Old Bailey Proceedings, 26th October 1826.
Reference Number: 18261026
Reference Number: f18261026-1

SESSIONS PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM VENABLES , MAYOR.

EIGHTH SESSION, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 26th of OCTOBER, 1826, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET, AND J. LIMBIRD, STRAND.

1826.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM VENABLES , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; and Robert Waithman , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; William Thompson , Esq.; John Key , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

James White ,

John Rice ,

James Shepherd ,

John Chs. Horn ,

Wm. Johnson ,

James Scott ,

Richard Hatfield ,

John Hodson ,

John Slater ,

Wm. Hen. Bruce ,

Robert Seaton ,

Edward Hickson .

Second

John Richards ,

Thomas Shelton ,

John Sutton ,

Robert Beverley ,

Wm. Walker ,

Geo. M'Dermot ,

James Corrock ,

Thomas Thorp ,

Ralph Elam ,

George Hurd ,

Wm. White ,

John Barber .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Edward Ford ,

John R. Edwin ,

Joseph Emmerton ,

Joseph Dossett ,

James Day ,

John Claverley ,

Charles Champion ,

Charles Fothergill ,

Samuel Froggett ,

James Buckland ,

Thomas Bell ,

James Bethell .

Second

George Allen ,

Wm. Dennis ,

Thomas Cummins ,

Samuel Barrow ,

John Barlow ,

Thomas Cantner ,

Wm. Dove ,

John Gurchin ,

Robert Butts ,

John Charrington ,

Joseph Foot ,

Wilmer Harris .

Third

Richard Aldersey ,

John Barber ,

James Barrett ,

Charles Alsiger ,

Thomas Haywood ,

Jonas Hahm ,

Joseph Burrell ,

Thos. L. Brown ,

John Haywood ,

John Bull ,

Wm. Dunn ,

George Deane .

Fourth

Isaac Alexander ,

Robert Dodson ,

Wm. Hare ,

Geo. Greenwood ,

Thomas Gilbert ,

Thomas Fulham ,

Wm. H. Fredgley ,

Thomas Crook ,

George Cook ,

Joseph Curtis ,

John Exley ,

Nicholas Bartlett .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 26, 1826.

VENABLES, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18261026-1

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Park.

1794. JAMES SHAYS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of James Thurston, about two o'clock in the night of the 11th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing 5 sets of harness, value 16l.; 1 saddle, value 10s., and 4 bridles, value 30s. , the goods of the said James Thurston .

RICHARD MAYHEW . I am a watchman of Wellington-street, St. Luke's. On Monday morning, the 12th of December, about four o'clock, Cleaver gave me information; I went in search of some persons - I found the door of Mrs. Cale's stable open; I met a man at the door, and as I went in, another man came out - they both said they belonged to the place; the first man started off - I believe that was Dolphin. I collared the other man, and gave him to Yoxall; I believe that man was the prisoner; I found three more men in the stable; they escaped, leaving five sets of harness there.

JOHN YOXALL . I am a watchman. Mayhew delivered a person into my care; it was not the prisoner, but proved to be the son of Mrs. Cale - his mother came out, and said I had got the wrong man. I never saw the prisoner; this was on Monday morning, between four and five o'clock, on the 12th of December.

ELIZABETH CALE . The stable in question belongs to me - I let it to the prisoner and Crook; he kept a pony there; they had it about four months; Crook continued to keep his horse there for four or five weeks after; I gave them the key on Sunday night, as they said they were going to market early. I went to bed at ten o'clock, and was awoke about four; I heard the cart come into the stable, and heard persons talking - I had heard the cart drive out at night, and in the morning, when the alarm was given, Shays came out of the gate with a lantern, and an old man(who has been tried) came out with him - Shays asked me what was the matter; I said that was best known to himself; he said, "Did not I take this shed of you?" the watchman came round, and Shays ran off, with the lantern in his hand. My son is in the country - he was at Watford when the other men were tried.

An accomplice, named Alderton, who was admitted as evidence on the part of the Crown, was not in attendance. Several other witnesses, on being called, simply stated they could give no evidence as to the prisoner being concerned in this offence.

RICHARD CROOK . I am a servant at the gas-works. - On Sunday, the 11th of September, the prisoner applied to me, and said he wanted to move a few things early in the morning, for a young man he was acquainted with, and asked me to lend him my pony and cart, which we had formerly bought together, but it was then mine - I lent it him; the cart was kept in Europa-place, and the pony in this stable; I gave him the key of the stable, and Mrs. Cale gave me the key of the outer gate - he was dressed in blue trousers, a black waistcoat, and a green coat - he lived in the same house as me, and did not come home till four or five o'clock that morning; he slept with me.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not with me when the people came to hire the cart? A. A young man called on him that morning, but what about I do not know.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a constable. On the morning of the robbery I found two hats in a garden adjoining the stable - Alderton claimed one, and it is said the other belongs to the prisoner, but it has been mislaid.

JAMES THURSTON. I live in Southampton-mews, in the parish of St. Pancras . On Monday morning, the 12th of December, I found my stables had been robbed - they join my dwelling-house, and open into the same yard, which is shut and locked up at night; a door leads from my house into the yard; nobody but my family have access to the yard. I missed this property from the harness-room at five o'clock - the room was not locked, but the gates were. I afterwards found the harness at Worship-street - it was given to me; I have not got it here - it is the same I lost that night, and worth 16l.

GEORGE WATERS . I found the harness in Cale's stable. Mr. Thurston claimed it at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery. I got the horse and cart from two people - Crook was with me when they came, and drank some porter with us. I was at home, supping with him, at eleven o'clock.

RICHARD CROOK . I had some porter with him and two men; I think Smith, who was tried here, was one of them - I was in bed by ten o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-2

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1795. EDWARD MALTBY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 2 geldings, price 200l. , the property of John McCurdy .

MAJOR JOHN McCURDY. I reside in Cecil-street, Strand.

In September last year I was in possession of a pair of carriage geldings - I had bought them of the prisoner in the month of June, for 150l., but I had exchanged one, and paid him 25l. more - in the first instance I kept them about six months - he called on me subsequently, in consequence of my having commenced and action against him to recover the money I had paid for the horses, as they were unsound; he called and asked why I had commenced the suit - I told him to get the consideration back which I had paid for the horses; he asked what I was paying for their keep; I said 10l. a month - he offered to keep them for half that sum in his own stable; I agreed that they should be kept in his stable, and I was to pay him 5l. a month; he said it would take at least three weeks to get them in selling order; I told him to keep them in his stable, and not sell them at all, but if he found a purchaser to come and let me know. I went to his stable three days after, and they were entirely gone. I applied at the office, and did not wish to press the felony, but was advised to go before the Grand Jury, and they found a bill for the felony. The prisoner said he had sold one of them - I authorised him to look out for a purchaser, but not to sell them.

Q. You named a price between the proposed purchaser and yourself? A. Yes - but it was to remain subject to my approbation.

Q. He sold them without consulting you? A. That is what he said immediately he was asked about it - I believe it was some months before the officer found him. - When he had the horses I told him I was going abroad, and wished him to find a purchaser as soon as he could; he said their coats were very rough, and it would take three weeks to get them in selling order.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How long did you keep the horses before one was exchanged? A. Probably two months - the two were 150l.; I paid 25l. more on making the exchange; I brought an action to recover all the money I had paid; I had not then sent back the horses - he called on me, about a week perhaps, after the action was brought; it might be about January, but I do not recollect dates - another person called with him, whose name I do not know; the prisoner asked why I brought the action - I replied that I had done it in a delicate way, by merely giving him a copy of a writ.

COURT. Q. What has become of that action? A. I believe it is still pending.

MR. PLATT. Q. In January, when the prisoner and Mr. Shaw called, was there any agreement that he was to have back the horses and the action be dropped, and he was to pay a sum of money? A. No; there was an agreement that if he paid me 110l. I was to drop the action - he would keep the horses in that case.

Q. You got a warrant, and the Magistrate said if he had heard the whole of the case before you should not have had the warrant? A. No - he said he did not think it a case of felony, but a gross fraud, and advised me to go before the Grand Jury; I went as soon as I heard that they sat - I went and told the same story as I have now.

Q. From January to September did you not know a Grand Jury were sitting? A. I went the first time the officer told me they were sitting; he had promised to let me know - the officer was some months finding him; it might be about January that I got the warrant. I might have seen him at Bow-street, probably, about a week after the warrant was issued - I have no memorandum of the date; I think it was a fortnight after; I have not seen the prisoner since he was before Sir Richard Birnie till to-day; I directed the officer to his stables in King's Head-yard, Russell-street - I cannot tell how long it was before he was apprehended.

Q. In January, when the agreement was made about the 110l., the horse had got out of condition, from not being used? A. Yes; I said, "You are to pay me before I give you any title to them." I suppose I was to pay for their keep. If he had paid me 100l., I should have given him a bill of sale, and I suppose I should have had no. thing to pay for their keep - he had no authority to sell them. I never wished to charge him capitally.

Q. On what day was the 110l. to he paid? A. I told him I was going abroad, and if he brought 110l. he might have the horses - no agreement as to time was made.

Q. Was not a time fixed? A. A person called and said he would pay it in a week or two.

COURT. Q. Was there a subsequent application for further time? A. Not that I recollect; a person called once or twice, and had several conversations about them before I delivered the horses, but after I delivered them no person called.

MR. PLATT. Q. You are quite sure of it? A. I am, for two days after I delivered them I went to the stable, and they were gone.

Q. Do you mean to swear no person called between January and September, and requested an extension of time? A. They called several times between January and September. From the time the horses were delivered till this hour no person has called, but prior to the delivery they did call for an extension of time; they asked if I would trust Mr. Maltby, and take his bill for time - I refused. I told Mr. Shaw I brought the action to bring Maltby to terms.

Q. If you had received the 110l. this indictment would never have been preferred? A. Yes, it would - I would never have received the 110l. after my horses were taken in the manner they were, for I never considered them sold.

- LEADBETTER. I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner first in January, by a warrant which Mr. Halls delivered to me - I executed it four or five days after - I was present at his examination, and he was discharged; Major McCurdy desired me to let him know when the Grand Jury sat, but I was in France, and had no opportunity of letting him know. Some time before last Session I sent him word when they would sit, and after they had broken up I saw him; he said he had been before them, and from what they said, he had no doubt they would find the bill. I expected the indictment was for a fraud - I examined the books, and found no bill returned; I went and told the prosecutor - he said he was indicted for felony; I then got a warrant on a certificate of indictment, and apprehended him in about a fortnight; I had frequently met him prior to that time, but in that fortnight I had been looking for him, but could not find him; I went to an acquaintance of his, and told him to appoint him to meet me, and he came in consequence of that appointment.

Cross-examined. Q. You had seen him frequently be

fore? A. Yes - I knew him and he knew me; I had met him in Piccadilly, and said, "You may depend on it the Major will indict you" - "Oh!" said he, "I don't mind that."

JOHN ROGERS . I am a commercial agent, and live in Sloane-street. I was at Major McCurdy's when the prisoner came there on business; it was in the summer, about May I suppose; I had breakfasted with him; in fact I was present when 25l. was paid, respecting the exchange of horses, and on the time in question the prisoner entered the room, and wished to know the cause of proceedings relative to the horse; the prosecutor said, "Why, you have been out of the way, and I have taken steps to meet with you, as I am not satisfied with the horses;" Maltby said he did not know he had given them a character which they did not deserve - that he was unable at that time to refund the money; the Major said, "Money is not particularly an object to me - you must pay me 110l. and have them back;" he said he had called to solicit time for the payment; the Major said he could not give him time, as he was going to America - Maltby said he had been to the stables and seen the horses, and they were in bad condition; the Major said he could not help that, he had not used them for a long time, and said, "Pay me a hundred guineas for them, and I will give you possession" - he said he could not, but if he would let him take the hores he would pay him in a few days, as he should be able to get them in condition, and raise the money; I said"Major, you must not part with them to Mr. Maltby, as he has not acted correct with you - you should not part with possession;" Maltby replied, "Oh! Sir, I don't mean the Major to give me possession - I don't wish to exercise any right of ownership over them - I merely wish to get them in condition for sale, that I may dispose of them, and so be able to pay the Major, and I shall be able to keep them at less than the Major now pays;" the Major said, "If you can get a purchaser, recommend that person to me - I have no objection to your doing it, but I do not part with my horses till I have received 110l.;" Maltby said, certainly he meant nothing more than that, and he need not fear trusting him with them.

MR. PLATT called the following witnesses.

CHARLES GIBLING . I was in the prisoner's service in June last year, when these horses were sold to Major McCurdy - one of them was afterwards changed, and after that I received an order from the Major to get the horses from Mr. Morton - I went and got them - they were much reduced, and out of condition. My master kept the King's Head stables, near Covent-garden, and carried on business there till September last, and resided over the water; he was at the stables every day if anybody wanted him.

WILLIAM MORTON . I keep livery-stables, and received an order to deliver these horses to Gibling - I produce the order - (read.)

To Mr. Morton. - Sir, please to deliver to Mr. Maltby the horses you have been keeping on my account, and I will pay you the small balance since last account when you send it. 19th November, 1825. J. McCURDY.

WILLIAM SHAW . I am an accountant, About October or November last I waited on Major McCurdy respecting an action between him and the prisoner; I asked his reason (by Maltby's direction) for bringing the action after keeping the horses so long; he said he only meant it as a notice, and if Maltby was willing to come forward, and give him 100l. or one hundred guineas for the horses, he would take it; I said from what Maltby had said I thought it would not be in his power, but I would mention it - he said Maltby had better wait on him, and he would settle it with him; I communicated this conversation to Maltby. I saw the prosecutor again three weeks or a month after; the horses had then been delivered back, and I requested the Major would wait one week longer, understanding the time had expired for payment for the horses, and after a great deal of hesitating he consented to do it - he said he understood the horses were sold.

Q. And he consented to give a week from that time? A. He did - he said he would give him a week, but it was to be perfectly understood he did not forego the action till the money was paid. I always found the prisoner at his stables when I went.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-3

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1796. JOHN JONES, alias WILLIAM BRYAN , was indicted for that, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, at Justice-hall, in the Old Bailey, on the 16th of February last, John Jones was in due form tried and convicted upon an indictment against him for felony, and was thereupon ordered to be transported for the term of seven years; and the said John Jones, alias William Bryan, afterwards, to wit, on the 30th of September , at St. John, Clerkenwell, was at large, without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term, for which he was so ordered to be transported, against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting to set out the Justices' names and indictment, before whom, and upon which, he had been before convicted.

JAMES HARRIS . I am principal turnkey of Newgate, and produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction for felony, on the 16th of February last, which I saw Mr. Shelton sign. [The certificate of the prisoner's conviction and sentence, as set out in the indictment, was here put in and read.] I know the prisoner - he was in custody and tried last February Session, on the indictment which has been read; he was moved on the 8th of March, to the Leviathan hulk, at Portsmouth-dock-yard; I saw him safely deposited there. He went by the name of John Jones in Newgate - I am positive he is the man. I saw him again on the 2d of October, when he was committed to Newgate on another charge.

WILLIAM GOULDING . I know the prisoner: I first knew him on the 30th of September, by the name of William Bryan - I saw him in my master's shop, No. 7, St. John-street; he came to ask if we had any buck-horn-hooks to sell - I am sure he is the man. My master is a cutler.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was transported it was merely for a petty thing, taking a bit of meat for my children; I was in great distress. I had left a wife and five children, and having opportunities and offers made to me to escape, I at last did escape, and came to see my family. The meat only cost 2s. 7d., - it was a hard thing to send a man out of the country.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Reference Number: t18261026-4

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1797. JOHN LEWIS and KEZIAH HIS WIFE were indicted for that they, on the 31st of July , being in the dwelling-house of John Farrant , feloniously did steal 1 violin, value 1l., and 1 hat, value 3s., his property; and having committed the said felony, afterwards, to wit, on the same day, about two o'clock in the night, the same dwelling-house burglariously did break and get out of the the same .

JOHN FARRANT. I have been blind twenty-seven years, and get my living by playing on the violin. In July last I lived at No. 20, Dock-street, Commercial-road ; I rented the house - it has only two rooms below and two above; I lived on the ground-floor, and let John and Keziah Lewis the front room up stairs, at 2s. 6d. a week; they came on the 27th of July, and remained till Monday, the 31st - they were in my apartment all day on Sunday; they dined and drank tea with me - they had 1s., and paid me 1s. for rent; I gave them 2s. 10d., and we were to spend the day together. I remained with them till twelve o'clock, when I laid down for a few minutes, and got up, as my little boy was very ill; I went to bed again, and between that time and half-past four o'clock this robbery was committed. I kept my violin in the bed-room, which has not a good lock to it. I got up between four and five o'clock, being restless, and asked the male prisoner if he would get up and sit with me a little while, as my little boy was ill, but I could not discover that anybody was in their room; nobody answered me. I walked to the street door, which I had bolted, and found it unbolted; I then went to my bed-room cupboard, and felt that the violin was gone; I called up my two little boys, one of whom if fourteen years old, and sent him to Nash - I asked my boy to give me my hat - he gave me one which I knew was not my own; my own hat and violin were gone, with the case and bow; I have not had any of them delivered back to me. I had bolted my front door when I went to bed; the back room up stairs was rented by a window and her three children - she was gone to bed when I fastened the door. The prisoners were apprehended about two months afterwards. John Lewis was to have gone with me on the Monday to Chatham races.

JAMES ABRAHAM NASH . I am a labourer. I know the prosecutor and the prisoners. I have seen a hat which was found in the prosecutor's room - I know it to be John Lewis', by the sewing on it; Farrant has worn it since, having no other - here it is; I know Lewis wore it previous to the robbery - I have seen him wear it all the time he lodged there.

OBADIAH BULL . I apprehended the prisoners on the 20th of September, in Cock-alley, Norton-falgate. I found nothing at their lodging.

JOHN LEWIS' Defence. I have only to say I am not accustomed to wear hats in general, but generally wear caps(producing a fur cap), being a strolling player. I know nothing of the robbery.

JAMES ABRAHAM NASH . I never saw him wear such a cap as that - I always saw him in a hat.

JOHN LEWIS - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

KEZIAH LEWIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1798. FRANCIS EDESON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Sanders , spinster , on the King's highway, on the 26th of September , at St. Pancras, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 8 yards of lace, value 8s.; 2 yards of net, value 2s., and 3 shillings , her property.

ANN SANDERS. I am single, and am servant to a gentleman at Kentish-town. On the 26th of September, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was returning home from Holborn - I was alone; it was dark, and not very moon-light, and in the Back-road, by Camden-town - I was going over the bridge in the road, and met the prisoner - he came up, and said, "Your money or your life;" he came from the opposite side of the road; I said I had no money - he said I had, and he would have it; he did not swear at me. I was examined at Hatton-garden. He merely said, "You have, and I will have it."

Q. Did he never say, "D-n you, I will have it?" A. After that he did - he then snatched a paper parcel out of my hand, containing eight yards of lace, and two yards of net; he took 3s. in money out of my left hand - he opened my hand by force, and took it - he then took hold of me with both his hands, then let go with his right-hand, and took a knife from his left-side pocket, held it in his hand, and said if I did not give up what money I had got, he would kill me - it was not a case-knife, nor a clasp one, but a long one, like a butcher's - he held me a few minutes, and then let me go, as I heard footsteps. I was a good deal frightened - my shawl came off one shoulder with his holding me.

Q. How long did this last? A. About ten minutes; I could see him by the light which came from the lodgegate - he appeared to be dressed in dark clothes, with a rough light great coat; he appeared to be in a sailor's dress - he had a short jacket under his coat; he had trousers on. I saw him again on the 28th, two days after, at the office, in the lock-up-room, with seven others, and knew him - I fixed on him myself - he stood in the centre of them; I heard him speak in the lock-up-room, and knew his voice again also. Nobody passed while he was robbing me.

Q. How long after the robbery were you getting home? A. Nearly half an hour; I saw my fellow-servant, Thomas, on the road, about a quarter of an hour after I was robbed, and told him - I described the prisoner to him. - When I got to the lock-up-room he appeared to be in the same dress, only without his coat; he had very full hair, combed over his face - it is cut now. I believe him to be the person.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Have you always given the same account of this transaction? A. Yes. I told the officer his hair was combed, and appeared like whiskers, not that he had large whiskers; I had never seen him before - it lasted about ten minutes. The lodge is not far from the bridge, about a hundred yards I should think; it was light, for the lodge door was open; I did not observe what light it was - I was over the bridge, exactly opposite the lodge gate, and the door was open. When I was in the lock-up-room, Pendergrass told me to look among the prisoners; I said, that was him who stood in the middle - I never said he was not there;

nobody pointed him out to me. The prisoner used no violence to me. I know the charge affects his life.

Q. Now, be careful, considering the very short time you was with him, can you positively swear to him? A. I am sure it was him.

THOMAS BUNCE . I am the prosecutrix's fellow-servant - I met her on the 26th of September, in the Kentish-town-road; she stated she had been robbed, and described the person to me - she said he had longish hair, as if it was whiskers - that he was dressed in a sort of sailor's jacket and trousers. I went with her on the second examination, and gave evidence.

SAMUEL PENDERGRASS . I am an officer. Bunce informed me of this robbery on the 26th of September, about eleven o'clock at night - he described a person to me, and I heard of a person answering the description being in Somer's-town watch-house on the 28th, and sent for the party - it was the prisoner - he was in custody for something else; he answered the description Bunce gave me, which made me send for them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not state before the Magistrate that you had seen a person of that description on the bridge? A. No - I said so to nobody.

HENRY HINKSMAN . I belong to the Police. About half-past ten o'clock on the night of this robbery I saw the prosecutrix: she described a person to me, as having a white-rough coat, dark clothes, a shiny hat, and large whiskers. On Thursday morning, the 28th, I found the prisoner at the watch-house; he answered her description, except not having whiskers; I fetched her to Hatton-garden, where she saw the prisoner among six or seven others; I said, "Be very particular and cautious what you say, for it is a very serious case, but if you see the man, say so" - I told them all to stand up, and said to her, "Which is the man" - she looked round, and said, "That is the man - I will swear it;" he stood in the centre of the others.

Cross-examined. Q. Then she described him as having whiskers? A. She did. He is materially altered since his apprehension; I cannot say whether he ever had whiskers; he has got his hair cut, and looks cleaner since he was taken; he had on the same jacket and trousers as he has now - it is a jacket used by sailors; she pointed him out in about two moments.

JURY. Q. Did she say to you he had whiskers, or like whiskers? A. When he was at Hatton-garden his hair was brought forward to the side of his face, which would appear like whiskers; she said, "Like whiskers."

ROBERT TEASDALE . I took the prisoner into custody the night before.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery. The two officers came to the watch-house in the morning, and said, "Teasdale, did you see that man with a white coat on?" he said, No, and then he said, "He has changed his dress" - I never had a dress besides what I have now since I came from sea. The officer brought in the prosecutrix, and asked if the man was there - she said, No; he said, "Are you sure of that?" she said, Yes; he pointed to me in the middle, and then she said, "That is the man - I will swear to him." I was called out and searched, to see if I had a knife, but I had not. Three prisoners in this gaol can prove it.

HENRY HINKSMAN . It is wrong; on my oath she never said she did not know him, nor did I point him out to her - my evidence is correct. The prisoner's statement is not true - he said this to the Magistrate.

COURT to ANN SANDERS . Q. Did you ever look at the prisoner and say the man was not there? A. No - I fixed on him directly - he was not pointed out at all; they all stood up together. I knew his person and his voice.

WILLIAM LEE . I am carpenter of the Buckingham, East India Company's ship, and live at Blackwall. I have known the prisoner eighteen months - he sailed from India, with me, as caulker's mate, and bore a most creditable character, to the satisfaction of the captain and every one; he never wore whiskers since I knew him - he left our ship the beginning of June, and I have not seen him since - he was a cabinet-maker.

JURY. Q. How was he accustomed to wear his hair? A. Nearly as it is now; I would take him into my service again at any time - if he is convicted I would take him at any period.

HENRY HODDER . I am under Mr. Lee in the vessel, and knew the prisoner eighteen months - he bore a very honest character, and was liked by every one on board.

WILLIAM FRANCIS HARDING . I live at Somer's-town, and am a milkman. I have known the prisoner four years - he bore an upright character; I have seen him twenty or thirty times lately. He was at my house on the 26th of September, at Hoxton; I lived then in Whitmore-row - he came about half-past three or four o'clock, and remained with us; I went out at six o'clock, and left him there - I returned about ten, and he was gone.

Q. Was anybody in the house with you when the prisoner came in? A. Yes - my wife and Drummond, who keeps the house - they saw the prisoner when he came; my wife said he left at nine o'clock.

COURT. Q. What became of you when you went out? A. I went on business. I am a salesman, but am endeavouring to go to sea again - I went to meet a gentleman at six.

ELIZA HARDING . I am the wife of the last witness - the prisoner is my brother. On the 26th of September he came at four o'clock to Whitmore-row, Hoxton, where we lodged; Mrs. Drummond, who keeps the house, was at home when he came, and till after tea; we drink tea about six o'clock - the prisoner drank tea with us, and stopped till nine; my husband was at home when he came, and went out after tea, about ten minutes after tea; we were not long at tea - I suppose it was about six o'clock or ten minutes after when he went out; he returned about ten, and asked how long my brother had been gone - I told him about nine o'clock; I am certain it had struck nine before he went - it was on Tuesday, the 26th of September; I heard he was apprehended on Thursday morning; my husband attended at the office.

COURT. Q. What is your brother? A. A cabinet-maker - he was then working for my father, who lived in Chapel-street, Somer's-town, and he lived with my father at that time; there was not business to keep him constantly at work.

JURY. Q. How was your brother dressed that day? - A. The same as he is; he had fustian trousers as he has now; I never saw him in a shag coat, or heard of his having one - I had seen him about a week before.

WILLIAM FRANCIS HARDING re-examined. I should think Hoxton is three miles and a half or four miles from Kentish-town - I should go down the City-road and Battle-bridge to it.

COURT. Q. How far from your house were you to meet this gentleman? A. In the City, about three quarters of a mile from Hoxton, at the corner of the East India-house; I was to meet him at six o'clock, but the prisoner's coming detained me a little, and it might have struck six before I started; he was dressed in the same clothes as he has now, except the waistcoat, which was kerseymere; he had no great coat.

CATHERINE DRUMMOND . I am the wife of James Drummond - we live in Whitmore-row, Hoxton; Harding resided with me. On the 26th of September, the Tuesday before quarter-day, I remember the prisoner coming to my house, about half-past three or four o'clock in the afternoon - Mrs. Harding was at home when he came.

Q. Where was Mr. Harding? A. I am not positive whether he was out at the time, or whether he went out directly after; I went out after tea myself - I drank tea at five o'clock, and went out.

COURT. Q. What, did they drink tea at five o'clock? A. Yes - Mr. Harding was not at home to tea.

Q. How long did Harding stay at home after his brother-in-law came, if he was at home? A. I cannot say - it might be a few minutes, or it might be longer; the prisoner drank tea there, and I left him there. I returned about half-past nine o'clock, and he was gone. Harding came home about ten.

Q. Were you sitting with them? A. No, not after the husband came home.

After the Learned Judge had summed up the evidence this witness was re-examined.

CATHERINE DRUMMOND. Harding does not board with us, but we frequently had our meals together. I rather think now that Mr. Harding did drink tea with us.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury, on account of his good character, and not using violence .

Reference Number: t18261026-6

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1799. HENRY GODFREY and THOMAS LOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 watch, value 20l., the goods of Antoine Vieyres , in his dwelling-house .

ANTOINE VIEYRES. I am a watchmaker , and lodge on the second floor at No. 25, Jermyn-street ; I do not keep a shop, but repair watches, and make them sometimes. Mr. Jordan rents the house, and lives on the first floor. On the 21st of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came to my room together, and Godfrey said they came from Mr. Dubois, of King-street, who had given them my direction, and they had some musical watches to be repaired. I knew Mr. Dubois perfectly well, and should attend to his recommendation; they had not brought the watches, but gave me a direction where to go for them - I went to another part of the room to get pen and paper for them to write the direction - my glass-case, which hung on the wall, was at that time open, and I had several watches in it, and a gold one among them; the prisoners were within reach of it; I had wound up my watches in the morning, it was then there; I had been at home all day; nobody could have taken it before they came. When I got them the paper, Lock wrote this direction - (reads) "May, 31, Great Ormond-street" - he wrote it in Godfrey's presence - I was to go there for the watches. About an hour or an hour and a half after they were gone, I missed this watch - no other stranger had been to the room - I went to No. 31, Great Ormond-street, found they did not live there, and nobody had a watch to repair - I saw them in custody about six days after, and am certain of their persons.

Cross-examined by Mr. PLATT. Q. At what time did you wind the watch up? A. About ten o'clock in the morning - it was not in my hands after. Two gentlemen and a lady had called that morning - she came to pay me 25s. - the gentlemen were in the room longer than she was; the first came to fetch his watch - he was not ten minutes there; the second came for a lady's watch - he was not five minutes there; I opened the case to get it, and it was open while the prisoners were there; I did not leave the room while they were there; they did not stay above two minutes - both the gentlemen and the lady were customers.

RICHARD GARDENER . I am a constable of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoners on the 21st of September, but found nothing on them relative to this charge.

GODFREY's Defence. He said the two gentlemen and the lady came, but he was sure they were not thieves. I know nothing of it.

LOCKE's Defence. He has perjured himself, for he said the lady came afterwards.

LOCK - GUILTY. Aged 19.

GODFREY - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-7

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1800. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Row the younger, from his person .

WILLIAM ROW, JUN. I live in Little St. Thomas Apostle. On the 9th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in St. Pancras Lane , looking at a fire. I felt somebody pushing behind me - I turned round and found the prisoner with my handkerchief in his pocket - I seized him instantly, and took it from him; it was safe a few minutes before, when I was in Size Lane.

ANDREW BADEN . I was with Mr. Row, and saw the handkerchief in the prisoner's pocket; he said he had not taken it.

WILLIAM GOODHEW . I was in Bucklersbury, and saw a crowd - I received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-8

1801. SARAH MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 25 yards of linen cloth, value 2l. 10s., the goods of John Marter , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MARTER. I am a linen-draper , and live on Holborn-hill . On the 14th of July, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop to purchase a small quantity of muslin; I showed her several

pieces; she bought a quarter of a yard, which came to 3d. - I saw her stoop down, which made me suspect her; I accused her of taking something off the counter; she said she had; she went to the further end of the shop, and produced this piece of linen cloth from under her gown; it measures 25 yards, and cost me 50s.; I have not measured it; she had not asked for any thing but muslin. She was ill last Session, and not able to be tried.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody; she seemed much overcome, and implored forgiveness - she had 9d. in her pocket. I do not think she had any companions about.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-9

1802. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 5 half-crowns, and 5 sixpences , the monies of Joseph Davis Haywood .

JOSEPH DAVIS HAYWOOD. I am a tobacconist , and live in London-wall . On the 2nd of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, while I was in the parlour, the prisoner came into the shop very quietly; my wife went towards the door and alarmed me; I saw him leaning across the counter, robbing the till. I went out at the private door; he had then got out at the shop-door, and turned round into Finsbury Circus, where several bad characters were standing - he went and stood close to them, with his hands behind him - I laid hold of him, and gave him in charge, but no money was found on him - he had unlocked the till, and drawn it out; I had put 20s. into it in the morning, in different coins, besides what I had taken - I know there were five half-crowns, five shillings, and five sixpences in it. When I took him, he said he had been looking at the boys at play, and had been there a quarter of an hour - he had not been out of the shop two minutes. I particularly noticed his dress, as he lay across the counter, and am positive of him by that there was not another boy dressed like him - I did not see his face. The till was quite empty - the silver was all in a little box in it - there were 2l. or 3l. there a few minutes before.

JOHN THOMAS GRAY . I am a constable, and took him in charge - he said he knew nothing about it, and had been playing with the other boys, as he had no work. After taking him to the watch-house, he said, "It was not me, though I know the boys who did take it."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-10

1803. WILLIAM RUSH and SAMUEL CLEMENTS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 lb. of tea, value 8s. , the goods of Nicholas Yarrow .

WILLIAM SEAL . I am shopman to Mr. Yarrow, a grocer , of King-street, Snow-hill . On Saturday, the 14th of October, Rush came into the shop and asked for a quarter lb. of sugar; a pound of tea stood on the counter, tied up, when he came in; he had a sack on his arm, which he rested on the counter close to the tea. I observed Clements pass the shop-door while he was there, but I did not observe him take any notice - I served Rush with the sugar, which came to 11/2d., and just as he got to the door I missed the tea - I immediately ran out and took him, walking with Clements, about thirty yards from the shop; I saw the tea in his right-hand, and saw him give it to Clements, who put it under his arm, under his coat, but not to conceal it. I asked him for the tea; he gave it to me without hesitation, saying, "That man told me to hold it." Rush immediately ran off - I took hold of Clements, and gave him to Mr. Young, while I followed Rush as far as the Cock public-house in Hosier Lane, and there lost him - I went with the officers, about half-past ten o'clock, to the Anchor public-house, Saffron-hill, and found him there, and was certain of his person.

GEO. THOMAS HANNINGTON . I am a constable. I took charge of Clements, with the tea; he said he knew nothing of the person who gave it to him. I went with Seal to the Anchor that night; he pointed out Rush directly, and never expressed a doubt of him.

Prisoner RUSH. Q. Was I not laying my head down on the table? A. Yes, he was intoxicated; it was eleven o'clock at night.

WILLIAM SEAL. I have no mark on the tea; I had packed it up for a customer.

GEORGE GODFREY . I went with Hannington to the Anchor - Seal pointed Rush out.

RUSH's Defence. I was out selling apples from ten o'clock till half-past eight; I then went home, had tea, and went to the Anchor; some gentlemen came in and took me, and on Monday, to my surprise, I found it was for a pound of tea.

RUSH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

CLEMENTS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-11

1804. HENRY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Watts .

BENJAMIN WATTS. I am a milkman , and live in Norwich-court, Fetter-lane - my door is a half-hatch - these boots were in the parlour - I went out at half-past six o'clock in the morning, returned at half-past eight, and found the prisoner in custody.

ELIZABETH WATTS . I went down into the kitchen, leaving the boots in the parlour, about half-past seven o'clock; I returned in a very few minutes, and saw the prisoner go out with something. Nobody else was at home - I called out, Stop thief! and ran after him; he was stopped before he got out of my sight, with my husband's boots; he was a stranger to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did not another person give them into your hands? A. I took them from his hands myself.

JOHN STEBRING . I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Several people ran, I ran as well, and when I came back, she stood at her own door and said, "That is the man;" I had no boots in my hand.

MRS. WATTS. I never lost sight of him - I have a lodger - he was up in his own room.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-12

1805. JAMES LOVE was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN DAWSON LOWDEN . I am a chemist , and live in Fleet-street. The prisoner was in my service for about a fortnight, and received money on my account. On the

21st of September, I sent him to Mrs. Orgel, at the White Heart public-house, Abchurch-lane, with some medicine, which came to 14s. 3d., but if the bottles were returned, he was to receive 12s.; I sent him about one o'clock, and he returned about four - I asked him if he had received the money; he said, No, they would pay next time.

HANNAH RILEY . I am acquainted with the landlord of the White Heart. On the 21st of September, the prisoner brought this medicine from Mr. Lowden, with a bill - I paid him four half-crowns and two shillings; he wrote a receipt to the bill in my presence, Lere it is - Mr. Lowden inquired about it the same evening.

DAVID ROGERS . On the 21st of September, I took charge of the prisoner, and in his boots found four half-crowns, one shilling, one sixpence, and a penny.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady paid me four half-crowns, a shilling, a sixpence, and 6d. in copper - I lost 5d., and put the rest in my stocking till I could see my father, to make it up - I was afraid to tell my master.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18261026-13

1806. WILLIAM ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 canvas bag, value 6d., and 27 ozs. weight of silver, value 6d. 10s., the goods of Henry Deacon , from the person of Joseph Sandland .

HENRY DEACON. I am a watch-case maker , and live in Upper Clifton-street. On the 26th of September, I gave Sandland, my servant , five sovereigns to go to Collings and Co., in Jewin-street, to get some silver, also a piece of silver called bottoms, which weighed 7 ozs., to leave at the Flatting Mills in Bunhill Row; he had it in a bag. He was brought home about three o'clock, by Gray, an officer, without any of the property.

JOSEPH SANDLAND. I am thirteen years old. My master sent me out at twelve o'clock, with some silver to be flatted, and five sovereigns to get 20 ozs. of sterling silver. I got the silver from Collings, in Jewin-street; I had then 27 ozs. in my bag, and was taking it home; the prisoner came up to me in Little Moorfields , and asked if I would go on an errand for him - I asked where it was; he said, "You will get 6d. for going, and if you take that bag, you will break what is in the bundle you are going for." I was to go about thirty yards down the street; I gave him the bag to hold, and went a little way, then looked back, and saw he was gone; I returned without going to the house, but could not find him - I have never found the silver; I am certain of his person; I saw him again about a fortnight ago, in a court in Wood-street, as I was going to Goldsmith's-hall. He came up to me and said, "I think I know you." I said, "Yes, and I know you; it was you who stole my silver." He was then sneaking off, and said to two boys, "Hold him while I run away;" - they struck me, and almost knocked me down, but I pursued, calling Stop thief! and he was stopped. I am quite sure he is the person.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge on the 13th of October, just after he was stopped - the witness brought him to me, and was very positive of his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was playing at top in a court; he came up and said, "Halloo, was not you the boy who stole 27 ozs. of silver?" I said, No; - he said, "I think you are;" - I was going away; he hallooed out, Stop thief! I ran, and they stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-14

1807. JULIA CANE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 1 purse, value 4d.; 1 sovereign, and a 5l. Bank note, the property of Thomas Davies , from his person .

THOMAS DAVIES. I am a mariner , and live in Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell. On the 5th of October, a little after twelve o'clock at night, I was going from Fore-street; the prisoner accosted me in Bridgwater-square - I was perfectly sober - she said she was a widow, and told me a tale of distress; said she had been to seen a sick friend, and asked me for money; I said I had none, but through her importunity I took out some loose silver, and not having a 6d., I gave her 1s. - I then felt my purse safe in my pocket; nobody was near enough to take it but her. I walked to the top of Fann-street, and putting my hand into my pocket, missed the purse - she was gone then. I went to the watchman, told him, and described her as a woman dressed in black, without a bonnet; we traced her to Smithfield, and in consequence of information from a watchman there, we found her at two o'clock - I am certain of her person; she was taken to the watch-house and searched; I described the purse and money - the purse was found on her, with the 5l. note and 12s. remaining in it.

Prisoner. Did I not meet you in Long-lane, when another young woman was talking to you? You insisted on my laying hold of your arm - you gave the purse into my hand, after we had been down a passage. Witness. It is all false; I made no proposal to her; I was not in Long-lane; I asked where her friend lived, and where she lived - she said, in Cow-lane. I was not out of the city while she was near me.

WILLIAM GLOVER . I am a watchman. Davies came to me in West-street, about half-past twelve o'clock, and described a person to me; I afterwards found the prisoner, by his description, at supper in a lodging-house in West-street; she answered his description; he spoke positively to her, on seeing her - I took her to the watch-house; she was searched in a room upstairs, and a purse was afterwards produced which Davies claimed.

JOHN IVERSON . I am constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, and found a purse coutaining a 5l. note and 12s. on her - Davies claimed the note and purse - the purse was in her month - I saw her take it from her bosom, and put it into her mouth; he described the name on the note.(Purse and note produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was unpinning my clothes, and had the purse in my hand - he thought it was in my mouth. He gave the note into my hand in a passage of a house; he asked my direction, which I told him, and in an hour and a half he came and asked if I was within - I said, "Yes, who wants me?" but if I had robbed him, I would have said nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-15

1808. THOMAS FRAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 2 ironstone-jugs, value 10s., and 2 earthenware-jugs, value 10s., the goods of John Davenport and others, his partners, his masters .

Mr. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MELLOR . I am servant to Mr. John Davenport, of Fleet-street - he has other partners. The prisoner came into their service about twelve months ago. In consequence of something that passed between master and myself, I noticed two jugs in the window of Mr. Reeve, of Snow-hill, and knew them to be our maufacture - I went into the shop; they described a person to me, in consequence of which I got an officer, who apprehended the prisoner; he was still in our employ - Reeve saw him at Guildhall, and recognised him.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How many such jugs has your master manufactured? A. Perhaps some hundreds. Reeve said he had only those two - it is stone china, and marked with masters' name at the bottom.

AUGUSTUS REEVE . I am apprentice to Mr. Reeve, pawnbroker, of Snow-hill. On the 20th of September the prisoner came to the shop, with two small jugs, and offered them for sale, for 2s. 6d., but took 1s. 6d. for the two; they are here, and have Davenport's name at the bottom of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain of his person? A. Yes. I never bought any others of him; it was on the 20th of September - I have entered it in our books; they are not here - I looked at them this morning.

WILLIAM MELLOR . These jugs are masters' manufacture, and have their name on them - they are ironstone; it is not customary to sell goods to servants; the selling price is 3s. for the pair - the trade price is 2s.; ninepence each is less than the manufactured price. The prisoner had the care of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Your masters might sell goods to their servants, though it is not customary? A. They might. The prisoner never bought them from our house - I do not think it possible he could have bought them to sell at 9d. - if he bought them of other persons they must have stolen them.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly have bought goods, which can be proved by their books.

WILLIAM MELLOR . I keep the books; I believe he has bought goods, but not such as these; he bought a few cups and saucers, and sold them to a friend; I have searched the books through - there are no jugs entered. - I swear he never bought these, or they would be entered; if he bought goods he might pay for them on Saturday night, out of his wages, but it would be entered in the books; if he had bought these he could not have sold them for 9d.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18261026-16

1809. THOMAS FRAMPTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 20 moulded glass salt-cellars, value 5l.; 20 stands, value 2l. 10s.; 14 cut glass salt-cellars, value 14l., and 14 stands, value 2l., the goods of John Davenport and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

ROBERT BIRD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Longacre. On the 27th of July the prisoner brought me four glass salts and four stands, for sale, for 12s. - I questioned him; he said he had cut the tops himself - that he was a glass-cutter.

THOMAS MARCHANT . I am servant to Mr. Lawton, a pawnbroker, of Green-street, Leicester-square. I bought four glass salts and stands of the prisoner, for 7s.; he said he was the manufacturer, lived in Cock-lane, and had cut the tops himself.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain he is the man? A. I cannot be positive of him.

JOHN BENNET . I am shopman to Mr. Payne, pawnbroker, of Whitechapel. I believe the prisoner to be the man I bought some salts of.

EDWARD CRISP . I am servant to Mr. Gurney, who keeps a wine-vaults. I know the prisoner - I used to see him two or three times a day; he brought me a brown paper parcel, which I felt - it was very heavy; I felt something like scallops; I thought it was glass salts - he left them with me: he said he was employed at Mr. Davenport's, to take them to a customer, and would take them when he went home at night; one was directed to Mr. Jones, Portman-square; he called for them in the evening.

JAMES PADMORE . I am clerk to the prosecutors, and was employed in the glass department. I was in the back part of the room, where the glass is kept; the prisoner came in in an anxious kind of way, and said he wished Mitchell would attend to his orders; he slipped his hand down, and I saw him walk out with four salts in his hand - he thought I did not see him; I slipped into the next room, and saw him with it - he asked what I meant; I told him plainly - he then confessed that he had taken them, but said he was going to purchase them - he returned them, and said if I would put by any imperfect ones they would answer the same purpose.

WILLIAM MELLOR . The prisoner had no business in the glass-room, and was never employed to carry out glass; these are our manufacture - we sell them at 5s. 6d. the salt and stand, to the trade; I have the mould they were made in. The prisoner lived at Paddington, and does not cut glass.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-17

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1810. ALEXANDER RAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , at St. John at Hackney, 1 watch, value 40l.; 1 seal, value 2l., and 1 key, value 6d., the goods of William Kershaw , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM KERSHAW, ESQ. I am a merchant , and live at Stoke Newington, in the parish of St. John, Hackney - my house stands in a kind of paddock, some distance from the road. On the 21st of September, about a quarter to ten o'clock in the morning, I was at breakfast with my wife, quite at the back of the house, on the ground floor - the two windows of the room look into an orchard; they were open, and are about three feet from the ground. I put my watch on the breakfast table, and left the room

with my wife, just to walk round the grounds. I have a little boy five years old; he was in the nursery at breakfast time. I walked from my house into the stable, and in about ten minutes, on returning from the stable-yard, I came througg the shrubbery suddenly, in sight of the window, and saw the prisoner getting in or out of the window; both his hands were on the window, as if he was dropping down; I immediately seized him by the neck, close to the window, and said, "You scoundrel, you have robbed me;" he attempted to get away - he replied,"You see I have only come to sell lemons;" he had a small basket. I took him into the stable-yard, and called to the gardener - my little boy immediately said, in the prisoner's presence, "I saw you get into the window," and when I complained that he did not tell me of it, he said, "I thought he had come to clean the windows - I saw him when you and mamma left, as I was playing in the orchard, and I saw him get into the window." I left the prisoner three or four minutes, to send for an officer, and as he had made some resistance to the gardener, I came out with a sword; the prisoner then complained, and said,"You see I have only come to sell lemons, and I have lost two or three out of my basket;" my little boy replied,"Oh! I saw you lose your lemous - I know where they are" - he immediately ran into the shrubbery, and brought both the lemons and my watch - it was laying with the lemons;" all this shurubbery into the stable-yard; the lemons and watch were found four or five yards off, so that he might have thrown them there without my observing it. Two chairs had stood in the recess of the window, and one I found had been removed, to make room for somebody to get in. It is a gold watch, and worth 40l.

ANN BATCHELOR . I am the prosecutor's nursery-maid. On the 21st of September I remember the prisoner being taken; I was in the nursery, and had seen him come up the front walk, with the basket in his hand - he was six or eight yards from the front of the house, and did not come to the front door.

HENRY FOX . I am Mr. Kershaw's gardener. I was in the stable-yard; I heard master call out, and went to his assistance - I saw the prisoner in his custody; I took him into the stable-yard, and there he complained of losing his lemons; the child instantly said, "I will go and seek your lemons" - he returned in less than a minute with the watch in one hand, and the lemons in the other; it was a dry morning. I had been digging under the window - I looked next day, and saw the marks of a man's footsteps under the window.

ELIZABETH BROWN . I am in Mr. Kershaw's service. On the 21st of September I was in the pantry, and heard him call out - I went out, and saw the prisoner in custody, between master and the gardener; I went into the breakfast-room - the watch was not on the table; I shut down the window, and observed footsteps leading from the window to the table, on the drugget and carpet - it was quite wet, from the mould under the window.

MR. KERSHAW. I had only slippers on - the footsteps could not be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the house to see if they wanted lemons - I knocked at the door, and received no answere; the gentleman then came and collared me - he shook me violently, and said he suspected I had been to his parlour - I said not; he gave me to the gardener, then fetched a cutlass, and said if I offered to move he would cut me down - I said I had done nothing; he sent the servant to see if all was safe - she returned, and every thing was safe; a child came to him with the watch in his hand - the gentleman took it from the child. I declare I was never in the house, and never saw the watch till I saw it in the child's hand. Previous to that the child had been missing from the house fifteen weeks.

MR. KERSHAW. The child had been playing under the window.

JURY. Q. Was it possible your child could enter the parlour while he went for the lemons? A. It is impossible - he must have gone all round the house, but he darted into the shrubbery, and brought it directly. The prisoner must have opened the gate to get into the orchard.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18261026-18

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1811. WILLIAM PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal, value 20s., and two keys, value 5s., the goods of William Hornsby . in his dwelling-house .

ANN HORNSBY . I am the wife of William Hornsby - we live in Hackney-church-yard . On the 29th of September, at half-past ten o'clock, I went into our back yard for some water, leaving the front door open - I returned in a minute or two, and saw the prisoner standing against a chest of drawers; he asked for a halfpenny-worth of apples, which I sell - I told him he might have knocked, and I should have heard him; he ran away directly, without waiting for the apples, and I immediately missed this silver watch from a nail over the mantel-shelf; it had a gold seal and key to it. I ran after him immediately - Adamson, the officer, stopped him, in my presence; I saw the watch taken from his hat.

ROBERT PRESCOD . I am an officer. I heard Mrs. Hornsby calling out - she was close to me; she pointed cut the prisoner, and said, "That man has stolen my husband's watch;" I called Stop thief! and Adamson caught him - the watch was found in his hat, which was on his head.

WILLIAM HORNSBY . I rent this house - it is in the parish of St. John, at Hackney. This is my watch; it is worth 30s. - I gave 30s. for the seal alone seven years ago.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261026-19

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1812. SAMUEL TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 waistcoat, value 2l. 10s., the goods of John Shearman , in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET SHEARMAN . I am the wife of John Shearman - we live in Guildford-street, Russell-square ; Mr. Shearman is a professional man. I had seen this waistcoat in the drawer of his study, about a week before the 25th of September - the drawer was not locked. The prisoner was employed at white-washing in the house; he would have to pass the study door, but had no business there - I

missed the waistcoat on the 29th - he had left the house about five days; it is velvet - I value it at 2l.(Property produced and sworn to).

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Orange-street, Bloomsbury. I received this waistcoat from the prisoner, on the 20th of September, in pawn, for 6s., in his own name; he had been two or three times to my shop before; he said he was a plasterer - that he had a job in Guilford-street, had no money, and borrowed the waistcoat of his uncle, who lived in Francis-street, Spafields.

GEORGE AVIS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of October; he denied the charge, but next morning I told him the waistcoat was found, and asked what he had done with the duplicate - he hesitated, and then said he had lost it; I held out neither threat nor promise to him.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261026-20

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1813. JAMES PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , at Acton, 1 gelding, price 3l. , the property of Sarah Medley , widow .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MRS. SARAH MEDLEY. I am a widow, and live at Acton, Middlesex . On Friday evening, the 29th of September, I had a black gelding in my possession, which I named Colonel - I had not seen it safe at night; I saw a gentleman, named Hedges on the 30th; I did not see my horse again till the 1st of October, when my man brought it home. - The prisoner was in my service that night, employed to watch my cows - I did not see him and Hedges together.

JOHN BRYANT . I am servant to Mrs. Medley, and know the black horse called Colonel. On the 29th of September, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I turned him out of the stable into the field, and left it safe in the field; there was a gate to the field, and left it safe in the field; there was a gate to the field, which I closed, but did not lock. Next day Chandler, the groom, went to the field, and it was missing. On Sunday Toothill brought it back. I saw the field next day, but did not examine the gate.

JOSEPH TOOTHILL . I am Mrs. Medley's servant. I know this black horse - I got it from Hedges, senior, at Paddington, on Saturday, about six o'clock, and brought it home that evening - mistress saw it on Sunday - I knew it to be hers.

WILLIAM HEDGES , SEN. I am a collar-maker and knacker, and live at Paddington. I know the prisoner - he brought me this horse for sale on the 29th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening; I took it over to the Red Lion public-house with him, intending to pay him; I was to give him 2l. for it; we called for a pint of beer: I wished to be correct, and asked his name - he gave me the name of Hyams; Barrett, who was there, knew Mr. Hyams better than I did, and thoug he had dealt with him he did not know the prisoner to be his servant - I would not pay him till he referred me to somebody who did know him; it was agreed that I should go to his master at Covent-garden, at six O'clock in the morning, to pay him; I kept it at the Red Lion - I sent my son to Covent-garden, and when he returned I brought the horse to the door, thinking it might be owned; a person said he knew the owner - I found out who it was, and sent my son to Mrs. Medley; the horse was afterwards fetched by her servant; I gave him the same horse the prisoner had bargained with me for.

THOMAS WILLIAM HEDGES . I was present when my father and the prisoner bargained about this horse; my father sent me to Covent-garden, to a Mr. Hyams - I found such a person, but he knew nothing of the horse; I afterwards went to Mrs. Medley's - her servant came afterwards, and took the horse - it was worth 3l.

GEORGE BARRETT . I know Mr. Hyams well; the prisoner was not in his service on the 29th of September, or at any other time.

MRS. MEDLEY. It was my horse.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) On Friday evening, the 29th of September, I left home at half-past seven o'clock, and went into the field, which is about a quarter of a mile from Hariesdon-green, to mind the cows, it being my turn to watch them; I found them all right - from the field I went to Harlesdon-green, on foot, which is about four miles and a half from Tyburn-turupike, and called at the Crown public-house, at Harlesdon-green, for refreshment, remained there about ten minutes, and from thence returned to the field, where I remained till the milking time, two o'clock in the morning. Mr. Hedges' son came to us in the morning, to see if any of the servants was the person who had been the evening before at his father's house - he did not at that time six on any one; he came again, with his father, on the next day(Sunday), to me, at the Green Man public-house, Harlesdon-green - he then told his father that he thought I was the man; we all went to my mistress's house - after staying there about two hours I was taken to the watch-house on this charge. Mr. Hedges' house is four miles from Harlesdon-green; I was not at his house on that evening, and am entirely innocent of the robbery in question.

WILLIAM HEDGES . I am certain of his person.

GEORGE BARRETT . I have not the least doubt of his being the man.

THOMAS WILLIAM HEDGES . I saw him on Friday night, at my father's, and went with them to the Red Lion - I was a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes in his company - I have no doubt of his being the man at all.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

MRS. MEDLEY. My Lord, he was nearly three years in my service, and was a very sober, steady, obliging servant - he had lived eleven years with a gentleman to the country, who gave him a good character. I wish to recommend him to Mercy. - The Jury joined in this recommendation .

Reference Number: t18261026-21

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1814. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 chain, value 6d.; 1 key, value 3d., and 1 cap, value 1s., the goods of John Perkins ; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Ash , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ASH. I am employed by the Great Westminster Dairy Company , and live in Fisher's-place, Palmer's-village, Westminster - I live at No. 2, and sleep at No. 1;

I am at No. 2 in the day time, when at home; there is no internal communication between the houses; I must come out into the yard to get from one to the other - the houses have a front yard, which is fenced round, and is common to both houses; nobody has communication with the two houses but those who live there - the yard has a door to it, which is bolted; I rent both the houses, and do not let them out; Perkins, my fellow-servant, sleeps in No. 2 - there is nobody in either house but my own family. The prisoner is my first cousin - I met him in the Park about eight days before this; he was in distress, and I invited him to my house to live. On Saturday evening, the 30th of September, when I went to bed, I pulled a yellow silk handkerchief off my neck, and put it on the mangle in No. 2; I then went into the other house to sleep. In the morning, when I got up, my handkerchief was gone; the prisoner had no victuals or clothes, except what I gave him - he slept up stairs at No. 2, by himself, in Perkins' room - I missed him in the morning, when I came from work - I also missed my handkerchief and 7s., which had been in Perkins' box; I had seen him put it into his box about a week before. I found my handkerchief in pawn, at Chelsea.

JOHN PERKINS . I am employed at the dairy, and sleep at No. 2, in the same room as the prisoner. When I went to bed on the night of the 23d, about half-past nine o'clock, I hung my watch up by the side of the mantel-piece - I had 7s., belonging to Ash, in my box, in the room. I got up about half-past five o'clock next morning, and left the prisoner in the room; I went out, leaving my property safe - I returned at half-past nine, he was gone, and the property also; here is my watch - I gave 3l. 5s. for it six months ago.

SIDNEY SMITH . I am assistant to a pawnbroker, who lives in Grosvenor-row, Chelsea. I received this handkerchief in pawn from Eliza Auderson, and the watch from James Saunders.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZA ANDERSON . I pawned this silk handkerchief with Smith - I received it from the prisoner; I had not seen him till the day before - he came into a public-house where I was waiting for my husband, and offered the handkerchief for sale to all the company; I asked what he wanted - he said 2s.; I said I had no money, but would pay him when my husband returned - he said that would do; as my husband did not come I went and pawned it; I threw down 2s. - he took up one, and said the other should he spent, but I refused to spend it; I inquired at the house about him, and understood he was in a destitute state, and had come from Wales - that his mother had given him this watch and handkerchief.

JAMES SAUNDERS . I am a prisoner. I pawned this watch at Smith's on the 24th. The prisoner came to lodge at the same house as me, and gave the watch to the landlord, who returned it to him in the morning; he asked me to sell it - I refused, but pawned it for him for 25s.; I gave him the money, and he gave me 1s.

PETER MITCHELL . I am a law-stationer. I had seen the prisoner at Ash's, and the day after the robbery I called there - he told me if I met the prisoner to give him in charge; on Wednesday, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I saw him by the Horse-guards, and took him to the watch-house - he had a cap on, which I have had ever since.

JOHN PERKINS . I lost this cap at the same time.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years, to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18261026-22

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1815. HENRY ABRAHAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Matthew Ross , about seven o'clock in the night of the 1st of October , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 6 silver teaspoons, value 12s.; 5 keys, value 5s.; 1 powder-flask, value 1s.; 1 shot-pouch, value 2s.; 2 coats, value 30s.; 1 set of bed-furniture, value 1l.; 2 yards of silk, value 6s.; 1 purse, value 9d.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of stocking, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 2 table-cloths, value 10s.; 1 pelisse, value 2l.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s. 6d.; 18 shillings, and 12 halfpence , his property.

MATTHEW ROSS . I live in Globe-road, in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney , and rent the house - I am sexton of the chapel burial-ground. On Sunday evening, the 1st of October, a few minutes before six o'clock, I went to the chapel with my wife, leaving nobody in the house - we bolted the back door, and the front kitchen door, came out at the street door, and double locked it - I took the key in my pocket; the shutters were fastened - it was just twilight. I returned a few minutes to eight o'clock. and found the street door as I had left it, but the front kitchen window, in the area, was open; I had fastened it myself before I went out - there is no fastening to the shutter, but there are two small sashes - a bar goes into one to keep the other from sliding back; a square of glass in the sash was rather starred before, but on coming home it was taken out, the bar moved, and the window open - there was no hole in the glass before. When we came in we kicked against some things on the floor - it was two pairs of breeches, a pair of trousers, a waistcoat, and a pelisse; these were on the parlour floor, and were not there when we went out; we got a light, and the first thing we saw was, a little cupboard door in the parlour standing open - I found six silver tea-spoons gone from there; I went up to the bed-room, and found the drawers pulled half out of the bureau - they were not locked; I missed two great coats, some cotton bed-furniture, two yards of black silk, and two table-cloths - there was a pair of gloves in my great coat pocket; I missed some powder-flasks from the parlour side-board, and five keys, belonging to the burial-ground office, were taken away. I informed a watchman of it that night, and found the prisoner at Worship-street next morning, with the property. I knew him before - we knew very little of him, but were intimately acquainted with his mother, who is a tambour-worker, living at Homerton. Brick-lane is nearly a mile from my house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you certain at what time you left your house? A. Yes - it did not want a quarter to six, for the clock was just before me; it was getting twilight, and was light enough to see a man's face if he was near. I have known his mother four

years - she has known my wife thiry years - we visited; I believe her to be very respectable - she is a widow.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am a constable of Christchurch, Spitalfields. On Sunday evening, the 1st of October, about eight o'clock, I and Barrs were on duty in Brick-lane, and the prisoner passed us - he had on a great coat, which I thought did not fit him, and I followed him; he took the first turning to the right, and ran; I overtook him, and asked what he had got - he said his own property; his pocket on the left side seemed bulky - he said he had got a shirt; I felt outside his coat, and found there was something else - I took him to a public-house, searched him, and found a purse, with 10s. 6d. in silver in it, also six silver spoons, a powder-flask, with powder, a shot-pouch, with shot in it, four handkerchiefs, a pair of stockings, a pair of gloves, an apron, a piece of black silk, a tobacco-stopper, and eleven or thirteen common keys - he had the great coat on: I also found on him two screwdrivers, a large chisel, and a phosphorus-box; he was nearly a mile from the prosecutor's. I took him to the watch-house. I produce the property.

JOHN BARRS . I have Almond's statement - it is correct. I saw the property found on the prisoner.

PHILIP PARISH . I am a Bow-street patrol. I have the bed-furniture, which I got from Mr. Arrowsmith's garden.

JAMES ARROWSMITH . I live in Globe-road, three doors from the prosecutor's. On Wednesday morning, the 4th of October, I went into my garden, and discovered a bundle laying in the garden of an empty house, next door - next to that empty house is a school. I sent for Mrs. Ross, delivered the bundle to her, and Parish took possession of it.

ELIZABETH ROSS . I am the prosecutor's wife. I received the bundle from Arrowsmith, and left it in his yard - Parish took it up - it contained my bed-furniture. I went to chapel with my husband, leaving the house secure. I missed a steel purse, a pair of cotton stockings, four handkerchiefs, a shift, two yards of silk, a white apron, marked with my name, and this tent bed-furniture, which had been worn some years; I believe it to be worth more than 1l. - it was dirty: we lost two great coats. I know the stockings and apron produced; they are marked E. C. - my former husband's initials.

MATTHEW ROSS . I know these flasks - they are worth 3s., and the spoons, which are worth 12s.; five of the keys are what I lost; the gloves were in my great coat pocket, and this tobacco-stopper; I am sure of this great coat - it was new last November twelvemonth, and cost 2l. 10s.; it was my best coat, and is worth 25s. - I had not worn it much: the other was worth 5s. The prisoner had not been at our house lately - I do not know what he is

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 24.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18261026-23

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1816. EDMUND SLAP was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Archer , on the night of the 11th of October , and stealing, 1 clock, value 7s., and 20 herrings, value 1s. , his property.

JOHN ARCHER. I am a weaver , out of employ, and live in Moor's-alley, Norton-falgate ; I rent the bottom room - the house is let out in tenements - the landlord does not live there; the street door is open all day; nobody but my wife had business in the room. On the evening of the 11th of October I went out with my wife, at seven o'clock - it was quite dark; we put our candle out - I did not lock the door, and am not sure whether my wife did - she is not here. I left this Dutch clock and a few herrings there; I returned in an hour and a quarter, and found the door ajar - the lock was not a good one; it seemed to have been pushed open. I missed the clock and herrings - I found the clock next morning, in Widegate-alley; I knew the prisoner before, but he was never in my room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEVY COHEN . I am a fruiterer, and lodge in Widegate-alley, Bishopsgate. On the 11th of October the prisoner came and asked me to buy this clock; I said I had no use for it; he said it was his own - that his goods were seized, and I should have it for 7s.; I at last bought it for 4s. 6d.; I gave it to the officer.

JOSEPH BUCK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and have brought the clock here.

Prisoner. I bought it for 3s.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Of larceny only . Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-24

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1817. GEORGE PARKER and WILLIAM MANSFIELD were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Blencowe Layton , on the King's high-way, on the 10th of October , at St. Sepulchre, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 4d.; 1 seal, value, 1s.; 2 watch-keys, value 4d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 rule, value 1s. , his property.

WILLIAM BLENCOWE LAVTON. I am a carpenter and joiner , and live in Peter's-lane, Smithfield. On Tuesday, the 10th of October, I was returning home between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, and about the middle of Holborn the prisoner Mansfield came up and said he knew me; he did not call me by name, he called me Bill - I asked how he knew me - he would not tell me, He kept on talking about the scarcity of trade, and one thing or another, and accompanied me down to my house, No. 11, Peter's-lane - I told him I was going in there - he said, if I would go a little further, he would tell me when and where he knew me; I went a few steps further, and he forced his hand into my bosom and took off my silk handkerchief, which was tied round my neck; I resicted this, and as I was so doing, the prisoner Parker came up and struck me a violent blow on the bend of my arm, which made me lose my hold - they both kept on struggling with me, till they threw me down, and as I was falling to the ground, I felt my watch pulled out of my pocket - they pulled my pocket quite off, and tore it from my smallclothes - they ran off - I instantly called out Watch! - they threw my hat into the middle of the road; I went to find that - I soon after missed a two-foot rule from my coat pocket. I heard that two men were taken to the watch-house, which is very near the spot - I went there, saw them both, and knew them - the rule and handkerchief have been found.

Q. Did they talk together while they were doing this?

A. Yes, and I saw Mansfield give Parker the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you said that you did not see Parker previous to the robbery? A. I did not see him till I felt the blow on my arm - I never said I had seen him before, and watched him - I was not in liquor, I never said I was - Mansfield was an entire stranger to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He called you Bill? A. Yes; I am not called Bill. I looked at him as I walked along, and did not like him at all as he kept pushing up against me - I observed his face several times; it was not a particularly dark night, I did not particularly observe; I went up Snow-hill straight into Peter's-lane. There were no other prisoners in the watch-house; I said directly they were the men; they were not pointed out to me; I knew them instantly. I am certain it was Mansfield who put his hand into my bosom - I was knocked down in rather a dark place, but a light came across from the lamp at the Queen's Head public-house, and I saw him give the handkerchief to Parker plainly.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a constable. About twelve o'clock on the night of the 10th of October, I was in St. John Street; in Peter's-lane I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoners running together in a direction from the cry, very fast; I heard them speak together at the bottom of the street, where they separated, but I did not hear what they said - I ran nearly close behind them; I told the patrol to follow Mansfield; I followed and overtook Parker down a place which is no throughfare - I went up and collared him; he asked if I was going to eat him. I took him a few yards, another patrol came up into the passage, a light was brought from the watch-house, and on the spot where I took him we found this handkerchief, which I have had ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he in the watch-house when the handkerchief was found? A. Yes, I returned directly, and found it - the spot is very little way from the watch-house. I am quite sure of Mansfield, for I had known him two years - I have frequently seen them both together, and know they are acquainted.

HENRY MORGAN . I am a watchman of Cow-cross. On this night I saw both the prisoners running - I pursued Mansfield, and took him to the watch-house, but found nothing on him: I knew them both well before.

ABRAHAM HARNER . I am a constable. I saw Phillips pick up this handkerchief: I had assisted in taking Parker to the watch-house - I walked behind him, and saw a two-foot rule fall from him, which I picked up and now produce.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain of Parker? A. I am - I saw the rule fall from him. Directly I took him into the watch-house, the prosecutor said, "That is one of the men who robbed me." He was not out of my sight after he dropped the rule - the prosecutor was sober.

WILLIAM BLENCOWE LAYTON . This handkerchief is mine, and was round my neck on the night in question - I have had it three months: this rule is mine - here is a mark on it where I join another to it.

The prisoners made no defence - one witness gave Parker a good character.

EDWARD NEWBY . I know Parker. I am a surveyor, and was originally a bricklayer; I live in Devonshire-street, in the same house as Parker's sister - I have known him four years, and took much pains to get him employ - I always understood him to be an honest boy: I have seen the proseuctor about this.

MR. ALLEY to MR. LAYTON. Q. Have you ever said to any body that you were drunk when this robbery was committed? A. No, I never told Mrs. Doveton so - she came to my house.

COURT. Q. What did she come about? A. She came and said she hoped I would be merciful to her brother - she was talking to my wife some time before I came home; and Newby came to my house, and said, if I would not go on with the prosecution, but make a flaw in the indictment, the watch would be produced, if it was between heaven and earth - he said he was a relation, and that Parker had robbed him, and he was afraid to touch his life.

MARY ANNE DOVETON . I live at No. 40, Devonshire-street, and am Parker's sister. I have seen the prosecutor - I went to him and asked him, about this, as my brother would not tell me: I said, "Was not you tipsy?" he said, No; he owned he had been drinking, but knew what he was about.

COURT. Q. Did you not say you hoped he would he merciful to your brother? A. No; the first time I went I said, if he was guilty, I hoped he would suffer, but if he was not, I hoped he would recommend him to mercy. Newby is a distant relation of mine; he married my mother's sister; he is my uncle.

NEWBY. I do not know that I am any relation to her; I lived with her aunt, who died about six months ago, but we were not married.

Q. You passed as their uncle, and that woman took your name? A. Yes, we lived together six years. I went to the prosecutor's house, and said I did not know whether I got the truth from the sister, but had come to him to get the truth; that I understood the watch had been overvalued at 3l.; he then said he would not take 4l. for it, and sooner than lose it he would do any thing, and if he had the watch he did not care. I said, all I looked for was the lives of the men, and if the property was his only object, I would endeavour to make a search - that money should not be an object, and I would go home and make every exertion for the purpose of recovering it.

PARKER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

MANSFIELD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18261026-25

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1818. SARAH (THE WIFE OF EDWARD) WILKINSON , and ELLEN HARTNETT , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Tingey , on the 11th of September , at St. Andrew, Holborn, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one 40l., two 30l., five 20l., ten 10l., and thirty 5l. Bank notes , his property.

Mr. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM TINGEY. I sell beast on commission at Smithfield market. On the 11th of September I was at Smithfield, selling beast; I received some monies, and had 450l. about me in notes - as near as I can recollect, there were

one 40l., two 30l., five 20l., ten 10l., and smaller ones; I had them safe when I went into a room with the prisoners - I felt them in my inside breast-pocket at the time I entered the room, in a book containing memorandums. I was standing near Smithfield Bars when the two prisoners came up to me - I am sure of their persons - they came up in a fondling way, and asked me to take a walk with them; I consented, and we went towards Cow-cross: we passed a public-house, and they asked if we should go in and drink there - I refused, and we walked to the bottom of Cow-cross; they then said, "We will go to our own lodging - we are sisters:" they took me to Sharp's-alley , which lends to Chick-lane - they said, "This is our home, walk in." I found a girl in the lower room; one of them asked her for a candle, and she lighted them upstairs, and when we got to the chamber-door, one of them said to her, "Light our fire," as if she was their servant, and then said, "Now, Sir, this girl will fetch a pot of ale" - I gave her a shilling, and she fetched a pot of ale - I took the shilling out of my purse. She brought the ale, and sat down in the room, then went out and fastened the door - the two prisoners and I then took a glass of ale each; I was then sitting on the bedstead, and the prisoner Wilkinson sat by the side of me; the other sat at a little distance off - she came closer soon after; I was very warm, and took my coat off; she came nearer to me, and made an attempt to get hold of the coat, which I had laid by the side of me - I perceived her attempt, and caught hold of the coat - Wilkinson immediately clasped her arms round my neck - Hartnett likewise fastened on me, and we were all down on the floor together. Wilkinson, in a great fury and heat of passion, pinched my hand and scratched the back of my neck, and called out, "Oh the b-r!" I was in great terror, and cried out Murder! They got my book out, opened it and got out this roll of notes, dropped the book, and the memorandums were scattered about the room - I stooped down to pick up the papers, and one got down stairs; I immediately ran after her; the other came down after me - I cannot say which of them went down first; they were both down in the lower room together, and I got hold of them both, crying out and begging for mercy. A man was in the room, who I supposed to be the master of the house; I said,"For God's sake, Sir, assist me - these women have got all my property - I am ruined for ever." He made no reply, but in a few minutes shut the door, and stood against it. I had hold of them for three or four minutes - the man then shut the outside door, and stood with his back to it - I heard him say in three or four minutes, "I have sent for a constable," or "I will send for an officer." The women cried out bitterly for me to let them go, and as he stood at the door, and from what he said, I let go my hold; the man immediately threw open the door, and said, "Go along with you altogether;" they started out, rushed through the crowd at the door, and I lost sight of them. I got my coat and book, but the money was gone - I recovered my memorandums, and every thing but the 450l. When I got out of the house, I went to an officer, who is not here, and informed him (I was obliged to go a hundred miles into the country next day) - I immediately went home to my lodgings, at Woodness's, in Bartholomew Close; stated the case to him, and he went with me to the house about eight o'clock the same evening. We found the man there who rescued them; he told me he knew nothing of them. I was sent for nearly a month afterwards to Lambeth-street, and was taken to the lockup place, where I saw the prisoners sitting together, and pointed them out. I am positively certain of them - I was certain of them the moment I saw them.

COURT. Q. Were there other females there? A. I think there were two; but the moment I saw the prisoners I took no further notice - I have recovered none of my money - I am positively satisfied they are the women.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How old are you? A. About fifty; I do not exactly know my age. I live with my wife, and have a child grown up. I had done business that day, and dined at my lodging - I had a pint of half ale and half porter to drink, that lasted me for an hour after dinner - I then went to Mr. Young's, in Smithfield, on business - I drank nothing more, and was perfectly sober: I did not go out to see a female - I thought nothing about it: they accosted me about seven o'clock in the evening, near Smithfield, going to St. John-street - my sight is middling; not so good as it has been; we had a candle in the room; I took my coat off because it was so very warm - that was my only reason - they ordered a fire to be lighted at some certain time; it was not lighted: the coat lay on the bed close to me; one of them came and sat close by me for three or four minutes - I was not ten minutes in the room altogether - I had not offered them any money - I did not intend to do any thing more than pay them a visit - I swear I had no object but sitting down with them. They took my book in the room, and instantly ran down before me; I followed, after picking up my book and papers, which did not take two minutes, and found them still in the house, down stairs; I laid hold of them both in the room - I went to no office, but to an officer's house, and then to Woodness, and went with him and the officer to the house - I saw nobody in custody before I saw the prisoners - I was in London two or three times before they were taken.

Q. Did the officer tell you the two women who had robbed you were in custody? A. He said two were in custody who he suspected might be the two - he said he had taken two, and wished me to go and look at them: when I went, I expected to see the women who robbed me - I think there was another woman there.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was a woman named Castles taken up? A. I do not know - I did not see such a woman - she was not examined in my presence. This money belonged to the owners of the beast; I paid them their money, though I lost this; I did not inform them about it, as I could pay them; I did not know I could take the man who was in the house.

MR. BARRY. Q. Were you perfectly sober that night? A. I was - the less excuse for me.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I apprehended the prisoners in Albion-street, Commercial-road; they lodged on the second floor front room at Mrs. Thomas', No. 4 - I took them at another house in the same street, playing at cards with other women; I think there were three others. I then asked if they did not lodge over the way; they said, Yes; I went to their lodgings on the second floor; I asked them their names;

Wilkinson gave her true name - Hartnett said hers was Jones; I found on her 24s. in a purse; she took it out of her bosom, saying, she supposed I wanted her money, and threw it on the table. Wilkinson had only a few halfpence, and in a tea-caddy which she claimed, were three sovereigas and six gold rings; one was a mourning ring, the others plain. I found a quantity of wearing apparel in the room, all new; there were three gown-pieces, some cotton and some silk, three or four shawls, some lace caps, and two Leghorn bonnets; I asked who they belonged to - Wilkinson said none of them belonged to her - Hartnett said, "You may as well say it is all mine." I took them to Lambeth-street - I showed the prosecutor into the lock-up room - he identified them almost immediately - he said he was satisfied they were the women, and said,"Poor creatures, I am sorry for you."

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you tell him you had got the women who robbed him? A. No, I said I had two women who I supposed to be them, from the description. There was another woman, and two or three men in the lock-up room.

COURT. Q. What do you suppose to be the value of the wearing apparel you found? A. I should think 15l. or 16l. I apprehended them from information relative to their being flush of money, not from the prosecutor's information.

HENRY MORGAN . I am patrol of St. Sepulchre. I know Tingey, by seeing him about the market - I recollect seeing him on the 11th of September with the two prisoners, about seven o'clock in the evening - I am certain of them, for I spoke to them; they wished him to go into a gin-shop; he said, No, he would drink nothing there, and they went on.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When was your attention called to this? A. I heard next day that he was robbed.

Q. Do you know any women who are like these? A. Hartnett has a sister who walks that way, very much like her - I do not know Dandy Bet, or Saucy Sall - Hartnett is called Irish Nell. I am certain the prisoners are the persons - the street lamps were not lighted, but there was a light from the wine-vaults.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You knew the prisoners, and are sure they are the women? A. Yes; I have been a patrol in that parish eleven years - I have known one of the prisoners from a child, and the other six or twelve months - my business calls me to Newgate market, and I frequently saw them walking there among the salesmen: I took particular notice of them that even ing; I followed them down to the end of Sharp's-alley, and said to them, "What, are you both out again? I hope this will be a warning to you." They had both only been liberated at three o'clock that afternoon - they were at the door of the wine-vaults - I am sure of them and the prosecutor.

EDWARD WEEDON . I am clerk to Messrs. Young of Smithfield, who are agents to the salesmen. On the 11th of September I paid Tingey 525l. 17s. 6d. between four and five o'clock - I have known him nearly twenty years, and transacted business with him nearly every market day - he was perfectly sober.

JOSEPH WOODNESS . I keep the Coach-and-Horses public-house, Bartholomew-close. On the 11th of September Tingey left my house after tea, a little after six o'clock; he was perfectly sober - he had dined with me about two and had a pint of half-and-half - he went out, returned to tea, and went out quite sober - and soon after seven o'clock he came in and appeared as sober as before - he complained of his loss - I went with him to a house in Chick-lane with Godfrey, an officer, and saw a man in a lower room.

WILLIAM TINGEY re-examined. Q. After you took off your coat and laid it down close by you, what was the next thing that happened? A. The girl who sat at a distance came closer to me and attempted to take hold of the coat - I seeing that, caught hold of it likewise - one clasped me round the neck, the other seized me, and we were all on the ground, and in the struggle they got out my pocket-book.

WILKINSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

HARTNETT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18261026-26

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1819. JOHN FIELDING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 watchmaker's tool, called a pinion-engine, value 3l., the goods of Joseph Jones , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Tombleson .

JOSEPH JONES. I am a watch-maker , and lodge at Thomas Tombleson's, Copenhagen-street, White Conduitfields ; this pinion engine is mine, and cost me 5l. On Saturday evening, the 30th of September, I left it in my shop, which I locked up at seven o'clock - the shop is in the back-yard under the same roof, and the only communication to it is through the house door - I slept at home, and went into the shop at seven o'clock next morning (Sunday) and found two panes of glass broken away, and the division of the sash, also an aperture large enough for a person to get through, which they must have done to get the engine - I missed that and a variety of tools - I went in search of it in the morning, and found it at Williams', a pawnbroker in Turamill-street, Cow-cross; the pri soner was in the shop, and I had him secured.

THOMAS POCOCK . I am shopman to Mrs. Williams, a pawnbroker. On the 2d of October, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop and put down this tool in a handkerchief; I was busy and put it aside for him to wait; and before I could attend to him, Jones came in and described it; I produced it, and he claimed it in the prisoner's hearing.

Prisoner's Defence. About half-past two o'clock, on Sunday, I was in White Conduit-fields, and found this tool in a handkerchief by some bricks.

WILLIAM TARRANT . I took him in charge; he said at the time that he had found it in the field.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer, and live close to the prosecutor. On Monday morning I saw the prisoner at Hatton-garden, and took his shoes off - I took them to the prosecutor, and under the shop-window, in a corner where they had got over, the marks tallied with the shoes - a bit of wax candle was left behind.

Prisoner. I never had the shoes on till eleven o'clock on Sunday - I always wear boots.

JOHN CLAXTON . I am a furniture carver, and live on Saffron-hill. On the last Saturday in September the pri

soner came to my place about eight or nine o'clock at night, to ask me to lend him a few shillings - I saw him at eleven o'clock when I came home, he was waiting for me - he supped, with me, and after supper finding it was after twelve o'clock - the house I lodge in is a baker's - and shuts up at twelve on Saturday, after that, nobody came in or out without asking the landlord for the key - I said if he liked he might sit by the fire in a chair for the night - he did so - I am married, and have three children - he sat in the room we slept in - I have but one room he was there at seven o'clock when I awoke - my wife is not here - he is my second cousin.

- SLANEY. I am a shoe-maker, and live in White Cross-street. I made all the prisoner's shoes - I never made boots for him - he had a pair of shoes repaired at my house on this Sunday - they were delivered to him on the Sunday morning - I had had them about three days - I soled and heeled them - those produced are certainly the same.

Q. Do you mean to say these shoes have only been worn a day after they were soled and heeled? A. They have been worn in the mud.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-27

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1820. FRANCIS WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 roll of parchment, being records of the Court of Common Pleas at Westminster, and containing remembrances and rules of the said Court, and dockets of causes entered of record in the said Court, value 10s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

2d COUNT, stating it to belong to the Right Honourable Sir William Draper Best , Knight, Chief Justice of the said Court .

3d COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Hudson , George Watlington , and Henry Belward Ray , prothonotaries of the said Court .

4th COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Sherwood .

5th COUNT, calling it a roll of parchment, value 10s., the goods of our Lord the King.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same as the 5th, stating the property as in the 2d, 3d, and 4th counts.

Mr. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS SHERWOOD. I am Clerk of the Dockets, in the Court of Common Pleas . I have seen a record roll, which has been produced, it contains remembrances and rules of the Court entered on record; I have the immediate custody of them; the office is in Tenfield-court, Inner Temple; I have known the prisoner twenty years, as an attorney's clerk.

THOMAS BROWN . I was waiting in the outer room of the Common Pleas-office, Inner Temple . On the 9th of October, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner came into the room and merely looked round at the public notices there - he came a second time, and I left him in the room - and as I returned saw him coming out with a roll of parchment under his arm, he was on the sill of the door - I made inquiry in the office - then followed, and took him in Mitre-court with it - Mr. Ordell took it from him.

RICHARD ORDELL . I am a clerk in the office. I was with Brown, and took the prisoner on the steps of Mitre-court with the roll of parchment under his coat - I missed more, and on taking him back, asked if he knew any thing of the rest - he said, No, and he should say nothing more - I gave it to Lightfoot.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 61.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18261026-28

1821. WILLIAM SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Matthew Pearey , from his person .

MATTHEW PEAREY. I am an ironmonger , and live on St. Mary-at-hill. On the 28th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was at the Holborn end of Fleet-market , going home; a person tapped me on the shoulder, and gave me information; I turned round, and saw the prisoner running from a cry of Stop thief! I pursued, and took him, without losing sight of him; the officer came up, and produced my handkerchief - I knew it to be mine, though I had no initials on it - I had used it a long time.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see nobody else running? A. No, except the officer; I did not see him take it.

HENRY HUGHES . I am a watchman of Holborn. I saw the prisoner in company with another, and watched them, crossing from Skinner-street towards Holborn-hill; I saw Mr. Pearey, arm-in-arm with a gentleman - I saw the prisoner twist up Pearey's pocket; the other then came up close to his side; I saw the prisoner take his right hand out of Mr. Pearey's pocket, with the handkerchief, and put it under his left arm - I was close behind, and received the handkerchief from his hand, as he was putting it under his arm, to hand it to his companion - I took hold of them both, shoved towards the prosecutor, and tapped him on the shoulder - a third person shoved me against the wall, and both the prisoners got away, in different directions; I pursued Sullivan, and stopped him about a hundred yards off, without losing sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you on duty? A. No - I had not my coat on; the shops were open - it was light; a great many people were passing; it might take three or four minutes.

JOHN GREEN . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house a quarter of an hour before the watch set, and was taken to the Compter; Hughes delivered me the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from drinking tea with my sister, and am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-29

1822. JOHN HARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 10 canvas-wrappers, value 5s. , the goods of William Charlsworth and others, his partners.

JAMES TONKIN . I am patrol of Cripplegate. On the 24th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner passed me, with a bundle under his arm; I followed him into Philip-lane, and there stopped him; I asked what was under his arm; he said, wrappers - he had ten canvas wrappers; he said they belonged to his master. Mr. Charlsworth, of Milk-street; I took him to the Comp

ter, and took them to Mr. Charlsworth next morning. I knew the prisoner before, but knew nothing against him.

WILLIAM CHARLSWORTH. I am a woollen-warehouseman , and have more than one partner - we live in Milk-street . The prisoner was in our service; these wrappers are ours, and are worth 5s. - we never allow them to our servants. I had advanced his wages in November last, and stated I should have no wrappers taken - he lived two years with me, and I had a good character with him.

Prisoner. Q. When I have sorted up the wrappers, have you not allowed me a few odd ones? A. I have allowed him brown paper, but not wrappers. He had said the wrappers were the perquisites of some warehousemen - I said I would rather advance his wages.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the care of all his property, and could have robbed him if I had chosen; most porters think these things their perquisites; I sorted up some when I had been with him three weeks, and he gave me some small bits.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-30

1823. JOHN HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 2 coats, value 5l. 4s.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 30s.; 1 shirt, value 3s., and 1 muslin handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Winn .

RICHARD WINN. I am a silk dyer , and lodge at No. 48, St. Mary-axe . This property was in a chest of drawers it was safe on the evening of the 22d of September; I got up between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and went out - I returned at eight, and all was safe then. The prisoner is a stranger to me; I went out, and was sent for about ten o'clock - I found my drawers open, and my clothes gone; the drawers had not been locked. I gave notice to the pawnbrokers, and that evening saw one of my coats exposed for sale, at Regins' stall, in Rosemary-lane; I found a waistcoat at his house. The prisoner was taken that evening, with the trousers on his legs. The house is let out in lodgings - the landlord lives next door.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you told us all you know? A. Not exactly; I did not know Regin; he took me to the prisoner's house, where I found the trousers on his legs; I asked where he got the property; he said he bought them that morning. of a Jew, in Cheapside, at a quarter past ten o'clock - he said the Jew hung his head down, and he did not know whether he should know him, and could not swear to him - he said he could not recognise him; he afterwards saw Mr. Pitcher, who lodges in the house, and said he thought he was the person; I occupy the second floor front room, and an old lady lives on the same floor. I understand my wife had locked the room door; Pitcher lived on the third floor. He said at once he had bought them of a Jew, but did not say what he had done with them in my hearing; Regin was present. The prisoner was asked if he had bought anything besides the coat and waistcoat - he said he had not - I am quite certain of that. I never said the robbery must have been committed by a person who knew the premises, nor anything like it. The officer of the night liberated him on his own word, to appear at the Mansion House on Monday, and he did appear - Pitcher was examined before the officer of the night, and by the Lord Mayor. What the prisoner said at the Mansion House was written down, I believe.

Q. Do you remember charging Mrs. Pitcher with having one Jack to visit her? A. Never - it was the prisoner charged her with it; I then inquired who Jack was, and found a person answering that description had been visiting her - I did not express dissatisfaction at it.

SOPHIA WINN . I live with my husband, at this house. I went out after my husband, at half-past nine o'clock to the butcher's, and locked the room door - I returned in about ten minutes, found the door open, and the lock seemed very loose; I had left my husband's clothes in the drawers - I found the drawers shut, as I had left them, and missed these articles. The prisoner was brought to the room, by the officer, that night - I had never seen him before - I was confused, and hardly recollect what passed - I did not notice his dress; Mrs. Pitcher lodges up stairs with her husband, who is a cutler. I never saw them in my room till after the robbery; her husband went with her to the Mansion House on Monday - the clothes were brought there by the officer; I never heard my husband say Pitcher must be concerned - we suspected nobody in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you heard your husband say he thought it must be done by a person acquainted with the premises? A. Never - he never thought of such a thing; I never saw the prisoner in our room - the drawers could be seen when the door was open; I saw the property safe the evening before. The prisoner told my husband on Saturday night he would go with him on Monday, to Holywell-lane, to see if he could find the rest of his clothes; he called on Sunday night, to say he should not be able to go - I asked him at what time he bought the clothes - he said about a quarter past ten o'clock, and that he had dealt in old clothes for three years. I was before the Lord Mayor at the third examination - Pitcher, his wife, and my husband were all there. When the prisoner called on Sunday, my husband called Pitcher down, to see if he would know him again - he said he would not swear to him, as the man he bought them of held his face down. Pitcher was discharged on the first or second day.

ANN PITCHER . I and my husband live at this house: he is a cutler, and works for Mr. Bear, of Chandos-street, and has worked there five years - we live on the next floor to Winn. I was never in their room till the night of the robbery; I had seen a man go out of the house about an hour before the robbery - I described him; he was a very respectably dressed man. My husband's brother, who has been at sea three years, came to see us on Tuesday - he stumbled on the stairs, and my husband said,"Hold up mate" - the people in the house mistook it for Jack; he is they mean by Jack. I described to Winn the man I had seen go out, as having a blue coat and trousers, and a moreen bag in his hand, full of something; I got up on Saturday a little after seven o'clock - my husband went out about a quarter past seven, to his work, and did not come home till eight at night; I was in bed when he went out - he is still in Mr. Bears' employ. When I went to the watch-house Winn said, "Will you see if you

can recognise the man?" as soon as I went in I said to the prisoner, "Will you turn your back to me?" as I had noticed the man's back - he did so, and I said, "I think you are the man" - he said, "Thank you ma'am;" and immediately said to my husband, "I bought them of you"- my husband has no bag.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you go to the watch-house? A. On Saturday evening, the 23d of September; the constable of the night was going to discharge him, and detain my husband; I said, "Harden, what, are you going to let the thief go, and detain an innocent man?" he went to his head officer, came back, and let them both go- I had seen the man go out of the house a few minutes before the clock struck ten; I was looking out of window, seeing half-a-bushel of coals measured from a waggon.

Q. On your oath, did you say a word about the man going out till he said he bought the clothes of your husband? A. Yes, the moment the robbery was mentioned to me, and I told an officer of it - my husband is not here. The Lord Mayor asked the prisoner if he could swear he bought them of him - he said he could not, and he was discharged - I believe Mr. Winn was present. My husband is hard at work, which there is a hurry for, for the last fortnight; he said if he had been slack of work he would have attended - he leaves off about eight; I do not expect him to call here for me.

CORNELIUS REGIN . I deal in second-hand clothes, and live in Crown and Shears-place, Tower-hill. On the 23d of September, about eleven o'clock, I bought this waistcoat and coat of the prisoner, for 6s. - they were very much out of repair; I have dealt with him for three years- it might be a few minutes before eleven o'clock; my house is about half an hour's walk from Cheapside - he did not say where he got them; he brought them in a black linen bag; I did not ask him about them - he had nothing else, except a few children's things; I think it was a brown poplin frock - he had not other men's clothes.

Cross-examined. Q. You have dealt with him for three years? A. Yes, and always found him honest and upright; I do not keep a shop, but expose my goods in the open street, directly I buy them - I gave him the full value. The prosecutor was passing at seven o'clock, and asked where I got them; I accompanied him to the prisoner's house, and heard all that passed - he immediately said he had sold them to me, and had bought them in Cheapside that morning - I do not recollect what time he said. I know he goes about the street with a bag, to buy clothes - (looking at a bag), that is the one he brought them in; the prosecutor then asked if he bought any trousers - he said, "This pair upon me I bought with the coat and waistcoat, and seeing them about my own size I thought I would wear them, to save a better pair." The prosecutor said Pitcher who lived in his house, was rather a doubtful character, habituated to drink, and he had not the best opinion in the world of him. I was before the Lord Mayor on Monday; the prisoner said, "I believe Pitcher is the man, but cannot positively swear to him."

COURT. Q. Was the prosecutor's wife present when the prisoner said this about Pitcher? A. No - that was said at my place, and it was there the prosecutor said about Pitcher being addicted to drink; nobody but my wife was present - she is not here. On Saturday night, as we went along to the prisoner's house, he said Pitcher was an idle character, a drinker, and he had not the best opinion of him; the constable was with us.

JAMES HARDEN . I am a constable. I went with Winn and Regin to the prisoner's house on Saturday evening: I did not hear him say anything about his suspicion of Pitcher - he said there was a man in his house who he had some suspicion of - that he did not know the man's name, but he lived up stairs. Cheapside is half an hour's walk from St. Mary-axe; if Winn had mentioned Pitcher's name I must have heard it; when we arrived at his house Pitcher had not come home - we went and waited at the watch-house, then went to see if Pitcher was come home, and met Mr. and Mrs. Pitcher, with the prosecutor - we walked behind them with the prisoner, who said, "I think that is the man;" I never heard Winn say he suspected Pitcher to be the man, for he went on the Sunday to Pitcher's employer, to inquire where he was on the Saturday- if he had mentioned Pitcher's name as we went to the watch-house I must have heard him; Mrs. Pitcher said the prisoner resembled the gentleman who went out that morning. I was not in the watch-house when she desired him to turn round.

Q. After she said she believed he was the man, did you discharge him? A. By the advice of Plaistow, the wardbeadle - he is my superior; he seemed to be respectable, from the neighbourhood he lived in, and the house he kept; I did not know him before. I consulted my superior.

Cross-examined. Q. He made his appearance on the Monday? A. Yes - he said he thought Pitcher was the man before Mrs. Pitcher said she believed him to be the man; he said so the moment he saw him in the street, but afterwards said he would not swear to him.

RICHARD WINN . I never said I suspected Pitcher, for I had never seen his face till Saturday. After the prisoner said he bought them in Cheapside, he said he bought them of another person, in Hartshorn-alley, near Aldgatepump - he said that at our house - the constable was present.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you not to state this in your evidence in chief? A. I was not asked about it; I never said I suspected anybody in my house - what the constable has said is false.

COURT. Q. Have you never said before that he said he bought them in Harishorn-alley? A. I was going to tell the whole of it, but I was interrupted by that gentleman. Regin has told a positive lie. The clothes are mine.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not the prisoner tell you he had bought the trousers which he had on at the same time? A. Yes - I never said I suspected anybody who lived upstairs, whose name I did not know; I never said Pitcher drank, or that he was a loose idle fellow; I had never seen him or heard any character of him.

COURT to JAMES HARDEN . Q. Did not you hear the prisoner say, after declaring he had bought them in Cheapside, that he bought them in Hartshorn-alley? A. Certainly he did; I did not recollect it before. I discharged him by the advice of my officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I have dealt in clothes for three years, and bought these in the way of trade; I really be

lieve Pitcher is the man who sold them me - his key fits Winn's door - the officer has tried it.

JAMES HARDEN. Pitcher's key will open Winn's door; the lock is in bad condition - a nail would open it; Pitcher is a short thin man, and does not look at all like a Jew.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-31

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1824. FREDERICK SEVILLE & DANIEL BLOOMFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , at St. Luke, 1 shawl, value 1l.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 7 waistbands, value 3s.; 2 buckles, value 5s.; 1 ring, value 18s.; 1 brooch, value 2s.; 1 necklace, value 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 4 pairs of gloves, value 2s.; 5 gowns, value 1l. 14s.; 2 frocks, value 10s.; 2 pinafores, value 2s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 4 pairs of shoes, value 10s.; 1 veil, value, 10s.; 7 yards of net, value 10s.; 1 pair of stays, value 4s.; 1 tippet, value 1s.; 1 spencer, value 18d., and 2 night-caps, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Grant , in the dwelling-house of John Grant .

ANN GRANT . I am the wife of Thomas Grant - we live in Sussex. I was visiting at my brother-in-law's, John Grant, No. 24, Sloane-terrace, Chelsea, in the parish of St. Luke . On the 30th of September (I had packed up my clothes, to go home) two trunks, containing the apparel stated in the indictment, stood on my brother-in-law's shop counter - he is a batter; there were three gowns instead of five; the property was worth above 5l., at a moderate value - I only include three gowns. I saw them safe on Saturday morning, the 30th of September, between six and seven o'clock, and was informed they were afterwards gone. I found them at Queen-square Office that day. I know nothing of the prisoners.

JOHN BLYTH . I am a gentleman's coachman. On the 30th of September, about half-past six o'clock, or twenty minutes to seven, in the morning, I was about a quarter of a mile from Sloane-terrace, and saw the prisoner Bloomfield carrying a trunk, in the New-road, by my master's stables; somebody called out Stop him! he immediately turned his head round, and seeing some one after him, set the box down and ran away; I followed, and never lost sight of him till he was taken; the box was taken up while I was pursuing him.

WILLIAM PRIDDON . I am a stable-man. I heard a cry of Stop him! and saw Blyth pursuing Bloomfield, who was running; I stopped him, and when I brought him back I saw the trunk; Seville was brought up in about ten minutes.

SAMUEL ELLIOTT . I live in Chapel-row, New-road, behind Sloane-street, and about a quarter of a mile from Sloane-terrace. I was in bed - one of my children said there was a cry of Stop thief! coming down the road - I jumped out of bed, put on my breeches, and went out; I saw somebody turn the corner - I ran with the people, without shoes or stockings on - I came into Sloane-street, and opposite Han's-street, they said, "There he is, among the clump of trees," and I there saw Seville; I got over the rails of the square, and secured him; the trunk was brought to me, with a silk handkerchief, while he was within the rails with me - I took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I live at Chelsea. I saw Seville on this morning, between six and seven o'clock, running, in Sloane-street, with a little trunk in his hand; I heard no alarm then, but suspected him, as he kept looking back- I then ran after him; he ran down Cadogan-square, and threw the trunk over the rails, and got over himself into the shrubbery there, and was taken by Elliott - the railing is four feet six inches high.

GEORGE SPENCE . I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoners and the trunks.

MRS. GRANT. These are my trunks, and contain the property stated - it is my husband's, and worth 5l. and more.

SEVILLE's Defence. There was a witness at the office, who could not swear to me, and he saw the person take the trunks; he said his coat was torn under the arm, and mine was not torn.

SAMUEL ELLIOTT . I found nobody else in the shrubbery.

SEVILLE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

BLOOMFIELD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18261026-32

1825. MARK MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Allen , on the 18th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 1s.; 1 gold-ring, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 4 half-crowns, and 4 shillings , his property.

JAMES ALLEN. I am a teacher of the violin , and live in the City-road. On the 18th of September, between eight and nine o'clock, I called at an oyster-shop, next door to the Three Crowns public-house, near the City-road - I do not know the name of the street; they sent next door for some beer; the man's wife came in, and said some one had struck her - the husband flew out, and a mob gathered; I went to see what was the matter, and this man struck me in the face - he was foremost in the mob; I got knocked down among the mob, and when I got up I found I had lost my hat; I was down about half a moment - my hat might, have fallen off; an officer came up, and went in search of my hat - he brought the prisoner - I said, "That is the man who struck me;" the officer produced my hat. As we went to the watch-house I missed feur half-crowns and four shillings from my waistcoat pocket - it might have fallen out, also a silk handkerchief from my bosom, and a ring from my finger - that might have dropped off; the handkerchief has been found in the oyster-shop. I only charge the prisoner with the hat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS, Q. I believe he had no hat of his own on? A. I do not know.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am an officer. I went up to this mob - there were about one hundred persons; Allen said he had been robbed of his hat - I looked round, and saw the prisoner with one hat on, and another in his hand- I took them to Allen, who seeing the hat said, "That is the man who struck me."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-33

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1826. JOHN FORD was indicted for manslaughter .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

DUNCAN WATTS . I knew the deceased, who was run over, his name is William Pangman .

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a piano-forte-maker, and live in Southampton-place, Camden-town. On the 12th of September, about half-past five o'clock, I was near the New Southampton Arms public-house - my attention was attracted by a grain-cart, and on looking behind I saw a van coming up behind with four horses; the cart was on the left, its proper side, going at a slow pace - the driver was in front, but whether on the horse or shaft I cannot say; the van came at a more rapid pace, and in about half a minute came in contact with the cart - I saw the deceased fall from the near side of the horse to the further side - he fell towards the middle of the road, strait on the shaft by the side of the horse, and from there to the ground, with his face downward - I immediately ran to his assistance, and as I passed the front of the van, I lost sight of him - during that time I heard the cart fall from the van with a heavy jerk, and the wheel of the cart went on the man's body - I went to lift him up, the blood was flowing copiously from his mouth and nose, and right ear - a person desired me to raise him up - the rattles immediately came in his throat, and he was dead - the prisoner drove the van.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were the van and cart going the same road? A. Yes; the cart went at the usual rate of a horse and a heavy cart - the van was not going faster than could be expected.

COURT. Q. Both were on the proper side? A. Yes - the van had turned more into the centre to pass the cart, and the wheels caught - it stopped us soon as it possibly could.

EDMUND COFFIN . I am a nurseryman. I was about twenty yards behind the van, which went at a proper pace - the prisoner was on the box - the van was about four feet from the cart, and getting out into the road to pass - there was room enough to pass, but it afterwards got nearer to the cart, and the near hind-wheel knocked against the cart-wheel - I saw the cart pass on, and the man laying down behind it - the wheel had passed over him lengthways - the man died instantly - there did not appear any thing wilful or careless on the prisoner's part.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-34

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1827. JAMES BISHOP , CHARLES DOWNES , HENRY ORE, alias HAWES , and GEORGE HACKMAN , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Fuller , on the King's high-way, on the 11th of September , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 sovereigns, 3 shillings, 1 sixpence, 1 case of surgical instruments, value 40s.; 2 cases of lancets, value 20s.; 1 hat, value 20s.; 1 cravat, value 1s.; 3 keys, value 2d.; 1 piece of ass'-skin, value 1d., and 1 pin-cushion, value 1d. , his property.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HENRY FULLER. I am a surgeon , and live in Suffolk-place, Hackney-road. On Monday, the 11th of September, I was passing from Whitechapel towards Bethnal-green-road and had occasion to go through Fleet-street-hill , it was about half-past seven o'clock in the evening; I heard footsteps behind me and the word "Now;" and immediately afterwards a loud whistle - I was seized by my arms by two persons - and my arms were pinioned by two persons, one on each side; they were tied by a rope; at that time about twenty persons had surrounded me, some of them had sticks - one of them said "If the b-r speaks, knock his b-y brains out;" I begged of the man who seized my right arm not to hurt me, but to take what I had got - he said I should not be hurt, but they would have what I had got- I said to them "Act like men, take what I have got, but don't injure me;" they then began to rifle my pockets and took from my right-hand trousers pocket a case of surgical instruments and two cases of lancets; and from my right-hand waistcoat pocket, three keys and a piece of ass'-skin; from my left-hand trousers pocket, two sovereigns, three shillings, a sixpence, and a pen-knife with a broken point - from my left-hand waistcoat pocket, a small velvet pin-cushion - one of them searched for my watch - I had not got one.

Q. How did he search for it? A. By rubbing his hand against my fob-pocket - another afterwards unbuttoned the flap of my trousers and felt for my watch; I had none - and the one who had felt said "The b-r has got no toy;" they then took off my cravat and then my hat; the man who took off my hat said, "Now give the b - r a rum one;" and the man on my right side said, "Don't hurt the poor b-r;" he then untied the rope and run away; the prisoner Downes is the one who held my left arm, or took my money from my left hand - he either held my left arm or took my money - he stands the second person from the Jury - I am certain he is the person who was in the position I have mentioned - Ore, who is third from the Jury, stood rather in front of me on my right side - I am certain of him - Bishop was standing rather more in front of me, on the right side - he kept pushing Ore and another (who stood rather more in front of me on the right) away to get closer to me - he stands nearest to the Jury - he pushed Ore with his right arm and another with his left, to get closer to me.

Q. Look attentively at him, and say are you sure of his person? A. I am - Hackman (who stands fourth from the Jury) stood on my left hand, rather in front - I am certain of him - I asked the person, who took my keys, to give me them back as they would be of no use to them - he returned one of them saying, "You b-r, there is your key;" I went into a chandler's-shop, about a yard and a half from where I was robbed; after I left there, I went towards Bethnal-green-road and gave information to West, an officer, and asked him to go with me - I gave him a description of, I believe, seven or eight of the persons.

Q. Were these persons presented to you then for the first time, or had you seen them before? A. I had seen them frequently when I have been walking in that neighbourhood by day-light, visiting my patients - I gave information at Worship-street, and accompanied the officers on the following day about the neighbourhood of Whitechapel, and saw a great number of persons of their rank and appearance, but none that I could identify that day - on the following morning I identifield one, and a few days after two others, neither of the prisoners are any of those persons - In consequence of information I received afterwards, I went to a place where one Sarah Holt worked -

it was on the Saturday after the robbery; I think Garton accompanied me - he found my two cases of lancets on her - and in consequence of the information we received from her, the prisoner Ore was apprehended - Downes was also apprehended.

Q. How soon after the robbery did you first see Downes? A. I think it was on the 4th of October at Worship-street-office, he was with two or three others in the yard - I pointed him out myself without any suggestion from any one - Hackman was apprehended, I think, about a week after Downes - I first saw him at Worship-street-office amongst, I suppose, about thirty persons.

Q. Did you point him out, or was any suggestion made from any other person? A. I was sitting in the Magistrate's room, and in about a quarter of an hour Mr. Bennet desired me to walk into the office and point out any person I knew - Hackman was then standing in the body of the office, not among the prisoners, and I pointed him out.

Q. You described seven or eight men to West, did you in particular describe any person at the bar? A. I described Downes and Bishop - Bishop at that time had his hair hanging down his face - I saw him some days after I saw Downes - I saw him at Worship-street, it was before Hackman was apprehended.

Q. Under what circumstances did you identify Bishop? A. I was taken into the lock-up-room by Gleed, there was about a dozen other prisoners there; I was ordered to pick out the person who robbed me, and I pointed him out without any intimation whatever from any body; I received an order from the Magistrate to go into the room and pick out the man, and I did.

Q. When, for the first time after the robbery, did you see Ore? A. I saw him at his father's house in Wilmot-street, Bethnal-green, after the robbery, I think about the 20th of September, and I then knew he was one of the persons who were present at the robbery.

Q. Immediately after the robbery, you went into a chandler's shop - did you borrow any thing? A. I borrowed a hat of Mr. Fernie, a butcher of Bethnal Green, about eight o'clock that evening - I went first to Mr. Marsden, but he had not got one to fit me. When I went to West and to Mr. Fernie, I had neither hat nor neckcloth- that was just before eight o'clock.

Q. Look once more at the persons of the four prisoners- do you entertain any doubt whatever of their being part of the persons who robbed you that night? A. I have no doubt whatever.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. How are you so particular of your memory as to time? A. The clock struck eight after I borrowed the hat - the transaction might last two or three minutes: I then went to the chandler's-shop kept by Dover - I staid there about five minutes - I saw neither the man nor the woman who kept the shop - I have seen the woman since; she is not the person whom I saw in the shop that night, for that was an elderly person. Fernie lives about half a mile from Dover's, but I had seen West before I went to him.

Q. Is there a bell rings in that neighbourhood at eight o'clock? A. There used to be, but I do not know whether it is continued. I felt alarmed at first, but when the man on my right said I should not be hurt, I certainly was not so much alarmed then. It was barely twilight - not daylight; it was not daylight nor dark; it was daylight, or nearly so - twilight had not began: they were lighting candles in the chandler's-shop when I was stopped against their door, while the prisoners were committing the assault - it is not uncommon to light candles before dark. I saw the colour of Bishop's clothes - he had a blue coat, and black or dark waistcoat, and dark or blue trousers - Ore had a long blue coat, and black or dark waistcoat; he stood about a foot or a foot and a half from me.

Q. Did you not say, on your examination, you could see the person who seized you on the right-hand, but could not observe the man who pinioned your left arm? A. I could not observe the person who pinioned my left arm.

Q. Were the prisoners all produced to you in custody? A. Ore was at his father's house - the others were all in some place of confinement. Hackman was in custody, I suppose; though he was in the office, and not among the prisoners, he did not tender himself as a witness for some persons under examination - not to my knowledge. I think it was on the 19th that I went to Ore's father's house; there had been an examination at the Police-office, and I went in consequence of something Holt said; I took my Solicitor with me - this was before the trial took place here last Session, one or two days before, but after a bill had been found by the Grand Jury; I asked him, in his father's presence, if he could give me any information respecting a case of lancets.

Q. Was he then, upon your certain knowledge of him, taken into custody? A. No; I gave information that night of him, and I think he was taken in about a week afterwards - the conversation at his father's lasted three or four minutes. My lancets were left at Worship-street, in the hands of the officer. I appeared here against three persons last Session, and was positive of all three of them- one of them went away at large, in consequence of his not being active, I believe.

Q. Did you not say to Ore, when you were going away, that it was very fortunate for him he was not acquainted with such characters? A. I believe I said something to that effect.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. - Where had you been to last before the robbery? A. To Mrs. Oliver, a patient, near Fleet-street-hill: I merely spoke to her at her gate, but did not go in - the last house I was in was Mr. Richman's, a gun-maker, in Church-lane, Whitechapel; that is three quarters of a mile from the spot - I came direct from there, only stopped to speak to Mrs. Oliver, I raised a cry of Stop thief! immediately after the robbery; nobody else called Stop thief! I believe; two persons came up, I think; but I cannot speak to the number - I pursued the thieves for ten or twelve yards, up a street, which I think is Fleet-street, calling Stop thief! Some persons came up and begged me to hold my tongue, saying the gang was so desperate, they would murder me if I did not. I then went into the chandler's-shop; some persons came in; I think it was the same two men who came up when I called Stop thief! I think only two came into the shop; I do not recollect more - there was an old lady in the shop, and a woman stood at the door - I only saw two women when I went in, but before I got away there might be a dozen persons at the door - I

saw no more in the shop - I do not recollect seeing Mrs. Dover that night - I cannot say whether I saw her or not; I was considerably agitated in the shop.

Q. Did you not say to Mrs. Dover, on being asked, that you did not know any of the robbers? A. No, I did not, nor that I could not identify them - on the contrary, I said I should know some of them.

Q. Did you not repeatedly say, in the hearing of three or four persons in the shop, that you did not know any of them? A. I certainly did not: I do not know a woman named F. Burdet, nor Charles Cousins ; I was about five minutes in the shop - when I came out, two men joined me, but not a man and a woman. I was in a confused state, and do not know whether the moon was up.

Q. Do you recollect an observation being made to you, that it was a pity it was such a cloudy night, for you could not see the persons? A. It was quite starlight and a very clear night.

Q. As soon as you came out of the shop, did you see a clear starlight night? A. I do not say, directly I came out of the shop, for I stood in the road some time - I do not know whether the moon was shining.

Q. Do you recollect it being remarked to you, that it was so cloudy, it was impossible to see anybody? A. No such remark was made in my hearing. I do not know Robert Burdet . When I got to Bethnal Green, it was a clear starlight night - I might be five minutes going there- it was then a quarter of an hour, or rather more, after the robbery, I suppose a quarter of an hour; it was not dark when the robbery was committed; I heard the clock strike eight after I went for the hat; I was above a hundred yards from the church, and heard it strike distinctly; I went into Fernie's house; I did not count the clock, but I am satisfield it was eight; I know it was after seven, and could not be nine.

Q. You conclude from those circumstances, and not from counting the clock? A. Yes; I was in the house, and not paying attention whether the bell rang.

Q. You have sworn to seven people positively - can you swear to more? A. Yes, I should know the man who took my hut: I never said I could swear to sixteen or seventeen- the robbery might last more than two minutes - I am certain of eight persons; the officers took me next day to see some persons, they were not in custody; I suppose I saw a hundred at least - I had eight officers in all; they took me to suspicious persons: I had described the persons to the officers; they took me round the neighbourhood to persons they suspected to be bad characters.

Q. Did you not state on the former trial, that you could not tell who was on your left side? A. No; I said I could not tell the person who pinioned my left arm.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY.* Q. Did you see Bishop except at the Police-office? A. I saw the back of some person one day in Dover's shop; it might be Bishop; he stood with his back to me, I do not know whether it was him.

*Not Peter Alley, Esq.

Q. You identified him at the office, and would know him at any time you saw him? A. Yes; I went into Dover's about five minutes after the robbery; it was, I suppose, twenty minutes before eight o'clock; I was robbed at half-past seven - I could not see the whole twenty persons who robbed me; I never said that Bishop stood on my left hand - he stood next to Ore, in front of me, on Ore's right-hand; I did not state at the office that the robbery was committed after eight o'clock; I did not perceive that any of the prisoners had sticks, but some of the gang had - Bishop did not speak to me, he spoke to Ore, and pushed him aside to get more forward.

Q. Had you not a full view of Bishop in Dover's shop? A. I never saw his face after the robbery, till I saw him at the office - I might be two minutes in Dover's shop.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Ore was apprehended a week after you had been to his father's house - when you saw him there, had you any doubt of his being one of the persons who robbed you? A. Not the slightest - I have frequently seen all the prisoners about the neighbourhood before the robbery, and knew them all.

COURT. Q. How many years have your engagements led you to pass about that neighbourhood? A. I have been in practice in the parish about ten years. I have met them about singly, and at other times in company together - I feel confident of them all - I have not the slightest doubt whatever.

Q. You saw Ore at his father's house - as you did not doubt about his being concerned, how did it happen that a week elapsed before he was apprehended? A. I complained at the office that he was not taken, and the answer I received was, that the officers had been after him, but could not take him - I gave directions for his apprehension the very evening I had seen him - he had only his shirt and stockings on at his father's, but I knew him the moment I saw him.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were any of the persons engaged in the transaction without their hats? A. Hackman had no hat, and another whom I have not seen; the other three prisoners had hats - I had seen them about the neighbourhood occasionally, both with and without their hats.

ROBERT FERNIE . I am a butcher and cow-keeper, and live in Church-street, Bethnal Green. On the 11th of September, I saw Mr. Fuller at my house, the corner of Fuller-street - it was, as near as I can state, about ten minutes before eight o'clock; he was without a hat, and had a silk handkerchief round his neck - I lent him a hat.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any particular reason for speaking to the time? A. As near as I can tell, that was the time. I had been at the public-house opposite; I went there about half-past seven o'clock, and had been there a quarter of an hour when I was fetched out to him - I did not particularly notice the time that I went to the house - there is a bell rings at eight o'clock; I did not hear it ring - I speak to the best of my belief of the time - when I went to the public-house, the gas-light in my shop was lighted; I do not know how long it had been lighted.

Q. Was it a dark night? A. Middling, I believe; there were lights in the public-house - I was not there long - it was too dark to see without candles - I do not know whether I could distinguish the features of a man out of doors by the light of the sky.

THOMAS JOHN WEST . I am constable of Bethnal Green. On the evening of the 11th of September, I saw Mr. Fuller in the shop of Mr. Marsden, the churchwarden -

there was a crowd round the door. He said he had been robbed a few minutes back, and described a tall person, with a greasy hat, dressed in a black coat - he described several, and said he should know them again - he had neither hat nor cravat on when I saw him - I am certain he said he should know several of them - it was better than twenty minutes to eight o'clock when I saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Had you been out on duty that night? A. No, I had been standing in the road, the corner of a turning, where I live - I had been at home, and had been out about ten minutes, when I saw him - I had lighted candles some time before I came out - I did not particularly notice how long - it was a bright starlight night; there was a moon afterwards, I believe; but I did not observe it at the time; there might have been one before.

Q. Had you particularly noticed the time? A. Yes; after I saw Mr. Fuller I went to a public-house, the Blade Bone, five doors off, to get my brother officer, and it wanted then about two minutes to a quarter to eight o'clock.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer of Worship-street. I received information from Mr. Fuller soon after the robbery - it was last month. I apprehended the prisoner Bishop on the 1st of October, in consequence of that information, and on the Monday, the 2d, I and Garton turned all the prisoners out of the lock-up place; there were about nine of them - Mr. Fuller pointed to Bishop, and said the instant he saw him, "That is one of them;" I had not suggested anything to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you recollect how he was dressed? A. As he is now; I apprehended him close to Bethnal-green watch-house.

GEORGE BLACKMAN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I received information from the principal officer of Worship-street (not from Mr. Fuller), and, in consequence of that information, I apprehended Ore on the night of the 25th, in the Bethnal-green-road; that was the day I had received the information - Grassmith was with me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you been to his father's? A. No; I do not know where his father lives - I did not go round with the prosecutor the day after the robbery.

MR. FULLER re-examined. Armstrong, Waters, and other officers were with me the day after the robbery.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. In consequence of information I received I went to the house of Sarah Holt, on Saturday, the 16th of September; I went to where she was at work, at Duff and Brooke's, in Spital-square, and accompanied her to a house in Quaker-street; Mr. Fuller was with us - when we got there there was nobody in the house but some children; in the course of a minute she produced these two cases of lancets from her bosom - she told me where she got them. I was at the office on some occasions, when Mr. Fuller was there; I was there when Hackman was - he pointed him out as one of the persons at once, without any hesitation; he was in the office with, I believe, twenty other persons - they were all ordered to put on their hats, then Mr. Fuller was called in, to go into the body of the office, to see if he knew anybody - he went round into the body of the office, and picked Hackman out.

Q. Was any intimation given to him to direct his attention to one person more than another? A. No; the persons all stood just as they were, they were only ordered to put on their hats.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Hackman was not brought there by any warrant or summons? A. No; I believe he had been apprehended the night before, and brought there on a charge - he was in custody: he stood among twenty persons; they were not all prisoners - he was not handcuffed; I do not know of his having been there twice before, offering to give evidence.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you go round with the prosecutor the day after the robbery? A. Yes - I did not point any persons out to him; I do not know whether anybody else did: nobody was taken that day in my presence - there were six officers besides me; it was the second day after the robbery.

COURT. Q. What was done two days after the robbery? A. We accompanied Mr. Fuller with a search-warrant, to a house on Fleet-street-hill - he pointed nobody out to me, nor I to him.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am a constable of Christchurch. I apprehended Hackman in Brick-lane, on the 17th of October, and accompanied him to Worship-street office; I saw Mr. Fuller identify him; he never saw him till be went into the office - there were ten or fifteen persons in the body of the office - we were all ordered to put on our hats, officers and everybody there; nobody could tell who were officers or prisoners; Mr. Fuller came round, went back to the Magistrate, and pointed out Hackman - he was not there as a witness, but in my custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had he been there before, as a witness? A. Not to my knowledge; he had been all night in the watch-house, and sat there in his clothes; I and the prisoners stood in the body of the office; the Magistrate was in an elevated seat - the persons in the office stood indiscriminately mixed together; I stood perhaps two yards from Hackman, who stood about the middle of the room - there was one person between me and him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you, in any way, intimate to Mr. Fuller to look at Hackman? A. Not in the least.

SARAH HOLT . I had some lancets in my possession - the prisoner Downes gave them to me on Saturday morning - I think it was on the 16th; he told me to take them to George Houghton's father, to deliver them to the doctor.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you go with Downes to a person named Bailey, to get the lancets? A. I know he went to a place in Bethnal-green, but I do not know the person's name; I passed the door with him- he rang the bell - whether he got the lancets there I do not know; he gave them to me in Brick-lane, between nine and ten o'clock on Saturday morning - that is about five minutes walk from the house where he rang the bell, but it was the next morning that he gave them to me; Mr. Houghton, whose son had been taken up, told me to apply to him to get the lancets on the Friday, and after that he passed the door, and rang the bell.

Q. He gave you none when you asked for them at first? A. No - a young woman named Kitty Watson lived up stairs in the house, where he rang the bell; she is married,

and I do not know her husband's name; I do not know who else lodged there.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you deliver the lancets to the officer? A. Yes, to Garton, or Mr. Fuller - (looking at them), these appear to be the same - he went into the house on Friday night, and on Saturday morning gave them to me.

JAMES FOWLER . I am a Bow-street officer. I apprehended Downes on the 22d of September, about eight o'clock in the evening; after taking him to the watch-house he said he received the instruments from a man named Bailey.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you know where his father lives? A. Yes - I took him at his father's door.

COURT. Q. Were you present at the office when Mr. Fuller identified Downes? A. Yes; he selected him himself, from three or four others.

Prisoner BISHOP. I leave my Defence to my Counsel.

DOWNES' Defence (written). My Lord, I was with Henry Ore and Hackman in Hare-street and Brick-lane, from about four o'clock in the afternoon on the day the robbery was committed, till a little after seven, when we all three went to Wilmot-street, where Henry Ore's father lives - Hackman and me waited outside while Henry Ore went in. On his return we went to the Angel and Trumpet public-house, at Stepney, where we arrived about eight o'clock, or a few minutes after; on our way I bought some bread and meat, which we took into a box, where William Adey , Thomas Sidebottom , and George Houghton were sitting. Now, as I understand the offence was committed after eight o'clock in the evening, I hope you will be satisfied that I could not be one of the offenders, because I was at the time near two miles from the spot. - All, my Lord, that I know about the matter is this: - a woman named Sarah Holt came to me, and said that George Houghton was taken into custody for the robbery, and that, although he was innocent, he might lose his life if the prosecutor swore against him, and she understood the prosecutor only wanted to have his instruments returned to him; I knew Houghton was innocent, because he was at the Angel and Trumpet when we first went there, and being anxious to save an innocent man's life, I undertook what Sarah Holt requested. Having heard that some men named Bailey were concerned, I went with Sarah Holt to John Bailey, who said he knew nothing about the business, and I afterwards went to his brother, William Bailey, who gave the instruments to me - I gave them to Sarah Holt, and she, as I was told, handed them to Houghton's mother, from whom Mr. Fuller and Gooding received them. This, I most solemnly declare, was all I had to do in the affair. I have reason to believe the prosecutor has been misled, and that he was induced more from suspicion and misrepesentation, than from his own recollection, to accuse me and Downes, and afterwards Hackman, whom it was well known was coming as a witness on our behalf - that the prosecutor may believe he is right I do not dispute, because he can have no object in accusing innocent men, but that he cannot safely and prodently swear to so many individuals as he has done, must, I humbly submit, be apparent to every discriminating mind, when it is considered that the offence was committed in the dusk of the evening, that it only occupied, as the prosecutor says, about two minutes - that he must necessarily have been in great trepidation and alarm, and that all the robbers were strangers to him. The prosecutor, at the Police-office, deposed that I was the person who either held his left arm, or took his money from his left-hand pocket - but I am informed, that when giving evidence against Houghton and Boyce he said, that Boyce seized his right arm, and he could not observe who seized the other; these statements, I submit, are inconsistent with each other, and cannot be reconciled. I refrain from making further observation, being well assured that I may safely trust my case to the penetration, justice, and humanity, of your Lordship and the gentlemen of the Jury.

ORE's Defence (written). My Lord, I most positively and solemnly assert that the prosecutor is entirely mistaken in accusing me of being a party to the wicked offence committed upon him. I am a weaver by trade, and work for my father at his house, where I also live, and where I have every thing provided for me in a comfortable way: I had, therefore, no motive whatever for joining in the crime which is falsely laid to my charge. On the day the robbery was committed, I was in company with Downes and Hackman, in Hare-street and Brick-lane, from about four o'clock in the afternoon, till a little after seven; we then went to my father's house, which is in Wilmot-street, and I went in to get some money, as I was going out to spend the evening, and was in the house more than a quarter of an hour. When I came out I rejoined Hackman and Downes, who were waiting in the street, and we all three went to the Angel and Trumpet public-house, near Stepney church, and there we remained till half-past ten o'clock, and then went home together and separated soon after eleven. I have witnesses to prove this, and to show what time I went to the Angel and Trumpet, and what time I came away. I heard of the robbery being committed, as others did who resided in the neighbourhood; but was neither accused nor suspected, as I believe, of having had any share in it, until I was taken into custody. On the 19th of September, Mr. Fuller, and another gentleman, who, I have since been told, was Mr. May, his attorney, came to my father's house and asked for me - I was at work at the time, and my father called me - I went down as I was, in my shirt-sleeves - they did not accuse me of the robbery, but asked me if I knew Sarah Holt - I said No - they then said she had told them that I had given her the instruments; this I denied, and said I knew nothing about them, nor of what they consisted. They then asked me if I knew George Houghton; I told them I did, and that I saw him last, about eight o'clock, on Monday the 11th of September - they asked me whether I knew Norton, Quay, and some other persons - I said, No; and they answered it was very well for me that I did not know such characters - they next asked me if I knew Downes, and I told them I did. My father said he did not believe that I had any business with the robbery, as there was a good table for me at home, and that when I went out he gave me what money he thought fitting for my years. They then said that they did not come to accuse me of the robbery, but merely to gain intelligence; this was before the trial of Houghton. If the prosecutor had identified me as one of the party, why did he not have

me taken up at that time as he ought to have done? Instead of this, he tells me he did not accuse me of the robbery, but that he came to gain intelligence. I heard no more of this business till Downes was taken up, and then my father, knowing I had been with Downes on the night of the robbery, questioned me very seriously about it, and advised me, if I had any hand in it, to get out of the way, and he said he would let me have what money I wanted - but knowing that I was innocent I refused to conceal myself, and remained in my ordinary business, going about as usual, till the 25th of September, when I was taken up, as I believe, for no other reason than to prevent my being a witness for Downes, as I could have proved that he was not at the place when the robbery is stated to have been committed. I had no sort of concern in the affair - my witnesses will shew that I could not have been there - and I leave it to your lordship to determine whether men, who were in my company all the time, are not more entitled to be believed than the prosecutor, alarmed as he must have been, and as he had good reason to be - and when it is considered that the robbery was committed, as the prosecutor says, in about two minutes, and when it was dusk or dark. I am informed that the prosecutor told several people that he could not swear to any of the robbers; yet he has already sworn to three persons, and now swears to four more. He has altered the time of the robbery to account for his taking up the persons who were at the Angel and Trumpet, but all the witnesses say the robbery was committed after eight o'clock, and they knew this from the circumstance of the bell ringing. Thus, it is plain, the robbery was committed at the time we were at the Angel and Trumpet, and could have had no hand in it. I shall not trouble the Court any further than again to declare, and call God to witness, that I am entirely innocent, as are also my fellow-prisoners, Downes and Hackman, who were with me all the evening.

HACKMAN's Defence. I can say nothing further than what my fellow-prisoners have stated. I believe I was apprehended that I should not be a witness for Downes and Ore; I had several times attended at Mr. Harmer's office to give my deposition, as I could prove their innocence. On the 16th of September I saw Houghton's mother, she asked if I would attend this Court to prove his innocence - I went to several persons that day, whom I knew to be at the Angel and Trumpet, when Houghton was there - I took to her house their addresses and business - she neglected to let me know when the trial was coming on, or I should have been here - Sarah Holt told me she had the instruments from Downes - I went to him, and he said he had them from Bailey - I went and saw Bailey, he said he did give him the instruments, but did not know he was going to give them to the woman - I understand part of the name is erased on one of the instruments.

MR. FULLER re-examined. These lancets are mine, one of them is marked F. Fuller, which is my brother's initials, but they are mine - the other is marked with the maker's name.

LYDIA BENDER . I know the prisoner Bishop. I saw him on the 11th of September at eight o'clock at night, that is the nearest hour I can fix - I went with him to the Hospital public-house, Whitechapel-road, and continued there till ten o'clock - he was not out of my sight during that time - he had called for me at No. 1, Hare-marsh, where I live - we got to the public-house about a quarter past eight o'clock - Lewis Tideman and Elizabeth Preston were in company with us there.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are they acquaintances of yours? A. No; I have seen them before, but not to be acquainted with them - I have seen them three or four times before - Preston lives in Wilmot-street - I do not know where Tideman lives - I know more of Preston than him; I have known her two years - she was not acquainted with Bishop that I know of.

Q. What makes you fix on eight o'clock? A. Spitalfields bell was ringing eight as Bishop came to my door- it was a darkish night, as far as I recollect - it did not rain, nor did the moon shine - I did not take notice whether the stars were out - Preston and Tideman were drinking by themselves in the public-house - Bishop had half a pint of gin and cloves, and we drank together - I had a full glass, there was not quite a glass each - Bishop had some - I do not know who was helped first - I was helped second - Preston was helped first, Bishop third, and Tideman last - I recollect now that Preston was helped first - we had no conversation together - we drank each other's health, that is all - I have said all I know, and that is all I can say.

Q. Do you mean to represent that you had no conversation with Bishop, Tideman, and Preston, from eight to ten o'clock? A. No, not a word, further than drinking health.

Q. You mean to represent that no conversation passed betwixt these three persons and yourself, except drinking health? A. No, nothing passed.

Q. Did you talk about any thing that happened lately? A. No - I do not know the landlord - I have been there several times since - he is not here that I know of.

Q. Now you must have had conversation; do you mean to represent to the Court that from eight to ten o'clock nothing passed in your hearing, except merely drinking each other's health? A. Nothing at all, I swear it.

Q. You said nothing, and nobody said any thing? A. Yes, nothing passed but drinking health - I have known Bishop a year and a half - he wore blue trousers, a round fustian jacket, a red silk handkerchief, a black silk hat, white stockings and shoes that night - it was not so dark but that I could see what he had on.

Q. At eight o'clock it was light enough for you to see white stockings, fustian jacket, and so on? A. Yes; if I had met him in the street I should have known him directly by his dress.

COURT. Q. This robbery made a great deal of conversation in the neighbourhood? A. It has; I have heard no paper read about it - nobody has read the Sessions' paper to me - I have heard it talked over once - I do not know whether that was before Bishop was in custody - he was taken one Sunday night - I heard people talk about reading the trial in the newspaper, but they had not then got the paper in their hands.

Q. Was the drinking between all four of you, or had you separate refreshments? A. Separate refreshments, except the gin and cloves - Bishop and I drank two pints of porter - the other two were drinking their porter, they were at the house before we got in, and we left them there - Bishop and I went away together.

LEWIS TIDEMAN . I live in Flower and Dean-street, Spitalfields. On the 11th of September, I went to the London Hospital public-house, Whitechapel-road - I got there by seven o'clock - Bishop came in in about an hour and a quarter with Lydia Bender - they continued there till very near a quarter to ten, as far as I can recollect; we drank separately; when they first came in they called for a pint of beer - I gave them my pot to drink - they drank - and when theirs came in I drank out of their pot - we paid separately for what we drank - I left a little after ten o'clock, they left very nearly half an hour before me - we had a quartern or half a pint of mixed liquor - Bishop fetched it from the bar - I cannot tell whether it was gin and cloves, or gin and raspherry.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What makes you certain you got there at seven o'clock? Q. It was seven by the tap-room clock - there is no seven o'clock bell rings - Bishop came in at a quarter past eight o'clock - I did not look at the clock then - it was a quarter past - I am sure it was not at eight.

Q. Will you swear it was not at eight o'clock? A. I cannot swear about it.

Q. Will you swear it was not more than half-past eight o'clock when they came in? A. I cannot swear exactly - I can swear it wanted more than a quarter to nine o'clock; as near as I can judge it was about a quarter past eight - I will not swear it was not half-past - we had the gin and cloves about half an hour after they came in.

Q. What did you talk about? A. Why about George Houghton, William Adey, and Sidebottom, who had gone down to the Angel and Trumpet - Bender was sitting at the same table with us, she was not talking to me - the table was between us - we talked about nothing else - I was talking to Bishop - Bender might have talked, to Bishop I cannot my.

Q. Did you drink Bishop's health? A. I said, "Here is luck," that is all - Bishop did not drink my health - I gave Bender a nod when I took the glass of porter - I did not say, "Here's your health" to her, nor to Preston, no further than nodding my head - the liquor made four full glasses - each had as much as the others, there was no difference.

Q. You saw them go out a quarter before ten o'clock, and had no conversation, except about Houghton and Sidebotton? A. That is all - I told Bishop they had gone to the Angel and Trumpet, at Stepney, that is all that passed between us; Preston and Bender were acquainted and they sat and talked together, but I could not hear what they said, as I did not listen - I cannot say whether they talked much or little - it was darkish when I went there at seven o'clock; I do not know whether it rained, the moon was not up, but it was starlight; it was darkish, but the stars were out - I did not see the moon - I had come from Wilmot-street, about a quarter of a mile from the house - it might have rained, but not to perceive it - I cannot say whether I was helped to the liquor first, second, third, or last - I think it was second or third - I had nothing, except porter - they had one pint before the liquor and one afterwards to my recollection - Bishop was dressed in blue trousers, a round fustian jacket, and, I believe, a red handkerchief; I did not observe his stockings or hat, it was either beaver or silk. I have seen him wear a silk hat.

MRS. DOVER. I know Bishop and Mr. Fuller. I saw Mr. Fuller in my shop on the Wednesday after the robbery, the prisoner Bishop was there; Mr. Fuller remained there about three minutes - Bishop was brushing his clothes - Mr. Fuller came in, and Bishop appeared no ways dismayed; Mr. Fuller said nothing to him nor to me; Bishop was standing with his back to the back-room door, in his shirt-sleeves; Mr. Fuller entered the street-door and could see him, and they could see each other; Bishop had come into my shop about half-past seven o'clock, in the evening of the robbery, for a slice of bread and cheese, and went out directly.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was Mr. Fuller's stick found in your house after the robbery? A. Yes; he brought it in his hand, and left it by the side of my counter - that I swear; he was humanely asked into my place as he was robbed; I know none of the prisoners but Bishop; he left my shop some time before the robbery; it was moonlight on one side of the way, and dark on the other, on account of the houses.

COURT. Q. Was you at home after the robbery, when the prosecutor came into your shop for assistance? A. I heard a faint cry of Stop thief! I was at needle-work behind the counter; I went to the door as quick as possible, and saw a gentleman without a hat; I suppose Bishop had left my shop three quarters of an hour then; I did not notice the time Bishop came into the shop; it was as near half-past seven o'clock as I can tell.

Q. How long after that did you hear of the robbery? A. About ten minutes after eight o'clock; I am convinced it was after eight; I was not out all that evening, and saw Mr. Fuller come in; Bishop had left three-quarters of an hour then.

Q. Do you mean to swear Mr. Fuller did not come into your shop before eight o'clock? A. I am confident it was a quarter-past eight; I saw him come in without a hat, and offered him my husband's, but it would not fit him - he had no cravat; he bound a handkerchief round his head instead of a hat, and left my shop.

Q. What was Bishop doing at your place, on the Wednesday afterwards? A. I had bought a bedstead of a friend, Bishop brought it home, and asked me for a brush to brush his clothes; Mr. Fuller was in my shop about three minutes at that time.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What time was it you heard the cry of Stop thief! - A. It was ten minutes or a quarter past eight o'clock, for I observed to my little girl some time before, "It is eight, and your father is not come home;" I am certain it was after eight - on hearing the cry Stop thief! I got to the door as fast as I could, and saw the gentleman without his hat, and Charles Cousins, who had been in my shop, but had got to the door before me, speaking to him - he had come for some table beer; he returned into the shop with Mr. Fuller and several neighbours - Mr. Fuller appeared extremely bad indeed; I never saw a person look worse - we offered to send for some drink for him, and every assistance was offered him; he said he did not know the persons who robbed him - I heard him say so once or more - I am confident he said it once; I believe I asked him myself once, "Should you know any of them Sir?" his answer was, "No, I should not" - I saw F. Burdet in my shop while he was there, and believe she saw

him part of the way home; he was at my shop about five minutes, to the best of my knowledge - two men, if not more, went out with him - Robert Burdet was one; I forget the other's name; he lives in the neighbourhood, and I should know him - it was certainly a moonlight night; but on account of the houses, which are four stories high, it appeared very dark on the side where the robbery was committed.

Q. How many persons were in your shop when Mr. Fuller was there? A. About half a dozen at least, but I cannot say distinctly - an old woman was there who had taken tea with me - she is not here, but has been sent for- I am quite sure I was in the shop when Mr. Fuller came in.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What time did Cousins come into the shop? A. About three minutes before I heard the cry - what detained him was he had a newspaper; I took it out of his hand and said, "Lord, I wish I could look at it a bit;" he said, he had just got it from Parnel's, and when he had done with it. I could have it; he had been there for strong beer, and came in with the strong beer in a pewter pot, and asked me for table beer - I believe he had that in a mug; my little girl served him; the old woman was not here yesterday, nor was I - I dare say Cousins spoke to Mr. Fuller in my shop, but I did not attend - Burdet was talking to him, but I did not hear what he said - I stood on the sill of the door - when Mr. Fuller was asked in, I came in also - so many people came in that I was obliged to attend to my place, and did not hear all the conversation - I heard him say, "The villains have stripped me of every thing;" on saying that, I believe Burdet asked if he should know any of them, and I asked him myself - he went away about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, to the best of my knowledge; I never saw Houghton or Boyce; I have been subpoenaed here; I was not here on the former trial.

CHARLES COUSINS. I am a weaver. On the night Mr. Fuller was robbed, I was in at Dover's, and heard a cry of Stop thief! it was between a quarter and twenty minutes past eight o'clock, for when I came out of my brother's door, the Spitalfields eight o'clock bell had been ringing about ten minutes; I went to Parnel's for a pint of strong beer for my brother, and then went to Dover's for a pint of table beer; the bell had done ringing when I heard the cry of Stop thief! it begins at eight and leaves off at a quarter past eight exactly; on hearing the cry, I came out with the two mugs in my hand, and saw Mr. Fuller at the step of the door; he had no hat or neck-handkerchief; he came to me and said, "The villains have robbed me of my hat, handkerchief, and two boxes of lancets out of my pocket;" Mrs. Dover and some one else said, "Will you come in Sir;" he did so; and I instantly came away; nothing more passed in my hearing - I left the door immediately and did not go in.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you seen any of the prisoner's before? A. I knew Downes by his living exactly opposite my mother's; I believe he is a weaver; I knew the others by seeing them come by my mother's door five or six weeks ago, but do not know them by name; I live in St. John-street, near Fleet-street-hill; I moved there on the Saturday before Mr. Fuller was robbed; I had got a newspaper for my brother to read; I cannot read; Mrs. Dover just looked at it while her daughter got the beer; I heard nobody ask the prosecutor if he should know the men; I went away directly, I did not ask him.

MARY REASON . On the night Mr. Fuller was robbed, I was in Dover's house - I heard a noise and ran out; it was between eight and nine o'clock, for I heard the clock strike eight, and stopped there a good while afterwards - I have just been fetched here.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. This is the first time you have heard of being wanted here? A. Yes; I have not seen Mrs. Dover since the 11th of September, and never had any conversation with her on the subject; I think it was nearer nine o'clock than eight; I was at Dover's when it struck eight, and heard the bell ring - I think it was better than half-past eight; Mr. Fuller came in without a hat, with a switch in his hand, and let it down by the side of the counter - I was there sewing; I go out charing and sewing; I drank tea between four and five o'clock - I went home directly after this, and got home at nine o'clock, or not much after (I live in Thomas-street, Brick-lane;) I will not swear it was not half-past nine o'clock, or a quarter to ten - I will swear it was not ten; I live about half an hour's walk from Dover's - it is about half a mile.

COURT. Q. Had you passed the day at Dover's? A. No; I called in, and she asked me to stop tea.

JEREMIAH MORELL . I live at No. 4, Fleet-street-hill. I was in doors when Mr. Fuller was robbed; my next door neighbour called out - I ran out, and found Mr. Fuller placed against the wall, by the door of the chandler's-shop; it was a moon-light night; I asked him to go into Dover's, which he did, and I went in with him - he seemed very much agitated; I asked what he had lost; he said he had lost his hat, his cravat, a sovereign, and 3s. or 3s. 6d.; he remained there about ten minutes; I asked if he knew any of the persons, but what answer he gave I do not know, the people being all talking - I can answer that it was from a quarter to twenty minutes after eight o'clock, for I had called in and had a pint of porter at the Red Lion public-house, at the corner of Hunt-street, Mile-end New-town - Spitalfields bell was ringing eight all the time I was going home- it strikes out at eight; I do not think it had ceased when I got home, but I sat some minutes before I heard the alarm.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far is your house from Dover's? A. Twenty or thirty yards - I had left home about seven o'clock, to go for my work; it was dusk - it might be a quarter past seven; the moon was up when I came home - I cannot say whether it was up when I went out; I remained with Mr. Fuller at Dover's - I think he was there about ten minutes; I went part of the way home with him. I am a weaver. I do not know Downes, nor any of the prisoners; I have seen the one in the white handkerchief, but not to have any personal knowledge of him, and I do not know his name any further than that you call him Downes.

ROBERT BURDET . I live at No. 4, Fleet-street-hill, and am a weaver. On the night Mr. Fuller was robbed I heard a cry of Stop thief! it was from a quarter to twenty minutes after eight o'clock, for I had been at my own door, and heard the bell ring eight - it had ceased when I heard the alarm; I was in doors, and, to the best of my knowledge, I did not hear it when I came out - I

saw Fuller standing against Dover's door, without his hat or handkerchief; Morell was up before me: I asked him what Mr. Fuller had lost - he made some inquiry of him. I went into Mrs. Dover's with them - he seemed very much alarmed; we might have remained there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; Morell and I accompanied him from Fleet-street-hill to the bottom of Fuller-street, Bethnal-green-road, which is about a quarter of a mile; he seemed much frightened, and asked if somebody would be so kind as to see him out of the neighbourhood - I offered my services. When he was standing at Dover's door I remarked it was a pity it was so cloudy, as it was not likely for him to have any assistance from the moon - it was very cloudy, and bade for rain; the moon was covered with clouds at times: I said it was a pity it was so cloudy, as I was doubtful whether he would be able to get the right parties - he made no reply; my wife had followed me to Dover's - I had no hat on, went back for my hat, returned, and found her there - she was there during my absence.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you remember advising the prosecutor not to call out? A. No, Sir - I never did, for I was not there at the time he was robbed; I only heard the call of Stop thief! when I was in-doors - I might have got to him in about three minutes. I did not say he had better not cry out, as the gang was so desperate they would murder him. I was once examined here as prosecutor of one Isaacs, a Jew - I was never here at any other time. I was not examined on behalf of persons named Bowyer and French.

FRANCES BURDET . I am the wife of the last witness. On the night in question I heard a cry, and went to Mrs. Dover's; Mr. Fuller had just got into the shop, and several people were there - he was much agitated; he was asked what he had been robbed of - he said he had lost a sovereign, 3s. 6d., and, I think, one or two cases of surgical-instruments, a beaver hat which cost 30s., and his neckcloth; he was asked, to the best of my recollection, whether he should know any of the robbers - I would not say but what I thought the truth; I think he answered No, he did not think he should, for he was taken at such a nonplus - he said it was rather dark, so dark he did not think he should know them if they were to come before him then. It was a lowering night - the moon shone now and then; the clouds went over it. When I went to my door Spitalfields bell was ceasing ringing; I went strait to Mrs. Dover's shop - it was a quarter or twenty minutes past eight.

SARAH BARLOW . I am a weaveress, and live in the neighbourhood of Fleet-street-hill. On the night Mr. Fuller was robbed I was going to a trade prayer-meeting; the bell was ringing eight - I believe it was ten minutes after; when I got about thirty yards from my house I saw the gang coming - I believe there was about a dozen of them; I thought at first they were going to rob me; they seemed then to return from me, and my spirits returned to me again; I turned myself round - a woman sitting on a step asked me to give her a pin, which I did, and said to her, "Don't go on - there is going to be a something;" I then heard the word "Now" - it was said by the gang, who were running; they immediately rushed upon the man, and I ran back, in fright, to my own door - I did not go in, but ran back again to the corner, in my agitation, and the woman was still sitting there, and said to me, "They have robbed the man - there he stands"- I went up to him; he stood against the wall, apparently speechless - a woman came out of the chandler-shop, and asked him in; he appeared much alarmed, and his countenance was very pale; I went into the shop, and staid two or three minutes - he went away almost directly, before I came out - I was rather alarmed.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the bell ringing when you were in the shop? A. No, nor when the gang came along - two men went out with Mr. Fuller when he left the shop.

WILLIAM CECIL . I am a weaver, and live on Fleet-street-hill. On the 11th of September I was at home, and heard some person call out Stop thief! I did not know but what it was boys at play; I did not go down then. I had occasion to send one of my children on an errand in about a minute after - I looked at the clock in my room, and it was ten minutes or a quarter past eight; I cautioned my child not to be gone more than ten minutes - she went for something for my supper, which is generally ready about eight o'clock. She had not been gone a minute before I heard a talking in the street - I went out to Dover's door - there were sixteen or eighteen persons there; Mr. Fuller was there: people said, a man had been robbed. I was not there above a minute before Mr. Fuller came out, and the people standing by observed, that was the man who was robbed - he appeared very much alarmed. I live opposite Dover's - it was moonlight on my side, but dark on hers.

MATILDA MOORE . I have been subpoenaed here. I was sitting on the stop when Barlow came up - I saw Mr. Fuller attacked; it was from a quarter to twenty minutes after eight o'clock; I have no reason for saying so, only that is the truth. I was subpoenaed here on the last trial by the prosecutor - I am a married woman.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What did you see done? A. I was sitting on the step of a door, and saw two young men follow Mr. Fuller - there was a whistle given, and the word Now; about a dozen came up, then there was another whistle, and more came up; as many as thirty collected I think; Mr. Fuller was attacked on the dark side of the street, between two empty houses - the moon shone on the other side - it was very dark indeed, I could hardly observe any thing before me - after he was attacked, he went to Dover's door, with a small cane in his hand; I said, "Sir, do you know any of them?" he said, "No, I do not."

Q. Could you tell who did it? A. I only know one, whom I saw with the gentleman's hat; his name is Thomas Norton - I saw him as he came on the other side, under the shop window, where there was a light. I gave information that I knew Norton when Mr. Fuller came to my father; and I said to him, "Sir, I never saw so short a one as George Houghton."

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What is your husband? A. A weaver. Mr. Fuller subpoenaed me here on the last trial; I was examined, and said I did not see George Houghton; I did not give evidence on behalf of the prisoners. Mr. Fuller paid my expenses, after a good deal of trouble.

WILLIAM ADEY . On the night of the 11th of Septem

ber, I was at the Angel and Trumpet, at Stepney; that is nearly two miles from where the robbery took place, but not quite - I got there before eight o'clock: at half-past six I came from my father's house, and met Houghton and Sidebottom; we went to the Angel and Trumpet together, and got there before eight o'clock. I know all the four prisoners; I saw Downes there and Hackman, who had a woollen cap - I was reading a paper, and looked up and saw Downes come in; I think that was about a quarter or nearly twenty minutes past eight o'clock, at the latest - he remained there till about a quarter past ten at night; I think we went out nearly altogether, but I am not certain - he came in deliberately, not in a hurry.

Q. Did you see Hackman almost as soon as you saw Downes, or afterwards? A. I think they were nearly together; I think another person was with them, but I did not take particular notice - my attention was directed to the paper. Hackman stopped there till nearly half-past ten o'clock - the landlord would draw no more porter, and we all went out nearly together.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was Sidebottom apprehended that night? A. I heard he was - I have never said that we got to the Angel and Trumpet about half-past six o'clock- I have known Downes a long time, by working as a weaver; I have been in that line, but am now a shoemaker, and live at No. 15, Mead-street, which is a quarter of a mile from Fleet-street-hill, or rather more. They came into the public-house cool and deliberately - it was a very dark evening - the moon did not shine before I went to the house; I did not observe what sort of a night it was when they came in - I was either at home or on my way home when Sidebottom was apprehended - I had left him talking to a young woman at the door. I was never taken on any charge of robbery; I was once charged with bullock-hunting, but I did not hunt it.

COURT. Q. Sidebottom was apprehended after you and him had separated at the door of the Angel and Trumpet? A. He went out first, or we might have gone altogether; but I left him talking to a young woman.

Q. After you heard the present prisoners had been apprehended on this charge, did you go to the Police-office? A. No; I went in Houghton's case - Mr. Houghton fetched me from my work, and I offered to give evidence; he was charged with robbing Mr. Fuller. Sarah Carnell waited on me at the Angel and Trumpet.

SARAH CARNELL . In September last I was servant at the Angel and Trumpet. I heard of Mr. Fuller being robbed, on the Wednesday after it happened - on the Monday before that, I waited on three young men at the Angel and Trumpet; Adey and Sidebottom were there; I saw Downes and Hackman there that night; one more came in with them, but I do not know whether Ore is the man. I first saw them there twenty minutes or a quarter past eight o'clock, to the best of my knowledge - I had been out with my beer and returned; I generally take it out a little before eight; it generally takes a quarter of an hour to deliver it - when I came back, I saw Downes and Hackman coming in at the door; they stopped till half-past ten, or a quarter to eleven o'clock.

COURT. Q. Did they stop till the house was shut up? A. They went away before the house was shut up - the landlord had not left off drawing beer.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. At what sort of a pace were they coming into the house? A. Not very fast - a middling pace, like other customers.

THOMAS SIDEBOTTOM . I was at the Angel and Trumpet on the 11th of September with Adey; we got there about a quarter to eight, and staid till half-past ten o'clock. I know all the prisoners; Downes, Ore, and Hackman came in about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after we got there - that would be from five minutes to a quarter past eight o'clock; they remained there till half-past ten, and they passed me at the door as they went out - I was talking to somebody - I am a weaver.

JAMES BARRETT . I have been subpoenaed here, and am a bricklayer - I should have been at work now, if I was not here. I went to the Angel and Trumpet at a quarter before eight o'clock on the night of the 11th of September, and staid till half-past ten - I saw those three prisoners there (pointing to Downes, Ore, and Hackman) - I saw Harry Ore, Charley Downes, and Hackman come in; it was a quarter past eight, as near as I can tell; they remained till half-past ten, or a quarter to eleven o'clock- three more persons came in first, at a quarter before eight - they were Sidebottom, Houghton, and Adey.

COURT. Q. Did you, on any former occasion, represent that Adey, Sidebottom, Houghton, and yourself, were the only four persons in the house that night? A. No; there were more.

Q. Have you ever sworn on any occasion, that the only four persons in your company, were yourself, Adey, Houghton, and Sidebottom? A. I cannot swear it; I have never been in trouble myself.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you present yourself as a witness, or were you sent for? A. They sent me a subpoena.

JOHN LESSENT. I am a weaver. I was near the spot when this robbery was commited.

Q. Did you see enough of the persons who committed the robbery, to know most or all of them? A. Yes; I went to the office, and gave the names; I saw all the persons engaged in it; there were ten; not one of the prisoners, are either of them, on my oath - Bond was with me.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Then it was quite light enough for you to see the person who committed the robbery? A. I ran with them and knew them all; it was moonlight, and light enough to discern their persons.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you seen any of them before? A. I had seen them in the afternoon, and have known them for years; I had been hardly a minute on the spot when it was done - I saw them come up, and when they went away I ran with them; Norton was one of them.

HENRY BOND . I am a weaver. I was with Lessent at the corner of a street, and saw the men who committed this robbery; there were nine or ten - I knew seven of them, and should know the others if I saw them; I went to the office, but they would not let me speak; not one of the prisoners were among them, on my oath.

GABRIEL ORE . I am the prisoner Ore's father. I live at No. 8, Wilmot-street, Bethnal-green-road; it is 1070 yards from Fleet-street-hill; I have measured it. On the 11th of September, my son left home, as near as I can recollect, at half-past seven o'clock; it was so dark I could

not see the colour of the money which I gave him to pass the evening out; Pratt worked for me; some time after this, the prosecutor and his solicitor called; my son was up-stairs at work; he inquired for Ore - I went up-stairs and called him, he was stripped at work - the first question Mr. Fuller asked him was, did he know Sarah Holt; he said, No; the Solicitor or Mr. Fuller said, Henry Ore had given her the instruments; my son answered, "Sir, I never saw the instruments, nor do I know what they consist of;" many questions were asked him - to the best of my recollection they asked if he knew Charles Downes - he said, Yes; they asked where he was last Monday week; he said, at the Angel and Trumpet - they asked what time he was there, and he said about eight o'clock; they asked how he knew it was eight; he said, because he heard some clock strike eight, but did not know what clock it was - they asked who he saw at the Angel and Trumpet; he said, Charles Downes, Adey, Sidebottom, and Houghton; they asked what Houghton was doing, and he said, reading the newspaper - they asked how many persons there were in the tap-room, who they were, and if there were any girls or not; he said, there were no girls that he knew of any kind; there were bricklayers, carpenters, and other tradesmen, but they were strangers to him - they asked if he knew Norton and Quay, and several other names; he said, he did not know those names - the lawyer replied it was a good thing for him that he did not know such characters - the Angel and Trumpet is 2260 yards from my house; my son did not go from home when they left, but remained at his work all the week - and I think it was on the 19th of September the officer took him; he was constantly at work till then - I now know Hackman, he was at the office twice among the officers - he went there as a witness for Downes and my son.

COURT. Q. Do you know of his going there once as a free man? A. Yes; he went to clear my son and Downes; that must be about four weeks before he was apprehended; Mr. Fuller was there at the time.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long was Mr. Fuller at your house? A. I suppose half an hour or twenty minutes; I only guess the time.

Q. Will you swear he was there five minutes? A. Yes; there was no hurry about it, we took our time - and I have not stated all that did pass - we were very considerate, for I thought it important - I had heard of the robbery the day after it was done, but did not know Mr. Fuller to be the person who was robbed till afterwards - I consider they were twenty minutes or half an hour with me; I am certain it was not done in five minutes, it must have been longer - my son was regularly at work from that time till he was apprehended; no officer whatever came to my place to ask for him till Sunday the 24th; when Atfield came, he did not inquire for my son, and I did not know he was an officer - I took him to be a gentleman; but I understood afterwards his name was Atfield - he did not ask for my son, but for another name.

COURT. Q. Then during the interval between the conversation, if an officer had come to ask for your son or apprehend him, they would have found him without difficulty? A. Yes; that I swear - I would have called him down if he had been asked for, the same as I did when the prosecutor came.

ROBERT PRATT . I work for Ore's father and with the son. On the 11th of September, he went out about half-past seven o'clock - it was then rather dark; I went out to the King's Head public-house about a quarter past eight, at the corner of King-street; I was near Fleet-street-hill.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You had heard then of the robbery? A. All was quiet then; I was told of it afterwards.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you worked with the son? A. About three years.

MR. HARMER. I was employed by the father of Ore to attend his examination before the Magistrate; the prisoner Hackman came to my office twice or thrice to state the evidence he could give on behalf of Ore and Downes. He afterwards, as I believe, attended at the Worship-street Police-office, for the purpose of being examined - I have no distinct recollection of seeing him at the office; but I informed the Magistrate, in the presence of Mr. Fuller, that I had several witnesses to prove the innocence of Ore and Downes, if he would hear them - Hackman was one of the witnesses to whom I alluded, and have no doubt he was there ready to answer, if the Magistrate had consented to his examination.

One Witness gave Bishop a good character.

JURY to S. BARLOW. Q. On what evening in the week is the prayer-meeting held in your chapel? A. Always on Mondays; it commences at eight o'clock; anybody who likes attend it - it is four or five minutes walk from my house, at the corner of Edward-street, Hare-street, at Mr. Stutevant's chapel - I went there after the confusion was over; there is no exhortation; it is merely an exercise of prayer; it closes a little after nine - they pray for the revival of trade - I dare say it was getting towards nine when I got there.

COURT. Q. Do you know any of the persons who have been examined? A. I think I know some of them as neighbours, but I never associate with anybody - none of them were at the prayer-meeting to my knowledge - it is never on any other evening in the week but Monday - I generally go when I can; I am not a member - I have attended there off and on these twelve years - these prayer-meetings have began since trade has been bad - I felt a lively interest in it, and attended.

BISHOP - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

DOWNES - NOT GUILTY .

ORE - NOT GUILTY .

HACKMAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-35

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1828. CHARLES THOMAS HALL SHINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2 coats, value 4l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 20s., and 1 bydrometor, value 5s., the goods of William Green , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GREEN. I am a publican , and live at Hampstead . The prisoner lodged at my house about a year and a half ago, and afterwards got a situation at Deptford; about the 24th of September he came to lodge with me

again - this property was in a bed-room opposite to that he slept in - I missed it on Saturday morning, the 14th of October - he still lodged there. I had seen them safe on the 1st.

WILLIAM WILCOX . I am servant to Mr. Gray, pawnbroker, of Fleet-street. I have two coats and one pair of trousers, pawned by a person, whom I believe to be the prisoner, but cannot be certain - they were pawned for 2l., in the name of John Hall.

PHILIP EATON . I am servant to Mr. Walton, pawnbroker, of High Holborn. I have an hydrometer, pawned on the 10th of October, for 5s., by the prisoner - I am certain he is the man.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a constable, and took him into custody - I found a duplicate of the hydrometer in the privy, torn up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 5s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-36

1829. RICHARD DRURY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , in the dwelling-house of Anna Francis , widow , 10 silver spoons, value 3l.; 2 miniature paintings, value 20s.; five 10l. and five 5l. Bank notes , her property.

ANNA FRANCIS. I am a widow, and live at No. 5, Jamaica-street, Commercial-road, in the parish of Stepney ; I believe it has no other name than that. The prisoner's brother and wife lodged in my house - he occasionally visited them, and had been there on the 17th of August; I kept all this property in a small deal box in my sleeping room, on the ground floor - I missed it early in the morning of the 18th of August - he was apprehended in about a week, in bed at his own house, after being denied by his servant, and the miniature-frame was thrown from the window.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am a marshal of the City, I traced a note into the prisoner's possession, and on the 29th of August apprehended him; I applied at the house between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, to know if he was at home; they said, No, he was out of town, and would be absent a fortnight - I afterwards returned, and said, I had a warrant, and must search - I found him in bed; we were waiting some time for his brother, who was in bed in the first floor back room; I heard the window thrown up, and immediately afterwards heard something fall from the window of that room; I went into the yard, and found this miniature-frame tied up in brown paper. I produce a 10l. Bank note, No. 9786, dated the 7th of December, 1825, with the name"Drury, 17th of August, 1826," written on it.

CATHERINE KOHLER . I am a furrier, and live in Cheapside. The prisoner paid me this 10l. note on the 17th of August - "Drury, 17th of August, 1826," is my hand-writing.

HENRY JOBSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Esdailes. I have an entry of some 10l. notes, No. 9777 to 9790, inclusive, which I paid on the 14th of December, for a draft of 148l. 3s., on account of the Yarmouth Bank - I cannot say to whom I paid them.

ANNA FRANCIS re-examined. I lost seven 10l. notes, and some 5l. notes, which I had received on the 14th of December, from Messrs. Esdailes, among others - I know what I paid away. I had a cheque for 87l., on Esdailes', drawn by Cowie, of Yarmouth, and received other notes there at the same time.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-37

First London Jury - before Mr. Justice Park.

1830. WILLIAM GARLICK was indicted for that he, being a person employed by and under the Post-office of Great Britain , in certain business relating to the same office, (i.e.) in facing letters and packets brought to the said office, on the 7th of December , a certain letter, lately before put into the said office, containing ten 50l., one 300l., and one 200l. Bank notes came to his hands and possession while so employed, and that he feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said Bank notes, the property of Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart. and others, his partners, against the statute .

FOURTEEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. SOLICITOR-GENERAL with MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WILLIAMS . On the 7th of December I was a payclerk in the Bank of England, and exchanged this 1000l. note (looking at it), for Messrs. Glyn and Co's. - I gave these notes in exchange (looking at them) - here is one of 300l., No. 693, dated the 22d of November, 1825, one of 200l., No. 3746, dated the 22d of November, 1825, and ten of 50l., dated the 12th of November, No. 633 to 644, inclusive.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is the entry of of this transaction in your own writing? A. Yes. I have not entered the number of the 1000l. note, nor made any mark on it - it has been in the library of the Bank ever since; I got it to day from the solicitor, and cannot say how it got out of the library.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you exchange any other 1000l. note that day for Messrs. Glyn? A. No; I am sure I delivered to their clerk the notes produced.

BENJAMIN LAWRENCE SOWELL . I am now in the accountant's office of the Bank of England. In December last I was employed by Sir Richard Carr Glyn, Bart, who has other partners; they had an account then with Messrs. Sparrow and Co. bankers, at Newcastle-underline. On the 7th of December I took the 1000l. note produced, and received in exchange a 300l., a 200l., and ten 50l. notes (looking at them) - I recognize this one, No. 644 - it was the outer one, and I have written "Sparrow and Co., 1000l." on it; I know the 1000l. note, because I have written on the back of it the particulars of the notes I wanted for it; I put the notes on Mr. Drewett's desk - he is corresponding clerk at Messrs. Glyn's.

JOHN DENIS DANIEL . I am clerk to Messrs. Glyns; Sparrow, and Co. corresponded with them in 1825, but have since failed. On the 7th of December I enclosed these notes in a letter - I have no doubt of this, No. 644, being one of them, as it has Sowell's writing on it, and Sparrow's name - I enclosed the notes in a letter with a bond and two bills of exchange in the ordinary course of

business - I should lay that letter aside to be sealed with wax, as it contained property, and have no doubt I did seal it - it was Raine's duty to take the letter to the post.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who did you receive the notes from? A. I took them off the desk of the corresponding clerk - a remittance sent to Sparrow at any time would have their name on it; but we did not, before, or subsequent to the date of that note, remit them so large a sum - I finish all the letters before I seal them; it might be unsealed a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes - I do not write the letters, only put the enclosures in them - I am very seldom called away.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Can you recollect whether there was any thing different in the appearance of the letter when you sealed it? A. I recollect unfolding the bond, and making it the envelop of the notes; I heard of the loss on Saturday, the 10th of December.

ROBERT RAINE . I am in Messrs. Glynn's service; it is my duty to take the letters to the post in a bag, and was so on the 7th of December - I always put into the post all the letters given to me - I cannot say this letter was put into the bag, but I copied the particulars of it before the notes were put it - I went to the Post-office about six o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You cannot speak to what letters you receive? A. No; I put them into the hole; I always shake the bag, and take great care that I put them all in; I have forty or fifty letters daily.

WILLIAM KEY . I am a clerk in the Post-office. On the 7th of December I was at the Liverpool division of the Inland-office, where the Newcastle-under-line bag is made up; it was my duty to examine the bags before they go out to see they are properly sealed - that bag was sealed and tied in the usual manner before it was put into the sack, and given to the guard.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What time is the bag made up? A. Ten minutes, or a quarter to eight o'clock - the letters are sorted at their different divisions - from twelve to sixteen clerks are employed in sorting letters, which go to that division - they are put into the office in a body, and distributed among different sorters, who place them at their different divisions - they are then collected by six or eight messengers, who carry them to their respective divisions - they are then placed before the clerk of the division, who marks the postage, which we call taxing - a second person then puts them into the box.

Q. Then there are twenty or thirty persons, through whose hands a letter may pass? A. Yes.

ELIZABETH BROTHERS . I am post-mistress of Newcastle-under-line; this paper, dated the 7th of December, is signed by me - I know by that, that I opened the London bag on the 8th - it was sealed and tied in its usual state - letters leaving town on the 7th, arrive on the 8th, about ten minutes before one o'clock - inquiry was made from Sparrow and Co. immediately they were sorted; but there was no letter for them.

WILLIAM TYSON . On the 7th of December, I was clerk to Sparrow and Co.; they expected a remittance on the 8th, from Messrs. Glyn and Co. of 1000l. and a bond - I inquired on the 8th at the office, and got no such letter.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Can you say no letter arrived, addressed to them, that day? A. No letter containing this money, or I should have seen it opened; Mr. Nicholson, the partner, was waiting at the bank for it; when I told him there was none, he told me to get the postmistress to examine again particularly.

BENJAMIN VANDERGUCHT . I am president of the Inland-office; the prisoner was a foreign letter-carrier. On the 7th of December, he was employed in the Inland-office as a facer and a collector of mis-sorted letters; his duty was to face them from five to six o'clock, then to collect the mis-sorted ones, till the business of the evening was over; he would go to all the divisions to collect them and bring them to a sorter to be re-sorted - there are a great many mis-sorted letters; mistakes very frequently arise between Newcastle-on-Tyne, and under-line; and such letters would come into his hands - he was the only collector that night.

MR. SOLICITOR-GENERAL, proposed to call Daniel Callaghan. The prisoner's Counsel produced a record of that person's conviction of uttering a counterfeit shilling, on the 31st of December, 1807, and his having received sentence of six months imprisonment, and to find sureties for six months then to come. Messrs. ADOLPHUS, BRODRICK, and LAW then contended that Callaghan was an incompetent witness, the offence being one of those termed "Crimen falsi;" to which MR. SOLICITOR-GENERAL and MR. BOLLAND replied. The Court stated, they could see no weight in the objection; but if, upon further consideration, they deemed it necessary, the question should be submitted to the twelve Judges.

DANIEL CALLAGHAN . I am a fishmonger, and live in Fleet-market. I have known the prisoner thirteen or fourteen years - I have known a person, named Welch, about twenty years - I am told be married Goodman's daughter - I have been in company with Welch, Goodman, and the prisoner together - I have been at Goodman's house with Welch, but not with the prisoner.

Q. Do you remember, some time ago, meeting the prisoner, and having some conversation with him? A. Yes; it was twelve or fourteen months ago - he then had a situation in the Post-office, as he told me, and I have seen him in his red coat - I saw him and Welch together above twelve months ago - we went and had two pints of stout at a public-house in Fleet-market - Welch told the prisoner he could do some good if he liked to look out, and if he got any thing, I knew where he (Welch) lived - Garlick said he would look out - he did not say for what - we parted; Welch had before then seen the prisoner with me, when he had his red coat on; the prisoner came to my stall in Fleet-market, one night about three months afterwards, and asked me to take a walk with him; we walked as far as St. John-street - he told me he had got something; I asked what it was; he said he did not know, but he believed about 400l. or 500l. - he did not then say where he got it; he asked where Welch lived, and I showed him; he lived in the City-road - he showed me something in a white paper, as we were going along, there was no seal or direction on it - we both went to Welch's house, and saw him - we went up-stairs - Garlick gave him this parcel wrapped up in paper, and there were some notes in it; Welch opened it, counted them, and made 1000l. - there were some 50l. notes - I did not look particularly at them; there were two or three other papers; Welch got hold of one and said, "Here is a bond, I will burn this;" Garlick burned it with the other papers - we

went from there to the Ivy public-house, Goswell-street, to call Goodman out of that house; we all three went close to the house, but I went in alone and asked for Goodman - I saw him, and told him Welch was waiting; he came out with me; I told Welch what had passed between me and Goodman; the prisoner was near - I cannot say whether he heard it - I took the notes from Welch to give to Goodman - Garlick was two or three yards off - Welch stood at the corner of the street, near the Ivy, close to me - Garlick was not many yards off - Welch came to me, and Garlick stood where he was.

Q. Did Garlick join in the conversation at all? A. After I had delivered the notes to Goodman, I did not speak to Garlick - I came back and told Welch what Goodman said he would give for the notes, and went back with a message, leaving the prisoner talking to Welch; I gave Goodman all that Welch gave me - Garlick said nothing.

Q. Was he within hearing when you came back the second time? A. Yes, I think so; I spoke low - I do not know; he might hear me; he said nothing on the subject till the next night - he and I then went to Welch's house, to receive the money - I received 250 sovereigns from Welch, and Garlick 350 sovereigns; Welch kept the remainder for him and Goodman, as he said; 250 for himself and 150 for Goodman. Welch said nothing more - he did not say how the notes were changed - I did not see Goodman any more on this subject.

Q. Have you at any subsequent time met Goodman and Garlick together? A. Never but once, which was by accident, at a public-house in the City-road - they have never been at my house together - I have frequently seen them together.

Q. Have you had any thing to do with the prisoner since? A. Not in that line.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-38

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1831. JOHN GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the above notes, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. SOLICITOR-GENERAL declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-39

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1832. WILLIAM PETTIT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 1 coat, value 3l.; 2 pairs of boots, value 2l., and 2 pairs of shoes, value 10s., the goods of Richard Gowland , in his dwelling-house .

HANNAH HYDE . I am apprentice to Mrs. Gowland - Mr. Gowland is a solicitor , and lives in Berwick-street . One Friday before the 5th of October, when I went to bed, I missed his great coat and some boots from the attic where I sleep; I had seen them safe on the Sunday, across a chair.

ANN GALLOWAY . I live at No. 49, Berwick-street, three doors from Mr. Gowland. One Friday evening before the 5th of October, my little boy was going to bed in the attic, and somebody asked him to let him in at the window, which was shut: I went up, and he asked me to let him in to go through the house; the prisoner is the person, to the best of my belief - he said his name was Mitchell, that he was a ladies' shoemaker, and lodged at Mr. Johnson's (who is a baker in our street) - that he had been sent on an errand, and staid a great while, and when he came home, his father was in a great passion, and he had got away on the top of the house. I was afraid to go back - I opened the window and let him through - I asked if he would let me see his mother, that I might be sure he was telling the truth; he said I should; he followed me down stairs; I walked with him as far as Johnson's, saw him go in, and I then returned towards my own house. He brought a woman, and said, "Mother, this is the person who has let me through the house:" she thanked me, and told me he had been sent on an errand, and stopped a long time; his father was in a great passion, and if he had caught him, would have beat him severely. I saw the prisoner in custody on the 5th of October; it was more than a week before that - I believe him to be the person. A parapet runs from Gowland's house to mine, and he could go no further than my house.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. On the 30th of September I found the prisoner at the watch-house - I told him I wanted him for a robbery at Mr. Mitchell's. where Gowland lodges. He said he knew I did, but Jem the errand-boy was as bad as him, for he let him through his master's house, and pointed out where the things were, and he went through the house, and took the boots and coat, and Jem was to go with him next morning to Solomon's, a fence, in Seven Dials - all this was voluntary - I got the articles from Fergues. I apprehended Jem next day, and after two examinations he was admitted to bail.

RICHARD GOWLAND. This great coat is mine; it is lined with serge, and worth about 2l. - these two pairs of boots are mine; they were in the attic when I saw them last. The house is kept by Mr. Mitchell.

FRODSHAM MITCHELL . I keep this house, and live there myself. James Hill is errand-boy to the person next door.

FRANCIS FERGUES . I am a copper-plate printer. I delivered these articles to Gook on the 14th of September - my servant had found a man under her bed.

JOHN FLOOR . I am servant to Mr. Fergues. I found this property up-stairs; I brought it down, and showed it to master, who went round the neighbourhood and found an owner. Our house is two doors from Mitchell's, and in the same line of parapet.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. John Clark is errand-boy to Mr. Fergues: as I stood at the door one morning, he said,"Bill, we can get 2l. or 3l. very easy: master was out last night, and I went on the roof and saw a window open; I went in and looked about, and saw a great coat and two pairs of boots, and in the window-seat a pair of bracelets, which I sold, and if you like to go on the top of the house, you will see the window open, you can go in and take the boots and coat;" and after work he came and said, "Will you go now? Master is out." I went with him up to the top of Fergues' house; I went in, took the boots and coat, and laid them under the window; I returned and found Fergues' window fastened. I walked along the roof, and seeing a light in Mrs. Galloway's room,

I asked her to let me through. If it had not been for Clark, I should not have thought of it.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-40

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1833. CHARLOTTE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , at St. John at Hackney, 1 bag, value 1s., 16 half-crowns, 30 shillings, and 7 sixpences, the property of Henry Pelling , her master, in his dwelling-house .

HENRY PELLING. I keep the Green Dragon public-house, in Well-street, in the parish of St. John at Hackney . The prisoner was two months in my service. On Sunday the 22nd of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, my brother called me from the adjoining room to the bar; I searched the drawer where my money was kept, and missed it - it was not locked. I cannot say how much I had there; there were more than twenty half-crowns, some shillings, and sixpences - I went to the prisoner and accused her of it; she denied it - I requested to know where it was, as it had been in a bag; she still denied it; I told somebody to fetch a constable - she then said,"Pray, Sir, forgive me, I will never do so any more," and pointed to a corner in the wash-house, where the bag lay, covered up; it was my bag, and contained 3l. 13s. 6d. in half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences. Her box was searched, and nothing found but new clothes, worth about 3l.; there were gowns, stockings, caps, thimbles, and a pair of scissars.

JOHN PELLING . I am the prosecutor's brother. At nine o'clock on Sunday morning, the 22nd of October, I saw this bag of silver in a drawer at the further end of the bar - I was in an adjoining room at three o'clock that afternoon, and saw the prisoner pass the door and go to the farther end of the bar; I heard the drawer open; she passed the door, returned into the kitchen, came back, went to the further end of the bar again, and I heard another drawer opening, and silver rattling; she then returned into the kitchen, and I went into the bar, and sat by the drawer till my brother returned - I informed him - he afterwards called me, and showed me the bag.

JOHN WOODS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, with the bag, at Mr. Pelling's house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18261026-41

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1834. JOHN SIDNEY SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Edwards , on the King's highway, on the 24th of September , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 seal, value 10s., and 1 watch-key, value 1s. 6d. , his property.

GEORGE EDWARDS. I am a journeyman carpenter , and live at No. 43, Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell. On Sunday night, the 24th of September, at ten minutes or a quarter past ten o'clock, I was in Goswell-street , going home - Hemus was with me - I saw the prisoner there plain enough, he was under a gas-lamp; he came right flat against me, made a pull at the chain of my watch, and his hand went up above my head; the chain broke, I lost a gold seal and a gold and copper key - it was done in a twinkling - he ran away - I ran after him up Bell-alley, which leads right across toward Golden-Lane.

Q. Did he use any force? A. No; he ran against me, and gave a pull at my watch - he must have ran against me wilfully; I ran after him up the alley, calling Stop thief! he was taken in less than five minutes - I lost sight of him, but am certain he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. How long was I in your sight? A. Not half a minute - I had been drinking a little - I was sober enough to go home, and to know him - I had drank part of two pots of beer between two of us, and we had a glass of gin each - I might be two hours sitting over the beer.

JOHN HEMUS . I was in Edwards' company, and had been drinking with him - we were going home at about a quarter past ten o'clock; I was not drunk, nor was he - the prisoner came out of a court, and attempted to snatch at his watch; the gas-light, which was very near, shone upon his face - I saw him plainly; I saw him snatch at the watch; the chain broke, and he got the seals - he rather ran against Edwards, but did not do him violence - he ran up Bell-alley, and I after him - I lost sight of him for five or seven minutes - the watchman secured him; I am certain he is the man - I had not seen him above a minute before the robbery.

JOSEPH BANKS . I am a watchman. I was in Bellalley - I heard a cry of Stop thief! went out of a court, saw the prisoner running down, and stopped him - he said, "Let me go, you bl-y fool, I have done nothing but broken a window;" I held him, and a young man came up and beat me about the head, and desired me to let him go - he got his hand into my neck, and held it so tight, I could not call out; he put his fingers within my handkerchief, but I kept hold of him; that man took my hat and ran away with it - I sprang my rattle; Edwards and Hemus came up - Edwards said to him, "Where is my seals, I want my seals" - Hemus said, he was the man who had robbed Edwards.

Prisoner. Q. Was I the first man who ran up the alley? A. I cannot say; for I was in another alley - Edwards was certainly intoxicated, but knew what he was about; he was very much in liquor, but Hemus was not; it was the prisoner who said, he had broken a window.

JOSEPH SIMONS . I am a watchman, and assisted in securing the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. How far was I off? A. About two hundred yards; Edwards was a little in liquor, but sensible enough to know the prisoner: he walked very well to the watch-house.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in New-court, Goswell-street, going into a house with a female; I heard the cry Stop thief! turned to the right to pursue the thief, and went into a court on the right-hand; I could not catch him, but the watchman seized me; up came the thief, struck him, and ran away directly.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18261026-42

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1834. AMELIA ROBERTS and PATRICK RILEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , at St. John, Clerkenwell, 6 candlesticks, value 18l.; 1 pair

snuffers, value 1l.; 1 snuffer tray, value 50s.; 1 tea pot, value 10l.; 1 sugar-bason, value 3l.; 1 cream-jug, value 2l.; 12 forks, value 10l.; 2 pepper casters, value 50s.; 1 mustard-pot, value 30s.; 1 wine-strainer, value 1l.; 1 soyframe, value 3l.; 6 salt-cellars, value 6l.; 24 spoons, value 6l.; 1 watch, value 15l.; 1 watch chain, value 2l.; 4 seals, value 2l.; 1 watch-key, value 7s.; 6 brooches, value 32l.; 3 pairs of earrings, value 18l.; 12 rings, value 16l.; 2 necklaces, value 4l.; 1 locket, value 30s.; 1 gold box, value 35s.; 1 necklace and bracelet, value 15l.; 1 bottle, value 8s.; 2 crosses, value 8s.; 1 pair of studs, value 15s.; 2 pairs of nut-crackers, value 4s.; 1 caster, 2s.; 1 tea cannister, value 4s.; 9 combs, value 15s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 gown, value 5s., and 10 sovereigns, the property of Morgan Fuller Austin , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. MORGAN FULLER AUSTIN. I live in Red-lion-street, in the parish of St. John, Clerkenwell . Roberts was in my service; I was absent at my country-house on the 10th of August, and left her in care of the house; Riley was in the habit of visiting her, which I thought improper, and I forbid him himself coming to the house, and threatened to discharge her if he continued to come; I came to town on the 10th, found the female prisoner out, and she never returned; on the following morning, I discovered my loss; upon going to the drawers for some linen, I found them in disorder, and upon examining, I found the back of the chest of drawers had been taken out, and put in again; I immediately went to the platedrawer, and missed most of the plate, and my wife's jewels; I missed all the articles stated in the indictment, and many others; I immediately went to Hatton-garden, and on the 12th, sat out with my brother-in-law to Monmouthshire, and found the prisoners at Newport, in Monmouthshire, cohabiting together, at lodgings there; an alarm had been given upon my arrival, and I found them at the top of the stairs; Roberts had my wife's black dress on, and a few trinkets; Riley had a silk handkerchief of mine in his pocket, a brooch of my wife's in his breast, and a pair of my nankeen trousers on; I found other property loose on the floor, with a box full of my plate; I said to Roberts, "You did not expect to see me;" she said, "Yes, I expected to be taken, and glad I am;" the man said he had nothing to with it, he knew nothing about it; I brought the property away; the prisoners were afterwards removed here by Habeas; here is the property in Court; the value of what I have lost, was full 400l.; many of the articles found exceed 40s. in value; here is a silver tea-pot, and a quantity of plate, I know it all to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Roberts say she took it all herself? A. I do not recollect it - I believe she said the man had nothing to do with it.

COURT. Q. Was it stated in the prisoners' hearing, whether they cohabited together in that room, and how long they had been there? A. Yes; it was stated they lived there as man and wife, and slept in one bed - and that the female passed herself as a travelling milliner, and the man as a jeweller; neither of them denied that statement.

JOHN HARVEY . I am driver of the Hackney-chariot, No. 18. On the 10th of August, between twelve and one o'clock, I was called by the male prisoner to St. John-square, to the end of Badger-yard, which is a thoroughfare for foot passengers, and leads into Red-lion-street - the prisoner led me to that spot; I turned my chariot round; he got inside, and waited there till the female prisoner came to him - she ordered me to come and help her to fetch the boxes; he remained in the coach - she had a small parcel in a red handkerchief; I could not see its contents; I fetched some things to the coach, and a woman brought some after that - I drove the prisoners to Crown-court, Picket-street, Strand; the luggage was taken out there - I carried some up stairs, and both the prisoners assisted; I waited in Crown-court, by their desire - and in half an hour, they both came back with the same luggage, and put it all into my chariot again, except a basket; they got in, and ordered me to get a post-chaise to go to Hounslow - I said, I could go as well as a chaise; and when I got to Somerset-street, they stopped me, and said, a box was left behind; I returned and got it, and drove them to Hounslow, where they got into a chaise, with the luggage, and started to go further.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain of the man? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Do you now know where the prosecutor lives? A. Yes; my chariot was drawn up about one hundred yards from his house. I am certain of them both.

MR. AUSTIN re-examined. Q. The first circumstance which attracted your attention was, finding the linen in your drawers disordered? A. Yes; the drawers were locked - there is a pannel back to the whole chest, and then a back to each drawer; I found that had been taken out.

ANN WATSON . I live at the end of Badger-yard, St. John-square. I know the prisoner Riley. On the 10th of September I recollect a chariot coming, which the last witness drove; I saw Riley opposite my window - he went down before the coach; I saw him cross over and get into it - he was there about a quarter of an hour, and then Mrs. Charles came with a basket of clothes, which she put into the coach, and went away; Riley then put his hand down to see what was in it - Roberts then came with a parcel in the shape of a writing-desk, in a cloth - she put it into the coach, and went away - then a long paper box was brought, and put into the coach; she went back, and fetched more things several times, and at last went away in the coach with Riley.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know where Mr. Austin lives? A. Yes - I did not see Riley go to the house - the things were covered up.

ELIZABETH CHARLES . I remember the coach being brought to the end of Badger-yard. I carried a flask basket there by order of the prisoner; it contained things which I had ironed and mangled for her - I do not know whose property they were.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. On the 11th of August I went to Mr. Austin's house, and found the back of his drawers had been taken out, and half broken off; it was taken quite away from the room, and then the back of the drawers themselves were taken out, and put under Mr. Austin's bed, and under the servant's bed was the

pannel back of the drawers - there was a quantity of nails in it, which stuck into the bed by the pressure. I found two panch-ladles and a cheese-taster under her bed; the drawers were about four feet and a half square - it was one entire pannel back and nailed in; it would require some time and some experience to take it out.

Prisoner ROBERTS. I beg for mercy.

RILEY's Defence. I am quite innocent, and hope and trust the Almighty will bring me out of it.

Five witnesses gave Riley a good character.

ROBERTS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

RILEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18261026-43

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1835. ELIZABETH LINHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 75 yards of ribbon, value 2l. 5s., the goods of William Davies , in his dwelling-house .

LEWIS PHILIPS . I am shopman to William Davies, a haberdasher , of Chiswell-street . On the 23d of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in the shop, near the door - there were a great many customers; she asked for ribbons, and I showed her a drawer - she asked to see more, and I showed her another drawer; she bought three yards, at 6d, and before she left the shop I missed some from that drawer; I said nothing. She went two or three yards from the door; I went after her, and said I thought she had some ribbons; she said she had nothing but a piece of pork in her apron - I brought her back, took hold of her apron, three lengths of ribbon fell down, and two more dropped from her - they are worth 45s.

HENRY CUTTER . I am shopman to Mr. Davies. Phillips brought the prisoner back - I saw a length of ribbon fall from her, which I took up; she was taken further up the shop, and another fell from her; five lengths were found in all.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop after buying a loin of pork, and bought three yards of ribbon, which I put into my basket - I set my basket on the counter, and when I came away he tapped me on my shoulder, and brought me back; there was nothing in my apron but the loin of pork.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-44

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1836. LEWIS MERRY WEBLEY , JAMES SAWYER , and CHARLES CORNWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 50lbs. weight of cheese, value 30s., and 30 eggs, value 2s. , the goods of William Cory , the elder, and William Cory , the younger.

WILLIAM FINCHAM . I am a constable. On Sunday, the 15th of October, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I had just come off duty, and met Webley in Long-alley, Shoreditch, four or five hundred yards from Mr. Corys' - he was carrying a bag with two cheeses; I followed, stopped him in Angel-alley, and asked where he got them; he said he found them at the top of Cornhill - I took him to the watch-house, and found thirty eggs in his hat, and in his pocket two leaves, corresponding with a book which Mr. Cory had in his shop; Mr. Cory claimed the cheeses. I took Sawyer on the Monday, and at the second examination the Lord Mayor sent for Cornwell - an officer brought him, and he was committed.

JAMES PAGE . I am porter to a wine-merchant. On Sunday morning, the 15th of October, I saw Cornwell waiting with two persons, opposite Mr. Cory's door, from six o'clock to half-past six; when they saw me at the window Cornwell said something to the other two, and walked down the street a little way - he then returned to them, and walked away again; I saw the other two run across opposite to Corys' door - I was going out in about half an hour, and Cornwell passed me with a bundle under his arm, tied in a black handkerchief.

WILLIAM CORY, JUN. I am in partnership with my father - we live in Bishopsgate-street. I know the prisoners, by seeing them all walk about the street, but I have not seen them in company. These cheeses are ours - we did not miss them till Fincham brought them; we have too many to miss them, but I know we never sold them.

WILLIAM PELHAM . I am in Mr. Cory's service. On Sunday morning, the 15th of October, about a quarter past six o'clock I opened the door - Webley and Sawyer crossed over, and came into the shop; Webley followed me down stairs, and brought up a cheese, which he gave to Sawyer; I knew them before. It was agreed they should come - they had been there the Sunday before, and I had made an agreement on Saturday with Webley, that they should come - I knew Cornwell before, but not Sawyer so well as the other two.

Q. Who came on Sunday morning? A. Webley and Sawyer. When Webley gave Sawyer the cheese he took it out, wrapped in an apron; Cornwell then came in, and I gave him a piece of butter, and twenty or thirty eggs; he wrapped the butter in a black handkerchief; Cornwell went away with them - Webley had a bag - he took two cheeses and put into it, and had thirty eggs, some in his hat - that is all they had that morning.

Q. Have you been in the habit of robbing your master? A. Yes, for about three Sunday mornings - I am still in his employ. I was taken up, and then mentioned this circumstance; Sawyer had never been there before - the others had been twice. I have lived a year and a half with Mr. Cory.

WEBLEY's Defence. He carried the game on long before I knew him; he knew three or four more lads, and never came out of the shop without his pocket full of copper.

CORNWELL's Defence. I met him on Saturday - he asked me to come down, and said he would give us anything.

SAWYER'S Defence. He told us to come at half-past six o'clock; we waited opposite the shop, and he called us; he called me out of bed one night, and gave me some ham; every morning he used to bring out halfpence, and give to us to change at the shop for silver.

WEBLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CORNWELL - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

SAWYER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-45

1837. RICHARD POINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 leather purse, value 2s.; 3

half-crowns, 5 shillings, 3 sixpences, and a 5l. Bank note, the property of Thomas Pugh , from his person .

THOMAS PUGH. I am a cow-keeper . On the 22d of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon I was in Smithfield pig-market , and bought three pigs; I took my purse out, and had to pull out a 5l. note, to give the pig-dealer three sovereigns - I returned the note into the purse, which I put into my pocket, and buttoned it up - it then contained the note, and 14s. in half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; it was a leather purse; I tied the legs of the pigs, and carried one of them to the cart - in putting it into the cart I felt something at my pocket; I put my left-hand down, and found the pocket unbuttoned; the prisoner stood close at my side. I buttoned my pocket up again, and when I was putting the third pig into the cart I could not shut the tail-board; I put my left-hand up to pull the board down, and felt my purse go out of my pocket - I put my hand down, and found it gone; I suspected the prisoner, who was then close to me - he ran away; I followed, crying Stop thief! down Long-lane; he turned down a court, round into the market again, and was there stopped; I am sure he is the man - the purse was picked up near to where he was taken.

GEORGE RANDALL . I am a journeymon butcher. I was round the turning, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner ran by me; I followed, and secured him by the Bell public-house - he stood close to the wall, and dropped the purse down behind him; I picked it up, and gave it to the officer.

JOHN SCOTT . I am an officer. I was in Long-lane, and heard a cry of "Run the other way, and meet him;" I met the prisoner - Randall was holding him by the collar, and said, "Don't throw it away;" Randall stooped - I heard something fall; Randall picked up the purse, and gave it me; Pugh owned it.(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He never saw me drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-46

1838. JOHN DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 10 hempen-bags, value 5s., and 1600lbs. weight of wool, value 100l. , the goods of John Cooper and another.

MR. JOHN COOPER. I am a public warehouse-keeper , my counting-house is in Chequer-yard; this wool was in our warehouse, in Tower-street . On the 25th of August, as I came from 'Change, my clerk informed me two officers wished to see me - they gave me information; I went to the warehouse, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and found the door of one of the floors broken open; some wool appeared to have been moved; I had not been there for some time - I went with the officers to Spitalfields-church, and found several bags of wool, which I knew to be ours - I have a partner - I inquired for the carman - they said they knew where to find him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner has been in your employ? A. He was our warehouseman, but had left us two or three years - I never knew any thing directly against him.

CHARLES SANDIERS . I am clerk to Messrs. Earl and Co., wine-merchants, Tower-street. On the 25th of August, at seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and two others loading a cart with wool from the prosecutor's warehouse - one of the men was the carman - the prisoner was getting the bags of wool out of the tier for the crane to let them down - I had never seen him before; I saw the cart go out of the gate - their warehouse is in our yard - the carman drove it away - the prisoner was active in loading the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe there has been some former trial on this business? A. The carman was tried and acquitted - the prisoner could not be found then - I never recollect seeing him before - it was quite light - I was not examined on the carman's trial - I could have sworn to him.

COURT. Q. Did the bags appear to be wool? A. Yes; I have no doubt of it.

JOHN CLAYTON . I am a silk-weaver. On the 25th of August, about two o'clock, I was in Brick-lane, and saw a cart loaded with wool, standing at the corner of Booth-street; several persons said it had been about there a long time; I saw it standing there for an hour, and thought something was wrong - I saw the prisoner pass once or twice, and speak to the carman; and when the cart went away he stood on the opposite side - I went to fetch Almond, by Spitalfields-church - he went and questioned the carman where he got the wool from; and he told him; the prisoner was waiting at some distance from the cart, patroling to and fro on the opposite side of the way, and not within hearing - this was about three o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. He was there patroling, was he? A. He was walking backward and forward - I did not know him before, and did not listen to his conversation; I was not examined on the last trial, but I was here - I have been a witness here once, as I apprehended a man, and was paid for my attendance - I have been here, and heard trials, but do not recollect having been a witness, except when I have mentioned.

Q. Have you been here within six years? A. Yes; I recollect it was about robbing a ready-furnished lodging, and I recollect being examined against Taylor for a highway robbery - he was acquitted - I got 3s. 6d. a day for my expenses - that is not more than I can earn - I now sell fruit about, as I have no work.

Q. Were you ever here, except as a witness? A. Yes; I was tried here, and honourably acquitted, and the prosecutor's expenses refused; it was for a highway-robbery - I merely went to assist a drunken man - that was in April, 1817.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am an officer of Christchurch. I went with Clayton to Brick-lane, and found the cart at the end of Booth-street, loaded with ten bags of wool - I questioned the carman, who stood at the horses' head, and found he came from Cooper and Spratts, who identified the wool - I did not see the prisoner.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer, and assisted in unloading the ten bags of wool at the watch-house.

WILLIAM HALL . On the 22d of September, in consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner in Whitechapel - I told him it was about Mr. Cooper's wool; he said he knew nothing about it - I asked if he had heard

of the carman being tried - he said he had heard there had been a piece of work about it.

Cross-examined. Q. He said so at once? A. Yes; he was standing in Whitechapel when I took him.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am a street-keeper; the wool has been in my possession since the 25th of August - I went to the prisoner's residence, but never could find him.

MR. COOPER. I saw the wool, it was taken from our warehouse in Tower-street, and have no doubt of its being ours - the prisoner left our service two years ago.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it; if I had, I should not have stood in the street looking for work as I did.

MR. COOPER. He absconded from his residence, which is a mile and a half from where he was apprehended - I believe he has four or five children.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-47

1839. SARAH WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 cloth pelisse, value 17s. 6d., and 1 cap, value 6d. , the goods of Edward Simmons Fleming .

EDWARD SIMMONS FLEMING. I live in Beech-street , and keep a child-bed linen warehouse . On the 21st of October, at a quarter to six o'clock in the evening, I received information, and went about three hundred yards - I overtook the prisoner - took her back to the shop, and found this pelisse and cap on her - the pelisse had hung in the shop just before.

ELIZABETH MARTIN . I know Mr. Fleming's shop - I saw the prisoner take this pelisse down - she reached her arm in, and took it from the door without entering the shop.

JOSEPH AUCKLAND . I took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-48

1840. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 2 pewter quart-pots, value 5s. 6d., and 1 pint-pot, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Wall .

GEORGE DEVEREUX . On the 12th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was at the bar of the Newcastle Coffee-house, St. Mary-at-hill - a person came and said a man was in the passage with some pewter-pots - I went and found the prisoner there - the waiter had taken these pots from him - I found they belonged to George Wall, my uncle, who keeps the Anchor public-house at St. Mary-at-hill.

JOSEPH DUTTON . I am waiter at the Anchor. I have frequently seen the prisoner about the house - we have lost many pots - I saw him come up the passage and take these pots, and secrete them about his person - I followed and took him with two quart and one pint pot.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-49

1841. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 2 coats, value 28s., and 1 hat, value 2s. , the property of Henry Downing .

HENRY DOWNING. I am a waterman and lighterman . I lost this property between ten and eleven o'clock, on the 25th of September, out of my vessel, which lay at Billingsgate - I found them at the Mansion-house; I have seen the prisoner once before, but do not know what he is.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am a watchman of Botolph-wharf. On the 25th of September, about a quarter to eleven o'clock, I detained the prisoner when he came on shore; I perceived he had a very decent coat and hat on - he had a great coat over his shoulder, and but one shoe and stocking on, which made me suspect him - I asked what he had done with his other shoe, he said, he lost it coming over the railing; Downing's vessel lay fifty or sixty yards from the wharf.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for the shoe; the man wanted me to give him one coat, and said then I might go; I said, I had bought the coat and would not.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18261026-50

1842. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 171 yards of coach-lace, value 2l. 5s. , the property of John Danford .

RAYMOND PROCTER DANFORD . My uncle, John Danford, is a fringe-maker , and lives in Leadenhall-street. On Thursday morning, the 26th of October, I was in the room behind the shop; the prisoner came in, and took a large parcel; he went to the door, and came back and took another parcel, and walked out with them both - I followed him about four doors off - he saw me, threw them down, and tried to run; but I secured him, and made him pick them up and bring them back; they contain one hundred and seventy-one yards of coach-lace.

BENJAMIN FIGGINS . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261026-51

1843. HENRY WOODHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 coat, value 20s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 20s. , the goods of Daniel Jones .

DANIEL JONES. I am a porter , and live in the Borough; the prisoner slept in the same bed with me; it is a private house. On the 28th of September, I went out about six o'clock in the morning, leaving him in bed; I was sent for about half-past eleven, and he was then gone, as also my box and clothes - I saw him next morning coming out of a pawnbroker's shop, in Fleet-market, with a bundle under his arm; a man stood in the market; he was going to open the bundle, but saw me, and ran; I followed, calling, Stop thief! I stopped him, and gave him in charge; he had my coat and handkerchief on his arm; I have known him about eight weeks; he was working at the Three Tuns public-house, in Jury-street; I never gave him leave to take them.

JOHN IVERSON . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner and property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-52

1844. CHARLES HASLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 6 fixtures, to wit, 6 iron stoves, va

lue 2l. 10s., belonging to Thomas Holland , and fixed to his dwelling-house , against the statue.

MARGARET ROBERTS . I am a friend of Thomas Holland, who lived in Bromley's-buildings . I was minding the house on the morning of the 5th of October; as Mrs. Holland was moving out, she left these fixtures for the landlord; the prisoner lodged in the house - he came down stairs and demanded the key of the street-door, which I gave to him, till he got his goods out - I went away to fetch a witness, to see that the stoves were there; returned in five minutes; he answered me out of the window, and said, he should let no one in - I went away - I am sure I left all the fixtures right; there were six stoves.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose Mr. Holland will appear here to-day? A. I saw him outside; I believe he owed his landlord some money; the goods were being taken out to prevent a distress; he left the prisoner behind and the fixtures - I moved some things; I knew he owed rent, but understood he left the fixtures to pay it; he said, they belonged to him.

ELIZABETH HOLLAND . I am the wile of Thomas Holland; the prisoner lodged with us at Bromley's-buildings; we occupied the house about four months and a fortnight, as quarterly tenants; it was a new house; we bought the stoves, and left them behind, in part payment to the landlord; I left Roberts and her cousin in care of the house, till they got their goods out; they were two friends, but did not lodge there - I left the fixtures there on the 5th and did not return till the Tuesday evening following; the stoves were then gone; I have since seen two, which I know.

Cross-examined. Q. Your husband is here? A. Yes, I valued the fixtures at fifty shillings; we owed one quarter and a half's rent - 10l.; it was 30l. a year - we left a water-but, blinds, stoves, and other things, valued altogether at 5l. - the landlord agreed we should pay the rest as we could afterwards; we took some of of our things away by daylight, and some at night; we did not tell the landlord we were going to move; the prisoner lodged in the house.

Q. Have you got any money since he was taken up? A. A young man named Chapman gave me five shillings for my trouble, for the two days which he took me about; he said, he did not wish me to go about with him, and lose my time - on a Monday morning I called to see his mother, whom I knew - she was there - he wanted me to see the prisoner's mother - I said I did not mind seeing her - he said, he wished me to satisfy her how the stoves went - I went with him, and he gave me five shillings, saying, he did not wish me to lose my time for nothing - on my oath, that is what he gave it me for; he wanted me to keep out of the way, but did not give me the five shillings for that - I never said, I would not prosecute the prisoner, as I thought my husband was more to blame than him - I did not promise him anything, it was too late - I wanted him to place the stoves back before I went to the officer; but then it was gone too far.

Q. Did you not move your goods, to keep the landlord out of the rent? A. I did it to prevent losing my goods, but not to cheat him - I was not able to pay him - the prisoner works at the shoe-business; he is married, and I believe he has two children.

COURT. Q. What is your landlord's name? A. Mr. Keaton - I have spoken to him since, about paying the rent; he sent to say we must pay for the stoves, as they were gone; Chapman said he knew the prisoner and his friends wanted me to see his mother, to ease her mind - I had then been before the Magistrate, and it was too late to settle it; he gave me the 5s. for my trouble in walking about to find the mother - the prisoner furnished his room himself, and had not moved his goods. I left this woman in the house till he could move them.

RICHARD DADY . I am a green-grocer. I went to the prisoner after a pair of boots; he asked me to assist in moving the stoves - I do not know what day it was; I took some chairs and crockery, and some stoves; I took two stoves, and saw him take two or three - there were six altogether; we took them to a broker's shop, not far off - I saw four taken to the broker's; the prisoner pulled them out of the fire-place with his hands.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go by accident to the house? A. Yes - there was no furniture left but what was in his room; I do not know what time of the day it was - he did not send for me: a person had sent for their boots - he did not tell me to keep it a secret. I was a stranger to him - he said he was left there without furniture, landlord or anything.

JOSEPH SHARPE . I am a broker, and live in Great Carter-lane, Doctors' Commons. I have known the prisoner three years. On the 5th of October he brought me four stoves; he said he had taken a house, and should put in better ones, for they were worn out, and were of no use to him; I paid him 17s. for them - I had bought things of him before, and knew him to be honest. The prosecutor saw them at my door, and owned them afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. You gave 17s.? A. Yes, and sold two of them for 6s. each - I gave the full value.

COURT. Q. Fixtures, left as such, are of more value then when moved? A. Certainly - there is the bricklayer's work; some charge 4s. or 5s. for setting a stove. They were large old-fashioned stoves - I would not set them in my own room.

MARY ANN ROBERTS . I was present when the prisoner demanded the key of my cousin, Roberts; he said he wanted it to get his goods out - the stoves were all safe then: he came to me before I left the house, and asked if I had seen Mr. or Mrs. Holland - I asked if he wanted to give them up the key; he said he would not give it up unless he was paid for it; he said if I saw Mr. or Mrs. Holland, would I ask them to give him a receipt for the stoves, for he wished to purchase them; this was on the Wednesday, nearly a week afterwards; I told him Holland had left them for the landlord.

Cross-examined. Q. Then, a week afterwards, he was walking about publicly, and wishing to see Holland? - A. Yes; the stoves would nearly have discharged the debt; I do not know how much they owed; I am not related to Holland - he keeps one of my children. I was left a widow, with three. I did not know the stoves were taken when I saw the prisoner.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Bread street-hill. I found two stoves at Sharpe's.

MRS. HOLLAND. They are the stoves we left in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. When I got up in the morning I found they were moving out; I asked where the landlord was - one of the women said she did not know: he was gone away, and owed three-quarters' rent. A person came in with a new bedstead, six chairs, and a chest of drawers; I would not take them in, for I did not know who was then the landlord; I asked them for the key, to move my goods out - they went out, and when they came back moved the rest of their things, except the stoves, which they said I might have for my trouble; people said that if I did not take them I should leave them for somebody else, and I thought I might as well have them as anybody - when I was in prison she signed a stamped agreement to make it up, and received 5s. in part.

ELIZA HASLETT . I am the prisoner's sister. On the 23d of October Mr. Hollands came to our house, and said my brother had moved the stoves from her house, and said if we would replace them and give some money down, as a satisfaction to her, she would not appear against him, for she only wanted the stoves. I was present when 5s. was paid her - it was in part payment of the stoves; it was given into Chapman's hands to hand to her.

COURT. Q. This was on the 23d of October? A. She came on the 23d, but she received the money on the 24th; Chapman was intimately acquainted with our family, and she came with him. I live in Pitman's-buildings.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I live in Radnor-street, St. Luke's. I have seen Mr. Holland outside the Court to-night. On Monday last I called at Mr. Adey's - a woman came in, whom I did not know before, and talked about the prisoner - that is the woman (pointing to the prosecutrix); she said she believed he was persuaded to it, and all she wanted was the stoves returned; I told her I did not know the case, for I was two hundred miles off at the time, but the family were respectable, and I made no doubt if he had taken them wrongfully they would be returned - she said that was all she wished, and that the witness had said a great deal more then was true; she then went with me to his mother, and wished to have a receipt on a stamp to show to her husband, or she should not feel satisfied; I said that was nothing but honour, and accordingly wrote it, but told her it was nought; she then said she could not walk about for nothing, and must have something for shoe-leather; I gave her 5s., and she went home satisfied.

Q. What did you give her the receipt for? A. For the stoves, which she said he had moved - I drew the receipt.

Q. Did she not say the stoves had been moved against her will, and unknown to her? A. Yes; I gave her the 5s. for her trouble, but I considered it on the stoves; I dictated the receipt myself - I did not then know he was in custody. This is the receipt - (read.)

This is to prove and satisfy Mr. Holland, that six stoves now removed from the house of the said Mr. Holland, at No. 4, Bromley's-buildings, by Charles Huslett, on the 5th of October, are to be replaced on his receiving his liberty, to which John Chapman, of Radnor-street, and his sister has placed the sum of 3l. 10s. to be paid.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-53

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1845 JOSEPH GARDNER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Knight with a certain sharp instrument, and cutting him in his right thigh, with intent, of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him, or to do him some grievous bodily harm .

SAMUEL KNIGHT. I am a labouring man , and live in White-lion-street, Chelsea . On the 11th of October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was at my own door, and heard a woman had been knocked down - I have lived in that neighbourhood six or seven years - I knew the prisoner by sight; I have merely spoken to him; he is a cobbler - I saw him in the street with a knife in his hand - I went up to him, and told him he had better put it away; I then laid hold of his arm, and he stabbed me in the left thigh; and after that I had hold of his right shoulder, trying to take the knife from him - he shook himself out of my hands - I got my arm round his neck, and tried to throw him down - he then stabbed me in the right thigh. I was stunned, and fainted away immediately; I tried to take the knife from him, because I heard he had knocked a woman down and stahbed her.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I had been robbed, and wounded in my breast? A. He did not say so to me - I saw no wound in his breast - I cannot say what happened before I saw him; he appeared sober.

JOHN GORMAN . I am a pensioner of Chelsea-college. I was in Turk's-row, and met the prisoner about a hundred yards from White-lion-street, coming out of a little alley, with a shoemaker's knife in his hand - I saw no blood on him - I said, "Are you an Irishman?" he said, "No, d-n you, what do you do with me?" - he seized me, and attempted to stab me - he cut my coat and breeches, but I got from him; I saw nobody doing any thing to provoke him; he said nothing about being robbed - I went directly to the constable - he declined coming, but told me to get a warrant. I went back, and saw him going towards the market-place, with the knife in his hand, swearing velemently if anybody should interrupt him, he would run their g-ts out; I had not been absent a quarter of an hour. Knight stood at the corner, with two or three other men: I said that man would injure somebody, it was a pity he was not taken up - Knight went forward, laid his hand on his left shoulder, and told him to throw the knife out of his hand - he said he would not - Knight took hold of his right shoulder; he then stabbed him with great force - Knight still held him, and tried to get him down; he endeavoured to catch him inside the thigh - Knight then got from him: he was swearing in the most unbecoming manner.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you knock me down? A. Yes, after you had stabbed Knight twice - you had no wound in your breast, and said nothing about being robbed - he appeared perfectly sober, but in a passion.

JAMES YOUNG . I am a labourer. I saw the prisoner with a drawn knife in his hand in Turk's-row; I saw nobody ill-use him; a good many people were round him, but not ill-using him - I saw him strike an old woman who met him; she had done nothing whatever to him - I did not hear him complain of being ill-used - I was not

near enough to hear what he might say - I saw him wound Knight, who had done nothing but try to get the knife from him.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you know I am nearly blind; and ran against the woman? A. No, I do not know it.

JOHN TANNER . I am a constable. John Gorman came and showed me his thumb, which was bleeding - he said the prisoner was brandishing a knife about - it was a trifling cut; I could not leave my shop then; soon after the prisoner himself came to my door with the knife in his hand; he appeared in great agitation, and told me to come with him, or he would get a magistrate - he did not complain of being ill-used, or say what he wanted; he seemed in a rage of passion - I told him to go about his business; he was afterwards given into my custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I had been robbed? A. No; he said something before the magistrate about being left in charge of a house - I saw no wound in his breast before to-day.

JOHN GORMAN re-examined. He complained to the magistrate of being wounded in the breast; he was not wounded when I met him - he must have done it in struggling - I saw it bleeding when before the magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. After complaining to an officer, who is not here, I was going home - they knocked me down, and knocked the knife out of my hand - I could not see where I was going, I am so blind - I was all over dirt - I cannot now see any body before me - I had been left in care of a house; four men came in, and threw me on the floor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-54

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1846. CHARLES THOMAS WHITE was indicted for that he, on the 5th of August , at the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did set fire to a certain house there situate, of and belonging to William Hopkinson , and then being in possession of him the said Charles Thomas White, with intent thereby to defraud the British Fire Assurance-office , against the statute .

2d COUNT, the same as the first, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud William Agnew , James West , James Henry Deacon , and divers other persons, whose names are unknown, being respectively subjects of our Lord the King, constituting a society or partnership called or known by the name of the British Fire Assurance-office, carrying on the business of insuring houses and other property from loss or damage by fire.

3d COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to defraud William Agnew, James West, and James Henry Deacon, being respectively subjects of our Lord the King.

4th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to defraud John Thomas Barber Beaumont , a subject of our Lord the King, and the managing director for the time being, of a certain association, or company, under the name of the Association of the County Fire-office.

5th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to defraud the said John Thomas Barber Beaumont, a subject of our Lord the King, and one of the directors for the time being, of a certain association, or company, under the name of the Association of the County Fire-office.

6th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to defraud James Sedgwick , a subject of our Lord the King, and one of the directors for the time being, of a certain association, or company, under the name of the Association of the County Fire-Office.

7th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to defraud George Ducket Barber Beaumont, a subject of our Lord the King, and one of the directors for the time being, of a certain association, or company, under the name of the Association of the County Fire-office.

8th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to defraud James Sedgwick, John Thomas Barber Beaumont, George Ducket Barber Beaumont , and divers other persons, whose names are unknown, being subjects of our Lord the King, forming a certain association, or company, under the name of the Association of the County Fire-office, for effecting insurances, against loss or damage by fire.

9th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to defraud the said James Sedgwick, John Thomas Barber Beaumont, and George Ducket Barber Beaumont, being subjects of our Lord the King.

10th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to injure the said William Hopkinson, a subject of our Lord the King.

11th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to injure Mary Ann White , widow , a subject of our Lord the King.

12th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to injure Godfrey Lazarus , a subject of our Lord the King.

13th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to injure John Yearsley , a subject of our Lord the King.

14th COUNT, the same as the first, but with intent to injure John Treacher , a subject of our Lord the King.

Fourteen other COUNTS, like the former fourteen, only not stating the house to belong to the said William Hopkinson.

MESSRS. ALLEY and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL SHINE . I am a watchman; the house No. 263, High Holborn, is in my beat, it is in the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields . On the morning of the 5th of August, I heard a cry of Murder! as I was going my rounds at half-past one o'clock; a female in the street gave me an alarm, and showed me this house, No. 265, High Holborn - the prisoner lived there and Mr. Lazarus - when I got to the house, the street-door was fast-Lazarus opened it to me - I had rang the bell - I will not be certain whether Lazarus had a light, but the kitchen-stairs were on fire, which gave me a light - I went through the passage to the back part of the house down the kitchen-stairs, over the part that was on fire - the fire was under the stairs - it was then burning quite in a flame through the joists of the stairs - I could not then judge how long it had been burning - I got water and extinguished the flame, then broke up two of the kitchen-stairs with my stick - people up the stairs threw more water on it - those people did not belong to the house - I thought it was the watchman; I broke down the lath and plaster to see if there were any embers remaining - the engines came, and I left the en

gine-keeper and men in the house, and I was ordered to my duty - it must have been burning some time, because two steps of the stairs were nearly burned through.

Q. Did any thing occur to you to observe what had produced the flame? A. I saw part of the flame coming down at the time - it seemed to be hanging down and dropping, as if it was from gas burning - about half an hour afterwards I went there, and Riley showed me two pieces of links - I have seen links burning, and my notion then was that the links had produced that flame, which was hanging down - it was similar to what I have seen with links burning - I believe that flame was produced by links - I looked at the place, but there was no gas-pipe there, which could have produced it - the shop was lighted with gas (the witness here examined the model of the house, and pointed out the spot where the fire had been found) - Furzeman, Riley, and a fireman, named Mills, had all come before I left the place - I found a kind of step-ladder placed against the cupboard-door; I was about the house all the morning till I left duty; I went in, but did not go down-stairs afterwards; I saw the prisoner and Lazarus when the fire was burning; the prisoner was coming down the stairs, not exactly dressed; I think he had a long grey frock morning-coat on; I went into the back-parlour every time I went into the house; I saw nothing amiss there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have talked a great deal about this since you were examined at the office? A. I have been answering questions that were asked me.

Q. Did you, at Marlborough-street, say one word about the flame, which was supposed to come from links, descending? A. I was not examined till the last hearing; I gave evidence, with regard to the flame burning down, to the best of my belief; but I was not sworn about the fire on the 5th of August; it was about the one on the 18th.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am round-house-keeper of St. Giles. On the morning of the 5th of August, I was called to a fire at Mr. White's house - I went with the parish-engine - my brother and Riley got there a little before me - I went through the passage and saw several gentlemen there, also Shine the watchman - they called me down saying, "Here is the fire;" I ran down - it was then pretty well out - I began to examine the place, and observed to Mr. White, "There is something wrong about this fire;" I looked about, and found the place under the stair-case was burned almost to a cinder - I went into the kitchen to Mr. White, and asked him whether he suspected any one in the house, for I was sure that it had been set on fire - he said that some time previous to that fire the table, which stood in the front-kitchen, had been set alight by some person - I examined the table; it was oak, I believe - it appeared to me that some liquied had been on the table and a candle - it was much burned in the middle; I asked him who occupied that kitchen; he said no one had access to that lower part but Mr. Lazarus' family and the servant.

Q. Was there any appearance of the door having been shut, to exclude anybody? A. No; the doors were all open - he said, he suspected Lazarus's servant, that is Margaret Drew ; she was called down-stairs, and there was some altercation between Lazarus and the prisoner, who should give her in charge - White insisted that Lazarus was the most proper person to charge her; Riley came and begged of me to come back, and search the place under the stairs - I did so, and on searching among the mortar that had fallen down, I saw Riley pick up two pieces of link, he has had them ever since - they were eight or nine inches long - one rather longer than the other; they appeared to have been burnt very much - I then examined under the stairs, and on one of the beams, on a sort of ledge, I found a quantity of pitch, which I supposed had come from the links - either Riley or I tried if one of the links would fit the place on the ledge, where it appeared to have stood, and it fitted the place - I do not think Mr. White went under the stairs with us - I went into the kitchen again, and asked White whether he ever had any links in the house; he said, he had never had any think of the sort in his house - the girl was then taken into custody - none of the gas conductors came near the place under the stairs, I observed nothing more that night - on Friday, the 11th of August, Lazarus and the prisoner called on me; I had sent for them in consequence of information I had received - White said, he had been dining with his mother the day before, and she had told him there were some links in the house, six or eight months ago - I said, "You told me the last time I saw you, that there were no links at all in the house, and that you had no occasion for any; it is very strange" - I said, I wanted them to go down to Mr. Bradford's, where I understood links had been bought, but I could not go then; it was appointed to go next day, which was Saturday.

Q. Did any thing else pass when he mentioned about his mother saying there had been links in the house? A. Yes; I said, "What in the name of God could you want with links six or eight months ago;" he said, he had had a party of friends, and they were sitting in the yard - the candles had blown out, and they had the links to light them.

Q. That would have been about Christmas, that they were sitting in the yard? A. It was in the winter; I I made some observations to him, which I do not recollect; we met next day (Saturday) at Bradford's; Lazarus, the prisoner, myself, and Davies, a broker, who lives in Holborn, within sixty yards of the prisoners house - Bradford is an oil-man, living opposite George-street, St. Giles, just by middle-row; on entering the shop, Lazarus said to Bradford, "Am I the person who bought the links?" Bradford said, "No, you are not" - the prisoner then directly said, "I can prove, by two witnesses, that I was in bed at twelve o'clock that day," meaning the 4th of August - Bradford had said, they were bought between ten and one on the 4th of August - Bradford then said, he could tell better if he saw White in his morning-gown; he had not at that time said anything about White being the person; Lazarus said, "I will go home and change my clothes, and put on every dress I have got, and you shall see me;" I said to the prisoner,"You will have no objection to go home, and put on your morning gown, and let Mr. Bradford see you;" he hesitated a minute, and said, "Indeed I shall not do any thing of the kind, for I shall not make a puppet-show of myself;" I had seen him in his morning-gown at the time of the fire, and when I saw him in it afterwards, it appeared to have been altered in the sleeves, and it had been cut shorter.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner is a married man? A. Yes; his wife slept in the house that night - I cannot say that he declined giving charge of the servant; Lazarus, I think, ultimately declined it; I said,"It don't matter which of you charge her, if you have any suspicion;" when she was in confinement, some things were brought her - I cannot say whether they came from White.

Q. What breadth was the ledge, which you say the links appeared to fit? A. Under the stairs is lath and plaster, and in that lath and plaster was a hole, where it appeared the links had been put in - I believe the prisoner afterwards went to the Fire-office, and gave notice of the fire.

Q. Did not he go voluntarily before the parish-officers? A. He would not about the first fire; a summons was sent to him on the 1st of September, and he did not come.

Q. Was not that summons to show some cause, why he did not pay some money for the engine? A. I think so, but the gentleman is here who wrote the letter - business prevented my going to Bradford's on Friday - we went on Saturday afternoon; I proposed to White, to go home for his morning-gown, and come back, and show himself - his house is about a quarter of a mile or rather less, from there - it is a crowded neighbourhood; and he said, he should not make a puppet-show of himself - Bradford and his boy were quite silent in his presence, as to whether he was the person who bought the links.

Q. I suppose on the night of the fire, there was great confusion in the house? A. I got to work directly down below - I saw three or four respectable inhabitants round about - I staid there about two hours examining the premises, and talking to persons.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Bradford declared distinctly Lazarus was not the person; the prisoner immediately said, he could prove he was in bed, and nothing further was said? A. No, nothing further was said.

PHILLIP RILEY . I am beadle of St. Giles. I went into the house on the 5th of August, rather before Furzeman; the fire was partially burning - I found two pieces of links, which I produce - I have preserved them as well as I could; I found him under the kitchen stair-case, among the lath and plaster, which had been pulled down - (Here the witness pointed out in the model, the place where he had found them) - the next morning I went with Furzeman, to examine the front kitchen; I examined the floor and the range; one of the bars of the range appeared as if some greasy substance had been on it; it was dirtier than the other part; and in a direction from the fire-place, to the place where the fire was, I found several droppings of pitch or tar in a train; I cut them up from the floor with my knife, applied them to a candle, and they burnt; I think them the same stuff as links are composed of.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. They extended from the range to where? A. Under the stair-case, as far as the floor went, and to where there was no water; and where the water was I saw spots, but cannot say whether they were far; there was a line of spots from the range to the fire.

THOMAS DODWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Bradford, an oilman, of St. Giles. On the 4th of August I recollect a person coming to purchase two links; I really believe the prisoner is that person - it was between eleven and one o'clock, or it might be half-past one - I cannot exactly say: he was dressed in a grey morning-gown, and took them away with him, rolled up in a blue bag; there was more pitch on them than links generally have; it is not very common to sell them in summer time - (looking at the pieces of links produced,) these appear very much like them, as far as I am able to judge. I saw the prisoner about two months afterwards, at St. Giles' watch-house, in a grey morning-gown - I thought it the same gown, but it was cut shorter at the tail, no where else that I observed. I recollect Furzeman, White, Lazarus, and another person coming to my master's house a few days after the 4th of August - I was not at home when they came, but the day before that the prisoner came without Furzeman, but with a short gentleman, whom I do not know; they came in, and asked if Mr. Bradford was at home; I said, No - he said, "My name is White - I called concerning some links;" I told him we did not want any at present - I thought he was come to sell some: he said, "I do not mean that - I understand you have been telling the beadle that I bought some links here;" I said, "How can you say that, when I did not know you?" I did not tell him what I said to the beadle, but told him we had sold some links, and described the person who purchased them.

Q. Did you describe him by his clothes? A. Yes; I said the person had a grey morning-gown on who bought the links; he replied, "That is just such a dress as I wear;" the short gentleman asked me what sort of a person it was, whether he was like a Christian or a Jew; I said I did not notice enough of the man. I have seen Lazarus, and am sure he is not the man.

Q. What was your opinion at this time, although you might not have expressed it? A. My opinion at that time was, that the prisoner was the person; I did not like to say so then. I did not like to accuse him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you not say as a reason for your knowing the less about him, that you had not dealt with him, but your master had served him? A. Yes; my master had served him - there were no other customers in the shop.

Q. Now, have you not always said it was between eleven and one o'clock? A. I have - I told the Justice so; it is quite uncertain what time I dine - my attention was called to the circumstance about a week after they were bought.

Q. Have you not always said from then till to-day, that it was between eleven and one o'clock? A. Yes, but I cannot speak exactly to a minute; I have no reason for extending the time.

Q. If the coat which you saw on the prisoner at the watch-house was the one he wore on the day he bought the links, you are sure it was cut shorter? A. It was shorter than when he bought the links, I am certain.

COURT. Q. Have you frequent demand for links since gas-lights have been established? A. Very seldom indeed - we mostly sell them about the 5th of November.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you saw him in the shop you thought he was the person who bought your links - why then did you say you had no orders to give him for links? A. Because I did not take much notice when he first came in.

WILLIAM BRADFORD . I am a colourman, and live in Broad-street, St. Giles - Dodwell is my shopman. On

the 4th of August some person came to buy some links - I at first said it was from eleven to one o'clock, but I think it might be a little after one; I had no knowledge of him before - he was dressed in a mixed morning drugget-coat; he bought two links, paid 4d. for them, and took them away, in a blue bag, something like an attorney's bag. I produce a link taken from the same bundle; they are more pitched than they generally are; I have compared the pieces produced before they got rubbed so much - they appeared to me to be of the parcel. On the 11th of August I heard, from my boy, that a gentleman named White had called. On the 12th Lazarus and Furzeman came with the prisoner - Lazarus said they came on the subject of the links, was he at all like the person who had bought the links on the 4th of August; I said, No, neither his person nor his voice would do (he is a Jew, I could tell that from his face); I said the person had on a morning-gown, and I should be able to say more about it when I saw him in that dress - Lazarus said he would go home and bring all the dresses he had, to convince me he was not the person who purchased them; Furzeman said it was evident some one in the house must have placed the links there; Lazarus said, perhaps Mr. White would not mind coming in his morning-dress, for me to see him - White said he did not see why he should make himself a puppet-show to please any one; they then went away. I have since seen the prisoner in a grey morning-coat, at the watch-house.

Q. Having seen him now, and on other occasions, what is your opinion? A. He very much resembles the person who bought the links; when I saw him at the watch-house his coat appeared as if cut shorter in the skirts.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It might be a few minutes before one o'clock as well as after when he bought the links? A. It might; I could have seen the time by locking out at the church, but I did not; I think it must be a little after one, from what I recollect since - I think I was not asked about the time at the office; the grey coat appeared something shorter when he was at the watch-house; when he was wrapping them up he took the cross way with his bag, and I noticed his dress more than his face, as I had not a full view of his face while he was wrapping them up, but I saw him come into the shop.

Q. You would not venture to swear to him without seeing him in his coat? A. I wished it to be put on - I say now he is very much like him.

COURT. Q. There was nobody else in the shop at the time? A. No, except the servant; I generally dine about one o'clock; my wife was coming in with a few steaks, just after he was gone. In the summer time we sell very few links, except to a few drovers, and boys about the Theatres.

Q. Do you usually sell many of them to persons of the prisoner's description? A. Very seldom, except persons go into the country, or it is a very foggy night.

GODFREY LAZARUS . I am a jeweller and general-dealer, and live at No. 3. Rutland-street, Gloucester-terrace, Commercial-road. In August last, I lodged at the prisoner's house with my wife, one child, grandmother, sister, and servant - there were six of us altogether - I lived there since August 1825 - Mr. White occupied the house then, and lived there till after the fire - I occupied the first floor, two rooms on the garret-floor, and the front-kitchen - the gas-cocks were in the front-kitchen; the prisoner and his family had access to the front-kitchen for the purpose of turning the gas on and off - it is turned on about dark - the kitchen-door is always open, they may go in and out when they please - I and my wife slept in the garret, the servant in the middle-garret, my grandmother and sister in the first-floor, back-room; but at the time of the fire the servant slept on a sofa, in the first-floor, as she complained of being annoyed by bugs - the prisoner and his wife slept on the second-floor, I believe - on the 4th of August, I and my wife went to bed near twelve o'clock - I was awoke in an hour and a quarter, or an hour and a half, by a smoke and smother in the room - I called my wife, got up and opened the door, as the room was full of smoke - I called out, "There is a fire in the house;" I took my child in my arms, and went down stairs as fast as I could to the street-door, having only my trousers on; I unlocked the middle passage-door, and while I was unbolting the street-door, the bell rang - the watchman came in as I went out; the middle-door prevents people coming to the shop, communicating with the stairs - I made no observation, but went down with my family to Little Turnstile - and when I returned, the prisoner was in the parlour - suspicion fell on my servant-girl - Furzeman had her in the parlour, questioning her about the fire - she said she knew nothing about it; but White suspected her - and she was suspected on a former occasion - they asked me to give charge of her - I said I did not know what to do; they said I must give charge of her - and I went and left her at the watch-house; I called to see my family - then returned, and the prisoner stood in the passage laughing - he was talking to nobody - I said, "Mr. White, I really see nothing to laugh at;" he made no answer - I went into the parlour with him, and he said, "Lazarus, if I was you I would not prosecute her;" he did not say why - I said, "Mr. White, I don't know what you mean, you first make me take up the girl, thinking her intention was to burn nine or ten persons in their beds, and now you tell me you would not prosecute;" he made no answer - I afterwards attended the Police-office, and the charge was abandoned - there is a trap-door over the garret, communicating with the roof; on the night of the 1st of August, when I went up to bed, that trap-door was open, and a ladder placed against it - I called to Catherine Taylor, the prisoner's servant, to know what the ladder did there - I removed it down seven stairs - I could not shut the trap-door down - I had never seen it open before, to my knowledge - it was never open at night - the ladder was kept between the front-kitchen and cellar-door - I never saw it up-stairs before - it was not a heavy one - it remained down six or seven stairs, where I had removed it, till the fire - on the Friday after the fire, I met with the prisoner and Furzeman, and it was agreed we should go altogether the next day to the place where the links were bought - I did not go before the next day - when I went, White was asked to put on a morning-coat - he said he would not - I said, "Mr. Bradford, if you think I am like the man at all, I will go home and put on all the clothes I have;" I never bought any links, and never placed them under the stairs - I quitted the house on the 8th of August.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. What do you mean by a general dealer? A. I buy jewellery, clothes,

and any thing; but do not work at any trade - I attend sales - I am of the Jewish persuasion - the place under the stairs where the fire broke out is where I kept some things which belonged to the feast of the Passover; they belonged to my grandmother - that place was in my occupation; it was not fastened at all. White attended at Marlborough-street on the Saturday and Wednesday when my servant was examined - I do not think he was examined; there were two or three examinations - the magisstrate said that nothing could be made of it, but the charge stood open against her.

Q. At that time you charged her with stealing some property of yours? A. Yes, she was detained on my charge, tried here last Session, and acquitted; I was not allowed my expenses.

Q. You slept in the garret, the furthermost place from where the fire was? A. Yes; I was the first person who gave the alarm; I did not knock at White's door as I came down; I think he was coming out of his door - I called out Fire! directly I opened my door; they were all down as soon as us. My first care was to put my wife and family in a place of safety, at Mr. Davies', in Little Turnstile - my grandmother and all went there - I was not gone five minutes, and on my return I heard that suspicion had fallen on my servant Drew; she was taken to the watch-house, and then I came back and saw him laughing - the fire was out then - I said nothing to him about the trap-door, as he was out of the house that night; I mentioned it to Catherine - it remained open from then till the fire, but I had taken the ladder away, and it remained where I left it - I had left his house myself before I went to Bradford's about the links, but all my property remained there.

Q. Why, he had levied a distress on it? A. No, not then, not till the Tuesday afterwards - I swear he did not levy the distress till then: we were not to leave his place till the 29th of September; I owed a quarter's rent, but no distress was put in till after I went to Bradford's. I received a letter about the rent on Tuesday, (it was sent to my mother's, at 33, Maiden-lane,) and on Wednesday a man came to let me know of the distress - no application was made to me about the rent till after the fire, but the agreement was that it should be paid half-yearly - my property was moved from the house six weeks before Michaelmas-day; we were to go to Bradford's on the Friday, but Furzeman being engaged, I went on Saturday.

COURT. Q. How long had the girl lived with you? A. Since August 1825 - we had had no difference before the fire; nothing had passed so as for her to have any spite against us; I never heard of her having any dispute with the prisoner or his family.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Why did you cease to sleep in the house - did the prisoner remain at home after the fire? A. No, he went out on Saturday, and said he was going to Fulham - he was gone three nights: finding he did not come home, I thought it right to leave. I and all the family had sat up two nights, and I left the house on Monday. I paid 50l. a year, and paid the rent half-yearly; here is a receipt for 25l. up to Lady-day (read) - nothing was due till Michaelmas, but he distrained on me for a quarter's rent - I was not under difficulty about the payment, if the proper time had arrived. The trap-door leads to a loft, and there is a way out on the roof.

JULIA LAZARUS . I am the wife of the last witness. On Tuesday night, the 1st of August, as I was going to bed, I observed a ladder placed against the trap-door, which was open - I had never seen it there before, nor the trap-door open of a night - I said I should not be easy unless the ladder was taken away before I retired to bed; Mr. Lazarus then moved it on the stairs - it remained there, and the trap-door open till the fire - it was usually kept by the kitchen-door. The fire happened on the 4th. We had been on the most amicable terms with Mr. and Mrs. White, and I had a great respect for him and his family.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you seen the ladder there during the day? A. No; I think I had not been up stairs that day - I had seen a ladder against the trap-door once, in the day time, during the time I lived there, but never at night; it is a flat trap-door in the passage, and leads to the loft, and then outside the house.

CATHERINE TAYLOR . I am servant to Mr. White - I am still in his service; he and Mrs. White slept in the middle-room, on the second floor; all the rooms not occupied by Lazarus, were in his possession; the ladder was generally kept down-stairs, but the boy had taken it to get some wood from the top of the house; he asked master if he should bring it down; he told him to please himself - this was on the 1st or 2d of August, I believe; I remember the night the fire broke out; Mr. and Mrs. White had gone to bed about twelve o'clock that night - I went to bed about ten minutes afterwards; he slept from home two nights after the fire - he had a previous engagement at his mother's, at Fulham - I sat up both these nights till four o'clock, as Mr. and Mrs. Lazarus wished me - Mrs. White slept out with him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before the fire had you lived there? A. Nearly three months; I went to bed on the 4th of August, about twelve o'clock; I was not down in the lower kitchen that night; my own kitchen is level with the parlour; master was engaged in the parlour with a friend for half an hour, before he went up to bed - I was not in Lazarus's kitchen, and cannot say whether there was a fire in his range - I sleep in the back attic, on the same floor with Mr. Lazarus - I heard an alarm of fire about one o'clock, and we all went down.

Q. On the night before the 4th of August, where had your master been - I mean the 3d of August? A. Master and mistress had been out, to go to the Coburg Theatre; it was nearly two o'clock when they returned - it was a very tempestuous evening indeed; master came down stairs next morning at twelve o'clock; I made no observation to him about it; he breakfasted in the parlour adjoining the shop, and even with the kitchen; he dined about half-past three; I moved the breakfast things after one; he was then still at the table where he had breakfasted; it was ten minutes or a quarter past one, when I moved the breakfast things away; he was reading when I left the room; I was in and out of the room frequently; when I went in, he was sometimes in the shop, and sometimes in the parlour; he could go out through the passage without going through the shop; I did not see him go out; I have every reason to believe he did not go out; I was about on my business all day; he had his morningcoat on that morning; I recollect it up to the time he was taken into custody; he had had new sleeves put to it, but

I never observed it shorter; I never took particular notice of it.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it your master's habit to wear that coat in the course of the day? A. He always wore it, except when he went out; he generally breakfasted between nine and ten o'clock - I have two beds to make up-stairs after breakfast; I seldom go up-stairs till after the breakfast things are cleared away; my kitchen is on the same floor with the shop and parlour, but detached from the house.

JOHN YEARSLEY . I am a mill and machine-maker - I live at No. 266, High Holborn, next door to the prisoner's house - he occupied the house at the time of the fire - Mr. Treacher, a tallow-chandler, lived on the other side - on the second day after the fire, I had some conversation with the prisoner; something was said about Lazarus's servant being detained; he told me Lazarus's servant had been remanded for a further examination at Marlborough-street, and that he had no doubt, but she was the person who sat fire to the house - he said, the marks of the links were found on her hands - I am certain of that expression, but do not know whether he said links or torches.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was this after the examination at Marlborough-street? A. After the first examination; he said, it was a very shocking affair; that the girl had been remanded, and he had no doubt she set fire to the house, for marks of the links were found on her hands - I understood it as his opinion; not what any one else had said.

MARGARET DREW . I was in Lazarus's service when he lived at the prisoner's house - I did not set fire to the house, on my oath - I had no pitch in the house, nor had I ever used any - I never had any on my hands when before the Justice, or at any time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you recollect on the night of the fire seeing Furzeman? A. Yes; he examined my hands; there was some black on them - I was putting my boots on, and they were all wet and dirty; I had left them in the kitchen before the fire - they were wet and dirty with the water which had been thrown on the fire; after putting them on, Furzeman looked at my hands, which were wet and damp; he said, it was pitch; but it was not; it had come off my boots; I said, it was not pitch; Furzeman asked Lazarus if he would give me in charge, and he said, Yes; I had been twelve months in his service - I never had any dispute with him, but when I had been out - Lazarus accused me of burning a table, and I was uncomfortable ever after - I had not burnt it.

Q. On the night of the fire, how soon before the alarm had you been in Lazarus's kitchen? A. I think about twelve o'clock - I was going up the kitchen stairs to bed, and met Mr. White coming down into the kitchen to turn his gas out - I bade him good night, and likewise his wife and servant, who were at the top of the kitchen stairs in the passage - I went up-stairs, and sat down for about half an hour, before Mr. and Mrs. Lazarus went to bed - it was customary for Mr. White to go down-stairs every night to turn his gas off.

Q. Have you had any dispute with Mr. Lazarus about your wages? A. No; I have asked him several times for my wages; he said, he could not and would not pay me, he would see me at the devil first.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you been paid your wages now? A. I summoned him for a quarter's wages, which he paid me; he will not pay me more; when the fire happened, all my clothes and every thing I had were in the house.

COURT. Q. Now, assuming your master and you had a quarrel, did you set fire to the house to be revenged of him? A. No, my Lord. The charge about burning the table, was not a dispute; I never had any dispute with Mr. White or his family.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN re-examined. I examined the girl's hands - the first moment I opened them there were two or three little bits of dirt; I thought it might be pitch - I wetted my finger and rubbed it, and it came off quite easy - I found it was only dirt; that was not my reason for taking her to the watch-house.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you state that you thought it pitch? A. I did - I cannot say whether Lazarus was present; it was early in the morning, just after the fire was got out.

Q. Was it on your saying that there was pitch on her hands that he gave her in charge? A. Oh! no.

COURT. Q. You immediatety rubbed her hands, and found it was not pitch; did you represent to Lazarus or White that it was pitch? A. Never - it was dirt, and if she had been in the kitchen it might easily have come from her boots.

WILLIAM HOPKINSON . The house the prisoner occupied in Holborn is my freehold; here is a policy of the County Fire-office (looking at it); I considered the prisoner's mother as my tenant, but he occupied the house; my interest in the house is worth infinitely more than 700l.

MR. FREDERICK TURNER . I am solicitor for the parish, who prosecute in this case. I produce the policy of insurance, which I received from Mr. Blunt, the prisoner's solicitor.

CHARLES LE GRANT . I am a clerk in the British Fire Assurance-office, and am attesting witness to this policy of insurance, for 3500l., which was effected by the prisoner, on the 30th of May this year; the persons who have signed it are three of the Directors.

The several amounts insured by virtue of this policy, were here read, and were as follows: - 350l on household goods, linen, books, apparel, and plate; 200l. on fixtures; 150l. on watches, tlinkets, china, &c., and 2800l. on stock and utensils in trade; - it was signed William Agnew, James West, and James Henry Deacon.

JOHN NELSON . I am a clerk in the British Assurance-office. At the time the policy produced was effected, another was cancelled; I have an entry of it, in my own hand-writing - there was a return of 4s. 6d. as premium, and 9s. 6d. duty, made on the cancelled policy, as the old one had not expired; this was on the 30th of May - I do not know what amount the cancelled policy was for.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you remember after the 5th of August, when the fire had occured, that the prisoner attended at your office, and gave information about it? A. I have heard so.

FREDERICK KING . I am a clerk in the same office. I have an account of the policy cancelled on the 30th of May - it had been taken out by Mrs. White, the prisoner's mother, at Michaelmas, 1823, and was for 1000l. altoge

ther; 600l. of it was on the stock. The prisoner came to cancel this policy, and had the new one instead of it.

JOSEPH COXHEAD . I am a bookseller, and live at No. 249, High Holborn. I have been an auctioneer, and kept a bookseller's-shop twenty-five years; I know the prisoner's shop perfectly well. I attended the fire of the 5th of August, and had an opportunity of looking at the stock - I should say it was worth from 600l. to 700l.; I had had frequent opportunities of seeing it before August.

Q. Could you observe an alteration in it to make a difference of from 700l. to 2800l.? A. Oh! no, but there was one or two valuable works, Pennant's London, and another, which increased the value - I include them in the 700l.; they are illustrated copies, and worth 10l. a volume; there are ten volumes of the two works together.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you estimate the value at the price they would fetch if forced into sale, or if sold to a customer? A. I estimate it at the price they would fetch in the stock; I have not gone all through the stock; I know a book of small size might be valuable.

WILLIAM WELTON . I am a bookseller, and live at No. 245, High Holborn. On the morning of the last fire I went into the prisoner's shop, to look over it: I cast my eye round to observe the nature of the books - my opinion, giving them a fair full price, which they would fetch to a retail customer, is, that it is not worth 800l.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, in commencing my defence against the accusation you have heard, I solicit your indulgence, for my natural defect of an imperfect utterance, the disadvantage of which I now most painfully feel. In the evidence, which has been brought forward, you cannot fail to remark the total absence of every thing like positive proof, and that my conviction is sought only upon one or two circumstances feeble in themselves and requiring the aid of strong inference to connect them. I will recall the facts briefly, and first draw your attention to those upon which my prosecutors rely. In the night, between Friday and Saturday, the 4th and 5th of August last, and when eight persons were in my house, it was set on fire clearly by design, and the instrument made use of was a link. It is in evidence that the day before two links had been purchased at an oil-shop, about half a mile distant, by a person habited in a dress similar to one I frequently used to wear, and resembling me in person; the prosecutors assert this person to have been me, and thence infer that I was the author of that fire. Their real evidence does not go beyond this, nothing else applies to me, but I am not the man who purchased those links, and I shall be able to prove this to you. On the night of the fire, a friend had been spending the evening with me, and did not leave me till past eleven o'clock, and I and my wife retired about twelve, leaving our servant to follow. My house was then occupied by myself, my wife, and servant, and my lodger's (who was a Jew) family of four persons, and their servant. On that night the Jew's servant, his sister, and grandmother, slept upon the first-floor, my wife and myself on the second-floor, and my own servant in the back attic. Between one and two o'clock in the morning, a fire broke out in the basement-story, in a closet under the kitchen-stairs, and belonging to the Jews; this fire was discovered, before it had made any progress, by Lazarus, who slept in that part of the house, the very furthest removed from the fire - he alarmed my servant, who awoke my wife and me; the whole house was presently alarmed, and we went down stairs - the fire was extinquished without any difficulty, and was discovered to be occasioned by a link placed in the closet and lighted; Furzeman, the officer, affirmed that he could trace droppings of the link along the passage, from the fire-place, in the Jew's kitchen, to the closet; the Jew's servant had come down-stairs nearly dressed, and had been, a few months ago, suspected of setting on fire a table in the kitchen; this drew suspicion on her; her master, not I, therefore gave her in charge on suspicion of having committed the fire; and she was taken to the watch-house. My wife and servant had sought refuge at the George and Blue Boar inn, and remained there; the rest of the night passed over quietly. - On Saturday morning, Lazarus and myself, and, I believe, most of the persons in the house, attended at Marlborough-street Police-office, on the examination of the Jew's servant. Her master stated his suspicion that she had set fire to the house, and she was remanded for further examination on the following Wednesday, when there did not appear sufficient evidence to warrant her committal on that charge, as the fire had been discovered in time to prevent any serious damage. I did not attach any great weight to it; and certainly thought, with reluctance, of taking the life of an ignorant girl for the crime. I call your attention to the fact that immediately afterwards I wrote to the British Fire-office, in which I am insured, acquainting them with the fire, and the day appointed for the re-examination of the servant of Lazarus, that their solicitor might attend and inquire into the matter. Between the committal of the servant, on the Saturday, and her re-examination, on the following Wednesday, not the least extraordinary circumstance of this mysterious affair was the receipt of two anonymous threatening letters, one by Lazarus and another by myself, apparently by some friend of the girl, accusing Lazarus of knowing all about the fire; the girl has since strongly denied all knowledge of these letters or the writer; they were placed in Furzeman's hand, I believe he still has them; the discovery of the place where the links were bought, by which the fire is said to be communicated, had been an object to all; and on the following Thursday, Lazarus and another Jew, his friend, one Davis, called at my house, and told me they had discovered where the links were bought, and that they were purchased by a man in a grey coat, and with a blue bag. I was glad to hear of the discovery, and they wished me to call with them on Furzeman to consult what was to be done - I was too busy then, but told them I would go on the following day; the next day I went with them to Furzeman's; we saw him, but he was going to Marlborough-street, and said he would go with us to the oilman, at four o'clock. I asked him who the oilman was, who had sold the links, for I did not then know. Furzeman and Davis said. Bradford. I then returned home; the same day a friend, who called upon me, advised me to go and see Bradford - I went with him - he happened to be out - when we got there, we saw his shop-boy, Thomas Dodwell; I told him, who I was, and inquired if he knew

the sort of person to whom he sold the links, and the day; the boy said it was a tall young man, about my stature, as far as he could recollect, and dressed in a pepper-and-salt morning-coat, and had a blue bag with him, into which he put the links; but his master had cut down the links, and would know better about them - I and my friend then left. On the following day, Saturday, before four o'clock in the afternoon, the Jew, Davis, called upon me to go to Bradford's - I and my wife went with Davis, and presently we met Lazarus and another Jew - we proceeded towards Bradford's, and I, having my wife with me, objected to go to Furzeman's, but agreed to meet him at Bradford's, which I did in five minutes afterwards - Bradford was questioned, and said he sold two links to a man between eleven and twelve o'clock the preceding day, Friday, and being asked whether he could recollect the person to whom he sold the links, he said, he could not exactly tell, he was more like me than Lazarus, but that he had his face towards the door, and he (Bradford) had only a side view of him - I told them then, I was not out the whole of the day, and could prove it - I was asked by one of the Jews to go home and put on my grey coat, and bring my blue bag with me; I refused, and said, I would not make a puppet-show of myself - we then left - and by the advice of my solicitor, I offered first, two, and afterwards five guineas, to the person who purchased the links of Bradford to come forward, but no one ever appeared; and I afterwards, time after time, pressed at Marlborough-street-office for inquiry and examination; repeated my communication to the Fire-office, and also to that in which the house was insured, and gave to the parish board all the information they asked for. But even without this, mark how every thing tells against my having purchased the links, and how completely I refute the charge - Bradford's, although above half a mile from my house, is within a hundred yards of the house where I was born, and had passed the greater part of my life, and not three hundred yards from the house where I was apprenticed, where I was known to almost every one - and it is singular, that I was not known to Bradford himself - and where my being seen buying these links, would have called forth half a dozen questions at once; but leaving out these improbabilities, it happened I was not out of my own house on the day the links were bought - and particular circumstances make both my servant and shop-boy recollect this, and enable them to be quite positive of my not having been out long after the time the links were hought. - Besides all this, you are to add the absence of all motives on my part; the only one alleged by my prosecutors, is the amount of my insurance - but this motive has been very much misrepresented - the actual value of all my property on the premises, considerably exceeded 2,000l., although that is not equal to the amount of my insurance, and I could not have proved a greater loss, even if I had ventured to claim it - I wish also to draw your attention to this, that it is now three months ago since this fire took place - the purchase of the links was known within a week afterwards, and every fact now urged against me was then known - not the slightest charge, however, was made against me, and a Session at which I might have been tried, has passed. - I do not know the author of the fire - my suspicions I confine in my own breast - but I hope I have proved to you my innocence of the crime I am charged with, and the consciousness of this enables me to wait your verdict without fear - I have been brief in my defence - but I look forward with humble confidence to the result.

DANIEL LANGLEY . I was in Mr. White's service in August last, as shop-boy. About a week before the fire I took a ladder up-stairs, to get a piece of petrified wood from the loft, and I left it up there; I asked master whether I should leave it or bring it down - he told me to do just as I liked, and I left it - it had been made no use of before, to my knowledge: we have steps and another ladder in the shop, to reach the books with; I left the trapdoor open, but not the one which leads from the loft to the roof; I did not sleep in the house when this fire happened. On the morning before the fire my master came down stairs, from bed, about twelve o'clock in the day - I asked if he knew what the time was - he said, "About ten, I believe;" I said, No, it was twelve.

Q. Where did he go then? A. I do not recollect; I do not think he was out all day, but am not positive. When I told him it was twelve o'clock he went into the parlour to breakfast; I saw him again about half-past one - he came from the parlour, and had been there all the time - I am sure of that; I had not been into the parlour to him, but can see from the shop into the parlour, and saw him there all the time.

Q. When he came into the shop did he go out of the door or stay in the shop? A. I think he staid in the shop - he did not go into the street that I remember.

Q. Was he out long enough to walk half-a-mile and back? A. I cannot say, but in my own mind he was not out at all.

MR. ALLEY. Q. This is a long time ago - when were you first desired to remember the time when your master got up on the day before the fire? I cannot tell - he sometimes takes out a blue bag to carry books in.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he take the bag out that morning? A. I am not positive - it is kept in a drawer by the side of the counter; it was not taken out of the drawer that morning. I told my mother that night how late master had got up.

ANN SLACK . I mended a morning coat for the prisoner - I fetched it on the 20th of September, but did not do it till next day; I half-sleeved it, and covered the buttons, but did not make any alteration in the length of it; this is it (looking at it).

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Hold it up, and see if any alterations have been made in the length since you worked on it? A. Not that I know of - I did not observe the length.

JOHN HELPS . I am secretary to the British Fire Insurance-office. Immediately after the 5th of August. I received this communication from the prisoner respecting the fire - it is dated, Monday, the 7th of August, and signed C. T. White - I laid it before the Board of Directors, but nothing whatever was done about it; the Directors assigned no reason why they sent nobody; the prisoner called afterwards to know if it had been received.(The letter was here read, as follows.)

265, High Holborn.

SIR, - Ibeg leave to call to your recollection the narrow es

cape of my house and property insured in your office, in March last, when considerable suspicion rested on Margaret Drew, the female-servant of my lodger, as the cause- not with standing this, Mr. Lazarus continued her in his service till now; and on the 5th of August the lower part of my house was discovered again to be on fire, and under circumstances evidently the result of design; fortunately it was got under without serious damage; but in consequence of this, Drew, on Saturday, was examined at Marlborough-street, where the Magistrate thought there was not sufficient evidence to warrant her commitment, but remanded her till Wednesday next, at twelve o'clock - at my suggestion Lazarus gave her in charge. I intend to attend the examination on Wednesday, and give you this information, that you may send and inspect the premises in the meantime, and, if you think proper, attend the examination on the part of the office.

RICHARD TILIER BLUNT . I am the prisoner's attorney. I attended with him at Marlborough-street, on the second examination of Lazarus's servant - the magistrate went into the examination, and to the best of my recollection the remark he made was, "Will you, Mr. White, prosecute the girl?" he said, "My landlord wishes me to do so, but as she is Mr. Lazarus' servant, he ought to do it." The prosecution was declined - I know he circulated some bills about the links; this is one of them - (read)

Links. - Two guineas reward: Whereas, on Friday, the 4th of August, between eleven and one o'clock in the day time, a man bought two links at the shop of Mr. Bradford, at Broad-street, St. Giles - this is to give notice, if such person will come forward to the office of Mr. Blunt, solicitor, Union Court, he shall receive the above reward.

GODFREY LAZARUS re-examined. We have a feast of Tabernacles, as well as Passover; the things in the cupboard were never used except at the Passover.

JAMES KENSALL . I am a tailor, and live in Brydges-street, Covent-garden. I have known the prisoner eight or nine years - I made this coat for him, and never altered it - it is the same length as when I sold it.

COURT. Q. Do you ever send them out with such ends as this? A. It is in the same state as when I sent it to him.

JURY to MARGARET DREW . Q. When you went to bed, did you leave any fire in the great of Lazarus' kitchen? A. No. I let the fire burn out; I do not recollect how long it had gone out - I left no light in the kitchen; when I met the prisoner on the stairs, he had a candle in his hand.

Eleven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18261026-55

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1847. MARY ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 18 yards of printed cotton, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the 28th of September, I saw the prisoner in Spital-square , three or four doors from Mr. Hall's, with something under her shawl - I followed her into Fleur-de-lis Court, and asked what she had there - she said, "What I have picked up," and under her shawl I found this cotton.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Hall, linen-draper, Bishopsgate street. On the 28th of September, I put this print into the passage of the shop in the morning - I was told it was stolen; I went out, but saw nobody.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did you miss it? A. About four o'clock - I know it to be ours - we had no more of this pattern - it was a foot and a half within the door-post; the place on the iron where it had hung was empty.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of Wheeler-street, and saw a woman throw this down - I picked it up.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Strongly recommended to mercy, in consequence of the temptation thrown in her way .

Confined for One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-56

1848. JAMES KIDD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , two shirts, value 4s. , the goods of George Thomas Lloyd .

GEORGE THOMAS LLOYD. I work at Mr. Bowerbanks', in Sun-street. These shirts were in a box in my room, in Long-alley - I have known the prisoner six years, and as he was in distress, I asked him to breakfast with me; on the 22d of September, between eight and nine o'clock, when I came home, I found him there, and left him there with my wife; when I returned at night, she missed the shirts; one was afterwards found in pawn, and the other on his person - I had a very good opinion of him.

REBECCA LLOYD . I am the prosecutor's wife. I left the prisoner alone in the room for about five minutes, and at night I missed the shirts - he had been to our house before.

LEVY TOBIAS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields. On the 20th of September, the prisoner pawned one shirt with me, and on the 22nd, another.

JOHN HARDING . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found a shirt on his back - I have known him ten years; he has borne a very good character.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He owed me a trifle; I went to ask him for it, and he said he could not pay - I thought the shirts worth about what he owed me, and I took them.

GEORGE THOMAS LLOYD . I borrowed 1s. of him about a year ago, and I have not paid him; but he never asked me for it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-57

1849. CATHERINE SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 watch, value 26s.; 2 seals, value 2d.; 1 watch-key, value 2d., and 1 watchribbon, value 1d., the goods of Alexander Longmore , from his person .

ALEXANDER LONGMORE. I am a tailor , and live in White-lion Court, Charterhouse-square. On the 11th of October, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I was in King-street, Smithfield , going home - the prisoner stopped me, and asked if I would give her some gin - I said, No - she said, would I give her the price of a glass; I put my hand into my pocket to give her 2d., she immediately snatched out my watch, and ran up a court - I followed and secured her without losing sight of her -

two girls came up and held me, but I kept hold of her till the watchman came - they ran off, and she was taken to the watch-house; I am certain of her person. The watch was safe a quarter of an hour before; I will swear that she took it - I found my seals and ribbon in my waistcoat-pocket - I suppose the swivel had broken, and in the scuffle the women had put them in my waistcoat-pocket while they were trying to get her from me - the scuffle lasted two or three minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Were you quite sober? A. I was; she ran off directly she took the watch, up a court in Hosier-lane; I took her within eight yards of the spot - I did not say I did not know what sort of a watch it was, for I know where it was made: I was surprised to find my seals in my waistcoat-pocket, as my watch had been in my fob. I said it was a small silver watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not five minutes there - he said he did not know whether he had pawned his watch or lost it, and that he would have given any money rather than have given me in charge, if he had known his seals had been in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-58

1850. WILLIAM GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 4 pictures, framed and glazed, value 40s. , the goods of Robert Dod Fullon .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-59

1851. WILLIAM CORSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 7s. , the goods of Philip Lawton .

RENTON NICHOLSON . I am servant to Philip Lawton, pawnbroker , of Bishopsgate-street . On the 21st of October, in the afternoon, a person gave me information; I went into the wine - vaults next door - Arendel pointed the prisoner out; he said he had been in there five minutes; the landlord said, "You have not been here two minutes." I gave him in charge - I missed a pair of trousers, which were safe ten minutes before.

JOHN THOMAS ARENDEL . I am a chimney-sweep. On the 21st of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner and another man at the prosecutor's shop; they tossed up, and then came close to the door - the prisoner either cut or pulled the trousers down, and threw them down; the other man picked them up, and ran away with them - the prisoner ran into the wine-vaults next door - I went and told Nicholson, who secured him there - I am sure he is the man.

RICHARD MORRIS . I took the prisoner in charge; he said he lived at Bethnal-green, but did not know the name of the street, as it was a new one - I found he lived in Wentworth-street.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a spiteful business - all they have said is false - the sweep is a well - known bad character; he has been tried here for robbing a public-house in Skinner-street.

JOHN THOMAS ARENDEL . I was never in custody, and that the officer knows: while I was at Chatham, some sweeps in Angel-alley had been doing something - I came up immediately that I heard of it, and gave myself up to the Lord Mayor; the witnesses said it was a taller man than me.

RICHARD MORRIS . That is true.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-60

1852. WILLIAM PARKINSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Figg , widow , about the hour of nine o'clock in the night of the 18th of October, at St. Bridget, otherwise called St. Bride, with intent to steal, and stealing therein one pair of women's boots, value 5s. , the goods of the said Jane Figg.

GEORGE CLARKE . I am warehouseman to my mother-in-law, Mrs. Jane Figg, who is a shoe-factor - it is her dwelling-house, in the parish of St. Bride . On the 18th of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, as I sat in the shop, I heard a pane of glass break; I sprang to the door, and saw the prisoner go away from the spot; he was a yard or a yard and a half from the door, when I first went out; I pursued him up the street, as he ran away directly it was done; I never lost sight of him; I saw him secured, and am sure he is the same person. As I came back, I picked up a pair of shoes, which I knew to be ours - they had been taken from a window just by the broken pane of glass, and could not be got at without breaking it, and he must have put his hand or some instrument in to take them - his hand was bloody at the watch-house. It was quite dark, but by the reflection of the gas I could see him plainly - I am certain of his person, for I never lost sight of him - the glass was whole before - nothing was found on him - I dare say he was in distress.

CHARLES RANDALL . I am a hair-dresser. I was going down Stonecutter-street, and the prisoner ran towards me; I saw him throw down these boots just before he came up to me - I collared him, and as I returned, Clark picked them up. Only 1d. was found upon him, and he said he was much distressed.

JOHN CARVILL . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the boots, which I produce.(Property Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going out in the street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! a man said I had thrown the boots down, but I had never seen them. I had only been in town three days, and have no friends.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, believing him to be in distress, and that it was his first offence .

Reference Number: t18261026-61

1853. JOHN GAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Daniel , from his person .

RICHARD DANIEL. On the 13th of October, at eleven o'clock in the morning, as I turned from Long-lane into Smithfield, the officer tapped me on the shoulder, and told me to follow him - he brought the prisoner to me, with this handkerchief, which was in my pocket shortly before- I had got the fellow one. I did not feel it taken.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Then you had two? A. Yes - one was in my hat.

ROBERT TYRREL . I am an officer. I was going down Chiswell-street, and saw the prisoner and two other boys - they went behind Mr. Daniel in Long-lane ; the prisoner took the handkerchief from his pocket, and ran across Smithfield; on seeing me follow him he threw it down; it was picked up, given to me, and I secured him.

Cross-examined. Q. Then there were three persons? A. Yes. I have always said the prisoner was one of them; I saw the other two try several persons' pockets, as they went along; I was on the opposite side of the way.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the handkerchief, and when the officer came I threw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-62

1854. RICHARD CONAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 3 gold seals, value 30s., the goods of Richard Witton , from his person .

RICHARD WITTON. I am porter to Mr. Tanner, of Maiden-lane, Wood-street. On the 6th of October, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was standing at the corner of a passage leading from Long-lane to King-street, Cloth-fair , with a child in my arms; the prisoner shoved against me - I put my right-hand down, and missed my seals; I collared and accused him of taking my watch - he said he knew nothing about it, and got away; I pursued, and collared him, between the posts, and held him till a mob gathered together; I told him to give up my watch, but upon feeling my fob I said it was only the seals; I looked, and saw them between his fingers; I said, "You have them in your hand" - he immediately put his hand behind him, and they were gone among the mob - I have not received them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where did you see the seals? A. When I collared him in the passage the second time; about twenty persons might have gathered round; I had not called out, but I never lost sight of him - it was a market-day; I did not see him give them to anybody. I did not tell the Magistrate that I said,"Come drop them now."

EDWARD SMITH . I am clerk to my father, who is an attorney. I found a piece of ribbon in this court - it tallies with the prosecutor's watch-ribbon.

HUGH DEVELIN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the Red Cow public-house, Long-lane; I found two knives upon him - the property has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and was so astonished at being charged with the crime, that I could not speak. On the day stated I was passing through Long-lane - forty or fifty people were stopping in this court, looking at a man with a pig; the prosecutor seized and accused me of the robbery - it was easy for him to be mistaken as to the hand that robbed him, among so many people huddled together in a court. I neither robbed him, nor did I see the thief.

RICHARD WITTON re-examined. I had a child in my arms all the time - I only ran six or seven yards - I cannot be mistaken.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to mercy .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-63

1855. MARY WILSON and MARY EDAY were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 3 veils, value 4l. 5s., and 30 yards of ribbon, value 2l., the goods of John Harvey , privately in his shop .

Mr. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN NORTON . I am shopman to Mr. John Harvey, a linen-draper , of Ludgate-hill . On the 26th of October the prisoners came into the shop in company together - they bought a veil and six yards of ribbon, which was put up for them; after I sold them the veil I saw Wilson put something into her muff in a hurried manner, which excited my suspicion, and after they paid, Mr. Harvey,(whom I had acquainted with it,) requested them to walk into the back-shop; he called me soon afterwards, and showed me a veil in Wilson's muff - I took it out; it was not the one I had sold them: it was not in paper, but folded up rough; a constable was called in, and as they were leaving I saw two more veils on the warehouse floor, where Wilson had stood - they were then in the passage, and did not see me find them. I got into a coach with them, and saw Wilson drop a piece of ribbon, which I picked up - that was ours, and I had not sold it them. When we got to the Compter, after they got out of the coach, the constable brought me another piece of ribbon, which was ours - when we were in the coach Eady cried; Wilson said she need not fret, for it was not her who had done it. - When Eady found the constable was sent for, she felt particularly anxious that the veil should be paid for, that they might go.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You cannot say that she saw Wilson take the property? A. No; they laid out 20s., and were dressed as fashionable as possible; they were a quarter of an hour in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. They bought a veil and a piece of ribbon? A. Yes; I showed them the veils in the shop - Wilson said she must have made a mistake in putting her handkerchief from the counter into her muff. The three veils were worth 4l. 15s., and the ribbon above 2l.; we have about twenty shopmen, but I only attended to them.

MR. JOHN HARVEY. Norton applied to me, and I asked the prisoners into the adjoining warehouse, and said, they were suspected of having taken more than they had paid for; I saw the corner of the veil projecting out of the muff, and called Norton, who took it out.

DANIEL TURNER . I am a constable. I went in the coach with the prisoners; I saw Wilson's arms under her pelisse two or three times, and something drop - when the coach-door was open I found two rolls of ribbon, where Wilson had sat.(Property produced and sworn to).

WILSON'S Defence. The veils lay all about the counter, and in putting my handkerchief into my muff I accidentally put one in; Mr. Harvey said, there was something in my muff, which I gave him, and he pulled the veil out with the handkerchief - as we got into the coach he accused us of taking two more - the shopman had asked if there were not some veils in the warehouse.

JOHN NORTON re-examined. I do not recollect seeing a handkerchief in the muff; we never keep veils in the warehouse. I had asked the shopman if there were not

some in the warehouse, but that was only an excuse, that I might get to tell Mr. Harvey.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

EADY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-64

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1856. WILLIAM ECKOTT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Stone , spinster , about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 27th of September , at Teddington, (she and other persons being therein), and stealing 8 silver-spoons, value 30s. , her property.

JANE WILLIAMS . I am servant to Sarah Stone - she is single, and lives at Teddington . This plate was in the kitchen. On the 27th of September, about a quarter to one o'clock, I found a door shut, which I had left open, and upon opening it I found the house door, which I had left shut, was open; I was certain somebody had been there. I saw a man running hastily out of the gate, with a basket on his back; I thought it looked suspicious; I went to the plate-cupboard, and missed this plate: I then went to the coach-gate - I saw nobody but a man in a cart, drawn by a grey horse; he was about thirty yards from the coach-gate; I think there were two men in the cart, but am satisfied the one I observed was the man I had seen running away; I gave an alarm to Cooke, the constable; the prisoner is one of the men I saw in the cart; and one of the men in the cart I believe to be the man I had seen running. I found the plate before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You believe the man in the cart is the same you saw running? A. Yes; I only saw his back, and cannot swear positively to him - my mistress and another servant were in the house; the other servant was up stairs, and could not have opened the door; I had not been out, but went from one kitchen to another - the door was shut a minute before, and must have been opened by the person who took the property.

RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE . I am a constable, and live in Teddington-street, two or three hundred yards from the prosecutrix's. On the 27th of September, about one o'clock in the day, I saw two men in a cart, drawn by a grey horse, galloping very fast by my house, towards Richmond; Williams came to me directly; I pursued, and came up with the prisoner at Richmond - Green was up before me; I saw the same horse and cart which had passed my house, in custody of Shadwell. I produce the spoons.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see anybody jump out of the cart? A. No.

WILLIAM SHADWELL . I heard an alarm, and got up to the cart, which had been stopped; the prisoner was sitting in it, and several people surrounding it; I saw nobody jump out.

JAMES GREEN . I heard an alarm, and went in pursuit - I saw the cart stopped - there two men in it; one jumped out, and escaped - the prisoner was taken in the cart; the next morning I found two spoons in a garden right opposite to where the cart had stopped; a person in the cart could easily have thrown them there.

JURY. Q. Did he drive the cart? A. He had the reins in his hand, and sat on the driving side; they both appeared to be at the horse to make it go fast.

WILLIAM SIMMONDS . I was going to work, and in Hill-street, Richmond, I saw this cart galloping; I got up after it was stopped - the prisoner was the only man in it then; I cannot say who drove. I saw my son find a tea-spoon under the cart, just at the horse's heels; I think the man must have dropped it as he jumped out: the prisoner said he would get out without our pulling him out. I found another tea-spoon under a cart which had stopped the prisoner's cart, to prevent its going by.

JANE WILLIAMS . These are my mistress' spoons, and are worth more than 30s.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man asked if I was going through Richmond, and asked me to give him a ride, as he was going to a doctor, and wished to make haste, his wife being dangerously ill.

One witness gare the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18261026-65

1857. JOSEPH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 waistcoat, value 6s.; 2 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 2 shirts, value 10s., and 1 ring, value 4s., the goods of Robert Iles ; 1 coat, value 10s.; and 2 waistcoats, value 10s., the goods of Frederick Hourgan , in the dwelling-house of Patrick Grant .

ROBERT ILES. I am publisher of the Sun newspaper , and lodge at Mr. Grant's, in the Strand ; he does not live in the house himself. On the 20th of October, I went to the theatre, leaving my property down stairs in the kitchen it was safe at six o'clock, and missed at half-past seven: the prisoner is a stranger.

FREDERICK HOURGAN. I lodge in the house; I missed a coat and two waistcoats from the kitchen.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer. About eight o'clock on the evening of the 20th of October, I and Boston were on St. Martin's-court; I saw the prisoner and another man come through the court, the other had a bundle; they kept looking back every minute; I asked what they had got, they said, it I would go to Long-acre, they would satisfy me; we went as far as Langley-street; the prisoner then struck me on the head, and we had a desperate fight; but at last got them to the watch-house - when I asked the other what he had got, the prisoner said, "What is that to you, they are my clothes, and he is carrying them for me;" we were followed by a mob, and got hustled by several of them - the other man made his escape from the watch-house in the crowd; there were thirty or forty thieves following us; the prisoner had the prosecutor's shirt in his hat, and his coat on his back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw one of the witnesses and a young man showing some clothes; he asked what I would give for the coat, I said, "6s. and my own."

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-66

1858. CHARLES PENNYCAD , WILLIAM MURRELL , and WILLIAM FLOOD , were indicted for a bur

glary, in the dwelling-house of Ann Potter , widow , on the night of the 27th of October, and stealing 8 pairs of shoes, value 5s., and 2 pairs of boots, value 5s. , the goods of the trustees of the poor of the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch .

MR. PHILLIPS' conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am constable of Norton Falgate. On the 27th of October, about nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoners singing together at the Duke's-head public-house, High-street; as they were going out, I observed that Pennycad had a bundle - I asked him to let me see what was in it; Murrell said, "Old shoes, show the gentleman" - Pennycad said, they were his fathers, and he was waiting there to meet him - I asked where his father lived, he said, he did not know - I took them to the watch-house; I put them in separate places - I said to Pennycad, "I don't believe your story, where did you get them;" he then said voluntarily, "Well, I will tell you the truth; we were in distress, and we got them from Shoreditch work-house - I and Flood got over the wall, and Murrell waited outside" - I took three pairs and two odd shoes from Pennycad's bundle, and one pair he had on, and Murrell had one pair on his feet - the next morning, I asked Flood who went over the work-house wall with him; he said, Pennycad, and that Murrell waited outside.

THOMAS FRANCIS . I am master of the shoemaker's shop, at Shoreditch work-house - the prisoners have been paupers there, and one of them worked in the shop; these shoes are the property of the trustees of the poor - I hung them up in the shop about four o'clock in the afternoon; it was then dusk - I found, about half-past eight next morning, that the window had been forced open.

PENNYCAD'S Defence. I applied to the overseers for relief; they pushed me out of the room, and said, "Go a thieving" - I was in want, or I should not have done it.

PENNYCAD - GUILTY. Aged 16.

MURRELL - GUILTY. Aged 16.

FLOOD - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-67

1859. WILLIAM PRITCHARD was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM WEBBER . I am a trunk-maker . The prisoner was not in my employ - he was recommended to me to collect debts, but has never collected any for me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-68

1860. JAMES SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 trunk, value 6s.; 20 tablecloths, value 15l. 10s.; 20 pillow-cases, value 3l. 10s.; 30 towels, value 2l. 5s.; 9 table-cloths, value 2l.; 2 pieces of linen, value 9s.; 6 bolster-cases, value 24s.; 10 yards of dimity, value 10s.; 5 yards of cotton, value 10s.; 2 coverlids, value 6s.; 1 shawl, value 5s., and 4 napkins, value 14s. , the goods of William Bowie .

ELIZABETH BOWIE . I am the wife of William Bowie; he is an American; I live in Crombies-row, Commercial-road . On the 29th of September I was moving there from East Smithfield, this property was in a van - it started about seven o'clock in the evening - I told the carman not to unload till I came to see all was right - I went into the house a few minutes, and when I came out I missed the trunk, containing all this property.

EDWARD KING . I drove the van, the trunk was at the bottom in the hinder part - Morris, who assisted in unloading, moved it to the other side of the van; and soon afterwards I heard an alarm that a man was gone up the road with it - Morris was still there - I did not see the prisoner there - the empty trunk has since been found.

SARAH TURNER . On a Friday night, at a quarter before eight o'clock, the prisoner and a young woman brought this trunk to a house in Albion-street, where I was minding a sick woman - Bowie's house is about thirty yards off - soon after I got home, Boden and Gascowen called me out - Boden was with the prisoner when he brought the box in - they told me there was a box in the alley - I went out and took it into my own house - I have not seen the prisoner since - I sold the trunk to Dunbar, as I did not know whose it was, and spent the money which I got for it - it did not strike me that I was doing wrong.

JAMES DUNBAR . I am a broker, and bought the trunk of Turner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-69

1861. THOMAS FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , at St. Andrews, Holborn, 1 set of bedfurniture, value 6l., the goods of Josias William Hill , in his dwelling-house .

JOSIAS WILLIAM HILL. I am an upholsterer , and live in Hatton-garden, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn ; it is my dwelling-house, and in the county of Middlesex. On the 18th of October, I had to send to Finchley a parcel, containing a set of bed-furniture, which was fully worth 6l. - I went into the bar of the Blue Posts public-house, in Holborn, and told the landlord to send me the Finchley carrier, to take a parcel to Finchley - he asked for the booking - I said I had given him 2d. once, and he never sent for the parcel, and I would give it to the carrier when he came; this was between two and three o'clock- I spoke loud enough to be heard in the tap-room, but I did not see the prisoner there - I came home, and between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came, and said I had got a parcel to go to Grass Farm, Finchley - I said I had, and asked him what the carriage would be - he said 1s. 6d., but agreed to take it for 1s. - he asked for 2d. for booking, and I gave him 1s. 2d. - he said he was the Finchley carrier, and had come for the parcel for Finchley - I believed that, and gave him the parcel of bed - furniture inside my house - he went a door or two off, and then returned and pitched it on the floor, and said, "You had better put down the name of the gentleman it is for, in case I should forget;" he took his pocket-book out, and tore a leaf out, and I wrote the name - I said, "I need not put Finchley;" he said, "Oh, no! I know very well;" and went away with it; I advertised it, and four days afterwards found it in the Borough.

JAMES BROOKMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Hill; the prisoner is the man he delivered the parcel to - I helped it on his shoulder in the warehouse. I went to Finchley on Friday to put it up, and found it had not arrived - I have since seen all the Finchley carriers, and find that none of them knew him.

JOHN LAMBALL . I am landlord of the Blue Posts.

When Hill came to ask for a Finchley carrier, the prisoner was within four yards of him, and must have heard what he said - I never sent him for that parcel - I know all the carriers - he is not one.

RICHARD ONSLOW . I am servant to Lamball. I saw the prisoner at that house, our day - he left about four o'clock.

GEORGE MASEY . I am constable of the night, of St. George's, Surry. On the 19th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner with another man at the Black Horse and Swan public-house, Blackman-street - the prisoner had a bundle on his back, and went upstairs with it - I followed, and asked him what he had got - he made no answer - I asked if it was his own - he said a man employed him to carry it - I took him, and produce the bundle which contains this furniture.

MR. HILL. This is the furniture which I gave the prisoner to carry to Finchley.

Prisoner's Defence. The man, whom the officer saw with me, hired me to carry the parcel - he bears a notorious character, and I was led away by him - I met him on the Wednesday, and he said, "My man, will you go to No. 102, Hatton-garden, and fetch a parcel to go to Finchley;" I went, and they asked if I was the Finchley carrier - I said, No, the carrier stood at the corner - I took the parcel, and delivered it to him - he gave it back to me, and said he would return directly; but he did not - I took it to the Cock public-house, and booked it for Finchley; the next day I met this man - he asked what I had done with the parcel - I said I left it at the Cock - he went there with me, and got it - he put it in a coach, and when we got out at the public-house door, I was taken - I have driven a Greenwich coach seven years, and never was in trouble.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it his first offence .

Reference Number: t18261026-70

1862. CHARLES PEARCE , JOHN STEERS , and WILLIAM STEERS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling - house of Samuel Maine , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 17th of August , at Hanworth, with intent to steal, and stealing 117 pairs of shoes, value 40l. , his property.

SAMUEL MAINE. I live at Hanworth-park, near Hounslow, in the parish of Hanworth . On the 18th of August, at six o'clock in the morning, Purchase, my foreman, gave me information - I found my house had been broken open, and upwards of 40l. worth of shoes stolen - I lost one hundred and seventeen pairs. On the 16th of October, I went with Cooke and a search warrant to the house of John Steers; the prisoner William is his son, and lives with him; the house is two miles from mine - we found his daughter and a younger son there; but neither of the prisoners were at home - I found a pair of shoes on the mantel- shelf of the first room I entered - Cooke opened a cupboard in that room, and the young woman obstructed him in his duty - he produced his warrant, and, I think, he there found three pairs of men's shoes (I have no doubt of their being mine); in a box up-stairs, which the young woman claimed, I found a pair of women's shoes - we went downstairs, and under a form, by the fire-side, found another pair - I believe them all to be mine - we then went to Pearce's, which is two doors from Steers', we found nothing there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you know the Steers were discharged by the Magistrate on their own recognizance? A. Yes; they have surrendered here - I found the shoes two months after the robbery.

JOHN FINALL COOKE . I accompanied Mr. Maine with the search warrant; his evidence is correct - I apprehended the Steers's; they were then in the service of a gentleman at Case Orton.

WILLIAM PULLUM . I am a labourer, and live at Hanworth. I was in Mr. Maine's employ, but was turned away, in consequence of this robbery - about a fortnight after I was turned away, I met Pearce in the Swan-yard at Hanworth; I knew him before; he asked me to drink; I drank, and he said, "Stop a bit, I want to have a little talk with you presently," and soon after, he said, "I thought you had been in some prison before now, from what I heard;" I said, it was out of anybody's power to put me into prison; "But," said, "you have done it nicely, I knew it was you that took them, as soon as Mr. Maine told me about the robbery, the next morning;" I said, "For God's sake, what did you do with them?" meaning the shoes; but I did not say shoes; I said, "There must have been five or six of you to take them away;" he said, "No, there was only Will Steers, me, and another;" I said, "What did you do with them?" he said, "We have done with them right enough, we have buried them in the gravel pits;" I asked him to let me have a pair, as I was almost barefooted, and wanted a pair; he told me to come over to him at Witton next Sunday, and he would let me know; I went over next Sunday, and found Pearce alone; I asked him if he would let me have a pair of shoes; he then told me that one Orwell, or'some such name, over at Twickenham, had them to make away with; I understood that Orwell had got them all; he asked if Benny, Mr. Maine's foreman, had lost any clothes; I said, I did not know, but I thought he had.

Q. Did it not strike you as odd, that he should ask you about what you knew nothing of, and he knew all about? A. Yes; he said, he knew he had, for he saw the waistcoat hung out to dry at Steers', and the jacket was at Witton; he said, Will Steers would be at home in a fortnight if I wanted any shoes, and that he was gone to work at Case Orton - on the next Saturday night, I went to Twickenham, as I wanted to buy a pair of shoes, but I could not find Orwell out - I thought I should get a pair cheap - three weeks after this I went to Pearce, and said, Steers was not come; he said, when Steers came home, he would let me know about the shoes. The next Sunday afternoon, he had promised to meet me again, but I thought he would not come - as I was going down to Mr. Maine, to tell him what I had heard, I met him in the Swan-yard again - he asked me if I had seen Will that day; I said, "No; he has not been here, has he?" he said, "Yes, he has been here all the afternoon;" I said, I had not seen him, and asked him again, if he had got any shoes, he said, Yes, for he had been sorting them out that morning - I told him to ask for a pair for me, for I would buy them; he said, No, he wanted a pair for himself; he would not ask for them, but he would show me the man, if I would go with him, and I might ask

myself - I went with him to Witton, which is about two miles - as we went along, he said, very likely Will would give me a ticket, to go and get a pair of shoes - I supposed by that. that they had been pawned - we went to the yard where Steers lived - he said, "Steers is gone to bed, but I will soon call him up; you stand under the tree, out of the moonlight;" he then called Will - his mother came, but I did not see Steers till he was in custody.

Q. Why were you so anxious to get a pair of shoes? A. To show them to Mr. Maine. I think I informed him of this a fornight ago last Monday; after Pearce said the shoes were at Steers', I went and told Mr. Maine; I did not tell him before, because I did not know whether they were telling me the truth or a story, and I wanted a pair to show Mr. Maine, as a proof.

BENJAMIN PURCHASE . I am steward to Mr. Maine. On Thursday night, the 17th of August, between eight and nine o'clock, these shoes were safe in a room adjoining the kitchen; they were worth above 40l.; I missed them about six o'clock the next morning; it was then daylight - I lost a great coat, but no waistcoat - I know the shoes produced to be Mr. Maine's.

GEORGE RIVOLTA . I am a boot and shoemaker. I know these shoes to be part of what I made for Mr. Maine.

MR. MAINE re-examined. Pullum informed me where I should find the shoes; he was my watchman, and suspecting he had some hand in the robbery, I discharged him, but my premises are very extensive, and I believe now he is clear of all guilt, and should not object to take him again.

PEARCE'S Defence. I know nothing about the shoes.

PEARCE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

J. STEERS - NOT GUILTY .

W. STEERS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-71

1863. JOHN KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 5 gowns, value 2l.; 1 shawl, value 3s.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 2 aprons, value 1s. 6d., 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s. 6d; 1 petticoat, value 2s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s., the goods of William Austin , in his dwelling-house .

MARIA AUSTIN . I am the wife of William Austin - we live in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove - the prisoner lodged at our house - I have known him from a child; he is a bricklayer , and worked for my husband, but did not board with us. On the 23d of October, I lost this property from two boxes in the second floor room, where he slept alone; they were not locked - I told him I had a loss, and accused him of it - he denied it for some time; I persevered in accusing him, saying, I was certain he must have them, but did not threaten or promise him - I asked him for the duplicates - he said he had pawned some of the property, and sold the rest; I have no doubt but he took them at different times; I had not seen them for a month.

JOHN THOMAS PEARCE . I am a bricklayer. I pawned a gown for the prisoner last Saturday week, at Flint's, in the Edgware-road, in the name of Mills; he told me not to pawn it in his own name - I did not suspect anything.

BENJAMIN BARREN . I have a whittle and gown, which the prisoner pawned on the 23d, and a gown, pawned by pearce on the 21st.

JOHN HEATH . I am a constable. I found a duplicate on the prisoner, which led me to Flint's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Pearce was the occasion of it - he knew where I got them.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-72

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1864. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JANE KENNESLEY . I live in Duke-street, Aldgate. - The prisoner came into my shop on the 16th or 17th of October , and asked for half an ounce of tobacco, which came to 2d. - he gave me half-a-crown, I saw him take some halfpence out. I sounded the half-crown, said it was bad, and put it on the counter, and on turning round it was gone; I asked him where it was - he gave it me back; I weighed it, and returned it to him; he said he took it of his master, and could get it changed; he went away. On the 20th, at a quarter past eight o'clock, he came for a quarter of an ounce of tobacco, which came to 1d. - he gave me a shilling, and I gave him a six pence and 5d. - he went away; I afterwards showed it to my son, and it turned out to be bad - I kept it separate from all others till I gave it to the constable; he came again in about two hours, for a quarter of an ounce of tobacco - he put down a shilling, but seeing me looking at him, he took the shilling up, gave me a penny, and went away. On the 22d he came again, and bought of my husband a quarter of an ounce of returns, which came to 1d., and gave him a shilling - my husband said it was bad, and secured him - 5d. was found upon him.

FRANCIS KENNESLEY . On the 22d the prisoner came for a quarter of an ounce of returns - he gave me a bad shilling; I said, "Have you got any more?" he said, Yes, and threw down a good one. I then searched him, and found a half-crown, two or three good shillings, and 5d. on him - I gave the first shilling to Roberts.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a constable, and received him in charge; Mrs. Kennesley gave me 1s., and Mr. Kennesley gave me another - I produce them.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am engaged in Mint prosecutions. Both these shillings are counterfeit, and from one die.

Prisoner's Defence. He called his wife, and asked if I was the man who paid the first shilling - she shook her head, and said, No - she then said, "Yes, but wait till my son comes, and if he knows you, you shall be detained;" the son said I was not the man.

MRS. KENNESLEY. I never said he was not the man.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years then to come .

Reference Number: t18261026-73

1865. JOHN LOCKE, alias HILL , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , three 10l., and two 5l. promissory notes , the property of William Reeves , his master.

WILLIAM REEVES. I am a wine and spirit-dealer , and live in Warwick-lane. I have been married two months, and found the prisoner in my wife's service - he was porter and cellarman . On the 25th of September, about twelve o'clock, I gave him three 10l. and two 5l. country

notes, to get changed, with all possible haste - three were payable at Lubbook's, one at Esdaile's, and the other at Hoare's; he never returned, but was apprehended on the 2d of October. On the 26th of September his uncle brought me 25l.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am clerk to Sir John Lubbock. On the 25th of September I paid for two 10l. Farnham notes, two 10l. Bank notes, Nos. 16,125 and 16,126; and for a 5l. note of the same Bank, No. 18,233, 5l.

MR. REEVES re-examined. Two of the 10l. and one 5l. were Farnham notes.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN . I keep a clothes-shop in Whitecross-street. About a month ago I changed a 10l. note for a young man, much like the prisoner; he bought a coat, two waistcoats, and two handkerchiefs, for 1l. 14s.; I changed the note at the King's Arms public-house, Whitecross-street. I believe the prisoner is the man.

JOHN COCK . I keep the King's Arms, Whitecross-street. On the 25th of September I changed a 10l. note, No. 16,125, for Benjamin (looking at the note); it has his name, in my writing, on it.

MR. REEVES. I received No. 16,126 from the uncle.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-74

1866. JOHN FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 72lbs. of ginger, value 2l. 5s. , the goods of James Turner .

JOSEPH HANBY OLIVER . I am apprentice to James Turner, of Holborn-bridge . This bag, containing 72lbs. of ginger, stood in the shop, about three feet from the door- I saw the prisoner going out with it, and secured him two or three doors off, with it - he had ran about six yards- he said he should not try to escape; I have inquired his character, and find nothing against him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner, in his Defence, pleaded distress, and stated that he was led to commit the crime with no dishonest motive, but in order to be sent abroad.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-75

1867. MARY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 yard of woollen-cloth, value 10s. , the goods of William Petherbridge and others, his partners.

THOMAS VIZOR . I am shopman to William Pether-bridge and others - they are woollen-drapers . On the 24th of October two gentlemen brought the prisoner in with this cloth, which had hung in the lobby of our shop- I do not know how she got it; the gentlemen are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-76

1868. ELIZABETH NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 bed, value 3l. 10s.; 1 bolster, value 10s., and 2 pillows, value 10s. , the goods of Evan Timothy .

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JANE TIMOTHY . I am the wife of David Timothy - we live in Barbican. On the 17th of October the prisoner came and bought a bed and bolster, which came to 4l. 10s. - she gave her name, "Mrs. Neale, 7, New-street, Clothfair;" she told me to send them there, and they should be paid for on delivery, or returned; she said she was going home to dinner, and I was to send it at two o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not ten o'clock when I called? - A. It was exactly eleven; I asked her for a deposit; she said she was in a hurry, but if it was not approved of she would either return the money or the bed.

DAVID TIMOTHY . I manage the business for my brother, Evan Timothy. I packed up this bed, bolster, and two pillows, and delivered them to Mears, at a quarter to two o'clock, to take to No. 7, New-street, Cloth-fair, with positive orders not to leave them without the money; I gave him a plain stamp to write a receipt; he returned without the goods or money. I went that afternoon with an officer, to No. 7, New-street, but could not find them; I found they had been pledged in Aldersgate-street, at four o'clock that day.

JOSIAH MEARS . This bed was given to me with orders not to leave it without the money - I found the prisoner at No. 7, New-street, a few minutes after two o'clock - she was called down to me - she called Williams from his work to carry the bed up-stairs, because my shoes would dirt the house - I expected to have the money, or I should not have let him had it - the prisoner came down and went into the back-room saying she was going to wash her hands - she came to the door with her bounet on, and said, "If you will go with me to St. John-street, I will pay you:" I went, believing what she said - she took me to a house in a court, in St. John-street, and told me to sit down - she sent a young woman out for some beer, which she poured out - the young woman said she had just had some tea - she then gave it to me, and I drank twice - she said she could not pay me then, but would give me her husband's direction, that he was Mr. Neale, a varnish-maker, Maiden-lane, Battle-bridge; I believed all this, and went to Mr. Neale, but did not get the money - I returned to New-street, but she and the bed were gone - I should not have parted with it, if I had not believed she was going to pay me.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am shopman to my father, who is a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street. On the 17th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, this bed, bolster, and pillows, were pawned by a woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner, in the name of Ann Lee, a lodger at No. 7. Long-lane - she wanted 3l. - I lent her two guineas - a man carried it in, and left the shop directly.

JANE TIMOTHY . She said nothing to me about her husband - she gave her direction No. 7, New-street - she said she had taken in lodgers, and it was for them.

HUGH WILLIAMS . On the 16th of October the prisoner took some rooms, at my house, No. 7, New-street, Clothfair; they were unfornished, at 4s. 3d. per week - she was to come in the next day - she called about nine o'clock in the morning, and said she expected a bed there, about eleven o'clock, and I was to assist in taking it in - she went out - returned about eleven o'clock, and went out again - she said she would return by one, and said if the bed was not come, it would be there at two o'clock; she returned at one, and while she was at dinner the man brought it she asked me to carry it up-stairs, as the man's feet were

dirty, and I did so - she asked me to let him remain in the passage while she washed her hands, and they went away together; she returned in forty minutes, and said she wanted to put the bed at the pawnbroker's for a day or two, as she had another coming that night with the rest of her goods; she asked me to take it to the nearest pawnbroker; I thought nothing of it, and we went to Adalns' and I left it there; the man afterwards called about it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner in her defence entered into a long dispute which had caused a separation between her and her husband, whom she stated to have had 1900l. with her, and she had bought this with a view of making him pay for it, as she could not get an allowance from him.

MRS. TIMOTHY. She never said a word about her husband to me - I saw him before the Alderman, and he desired me to prosecute her.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-77

1869. JOHN STANBURY was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

MESSRS. ALLEY and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

A record of the trial and acquittal of Arthur Thompson was here put in and read. (See September Session, page 550.

WILLIAM OSMAN . I am clerk to the Magistrate of the Whitechapel-office - I produce a deposition made by the defendant, on the examination of Arthur Thompson, on a charge of forgery - I took it down - it was read over to him deliberately, before he signed it - he was asked if it was true - he said, Yes - he was perfectly collected, and appeared perfectly to understand it - he did not appear at all frightened.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you been a clerk at that office? A. Nearly twenty years- I remember his being first brought there; he appears to me to be a young man.

Q. What is the mode of taking these examinations? A. The witnesses state their evidence to the Magistrate, and when he decides to commit, they are sent into the clerk's office to have their evidence written down; on this occasion I went into the office with the defendant; I asked him what he had said to the Magistrate, and what he had to state, and I wrote it down - I endeavoured to take the very words, and believe I did, on this occasion - I will not say I took down his very words, but the substance of what he said, that is our general practice - I took his own words as nearly as I could; he was examined twice; I read his deposition over to him in the presence of the Magistrate, and he signed it; we are sometimes much pressed with business at our office, but I have as much time as I think necessary to take down what a witness says. (The deposition was here read, in which the defendant swore positively that Arthur Thompson, the person then under examination, was the person who had delivered a note to him to take to Messrs. Taylor's brewery; on his return he saw him by the turnpike, that Thompson beckoned to the defendant, who then pointed him out to the officers; Thompson ran away, but was pursued and taken into custody.

HENRY BUCKLER . I am short-hand writer to the Court; the defendant was examined here last Sessions, on the trial of Arthur Thompson - I took his evidence in shorthand.

MR. ALLEY. Will you read those parts of his evidence, which apply to this case? (Reads.) Q. How old are you? A. Seventeen years. Q. Where do you live? A. At No. 2, James-street, Limehouse-fields. Q. On the first of July, did the prisoner accost you? A. Yes; I do not think that is the man (looking at him). Q. Are you sure about that? A. Yes; I am sure that is not the man. Q. Was there a man afterwards taken into custody? A. Yes. Q. Do you know whether that is the man who was taken into custody? A. Yes; he looks like the man. Q. When was he taken? A. On the first of July; Mr. Tuson, an officer, took him. Q. Did you point out the person who was to be taken into custody? A. I saw a person run across the road, and I said that looked like the man. Q. Was the man who ran across the road, and who you pointed out, the same person who had spoken to you before? A. He looked like the same person. Q. Was that person taken into custody? A. Yes. Q. Was the person taken into custody, the person you had seen before? A. I am not positive. Q. Were you positive then? A. No. Q. Do you mean to say you were not positive, and that you did not swear to him? A. No, I was not positive. Q. Have you never been positive about the man? A. Not altogether positive. Q. Now you say you are not positive that is the man? A. No, I am not. Q. Have you seen any friend of the prisoner's lately? A. No. Q. Had no communication with any one? A. No. Q. How long were you with any person whom you had any communication with? A. Do you mean the person who gave me the note? Mr. Brodrick. Yes. A. I suppose about ten minutes. Q. When that person was taken into custody by the constable, do you mean to say you did not speak to him positively? A. No. Q. Were you sworn before the Magistrate? A. Yes. Q. Was what you said taken down in writing? A. Yes. Q. When that man was taken into custody, did you not speak positively to him, to the officer? A. No, Sir. Q. You will swear that, will you? A. Yes. Q. Did you or not speak positively to the man, to the officer? A. No. Q. That you swear? A. Yes. Q. By the Court. Do you believe the man taken into custody, is the man who before had spoken to you? A. No, my Lord, I do not think it was the man. Q. You do not think he is the man who spoke to you? A. No. Q. Did you say so to the officer? A. No, I was so frightened at the time. Q. Did any person speak to you that day, and give you anything? A. The man spoke to me, and gave me a note. Q. What did you do with the note? A. I was to take it to Mr. Taylor's. Q. Did you point out any person then to the constable? A. No. Q. Did you point out that man then to Mr. Sewell, or to the constable? A. No, I did not point him out. Q. Did you say anything to them? A. No, I did not. Q. Did you say whether he was the man or not? A. No. Q. Now, young man, be particular, are you quite sure you did not point out that man, as the person who had spoken to you before? A. Yes. Q. Attend to the question, I am speaking of the time after this man was stopped; you say the person had him in custody - you came up first, then the constable, and afterwards Sewell; did you point out to the constable or to Sewell, that the man in custody was the person who spoke to you before?

A. I did not point at all. Q. Did you say that he was the man, or that he was not? A. No, I do not recollect saying a word. Q. Will you swear you did not say anything? A. I did not speak a word. Q. Do you mean to say you did not intimate in any way, that he was the man? A. No. Q. Did you afterwards state that to be the man? A. No. I did not think him to be the man - I had my (or great) doubts whether he was the man. Mr. Brodrick. Q. Now look at that (handing him the deposition), is that your signature? A. This looks like my writing. Q. Have you any doubt of it? A. No - it is my writing. Q. Now do not read it aloud, but read it to yourself, beginning here, "I the said John Stanbury on oath say" - (he does so) - was the account you have now seen read over to you before you signed it? A. I do not recollect it being read over. Q. Was what you said before the Magistrate written down? A. I do not know, my Lord - I said that to the officer, I believe, what is written down. Q. Was it afterwards read over to you? A. I do not recollect its being read over. Q. Did you sign it without its being read over? A. I believe I signed it without its being read over. Q. Now having read that, do you now know who was the person who came to you in the morning with the letter? A. Came to me in the morning with the letter? Q. You said a person came to you and gave you a note? A. Yes. Q. Where was it? A. At the top of Gill-street. Q. Who was that person? A. The man looked very much like the man at the bar; but that is not the man. Q. Now I advise you to be cautious - who was that man? A. I have seen a man since very much like that man. Q. You believe that not to be the man? A. Yes, my Lord. Q. After you had gone to Mr. Taylor and Mr. Sewell, and the constable came back with you, did you see the man who was taken up, before he began running? A. No, Sir. Q. Did the man who was running, or did he not, beckon to you? A. No, Sir, I do not think he beckoned to me - I do not recollect his beckoning. Q. Did he or not beckon to you? A. No, I do not think he did beckon. Q. Do you mean to say you do not think he did, or that he did not beckon? A. No, he did not beckon. Court. Q. Did you, or not, swear before the Magistrate that the prisoner did beckon to you? A. No, I do not recollect swearing that he beckoned to me. Q. Now look again, and tell me whether you have not sworn before the Magistrate that the prisoner did beckon to you - read the whole of it again - did you swear before the Magistrate that the prisoner beckoned to you? A. I do not recollect it. Q. Read and see (he reads) - Now did you before the Magistrate swear that the prisoner did beckon to you? A. It says so there, my Lord; but I do not recollect his beckoning. Q. The question is not whether you recollect it now, but whether you said so then? A. I do not recollect saying so. Q. Did you state before the Magistrate that the prisoner was the person who gave you the note? A. (after some hesitation) I had my doubts whether he was the man. Q. Did you state that it was the prisoner who came to you, talked to you, and gave you that letter? A. I believe I did; but I was so frightened, I did not know what I was swearing.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer of Worship-street. I was present when the defendant was examined at the office against Thompson - his deposition was read over to him; he did not appear to be at all frightened - it was at the second examination he was asked whether it was true, and he said, Yes; he was quite collected.

WILLIAM SEWELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Taylor and Co. - the defendant brought this letter to our counting-house; it contained a forged cheque. Tuson and I appointed to meet him at Poplar turnpike, where he said the man was waiting; we went and saw him walking up and down, looking for the person, and after some time he called out, "Here he is, here he is" - I saw a man run across the road, and immediately we all three gave him chase as the defendant pointed him out - we ran in different directions - I saw no more of the man or the boy till I met them at the watch-house; it was Thompson, who was tried here; the defendant was asked by Tuson, at the watch-house, whether that was the man, and he said, in quite positive terms,"Yes, it is" - the person he pointed out was the same in figure and dress as the man who was taken, but I only saw his back - I heard the defendant examined at the office; he swore positively that he was the man; his deposition was read over to him; he said it was true, and signed it - he appeared quite calm and collected.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. I suppose you were very eager to apprehend the man? A. My object was to find the right man; I have talked to the defendant since, and never observed any timidity about him.

Q. Now did you not urge him again and again, to be sure of the man who delivered the letter, before he spoke about it? A. I have no recollection of it; I never observed any timidity about him; I believe he was a perfect stranger to Thompson; I understand he is a journeyman tailor.

HENRY TEWSON . I am an officer. I went with the defendant and Sewell, to Poplar turnpike; he met us at the gate; he stood about five minutes looking out for the man, and when Thompson came across the road, Stanbury called out, "Here he is, here he is" - Thompson set off running; the defendant called, Stop thief! as well as I did - I pursued and took him, at the King and Queen public-house, Three-colt-lane - as I was taking him to the watch-house, I saw the defendant; he said to Thompson, "A pretty thing you wanted to bring me into, did not you?" at the watch-house, before I booked the charge, I asked whether he was confident that was the man who gave him the letter, he said, he was - I asked, if he could swear it; he said, he could - I was present when his deposition was read over to him; he appeared quite calm and collected, and to understand what he was about.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I was at the office when the defendant was examined, and heard his deposition read over to him - I saw him sign it; he appeared calm, and no more in a fright than I was.

MR. ANDREWS addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-78

SEVENTH DAY. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2.

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1870. ANN GARRAWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 cotton-gown, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Allen .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am servant to Samuel Allen, a cabinet-maker , Princes-street, Barbican . On the 14th of October, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming down stairs for a light, and heard the first-floor room door shut - when I came down I saw the prisoner; she turned her back, and knocked at the back-room door - I asked what she wanted - she said a straw bonnet-maker; I said if she would go down stairs I would ask my mistress - she said, "Very well;" I went and told my mistress; she was then gone; I ran out, and saw her running across Barbican; I got up to her, and told her to come back; she said she could not, for she had made a mistake - I pulled her back; she said she had got nothing, but this gown was found under her shawl.

ELIZABETH ALLEN . I saw the prisoner in my house; my boy fetched her back, and I found the gown on her.

JOSEPH HORTON . I took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had bought a bonnet of a woman in Smithfield, on condition that if it would not do she would exchange it, for which purpose she gave me her address, No. 16, Barbican, and when I got home, finding it did not suit me, I went to change it; I met a young woman on these stairs, whom I asked for the woman; she asked me to hold this gown while she went to fetch her, and staying longer then I expected I became alarmed; being in a state of pregnancy I trust to your mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, being pregnant.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18261026-79

1871. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 4 saws, value 9s. 6d.; 4 planes, value 9s.; 1 saw, value 3s. 6d.; 1 tool-basket, value 10d.; 2 squares, value 5s., and 1 smoothing-plane, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Ward .

THOMAS WARD. I left these tools in a house in Waterloo-road . On Thursday, the 12th of October, I was ill, and did not go there next day - the house was locked up. The prisoner was quite a stranger.

JOHN PEAGAN . On Saturday night, the 14th of October, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came and offered me two squares, a chisel, and a spoke-shave for sale - I bought them of him; he had several more tools in a basket; I told some of my shop-mates of it, who bought some of him - he said his father had died, and left them to him.

JOHN HARTWELL . I bought some tools of the prisoner on this evening.

GEORGE ALSOP . I bought a saw of the prisoner.

JOSEPH AVANT . I am shopman to Mr. Grey, pawnbroker, of Aldgate. I have a saw, pawned by the prisoner, on the 14th of October.

RICE PRICE . I am servant to Mr. Fleming, pawnbroker, of Fleet-market. The prisoner pawned a saw with me.

JOHN GUEST . I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of October the prisoner pawned a saw with me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When he was at Guildhall he said they were all safe at four o'clock on Friday, and now he speaks of Thursday.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-80

1872. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN ARGILL . I keep a tavern in Abchurch-lane . - The prisoner was employed in my kitchen, but was not entrusted to receive money on my account.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-81

1873. HENRY COCK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Ashton , from his person .

THOMAS ASHTON. On the 29th of September, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I was in Newgate-street , and felt something at my coat pocket; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and on turning round I saw Hughes holding the prisoner, and taking the handkerchief from his bosom.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a watchman, and saw the prisoner in company with another person; the other person took the handkerchief, and handed it to the prisoner, who put it into his bosom; I secured him - he said, "What is a man to do? I have not broken my fast for twenty hours, and am starving." I did not find a farthing on him - I know his companion.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18261026-82

1874. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 2 jackets, value 45s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 4d., and 1 comforter, value 4d. , the goods of John Ollis .

JOHN OLLIS. I am a labourer , and live in Ship-court, Old Bailey . On the morning of the 4th of October I went out, leaving my property safe in my box; I left the prisoner in bed in the room - he had only come there the night before; I returned home, and he went out with a bundle about five minutes after five o'clock; I followed him, and found this property on him.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I took the prisoner, and found a pair of gloves, and a handkerchief in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18261026-83

1875. HENRY ROYAL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 box, value 1s.; 3 caps, value 10s., and 1 handkerchief, value 4d., the goods of Thomas Harding , from the person of Mary Richards .

MARY RICHARDS. I am apprentice to Mrs. Harding, who lives in Newgate-street, and is a milliner. On the 26th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, my mistress gave me three caps in a band-box, to take to St. Paul's-church-yard, and at the corner of Warwick-lane a boy came behind, and snatched the box from me; he ran away, down Warwick-lane; I called Stop thief! the people pursued, and he dropped it in Paternoster-row; I only know that he was dressed in blue; I cannot say whether he wore a cap or hat; the prisoner was taken soon afterwards - he was in the same dress, and is the same sort of boy.

JOHN NORRIS . I am servant to Mr. Kelly, of Paternoster-row. I was coming from Cheapside, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running - I pursued, and collared him in St. Martin's-le-grand; I brought him back - he swore d-n his eyes, he would not come back unless I got him a coach - nobody was running but him.

BARTHOLOMEW SCANLAN . I am a patrol, and live in St. Dunstan's-court, Old Bailey. I was coming from Newgate-market into Paternoster-row; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running with another; the prisoner had a band-box; I distinctly saw him pass me with it. I secured the other, and saw the prisoner drop the box - I picked it up; he was secured in St. Martin's-le-grand. I am sure he is the man.

MICHAEL LYON . I am a patrol. I was in Paternoster-row, and saw the prisoner run from the spot where the box was found - he was taken almost immediately; I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS HARDING. This girl is apprentice to my wife. I know the box the caps are in.

Prisoner's Defence. I carried a parcel for a gentleman from Wood-street to Snow-hill, and as I returned this man charged me with picking a gentleman's pocket in Newgate-street, and then with stealing the box.

GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-84

1876. ANN FIELD was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JEREMIAH GARLICK . I am a furnishing-undertaker , and live in Fleet-market. John Howes has dealt with me some years. On the 23d of September the prisoner, who was a stranger, brought me this note, saying she brought it from Mr. Howes - she told me to make haste, as her husband was going to a funeral directly; I delivered her a silk hat-band and gloves, believing that she came from Howes (note read)

Sir, - Please to send, by bearer, one black silk hat-band and one pair of silk gloves - I will call in the afternoon.

JOHN HOWES.

JOHN HOWES. I am a hot-presser, and dealt with Garlick - the prisoner once lodged with me, but not on the 23d of September - this order is not written by me, or by my direction, nor have I received the things.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-85

1877. ROBERT CONSTANTINE was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury , on the trial of Mary Ann Williams .

EDWARD THOMAS . I am surgeon. I prosecuted Mary Ann Williams here for stealing a gold watch and seals - the prisoner swore positively to her at the office (a record of the trial and acquittal of Mary Ann Williams, was here put in and read).

JOHN THOMPSON . I am clerk to the Magistrates, at Lambeth-street office. On the 20th of October the prisoner was examined on a charge against Mary Ann Williams - I took down his own words as near as possible - I saw him sworn, and saw him sign this deposition (read).

ROBERT CONSTANTINE. I belong to the 1st Regiment of Guards - I have been acquainted with Mary Ann Williams about eight months. On the 4th of October, she came to me, and said she had bought two watch-seals and a key for me - the corporal stood by, and I did not speak to her - she threw them down - I picked them up, and showed them to the man.

DAVID LING . I am in the 1st Regiment of Guards; the prisoner was a grenadier in the same regiment; I have known him four years, and have known Williams, who was tried here, seven or eight months - I have seen the prisoner and her together frequently - they kept company - she used to visit him when he was on guard, and at the barracks - I have taken messages from him to her at different times.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. On the 3d of October I received information of this robbery - I went to the barracks on the 7th and saw the prisoner - I found the seals upon him - I had him detained at the barracks - he said he got them from a young woman, named Mary Ann Pemberton, or Williams, I am not certain which, when he was on guard; and that she lived at No. 10, Blue Anchor-yard, Whitechapel, and he had known her seven or eight months - I saw him sworn before the Magistrate, and his deposition was read over to him - he signed it.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a serjeant of the regiment - I heard the prisoner swear at the office that he had known Williams eight months.

WILLIAM FIELD . I am a short-hand writer, and take notes for Mr. Buckler, in the New Court. On Friday evening last, the defendant was examined on the trial of Mary Ann Williams - I took down correctly in short-hand what he said (reads)."I am in the 1st regiment of Guards - I do not know the prisoner. - Court. Q. Look at her? A. I do not know her. - Court. Q. You knew her before the Magistrate - you had known her for eight months then? A. I do not know her. - Court. Q. Is the signature to this deposition your hand-writing? A. No. - Q. Do you mean to state that on your oath? A. Yes; it is not my hand-writing. - Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes. - Q. Is your name Robert Constantine? A. Yes. - Are you in the 1st regiment of Guards? A. Yes."

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-86

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1878. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 7 shillings, the monies of James Milbourne, his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-87

1888. JAMES JONES and CHARLES PEARCE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 1 trunk, value 20s. , the goods of the Rev. Thomas Dupree , clerk .

REV. THOMAS DUPREE. On the 21st of June I left a trunk in the care of Mr. Cormack, in Oxford-street, to be sent into the country by coach - I have never seen it since; it contained wearing apparel.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I went with Becket on the 21st of June, and met the prisoner in Chappel-street, Paddington - Becket pointed him out, but he has absconded - he is a supposed accomplice.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-88

Before Mr Sargeant Arabin.

1880. JOSEPH WILMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 necklace, value 30s., and 1 pair of ear-rings, value 14s., the goods of Samuel Cohen , from the person of Emanuel Godfrey .

EMANUEL GODFREY. I am nephew of Samuel Cohen, an importer of coral , who lives in the Strand . The prisoner came into his shop one Friday, in August 1825 - my aunt was serving in the shop - he said he wanted to purchase a few articles in jewellery - he looked out a pair of ear-rings and a coral necklace; I think my aunt knew him; he then said he had no cash about him, but if I would go with him to Exeter-street, he would give me the money - I think they came to 44s.; my aunt desired me to carry the articles - I was to receive the money before I parted with them - she said so before the prisoner; I went with him till he came to a very genteel looking house, where he took the property, and went up-stairs - he came down in a few minutes, and said he had no change in the house, but he would go to his uncle's and get change; he asked me, in the meantime, to walk up-stairs into the garret - I went up and staid an hour and a half, but he did not return; I should not have parted with them, if I had not believed that he would have brought down the money - he told me he would bring it down; I have made inquiries at the house, and there was no such a person as Joseph Wilmot lived there, but a woman in the garret knew him.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear I am the person? A. No, I gave the goods to the person at the door, and he was very much like you - he was a quarter of an hour in the shop; I heard him talk to my aunt - I believe the prisoner is the man.

CATHERINE COHEN . My husband keeps this shop in the Strand. On a Friday, in August 1825, a person, who, I believe, was the prisoner, or very much like him, came to the shop, and asked for a cut coral necklace, and earrings, which came to 44s. - my nephew took the goods, and I gave him a charge in the presence of the prisoner, to bring the money back - I knew the prisoner before - he had lived with a pawnbroker three years before, but I had not seen him since that - he was a lad when I knew him - I have not much doubt that he is the man, he looks very much like him - the person who came and dealt for the articles was the person I had known so long before - I have been sworn on the Old Testament, and I have no doubt the prisoner is the person - though I knew him, I would not have parted with my goods, but for ready money - my husband described his person to Mr. Jonas.

BENJAMIN JONAS . I am a tailor and draper, and live at No. 446, Strand - Mr. Cohen described the prisoner to me, and said, he had formerly lived at Mr. Newby's, the pawnbroker, in Drury-lane - I had known him for five years, and have no doubt whatever that he is the man - I met him on the 23d of September last, in the Strand - he called me by name - I said, he had been acting very wrong to my neighbour; he said, "About Cohen's ear-rings?" I said, Yes, and he should go with me there - he said it was of no use, he had no money, but if I would go with him to a place he described, he would give it me - I went with him nearly there, and then he said he would go to another place and get it - I went on till I met an officer, and then gave charge of him: Mrs. Cohen made no difficulty in saying he was the man.

ROSELIA STOCKDALE . I live in Exeter-street. A young man came to my house about this time, and my servant opened the door to him - he asked if Mrs. Black was at home; she said, Yes: I came out of the kitchen and saw him going up-stairs - I said to the servant, "Who is that?" she said, "A person for Mrs. Black." I afterwards saw Godfrey up-stairs, and asked him in; he waited some time there - I believe the prisoner is the person who came, but I cannot swear to him - I had never seen him before.

ANN BLACK . I lodged in the third floor at Mrs. Stockdale's. I knew the prisoner - he came on the day in question, but I do not know for what purpose - I think he had called before, and knew that I lived there. I did not hear about the ear-rings for two or three days afterwards.

JOSEPH PRIECE . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner about a month ago - as we were going to the watch-house, he said it was hard if he could not get over Mother Cohen.

Prisoner's Defence. I have known Jonas for seven years. The day I was taken, I accosted him; he asked if I was not afraid to walk about - I said, "What for?" and he said, if I would pay him for the ear-rings, it would be all right. I had heard of the robbery before that - I saw it was his view to get money, and I did not deny it, but kept him in conversation, and when we had been some distance, I said I would go to Mr. Cohen's, which I did - I believe Jonas's character is not very honourable.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-89

1881. CHARLOTTE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 reticule, value 8s. , the goods of Henry Garratt .

LOUISA TAPPY . I have a stand in the Soho Bazaar ; Mr. Henry Garratt has a stand next to mine - he deals in dressing-cases and reticules - Miss Garratt minds his stall. On the 13th of October, I saw the prisoner stand between his stall and mine, about four o'clock in the afternoon - I saw her take up a reticule, and I then saw her put some

thing under her shawl - I suspected she had taken the reticule - I went outside the counter, missed it, and told Miss Garratt of it - she was taken in about half an hour. I saw the reticule after she was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is the property you sell your own? A. Yes, it is not Mr. Trotter's - there was a woman at my stall; she did not speak to the prisoner - I do not think there was any other person in the room - I do not think the prisoner was called away; she was not taken in that room - there is an officer attends at the front of the building; but this was in the back lower room, called the Dean-street room.

JOHN MASON . I am the officer. On the afternoon of Friday, the 13th of August, I took the prisoner, and found this reticule under her shawl - she said she had a child at home, and did it for want.

Cross-examined. Q. Is that all she said? A. She showed me some money; but did not say she intended to purchase it, till the second examination - I saw her purse in her hand.

MARY ANN GARRATT . I am the daughter of Henry Garratt - I take care of his stall; it is next to Miss Topping's - I saw the prisoner between the two stalls - this reticule is my father's property - I had not sold it - I missed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it in the state it was? A. Yes, all but a little ticket under the lock, which is not here now.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I went there for the purpose of buying a few articles - I took up the reticule, intending to purchase it, having sufficient silver for that purpose; I had scarcely taken it in my hand when a very old acquaintance passed me, and in the anxiety of the moment I passed on with it in my hand - I had passed only a few yards in conversation before I was taken by the officer.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-90

1882. ELLEN TARRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 1 box, value 2d.; 8 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the property of George Casey , from the person of Judith, his wife .

JUDITH CASEY . I am the wife of George Casey - he is a labouring man , and live in St. Ann's-court, Westminster - the prisoner lived next door to me for about a week. On Sunday night, the 27th of August, she and the woman she lodged with came to me about ten o'clock, just as I was going to bed, and wanted me to go to their house, as my husband and some more men were drinking; they would not let me have any peace - I went and staid till one o'clock: I went into their kitchen; the bed was down, and I sat down on it by the side of the prisoner - I had eight sovereigns and a half in a box in my right-hand pocket - I am sure it was safe when I went into the house; I had put it there as I was going to bed - the prisoner took up my pocket as I was on the bed, but I had no suspicion of her, I thought she was honest - I then got up to take the child home; the prisoner put a shawl round the child; she then went away, and I saw her no more - I missed the money in about five minutes; the box was found in the street.

CATHERINE LANDIGAN . The prisoner lodged at my house for a week - I went with her to ask Judith Casey to come in, as I knew her, and the men were drinking upstairs; she came and sat down on the bed; the prisoner sat on her right-hand - I did not see her take any thing - I recollect her going away; I then missed a gown of my own - Casey said she had lost her money and box - the prisoner gave me no notice of her going, and had not paid her rent; but she had made two gowns for me, which I said should go for her lodging.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I was sent to bring the prisoner from Ireland; I found her there in Bridewell; there was a sovereign found on her, which I exchanged, to redeem a shawl and a ring, which she had pledged. I told her what I took her for, and she said she was quite innocent, and knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence (Written.) Mrs. Landigan persuaded me to stay there, and have a Sunday's spree - Casey, his wife, and two or three more were there; we drank six pots of beer; Casey brought four of his lodgers in, and four more gallons were fetched; the men began to take liberties with me, and I left the house; my brother persuaded me to return to Ireland before the bad weather set in, and I went.

COURT to JUDITH CASEY. Q. Is it true that you were all drunk? A. I was never drunk yet; my husband did not bring one man in - the witness' husband was there, with two more men; the prisoner asked me to drink the beer, to suckle my child; I tasted it twice while I was waiting for my husband. Mrs. Landigan was sober - there were three men, and they brought in two half-gallons of beer - when they had drank that, they had a pot a piece; the prisoner drank with us.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-91

1883. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 gold ring, value 5s. , the goods of William Chaulk .

WILLIAM CHAULK. I am a silversmith , and live in the Strand . On the 16th of October, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house - he asked for some wedding-rings; as I had been robbed several times, I took them out one at a time; I took out nine separately, and laid them on the counter; he made several excuses - one was too large, and another too small - he then desired me to weigh one, and while I was doing it I thought I saw him take one; I counted them, and found there were but seven on the counter, instead of eight; I said the one I had weighed came to 9s., and he said he would give me 7s. for it; he was then going away, but my sister shut the door, and I sent for an officer, who searched him in the parlour; his coat and waistcoat were taken off, and nothing found; I heard the ring drop, and it was found on the floor.

JAMES COX . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the shop; I searched him in the parlour, and found a few halfpence; I found the ring on the ground, between his legs, on the carpet.

Prisoner's Defence. My hat was on the table, and this handkerchief was in it; the prosecutor said, "I am surprised - I thought he took the ring, and put it into his

pocket;" I then took my handkerchief, to wipe my face, and this ring fell out of it.

JAMES COX . It fell on the ground while I was searching him, but I cannot say from where it fell; I thought he had the handkerchief in his hand.

WILLIAM CHAULK . There was no appearance of a handkerchief while he was dealing with me.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-92

1884. THOMAS SOUTH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 clock, value 10s., and 5 biscuit-dockers, value 15s. , the goods of William Johnson .

WILLIAM JOHNSON. I live in Hopkin's-street , and am a baker . I had a clock in my bake-house, which I saw safe between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday night, the 30th of September, after my bake-house was shut up- I missed it the next day; the prisoner was my servant, but I discharged him about three weeks before; I went and took the clock from his lodgings on the Monday - he was not at home; I took him about two hours afterwards - I made him no promise or threat, but he said he would tell me the truth, that he did not take it, but he had received it.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I lived with Johnson. I went down into the bake-house on Saturday night, the 30th of September, about twelve o'clock - I saw the doors safe, and returned to bed; in the morning I missed the clock. I saw the prisoner standing near the bake-house-door, about half-past eleven o'clock on the Saturday night, in conversation with one of the lodgers.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you a servant of Johnson's now? A. No - I am in the same shop, but another person keeps it. I went to the prisoner's lodging with Ross.

JOHN ROSS . I was occasionally employed by Mr. Johnson. The prisoner came to me on the Sunday morning, and said he had been to Johnson, and taken the ticker - he said he wanted some other persons to go with him, but they had got drunk; he came to me in the clubroom the same afternoon, and showed me the bisuit-dockers; he was then drunk, but he was sober in the morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you ever discharged by Mr. Johnson? A. No; I only went there for an occasional job - there was no dispute about any claim. I gave the information on the Monday; the biscuit-dockers were there till the Tuesday morning - I am now out of a situation; I had worked for Johnson on the Saturday, and left his house about half-past four o'clock; I did not work there that night, nor did I see May.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the Friday, May, the foreman, came to me, and said he wanted to take the clock, as Mr. Johnson would not pay his wages; we were then drinking together, and he wanted me to take it; I said I did not like to do so; he then said he would go and shove the door open, but I did not like to go in - May then said,"Go stand at the post," and I did; some person brought me the clock - May tried to sell it, but could not. I then took it to my own room.

COURT to WILLIAM JOHNSON . Q. Did you owe May anything? A. He had spoiled his work, and I would not pay him - he went away very much intoxicated.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-93

1858. WILLIAM NORTON , THE YOUNGER, was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 saw, value 8s.; and 1 iron cramp, value 10s. , the goods of William Norton , the elder.

WILLIAM NORTON. I am a chair-maker , and live at No. 11, Carnaby-street , the prisoner is my son - he has left me three years; he comes sometimes when he ought not to come - I went out on the 28th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I returned in the evening, and was then informed he had been, and taken these articles - I went into my kitchen, and they were gone - I found them afterwards in pawn.

CHARLES POORE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a saw, pawned by the prisoner, on the 28th of September.

THOMAS DONDERS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street - the prisoner pawned this cramp with me on the 28th of September - he was without a coat at the time.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 29th of September.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-94

1886. ROBERT VARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 leaden pump, value 12s., belonging to John Burge , and fixed in a court-yard, belonging to three dwelling-houses of his .

GEORGE BEECH . I am a labourer, and live at Whetston : the prisoner is a barber , and lives next door to me - my house joins to the yard where Burge's three houses are; it is an open yard, and has one entrance - about one o'clock in the morning of the 10th of October, I was in bed, and was awoke by the barking of my brother's dog, and heard a noise in the yard - I thought some person was stealing my pig; I awoke my brother, we got up, and called some neighbours, and five of us went into Mr. Burge's yard, and missed the pump which had been fixed there - I had not seen it for some time before, as it had not been used - we found the prisoner in a cart, in the same yard; he appeared to be in liquor - we said, the pump was gone; he said, he knew nothing about it, but that he was locked out last night; he is a single man, and keeps the house himself - we then went out of the yard, and he followed us; in passing by his house, I saw the door open, and the pump laid just inside over the threshold - he went in, and the officer was sent for, who took him.

JAMES HOWARD . I went with Beech into the yard; we missed the pump, and found the prisoner in an empty cart in the yard - I saw the pump in his house; I had not noticed it for two or three weeks before.

JAMES MATHEWS . I am a constable. I was called up about half-past one o'clock on Tuesday morning, the 10th of October, I went to the prisoner's house, and found it shut up; I heard him drag the pump up-stairs; I called several times to him, and told him what I wanted - he

said he knew nothing about it; soon afterwards, he threw the pump from the window - it fell about one foot and a-half from me; the prisoner then began to swear and abuse me - I sent for the beadle, who desired me to break open the door, and take him, which I did - he had his coat off, and appeared rather intoxicated, but not much - I had not seen the pump before, nor did I fit it to the place - but they were both cut, and appeared alike.

WILLIAM STUTCHBURY . I am headborough of Whetston. I had seen the pump about five o'clock the evening before it was taken - it was out of repair, and not useable - but it was fixed in the ground as pumps are.

JOHN BURGE . This pump belonged to me; it was in an outlet, in a sort of stable-yard - the three houses are mine, and the outlet is mine - the prisoner had lived three weeks in a two-roomed house of mine there.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the house of Burge, but I have not slept in it, for the lock was broken, and it was not fit to live in; the door was open, and any one could have put the pump in - I did not put it there, and do not know who did - I had been in lodgings, and that night I was locked out.

COURT to JAMES MATHEWS . Q. Did you find the prisoner in bed? A. Yes; he was in bed covered up; he had nothing off but his coat - when I opened the door, it was bolted and locked; the key was inside - there was no other person in the house.

- SIMMONS. I am a fishmonger. I have known the prisoner fifteen or sixteen years; he did live at East Barnet - I had been drinking with him on the night this happened; he was very much in liquor, and did not know where he was going, nor what he was about - he came home with me as far as he had to come; he did not go to his own house, but went to a neighbour named Ellis.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-95

1887. JAMES McBRIDE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 saw, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Bushell .

THOMAS BUSHELL. I am a carpenter . On the 20th of September, I lost a saw from Mr. Flynn's wine-vaults, at the corner of Princes-street, Little Rupert-street - the prisoner came there, and had some drink, and I went out - I returned in half an hour, and the saw was gone.

JOHN CLEAVER . I was at this house - the prosecutor went out, and no person but the prisoner could have taken the saw; he went out, and when he came back, he shared some money with me for a pot of beer.

EDWIN SOMES . I live with Mr. Aldis, the pawnbroker, in Berwick-street - I have a saw, pawned by the prisoner, on the 20th of September.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and found the duplicate of this saw on him.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-96

1888. EDWARD MALBY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 5 handkerchiefs, value 15s. , the goods of Benjamin Mather .

BENJAMIN MATHER. I live in New-street, Covent-garden , and am a hosier . On the 2d of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was called down by my boy; I came down instantly, and saw the prisoner and Robert Jones, in the shop - the prisoner was sitting in a chair, and Jones looking at some trousers; as I crossed my parlour, the boy met me, and said, "They have robbed you of some silk handkerchiefs;" I went into the shop, and the prisoner asked me, if I had any larger silk handkerchiefs? I said there were no larger made; he then tried one on his neck, and said he liked it, but it was not large enough; I turned to my workman, who was there, and said, "Which is the man who stole the handkerchiefs?" the prisoner could not hear that - he then left the shop, and Jones went into the parlour to try on the trousers - the prisoner was taken the following afternoon - I missed seven or eight handkerchiefs, and have never seen them since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What became of Jones? A. A watchman was sent for and took him.

EDWARD PEARCE . I am the prosecutor's shop boy - Jones came into the shop, about two minutes before the prisoner - Jones asked for some trousers, which I showed him, and the prisoner asked for some handkerchiefs, which were in the window; I showed him the bundle - Jones then said, "Have you any place to try the trousers on?" he then said, "You can measure me, can't you?" I came round to measure him, and as I stooped, I saw the prisoner put some handkerchiefs into his pocket, and he kept letting his own fall - Jones kept getting into my way, that I should not see what the prisoner did, but I got sight of him between Jones's legs - he took these handkerchiefs out of the bundle; there were seven or eight of them missing; when I looked up, the prisoner asked to see some stockings; I called Charles to mind the shop, while I went to call my master, and I told him they had taken some silk handkerchiefs - Charles told me to go and fetch the watchman, and when I came back, the prisoner was gone - I went to the side door - there is a glass door in the shop, which looks into the passage, and I saw Jones rolling up a pair of trousers in a silk handkerchief, and putting them into his hat - Jones was then taken into custody; I saw the prisoner again when he was taken, and know him to be the man I had seen in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. What size is Charles? A. He is a man grown; I did not tell my master I suspected Jones had taken some, but I did not suspect the other man - I said he had taken some handkerchiefs; I did not point out either Jones or the prisoner; my master asked Charles who took them; he said he thought it was Jones; he had not been in the shop when they were taken; Charles is not here, because there would be no one to mind the shop.

JAMES BOND . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the Cock and Magpie public-house, in Drury-lane; he was in the skittle-ground with ten or twelve others; Jones was fully committed at the time I took the prisoner.

COURT to MATHER. Q. How came the prisoner to go out of your shop? A. I did not know he was the person who took them - I did not detain him, because Charles told me it was Jones who stole the things; the boy had not said who stole them - when he came back he said, "You have let the wrong man go."

Prisoner's Defence. When I was before Sir Richard Birnie, neither the prosecutor nor his lad could say who it

was - the boy said he could not say, nor could he tell how many he had lost; I said I was sorry I had given him the trouble; he then called his master down, and whispered something to him; I sat down, and took a pinch of snuff; I wished Mr. Mather good night; he returned the compliment, and I went away; the next day the officer came, and said he wanted me; he said he believed it was for an assault, and I went.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-97

1889. ROBERT JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s., and 1 handkerchief, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Mather .

EDWARD PEARCE . I live with Mr. Mather. On the 2d of October the prisoner came to the shop and asked for some trousers; I first showed him a blue pair, which I took from the door - he then asked for a black pair, which I showed him; he asked if there was a place where he could try them on; but then said, "No, you can measure me, can't you?" which I did, and saw Malby take the handkerchiefs; I called Charles, who sent me afterwards for a watchman; and when I came back, I looked through a window, and saw Jones take a pair of trousers, roll them up in a silk handkerchief, and put them in his hat; he saw me whisper to my master, and then threw them out of his hat under the table, and came from the parlour into the shop, and said they would not fit him.

COURT. Q. Whose handkerchief was it he put them into? A. Into one, which he took from my master; he not had bought any of me.

Prisoner. When I went to your shop, I asked to look at a pair of trousers, and you asked me to go into the parlour. Witness. No; you asked me if I could measure you, and you kept trying to get in the way that I should not see the other take the handkerchiefs; I got sight of him between your legs; he then asked for some stockings, which I did not show him; I did not tell my master that I suspected you of stealing the handkerchief.

BENJAMIN MATHER. In consequence of my boy calling me, I came into my shop and found Jones and Malby - I let Malby go; and when my boy came back, he said,"You have let the wrong man go;" Jones then came into the shop from the parlour, and said they were too small: I said, "Here is another pair;" but I looked, and could not find them; the boy then came into the shop and said,"He has got a pair of trousers in his hat;" the prisoner said he would try another pair on; he went into the parlour, and took off his hat; I went and looked into it, but there was nothing there; I said, "Your friend has stolen some silk handkerchiefs, and I suspect you have got a pair of trousers;" he said he had not.

Prisoner. Q. Why did not you detect me in taking them, and putting them into my hat? A. I had left them on the counter, in the shop, when I went up-stairs; and when I went into the parlour again, I found them in a red silk handkerchief under a table, at the further end of the parlour, a place where he could not have stood, on account of the chairs.

JURY. Q. Was the handkerchief you found with the trousers, one of the same as those the other prisoner took? A. It was of the same description, but not of the same bundle.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-98

1890. EDWARD JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 desk, value 25s. , the goods of William Day .

JAMES BLAGG . I am shopman to Mr. William Day, dressing-case-maker , of Charing-cross and the Strand. On the 11th of October I saw the prisoner near the shop, about half-past eleven, or a quarter before twelve o'clock, he was looking at the things; a butcher's boy came and spoke to him; a young woman soon afterwards gave me information; I then went after the prisoner, and found him near the statue, at Charing-cross, with the desk under his arm, about two hundred yards from master's house; he said it been given him.

ELIZABETH IBBERTSON . I was passing the house with a basket of linen on my head; I saw the prisoner, and another lad; the other took the desk, and gave it to the prisoner - I informed the shopman, and never lost sight of the prisoner till he was taken; the boy took the desk from a rail, by the side of the door, and the prisoner put it under his apron; the other went towards New-street, Covent-garden.

MATTHEW FARMER . I saw the prisoner running with this desk, and received him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Westminster, - a young lad, who lives near me, was waiting near the shop, and he told me to take this desk, which I did; he told me to run home with it.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character, and one engaged to employ him - it appeared that the master, to whom he was apprenticed, had run away, and his mother had turned him out of doors.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18261026-99

1892. THOMAS DREW was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 pair of boots, value 10s. , the goods of George Wright .

GEORGE PARKHOUSE . I am a carpenter. Mr. George Wright is a boot and shoemaker , and lives in Bear-street, Leicester-square . I saw the prisoner near his house, on the 27th of September, about ten minutes before nine o'clock - he put his hand inside, and took a pair of Blucher boots, which he put under his arm and ran away; I followed, and took him with them.

Prisoner. He had lost sight of me for a quarter of an hour. Witness. I had not - I collared and took the boots from you.

GEORGE WRIGHT . I keep this shop - I heard an alarm, and missed the boots; I ran out and saw the prisoner in the hands of Parker - I saw the boots taken from under his coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-100

1892. MARIA BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 pelisse, value 30s.; 1 bonnet, value 30s., and 1 petticoat, value 1s. , the goods of Ellen Gordon , widow .

ELLEN GORDON. I am a widow - I live at Newington, and am a dress-maker by trade - I met the prisoner on Sunday night, the 17th of September, about half-past nine or ten o'clock, in Leicester-square - I had seen her at a friend's house about twelve months before. I was taken very ill that night in the square, and the prisoner came and said, "Gordon, is that you?" and offered to take me to her lodgings in Pump-court, Westminster ; she had a young man with her - I told her not to take me to her house, but to a friend's in Catherine-street - she said,"Come to my place; it is very humble; but you will be better in the morning" - it rained very fast, and I went. The next morning, having no money about me, I gave her my handkerchief to pawn, and she took up my lace-cap and said, "Let me take this too;" I said, "Do," and when she came back, she gave me a glass of gin - I was still in bed, and I turned round and went to sleep again - I awoke in about an hour and a half, and all the articles stated in the indictment were gone, and the prisoner also. I did not know what to do, as I had nothing to put on - I did not see the prisoner again till the Tuesday, when I met her with my bonnet on; I caught her, and took her to St. James's watch-house - I never permitted her to pawn any thing but the cap and handkerchief, which I believe she pawned for 3s. I knew her by the name of Simmonds.

JOHN NICHOLAS . I am shopman to Mr. Gray, pawnbroker, of Tothil-street, Westminster - I have a silk pelisse and a petticoat, pawned by the prisoner in the name of Mary Smith.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am a constable. This bonnet was on the prisoner's head when she was brought to the watch-house.

GEORGE BEAZELY . I was told the prosecutrix was in the house, and had nothing to put on - I went there, and took her some clothes - I found the place a den of thieves, and was afraid to go up-stairs; when I got half-way, I found the place all in darkness.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. This lady has no claim to the name of Gordon; but she has gone by the name of the Duchess of Gordon - she is a common prostitute - the last witness keeps a house of the same description. When I met her, near one o'clock in the morning, quite intoxicated, I asked her if she would have a coach home, and she said she had not the money to pay for it. I am married to a person of the name of Benjamin - all the articles were given me to pawn except the bonnet, which was lent to me.

ELLEN GORDON . My husband's name was James Henry Gordon. I had been that evening to Broad-court Chapel, and I think it was the heat that overcame me - I was taken very ill in the street, and the watchman said, "Sit down on the steps, and you will be better."

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-101

1893. JOHN THICKET was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 copper boiler, value 3s.; 1 pail, value 9d.; 1 tub, value 1s.; 1 saucepan, value 1s., and 1 looking-glass, value 1s., the goods of Jonathan Layton , in a lodging-room let by him to the prisoner .

JONATHAN LAYTON. I live in Jeffries'-buildings, Westminster . I let a furnished lodging to a young lass, but I cannot say when - the prisoner came and lived with her, but he never paid any rent. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-102

1894. JAMES PITT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Edward Tylee , from his person .

EDWARD TYLEE. I am clerk in an attorney's office. On the 28th of September, I was walking down the Strand , between eleven and twelve o'clock in the evening, and I felt something pull me behind - I turned, and saw the prisoner - I seized him, and he dropped my handkerchief behind him - the officer came up, and I gave him in charge.

HENRY GODDARD . I had seen the prisoner and another follow this gentleman, and I saw the prisoner put his hand towards his pocket - I ran round the coaches to take him, but the gentleman had seized him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Coburg Theatre, and I went to try to get some beef for supper; there were four or five gentlemen there, and this gentleman said I had picked his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-103

1895. MORRIS BRIGHT and WILLIAM ROBINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2 truck-wheels, value 40s. , the goods of John Richardson .

JOHN CLUTTERBUCK. I am a blind-maker. On the 10th of October, I saw the two prisoners by the Three-compasses public-house, in the Mile-end-road , about a hundred yards from Mr. Richardson's, about half-past six or seven o'clock in the evening - I knew Bright before; they were in company, and had these wheels on their shoulders - I heard Bright say, "Let us put them down, we can run them the quicker" - they did so - I seized Bright, and called Stop thief! and Robinson was taken.

JOHN RICHARDSON. I lay the gas-pipes - these wheels are mine: they were on the premises of a friend of the name of Buck, two or three hundred yards from me - I leave them there almost every day.

RICHARD CLUTTERBUCK . My son took one of the prisoners, and gave him into my custody.

THOMAS STIMSON . I am headborough of Mile-end Old-town - I took the prisoner in charge.

BRIGHT'S Defence. We were paid 6d. to wheel them to Whitechapel - we first carried them because it was muddy.

BRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-104

1896. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 coat, value 15s.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 centre-bit, value 6d.; 2 books, value 6d.; 1 check-line, value 3d., and 4 screws, value 3d. , the goods of John Briggs .

JOHN BRIGGS. I am a carpenter . I was at work on the 10th of October, in the upper-room of a house in Oxford-street, Mile-end Old-town ; I had left my tools in the lower-room - the window and the door were open; I missed the tools about four o'clock in the afternoon. The prisoner is a stranger.

THOMAS STIMSON . I am headborough of Mile-end. I took up the prisoner on this charge, and found in his pocket this centre-bit, book, check-line, and four screws.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in a dust-hole in the Commercial-road.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-105

1897. WILLIAM BEECH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 2lbs. weight of ham, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Vaughan .

RICHARD VAUGHAN. I keep a cook-shop , at Shadwell . On the 3d of October, at half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I was in my room, behind the shop - the prisoner came into the shop, and took the ham off the stand - I looked up, and saw him running with it; I followed, and cried Stop thief! he threw the ham in the road, and I took him; he said, "I am not the man;" I said, "Yes, you are:" he then said, "I will pay for it" - he appeared sober.

Prisoner. I was very much intoxicated, and two other persons agreed with me to have something to eat; I did not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-106

1898. DANIEL BREWER & ROBERT SQUIRES were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 sheet, value 2s., and 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of Elizabeth Brown .

ELIZABETH BROWN. I am a widow , and live in a cottage at Wilsden . On the 19th of October, about eleven o'clock, I hung a gown and a sheet on the line in my garden - I went out between twelve and one, and missed them; I saw Squires creeping through the bushes - he gave a white bundle to Brewer; I cried Stop thief! they both ran across the meadow; Howard went after them, and brought back the property. I had seen the prisoners pass the house, on the high road, but never spoke to them.

EDWARD HOWARD . I live next door to Brown. I heard her cry out that she had lost her things; I pursued, and got sight of the two prisoners, who were standing under a hedge, buttoning up their clothes; I advanced towards them, and they ran into another field - I called Stop thief! I lost sight of them for a moment, and on turning the corner of a hedge, in the way they were running, I picked up these articles - they were pursued and taken.

SARAH MILLAR . I was passing the house, and saw the prisoners get over the hedge and come back; I saw Squires hand the bundle to the other, and then he handed him over the hedge; they ran across the field; I am quite sure of them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BREWER'S Defence. A man came after me for breaking the hedge, and I saw a man come out of the garden with something in his hand - I was following him, and they said I had been in the garden, but I had not.

BREWER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SQUIRES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-107

1899. JEREMIAH DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 1 pair of trousers, value 20s. , the goods of George White .

WILLIAM SANDS. I am in the employ of Mr. George White, a tailor , of Leicester-square . The prisoner came there on the 16th of September, to know the price of a suit of fustian; I had a gentleman in the shop, and told him to wait; when the gentleman was gone I told the prisoner the price - he then asked for some black trousers, and I laid four or five pairs on the counter; he asked for a pair of the best, and then said he thought he should like a pair of blue ones - I told him to go to a place and try them on, which he did, and said they would not fit; he then tried a pair of black ones on, which fitted him well, and he told me to put them aside; I went to put a pair of trousers behind the door, and saw another pair of black ones in his hat, which was on a chair, and his own apron partly over them; he told me to make out a bill for a suit of fustian and the black trousers; I went to get the ink, and told Mr. White he had a pair of trousers in his hat, which he had then put on: Mr. White took his hat off, and saw the trousers; he said, "Whose are these?" the prisoner said, "They are yours;" I then went for a constable - he was very well dressed.

WILLIAM BOND . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he had no money about him, and begged me to speak to Mr. White not to prosecute him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me three or four pairs to look at; there was no place to lay them down, and I laid a pair across my hat - they were not in it; I took it up, not knowing they were in it.

COURT to WILLIAM SANDS . Q. Were they folded up? A. Yes, and pushed into his hat - he put it on his head, with them in it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-108

1900. JAMES DAY and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 set of harness, value 2l.; 1 saddle, value 20s., and 1 bridle, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Wroots .

RICHARD FLIGHT . I am a carman. Robert Wroots is a linen-draper , and has a stable in a small mews in Wells-street - I occupy part of the same stable and coach-house. I locked the stable door one Saturday night in October, between nine and ten o'clock - I cannot say what day; I left the set of harness, saddle, and bridle all safe - I heard in the morning that the stable had been broken open, came down, and missed the articles stated; they belonged to Mr. Wroot - I saw them again at the watch-house; the prisoners were strangers.

JOHN WAUGH . I was coming down Union-street, about half-past six o'clock on Sunday morning, the 8th of October, about one hundred yards from the mews; I saw the two prisoners, and watched them - they went up the mews, and appeared to go towards the prosecutor's stable; I

waited about ten minutes, when they came out, and Day had this bag with the harness and saddle in it; Smith had the bridle - I went and told Mr. Bell; I saw Day throw away the bag; I went and took it up; they were in company together.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see Smith throw anything away? A. No; he had the bridle in his bosom - I might be twenty or thirty yards from them.

COURT. Q. Were you near enough to see him? A. Yes; I passed them when they were crossing the mews - they went in with nothing, and came out with these articles.

ABRAHAM BELL . I had just finished taking down my shutters, at the corner of Mortimer-street, when Waugh gave me information; I ran out, and saw the prisoners going down Mortimer-street, one on each side; Day was carrying this bag; I ran after them, and he threw it down - I pursued him down Titchfield-street, and into another street, where I collared him, without losing sight of him - I called Stop thief! and another person took Smith; I am quite sure that Smith run at the same time the other did - I saw him again at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Were their backs towards you? A. Yes; my observation was chiefly directed to the man with the bag.

COURT. Q. How was the man dressed who ran away? A. He had a blue round-frock on, like a butcher's-frock; Day had a fustian jacket and trousers. When I got to the watch-house I found Smith there, in the same dress as the man who ran away, but I had not seen his face.

JOHN MILLER . I am a watchman. I was coming off duty at half-past six o'clock - I heard a cry of Stop thief! in Margaret-street, and saw Smith running towards me - he was the first person running; I took him into custody when he had run down Margaret-court - he had a bridle in his hand, which he threw on some rails.

THOMAS BUBB . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw Smith running in Margaret-street; he made into Margaret-court, and I followed him; when he had run about ten yards he threw this crow-bar from him; I took it to the stable door; it fits two marks there exactly - I have not the least doubt it was opened with it.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I went, and tried this crow-bar at the door - it fits the marks exactly.

ROBERT WROOTS . This is my property - I had left it in the stable, which I rent - Mr. Flight has a part of it.

DAY'S Defence. I was looking for work, and met this young man - we saw this harness on a dung-hill; we went on, and I said to him, "That is no good laying there - we may as well take it to some office," and we were going to take it there.

SMITH'S Defence. We saw these things, and were taking them to an office; I put the bridle into my hat, and the bar into my pocket.

DAY - GUILTY . Aged 25.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-109

1901. THOMAS HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 truck, value 5l. , the goods of Charles Buckwell .

JOSEPH HOWE. I live with Mr. Charles Buckwell, a wheelwright ; he lets out a truck for hire. On the 28th of September, the prisoner came and rang the bell - my mistress came down, and he said, he wanted a truck for Mr. Beard, the baker - she told him he should have it in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and told me to get it - I went to take it to Mr. Beard, and met the prisoner in Long-lane; he put 1s. into my hand, and said, that would do, and that he was going to take it to the wharf, to get a little lime - I went home, and asked my mistress, if I had not better go and see if it was all right, which I did, and it was not; I have seen the truck since - it has been painted blue, and my master's name, which was in yellow letters, is scratched off; it was a lead colour before.

JOSEPH BEARD . I am a baker. I never wanted the truck, nor sent the prisoner for it; I know nothing of him.

THOMAS LUCAS . I live with Mr. Moore; the prisoner came and asked me, if I had the key of the pound, and asked me to let him put the truck in there, which I did - the next morning he came with a paint pot, and painted the front of it - Maybank afterwards brought him to the pound, and made him take it away.

CHARLES BUCKWELL . I keep trucks to let out: I am certain this is my property, though my name is not on it now - I never would have permitted my boy to let the prisoner have it, being a stranger.

JAMES THOMAS . I am a broker, and live in King's-road, Chelsea - the prisoner came to me on the 29th of September, and asked, if I wanted to buy a truck - I asked where it was - he said, at the Admiral Kepple public-house - I said, "I did not want it, but I knew a person who I thought did;" I took him to Mr. Biggs, who said, he was the person he wanted, and gave him to the officer.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-110

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1902. WILLIAM HUTCHINGS & GEORGE PLUMMER were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 lamp, value 1l. , the goods of Philip Powell .

PHILIP POWELL. I live at Chelsea , and am a bedstead manufacturer - I had a lamp in my shop for sale, on the 4th of October - I saw it a few minutes before five o'clock; I sent a little boy on an errand, and as he came back, he met the two men with the lamp; he told me of it, and I then missed it - I ran out, and Clark, and two or three other men, who were at work in the shop, ran out with me; Clark came up with the prisoners - I saw the lamp in a very few minutes after.

GEORGE BLACKBOROW . I am ten years of age; I do not know the commandments.

THOMAS CLARK . I went out with Mr. Powell; I saw the two prisoners going along at a sharp walk, and Plummer had the lamp under his arm, wrapped up in a handkerchief - I saw two gentlemen on horseback, and I gave an alarm - I then saw him throw the lamp out of his handkerchief; I followed, but I did not see them taken - I was up in about two minutes after.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was your view of the persons intercepted by bushes? A. No; there

were bushes by the side of the path, but I could see distinctly who they were; they were twenty steps from me - I do not think it had struck five o'clock; it was quite clear daylight - I was rather behind them; I looked most steadfastly at Hutchings, who was nearest to me - the other was about eighteen inches before him - I went by the side of them for about two hundred yards - they did not run till I gave an alarm.

Prisoner HUTCHINGS. Q. How could you see what it was in the handkerchief? A. I saw it was something, and it proved to be the lamp.

WILLIAM LLOYD . I am a carman, and live at Chelsea. On the 4th of October, I was in the Fulham-road, about five o'clock - I saw the two prisoners going at a kind of jog-trot pace; I did not see any persons after them; Plummer had a lamp in his hand, but not wrapped up; when I got a little further, they passed me, and I stood and looked at them - I saw Plummer throw it down: I picked it up; they then ran on - I did not see them taken, but I saw them in custody in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - I took the lamp to the watch-house; I am certain the prisoners are the persons.

Cross-examined. Q. Then the lamp was quite open? A. Yes, at first, but there was a handkerchief over it afterwards; they were five or six yards from me, on the other side of the road - I saw them about ten minutes in all; I did not know either of them; when I followed them, they were about twenty-one yards from me; they had got a good distance when they were taken; I did not see them stopped.

RICHARD FORDER . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to me by Powell and two other men.

Cross-examined. Q. Are the persons here who stopped them? A. I do not know who took them; they brought them to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PLUMMER'S Defence. I had been to Chelsea for clean linen, and I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw a young man before me who dropped something; I went in pursuit of him, but he ran through the barracks and got away; a gentleman on horseback stopped me and this young man, and said, we had done something.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-111

1903. JOHN JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 8lbs. of pork, value 5s. , the goods of John Sayre .

THOMAS HALLIS . I am in the employ of John Sayre, a cheesemonger , of High-street, Shadwell . On Saturday night, the 14th of October, I was standing at the window, and saw the prisoner take a leg of pork from the end of it- he walked away - I got out of the door as soon as I could, and called to him; I caught hold of him, and a boy picked up the pork, and gave it to my master; he appeared in liquor.

JOHN SAYRE . I keep this shop. I was in my parlour, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I went out, and missed the leg of pork; I went into the street, and a boy gave it to me.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner, and this pork was given to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a drop too much; the boy called to me to stop, and said I had taken a leg of pork; but I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-112

1904. HENRY HUGH MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 5lbs. weight of pork, value 3s., and 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. , the goods of John Sheppard .

JOHN SHEPPARD. I am a pork-butcher , and live in Hollywell-street, Shoreditch ; the prisoner was in my employ. On the 12th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was at Worship-street office, and four pieces of pork were produced, which I had cut and put on my own counter the night before; there were two loaves likewise produced, which were similar to two I had lost, but I could not swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is become of the pork? A. It was fresh pork, and I told the officer if he liked to make use of it, he might; I had no brandmark upon it, but I knew it; they were cut out of the prime part of a spare-rib; I can swear they were my own cutting; I took particular notice of it; I saw them again soon after, and knew them to be the same; I cut different to ninteen butchers out of twenty; there is not one butcher in fifty, that knows how to cut a joint of meat - from the sight of any piece of meat, I could tell whether it was my own cutting.

COURT. Q. I understand that you cut this as you usually do, and yet in some particular manner? A. Yes; I cut six pieces particularly straight and fair, to see if I missed any of them.

RICHARD REEVE . I live in Shoreditch. On Tuesday evening, the 10th of October, I received information from the prosecutor, and on the following Thursday morning, I went to his back-door, soon after six o'clock - I saw the prisoner about a yard from the door - his back was towards me, and he was talking to his wife - I had seen him before, and am positive of his person - he was in the act of delivering something from his apron to her - he then shook his apron, and went in doors - I followed her to Worship-street: an officer came and stopped her - her lap was opened, and I saw the pork.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I stopped the woman on the 12th of October, and took from her two quartern-loaves and four pieces of pork - I showed them to Mr. Sheppard in a quarter of an hour.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you eat any of this pork? A. No, Sir, my dog would not eat it - it was four pieces of pork, without bones - it was fresh when it was taken.

JOHN SHEPPARD . It was quite sweet and good when I cut it - it was ripped off for sausages - on my oath it was fresh and good.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-113

1905. WILLIAM PURNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of Edward Turner .

EDWARD TURNER. I lost this sheet, but I cannot say when. I was called to take the prisoner on a charge of robbing his lodgings, on the 13th of September, and I

found on him a duplicate of this sheet - it was safe a week or ten days before - he said he bought it of a young man, and he stated the same before a Magistrate.

RODERICK FRASER . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this sheet with me, on the 8th of September - I gave him a duplicate in the name of John Thompson - I remember Mr. Turner coming to our house on another charge, on the 13th of September.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man in the Harrow-road, who asked me to buy the sheet, which I did for 3s.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261026-114

1906. JOSEPH SMITH and JAMES SMITH , were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 100lbs. weight of lead, value 15s., the goods of Henry Abbott , and fixed to a dwelling-house belonging to him .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

HENRY ABBOTT. I have a house in Samuel-street Stepney , which is not inhabited. On the 5th of October, I lost some lead from the gutters; I had not seen it for some time - I found it in the beadle's possession.

JOHN MORGAN . I live in Well-street, Mile-end New-town; I am employed by Mr. Abbott to look after his houses. I repaired this gutter for the tenant, who left about three months ago; I received some information, and went to the house - I found the lead of the gutter had been taken up, and cut into three pieces, and one piece, seven foot long and one foot wide, was gone - one man could have carried it - we saw two persons on the top of the roof - James Smith was found up the chimney, and Joseph Smith between the fence and the privy - he said he had done no harm; I said if that was the case, he should not be detained; but I had seen them both on the gutter and called to them - I went up the ladder, and missed the lead - he said he knew nothing about it; there was a large piece of lead rolled up in the gutter, and a knife was found.

JOSEPH SMITH'S Defence. I had done work - I was passing by the house, and saw a great many people in the parlour - I went in and was left there.

THEODORE JENNINGS . I am the headborough. Morgan sent for me, about eight o'clock that morning, and when I got there, two men had taken one of the prisoners down from the chimney - I found nothing on either of them - I did not look at the cutting of the lead - I took Joseph Smith from behind the privy.

THOMAS TODD . I went to the house at the request of Morgan - I saw James Smith on the roof - he slid down on the roof of the wash-house, and then got in at a window - I got a candle, and searched every room in the house - at last I saw his feet hang down a chimney - I got him down - I went and got a ladder, and saw the lead had been cut and rolled up - seven feet had been taken away.

Prisoner JOSEPH SMITH. Q. Could I get from the top of the house, and go through it, and get behind the privy, while you got through the house? A. No.

SAMUEL DORSON . I am the beadle. I received the two prisoners into custody, and have the lead, which was rolled up - it matches with what was left - this is but a small part which was dropped in the yard - a long piece is gone - I found this knife in the gutter.

COURT to THOMAS TODD . Q. Does what you have here match with what is left in the gutter? A. Yes, it is of the same sort and appearance; it seemed to have been fresh cut.

JOSEPH SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JAMES SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-115

1907. THOMAS TRIGG was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 4 loaves of bread, value 16d.; 10lbs. weight of beef, value 7s.; 14lbs. weight of mutton, value 8s.; 24ozs. weight of veal, value 1s.; 4lbs. weight of lard, value 2s., and 8ozs. weight of cheese, value 3d. , the goods of Russell Ellice .

ANN JAMES . I am housekeeper to Russell Ellice, who lives in Bryanston-square . I saw all these articles safe in the larder on the 23d of September, at a quarter before one o'clock in the morning, and about eight o'clock one of the maids told me the larder was robbed; I went there and missed every thing - I went to the office and saw the articles, which appeared to me to be the same - I saw no difference in their appearance, except that the cheese was broken into pieces.

WILLIAM JENNER . I live in East-street, Manchester-square, and am a butcher; I serve Mr. Ellice. I saw some meat at Mary-le-bone-office, on the Monday, which I believe was what I had sent him on the Saturday.

JAMES DOUGLAS . I am a watchman. On the morning of Sunday, the 24th of September, at a quarter-past five o'clock, I was in Upper Berkley-street, I heard the rattles spring; I ran and met the prisoner, whom I stopped; there was no one following him then, but I saw a person picking up the articles, which he had dropped; he asked me what I wanted with him; I said when he came back to the place where he had dropped the bag, he would know - he said if we had been as much in want as he had, we should have done the same.

THOMAS LOCKWOOD . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 24th of September I saw the prisoner in Sovereign-street, about three hundred yards from Bryanston-square, with a bag on his shoulder; I arose up from the step of a door - the prisoner turned round, and spoke, but I could not see any one there but him; I went after him - he saw me, and made the best haste he could; I desired him to stop; he asked what for; I said I wanted to know what he had got in his bag - he then dropped the bag, and ran away - I sprung the rattle, and took up the bag; it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

PETER HOLT . Lockwood left the bag with me, on Sunday morning, the 24th of September - I showed the contents of it to Mrs. James, at the office - I found a knife and chisel on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up this bag at the corner of the street; I was going to take it home.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-116

1900. MARY WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 25 yards of linen, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Charles Corder , privately in his shop .

THOMAS NEALE . I am assistant to Mr. Charles Corder,

linen-draper , of New Cavendish-street, Portland-place . The prisoner came on the 27th of September, and asked for some shawls; I showed her several, but she said, they were not the right colour; she did not buy anything - she went out, and in consequence of suspicion, I followed her; when she saw me watching her she ran away, and I saw her take a parcel from under her cloak, and throw it down an area - I stopped her instantly, and went and got the parcel, which was this piece of Irish linen; it is Mr. Corder's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not an old woman in the shop? A. I did not observe one; there were four or five customers - I did not see this piece of linen on the prisoner before she got out; I have not said so to any person.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of Stealing only - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-117

1909. WILLIAM TEWKES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 8 pairs of scissars, value 6s., and 16 knives, value 12s., the goods of John Smith , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM GOULDING . I am an apprentice to John Smith, a cutler , who lives in Clerkenwell . On Saturday, the 30th of September, Bryan came into my master's shop about half-past two o'clock, and the prisoner came in soon afterwards - I went up-stairs, and when I came down, they were talking together; my mistress was in the shop, and I went down-stairs to get some born-tips, which Bryan asked for, and when I came up, I saw the prisoner going out.

MARY ANN SMITH . I was coming down-stairs when the prisoner was going into the street - Bryan remained in the shop, and I talked to him about five minutes; he then went away - and I missed two papers of penknives, which I had seen about half-past twelve o'clock - my husband and I went to look for the prisoner and his companion; we saw them in less than twenty minutes in Aylesbury-street; I crossed over and taxed them with it - Bryan ran away, and my husband took the prisoner; we found on him a paper which is marked, and two knives.

WILLIAM JOHN HEARRING . I took the prisoner from Mr. Smith, and found these knives on him.

Prisoner. Q. He was not there at all? A. Yes, I was.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I took Bryan, and found some knives which he dropped, and a basket - I knew nothing of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Those two knives I got of Bryan, at a public-house, in Aylesbury-street - he asked me if I knew where he could sell such things; I was going to take him to a man who would buy them, and I was stopped by Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-118

1910. WILLIAM BILLINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 shilling, and 24 half-pence , the monies of Andrew Smith .

SARAH SMITH . I keep a green-grocer's shop in Spafields . On the 30th of September, I left my shop, to take my little boy to school - I left 1s., 111/2d., and two farthings, on a tea-board in the back parlour - when I came back, I met the prisoner coming out of my house; I asked what he wanted - he said, an apple; I said, "Perhaps you have been into my room;" I looked and the money was gone - my sister came in at the time, and said, I had better send for an officer; I asked, if he would give up the money? he said, it was 2s., and he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled it out; he was then very saucy - the officer came by and asked what was the matter.

JOHN BRUNDLEY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner from Cooper - I asked what it was for; he said, "For taking some money from a woman's shop."

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy a halfpenny-worth of apples; I saw the money lay on a board, I took it up, and put it into my pocket; the woman came in and said, she had lost some money; I gave it her, and said, I was very sorry.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-119

1911. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 horse-cloth, value 1s.; 1 shovel, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pail, value 1s.; and 1 brush, value 6d., the goods of John Shepherd; and 3 pewter-pots, value 2s. , the goods of John Griggs .

JOHN SHEPHERD . I keep stables at Westmorelandmews ; the prisoner was my watchman for eight or nine years, and had access to the key of my stables, to let the coachmen in at night - I had the greatest confidence in him; these articles are mine - I cannot say when I had seen them.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I went to the prisoner's lodgings in Stingo-lane - he was in bed - his wife got up and opened the door; I said I wished to look into their premises - the prisoner said he had no objection: I found this brush with J. S. on it, for Mr. Shepherd's name - I then found these three half-pint pots, with the name nearly out, under the bed, and found this shovel, with the name nearly scraped out - between the bed and the mattress, I found this cloth with the name on it; the prisoner said he had picked it up in the Mews, and washed it several times, but never noticed the name on it; and he had given another brush for it to one of Mr. Shepherd's men.

ELIZABETH SPOONER . I borrowed this pail of the prisoner on the morning before he was taken. I live nearly a quarter of a mile from Westmoreland-mews.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The horse-cloth I picked up in the street, all over dirt, four years ago - there was a hackney-coach there, and I offered it to the man; he said he would not have it - I washed it several times, and saw the sign of a name on it, but as to whose it was, I could not tell. I gave a hard brush to Morgan, Mr. Shepherd's hostler, for this clothes-brush - I picked up the shovel in the street, and as I had met two dung-carts, I thought they had dropped it - there were several pails about, and I took this one home.

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of his character .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-120

1912. ELISHA FRY was indicted for stealing, on the

21st of September , 1 spoon, value 5s. , the goods of William Beavern .

HANNAH INGRAM . I am servant to William Beavern, a tailor , who lives in Burlington Arcade . I put a spoon on the dresser-shelf after one o'clock on the 20th of September, and missed it the next day, when I wanted it for dinner - the prisoner used to put up the shutters and take them down; he was there on the evening of the 20th, and the morning of the 21st - I have not found the spoon.

WILLIAM CURTIS . I am the shopman. The prisoner put the shutters up on the night of the 20th, and came in the morning to take them down - he went into the area, and I put the shutter down to him; the dresser was close to a window where the shutters went in - he went away, and did not finish his work that morning.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner on Thursday, the 21st of September, and found on him 2s. 10d.

JANE DEWS . I saw the prisoner come into Princes-court, Little George-street, on the 21st of September - he said to me, "Look here, I have picked up an old piece of silver spoon coming along" - I said, "It is not silver;" he said, "Is it not?" and he threw it on the stones - I saw no more of it.

THOMAS SAVAGE . I saw the prisoner on the 21st of September; he showed me a bit of a spoon, and I took out my knife to see if it was silver - I said I thought it was not.

ANN TWIGGER . I saw the prisoner show part of a spoon to Mrs. Dews.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the bit of a bowl of a spoon, and I asked the witnesses if it was silver; they said, No, and I threw it away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-121

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1913. WILLIAM ROLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 3 loaves of bread, value 2s.; 4lbs. weight of veal, value 2s., and 3lbs. weight of beef, value 1s. , the goods of Lewis Blancheney .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-122

1914. SARAH NOBLE and MATILDA NOBLE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 1 ring, value 8s., the goods of David Bidmead , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH BIDMEAD . I am the wife of David Bidmead; he is a merchant's clerk ; we live at Stepney , and keep a shop. On the 20th of July, the two prisoners came together, and Matilda purchased a ring, for which she paid; in the mean time, Sarah requested to look at some gold rings; she tried on three, which she held in her hand with the cards - she then took up a fourth, which she said was too small - I said, "The first you took up, I think, will fit you:" she then opened her hand, and laid down two instead of three - I said again, "The one marked 17s. will fit you." In the meantime, she must have dropped it, for Matilda stooped down and picked up something - I asked what it was; she said 6d. - she faltered in her speech, and I said, "What have you in your mouth?" she said, "A bit of paper" - I said, "Let me look at it," and it proved to be the card on which the ring had been: I then charged her with having it, but they both strongly denied it; I sent for the officer, who found it in Matilda's mouth.

JOHN SEAGRAVE . I am the officer. I went to the shop; the lady said she had lost a ring; the prisoners said they knew nothing of it - I took them into the parlour, and on searching Matilda, I took off her bonnet, and began to search her curls - she began to exclaim against the lady of the shop, and said she had been a good customer, but would never come there again - she faltered in her speech, and I said, "What have you in your mouth?" I seized her mouth, and said, "Put out the ring into my hand," and I showed it to Mrs. Bidmead. I found 2s. on Sarah, but nothing on the other.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MATILDA'S Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

MATILDA NOBLE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH NOBLE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-123

1915. MICHAEL MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Oswald .

WILLIAM OSWALD. I lost a handkerchief on the 3d of June, from off the hall table, at Lord Melburne's - I had left it there about three o'clock in the afternoon; I did not see it again till I was at Bow-street, on the 15th of August. The prisoner was coachman to Mr. George Lamb, and used to come there frequently. On the evening I missed it I asked him about it - he said he gave it to Mr. Lamb's footman.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner, and bring this handkerchief; I found the duplicate of it on his person, and these keys.

JAMES WILLIAM CRESSY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Green-street, Leicester-square. There was a handkerchief pawned with me, on the 23d of June, in the name of Michael Miles - I gave a duplicate to the person who pawned it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me by one of the servants, who said it was Edward's - I took it to him; he said it was his, but I might keep it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-124

1916. FRANCIS WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 miniature-painting, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 1s. 6d.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s. 6d.; 1 cap, value 3s. 6d.; 1 pin, value 3s., and 1 pair of scissors, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Barber .

SAMUEL BARBER. I keep the Crooked Billet public-house, Portsmouth-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On the 7th of October the prisoner was at my house from one to four o'clock, when he went up the bed-room stairs; my daughter went up, and alarmed me - I ran, and saw the prisoner coming down stairs - he ran out; I followed, and found this property on him - the shirt and cap were in his hat; they were taken from the drawers.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY . I am an officer, and received him in charge with the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came out and met a friend, who took me back, and told me to go up-stairs, to the bagatelle-room, and he would follow me; I did not go up, but put my hat on the stairs; I heard an alarm, took my hat up, and ran out; the property was in my hat - I do not know who put it there - I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-125

Before Mr Sergeant Arabin.

1917. GEORGE SQUIRES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas George Pigram .

THOMAS GEORGE PIGRAM. I keep the Red Lion public-house, at Hillingdon . On the 12th of October, at half-past six o'clock, my great coat hung in the passage; my servant said it was gone - I had seen it safe the night before. I pursued the way she told me, and met my man with it and the prisoner in custody - he was a stranger.

SOPHIA BUTLER . I live with Pigram. About half-past six o'clock a boy came in and asked for a loaf - I said I had none; he then asked for water, and when I came in I saw the prisoner running out with the coat - I sent the ostler after him.

SAMUEL EDEN . I am the ostler. Butler sent me in pursuit of the prisoner, who had the coat on his arm; I called to two men in a cart by the road; he then dropped the coat, and they took him, but he got from them. I gave it to a man to hold while I secured him.

FRANCIS WEEDEN . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-126

1918. GEORGE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 2 gowns, value 10s.; 2 shawls, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d.; 1 hat, value 1s., and 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of John Fleetwood .

JOHN FLEETWOOD. I keep the Red Lion public-house, Robert-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 30th of September, at half-past five o'clock, I went to lay down, being ill; my room door was then locked, but I laid down with it only pushed too; at a quarter past six my daughter awoke me, to give me some tea; I found the room in a litter, and the contents of a box strewed about, which were safe when I went to bed - on the table lay a gown and two shawls - my daughter looked round the corner of the bedstead, and said, "Here is a man in the room;" I then found the prisoner under the bed - I immediately looked for my jacket, which I had laid on my bed, with 40l. in it, and found it on the floor; my daughter ran down, and got two persons up; I endeavoured to arouse the prisoner, who pretended to be asleep; we at lost got him up, and asked what he did there - we could make nothing of him, but he said he wanted to go to bed; he then suddenly jumped up, and made a desperate resistance. An officer came in about five minutes, and tied his hands, and in his hat I found a handkerchief; all the other things had been moved from their places.

ANN FLEETWOOD . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I took him some tea, and found the property strewed about - I found the prisoner partly under the bed, concealed; he affected to be asleep; we could hardly awake him - I got two persons up, and he at last made a powerful resistance - the officer took him. I had left the room in order before my father went up.

JOHN COLLINS . I am an officer, and was fetched. - The prisoner pretended to be intoxicated, but he certainly was perfectly sober.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was inebriated, and did not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-127

1919. JAMES MILES and JAMES ROBINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 5 silverspoons, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Kelsey .

ELIZABETH SHATTOCK . I am servant to Henry Kelsey, who lives in Bolton-row - I had only been there five weeks. On Friday afternoon, the 23d of September, Miles came and asked if the kitchen chimney might be swept next morning, as it was time we had it done - it was usually done once a month, and that he always did it; I asked if they were the right people - he said, Yes: my master was out; it was agreed they should come next morning. He came with a boy about a quarter past five o'clock - the boy went up the chimney; Miles held up the cloth: there was a knock at the door - Miles asked me to let his young master in; I went up, leaving him alone, and let Robinson in; he came down. Soon after the boy came down the chimney. and they sent him to another house; after they had taken up the soot, Robinson asked me to let Miles out with the bag, which I did, and then he went. After they were gone, at eight o'clock, I missed five silver spoons from the kitchen cupboard, which had the key left in it; I had asked if they came from Mr. Bentley, our sweeper - they said, Yes; both the prisoners were present then - they never came to be paid. The spoons were safe the night before - nobody but them had been in the kitchen.

HENRY KELSEY . Bentley is my regular sweep. I know nothing of the case.

THOMAS RIDDLE . I have been twelve years in Bentley's employ; neither of the prisoners were in his employ on the 23d of September, but Robinson has worked for me when I was ill - I always found him honest.

JAMES BRIDGEN . I am a sweep, and know the prisoners - I have known Miles five years; I am fourteen years old. Robinson came to me in Park-street, and my master sent me with him to Bolton-street; he at first said No. 1, then said No. 1, Bolton-row, and then No. 6; I went there with the prisoners; I rang - Miles and I went in, and Robinson went over the way; I went up the chimney, and when I came down both the prisoners were there - they sent me to another place. and told me to be sure and not tell Bentley I had done the job.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I received information, and apprehended the prisoners.

JOHN KIRKMAN . On the 23d of September, Robinson came and asked me to lend him a boy to do a job; I sent him to Park-street, to him.

MILES' Defence. It was I who took them, while she was gone to let Robinson in; he asked me afterwards if he should go for the money - I said I had got it.

ROBINSON'S Defence. I knew nothing of his having them; he asked me to get him a boy, which I did. I went for some coffee before I went in.

MILES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBINSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-128

1920. ELIZA PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 5 napkins, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2d.; 1 sovereign, and 1 shilling , the property of Mary Ann Buse .

MARY ANN BUSE. I am servant to Miss May, of Upper-terrace, Islington ; I had been there three days, when the prisoner came, on the 5th of October - she left, and left a box behind; I missed from my box a sovereign, five napkins, a pocket, and a shift - it was not locked. - Next morning an officer came, and opened her box, which was locked. and there they were found.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was the prisoner when the box was searched? A. The officer brought her with him; she said she did not know how they got there. The sovereign was not found; she had seen the sovereign in my box that day, and hurried me down out of the room; she took my keys out of my box, and threw them into the drawer. She said she had worn the stockings, but knew nothing of the napkins.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's box, which was locked; I had taken her at her mother's house - she left the key at her mother's, and said I might break the box open - the articles were found.

Cross-examined. Q. Who directed you to her mother's? A. The prosecutrix; I found nothing in the boxes she had taken away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-129

1921. JOHN READY and JAMES WILKS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 bag, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Turner .

HANNAH HARTLEY . I live at Harrow-on-the-hill; I was on Charles Turner's Pinner-coach, on the 11th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I was in the dickey; we were near Fortune-gate , about half way to Harrow - I observed the two prisoners running behind the coach - Wilks was holding the door open, and the other drew something out; they got it out, and Ready carried it - I alarmed the coachman, who pulled up; they ran immediately off - Ready ran into a ditch with the parcel, and Wilks ran a little way along the road, and then made through the hedge - I then saw them both run across a field; they had left the bag in the ditch, and Wilks had left his hat in the hedge - I saw them, and have no doubt they are the persons.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Could you tell what it was? A. I could not tell whether it was a bag or a parcel; I looked down on them, and they looked up at me; we were about the middle of the road.

JOHN HOPKINS . I was in a field by the side of the road; I heard the coach come by; I looked over the hedge, and saw the two prisoners behind the coach - I saw Wilks open the door, and the other put his arm in and take out the bag - he then came to the hedge, dropped it there, and took hold of a bramble and drew it over his face; he then got through the hedge, and Ready got through the hedge, and dropped his hat; they then ran across the field - I saw Ready taken, but not Wilks; I can swear positively to them.

CHARLES TURNER . I am owner of the coach; I had this bag in the hind boot; the witness gave me information, and I pulled up - I never lost sight of the prisoners till they were taken.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where was this bag to have been delivered? A. To Mr. Roach; I took it there, and he gave it me again next morning.

WILLIAM COOK . I work on the road; I saw the two prisoners run behind the stage; I pursued and took Wilks; he had no hat, but it was afterwards found - I saw Ready running, and am certain of their persons.

EDWARD KITCHENER . I was with Cook; I saw the prisoners run behind the stage, and soon after, Mr. Turner called Stop thief! I saw them running across the field, and I took Ready - I am certain they are the persons.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILKS' Defence. I was picking blackberries, and there was a dog came to me; I threw a stone at him, and he went howling away - I saw some gentlemen coming up to me, and I made through the hedge and ran off.

READY'S Defence. In going through the hedge, he must have lost sight of me; circumstances may appear against me, but I know nothing about it - I heard a noise, and said to Kitchner, "What is the matter;" he said,"They are calling after you;" I said, "I will go and see."

READY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILKS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-130

1922. THOMAS SHELLES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 cloak, value 8s. , the goods of Frederick Hopkins .

FREDERICK HOPKINS. I am a linen-draper , and live in Broadway, Westminster ; this cloak hung three feet within my shop. On the 14th of October, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I heard something torn from the door; I went and missed this cloak, and saw the prisoner about fifty yards off with it; he dropped it - a sweep jumped out and knocked me down - I lost sight of him; I saw him again next day, and believe him to be the man.

JOHN KAINES . I saw the prisoner about seven o'clock, looking in at Mr. Jones, the pawnbroker's shop; I watched him to Mr. Hopkins's shop; he went in two or three feet, and took the cloak - I followed and saw him drop it; I took it up; I knew him before, and knew his name.

JOSEPH HILL . I am an officer. I was in this shop: Kaines brought the cloak in, and told me who it was; I took the prisoner next day; I know he was in great distress, and deserted by his friends.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it; I heard a cry, and went to see what was the matter.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-131

1923. JOSEPH WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 saddle, value 35s., and 1 chaise harness, value 40s. , the goods of William Robertson .

WILLIAM WALL. I am groom to Mr. William Robertson, whose stable is in Southampton-mews, Euston-square . On the 18th of September, the prisoner asked me for a situation; he said, he had no place to sleep, and I locked him in the stable at seven o'clock in the evening to sleep; at eight next morning, I found he had got out into the coach-house, and out at that door, and we missed this property, which was safe the evening before - I met him on the 7th of October in Hampstead-road, and asked him for the harness which he had stolen, he said, he knew nothing about it; I said I would give him in charge; he then said, if I would go to his house, in Tottenham-court-road, he would give it to me - I went; he wanted me to stop there while he fetched it, but I would not; he then got out and tried to shut me in - I gave an alarm, and had him secured; we have not found the harness.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am an officer. I took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-132

1924. WILLIAM DOWNES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Robert Dixon , Esq. , from his person .

ROBERT DIXON, ESQ. I am a barrister . On Wednesnesday, the 11th of October, I was in Dean-street, Redlion-square , about two o'clock, and felt something at my pocket - I turned and collared the prisoner, who threw my handkerchief down in the scuffle; I gave him in charge.

RICHARD CHEVILL . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner struggling with Mr. Dixon, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261026-133

1925. JAMES HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 seals, value 36s.; 1 chain, value 1l.; and 1 ring, value 1s., the goods of George Erratt , from his person .

GEORGE ERRATT. I live in James'-street, Manchester-square, and work for Mr. Moore, a breeches-maker, of Bond-street. On the 4th of September, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was returning from Bayswater , and met the prisoner in the fields - I had never seen him before: he said, he would cross the fields with me; I said, "Very well;" we went into a public-house, and had a pint of beer - I had been drinking before; he paid for the beer - I knew the house, and thought I should like ten minutes' sleep - I was about half an hour there - nobody else was there but Rhodes, she pot-boy - I was asleep, and on awaking, missed my watch, which was safe a few minutes before I went in - I had only been to two public-house; he was gone when I awoke, and was apprehended about a month afterwards - I have not found it.

WILLIAM RHODES . I am the pot-boy; the prosecutor appeared drunk, and came in with the prisoner; he fell asleep, and the prisoner sent me for a glass of gin and water, and then asked me to fetch sixpenny-worth of oysters - when I came back he was gone - the prosecutor's fob was open, as he lay asleep on the seat - I awoke him, and he missed his watch - I had seen his seals hanging out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-134

1926. GEORGE POWER and WILLIAM BLAKE were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Alexander Brand , from his person .

ALEXANDER BRAND. I am an agent . On the 12th of October, about half-past two o'clock, I was in Grafton-street, Soho , and saw the prisoners step off the pavement, close behind me - I turned, and saw Power, with his feet bare, and Blake crossing the street, with my handkerchief between them; I then felt, and missed it - my pocket was turned inside out; I went and laid hold of them - they dropped it, and ran away, but were stopped in my sight.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am an officer. I took them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners received a good character.

POWER - GUILTY. Aged 12.

BLAKE - GUILTY. Aged 10.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of their youth .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18261026-135

1927. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 7 live tame rabbits, value 7s. , the goods of George Watson .

GEORGE WATSON. I live at Sunbury , and keep rabbits in a shed, opposite my house; I missed seven about half-past eight or nine o'clock in the morning of the 8th of October. The prisoner has been in the workhouse - he knew my premises, and has worked there.

MARTIN JONES . I am a constable, and took the prisoner at his mother's, but found nothing there. I found four dead rabbits at Poore's, about a mile and a half from Sunbury.

WILLIAM POORE . I work on the road - my mother brought these rabbits to me.

MARY DOWNEL . I live with Watson, and fastened up the rabbits at night.

HENRY JONES . On Sunday morning the prisoner asked me to buy five rabbits - I would not; I did not notice them; he said he had found them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-136

1927. JOSEPH ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 nose-bag, value 3s.; 2 jackets, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief. value 4s., and 1 knife, value 2d. , the goods of Thomas Melvin .

THOMAS MELVIN. On the 23d of September I lost this nose-bag and two jackets, off the shaffs of my cart, in Drury-lane , while I was gone for refreshment - the prisoner worked for me twelve months ago.

CHARLES NASH . I am a tripeman, and live in Drury-lane. I saw the prisoner take the bag and jackets off the shafts, and go up the lane - I thought he might belong to them - I swear he is the man.

DENNIS CUTLER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner

the same evening in Plumtree-street with the jackets on his back - he said did I want to transport him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-137

1929. JANE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 3 pewter-pots, value 2s. , the goods of Wilkinson Moore .

SAMUEL SUTER . I am pot-boy to Wilkinson Moore, of Buckingham-place . On the 10th of October I saw the prisoner about one hundred yards from our house, and saw her take a pint pot from her lap, and put it into her pocket - I went and asked what was in her pocket and her lap - she said it was nothing - I pulled her lap down, found two pots, and as I was taking her back, she gave me one from her pocket - they had been put out at a door in Cleveland-street.

WILKINSON MOORE. The prisoner was brought back with these pots, which are mine.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I took her in charge.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-138

1930. JAMES BISHOP and HENRY DUMON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 writing-desk, value 20s. , the goods of Ann Clementia Teschemacher .

MISS ANN CLEMENTIA TESCHEMACHER. I am single , and live in Prospect Cottages, Barnsbury-park, Islington ; this writing-desk stood in my drawing-room. On the 26th of September I was in my parlour, which is separated from my drawing-room by a passage; between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was alarmed by a violent ringing at the bell - I got up, and went to the window - I saw two persons standing by our rails, the gate was locked - they said a robbery had been committed - I went into the drawing-room, and found the window and blinds wide open; the blinds had been shut before, and the window a little up, to admit the air - I was then desired to look about the room, and I missed the desk, which I had seen on the table; but I cannot say I had seen it that day.

ROBERT OLDFIELD . I am a milkman. On the 26th of September, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoners with another person, at the corner of Prospect-row - I passed them twice, and went home, which is two hundred yards off - I was working in the field, and saw them looking about - I saw Bishop go into the fore-court, and get over the iron-rails into the prosecutrix's fore-court, and get in at the window: he came out in two minutes with something wrapped in a bag or apron, and gave it to the man, who is not here - Dumon stood at the corner, while Bishop went in, and the other received the article from Bishop, and went down Brooksby-street - the prisoners went another way - I rang the bell, and told the lady - I followed, and took them in Park-street - a man, who works for the lady, seized Dumon, who knocked him down - the street-keeper came by, and took them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were they strangers to you? A. Yes; the parcel seemed about the size of a desk.

THOMAS COPE . I live in Elliott-place, Lower-road, Islington. I saw Dumon strike another man, and knock him down - I secured him and Bishop - I found on Dumon a bad sovereign, or gilt farthing, and one of Bramah's patent keys.

BISHOP'S Defence. He swore to Dumon first, and then to me.

BISHOP - GUILTY . Aged 21.

DUMON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-139

1931. CHARLES COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 3lbs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Leman .

EDWARD LEMAN. I am a cheesemonger , and live in White Cross-street . On the evening of the 18th of October, about half-past nine o'clock, Cassell gave me information - I went out, and took this bacon from the prisoner and let him go; but the officer took him the next night

JOHN WILLIAM CASSELL . I saw the prisoner take this bacon off the shop-board, and walk out.

THOMAS HARRISON . I apprehended him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY. Aged 73.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-140

1932. WILLIAM CONNEIL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 3lbs. of pork, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of William Geary .

ROBERT WINTER . I live with William Geary, a cheesemonger , of Broad-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner came into the shop, took this pork, and brought it to the scale; but instead of giving it me to weigh he put it under his coat, and walked out - I followed, and took him with it, about twelve yards off - he resisted being taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked the price, and said my wife was at the door, and I would show it to her - I went to the door - there was a disturbance, and she had gone into the next shop but one - I was going to her when he seized me - it was not under my coat.

ROBERT WINTER . I did not see his wife - he said he was going to show it to her in a yard opposite - I took it from under his coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-141

1933. GEORGE CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 2lbs. of bacon, value 16d. , the goods of William Geary .

ROBERT WINTER . I am servant to William Geary. On the 16th of September, while I was at the desk, I saw the prisoner come in take this bacon, and go out - I followed, and took it from under his coat.

GEORGE POND . I received him in charge, and found 3s. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up a piece of paper with this bacon in it.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-142

1934. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 28 yards of stuff, value 14s. , the goods of James Burrows .

JAMES BURROWS. I am a haberdasher , and live in Whitechapel . On the 6th of October the officer brought the prisoner in with this stuff, which had been about six

inches within the door, tied with several others - the string was cut.

JOHN VAN . I am an officer. I was near the shop - Brown delivered the prisoner and stuff to me.

JOHN BROWN . I am a City officer. About half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was passing Burrows' shop, and saw the prisoner go in, and return with this stuff; I followed him, and asked what he had got - he said he did not know - that a gentleman gave it him to hold - I called Van, and gave him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it me to hold.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-143

1935. ROBERT FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 bag, value 4d., and 9l. in copper monies , the property of Thomas Moorman and Josiah Moorman .

JOHN MURFETT . I am a carman to Thomas and Josiah Moorman, iron-founders , of Old-street, St. Luke's. On the 29th of September I was in Little Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields , and had four bags, each containing about 10l. of copper, in the cart; we had it to pay the men; I stopped at a public-house to get refreshment, and could see the cart as I sat in the house; I saw the tail-board was down, which I had left up; I ran out, and missed one bag; I looked round, but saw nobody - a lad came and asked if I had lost anything; I went with him, and secured the prisoner at the corner of Wild-street, with the bag; another man was supporting him; I asked where he was going to carry it - he said he did not know; I said, "I will show you where to take it - put it on your shoulder;" he said he would see me d - d first. I gave him in charge.

WILLIAM HENRY ROWSHAM . I was in Little Queen-street, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I saw the prisoand another going towards Drury-lane - the prisoner had a coarse bag on his shoulder; I then saw the carman running after them - he seized the prisoner, who threw the bag down, and tried to escape; the other tried to get the copper - I and another man took it into a shop for safety.

ROBERT DUKE . I received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A respectable man asked me to carry this for 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-144

1936. JOSEPH GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 3 remmants of cloth, containing in length 41/2 yards, value 1l. , the goods of Thomas Steel .

MARY ANN STEEL . I am the daughter of Thomas Steel, a tailor , of Gray's Inn-lane . On the 5th of October I was in the room adjoining the shop, and saw the prisoner going out with something bulky under his arm; I ran after him; I took hold of him - he brought back the property; I gave it to the officer.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I was coming by, took the prisoner, and have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I thought they were tailor's cuttings, or I would not have taken them.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-145

1937. GEORGE GILLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 2 shillings, and 3 sixpences , the monies of Josiah Burnham .

AMELIA BURNHAM . I am the wife of Josiah Burnham, a cheesemonger , of Great Titchfield-street . On the 29th of September, at nine o'clock in the morning, my girl called me into the shop; I came up, and saw the prisoner taking money out of the till - he had got the till on the counter; there was about 4s. in it - he ran out; I pursued and he was taken; he returned me 2s. 6d., and said that was all.

JAMES LEDGER . I heard an alarm, and stopped the prisoner about thirty yards from the house; he said he had broken a window, and I let him go; the prosecutrix came up - I pursued, and secured him again.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer, and took him - I found a shilling and three sixpences on him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Seven Days and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261026-146

1938. WILLIAM GEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 28lbs. of iron, value 3s.; 1 chisel, value 4d.; 1 fuller, value 4d., and 1 rivet-tool, value 4d. , the goods of Peter Cannell .

PETER CANNELL. I am a coach-smith , and live in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane . I lost these tools from my shop, and found them on the prisoner, whom I saw leave the shop; I knew him before - he has been turned out of the workhouse.

LAMBETH CASE . I took him in charge, and found the tools on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-147

1939. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 pair of stays, value 4s., and 1 petticoat, value 4s. , the goods of Mary Ann Price .

MARY ANN PRICE. I live in Blandford-place, Regent's-park. On the 4th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I hung these things to dry in a yard in Camden-town , where I was; an alarm was given, and I missed them. The prisoner was immediately taken.

THOMAS ELLICE . I live in this house, and am a coal-dealer. I was on the stairs, and saw the prisoner come and take these things off the line, and roll them up; I ran down - he threw them over a wall, and jumped over - I followed, and took him; I showed the things to Price, who claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. FISH. Q. How far were you off? A. Five or six yards; I did not know him before; I took him not five yards off - he was sober; it was half-past six o'clock; I did not lose sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met some friends, and drank too much; I did not know where I was going; I was taken ill, and went into this house for a necessary purpose, the door being open, and I was taken.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

The prisoner received a good character, and was strongly recommend to Mercy .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-148

1940. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on

the 11th of October , 1 shawl, value 1s., and 1 child's coat, value 1s. , the goods of George Harvey .

ELIZA HARVEY . I am the wife of George Harvey - we lodge on the first floor of No. 4, Titchbourn-court, Holborn . On Wednesday evening, the 11th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, these things hung on a chair in the room; we were alarmed by a stack of chimnies falling; I snatched the child out of bed, ran into the court, leaving the room and street doors open, and in about five minutes there came a second crash, two doors off- we ran further off, and in about ten minutes I returned for my shawl, to cover the child, and it was gone; the prisoner is quite a stranger - I saw him in custody with the shawl under his coat.

GEORGE BROWN . I live in Whetstone-park. I heard some houses were falling - I went out; Mrs. Harvey said she had been robbed, and in half a minute I saw the prisoner brought back; he said he had not been in the house, and had nothing about him; he partly took his hat off, and I saw something in it - Mrs. Harvey knocked it off, and the coat was found in it; the shawl was at the back of his coat; he was very impertinent, and knocked out the watchman's light.

MICHAEL SHINE . I am a watchman, and took him in charge; he struck me, knocked my light out, and got from me about a yard, and was then secured.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for a man who lived there, and found the things on the stairs.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-149

1941. ROBERT JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 cravat, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 1 book, value 5s.; 1 pot of cold cream, value 2s., and 2 bottles of sauce, value 4s., the goods of John Forbes , Esq. ; and two pairs of trousers, value 12s.; 1 jacket, value 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 2 pairs of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of Charles Demurice .

THOMAS CLIFFORD . I am carman to William Birmingham , of Fitzroy-market. I had two portmanteaus, a writing-desk, and two coats in my cart, to take from Sir Charles Forbes' house, in Fitzroy-square, to Blackwall; a servant went with me - when we got about fifty yards from the Commercial-road turnpike , (it was then about ten o'clock at night.) I was on the off-side, and turned my head and saw a man spring from the cart; I gave the servant the reins, got out of the cart, and missed a pormantean; the prisoner was taken about a hundred and fifty yards off.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not see him taken? A. No.

JAMES HALL . I am a waiter, and live in Somerset-place, New-road. On the 19th of September I was in the Commercial-road, and saw two or three men following this cart - I walked down to the turnpike; the cart stopped to pay toll, and was going on - I saw the prisoner run up, spring out, and take a parcel (as it appeared) from the back of the cart; he walked away in a contrary direction with it; I followed and told a watchman, who took him with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever say to any one that you doubted whether he was the man? A. No; there were three examinations - I never said, that if I was paid my expenses by the prisoner's friends, it would be more pleasant to me. I have received no money from them or anybody - I do not know Sims or Fitzpatrick - I was not at home at the second examination, as I had slept at my aunt's, and did not receive the summons in time; I went in the evening, and gave bail for my appearance. I know the Black-horse in Lemon-street - I have been there, but not with any one; I spoke to no woman there; I saw Sims at the office, but not at the Black-horse; I never told Sims to pay my mother 7s. 6d. - she told me this morning that she hoped I would not hurt the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Did you give the same account to the Magistrate as you have to-day? A. Yes, as nearly as possible.

THOMAS BOGGIS . I am a watchman. On the 19th of September, about ten o'clock at night, I took the prisoner in charge, with a bundle on his shoulder: I asked what he had got; he said it was no business of mine - Hall came up, and said he was the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he had found it in the road? A. No.

PETER WILSON . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with this property. Hall said he saw him take it from the cart, and never lost sight of him.

HENRY SCOGGIN . I am servant to Sir Charles Forbes. I put these bundles into the cart, and know this property; they were all packed in one mat.

WILLIAM BIRMINGHAM . I let out this cart; my man went with it.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife and three women gave Hall 7s. 6d.; if he has perjured himself in one thing, he will in another.

MARIA ANN SIMS . I am married, and live in Somerset-street. I saw Hall at the Black-horse, where I used to deal; he demanded 10s. of the prisoner's wife in my presence, for his day's expenses; he received 2s. 6d. from her, and I took 7s. 6d. to his mother's house, by his desire: we gave it into her hands. Fitzpatrick was at the Black-horse.

COURT. Q. Have you ever told him that you hoped he would not hurt the prisoner? A. No; he said the prisoner was full fifteen yards from him, and several other persons being there, that he could not swear to him, and if his expenses were paid, he had rather not appear against him.

MARY FITZPATRICK . My husband lives in Middlesex-street, Aldgate. I saw Hall at the prisoner's mother's; he called there on the first examination, and said it would he more to his satisfaction not to appear, if his expenses were paid - I saw 2s. 6d. paid to him at the Black-horse - the prisoner's wife was present.

JAMES HALL re-examined. The prisoner's wife was asked at the office three times if I had received any money; she said, No. I earn 9s. a week, and am a waiter at the Eagle, George-street, Mansion-house - I never received any money - I swear I was not with these women at the Blackhorse.

MARIA ANN SIMS . I was nearly an hour with him there in the back room; we had a quartern and a half of gin and

a pot of beer, which the landlord brought; he saw him there.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-150

1942. SARAH CURREY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 cap, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 1 pillerine, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 pocket, value 2d.; 1 pair of scissars, value 4s.; 1 scissarsheath, value 1s.; 1 shuttle, value 2d.; 3 yards of ribbon, value 6d.; 2 yards of trimming, value 1s.; and 4 yards of lace, value 4s. , the goods of Britannia Brown .

BRITANNIA BROWN. I now live in Bell-yard, Templebar - I lived in the prisoner's house, in Buckingham-street , for six weeks; my sister took the second floor, and paid 2l. a week - we left last Saturday week - before that I missed this property, and asked the prisoner about it; she said she knew nothing of it: she had no permission to use our things - we did not board with her.

HENRY BUCKRIDGE . I am an officer. I went with a warrant and took up Hales, and brought her to East-street, Marylebone. The prosecutrix and her sister searched her and produced a piece of lace. I then went to the prisoner's house, and told her I had come to search, as some property had been found on Hales, who said she had it from her; she said she should turn the tables on her - I said I must search; she then opened a drawer, and gave me a petticoat, which she said had come from the wash; she produced a cap, a collar, and some ribbon, which she said was given to her by her servant Nancy - I went into the kitchen, and searched the girl's boxes in the prisoner's presence, and found the rest of the lace, the scissars, shuttle, and sheath; I asked how it got there - Ellen Brown said, "I must tell the truth; she wants me to say that I gave it to her, but I did not" - the prisoner then wanted to make it up, but I took her to the office.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did she not say she took them for her rent? A. No; she said the girls took her clothes, and when she found any of theirs, she took them - it is a house of ill-fame.

ESTHER HALES . The prisoner gave me a piece of lace when I was in her room one day, saying it was of no use to her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not great familiarity between the prisoner and the prosecutrix? A. Yes.

ELLEN BROWN . I am the prosecutrix's sister, and lodged at this house. I saw some of the things found, some in the prisoner's room, and some in the kitchen - the prisoner said, "For God's sake, burn them, and I will give you 5l.;" she then said, "Say you gave them to me;" I said, "I will do no such thing."

Cross-examined. Q. What is your name? A. Brown: I have gone by the name of Lee; I was never married - my sister's name is Brown; I never knew her go by the name of Parker. The prisoner once lent me a tablecloth; I took it with me by mistake; when we moved, I gave it to Mrs. Judd, for her girl to take it back on the day of the search. When my sister left the house, she did not ask the prisoner for the things.

BRITANNIA BROWN re-examined. I told the prisoner of my loss; she said she knew nothing about it - I did not suspect her, but Hales.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you ordered any goods from Ludgate-hill while you lodged there? A. No, nor had my sister: some goods came which Curry would not take in, because she had no money to pay - I did not order them: if my sister did, I was not present - I was ill at the time. I was never here before: I was a witness at Guildhall about having our clothes cut at the fair; I gave the name of Brown there; I never went by the name of Lee.

Q. What did the prisoner mean by turning the tables on you? A. She said I had pawned the table-cloth - my sister took our present lodging by the name of Lee; I have only been eleven weeks in town; I came from Lincolnshire.

Prisoner's Defence. They went away in my debt, and what I found in the house I took as security.

- JUDD. These young women now lodge with me; one goes by the name of Bearpark, and the other Parker: Ellen gave me a table-cloth to send back to Curry.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-151

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1943. MICHAEL KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 half-a-crown; 2 shillings, and 41/2d. , the property of Ann Kenchington .

ANN KENCHINGTON. I am servant to Mr. Dolyter, of Argyle-street . The prisoner was working there as a plasterer's boy . On the 13th of October, at one o'clock, I saw this money in a handkerchief in the dresser drawer, and at three it was gone - I saw the handkerchief and money in the dust-hole that afternoon - none was lost; the prisoner was in the kitchen several times.

JOHN CROUK . I am under-butler at Mr. Dollyter's. The prisoner was asked if he had taken the money; he said he had not; he went towards the dust-hole, and then went up-stairs - I went with a light, and found the handkerchief and money there. The water-closet is by the dust-hole: there were several other persons in the house; I saw nothing in his hand.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I took the prisoner; he denied the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-152

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1944. ISAAC LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 50lbs. of lead, value 8s., the goods of Lewis Prendergast , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I live in Bell-yard, Doctors'-commons; I receive the rent of the house No. 2, Walbrook-buildings , for Lewis Prendergast, who is abroad; some lead was missing from the roof.

GEORGE MORRIS . I am a watchman. On the 23d of September, I was going off duty, and saw the prisoner in Thomas-street, with a bag under his arm - I crossed over, and he went into Hackney-road - I went up and found he had got this lead - he said, he found it; I took him to the watch-house - I saw it compared with the building.

GEORGE BINKS . I stopped a man opposite Shoreditch-

church, at a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, and took a bag of lead from him; he escaped - that was not the prisoner.

ROBERT BURNHAM . I compared this lead with the roof of No. 2, Walbrook-building - it matched exactly.

JOHN TAYLOR PITTS . I saw the lead compared; it fitted exactly.

THOMAS HAYCOCK . I received the lead at the watch-house; it matched the building exactly - there was about1/2 a cwt.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw this bag near the Woolpack public-house, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-153

1945. SAMUEL MAKEPACE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 watch, value 30s.; and 1 half handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of James Watkins .

JAMES WATKINS. On the 9th of October, I was in my master's bake-house, in Garnet-place, Clerkenwell , and lost my handkerchief and watch from there; the prisoner was my fellow-servant, and was going out with bread - I missed the watch, which hung by the trough-board, directly he was gone; it was safe five minutes before - the handkerchief was in the room we both slept in - I went round to the customers, found he had served them and gone away, leaving his basket - I could not find him till last Monday week, when he was taken with my handkerchief on his neck.

WILLIAM JOHN HUETSON . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned this watch on the 9th of October, about four o'clock; he said it was his uncle's, Samuel Makepace.

JOHN SUTTON . I superintend the watch; I received the prisoner in charge with this handkerchief on his neck - he told me where the watch was, and said he had torn the duplicate up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-154

1946. THOMAS MANN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 sovereign, and 2 shillings , the monies of Adam Bush .

ADAM BUSH. I am a cutter at the Bedford eating-house, Bedford-street . On Thursday, the 12th of October, about ten o'clock, I missed a sovereign and two shillings from my box, which I had seen safe on Sunday, and locked it up; the key was in my pocket - the prisoner slept in the same room - I told him of it; he denied taking it - I gave him in charge, and at Bow-street he said, that at three o'clock in the morning, he got out of bed and took the key from my pocket, and took the sovereign from my box.

WILLIAM OXLEY . I am an officer. I was fetched to the house, and took the prisoner - he said he bought a coat with part of the sovereign; I asked for the change - I followed him down to the cellar, and saw him take up 11s. out of the earth.

Prisoner. Q. Did he not say he would make it up? A. He said he would, if the prisoner's father would pay the money; but he said, he had made up so much, the law should take its course.

ADAM BUSH . I made him no promise; I went to his father, who said he had settled so many things, the law should take its course.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-155

1947. THOMAS MILLER and RICHARD HEYLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 108 shirt-buttons, value 18d. , the goods of Thomas Biscoe .

MARY BISCOE . I am the wife of Thomas Biscoe, a shoemaker , Wheeler-street, Spitalfields - these buttons were in the shop-window on the 20th of October - I saw them safe about six o'clock in the evening, and missed them about seven - I know the prisoners, but had not seen them that evening - I know these buttons by the paper, which I had cut in a very particular manner.

SAMUEL ROWE . I am a weaver. On the 20th of October, I was in Wheeler-street, near Biscoe's, and saw the prisoners there; Miller put his hand into the window, and took out this card of buttons - Hayland was looking through the window of the door - he received them from Miller, and concealed them under his jacket - they ran across, and I followed them to Miss Westcoat's, in Lamb-street - Miller went in; I had him detained there, and got an officer - Hayland stood opposite, but I could not leave to secure him - I went with the officer to Biscoe's, and saw Hayland go by - I had him secured.

MARY ANN WESTCOAT . I live in Lamb-street. Miller came into my shop, and asked me to buy this card of buttons - while I was asking how he got them, Rowe came in and had him detained.

THOMAS HART . I am an officer, and took them in charge - Hayland said, he knew nothing of Miller.

MILLER's Defence. I found them, and went to sell them - I had not seen Hayland at all.

SAMUEL ROWE . I am certain Hayland is the boy who took them - I could not secure them both; I beckoned to him, but he would not come - I said, "I shall have you in an hour;" he said, "No, you will not;" there was a strong gas-light; I saw him distinctly three times - I saw him return the buttons to Miller at Westcoat's door.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

HAYLAND - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-156

1904. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of John Grose .

JOHN GROSE. I am a shoemaker , and live in Manor-place, Chelsea . On the 9th of October, about one o'clock, I left my shop for a few minutes, and on returning missed a pair of shoes from the window; my wife described a person to me; I saw the prisoner next morning, and took him - my wife said positively he was the boy who took them - he said he had not been that way for a fortnight.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ESTHER GROSE . On the 9th of October I saw the prisoner come into the shop: I missed the shoes from the window directly he was gone; no other person came into the shop - I am sure of his person.

JOB VALENTINE WATKINS . I am a pawnbroker. The

prisoner pawned these shoes about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 9th of October - I knew him before.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18261026-157

1949. JOSEPH POPE and JAMES CRAYFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 3lbs. 9ozs. of pork, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Turner .

WILLIAM ACTON . I live with my sister, Mrs. Turner, who keeps a chandler-shop in Radnor-street, St. Luke ; her husband is in Bethlem. On the 4th of October, Pope came in for a halfpenny-worth of beer - I set it before him, and saw Crayford behind him - he said, "Draw me a halfpenny-worth;" Pope then said, "You may put them together." I thought, as I arose up, that I saw Crayford do something - I stooped, and again saw him take something in his hand - I looked up, and missed two pieces of pork from a dish on the counter; Crayford went out with it; Pope remained in the shop. I went to the door, and called Stop thief! an officer brought him back with the pork in a few minutes.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate that Pope ran out? A. If so, it is a mistake.

JAMES TAYLOR . On the 4th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at my door, which is half a mile from Turner's, and saw the two prisoners go by; some time afterwards I saw them again, and followed them to Radnor-street; I saw them go into this shop - one came out, and ran - I pursued, and he threw the pork away - I think that was Crayford; I secured him.

COURT. Q. You said Pope ran out at the office? A. I did not know their names: they refused to tell their names at the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

POPE's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a mob; I made a stop, and the man came and took me; I found Crayford in the shop - I had never seen him.

CRAYFORD's Defence. While I was there Pope was brought in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-158

1950. THOMAS PARR was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 7lbs. of mutton, value 5s. , the goods of William Charles Greenop .

GABRIEL AILLEE . I am servant to William Charles Greenop, who keeps a butcher's-shop in Cowcross . On the 14th of October, about nine o'clock at night, I was in the shop - somebody said a person had stolen a joint of mutton; I went to the door, and saw a man running with a joint; I saw him stopped with it - it was ours; it hung on a hook in front of the shop five minutes before.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I live about fifty yards from Greenop's shop. I saw the prisoner run down Cowcross, followed by the officer, and when I got near to him he dropped the mutton; a man took it up, and gave it to the officer.

JOHN FORBES . I am a patrol. I stood at the watch-house, which is next door to this shop, and heard somebody say, "He has got it;" I ran out, and saw him secured; the mutton was picked up, and given to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-159

1851. JOHN STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 2 pieces of wood, value 5s., the goods of Edward Garland and Philip William Perkins ; and 1 square, value 1s. , the goods of Robert Bryant .

EDWARD GARLAND. I am in partnership with Philip William Perkins - we live in Amwell-street, Pentonville . On the 18th of September, about a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, I was at my bed-room window, and saw the prisoner moving timber in our yard; I sent my servant to watch him; I got up, and gave him in charge - he was frequently on my premises, but was never in my employ.

MARY SMITH . I am Mr. Garland's servant. I saw the prisoner take up some wood in his arms twice, and put it down again - he was taken into custody.

FRANCIS NEWTON . I am a watchman, and took the prisoner - he had nothing in his possession; he was charged with carrying some timber four or five yards, and putting it down again - he was charged with stealing it.

THOMAS GARNER . I am a watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought in - I searched his lodging in White Horse-court - he said he lodged there; I found a square under some straw, and this piece of wood.

ROBERT BRYANT . I am in the prosecutor's employ - this piece of timber is their property; I had worked on it on the 15th, and missed it next morning. The square is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through the place on the 18th; there were some pieces of wood there - my door was open, and persons might have taken what they liked there.

GUILTY . Aged 73.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-160

1952. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 9 yards of carpet, value 20s. , the goods of Ann Oldham .

ANN OLDHAM. I keep a broker's-shop , in Bagnige Wells-road, and am a widow . On the 28th of September I was at my back window, and saw the prisoner about a hundred yards off, in the road, with this carpet under his arm - I sent my man after him, who brought him back with it - it is mine, and was tied to the door with a rope.

JOHN IZARD . I followed the prisoner, and brought him back, with the carpet under his arm.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it tied with a piece of string, about a yard from the curbstone. I saw no one coming; I took it up and walked away.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-161

1853. ANN WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 3 bed-gowns, value 2s. 6d.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 pinafore, value 4d. , the goods of Ann Radnor .

ANN RADNOR. I am a widow , and lodge in Crombie-street , on the first-floor. On the 22d of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise; I was in

my front room; I went out, and found the prisoner on the stairs - she said she had some work for a shoemaker, but had forgotten the name; I said there was no such person - she went down; I left my room soon after, went three doors off, and saw her walking about the door. I again said there was no such person there - and as I returned I met her at the foot of my stairs, with something under her handkerchief; I said, "What have you got here?" she said they were not mine; I found she had got all these articles. I sent for an officer.

BENJAMIN PARRETT . I am an officer, and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-162

1954. MARY ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on 2d of October , 1 watch, value 20l.; 1 watch-chain, value 10l.; 4 seals, value 10l.; 1 ring, value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 10s.; 1 other watch, value 7s.; 1 seal, value 8s.; 1 watch-key, value 4s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 12s.; 1 lancet-case and 5 lancets, value 1l.; 1 spy-glass, value 5s.; 1 penknife, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Thomas .

EDWARD THOMAS. I am a surgeon , and live in Leonard-square - I am married . On the 2d of October I went to the West-end of the town, and had to call at several public-houses, and got too much to drink; I do not know that I went into Blue Anchor-yard - I was with a friend about seven o'clock, and know my property was safe when I left the last public-house, which was near Covent-garden - I awoke about three o'clock next morning, and found myself alone in bed, at a house in Blue Anchor-yard, Whitechapel; I called the watchman, and missed all this property - here are two seals, a key, and a ring in Court, which are mine.

ROBERT CONSTANTINE . I am in the 1st Regiment of Guards - I do not know the prisoner (looking at his deposition) - this is not my hand-writing. (See page 739.)

DAVID LING . I am in the 1st Regiment of Guards, and know the prisoner - I have often seen her with Constantine - they were intimate. On the 4th of October the prisoner came to me, about twelve o'clock, and said she had bought two gold seals for Constantine - and said she had thrown them down to him when he was on sentry - she told me to tell him to put them on his watch, and wear them the next guard-day, that she might see them. Soon after that, Constantine sent me to her for some tobacco - she said, she dare not be seen out, for she had robbed a gentleman of a gold and silver watch; but after dark, she would go out and send him tobacco and money also; that the gentleman was drunk, and did not know what he was doing - I saw Constantine sign his examination.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I found Constantine with these seals, and from his information I took the prisoner; he said he got them from her.

DAVID LING. Constantine told me, half an hour ago, that he would deny knowing any thing about her, and wished me to do so also, that he and she might get over it; the prisoner told me the gentleman was a medical man, and wore spectacles - that she had robbed him of a pencil-case, a case of instruments, and various other articles.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had bought the seals.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-163

1955. CHARLES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 pair of boots, value 8s. , the goods of Robert Ames .

ROBERT AMES. I am a shoe-maker , and live in Coffee-house-walk, Hoxton . On the evening of the 22d of September, my man was at work on these boots - I missed them next morning.

JAMES ELLIS . I was at work for Ames on this night, and left the shop at a quarter-past twelve o'clock, and locked the door - I went there next morning, at half-past six, found the door open, and the boots gone.

GEORGE VALE . I stopped the prisoner with the boots, on the morning of the 25th of September, about a quarter-past five o'clock; I asked what he had got, he said Nothing; I had seen him and another at Ames' door - I turned down a passage, and watched them - I saw a person within the shop give the prisoner the boots - he put them into his apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw them at a door - I knocked, and nobody answered.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-164

1956. MARY ANN GAYFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 cornelian-stone, value 6d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d.; 1 cockade, value 1s.; 2 veils, value 3d.; 1 skirt of a gown, value 6d.; 1 piece of cambric, value 1s., and 1 playbill on silk, value 6d., the goods of John Hill , her master .

EMMA HILL . I am the wife of John Hill, we live in Plumber-street. City-road - the prisoner came into my service on the 13th of September, and on the 18th, I was fetched to Mrs. Langham's in the next street, and found this property - Miss Langham brought them to my house- she had recommended the prisoner to me.

CELENDA LANGHAM . I recommended the prisoner to Mrs. Hill. On the evening of the 18th of September, she brought a parcel to my house, and went into my bed-room where her box was, and soon after went out - I looked into her box, and found these things.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found a cockade and a cornelian-stone in her pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-165

1957. THOMAS RYCROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 necklace, value 8s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of John Renshaw , his master.

ISABELLA RENSHAW . I am the wife of John Renshaw; we keep the King's Head public-house, Albemarle-street ; the prisoner was our pot-boy four months - I missed this handkerchief and necklace; I had seen the handkerchief on the child's neck, half an hour before.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How old is your child? A. About fourteen years old - she had taken it off in the parlour, and put it on a chair.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am an officer. I was sent

for - I searched the prisoner, and found the handkerchief in his trousers pocket - he said he found it in the kitchen, and that the necklace was in his trunk; he gave me the key, and I found it - he said it was Renshaw's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know whose it was.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18261026-166

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1958. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 2 silver spoons, value 12s., the goods of John Payne Collyer , her master .

JOHN PAYNE COLLYER. I live in Hunter-street, Brunswick-square ; the prisoner was in my service three months - two spoons were missing on Saturday; I found her in custody on returning from the theatre at night - they were kept in the kitchen.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BENHAM TOMLINSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wilmot-street. On the 30th of September the prisoner pawned a desert-spoon, in the name of Mary Sullivan, Little Coram-street - I asked if it was hers - she said it was - the day before she was taken, I saw her at Mr. Collyer's door - she came with another spoon last Saturday, and said she lived at another place - I detained her.

JOHN HUNT . I am an officer. I apprehended her - she said she meant to redeem them in a few days.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-167

1959. SARAH SHEPHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 yard of linen, value 2s.; 11/2 yard of lawn, value 2s., and 1 yard of muslin, value 2s. , the goods of Stephen Keene , her master.

STEPHEN KEENE. I live in Tavistock-street, Covent-garden , and am a tailor - the prisoner was my servant . On the night of the 20th of September, I missed several articles, and requested she would give me my property - she denied having it - I got an officer, who found this property in her box - she bore a good character, and has expressed great contrition.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer. I found these articles in the prisoner's box - she gave me the key - she said the linen was her master's, but the other things were her own.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-168

1960. SARAH WOODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 3 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value 4s.; 1 towel, value 4d.; 1 pinafore, value 2d.; 1 pocket, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 8d.; 1 tea-tray, value 2s.; 1 ring, value 12s.; 1 umbrella, value 6s.; 2 waiters, value 4s., and 24 knives and forks, value 19s. , the goods of Ann Harlow .

ANN HARLOW. I am a widow , and live in Norton Falgate - I deal in jewellery - the prisoner was four months in my service. On the 26th of September, about five o'clock in the morning. I heard the bell ring, and somebody open the door - I got out of bed, and heard two persons coming up-stairs; I waited a little time, and saw the prisoner go into the garret - she went into the kitchen in a few minutes; I went in and saw a strange woman there - she said she had come to assist the girl to wash; she had a few things to wash - I desired the woman to leave the house directly; but I saw the tea-tray and some things tied up together - I went to let the woman out, but she could not find her bonnet - the prisoner fetched it from the garret - I then missed the tea-tray from where I had seen it, and found it in the coal-hole - I asked the prisoner what she meant to do with it; she said, to give it to that woman for helping her to wash - I called up Store; we searched her box, and found several of these things; and between her bed and the mattress, I found an umbrella of mine - the pocket she had on was mine, and had my handkerchief in it, with my gold ring hid in the corner of it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had she not a good character? A. Yes; she is in the family-way - I have heard that she is married.

RICHARD STORE . I am in Mrs. Harlow's service, and saw the property found.

THOMAS VAN . I apprehended her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-169

1961. MARY DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 watch, value 40s., and 1 seal, value 10s., the goods of John Lewis , from his person .

JOHN LEWIS. I am a tailor , and live in Silver-street, Bouverie-street; I met the prisoner in West-street, Saffron-hill , at eleven o'clock on the 14th of October; she asked me to go with her - I refused; she then snatched my watch from my fob - the chain broke, and I got a part of it; I saw her give it to a woman who stood close behind her - she went away; I seized the prisoner, and gave her in charge. I have not found the watch.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Were you sober? A. Yes; it was not very light - I am certain she snatched it - I had been with no woman that night.

GEORGE ROGERS . I am a watchman. Lewis gave the prisoner into my charge - he was sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there no other women about? A. Not near him.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am the beadle - I searched the prisoner, but found nothing on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the woman who did it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-170

1962. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 chain, value 20s.; 1 seal, value 6d., and 2 keys, value 7s., the goods of Joseph Taylor , from his person .

JOSEPH TAYLOR. I live in Seymour-street, Euston-square. On the 9th of October, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in the New-road ; Strong told

me I had lost my watch, I felt, and missed it - it was in my waistcoat pocket; I saw it half an hour afterwards.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SIMON STRONG . I am a carter. On the 9th of October I was in the New-road, and saw Mr. Taylor - I saw the prisoner with three more boys, who appeared to be knocking up a kind of fight - I kept at some distance, and saw them come up to Mr. Taylor - I thought they meant to push him into the mud; I then saw the prisoner take a watch and chain from Taylor's waistcoat-pocket, and put it into his own - I left my horses and ran over; the prisoner crossed the road down a street; I followed - he turned back at last and gave himself up; I brought him back - the watch was found in the street.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Do you mean to say this is the boy who seized the watch? A. Yes, positively he is the hand who took it - I did not see him throw it down; he ran two or three hundred yards, and seeing persons before him he gave himself up.

COURT. Q. Where did the robbery happen? A. At the further end of Euston-square.

SAMUEL ROBINSON . I was in the New-road, and heard this old gentleman had lost his watch - I saw some persons looking into the nursery, and I found this watch in a pool of water, on the Gower-street side of the nursery.

GEORGE WHITFIELD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

MR. ROBERTS called -

CHRISTIANA HALL . I live in Field-terrace, Bagnigewells. I was in the New-road, and saw some boys fighting; and, as I went on, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I thought it was the boys calling one after the other - three boys came one way, and one threw something out of his hand into the water; he was not so tall as the prisoner - I saw the prisoner.

COURT. Q. What was the prisoner doing at the time? A. He was running.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-171

1963. ROGER FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 3 seals, value 14s., the goods of Mary Harding , widow , privately in her shop .

MARY HARDING. I am a widow, and keep a jeweller's shop , in Holles-street, Cavendish-square . On the 19th of October, the prisoner and Jarman came into my shop, about four o'clock in the evening, and asked for one of my lodgers, who was called down - a tray of gold seals was on the counter, near to where he stood - he took up one and said, "This is a pretty seal, it is glass;" Jarman said, "No, it is a pebble;" the prisoner took up another - I did not move from my seat; they left soon after - and at eight o'clock, when I went to put away the seals, I missed three, if not more, one of which has a yellow stone; I had seen it in the prisoner's hand.

THOMAS JARMAN . I went with the prisoner, and when we came out he showed me three seals, which he said were his own; two were small, and appeared to be guinea-gold - one had a yellow stone, and was similar to what I saw in the tray; I did not then suppose he had stolen them. I heard of the robbery next day, and now believe it was her seal - I gave her information.

JOHN LACY . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I found on him a purse, which Jarman said he had the seals in - he said, "I had the seals from Mrs. Harding, but don't know what has become of them;" I found nothing on him.

BENJAMIN RALPH . I lodge at this house. Jarman called on me; I saw the prisoner with him in the shop; I told them to go to the Green Man public-house, and I would come to them - when I got there, I saw the prisoner take out three seals, saying they were very handsome; he put them into a leather purse, and left the room.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-172

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1964. GEORGE WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Amelius George Wilks Pearce , from his person .

AMELIUS GEORGE WILKS PEARCE. I am an officer in the Army . On the 16th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was crossing Frith-street - Bidgood came, and said I had lost my handkerchief; it was safe five minutes before - he had the prisoner in charge with it.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter. I was in Compton-street, and saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket; I secured him in the act of putting it up his waistcoat.

THOMAS GOOK . I received him in charge - he said he was in distress, and had ran away from his parents.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18261026-173

1965. WILLIAM STURDY was indicted for feloniously harbouring, assisting, and maintaining Catherine Parmenter and Sarah Jarvis , well-knowing them to have committed a felony , against the statute.

ALOYSIUS LAST . I prosecuted Catherine Parmenter and Sarah Jarvis here, last Session. I was returning from a cricket-ground, with my brother, one Thursday, and was met by those two women and two men (the prisoner was neither of them), in Lisson-grove-road, about eight o'clock in the evening; the women said, "How do you do?" I made no answer - the two men then came up, and struck me; I felt one of the women draw my watch from me, and saw Parmenter running off - I was nearly knocked down; they all ran away; I followed Parmenter to Lisson-street, where she spoke to two men, who went into a public-house, and fetched out the prisoner; this was a quarter of a mile from where I was robbed; he came out, seized me round the waist, and prevented me following Parmenter; some persons got me from him, and I ran after her again; he came after me, and struck me - I got from him, and followed her into George-street, where I lost sight of her - he struck me again in George-street. (See September Session, page 538.)

JAMES PROCTOR . On the 24th of August I heard a cry of Watch! I went, and saw the prisoner holding the prosecutor round the waist; some persons came up, and he let him go - the woman ran down Harrow-street; I saw

the prosecutor on the ground, and afterwards saw the prisoner give him several violent blows in George-street.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261026-174

1966. MARY BLY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Jones .

JOHN DOUGLAS SMART . I am foreman to Robert Jones, a boot-maker , of Whitechapel-road . The prisoner and her husband worked for us; she came to change a pair of soles - I left her in the shop about ten minutes, and when I came up, I received information - she was then gone; I pursued - the officer took her, and found these boots on her - she had no business with them.

THOMAS HALES . I am an officer, and took her into custody - she took me to Colchester-street, and pulled the boots out from under a gate.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-175

1967. WILLIAM BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 4 shillings, and 9 half-pence , the monies of John Brooksbank .

SUSANNAH STOKES . I live next door to Brooksbank, a butcher , of Drury-lane . On the 19th of September, about a quarter-past three o'clock in the afternoon. I saw the prisoner in his shop; no other person was there - I saw him close to the counter; he opened the till twice, and took money out - I cannot say how much - he put it into his pocket; he stopped in the shop, and I gave information - he just turned round from the till, but I do not think he saw me.

JOHN GREY . I am servant to John Brooksbank. I was outside pulling the sun-blind down. Stokes gave me information - I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner there - I had seen him pass the shop twice before - I asked what he wanted - he said a half bladder - I asked if he was looking into the till for one - he then began to cry - I took hold him, and found 4s. and nine half-pence on him - I missed 4s. from the till - only 6d. was left, and there had been some copper in it - I cannot say how much.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am an officer, and have the money.

Prisoner's Defence. Some boys desired me to go and ask for a bladder, and to take the money out of the till.

GUILTY. Aged 8.

Recommended to Mercy - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18261026-176

1968. MARY GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 watch, value 50s., and 1 seal, value 10s., the goods of John Gratten , from his person .

JOHN GRATTEN. I am a journeyman hatter , and live in Devonshire-street, Newington-causeway. On the 15th of October, about eleven o'clock, I was in the Commercial-road , going home - I had been out with a friend - I was accosted by two or three women - I was a little in liquor, and could not recognise any of them - they went away very abruptly - I then felt and missed my watch - I immediately found the watchman, and saw my watch again that night - the loss made me sober.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had only talked to them? A. They bugged me a little.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and gave up this watch; she said it was her husband's - I understand she bore a good character.

THOMAS TURNBULL . I am a watchman of Humberton-street, Commercial-road. I stopped the prisoner with the watch in her hand, about two hundred yards down the street; she was running; I asked how she came by the watch; she said she had none - I said, "I see it in your hand;" she then said she got it from a friend, and pointed to the Commercial-road; and in going along she said she took it from her husband, who was drunk in Spitalfields. I took her to the watch-house - I saw the prosecutor in the Commercial-road - he claimed it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-177

1969. WILLIAM KEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 ring, value 7s.; 1 pair of earrings, value 4s., and 1 half-sovereign , the property of Mary Burrows .

MARY BURROWS. I am single , and am housekeeper to Mr. Jackson; my sister is his servant. This property was in a work-box in a trunk in my bed-room; the prisoner lodged in the house for a fortnight; my door was not locked; my sister gave me information, and I went up and missed the property. I went with the patrol to the prisoner, who was in his bed-room, and told him of my loss; he said he knew nothing of them, but if I said he had taken them, he would make them good. I found the ring on his mantel-piece; the rest have not been found - they were all safe on the Thursday.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a patrol. I found the ring on the shelf.(Ring produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and went into her room by mistake, but took nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-178

1970. EDWARD LAW and JOHN NEWLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 live pig, price 20s. , the property of Joseph Tayler .

WILLIAM HENRY BAIN . I live in West-street, Globefields. Mr. Tayler lives in a crescent in Hackney-road . On the 28th of September, at a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was in my room, and saw the prisoners in West-street, which is half a mile from Tayler's; Law was in the road driving the pig with a whip; Newland was on the path talking to Law - the pig turned up Anne-street; Newland turned it back; they drove it to Devonshire-street; I went after them - Newland kept looking back, and I think saw me - he crossed over the way; Law turned the pig down Red-cow-lane, and towards Dogrow: Newland had then left him - Law turned it up Devonshire-street again, and there I saw Newland again; Newland turned down Northampton-street. I saw Crew, the officer, and told him - I took Law - Crew said, "Where is the man who was with you?" he said, "Down Northampton-street" - Crew went and took him - he said the

man had asked him to turn the pig back, but he knew nothing of him, and refused to go with us; Law said it belonged to B. Jackson, who worked at Box's, in Chicksand-street; Newland said if we would let him go, he would walk quietly, but he ran away; I followed, and took him to the watch-house - we could not find Jackson.

JAMES CREW . I am an officer. Bains said he suspected these men; I saw Law with a whip - he said he was going to Jackson's; I went and called Newland back, saying, "The man with the pig wants you;" he returned, and I said, "I have got you on suspicion of stealing a pig;" he said he would be d-d if he would go; I asked Law if he knew him - he made no reply - Newland ran away, but was secured.

SUSAN LEHUP . I saw the prisoners driving this pig in West-street; I asked Law if it was his; he said, "Is it your's, mistress?" I said, No.

ANN BECK . I saw the prisoners driving the pig in West-street, and asked if they were taking it to the greenyard; Newland said, No; I saw some grains in his hand.

THOMAS COOPER . I keep the green-yard. Crew brought me the pig; Mr. Tayler saw and claimed it.

JOSEPH TAYLER . I live in Phoenix-street, Hackney-road. I saw this pig in the Green-yard; it was taken from an open field, opposite my house, and was safe that morning about seven o'clock.

LAW's Defence. I was hired to drive it by a man, who said his name was Jackson, to Box's-yard; I asked Newland to turn it back, which he did.

NEWLAND's Defence. He called me to stop the pig from going down a street; I knew nothing of him.

LAW - GUILTY . Aged 20.

NEWLAND - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261026-179

1971. BENJAMIN FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 2 live pigs, price 3l. , the property of William Henry Bain .

WILLIAM HENRY BAIN. I lost a boar and sow from a field opposite my house, in West-street ; I turned them out there about three o'clock in the morning, and missed them at half-past three; they were found on the prisoner's brother's premises, behind the Lamb public-house, in Camden-gardens, Bethnal-green, about half-a-mile from my house.

JOHN GLAVES . I saw the two pigs in Helen's-place, behind the Blind Beggar public-house, on the 12th of September - the prisoner was driving them; he was alone, and said to me, "Drive them back;" he then drove them into the road again; I said, "Where did you get them?" he said he had bought them - I knew him before, and am certain of him; I saw the same two pigs again at Simpson's, and knew them to be the same.

JAMES HENRY SIMPSON . I am a baker. I lost two pigs, and in the evening found them with Bain's, at Camden-gardens; I drove them home.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he said he did not drive the pigs, but only threw a bit of dirt at them - he said he lived in Collingwood-street, but did not know the number and who kept the house; I went there, but could find no such person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and saw the pigs; I only threw a stone at them, and then went to work.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-180

1972. ELEANOR MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 umbrella, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Walter .

THOMAS WALTER. I am a pawnbroker , and live in High-holborn . The prisoner came to my shop on the 16th of October, and pawned an umbrella for 1s. - she went out - I missed a silk umbrella from the front of the shop; the officer brought it to me in the evening.

RUBEN RICE . I am an officer. I heard the prisoner was offering a silk umbrella for sale for 2s. - I went and found her in the street with this one, and found a duplicate on her, which led me to Walter's.

GEORGE COOPER . I am an officer. I found the prisoner offering this umbrella for sale.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found this by the door, as I came out.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-181

1973. MARY McMANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 gown, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Wood .

GEORGE TURNER . I am servant to Thomas Wood, pawnbroker , of High-street, Bloomsbury . On the 16th of October the prisoner came and looked at several gowns - she bought none, and directly she was gone a person gave me information; I went out, and found her in Hampshire-hogyard, with this gown in her apron.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner go into the yard, and saw Turner take the gown from her.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave it me to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18261026-182

1974. BRIDGET OVERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 2 table-cloths, value 14s., and 4 napkins, value 6s. , the goods of Hannah Triggs , widow .

HANNAH TRIGGS. I a widow, and live in Wellington-street , and am a laundress . On the 26th of September I employed the prisoner to work for me, but she did not come next day as I expected: I missed two table-cloths and four napkins, belonging to the London-tavern.

MOSES DAVIS . I am a salesman, and live in Gray's-inn-lane. I have four napkins and a table-cloth, which I bought of the prisoner - next morning I offered them for sale to a neighbour, who observed a mark upon them - I cannot read, but they told me what it was, and I gave them to an officer.

WILLIAM MOTE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Warner-street. On the 26th of September the prisoner pawned this table-cloth in the name of Brown.

RICHARD WAINWRIGHT . I received the property from Davis, made inquiry, and found the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and intended to return them - the prosecutrix has often pawned people's things and redeemed them.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-183

1975. JOSEPH PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 till, value 1s.; 48 penny-pieces, and 72 half-pence , the property of John Perkins .

JANE PERKINS . I am the wife of John Perkins, a Greenwich pensioner - we live in Little George-street, Bethnal-green , where I keep a chandler's-shop. On the 1st of July I left the shop for a short time - the till had a good deal of copper in it - I was in the back room about four minutes, and when I returned I missed the till - I received information, and a person brought back the till, but I have not found the money - the prisoner was afterwards taken - he lived in the neighbourhood, and had no business in my shop.

WILLIAM DIXON . I live in the next street to Perkins. On the 1st of July I was passing her house, and saw three boys looking through the window; I think the prisoner was one - I knew his father - I saw one of them go into the shop - I cannot say which - I went into a house to get a light, and heard an alarm, ran out, and saw the till laying in Blackbird-alley - I took it to the prosecutrix- the boys got away.

MARY HAYES . I live opposite to Perkins. On this morning I saw three boys at her window, and am sure the prisoner was one - I had known him six years - I saw him go into the shop with nothing in his hand, and come out with the till, and with a handkerchief - all three ran down Blackbird-alley - an alarm was given, and Dixon, who was lighting his candle in my room, ran out and got the till - the prisoner lived with his parents in Great George-street - I told the prosecutrix he was the boy.

THOMAS GOODING . I am an officer. I was stationed at Bethnal-green, and, in a brick-field, there are a parcel of boys resort at night; I went there and found the prisoner on a brick-kiln, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in that woman's house several times since - she was asked if it was me - she said, No.

MARY HAYES . He is never in my house - I never said so.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-184

1976. WILLIAM RUSSELL and WILLIAM KING were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 silver watch, value 5l.; 3 gold seals, value 6l., and 1 gold key, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Howard , from his person .

WILLIAM SMEE . I am a constable. On the 15th of September, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I was sent for by Mr. Carr, of Banner-street, to remove the prosecutor and a friend of his, who were rather refractory; Howard was perfectly sober, but his friend had been drinking; I got them into the street, but Howard's friend did not like to go to the watch-house, and was rather troublesome; as we were going down to the watch-house, in Bunhill-row, the prisoner Russell came suddenly in front of us - he put his head against the prosecutor, and drew something from his fob; he put both his hands behind him, as if to give it to some one; the prosecutor called out, "I am robbed of my watch;" I collared Russell, and took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. What! do you mean to say he drew the watch? A. I mean to say he drew something; the prosecutor was perfectly sensible, and had assisted me in taking his friend to the watch-house, who was a little refractory; I had never seen either of the prisoners before; I did not see the watch in Russell's hands - I had seen the seals hanging out before, and suspected he had taken the watch; the prosecutor's friend was close by, and he took the other prisoner - I am positive it was not the friend who put his head against the prosecutor - it was Russell. The watch was found on the ground, between the two prisoners.

GEORGE BENNETT . I live with a relation. I happened to be there, and saw the people at a distance from me - I had before that seen the two prisoners in company; I think they came out of the Rose and Crown public-house, but I did not see them come out. When I got up to this party I saw Nelson making some little altercation, about not wishing to go to the watch-house. The prosecutor said,"I have lost my watch" - I saw the watch being passed from Russell to King - it dropped between them, but which had hold of it I cannot say; it was in the act of being passed; King was in the act of receiving it, when he was seized by the collar by the prosecutor - they then scuffled across the road, and some people said, "Let him go - a baker has got your watch;" King them got away, and ran down Chequr-alley; I ran after him, and some other persons - he went into the Salmon and Ball public-house, into the privy, and shut the door; the prosecutor's friend came up, forced open the door, and found him behind it; there was an old woman in the privy.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say the prosecutor laid hold of King? A. Yes; Smee was then gone with Russell to the watch-house; I did not see the watch in Russell's hand, but I saw it passing - it was quite daylight.

CHARLES FRANKLIN . I am a labourer. I saw the prosecutor and his friend with Smee; I saw Russell put his hand behind him, to drop the watch. I did not see King till the prosecutor had hold of him; the people who were round said he had nothing to do with it - he got away from the prosecutor, and ran down Chequer-alley; I was one who followed him.

HENRY PINDARD . I was in Bunhill-row, and saw Russell put his hands behind him, and drop the watch - King put his hand out to receive it, but it dropped.

THOMAS HOWARD . I am a gentleman. Myself and Mr. Nelson were at this public-house, and he was rather out of humour; the officer was sent for, who took us into the street; I was perfectly sober, and had my watch. - When we got into Bunhill-row I felt my watch taken from me; somebody put his head into my breast, but I cannot say who, and my hands were held up. I collared King, but by the persuasion of the mob I let him go - he was pursued, and retaken; I called out that I had lost my watch - it was found in the possession of a baker.

Crossexamined. Q. Then they did not rob you? A. No - the constable had hold of Russell.

JOSEPH NELSON . I was rather out of humour, being a little in liquor. I heard Mr. Howard say he had lost his watch; I saw King run away; I pursued, and found him in a privy; I had lost sight of him, because I fell down in running.

THOMAS GOOD . I am a baker, and live with Mr. Fisher, in Bunhill-row. I was at tea, and went out, hearing this noise - I saw a crowd, and heard a gentleman say, "I have lost my watch." I saw Russell drop the watch; I took it up, and gave it to the officer at the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RUSSELL'S Defence. I was attracted by the crowd, and immediately I got up Smee laid hold of me, saying I had taken something from Mr. Howard's pocket, but I am innocent.

KING'S Defence. I was going up Bunhill-row, and had occasion to go to the privy; some persons came and took me; I was going in another direction, and met the other prisoner, but I did not know him.

RUSSELL - GUILTY . Aged 36.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18261026-185

1977. PATRICK HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 2 mattocks, value 2s.; 1 spade, value 1s.; 1 shovel, value 1s.; 2 hoes, value 1s.; 2 hooks, value 2s.: 1 rake, value 1s.; 2 pecks of potatoes, value 1s.; a pair of trousers, value 6d.; 4 cloths, value 4d., and 10 baskets, value 12s. , the goods of Charles Brignell .

CHARLES BRIGNELL. I am a gardener , and live in Well-street, Hackney - I have a shed there, which was broken open on the 8th of October, and these tools taken, which were safe the night before - the watchman called me up at half-past five o'clock - I found him in the shed with the prisoner, who had my trousers on - my tools were found on the next premises.

WILLIAM COWLING . I received the prisoner in charge at six o'clock, and at eight, I found the tools removed.

RICHARD PATEY . I am a watchman. About half-past five o'clock, I saw a lot of tools laying in the next premises to this shed - the prisoner was in the shed with the trousers on, two cloths under his arm, and two in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18261026-186

1978. SOPHIA RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of John Elliott .

JAMES CROCKWELL . I am a constable. On the 19th of September, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner running from a cry of Stop thief! I took her, and found this handkerchief under her arm.

NATHANIEL BENJAMIN JUDGE . I live with Mr. John Elliott, a pawnbroker , of Kingsland-road . I had seen this handkerchief at our door, a quarter of an hour before - I was not at home when it was taken.

JOHN PROBETS . I live with Mr. Elliott. I heard a snatch at the door, and ran out - the prisoner was pointed out to me, and Crockwell stopped I e: - I went back and missed the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had found the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18261026-187

1979. CHARLES ROBINSON and GEORGE PEARSON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 2 shirts, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Francis .

ELIZABETH FRANCIS . I am a laundress, and live at Islington. On the 20th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, these shirts were stolen off a horse in my parlour - the window was open - I had seen them safe ten minutes before - my house is open to a field - I found them at Hatton-garden, with the prisoners in custody - my husband's name is Henry.

ROBERT OLDFIELD . I live at Islington, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutrix. I saw the prisoners make an attempt at my grandfather's house - I followed them, and informed an officer, who took Robinson - I and a friend pursued, and took Pearson - I had seen them about the premises the day before - two came the first morning, the prisoners and another the next.

MARK WELCH . I am a milkman, and live in White-conduit-terrace. I was passing Oldfield's grandfather's premises, and saw him and his uncle watching the prisoners - I went on, and saw the prisoners standing by Titterton-terrace; I saw a person come from the front of the terrace, and speak to them - I ran for Keys, the officer: and as I returned, saw Robinson running towards me with something - Keys took him - I and Oldfield took Pearson - this was about eight o'clock in the morning.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I was called, and saw Robinson running with something in his bat - he jumped over a ditch, and I after him; he threw the shirts down; I tookthem up, and secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBINSON'S Defence. I found the bundle by the bricks, and took it up.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

PEARSON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-188

1989. SARAH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 1 canvas bag, value 1d.; 3 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 4 half-crowns, 1 bill of exchange for payment of and value of 100l.; I do. for payment of and value 50l.; and two 10l. Bank notes, the property of Samuel Eaton , from his person .

SAMUEL EATON. I am a butcher , and live at Uxbridge. On the 23d of September, about eight o'clock in the evening. I was in High-street, Uxbridge , going home - I had drank some ale, but was sober - I had a bag containing this property, in my left-hand breeches pocket - I had my hand in my pocket when I met the prisoner, who took hold of my arm, and asked me to walk with her - I refused - she asked for gin, which I refused - she then slipped away across the road - I put my hand into my pocket, and immediately said, "You have robbed me;" she was alone - she had been close to me; she turned into some place on the other side, and I missed

her - I went home, and informed Mr. Wild, who keeps the Cock and Bottle public-house - she was taken on the Monday night following, at High Wycomb - I did not know her before - I have found none of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was one Ellen Donovan taken on this charge? A. Yes, and discharged, and a man named Rosin - she was no acquaintance of mine - it was not dark, it was about eight o'clock - I did not feel her hand in my pocket - I had been to three public-houses, and had a glass of ale at each - I was quite sober; the prisoner got into a gateway, and shut the door - I could not open it; I was not two minutes with her.

COURT. Q. The other persons were not taken by your direction? A. No - I inquired all I could to find her - Wild said, I had better be quiet about it.

JOHN TARRANT . I am a constable of Uxbridge - Eaton informed me on Monday, that he had been robbed on Saturday night, and described the prisoner - I knew her, and could not find her - I found her at High-Wycomb fair, in company with Donovan and Rosin - Eaton accused nobody but the prisoner; he told me two women had been in his company, one shortly before the other - Donovan is not like the prisoner; I took her from his description - one could not be mistaken for the other - I found seven sovereigns, and 17s. 6d. on the man; the women left word at a stall that Jem would finde them at the Red-lion public-house, and he came there to them.

Cross-examined. Q. Who is Jem? A. Rosin; I believe he travels with turnery - I have found none of the property; he described two women to me, and I thought Donovan was like one of them.

COURT. Q. Did he say which of the women robbed him? A. No; he said, a woman came up, and in a few minutes another joined him - he did not say which he suspected, nor that he felt his money safe after the thin one left him - he said when the last one left he missed his purse.

COURT to S. EATON. Q. Did you meet two women? A. Yes; I met one three hundred yards before the prisoner, she only spoke and passed on; she was a thin tall woman - I had my hand in my pocket when the prisoner came up - I told the officer where I was robbed.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you tell him who robbed you? A. I said the second person who met me.

MARY ANN GOLDING . I live at Uxbridge; I was at the Red-lion public-house, on Sunday morning, in church time - I saw Eaton come in with the watchman - he said, he had been robbed of some sovereigns and notes last night - I went into the kitchen and told the persons there, a man had been robbed last night of sovereigns and notes; there were several travellers there - Ellen Donovan, Rosin, and the prisoner were there - Donovan turned very white, and went into the back parlour, staid some time, and then came back - they dined, and then went away - Eaton did not go into the kitchen.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner show any indication of guilt? A. No - Donovan looked frightened - the prisoner heard what I said.

SAMUEL EATON . I am sure she is the person, and that my money was safe when she accosted me; when she caught hold of my arm, I drew it out of my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I never saw him before - Donovan said, she took money, and that I was innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-189

1981. JAMES VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 pair of breeches, value 14s.; 1 shawl, value 15s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 and cap, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 basket, value 6d.; 1 half-crown, and fourpence, in copper monies , the property of Bartholomew Crawley .

HANNAH CRAWLEY . I am the wife of Bartholomew Crawley; we live in Carey-street - the prisoner lodged in the same room, from the Sunday night till Thursday, the 21st of September - this property was locked up in a box in the room - I had the key tied to my side; I went to market on the Thursday morning, and the prisoner took care of the room - I came home at twelve o'clock, he was then gone, and never returned - I went to my box and found it locked as I had left it, but all that had been in it was gone - he was taken up in about three weeks.

THOMAS PEAKE . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 1, Union-court, Catherine-wheel-alley, Whitechapel, one Sunday morning; I found him in the room; this basket and this silk-handkerchief were there - he said they were his property; he first said, he had had this handkerchief some time, and then said, he had bought it of a man in the street.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I am a Bow-street patrol. I went to take the prisoner - on searching him, I found this handkerchief in the inside of his neck-handkerchief.(Handkerchief and Basket sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me that basket in exchange for another - I bought the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-190

1982. JOHN ANTHONY WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 saw, value 2s. 6d., and 1 plane, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Pullen .

JOHN PULLEN. I am a carpenter . On the 3d of October, in the evening, I left these tools safe at an unfurnished house in East-lane, Hoxton - next morning I found a ladder against the window, and the tools gone.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. On the 4th of October, I went to the prisoner's house with a summons; he went to the privy - I thought he was there a long time - I took a light, and found the saw down the privy, and the plane in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the saw - I bought the plane in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18261026-191

1983. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 watch, value 30s.; eight silver spoons, value 18s., and 1 shawl, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Christian , her master.

REBECCA CHRISTIAN . I am the wife of Charles Christian; we live in Sun-yard, Lower East Smithfield . The prisoner was my servant . On the 20th of September, I

went out, and left her mangling; I returned in twenty minutes, and she was out, and never returned; she had come to me on the 10th of August, and had not asked my leave to go away. I then missed a watch, eight spoons, and a shawl; when she was taken, she had the shawl I on.

CHARLES CHRISTIAN. When my wife came home, she inquired for the servant: I thought she was up-stairs, but she was gone. Next day I found the watch and spoons in pawn.

RICHARD ROPER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel. I have a watch pawned on the 20th of September, in the name of Theodocia Brown; I believe the prisoner to be the person.

WILLIAM JOHN LONGER . I live with Mr. Williams, pawnbroker, Spitalfields. I have four tea-spoons pawned by the prisoner on the 21st of September.

THOMAS ORORN . I am an officer, and received her in charge; she had this shawl on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-192

1984. FRANCES PATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 5 yards of lace, value 12s.; 5 yards of ribbon, value 2s.; 1 piece of baize, value 2s.; 1 frill, value 1s. 6d., and 1 book, value 6d., the goods of Thomas William Corbett , her master .

MARY ANNE CORBETT . I am the wife of Thomas William Corbett; we live in John-street, Fitzroy-square . The prisoner was in my service, and left on the 19th of October - we had given each other warning. The night before she went away, the person she went to lodge with came to know if she was coming that night; that person left her umbrella, and took mine: I did not know where to go for it, till I met the prisoner in a day or two in Charlotte-street, and said to her, "You are the person I want to see" - she fell back, and said, "What for?" I said, "About the umbrella;" she said, "Oh, is that all?" I said, Yes, and desired it might be sent to me; she said,"Very well." I had missed the lace the day after she left - all the property had been locked up.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I found this lace and a piece of baize in the prisoner's box, when I took her, about a fortnight ago - she was lodging with two or three women; I found her in bed, and told her what I came for; she denied all knowledge of the things - the mistress of the house brought down the keys, I opened the box which the prisoner said was hers, and found the property.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I was with Read, and found a frill in another box.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know I had them, as I had not opened my trunk - the book was not locked up.

MRS. CORBETT. She always kept her trunk locked. I went out one day, and when I returned I found a drawer unlocked, and suppose I forgot to lock it - I had no other servant, or anybody who could hyave put them into her box - a skeleton-key was found on her.

WILLIAM READ. I found this skeleton-key on her; it would open any common lock.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-193

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1985. EDWARD BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 sovereign, the money of George Fleming , from his person .

GEORGE FLEMING. I am a sailor . I did not know the prisoner till the 12th of October, when I met him in the Commercial-road, as I was going to Stanley-street - as I returned, I saw him again; he showed me a watchchain, and asked me to buy it - I said I had no money. and asked him to let me see it; he showed me the seals and ring: I went along towards the Docks, and went on board for about half an hour - I then came ashore, and he was by the Dock-gate; he walked with me half-way up the road, and kept asking me to buy it - I said I would not, unless he went into a goldsmith's shop, that I might know the value; he refused, and said I should get him into trouble; I said if he would go to my captain, I would buy it - he would not: he then said it was worth 20l.; I said I would not buy it; he then asked if I would buy a a watch; I said, "Where is it?" he said, "Come round the corner," and then said, "Have you any money?" I pulled out a sovereign, and said, "Here is my money, where is your watch?" he snatched the sovereign from me, threw the chain at me, and ran off - I followed him, but two women who were there stopped me; I got from them, and White stopped the prisoner without my losing sight of him - he then said, "Here is your sovereign; say no more about it" - White would not let me do so.

Prisoner. Q. What time was it? A. About two o'clock- I gave him the sovereign about four; I saw no watch - I had money, although I said I had none - I said nothing about my mate - I did not tell him to wait for me - the chain and seals are only gilt - I did not ask a gentleman if they were gold - he would follow me - I could not get rid of him.

ROBERT JAMES WHITE . I was in East-street, Commercial-road. I had seen the prisoner talking with the prosecutor at the end of the street - they then walked up the street, and I saw two women following them; I was standing near the top - the prisoner and prosecutor turned back, stopped about the middle of the street, and talked - the prisoner then ran up the street, and two women took hold of the prosecutor; I ran, and secured the prisoner till the prosecutor came up - he then said, "Here is the sovereign, take it, and settle it;" I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me before? A. No - I suspected you by the girls who were with you; I was about ten yards off - I did not see you receive the sovereign - I saw it when I took you.

JOHN LEMING . I am an officer. I received him in charge, and found a sovereign on one of the women - the prosecutor said if the prisoner would give him the sovereign, he would let him go; I searched the prisoner, and found no sovereign on him.

GEORGE FLEMING . I saw him pass the sovereign to one of the women as we went along - she was one of the women who had stopped me; I saw it found on another woman, but not the one he had passed it to.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear to the sovereign? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. Gentlemen, can you believe such a man - he says he can swear to the sovereign - if I had robbed him, would I have given him the goods - the truth

is, I had just come from Bristol; I met a man, who sold me these things for 18s., and, having no money, I sold them to this man.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-194

1986. WILLIAM COTMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 seal, value 2s., and 1 watch-key, value 1s. the goods of Thomas Molloy , from his person .

THOMAS MOLLOY. I am a pilot , and live in the trinityalm's-houses, Mile-end. On the 31st of August, about the middle of the day, I was walking behind Bonner's houses, Bethnal-green , being ill; two men suddenly rushed upon me, one on each side - the one on the right snatched at my watch - the ribbon broke, and he got the seal and key; I do not know them - they were gone in an instant - I have not found the property.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you ever said that five or six persons were near you? A. I only saw these two - they came as if from a corner - it happened in a field.

JAMES PURSER . I was in Bonner's-fields, between eleven and twelve o'clock that morning - I saw the prisoner there, and five others, crossing the field on the north of Bethnalgreen; I saw them changing their clothes - the prisoner and two others ran round a building to meet the prosecutor, who was walking there; I met an officer, and told him - he went home and got his staff; I had seen the prisoner before - he is a tripe-man, and lives in Brick-lane - after he had committed the robbery (as I suppose) I saw them all run to the brick-kiln.

GEORGE HALL . I was at the Greyhound, Bethal-green, on the 31st of August; I saw the prisoner, and watched him across the fields; I saw him and three others pull off their clothes, and change them; I then saw them go round the house, as if to meet the prosecutor; I followed, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw them all run to the back of a brick-kiln, and there they exchanged clothes again - one man pulled off a pepper and salt jacket, and gave it to the prisoner; the prosecutor was not two minutes out of my sight.

Cross-examined. Q. How long after they passed the Greybound did you see them change their clothes? A. It might be ten minutes; I am sure of the prisoner; I have known him some time.

RICHARD COLLEY . I saw the prosecutor in the field, as I was going out of my yard; I saw three men following me - when I got farther, I saw them before me - one of them had a pepper and salt dress; I cannot say that was the prisoner, but I saw that man make a push at the prosecutor's fob, and then heard a cry of Stop thief!

Cross-examined. Q. You saw a man in a grey jacket make a push? A. Yes - the prosecutor is near-sighted, and had a shade on his eye; I saw nobody in a blue or green jacket.

COURT. Q. How far were the other two from the man who made the attack? A. Only a few yards - they ran by me together; I saw them together afterwards - one said to the other, "Come along, come along;" I do not know them.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-195

1987. MARY ANN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 1l.; 2 seals, value 20s., and 2 keys, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Gowland , from his person .

THOMAS GOWLAND. I am master of a ship . On the 22d of September I met the prisoner between twelve and one o'clock at night - I treated her at a public-house, and when we came out she snatched out my watch - I called Stop thief! the watchman ran, took her, and found the watch on her - one of the seals are gone.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you go home with me? A. No - I did not give her the watch to keep till next day; I gave her no money.

THOMAS BOYCE . I am a watchman. On the 22d of September I saw the prisoner running; I came up, and asked why she ran; she said she wanted to get into the highway; Gowland was with another watchman - he said he was robbed; I pursued, and took the prisoner in King David-lane, with the watch in her bosom. Gowland had been drinking, but was sober; the prisoner said he gave her the watch - he decied it.

THOMAS DEVERELL . I was constable of the night. - The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - she said Gowland gave her the watch in a house where they had been - he was not quite sober - he had only a shilling about him.

THOMAS GOWLAND . I suppose it was in a public-house that I treated her, but I do not know. I think I gave it her at the bar, but I do not recollect; I cannot say whether any other person was there. We were not alone in a room; I did not go to her apartment.

Prisoner's Defence. He was in my room, and gave me the watch.

ELIZABETH BURTON . I live at No. 41, Philip-street, St. George's. Between twelve and one o'clock the prosecutor brought the prisoner home to a house I lodge in - I am sure of it; she called me down, and he gave me a shilling to fetch liquor; I fetched some rum, and brought 7d. back; the prisoner said he had asked her to go on board ship with him - I persuaded her not, but she said she should: I went to bed, and shut her door; in about half an hour she called me, and said she was going - I heard no more.

SARAH ROUTLEDGE . I keep this house. I heard the prisoner come in with somebody, but did not see them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-196

1988. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 2 shirts, value 10s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 night-cap, value 6d.; 1 bed-gown, value 3d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 3d.; 1 cravat, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of Ann Dales , widow , from her person .

ANN DALES. I am a widow, and live in Thomas-street, Brick-lane. On the 18th of October I was in Brick-lane , with these articles in a bundle; I went into the Crown public-house, and got a glass of gin - I came out again, and in a minute I was knocked down by a blow on the head, from a woman, and my bundle taken from me; I screamed out "I am robbed," and begged them to return it, as they did not belong to me. I received it from

two men in lest than two minutes. The prisoner is quite a stranger.

THOMAS FOWLES . On the evening of the 18th of October I was at the corner of Slater-street, Brick-lane, and saw the prosecutrix with her bonnet torn, and a mob round her; she then had the bundle in her hand; the prisoner was there, and said she was her aunt; I brought her to the light, and the prosecutrix said she was no relation.

ROBERT GARRATT . I was at the corner of Slater-street, saw a mob, and went up - the prosecutrix said,"For God's sake, give me the things - I am robbed;" the prisoner was there, and kept calling her aunt and mother - the prisoner then had the bundle, and was going away; I snatched it from her, and gave it to the prosecutrix.

FREDERICK OSMAN PRESTED . I saw this disturbance. I saw the prisoner and the prosecutrix just after they came out of the public-house - the prisoner then had the bundle, and said, "Come along aunt;" she seemed to be going on; the bundle was taken from her - she then flew at the prosecutrix, and tore her bonnet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the public-house - we came out together, and get into a few words; I was rather intoxicated, and she said I had robbed her.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-197

1989. ELIZABETH THORNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 2 keys, value 1s.; 1 crown-piece, 11 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Charles Boyle , from his person .

CHARLES BOYLE. I live in Paddington-street. On the 18th of October I met the prisoner, and went to a house with her; she took my watch out of my pocket; I missed it soon after, and made her give it back - I then put it into my pocket, and when I went to bed I put it under my pillow, in my pocket - it had two keys and a seal to it - I had 16s. 6d. in my pocket; there were two other women in the room; I was awoke in the morning, by her pulling my trousers from under my head - she handed something out of the pocket to another girl, but I did not see what; the other girl ran down stairs - she was dressed, but the prisoner was not; I took hold of my trousers, and missed the watch and money; I heard it rattle in her hand - I am sure I had it when I went there - I was not very sober.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I live near the prisoner; Boyle called and said he had been robbed - I went and searched the prisoner, but found nothing; there was another woman in the room, but I cannot find the woman who had the money.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman who took the money I do not know - I never had his trousers in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-198

1990. MARIA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 ring, value 3s., the goods of Jane Woolf , from her person .

JANE WOOLF. I lived in Satchwell's-rents, Bethnalgreen. On the 17th of September I was going through Chequer-alley with Pitt and met the prisoner and another woman - they first began knocking Pitt about - they knocked him down - the prisoner then came, and struck me - took the ring off my finger, and twisted my arm - I I told her I would not go without the ring - she went away, and denied having it.

WILLIAM PITT . I was with Woolf in Chequer-alley. The prisoner stopped me, and struck me - I did not see her do any thing to Woolf; but after she abused me, and I got away - Woolf said she had lost a berring, and would not go without it.

JOHN McDONALD . I came up, and found Pitt all in a gore of blood - I saw the prisoner with Woolf - the prisoner said she would charge her nothing to go up to her room - I had seen her take the ring from Woolf, and I took hold of her - she denied having it - I found it in her hand, and gave it to Brown.

JOHN BROWN . I am the watch-house-keeper. I have the ring.

JAMES FORDHAM . I saw a riot in Chequer-alley - went up, and saw the prisoner fighting with two other women - I went with an officer, and dispersed the mob - when I returned, my brother-officer said the woman had lost her ring, and I took her.

THOMAS HARRISON . I took the prisoner to the watch-house - she said if she had not been drunk, there was plenty of time to have got away - the prosecutrix and Pitt had been drinking - I found the prisoner in a house, and was obliged to force the door to get her.

Prisoner's Defence. Pitt was ill-using Woolf - I went to assist her, and the ring came off; I wished to have given it her; but McDonald came and took it from me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-199

1991. MARY ANN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 crown-piece, 3 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Jacob Evanson , from his person .

JACOB EYANSON. I am a sailor , and work in the West India-docks. On Sunday morning, the 24th of September, at four o'clock, I was going home, met the prisoner, and went with her to a house in Wentworth-street - I took out a green flannel purse from my trousers, with 16s. in it, and gave her one - I never saw her before: I returned my purse to my right-hand trousers pocket; I found she was rubbing me down: I told her to be quiet; she turned round, and gave three knocks at the door; another young woman came up, and asked me to pay for the room; I said I had paid for it; the prisoner then absconded; I felt my pocket, and said I was robbed; I went down, found two watchmen, and told them I was robbed; one of them searched the house, but could not find her; I was sober; the money was found on her at the watch-house soon after; but I had no marks on it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you married? A. Yes: I have three children; my wife was in the country; the prisoner left me about half-past four o'clock, and was taken before five - I was about ten minutes with her - I knew her face - there was a candle in the room; I never said I thought her to be the girl; I had a pint of beer with her mother at a public-house, by Hicks's-hall; and she paid for it.

WILLIAM HEATH . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. I heard a cry of Watch! before five o'clock on this morning, and saw the prosecutor, who said he had been robbed by

a woman in black, of one crown, three half-crowns, a sixpence, and two shillings; I waited while another watchman went into the house, but could not find her; we found the prisoner in Osborne-street - the prosecutor said she was the woman; she said she never saw him in her life; I asked what money she had; she said she did not know; I then searched her, and found three half-crowns, a sixpence, six shillings, and 1s. 3d. in copper; but no green bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there any crown-pieces? A. No; 15d. was in copper; he only described her as a woman in black.

SAMUEL SMITH . I keep the Two Brewers public-house - the prisoner came there on this morning; one or two men were there, but not the prosecutor; they had two glasses of liquor, which came to 8d.; the prisoner gave me a crown-piece; I gave her in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give her 15d. in copper? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-200

1992. HARRIET DOREE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Lester , from his person .

JOHN LESTER. I am a sailor , and live in Ratcliff-highway. On the 15th of October I was in a public-house drinking with some shipmates, and missed my handkerchief off my neck, and found an old one in the room of it; I took the prisoner in the house, suspecting her, and the officer found it on her - I had said nothing to her; I was intoxicated.

THOMAS OBORN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, about four o'clock in the afternoon; the prosecutor charged her with taking the handkerchief off his neck: I asked her where it was; she pulled out an old one, and said she had no other; when I said I would search her, she gave me another from her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. He was in liquor, and gave it me to pawn, as he had no money; I lent him the old one.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-201

1993. ELIZA WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 gown, value 1s. 6d., and 2 yards of cotton, value 18d. , the goods of Robert Dowzall .

LOUISA DOWZALL . I am the wife of Robert Dowzall; we lodge in Queen-street, Seven Dials, the prisoner is a stranger. I saw her going out of my room, on the 18th of October - I followed, and caught her a few yards off with my gown, and this cotton, under my arm; I asked how she came to take them; she said she had not been there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS FOXHALL . I am an officer. I took charge of her.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-202

1994. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 3 sheets, value 13s.; 1 towel, value 1s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. , the goods of James Hall .

JAMES HALL. I keep the King's Head public-house, at Hampstead . On the 5th of October the prisoner hired a bed, and paid me at the bar - he left next morning at a quarter to seven o'clock - my wife sent the girl up-stairs, and the sheets and other property were gone.

ELIZABETH DENNIS . I am in the prosecutor's service. The prisoner slept in a double-bedded room; I heard him go down-stairs next morning, and saw him go out; I thought he looked rather bulky; I ran up-stairs, and missed two sheets off the other bed - not the one he slept in, and two handkerchiefs; he had broken open the door of an opposite room, and taken a towel.

JOHN BUSTIN . I received the prisoner in charge, in the house, on the morning of the 5th of October - I asked what he had got about him; I found two sheets in his small clothes, with the towel and handkerchiefs; I said,"Is that all?" he took off his hat, and said, "There is another sheet;" I took him to the watch-house, and found these chisels and a phosphorus box in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-203

1995. ABRAHAM SPRADBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of William Houseman .

WILLIAM HOUSEMAN. On the 20th of September this coat was in my chaise-cart, in Union-street, Spitalfields ; I was away from it half-an-hour, and on returning missed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS NEWMAN . I am a scale-maker, and live in Spital-fields; I saw the prisoner go up to this cart, take hold of the coat, and run off; I called Stop thief! - he threw it down - an officer took it up - another officer took - I am sure he is the man.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I heard a cry, saw the coat thrown down, and took it up.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner; I did not see the coat thrown down - he was running very fast, came against me with violence, and fell down.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards Bishopsgate - I was running at the head of some people, and was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-204

1996. WILLIAM RIPPIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 4 carpenter's planes, value 14s., the goods of George Ewins , and 1 plane, value 3s. , the goods of John Davis .

GEORGE EWINS. I am a carpenter , and work for John Davis. On the 26th of September I was working with him in John's-place; I left these tools safe on the night of the 25th, behind some oak sills in a corner, and in the morning they were gone; I had seen the prisoner about the buildings about a week before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BUCK . I am a constable. On the morning of the 26th of September I was in Bethual green-road, and saw the prisoner with another personer sitting on a bank

facing the Dundee Arms public-house - the prisoner had four planes in an apron, and the other had one; I asked the prisoner who they belonged to - he said to himself, and he was going to pawn them, and was waiting for the pawnbroker's shop to he open; I took him to Worship-street; he was detained for a week, and the owner not being found, was liberated; I afterwards found the prosecutors.

PHILIP PARISH . I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say they were mine, but that a young man gave me them to mind.

JAMES BUCK re-examined. He said that at the watch-house; but at first he said they were his, and it was hard to take a man for his own property.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18261026-205

1997. MARIA COUTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 carpet, value 13s.; 1 pair of boots, value 10s., and 3 bed valances, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Eyland .

SAMUEL EYLAND. I am a shoemaker , and live in Hanway-yard . I heard a cry of Stop thief! about three o'clock, on the 29th of September - I ran out, and saw my servant picking up these articles, which are mine; I went with her to the bottom of the street, and took the prisoner, whom she pointed out.

JEMIMA WARD . I am Mr. Eyland's servant. I was coming out of the room, and saw the prisoner coming down-stairs with a bundle - she was a stranger; I followed, calling Stop thief! - she dropped it about ten yards off; I took it up - it contained these articles, which are master's; I am certain of her person.

JOHN WOODWARD . I took her in charge.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-206

1998. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 1 blanket, value 4s. , the goods of Ann Tarlizzic , widow .

ANN TARLIZZIC. I am a widow, and live in Golden-lane . The prisoner is a stranger; on the 3d of October I found this blanket on the landing-place - she had been up-stairs, and taken it from a room, which was not occupied.

ROBERT TIPPETT . I am the prosecutrix's grandson; I saw the prisoner sitting on the landing-place, on this blanket; she asked me for some person whom I did not know: I made no answer, and went into a back-room, and shortly after she asked how long the person who lodged in the front room would be; I said, "I could not tell;" she shut the door - I heard her go down soon after; I looked after her, and saw this blanket fall from her on the landing-place; I asked her what business she had to take it - she said she had not taken it, that she kicked it on the stairs, but I had seen her sitting on it; an officer was fetched, and took her.

SARAH GABLE . I lodge in the house; I heard a noise, opened the door, and Tippett said, "This woman has taken a blanket."

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in any room - I went on an errand to a man's wife there; it laid on the bannisters and as I turned round, it fell down.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-207

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1998. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 watch-key, value 4s.; 2 seals, value 6d.; 3 sovereigns; 1 half-crown; 14 shillings; and 1s. sixpence, the property of William Mann; 1 watch, value 1l.; 2 seals, value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 4s., and 1 watch-chain, value 6d. , the goods of Richard Bowden .

RICHARD BOWDEN. I am an officer of the Customs . I was on board the Atalanta on the 12th of October; she was lying off Irongate, St. Catherine's , near the Tower - I was awoke by a person taking my watch from off a locker, near to where I was lying - I had put it there the night before - I got out of bed, and saw a person going up the companion-ladder - I followed, saw him go to the adjoining vessel, and called Stop thief! I did not overtake him, but when I got to that vessel, I found my watch in one place and the case in another, on the deck - I saw the prisoner in about a minute in custody.

WILLIAM MANN . I am master of the Atalanta. Bowden slept on board that night - I heard an alarm, and saw him find his watch and case - I also missed a watch, three sovereigns, and some silver, from the state-room; I went and found the prisoner in a boat alone in about five minutes, and charged him with it - he denied having been on board, but said, he was smuggling two bottles of gin, and was pursued by the police; that he belonged to a vessel in the tier above; he was without a hat - a person brought it to him, and he owned it - as I was going down into the boat where he was, somebody said, "Captain, he has hove your watch overboard;" he said the man was a liar.

JOSEPH HARDING . On the morning of the 12 of October, I took the prisoner in this boat, about four vessels from the Atalanta - he said he went there to sleep, and that he had been let out of prison the night before - I found 1s. 4d. on him.

THOMAS HAMMOND . I am a Custom-house officer, and was on board the next vessel to the Atalanta - I heard an alarm, went on deck, and saw Bowden pick up his watch; I saw a person getting into the next vessel and followed him four or five vessels off into a boat - some men in the sixth vessel called out, "He is in a boat" - I got down and callared him; it was the prisoner - he put his hand into his pocket and took out something - then put his hand into the water and dropped it - I cannot tell what it was - he said he was pursued by two officers, as he had had two bottles of gin, and lost his hat in the scuffle - I said that was a lame story, and it was likely he had taken the watch - he said I was a d - d liar - I then went and found his hat near the companion door of the Atalanta - I brought it to him, put it on, and it fitted him very well; I said, "I have brought your hat;" he said, "Oh! have you;" I believe

him to be the man whom I saw crossing the ships - it was between two and three o'clock in the morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A countryman promised me two bottles of gin - I went on board to get it - I was pursued by an officer, and escaped across the tier, and in a quarter of an hour, they came and said I had robbed them - my hat had fallen into the water.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18261026-208

1999. JAMES BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , 12lbs. of candles, value 6s., the goods of Thomas Birke , his master .

Mr. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FARRELL . I am servant to Thomas Birke, a tallowchandler - the prisoner was in his employ. On the 2d of September, about a quarter past nine o'clock at night, I saw him take an apron full of candles out of a box, and take them to his own premises - I gave information to Bain, the foreman, and he was afterwards apprehended - he had 12lbs. or perhaps 18lbs.; he took them from a place where candles are laid out for the men, who work at night; I was in the melting-house; he took a candle to take them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long after this was he in Mr. Birke's employ? A. Eight or ten days - Bain said, "Why did not you stop him" - I said I could not; he said, "Let it lay, and we will catch him again;" he was taken to the office on the 14th and discharged, because I was not there - he did not give himself up on this charge.

COURT. Q. How far was his house off? A. Not twenty yards - I went up-stairs and told Bain directly.

JOHN BAIN . Farrell informed me of this; I told him to he quiet about it - the prisoner did not surrender himself - I went to his house and found 6lbs. or 8lbs. of candles on the 14th - they were such as we make.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did not you go insantly and search his house? A. I had no authority; I believe there has been a charge against my master for smuggling, but not against me - I have no idea of the prisoner being a witness against my master; I do not expect it - the prisoner is married, and has one child.

RICHARD CORFF . I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of September, on a charge of stealing soap - I went to his house, and found a quantity of candles in a box, they were so broken, I have not brought them - he was discharged about the soap; I took him afterwards about the candles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he give himself up? A. He would, I believe - he sent me word that he would give himself up, but he had been absent.

Prisoner. I never took a candle; the officer let me remain at home all night, on promising to come in the morning, which I did - all the candles I had, these men gave me - Bain has called me up twice to work after the Excise officer came round.

COURT to JOHN BAIN . Q. Where does Mr. Birke live? A. In Fulham-road, about three-hundred yards froca the premises; I thought it not worth while to go and tell him; he was at home - I told his son of it - the prisoner never bought any candles; the men are not allowed candles - they were broken candles for the men's use.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18261026-209

2000. JAMES BENNETT was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 6lbs. of soap, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Birke .