, on Holbornhill - he had at first said that he had carried them to Islington. Mr. Rhodes came to me in the afternoon, and I told him what the prisoner had said.

Cross-examined. Q. What time were you at this young man's father's? A. About nine o'clock on Friday morning - I did not go into the shop - the father was outside the door; I saw his sister in the shop.

JAMES GIBBONS . I am a constable. I was applied to on Monday night to take the prisoner at his father's house - he went willingly with me.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that his father had sent him to Smithfield to try to buy a calf - that he called at Newgate-market, and saw nobody but Clarke, a porter, whom he knew - that as he returned from Smithfield, without buying the calf, he saw a man at the corner of Newgate-street, with four pigs on his shoulder, and he asked him to take two of them (as they were slipping) as far as Hatton-garden, which he did, and the man there took them off his shoulder, and put them into a cart.

FREDERICK BOULTER . I am a butcher in the employ of Mr. Hayward, of Oxford-market. On the Friday morning these pigs were stolen - I saw Harman, the salesman, and heard him questioned about the man who had the pigs; he said he did not know him, and should not be able positively to swear to him: I asked how he was dressed; he said he could not positively say, for he was busy at his weights at the time.

COURT. Q. Did you ask whether, if he saw the man again, he should know him? A. Yes, he said he did not know whether he should know him positively - I saw him at his master's shop, about half-past six o'clock, on the 10th of November; but this conversation was about twenty minutes after seven. I had not seen the prisoner, and did not know they were stolen - I asked him who he had given them to; he said some man had fetched them - I was with Mr. Rhodes when they were bought; and when he questioned Harman, he said, in Rhodes' presence, that he should not know the man who took them; he said so positively - I had hung the pigs up myself in the shop - I saw the prisoner in his father's shop, about two hours afterwards - Clarke and Hodwell were present when Harman said this.

GEORGE CLARKE . I am a porter of Newgate-market. I saw Boulter there on the 10th of November, when I went with young Mr. Rhodes to inquire for two pigs which he had bought - Harman said, he could not positively swear to the man who had them, if he saw him. I said I thought it strange he should not know the man who fetched them. I heard him say this more than once - he said no further than that he could not positively swear to him if he saw him.

COURT. Q. Were you present when he saw the prisoner at his father's? A. No; I know nothing further.

JOHN HODWELL . I was in Clarke's employ, and was at Newgate-market with him on the 10th of November, when Harman was asked if he knew the man who took the pigs - he said positively he did not think he did know him, and he could not swear to him.

COURT. Q. At that time the prisoner was not in his sight? A. No.

HARRIET JONES . I live at No. 109, Great Tichfield-street. Last Saturday night, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw young Mr. Rhodes - he said, if the prisoner's father would have paid for the pigs at the time, he would have dropped all further proceedings.

COURT. Q. How came you to be with him? A. I went to buy some butter at his shop - the prisoner's sister had told me about the pigs - I have been acquainted with the prisoner and his family about five months. Rhodes said this to me without my naming any thing about it - I went there to buy a quarter of a pound of butter, and he began telling me the whole particulars - he said it was an unfortunate affair about William Davies; I said it was - he said, if Mr. Davies had given them the money for the pigs at the time, his father would have dropped all further proceedings.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did he know you were acquainted with Davies? A. Yes; the prisoner is a married man, and I live with my father.

ANN DAVIES . I am the prisoner's sister - I was in my father's shop on Friday morning, the 10th of November, at nine o'clock; I did not see Garland there all that day; I saw young Mr. Rhodes come by the shop between eight and nine o'clock that evening; Harman, the salesman, was with him - my brother was in the shop - I heard young Mr. Rhodes say to Harman, "That is him in the smock-frock" - they did not come in; they were at the next door - my brother had a smock-frock on then, but he wore a drab-coloured coat in the morning.

WILLIAM DAVIES . I am the prisoner's father. I was in the shop from seven o'clock in the morning of the 10th of November, and he never went out all the morning;

Garland was neither in the shop, nor in front of it all that day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-36

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 11.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sargeant Arabin.

37. EMMA GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 ring, value 10s.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 5s.; 2 seals, value 30s.; 1 watch, value 40s.; 1 book, value 6d., and 1 1/2 yard of lace, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Newman ; 1 cap, value 1s.; 3 yards of ribbon, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissars, value 6d.; 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 14 shillings, the property of Ann Knape , in the dwelling-house of the said John Newman ; and JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously receiving the said ring, being part and parcel of the said goods, well knowing it to have been stolen .

ANN KNAPE. I am housekeeper to John Newman, who keeps a public-house in Sun-yard, Nightingale-lane, in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate ; the prisoner, Green, was fourteen days in his service, as maid of all work . On Sunday morning, the 12th of November, about twenty minutes to twelve o'clock, I saw her standing at the next door talking to a young man - I told her, her master would be very angry, and said, "I have found you out; what, is that your sweatheart?" she said, No, that was not the right one, but he was the brother of a young man who was in trouble; a neighbour came and gave me information - I mentioned this to master - an officer was fetched and her box was opened, but I was not present; I afterwards found in her box a pair of scissars, 1 1/2 yard of lace, and a spelling-book, which belonged to my master; also a lace cap of mine and the trimmings of a bonnet - this was on Monday, I did not look at her box myself on Sunday - I have the key of a drawer, in which Mr. Newman keeps his money, and from which was missing two sovereigns and a half, and fourteen shillings; I got the key from Mary James - a pair of ear-rings was also missing.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am a headborough. I was sent for on Sunday, and the prisoner's master said he had lost a ring and several things, and suspected her - she said she knew nothing of it - I went up and opened her trunk in her presence, it was unlocked - I found a pair of ear-rings and a gold drop - she said her master gave them to her - I asked what she had done with the gold ring which had not been found - she said she had given it to a young man, named Saunders, that she was sweeping and had found it among the dirt.

MARY JAMES . I was servant to Mrs. Sheen, who is a widow, and was turned away in consequence of this circumstance - I live in Bushel's-rents. I have known Green seven years - I was going up Nightingale-lane between ten and eleven o'clock, on the night of the 12th of November, she ran after me and asked if I had a pocket on; I said, No - she asked if I would mind a purse for her till she called in the evening for it - she gave me the purse - I never looked into it - Ann Knape came, and I gave her the same purse - this is it (looking at it).

ANN KNAPE. The purse contained a sovereign, seven shillings, two sixpences, a pair of ear-rings, and the key of master's drawer; they were all in it when she delivered it to me - I know the ear-rings very well.

JOHN JAMES DOWNES . I am a constable. I apprehended Saunders about eleven o'clock on Saturday night, the 11th of November; I heard the rattles spring, and found the watchman securing him at Wapping - I took him to the watch-house and asked his name, which he refused to give - I found this ring on him, and asked where he got it - he said it was immaterial to me.

JOHN NEWMAN. I keep this house. I know this ring to be mine, and the ear-ring belongs to my child.

GREEN's Defence. The money was given to me by a young man, who is gone to sea - I found the ring when I was sweeping the tap-room, and gave it to Saunders - I picked up the key, but did not know it was in the purse.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

SAUNDERS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-37

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

38. JAMES COOL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 2 coats, value 4l.; 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 10s.; 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 pencil-case, value 6d.; 1 knife, value 6d.; 1 tooth-pick, value 6d., and 8 shillings, the property of Richard Clark Bladon , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD CLARK BLADON. I lodge in Upper Conway-street, St. Pancras - it is Mr. Eusted's house and he lives there. On Tuesday, the 28th of November, when I got up in the morning, about nine o'clock, I missed all these articles from my bed-room - they were all safe over night - I had worn some of them - the prisoner slept in the same room that night, and was in bed at eleven o'clock when I went to bed - I did not hear him get up, but he was gone when I awoke at nine o'clock; I gave an alarm, and went to look after him, but did not find him - he was apprehended on Saturday, the 2d of December; I saw him at Bow-street, and he had got a pair of my new trousers and my black waistcoat on - I saw my purse, pencil-case, and silver tooth-pick found on him, with some ancient coins of mine.

JEREMIAH THOMAS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at a public-house at the end of Bedford-row, by Gray's-inn - he said nothing to the charge - I saw Curtis find the things on him.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found a purse, five old coins, a pen-knife, silver pencil-case, and tooth-pick - he had the trousers and the waistcoat on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had had the pencil-case for a week.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 25. Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-38

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

39. GEORGE TOBIN and THOMAS WEBSTER were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 31 yards of silk, value 3l. , the goods of Thomas Stevens .

FREDERICK ROBERT STEVENS . I am apprentice to my

uncle Thomas Stevens, who is a haberdasher , and lives next door to the Angel at Islington . On the 16th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, Tobin, came into the shop alone - I did not know him before; he asked for a quarter of a yard of calico, at 3d. or 4d. a yard - I went into the warehouse, which joins the shop, to fetch it, leaving him by the counter in the shop; there were several people there - we were busy - I returned and cut him off the calico, for which he paid 1d.; and at seven o'clock I found him at the watch-house - I had not seen Webster at the shop.

Cross-examined by J. H. ALLEY. Q. Did you see him steal any thing? A. No; I asked him to go to the other side of the shop; but he did not.

JAMES WILLIAM HARRIS . I am apprentice to Mr. Stevens - I saw Tobin in the shop on the 16th of November - I was serving a lady out of a box, which contained these goods - I only know they were in the box a quarter of an hour before they were missed - I did not see Tobin do any thing - I saw him go to the further end of the shop.

WILLIAM HENRY WADE . I am servant to Mr. Lee, who lives at No. 41, High-street, Islington, about a furlong from Mr. Stevens'. On the 16th of November, about half-past three o'clock, Tobin came into the shop alone, and bought a quarter of a yard of calico for 1d.; I stopped him as he was going out, in consequence of information, and asked what he wanted it for; he said he came from Chelsea and wanted to mend his shirt with it - he was taken to the watch-house about half an hour afterwards - Webster had been pointed out to me, and I went after him - I saw two or three different quarters of yards of calico found on Tobin at the watch-house; that I sold to him, was among them - a lady's silk handkerchief and one or two quarters of yards of calico were found on Webster- when I stopped Tobin, as he was leaving our shop, I saw Webster sitting nearly opposite the shop, with his apron full of something - I followed him, and picked up two pieces of sarsnet, one shawl, and one cloak - they laid in the way he had run, but I had not seen him drop them.

GEORGE PYGALL . I live in the Back-road, Islington. On the 16th of November, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw Webster running round the corner very fast, and stopped him; he had an apron on, but nothing in it then - his hat fell off with two pieces of calico in it - he asked me to let him go, saying he had only knocked a man down; but I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he ever out of your sight? A. No; he met me as I came out of my shop; I cannot say he had not been quarrelling with anybody.

WILLIAM BIRDSEYE . I have two pieces of silk, which Wade brought to the watch-house with the prisoners.

WILLIAM HENRY WADE . I picked up these two pieces of silk over a railing by the road side, and gave them to Birdseye.

JAMES WILLIAM HARRIS . These two pieces of silk are Mr. Stevens' - they were in the shop a quarter of an hour before Tobin came in laying on the counter, and he stood by them - I did not sell them - other persons were as near to them as he was.

JOHN SHEARS . I saw Webster throw this silk and the other goods away.

TOBIN's Defence. I left home about three o'clock to look for a situation, and seeing the calico in Lee's shop, I called there for a quarter of a yard.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-39

41. GEORGE TOBIN and THOMAS WEBSTER were again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 shawl, value 2s. 6d., and 1 cloak, value 5s. , the goods of James Withenbury Hawthorn .

HARRIET EDWARDS . I live at No. 8, Islington-green. On the 16th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing Mr. Hawthorn's shop, and saw Tobin run out with this shawl in his hand - it was not tied in any thing; he scrambled it up like a pocket handkerchief; I saw him give it to a man who was standing three or four yards from the shop, on the same side of the way; I saw Webster when he was at the watch-house, between four and five o'clock, but cannot swear to him. The man was dressed in a brown great coat, and had a blue apron on, which he put the shawl into, and went down the road; Tobin went away round the pavement, then returned, and met the man again in the road; he stood with him about a minute, and then left him - I followed him into Mr. Lee's, a linen-draper's-shop; I went in and mentioned this, and had him secured. Webster was dressed the same as the man who received the shawl, but I cannot say whether he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Should you know the shawl again? A. It was the same colour as the one produced.

JOHN SHEARS . I am shopman to James Withenbury Hawthorn, a linen-draper , of Islington . Edwards came to our shop - I went, with Wade, to Mr. Lee's, and found Tobin in Mr. Lee's custody - it was between three and four o'clock; I saw Webster sitting on a rail, directly opposite Lee's door, with a brown coat and blue apron on - he came towards me, and I laid hold of his coat; he struck me and ran off, and I after him - when he had got to the other side of the way I saw him throw these goods out of his apron over the rails; it was the silk - also a shawl and cloak; he threw the shawl over first; Wade picked them up. As he turned the corner of Back-road I called Stop thief! and he was stopped; he is the man who threw the goods away.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him throw them away? A. Yes. I know the shawl by the pattern - it has no mark on it; the manufacturer makes for many persons - I know the cloak to be Mr. Hawthorn's, by the shape and by the ticket which is on it; it is very small, and was made from a remnant of cloth which we could not use.

WILLIAM HENRY WADE . I stopped Tobin in Mr. Lee's shop - I then went to Mr. Hawthorn's, and saw Webster opposite there; he ran away from Shears. I found the silk, a cloak, and a shawl over the rails; I did not see him throw them away, but saw them laying loose over the rails there as I ran - Shears was then pursuing him, a very short distance before me. I took the property to the watch-house, and delivered it to Birdseye - I examined it first.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was Webster out of your sight? A. Not a moment - he is the man who ran from Shears.

WILLIAM BIYDSEYE . I received these goods from

Wade. When the prisoners were brought to the watch-house he charged them with stealing the cloak and shawl, and they said nothing about it.

JOHN SHEARS . I know the shawl and cloak; I had seen them both in the shop one hour before; the shawl hung on a line in the shop, near the window, about two yards from the door; the cloak laid on a box by the side of it. They were missed about an hour after Tobin had been in the shop, between four and five o'clock, but I had not seen him there.

GEORGE PYGALL . I heard the cry of Stop thief! about five o'clock, and stopped Webster, who had a brown coat and blue apron on.

WEBSTER's Defence. I had a few words with a man, and struck him - he wanted to give charge of me, and hallooed Stop thief! I ran away.

TOBIN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

WEBSTER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-40

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

42. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , at St. Sepulchre , 2 brass lamps, value 4l., the goods of the Reverend Edmund Henry Penny , clerk , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS PICKARD . I am servant to the Reverend Edmund Henry Penny, who lives in Charterhouse-square , and rents the house. On the 2d of December about half-past two o'clock, I went up stairs to answer the dining-room bell, and as I came down to the foot of the stairs, I observed some one in the knife-house, which is part of the dwelling-house, and joins it; his back was towards me. I went into the knife-house, and found it was the prisoner - he had these two patent brass lamps in a basket, which was on the ground, before him; there were a few lemons in the basket; he turned round with two lemons in his hand, and asked if I wanted any lemons; I had put the lamps on a shelf in the knife-house before - he could reach them down; I asked what he was going to do with the lamps - he said, "Nothing at all;" I collared him, and called Edgar, the porter, to fetch the beadle. The lamps belonged to Mr. Penny; I am certain they are worth full 3l. - I do not know what they cost; they are large lamps, with two burners each; I think them worth between 3l. and 4l. I am certain they are worth more than 40s.

Prisoner. Q. Is there a back-door to the house? A. Yes - there is a side-door, which we call the back-door; he must have entered at that door. One lamp alone is worth 40s. I did not value them at Hatton-garden.

ALEXANDER EDGAR . I am porter to Mr. Penny. I saw the prisoner in the knife-house, holding some lemons up - he was taking the lamps out of the basket, which laid on the ground. I went for the beadle; I got a constable, and when I returned he was begging Pickard's pardon, and saying if he would let him go he would never do so any more - we detained him.

JAMES CLIFFORD . I took him in charge.

THOMAS PICKARD re-examined. He begged my pardon, and said he would never do so any more if I would lot him go; the knife-house is opposite the kitchen-door, and is enclosed by the Charterhouse-wall, which surrounds the house.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18261207-41

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

43. JOHN SERRINGOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 trunk, value 10s.; 18 shirts, value 4l. 10s., and 1 Bible, value 10s., the goods of John Beattie , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Seymour .

JOHN BEATTIE. I am a journeyman baker . About six months ago I left my box at Mrs. Sarah Seymour's, who keeps the Black Boy public-house, in St. Martin's-lane ; I never slept there - I left it on the third-floor landing-place - it was covered with black leather, and had the letters J. B. on it; it cost me 27s. two months before - I left the articles stated in the indictment in it, which were worth 5l. I went about six weeks ago to fetch it, and it was gone; I had not been there in the interval. I went about a week afterwards to the prisoner, whom I knew before by sight - I said I heard he had taken my trunk; he said he had not, but he knew who had it; I said I should see further into it - he said Forsyth and Clarke had taken it, and sold it for 16s. - I knew them by sight; he spoke about the trunk, but did not mention its contents; I have not seen it or its contents since; I did not leave it in any one's care, and told no one that I had left it there; I was frequently going there.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You knew the prisoner before? A. Yes, and I knew the other men by sight; they lodged in the same house. No application was made to the Magistrate for a warrant to apprehend Clarke and Forsyth, in my hearing. Forsyth is gone to Scotland. I met Clarke in Drury-lane since, but did not speak to him; I lost sight of him all at once - I do not know that he ran - he merely passed me; he was walking, bot when he saw me he got out of my sight; I did not follow him - I saw him afterwards come out of the Temple, but did not speak to him, as he ran off; I pursued, but did not cry Stop thief! he was not taken.

COURT. Q. Was your box covered with nails? A. There were brass nails round the lid.

SARAH SEYMOUR. I keep the Black Boy and Apple Tree public-house, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, and am a widow. I saw Beattie at my house six months ago. A dark trunk, covered with leather and brass nails, with the initials J. B. on it, stood on my third floor landing-place, for five or six months. I never knew who it belonged to; I have several lodgers; I do not know how it went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Is yours a house of call for journeymen bakers? A. Yes. The trunk was not left in my care - I have four or five lodgers at a time, sometimes six - it is an open landing-place; Clarke and Forsyth lodged with me five or six months, and left about seven weeks ago; they went away within a day or two of each other; there was no alarm about the trunk then; I have not seen them since. I think other boxes stood there.

EDWARD SEYMOUR . I am son of the last witness. I have known the prisoner about six months, by his club being held at our house. I was taking something up to a gentleman in the parlour some time ago, and saw the prisoner taking

the box in question out of my mother's house - it was a dark leather box - I think black; it had brass nails round the top, and the initials J. B. or I. B., about the middle of the lid, in brass nails. I went to my mother, and told her Serringour was taking away his box, not knowing but it belonged to him - I took no further notice, and do not know what became of him; I at first saw him on the landing, and when I came down from the parlour he was gone. I had seen it on the third-floor landing-place once or twice, but never took particular notice of it.

Cross-examined. Q. How many lodgers were there? A. I cannot say - there were several bakers, who were out of place. I thought the box might belong to the prisoner, though it had those initials; Clarke left the house about a week or a fortnight afterwards - Forsyth left a little before. I do not know of their being wanted on this charge.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of November, at a baker's shop at Westminster - I had received information of this robbery two days before - I said I took him on suspicion of stealing Beattie's trunk, and asked if he knew any thing about it - he said he did, that a man, whose name he mentioned, (and which I think was Forsyth,) and another man, had told him they had taken the box away from the Black Boy and Apple Tree - he said he had taken a box from there and could produce it, and the person it belonged to - I took him to the office - the man did not appear there, nor produce the box - since that I have had a warrant against Clarke.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner deny the robbery? A. Yes - he was servant at the shop where I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never got my living by thieving.

WILLIAM SOUTH . I am a journeyman baker, and lodge at Mrs. Seymour's. I left, on the 3d of September, leaving my box there for two days, and desired the prisoner to move it for me, which he did, and delivered it safely to me - I did not pay him any thing for doing it - it is covered with black leather and has brass nails - here it is (producing it).

COURT. Q. Why did you not take it yourself? A. It was Sunday, I could not find time to fetch it - I lived at Mr. Horton's, Clifton-street, Finsbury, at the time, and the prisoner was living at Mrs. Seymour's - I have had the box three months - I bought it of Forsyth - it was open when I bought it - I gave 6s. and another box for it - all my clothes were in it when the prisoner fetched it - I was not before the Magistrate, and did not hear of this till last Saturday week.

JOHN BEATTIE. This box is not mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-42

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

44. MICHAEL SULLIVAN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Taylor , about twelve o'clock in the night, of the 20th of September , and stealing therein, 3 sheets, value 13s.; 1 counterpane, value 10s.; 2 shirts, value 14s; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 2 shawls, value 10s.; 1 basket, value 18d.; 1 petticoat, value 4s.; 1 shift, value 4s.; 1 bed-curtain, value 4s., and 3 yards of calico, value 2s., his property .

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . I am the wife of John Taylor - he is a carpenter , and lives in Angel-gardens, Shadwell . On the 22d of September, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, when I went to bed I left a basket containing the articles stated in the indictment safe - one of the shirts was marked J. H. - I fastened the house up myself, and fastened the window; about six o'clock I thought I heard a noise in the front parlour; I ran down, opened the parlour-door, and the things were all gone - the window was wide open, and the curtains fastened back; I saw no one there - the window was forced open; I had bolted it myself.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was quite light at six o'clock, I suppose? A. Yes.

EDWARD MASON . On the 21st of September, about six o'clock in the morning, I was within four doors of Taylor's house, saw the window shoved up, and a person coming out - he had nothing with him that I saw; I was close to him - he came out - it was Mike Sullivan, the prisoner - I could not observe that he had any thing - he tried to shove the sash down, but could not - he then took hold of one of the shutters, and tried to tie it to a nail - I went away, leaving him standing outsids the window.

JEREMIAH BUCKLEY . I was with Jefferies when he apprehended the prisoner, on the 22d of October, in Hairbrain-court, on suspicion of a robbery at Wapping - nothing was said to him about this robbery, and none of this property, or any duplicate has been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-43

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

45. SAMUEL OAKINGHAM MARY ANN HANCE , and MARY ANN PAGE , were indicted for feloniously assaulting a certain man whose name is unknown , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., and 60 sovereigns, the property of the said man .

JOHN WILLIAMSON. I am a constable of Acton. On the 7th of November , about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was fetched to the Red Lion public-house, at Acton, and found the three prisoners and another in custody: I took them from the tap-room into the parlour, and searched the three prisoners - on Page I found two sovereigns, 9s. in silver, and about 8d. in copper, and a knife - the sovereigns were very dirty, having the appearance of dried mud on them - they were all three intoxicated; I asked Page how she got the sovereigns - she said by prostitution - I found 5s. on Hance, which she said she got by prostitution. Oakingham had a 6d. and 4 1/2d., and in his hat I found a pair of gloves - he began to sing - I told him they were charged with a highway robbery, which I thought affected their lives - the girls answered "Then we shall have a holiday at the tread-mill if it is so;" I took them to the watch-house, and, on returning to the Red Lion, the servant of the house gave me a red silk handkerchief, which I produce.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They were all intoxicated? A. Yes.

WILLIAM LESTER . I am the tap-boy at the Star and Garter public-house, at Kew-bridge . On the evening of the 7th of November the prisoners came in between six and seven o'clock, and remained their drinking till between eight and nine - I went to the door just after eight, and

saw a man come up - he opened the door, and walked in- he staggered about, and was drunk - the prisoners were then in the tap-room - the man looked round, and said,"I am done," and walked out - the prisoners could not hear that, as he was at the bar at that time, and they in the tap-room - he walked away towards London; there is a window between the tap-room and the passage - persons in the tap-room might have seen him come in - the prisoners went away about ten minutes after he went out; I went up the road in a quarter of an hour with the newspaper, and saw the two women run down the lane towards Gunnesbury-lane; I was just opposite to them: Hance said to Page, "Go it;" there was a man behind running after them; he was without a hat, and very muddy - he ran towards Kew-bridge in a different road to them.

Q. How then could he be running after them? A. He was close behind them; I do not know what made him go a different road - when I delivered the newspaper he was in front of a house, and when I came back, I found him standing there - he was the man I had seen before in our passage - two men stood by the side of him - he was telling them something - he appeared very much intoxicated, and very muddy, as he had been falling down - his clothes were very dirty, and he had no hat on - his left breeches pocket was cut; the prisoners were all gone away then; he afterwards went into our tap-room, and slept at our house that night.

JOHN WALKER . I am a butcher, and live at Brentford. On the 7th of November, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock at night, I was coming on the road from Chiswick towards Brentford - when I came to London-stile-lane I saw a short man standing with his back towards me, and, as I came further, I saw two women with a respectable man sitting between them on the bank of the road; I saw that the women had hold of him - he was without his hat, and I wished to speak to him, but my wife, who was with me, would not let me - he appeared very much in liquor; I went on about thirty yards further, turned round, and saw the man falling back against the bank, and the prisoner Page upon him; Hance was at his side; I said I would go back and see what they were doing - a gentleman came up, whom I asked to go with me; I went up at last, and asked the two female prisoners what they were at with the man, if they wanted to rob him, or what - they were on the bank then, but when I spoke they had got up - the man staggered nearly under the wheel of a waggon; I jumped into the road and pulled him forward - the women took him up in the path, and Page had hold of him; Hance pointed to her, and said to me, "Walker, it is her lawful husband;" I knew them both before; the people did not like to interfere, and we all went home leaving them there with the man - he said nothing to me; I said, "My friend, leave their company; they assuredly will rob you;" he appeared in liquor, and so did both the girls.

JOHN PRICE . I live at the Star and Garter public-house, Kew-bridge, kept by Mr. Matthews. At a quarter before eleven o'clock, Mr. Matthews ordered me to take a man to bed, who was in the tap-room; he was very dirty, much in liquor, and had no hat - I slept with him - I locked the door, and put the key into my pocket; he pulled his boots off, but would not undress; I found him standing up in the room at half-past five o'clock; he wanted to go, but I would not let him - at six o'clock he borrowed my hat, and left; I have not got it back.

CHARLES DEAR . I am a constable. I was fetched to the Star and Garter about nine o'clock that night, and saw a well-dressed man in the tap-room, all over blood and dirt - he said he had been robbed of sixty sovereigns; I and Mr. Marshall went to Acton, and met the three prisoners about two hundred yards from the Red Lion public-house, coming from Acton towards Kew: I asked where they were going; they said they did not know; I took them to the Red Lion, and they were given in custody; they were not sober.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I live at the Strand on the Green, by Kew-bridge. I saw a man at Matthews', who complained of being robbed; I went with Dear, and met the prisoners - Dear's account is correct.

HANNAH DUNFORD . I live at the Red Lion at Acton; I found the handkerchief behind the street-door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-44

46. JOSEPH WILLIAMS and ROBERT MINSHULL were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 coat, value 2l., the goods of Thomas Nugent , in the dwelling-house of Louisa, Dowager Marchioness of Cornwallis .

JOHN BOSTON . I am an officer. On the 8th of November, about a quarter past twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners in Queen Anne-street, and watched them down the areas of several gentlemen's houses; they went down, and came up again - I at last saw Williams go down the area of No. 12, Park-crescent ; Minshull stood against the area-gate of the next house, waiting for him; Williams had a blue coat and white apron on when he went down, but he came up with a white livery top-coat on - I was about eight houses off: he went up and joined Minshull, whom I seized, and Roberts took Williams. Williams said he knew nothing about it, but that a man at the corner had given him the coat - Minshull was waiting there, looking up and down the street, while Williams was in the area.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Boston; his evidence is correct; I saw the prisoners go down Park-crescent together - Williams went down the area, and Minshull waited for him; he came up, and we seized them - Williams said that a man gave him the coat to carry, but there was no man in the Crescent.

THOMAS NUGENT. I am footman to Lady Louisa, Dowager Marchioness Cornwallis. On the 8th of November, I missed my livery coat from the servants'-hall - the two witnesses produced it, and I identified it - I suppose it is worth 2l.; her ladyship's dwelling-house is in St. Mary-le-bone parish .

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

MINSHULL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-45

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

47 . THOMAS WILKINSON , HENRY WRIGHT , SAMUEL CLARKE , and ISAAC HARRIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , at St. John at Hackney , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of Edmund Thomas Moore , in his dwelling-house .

EDM. THO. MOORE. I am a watchmaker , and live at No. 8, Prospect-row, Kingsland-road , in the parish of St. John at Hackney. On Wednesday afternoon, the 29th of November, at two o'clock, I was in the shop; Wright and Harris knocked at the door - I did not know them before; they came in and asked to look at a second-hand silver watch; Wright said he had just come from sea, had 6l. in his pocket, and he wanted to buy one - I said I did not sell silver watches, and had none to suit him; he asked to see a metal one - I said I thought I had none that would suit him; he desired me very much to show him a watch - I showed him an old metal one in a tortoise-shell case - Wilkinson and Clark were standing at the window all this time, and appeared in conversation with each other - Wilkinson came in, and stood behind the other two; I asked what he wanted; he said, after some hesitation, that he wanted to buy a ring: I said I had none for sale, and desired him to go about his business - he went out, and stood at the window again, with Clark - while Wright was looking at the watch, Harris took an old silver watch off the case, and covered it with his hands; but I discovered it, and took it from him; I desired him not to touch any thing, unless I gave it into his hand; I took it from him, and hung it up - Harris then passed behind Wright, and got behind me, by the window - I turned round to speak to him, and at that instant Wright snatched up a watch and ran off; it was a French repeater, in a silver case, and a very large antique watch. I immediately rose a cry of Stop thief! my neighbours ran out and pursued Wright; Mr. Slark caught him in my sight; I called my wife down-stairs, but Harris slipped out behind me, and ran off with the other two prisoners who were at the window: I pursued them; they all run one way - I saw Slark take the watch from Wright; he gave it to me(Joseph Dossett here produced the watch); this is it; it has been in my possession ever since 1810, and is worth more than 40s.; he took it off a hook in the window.

JOHN SLARK . I live at No. 12, Prospect-row. I heard an alarm, and pursued Wright; I secured him, and accused him of stealing the watch, which he denied - I said,"Give it to me, and I will let you go;" he took off his cap, and gave it me - I gave it to Moore.

JAMES SEER . I live at No. 6, Prospect-row. About one o'clock on the 29th of November, Wilkinson, Wright, and Harris, came into my shop, and after they left, my suspicion was excited - I watched them some distance, and saw them join Clark ten or twelve doors from my house; they all went on together to Moore's window, and all stopped there some time, then went on together four or five doors, and separated; Clark and Wilkinson went over the road, and crossed over again to Moore's door; the other two went to the window - about an hour after I heard a cry of Stop thief! - I followed and secured Wilkinson.

JAMES CLARK . I am a constable. I was sent for, and found the four prisoners at the Fox public-house; I took them into custody; I found nothing on any of them.

JOSEPH DOSSETT . I received the watch from Mr. Moore, and have had it ever since.

WILKINSON's Defence. I never saw either Wright or Harris till I was apprehended.

WRIGHT's Defence. I had just met Harris, and while he was in the shop I saw nothing in his hand.

CLARK's Defence. I know nothing about the other prisoners; I was only looking in at the window - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran.

HARRIS' Defence. I met Wright; I knew him before he went to sea - he asked me to go with him to buy the watch, which I did - he ran out, but I did not see him take any thing. Mr. Moore pulled me into the shop.

WILKINSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

CLARK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

WRIGHT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

HARRIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Reference Number: t18261207-46

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

48. JOSEPH COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 2 yards of woollen cloth, value 1l. 10s.; 2 other yards of woollen cloth, value 1l. 10s.; 3 yards of kerseymere, value 1l.; 2 yards of kerseymere, value 16s.; 1 yard of toilenette, value 6s.; three quarters of a yard of stripe, value 6s.; 6 yards of serge, value 18s.; 3 yards of flannel, value 4s., and 1 pair of doe-skin strings, value 2s., the goods of Alexander Wyllie and Sydney Alexander Wyllie , in the dwelling-house of the said Alexander Wyllie .

ALEXANDER WYLLIE. I am in partnership with my son, Sydney Alexander Wyllie. We are tailors , and live in Conduit-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . It is my dwelling-house only; I charge the firm rent for the part occupied by the business - my son boards with me, but the house is mine. The prisoner was my groom . On the 26th of October, in consequence of suspicion, I sent him to Bayswater, out of the way, and in his absence had his box opened by a smith; it stood in the back kitchen, down-stairs; I saw it opened, and the articles stated in the indictment found in it - they have no marks on them, but we have the pieces which the cloth was cut from, and I have compared them. I had an officer ready when he came home about three o'clock, and I gave him in charge: I told him he had been robbing me; the officer asked him for his key, and we went to search the box again, in his presence; the things were there still - he said he had done wrong, and they were my property.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many other servants have you? A. Several; the prisoner had no right in the warehouse - all the servants had access to the place where his box was; the goods correspond with the pieces in colour and pattern, but not in the cut, that I know of.

WILLIAM DUCK . I am apprentice to Messrs. Wyllie. On the 23d of October, in consequence of something I observed, I watched at night - I was in the back yard, and heard the prisoner come from the warehouse, and go down stairs; I then saw him through the back kitchen window; he had a bundle under his arm, and a light in his hand; I saw him put the bundle into his box, and shut it; I went to bed, and he went up-stairs - next day, about four o'clock, I went to a drawer which he used in the back kitchen, and saw a piece of blue cloth tied in a silk handkerchief - I went up-stairs, intending to tell Mr. Wyllie, but he was not in the way; in about ten minutes I went there again, the cloth was gone from the drawer, and he was gone out; I had not seen him in the meantime.

Cross-examined. Q. You could not see him in the warehouse? A. No, I saw a light in the warehouse, and heard somebody coming down from there - I saw him directly he got down the stairs, in the back kitchen - the drawer was not locked, but it was generally used by him; I did not see him at the drawer when the cloth was there.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am a constable. I was called in, and found the things in the prisoner's box; I asked him if there was any property there which did not belong to him - he said Yes; and as I took every article out singly, he said they belonged to Mr. Wyllie, and that he was sorry for what he had done.

GUILTY. Aged 25. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261207-47

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

49. BRIDGET ANDREWS , THOMAS ANDREWS , and MARY BENYON , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 guinea, 1 half-crown, 5 sixpences, 20 shillings, and one 10l. Bank note, the monies of Ann Pater and George Okey Pater , in their dwelling-house .

ANN PATER. I live in Acton-place, Holloway-road , and am in partnership with my son, George Okey Pater; he occasionally sleeps at the house, but not always - the rent is paid out of the partnership funds; we are grocers and cheesemongers . On Sunday morning, the 29th of October, between nine and ten o'clock, I came down stairs, and found the three prisoners alone in the shop; I knew Bridget Andrews before; I said, "God bless me, I thought my son John had been at home" - she said, "Do not be afraid - you have lost nothing by us;" she then bought a ham bone, which she had bargained for the night before, and paid me 1s. 3d. - she also bought a hock of bacon, and then went out; my son John came home in a short time - he went to the desk, and the purse and money were gone; I had given him the purse that morning - it is usually kept in the desk, which is not locked - the desk stands on the counter; the purse was a yellow canvas bag.

Prisoner BRIDGET ANDREWS. Q. Did not a woman come into the shop while we were there? A. Yes - it was the daughter of a respectable person - a gentleman's daughter also came in, and went away after they left.

JOHN JAMES PATER . I am son of the last witness. - On the 29th of October she gave me the bag, which contained a 10l. note, two half-sovereigns, and some silver - I counted it, and put it into the bag again, and, to the best of my recollection, put it into the desk, but I am sure I left it in the shop; I recollect there was a half-crown piece in it, which I had taken between eight and nine o'clock that morning, and on ringing it, it sounded like lead, but I found it was cut in the edge, and cracked in two places; a little girl had paid it to me, who brought it from Mr. Griffiths; this did not occur to me till next morning, but I am positive I put a half-crown of that description into the bag. I went out of the shop about half-past nine o'clock, and thought I had left my mother there - I left no customer there; I thought I shut the door, but it does not latch very easy; when I came home I desired my mother to look into the desk for the bag, and it was gone. I went with a friend between eleven and twelve o'clock, to the prisoners' house, and found them with two more persons in the room; Thomas Andrews is Bridget's son - she was on the bed, beastly drunk, and smoking a pipe; Benyon was sitting on the bed, but not quite so drunk - she smelt of rum; the boy was sitting in the room. I told them we had missed some money in the morning, and asked if they could give me any information about it. I fetched Eatough, and was present when he made a search; 18s. in shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns were found in Bridget Andrews' pocket, and 7d. in copper; the officer took it, and the next day, at Worship-street, I recognized the half-crown, which was among them - I am sure that half-crown was in the bag; it was the one I have spoken of, and was taken out of her pocket.

JAMES JONATHAN GRIFFITHS . I live in Acton-place, Holloway-road. I know the half-crown produced - I took it at my shop on Saturday evening, the 28th of October, and took particular notice of it; I saw that it was scratched - there was a notch on the side, and a scratch on the head, and it was bent; I am sure it is the same half-crown - I sent Rosetta Hanson with it on Sunday morning, to buy something at Pater's shop.

ROSETTA HANSON . On Sunday morning Mr. Griffiths gave me the half-crown - I paid the same half-crown to Mr. Pater; I had no other - he tried it on the counter; I do not remember what I bought.

THOMAS EATOUGH . I am a constable. I went with Pater, and took the prisoners and another person - they were all in one room; I knew them before - Thomas Andrews does not sleep at home; Benyon lives in the same street, sixty or seventy yards off, but they were all in one room, in Catherine-street, Holloway. I found on Bridget Andrews 18s. 7d. - one of the half-crowns among it is cracked in the side, cut at the edge, and does not sound well; I found 11s. 6d. on the son, and a few halfpence on Benyon; both the women were intoxicated; the boy seemed sober, and said the money he had was his last week's earnings.

THOMAS JOHN COLSON . I am a brick-maker. Thomas Andrews is in my employ. On Saturday night, the 28th of October, I paid him 7s.; he had only worked four days - if he had worked all the week he would have had 12s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-48

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

50. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 wooden box, value 1s., and 25 pieces of plain French cambric, value 40l. , the goods of Robert Brown and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Wm. John Hall .

Mr. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT STEPHEN PARSLOW SPILLMAN . I am shipping-clerk to Robert Brown and Co.; they had some plain French cambrics at Mr. William John Hall's wharf. I was desired to go there for six cases to be taken from a bale containing ten; I paid the duty; one box was opened, and contained twenty-five pieces of plain French cambric - it was closed again in my presence: I arranged with Fancourt, Hall's servant, for two men to convey them to our premises, No. 157, Cheapside, and paid him 3s. for

the conveyance, but only five boxes arrived - the one missing is worth 45l., and has not been found; the persons who brought them made a communication to me.

RICHARD MARSHALL FANCOURT . I am warehouseman to Mr. William John Hall, at the Custom-house-quay. On the 23d of November, Spillman came for some packages of cambric; the duty was paid on six boxes - I opened them; they contained plain French cambrics - they were to be conveyed to Messrs. Brown and Co., by the men working in our warehouse - Short and two others were to convey them; I saw them in his possession on the quay, outside the warehouse, but did not see the prisoner there - I have occasionally seen him there - he is a carman, but was not employed by us.

WILLIAM SHORT . I am a labourer at the Custom-house-quay. On Thursday, the 23d of November, I received six wooden boxes and a bale from the locker; they were placed just outside the warehouse door; I know the prisoner very well - he was there above half an hour; I first saw him there about half-past four o'clock - he asked if I wanted a cart to take the cases; I said, No, the man was going after a truck. I have known the prisoner two years - he asked me ten or twelve times if I would have a cart, and kept leaning on the cases; a truck came along, and I asked the man who came along with it, if he would take them, as we could not get one; Brown said he would be d-d if I should take them in a truck, he would fetch a cart; instead of a cart coming a carman came; the prisoner came to the boxes, and leaned over them again; the carman asked if I wanted a cart - I said No; he said he would have nothing to do with them, and walked away; Brown was still leaning on the boxes; the man whom I had sent for a truck came in at the gate; I went to ask if he had got one, and when I turned round I saw Brown take one box in his right-hand; it would not weigh 28lbs.; he ran out of the gate with it; I told the man to mind the other five, and I followed him, but saw nothing of him - he was out of sight when I got to the gateway. The box has not been found; it was about five o'clock when he took it; I am positive I saw him take it away.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a carman, and live in Lower Thames-street. On the 23d of November I was in Cooper's-row, Tower-hill. The prisoner passed me with a small box on his shoulder; he asked which way I was going - I made no answer, but a man, who was with me, spoke to him; he went on, across John-street, towards Jewry-street - that is not the way to Cheapside.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Friday morning, the 24th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, in Webb-street, Borough. I told him he must go with me; he asked what for; I said a box from the Custom-house-quay - he said he knew nothing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. The box the witness speaks of, a gentleman gave me to carry from Tower-stairs, as he could not get a coach - he gave me 1s. to carry it to the stand in the Minories.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-49

51. JOHN BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Upsall .

CHRISTOPHER DEER . I am apprentice to Robert Upsall, a pawnbroker , of No. 10, Barbican . On 30th of November, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, these handkerchiefs hung inside the shop, near the door; I had seen them safe about a quarter of an hour before. - I observed the prisoner, who was a stranger, in the act of pulling down a belcher handkerchief - he came into the shop to get it; he ran out of the shop, and I ran after him - the officer stopped him in my sight; he said a boy pulled it down, and he picked it up, but I saw him take it.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. I was watching the prisoner from shop to shop, for ten minutes. I saw him go into Upsall's shop, and put something into his pocket; I at last stopped him, and he threw this black handkerchief out of his pocket; Deer delivered me this belcher one.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy in a red waistcoat come from the shop; he dropped a handkerchief, which I picked up, and put into my pocket; I picked a belcher one up at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years , to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18261207-50

52. MARY DUNN and MARY GRIFFIN were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 4 handkerchiefs, value 7s. 6d., and 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Upsall .

CHRISTOPHER DEER . I am apprentice to Robert Upsall, of Barbican . On the 14th of November, about four o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop together - Dunn offered to pawn a piece of cotton for 4s. - I offered 3s. 6d., which she would not take, and they went out; they both returned almost directly, but did not come up to the counter - Dunn asked me again for 4s., which I refused - this apron hung within the shop near the door, with four handkerchiefs fastened to it; I saw it safe then - I went to serve another customer - my attention was drawn to the door, and I heard the apron pulled down; I could not see who did it, as Dunn stood before the person - there were two or three persons in the shop; I went round to the door immediately, and Dunn exclaimed, "Good God! she has got it;" I ran down the street three or four doors, and found Griffin with the handkerchiefs and apron on her arm - Dunn was looking towards me, and could not see them taken; I secured Griffin, brought her into the shop, and Dunn exclaimed, "Mary Griffin, what a fool you must be to do it where I am so well known;" they were both detained, and on Dunn was found some silver, and a knife, which belonged to Griffin.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You knew Dunn? A. I had seen her before; I was talking to her about the cotton at the time - she saw me coming to the door before she said, "She has got it;" she remained in the shop.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. I took them in charge; Dunn said at the Compter, "What a fool you must be, to go where I was so well known."(Property produced and sworn to.)

DUNN's Defence. I did not see her pull them down, as my back was towards her.

GRIFFIN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

DUNN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-51

53. JOHN BARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 shirt, value 8s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., and 2 aprons, value 2s. , the goods of Samuel Enson Smith .

ISRAEL GILES . I keep the White Horse public-house, Little Britain . This property was locked in a box in my second-floor room; Smith, the prisoner, and another, came to lodge in that room on the 16th of November - they had all come to town by the Birmingham waggon - the prisoner was the only person who slept there on the 19th - Smith, I understood, had lost himself - when the prisoner came down in the morning of the 19th to breakfast, he had two large bundles - he went away with them; I sent my wife up-stairs, and then fetched him back with the bundles; I asked if he knew any thing of a box being broken open; he said he did not; I gave him in charge - the bundles contained the property stated in the indictment, with other things; Smith returned next day, and claimed them - his box was broken open.

SAMUEL ENSON SMITH. I came to Mr. Giles' to lodge, and left my box in the room, on the 18th of November - I locked it, and had the key with me; the prisoner slept in the same room - he had come by the same waggon with me, but was a stranger; I returned on the 18th, found the hasp broken, and missed this property, which I found in the bundles at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. A journeyman brass-founder; I was apprentice to Mr. Simpson, and lived nine years with him; I never went by the name of Simpson.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I took the prisoner into custody; he had only 2 1/2d. in money.

The prisoner received a very good character, and Mr. Mallett, of Coleshill, in Warwickshire, engaged to take him into his employ.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-52

54. JAMES CLARY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 crown, 5 half-crowns, and 3 shillings , the monies of Walter Barnden .

WALTER BARNDEN. I live at No. 25, Brick-lane. On the 4th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going from Fleet-market to Blackfriars-bridge; I had a crown, five half-crowns, and three shillings in my purse; I was sober - the prisoner came up to me in Bridge-street, near Earl-street , and asked me the way to Blackfriars-bridge - he asked if I had been long out of the country; I said I had been in town about a fortnight; he asked if I knew Mill-hill; I said it was near Barnet - a young man came by, and dropped a needle-case - the prisoner picked it up, opened it, and took out a needle - he said, "I suppose it belongs to some tailor - I will have a lark with it;" he stuck the needle into his coat, and put a pin into the case - he gave it into my hand, and said it was of no use; I said, "If it is of no use to you, it will do for my little sister;" the man who dropped it came back, and appeared to be looking for something; I said, "I suppose this is what you are looking for," and gave it him; he said it was of no consequence, it was only a needle; the prisoner said, "You have not got a needle in it;" he said, "I have;" the prisoner said, "I will bet you 6d. there is no needle in it;" he said he would bet a sovereign - the prisoner said he had only 6d., and asked if I had any - I said I had; he nudged my arm, and said,"Put it down;" the young man put a sovereign into the prisoner's hands, and I put down one crown, five half-crowns, and three shillings; they opened the needle-case, and there was a pin and needle in it; they laughed at me, and ran away, but I collared the prisoner. I did not know what I was about; I had been most of my time in the country - when I collared the prisoner, some others caught hold of me behind, and said, "What do you want with him, he has not got your money; that man has got it, who is running away;" he got from me, and ran down Earl-street; I hallooed Stop thief! and he was secured before I lost sight of him; I have not found my money; he said, at Guildhall, if I would not come against him, he would get all my money back.

Prisoner. Q. Did you expect to win or lose? A. I did not know what I was doing; I laid no wager.

WILLIAM HART . I am an officer. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and the prisoner was running down Earl-street, pursued by a number of people; he was secured, and the prosecutor gave the statement he has now, as he went to the Compter; I heard him say something to the prosecutor to the effect he has stated, but, being in conversation with another officer, I did not attend to it.

Prisoner's Defence. He tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I would decide a wager; I asked what it was, and said, "Well, I will hold it, just to decide the wager;" he gave me the money, and told me to give it to the winner, which I did - he turned round, and said I had got his money.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-53

55. ABRAHAM PASSMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 knife, value 6d. , the goods of John Allen .

ANN ALLEN . I am the wife of John Allen; we live in Jewin-street, Cripplegate - he is a labourer in the East India-docks . On the 30th of November the prisoner knocked at my door, and asked if I had any body at sea belonging to me - I said, "Yes, a son;" and asked him to walk in - he said my son and his son, and all the ship's crew had ran away, and that his son was in the same ship as mine - he said they had been ill-used by the captain - he asked me for pen and paper, and wrote down, "On board the Industry, bound to the Cape of Good Hope;" here is the paper - my son had been in the Prospect - I asked what he would take - he said he had come from Greenwich - I gave him a crust and some meat, and 3d. to get a pint of beer on the road - he told me to go to Captain Jones, No. 27, Stepney-causeway, at nine o'clock next morning, and I should receive 25s. as my son's half-pay - I went, but could find no No. 27 - I met Mrs. Wells there, and when I came home I missed a knife, which was safe

when he came into my room - he had used it to cut his bread - I found it in Wells' possession.

ELIZABETH WELLS . I live in Three Tun-court, Redcross-street, and am a widow. On the 30th of September the prisoner came to my house and asked if I had a son at sea - I said, "Have you come from Sydney?" he said,"No; but my son has" - I said, "Then you have brought me a letter from my son;" he said, No; but if I would go to Captain Jones, No. 20, Stepney-causeway, at ten o'clock in the morning, I should receive twenty-five dollars; I cried, and said I knew it was no such thing, as I had heard from my son in August; he said it was the case, and asked if I had any letters from my son; I gave him four; he asked for a pen and ink, which I went downstairs to fetch; I fetched him some porter, and gave him a knife to cut a slice of bread and some bacon; and while I turned to get the bacon, he must have taken my knife, which was a good one, and left this one of Allen's behind; I gave it to Allen; I found his account entirely false; I am sure of his person.

WILLIAM WOLFE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on College-hill; he came to my house on the 17th of October in great haste and said, "Have you got somebody belonging to you at sea;" he went away, and I secured him on the 3d of November on College-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261207-54

56. WILLIAM ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 looking-glass, value 19s. , the goods of Thomas Standage .

THOMAS STANDAGE. I am a furniture-broker , and live at No. 114, Chancery-lane , which is in the City. On the 22d of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw a young man take this looking-glass off a table in my shop - he took it about ten yards and gave it to the prisoner - my man collared him, and he dropped it in my presence - it was only chipped - I should know his companion again; he is well known in our lane.

BENJAMIN SIMMS . I am in Mr. Standage's employ. I was coming along on the other side of the way, and saw a tall man take the glass from a table, which was half a yard within the door; I had seen the prisoner pass the door twice before it was taken - the tall man took it about ten yards, and then gave it into the prisoner's hands - I ran across the road - my foot slipped, or I should have caught him; he was secured before I lost sight of him; I kept close to his heels, and saw him drop it.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the glass, which I have had ever since.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-55

57. GEORGE HORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , at St. Sepulchre , 1 gelding, price 7l. , the property of Richard Huggett .

RICHARD HUGGETT. I am a carrier ; I live in Godston parish, and keep a cart and horse. On the 3d of August I turned out my gelding on a heath, in Godston parish ; between nine and ten o'clock at night I saw it safe - I went to get it next morning, about four o'clock, and it was gone - I could gain no tidings of it - I know the prisoner - he travels about the country - I have seen him before, but not about that time - I saw my gelding again on the 18th of August, in Williams'-mews, near Hampstead-road - I had it brought to Union-hall, and swore to it; the prisoner was taken up about a week after I lost it - I took him on suspicion; I am sure the gelding was mine - I always attended to it on the heath - it was worth 7l., and was very useful.

WILLIAM MILLS . I live at No. 16, China-row, Lambeth, and am a dustman and sweep. I saw the prisoner in Smithfield riding this horse up and down for sale on the 4th of August; it was lame in front naturally, and had a shoe off behind; he asked me 3l. 10s. for it; I offered 50s.; and after a few minutes he agreed to let me have it; I am certain of his person; there was a boy and a young woman with him; I cannot be mistaken in him; I bought it between half-past three and five o'clock; a friend gave me a cart-horse for it, and he sold it to Mathey, a hackney-coachman - I saw the gelding when Huggett claimed it - it was the same as I bought of the prisoner - I saw it come out of the stable at Hampstead.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear I sold you the horse; for I have not been to Smithfield for fifteen years? A. I swear to him; he took the money for it, and I had it booked.

CHARLES STEVENS . I live in Godston parish, near the heath. I know Huggett's horse; I did not see it on the heath on the 3d of August, but I saw the prisoner on that day, between six and eight o'clock in the evening; I knew him before by sight - I have seen him twenty times within these two years - he frequently came round there; I am certain of his person - I saw him go on the heath between six and eight o'clock.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable - the prosecutor applied to me. I found Mills and the horse - the prisoner was in custody; the horse had been restored to Huggett at Union-hall, where he had sworn to it - Mills was by when he claimed it. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18261207-56

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

58. JOHN COOPER and WILLIAM NEWLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 126 prints, value 10l., and 4 books, value 10l., the goods of Alaric Alexander Watts , in his dwelling-house ; and HENRY BATEMAN JENKINS and JOSEPH JOHN JENKINS were indicted for feloniously receiving 77 of the said prints, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ALARIC ALEXANDER WATTS. I am proprietor of the"Literary Souvenir;" Newland was in my employ, and left my service about two months ago, and was succeeded by Cooper, who remained with me up to this time. I live at North Bank, Regent's-park . Cooper was sent out on Friday morning, the 1st of December, and did not return till about eight o'clock the next morning; I immediately asked what he had done with fifty-seven portraits, a memorandum of which I had found in the pocket of his livery coat - he denied having taken them at first; but when I produced the memorandum in his own writing, he acknowledged he had taken a few prints and given them to Newland; he said it was of no use to hold out any longer, and they had sold them for their mutual benefit; I sent for a constable, and found Newland in a lane adjoining the house, looking from behind my gateway; he was

brought in and confronted with Cooper - I did not either threaten or promise them any thing - I asked how they had disposed of the property - they said they had sold a large portion to the two prisoners Jenkins, at 6d. each, as I undestood them - I never myself sold any of this size - I have them on larger paper - they said they had sold them at three different times - they were prints in sets of ten each, and some were considerably more in demand than others; several of those I missed were the most popular ones - I found some of them at the office, and knew them - I went with an officer to Jenkins' shop, in Bear-street, Leicester-square, and saw Joseph John Jenkins - I asked if he had any proof prints of the "Literary Souvenir" to dispose of- he said, Yes, and produced a port-folio with thirty or forty of them - I beckoned to the office, who came in - I said they were my property, and gave him in charge - I then inquired of whom they had purchased them - he said he bought them of a lad in livery, and had no reason to believe they were stolen - I understood him to say that he or his brother had given information to some persons belonging to Hurst and Co., who had published the volumes of the work which these prints belonged to - he was asked to produce what other prints they had, and did so after some hesitation.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The shop is kept by Jenkins' father? A. I cannot say that; some of the prints were exposed in the window.

Q. When you said they were stolen, there was some hesitation about producing the rest? A. Yes; both the Jenkins' were bailed and have surrendered here.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKRIDGE . I am an officer, and went with Mr. Watts, on the 2d of December, to Jenkins' shop - he called me in after the first prints were produced - I had been in the shop 7 or 8 minutes before John Joseph Jenkins produced the rest; he had hesitated about it, but I said I should certainly search - he then fetched them, and produced in all twenty-two - he said they had bought them of some lads, one of whom was a livery-servant - he said he did not purchase them, but at last acknowledged he was present when his brother did; that his brother was at Walworth, and that they had given information to Hurst and Co. - I went over to Walworth to his brother - he said they had bought them very fair - that the boy had produced his master's crest on his buttons, and that, as at times, these things were sold when persons were in distress - he thought it all correct - I found they had given information to Hurst and Co.

HENRY GIBBS . I am a printseller, and live in Newport-street. On the 30th of November, about the middle of the day, Newland came and offered me some heads of Butler Dryden and Milton, which I gave him 2s. for - as he was going out he turned and asked if I would buy twelve plates to illustrate Byron's works - I said there should be twenty-two, and asked him the price - he said 9d. each; I offered him 5s. for the twelve - he went out, returned in two hours and a half, and took the 5s.; the next morning he brought me eight plates, five or six were soiled, but one was quite clean - I gave him 5s. 6d. for the lot - I had no suspicion at that time; but in the afternoon he produced some more, and I asked if he was a copper-plate printer - he said, No; that he had lived with Colonel Smith, in Harley-square, and the female-servant had given them to him - that she lived with Alaric Watts, at Manchester, who had given several soiled ones to his children, and she had asked him for some, which she had got framed - he went away - I gave information, and saw him in custody the next morning.

WILLIAM McDOWAL . I am a printsellre, and live in Newport-street. Newland came to me, four or five days before he was taken, and brought a print called the Rivals, belonging to the Souvenir - I asked if he was a printer - he said, No; and suspecting him, I called him into a back-parlour, and asked where he got them from - he said Mr. Watts had given each of the servants a set - I said I knew they were stolen, and asked him to write his own and his master's name and address - he wrote "James Evans, No. 5, Foley-place - A. Watts, North-bank" - he asked 6s. for the set - I said I had been selling them at 6d. each, and I would give him 5s.; he said very well, and he would bring them in the morning - I intended to secure him if he brought them; but he came and said he had only eight and did not bring them - I said, "I must have the set;" and he said his fellow-servant had two which would make the set, and he would bring them - he called again, and said he exchanged them for other prints, which he produced - I did not secure him.

PATRICK O'CONNER . I am a watchman - Mr. Watts' house is in my beat. On the 1st of December, at one o'clock in the morning, both the prisoners passed my box with another person - I went after them - they went into Mr. Watts' gate, opened the door, and all three went into the house - one of them had a bag on his shoulder - I saw no more - about eleven o'clock, two or three nights before, I had seen Cooper go into the house, while Newland waited outside, with a woman - when I returned from calling the hour, they were gone - I did not inform Mr. Watts of it, as seeing a light in the house I thought they were at liberty to go in - Cooper had his master's bag, in which he used to carry things.

RICHARD ROOTS . I am an officer of St. Mary-le-bone; I went with Mr. Watts to Cooper's house - he lived there with his father - I found there some books, pamphlets, and fifteen plates, which Mr. Watts claimed - Cooper's sister was in Mr. Watts' service.(Property produced and sworn to.)

COOPER's Defence. I sold none of the prints.

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

NEWLAND - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

J.J. JENKINS - NOT GUILTY .

H.B. JENKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-57

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

59. ANN GARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , at St. George, Hanover-square , 1 watch, value 40l., and 1 watch-chain, value 4l., the goods of Ulich John De Byrgh , Marquis Clauricarde , in that part of the United Kingdom called Ireland, and Baron Somerhille , in that part of the said Kingdom called England; in the dwelling-house of Louis Jaquier .

MARQUIS JOHN DE BYRGH CLAURICARDE. I am Earl of Somerhille. In the summer of 1824 I lodged at the Clarendon Hotel for two or three months; I left at the middle or end of July - in the course of the day, when I was on the road, I missed this watch; I had left it there;

I had seen it the night before; I did not see it again, till very recently, when I was before the Magistrate.

SUSANNAH FINNESTER . I live at No. 7, Sneyd's-court, Piccadilly. The prisoner lodged with me in the beginning of May, 1824; she lived at the Clarendon Hotel in July, after she left my house - she called on me, when she lived at the Clarendon, and brought me a watch; it was either the latter end of July or the beginning of August, 1824; it was a small gold watch - she wished me to sell it, and left it with me; I asked James Ross if he knew who wanted such a thing, and I gave it to him, as he said he would see what it was worth; I never asked him to return it; I have since seen one in possession of Plank, which I believe to be the same; I knew she was in service at the Clarendon, because I wash for a gentleman there, and have seen her there.

JAMES ROSS. I am a servant to Dowager Lady Anson. I remember receiving this watch from Finnester; I think it was the latter end of July, 1824; I was to ascertain the value, and sell it if I could; I thought it not properly come by, and never offered it for sale; I kept it, in case I should see it advertised; I did not inquire among the families I knew, whether it had been lost; I have shown it to several people, and I sent it to have a new glass; Plank came to me, and I delivered it up to him immediately, as the same I had received from Finnester.

CATHERINE CROULE . I am housekeeper at the Clarendon Hotel, which is kept by Louis Jaquier, and is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. I believe the prisoner to be the person who lived there in 1824, for about a month; I received a most excellent character with her, but discharged her at the end of July, on account of this watch being missed; Lord Clanricarde was at the hotel in July - the prisoner was housemaid, and attended the rooms where he slept; Mr. Jaquier resides in the house himself.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I produce a watch, which I received from James Ross on Sunday the 3d of December, and, in consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner at No. 16, Newman-street, Oxford-street; I told her it was on suspicion of stealing a watch, and asked if she ever lived at the Clarendon Hotel; she said she never did, and had no recollection of ever having had a small watch in her possession; I did not hold out either threat or promise to her; I asked her if she knew Mrs. Finnester, the laundress; she said, Yes; I then produced the watch, and said, "You delivered this to Mrs. Finnester;" she then cried, and said she was very sorry that she did take it, but she thought it was of very little value, and that she found it on the hearth-rug in Lord Clauricarde's apartment; I took her into custody - she was in service when I took her, and her master and mistress spoke very highly of her - they had had a twelve-months' character with her.

LORD CLAURICARDE. This is the watch I lost; it is a very remarkable one - I had had it about three months.

JOHN HENRY WOOLBERT . I am shopman to Mr. Henrick, jeweller, Princes-street, Soho. I sold the Marquis Clauricarde this watch on the 12th of July, 1824; it is worth 40l. - I am certain of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave the woman this watch with the foul linen, from the Clarendon; she had not seen me with it, but I saw her with it on the Sunday when I called, and told her not to give it to any body that knew me, for fear of any harm; she said she would show it to a young man, who would buy it for his sweetheart; she fell out with me in consequence of my bringing a strange washerwoman to the house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her good character, and not having profited by the transaction.

Reference Number: t18261207-58

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

60. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Middleton , Mary Ann Catherine, his wife, being therein, about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 14th of November , and stealing 6 snuff-boxes, value 6s.; 6 segar-holders, value 12s. 6d., and 1 purse, value 9d., his property .

JAMES MIDDLETON. I live in William-street, St. Pancras , and am a tobacconist . On the 14th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, as I came home, I found my shop window in a disordered state, and when I got in, I found a piece was cut out of the bottom square, about five inches by three - it was whole at a quarter to four o'clock; I missed three wooden boxes, which cost me 1s. 3d. each, three at 10d. each, also six segar-tubes, which cost me 12s. 6d. - I found the snuff-boxes at the office, with a purse which I had not missed - I rent the house.

DANIEL RIERDON . I am a patrol, and live in Titchbourn-court, Holborn. On the 14th of November, at a quarter past five o'clock, I met the prisoner in Crown-street, Soho, with two boys less than himself - they were all standing together, but when we got towards them they walked on - I secured the prisoner, and Cuthbert, who was with me, took the others; I felt these boxes in his breeches - he said they were his own, and, as I was taking them out, I asked where he got them - he said he picked them up, wrapped in a piece of green paper, at Charing-cross, and he could not tell how many there were; I found there were six boxes and a purse - I asked if he had picked the purse up - he said there was none - we took them all to the office, where the prosecutor described one of the boxes before he saw it.

HENRY CUTHBERT . I was with Rierdon, and took the other two.

JAMES MIDDLETON. I believe all these boxes to be mine, by the patterns, but I know one in particular by the plug being out - I have not found the segar-holders - some of the boxes were eighteen inches above the broken pann - they could not have fallen out of the window; I had gone out at eight o'clock in the morning - my wife, whose name is Mary Ann Catherine, and the servant, were at home when I returned.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them at Charing-cross, wrapped in a piece of paper.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Of stealing one box only, and no person being in the dwelling-house . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-59

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

61. THOMAS CANNING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Nolan , no person being therein, about nine o'clock in the forenoon, of the 31st of October , at St. George, Hanover-

square , and stealing therein, 3 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, his monies .

SARAH NOLAN . I am the wife of John Nolan, and live at Little Ebury-street, Chelsea , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. On Tuesday, the 31st of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I went out - I locked the door - there are only two rooms in the house - I rent it all - I left nobody at home - I returned in better than half an hour, found the lock broken, and the door wide open - it was a padlock - the staple was drawn out; I am sure I left it locked; I found my box had been broken open with a poker, and a glove containing three sovereigns and a half was gone, but the clothes were all left safe; I have known the prisoner five years - he lived in St. James's parish, and very often came to our house; he had been there on the Saturday night before - there was a friend of his lodged in one of our rooms - he came about half-past six o'clock, and remained till near twelve at night - my husband was at home - he was sitting down - we had nothing to drink; I did not show him the money.

JOHN PEARSON . I keep the Red Lion public-house, in Ebury-street. I let this cottage to the prosecutor - it is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - there are four rooms to it, but their two rooms do not communicate with the rest: I do not occupy any part of it myself, but let the shop and parlour on the ground-floor to another tenant; there is a private passage goes from the street into my yard, and then up-stairs into their rooms; I can see into the passage from my house - I have every reason to believe the prisoner is the man whom I saw coming up the yard, about a quarter before ten o'clock, on Tuesday morning the 31st of October; I looked at him, and went out at the front door, thinking to meet him, but he did not make his appearance; I thought I heard him go up-stairs, and thinking he might be one of the lodgers, I took no further notice; I will not swear to him, as I could only see him half-way, and he held his head down when he saw me looking.

DAVID REDSING . I am servant to Mr. Pearson, and know Nolan's premises. On Tuesday, the 31st of October, about a quarter or half-past nine o'clock, I was in Nolan's yard, and saw the prisoner in the passage leading from the street to the yard; I stood in the yard, and he was standing in the passage, and was particular to shut the door after him; he went up Nolan's stairs very slow; I also went up, and he asked me if Mrs. Nolan was at home - he was then standing on the landing; I said I did not think she was at home; I left him standing on the landing; I went away: I am sure he is the man - he was dressed as he is now.

JOHN NOLAN. I rent these two rooms. I came home at twelve o'clock - my wife told me what had happened; I went over at night to where the prisoner lodges, and found him at last at the Cock public-house, in Hopkins'-street, sitting there with his brother, having a pot of beer - his brother, the man who lodged with him, and his wife, were with him - his brother desired me to sit down, and drink; I said I wanted to speak to them at the door - they came to the door; I collared the prisoner, and said,"Was not you at my house to-day;" he said, "I was not;" I said, "I am told you were, and have broken my door and box open, and taken three sovereigns and a half out of it;" he said, "I was not there;" I said, "The man will know you - come up with me to him, and he can see you, or else I shall send you to the watch-house, and bring Pearson forward in the morning;" I took him to Pearson, who said he was the man who was in the yard, and went up the stairs - he denied it.

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . I am beadle of St. George, Hanover-square. I was called in about eight o'clock at night on the 31st of October. I went to the Red Lion public-house in Ebury-street, and found Nolan - he said the prisoner had broken into his house, and robbed him of three sovereigns and a half; the prisoner denied it; I asked where he had been all that day - he said at work in Newport-market. I searched him, and found one shilling, one sixpence, one penny-piece, and a duplicate, on him. On the following morning, previous to taking him to Queen-square, I said I should go to Newport-market, and inquire if he had been there all day - he then said he had been there but half a day, and he could not tell me the number of the house, or the person's name, or where they lived, but that he had been moving goods.

Prisoner's Defence. I was working half a day - this man is my first cousin; I was moving a man's goods, and he gave me 2s. and a pot of beer. I never asked him where the goods came from; I helped to put them into the waggon - my partner is gone into the country, and cannot come here.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence.

Reference Number: t18261207-60

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

62. WILLIAM PARTRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 5 mills, value 3l., and 4 weighing-machines, value 5l., the goods of John Yearly , his master, in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BOWTER . I am a fixture-dealer, and live in Castle-street, Long-acre. I have known the prisoner about twelve months - I bought a coffee-mill and a pepper-mill of him, on the 23d of November - I gave 10s. for the two; they are not worth more. I sold the small one, and the other is here; I have bought some of him before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know whether he is the manufacturer himself? A. I always considered him so.

JOHN YEARLY. I am a mill and machine-maker , and live in High Holborn . The prisoner was in my employ four months, up to the time of his apprehension, as a journeyman weighing-machine maker , at weekly wages. I received information, and went on the 29th of November, to Bowter's, and there saw a mill; I asked him the price, and desired him to put it aside - I returned in five minutes with Furzeman, and claimed it - it is worth 25s.; I know it by the make, and there is my name, and the name of my predecessor (Stockwell) inside - it had been made in my shop within three months - I do not believe it was ever sold. Bowter accompanied us to my shop, where the prisoner was at work, and recognized him as the man who sold it to him. I brought him into the shop, and asked him to tell me to what other places he had taken my property, as I had lost some weighing-machines -

I said it would save me a deal of trouble, as I was determined to find it out; he then said, voluntarily, that he had sold two mills and two weighing-machines of mine, to Mr. Frost, of Castle-street, and some mills and weighing-machines to Levi, of Belton-street; we went to Frost's, and found two mills and two machines; we also found two mills and two machines, at Levi's - I know them all to be mine. I had missed such things the day before. I believe they have all been made within three months.

Cross-examined. Q. You have sold a great many? - A. Yes. I will not swear that these have not been sold.

SAMUEL THOMAS FROST . I dealt with the prisoner several years ago - and within the last few months I have bought some weighing-machines and mills of him - I bought them separately. The machines are worth about 15s. each; they are of a very inferior manufacture.

LEVI LEVI . I have known the prisoner above six years. Mr. Yearly claims two machines and two mills which I bought of him - I bought them separately; I gave 15s. for one mill, and 14s. for the other, but he was to alter the first.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I went with the prosecutor to Bowter's - we returned, and found the prisoner at work; Mr. Yearly charged him with robbing him - he acknowledged he had sold some mills and machines at Frost's and Levi's.

MR. YEARLY. I believe these things all belong to me, and have no doubt of their having been stolen; here is the copper pan of one machine, which I am certain was never sold - it was separate from the machine, but it was not complete without it; the mills are worth 12s. each, and the machines are worth 20s.; no one article is worth 40s.

GUILTY. Aged 24. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-61

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

63. JONATHAN BATTY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Valentine Cocking (Sarah, his wife, being therein), about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 2d of November , at St. George, Hanover-square , and stealing 1 half-crown, 1 penny-piece, and 5 pieces of copper money, called half-pence, his property .

SARAH COCKING. I am the wife of Valentine Cocking - he is a brush-maker and turner ; we rent the house, No. 52, South Molton-street , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. On the 2d of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought into the shop by Turner, the officer; I had not seen him before; I was in the shop about three o'clock, and then went into the parlour behind; I was absent five or ten minutes, but was never out of the house; my son had gone out, and I desired him to shut the door after him; it is half glass - it was quite shut, for the bell rung when it opened - I heard him shut it. I had been to the desk about half an hour before, and I left in it a wooden bowl, containing a half-crown, and another containing some halfpence; I heard the door open and the bell ring, but thinking it was my son I did not attend; I heard the handle turn round - a bell rings in the parlour when the door opens; I heard a cry of Mother! I ran into the shop, and saw Turner bring the prisoner in - my son was there. I described what money I had, and Turner produced it; I missed the half-crown and halfpence from the desk.

HENRY COCKING . On the 2d of November I went out, and shut the door after me; I fastened it, and it could not be opened without turning the hasp; I returned in about five minutes, and found the door standing open; I saw a stranger at the desk where the money is kept - I went up and asked what he wanted there; he said, "Did not you hear me knock?" I said, "What business have you at my father's desk?" and immediately called Mother! he instantly ran out of the shop; I pursued, crying Stop thief! Turner was coming out of his house - he joined in the pursuit, and he was taken, without being out of my sight; he had the desk open, but I did not see him take any thing. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES GEORGE BARTHOLOMEW . I am an errand-boy. I was in South Molton-street between three and four o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I looked across the road, and when the prisoner came to the corner, by the public-house, he threw something from his hand, inside the passage of the public-house, which, from the sound, I could tell was money - I heard it jingle; I picked up, on that spot, a half-crown and some halfpence, which I gave to Turner, who then had him in custody - he is the man who threw it away.

ROBERT TURNER . I am beadle of St. George, Hanover-square. I heard an alarm of Stop thief! about twenty minutes after three o'clock; I was just coming out of my door, and saw the prisoner running very swift, pursued by Cooking; I followed, and took him; Bartholomew gave me a half-crown, a penny-piece, and five halfpence - I did not see it thrown away.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18261207-62

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

64. HUGH DOYLE WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 8 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the monies of Thomas Higgins , in the dwelling-house of Edward Burke .

THOMAS HIGGINS. I am a labourer , and lodge at Edward Burke's, in Angel-court, St. James ; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me there for three weeks; we slept in the same bed - I had thirty sovereigns at the bottom of my box, in a glove - I put them there at ten o'clock at night, on the 27th of November; we went to bed together about ten o'clock - I locked the box, and put the key into my waistcoat pocket; we got up together about eight o'clock in the morning, and left the room together at half-past nine - my box was in a cupboard in the bed-room, but before that we had gone into the next room to breakfast - he asked me to go to get my hair cut at half-past nine, and went with me as far as the door of a house in the same court, where there was a man whom he recommended to me to cut my hair; he was not a hair-dresser - I staid there about a quarter of an hour, and returned immediately to my room - I met him coming down-stairs as I went up; he was coming from the room we had breakfasted in - he asked me to lend him 1s., and at last

some halfpence - I had none, and went to get some from my box; I found the hinges forced off, and missed eight sovereigns and a half; I went down-stairs, but could not find him - I saw him in the street in about two hours, and had him taken on suspicion; another man assisted me - I asked what made him break open my box, and he denied it - we took him as far as St. James' church; he would go no further - I left a man with him, while I went for an officer, and he escaped, but was taken about twelve o'clock. No one slept in the room but him and me; I left nobody but the landlady at home.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there not other lodgers? A. Yes, but they were not in the house at the time; there were three more: I left the prisoner standing at the street-door - my hair was cut two doors off, on the same side of the way. When I met him on the stairs, I do not know whether he came from the breakfast or bed-room - I never said I had lost but seven sovereigns, or 5l. 10s. - I found the rest among my clothes; my box was safe at half-past nine o'clock in the morning, and the other lodgers were then all gone out, and my landlord was out - there was no lock to the bed-room door; one of the lodgers breakfasted with us, and he went out at the same time as me.

MARY BURKE . I am the wife of Edmund Burke - we only have the first-floor; the landlord lives in the second-floor; there is but one street-door, which is common to us all - Higgins lodged with me; I had five lodgers at that time. On the 28th of November, the prisoner and Higgins breakfasted with me, but nobody else; the other lodgers had all gone out to work at six o'clock; Higgins said he wanted his hair cut, and the prisoner said that a man next door would do it - I asked Higgins to stop in his own room and have it done, but the prisoner persuaded him to have it cut next door, and after breakfast they went down-stairs together; the prisoner returned directly, and went through my room into the bed-room; nobody but him was there - he told me he was taken very ill in the stomach, and asked me to lend him 1 1/2d. for some gin, as he had not got a farthing; he wanted me to fetch it, but I went down and sent somebody for it, and as I returned, he went into the bed-room and closed the door, he merely shut it; the gin came in about ten minutes, and I asked him to come out and have it; he said, "Stop a while" - I put it down, and he was in the room full ten minutes longer; I heard a noise like the box moving against the wainscoat, and the jingling of money on the floor - it did not sound like silver, but like gold falling on the floor - he came out and asked me for the gin; he drank it out of the bottle, without pouring it into a glass - I went downstairs, and did not see him again till he was taken; he had lodged there about five weeks; nobody but him had gone into the room before Higgins returned, which was in about five minutes after the prisoner left.

Cross-examined. Q. The bed-room is the next room to where they breakfasted? A. Yes; the breakfast-room is a very small one; the bed-room is not large; it contains two beds, and they must pass through my room to go to it. Higgins first mentioned about getting his hair cut - I was not more than a minute or two gone down for the gin; I found him in the bed-room, and the door closed - I saw him close the door - I heard something move against the wainscoat, and after that heard money scattering on the floor; I thought at the time it was something in his pocket, which he shook on the floor - it struck me at the time it was nothing proper; I thought it was gold; I said nothing to him; he had told me he had no money about him, but I did not know but he might have money and yet deny it, as he owed me some; it was not my place to ask him about it.

MR. PHILLIPS to HIGGINS. Q. You found Mrs. Burke in her room, I suppose, when you went up? A. Yes; there were four suits of clothes in my box; it had a good lock - I missed the key out of my pocket; the hinges were wrenched off from the screws.

WILLIAM WHITE . I am an officer. On the 28th of November, a little after twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner running along Church-street, Soho, followed by a mob calling Stop thief! I fetched my staff, went into Grafton-street, and there found him in a man's custody - he said he would go with me, as I was an officer; and as we went along, he said, "I did not take the sovereigns" - I had not mentioned sovereigns, nor heard a word about them before. When I got to the watch-house, he said, "Don't search me, I have not got the sovereigns" - I found 19s. 3d. on him. A man named George Craven followed him to Marlborough-street; they got into conversation by the fire-place in the office, and the prisoner said to him, "Mind you say you brought me some silver;" "What silver," said Craven; "O," he said, "say you brought me some silver, and be sure you say it was after breakfast to-day" - Craven said, "After breakfast?" "Yes," said the prisoner, "after breakfast, and more than that, you must swear to it; or if you cannot, you know who will" - I turned round and said, "What are you talking about, silver?" Craven replied, "I brought him some silver" - I said, "What silver?" he said, "I don't know" - I said, "Where did you bring it from?" he said from a man; he did not know what man; I said, "What house? what number?" he said, "I don't know, but I know it was yesterday."

Cross-examined. Q. Had not Higgins been speaking to him before you took him? A. Not to my knowledge; I found no gold on him - he said I should not find the gold.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my tobacco-box and a few halfpence that fell out of my pocket in the room - I did not breakfast with Higgins that morning: the other men might as well have taken the money as me, as he had lost his key. Mr. Thomas had advanced me the money which was found on me when I was taken.

JEREMIAH THOMAS . I am an apothecary, and knew the prisoner in Ireland for five or six years; I gave him a sovereign about three weeks ago; I think it was on a Monday morning - he said he had got a letter for Mr. Canning, through the interest of Mr. Martin, and was getting a situation - he asked me to lend him some money, and I gave him a sovereign.

GUILTY. Aged 24. Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-63

Before Mr. Recorder.

65. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 clock, value 5l., the goods of Thomas Fiske , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS FISKE. I keep the Red Lion public-house, in Old-street . This clock was safe at half-past eleven o'clock on the 12th of October - I do not recollect seeing the prisoner there, not to be positive of his person: it was missed about twelve o'clock - there was a person in the house similar to the prisoner in dress, but I cannot speak to his person. On the 17th I found the clock at Munting's, a broker, in the New Cut, Lambeth - it is worth 5l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it an old clock? A. Yes; but it had a new case - I had had it twelve years, and the case cost me 50s.

JAMES MUNTING . I am a broker, and live in the New Cut, Lambeth. On a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday in October, I bought this clock of the prisoner for 2l. - he brought it to me about the middle of the day; I think he was alone - he told me it did not belong to him, but to a clockmaker who lived in Clerkenwell, and who was obliged to part with it - he expected to receive 5s. for his trouble in selling it. Mr. Fiske claimed it in about four days - I met the prisoner, three weeks or a month afterwards, in Fleet-street; I had been told by an officer that I was to take him up when I saw him, but it was not in my power to lay hold of him; I only spoke civilly to him, and said nothing about the clock - I think we only said,"How do you do?" I did not give any alarm; it would have been a folly to do so, as no officer was near - he came to sell something at my house about a fortnight afterwards, and was taken - there had been a plan laid to take him - I am certain of his person.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you recollect the day of the month? A. No; I only know it was Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday; I thought it best to take him when I had an officer handy - when he sold me the clock, he told me there was a person waiting outside for the money, but I did not see that person, nor did he point him out; I did not go to the door; I had known the prisoner twelve months, or I should have been more particular - he might have said it belonged to a man who was waiting at the door, but I do not recollect it - I only recollect that he said it belonged to the maker in Clerkenwell. I thought 2l. as much as it was worth, to sell again; but I am not a competent judge - there was a person hanging a bell at my house at the time; I do not know his name.

EDWARD BERRY . I am an officer of Lambeth. I apprehended the prisoner in Munting's shop, on the 11th of November, at half-past nine o'clock at night - I told him I took him on suspicion of selling the clock, which he knew to be stolen, Mrs. Munting having informed me so; he made no answer - he said nothing to me about its belonging to a clockmaker in Clerkenwell.

JOHN MINTER . I am servant to Mr. Munting, and was present when the prisoner sold this clock - I am certain he is the man; 2l. was paid for it - he came to sell some other things, and was apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not hear him say it was not his own? A. Yes - he said it belonged to another person, and that he expected to have 5s. for his trouble; I did not hear him say the man was at the door; I was outside the door at times - a man was hanging a bell at the time.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 17th of October I went with Mr. Fiske, and got the clock from Munting's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a long written defence, stating that he had met an acquaintance, named Conway, in St. John-street, whom he understood to be a clockmaker, and whom he had been in the habit of meeting for the last four years, at the Cherry Tree public-house, in Clerkenwell. Conway had the clock, which he stated to be worth 4l. 10s., but, being in distress, that he would give the prisoner all he could get above 2l. for it; that they went together over to Lambeth, and Conway waited outside while he went in and sold the clock; that he told Munting, that all he got above 2l. he was to have, and, after walking from Clerkenwell, it was natural that he should wish to get something - that Munting pointed to the door, and said, "Is that the person it belongs to;" he said, Yes; he met Munting in Fleet-street afterwards, and went and drank with him at a public-house in Shoe-lane, but he said nothing about the clock.

JAMES MUNTING re-examined. I did drink with him when I met him in Fleet-street, and stopped with him about an hour; my reasons for so doing were, that if an officer had come in I should have given him in charge; I did not desire the landlord to send for one. I was entirely guided by the officer's directions; Sinderby is the man who was hanging the bell.

- SINDERBY . I was hanging a bell in Munting's passage in October, when the prisoner came there - the shop door was open, and there was a man out at the door - Jones said he had the clock to sell for a person, who was waiting at the door - he told Munting the person who belonged to the clock, said it was a very good one, and worth at least 3l., but he should have it for 2l. 10s., and then he should get 10s. for his trouble; he agreed at last to give 2l. for it. When I had finished my job I went into the public-house; he paid the prisoner for the clock within five minutes after he paid me - they were nearly an hour bargaining about the clock; it was then five minutes after three. I, the prisoner, and the person who was waiting for him, went into the public-house together, and had a pot of beer - I saw him give the man the 2l., and he gave him 5s. for his trouble; the man complained that the clock was worth more, and then went away. The public-house is two or three doors from Munting's.

COURT. Q. Was this a short or a tall man? A. He was rather tall, and pitted with the small-pox - I have not seen him since; I did not go before the Magistrate: I heard of the prisoner being taken up about a fortnight ago - I think his wife called on me; I did not mention what I knew to anybody; I have known the prisoner a good while.

Q. When, for the first time, did you tell anybody what you have stated to-day? A. I suppose a day or two afterwards - I told it to a person whom I knew.

Q. Who was that person? A. Why, I do not know; I might tell it - there is no doubt but I mentioned it to people, but I cannot say who.

Q. Upon your oath, who did you tell it to? A. I told it to a person named Gibson, who lives in Bear-lane, directly I heard he was taken about the clock, and I told it to one Butler, and Wilson; I dare say I told it to half a dozen or a dozen people; none of them are here; I never

saw the other man before; there was no conversation between us, except his giving him the 5s. I did not say a word; we were not ten minutes in the public-house - the man was dressed like a working man, with a white apron on - he went away before the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-64

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

66. JAMES FROST was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 sheep, price 1l. 18s. , the property of John Stanley .

The prosecutor stating his name to be John Hughes Stunley, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18261207-65

67. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Legget (no person being therein), about seven o'clock in the forenoon of the 23d of April , and stealing 2 gowns, value 20s., and 2 crown-pieces, his property .

JAMES LEGGETT. I live in Church-row, St. Pancras , and rent the lower part of the house; the landlady lives above me, but I have a separate door to enter - she could not get to her room from mine, without going into the street. On the 23d of April, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I went out, and double locked my door; my wife was gone to market - I had the key. I returned between eight and nine o'clock, and found the street door burst open, the drawers all open, and property strewed about; I missed a 5s. piece, and a few shillings from the drawer; some gown pieces laid in the middle of the room, with a large shawl, ready to pack them in. The officer was there before I got home; the gowns had been removed from their place.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long ago was this? A. On the 23d of April, 1825 - my landlady's name is Penn; she has a stair case outside the house, which leads to her room; her door opens on some leads; I do not enter at that door. I never had a man named Gravett taken up on this charge - I did not appear at Hatton-garden against him.

MARY DIMMOCK . I live in King's-place, within thirty yards of Leggett's house. On the 23d of April, 1825, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I saw Gravett standing at the end of Church-row - he watched Mrs. Leggatt out to market, away from the house; he then went down Church-row, and about twenty minutes after seven o'clock, I went to Leggett's house for some milk, and passed Gravett within fourteen or fifteen yards of the house; I went on, and when I pushed Leggett's door I found it was open; a chain was round the knob - it had been broken open; I went into the shop, and the prisoner stood there; I have known him many years. I said, "Is not Leggett at home?" he said, No - I said, "I want some milk;" he said, "So do I;" I put my back against the door, and said, "Well, he won't be long;" he stood with a bit of parsley in his hand, twisting it about, in an agitated manner, and said, "Well, Mary, as Leggett is not here, we can't have it" - he then passed me, and ran away. I did not know where he lived - his family were brought up in our neighbourhood; I had seen him constantly about before this happened, but not afterwards, till the 24th of November last, when he was in custody, except once, about twelve months ago or longer, when he came and begged of me not to appear against him, and asked me to say he was asking for milk; I had a basin in my hand for the milk, but he had neither basin nor mug; I saw nobody else in the house. I saw Leggett between eight and nine o'clock, and told him what I had seen; I called a young woman, and told her somebody had broken in; we looked into the parlour, and saw the drawers open, and the things scattered about; Gravett was taken up, and examined at Hatton-garden - the Magistrate discharged him, saying he must be taken again if Smith was found. Leggett did not appear there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe the door open? A. I pushed it, and the chain rattled. I found it ajar - anybody going to it might see that.

JOHN DANGER . I am a gold and silver worker, and live in Spann's-buildings, St. Pancras, fifty or sixty yards from Leggett's. On the 23d of November, 1825, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went to my gate, and saw Smith come running down as fast as he could, from the back walk, in a direction from Leggett's house; I thought there was something the matter; I went, and found Dimmock there. I went into the house which had been broken open, and the things were all in confusion. I knew the prisoner before, and cannot be mistaken in him. Limbrick was sent for, and then I left the place. I knew the prisoner lived in the neighbourhood, but I did not know where; he was frequently about, but I never saw him after this.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I was fetched to Leggett's house, which appeared to be broken open. - The property was not taken away.

WILLIAM SELLERS . On the 8th of November the prisoner was given into my custody, by a watchman, on a charge of dog-stealing.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived at Paddington at the time of the robbery; I slept at my mother's over night, and stopped to breakfast; I went to get a penny-worth of milk for breakfast, and had a basin under my arm - the door was open, and I stood calling for the milk; I did not run out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-66

68. JAMES GREEN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Brady ( Mary Brady and others being therein), about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 5th of December , and stealing 2 tea-caddies, value 18s., and 1 petticoat, value 6d., the goods of Hannah Seward .

HANNAH SEWARD. I am a widow , and lodge on a ground-floor in White's-yard, Whitecross-street, St. Luke's . Charles Brady rents the house, and lives in it. On the 5th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, and locked my room door; I left the two tea-caddies and petticoat safe; I returned between six and seven o'clock, and found the door unlocked, but closed - I am certain I had locked it; the street door is kept open. The witness Lock gave me information - I then missed two tea-caddies from the bureau bedstead, and the petticoat off the back of a chair; I have only one room - the prisoner was in custody; the articles are worth 1s. 6d. - he is a stranger. I heard Mrs. Brady and her children up-stairs when I went out, and they were at

home when I returned - they might have gone out while I was away.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner about four o'clock last Tuesday afternoon, in Whitecross-street. I first saw him in company with another man, about thirty yards from Brady's; I followed, and took him with these caddies and petticoat under his arm - I said, "What have you got here?" he said, "Why, a tea-caddy, which I have brought from my mother;" I looked under the petticoat, and saw another caddy - he said he had brought them both from his father, who lived in Clare-market, but gave no account of the petticoat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man with the teacaddies in Old-street; he said, if I would carry them to Whitecross-street, he would give me some porter.

GUILTY. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-67

69. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , at St. Mary-le-bone , 28 yards of linen, value 2l. 16s., the goods of John Limbert and Bryans Thomas Limbert , in their dwelling-house .

BRYANS THOMAS LIMBERT. I am in partnership with my father, John Limbert; we live at No. 39, Rathbone-place , St. Mary-le-bone, and are linen-drapers . On Wednesday, the 29th of November, the prisoner came alone into the shop, about half-past one o'clock, and asked to look at some cambric muslin - I was serving three distinct customers at the time - there was a shopman there - nothing was shown to her; I desired her to walk lower down the shop and I would attend upon her - I suspected her, and watched her as minutely as I could - I saw her reach over the counter, just opposite a pile of Irish linen; I shortly saw her lay hold of something, but could not see what it was - she put it under her left arm, and walked down the shop, concealing it under her shawl - I could just see the end of it; she attempted to walk out, and when she came opposite me, I asked if she had been served - she said, No - I said, "I will serve you directly;" she said, "No, I will call again;" but I reached a chair for her to sit down, so that her left-side should be towards me: but she turned her back to me; I then laid hold of her, and found she had a piece of Irish linen, which cost us exactly 2l. 16s. - I said, "You old wretch, what have you got under your shawl;" she stammered, and said,"I have nothing but this bundle;" producing one from under her right-arm, at the same time she dropped the Irish linen - I sent for an officer, who took her - the house is the dwelling-house of myself and father - we both reside there, and the rent is paid out of the partnership funds.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a constable. I was sent for, and look charge of the prisoner and the linen, which I have had ever since - the bundle she had contained dirty linen.

MR. LIMBERT. This is the Irish linen; my initials are on it - it cost us 2l. 16s. each piece, purchasing a box at a time; I have never measured it: but it is marked twenty-eight yards with the register stamp.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 52.

Reference Number: t18261207-68

70. JOHN HENDRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 6s., and 1 key, value 5s., the goods of John Hunt , in the dwelling-house of Hannah Hunt , widow .

JOHN HUNT. I am a sawyer , and live with my mother, Hannah Hunt, who is a widow, at No. 10, Black Boy-lane, Poplar : I went out at eight o'clock in the morning, of the 9th of December, leaving my watch in a small box on my bed-room table; the prisoner had lodged in the house a week, but not in that room; there was another lodger, but he had not been at home for three nights; I returned about five o'clock in the evening, and my watch was gone- the prisoner was not then in the house; I found the watch in Austin's possession, and knew it to be mine; I had had it five years; it cost me 4l. 10s.; I found the prisoner that night in a public-house, and told him what I suspected; he said he could not speak English, which is false; he speaks very good English; there was a gold seal to it; my room-door was not locked; the street-door is usually kept shut, but might be opened outside.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am a pawnbroker, and live at High-street, Shadwell; I bought this watch of a man of colour, about eleven o'clock in the morning; I will not be positive that it was the prisoner; he said he wanted to sell it; I gave him 25s. for it; they are to be bought in the trade now for 28s.; I asked if he lived at Mrs. Gold's, who keeps an establishment for black men; he said, Yes; I sold the seal; I gave 25s. for them both together.

JOHN HUNT. This is my watch; no other man of colour resided in our house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-69

71. JAMES DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 9 shillings , the monies of James Milburn .

JAMES MILBURN. I am a dustman , and live at Mile-end ; the prisoner was seven weeks in my employ. On the 19th of July, I saw my wife give him 9s. to fetch three hundred weight of potatoes; he never came back with the potatoes or money; I found him yesterday, and secured him; I had seen him before, but did not know I had a right to take him; he lived at the back of my house; but as soon as he heard I had indicted him, he went hopping and absconded; I have asked him for the money, and he sometimes promised to pay it; I went to receive it, but I heard in the neigbourhood he was ready to murder me; I called him over and said, "I understand you are going to murder me;" he said, Yes; a young man came up, and they got a fighting.

Prisoner's Defence. I offered him the money back; he said it was of no use to him, he wanted 19s.

PROSECUTOR. He brought me 9s. when he heard Smith was punished; I had indicted Smith for taking some money from me; he pleaded Guilty last Session; he had 7s. the same morning as the prisoner had 9s.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-70

72. ARCHIBALD KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 cloak, value 5s; 7 pairs of stockings, value 7s.; 2 razors, value 5s.; 1 stock, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Adam Lodge .

MR. ADAM LODGE. I have chambers at No. 64, Lincoln's Inn-field . Last Saturday, between eight and nine

o'clock in the evening, I was at the chambers; my cloak hung in the passage, and the other things were in the bed-room; the prisoner is a stranger; I did not see him in the chambers; I was sitting in my room; the servant entered and asked if any body had just left me; I had heard a footstep in the passage half a minute before; she rang the bell; her husband ran out, and the prisoner was stopped in the square; and the articles stated in the indictment were produced.

GEORGE BOWENS . My wife has the care of these chambers. I went out, and found the prisoner turning into Great Queen-street, with this property; he was stopped by a men, whom he broke away from, and I stopped him.

SARAH BOWENS . I am laundress at the chambers. I met the prisoner coming out of the chambers with a cloak on his arm; he had no business there.

THOMAS GODLING . I am a watchman. I found the other property on the prisoner; he is a stranger; he had no money, and appeared in poverty.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE BOWENS, JUN. I saw the prisoner going out of the house: I saw him throw the coat and cloak away, which I picked up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work a long time, and in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18261207-71

73. TIMOTHY TIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 truss of hay, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Brown .

CHARLES BROWN. I am a grocer , and live at Uxbridge . I have a field there; I put two trusses of hay into the field every night for cattle, and, as I was continually losing it, I set Clayton to watch - the prisoner was not in my employ.

GEORGE CLAYTON . I am in Mr. Brown's employ. The prisoner lived in the neighbourhood; I do not know what he is. On Thursday, the 23d of November, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I stationed myself in the middle of the field, about twelve yards from the hay; I saw the prisoner and White come into the middle of the field, and take the truss up - it would weigh 30lbs. - they each took half of it; I followed them with it into the road, and asked if they had stolen that hay - they said, No - they both had it on their backs; I followed them into the town, but let them go without stopping them; I have not found it - there was no hay in the field, but what was my master's - the prisoner was taken on the Wednesday following.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you when we took the hay? A. About twelve yards off - they did not appear to see me - they each had a sack, which they put it into.

Prisoner's Defence. The sack would not hold half a truss; I never had any hay out of his master's field - he came and said I had stolen his master's hay; I said I had not; he said, "You have, and I shall know you."

GEORGE CLAYTON. I said, "Tims, you have stolen this hay;" he denied it, but when we got nearly into the town, he said he had, and it was the first time.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped for the space of 200 Yards at Uxbridge .

Reference Number: t18261207-72

74. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 truss of hay, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Brown .

GEORGE CLAYTON. I am servant to Mr. Brown. This prisoner was with Tims, and had half the hay in a sack - he lives in the town, and keeps a donkey - he has no father.

CHARLES BROWN. The hay in this field was all mine; as the grass was very short, I had it put there for the cattle, and missed it every night for three weeks.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-73

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13.

First London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

75. GERARD FRIAR was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-74

76. THOMAS BECKET was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ROWE conducted the prosecution.

HENRY GEORGE HORN . I am deputy signer of the writs in the King's Bench; I produce an affidavit from there - my appointment is only a verbal one.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any commission or authority? A. No - the principals have none.

SARAH PRICE . I know the prisoner - the signature"Thomas Becket," on this affidavit, I believe to be his hand-writing.

This document was here read; it was an affidavit in which the defendant deposed that Richard Case Coll was justly indebted to him in the sum of 21l. for goods sold and delivered - dated 6th of June, 1826 - signed, T. BECKET.

MR. HORN. This affidavit was sworn in the regular way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you present? A. No - I have no recollection of it; I bring it here in the course of my office.

COURT. Q. Are your principals present when these affidavits are made? A. In general - they were on this occasion, because it is signed by one of them, and, had none of them been present, I should have signed it - they would not have signed it if they had not been present.

RICHARD CASE COLLS. I was last year an assistant-surgeon , living at Worcester. The prisoner lived nearly opposite to me; I became acquainted with him in the beginning of 1825, when he sent a note for me to bleed him - he was not in business at that time, but I understood from himself, that he had been running a coach - a legacy had been left me, which the prisoner did not know then, but did afterwards. About July, 1825, he stated a great deal to me about coaches, and said if I liked to have any concern with him, he was going to run a London coach, and if I would advance him 100l., I should have three horses, half a new set of harness, and half the profits, and if I did not approve of the business, there was an agreement entered into; it is burnt - I did not see it burnt - I understood so from Mr. Becket; if I did not like, the agreement was, that I might return the horses and harness, and the

money should he returned to me; I continued to run them about seven or eight weeks.

Q. Was there any limited time for you to see whether you liked or disliked it? A. No - after I had run them some time, I told him I did not like the concern, and requested him to return me the money according to his agreement; I returned the horses, and he told me he could not pay the 100l., but wished me to draw a bill on him at three months - this was in October - it became due in January - he accepted it, but did not pay any part of it when due; I produced the bill (this bill was here read, it was a promissory note for 136l., and interest for the same, dated October, at three months, signed T. Becket; and endorsed was a receipt for 21l. dated March 9, 1826 -"11th of March, received for rent and fixtures of place, No. 26, Blackfriars-road, 6l. 10s. 8d.") I have given him credit on the back for all I ever received on account of the bill. I received this letter from him about the end of March, or beginning of April last - it is not dated - he gave it me himself - (the following extract from the letter produced was here read, "N. B. The balance of 108l. 10s. 8d. shall shortly be paid, that we may quit friends") - subsequent to the receipt of this letter, I was arrested at the suit of the prisoner for 21l. - this was at the end of June - I was taken to a lock-up house in George-street, Blackfriars-road, and kept there two days and two nights; on my solemn oath, I did not owe him a farthing, but he owed me the balance of the bill 108s. 10s. 8d. - about five minutes after I got to the lock-up house, the defendant called on me, and much violent altercation took place upon the impropriety of his arresting me; I told him he had perjured himself - he said if I used any such abusive language as that, he would take his hat and go out - in about half an hour he sent for some porter, and asked if I would have some, and told me he had arrested me on purpose, that I might not be hostile to him with regard to his commission of bankruptcy (he was a bankrupt at that time, as I understood, by the papers), and that he was going to bring an action against a clergyman in Lincolnshire, which he could not do without my evidence; he said he would endeavour to get me out, but it was too late that night; he called several times next day; I was afterwards liberated, and he paid all the expenses; I am married - my wife was at home - she called at the lock-up house that night, but whether while the defendant was there I do not know - (here the following extract from the letter produced was read,"This is the account as it stands, leaving to you 108l. 10s. 8d. of my own good will and gift.")

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the first application, on the coach account, made by you to the defendant? A. No. I did not tell him I was tired of my profession, by which I was not getting a farthing, and wish him to allow me to horse a coach; I swear that - Herbert Evans was our book-keeper - he was about three months in our employ - we were concerned in two coaches - the bill was the balance of all accounts; he sold me five horses and half a set of new harness; they came to 106l.; I was to horse the Worcester coach from there to Pershore, which is nine miles, no further; I was to horse the Independent coach to Bromyard, fourteen miles; I did that five or six weeks; I was to pay for the forage of the horses on that stage - the defendant paid that, but it was settled in the balance - I could see the books when I liked - I cannot say whether Evans, the book-keeper, knows of my paying for the forage; I think I never conversed with him on that subject; I swear that I paid it.

Q. Did you ever give the defendant a bill for any money you owed him? A. Yes; and that bill was cancelled at the time of our settlement - it was not given up to me; he told me he had burnt it at the time of the settlement - nobody was present; I know the defendant was a bankrupt; I swear he said he arrested me that I might not be hostile; he was not a bankrupt when we made the settlement, nor had he even told me he was about to become one - what I mean by the settlement is, when he gave me this promissory note.

COURT. Q. If the note had been paid, it would have been a settlement? A. Yes, my Lord.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you say whether he become a bankrupt, or arrested you first? A. I cannot exactly state - I think he was a bankrupt about a week before.

Q. Did you not, when you gave him the 21l. bill, owe him 150l.? A. No. I had taken no proceedings on my bill before he arrested me; nobody was present when I paid him for the horses and harness - I took no receipt - I received a note from him, saying, he had the 21l. bill, and if I did not pay it, I should be arrested; I believe he has stated he has a claim of above 100l. on me; I do not know E. Eastwood, and am not aware that I ever saw him - I was at a house in Basinghall-street with the defendant and a gentleman; I was not then in conversation with him on the subject of our accounts - nobody was present when we talked about our affairs; I never said the 108l. bill was nothing but an accommodation bill, or that the defendant liberated me, on my promise to give up that bill, and call it an accommodation bill; I never had any conversation with the defendant on the subject of this bill in the presence of Evans - he was not present when this bill was drawn, nor sent out to buy a stamp; the defendant advanced to me the keep of the five horses for about five weeks; I did not pay him weekly - it was settled monthly, with the coach accounts, out of the earnings of the coach, instead of giving it to me; the book-keeper is aware of that, I should think.

Q. Was not some coach stopped, and 500l. due to the defendant in consequence of it? A. I do not know that he was to receive 500l. - he never told me so; I was witness to a signature on a stamp; this bill was not given for my expenses and trouble on that occasion; I never stated in Evans' presence that it was given for that; Becket gave me the bill in his lodgings, at Worcester - Evans was not present at any conversation about this bill being given - Becket never told me he had brought an action to recover the 500l. - I am now assistant to a physician; I was living with Mr. Humphreys, an attorney, when I was served with this writ; I lived four or five months with him, and have left only ten days; I lived with Messrs. Raymond and Co., at Worcester; when I settled with the defendant for the keep of the horses, I had the books; the book-keeper was not there; I received 28s. or 29s. as my share of the profit, after he had paid himself for the horses; I have not proved this debt under his commission, as I intended to take him for it afterwards; I went to examine his ba

lance sheet before the Commissioners - they asked if I was a creditor; I said, Yes, but declined proving.

MR. ALLEY. Q. If you had, you must have given up your bill? A. Yes; what I call the settlement, was the bill being given; nobody was present.

COURT. Q. When the 136l. bill was given, there had been a 21l. bill given before; what became of that? A. It was cancelled; this bill was given as a final settlement of every item on both sides; Becket said he had burnt it; it was reckoned before the balance was struck of 136l.; there was no money transaction of any kind after that, or any thing upon which a debt could accrue.

MARY COLLS . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the defendent when my husband was under arrest - my husband was present at part of the conversation I had with him - I heard him say he had arrested my husband to prevent his being hostile to his commission.

R - COX . I am a sheriff's officer. My brother arrested Colls on the 27th of June, and brought him to my house - the defendant gave me a paper, which I produce(read) - "In the King'-bench, T. Becket, plaintiff; R. C. Colls defendant. Discharge the above-named defendant, and this shall be your authority. T. Becket." I said I could not discharge him unless the attorney signed it - I received another, signed by the attorney, and he was discharged - Becket paid the expenses.

COURT to COLLS. Q. At any time before or after your arrest, did you pay the defendant, or promise to pay him any thing in consequence of you discharge? A. No; nor did I promise to give up the bill.

MR. PHILLIPS addressed the Court and Jury, and called.

EDWARD EASTWOOD . I am a commission-broker. I have known the defendant several years - I have seen Colls once or twice - I saw him in company with Becket, who said to me, "This is my friend Mr. Colls, who I mentioned to you before;" some conversation took place, and Becket said, "We have had some differences, but they are now made up;" Colls nodded assent; this was on the 5th of August; some of Becket's friends then came up, and Becket went away with them; Colls told me he was very sorry for what had passed, and he would do any thing for him; that Becket had arrested him for a 21l. bill, and at the same time he had a bill of his for 108l. - he considered the arrest was unjust, but matters were settled between them - he said Becket had released him, and they had settled their differences - that Becket was a good fellow, and he would do any thing to serve him - he did not say he had promised to give up the 108l. bill - this was after the arrest, on the day of the third meeting of Becket's creditors - he walked into the Bankrupt-court, and I asked if he meant to prove his debt - he said, No, they had settled their differences; he did not say where the bill was - Becket bears the character of a perfect gentleman.

HERBERT EVANS . I was book-keeper to these parties; Mr. Colls horsed the coach to Birmingham - Mr. Becket fed the horses for about three months - I was never present when Colls paid Becket any of the money advanced: I never saw this 136l. bill before; I was present when a bill was given by Becket to Colls; I bought the stamp - this was the latter end of October, or the beginning of November 1825, for it was after the London coach had stopped, which was on the 28th of October; the other coach stopped on the 10th of November; I heard Colls say it was an accommodation bill - it was said Colls was principal witness to the signing of a bond respecting the stopping of a coach, and he being necessary to prove the signature of Mr. Bowen of Pershore, Colls said it would be a great expense to come from London to Worscester to give evidence, and wanted 150l.; and after consideration, Becket gave him a 140l. bill, considering the 40l. would pay his expenses if he was absent a week, and the 100l. to put into his pocket - I heard this between Colls and Becket.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What are you now? A. I am in the employ of Mr. Hyde, an attorney at Worcester - I left the defendant's service in November, 1825; before that, I lived with a Mr. Clark, who made a charge against me for having misapplied some of his money - I had left him before I heard of it - he is a coach-owner.

Q. Did not the defendant dismiss you for embezzling his money? A. No - I left them because the coach stopped - I was not charged with going off with 50l. or 60l. - I never saw a bill paid by my father to Becket - I never heard of his paying the defendant any money on my account - I went from him to Mr. Hyde.

COURT. Q. Was any charge true or false made by Mr. Becket? Q. No - I left on the 10th of November.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Mr. Clark make any charge against you? A. No; he was under-sheriff of Worcester last year; both coaches had stopped in 1825.

COURT. Q. With respect to the 140l., what became of the action? A. It dropped on account of Becket being involved; he could not carry it on.

THOMAS BURT. I was in Becket and Colls' employ on the Bromyard coach - Colls was to horse it; the horses were kept by Becket nearly three months; I am sure it was above five weeks - he allowed me 1s. a day for attending them. GUILTY .

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18261207-75

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

77. THOMAS CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 truck, value 30s. , the goods of John Riggs .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261207-76

78. JAMES FRANCIS ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , part of a carding, twisting, and spinning machine, value 14l.; 1 smith's bellows and fixings, value 3l., and 1 smith's anvil, value 2l. , the goods of James Mowbray Warren .

JAMES MOWBRAY WARREN. I am a carver , and live in Regent's-park. This property was in my workshop, in China-mews, Gower-street - I saw them safe between three and four o'clock on the 2d of July - I was sent for about

a quarter to eight, and was told Mr. Abbott was taking them away: I found him there, with part of them in a cart; I knew him before; he is a broker - I asked by what authority he took them, having distrained before to seven or eight times the value of the debt; and one quarter more than I owed was levied for - the condemnation had been four days before this; it was a distress for rent, by order of the executors of William Gaskill ; they employed the prisoner as the broker: I was confident he was not employed by them in this last case, as he would not show his authority - he had not then sold the former goods; they have now realised considerably more than the rent. I asked for his authority; he gave me none - he took the goods away about eight o'clock in my presence - I have purchased such of them as I wanted; but they were shifted from place to place, and it was quite by accident I discovered them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not, on the 15th of June, send to say that he had got the authority, but wished to give you an opportunity to pay your rent? A. He did - when he was brought into the Court of King's Bench to be bailed, I certainly interfered, and wished him to be brought to gaol - the Judges said it was no felony, but it was a robbery.

WILLIAM McPHERSON . I saw Abbott, on the morning in question, come and ask if Warren was at home - I said not - he spoke to Warren's son, and left his man in possession; and when the goods were condemned, he took them away in his cart - on Saturday evening he came again, and took these things, which were not in the inventory.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-77

79. JOHN TOOL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 3 loaves of bread, value 2s. 3d. , the goods of Christian Dill .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

The prisoner received a good character.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-78

80. SAMUEL ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 2050 needles, value 12s. , the goods of John Railton .

JOHN RAILTON. I am a haberdasher , and live in Church-street, Hackney . On the 11th of November, the prisoner came for some needles, and looked out some, which came to 3s. 6d.; he then selected another parcel, and said,"Lay them by, and I will call presently" - I looked into my drawer, and missed a number of needles - I went after him about a mile, and as I returned saw him go into a public-house: I followed him, and asked if he was coming back about the needles - he said Yes, when he had had his beer - I asked for those he had in his pocket - he said he had none; I collared him; he then produced them on the table, and said, "Will you forgive me?" I went to the table to look at them, and he ran away - I followed and secured him: he said, "If you won't take them up, I will;" he then went to the table, and pulled out a great many more, which belonged to another person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-79

81. PATRICK FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 umbrella, value 2s. , the goods of the Rev. Ralph Wasley .

ROBERT BREWIS . I am servant to the Rev. Ralph Wasley. This umbrella is my master's; it was in the dickey behind his carriage in Oxford-street .

JOSEPH MOBBS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in Oxford-street on Thursday, the 23d of November - I saw the prisoner standing at the end of Woodstock-street - I saw the carriage come by; the prisoner got up behind it, and took this umbrella - I took him into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence, and having a good character.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-80

82. JAMES GOULD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 2 lbs. weight of pork, value 1s. 5d. , the goods of William Merry .

WILLIAM MERRY. I am a pork butcher - I live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate . On the 4th of November, a little before eleven o'clock, the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to my house - I immediately afterwards received some information, and followed him into Long-alley - I found in his hat about 2 1/2lbs. of pork, which is mine - I asked him if it was mine; he said it was not, and was rather insolent - the constable came up, and took him - I looked into my shop, missed the pork, and have no doubt it was mine.

GEORGE TABB . I was in the prosecutor's shop - I saw the prisoner take the pork from the window, and put it under his jacket; I told Mr. Merry of it, and he followed him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the pork under the window; I did not take it out; it was through distress that I did it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261207-81

83. JOHN HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 3 live tame rabbits, value 4s., and 4 live tame turkies, value 1l. , the property of Ford Wilson .

THOMAS BOLIVAR . I am gardener to Ford Wilson, Esq. - he lives at Stamford-hill : these rabbits were in hutches in the cow-house, and the turkies were loose on the top of the hutches; we lost three rabbits and five turkies on Tuesday night, the 7th of November - they were safe at six o'clock, and were gone before ten - I did not know the prisoner; I know his father - neither he nor his father had ever worked for Mr. Wilson - I found two of the rabbits on the following Thursday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was the cow-house locked? A. No; the rabbits and turkies were alive - the prisoner got a person to bail him.

THOMAS ADKINS . I am constable of Stamford-hill. On Wednesday morning, the 8th of November, between nine and ten o'clock, I received information from Bolivar; I was then coming to town, and on my return I heard that William Hodgson had bought two rabbits - I went to him on the Thursday morning, and found these two rabbits at his house, in High-street, Newington. The prisoner came up to the office with William Hodgson, to surrender himself - I heard him say that he had bought them of a countryman.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not two examinations? A. Yes, and Hodgson attended at at the first - I had known one of these rabbits before Bolivar bought them for Mr. Wilson.

WILLIAM HODGSON. I am a labourer, and live in High-street, Newington, about three quarters of a mile from Stamford-hill. I bought these two rabbits of the prisoner on the Wednesday morning, at near nine o'clock - I knew him before; he was a labourer - I gave him 5s. for the two; they are does - I did not think I had any particular bargain: he has occasionally worked for me on some ground which I rent - he said he had bought them of a man, who appeared to be a countryman, near the Rochester Castle public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you buy any turkies of him? A. No, he had nothing but the rabbits - I attended before the Magistrate, and stated that I bought them of him - I saw him the same day they were taken from me; I told him they were said to be stolen, and he said he would come voluntarily - I told him to meet me at the office the next day, and he did so.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-82

84. WILLIAM SMART JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 cart-cloth, value 1l., and 1 belly-band, value 5s. , the goods of Daniel Brown .

DANIEL BROWN. I am a carman . On the 28th of November, I lost these things from my stable in the Adelphi ; I had seen them safe at half-past eight o'clock that day; the stable was locked - the back part of it was broken through to get them. The prisoner worked as a carman near me - I met him, and accused him of taking my cloth; he denied it, but afterwards took me to his employer's, where I found it cut into six pieces.

WILLIAM LEMON . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house, by one of the patrol, on a charge of taking the cart-cloth and the belly-band - I found a key on him, which he said belonged to an upholsterer.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up by the stable, cut as it is now.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-83

85. WILLIAM BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 box, value 5s.; 2 blankets, value 8s.; 2 shirts, value 6s.; 1 bed-tick, value 3s.; 5 gowns, value 16s.; 3 shifts, value 9s.; a pair of trousers, value 9s.; 3 shawls, value 12s.; 4 petticoats, value 6s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 5 spoons, value 2s., and 5 rings, value 7s. , the goods of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I am a discharged soldier , from the 60th regiment of the Duke of York's rifle corps. On the 10th of November I packed up my clothes, to go to Bristol, in my way to Ireland; my box contained the articles stated in the indictment, and several more. I never saw the prisoner till the 6th of November, when I met him at Chelsea; I found he lodged in the same house as my wife and family, in Pugh's-row, Westminster - he came to me on the 9th, and asked if he should carry my box, as it was too heavy for me - he knew where it was going, and put the direction on himself; I accompanied him when he carried it, to the White Bear, Piccadilly , on the 10th - we returned together, and after breakfast he shewed me the way to Bristol - I walked, and got there on the 17th, and found my box had not arrived - I wrote to London, and had no answer. I then walked back, and waited at Pugh's-row till the prisoner came in - I told him I wanted him to go to the office, to inquire about the box, as I had not received it; he went with me, but said he had occasion to stop, and desired me to go into the office - I went in, but did not find it. I was coming back, not having seen him, when he ran after me; I said, "You was not at the office; and the clerk says you took it away"- he said, "I did not," and returned towards the office with me; just before we got there he went down a dark turning; I followed him - he ran, but I seized him - he tried to escape, but I took him to the office; the clerk said, "That is the man who had the box."

GEORGE RYDER . I am the book-keeper. The prosecutor and the prisoner came on the 9th, and asked a few questions, and on the 10th they brought the box, before nine o'clock in the morning - Williams gave me 2d. for booking; the prisoner then said, "You need not be in a hurry to load the box, as we may want it again - he may not go;" I said, "Very well;" they left, and in about two hours the prisoner returned, alone, and asked for the box - I asked how he was going to send it; he said, "The soldier is not going for a week - I am going to take it back to his lodging;" he took it away. I believed that Williams had sent him. I have no doubt of his person.

GEORGE OVERS . I am a patrol. I took him in charge - he said nothing about the box.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On the 28th of November I went with a warrant to Jew's-row, and in a bed there found this shirt, which Williams claims; I saw the prisoner next morning, in New Prison, and told him I had searched his lodging, found this shirt, and it was useless to deny it - he said, "Well, I did take it," and that he had sold the other things to a man who sold things about the street.

HARRIET BUCKLEY . I live in Jew's-row. The prisoner slept in the bed the shirt was found in.

Prisoner's Defence (written). The prosecutor had married an Irish woman, for no other purpose than her money, which is plainly evident, by his telling me that on their arrival at the County of Cork, he intended to leave her, and return to London, and he ordered me to fetch this box, sell the things which it contained, and have the money ready against his arrival. I was much in want of money, and when he came up I had spent it.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS re-examined. There is not a word of truth in this statement.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-84

86. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 8 knives, value 2s., and 7 forks, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Bramble .

WILLIAM SHARP . I am a gardener. Mr. Bramble is a watchmaker , of Oxford-street, and has a summer-house at Bayswater . On the 23d of November I was at work just by my father's premises, about seven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner, with another person, coming up the lane, from Mr. Bramble's garden; the other

held the prisoner's hat while he got through the hedge, into another garden; I got over the fence, and secured him - he was a stranger. The summer-house door had been struck with a hammer, but they could not open it; two squares of glass were cut out at the back of the premises, and there they must have got in.

JOSEPH BRAMBLE. I had seen my summer-house safe on the Sunday before this, and left these knives and forks there; the door has been beaten nearly to pieces, and the head of the hammer was left sticking in the door.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge, and found these knives and forks on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to work, and met a young man with these knives and forks. I saw the witness running after him; the property laid on the ground- I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-85

87. JULIA McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 8 shirts, value 6l.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 30s.; 8 pairs of socks, value 8s., and 1 pair of gaiters, value 2s. , the goods of Frederick William Slade .

FREDERICK WILLIAM SLADE, ESQ. I am a member of Brazen-nose College . On the 12th of October I was at the Bath Hotel, Piccadilly , and gave this dirty linen, in a bundle, to one to the servants, to be washed - I have never seen it since.

ELIZABETH CAVANAGH . I am servant at the Bath Hotel, Arlington-street, Piccadilly. Mr. Slade gave me a bundle, which I delivered to the prisoner, to wash, next day, between two and three o'clock - she was in the employ of Ann Savage , our laundress; I told her to get it done by next day (Saturday) - I am sure I gave it to her- she frequently came for the linen.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say you gave it to a short woman like me, without a bonnet? A. No. She persisted in saying she had not received it; my fellow-servant said he had sometimes seen her without a bonnet.

PHILIP CHASTENEY . I was a waiter at the Bath Hotel, and saw Cavanagh deliver this bundle to the prisoner, when she had brought another small one home.

ANN SAVAGE. I wash for this hotel. The prisoner was employed by me - I sent her there twice on the 13th- she took a small bundle, and was to bring back what there might be; she returned, but brought nothing. On Monday the porter came for the bundle, but I had not received it - she has been with me three years, and behaved well.

EDWARD BOOTHMAN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner. I found several duplicates on her, but not relating to this.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, denying that she had received the property.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261207-86

88. HENRY PINK and CHARLES KELK were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 3 hats, value 3l., and 2 ruffs, value 28s., the goods of John Hyde Bowler and other ; and JAMES ORGAR was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

BENJAMIN LINCOLN . I am a hatter, and live in Sackville-street. Pink was my apprentice , and Kelk my errand-boy ; Pink had been three years with me. In consequence of information I questioned Kelk, and he gave me a great deal of information about the other prisoners, who were not present. We went to the office together.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. Mr. Lincoln and Kelk came to the office on Tuesday, the 14th of November, and I went to Mr. Lincoln's house; I saw Pink, took him into the ware-room, and found some razors on him, which he said Kelk gave him - I called Kelk, and said to him, "Pink says you have been stealing some articles;" he then admitted stealing the razors from Exeter'Change, but said to Pink, "You know you told me to do it, and you stole several hats from Mr. Bowler, and left them at the coal-shed, for James, at Jarratt's, and two ruffs also;" Pink said, "I know I did, and you stole a hat from Mr. Lowe;" he also admitted that he took another hat from Mr. Bowler's to his father, who pawned it for 7s. I took them to the office, and went to Brewer-street, where Pink said his father lived, and told him Pink said he had pawned a hat - he then gave me the duplicate of it. In consequence of what Mr. Lincoln said I went to Mr. Jarratt's, a hatter, in Piccadilly; Orgar, his shopman , was not at home; we found him there soon after; I told him Mr. Lincoln's boys had been committing depredations, and had stated that he had some hats and ruffs from a coal-shed, in Swallow-street, where they had been left - he then said, "I have had things which where left at the coal-shed, and the ruffs are now in my box;" I found them in his box, and got this hat from the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Did he state any thing about a price for them? A. He said something about 26s. or 28s., but I think he said he had not paid it - he said he had sold one hat to a Jew.

HUGH PINK . I am Pink's father, and am a shoemaker. He brought home this hat three weeks or a month ago, and said it was a present made to him from one of Mr. Bowler's men - I questioned him strictly about it, but he still said so - I pawned it for 7s. at the corner of Crown-court - I did not ask the name of the person who gave it him, as I never knew him dishonest.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What connexion had he with Mr. Bowler? A. I believe he went there to carry hats - he never brought any thing before - I pawned it a day or two afterwards - I did not know where Bowler lived - my son said he lived over the water - I did not go there to inquire about it; it would not fit either him or me- I saw the name of Daniels of Bristol in it, after my son was gone, but suspected nothing.

PETER TATE . I am shopman to a pawnbroker of Crown-court; this hat was pawned by Pink's father for 7s. in this box, which has Pink's name on it.

HUGH PINK. It was a box which I had with another hat.

THOMAS GOODHALL . I am foreman to John Hyde Bowler and his partners; this hat is theirs; it was put out to go to Bristol; Pink came to our house three or four times a week from Lincoln's shop, and had access to the warehouse - the wholesale price of it is 22s.; I did not miss it

till I heard of his being in custody; the ruffs cost 15s. and 16s. each; and must have been taken while I was at tea; the ruffs are in an unfinished state; he could do nothing with them.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I keep a coal-shed in Swallow-street. I have known Orgar about a year and a half; he came to my house about seven or eight weeks ago, and asked if he might leave some boxes which he bad been with to a gentleman's house, but he was out - he then asked if his brother might leave a parcel there, and said he would come for it - Pink, who was with him then, left a parcel and hat-box - I had seen Pink pass the door with hat-boxes in his hand; the parcel was as large as these ruffs - Orgar called in two or three hours and fetched them all away - he had left things there before.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot tell what was in the boxes? A. No.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Five witnesses appeared to the character of Pink, and five for Orgar.

PINK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

ORGAR - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

KELK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-87

89. HENRY PINK and CHARLES KELK were again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 4 razors, value 4s.; 1 pair of boot-books, value 1s. 6d.; 1 hone, value 1s. 6d.; 3 button-hooks, value 1s. 6d.; 2 boxes, value 1s.; 1 corkscrew, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissars, value 1s., and 1 knife, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Clarke .

JOHN ROBINSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Clarke of Exeter'Change ; Clements produced to me the articles stated in the indictment; which have my marks on them, and belong to Mr. Clark; but when they were taken I do not know; I know nothing of the prisoners.

BENJAMIN LINCOLN . I was with Clements, and saw him find this property in the box.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I found this case of razors in Pink's coat-pocket; he said Kelk stole them from Exeter 'Change and gave them to him; Kelk came up, and said he had stolen them, and that Pink was always telling him to steal them, and wanted him to steal another hat from Bowler's; Kelk then said he had two other razors at his mother's; I went there, and found 2 razors, a knife, and scissars; in Pink's box I found the rest of the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Seven witnesses gave Kelk a good character.

PINK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

KELK - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-88

90. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Philip Bocket Barlow , from his person .

EDWARD RANTMORE . I am a watchman. On the 4th of November, I was crossing the end of Beaufort-buildings, Strand , and saw Mr. Barlow - the prisoner, who was alone, took this handkerchief from his coat-pocket - he started to go down the buildings; I caught him in my arms, and sent another watchman after Mr. Barlow - he knocked my hat off - I told Rickhuss to see if he had not thrown it down.

PHILIP BOCKET BARLOW. I was in the Strand, and had this handkerchief in my coat-pocket - I did not feel it taken, but was called back, and found the prisoner in custody with it - my pocket had been attempted two minutes before by somebody.

ROBERT LUTWICH . I was walking with Mr. Barlow; we are students in law. The watchman came and asked if we had lost any thing - we found the prisoner in custody with this handkerchief.

THOMAS RICKHUSS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from one of these gentlemen - Rantmore caught him, and sent me after the gentleman; he then told me to look and pick up his hat - I found the hat and handkerchief in the street - the prisoner said he was taken short and was running down to the coal yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-89

91. GERSHOM SHEPHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 5 loaves of bread. value 10d., and 15lbs. of flour, value 3s., the goods of Charles Westley , his master .

CHARLES WESTLEY. I am a baker , and live in South-street, Manchester-square . The prisoner was two years in my service - I suspected him, and in the week this happened, he had the whole charge of my business, as I was ill. On the 11th of November I found a box in my back premises, in a small room which was not occupied; and in the box I found four loaves and a half - I fetched Gibbs the officer, who took off the prisoner's hat, and found a 2lb. loaf in it; and in his pocket, half a loaf - he was not going out to sell bread.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you not allow him bread? A. He is allowed him to eat what he wants, and generally when he goes home I give him a loaf; two of the loaves in the box had been made the day before- I have other workmen; but the key of the box was in the prisoner's pocket; I had given him no bread the day before.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer, I went to Westley's; the prisoner came in; I found this loaf in his hat, with a handkerchief over it, and half a loaf in his pocket - Westley fetched the box; the prisoner gave me the key, and I found four loaves and a half there - I went to his lodging and found 15lbs. of flour in a bag.

Cross-examined. Q. What did he say? A. He said he would give up his week's wages to pay for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention of defrauding my master; he allowed me a 2lb. loaf a day, which was not sufficient - the flour was not his - I had bought it, and paid for it.

GUILTY. Aged 32. Of stealing the bread only - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-90

92. WILLIAM HENRY JOHNSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 5 half-crowns, the monies of Thomas Dawson , from his person .

THOMAS DAWSON. I am a carpenter , and work at the corner of Downing-street. I live in Crown-street, Westminster - the prisoner is my son-in-law, and lodged with me. On Friday, the 17th of November, I was ill in bed; I had five half-crowns, and a sixpence in my left-hand

trousers pocket, which was under my pillow - the prisoner was there at his dinner-hour - I fell asleep between two and three o'clock, and when I awoke he was gone; about two hours afterwards I missed my money, which I am sure was safe when I went to sleep - I found the sixpence laying on the bed, then looked and missed the five half-crowns - the prisoner did not come back till the 22d of November; when he called, "Mother!" I let him in, and said, "You are a pretty boy, where is my money?" he said he had spent it; I said, "What did you take?" he said, "Five half-crowns;" I gave him in charge - he has been in many places, but defrauded his masters.

MARY ANN DAWSON . I am the mother of this boy. I know no more than my husband has stated.

GUILTY. Aged 14. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-91

93. MARY NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 watch, value 40s., the goods of William Frost , from his person .

WILLIAM FROST. I live in Kingsgate-street, and am foreman to Messrs. Young and Son, carpenters . On Saturday, the 18th of November, I left the pay-table, and went to Soho on some business; I was returning about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock, and met the prisoner in St. Giles - she wanted me to go with her, or to give her something, which I would not - she kept up with me on my way to Kingsgate-street, and, at the corner of Duke-street and Little Russel-street , she left me - I turned, and saw her running - I put my hand to my pocket, and my watch was gone; I ran to the watchman, who followed her - he saw her put the watch down at a door-way, and took it up - she was taken directly.

TIMOTHY RYAN . I am a watchman. The witness told me he had lost his watch; I saw the prisoner run, put the watch down at the step of a door, and then run on; I took her, and found the watch at the step of the door - the prosecutor said, "She has got the watch;" I said, "No - she has put it down."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from my aunt's - a girl ran by - the prosecutor ran up, and said he had stolen his watch; the watchman came, and looked about with his lantern; I stopped - he said he supposed I was like the girl, and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-92

94. ANN BLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 ribbon, value 2d., and 1 key, value 2d., the goods of Robert Finlay , from his person .

ROBERT FINLAY. I am steward on board of His Majesty's ship, Huzza , which was paid off at Chatham about a month ago. On the 1st of December, between twelve and one o'clock, I was with a shipmate, and met the prisoner at Charing-cross with another girl - they stopped, and asked us for something to drink - my shipmate knew them both before he went to sea; it was too late to give them drink - we went home with them to Duck-lane, Westminster - just before we got there, my shipmate stopped - they said he knew where to come, and we might as well walk on; we went to No. 20, Duck-lane - the prisoner and I went up to a room on the second - floor - the other girl followed us - in two minutes I asked her where my shipmate was - she wished us good night, saying she would go and look for him - we went to bed; I put my watch under my pillow - the prisoner said that was a safe place to put it - the door was shut, but not locked - she then said she was thirsty, and must go down to the first-floor for some water - she went, and staid some time - I felt for my watch, and it was gone; I had not been asleep, and am certain no other person was in the room after I put it there; I went down to the watchman, who searched the room, but could not find it; she was afterwards taken- I was perfectly sober, and am certain she is the girl.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am a watchman, and have known the prisoner by sight some time. On the 1st of December I was in Orchard-street, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor in company, at half-past twelve o'clock; I called the hour, and saw them go into No. 20, Duck-lane - the prosecutor came out soon after, and said he had lost his watch - he was quite sober.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am patrol of St. James's. The prisoner was given into my charge last Sunday.

Prisoner's Defence. If I was to die this minute, I never saw that man before - when I was taken, he said it was not me, but a girl named Jane.

ROBERT FINLAY . I never said so: when I told the watchman, he said it was a girl called Gipsey Nan - I had given her money - she went away half dressed, leaving her petticoat and stays behind her.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-93

95. HENRY MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 hat, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Edwards , from his person .

WILLIAM EDWARDS. I am a labourer . On the 25th of November, between eight and nine o'clock, I was in George-street, St. Giles - my hat was knocked off by somebody - I looked round, and saw the prisoner running with it - I called Stop thief! - I had not seen him before; I ran, and fell down - the patrol took him.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner coming towards me, bending down close to the houses; I took hold of him, and he threw this hat into the road; I dragged him to it; Edwards and several others came up - Edwards was very much in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the road - somebody called Stop thief! and the patrol took me.

MARY LITTLEDALE . I am a widow, and live in St. Giles, and work in Covent-garden. I have seen the prisoner about the street; I saw him going along - he picked up this hat in George-street; I saw it lay there before he came up to it, in the middle of the street; I was going to pick it up, but he got it before me; I went on, and saw the prosecutor, and said I saw a lad pick a hat up - he said,"Stop him;" I turned, and saw Reardon coming with the prisoner. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-94

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

96. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for bigamy .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS COULSELL . I knew Ann Maria Viner ; she is my daughter-in-law; I was present on the 4th of January, 1821, when she was married to the prisoner; I gave her away; she is now in Court; I produce a certificate of their marriage (read).

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where did you get this certificate? A. From Mr. Harmer's clerk; Mr. Phillips got it from the church; I know nothing of Elizabath Duncom: the prisoner and Viner parted about three years ago; she has been living at her mother's, at Bethnalgreen, since; he had no property with her, but has since the marriage.

SARAH BOOTH . My husband is a weaver. I was present on Easter Monday, 1825 , when Elizabeth Duncom was married to the prisoner, at the Bow church ; I know his first wife is still living.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known Viner? A. Nearly two years; I saw her once before, and I heard the prisoner call her his wife two years ago; I knew he was a married man when I acted as bridesmaid to Duncom, but he said they were parted; I do not think Duncom knew any thing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. Viner never acted as my wife - if she had been prudent, I should not have acted so.

MARY PLATT . I have known the prisoner from his childhood; I know he threw himself into the river, when he and his first wife separated; he came to me in great distress about it - he never had any children by either wife.

JAMES DEVONSHIRE . I am the prisoner's brother-in-law. I saw a man drag him out of the canal.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do not you know his first wife left him on account of his ill-treatment? A. No - I believe to the contrary.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-95

97. MARY ARCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 pewter pot, value 2s., the goods of Robert Seaton , and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Longstaff .

ROBERT SEATON. I keep the Montague Arms public-house, Montague-street . This pot is mine - Mr. Longstaff brought the prisoner to me with it on the 1st of November.

JOSEPH LONGSTAFF. I keep the Wheatsheaf public-house, Dorset-street . The prisoner was brought to my house by Gee, with two pots, one of which is mine; the prisoner said it was not mine; I took her to Seaton's - she tried to escape.

JOSHUA GEE . On the 1st of November I saw the prisoner take a quart pot off some railings, and then I saw her take this pint pot off the step of a door in Dorset-street- I went and said, "What are you going to do with the pots?" she said she had none - I took her to Mr. Longstaff's.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-96

98. WILLIAM BONE was indicted for stealing, on the 21th of November , 1 heater-stove, value 24s. , the goods of Frederick Baynes .

FREDERICK BAYNES. I am a furnishing-ironmonger , and live in Woburn-buildings, Tavistock-square . On the 28th of November this stove was safe on my step at five o'clock, and about half-past five the watchman came, and I missed it; I went with him, and took the prisoner with the stove.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TIDSDALE . I am a watchman. I met the prisoner about half-past five o'clock, with the stove in his arms - he said, "Give me a lift:" I lifted it on his shoulder; I then went into the shop, inquired about it, and went and took him in the square with it; he said a man gave him 1s. to carry it towards Seven-dials.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he was to go to the Crown public-house, Seven-dials? A. No; I was dressed as a watchman.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with a man, named Chandler, to a public-house in Charles-street, and, when I came out, a man asked me to carry the stove to the Crown.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-97

99. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. 8d. , the goods of John Lloyd .

JAMES IRVINE . I am in the employ of John Lloyd linen-draper , Commercial-road . On the night of the 28th of October, about half-past eight o'clock, a girl gave me information; I went out, ran down the street, and saw the prisoner - he dropped these stockings when I was within a yard of him; I took them up, and took him back - they hung at the door just before.

WILLIAM CLUBB . I took the prisoner on the 28th of October.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, being a cripple.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18261207-98

100. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 10 yards of printed cotton, value 9s. , the goods of William Smyth .

WM. SMYTH . I assist my father, Wm. Smyth, a linen-draper , who lives in Piccadilly . On the 19th of November, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, Shanks alarmed me while we were at dinner in the back parlour; I went out, missed this blue print from the door, and saw the prisoner in Half-moon-street - Shanks pointed him out as the person who took it - I went and took him, but have never seen the property since; it was safe half an hour before.

THOMAS SHANKS . I saw the prisoner run from the door with another person; the prisoner had a parcel - Butler pointed him out to me - I saw him ten yards from the door, with the print under his arm; I am certain of him.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I saw the prisoner and another young man go up to Smyth's door - the other took the blue cotton, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it under his coat and ran away - I am certain of him. I told

Shanks to alarm the people - I saw the prisoner taken, but did not see what became of the print; I lost sight of him for about ten minutes.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner, but found nothing on him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261207-99

101. MARY COX was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 purse, value 6d., and 10 shillings , the property of John Cox .

JOHN COX. I am blind; the prisoner is my daughter; I had my purse, containing 10s., safe, on the evening of the 14th of November, when I went to bed - I put them into my waistcoat pocket; and when I got up in the morning I missed the purse and money - the prisoner was at home, out of place, and slept there that night; she got up early, and went away. I never allowed her to take my money.

JOHN SHERLOCK SIMPSON . I took the prisoner, by her father's desire, and found 2s. on her - I took her to her father, who charged her with this; she said she had spent the remainder - this was about four o'clock in the afternoon.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-100

102. JOHN CLINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 timepiece, value 12s. , the goods of Edward Bulpit .

EDWARD BULPIT. I live at No. 27, Eagle-street, Red Lion-square . On the 14th of November, my daughter called me into the shop, about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock - she produced this timepiece.

ELIZABETH BULPIT . I was going into my father's shop, and saw the prisoner behind the counter, with something like brass in his hand - I looked up, and saw the timepiece was gone; I collared him; he dropped it, and I took it up, but thinking he would beat me, I let him go; and called Stop thief! my father ran down the street, and took him.

GEORGE STRIPLING . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I never touched it.

ELIZABETH BULPIT re-examined. I was in another house, and saw him with a man, who whistled, and the prisoner went into our shop - I went in after him.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-101

103. ALEXANDER SMITH was indicted for feloniously marrying Mary Glasscot , on the 4th of May , at St. Martin in the Fields , his former wife being still alive .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 46.

MR. LAW (on behalf of the Prosecution) recommended him to Mercy, neither of the females being the prosecutrix.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-102

104. WILLIAM REED was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HAIR . My daughter Catherine was married to the prisoner on the 30th of October last - I gave her away at St. Martin in the Fields - I have searched the register of St. James, Westminster, and produce a certificate of his marriage to Mary Hitchcock , on the 7th of December, 1818 - I compared it - it is an accurate copy (read). The prisoner spoke to me respecting my daughter before he married her.

GEORGE SERGEANT . I know the prisoner. On the 7th of December, 1818, I and my wife were present at St. James's, Westminster, when he was married to Mary Hitchcock - they lived together till within the last five weeks; she is now in Court, and very near her confinement.

JOHN HAIR re-examined. When I consented to my daughter's marriage, I do not recollect his saying whether he was single or a widower - he never told me he had been married - he paid his addresses to her about two years, but only three months at my house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was there never any report of a former marriage? A. There was, about four months ago; my wife heard of it, but we could learn no foundation for it - she married from my house, but she had lived at a liquor-shop, and he visited her there. There was some little dispute between her and my wife, who is her mother-in-law, and I got her a place - I knew the prisoner was a police-officer of Marlborough-street; he lived near me - I inquired of my daughter about it.

MRS. HAIR. I know the prisoner - he used to come to our house; I heard a report of his having been married, and inquired of my daughter-in-law about him; she said he was not married.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-103

105. CATHERINE COCHRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 pig's head, value 2s. , the goods of William Geary .

JOHN LEMON . I am in the employ of William Geary, of Broad-street, St. Giles . On the 28th of October, at night, I was at the window - the prisoner came and looked at this pig's head, and asked the price; I told her - she bought nothing - some customers came up, and in a short time the watchman brought her back with this head.

FRANCIS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner take the head, and took her with it, two or three doors off.

Prisoner. I took it to ask the price.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-104

106. TIMOTHY CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 72 combs, value 30s.; 1 tongue-scraper, value 1s., and 1 brush, value 6d. , the goods of William Jackson .

WILLIAM JACKSON. I am a comb-maker , and live in Tottenham-court-road - the prisoner has been in my service three or four years. On the morning of the 23d of November, I found him in the workshop alone; he appeared confused, turned into the yard, and then into the kitchen; I turned to look after him, and saw that his coat, which hung on the door, was moving - I looked into the pocket, and found thirteen combs; I sent for an officer, who found on him a key, which he said was the key of a box at his house - we went to his lodging, his wife produced a box which the key opened, and there we found this tongue-

scraper, and fifty-two combs - he has bought combs of me, but not of this sort; the thirteen had only been made two days.

JAMES JACKSON . I am in the prosecutor's employ - I went to the prisoner's lodging, and saw the combs found; he never bought any but damaged combs - I had made some of these, and they were missed next day - here are four which I can positively swear to, and I made most of them.

JOHN WYER . I am an officer, and found the property at his lodging, in Church-street, St. Giles, and thirteen combs were in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the dirt when I swept the shop - I took them up, and cleaned them - the prosecutor's father gave me several of them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-105

107. MARY CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 frock, value 1s., 1 night-gown, value 6d.; 1 night-cap, value 3d., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d. , the goods of Samuel French .

CHARLOTTE FRENCH . I am the wife of Samuel French- we live in Earl-street, Lisson-grove. On the 20th of November I was in the street with my child, who was crying - the prisoner asked what was the matter; I said she wanted to go into a yard, and she asked me to go into her yard; I went in, and put down a bundle, containing these articles, at the privy door; I saw her take them - I followed, and had her taken; the officer, who has the property, is not here - he said, in the prisoner's presence, that he had found them under her bed - it was my bundle.

Cross-examined by Mr. J. H. ALLEY. Q. Were you ever in her house before? A. No. I was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. She went into my yard; I did not see her for half an hour, and know nothing of the bundle - she was drunk.

ELIZABETH FITZGERALD . I am the prisoner's niece. I went into the yard to empty a pail of water, and seeing this bundle I took it into my aunt's room, for safety.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-106

108. THOMAS DAVIS , JAMES NORTON , and RICHARD McCONNELL , were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 iron rail, value 5s., belonging to Edward Fletcher , and fixed to his dwelling-house , against the statute.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 31st of October I was with Morgan, about six o'clock in the evening, at the corner of Park-lane, and saw the three prisoners together - Davis had something under his arm; we crossed the road, and I saw it was an iron rail; I asked him what it was - he said, a few sticks, which he had picked up in Park-lane. The other prisoners ran away.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I was with Jones, and followed the other two prisoners, and took them - they had nothing, but Davis had these iron spikes of a railing.

JOSEPH DENMAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Edward Fletcher, of Park-lane . I saw the rail safe on the evening of the 30th of October; I came to town from Fulham on the 1st of November, and missed it - about nine feet was gone. I saw Morgan match this with what is left, and it corresponds.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

NORTON - NOT GUILTY .

McCONNELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-107

109. ABRAHAM DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 3 trusses of hay, value 7s. , the goods of Michael Bowran .

MICHAEL BOWRAN. I live in Lower Mary-le-bone-street, and have a farm at West-end-green . On the 24th of October, I found three trusses of hay at the watch-house, which were on my farm on the 23d; we had bound two loads that day. I believe it to be mine.

MARTIN BURTON . On the 23d of October, in the evening, I was on duty in the Harrow-road, and saw the prisoner near Mr. Bowran's farm; he passed me with an empty cart, and stopped in the road, about one hundred yards from Bowran's place; two loads of hay came out of the yard, and directly they passed, he went to the yard - a man came out, and I saw them put three trusses of hay into the cart; the prisoner went on in the cart with them; he did not take the hay out of the yard, but was in the cart, and received it. I went and asked if that was Mr. Bowran's cart; he said. Yes; I said I did not think it was; he said it was - I said, "Why then did not you come out with the teams?" he said he had been to Kensal-green; I said he had not been out of my sight; he then said he came from the Red Lion public-house - that they wanted some hay, and he had been for it; he asked if I would go there; I said perhaps I might - he said if I would there was any thing I choose to drink at my service. I then took him to the watch-house. The name of R. Miller was on the cart - he is hostler at the Red Lion. I took the prisoner next morning.

Prisoner's Defence. A man came and said he wanted my horse and cart for an hour; he did not say for what; he took me along the road, and threw the hay into the cart - he told me to go on, and he would catch me before I got to Paddington.

MR. BOWRAN. I think my foreman, who has absconded, did it, and that the prisoner is innocent; two of my men have absconded - I suspect both.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-108

110. HENRY DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 coat, value 15s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 7s., and 2 waistcoats, value 8s. , the goods of John William Richardson .

JOHN WILLIAM RICHARDSON. I live at No. 20, Southampton-crescent, Euston-square . On the 23d of October, at half-past six o'clock, I left this property safe in my drawer - my sister came to me about half-past eleven o'clock, and gave me information; I came home, and missed my property - I found it in eight or ten days; this property is mine - the waistcoat had a mark of S. M. on the back, but it is not here now. After the prisoner was in custody somebody brought the coat to my house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were your trousers lined? A. No, but they are new. I have no private mark on them, but am certain of them.

ANN RICHARDSON . I am the prosecutor's mother. -

The prisoner looked at some lodgings which we had to let, on the 20th, and came on Tuesday, the 24th, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; he left, and returned in half an hour, with a bundle, went up-stairs, and I heard him go out in about ten minutes. I then went up-stairs, and found some straw in the front room, into which I had taken him: there was none there then. In about an hour I missed these articles - my son wore them the night before; he did not return to the lodging, but I found him at Hatton-garden on the Thursday week - I believe him to the same man.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen him on the 20th? A. No; I will not swear to him.

SARAH MARTHA RICHARDSON . I am the prosecutor's sister. The prisoner came to our house on Tuesday - I let him in - he went up-stairs; I did not notice his bundle. I saw him again in Charlton-street on the 2d of November, and followed him to No. 20, Edward-street - I told the constable, who took him, and produced this property at Hatton-garden.

Cross-examined. Q. Your mother had a better oppertunity of seeing him than you? A. Yes.

RICHARD COOPER . I went to No. 20, Edward-street, and took the prisoner in the parlour. I found this waistcoat on his person at the office - he had the prosecutor's trousers on at the time.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. I took these trousers off the prisoner, in the prison, on the 2d of November.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-109

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

111. GEORGE EAST and JOHN JORDAN were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 2lbs. of sausages, value 16d., and 2lbs. of butter, value 16d. , the goods of John Jacobs .

JOHN JACOBS. I keep a poulterer's-shop at Kingsland . On the 7th of November I lost 2lbs. of sausages and some butter - my boy, Arthur Bell, gave me information, and in about five minutes I saw the prisoners - they were searched, and 1lb. of sausages and 2lbs. of butter were taken from Jordan's hat - nothing was found on East - he was taken first, and conveyed to the Lamb public-house- Jordan gave no account of how he got them.

ARTHUR BELL . I am eleven years old, and am in the service of Mr. Jacobs. I saw East walking about my master's shop, for half an hour, and he then came and took 2lbs. of sausages and two rolls of butter - he ran off, and I ran after him; I cried Stop thief! and a coal-heaver stopped him in the field. I went to tell my master, and as we were going to where he was, the coalheaver let him go - I saw him, but did not know him; some people said, "There he goes," and a publican stopped him - he was taken to the Lamb, but there was nothing found on him. I had not seen Jordan when I left East with the coal-heaver.

JOHN CHAMBERS . I saw the two prisoners brought to the watch-house, and I asked them several questions; East said he received 6d. a day relief from St. Luke's parish, and Jordan said he had received 5s. on the Friday before, but that was not enough to live on; and I heard them say, "We shall get seven pennyworth for this."

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable. I saw these two boys on the 7th of November, near the Lamb; Jacobs had got Jordan, and the landlord East. I searched them, and found the sausages and two rolls of butter in Jordan's hat; Jacobs claimed them. I found on East a knife and a tobacco-stopper.

JORDAN'S Defence. I was coming home, and a person asked me if I would have any sausages and butter; I said Yes, and I put them into my hat; I saw a mob of people round the Lamb - I went up, and this man took hold of me.

EAST - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JORDAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-110

112. JAMES FURNISS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 2 cupboard doors, value 4s. , the goods of John Payne .

ISAAC COOK . I live at Barnsbury-place, Islington, and am a watchman. On the 8th of November I stopped the prisoner at the top of Barnsbury-place, with two doors, the board of a bench, and a bench-screw; I asked where he was going to take them - he said he was going to take the doors to Mr. Bright, and the other things to his father- I said he had no business to bring them, as they belonged to Mr. Payne; he said it was all right, and Mrs. Taylor knew the same; I said, "If you like to go back to the building, I will go with you;" I went back, and saw Mrs. Taylor - she said the board and screw belonged to his father, and he had borrowed a hammer of her to knock the board off with, but she knew nothing of the doors.

JOSEPH BRIGHT . I was managing some work in Barnsbury-place on the 8th of November. I know these two doors - they were at a building there, belonging to Mr. John Payne; I know the prisoner's father, but he had no right to these doors - I had not been at the place for some weeks.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . The prisoner had worked in this house a month before; he came on the 8th of November, and asked me to give him a light, to go and take the screw out of the bench, which his father had sent him for, and the board; I gave him the light, and went into my own house, No. 3; while I was there he went out with the property - I had not seen the doors.

DANIEL WARREN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produced the doors.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-111

113. JAMES FINNERTY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 pig's head, value 2s. , the goods of William Geary .

GEORGE FIELD . I am in the service of William Geary, a cheesemonger , of Broad-street, Bloomsbury . On Saturday evening, the 4th of November, the prisoner came to the shop, with a small bundle under his arm, and in a little time he put it down on a barrel, which had some pig's heads on it; he staid there a short time, and then

put one head into the bundle, which had a piece of bacon in it; he put the head on the bacon, and walked out - I followed, and took him about three yards from the shop, brought him back, and he offered to pay for it.

FRANCIS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman, and took up the prisoner; Field made this charge, in his presence; he denied having it.

THOMAS WELCH . The prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house - he had a pig's head and a piece of bacon; there was some money in his pocket.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-112

114. ANN HAWKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 gown, value 5s., and 1 petticoat, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Perry .

MARY PERRY. I am single ; the prisoner lodged in the same house as me, and slept in my room. On the 8th of November she got up at a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, while I was asleep; and when I awoke I missed these articles, which had been safe the night before- I had worn them that day - I saw my gown on the following Saturday morning in Monmouth-street - this is it; I have never seen my petticoat since.

AMELIA WEST . I keep a clothes-shop in Monmouth-street. I bought this gown of the prisoner on the 8th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, for 2s. 6d.; and on the 11th, Mary Perry owned it at my door - it was dirty when I bought it, and I washed it.

JOHN SHERLOCK SIMPSON . I took the prisoner, and have the gown. I have known the prisoner many years, and believe she was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261207-113

115. JAMES HOPE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 2 gowns, value 10s.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 10 aprons, value 8s.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 2 caps, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 petticoat, value 2s., the goods of Mary Ann Doswell , spinster ; and 1 gown, value 2s., and 4 aprons, value 3s. , the goods of Ann Lynch , spinster .

MARY ANN DOSWELL. I am single, and am a housemaid at Blake's-hotel, Princes-street . I lost some articles on the 4th of August - they were in the laundry drying; the sweep s came that morning, and some of them took these things - I have never seen any of them since.

ANN LYNCH. I am servant at the hotel. I lost a gown and four aprons from the laundry at the same time; I have seen an apron since - I know it; I did not see the sweeps.

ROBERT JERRY . I am a waiter at Blake's-hotel. The prisoner and another came to sweep the flue on the morning of the 4th of August; he said he came from Angel-court.

JOHN BRYERS . I am a chimney-sweeper, and lived, on the 4th of August, at No. 47, Duck-lane. On that morning the prisoner, with Miles and another person, came in with a sack, with something in it, and a brush and a shovel, at half-past seven o'clock; they put the sack down on the floor, and it laid there for a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - I saw it opened, and a bundle of linen was drawn out of it, which was thrown up in an empty cupboard - they all went down; I then got up, and saw this apron hanging half-way out of the bundle - Miles brought the sack in.

Prisoner's Defence. Miles asked me to go with him to do the flues, and when I came down I missed him out of the kitchen - he returned with something in the sack - I asked what it was, and he said, "Ashes from the dusthole" - he then took up the ashes from there, and we went away - I believe Miles suffered for it last Session.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-114

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

116. HENRY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 looking-glass, value 36s. , the goods of Abraham Moore , and Abraham Moore, the younger .

JAMES TURNER . I am a private gentleman - the prosecutor's house is in Coppice-row, Cold Bath-fields . On the 29th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner near their door - I passed by him, saw a glass handed from the window, and put on his shoulder - the man, who handed it out, then leaped out of the window, and they walked away together - I followed them about one hundred and fifty yards - the prisoner then turned up a passage, and was taken in Cold Bath-square.

ABRAHAM MOORE. I am in partnership with my son Abraham - this glass is ours, and had been standing in our shop. I never saw the prisoner before.

JAMES THOMAS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, with the glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was stolen - the gentleman asked me to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-115

117. GILBERT HUMES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 3 gloves, value 4.s , the goods of John Corren .

SAMUEL LEWIS . I am in the employ of John Corren; he lives in the Strand , and is a glover . The prisoner came there on the 30th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, and asked for some black-kid gloves - I showed him some, and while I turned my head, he put three gloves into his pocket - he was going away, and I accused him of taking them - he denied it, and tried to make his escape; but another young man came up, and he was taken - I found three gloves on him - I missed them from the paper - I found the fellow to one of the gloves.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not the prisoner offer you 2s. 6d. a pair for the gloves? A. Yes; he offered to pay the other young man for them, when I accused him of it - I told the Magistrate that he offered to make his escape - I went out to call my master.

CHARLES BECKET . I am shopman to Mr. Corren. - Lewis rang the bell - I ran up; and on getting into the shop, I saw the prisoner with the handle of the door in his hand; Lewis accused him of taking some gloves, which he denied; but on his persisting, the prisoner said he had a pair of gloves in his pocket, for which he was going to pay; and, on his producing the gloves, I found this pair

and this odd one on him - he offered 2s. 6d. for the pair - I saw him attempt to open the door, which the witness kept shut - he took the chain down, I believe, but there was a latch - my master came into the shop, and the prisoner fell on his knees, and asked for forgiveness - I heard him say he was willing to pay for them after he had produced them - but he denied having them at first.

JOSEPH PRICE . I am the officer. I took the prisoner; these are the gloves.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent. I was going into the country - I had the money in my pocket to pay for the pair of gloves, and the third glove I took in mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-116

118. JOHN HONEYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 leaden pump, value 10s., belonging to Mary Broad , widow , and fixed to her dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WEBSTER, JUN. I am a watchmaker, and live at Stoke Newington . On Wednesday the 22d of November, I was standing at my own door, between ten and half-past ten o'clock in the evening - I saw the prisoner bringing this pump on his shoulder from the Wesleianchapel yard; I gave notice to my father, who came out of the house - he informed Mr. Graves of it, who watched the prisoner - I have known the prisoner eight years, and am certain of his person - he was close to the house of Mrs. Mary Broad.

GEORGE GRAVES . I am constable of Stoke Newington. I had information that the pump was gone, and I went and missed it; I then went to a house, which is a resort for theives, and found it under the bed, where a person of the name of Cowling was - I secured it, and then went to a public-house, and took the prisoner and Cowling; I asked the prisoner about it - he denied all knowledge of it; I did not see him in the house where I found it; this part of the pipe was left on the premises - it matches exactly with the pipe of the pump.

WILLIAM WEBSTER, SEN. I am constable of Stoke Newington. My son told me what he had seen - I went up on the same side of the way, and saw the prisoner at the corner of a court - he appeared as if he had set down something heavy, and was then wiping his face; I then went on the same side of the way as him, and missed the pump; I told Mr. Graves of it, and waited at the corner of the court, while he went to the house, which is about two hundred yards up the court, and found this pump.

MARY BROAD. I am a widow. I had a pump fixed at my dwelling-house, which I had seen safe on the day before, and missed it the next morning; I saw the wood saying about, and the pump was gone - it had been close to my back door, in the meeting-yard, which is a private yard.

COURT to WILLIAM WEBSTER, JUN. Q. Had you known the prisoner before? A. Yes; for eight years - he was carrying this pump on his left shoulder; I am sure his is the pump - he might be twenty yards from me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the pump, and never had it in my possession; I think it is impossible he could see me from any one else, in such a dark night.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-117

119. CHARLES JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 1 pair of boots, value 14s. , the goods of John Irons .

JOHN IRONS. I am a boot-maker , and live in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields . On the 8th of August, the prisoner, who is a stranger, came into my shop - he wanted a pair of Wellington-boots, I fitted him with a pair, and he desired them to be sent to Mr. Stevens, No. 17, Back-church-lane, who he said was his employer, and that he was a lighterman- he likewise ordered a pair of shoes to be made, for which he was to call in the ensuing week - he told me to send a bill and a receipt with the boots, and his employer would pay me for them - they were to be 19s.; I made out the bill and receipt, and sent my servant with them to the place he had named; I told my servant I had some doubts, and not to turn his back upon them without the money; I gave him 1s. in case they should want change - he came back with the 1s., but no boots; I afterwards gave information, and, on the 14th of November, he was in the watch-house on another charge.

GEORGE PARSONS . I live with Mr. Irons. He gave me a pair of boots to take to No. 17, Back-church-lane - he gave me the bill and receipt, and 1s., in case they wanted change - the boots were to come to 19s.; I went to the house, and saw a woman - she said no such person as Mr. Stevens lived there; I then made the best of my way home, and met the prisoner going from my master's; he said, "Oh, I have just paid for the boots;" I walked with him a little way past the church, and then he said,"There is no necessity for you to go any further," and he held out his hand for the boots; I gave him them, with the bill and receipt; I am confident he is the man.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am an officer. I had information given me of the prisoner - I looked for him some time, and in November he was given into my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and child, who depend on my earnings for their support.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

120. CHARLES JAMES was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 hat, value 20s. , the goods of William Stocks .

FREDERICK JOHN SMITH . I live with William Stocks, at Wapping-street, opposite Execution-dock . Between eight and nine o'clock, on the evening of the 22d of November, the prisoner came to his shop, and said he wanted a hat - my master served him with it - it came to 25s., and he ordered it to be sent to No. 32, Bird-street - my master sent me with it, and it was to be paid for when I took it home - as I was going with it, I saw the prisoner, who said he had been and paid for the hat and ordered a cap, which I was to take up before nine o'clock the next morning; I gave him the hat - I came home, and found it was not true; I went out to see for him, but could not find him; I went on board the ship Resolution, which he said he was going on board, and he was not there; I was coming back, and met him; I went up to him, and asked if he

was not the man - he said he was, and he would go with me if I would go a little further - he led me a long way into the country, and then ran away; I found him afterwards, and gave charge of him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-118

121. LOUISA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 6s. , the goods of Benjamin Mather .

EDWARD PEARCE . I am in the employ of Benjamin Mather, a hosier , who lives in New-street, Covent-garden . On the evening of the 7th of November, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner and two others came in - they asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I said we did not keep ladies' silk handkerchiefs - they said gentlemen's would do - there were seven silk handkerchiefs in a bundle, and I showed them to them; they said they did not like them - they prisoner then asked me to look for some cotton stockings, and, while I did so, she ran off with a silk handkerchief from a piece of flannel - my mistress came in, and said she had run off with a silk handkerchief; I pursued her some distance, and found her with it - a man assisted me to bring her back.

CHARLES BROWSKIN . I am in the employ of Mr. Mather. My mistress called me to go and assist, as a girl had stolen a handkerchief; I ran down Bedfordbury, and met Pearce and the prisoner coming back; I took hold of her arm, and brought her to the shop - Pearce had the handkerchief in his hand.

JOSEPH BLACK . I am a watchman. The prisoner was given into my custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was not in the paper - it was laying on a piece of flannel; a young woman gave it me to take to my lodgings; a young girl whom I met, asked me to go with her to buy the handkerchief; I never asked for any stockings.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-119

122. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 cloak, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Rumbell .

WILLIAM PLUMBRIDGE . I am in the employ of Mr. Joseph Rumbell - he is a silk-mercer and linen-draper , of Leicester-square . On the 8th of November there was a cloak missing from our door at a quarter before eight o'clock; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner run across the street; I followed him, and gave the alarm of Stop thief! - I saw him caught with the cloak under his left arm - he dropped it immediately.

JAMES ASHLY . I am an officer. I was at the corner of New-street; I heard the cry of Stop thief! from Cecil-court; I ran there, and stopped the prisoner - there were several others there, and the cloak was at his feet; I did not see him drop it, but he was the first person running, and the cloak was nearest to him.

WILLIAM LLOYD . I am a coach-maker. I saw a man take a cloak from the rail at the door; I gave the alarm to the shopman, who followed him; I waited till he and the cloak were brought back; I cannot swear it was the prisoner, but the man was about his height.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I called at a public-house for a pint of beer, and, as I came out, three or four men stood before the door; I heard a cry of Stop thief! - a man ran towards me - one of them caught him; he got away - a man then came up, and accused me of stealing the cloak.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-120

123. WILLIAM KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 set of chaise harness, value 10s.; 1 saddle, value 2s.; 1 bridle, value 1s.; 2 stirrup-irons, value 2s., and 1 girth, value 3d. , the goods of Joseph Tickell .

WILLIAM FULBROOK . I am night patrol of Hackney. On the 15th of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in Morning-lane; I met the prisoner carrying this harness in a bag at his back - the saddle was in front of him; I asked where he got it - he said he bought it for 16s. - I took him to the watch-house - he was about half a mile from Mr. Tickell's.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a patrol. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in with this harness; I found in his pocket a tinder-box, some matches, and two knives, one of which has been used to strike a light with.

RALPH LAWES . I live with Mr. Joseph Tickell, at Clapton . This is my master's harness - it was taken from his farm, in Pound-lane ; I missed it on the morning of the 15th of November - it was looked up safe the night before- I found two of the boards of the cow-house broken down for them to get in; I was alarmed at three o'clock in the morning, by the barking of dogs - I got up, but could see nobody.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 16s.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-121

124. JOSEPH OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 milk-kettle, value 2s., and 4 quarts of milk, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Laycock .

JOHN PIDDINGTON . I am a watchman of Islington. On the 1st of November, at a quarter-past three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming out of Mr. Laycock's premises with a pail and tin milk-kettle in his hands - I said, "What have you there? give up what you have got;" he gave the kettle to the woman who was with him- they walked on - I called to them to stop; the prisoner ran over to me and said, "Watchman, don't say any thing about it" - I took the woman and can back to the yard; the prisoner went away; it was full of milk.

CATHERINE PARKER . I am dairy-maid to Mr. Richard Laycock of Islington - the prisoner worked there as a labourer , but did not live on the premises - he had to milk at three o'clock in the morning. I know this kettle to be ours - he used to take milk every morning to St. Bartholomew-hospital in a cart - Mary Read was brought back with it - she is a stranger.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a night-officer. The prisoner came to the watch-house to see Read, who was in custody- and from the description given to me I detained him; Mr. Laycock is willing to employ him again.

GEORGE GREEN . I am one of Mr. Laycock's watchmen. I called the prisoner up at his lodging, at twenty

minutes to three, and afterwards saw him go up the yard with the kettle and pail.

GUILTY. Aged 26. Of stealing the milk only - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261207-122

125. JOHN PRYKE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 3 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, and 7 shillings , the monies of Thomas Morris .

THOMAS MORRIS. I am occasionally a gentleman's coachman; but at this time was driving a cabriolet . On Sunday morning, the 29th of October, at half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner came to me in Liquorpond-street - he had two other men with him - they got into the cabriolet - I drove them to the King's-head public-house, in King's-street, Bloomsbury, where they staid some time- I set them down at half-past one o'clock in Orchard-street, Westminster - I got out last; my foot slipped - I fell backward, and all my money fell out of my pocket; there was 15l. in sovereigns, half-sovereigns, and silver, in my left-hand trousers pocket - the prisoner was the first who picked up my money - I saw him pick up what he could - I picked up ten sovereigns, but the tallest man showed me away; I got only 4l.; I lost 11l. - I am sure the prisoner picked up some and ran away - he was taken in about ten minutes, and searched in the watch-house - I was elevated with liquor - they were strangers to me.

Prisoner. Q. Was not one of the men in the cabriolet when I came up? A. No; I drove to Shepherd-street and other places; I knew what I was about.

EPRRAIM WILSON . I am conductor of the patrol. On the 29th of October, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw this cabriolet; the prisoner, two other young men, and a girl were in it; they went to the George and Ball public-house, but could get nothing, as it was Sunday; I went into my room, and soon after I saw them pass my own door, and heard them say, "Let us go back and capsize the old b-r, and take horse and gig and all;" I went to my door and saw the cabriolet just by, and the driver coming out; he fell on his hands and knees in the mud, and the money fell out of his pocket; I saw gold and silver; the prisoner was the first who ran up and began to pick it up; as soon as he had got some he ran away, leaving the other two picking up the rest; one was a tall man; I saw him shove the driver away; I pursued, called a constable, and we took the prisoner in a stable-yard; as we took him back he said his shoe was down at heel; it was not so, for it was a high shoe; but he stooped, and I saw him put something into his shoe; which I took off, and found a half-sovereign in it; he was very obstreperous indeed: I found in his pockets two sovereigns and one shilling; we traced the other two men through the park to a coach at the Horse Guards.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am an officer. I saw this cabriolet in Orchard-street while I was talking to a person; the prisoner ran by me; Wilson called to me; we followed and took him in a stable by the Broadway; I saw him put his left hand to his waistcoat-pocket. and draw something out; I took it from him; it was a paper with a sovereign and a half in it, and in the lock-up place I found a shilling under where he had been sitting.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not intoxicated? A. You appeared a little so.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I was coming down Stretton-ground, and saw the prisoner, a woman, the driver, and some other men near the cabriolet - I thought they all appeared rather in liquor; I went to the watch-house, and in about ten minutes saw the prisoner running - I pursued, and soon after saw the other men running - I asked what was the matter; they said, "Nothing; it is only a lark;" I ran out, and found the prosecutor, who said he had been robbed; I found the prisoner in the watch-house - he said he would knock any man's head off who dared touch his hat; I said, "That must be me;" I took and shook it, and five very muddy shillings fell out - I found this half-sovereign in the lining of it.

RICHARD OATES . I am an appraiser. I was passing, and saw the prisoner take up some money, and run away- I am positive of him.

The prisoner put in a long written defence stating, that he had treated his companions at several public-houses, and ran away when he got out of the cabriolet, that he should not be expected to pay for the hire of it; and that the money found on him was his own.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-123

126. ELIZABETH RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 7 yards of stuff, value 7s. , the goods of William Hodges .

WILLIAM HODGES. I am a linen-draper , and live in Tothill-street, Westminster . A window in my shop was broken, and some pieces of stuff put against it - the prisoner was brought into the shop with one piece.

SUSANNAH FIELDER . I am shop-woman to Mr. Hodges. On the 13th of November, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner come and take this stuff out of the window - I heard it drawn out, went to the door, and saw her pull it out - I called to her, but she went into a passage; I went and took her - I have seen her in the shop before; another girl was with her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a little girl who asked me to hold it while she tied her shoe opposite the window - this lady came out, and the girl ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-124

127. JOHN SUKER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 6lbs. of beef, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Dawes .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am shopman to John Dawes, a butcher , of Silver-street, Kensington . These two pieces of beef were missed on Sunday morning, and Lawrence brought it back that night - I had seen them safe on Saturday night, but did not see the prisoner there.

HENRY LAWRENCE . I am a labourer. The prisoner lived in the Gravel-pits - I bought this beef of him on Saturday night, the 11th of November, for 1s. 6d., and gave it to Dawes - I thought it a fair price; I do not think there was quite 6 lbs. - he told me he had bought it, but did not say where.

GEORGE WEBB . On Saturday night, I saw the prisoner - he told me he had stolen a piece of beef from Dawes, and sold it for 1s. 6d. - that was in a public-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How came he to

tell you this? A. I was questioning him about my watch; I am pot-boy at a public-house - I indicted him for stealing my watch - I do not know whether the bill is found or not.

JOHN SHEPPARD . I brought the beef to the office - the prisoner did not deny its being Dawes'.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-125

128. BENJAMIN VALENTINE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 iron weight, value 4s. , the goods of John Crowley and others.

JAMES FOGG . I am a Thames-police officer. I met the prisoner in Cowcross-street, on the 24th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, with this 1/2 cwt. on his shoulder, about two hundred yards from the prosecutors' - I asked how he came by it; he said that he brought it from home, and had picked it up in Fleet-market, by a butcher's door. I gave him to Carter; we were going there; but he said it was of no use, as he took it from the Salisbury Arms public-house.

RICHARD CARTER . I was with Fogg, who gave the prisoner to me - we were going to the market - he said it was of no use going further, as he had taken it from the Salisbury Arms, and distress had caused him to do it.

JOHN LATHMORE . I am hostler to John Crowley and others, at the Salisbury Arms, King-street, Smithfield . I set a - cwt. against the ladder on this morning, but did not miss it till the officer came.

Prisoner. I was in distress, and one of my children was dying for want.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-126

129. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 3 shirts, value 5s.; 2 aprons, value 2s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 1s. , the goods of Daniel Benning .

ELIZABETH BENNING . I am wife of Daniel Benning, a shoemaker - we live in George-street, Grosvenor-square . About seven o'clock in the evening of the 31st of October, I heard a noise on our area steps; the gate was open all day - I ran to the area door with a light, and just caught sight of a man at the top of the steps - I turned my head to the cellar-door, and missed some clothes from a basket; I gave an alarm, and pursued him to the top of Queen-square; I saw the bundle under his coat - I did not see him drop it - the prisoner was taken in about five minutes; he has the same appearance as the man - I took the property up - I said at the office that I could not swear to his person; but he answers in size and dress to the person I saw at the area.

CHARLES WARREN . My father is helper at a stable - I am in St. George's charity-school - I was in Queen-square and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner, with a bundle under his arm - he dropped it at the top of Queen-street; I am certain he is the man; I soon afterwards saw him stopped by a barber who lives in Hart-street, before he got out of my sight - he had the tail of his coat over it.

JOSEPH COLLINS . The prisoner was given into my custody - he had a long coat on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She said, "I cannot swear that is the man, let him go" - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and met a man running towards me; he knocked my hat off; Warren came up, and said I was the man.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-127

130. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 umbrella, value 7s. , the goods of Richard Williams .

CHARLES HEATH . I am in the service of Richard Williams, an umbrella-maker , of High-street, Holborn . On the 17th of November, in the evening, while I was packing a parcel, the officer came in, and I missed an umbrella, which he produced - he had the prisoner - it was taken from the passage.

GEORGE POND . I am an officer. Between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner enter this shop, and come out in about three minutes with this umbrella; I stopped him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Fined 1s. and delivered to his friends.

Reference Number: t18261207-128

131. AMELIA WALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 2 sheets, value 10s., and 6 candlesticks, value 6s. , the goods of William Hawkins .

WILLIAM CUMMINS . I am watchman of St. Ann's. I met the prisoner in Market-street, on the 8th of November, at half-past four o'clock in the morning - she said she was an hour too late for her washing: she had these sheets and candlesticks before her - I followed her across the turning, and asked what she had - she said a sheet, which she was going to take to wash at her sister's - I said,"Here is a candlestick;" she said, "Yes, I am going to clean it" - I took her to the watch-house; she objected to the sheets being examined by a man, and took the candlesticks out herself - she gave me two false addresses - I at last found the prosecutor.

WILLIAM HAWKINS. I live at No. 24, George-street , and am a shoemaker . This property is mine - the sheets were on a bed, and the candlesticks on the parlour shelf; the lock of the door was a bad one; but I do not know bow the prisoner could have got into the house.

ELIZABETH SAUNDERSON . I am cousin to Mr. Hawkins, and live with him; the candlesticks were in the parlour, and the sheets on the bed, at four o'clock on the 7th of November - I never saw the prisoner; I believe she must have got in through a servant who was rather in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up to go to work, and met a female whom I knew; she asked me to take these things home, as she was leaving her lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-129

132. EDWARD WALLACE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 counterpane, value 15s.; 1 looking-glass, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 1s. 6d.; 3 towels, value 1s. 6d.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s., and 8ozs. of soap, value 3d., the goods of John Ahmke , in a lodging-room .

HANNAH AHMKE . I am the wife of John Abmke; we

live in Seward-street, Goswell-street - the prisoner came, on the 14th of October, and took half a bed at 2s. a week; we let no furniture with it, but found soap and towels - nobody slept with him - I gave him 1 towel; the other two and the table-cloth were in a drawer - he had the use of the sheets and counterpane - the other half of the bed was not let: he went away on the 16th, without notice - I missed the goods, and have recovered none of them; I did not see him again till the 7th of November, when I met him in the North-road, and seized him - I asked him for my property; he said, "Woman, I don't know you;" he was detained.

JAMES GODLONTON . I am a blindmaker. I was in the road - I secured the prisoner, and took him to the officer's house; he then said, "My good woman, what is the amount of your loss - I will go to your husband and settle it."

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge - I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never lived in the house, and do not know the woman.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-130

133. ELIZABETH WHITEHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 2 blankets, value 4s., the goods of James Elliott , in a lodging-room, let to Nathaniel, her husband .

JAMES ELLIOTT. I live in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane . I let a front floor room, furnished, to the prisoner and her husband, about nineteen weeks ago, at 3s. 4d. a week - they paid for fifteen weeks regularly, and were going to leave; I watched her out with one blanket on the 31st of October; her husband was not there after the 30th.

ELLEN POTTER . I keep a coffee-shop. The prisoner came to my house about seven o'clock in the morning of the 31st of October, and asked if she might leave these blankets at night, till she could fetch them.

LAMBETH CASE. I am a constable, and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had taken the blankets by mistake for her own.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-131

134. ELIZABETH SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 6 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s., and 3 pairs of drawers, value 6s., the goods of James Thompson Parkinson , her master .

Mr. KNOWLES conducted the prosecution.

JAMES THOMPSON PARKINSON. I live in Bryanston-square . The prisoner was in my service as upper-housemaid - in consequence of suspicion I spoke to her, and said I would deal leniently with her if she would say where my property was - I meant she should be slightly punished; she did not tell me - another servant gave me information - the constable said she had better confess. - She has been five months with me, and conducted herself very well.

LAWRENCE BROWN . I am an officer, and took her.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I went to Colonel Armstrong's - she had told me her box was at No. 2, Burlington-street, where I found it; she said she did not know what she had done with the key; I saw her husband there - he pointed out her box, but could not find the key; I took him and the box to the office - they both told the Magistrate they did not know where the key was - he told me to break it open, and this property was found in it. I believe the key was found at Colonel Armstrong's next day.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You went there in consequence of what Brown told you? A. Yes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-132

135. WILLIAM FINCH and ANN STIFF were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , 3 sheets, value 6s.; 1 dish, value 10d., and 1 knife, value 2d., the goods of David Burke , in a lodging-room .

MARY BURKE . I am the wife of David Burke - we live in Rose and Crown-court, Essex-street , but my husband is now at sea. Stiff came and took a furnished room at 3s. a week, and brought Finch as her husband; they passed as man and wife, and only staid two days - they went away wlile I was at breakfast, and I missed two sheets off my boy's bed, and one off theirs; the boy slept in their room - I have not found the sheets; they had given me no notice. They were taken that evening, in Kent-street.

FINCH - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

STIFF - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-133

136. JAMES BARFOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Taylor Noyes , from his person .

WILLIAM TAYLOR NOYES. I am employed in a counting-house . On the 10th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the City-road , with a gentleman, and perceived the prisoner close behind me; I turned round, and he crossed the road. I felt my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone; I ran, and found it on him.

JOHN BARNWELL . I was with Mr. Noyes. I saw him find the handkerchief on the prisoner.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a patrol, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. All I can say is, I saw it fall from the gentleman's pocket - it did not belong to me, but I took it up, and crossed over the way. I was in distress at the time. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261207-134

137. MARY ANN GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 bag, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, and 14 shillings, the property of John Lloyd , from his person .

JOHN LLOYD. I am single, and am a butcher - I live at Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove, and serve a few customers with a tray on my shoulder. On the evening of the 27th

of October, I met the prisoner about two doors beyond Upper Gloucester-street - she asked where I was going- I said, "Home;" she asked me to go with her, and I at last went with her to a by-part of a square, but we were disturbed twice - we then made an agreement, and I was going with her to another place, but as we went along, she slipped her arm from me, and ran away, saying she heard the watchman coming, and was afraid to meet him, as he had said that he would take her away, if he found her on his beat - I thought it strange she should go away on that frivolous excuse; I had before given her sixpence out of my purse, and returned it into my breeches pocket; when she was gone, I missed my purse, containing the money stated - I gave information to the watchman, who took her on the Sunday evening. I have known her by sight for some years, and her mother too, but I never spoke to her before - I had not been drinking; she had pattens on when she spoke to me.

WILLIAM TRODD . I was serjeant of the night; I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor talking together under a lamp - I have known her by sight for a year and a half; in a short time after, I heard of the robbery; I saw the prisoner going round Dorset-square, taking off her shawl and bonnet to alter her appearance; she left her pattens, which were found the next morning by another man - I followed her to Quebec-street, where I lost her - I told the officer of it, and on Sunday evening she was taken - she said to me, "I will give you 1l. if you will not take me to the watch-house.

MILES JONES . I was crying half-past nine o'clock, and I saw the prosecutor with the prisoner; I saw no more for about ten minutes, when the prosecutor came and asked me if I had seen a tall slender young woman; I said I had not - he said he had been robbed, and I found the prisoner on the Sunday evening following.

JOHN HEATH . I am a watchman. I knew the girl by the description, and I saw her go into a public-house; I gave information, and she was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. They are all false-swearing people, and God will punish them for it; I never saw the man till I saw him at the office.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-135

138. CATHERINE KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 2 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the monies of John Ledger , from his person .

JOHN LEDGER. I am a plasterer , and work for a gentleman, at No. 306, Regent-street. Last Saturday night, at a quarter past eleven o'clock, I was in the New-road; I had received my pay, but was not in the least in liquor - the prisoner ran up against me, and I asked her what she did it for; she then asked me to give her something to drink, and we went to the Globe public-house, but could not get in - we then went down Church-street , and there she pushed me about; we then came up the street again, and stood against some gates for a little time; she said to me, "Have you lost your watch?" I said, "No, but I have lost something else;" I missed two sovereigns and a half from my waistcoat pocket; I said, "You have robbed me of two sovereigns and a half;" she said, "No - I have not a farthing about me;" she then threw herself down on some steps, pulled both her stockings off, and some half-pence fell out, but nothing else; she was then walking on, and some more half-pence fell from her; I then saw her attempt to put her hand into her bosom, but I clasped her hands, and said I would take her to the watch-house - she said she would go, and I gave her to the watchman - we then went on, and a sovereign dropped before us in the watch-house - the constable searched her; I heard a sovereign fall from her after that, and saw her take the half-sovereign from her mouth.

THOMAS BALSTON . The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge for robbing him of two sovereigns and a half - he appeared quite sober; I took the prisoner to the watch-house - she was loosing her stays, and a sovereign fell from her - she was taken into the back room, and I heard another sovereign fall - she then came into the room again and she took a half-sovereign from her mouth, and laid it, on the table.

SAMUEL FURLER . I am the constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and a sovereign fell from her - I then searched her in the back room, and another sovereign fell from her - she then gave me a half-sovereign, but I did not see where she took it from - there were 8s. or 9s. in silver found on her - she affected a great deal of delicacy, which was the reason of my taking her into the back room.

Prisoner's Defence. I live with a clergyman in Lisson-grove - my mistress had given me 4l. - I got a little intoxicated, and was counting my money when the prosecutor came up, and said, if I did not give him two sovereigns, he would take me to the watch-house; I had 3l. 10s. 6d. when I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-136

139. ANN McCOY and HANNAH FOX were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 watch, value 2l., the goods of George Mason , from his person .

GEORGE MASON. I am a jobbing gardener . On Sunday morning, the 26th of November, I was in Church-street, St. Giles, between ten and eleven o'clock - I met the two prisoners, who accosted me, and I went into a public-house with them; I had had a little drink on the Saturday night, and was some what the worse for liquor - I had stopped at a friend's house all night - the prisoners then enticed me to go home with them - I went with McCoy to No. 18, Church-street , up to a first-floor room, I think, and went to bed; I had laid my breeches in a chair by the bed side, and the watch was in them; I remember feeling in the fob when I laid them down; McCoy got up after some time, opened the door, and let Fox in; Fox said she was the landlady, and she demanded a week's rent; McCoy said she did not owe any; I saw McCoy with my breeches in her hand, and she then went out; I felt, and my watch was gone; I got up, and ran down-stairs; I found Fox in the passage, and gave charge of her; I gave the alarm, but I did not see McCoy till I saw her at Marlborough-street the next day; I am quite sure of her person; I had not given her any thing; I did not see what she was doing with my breeches.

EDWARD HEDGES . I am a constable. I saw a mob of people; I went up, and saw the prosecutor, whom some

women were pulling about; I took Fox - she said if I would get her away, she would tell me where the watch was; I took her to the watch-house, and she had a child in her arms; I left word that if the mother of the child came, to detain her - McCoy came for it, and was detained.

FOX's Defence. I am the girl the prosecutor went with - we had been to several public-houses together, and the prosecutor called for a quartern and a half of gin, and had not money to pay for it; the landlord asked him what he meant - he then put his hand into his pocket, said he had some money, and he called for more, but the landlord would not bring it.

McCOY's Defence. I met the prosecutor and Fox in the street, as they were going home; I went to the house afterwards, and Fox asked me to go and get something for breakfast; I left her my child, and she was taken to the watch-house.

GEORGE MASON. I am sure it was McCoy whom I went to bed with.

McCOY - GUILTY . Aged 26.

FOX - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-137

140. ISAAC ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 16 bundles of hoops, value 5s.; 1 iron hoop, value 6d., and 1 pair of shoes value 6d. , the goods of William Day .

PAUL ACKARY . I am in the employ of Mr. William Day - he is a cooper , and lives in Wood-street, St. Pancras. On the 30th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I had a bag containing sixteen bundles of sieve hoops, an iron hoop, and a pair of shoes; I left them on the rails of a coffee-shop in Crown-street , close to the house, while I went in to get a cup of coffee; I came out in about ten minutes, and it was gone; I found it at Hatton-garden.

JOHN MITCHELL . I am an appraiser, and live in Judd-street. On the 30th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with this bag - another person was with him; I saw them go to Zion-terrace, and I thought they were going home; I turned down another street, and then saw them again, going into Cromer-street; I called a constable - the prisoner was taken - the other got away.

BENJAMIN PARRETT . On the 30th of October Mitchell came to my house, and told me two men were gone round the street with a bag; I put on my coat, and went out - I stopped the prisoner in Swinton-street, and took him to Hatton-garden - this bag has been locked up there ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Cromer-street - I saw a man cross the road with this load - I went and asked if I should carry it for him; he said, if I would he would give me a few halfpence; I took it, and he went on before me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-138

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

141. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 4 keys, value 5s.; 1 purse, value 2s.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, and 5 shillings, the property of John Vaughan Dutton , from his person .

JOHN VAUGHAN DUTTON. On the 21st of November, at near two o'clock, just at the time the King was going to the House, I was at the bottom of the Haymarket - there was a violent crush, and I felt myself surrounded by some men; I think they were powerful men, as my arm was held up for some time - my wife was with me; I was more attentive to her than to myself; I lost my purse and keys, and have not seen them since.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was any body taken into custody, presently after your loss? A. Yes - a man; I have no idea who took my property.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I was at the corner of the Haymarket; I saw the prosecutor there, with a lady; I saw his right arm held up, and a man put his hand into his waistcoat-pocket - it was not the prisoner, but I saw the prisoner close behind his back, and his coat-pocket was lifted up; I heard some keys jingle, and saw the keys, and something yellow, come from the prisoner's hand; I made a grasp at the prisoner's hand, but there was nothing in it - the man, who I saw with his hand in the prosecutor's pocket, escaped; I was close to the prosecutor, and there were eight or nine persons round him.

RICHARD MILLS . I was with Waddington; I saw some persons surround Mr. Dutton - the prisoner was behind him, and was stooping; I saw the coat held up, and heard something rattle, but I did not see any thing; I cannot say whether the prisoner was holding up the coat or not - he was close to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-139

142. JAMES SMITH was indicted for embezzlement .

EDWARD TAYLOR . I am a baker , and live in Charlotte-row, Islington . The prisoner was my servant , and was to receive money on my account; on the 7th of July , he did not bring me any money from Mary Watson's - it was his constant habit to account to me daily for any money he received - I think he accounted for money received on the 7th of July, but not for Mary Watson's; I gave him notice to leave on the 15th, but he left on the 8th.

MARY WATSON . I paid the prisoner 14l. 6s. on the 7th of July, in a 10l. Bank note, four sovereigns, and some silver - the prisoner receipted the bill - this is it (read).

THOMAS COPE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 10th of November - he said, "I hope you will be merciful to me, master."

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-140

143. MICHAEL ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 3 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Wennington ; 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of John Hair ; 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of James Gorely ; 1 pewter pot, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Brown Underwood , and 1 pewter pot, value 6d. , the goods of James France .

ROBERT DELL . I live at the George public-house, in Chapel-street, Soho , and am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Wennington. I was out, collecting pots, on the 28th of November, and put them down at the door of No. 15, Cha

pel-street, while I went into a house; I heard a noise, and came out; I missed one of my pots - I ran up to the prisoner, moved his apron, and saw it was full of pots; I found three of my master's pots in his apron, and five of other persons.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I took the prisoner in Chapel-street, Soho, and produce the pots.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Chapel-street, Soho - I met a man, talking to another - he gave me some of these pots, told me to pick up three more, and he would meet me round the corner, and give me something.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-141

144. MICHAEL BUTLER , JAMES SMITH , CHARLES GOAT , and JOHN JONES , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 hat, value 10s. , the goods of William Gravenor .

WILLIAM GRAVENOR. I am a hatter , and live in Manor-row, Tower-hill . I had some hats hanging outside my house, about three o'clock, and I missed one of them soon afterwards.

JAMES MANN . I am in the employ of Mr. Sherman - he is a chandler. On the 21st of November I saw Butler and Smith at Mr. Gravenor's window, and the other two prisoners about twelve yards off; I saw Smith take the hat, and give it to Butler - he put a handkerchief into it, and put it on his head - they all four then walked to Queen-street- the other two were near enough to have seen it taken; I afterwards told my master of it, and they were taken; I am sure of their persons - they had been ten minutes at the window.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer. Butler and Smith were brought to the watch-house, but they denied knowing any thing about it - the others were taken the next day.

BUTLER's Defence. I met Smith that evening - as we were going along, the patrol came and took us - he brought us to this lad, and he hardly knew us, but, all at once, he said we were the two.

JURY to JAMES MANN. Q. How long was it, after you saw the boys, that you gave the alarm? A. About three hours; I was going out then, and returned about four o'clock; I told my master, and he said, why did I not get an officer; I said I was afraid - I afterwards saw Smith looking in at our window, and told the patrol, who went and caught him and Butler.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-142

145. SAMUEL CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 saw, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Middleton .

HENRY MIDDLETON. I am a carpenter . On the 12th of November I was working at No. 106, in Drummond-street, Somers'-town - I went to No. 104, where I live, and when I returned, in about three minutes, I missed my saw from the bench - I met the prisoner coming out of the house with a saw, and when I got in I missed mine - I followed, and took him without the saw - I gave him in charge to the constable - I found my saw afterwards behind the shrubs in the shrubbery, which he had passed by - I did not see him throw it away.

JOHN REID . I took the prisoner. Here is the saw; it was found behind the shrubs.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261207-143

146. THOMAS CUMMINGS , THOMAS MORLAND , and JOHN ROWLAND , were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 7lbs. weight of hogs'-lard, value 6s. , the goods of Susannah Powl , widow .

SUSANNAH POWL. I am a widow, and keep a chandler's-shop on Great Saffron-hill . I was in the room behind my shop on the evening of the 15th of November, I saw Morland come into my shop on his hands and knees - the other two were then looking in at the window; Morland went out, and soon after came in again, took this bladder of lard, and went out with it - I had lights in my shop, and am quite certain of his person - I followed him - he threw it down into the gutter; I picked it up and brought it into my shop - the prisoners ran off - I had seen them before, and had been watching them.

JAMES ISAACS . Mr. Turner, the constable, came to me, and said there were three boys round the shop, and one of them had been in - he asked me to come and watch them- I went, and saw Morland go in on his hands and knees and take the bladder of lard from the corner of the window- he came out, and the lady came after him; he threw the lard into the gutter - the others were at the window when he took the lard - I ran and took Rowland into custody.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am an officer. I had been watching the prisoners for twenty minutes - I saw Morland go into the shop two or three times - Rowland and Cummings were at the window - Morland came to the door several times, spoke to them, and then he went in, and came out with this bladder of lard - he threw it into the kennel - I secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CUMMING's Defence. I was going on an errand, and stopped to hear a man sing - I do not know the others.

MORLAND's Defence. There were no other boys with me when I did it.

COURT to JAMES ISAACS. Q. Where did you see the other boys? A. I took Rowland, and called to Mrs. Powl to take Cummings, which she did, and took him into the shop.

CUMMINGS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

MORLAND - GUILTY . Aged 12.

ROWLAND - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-144

147. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 2 blankets, value 6s.; 1 counterpane, value 3s.; 1 pillow, value 2s., and 1 sheet, value 6d. , the goods of Deborah Cook .

DEBORAH COOK. I am a widow , and live in Rycroft-court, St. George in the East . On the morning of the 8th of November, I went out to sell a basket of herrings - I returned at half-past twelve o'clock and missed these articles - I have seen the sheet and the counterpane.

MARY SIMMONS . I live in Rycroft-court. I went out and met the prisoner on the steps with a bag under his arm - on my return I met him coming out with the bag

full on his shoulder - the prosecutrix then came home and said she had been robbed of all she had - I then recollected that I had seen this coloured man - I went and gave information of him and his dress - he had a canvas jacket on- we were directed to Blue Gate-fields - we found the prisoner at No. 37, Angel-gardens - I accused him of coming out of Rycroft-court with a bag; but he denied all about it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see what was in the bag? A. No; I met you with the bag empty, and when I returned I met you with it full.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home and had this wood to carry to a friend's; I sat there I suppose an hour, and then this woman came, and said, "That is the man who robbed me;" I said, "Ma'am" - "Yes," said she,"you have robbed me of my bed-clothes;" I said I had done no such thing, what I brought here is in the coalhole - the empty bag was on the floor - she saw it, and did not know it again - I never saw this property till it was shown me by the officer - there are many people come to that house - it is a lodging-house.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a watchman, and live in Angel-gardens. I saw a headborough go into a house there, at a quarter before two o'clock - I went in to assist him; the prisoner was in the front-room - I then went into the kitchen, and found this pillow, sheet, and counterpane stowed up between the ceiling and the tiles; Mrs. Cook saw them, and said they were hers; the woman at the house said he brought these things to her; and she begged him to take them out as quick as possible; I do not think the prisoner heard that.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-145

148. JAMES HUTCHINSON , JAMES QUIN , and JOHN IRVIN , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 3 shillings, and the sum of 17 1/2d. in copper monies , the monies of William Rozzell .

WILLIAM ROZZELL. I am a fruiterer , and live in Great Wild-street . On the 28th of November I went down into the kitchen, and while there, I heard a rattle at the till; I ran up, and saw Hutchinson behind my counter handing the money out of the till to the other two prisoners who were standing at the door; Hutchinson tried to make his escape; I ran to him, and took hold of him; he got under my arm and ran out; I ran, and caught him before he got off the pavement; there had been two shillings and two sixpences in a small trough, and the copper in the square-till; I saw some money in Hutchinson's hands; he put it down on the counter - when we went to take the others, Quin said that he took a sixpence, and put it into his shoe, and lost it in running.

Prisoner IRVIN. We only took one sixpence; one was dropped in the shop, and the other was lost.

MAURICE NICHOLAS . I am an officer. I was called in, I saw Hutchinson in the shop, and this money; I went and found the others in the Borough.

HUTCHINSON - GUILTY . Aged 8.

QUIN - GUILTY . Aged 10.

IRVIN - GUILTY . Aged 10.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-146

149. SAMUEL HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 jar, value 2d., and 3 quarts of pickled walnuts, value 2s. , the goods of Francis Reeve .

FRANCIS REEVE. I am an oilman , and live in South-Audley-street . I had my jar of walnuts safe on the 10th of November; between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner going out of my shop with it; I followed, and took it from him; he was secured; I lost sight of him for about five minutes; I had not noticed his person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You lost sight of him for five minutes? A. Yes; he was quite a stranger.

Q. What was the prisoner doing when you came up to him? A. He came up to me; I had been hunting for him, and he came up into my hands; I had seen him go out of my shop; but I was down in the area.

THOMAS LEWIS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me; I know nothing of the transaction; I asked him how he came to do it; he said he was very sorry for what had happened; his father and mother have lived in St. George's, and were very respectable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-147

150. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 2 shirts, value 5s.; 2 half-handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 1 jacket, value 5s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 6s., the goods of Nathaniel Edwards ; and 1 pair of spectacles and case, value 3s., and 1 pair of scissars, value 6d. , the goods of James Johnson .

NATHANIEL EDWARDS. I keep the Windmill public-house, in Rosemary-lane - the prisoner lodged there on the 3d and 4th of November: on the 4th, we missed the two shirts, and in the course of the next day, the jacket and trousers; they had been in the front room, up two pair of stairs - the door was not locked - the key was mislaid - the prisoner had slept there twice before; I saw him, on the Sunday morning, while I was collecting in my pots; but I did not speak to him till the Wednesday, when I met him close by my door - I asked him to come into my house, as I wanted to speak to him - he came into the bar, and I asked what he had done with the boy's clothes - he at first denied having had them; but at last said he had left them at the Blue Boar public-house, for 2s. - I sent my wife there, but she came back and said they had not been left there - I then went there with the prisoner, and in going in, he said he had not left them with Mr. Burgess, but had sold them to a woman of the name of Payne, who came from Bristol - he pointed her out to me at the Blue Boar; but she strongly denied it - the landlady of the Blue Boar said it was of no use to deny it, and then we went up-stairs, and a large pack was opened, I pointed out my boy's clothes, which were there amongst them; they were packed up to go to Bristol - that woman was to appear at the Thames Police-office, but she went off to Bristol.

Prisoner. You said you would not prosecute me, if I would tell you where the things were - I said it would be a warning to me as long as I lived. Witness. I told him I would act leniently towards him; but when we found the clothes, he set off, and I had to pursue him down a number of turnings, where I never was in my life before; I cried Stop thief! and some persons took him.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I live in York-street, Commercial-road . I lost a pair of scissars on the 8th of November, and a pair of spectacles and case; they were taken at one time from my house.

HUGH PARSONS . I lost a chair from a back room of mine.

ELLEN HICKEY . The prisoner came to see a woman who lived up-stairs at my house for nearly a fortnight, and he left this chair there.

ROBERT BURGESS . On the 8th of November, the prosecutor was coming down Butcher-row - I heard him cry Stop thief! I ran, and took the prisoner - I found in his pocket these scissars and spectacles, which he said his uncle gave him.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his former good character.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18261207-148

151. MARY ANN LUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 brooch, value 6s. , the goods of William Sparshott .

HENRIETTA SPARSHOTT . I am the wife of William Sparshott - we keep a shop in Ann-street, Spafields . The prisoner (whom I had seen there before) came on the 16th of November, with another female - she asked to look at a bonnet, which she agreed to have for 6s. - I was to change the trimming, while she went to Exmouth-street; she went, but never returned: she had tried the bonnet on at the glass in my parlour, and this brooch was missing from under the glass - I had seen it there five minutes before; nobody but her had been there.

JOHN HANCOCK . I am an officer, and produce the brooch, which I got from the pawnbroker.

SAMUEL COGGER . I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody on the 16th of November - she said she had got herself into this trouble by being foolish to other people - a woman named Barrett was with her; she was discharged.

HENRY JENNINGS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of November, I received this brooch in pawn from a female; I cannot say who.

WILLIAM CLUNIS . A brooch similar to this was offered in pawn to me on the 16th of November, by the prisoner; I refused to take it in.

Prisoner's Defence. The other female went into the parlour as well as me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-149

152. ELIZABETH LEVETT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 2 bedgowns, value 6d.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 cap, value 6d.; and 1 piece of linen, value 3d. , the goods of William Dandy .

CATHERINE DANDY . I am the wife of William Dandy; we live in Currier-street, St. Giles - the prisoner had refuge in my house for a few nights, and was there on the 25th of October - I missed this property, and found some crockery at Mrs. Killon's, Great St. Andrew-street - I believe she was in dristress, as her husband had left her.

CHARLES KILLON . One Friday in October, the prisoner sold me several crockery articles, with a petticoat and frock.

JOHN TOFT . I took the prisoner, and have he property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-150

153. EMMA MARKWELL and STEPHEN MARKWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 gown, value 5s.; 3 frocks, value 3s.; 3 bed-gowns, value 2s.; 2 night-caps, value 6d.; 3 pairs of socks, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 2 pincloths, value 6d., and 1 towel, value 1d. , the goods of John Sells .

JOHN SELLS. I live at Enfield - the prisoners live in a yard just by me. I was in the field drawing turnips, with my wife, who saw her bed-gown hanging in the prisoner's yard - we went round there - the prisoner Emma came out and said she had it to wash; my wife said she would swear to it; she then said she found it on the bridge.

SARAH SELLS . On the 21st of November I lost a parcel out of the back part of the Enfield stage, as I came from town, about half-past three o'clock; it contained these articles. On the following Saturday, I was in my garden, and saw my bed-gown in the prisoner's yard - we went to her; she said she had it to wash, and afterwards said that she found it on the bridge - I found more things at King's.

JAMES KING . I am a pawnbroker. Emma Markwell pawned a gown and three frocks with me, on the 23d of November, and said she brought them from her daughter.

JOHN WAIT . I attended the coach, and put Sells bundle behind - it was missed.

HENRY HICKEN . On the 21st of November, I was working with my father - the coach arrived at Enfield - I saw Mrs. Sells get out, and just before the coach stopped, I saw Stephen Markwell running behind it, but saw him do nothing.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. On Saturday, I went to Emma Markwell's house, and found this bed-gown; and next morning I found a towel by the fire, the end of it is burnt off; Stephen was sitting at the fire; I took him - Emma said she had found the parcel.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was with Mead, and found the bed-gown - as we went to the Magistrate, Emma told me that she took it out of the coach herself, and afterwards said that her son took it out, as he was in distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

EMMA MARKWELL's Defence. I was at home at the time - my son went out between four and five o'clock, and returned next morning with the bundle - he said he found it - I said I hoped he had not taken it from any one; he said not.

EMMA MARKWELL - GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Six Months .

STEPHEN MARKWELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-151

154. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 pelisse, value 2s., and 1 jacket, value 2s. , the goods of Joannah Leonard .

JOANNAH LEONARD. I am single - the prisoner lodged four days with me. On the 13th of November, the watchman awoke me - I found the prisoner at the watch-

house with this property, which he had taken from the back room.

FRANCIS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner coming out of the house at half-past three o'clock in the morning, with these things under his jacket - he asked the time - I asked what he had got; he said it belonged to his wife.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man there gave it me to take to the Royal Oak public-house, Thames-street.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-152

155. JAMES PRICHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 hat, value 10s. , the goods of John Gravenor .

HARRIET GRAVENOR . I am the wife of John Gravenor, a hatter - we live at Bethnal-green . On the 20th of November I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take a hat off the rail - I ran out, calling Stop thief! he threw it into an entry - I took it up, and returned; he was brought back in about five minutes; I am certain of him - he said, if I would forgive him, he would not do so again.

THOMAS SMITH . I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prosecutrix following the prisoner - I overtook him, but did not see him with the hat.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - he said he would not do so again.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Fourteen Days and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-153

156. RICHARD PHEBE and JAMES MALONEY were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 5 knives, value 2s. 6d., and 2 forks, value 8d. , the goods of George Grubb .

GEORGE GRUBB. I live at No. 4, Drury-court, Strand . I went out on the 22d of November, about two o'clock, and returned at half-past nine at night - these knives and forks were then gone - I made them myself.

MARGARET GRUBB . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I was in the room behind the shop about seven o'clock in the evening - a person came in, and asked if I missed any knives; I looked, and missed them - I ran and took Maoney, brought him back, and he took this knife and fork from up his sleevs, and laid them on the counter - Phebe came up afterwards to look for him, and the constable took him. When I first went out, I saw them both together, looking at a pawnbroker's window at the bottom of the court.

FRANCIS SPEIGHT . On the evening of the 22d of November, I saw the prisoners standing at Grubb's window; I am certain of them both - I saw Phebe put his hand into the window, and take some knives and forks - Maloney leaned against him, to prevent his hand being seen to enter he window: I went in and told the lady, but did not see the prisoners taken.

JAMES GRUBB . I live with my father. Maloney came into the shop, about a quarter to seven o'clock, and asked the price of two or three pocket-knives - he said he was going to the coal-shed, and he would call again - I did not see Phebe with him - the property was taken about a quarter of an hour after.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am an officer, and took them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PHEBE's Defence. I was going along; this lady took hold of the other prisoner - I went to see what was the matter, and they took me.

MALONEY's Defence. I only went to ask the price of a knife.

PHEBE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

MALONEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-154

157. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 9 lbs. of pork, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Hannah Ebsworth ; and WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

NATHAN BUTT . I am shopman to Hannah Ebsworth, a cheesemonger , of Drury-lane . On the 23d of November, about eight o'clock, I saw Roberts take a piece of pork from the window - I ran out and took it from Jones; they were both together ten or twelve yards from the house - I secured them both.

DANIEL DUNA . I am a constable, and took them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 45.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-155

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

158. JOHN CONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Isaac Whitehouse , from his person .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ISAAC WHITEHOUSE. I am a traveller , and reside at Birmingham. On the 3d of November I was in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles , going to Oxford-street - I felt a twitch at my pocket - and thinking my handkerchief was being taken, I felt conscious the man would come before me, and in a moment the prisoner came before me - I saw his hand in his breast - I seized him, opened his breast, and found my handkerchief there - on seizing him, a man, named Connelly, and eleven or twelve others, sprang upon me and pushed me violently about; I lost my hold of him; but I got from them and seized him again; they seized me again, and Connelly cut my fingers, either with his nails or something else, and the prisoner got from me again - I broke from them and seized him again; not less than twenty persons then attacked me; and Connelly, who was one of the most active, seized me again; but Eldridge came up to my assistance, and I kept him till the officers came up - by this time there were not less than sixty of the lower orders around me; the prisoner and Connelly were finally secured, and committed.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I was passing and saw this gentleman surrounded by a number of persons; I went to his assistance.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I was on duty near St. Giles on the 3d of November, with Clark; I saw the mob; went up, and saw the prosecutor struggling with Connelly, who held Mr. Whitehouse by the collar; the prisoner and Connelly were secured.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM CLARK . I was with Bartlett, and confirm his statement.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-156

159. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 2 books, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Smith .

MARY SMITH . I am the wife of Joseph Smith - we live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury . On the evening of the 7th of November, I lost two books from my window, which I had seen there a minute before - I went to the door to serve two gentlemen, and as I went in, I missed these books - I looked round, and saw the prisoner going away with them under her arm - I seized her about three yards off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS STEVENS . I took her in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-157

160. FRANCES WEBSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 6 caps, value 12s., the goods of John Haigh , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH HAIGH . I am the wife of John Haigh, a green-grocer of Cartwright-street . On the 31st of October I washed some caps, and took them into the shop - I sent my daughter out; and on her return, in consequence of what she said, I looked and missed them; that was between five and six o'clock; I had not seen the prisoner.

HANNAH HAIGH . I was returning from an errand, and met a woman in the passage - I followed her out, and saw it was the prisoner - I did not see any thing with her; I spoke to my mother, and the caps were missed - I went out and found the prisoner near East Smithfield, and took one cap from her bosom - she then pulled three caps and a handkerchief from her bosom, and threw them into the street - a girl came by and took them up - the officer has them.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer. The prisoner and property were brought to me at the watch-house - she said a woman gave them to her; but did not say who she was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix has bought things of me - I went to her shop and met her daughter - a woman came and give me the things to hold; and before she came back I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-158

161. WILLIAM WITHERS and WILLIAM HARDING , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 watch, value 1l. , the goods of William John Foster .

WILLIAM JOHN FOSTER. I am a silversmith , and live at Guildford . I went out, and left a watch in my window, when I returned in the evening it was gone - I found it in the officer's possession - I am not certain whether it was on the 25th or 18th of October.

WILLIAM COOKE . On the 25th of October, as I returned from work, I saw the prisoners at the corner of Stingo-lane - they crossed over, and asked me to buy this watch; I said I wanted one, and asked where they got it; they said they had found it, and wanted 30s. for it - I said I had not the money; but gave them a time-piece and 5s., and was to give them 5s. more - I afterwards pawned the watch at Wissett's - I knew Withers before.

THOMAS RILEY . I live with William Wissett - Cook pawned this watch for 10s.

JAMES BURCHMORE . I am a prisoner in the House of Correction. I went with the two prisoners in October last - we set off to go to Portsmouth in order to go to sea - we went to Guildford - they said we had better not go all together into town, as the people would look at us - this was on a Wednesday - they told me to stop behind; but I followed gently after them - I saw them go into the prosecutor's shop - I did not see the name on the door - Harding went and staid a little time - Withers stood at the door and window - when Harding came out, they walked on very fast - I went, and asked what they walked so fast for - Harding said, "Never mind, we have only got a silver watch;" he pulled it out of his pocket, and gave it to Withers - I saw it was a silver-hunter - we went to Portsmouth and returned from there in a week, on a Tuesday - I saw Cooke on the Thursday morning, and he had bought this watch the day before; and on Saturday, I told Buckeridge of it - I had no share in the produce of it.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKRIDGE . In consequence of what Burchmore told me, I went to Harding's house; they denied him; but I found him concealed in the back-parlour- and in taking him to the watch-house, I told him it was for stealing a watch at Guildford, and some pen-knives and other things at Portsmouth; he said he did not care, there were more in it, and they must all fare alike; I afterwards took Withers, and have been since looking for one Suter; but have not found him.

WITHERS' Defence. I was going down the town, and Harding picked up the watch; we gave it to Suter; who returned it as we came to town, and sold it to Cooke.

HARDING's Defence. I say the same.

WITHERS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HARDING - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-159

162. WILLIAM HERMAN WAKEFIELD was indicted for embezzlement .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-160

163. EMMA BASSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 purse, value 18d.; 8 sovereigns, and a 5l. note, the property of John Cummins , from his person ; and MICHAEL CURTAIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN CUMMINS. I am a silk-mercer , and live in Harley-street, Cavendish-square. On the 8th of November I met Bassett in Tottenham-court-road, about nine or ten o'clock in the evening; she requested me to give her something to drink, as it was cold; I gave her some gin and water; she then took me to another public-house in

Bainbridge-street, where we stopped some time, and changed a sovereign at the public-house, and received 18s. 6d.; I had eight sovereigns and a 5l. note in my purse; I got up about eleven o'clock to go home, and she took me down some streets and passages into a private house; she asked me to go up-stairs, but I did not; I only went a yard or two into the house; she then wanted me to sit down on the stairs; I got up to go home; she put her arms round me and said, "Pray, sir, don't go;" she then took my purse and papers; I felt her hand in my pocket; I seized her hand, and called, Watch! Curtain came in instantly; she stretched out her hand and gave the property to him; I collared him, but he got from me, and attempted to rescue her; a watchman came up, and I gave her in charge; she gave part of my papers to the watchman, acknowledging that she had taken them from me, and given the rest to Curtain.

THOMAS LESLIE . I am a watchman. On the 8th of October I went into this house in St. Giles ; hearing a cry of Watch! I found the prisoners and prosecutor together; the prosecutor said that Bassett had robbed him of eight sovereigns and a 5l. note; he did not, at that time, say what she had done with it; I took her, and as we went along sprang my rattle for more assistance; Cummins then said a man had received the purse from her and gone up-stairs; I sent two watchmen to the house, but they found nobody; I then took Bassett to the watch-house, and there Cummins described Curtain; Bassett gave me these papers; she said two men came up, and she gave the money to Michael Curtain.

Prisoner CURTAIN. Q. Did not you see me standing at the door? A. Yes; Cummins said the man had run up-stairs; I believe he was sober.

GRIFFITH JONES . I am a watchman. I went up, and saw Leslie with Bassett; Cummins said she had given his property to a man who had gone up-stairs; Curtain was then standing at the street-door; the prosecutor was near enough to see him.

BASSETT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

CURTAIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-161

164. FRANCES BLUNDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 2 blankets, value 6s.; 1 candlestick, value 6d., and 2 sheets, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Pearless .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-162

165. LUKE BLACKBEARD and WILLIAM ADAMS , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 18lbs. weight of lead, value 2s., the goods of Samuel Turner , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

ANN THACKERAY . I am the wife of Robert Thackeray , a shoemaker of Norton-Falgate , he is very ill. On the 25th of November I was in the kitchen; my husband called me; I went up-stairs, got on the roof, and saw him talking to the prisoners there; Adams said they were sent by Mr. Johnson to take up the lead; I saw two pieces of lead rolled up; they were on a house next but one to ours; the next house was unoccupied; our boy fetched Coventry, who asked how they got there; they said they were let in by a key at the next house, and got out at the trap-door.

WILLIAM COVENTRY . I am a plumber. I went to the top of the house, saw the prisoners, and the lead rolled up; they said Mr. Johnson sent them to take up the gutters; Mr. Johnson built three houses adjoining this, but they were on Mr. Samuel Turner's; I know he is the landlord.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoners, and on the top of Turner's house I found this lead against the trap-door; I matched it with what remained in the gutter, it corresponds exactly; there was some other lead cut and rolled, but not quite separated; I found a knife on Blackbeard, the edge of which was very bright; they said they were employed by Mr. Johnson; I asked if they meant Johnson the builder; they said, No.

SAMUEL TURNER. The house, this lead was cut from, is mine, and was occupied at the time.

BLACKBEARD's Defence. My fellow-prisoner fetched me to do a job; I went to see what it was; he said it was to take up these gutters, as there was to be a new one put down; he took me there, and gave me a knife to do it with.

ADAMS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

BLACKBEARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-163

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

166. GEORGE WARD and WILLIAM PARKER were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 book, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Cornish .

ELIZABETH TAFLOW . I am servant to Samuel Cornish, bookseller , of Chancery-lane . When my master came home he missed this book - it was safe a few days before.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a patrol. About six o'clock in the evening of the 25th of November, I was coming down Gray's-inn-lane, and saw Parker standing against the wall of Gray's-inn; I looked over to a pawnbroker's shop, saw Ward come out, and give something to Parker; I went up, and took them; Parker had a duplicate of this book - he said he got it at a raffle six months ago.

HENRY JENNINGS . I am shopman to Mr. Cree. Ward pawned this book for 6d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WARD's Defence. I pawned it for Parker - he said he found it in Holborn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-164

167. ROBERT THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of George Dupen .

JOHN COLLINS . On the 16th of November I was in Dupen's parlour, at Ratcliff-highway - a lady stopped, and said a boy had taken some shoes from the door - I ran out, and saw the prisoner running - he dropped these shoes in the kennel: I picked them up, and saw him taken.

JOHN ROBERTS . I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner pursued; I took him, and found a knife and a piece of bacon on him; I did not see him drop the shoes.

GEORGE DUPEN. I am a shoemaker . These are my shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-165

168. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for stealing,

on the 14th of November , 170 brushes, value 8l., and 120 combs, value 33s. , the goods of John Burnell , Esq .

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. I was in Rose-lane on the 13th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, and met the prisoner with a bag on his left shoulder; I asked what he had got - he said he was moving something for a poor woman at the back of the Star public-house, and I should see her come in a few minutes; I waited some time, but she did not come; I gave him to Almond, and next morning Mr. Burnell claimed the brushes in the bag.

THOMAS ALMOND . I was with Barrs - his account is correct.

JOHN QUINTIN SHORTNEY . I have some premises in Black-horse-yard, Whitechapel . This property was taken from my warehouse there; it was all safe at six o'clock on the night of the 13th; I locked the premises up - they are the property of John Burnell, Esq.

JANE FORSYTH . My husband made these combs for Mr. Burnell.

DANIEL READON . I am in Mr. Shortney's service. On the morning of the 14th, I found the gate of the premises and a drawer open, which had contained this property the night before - the warehouse was in confusion.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from the Coburg Theatre, and, in Petticoat-lane, I overtook a man with a load - he asked me if I would assist him, which I agreed to do, in consideration of having a shilling.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-166

169. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of James Watts .

JOHN SPENCER . I live with Mr. James Watts, No. 89, East Smithfield . On the 11th of November, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the door - he snatched a pair of shoes; I followed, and took him with them, about one hundred yards off: he is a stranger.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer, and received him in custody with the shoes; he said he was much in want, and took them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18261207-167

170. JAMES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 plane, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Doren .

JOHN DOREN. I am a carpenter . On the 16th of November I saw the prisoner at Islington , near a new building, where I was working - I found this plane on him - he was quite a stranger.

THOMAS COPE . I am an officer. I received him in charge, with the plane, gimblet, and rule.

MARY IRELAND . I saw a man come out of this building.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-168

171. ROBERT HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 25 yards of gingham, value 15s. the goods of John Dent .

JAMES HENRY JERMYN . I am servant to John Dent, linen-draper , Crawford-street, Montague-street . About five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 21st of November, the prisoner came and took this gingham from a box, outside the door; I followed, and took him with it.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES KERKES . I was at work at Dent's window, and saw the prisoner take the property.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-169

172. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 cheese, value 9s. , the goods of William Walton .

SARAH WALTON . I am the wife of William Walton - we keep a chandler's-shop , in Brick-lane . On the 10th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in my back parlour, and heard an alarm; I went out, and found the prisoner in custody with this cheese, which is ours, and was taken from inside the door.

WILLIAM SWEEPSTONE . I was coming by Walton's house, and saw the prisoner take the cheese - he reached in, and took it; I followed, and took him with it; he threw it down - I had been watching him and another lad some time.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the road when he took me - another lad ran before me - I had not had the cheese.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-170

173. GEORGE GATES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 2 lbs. of soap, value 15d.; 2 lbs. of sugar, value 18d.; 6 ozs. of nutmegs, value 2s.; 6 lbs. of raisins, value 3s., and 1 lb. of allspice, value 2s. , the goods of Rowland Thomas .

THOMAS HARRISON . I am headborough. On the 18th of November I was directed to watch Thomas' shop - the prisoner came out with a basket - we followed him about one hundred and fifty yards, and asked what he had got; he said grocery, which he had bought of Mr. Thomas - we took him into the Cherry Tree public-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is he not a carpenter ? A. Yes - he was working at Thomas's.

ROBERT LOCK . I am an officer. Harrison's account is correct.

ROWLAND THOMAS. I am a grocer , and live in Whitecross-street . The prisoner was employed there - this property is mine; he had bought nothing that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Has he ever bought things of you? A. Yes - sometimes; I have three or four servants - they are not here; I was at home all the afternoon, and in the shop all day, except at dinner time, which was a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes; I might have been up-stairs some time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-171

174. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , 1 jacket, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value

3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 hat, value 3s.; 1 watch, value 20s., and 14 shillings , the property of William Stamp ; and FANNY BERRYMAN was indicted for receiving the said jacket and waistcoat, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM STAMP. I am apprentice to James Tapp , a lighterman . On the 22d of October his barge was at Kew-bridge ; I had this property all safe on the seat of my bed-cabin; I went to bed at seven o'clock, and awoke in the middle of the night, but do not know the time - my property was then all gone; I know nothing of the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where was your barge? A. In the middle of the stream.

JOHN COPE FOLKHARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Brentford. I have a jacket and waistcoat, which were pawned on the 28th of October, by Fanny Rose , who lives in the town - Berryman has been in my shop at times.

MARTHA SIDEBOTHAM . I have been in service, but have been lately at home, with my mother, at Richmond. I know the prisoners - I had a dispute with Berryman - I had lost a handkerchief, and, at Ewell fair, I saw it on her neck, and said it was mine - she said it was not; this was seven or eight weeks ago - she struck me; I had an apron of hers on: I took it off, gave it to her, and said I would go to Brentford and tell of her misconduct; she ill-used me; I got away; I saw Davis and Berryman at Gurney's house - Davis tried on a jacket and waistcoat - he took a handkerchief off Berryman's neck, and burnt it - there was a smock frock - he wanted to cut it up, but Berryman said she would pawn it.

FANNY ROSE. I am thirteen years old. Berryman sent me to pawn a jacket and waistcoat at Folkhard's - she told me to sell them for 6s., and afterwards, to pawn them in my own name, which I did. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-172

175. JOHN GROUT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 3 cwt., 1 qr., and 20lbs. of white lead, value 6l. 10s., and 1 cask, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Barwick .

CHARLES BRETT . I am a watchman, and have known the prisoner for ten or twelve years. On the 20th of July, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I met him in Fleur-de-lis-street, with two others rolling a cask - the prisoner sometimes rolled it, and at times the other two - they were about four hundred yards from Mr. Barwick's; the prisoner knew me - he came over, and said, "Charles, are you going to work;" I said, No - I had no work to do, but I said, "I see you have got a job, but you shall take it no further;" I tried to secure him, but the others assisted him, and they all ran off, leaving the cask with me; I took it to the watch-house - the others were afterwards taken, but the prisoner was not found till lately.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am headborough. On the 20th of July, Brett brought this cask to the watch-house, about five o'clock in the morning - it contained white lead, which Mr. Barwick claimed - Brett described the persons - I knew them.

THOMAS BARWICK. I am a plumber . On the 20th of July I found this cask of white lead at the watch-house - it is mine - it was taken from an avenue, which leads to my back premises, and was safe on the evening of the 19th.

JOHN BARRS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of November.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to look for a job, and two men asked me to roll the cask - they said they would give me 1s. - Brett attempted to take me, and I got away.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-173

176. JAMES SAYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 2 lbs. of cheese, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Osborne .

HANNAH BURNS . I keep a stall opposite to Mr. Osborne's window, at the corner of Crown-street, Finsbury . On the evening of the 30th of November, I saw two boys near the shop - one of them came to me, asked how I sold my fruit, and then the other came up, and pulled my bonnet down over my face; I put it up, looked round, and missed a piece of cheese from the window before me; I called to the shop-boy.

JAMES SAUNDERS . I am in Wm. Osborne's employ - he is a cheesemonger . Burns alarmed me; I missed the cheese from the window; I went in pursuit, and when I got to Long-alley, a boy said, "Are you looking for the cheese?" I said, Yes; he said, "He is gone over the way with it;" I crossed over, but saw nobody - the officer afterwards brought it to the shop.

WILLIAM CANTON . I am a constable of Islington. I was going along, and saw the prisoner and two others - one of his companions pulled Burn's bonnet over her eyes, and the prisoner took the cheese - I pursued, and took him with it under his coat; I saw Saunders pursue him - the others sent him quite a different way; I believe the prisoner was in distress - he has no home to go to.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years , to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18261207-174

177. JOHN FUNSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Stephen Woodford .

STEPHEN WOODFORD. I am apprentice to Mr. Robinson, of Sloane-terrace, Chelsea . I slept in the same room as the prisoner - on the 4th of December, when I got up, I missed these shoes; he had gone out, and left his own - mine were almost new; I never allowed him to take them; I found him again next day, with them on.

WILLIAM MAYBANK . I took the prisoner - he said he had put the shoes on to go to see his sister.

Prisoner. I came back to pay for them, and was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-175

178. JEREMIAH DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 tea-pot, value 6d.; 3 cups, value 3d.; 3 saucers, 3d.; 4 basins, value 6d.; and 1 box, value, 3d. , the goods of Francis Crawford .

ELIZABETH CRAWFORD . I am the wife of Francis Crawford - we live in Turner-street, Bethnal-green . On the 21st of November, I went out in the morning, and left this crockery in the cupboard; I did not lock the door - on returning, I missed them; the prisoner's brothers live about two yards off; I found them there - he lives there.

CHARLES VINSON . I took the prisoner in charge - I

found the duplicate of a watch at his brothers' - the prisoner said he had given the crockery to his brother.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I have the property - the prisoner told me voluntarily that he had taken the property.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-176

179. THOMAS DOWSETT and WILLIAM BARRY were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 25s. , the goods of Robert Hawkes .

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I am a constable. On the 6th of November I saw the prisoners in Oxford-street, and watched them down Regent-street into Glasshouse-street - they stood at the prosecutor's window some time - they went away, returned, and I saw Dowsett take something, and give it to Barry, who put it into his apron; they both ran towards me, and I secured them, and pushed them into a shop - Barry dropped this cotton from his apron - I took it up, and put them into the watch-house - he took it from under the door.

CORNELIUS VERIER . I am shopman to Robert Hawkes. This printed cotton is his, and was inside the door - I saw Barry look in at the window before it was taken.

DOWSETT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BARRY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-177

180. JAMES CLARIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 dressing-case, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel Britten .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE WHITMARSH . I am a publican. The prisoner left a razor-case with me to take care of for him, about six weeks ago - I produce it - I have known him some time - he is married, and has a family.

SAMUEL BRITTEN. I have a shop in the Western Exchange - this case is my property - the prisoner was porter at the Bazaar , and had access to the property.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I apprehended the prisoner - he said voluntarily that he was sorry for it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-178

181. EDWARD BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 1 till, value 2d.; 3 shillings, and 5s. in copper monies , the property of James Symons Cook .

FANNY GURNEY . I am servant to Jas. Symons Cook, baker , who lives near Edgeware-road . About ten o'clock at night, on the 2d of December, I was in the back parlour, and saw the prisoner leaning over the counter, and reaching out the till - he ran out with it; I gave an alarm, but could not pursue him, as I was alone - I found him in the watch-house soon after - the till was brought to the shop - it had contained three shillings, and about 5s. in copper.

ROBERT MILLER . I am a watchman. I was coming from my box, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I turned, and the prisoner rushed past me, and up a passage where my box stands - I saw him throw this till away in the passage - I pursued him across the Harrow-road, into the Cut - a gentleman seized him, and brought him back - I said,"That is the man, who had the till and money."

FRANCIS BRADBURY . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; about half-past twelve o'clock, a watchman and some others brought in the till - Enson brought some money - Mrs. Gurney came in, and identified the prisoner as the man who took it.

JOSEPH ENSON . I saw the prisoner running, and Miller following him - I saw him throw the till down - he had a cap on - I believe he is the man; I took up some money, and more was found by other persons.(Till produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a lad throw the till down; I ran to catch him, and was taken. GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-179

182. GEORGE BROWN and JOHN PRESNALL were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 ham, value 20s. , the goods of Benjamin Stewart .

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am shopman to Thomas Bass , a haberdasher - I was opposite Mr. Stewart's shop, in Ratcliffe-highway , on the 17th of November, watching the prisoners and another person - I knew Brown before; they were all in company together - I saw them try several shops, particularly a wire-worker's, where they were disturbed; they then went to Mr. Stewart's - Brown stood at the corner of the window, while Pressnell went into the shop, and came out with a ham; they crossed the road, and I secured Presnell with it - Brown was holding out his apron to catch it; but he ran away when I came up - Brown returned soon after; I saw him, and he was taken.

THOMAS GIBBON . I am an officer - I took the prisoners, and have the ham.

BENJAMIN STEWART. The ham is mine - I did not miss it till the alarm was given.

PRESSNALL - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-180

183. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 2 half-crowns, and four shillings, the monies of James Brown , from his person .

JAMES BROWN. I am a cutler , and work for Mr. Milikin, in the Strand. On the 26th of November, I was in a house in Duck-yard, Duck-lane , with a woman of the town, whom I had met just before - I took off my clothes: she went away to fetch a candle, and never returned - I went to bed - I had two half-crowns, and seven shillings in my breeches pocket - this was about one o'clock in the morning; I fell asleep; the prisoner came into the room about four o'clock - I was sober; he said the room belonged to him, and wanted to know what I did there; I said, if it was his room, how came he out so late - he said he had been on the watch - I dressed, and then missed my money, which I had counted before I went to bed - I charged him with having it, which he denied, but said he knew the girl I had been with, and would take me to her; he took me to the top of Duck-lane, then gave me a push, and ran off - I ran after him, calling Watch! he called Watch! also - the watchman took hold of me, and the prisoner ran away; I told him I had been robbed; he went with me to the place, and knocked at the door with his stick, but the prisoner did not open it; the watchman broke the door open, and found the prisoner on the bed - he said he had

been asleep, but I had not parted with him three minutes - I said, if he had my money, there were two half-crowns among it; they took him to the watch-house, and two half-crowns and some silver were found on him.

JOHN DEMPSEY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and prosecutor, and heard one of them call out, "What right had you in my room?" I ran up; they had hold of each other; I took hold of Brown, and the prisoner ran away directly - Brown then told me he had been robbed; I let him go; he ran up the yard after the prisoner, then returned, and I went with him and Phillips to Duck-yard; I knocked at the door very loud, received no answer, and burst it open - the prisoner was on the bed, and said he had been asleep; I took him to the watch-house, and in his waistcoat pocket found the money.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. I was called, about half-past four o'clock, by Dempsey - Brown said that he had been robbed of two half-crowns and seven shillings - we broke the door open; the prisoner was on the bed, with his clothes on - I asked why he did not open the door; he said he was fast asleep - I looked round, and he bolted out of the room; Dempsey met him at the door, they closed, struggled, and both fell; I ran out, and took hold of the prisoner; he seized my lantern, and broke it in pieces - he begged of me to let him go - we took him to the watch-house; he swore we should not search him; he then pulled out two half-crowns and seven shillings in a purse - I knew him; he is a pauper in the workhouse - Brown was sober.

GUILTY. Aged 41. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-181

184. WILLIAM SCHOFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 watch, value 26s.; 1 seal, value 1s., and 1 key, value 3s., the goods of Charles Flackney , from his person .

CHARLES FLACKNEY. I am a weaver , and a Chelsea pensioner . One Thursday in July 1825, I was in Church-street in Bethnal-green , about eight o'clock in the evening, and saw a person a few yards before me; he kept his eyes on me - I saw him go into the road, and in a minute or two he made a side spring to his left, drew my watch out of my pocket, and gave it to a man on my left - I saw it in his hand; the prisoner made a step to my right - I said to the other man, "You have robbed me of my watch"- another young man ran up to me, but did nothing - I threw the man down, but he got away: the prisoner was taken, by my description, on the 6th of November; he has been to sea since this happened.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you quite certain of him? A. Yes; I do not know where he lives; I heard he was a weaver. I received a wound in my head, by diving in shallow water, and when I drink, that causes my head to be affected - I had received my pension, and drank 6d. worth of gin and water, and two glasses of Port wine - I never said to Henry Schofield that I had had two glasses of gin and water, or that I was groggy; I never said so to Hart or anybody, or that I ran against three men and lost my watch, but could not tell who took it - I was speaking to Hart to-day: the prisoner's wife told me that he was at sea; his brother Henry has been to my house twice; I never received a message that the prisoner was ready to come to me at any time - his friends came to me and said that his father was in a dangerous state, and that he could not have done it; but I was confident he was the man: his friend laid some money on my table, I did not take it - I never offered not to swear to him if they gave me money.

COURT. Q. Who put money on the table? A. A man put down three sovereigns (which laid there some time) for me not to prosecute - I said I knew nothing about law - a person said it was only not to appear at Worship-street; and I got out of the way till I was forced to appear. I laid the money on the mantel-piece after some time - I know the prisoner was living at Bethnal-green on the 6th of November, three or four hundred yards from where I was robbed, and about two hundred yards from me - I do not know where he lived before - I complained of somebody throwing dirt at my windows, but not that it was him - I heard he was often passing my house.

JOHN McWILLIAMS . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner in his own room, by the prosecutor's direction; we went there together: he is a weaver; I found his loom there; he has been at work some time.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare I am innocent.

HENRY HART . I have known the prosecutor for five years, and drank with him; sometimes he is very quarrel - some after drinking; he told me he was rather groggy when he lost his watch, and did not know who did it; this was fifteen or sixteen months ago.

COURT. Q. Did he say he did not or should not know him? A. He said he could not swear to the parties.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-182

185. MARY GOOCH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 pocket-book, value 6d.; 3 sovereigns, seventeen 1l. promissory notes, and 1 bill of exchange for 30l., the property of William Radford , from his person .

WILLIAM RADFORD. I am a baker , and live in Hertfordshire. On the 14th of November I was with some friends, and drank too much; I met the prisoner, I cannot say where, and what happened I cannot say; we went and had something to drink, for which I paid; I do not recollect whether I took out my money - my notes were in a pocket-book, in my great coat side-pocket; I have found 15l., and the bill.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you a wife? A. Yes, and one child; I was with no other woman.

LEWIS MYERSON . I am a constable. On the 14th of November, about nine o'clock at night, I saw Radford with the prisoner, within one hundred and fifty yards of where her parents live, in Hackney-road ; I was going on towards Shoreditch, and saw four desperate thieves come up and surround them - I stepped up, and the prisoner said to me, "I will thank you to assist me in seeing my friend home;" I went on towards her house - she said to me, "This foolish fellow has dropped some money in Hackney-road; some boys were grabbling about for it, and I had no opportunity to see what it was;" I took the prosecutor up to her house - there is a small garden before it - he was so beastly drunk, he fell down there, and I fell on him; the prisoner's mother came out, and said, "Who

is there?" the prisoner said, "It is me;" she said, "I shall let no one in whom I do not know;" she let me in with the prosecutor, who was in a very bad state - I untied his neck-handkerchief, and they brought him a pillow.

GEORGE DAVISON . I am a watchman. I took the prosecutor to the watch-house, as he was drunk, and next morning he said he had been robbed.

PHILIP PARISH . I am a Bow-street patrol. I heard of this robbery, and found the prisoner, between seven and eight o'clock next morning, going into her own house; I took her, and she denied the charge - she at first said I should not search her; I unbuttoned her pelisse - she said, "You need not go any further;" she then gave me this pocket-book, with fifteen one-pound country notes, and a 30l. bill, and said, "Did the fool think I meant to steal his money?"

Cross-examined. Q. You found the money safe there? A. All but 5l.

THOMAS MOORE . I am a baker, and live in Hackney-road. I received a note from either her or her sister, but I cannot distinguish them apart; her father has dealt with me for some time.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw another girl afterwards, whom you took to be the one who brought the note? A. Yes; I heard of the robbery the night after I paid the note away.

SARAH CAVANAH . I saw the prosecutor on the steps of the door, and two women at his pockets; I cannot swear to either of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-183

186. EDWARD NEWLAND and THOMAS MORTIMER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 watch, value 20l.; 1 chain, value 4l.; 3 seals, value 3l.; 2 keys, value 7s., and 2 half-crowns, the property of William Alban Westen , from his person .

WILLIAM ALBAN WESTEN. I am a brush-maker , and live in Cleveland-street. On the 28th of November, (I had been out most of the night drinking,) about nine o'clock in the morning I lost this property - I do not recollect being robbed of it, or who robbed me, but it was safe in the night - here is my watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Had you any women with you? A. No, except at the public-house by the Piazza - I only had one with me; the whole business was a drunken spree, it is not impossible that I gave them the watch, but it is not probable.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am bar-man at the King's Head public-house, King-street, Covent-garden . The prosecutor came in there about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, with the two prisoners, another man, and four women; they had some gin and water - one of them paid for it, and then one of the women had some gin; I heard two children say, "That man has gone out with the other man's watch;" the prisoners were out at that time; Linsey then came in - he and I went after them, and found them at Quidley's, a hair-dresser, in Hart-street, with one of the women, and several other persons; the prosecutor was too drunk to go with us; I said to Linsey,"Here are the persons who were in our house;" they all got up, and I had hardly spoken before some person put this watch on the back of a chair - Linsey caught it, and said, "That is what we came for;" I did not see who put it there - it was but a small room; the prisoners were having their hair cut - the third man was there; I sent for an officer.

HENRY LINSEY . I am a porter, I went with Simpson to the hair-dresser's; the prisoners were sitting down having their hair cut - in the bustle one of them escaped; but before that I had taken this watch from the back of the chair, as it was in the act of falling; the man who escaped had been sitting on a form - several other persons were in the room; the prisoners were about two yards from the chair - the room is about four yards wide. Ann Hughes, the woman, was admitted an evidence for the crown, but is not here.

JAMES LEDGER . I am a constable. I was fetched about half-past nine o'clock; the watch was delivered to me by Linsey - Merry found on Mortimer two half-crowns and some other silver; I found the prosecutor at the King's Head, very insensible.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the money delivered back? A. Yes.

CHARLES QUIDLEY . I am a hair-dresser. The prisoners were taken in my shop - they were both sitting down, having their hair cut - a third man was waiting there, and a woman - they had been there five or six minutes, when Simpson came in - the prisoners both remained in their situation, but I saw the third man in momentary agitation - he made up to Newland - I was then keeping some intruders out of the shop, and the third man escaped; the prisoners got up after the third man escaped, but not before.

JOHN SIMPSON re-examined. The moment I went in the prisoners got up, and I think, said, "What do you want with us?"

HENRY LINSEY . They got up the moment we went in; I cannot say whether the third man escaped before they got up - it was all in a moment; Quidley left off cutting the hair directly the door was open.

CHARLES QUIDLEY . I saw Linsey take the watch from a chair in which Newland had been sitting - I cannot say who put it there; I think the third man was gone before it was found - he sat about a yard from the chair - I never saw them before.

Cross-examined by Mr, PHILLIPS. Q. You were cutting Newland's hair? A. Yes; he did not take his coat ff - I did not see him with the watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did not you put a cloth over his arms? A. Yes; he could not put his hand behind him; the watch hung on the back of the chair, it was not there before they came in; I know the third man came up to the chair, or near it - I was attending to my business - I think the other man might have put it there.

COURT. Q. You say Newland could not put it there without your seeing him? A. No; they had cloths before them; that does not confine their arms - the watch hung on the chair back; I stood behind the chair till Linsey took the watch.(Watch produced and sworn to.)

NEWLAND's Defence. I was at the King's Head till eight o'clock - the prosecutor and some women came in - he asked me to drink; I went to get my hair cut; I sat next to the door, but did not attempt to get away.

MORTIMER's Defence. I met the prosecutor, going by with a female, at the corner of James-street - she pushed him down; I went into the King's Head, they came in, and he offered me his watch to take care of - I said I would not have it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-184

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

187. THOMAS DODSON and SARAH AUSTIN, alias SAPSARD , were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 5 sovereigns, and three 10l. Bank notes, the property of John Bassil , from his person .

JOHN BASSIL. I am a labourer , and live at Enfield. In July last I received three 10l. notes, seven sovereigns, and four shillings - and on the 31st of October I was laying down in the Green-lane, Enfield , between the Horse-shoe and Rising Sun public-houses, and was robbed of this money.

The prosecutor was quite intoxicated, and could not proceed in his evidence, he was committed to goal.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. I produce some notes.

JOHN PALMER . I am a linen-draper, and live at Hertford. On the 9th of November the prisoners came to my shop and bought some goods, they paid me this 10l. note; Austin gave it me - I wrote my name on it; their bill was 1l. 2s. 6d. - I gave them nine sovereigns.

WILLIAM IVES . I am a grocer, and live at Tottenham. About half-past eight o'clock in the evening of the 31st of October, Dodson came and asked for change of a 10l. note, which I gave him, and in consequence of information, I took the note to the Bank next morning.

THOMAS THOMPSON . On the 31st of October, in consequence of information, I went after the prisoners - I stopped them: Walker found nine sovereigns and sixteen shillings on them - they were going off to London in the coach; I found on Austin some Irish linen and some stockings.

RICHARD WALKER . On the 31st of October I found on Dodson nine sovereigns and sixteen shillings; he said he took it in change for a 10l. note of a grocer, and that he got the note from a friend; Ives came and said he took the note of him, and thought it was bad; but next morning, finding it was good, the prisoner was discharged; they were taken again on the following Saturday, and on Austin was found ten sovereigns and a half.

ALEXANDER GIDDES . I am a banker's clerk. On the 10th of July I paid for a dividend account, three 10l. notes, Nos. 7615, 7616, and 7617 - these are two of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-185

188. GEORGE JENKS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 61lbs. of lead, value 20s., the goods of George Mann , and fixed to a certain building of his .

GEORGE MANN. I live in Glebe-terrace, Islington. I have some houses in the Green-lane ; the lead was cut from them; I have compared some in court, and it tallies with what remains; it was safe a few days before.

GEORGE GREENING . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 29th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in Green-lane, and heard a noise - I saw the prisoner throw a quantity of lead from the top of this house - we called him down - he came at last, and we found on him two knives and a pair of pincers - we fitted the lead to the building, it corresponded; he said he did it from want.

JOHN HARPER . I was in Green-lane, and saw the prisoner throw the lead down; he said he did it through want.

EDWARD PALMER . I was with the other witnesses.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Strongly recommended to mercy, Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-186

189. ELIZA SMITH and MARY BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 4 pewter pots, value 4s., the goods of Richard Bingley , and 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 8d. , the goods of Nicholas Winton .

NICHOLAS WINTON. I keep the Euston Arms public-house, Euston-square . On the 14th of November these two pots were found - they are mine.

RICHARD BINGLEY. I keep a public-house at Somers-town - these four pots are mine.

JAMES SEAWARD . On the 14th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was informed the prisoners were passing with something in their aprons - I went out and saw them together - I went up, and each had three pots in her apron; before I took them they began to cry out for mercy, and said as it was the first time, they hoped I would let them go.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am a constable. I took them in charge with these pots.

Brown put in a petition soliciting a light sentence, and expressing her contrition - she received an excellent character.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-187

190. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 shirt, value 6d. , the goods of Peter White .

ALICE WHITE . I am the wife of Peter White - we live in Nightgale-lane . On the 17th of November I hung a shirt, on a horse, before the kitchen fire - I went into my parlour, and saw the prisoner coming out of the kitchen - I knew him, and spoke to him; he told me if I saw his shopmates, to send them to the Coach and Horses public-house; I went into the kitchen, and missed the shirt.

ROBERT STUPART . I am shopman to Mr. Murray, a pawnbroker. The prisoner offered this shirt for sale on the 17th of November - he said it belonged to a shipmate. White came in and gave charge of him - I know he was in distress.

PETER WHITE. My wife missed a shirt; I found the prisoner at the pawnbroker's.

JEREMIAH GIDNEY . I took him in charge - he acknowledged taking the shirt.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261207-188

191. JAMES RIPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 3 lbs. of horse-hair, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Keat and Ebenezar Keat .

EBENEZAR KEAT. I am in partnership with my father, Henry Keat - we are flock manufacturers , and live in

Cleveland-street . The prisoner worked for us, and, on the 31st of October, I detected him in a shop in a Rathbone-place, with this horse-hair - we had seen him take it out of his breeches, and put it into his apron, as he went along - we deal in hair of this description; I went into the shop, and said, "This is mine," and gave him in charge - he made no answer.

JOHN NASH . I work for the prosecutors - master followed the prisoner, and saw him move the hair from his bosom or his breeches - he went into the shop, and took him.

SARAH BURLEIGH . My husband keeps a rag-shop in Upper Rathbone-place. The prisoner came in on the 31st of October - I had seen him once before - he put this hair into the scale; I said, "This is short and soft; I cannot sell it;" he said, "If you untwist it, you won't find it short;" the prosecutor came in and claimed it.

JOHN JAMES . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up a little at a time, as I swept the workshop.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-189

192. DAVID PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 lb. of butter, value 15d. , the goods of Andrew Ramsey .

ELIZABETH WREN . I am servant to the Honourable Andrew Ramsey, of No. 43, York-street, Portman-square . On the 18th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I took in a pound of butter, and missed it between eight and nine: it was brought back soon after.

JOSEPH CADNEY . Hurley brought a pound of butter to my shop on the 18th of November; I knew it to be what I had sent to Mr. Ramsey, by the paper round it.

CORNELIUS HURLEY . I am an officer. On the morning of the 18th of November, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another lad looking down different areas - I knew him before - I went round another way, and met him coming out of No. 43, York-street, with this butter in his bosom - he said he had bought it at a shop in Crawford-street - I went there, but they had sold none that morning - I afterwards showed it to Cadney, who knew it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me by a young woman.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-190

193. HENRY PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 5 lbs. of mutton, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Feather .

ROBERT FEATHER. I am a butcher , and live in Wapping-street . On the 4th of December, while I was at dinner, this mutton was stolen; an officer came - I found it at the watch-house, and knew it.

JOHN JAMES JONES . I am an officer of the Thames-police. I met the prisoner about a quarter to two o'clock, on the 4th of December, with a bundle; I asked what it was - he said some mutton, which he had bought by Shadwell church; I asked him to show me the shop - he said he did not know where it was; I at last found out Feathers.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-191

194. MICHAEL MORNING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 gold pin, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Mason .

THOMAS MASON. I am a coach-smith . The prisoner lodged with me at Walker's, in White-horse-court , for four or five days - we went out together on the 28th of July, about five o'clock, to have some beer at a public-house - he got up soon after, and said, "Good bye - I don't know that I shall see you again to night;" when I went to my room I missed this property off a table in another room. On the 22d of November I met him in Regent-street - he said he did not know me, and had none of my things - he said he would go to Walker's with me; he turned down Black-horse-yard, and said if I did not leave him, he would fall on me - he struck me several times - my hat fell off - I at last gave him in charge - he said he would satisfy me for the things, and never denied having had them.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I say I would satisfy you before the Magistrate? A. He said he would satisfy me.

ELIZABETH WALKER . The prisoner and prosecutor lodged at my house in July - the prisoner left me without notice - he paid his rent in the morning - he came home in the evening, soon after five o'clock, without hiscoat, and sent my child out for some ink - I missed him, and, on looking, missed Mason's things, and some linen of my own.

JOHN JONES. I received him in charge - he said he would make the property good, if the Magistrate would indulge him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-192

195. SUSANNAH JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 4 shifts, value 6d.; 4 petticoats, value 4s.; 1 pillow-case, value 2s.; 8 pinafores, value 8s.; 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 towel, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 table-cloth, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Robinson .

HENRY ROBINSON. I live at No. 16, Little Saffron-hill , and am a smith . I know nothing of the prisoner.

SARAH ROBINSON . On the 10th of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, I caught the prisoner in my father's house, with this property in her arms - she had just got out of the kitchen; I was coming from the yard - they were on the kitchen-dresser before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS COOPER . I am an officer. I received her in charge, with this property - she said one shift in the bundle was her own; I think she was in liquor.

Prisoner. I was in liquor, and know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-193

196. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 48 yards of calico, value 1l. , the goods of John McMin .

AMELIA McMIN . I am the wife of John McMin, a linen-draper - we live in Tabernacle-walk . On the 28th of November, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came in with another lad, and looked at some cuffs - his companion asked for a fringed pair; I said we had none - the prisoner said, "Shall I have cuffs or gloves," and asked

asked for yellow gloves - a third boy came in to look at a handkerchief, which I showed him - he then asked for blue ones; I turned to get them, and the other boy ran off with this collar; the prisoner and the third boy were still there - the prisoner exclaimed, "He is gone;" I saw him going out with it; the prisoner went after him, and was brought back afterwards; the third boy said, "Excuse me - I think these boys are thieves," and, before I got round the counter, he ran off himself - a little girl brought the calico in - the prisoner had 1s. in his hand.

FRANCES VENICOMB . I live near McMin. I saw several boys running with the calico; I believe the prisoner was one of them; I did not think so at first (I saw a bigger boy tie it in his handkerchief) but when I looked at the prisoner minutely, I knew him - they dropped the calico - I took it back - I lost sight of them for ten minutes.

WILLIAM HOLLIDGE . I am a weaver, and live in Tabernacle-walk. I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and met Venicomb at the end of York-place - she said, "There they are;" and I saw the prisoner close to a bigger boy, who dropped the bundle, which she took up - the prisoner crossed the road, and I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. There was another boy in the shop, who said, "Why don't you have gloves?" he ran off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-194

197. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 8lbs. of sugar, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Bernard .

JOSEPH STRATTON . I am servant to Thomas Bernard, who keeps a grocer's shop ; the prisoner lodged in the house. On the 20th of November, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw him at the entrance of the parlour-door - I asked what he did there; he made no answer; I felt in his apron and found some pound papers of sugar - he said it was his first offence, and he took it while the shop - man was taking down the shutters; he asked Rumble if he might put it back; and he put four or five papers out of his apron - my master keeps a butcher's shop also, but this was in the grocer's shop.

THOMAS GOOK . I took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-195

198. MOSELY GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November ; 7 lbs. 9 ozs. weight of quicksilver, value 6s. , the goods of Shakespeare Read , and others, his partners.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILKENS STIFF . I am in the service of Messrs. Shakespeare Read, and Co., plate-glass manufacturers - the prisoner was employed at the manufactory, in East Smithfield ; there are about one hundred workmen. On the 7th of November, at one o'clock, I saw him go out to dinner, and Mr. Wainwright stopped him; I searched him, and found on him this bottle of quicksilver; I asked how he could deceive me, after the confidence I had placed in him - he made no answer; he said he took it from the top silvering-room, and did not know what he meant to do with it, but he was starving - he had 14s. a-week; I believe he is married.

CHARLES WAINWRIGHT . I am one of the firm - Stiff's account is correct.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-196

199. PHEBE DUMVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 pelisse, value 20s.; 1 bonnet, value 15s.; 2 books, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 2 shirts, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 piece of ribbon, value 1s. 6d., and 1 candlestick, value 1s. , the goods of George Olley .

GEORGE OLLEY. I lodge in Norway-street, St. Luke's , on the first-floor, and the prisoner lived in the next room - she was in the habit of coming to my room; I missed this property, and on the 22d of November got Tweedy, who questioned her; she denied it, and resisted being searched - he found about sixty duplicates on her - she then said she had taken my property, and would pay me.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I found duplicates of this property on her - she offered to make them good.

CHARLES BATH . The prisoner pawned some of these goods with me at different times.

LEWIS PUGH . I am a pawnbroker. I took in a bonnet of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. His wife sent me to pawn them, as she was ill, and told me not to let him see the duplicates.

GEORGE OLLEY. I charged her with it in my wife's presence - she said nothing of this then.

CHARLES BATH. She told me she pawned the pelisse for Mrs. Olley.

ANN OLIVER . I have known the prisoner some time - the prosecutor has twice attempted to hang himself, and the prisoner cut him down.

GEORGE OLLEY. I never did such a thing.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I cut you down? A. If I did do so, I was in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-197

200. RICHARD ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 pocket-book, value 2d., and 9 sovereigns , the goods of John Savage .

CHARLOTTE SAVAGE . I am the wife of John Savage. On the 9th of November, about a quarter to three o'clock, my landlord came for my rent; the prisoner had taken a shop of me in New Compton-street; I took out my pocket-book and paid Ellis, the landlord; I had 9 sovereigns and 13s. left; I laid the book on the table in the lower-room, and missed it the next day when my husband asked for it; I have never seen it since; I went to the prisoner, and told him my child had seen him take it - he said it was no such thing - I asked where he had changed a 10l. note - he said he would tell me - he went into the parlour, then came out, and said he would not tell me; he was taken in charge, and no sovereigns found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you occupy the shop before the prisoner? A. Yes; I had not the pocket-book in my hand after Ellis left; the Magistrate discharged the prisoner on his own recognizance.

CHARLOTTE SAVAGE . I know the prisoner. I saw the pocket-book in my mother's hands, when Mr. Ellis

and the prisoner were there; and while my mother went for the pen and ink, the prisoner took it off the table, and put it under his coat; Ellis wrote a receipt; I did not tell my mother of it till next day - I was afraid she would beat me; it was a dark red pocket-book; I told her next day when she missed it.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you and your mother talked about this? A. Not many times; she said she would not have beaten me if I had told her; he went out directly - Elizabeth Parry was not in the room - my mother did not tell me what to say to-day - she paid Mr. Ellis some money; the prisoner was in the shop; I saw my mother put some gold and silver into the pocket-book - I saw her put six sovereigns into it; and there were nine on the counter; my father took it up and gave it to my mother.

JOHN SAVAGE. The prisoner had taken this shop, and paid me three sovereigns, and then was to pay seven, but he only gave me 6l. 13s., and said he should keep the rest for good-luck; this was about noon on the 9th of November - next morning I wanted the money - I said to my wife, "Have you got your money all right?" and the child said, "Oh, mother! Mr. Anderson took it" - she took the child to him, and after this I went to him with the child - he said it was all false, and he said he had changed a 10l. note the night before, as he had no silver; he had asked me to lend him 6d. - I found he had changed a note at a grocer's.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I have driven a cabriolet, but do nothing since I lost my money - I let this shop in order to get two horses to drive the cabriolet.

Prisoner's Defence. I engaged to give 10l. for this shop; when I went there, I met Mr. Ellis coming out at the door - my wife said, "This is the landlord; Mr. Savage has been paying some rent, and you must pay him 4s. 6d. on Monday" - I talked with him, but we did not go in, and I never saw the pocket-book.

ELIZABETH PARRY. I am out of place, and live with the prisoner - when Mrs. Savage was paying Ellis some rent, the prisoner came in and met Ellis at the door; after they were both gone, I saw a very dark-coloured pocket-book - I saw the book in her hand, while Ellis was writing a receipt.

- ELLIS. I am the landlord - Savage paid me the rent - I met the prisoner at the door as I went out; we just stopped and talked about some repairs at a coal-shed; I went home - I think Anderson went just before me; I had settled with Savage before the prisoner came; I did not notice the little girl there; I saw no pocket-book.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-198

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 11.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

201. JOSEPH POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 22 lbs. of cheese, value 12s. , the goods of Eliza Emmett .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Two Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-199

202. THOMAS JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Haydon .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-200

203. JAMES DEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 210 lbs. of potatoes, value 6s. , the goods of Henry Walker .

HENRY WALKER. I am a farmer , and live at Enfield . On the 22d of November, at night, 1 set Palmer to watch my farm yard.

JOHN PALMER . I was set to watch - there were several tons of potatoes in our barn; about twelve o'clock the prisoner came to his horses; he is our carter; he was about a quarter of an hour in the stable, he then came out, went into the barn for three quarters of an hour, and brought out a sack of potatoes, which he carried into the stable; he went in again, and brought out about three bushels more in another sack: he then harnessed his horses; I moved to the garden, and saw him put these potatoes on his cart, in which were twelve sacks of potatoes, which he was to take to Covent-garden Market - these were in addition to the load; he drove down a street - I called him and said, "Dearman, I did not think you had such a load"- he said, "I have done wrong, and must suffer for it."

ROBERT DAVIS . Palmer called me out; I found the prisoner in his custody: the potatoes were in the sacks.

RICHARD WALTER . I took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-201

204. GEORGE WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 half-crown, the money of Ann Short , from the person of Joseph Fox .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-202

205. ROBERT EBRALL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 1 sovereign, 1 half-crown, and 3 shillings, the goods of John Kendal , from his person .

JOHN KENDAL. I am a plasterer , and live at Hackney. On the 2d of December, Mr. Watkins, my master, paid me one sovereign, one half-sovereign, and some silver money: I went to the Barley Mow public-house, and drank; I paid 1s. 6d. as my share of the reckoning - I was not quite sober when I left - I then went into the George the Fourth public-house, about two hundred yards from there; I drank more there, and when I came out, I was quite insensible - I found myself in the watch-house next morning, and missed my money from my left-hand breeches pocket.

MARY HOLMES . I was in Old-street on the 2nd of December, about a quarter past twelve o'clock - I saw the prosecutor sitting down in the street, insensible - the prisoner came up and said, "Jem, do you live at the baker's now?" he made no answer; the prisoner then took him up, and led him round to a baker's by the London Apprentice public-house; the gentleman said, he had never seen him before: I then saw Wayfield, who said, "You had better give him in charge of the watchman," which I did; the watchman and the prisoner were leading him to the watch-house; I saw the prisoner put his arms round his waist, and put his hand into his left-hand pocket; I saw the pocket come out, but saw no money; I said to Wayfield."Do you see that?" he caught hold of the prisoner's

hand, and the money was taken from it - the prosecutor then fell down.

JOSEPH WAYFIELD . I am a gardener. I was passing the London Apprentice public-house , and saw the prosecutor at the baker's shop; the prisoner had got hold of him; I saw the prisoner catch hold of him by the middle; Holmes said, "Do you see that?" I took hold of his hand, and there was a half-crown in it, and 2s.; the watchman came up; I said, "Here is the money;" the prisoner then knocked it out of his hand - I picked it up, but could find no sovereign; Holmes picked up 1s.

GEORGE CRIPS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with three shillings and a half-crown.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-203

206. EDWARD EVANS and WILLIAM ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Acocks , from his person .

WILLIAM ACOCKS. On the 20th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields - Green brought the prisoner Evans up, and asked if I had not lost my handkerchief; I felt in my pocket, and it was gone - it was safe ten minutes before.

JOHN GREEN . On the 20th of November, I saw the prisoners in Queen-street - I had watched them from Holborn; Roberts drew this handkerchief from Acock's pocket - I seized them both by the collar; they were close together; my son and a patrol were with me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was not this at the end of the archway? A. Yes, I was within a yard of them; I never said that Evans drew the handkerchief; my son picked it up - I had seen Roberts try the pocket three times; he was in the act of giving it to Evans, bat it fell down.

EVANS's Defence. I was collared by Green, who said I had picked the gentleman's pocket - he said afterwards that Roberts took it.

EVANS - NOT GUILTY .

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-204

207. WILLIAM DUCK and THOMAS PARKER were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 12 shillings, the monies of Frederick Batwood , from his person .

FREDERICK BATWOOD. On the night of the 25th of November, I had been drinking, but was sensible. I met the prisoners near New-street, Covent-garden ; they wanted to assist me home - Duck took hold of my right arm; Parker walked on my left: when I got nearly home, Parker put his hand into my left-hand breeches pocket - I called the watchman, who came; he pursued, and took them; Parker denied having more than 2d., but some silver was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you not as drunk as you could be? A. I was sensible - it was about half-past one o'clock in the morning; I had been at a public-house in Chandos-street at eight o'clock at night; I paid 2s. as my share - there might be ten pots of beer amongst us - I was kept in the watch-house till Monday morning, as the watchman thought me in liquor - 14s. 6d. was found on Parker; my money was not marked.

WILLIAM PALLISTER . I saw the prosecutor in the street - three persons went up to him; I believe Parker to be one of them; I saw the prisoners run away - he then said he was robbed, and called Watch! I pursued and took them; Parker said he had but 2d.; he took off his cap, and threw something into the road - I then thought it was money, but cannot tell; 2s. 5d. was found on one prisoner, and 14s. 6d. on the other.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he arm in arm with them? A. Yes; he was insensible - I kept him in the watch-house from Saturday night till Monday morning.

NATHAN JACKSON . I am a watchman. Pallister called me; I pursued, and took the prisoners at the corner of Peter-street - Parker had 2d. in his hand; I told him to put it into his pocket; I saw him take off his cap, and throw something out which sounded like money or keys.

PARKER's Defence. He was laying in the road, and another man was with him - it was a very dirty night.

WILLIAM PALLISTER . I think his clothes were not dirty; it was a dirty night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-205

208. CHARLES COXON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Barckley , from his person .

WILLIAM BARCKLEY. On the 2d of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming out of the Haymarket into Coventry-street; I was hustled at the corner, and a number of persons said that my pocket was picked, and they pointed out the prisoner running across the street - I ran and seized him, and called the constable, who came and took him - he took out my handkerchief from his pocket or his breast, and held it in his hand.

CORNELIUS O'BRYAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; this handkerchief was then on the prosecutor's arm.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home when this gentleman took hold of me; there was a mob, and the handkerchief was thrown on his arm - I had never seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18261207-206

209. SAMUEL BARLEY and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a man unknown , from his person .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . On the 31st of October, I saw the two prisoners in Oxford-street, and then in Poland-street ; they were close together for about a hundred and fifty yards - an old gentleman in black was before them; Smith got up to him with a very short, light step; and I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and take the handkerchief; I pursued, and took him in Poland-street; I said to a baker, "Take hold of this man, and I will go after the gentleman" - I turned to go, and Smith got away from the baker; I pursued him, and an officer took him - he got from the officer, but he caught him again - he said he had no handkerchief at all; I said he had put it somewhere in his breeches - his breeches were then searched, and the

handkerchief produced - I then said there was another with him; I turned, and Barley was coming up - I took hold of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you stand by while he was searched? A. Yes, and the other prisoner came up - I suppose I was with the officer two or three minutes - I am a shoemaker - I had the jaundice at the time; Smith said, "You yellow rascal, if you don't let me go, I will knock you down."

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was in Poland-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I pursued Smith, and a gentleman stopped him - I took hold of him; he made great resistance, and said, if I did not let him go, he would cut my*** - Williams came up, and said that he had taken a gentleman's handkerchief - Smith said he had none; but I found this one in his pocket. Barley came up in a minute or two, and was taken; as Williams said he was the other - I have not found the gentleman.

BARLEY's Defence. He said he went to the gentleman's house at Paddington, and he said his handkerchief was yellow and blue.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN. I had an address from somebody, and went to a house; the gentleman there said this was not his handkerchief - somebody in the crowd gave me the address.

SMITH's Defence. That is my neck handkerchief.

BARLEY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-207

210. JAMES KIMBER and JOHN WILKIE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 2 handkerchiefs, value 10s., the goods of Charlotte Wyld , privately in her shop .

SUSANNAH BEADLE . I am shop-woman to Charlotte Wyld, of Paddington . About six o'clock in the evening Landey gave me information, and I missed two handkerchiefs off a line in the shop; I know nothing of the prisoners; they were two together, not cut.

WILLIAM ORD LANDEY . On the 27th of October I saw Wilkie go into a linen-draper's shop, and come out with something under his jacket - I did not notice the name on the shop - I stood at a distance; I went and told my father, who sent me to tell the people at the shop, which I did; I have seen the prisoners before - they were together before Wilkie went in, and when he came out, they ran off together.

HENRY BAILEY . I am a pawnbroker. I took in a handkerchief, the fellow to this one, but I have left it at home - Kimber pawned it; he said he bought it for 5s. 6d. and then said 3s. 6d.

JOHN WELLS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a handkerchief, which Kimber pawned on the 27th of October.

JOHN KITTS . I am an officer. I was fetched to take Kimber at Bailey's, when he came to redeem the handkerchief. I found the duplicate of the other handkerchief on him. I took Wilkie on the 29th.

KIMBER's Defence. I met a hawker, who sold me a handkerchief for 5s. 6d., and Wilkie bought one for 5s. I pawned my own, and Wilkie pawned his.

KIMBER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILKIE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-208

211. WILLIAM TUPMAN was indicted for stealing on the 24th of June , one 200l., one 100l., and one 50l. Bank notes , the property of James Philip Devenish .

Mr. McDOWELL conducted the prosecution.

JAMES PHILIP DEVENISH. I was formerly an ensign of the 87th regiment of foot. I retired on half-pay, and o the 25th of May, 1825, I sold my commission for 403l. odd - there were two 200l. notes; I exchanged one for a 100l., a 50l., and 50l. in gold; I gave all the notes and some gold to my wife, who did not live with me, but in the prisoner's house, No. 22, Bury-street, Bloomsbury .

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. What are you now? A. I sell fish ; my wife, I believe, is in the habit of seeing gentlemen - her conduct is not as it should be.

COURT. Q. But did you know this at that time? A. Yes, but I had intrusted her with money; I paid some small debts, and intended to rescue her from her situation, and send her home to her mother.

ELIZABETH DEVENISH . I am the prosecutor's wife. In June, 1825, I received this money from him. I then lodged in the prisoner's house, No. 22, Bury-street - he knew I had this money, as I paid him some - the rest was in a paper; he came up to my bed-room door on the 24th of June, (I think) - I was not up, and asked who was there? he said, "It is me;" I put on my gown, went into the front room, and he said, "I have come up relative to this money, for I advise you not to keep it in the house, where there are so many lodgers, and so many persons coming;" I said, "I intend to take it to Coutts' bank;" he said, "I am going past there (to the Adelphi) in the course of the morning, and will leave it, it is not safe here;" I said,"Who is to find the money - how are they to know it is here?" he pointed to the window, and said, "How easily might a man get in there, and if any thing was to happen to the money I should cut my throat, for my regard to Mr. Devenish;" I said, "How are they to find it?" he said they would have it if they tore the carpet up; I had put it on the top of the bed, and in several places - I believe I then took it out of the chimney; he said he would take it to Coutts', and would put it there, in Mr. Devenish's name or mine, which I liked; I said I would take it myself; he said there was nothing to do but to take it there and bring me a book, and leave it in what name I thought proper; I objected to it for, I suppose, a quarter of an hour; he said he was going to a jeweller for some watches for his brother, and would leave it, and bring me the book before I was up; I at last gave him a 200l., a 100l. and a 50l. Bank note; I had 27l. in gold, which I kept back; he said, "You had better send the whole;" I said I would not - he took the notes, and came back at three o'clock to dinner - I did not see him then, but I sent down in the evening for the book - he sent up word that they would not take less than 500l. there, and he would keep it till next day, and take it into the City; I asked him about six o'clock for it - he said it was in his brother's iron chest, and he would keep it there till next day, when he would go and get me more for it in the City, by putting it into the Stocks or Bank; I told the woman with whom he lived, that evening, that upon consideration I would not have it put into the Bank next day, which was Saturday, I went into the kitchen to him, at three o'clock, and asked him for the money, as I would not have any thing done with

it; he said he had left it at his brother's, and would go and fetch it; I said, "Mr. Devenish is now up stairs, and I wish to have it immediately, as he does not know it is out of my hands;" he said he would go and get it immediately - he went out, and I did not see him again till last Thursday week, when he was apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you mean by living with the prisoner? A. I lodge there - I gave him the money in the front room; there was a gentleman in my bed at that time - I do not know his name, on my oath - I never described him as a dry-salter in the City; my husband was with me the next day - I did not tell him what I meant to do with the money; I never said I wished to put it out of my husband's way because he wasted it; or that he was a worthless and careless fellow; I told the prisoner to put it in my name, Mrs. Devenish; I have at times gone by my maiden name; I never authorized him to take it into the City; I did not go to his brother's; I indicted his brother for receiving the 50l. note this Sessions; nobody advised me to prosecute - I always intended to do it when I found the prisoner; I saw him last Thursday week in a public-house at the corner of Bury-street. I believe my husband has had 100l. back; Sarah Heale acted as landlady in the prisoner's house - I paid her the rent occasionally; I told her on Sunday morning, I did not know how to tell my husband about the money, for he would murder me; she and I went to his brother's house at two o'clock that morning - I saw my husband's receipt for the 100l.; I said I had ruined my husband, because he had sold his commission to get me out of my situation, and I would punish the prisoner whenever I found him; I went to Bow-street, and took every pains to trace him; Mr. Devenish also went to Norwich about him; I was never married but once - I have heard he had a wife living when he married me, but I am not positive of it.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found several duplicates on him, and this receipt - (read)

"Received of William Gibling, 30th Sept. 1826, 350l. being in full of all demands against William Tupman - and destroy the warrant I hold against William Tupman; (signed) James Philip Devenish, Richard Molyneaux, Thomas Cherry."

Q. Have you not seen the prisoner about within the last year? A. Yes; repeatedly.

JAMES PHILLIP DEVENISH re-examined. The signature to this receipt is mine - I only received 100l. - Gibling paid it to me - he is ostler at a livery stables; I saw him several times about thit.

Mr. ANDREWS called

WILLIAM GIBLING . I am an ostler at a livery stables, and have been there 25 or 26 years. I have known the prisoner 12 or 14 years, he keeps a house close to Mr. Bevan's stables. In June, 1825, the servant of the prosecutor came for me; I found Mr. and Mrs. Devenish there - they asked if I knew where Mr. Tupman was - I said,"No; I saw him last night, and parted with him at the corner;" I did not know what they wanted - they sent for me again in half an hour; I saw them both on the stairs - it was on a Sunday; they said they had had a great loss; I asked, what - Mrs. Devenish said she had put 350l. into Tupman's hands to take to the banker's, and they were afraid he had absconded; I said, I thought he would return in a short time; she mentioned Coutt's name to me, but nobody else; Mr. Devenish then came and asked if I had any relations at Norwich; I said, "Only an acquaintance or two;" he asked their names - I said, I did not know - he said he would find them - that he supposed he should not get half his money back. In September last, I sent for Mr. Devenish, and told him there was a great chance of his getting 100l. back; I had not seen Tupman till last September, at a house in Russell-street; I did not say I had seen him; he said he would give a receipt for the whole if he could get 100l. back; he said he would prepare a receipt, and brought a draft of it, and left it with me; we met the same day to settle it - Mrs. Devenish knew what was going on - she did not see the prisoner, but she came to me with her husband.

Q. Did you know while all this was going on, that they charged him with a robbery? A. Yes; Mrs. Devenish objected to a receipt for the full amount - but Mr. Devenish proposed this form - as soon as this was done, the prisoner appeared in his business as usual.

Mr. McDOWELL. Q. He was very much in your society? A. Yes. - I knew he was charged with a robbery; I saw him in September, and asked what he had left; he seid, 100l. - he had spent the rest; he kept out of the way till I got the receipt; I recommended Mr. Devenish to take the 100l., rather than lose all.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know that he had stolen it? A. Mrs. Devenish said she had given it him - I should not have interfered if I had known he had stolen it.

COURT. Q. She gave him the money? A. Yes, to put in the banker's.

RICHARD MOLINEAUX . I am a coach wheel-wright; I witnessed this receipt, which I should not have done if I had any idea of a robbery; I asked Mr. Devenish if he considered it a debt - he said Yes; he was willing to consider it so, or I would have had nothing to do with it.

THOMAS CHERRY . I have known the prisoner several years. I signed this receipt; I should not have witnessed it if I had any notion of a robbery.

Mr. McDOWELL. Q. Had you seen him about publicly before the receipt was signed? A. No; I know he was out of sight.

SARAH HEELE . I lived servant to the prisoner at this house. Mrs. Devenish told me on the Thursday to send Tupman up-stairs; he went up, when they were all at supper; and she told me to send him up to her; and in the morning she said, in my presence, more than once,"Be sure, Bill, you come up to me in the morning before you go out.

Mr. McDOWELL. Q. Did Tupman return at his usual hour on Saturday? A. No. He went away - I never saw him after - when he came home on Friday, I asked him what she wanted; he said she had given him 350l. to put into Coutt's bank. The truth is, I was living with him.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-209

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

212. WILLIAM ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 4 sheets, value 20s.; 1l towels, value 1ls.; 3 pillow-cases, value 3s.: 12 knife-cloths, value 3s.; 3 curtains, value 3s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; 1 ta

ble-cloth, value 5s., and one bag, value 6d., the goods of Elizabeth Monck , widow ; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s. , the goods of Eleanor Reynolds , spinster .

ELIZABETH DOWLING . I am servant to Lady Elizabeth Monck, widow, who lives at No. 18, St. James's-place . Eleanor Reynold is her cook - she had washed this linen, and, on the 29th of October, I gave it to the prisoner to take to Mrs. Haynes to be mangled; Haynes had sent her little boy with him for it; I had seen the child before - none of the property has been found.

JAMES HAYNES . I am the son of Elizabeth Haynes . I went to Lady Monck's with the prisoner, for the clothes to mangle - we were to carry them to my mother's, in Little St. James'-street - the prisoner carried them down to the bottom of St. James's-place, where I stopped to tie up my boot, and he ran off with the things; he was taken on the Monday; I knew him before.

ELIZABETH HAYNES. On Saturday, the 29th of October, I sent the prisoner and my boy for these things, but never received them - he never came to my house again.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in Gerrard-street on the 31st of October.

Prisoner's Defence. I put the bundle down to rest - a gentleman gave me a horse to hold, and the bundle was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-210

213. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 3 loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d.; 4 lbs. of flour, value 9d., and 1 bag, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Trendall ; and HENRY GODFREY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM WALTERS . On the 18th of November, about five o'clock in the morning, I was at Finchley , and saw Mr. Trendall's cart standing there - I saw Smith get on the step, and reach out three loaves and a bag of flour - he ran towards the fields; I was with him, and went with him for about a quarter of a mile, where he hid them in a hedge - we went to Godfrey, who asked if we had got any thing - we said, Yes: we had all been together, and it was agreed that I and Smith should rob the cart - we all went to the hedge; I got over, and pitched the flour over to Godfrey; I brought the bread through, gave him the quartern loaf, and Smith the two half-quarterns; Smith said, "We will have part of one;" he cut one in two - he eat one half, and I the other - Godfrey took the rest home - we were afterwards taken.

JOSEPH TRENDALL. I am a baker . I lost a four-pound, two two-pound loaves, and a bag of flour, from my cart - I was away from the cart about five minutes - the prisoner lives in the neighbourhood; I found my bag of flour, a four-pound and two two-pound loaves at Godfrey's house about an hour afterwards - here is the bag, which I know to be mine; I am convinced the bread is mine, but it was rather wet, being a damp day; Godfrey was not at home; he was taken next night; I had not seen Smith near the cart - he was taken, but nothing being found on him, he was not detained.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a constable. I went to Godfrey's, and found the bag of flour and the bread.

SUSANNAH BLAND . I live with Godfrey. I was not at home when this bread was brought there.

THOMAS SATCHELL . I apprehended Smith, but had no conversation with him.

GODFREY's Defence. There is no mark on the flour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-211

214. MARY SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 2 counterpanes, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value 1s., and 1 flannel skirt, value 1s. , the goods of Margaret Franklin , widow .

LOUISA LAWSON . I live with Margaret Franklin, who lodges at Mr. Taylor's. On the 1st of December, about three o'clock, I met the prisoner on the third flight of stairs, coming down with her apron full of clothes; I inquired who she wanted, being a stranger - she said Mrs. Taylor; I said they lived on the first-floor, not so high as that, and asked what she had got in her apron - she said only her arm; I found these articles in it, and detained her till an officer came.

MARGARET FRANKLIN. I am a widow, and lodge on the third-floor. Lawson called me; I found the prisoner on the landing, with this property, which is mine.

GEORGE JAMES JENNINGS . I am an officer, and took the property from the prisoner - it was all wet - she appeared in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-212

215. WILLIAM NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 pewter pot, value 1s., the goods of William Hidden ; 2 pewter pots, value 18d., the goods of William Reckets ; 1 pewter pot, value 9d., the goods of Richard Hockham ; and 1 pewter pot, value 9d. , the goods of Richard Simmons .

WILLIAM JONES . I am an officer. On the 6th of December I was in John-street, Grosvenor-mews, and saw the prisoner looking about a stable-window; I saw him take this quart pot, and put it under his coat - he walked to Berkley-square, where I took him, and found four more pots on him.

WILLIAM HIDDEN. I keep a public-house in Grosvenor-mews . This quart pot is mine, and was left at a customer's door.

WILLIAM RECKETS. I keep the Running Footman public-house, in Charles-street . These two pots are mine.

RICHARD HOCKHAM. This is my pot.

RICHARD SIMMONS. This is my pot.

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-213

216. ANN KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 tea-caddy, value 5s. , the goods of Elizabeth Priscella Hawton .

ELIZABETH PRISCELLA HAWTON. I am a widow , and live at No. 4, Vine-street , and keep a broker's shop . On the 7th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I received information, but was not at home.

JANE CULLAN . I live nearly opposite to Hawton. I saw the prisoner standing by her shop-window - she took this caddy; I went out, and Hawton's son secured her with it.

CHARLES HAWTON . I found the prisoner about twelve

twelve yards from my mother's house, with the caddy under her shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-214

217. THOMAS ALDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 2lbs. of butter, value 3s.; 1 chamber-pot, value 2s,, and 1 lb. of cheese, value 7d. , the goods of Robert Harvey .

ROBERT HARVEY. I keep a chandler's-shop , at Kensington . The prisoner is a private watchman about there - I spoke to my boy about some butter, and from what he said I was led to the prisoner; the constable searched his house, and a great number of things were found; the prisoner was then in custody, but I know that was his house; I missed this butter on Tuesday, and the pot and cheese some time before.

CHARLES READING . I am a constable. The prisoner is a private watchman at Kensington. I went to his room - I know it was his room; I found there this pot, butter, and cheese, with nearly a cart full of other things.

WILLIAM WITING . I have lived with Mr. Harvey two years. I do not sleep there, but serve in his shop; I have known the prisoner about three months; this pot is my master's - the prisoner asked me for it, and I gave it to him, and a great many other things; he often asked me before I gave him any thing; these are things master dealt in; I used to give them to him at master's gate, close to the shop - he asked me a long while before I gave him any thing; I never got a farthing for them - he had the butter and cheese on Monday; he paid me nothing for them; he once gave me some grapes, but nothing else; after I had given him a few things, I was frightened. This began about three months ago - he used to talk to me, and then ask me for things; I had no part of the produce; I have dined with him sometimes on a Sunday.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you come to me, and ask if I would have some tobacco and several other things? A. No; I gave him the pot at the hedge, and the butter at the gate.

Prisoner's Defence. He brought them to me; I did not steal them; he gave them to me sometimes at the gate - I asked if there was any danger - he said No, he had paid for them.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-215

218. BENJAMIN DOWNING was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of George Joseph Wilson , from his person .

GEORGE JOSEPH WILSON. On the 1st of November I was in Piccadilly , turning into St. James's-street - I felt something in my pocket, just by a board; I put my hand behind, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round, and saw the prisoner; directly he saw me, he ran; I called Stop thief! - he was stopped at the corner - nobody else was near me.

CHARLES REEVES . I am a beadle. I stood at the corner of Albemarle-street, heard a cry, and ran over, and saw the prisoner stopped at the corner of St. James's-street- the prosecutor came up, and said, "This is the man who robbed me;" I saw his right hand behind him against the shutters; I pulled his hand forward - there was nothing in it; I took him to the watch-house, and Harrison brought this handkerchief to me.

JOSEPH HARRISON . I am a patrol. I heard an alarm, ran over, and saw the prisoner drop something behind him; I looked, and it was this handkerchief; I took it up, and the prosecutor claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going into St. James's-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - this gentleman was twenty yards from me; he came up, and said he was robbed; the officer snatched this handkerchief from my hand; he said it was his; I said it was not; he could find no name on it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-216

219. THOMAS LILEY was indicted for bigamy .

FRANCES SMITH . I am sister of Elizabeth Mathews - I was present at her marriage with the prisoner on the 25th of July, 1826, at the new Mary-le-bone church - this signature to the register is mine - my sister is now alive(register read).

MARIA HASTE . I was married to the prisoner in August last , at St. Ann, Westminster - I was in the milk business ; he and I had lived together five years; we had cows of our own; he once went to sea.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-217

220 JOHN WELLINGTON and GEORGE EAST , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 2 live pigs, price 6l. , the property of John Draper ; and JOHN JACKSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN GARLAND . I am in the employ of George Shankster , of Oxford-market, a pork-butcher. On the 30th of November, the prisoners Wellington and Jackson came to my master's shop together, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening; they asked if we had pork enough for the week, and if we would buy two pigs of them; I asked what they would weigh; they said about twenty-four stone each - they wanted six guineas for the two; I inquired if they were not old ones or sows, as they were so cheap; they said, No; and I took them over to Mr. Elton's house; Wellington put his hand on a pig there, and said they would hang about that length when they were dead; they said, would I go next day and see them - I said I could not - they said they would bring them down, which they did in about an hour - Elton thought it could not be all right from the price they asked; and he asked Jackson what they were fed upon; he said he was never asked such bl-y foolish questions as that when he bought pigs; we then all went, and had a pot of ale; Wellington stood by the donkey-cart where the pigs were; but came in and drank with us; Jackson then asked if I would buy the pigs; I said I had no objection if they were all right; we then asked him how long he had had them; he said from the Monday before, this was on the Thursday; I said I did not like to have them, I thought it was not all right; we then came out of the public-house; Jackson called to Wellington to go on with the cart; Jackson then said I should not have them if I would give him 30s. more; they were very impudent; I followed them to the

back of Boston-street, where I knew they lived, as they had applied to me the week before to buy some small pigs of them; I then informed the constable; East came to the office as a witness and was taken.

JOHN DRAPER. I am a labourer , and live on Murrell-green, near Basingstoke, in Odiham parish . These pigs were stolen from me on Wednesday evening, the 29th of November; they were in my stye when I went to bed, and at seven o'clock in the morning they were gone; I received information from a gentleman, who brought down a hand-bill - I came to town last Monday, saw the pigs, and knew them to be mine; I know neither of the prisoners.

HUMPHREY ROBERTS . I am a constable. About half-past nine o'clock on the 30th of November, Garland gave Wellington and Jackson in charge with the pigs - I showed the same to Draper; I asked Jackson whose they were - he said, "What odds; they are mine, I have four more."(looking at the examination.) - This is signed by Mr. Hoskins, the Magistrate - the prisoners were examined before him (read).

"Wellington says he bought the pigs at Salisbury, and Garland has given false evidence against Jackson; East says he was with Wellington when he bought them at Salisbury, and that Jackson only took them in his cart."

ROBERT CLIFFORD . I live near Draper. On Wednesday, the 29th of November, Wellington and East came to the house I live at, as ostler, between nine and ten o'clock, with a cart, and called for a pint of beer - I did not notice what was in the cart - Wellington paid for the beer, and they ordered two pipes and a paper of tobacco; they stopped five or six minutes, and asked how far it was to Bagshot - I said twelve miles - they said they should go as far as Blackwater that night - they then left; I served them, and talked with them - I am sure they are the persons; I heard of the robbery next morning.

EDMUND LUCAS ELTON . I am a pork-butcher. On Thursday evening, the 30th of November, Garland came to me, and said he had two cheap pigs offered to him; I said that they could not be honestly come by - the prisoners then brought the pigs - I went with them to the public-house, and heard Jackson say he had had them since the Monday before.

WELLINGTON's Defence. I live at Jackson's, and hired his cart to take the pigs to Oxford-market for sale.

JACKSON's Defence. Wellington came to live with me on the 12th of November; his horse was knocked up, and his cart broker - he hired my cart to take the pigs to Oxford market, and paid me 2s.

WELLINTON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

JACKSON GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

EAST - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-218

221. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 40 lbs. weight of paper, value 10s., and 40 books, value 10s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

MESSRS. BOLLAND, BERNARD, and CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a Surveying-examiner at the Board of Excise; the prisoner was one of the fire lighter s there - it was his duty to clean the rooms previous to office hours. On the 3d of November I went to the Red-Lion inn yard, Whitechapel, with Taylor and Finlay, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - we went to the rooms No. 3, in the corner of that yard - the rooms open on a gallery, and we pass Nos. 1 and 2, to go to No. 3 - Mr. Lewis came immediately after we got there; we found these survey books in No. 3 - some of them are dated 1822, and some 1823, and these we found in No. 1 - we found these keys and some covers in No. 3 - the key unlocks a closet at the foot of the stairs, at the Excise-office, where the prisoner's articles were kept; some covers belonging to these books were found in the office of the Comptroller of cash.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was kept in the closet? A. There was some brown paper, a salt-ledger, and a survey-book - I do not recollect seeing any brushes or brooms there - he was allowed the key of it, and there he kept his paper to light his fire - I believe he has nine children - a daughter of his was taken up, but discharged.

JOHN LEWIS . I am the Surveying-general examiner. I went to the prisoner's room - there were some surveybooks and papers of 1822 and 1823 - there were some permits and covers in No. 1, of 1821, 1822, and 1823; Mr. Powell produced the books, which corresponded with these covers - there was a beer book for 1822. On Saturday, the 4th of November, I opened the cupboard, at the bottom of the stairs, in company with Foster and one of the messengers - we found this salt ledger of 1821, but it was not cut in the manner books are when they are sold - there were some tea books in a drawer, and some brown paper for lighting fires; some of the papers were strewed about the rooms, and some locked up.

MR. TAYLOR. I am first clerk in the Store-keeper's office. I went to the rooms No. 1, and No. 3. and I afterwards saw some books produced by Mr. Powell, which tallied with some books found there; I have known the prisoner ten years, and he has an honest character.

JOHN POWELL . I am a sorter of old books at the Excise-office. The last cutting of old books was those of 1821; these covers were found in the offices to which the prisoner had access.

Cross-examined. Q. How often do the Excise have sales of books? A. It used to be every three years; but it is every twenty years now.

JAMES PIERPOINT . I had the custody of these books.

WILLIAM HETHERINGTON . I attend the machine that cuts the stamps off the books, previous to their being sold, before they are regularly disposed of; these books have not been cut.

- ROWLEY . I am a ham and tongue merchant. This paper is worth 3 1/2d. or 4d. per lb. for waste.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent - my daughter must have done it unknown to me; I never saw one of the books.

GEORGE FURLONG . I went to the rooms.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you bring the prisoner and his daughter together? A. She saw him at the watch-house; and said he knew nothing of it.

- STEVENS . I belong to the Excise. The prisoner's daughter used to assist him occasionally in lighting the fires there - she is twenty-two years old.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. When did she assist? A. When he was unwell at home. GUILTY . Aged 58.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-219

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

222. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 2 coats, value 3l.; 3 pairs of pantaloons, value 2l.; 7 cravats, value 7s.; 4 collars, value 2s.; 1 jacket, value 6s.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 1l.; 1 pair of boot-trees, value, 7s.; 2 pieces of sponge, value 6d.; 1 night-cap, value 6d.; 3 waistcoats, value 3l.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 10s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 2 brushes, value 1s.; 1lb. of gunpowder, value 3s.; 1 pair of gaiters, value 1s.; 3 pairs of hose, value 3s., and 1 trunk, value 5s. , the goods of Frederick Charles Burt .

Mr. McDOWALL conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK CHARLES BURT, Esq. On the 3d of November I came from Derbyshire - I arrived in Harley-street at half-past eight o'clock, and missed my trunk, which had been fastened on the foot-board of the carriage; I saw it safe at Watford, sixteen miles from town; I found the prisoner at Mary-le-bone office, next morning, with it; I claimed it; here is all the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS INNESS . I am a watchman. On the 3d of November, at a quarter past eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in Southampton-row, with this trunk on his shoulder; I asked where he was going with it - he said,"To No. 10, Maida-vale," and that he had brought it from the White Horse Cellar, Piccadilly - but as he was not going that way, I sprang my rattle, and secured him; I took the trunk to the office, and produce it here.

WILLIAM TRODD . I was serjeant of the night, and assisted in securing him, with the trunk on his shoulder.

Prisoner's Defence. A decent dressed man hired me to carry it, and said he would give me a shilling; I said I did not know that it was the White Horse Cellar that I had brought it from; I said, "Come over to the corner where the gentleman is," but he refused.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-220

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

223. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , 1 brooch, value 12s. , the goods of Hannah Harwood .

HANNAH HARWOOD. I live with my father, in East-street, Mary-le-bone - he keeps a ham shop. On Sunday, the 22d of October, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came there, and asked for a plate of beef - I had left my brooch and a locket on a table in the shop a quarter of an hour before; I was in the kitchen when the prisoner first came in - he went out, I missed my brooch, which I have not found.

WILLIAM HARWOOD . The prisoner came into my shop, and asked for half a pound of beef, which he eat there - before he sat down I thought I heard something rattle - I turned my head, and saw my daughter's locket in his hand - he brought it and laid it on the mantel-shelf - he was quite a stranger - after he was gone, I went into the kitchen; my daughter went into the shop, then came and asked if I had seen her brooch - I said, "No, I did not know it was there" - I had locked the shop-door before I left - nobody could have come in.

PHILLIP HARVEY . I was at this shop on the 22d of October, and saw the prisoner there; and on Monday I heard of this loss: and on Tuesday I went there again - the prisoner came in and asked for a plate of soup - I said he was the person who had the brooch. The prosecutrix desired me to follow him, which I did - he went to another shop, and then to East-street, where he borrowed a barrow; I went and brought him back - he acknowledged being there, and having the beef; and afterwards said he had stolen or taken the brooch.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer, and took him into custody - he said he had stolen the brooch.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261207-221

224. ELIZABETH WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 yard of silk, value 2s.; 2 yards of calico, value 1s., the goods of John Perkins ; and 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 2 spoons, value 4s.; 3 caps, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 3s.; 1 bonnet, value 3s.; 1 box, value 6d.; 1 umbrella, value 1s.; 1 pair of pattens, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 2 shirts, value 4s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 2 towels, value 6d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 dish, value 4d.; 1 basin, value 2d.; and 1 bucket, value 1s. , the goods of James Leggett .

JOHN PERKINS. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Church-row, St. Pancrass . On Sunday, the 19th of November, Mrs. Leggett, who lodges with me, came to my room, and asked me to take the prisoner in as a lodger - we agreed - she was to sleep on a sofa-bed in the front parlour. On the, Tuesday evening following, Mr. and Mrs. Leggett went out between eight and nine o'clock. They live in the front kitchen. The prisoner soon afterwards told my wife, in my presence, that she was going out; she went out, and returned in about ten minutes; and then said she was going to have her bonnet cleaned - she went out soon after with a bonnet-box in one hand, and an umbrella in the other - she said she should return; but did not. I afterwards received information from Leggett, and next night the pawnbroker called, and shewed me some silk and other things of mine.

CHARLOTTE PERKINS . I am the wife of John Perkins. This silk is mine; it was locked up in the front-parlour, where the prisoner slept; the key was in my bed-room, which is the back-parlour. There were no marks of violence on the door - it must have been opened by a false key.

JAMES LEGGETT. I lodge at Mr. Perkins'; - the prisoner drank tea with me on the 21st of November. I and my wife went out about nine o'clock that evening. I returned about ten o'clock, and missed a hat-box and the articles stated in the indictment.

ANN LEGGETT . The prisoner came to lodge at the house on the 19th of November; - on the 21st I went out with my husband - I had been away about an hour, and had left the prisoner in the house - we missed this property.

ISAAC KEMPTON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner last Monday. I found a hat-box, umbrella, and a pair of pattens - and on her person I found fifteen duplicates.

JOHN ABITHEL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane; - on Tuesday, the 21st of November, the prisoner pawned two tea-spoons.

ELIZABETH BARTLETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cromer-street - the prisoner pawned a shawl with me.

JAMES FRANCIS THOMPSON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker; and have a remnant of silk pawned on the 21st of November by the prisoner.

JOHN BRITTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Battle-bridge. I have a remnant of calico which was pawned on the 20th of November - I cannot say who by.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I was with Kempton; I have a duplicates of this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-222

225. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 4 drinking glasses, value 4s. , the goods Henry Jacobs .

HENRY JACOBS. I am a dealer in glass , and live in Mansel-street, Goodman's-fields ; - I had employed the prisoner for a few days, and paid him 10s.; and on the 20th of November he came and asked if I had any thing for him to do - I said No; he then asked me to give him a few glasses to take out as a pattern, as he thought he could sell some. A gentleman came in, whom I went into the parlour with. I came out, and the prisoner asked the price of the glasses, and I told him; and as he was going out, the gentleman said he had robbed me - I called him back - he hesitated about returning - but I collared him - he then opened his coat and took out seven tumblers and a wine-glass, and in his breeches pocket were two wine-glasses, which I missed out of a locker; - he begged for mercy, and said it was his first offence.

JOHN BASNETT . I am a glass-cutter. I saw the prisoner in Jacobs' shop, wiping some glasses - I saw him walk from place to place, and saw him take six tumblers(three in a nest stuck together with hay) from a locker near the floor - Jacobs was then in the parlour; he came into the shop in five minutes, and the prisoner asked the price of some other glasses which he had picked out - Jacobs went into the parlour again, and the prisoner walked to the back of the counter, and fetched a goblet - Jacobs saw him, and asked what he did there; he said he was looking out another goblet, and asked the price of some on the counter - he then asked the weight of two, which was told him; he said he could not believe it, and went and weighed them; at this time I saw him take something out of a nest, and put into his pocket - he walked up, weighed the tumbler, and said it was very good - he took a wine-glass, and put it into his pocket; I heard it knock against the others in his pocket - Jacobs returned into the shop; the prisoner had two weights in his hand; he put them down, and packed up some ale-glasses and goblets which he had looked out on the counter - he was going out, and I said he had something in his pocket; Jacobs called him back and said, "Let me look at those things you have got;" he said, "What things? I have none but what you know of;" Jacobs then said to me, "What was it my son spoke about?" I said, "A gross of wines" - the prisoner had then got into the shop - Jacobs seized him, and found this glass on him; he begged him, for Heaven's sake, to let him go; when the officer came, Jacobs loosened his hold, and he ran out into the Tenter-ground - I pursued, and saw him taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I had bought some glasses at a sale - I went and looked out the pattern glasses: I have the same coat on, and there is no pocket in it; he sent me into the warehouse himself.

HENRY JACOBS. I do not know that he was in the warehouse - the glasses were in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-223

226. CHARLES LESSING was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 work-box, value 11s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Cameron .

MARY WATKINS . I live at Charles Cameron's, a cabinetmaker , in Dorrington-street, Clerkenwell . On the 4th of August, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to look at some work-boxes; he chose two, and said they were to be sent to Sadler's Wells, and he would meet the person there, and send one of them back, and the money for the other - I put them into a handkerchief, and Charles Cameron, Jun., took them; his cousin went with him - he returned in an hour with one box, but no money - I am sure of his person; he wanted me once before to send some goods out.

CHARLES CAMERON, JUN. I am the prosecutor's son - I went with the boxes, and when I got near Sadler's Wells, I met the prisoner; he told me to sit down on the steps of a door; to give him one box, and his mother would call on Saturday and pay for it, and bring the handkerchief - I saw him knock at three doors, but he did not go in - I lost sight of him after he knocked at the third door.

ANDREW LLOYD . William Reed (who is not here) apprehended the prisoner - the box has not been found.

CHARLES CAMERON . I missed a work-box from my shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Mr. Trueman's to attend a sale, and a person told me to buy a work-box; I went to Cameron's, and took it to the house of the person who wanted it - I left it there, and told the lad that the lady would call in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-224

227. THOMAS GOULDEN and GEORGE BETHELL were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 6 lbs. of ham, value 5s. , the goods of William Yale .

Bethell pleaded GUILTY . - Whipped and Discharged .

JAMES MEDLEYCOTT . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 8th of December I met the prisoners about one hundred yards from Mr. Yale's shop; Goulden had this ham in his hands, partly concealed under his coat; Bethell had nothing; Goulden said it belonged to Bethell, who said, after hesitating, that he got it from a shop over the way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How was it concealed? A. Under his coat, and wrapped in a cloth.

WILLIAM YALE . This ham is mine; I saw the two prisoners looking through my window, and drove them away about seven o'clock - about nine Medleycott came, and I missed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your window down? A. Yes; it was about five feet from the door; I was in the parlour.

GOULDEN's Defence. I met this boy - we went in toge

ther - he went over, and returned with this ham, and told me to put it under my coat.

GOULDEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-225

228. ROBERT GEE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 live pig, price 30s. , the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I live in Anchor-hope-alley , and am a baker . On the 1st of December, when I opened my shop, my pig ran out after my boy into the street; I afterwards missed it - I kept it in a shed.

JOHN SMITH . I live next door to the prosecutor. On the 4th of December, the prisoner borrowed a knife and gamble of me, saying he was going to kill a pig - he returned them in the afternoon.

ELIZABETH MASTERS . I live in Love-lane, near Smith's back premises. On the 1st of December I met the prisoner driving a pig from Smith's; I knew it to be Smith's house-pig - it wanted to return - he would not let it; I have seen him about with a dog-cart, and some trotters; I am certain of him.

JAMES WHITE . I took him in charge - Masters said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I borrowed the knife to kill a pig for Mr. Gardener at the Globe public-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-226

229. RACHAEL ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 tea-board, value 3s., the goods of Margaret Phillips ; and 1 sheet, value 2s. , the goods of Susannah Weetman .

MARGARET PHILLIPS. I am a widow , and live at Shadwell . The prisoner came to my house on the 2d of December, and slept there two nights - on the 4th of December she said she was going to a situation; on that evening I went out, and on my return she was gone: I missed the tea-board and sheet: the sheet was Weetman's - it was dirty in the cupboard that morning; the tea-board was mine, and hung in the room at tea time.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner on the 6th of December, and found on her duplicates for the sheet and tea-board - the pawnbroker delivered me the tea-board up.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker. This sheet was pawned with me; I cannot say who by, but I gave the person this duplicate.

SUSANNAH WEETMAN. This sheet is mine - I gave it to Phillips to wash.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were three other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18261207-227

230. JAMES CAPES was indicted for stealing, on the the 2d of December , 1 sack, value 2s.; 10 lbs. of hair, value 8s., and 125 bullock and cow-horns, value 4l. , the goods of Thomas Green .

WILLIAM MERRY . I am a constable. Last Saturday week, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Ball-yard, Golden-lane; I stopped him, and asked what he had got in his sack - he said cow-hair, which he got from his master, Mr. Page, and, in consequence of what I heard, I went to Mr. Kember.

JAMES MINGARD . I am a lamp-lighter, and live in Ball-yard. About a month ago I saw the prisoner coming out of a shed there, with a bag or sack on his back; I could not see what was in it - he carried it to his own room; I went, and saw it was a quantity of bullocks' horns - he afterwards told me he had got them from Green's shed, and was going to take them to Mr. Kember's.

WILLIAM KEMBER . I am an ivory comb-maker. I remember buying a few horns of the prisoner - he left a sample one day, the beginning of November, when I was out.

THOMAS GREEN. I deal in horns and hair . I missed some hair last Monday, and the Wednesday before, and at other times, from my shed; it was in two sacks, and both sacks were gone; I believe the hair in this sack to be mine; it is of the same description, and the bag I believe to be mine; I have not found the other - this has the initials of the person I bought the hair of - it was safe about four months ago; I think I saw it three weeks ago - the man I hire the shed of ought to mind it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18261207-228

231. MARY CROCHETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 3 pairs of pattens, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Walter Pitman .

JAMES RICHARDSON . I live in Whitecross-place , and am shopman to Walter Pitman, a shoemaker . Between three and four o'clock, on the 1st of December, I heard the clanking of pattens; I saw the prisoner pass the window - I pursued, and took her with these pattens.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I took her in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261207-229

232. WILLIAM BANBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 3 live tame ducks, price 7s. , the property of James Elms .

MATTHEW ELMS . I am the son of James Elms, of Heston . On the 7th of December Giddens came, and said somebody was killing the ducks; I went to the place, and the man was gone; I went in pursuit, and found the prisoner under a hedge, with these ducks tied in a brown handkerchief, he was stooping down; he then ran, and I after him - he jumped into the canal, and there he left the ducks - some women in a tow-boat raked them out - they did not sink; I took the prisoner, and asked how he came to take them - he said he did it through want - he was about a hundred yards from my father's, when I saw him.

JONATHAN GIDDENS . I saw the prisoner in a meadow, near Mr. Elms', at Heston, North-hyde - he was killing the ducks in the meadow; I gave an alarm - Elms' son and I went in pursuit to the canal side, and I heard him flounce into the water - he is the man who took the ducks - he carried them about half-way across the canal in his month, and there left them.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man get over the hedge with the ducks - he ran away, and I took them up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18261207-230

233. THOMAS CALLINDER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 2 sixpences, 12 penny pieces,

15 half-pence, and 1 farthing, the monies of William Allibone , his master .

WILLIAM ALLIBONE. I am a baker . The prisoner was in my service - on the 22d of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning. I went to give change for 1s., and there was only 3 1/2d. in the till; I fetched a constable, who found this money; the prisoner confessed that he took it from the till - his brother desired me to prosecute.

JOHN ALEXANDER COX . I am headborough. The prosecutor told the prisoner if he would say where the money was, he would forgive him, but he would not; I took him to the watch-house, and, about nine o'clock in the evening, he said I should find it under the coals, which I did.

Prisoner. The other boy took it, and gave it to me.

- CALLINDER . I am the prisoner's brother; I told the prosecutor if he got a slight punishment, I did not care if he prosecuted - he told me his other boy had robbed him.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-231

234. MARY SULLIVAN and THOMAS BURGESS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 hat, value 2s., the goods of John Henry Hoskyns , from his person .

JOHN HENRY HOSKYNS. I live in Cirencester-place, Fitzroy-square. I was in St. Giles , about twelve o'clock, on the 4th of December - Sullivan came up, forced her arm into mine, and asked me to go home with her, which I declined - we went on till I came to a turning, and there I broke from her - she ran at me, took my hat off, and kicked me violently in the groin; I seized her - her shawl came off; I said, "My good woman, I have no vindictive feeling - give me my hat, and I will give you your shawl"- Burgess then came up, and said if I did not give her the shawl, he would rip my*** open; I have not found it.

WILLIAM CHURCHILL . I saw Burgess with the hat - Sullivan was in a line with him; the prosecutor was there, but I could not hear what was said - Burgess covered the hat with the shawl.

MAURICE LEONARD . I am a watchman. I heard a cry, ran up, and saw the prisoners, who had passed my box together about five minutes before I ran up; I did not see the hat, he was quite sober.

SULLIVAN's Defence. He was in liquor, and wanted to take liberties with me - he pulled my shawl off, and his hat fell off - I saw nothing of it afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-232

235. MARY HARRIS and MARGARET KEEF were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 half-crowns, 8 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Paul Hall , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-233

236. ELIZABETH BURGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 seal, value 12s.; 1 key, value 3s., and 1 chain, value 3d., the goods of Edward Bell , from his person .

EDWARD BELL. I am master of the York packet . On the 12th of November I was at the Coach and Horses public-house, Shadwell, and saw the prisoner there about seven o'clock in the morning - I spoke to her, but went no where with her, on my oath.

Q. Look at this; is it your writing? A. Yes; (looking at his deposition) I signed this; but on my oath I went no where with her - she took my watch from me in the street - I do not know in what street - it was a quarter of a mile from the public-house; she had walked after me, but not with me; she took my watch in an alley, and I ran after her - it was produced before the Magistrate.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not take me to the Coach and Horses, and give me a glass of spirits? A. I believe I did treat her - I received the watch-chain from the landlord of the Coach and Horses.

GEORGY DEVERELL . I received this watch from Ayer on the Monday; there was no seal or key to it; she said she had given the girl 2s. for it, and it belonged to her husband.

MARGARET AYER . I am the wife of Henry Ayer . On the 12th of November the prisoner brought a watch to me, which I gave to Deverell - she owed me 3s. 6d. for victuals - I would not trust her any more, and she said she would leave this watch - that it was her husband's, who was dead - she had a man with her - they both dined at my house.

BASIL SANDS . I am a waiter at the Coach and Horses - I found a watch, chain, seal, and key, under a seat where the prisoner had sat with another woman and boy, on the 12th of November, about four o'clock; I saw the prosecutor with her, between seven and eight o'clock that morning; he was not sober; he had been in the house the night before; my master took his watch, and returned it to him in the morning; the prisoner came in at three o'clock with another woman and a boy, and had a pint of beer; she told my master she was charged with stealing the watch.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had spent the evening with her, and given her the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-234

237. ELIZABETH HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 2 sheets, value 6s.; a counterpane, value 4s.; 1 looking-glass, value 2s., and 1 flat-iron, value 1s., the goods of George Read , in a lodging room .

MATILDA READ . I am the wife of George Read, who lives in Orchard-street, Westminster . On the 22d of November I let the prisoner a furnished room. She left on the 2d of December without notice; I went up that day for my rent; as she was not there, I got a constable to break the door open; I missed an iron, a looking-glass, a counterpane, and a pair of sheets, which were let with the room.

LEONARD NEED . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this sheet with me on the 27th of November.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I apprehended the prisoner on the 2d of December, and found a duplicate of this sheet on her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. All she says is false, except about the sheets, which I intended to get back: I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-235

283. HENRY MARLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 169 lbs. weight of lead, value 20s., the

goods of George Watkins, the younger , and fixed to a building of his .

TIMOTHY COLTMAN . I am a watchman at Mr. Watkins' premises, Henry-street, Lambeth . On the 8th of December, at six o'clock in the evening, I was alarmed by one of the workmen; we got on the top of the house with a ladder, and found the prisoner there, with this roll of lead by his side; it appeared fresh cut; he had two knives; I did not know him before; it is an unfinished house.

GEORGE WATKINS. I belong to this house - this lead was on the roof - the prisoner is a stranger.

THOMAS WOOD . I am headborough. I received the prisoner in charge with the lead; I found two knives and two keys on him; the lead fits, what is left on the house, exactly.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm, and got into the house with others.

TIMOTHY COLTMAN. There was nobody but him there; he was laying in the gutter.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261207-236

FIFTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

239. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 pair of boots, value 1l., the goods of David Davis ; and 1 hammer, value 1s.; 1 knife, value 4d.; 1 rasp, value 1d.; 1 stamp, value 6d.; a pair of pincers, value 1d.; and a brush, value 1d. , the goods of William Rushton .

ANN DAVIS . I am the wife of David Davis, and worked with Mr. Rushton, in New Tothill-street - the prisoner also worked with me as a shoemaker ; I gave him some boots and shoes to sell on the 6th of November - he took these boots with him, and never returned.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am an officer. I was sent for on the 10th of November; I found the prisoner with Rushton's property, in Lilley-street, Saffron-hill.

WILLIAM RUSHTON. I am in the 1st regiment of Guards ; I had these tools at Davis's; - we at times borrow each other's tools.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261207-237

240. SOPHIA ZEALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 coat, value 8s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 2s. the goods of John Marchant .

JOHN MARCHANT. I live in Dartmouth-street, Westminster . The prisoner lodged in my house on the 6th of November. I missed my coat and trousers from my bed-room; the prisoner was at the office on some other charge; and she directed us to the pawnbroker; her husband is a butcher.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am an officer. I was taking the prisoner to Tothill-fields. I made her no promise or threat; but she told me this property was pawned at Stocks and Co.'s; I went there next day with Marchant, and found them.

LEONARD GEORGE NEEDS . I live with Stocks and Co. Tothill-street, Westminster. I have a coat and trousers which were pawned by a woman, on the 6th of November, in the name of Maria Watts .

Prisoner's Defence. I said I thought they were there. He said he would give me 2s. to tell him where they were; I saw a person coming out of the room with them, but I did not take them.

JOHN LANGLEY. It is false. She told me she had pawned them, but had lost the duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another Indictment against the Prisoner.

Reference Number: t18261207-238

241. JAMES WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 stove, value 16s. , the goods of Edward Hill Friend .

JOHN GANT . I am servant to Edward Hill Friend, a tinman , of Seven Dials . This stove stood at his door on the 9th of December, about 12 o'clock at night. I saw the prisoner at the window a quarter of an hour before it was taken: - he went on - then returned, and took it; - my master ran after him. I knew him before.

EDWARD HILL FRIEND. I saw the prisoner take the stove, and secured him with it.

THOMAS SPEED . I am a watchman, and took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it belonged to any body.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined One Month and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18261207-239

242. SAMUEL YELDHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 3 sheets, value 12s.; 9 shirts, value 2l.; 4 table cloths, value 2l.; 8 napkins, value 8s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 12s.; 11 cravats, value 11s.; 1 pillow-case, value 2d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; a pair of drawers, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 4 towels, value 4d., and 2 night-caps, value 2d. , the goods of James Wood .

JAMES WOOD. I am a coachman , and live at Lisson-grove. I had two or three bundles, one of which contained this property, in a cart; it could not have fallen out - I was in Upper York-street about half-past five o'clock; a woman said there was a bundle gone; I turned and saw a person running with it in his arms about ten yards off; I jumped out of the cart, called Stop thief! and he threw it down; the prisoner was taken in two or three minutes - I believe he is the person - he begged I would forgive him, for the sake of his mother and family; he said he would give me half a sovereign to let him go.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Were these things for your wife to wash? A. Yes - it was getting dark.

WALTER COTTON . I saw the prisoner running - a butcher caught at him, but did not secure him - I ran and took him; he said, "For God's sake, Mr. Cotton, do not stop me, I have got nothing;" three or four persons came up, and said he had robbed a cart - I detained him; his family are respectable; I am sorry to see him here, for he bore a very good character.

MARY WHEELER . I saw a young man with a bundle - he threw it down on a cry of Stop thief! being raised.

ELIZABETH HEWIT . I saw the bundle taken, but am not certain of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man take the bundle; be

fore I touched it a man took it up, and as a chaise was coming, I ran.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261207-240