Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th September 1826.
Reference Number: 18260914
Reference Number: f18260914-1

SESSIONS PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM VENABLES, MAYOR.

SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 14th of SEPTEMBER, 1826, and following Days.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(By Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET AND J. LIMBIRD, STRAND.

1826.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM VENABLES , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir John Perring , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; George Bridges , Esq.; and Robert Waithman , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; John Key , Esq.; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Thomas Ferrars ,

Wm. Wright ,

George Hogg ,

Charles Sanderson ,

Joseph Bell ,

George Holmes ,

Richard Kipling ,

Edwin Cuthbert ,

Arnold Rodgers ,

Thomas Gould ,

John Scott ,

John Hall .

Second

Henry Roper ,

John Shaw ,

Wm. Bradley ,

Richard Knight ,

Henry Crossley ,

John Armitage ,

John Robins ,

Wm. Tate ,

Thomas Wilson ,

Henry Baldwin ,

Richard Vaughan ,

John Westbrook .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Richard Adams ,

Thomas Applebee ,

Wm. Bush ,

Henry Brown ,

Wm. Brown ,

Wm. Bullock ,

Richard Blizard ,

Thomas Brown ,

Benjamin Bright ,

Mark Burnham ,

Rd. John Ball ,

John Barnes .

Second

Wm. Brass ,

Wm. Bailey ,

Robert Best ,

Edward Bennett ,

Richard Brown ,

Thos. I. Blundel ,

Richard Barfoot ,

Benj. Bradford ,

Peter Brown ,

Wm. Blencko ,

Charles H. Boyce ,

John Barker .

Third

John Alexander ,

Wm. Ashley ,

John Ashwell ,

Geo. Atkinson ,

John Allardice ,

John C. Aberdeen ,

John R. Anderton ,

James Armsby ,

Henry Ayling ,

James Anstead ,

Richard Abud ,

James Angus .

Fourth

John Abel ,

John Angel ,

George Aslet ,

James Allard ,

Geo. Alderton ,

Wm. Aldridge ,

Robert Atkins ,

John Anderson ,

Francis B. Adams ,

Thomas Allen ,

Robert Askew ,

Wm. Barlow .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1826.

VENABLES, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18260914-1

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1312. JAMES COLE , JOHN MACK , and WILLIAM ROBERTS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Daniel Aldridge , on the King's highway, on the 9th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 half-crown, 6 shillings, and 1 sixpence, his property .

DANIEL ALDRIDGE. I am a bricklayer , and live in Cousin-street. On Sunday, the 9th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Edgware-road ; the three prisoners were standing against an iron railing: Cole put his feet out, and tripped me up - I fell; Mack fell on my back. I hallooed out three times, and then Roberts fell on my head. Cole and Roberts got from me, and crossed the road; Mack then turned down to the right. - I had felt a hand come out of my pocket, where I had 10s. 6d.; directly I got up I felt, and found only 1s. left: I ran after Mack, but could not catch him; I could discern their clothes, but not their faces - I had never seen them before. I saw them in Edgware-road on the Tuesday following, about ten o'clock in the morning, all three sitting together - I had nobody to assist me, and said nothing to them; Cole had a black coat, with the tail torn off, and black trousers - Mack, a long blue coat and blue trousers - Roberts, a light fustian jacket and corded trousers; they were dressed the same on Sunday - they appeared to be the same persons by their size and dress. - I saw them again together on the Friday, in Edgware-road, dressed as before; I got the officers to take them then. I can only swear to them by their clothes.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am an officer. On the 14th of July Aldridge pointed the prisoners out to me; they went three different ways: I took Cole, who had run a considerable distance. I have often seen them together, about Edgware-road, holding gentlemen's horses, and sitting about.

JOHN - . I met Shepherd, and secured Roberts. I have seen them all together about Edgware-road, at all hours in the day.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I apprehended Mack in Berkeley-street. I frequently saw them about Edgware-road; they are there most of the day.

MACK's Defence. I was coming up Holborn at the time he was robbed; it was ten o'clock before I left Whitechapel.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-2

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1313. JOHN HUBBARD and HENRY ROWE were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Dixon , on the King's highway, on the 18th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 pocket-book, value 6d., and 5 sovereigns, his property .

GEORGE DIXON. I am a seaman . On a Saturday night in June, I was in Lemon-street , between twelve and one o'clock, going to the Edinburgh Castle public-house, where I lodged - Stewart was ten or twelve paces behind me: six men, in two rows, came walking arm-in-arm towards me; the first three surrounded me, and the middle one put his hand into my side pocket; I immediately seized and held him fast by one hand; he was holding out my pocket-book in the other hand; I struggled to get it, but one of the others snatched it out of his hand, and started off - I had felt it safe two minutes before. The man I seized said I squeezed him too hard, and hurt his arm; I loosened my hold, and sung out Watch! - he gave a rush, and got out of my hold, but did not run twenty yards before he was taken - he was not out of my sight. The watchman came up the moment he was stopped, and took him to the watch-house; my pocket-book contained five sovereigns. Hubbard is the man who put his hand into my pocket, and Rowe received the book - I am certain of him; it happened very near a gas-lamp: I could see Rowe's face, and he was taken in five minutes. I had sung out, "Stewart, I am robbed" - he came up just as Hubbard got from me; the other four escaped. I had been spending the evening at a club, but drank very little.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS, JUN. Q. I suppose you were struggling with the man? A. Yes. It did not last five minutes; some of the men were between me and Stewart. I had drank very little. I said Rowe was the man, directly I saw him; I did not ask Stewart if he thought that man was one of the party.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long had you left your ship? A. About a fortnight; I was paid off at Plymouth, and had been in town three days. I had been at a baker's club with Stewart; I had not drank above half-a-pint of gin.

Q. Will you swear that Hubbard did not come up when

you were struggling with another person? A. Yes - I struggled with nobody else. I had changed a sovereign, and spent 2s.; three of us drank together: I was not well, and drank very little.

COURT. Q. Stewart was behind you, and you called out? A. Yes - he came up in two or three minutes. - After Hubbard got from me I felt in my pocket, thinking my handkerchief might be gone also.

JAMES STEWART . I am a sailor, and lodged at the Edinburgh Castle. I took Dixon to this club, between five and six o'clock, at a house in Swan-street; as we returned, he was rather before me in Lemon-street - three men came up to him and three were behind them; Dixon called out, "James, my pocket-book is gone," and called Watch! I went up, and saw Hubbard hand the pocket-book to Rowe; Hubbard said Dixon was pinching him too hard - he then got away, and was taken by a man who stood by; Dixon caught hold of him again, and then the watchman came up; Rowe and all the rest ran away when they had got the pocket-book: I saw him give it to the others; Rowe was brought into the watch-house, and I knew him by his white coat - it was a clear night.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS, JUN. Q. What had you drank? A. We had a glass of beer together, and drank some gin - we were quite sober. All six men were round him when he called me - it took us about five minutes to go to the watch-house. Dixon did not ask me if Rowe was the man; I am certain he is the man - I could not describe his features.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was there a sovereign changed at the public-house? A. Dixon changed one down stairs, and after that paid for a little ale. I do not suppose I was twenty yards from him when this occurred.

JOSEPH COLUMBINE . I am a watchman. I was in Lemon-street; Dixon called out and before I got to him Hubbard ran from him; Stewart stopped him: Dixon gave him into my charge for robbing him of five sovereigns and his pocket-book; as they were taking him along somebody said that was not the way to the watch-house; Hubbard said he would walk if they would let go of him - he let him go, and he ran up Lemon-street, towards the watch-house, for twenty yards, when Stewart and another man stopped him - we took him to the watch-house. I returned with one Mr. Scurr, to look for another man, and on my return found Rowe at the watch-house door; Scurr said he was one of the party - Rowe said nothing, and I took him into the watch-house; Dixon and Stewart said he was one of the men: they had both been drinking, but knew what they were about.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS, JUN. Q. Did Dixon describe the man to whom the book had been passed? A. No. Stewart said there was a man there in a light coat; my meeting Rowe was quite accidental; he had a white coat on. Both the witnesses were rather in liquor, but knew what they were about.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did not Hubbard say that was not the way to the watch-house? A. I was not near enough to hear - he ran towards the watch-house when he got away.

HUBBARD'S Defence. As I was going home I saw seven or eight people in the road - I crossed over - the prosecutor laid hold of me, and said I had robbed him - I told him to go away, for he was drunk; he held my arm so tight I wished him to let me go, which he did - I said I would go to the watch-house, and was walking away - he came after me, and I was stopped.

ROWE's Defence. I was going home, and saw the prosecutor, his friend, and two or three more, walking up Lemon-street; I went up to see what was the matter, and when I got into the watch-house Mr. Scurr said, "I think you are one of the party, as one of them had a white coat on," but he should not like to swear to me; Dixon and Stewart both said they had no recollection of me - the watch-house keeper discharged me; I was going out, when Scurr said, "If I was not to swear to you I think I should tell a lie" - I was then locked up.

WILLIAM DOWEY . I am a broker, and live in Suffolk-street, Borough. I was coming down Lemon-street, and saw an altercation in the road; I crossed to see what was the matter - a sailor-looking young man collared Hubbard, and accused him of robbing him; he said he was willing to go to the watch-house. I gave him my direction, in case I was wanted. Hubbard had come up at the time the altercation began - it was half-past eleven o'clock; I dare say there were fifteen or sixteen people round. I did not know Hubbard before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-3

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1314. JOHN NORTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Hughes , on the King's highway, on the 14th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 seals, value 14s., and 1 chain, value 3s., his property .

ROBERT HUGHES. I am a perfumer , and live in Bottle Hay-yard, St. John-street. On the 14th of August, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I took a chariot at Shoreditch church stand, to go to Clerkenwell-green; the prisoner rode on the box with the driver - I had seen him many times before about that stand. The coach drove me to Chapel-street, Pentonville , quite out of my way; the prisoner got down, and opened the door - he let the steps down, and said, "Come out," and as I got on the coach step he took hold of my collar, tore my coat, and pulled me on the ground; he then stripped me of my watch, and knocked me down - fear prevented my resisting; I laid on the ground three or four minutes: he ran after the coach (which drove off directly;) I ran after him and saw him get on the coach-box when he had got some distance - it got away; I have frequently seen him about the Shoreditch stand, with the coachmen - I am there twenty times a day sometimes; I lived there two or three years ago. I directly went to the stand, but could not find him. I did not know the coachman. The watch came out easily, without resistance.

GEORGE DODSON . I am waterman at the stand, and let Hughes into the coach - the prisoner then got on the box with the coachman. I have known him some years about Shoreditch; he was once a coach-master; he drove off with Alger, the coachman: the order was to drive to Clerkenwell; I cannot say whether the prisoner heard that. Hughes' seals hung out.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. On Tuesday morning, the 15th of August, in consequence of what Hughes told me, I went to a house at the back of Shoreditch, and apprehended the prisoner, who was asleep. I said, "I want you for a watch, Jack - you will get into trouble if you don't leave this off;" he was in liquor, and said, "I can't help it, I am pretty well tired of it."

ROBERT HUGHES . The coachman did not ask me for his fare - I do not know the number of it; it drove off when my watch was taken, and was full thirty yards off when I saw it - it drove off at a great rate when the prisoner got on.

Prisoner. Q. Were you in liquor when you got into the coach? A. I had been drinking, but was as sensible as I am now; I had drank about three pints of beer since breakfast - I had very little in the evening.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning after the robbery he came to my apartment, and asked my wife if I was at home, as he wanted to see me particularly; she said if he would leave his message she would tell me when I came in; he said, "Last night I took a coach, and your husband, being continually among the coachmen, might give me intelligence of my watch, which I lost last night - if he can I will leave a sovereign." When I got home I was tired, and went to sleep.

Prisoner to ROBERT HUGHES. Q. What did you state at Brown's, the farrier, the morning after the robbery? A. I was in his shop on the morning of the 15th of August - I did not say I was very much in liquor, and did not know whether I lost the watch in the coach, or out of it. I said Norton stripped me of my watch; I did not say I was drunk or in for it, nor that I would leave a sovereign at Bingley's, if I could get information about it; there were two or three persons at Brown's.

JAMES PINES . I am a coachman. I was at Brown's on the morning of the 15th of August, when the prosecutor said he did not know whether he lost his watch before he got into the coach, while he was in it, or after he got out - those were his words. I never heard Norton's name mentioned; I did not know Hughes before.

NATHANIEL HUBBARD . I am a carpenter, and was at Brown's on the 15th of August, and heard Hughes say he did not know whether he lost his watch in the coach, out of it, or before, for he was so much in liquor, and he was in liquor when he was speaking; he said he had been with a girl of the town, who lived next door to the farrier's-shop. He said Norton did not take it that he knew of, he was so much in liquor.

Q. Did he mention Norton's name? A. No.

JOHN MANWOOD . I was at Brown's, and heard Hughes say he did not know whether he lost his watch out of the coach or where; I heard nothing about a girl of the town; Bingley keeps the King's Arms, public-house; I heard nothing of his having a sovereign.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-4

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1315. JOHN BARLOW and ROBERT ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 clock, value 10l., the goods of Francis Anthony More , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE CORK . I carry out beer from Lord's cricket-ground. On the 6th of July, a little before five o'clock, I was in Grosvenor-row, and saw Barlow and another young man coming down the road - I turned round to look at some pots I had left on a wall, and saw Roberts come over Mr. More's iron garden fence, into the road, Barlow and the lad then went down the road, and the lad took something over the fence where Roberts had come from - I could not see what it was; the fence is six or seven feet high: he got up and reached it over, and handed it into Barlow's hand; Roberts had then got some distance up the road - they followed him: I went down to Mr. Hall, who lived in Grove-end-row, and told him - I then went and rang the prosecutor's bell; the servant came to the door: I then went up the road, and saw Benns standing in Hall's-place; we went up the road together, and saw three men standing in a field together; I was some distance from them; Benns got up first - I went up, and found Barlow in his custody, and knew him - I took him to the house, and then to the office. Roberts was brought into Mr. More's; I knew him also - the third man was not taken.

WILLIAM BENNS . I live in Princes-street, Lisson-grove. Cork came to me - I went up the Abbey-road, into Kilburn-fields, and saw the two prisoners and another at the corner of the field, together, and the timepiece laying between them, partly tied up in a handkerchief; on seeing me one of them took it up, and threw it into a ditch - I think it was Barlow; they set off running, and I after them; Barlow threw himself into a ditch - I took him out, and brought him to Mr. More's house; I am certain of Roberts - I was close to him, but could not take both.

CHARLES STRONG . I live in Harper-street, Lissongrove, and am carter to Mr. Johnson. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I was in a brick field, and saw Roberts running; I pursued, and took him; I said I thought he had robbed somebody; he said he had not. I took him to Mr. More's, by the people's direction.

THOMAS WHITNELL . I am a well-digger, and live in Upper Boston-place, Mary-le-bone. On the 6th of July, about five o'clock, I met Roberts, alone, in Grove-end-road, going towards Abbey-road - I said nothing to him. About twenty or thirty yards behind him I met Barlow and a young lad; Barlow had something in his left hand, covered with two handkerchiefs: when they passed me I looked and saw four brass nobs at the bottom of it - it was a time-piece. I met the witnesses, and gave them information; I went with them to a field. and saw the two prisoners and another: I saw Barlow put the time-piece into the ditch - they ran away. I got the time-piece up, took it to the prosecutor's house, and gave it to Buckeridge. I did not see them taken.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer of St. Mary-le-bone. I received the prisoners in charge, with the time-pices, in Lisson-grove.

MR. FRANCIS ANTHONY MORE. I live in Grove-end-road . I went out on the morning of the 6th of July, and returned about half-past six o'clock - the prisoners were then in custody. There is a party-wall comes up to the iron fence; the clock could be placed on that, and reached over - it is mine, and worth 10l. or 12l.; it was in the

front room on the ground-floor when I went out; the window and gate are generally shut.

BARLOW's Defence. I had been asleep for an hour before I was taken.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

BARLOW - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-5

1316. ALEXANDER LAWSON BUXTON was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-6

1317. JAMES KING was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Neville Brown , from his person .

MR. NEVILLE BROWN. I am a City-marshal . On the 4th of September, between five and six o'clock, I was at St. Bartholomew fair ; Cowtan gave me notice that my pocket was picked - he produced my handkerchief, which I had felt safe five minutes before. The prisoner was taken immediately - I had not seen him before.

JOHN COWTAN . I am superintendant of the Police. - Mr. Brown and I were passing through the fair, dressed in plain clothes; Mr. Brown stepped two or three yards before me - the prisoner went behind him, took the handkerchief from his pocket, and put it into his breeches; I directly seized him, and took it from him.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260914-7

1318. SAMUEL WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Gardener , from his person .

JAMES GARDENER. I live in Brook-street, Holborn, and am guard to a coach . On the 4th of July, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was on Holborn-hill , going from Fleet-market, and stood listening to some music - a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and said my handkerchief was gone; he pointed to the prisoner; I went and asked him for my handkerchief: he immediately struck me on the breast, and knocked me half-way across the street. I told him I knew he had it - he put his hand into his breast, and pulled it out, saying, "Here is your bl-y handkerchief;" I gave him in charge.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you what colour it was? A. No; I told you it was red. It is possible I might have dropped it - it was safe ten minutes before.

GEORGE LOCK . I received the prisoner in charge - he was rather in liquor.

DAVID GILL . I am a tailor. I went up the instant I saw the prosecutor go up to the prisoner; I heard him say, "You have robbed me" - he turned round, and made a desperate blow at him; he afterwards delivered it up, saying "Here is your bl-y handkerchief."

ADOLPHUS PROVOST . I live in Bloomsbury. I saw the prisoner strike Mr. Gardener, and afterwards give the handkerchief up.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief laying by the mob, and picked it up - the gentleman came and said,"Have you got my handkerchief?" being rather in liquor I said No, but said if he would tell me the colour I would give it to him - he did so, and I gave it him.

GEORGE LOCK. The prosecutor was rather before the prisoner, coming for my assistance - he pointed him out, and I took him - he said he had found it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-8

1319. WILLIAM GRANGER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Samuel Owtram Bacon , from his person .

SAMUEL OWTRAM BACON. I live in York-place, City-road. On the 17th of August, at ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Basinghall-street - the officer asked if I had lost a handkerchief; I then felt and missed it - he immediately produced it.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 17th of August I was in Fore-street, and saw Mr. Bacon - the prisoner was seven or eight yards behind him, in company with another person; I watched them on the on the opposite side of the way; there was nobody between them and Mr. Bacon; at the corner of Aldermanbury-postern the other man (whose name is Sampson, and who is now in Cold Bath-fields prison) took out the handkerchief, and turned down Aldermanbury-postern - the prisoner was close at his side, and crossed over Fore-street, down Moor-lane; Mr. Bacon went on: Sampson returned, and went down Moor-lane, to the prisoner, whom I saw deliver the handkerchief to him, up a turning; they saw me, and Sampson ran away; I laid hold of the prisoner, took the handkerchief out of his pocket, and made him run with me down Basinghall-street; I took it to Mr. Bacon, who claimed it- the prisoner said he did not take it - I said I knew that.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for work, and met this man, and in going along I turned up Moor-lane - he there asked me to take the handkerchief - I put it into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260914-9

1320. GEORGE BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 3 pump-handles, value 19s., and 2 sucker-hooks, value 9s. , the goods of Thomas Gunn and Samuel Gunn .

BENJAMIN GUNN . I am in the employ of Messrs. Thomas and Samuel Gunn, who are white-smiths . These articles were in their front shop in Aldermanbury - they were safe at one o'clock, when I went to dinner; I returned in a quarter of an hour, and found the prisoner in custody with them in his hand, in the street - he worked for us two years ago, for four or five months.

JAMES COOK . I am in Messrs. Gunns' employ. Having lost property I and Bass concealed ourselves in the cellar at dinner time, and saw the prisoner come into the shop alone - he stood there about five minutes, then went out with this property on his shoulder, and shut the door after him; we secured him on the step. The door had a secret spring, which he knew how to open; I jumped out of the cellar, and secured him with the pump-handles and hooks; he said, "Oh! Cook, it is not your's"

JAS. THOS. BASS . I was in the cellar with Cook. I saw

the prisoner go up the steps, and saw him go out with the property - we secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for work, and met a gentleman in Houndsditch, who said he wanted some pump-screws and handles; I gave him my direction - he said he would call on me on Saturday. I was passing the prosecutors' shop - there are two windows to the cellar; I called to Cook - he made no answer; the door was not fastened, and I went in, but not seeing him, and these things laying there, I took them in my hand, and was going down the steps to call him from the cellar - the moment I put my head down he seized me - I had no idea of taking them away.

MR. GUNN. When I came down he was in the street - it is evident he had left the shop with the property; not to go to the cellar.

JAMES COOK . When I took him he had shut the door, and was beyond the steps. I heard him call out Oh! before he opened the door - he called to nobody when he came out. Our dinner time is between one and two o'clock - he knew that. He has a wife and child.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-10

1321. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 coat, value 20s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 20s.; 1 gown, value 12s. 6d.; 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 chain, value 2s.; 1 key, value 18d., and 1 seal, value 1d. , the goods of John Creedon .

MARY CREEDON . I am the wife of John Creedon, who is a labourer . This property belongs to my son John, and was in my trunk. The prisoner lived with me, as servant , in Coleman-street-buildings , on the first floor - the box was in my room, and was kept locked; I saw my son's clothes safe in it between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning of the 27th of July, and my own gown - I had the key in my pocket; I set in the street with fruit all day; about one o'clock the prisoner brought up my dinner, and asked leave to go out, which I gave her - she returned to me about four o'clock, and I gave her the key of the room; she came to me in about ten minutes, and said, "Mistress, the hasp is off the door, and your trunk is open;" I went home, and missed all this property. She left me on Friday, without notice, and on the Tuesday following I saw the duplicate of the watch found in her bosom.

JOHN BRADY . I am an officer. On the 4th of August I found the prisoner in Wentworth-street; she denied knowing anything of the robbery; I said, "Have you any duplicates?" she said none, and turned out both her pockets; I said I must search her - she then put her hand into her bosom; I saw her move something under her arm: I held both her hands while the prosecutrix took the purse from her bosom, and in that purse I found a duplicate of the watch, pawned at Price's, two doors off - I took her there - he said, in her hearing, that she had pawned it, and had only asked 4s. on it; she said she knew nothing of the other property, but next morning she said voluntarily, "There was another person, named Haggerty, with me, who encouraged me to break open the trunk with a poker - she got the wearing-apparel, and I the watch."(Watch produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman came up to the room after me, and asked what was in the box - she broke the box open with a poker; I began to cry - she struck me, and said she would kill me if I spoke.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-11

1322. MARGARET LOWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 14 razors, value 20s.; 3 pencil-cases, value 6s., and 6 thimbles, value 4s. , the goods of John Strickland Rigge and Thomas Howard Rigge .

WILLIAM COCK . I am shopman to Mr. Essex, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. On the 28th of August the prisoner came and offered fourteen razors in pawn; I asked who they belonged to - she said to John Castle , of Love-lane, Holborn, and that he was a hawker; Mr. Rigge's name being on them I gave her in charge.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am a constable. I received her in charge - she said she lived at No. 10, Holborn; she said there was nothing in her basket, but under a handkerchief I found six thimbles and three pencil-cases.

MR. JOHN STRICKLAND RIGGE. I am in partnership with my brother, Thomas Howard Rigge. The prisoner was our servant at this time, and lived in the house - she occasionally went out for butter in the morning. This property is all our's, and quite new.

Prisoner. The shop was open, and the temptation overtook me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-12

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1323. BENJAMIN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , at St. Mary-le-bone, 8 tablecloths, value 14l. and 2 towels, value 2s., the goods of Raikes Currey , in his dwelling-house .

CATHERINE STANLEY . I am servant to Mr. Raikes Currey, who lives at No. 40, Harley-street , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On the 11th of July I carried this linen from Wimpole-street, where Mr. Currey did live, to No. 40, Harley-street, and put it into the housekeeper's-room - we were then moving in there; Mr. Currey had then taken possession of the house, and had put in two women to take care of it; they had slept there for a week, and part of the furniture had been there for a week before - I put this property into the housekeeper's room, tied up together.

JOHN BOSTON . I am a porter. On the 11th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another man by Mr. Currey's house - they were together against the area gate - I saw the other lad go down with a basket, which appeared empty; the prisoner sat down on the steps of the next door, which is quite close to the area gate; the other returned in less than five minutes - his basket then appeared heavy and full; the prisoner instantly joined him, and they walked into Weymouth-

street: the other gave him the basket, and they separated - I followed him to Foley-place - he there opened a hackney coach door, put the basket in, and jumped on the box - the coachman drove on; I followed him into the New-road, and informed a friend who I met - he stopped the coach, and took him.

JOHN WYATT . I am beadle of St. Pancras. Boston pointed out the coach to me - the prisoner was on the box with the driver. I stopped it, took him off, and took out the property, which I produce.

ROBERT GRAY . I am a hackney-coachman. On the 11th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, my coach stood in the ranks in Foley-place - the prisoner opened the door, and said, "Come, coachee" - I said, "Where am I going to take up?" he said, "Drive me to Goswell-street," and threw a basket of linen into the coach; he shut the door himself, got on the box, and I drove on till the officer came up.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge with the property, which I have had ever since.

CATHERINE STANLEY. It is all master's, and worth 14l. - it is all marked.

Prisoner's Defence. I came out of a public-house, saw the bundle laying down, and picked it up - this man immediately collared me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18260914-13

1324. CATHERINE HAINLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 2 table-cloths, value 4l., and 5 napkins, value 1l., the goods of Lord Howard, of Effingham; 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 frill, value 6d., the goods of Jane Chilcott , in the dwelling-house of Lord Howard, of Effingham .

EDMUND NOTLEY . I am footman to Lord Howard, of Effingham, who lives in Mansfield-street, Portland-place . On the 20th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, I went down to the housekeeper's-room, and found the prisoner there; I asked what she was doing - she said no harm - but in her apron she had the articles stated in the indictment; she said she came down the area to beg broken victuals.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-14

1325. GEORGE MULLINS and WILLIAM ARTHUR were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Brown , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of July , at Kingsbury (no person being therein), and stealing 4 pairs of stockings, value 5s., his property .

JOHN BROWN. I am a labourer , and rent a house in Kingsbury parish, near Edgware-road. On the 17th of July, about four o'clock in the morning, I and my wife left the house - we returned about half-past five; all was then safe; I was the last person in the house. I fastened it up safe, shutters and all; I locked the door, and took the key; the stockings were in a box in the bed-room - there are but two rooms in the house. I returned between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and found the door open (I had given the key to my wife) - I watched, and saw the two prisoners come out of the door, and go round the corner of the house; I jumped over my garden fence, went on the other side, and met them coming round. I collared one, pushed the other against the house, and secured him - I asked what they wanted there - they said they came to ask for some water; I asked why they came for water when the garden-gate and house were fastened up. I dragged them into the house, and got a person to hold them while I examined, and found a box in the bed-room broken open, and things laying about the bed; the stockings were taken out of the box, and laid about the room - they are worth 5s.; I left nobody in the house. The door had been forced open by an iron wrench.

SUSAN BROWN . I am the prosecutor's wife - he gave me the key. The box was safe when I went out. I came home after the prisoners were in custody, and found the trunk broken open; I picked up the staple of the lock - I found three pairs of stockings under my bed - they had been taken out of the box - another pair were on the bed; property above 5s. value had been moved.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MULLINS' Defence. We were going to Edgware to look for work, and asked a man where we could get a drop of water - he said over in his garden was a well - we got over, but could find no well; this man came and asked what we wanted, and swore he would kill us - he was quite drunk.

ARTHUR'S Defence. We got over the stile to find a well.

MULLINS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

ARTHUR - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy in consequence of their youth.

Reference Number: t18260914-15

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1326. RICHARD WELLS was indicted for the wilful murder of Frances Farbridge .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY FARBRIDGE . I live at Bethnal-green. On the night of the 13th of June I was coming from Barnet, with my wife, in a one-horse chaise - she sat on one side of the chaise and her mother on a fixed seat in front, with a child in her arms; I started about nine o'clock - it was quite light; my chaise had no hood. I heard a coach coming behind me, and a horn blow; I was then directly opposite Barnet-church - it was nine o'clock by the church clock; I had not gone ten yards before the leaders of the mail came near me - I was then nearer to the proper side of the road, which was the left; I was nearer than three feet of the footpath; I looked, and think there was sufficient room for a large waggon to pass me, but not for a waggon and mail also; as I cast my eye to see if there was sufficient room I saw the leaders, and immediately looked to see if the coachman was pulling up, as it was too near me - he was not pulling up; I had no time to get further away; the fore-wheels or the cross-perch immediately struck my chaise, and turned the horse's head nearer to the right side; the hind wheel of the mail drove us completely over; my wife was thrown between the two wheels of the mail; I came down by the hind wheel, and caught hold of the wheel, as the coach was then stopping; seeing my wife's head had become a stop to the wheel, I thought she was killed, and had no power to

raise her. I turned round to the coachman, and said, "You villain, you have been the cause of this;" he said, "Me, it was no fault of mine - my guard blew the horn," and I think he said he called to me, and I should have got out of the way. I went round to the other side, between the coach and the church-yard, as he said there was not sufficient room; I said, "Here is almost room for another coach;" he made little or no reply; I should think there were six or seven feet of room from the off side of the mail to the wall; I have since ascertained the distance was seven feet. My wife was taken away by somebody - I did not see her for a quarter of an hour. I asked the coachman to come down and give me his address, which he did on my second or third application. The accident happened on a flat high road; there is no hill. I was driving at the rate of seven or eight miles an hour - it was quite light. My wife was in good health before - she remained at Barnet eleven days, and was then brought home, and died at Bethnal-green. Mr. Jeffs attended her. On the following morning, between three and four o'clock, I went into the road to survey in what situation I had been, and found my wife's ear-ring broken in the dust, and conclude that was the very spot where the wheel came in contact with my wife's head - I measured the road with my feet; the ear-ring was nine footsteps and a half from the foot-path, on my side. I did not measure the distance to the other side.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you know the width of the road? A. Twenty-three feet; there is a post to keep the carriages from going against the church-wall, but the wall turns off round just there, so that it does not occupy any space. My mother-in-law sat, as it were, between us. I heard the horn blow - I merely looked aside, and saw the leaders - they had not at that moment passed me; I saw their heads approach as I looked round; my eye was on the leaders, but at the same time on my own horse; they became like three horses abreast, as I just looked sideways. The wheel did not go over my wife's head. I had just started from the Wellington, public-house, and was going rather faster than usual - I was perfectly sober. I had not started above a minute - my pony was pretty fresh. Mr. Morris attended my wife at Barnet.

Q. Was she not removed contrary to his orders? A. He seemed unwilling for her to go, and said he considered it as dangerous for her to go as at first, but she always said, "I shall die, and let me die at home" - she was moved in a glass-coach.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there any post on the side of the road to diminish the space left for the mail? A. I believe there is a post against the wall, but it could not make more than a foot difference.

JOHN ALLSOP . I am a farmer. I had been to market on this evening; a gig passed me, and then the mail passed - I heard the horn blow, and saw the mail strike the gig - I cannot say what part of the mail struck it; I was ten or twelve yards behind them. I saw the deceased almost under the coach wheel; the coachman had stopped then - I had not seen him endeavour to stop before he struck the gig; it appeared to me that the gig was in danger. There was plenty of room for the mail to have gone more to the right; I stopped the chaise-horse; I saw somebody with his shoulder to the wheel of the mail, as if pushing it back; the mail went at about the regular rate, about ten miles an hour, I suppose. I think there was no want of care on the coachman's part - he was on his right side. The prisoner was the coachman.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you when the gig and mail passed? A. Nearly opposite the King's Head public-house, walking in the road. I was as near the middle of the road as possible after they passed. The mail stopped directly the accident happened. I was behind, and saw the mail and the gig.

ROBERT JEFFS . I am a surgeon, and live at Shoreditch. I saw Mrs. Farbridge the morning after the accident; there were three fractures on her lower jaw, and a dreadful contusion, extending the whole length of the neck - her collar-bone was fractured, and the shoulderbone much bruised, and injured; she had great difficulty of breathing, and altogether it was a horrible case; I was convinced she could not live - she was sensible, but could not speak. I recommended her being brought to town, which was done in nine or ten days - I then attended her daily - she mended for a day or two, but died on the 5th of July. I believe the actual cause of her death was inflammation of the lungs, produced by the external injury.

Cross-examined. Q. Had inflammation taken place when she was moved? A. I believe it commenced when the injury was given, and gradually increased till she died; I only saw her once at Barnet - I advised her coming home, that she should have a physician. I thought the case was dangerous from the first; her removal would not increase the inflammation in the state she was in.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming very steadily round Barnet - it is a very dangerous place. I saw the chaise; the guard blew the horn, and I hallooed out; I was pulling up my horses at the time; the wheel got entangled with my wheel; her head was under my wheel: I was as careful as a man could be. I have driven the mail twenty-two years, and never had an accident.

Prisoner to HENRY FARBRIDGE. Q. When you turned aside a little, and saw the leaders, can you say you did not pull the right-hand rein a little? A. I pulled to the near side when I was opposite the clock, but pulled neither right or left afterwards; I am certain I did not pull them when I turned. I have been used to drive for about twenty-three years.

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER HUDSON . I am post-master at Barnet. I saw Mr. Farbridge drive by my house, with two other persons in his gig; I thought by the manner of holding his reins he was not accustomed to drive, and was fearful an accident might occur, as I heard the mail go by - I did not see the accident.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where did you see him? A. Passing my door; he might get perhaps fifteen yards before the mail got to my door. The ground slopes rather towards London; the road is about eight yards wide where the accident happened; three carriages might pass with careful driving.

EDWARD RANS . - I was guard to the Liverpool mail on this night. At Barnet we saw a gig before us - I blew the horn full one hundred and fifty yards off, and continued to blow till we got up to it, and the prisoner hallooed

as well; the horses and the fore-wheel cleared the gig, but instead of the prosecutor drawing his rein to pull out, he stopped for an instant, and came back on the carriage - the horse jibbed back as it were, and so the mischief happened; the step of the mail struck the gig - our splinter-bar projects as near the extremity of the wheel as possible - the bars of the leaders project as near the same length as possible, and, if they pass without touching, we consider that the coach itself will pass. The prisoner pulled up immediately - he must have had his horses very tight in hand - the wheel did not go over the deceased.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Did you ever drive? A. I have in case of emergency - but seldom; the lower step of the coach turns up - I cannot say whether it was turned up - the chaise might have turned it down - it came exactly against it, and bent it - we were on our proper side; I do not believe there was more than three feet of room on our right side, but there was room to pass if the horse had not knocked against the carriage; the backing of the gig caused the accident. As soon as the coachman got somebody to mind the horses he went in and gave his address. We were not going at more than seven miles and a half an hour - our time from South Mims to town is an hour and forty-five minutes - it is fifteen miles and a half - we were coming up. The prisoner has surrendered here to-day.

ELIZABETH KING . I live at Barnet. I was standing at my door, about ten yards from where the accident happened; I had a perfect view of what passed - I saw Mr. Farbridge, his wife, and mother, coming down in a gig, on the off side, by the church wall - the horn blew some time before the mail got up - Jervis, who was at my house, called to him three or four times to come on his own side, and the coachman hallooed some time before he got up. Mr. Farbridge drew directly across the road - the mail was on its own side - the right rein was pulled by Mr. Farbridge or his mother, and that occasioned the accident; I saw it plainly - the coachman stopped instantly. The deceased was brought to my house, and remained there eleven days. Mr. Morris saw her three or four times a day - she got much better, and was in a fair way of doing well.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. What are you? A. My husband keeps an ironmonger's shop there - the prisoner was quite a stranger to me - he called six or seven days after the accident, to know how she was. I heard Jervis call to Mr. Farbridge to come on his own side - the mail was then about twenty yards from him - he had time to get out of the way.

Q. Had not the coachman time to stop? A. I do not know - I should not think he had occasion to stop. I swear that Farbridge was on his wrong side - my house is directly opposite the church-yard corner.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When the gig was called to it crossed over to its proper side? A. Yes.

Mrs. BETTY. I live next door to Mrs. King. I was at my ground floor window, which is rather high - I could only see straight before me - I heard a horn blow, and a hallooing, that made me go to the window, as it was a particular noise; I saw a gig coming with particularly large wheels - the Liverpool mail came on its own side of the road, as near as it could be with propriety to the iron railing of the church-yard; the horses and the fore-wheel passed the gig, then the chaise, instead of going straight on (for then the coach would have cleared it) instantly flew back towards the coach doors, and immediately upset.

Q. As far as you can judge, what occasioned the accident? A. Great neglect in driving, on Mr. Farbridge's part - but I am not used to drive - if he had gone straight on he would have cleared the coach.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Are you acquainted with Wells? A. I never spoke to him: Farbridge was on his right side when I saw him.

JAMES CLARK . I keep the King's Head public-house, at Barnet, on the opposite side to the church. I stood in the foot-path, in front of my door, about thirty yards from where this occurred, and could see what happened perfectly well. I first saw the gig on the same side as my house - I saw the mail coming from the post-office - the gig passed my door, and the horn blew - instead of the gig keeping on that side it darted towards the other side - the coachman hallooed very loud when he got nearer to it - the horses and front of the coach passed, but the man in the gig pulled the rein, which pulled the horse from the coach and turned the back of the gig into the lock of the coach. This, in my opinion, caused the accident - I am not acquainted with the prisoner.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. You think it was occasioned by the driver of the gig bringing the hind wheel into the lock of the coach? A. Yes; if it had kept on properly it would have been within a foot of the coach.

Q. Was there not at least seven feet of space where the mail might have gone to the right side and not been near the gig? A. No, there might be about six inches from the mail to the post, but I did not measure it - there is a drain which it must have gone on if it had gone nearer.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Where was the drain? A. Near the coach - there is a post to keep coaches from running on the drain, which is between two and three feet from the wall.

JOHN CLAY . I keep the Mitre public-house, at Barnet. I was about forty yards off when this accident happened, but cannot state the particulars. I went up before the coachman got off the box, and saw where the mail had pulled up - I measured the distance of the hind wheel to the post - there was only the length of my foot between the wheel and the post; it had not moved for I saw the blood lay under the step; I measured the road yesterday - it is twenty-two feet six inches from the post to the near side of the road - the fore wheel of the coach stood against the post - the hind wheel would have come nearer to it.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Could not three carriages go abreast in that space? A. Yes - the gig was in the middle of the road - there must have been a space of about two yards and a half on his near side.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-16

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1327. ISACC BATEMAN was indicted for the wilful murder of Sarah, his wife .

MARY HUGHES . I am the wife of John Hughes - we live in Fulham-fields. The prisoner and his wife lived at

the Old Grayhound houses, Fulham-fields - nobody else lived in their house - we live about one hundred and fifty yards from them. On Monday, the 31st of August , about twelve o'clock at night, I stood at my own door and heard a great noise of crockery breaking - I supposed it came from one of the Grayhound houses; I went to the corner, about a dozen yards from the prisoner's house, and heard a groan - I drew nearer and saw him come to his door - I said "Bateman, you have murderer your wife, you thief;" I repeated that three times; he said No, he had not hurt her; I screamed murder, and alarmed the neighbourhood - he said he had not hurt her - it was only gin she wanted, or gin and water, and water he would give her - he went towards the pump,' which is in a lane, with a pan in his hand, and I saw no more of him - the pan was afterwards found in a ditch, not far from the pump; I thought he looked very pale when he came to the door- I continued there about ten minutes - the neighbours came with a light - Mrs. Rochfort, Bennet, and Chapman went into the house - I stood at the door, and saw the deceased found in the lower room - they washed her; I was not near enough to observe much; I went home and stood at my door till Chapman (my brother) and the doctor's assistant, came, and went to the house with them - she had then been moved more towards the fire-place; we assisted in taking her up stairs to bed - I left her in Mrs. Mason's care.

JOHN BOWLING . I am a surgeon, and live at Hammersmith. I was sent for on the night of the 31st of July, and sent my assistant; I saw her next morning about ten o'clock - she was much bruised - her left eye was black, and nearly closed - she had a cut over the right eve and another on the side of the head - she complained of much pain over the whole of the belly, particularly the lower part, and her bladder was ruptured - I told her so, and that I considered her in danger; she said she was very bad, and should not be here long; she appeared sensible of her danger; I do not think she thought she was dying at that moment; I was not certain her bladder was ruptured, and did not consider her case as entirely hopeless. I found afterwards that her bladder was ruptured, and that was certainly the cause of her death. She never said she was dying, and could not recover. Her wounds appeared to have been inflicted by a blunt instrument - the cut on the back of her head, appeared as if she had fallen on some broken crockery - she was moved to St. George's hospital that day, and I did not see her afterwards. The rupture of the bladder must have been occasioned by some violence, and the bladder must have been in a state of distension at the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Could you judge whether she had been drinking? A. No; her falling violently on any thing, with her bladder distended, might occasion the rupture - any very violent concussion would do it - falling on a chair or tub might do it, if she was struck near the region of the bladder; frequent intoxication increases secretion and produces a weakness in the bladder - a fall might do it if the bladder was excessively distended, not otherwise.

HENRY RUSSELL . I am house-surgeon at St. George's hospital. The deceased was brought there on Tuesday evening, about seven o'clock - she complained of exquisite tenderness on being touched on the lower part of the belly, and there was great anxiety in her countenance - I asked how she met with the accident, and from what she said my impression was that she had ruptured some large blood vessel, or the bowels - I thought she would die, but did not communicate that to her - she told me, when I was examining her wounds, she thought she should not live - I think she said so when I first examined her, but I am not certain whether it was before or after she told me what had happened; she died next day about three o'clock in the afternoon. I opened her body, and found the bladder ruptured in two places - that must have caused her death - it must have been occasioned by a violent blow or fall - there were no external marks of violence.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a stage-coachman, and lodge with my sister in Fulham-fields. On the 31st of July, as I was going home I heard a noise like china and glass breaking; I met my sister, and afterwards went to the prisoner's door - there was a light there, and the neighbours were outside - the prisoner was in the house - I would not let any one go in till he came out to fetch some water - I saw him come out with a pan - somebody lighted him to the pump - I saw his wife before he came out, laying in her blood; he never returned - I fetched a surgeon, and went into the house with him; I had not gone in before - I then saw the woman lying on a pillow down stairs - the blood was washed off her face, but there was a great deal about her clothes; I helped to carry her up stairs, and staid there all night; between three and four o'clock that morning I saw the prisoner by the side of a potatoe field, close to the road, about a hundred and twenty yards from his house - when he saw me he went down the lane, and when he found I gained ground on him he took to his heels and ran like a deer, and jumped over into Mr. Sandall's ground; I called to him, and told him I wanted him - he got over the fence, and gave himself up to me - I asked him what noise he had been kicking up the night before, and told him his wife was dead; he said "I have made up my mind to die for the bl-dy b-h;" I took him to Hammersmith, and gave him to a watchman. When I went to the house a great deal of crockery lay broken on the floor, near the fire-place; he appeared sober when I saw him. When I carried his wife up stairs she seemed very wet with blood.

Cross-examined. Q. What coach do you drive? A. I drive the Richmond coach off the stones. Hawkins was with me when the prisoner surrendered to me; he might have heard what passed. I swear I spoke to the prisoner and said his wife was dead.

Q. Was not his answer "Good God, that is impossible?" A. I heard nothing of the kind; I did not hear him called an old - when he went to the pump - I did not hear him abused at all; the women called him a murdering thief; I heard nothing else; a great many people had been merry-making at Hawkins' house, and I had gone there, at a quarter to twelve, to fetch my brother-in-law.

JANE COUSINS . My husband is a labourer - we live next door to the prisoner. On the 31st of July I was at home all day - I was in bed when this happened - his wife was merry-making at Hawkins' house that evening;

I was not there, but I saw her going in and out between five and six o'clock - she seemed rather intoxicated; I believe they lived comfortably when she was sober - she was given to drink.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not he very kind to her when she was sober? A. Never otherways - he is an inoffensive man, and associated with none of his neighbours; I never knew him given to drink; I saw her at Hawkins' between five and six o'clock - she was forward in liquor then.

COURT to Mr. BOWLING. Q. State particularly what the deceased said on the subject of the accident? A. On my saying I suspected her bladder was ruptured she immediately said he had done it by kneeling on her - I cannot say whether she said he or the villain - I think the husband's name had not been mentioned - something was said to her, immediately afterwards, as to her husband's having caught her with some man in a shed, she said that was false, and when he was drunk he would say any thing. No doubt kneeling on her would have done it had the bladder been distended - taking a quantity of liquor would distend it.

Mr. RUSSELL. She told me her husband had knocked her down and knelt on her - that would cause the rupture if the bladder was distended.

Cross-examined. Q. Could there have been an effusion of the urine without a rupture of the bladder? A. No; if she had fallen on a chair or tub it might have happened, if she fell on her stomach. She was brought to the hospital in a cart, by two females, who left in a few minutes - the name of Sarah Bateman was written over her bed by the porter - it is usual for him to obtain the name.

JANE COUSINS . I never saw her in the hospital - she was forty-two years old, tall and thin.

Mr. RUSSELL. She was a middle-aged woman - I never saw her except in bed.

The other witnesses being called all stated, that they had not seen the deceased after she left home.

- COLES. I went to the house on the Thursday - it was then empty.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare positively, before God and this Court, I never knelt on my wife, but through her intoxication she fell where there was a pail, a chair, a a washing stool, and tub, and there she must have met with the violence - I had no animosity against her at the time I entered the house.

ANN MASON . I live next door to the prisoner. On the 31st of July his wife came into my house, about nine o'clock and at two - I saw her in the evening, and about eleven; she had been drinking beer - she was very forward in liquor at two o'clock, and was quite tipsy in the evening; I saw her last at ten o'clock - she was very tipsy, and her child, who is about fourteen years old, was begging her to come home: she had been tipsy nearly all the week; the prisoner behaved kind to her except when she was in liquor; she always said he was a good husband, and kept to his work - and if she could wear gold he would be pleased.

COURT. Q. Did you hear what passed that night? A. I sat up with her, and assisted in putting her into a cart next day, to send her to the hospital, but did not see her after she was there. After the surgeon was gone I said to her "Lord have mercy upon you, you are dying;" she said she thought she should die, several times; I asked if she knew whether her husband stamped or knelt on her; she said she did not know what he did to her - this was about twelve o'clock on the day it happened - there were tubs and chairs in the lower room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-17

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1328. JOHN SHALES was indicted for that he, at the General Session of the Delivery of the Gaol of the County of Norfolk, holden at the Castle of Norwich, on the 17th of August, in the 53d year of his late Majesty's reign, was in due form of law, tried and convicted of a burglary in the dwelling-house of Anthony Ayres , and stealing his property, and was thereupon ordered and adjudged to be hanged, and was afterwards pardoned upon condition of being transported beyond the seas for the term of his natural life, and afterwards, (to wit), on the 3d of July , in the 7th year of his present Majesty's reign, feloniously was at large, without lawful cause, within his Majesty's dominious, (to wit) at St. Andrew, Holborn , before the expiration of the term for which he had been so ordered to be transported , against the stature.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only not setting out the indictment of which he had been convicted.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution

Mr. JOHN STAFFORD . I produce a certified copy of an abstract of the record of the conviction of John Shales, at Norwich; I received it from Mr. H. Edgell, clerk of Assize on the Norfolk circuit - I have compared it with the original (read).

JEREMIAH HERBERT . I am an officer of the City. On the 3d of July I apprehended the prisoner at the White Hart public-house, Fetter-lane.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am keeper of the gaol at Norwich, for the county of Norfolk, and was so in 1813. I remember the prisoner there - he came into my custody on the 26th of March, 1813. I have referred to the journal of the gaol for the date - it is kept by myself - I have not got it here - I referred to it on the 14th of July, on receiving a letter from Mr. Stafford - I have no recollection of the date except from reference to that book.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner going into Court to be tried? A. Yes; I took him into Court at the Lammas Assize, 1813 - he had been in my custody about four months, and rather better than a month afterwards. I took him to Portsmouth, in consequence of the sentence of the Court - he was in my custody full five months - I saw him daily, except duty called me away - it was my duty to notice his person; I saw him tried - he is the same person who was tried - I afterwards accompanied him to Portsmouth - we were two nights and a day on the journey. I am certain, beyond doubt, of his being the person.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY. Q. Have you many prisoners in your gaol? A. From two to three hundred in the course of a year; there might be fifty while he was there; I was in Court when he received sentence; I only had one servant at that time, in that department - he is at Norwich now - I do not recollect the name of the priso

ner's prosecutor, nor any of the witnesses - he was committed by the Rev. Mr. Salmon, who is not living; I took five or six more to Portsmouth with him - our prisoners at that time wore a gaol dress as soon as they came in. I know him by his features - I have little doubt but I should recollect the features of the whole fifty I had in custody - I speak positively to the prisoner.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is it your particular duty to know the features of every prisoner? A. Yes; I take their measure and description - he wore his own clothes at his trial; I sat in Court all the while, and when he went to Portsmouth he wore his own clothes - I am certain he is the man.

JOHN CROWLY . I first saw the prisoner at New South Wales - at Sidney; I was steward of the ship "Army;" he was employed on board the ship, when we got there, as a carpenter - as an emancipated convict; after we sailed from the colony he was discovered concealed in the ship - I knew he was on board when we sailed; he was concealed in the after-hold; he was on board from November till we got to Monte Video - nearly two months - he is the same man.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you displaced for misconduct? A. I was displaced, but was not told what for - I do not know now fully; Mr. Leach was the Captain; the prisoner took my place. There was a placard stuck on our mizen before we sailed, about John Shales; the prisoner was not examined in consequence of that placard - he could not be found.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What was the placard about? A. A convict having absconded, and offering a reward; the Captain's apprentice acted as steward after we got to Monte Video - it is a merchant's ship.

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to say my name is not Shales, but King.* I have spent most of my time abroad, and was never in Norfolk. I acknowledge concealing myself in the Army.

* The prisoner had pleaded a misnomer, upon which issue was joined, and a verdict found for the Crown.

DANIEL LEACH . I was Captain of the Army, on which Crowly was on board; I certainly would not believe him on his oath - I dismissed him shortly after I left England, for making away with my property - he was succeeded by a person; and about six months afterwards he fell on his knees, and begged I would restore him to his situation, on account of his wife and children - he knew the cause of his dismissal; he was despised by every body in the ship. There was a placard on our mizen - it is worn out; the prisoner conducted himself very well indeed on board our vessel; I trusted him with all my stores, and so did all the passengers.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you traded long to New South Wales? A. I have been three voyages; I did not know the prisoner was on board till we left; I did not have him from the convict establishment; I did not know what he was: he was found three days after we got to sea, and I have no doubt Crowly secreted him there, for he was not mustered with the crew; he was to have no wages. I found four persons on board before I started, and delivered them up. I was three hundred miles at sea when I found the prisoner; he went ashore at Monte Video, and never returned; I reported him there to Mr. Hood, as being on board unexpectedly; he was called by the name of James.

Q. Did you ever write from the ship about him? A. Yes, to the consul, Mr. Hood; I suspected he was Shales by the placard; I knew such a man had escaped: I did not believe him to be the man; some people on board called him James Miller.

JURY to JOHN JOHNSON. Q. Do you take a description of the prisoners when they come in? A. Yes; I have not got it here; he was about twenty years old when convicted.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18260914-18

1329. WILLIAM LILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 5 handkerchiefs, value 25s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Spencer Hazeland , his master .

THOMAS SPENCER HAZELAND. I am a linen-draper , and live in Bishopsgate-street . The prisoner was three weeks in my service; I had my suspicions, and as I was going into the kitchen I found a pair of new stockings hanging out of his coat pocket, which was in the cupboard; while he was cleaning the front room window I called up Brown, my shopman, and left him there while I fetched Sapwell, the officer. I called Brown down - he was to send the prisoner out with a parcel; I cannot state what transpired afterwards, except that after he was detained I saw him throw some duplicates on the floor, which I took up, and gave to Sapwell.

HENRY BROWN . I am the shopman. On the 12th of July, after hearing of this circumstance, I told the prisoner to take out a parcel; he put his coat on with one arm, and with the other threw the stockings out of his pocket. I then prevented his going out, and called the officer up. The stockings are new, and have our shop-mark on them.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. Mr. Hazeland delivered the duplicates to me, in the prisoner's presence, and said he had thrown them away - he said nothing to it.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I was sent for, and seven duplicates were delivered to me; Mr. Hazeland said the prisoner had them in his possession, and he admitted it; five of them relate to handkerchiefs.

JAMES WISKARD . I am servant to Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker, of Houndsditch. On the 1st of July the prisoner pawned a new handkerchief, for 2s., in the name of Edwards. I gave him one of the duplicates produced.

SEPTIMUS SADLER . I live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 1st of July a handkerchief was pawned with me, in the name of John Edwards - I do not know who by, but the duplicate of it is among those produced.

JOHN WARD . I am servant to Mr. LeBlane, of Shoreditch. On the 1st of July a handkerchief was pawned with me, in the name of John Edwards - I do not recollect the person, but here is the duplicate I gave him.

CHARLES PADDON . I am shopman to Mr. Cotton, of Shoreditch. On the 1st of July a handkerchief was pawned with me, in the name of T. Edwards - I do not recollect the party, but here is the duplicate I gave him.

WILLIAM BUGG . I am servant to Mr. Attenborough, of Crown-street, Finsbury. A handkerchief was pawned

with me, in the name of Pressy, on the 23d of June - I do not know who by, but here is the duplicate I gave.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There are six shopmen and a maid-servant; he declares he took the tickets off the ground, but the servant brought them out of the kitchen.

MR. HAZELAND. The servant was behind him, but I saw him put his hand into his trousers pocket, and take them out.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-19

1330. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 7 penny-pieces, and 5 half-pence , the monies of William Miller and William Imeson .

JAMES TOMLIN . I am clerk to Messrs. William Miller and William Imeson, brewers , Horsleydown. I was out with their dray, delivering beer, and in Snows-fields I put a shilling's worth of pence and half-pence into the nose-bag, about ten o'clock, and between twelve and one, when I was in Sun-street, Bishopsgate , I missed seven penny-pieces and five halfpence; the drayman brought the prisoner to me.

JAMES SAMSON . I am the dray-man. I saw the prisoner take his hand out of the nose-bag in Sun-street; I asked Tomlin if anything was in it; I then ran and caught the prisoner, without losing sight of him; he said he had got nothing but what was his own, but afterwards took seven pence and five halfpence out of his pocket, and said that was what he took from the bag.

JAMES LOVELL . I was coming by as he delivered the copper up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-20

1331. MARY CONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 sheet, value 3s. , the goods of Margaret Baines and John Baines .

JOHN BAINES. I am in partnership with my mother, Margaret Baines - we are upholsterers , and live at the corner of St. Paul's-church-yard . On the 19th of July the prisoner, who was a perfect stranger, passed through the shop from up stairs; I sent a clerk after her - he brought her back, and this sheet was produced.

WILLIAM MANNERS . I am in Mr. Baines' service. I went after the prisoner, and asked what she had been up stairs for - she said she had been to speak to a woman, but could not tell me who; she had this sheet in her hand, under her cloak.

HANNAH LEWIS . I am the prosecutors' servant. The prisoner was a stranger. This sheet was taken off a bed on the third floor.

HENRY FOX . I am in Mr. Baines' service. I saw the prisoner at the door as I came out, and asked her business - she immediately stepped into the passage, and I went away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was much in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-21

1332. HENRY MOULDING and WILLIAM SAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Leach Street , from his person .

THOMAS LEACH STREET. I am clerk to a solicitor , and live in Upper Seymour-street. On the 3d of July, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was on Holborn-hill , a few paces from Field-lane; I did not perceive my handkerchief taken, but Moulding passed me - I then suspected it was gone; Sage immediately passed me, and joined him; I then missed my handkerchief - it was safe when I left my office in Mincing-lane. I stopped them both, and charged them with it - Moulding denied it - Sage said nothing; I found it in Moulding's coat pocket; a person assisted me in taking them to the watch-house; I met Lock, and gave them in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE LOCK . I am a constable. Mr. Street gave the prisoners into my charge. Sage said he did not do it, and knew nothing of the other.

MOULDING'S Defence. I was going up Field-lane, to Mr. Barret's, of Liquor-pond-street, where I have worked four years, and picked the handkerchief up; several people said they saw me pick it up, and told him to let me go.

MR. STREET. Nobody said so.

MOULDING - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

SAGE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-22

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1333. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, at the Delivery of the Gaol of the County of Southampton, holden at the Castle of Winchester, on the 5th of March, in the 2d year of his present Majesty's reign, was in due form of law tried and convicted upon an indictment against him, for feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, having in his possession and custody, a forged and counterfeited Bank note, well-knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited, and was thereupon ordered to be transported beyond the seas, for the term of fourteen years; and afterwards (to wit), on the 15th of March , in the 7th year of his Majesty's reign, feloniously was at large, without lawful cause, at the parish of St. Mary Matfelon, alias Whitechapel , before the expiration of the term for which he was so ordered to be transported , as aforesaid, against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting to set out the indictment upon which he was before convicted.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18260914-23

1334. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , at St. James, Westminster , 18 silver forks, value 20l., and 6 silver spoons, value 6l., the goods of William Young Knight , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WALTER . I am butler to Mr. William Young Knight, who lives in Marlborough-street, in the parish of St. James . On the morning of the 19th of July I missed eighteen silver forks and six spoons, which were worth

about 26l.; I had left them on the side-board the night before. The servant cleans the steps in the morning, and gets the water from the yard. The prisoner formerly lived in Mr. Knight's service, as footman , and had left about two months. I saw the plate at the office, and am certain it is master's.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer, and beadle of St. Giles'. On the 24th of July I apprehended the prisoner in Pall-mall - Nicholas was with me; as I took him along I called him aside, and told him I suspected he had committed a robbery, and attempted to bring me and my fellow-officer into trouble; I neither threatened or held him out any inducement to say any thing; he asked if I would allow him to write a letter to his master, Mr. Knight - I said, certainly, and asked where he would have it taken to; he said to his master's chambers, in St. James'-square - we took him there; Mr. Knight was out of town, and we took him in a coach to Marlborough-street - he stated in the coach that he had stolen the plate from Mr. Knight's house, No. 8, Marlborough-street; I went there, and got a pattern fork, then got into the coach, and drove to Mr. Levy's, in Holywell-street, Strand, where he said he had left the plate - I asked Levy if he knew him - he said Yes, and that he had brought the plate there; I asked if he had any plate similar to this fork; he said Yes, and sent his wife up stairs - she brought down eighteen forks and six spoons; Levy said the prisoner had brought it there - that he had given him a pair of trousers and 1s. 6d. for one spoon - the prisoner did not deny it.

JOSEPH LEVY . I live in Holywell-street. On a Sunday morning, a week before the officer came, I got this plate from the prisoner; he first came and bought a pair of trousers for 6s.; my son called me down; he said he had got some plate to sell, and that it was his own; I put my hand on it, and said I could not buy it without a reference; he said he would bring two references in two hours, but he did not come, and I gave information at the office next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there no quarrel between you about the price? A. No; he asked 5s. an ounce - I offered him 4s., but I did not pay him for it; I should not have bought it without a reference; I suspected it was not his own. I keep a clothes-shop. I gave the same plate to Green.

MORRIS NICHOLAS . I am an officer, and was present when the prisoner made the confession; it was voluntarily. Green's statement is quite correct.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18260914-24

1335. MARY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 30 yards of flannel, value 50s., the goods of Thomas Robinson and John Harris , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN BIRBECK . I am a boot-closer. On the 11th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was about ten yards from the prosecutor's shop, in Crawford-street, Mary-le-bone , and saw the prisoner catch hold of a piece of flannel, which was in the shop, but projected a little out of the door - she was close to the door; she examined it with her fingers, then lifted up her shawl, took the flannel in her arms, and got about twelve yards from the house with it, when I secured her - she dropped it. I took her back, and then fetched the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was she drunk? A. I think she was rather in liquor, but not much; when I first saw her a woman stood at her back - the prisoner is the woman who took it.

THOMAS ROBINSON. I am in partnership with John Harris - we are linen-drapers . Birbeck brought the prisoner in, and then fetched the flannel, which is ours; I should sell it for 45s.

GUILTY. Aged 39. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-25

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1336. JOHN LEE , HENRY STOCK WELLER , MATTHEW SMITH , JOSEPH SEWELL , and JAMES SANDERS , were indicted for the wilful murder of Edward Lavey .

WILLIAM DOWNE . I am a comb-maker, and live in Shoreditch. I knew Edward Lavey - he was a French polisher , and about sixteen years old. On Wednesday, the 16th of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw him and Lee in Leonard-square; Sanders and a person named Ghost were there; Lavey struck Lee twice - then Lee struck him; they fought two rounds - the watchman parted them, and they went home; Lavey challenged Lee to fight on Sunday morning - they agreed during the week not to fight, but on Saturday I understood they agreed to fight; they met at Shoreditch church on Sunday morning, about half-past seven; all the prisoners were there, and a quantity of people; they began to fight in a field about eight o'clock, and fought more than an hour, with their fists; there were no regular seconds - several acted as seconds. Lavey had the best of it, but at the close of the fight Lee fell with his elbow on Lavey's throat - it was an accident in the fall- he was taken up by his second, and put on his knee, but he fell senseless; I and two more helped to take him to a doctor, who bled him, and ordered him to the London Hospital - I went to see him there - he died at two o'clock that afternoon. I saw no unfair blows struck; the other prisoners acted as seconds, as well as others on the ground - when one was tired the other helped. I saw Stockweller pick Lee up two or three times; Smith picked Lavey up three or four times; Sewell picked up Lee once or twice; and Sanders picked up Lavey once or twice. There were fifty or one hundred people there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not the principal object of their interference seem to prevent any unfair blows being struck? A. Yes. Stockweller tore his trousers, and left them after the first three rounds; he sat down on the bank, and did not interfere again; he was not there five minutes; the accident happened at least an hour after - he was ten or twelve yards off - he said nothing, but looked on.

HENRY BROWN . I live in Shoreditch, and saw this fight; it was at Hackney - I saw all the prisoners there. Lavey and Lee fought an hour or more; I did not see the end of it. I was on the bank. I saw all the other prisoners picking them up; it was a fair fight - several others picked them up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not they endeavour to prevent any thing unfair being done? A. Yes; I was on the same bank as Stockweller; he did not interfere after he sat down.

THOMAS DRAKE . I am a pupil at the London Hospital. Lavey was brought there at ten o'clock in the morning, perfectly insensible; he was bruised on his temple, forehead, neck, face, and under the left ear; the bruises appeared to have been produced by blows from a fist; he died about two o'clock that day. I opened him next day, and found a considerable quantity of extravasated blood on the brain, which caused his death; a severe blow or fall was sufficient to occasion it - his stomach and chest were quite perfect.

Cross-examined. Q. If in fighting he used violent exertion himself, and fell from that exertion, might not that have occasioned the extravasation? A. Yes.

JOSEPH WALTERS . I apprehended Lee on Sunday - he said he did not wish to fight if he could have avoided it.

LEE'S Defence. I met the deceased on Wednesday night - he walked with me to Leonard-square; I wished him good night, and he struck me twice - we had two rounds, and the watchman parted us - he wanted me to meet him again; I said I owed him no animosity, and hoped he did not; he said he did, for I had called him spungy, and he would give me a good licking - I said I did not wish to fight; he said he would meet me on Sunday morning - I said I did not like to fight on Sunday, as my master always wished me to go to the Poultry chapel. On Saturday night, as I was coming home, he said he wished to fight on Sunday morning, and in the morning I met him by Shoreditch church, as I had been for some watercresses; he asked if I meant to fight - I said No; he said then he would hit me in the mouth - I did not wish that, and two or three others persuaded me to fight, and I went and fought him in the Cat and Mutton fields .

The other prisoners stated they had only assisted in picking up the deceased and Lee.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-26

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1337. WILLIAM MURRAY was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with killing and slaying William Bass .

JOSEPH BELL . I live in St. Martin's-lane , and am a hair-dresser. On the 8th of August , about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner driving a waggon , loaded with dung - he had three or four horses; it was walking at a fair pace, not fast, and coming up the lane, from the Strand; a waggon of flour was unloading on the opposite side, and a donkey cart was close to my door, coming down the lane, towards the prisoner's waggon - the wheels were close to the curb- the waggon ran against the donkey-cart; the man called loudly to the prisoner to stop; I think he must have heard him - he did not stop. After he passed that there was a truck, drawn by two men, about four yards before him; the fore wheel caught hold of the truck, and threw the man down who was next the waggon, and the hind wheel went over him; I think the prisoner must have seen the cart and truck; the man called out very loud, and the waggon stopped when the wheel was on the man's legs; it was backed, and the man got out from under the wheel - he was taken to the hospital - I believe he was a pauper.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he appear an infirm man? A. He was fifty-nine years old I believe - the other man was not hurt. The waggon went at a fair pace, and stopped instantly it occurred; it drew in to pass the flour waggon, but there was not room; it would make a noise going along - the road is paved.

COURT. Q. Where was the waggoner ? A. On his right side, about the second horse; the flour waggon was rather further from my house; he had not passed it when the accident happened; his horses were drawn in, and going by the waggon, before his waggon had passed my house. The street is five yards and three quarters wide; his horses were between me and him; the donkey-cart and truck were next to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-27

1338. JOHN HAYES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Larkins Pascall , about two o'clock in the night of the 11th of July , at All Saints, Poplar , with intent to steal, and stealing, 29 wine glasses, value 2l.; 2 butter glasses and saucers, value 30s.; 3 glass salt-cellars and saucers, value 20s.; 2 other salt-cellars, value 4s.; 1 salt-spoon, value 7s.; 2 wine-decanters, value 3l.; 1 knife-rest, value 2d.; 2 chandeliers, value 3l.; 1 watch, value 5l; 1 gold chain, value 18l.; 2 seals, value 9l.; 1 watch-key, value 1l.; 4 shells, value 4s., and 1 bell ornament, value 1s., his property .

Mr. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

CAPTAIN WILLIAM LARKINS PASCALL. I am a master mariner , and live at No. 150, East India-road , in the parish of All Saints, Poplar. On the 12th of July, at two o'clock in the morning, I thought I heard a noise; I got out of bed and heard the church clock strike two, and my own clock also; I listened for ten minutes, and hearing no further noise, on getting into bed again, I awoke Mrs. Pascall - I heard the noise a second time, and got out of bed - I could not find the key of my chamber door for some time, and it was three o'clock when I got down stairs; when I heard the second noise it was light enough to see some distance - the noise was the falling of the Venetian blind; I found the bolts of the parlour door strained open, and missed every thing from the side-board except a large carving-knife, which was placed there as if for self-defence; I missed all the things enumerated in the indictment; I cannot say that I saw them all there the night before; the outer sash of the window was lifted up, and the lower hinge of the lower inside window shutter was burst open, and so the bar was pushed up. On the 14th, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, Levy called and informed me he knew where the property was - I had before that offered a reward of 50l.; in consequence of what passed between me and Levy, I and a friend went to Dr. Beal's, at nine o'clock at night, and met Levy - we went with him into the neighbourhood of the prisoner's house; Levy stationed us where we should find the prisoner - it was then about half-past ten o'clock; we all went to the prisoner's door in Well-street; I saw him and brushed against him - I had four or five persons with

me; he said "What the devil are you doing here;" Levy said "That is the man;" and I collared him; he hove me down, and I fell upon him; he had a canvas frock on, and in the scuffle an immense quantity of glass fell from his person - it was part of the property I had lost. He was secured and taken to Dr. Beal's, and sent to the watch-house. Levy proposed we should go to a hedge in Bow-lane, about half a mile from Well-street, and after looking in the hedge with a light, we found a quantity of my property (a pair of bronze candlesticks, and other things) which I knew to be mine; from there we went to the watch-house - the prisoner had then been searched; I said"Oh, Hayes, I am sorry to see you in this situation;" his reply was that he had found the things. I knew there was such a man before, and have occasionally employed him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. You had employed him? A. I sometimes employ three hundred men in a day; I do not recollect employing him, but I am told that I have. I offered a reward on the evening of the 13th- Levy had not called then; the prisoner was searched before I got to the watch-house; it was dusk when we apprehended him; Levy was near us when the glass fell from him - some of it broke, and some was picked up whole; the glass was not marked; the value of the property found in the field is about 25l., for the watch was not found; some of the glass was in the field. I value all my property at 50l., including the watch - I gave 5l. for that, and eighteen guineas for the chain.

COURT. Q. When you came down at three o'clock, was it light enough to see a man's countenance? A. No; the day had began to break; there were two men under my window, but I could not see what colour their jackets were. My bill offers a reward in proportion to the property recovered, on conviction.

LYON LEVY . I live at No. 1, Borer's-buildings, Cutler-street, Houndsditch, and am a dealer in foreign curiosities. I first saw the prisoner on Friday, the 14th of July - he came up to me in the middle of Poplar, and asked me if I would buy any things of him; I asked what things - he said cut glass; I had seen bills about the street - it struck me they might be the same goods, and I said I would buy them.

Q. The bill advertised a reward? A. I was too much agitated to think of the reward - I was thinking more about the prosecutor's robbery. He took me to his house in East India-court, Well-street, Poplar, and told me to call on him at nine o'clock. I left him, went about my business for two or three hours, and then went to the prosecutor's, supposing it was his property, but I did not know it. I went at nine o'clock by appointment, and found him at his house; he took me to a field behind a hedge, in the road leading to Bromley, Middlesex, by Bow; before we got to the field he shewed me a silver hunting watch, with a ribbon to it; he said "The things I am going to shew you are queer;" I understood his meaning - he took me to the field, searched along the hedge for two bronze candlesticks, and two cut wine-glasses; he said "D-n it, I cannot find these - I suspect somebody has found them;" he searched further, and found a silver salt-spoon, a china knife-rest, and four shells; he said "I must leave this place, and come somewhere else;" he crossed over the hedge, took me to a ditch, knelt down, pulled up his sleeves, and pulled out two decanters, a handkerchief with eight wine glasses in it, three cut-glass salt-cellars and stands, two cut-glass butter pots and stands: he asked me to purchase these things of him; I asked how much he wanted for them; he said 30s. - and, not with a view of buying, I offered 15s.; he said he would not take it, but I should have them for 18s. I accompanied him towards home, and when he came to the hedge where he had been before, he crossed over, and put some of the cut-glass there: we proceeded on towards Captain Pascall's; he said "You may as well have these things - we are near the place I took them from." We went towards his house, and on the way he asked if I would have them - he would not take less.

Q. When did you get to his house? A. Between ten and eleven o'clock. I had stationed the prosecutor and his friends in a court; I went to the prisoner's house with him, and directly after he was taken by the prosecutor and his friends - he was giving the glass to his wife in the court. I went out of the court, gave Captain Pascall a signal and he was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to say he came up to you in the street, and told you this story, all at once? A. He did; he was a perfect stranger. I had seen the bills up very near his house - he had the same opportunity of seeing them as I had - the bills were in High-street - he lived about three minutes walk from there - I went to no officer but went to the prosecutor about seven o'clock; I intended to do it at the time, but had business to attend to at two or three places, where persons had goods to dispose of; I met him about one o'clock - about three minutes walk from the prosecutor's; I had to go to Blackwall - it would be out of my way to call on the prosecutor going there; I thought if I went when I had done my business it would be just time to attend to the prisoner at nine o'clock; I did not get home till one o'clock at night; I went to the prosecutor's about six o'clock; I was agitated, but was determined to attend to it; I knew a reward was offered.

Q. On your solemn oath is it for the sake of the reward, or public justice that you do this? A. Public justice; I do not care about the reward a bit; I certainly expect it as it is offered, if the prisoner is convicted, as it is on conviction; such a thing never happened to me before; I have been about the neighbourhood daily for four years, and he might know me by sight; I never spoke to him nor saw him before; he did not tell me where the things were - it was not the first time I heard the word queer - it means stolen; I do not keep a shop - I deal with eight or ten respectable tradesmen; I sell goods as I buy them, and keep them at home - I live with my father; I met the prisoner three or four miles from my house; I told nobody of this till I got to the prosecutor's; I had seen the bills about eleven o'clock that morning; I did not tell him of the bills; it would be giving him an opportunity of making away with the property. I was agitated but knew what I was about; as he told me to call at nine o'clock I did not suppose he would take the property away before; he took me to his house - his wife was present - I could not tell what the property was till he shewed it me, and could not be certain it was the prosecutor's; he did

not tell me I was to go to the fields, but said he would take me somewhere; it was agreed that the prosecutor should wait at Dr. Beal's, while I went with the prisoner, and saw if they were the goods; nobody saw him shew me the property in the fields; two persons passed but took no notice. The prosecutor does not claim the watch which he shewed me.

THOMAS BRADLEY . I am constable of All Saints, Poplar. On the 14th of July I attended with the prosecutor and others, and apprehended the prisoner about half-past ten; he made a most desperate resistance at being handcuffed, during which time several pieces of glass fell from his person, which McLean picked up; I afterwards went to the watch-house, and said I was sorry to see him there- he replied that he had found the property: I went to the field with Levy, the prosecutor, McLean and two watchmen, and found the decanters, chandeliers, and butter-glasses, which I now produce - the prisoner was then in the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search the prisoner's house? A. No. I knew him before, and said I was sorry to see him there.

JOSEPH McLEAN . I was present when the prisoner was apprehended, and afterwards saw him in the watch-house; he said he had found the property; I have two butter saucers and the broken glass which he threw from his person; I found three pieces on the ground after he was taken away.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Levy near him at the time? A. He was not far off.

SAMUEL CHRISTIAN WILLIAMS . I am headborough. I was at the watch-house and searched the prisoner - I found upon him a salt spoon, a knife-rest, a curtain or nament, (which the prosecutor claims), and a watch (which he does not claim.)

REBECCA WESTLAKE . I was in the prosecutor's service. I went to bed at half-past eleven o'clock, and left the parlour perfectly secure as usual - I was the last person up, and saw every thing secure when I bolted the door; all the articles, stated in the indictment, were on the side-board when I went to bed (examining the property produced); this knife-rest I left on the side-board drawer, with master's watch, chain, seals, and key; this curtain ornament belonged to the parlour bell-pull - I saw it the night before: this is our salt-spoon, and the only one I left on the side-board; I know these butter saucers and glass, by having used them daily for nine months; also the decanters found in the ditch, and the wine glasses, by continually using them - these two shells were on the mantel-piece and these bronze candlesticks were also on the mantel-piece - these salt-cellars were used the night before - I swear to every thing.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What do you call these candlesticks? A. Chandeliers. This ornament had been pulled off the bell the day before.

MR. PASCALL. These decanters are worth 15s.; the chandliers two guineas; salt-cellars 4s.; salt-spoon 4s.; seven wine-glasses 4s.; two sugar-basins, 10s.; the butter sancers are worth 1l. My watch was safe the night before - I have not found it - it cost me 5l., and the chain 18l.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you call these things candlesticks? A. No - chandeliers; I do not know what they cost but know they were expensive - I have had them four years. My wife is ill, and has been given over, ever since this happened: I am sole occupier of the house.

COURT to LEVY. Q. How came you to know that the things you pointed out to Bradley were in the hedge? A. I saw the prisoner put them there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed at the time the robbery was done.

Eight witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25. Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary.

Reference Number: t18260914-28

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1339. SAMUEL MERRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , 1 gelding, price 5l. , the property of Joseph Hoggett .

JOSEPH HOGGETT. I am a labouring man , and live at Laytonstone. On Saturday night, the 22d of April, about eight o'clock, I turned my gelding out on Wanstead Flats , and missed it between seven and eight on Sunday morning; I had had it about eight months - it was a black gelding, was chafed on the rump a good deal, and was worth 5l.; it was in an open place; I found it in possession of Bevan, at the New London Docks, about a month afterwards.

JAMES BEVAN . I lived at King's-head-yard, Kingsland-road, but now live in Burr-street, Wapping. I never saw the prisoner till the 21st, 22d, or 23d of April; I think it was on the 22d I saw him in Old-street - he had nothing with him then, and I said nothing to him; I saw him afterwards at Gotts' livery-stables, Old-street-road, nearly opposite Pitfield-street; the witness Lock came after me, and I went there (I had asked him if he knew who had a horse to sell); he took me to Gotts' livery stables: we met the prisoner coming up Pitfield-street, towards where I lived; he asked if I wanted to buy a horse - Lock was with me, and told me the prisoner had a horse to sell; the prisoner took me to Gotts' stables, shewed me a horse, and asked if that would do; I said it would not do at all - I would have nothing to do with it- I wanted a cart horse, and it was not big enough. He asked what I would give for it; I said I could give nothing for that; he said he had a horse he could bring me, if I would try it. He brought the horse away, and came up to my place in King's-head-yard, and I tried it; Lock said he had known the horse for three years; I asked what the price would be if I should like him after trying him a day; the prisoner asked what sort of a horse I wanted; I said a strong cart horse, worth about 8l. or 9l.; he said he wanted a little money to go to a fair; I said I would let him have 50s. on this horse till he brought me one to suit: I had but 49s. - he took that, and left the horse with me; I had it about six weeks, I think, when Hoggett came and claimed it in Old Gravel-lane, by the London Docks - I gave it up to him; I did not see the prisoner afterward till he was taken - he never brought another horse - one was brought to me but not by him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who brought it? A. I was not at home at the time - it was not left;

another was brought afterwards, but it was too dear. I took it on Lock's recommendation; he said he had known it three years, working at the back of the White Raven public-house. I have known Lock five or six years; it was sold to me openly in the King's Head-yard; any one passing might see it - it is an open yard; he did not tell me he had bought it that morning. I do not know whether he is a horse-dealer.

GEORGE HYDE . I am a carman, and live at the King's Head, Kingsland-road. I know Bevan. I first saw the prisoner on the 23d of April, coming down King's Headyard, with Lock; Bevan was gone into his own house; the horse was put into Bevan's stable - they brought it into my yard, and the prisoner tried it. Bevan had the horse at work with me, at the London-docks, for four or five weeks. The last time I saw it was at Worship-street, on the 21st of June - it was then in Hoggett's possession.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you say whether the prisoner or Lock led the horse into the yard? A. No; the prisoner seemed master of it; Lock said he had known it at the back of the White Raven for three years. I knew Lock before by his driving about town.

GEORGE GOTTS . I keep the Crosby's Head liverystable, Old-street-road. On Sunday, the 23d of April, the prisoner brought a black horse to my house - he came alone, and left the horse in my stable for about an hour; then two or three people came with him to look at it, and took it away with them - it was one or two of the witnesses - Lock was one, I think. I saw a horse at Worship-street, at the examination - it appeared to be the same.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you get up that morning? A. Between six and seven o'clock - he brought it as early as that.

JOHN LOCK . I am a carter, and live in Old Nichol-street, Shoreditch. I know the prisoner by sight. On a Saturday in April (I do not recollect the date) I saw him in Golden-lane - I knew him before, only by sight. I went to a house in Golden-lane to him; I saw him again on Sunday morning, between six and seven o'clock, in Old-street-road - he had nothing with him then, and I had no conversation with him; he had told me overnight to tell Bevan he would bring the horse to Gott's stables on the Sunday morning; Bevan had asked me on Saturday if I knew who had one to sell; I said I thought I did, and went to Merrett, and he told me to tell him he would bring one there.

Q. How did you know he had one to sell? A. He had told me if I knew who wanted one to let him know - I thought he dealt in horses. Baker and Bevan were with me when I met the prisoner on Sunday, and we all four took the horse up to the King's Head, which is nearly a mile from Gotts', and tried it; the prisoner went with us to Gotts', and got the horse - Bevan lent him 49s. on it till the Friday following, when he was to bring him another - I do not know whether he did take him another - I never took one. I saw the same horse at Worship-street afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a horse-dealer? A. No- I only knew Merrett before by sight.

Q. Did you not ask him to sell this horse for you? A. No - I am certain of that; I did not take another horse to the King's Head; I thought I knew this horse by its working at the back of the White Raven - it was so much like that horse, I thought I could swear to it. I pledged myself that I had known it three years, and one James Howard pledged the same. I did not tell Bevan afterwards that I was mistaken - I did not find it out till the horse was owned. I was at the King's Head afterwards, when another horse was brought, and should know the man who brought it, but I did not; I was there by accident, standing outside the gate - it might be between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I live half a mile off - that horse was sold to Harwood; I do not know where the prisoner got this gelding from; I told the prisoner I had known it three years, behind the White Raven, and he said that was where he brought it from.

WILLIAM BAKER . I live in Mill-row, Kingsland-road. I was passing the King's Head gates on Sunday morning, when Bevan asked me to go and look at a horse; we went to Gotts' stables, the Crosby's Head - we met the prisoner in Pitfield-street in our way; Lock said he was the man who had it to sell, and he went back with us and showed us the horse; we then went to King's Head yard - Bevan said it was too little; the prisoner said he would let him have it to work a day or two, and would then bring him another, as he was going to a fair.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Lock appear to know the prisoner? A. We should have known nothing of the prisoner, or horse if Lock had not come to us. We were about half an hour in the yard looking at the horse.

JAMES BROWN . I am a Bow-street officer. I received information that the prisoner was wanted, and apprehended him at the corner of St. John-street, Smithfield.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. The prisoner was brought to the office on another charge, and I detained him, as the person described as bringing this horse to the King's Head.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I only found the horse.

JOSEPH HOGGETT. The horse found at Bevan's is mine. I never saw the prisoner near my premises.

Prisoner's Defence. I had witnesses here, but am afraid they are gone into the country.

GEORGE GOTTS . The prisoner paid me 6d. for a feed of corn for the horse.

One Witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18260914-29

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1340. JAMES GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Allen ,(the said John Allen and others of his family therein being), about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 18th of August , at St. Luke , and stealing therein 4 pieces of udder, value 2s. 6d.; 15 bundles of tripe, value 1s.; 2 bullocks' tripes, value 2s. 6d.; 1 bullock's mane, value 6d., and 1 sack, value 6d., the goods of the said John Allen .

JOHN ALLEN. I live in Whitecross-street , St. Luke's, and am a butcher and tripeman . The prisoner came into my employ before Christmas, and went away on the 17th of August, at night, informing me he had got other work, and should not return to me. After he was gone I went into the tripe-house, where there was tripe, udder, and a

bullock's gall; I cut the letter A in the udders. I directed Gould and Harrison to watch. Next morning Belsham brought me a sack, which I knew to be mine - it contained four bullocks' udders, two tripes, a bullock's feck, and fifteen penny bundles of tripe; the udders were part of what I marked the night before. I went into the tripe-house, and missed them - there is a door goes from my dwelling-house into the slaughter-house, and then into the tripe-house: they all join together, and are under one roof; there is a back door to the tripe-house and stable, opening into a court in Banner-street; the tripe-house has been added to the building since I have lived there. I and my family all slept at home on this night; the house was fastened up, and in the morning I found somebody had broken into the stable, from the court, by moving one of the wooden staves - it has been cut so as to be moved in and out, to admit a person through the window; I had not examined it for two or three days, and cannot say when it was done.

JAMES GOULD . I am a constable. I received directions from Mr. Allen, and at four o'clock in the morning placed myself so as to have a view of his house, and the court leading to his back premises - at five o'clock I saw the prisoner coming up Banner-street, with a sack or something under his arm; he looked through the prosecutor's door and shutters, and then went down towards the back door - he looked about, and then went up the court; Harrison came up - we waited about twenty minutes, and saw him come down the court, with a bag on his back; he turned round, saw us, threw the bag down, and away he ran; Belsham came up, and we gave him the bag; we followed him to South-street, Finsbury, and there secured him. I said to him, "You are the confidential servant, are not you?" he said it was the first time - we took him to the watch-house. I was present when the udder was marked the night before.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a headborough. I joined Gould at five o'clock, and in about twenty minutes saw the prisoner come down the court, with a sack on his back, which he dropped on seeing us, and ran away; we followed him nearly a mile, when a waggoner stopped him- he said it was his first time. As I took him to the watch-house I said to him, "How came you to rob your master?" I did not threaten or make him any promise - he said it was through distress; I said he had plenty of work - he said he only had three days work in a week, and had a wife and three children to support.

SWAN BELSHAM . I am a watchman. On this morning I saw the prisoner go down the alley into Banner-street, with the bag on his back - he looked, and saw he was pursued, and cropped it - he ran off; I minded the bag while they pursued; I carried it round to Allen's front door, and gave it to Gould when he returned; I never opened it. Allen afterwards gave it to me to take to the office - I have it here.

JOHN ALLEN. I know this bag - it was brought to me with the property in it - it was kept in the slaughter-house - I had not seen it for two or three days before.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 32. Of stealing only . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-30

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1341. JAMES FOYLE was indicted for that, at the General Session of the Delivery of the Gaol of Newgate, holden for the City of London, on the 22d of June, Edward Archer was tried and convicted on an indictment for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April, seven 5l. notes, and five hundred 1l. Bank notes, the property of William Chaplin and others, his partners, and was thereupon adjudged to be transported beyond the seas, for seven years; and that the said James Foyle, before the said felony was done and committed (to wit), on the 11th of April , feloniously did incite, move, procure, and counsel the said Edward Archer the felony aforesaid, in manner and form aforesaid to do and commit - and GEORGE ARCHER, alias BARTLETT , was indicted for feloniously receiving the said notes, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN BUTLER produced a copy of the record of the conviction of Edward Archer - (read).

AUGUSTUS FREDERICK STONEBRIDGE . I am clerk to Messrs. Robinson, Bolton, and Watt, of Birmingham - they have a house in town. On the 11th of April I procured seven 5l. Bank notes, Nos. 6538 to 6544, dated the 8th of March, and five hundred 1l., Nos. 80,001 to 80,500, and enclosed them in a parcel, directed to Mr. John Robinson, Soho, Birmingham; I took it to the Spread Eagle, Grace-church-street, and delivered it to the prisoner Foyle, at the coach-office, and paid him 2l. 4s. 6d., as an insurance on it, as a valuable parcel.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How do you know the numbers of the notes? A. I took a memorandum of them at the time.

JOHN BROOK LARKMAN . I am book-keeper at the Spread Eagle, and was so in April, and so was Foyle. I was not present when this parcel was brought, but Foyle pointed it out to me, and told me it was insured for 535l.; it was directed to Mr. Robinson, Soho, Birmingham; I delivered it to Evans, the guard of the Birmingham coach - Foyle was in the office, three or four yards from me, when I gave Evans particular directions about it; I referred to the book, and saw it entered in Foyle's hand-writing; the other parcels were called over to me by the porter - I checked them off, then gave Evans this, stating it to be a valuable parcel; Foyle went away, according to his custom, before the coach started.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did any thing more happen than there does every night? A. No - he left at his usual time.

COURT. Q. When you gave the parcel to the guard did you speak loud? A. No - I leaned over the counter, not wishing every body to hear me - I think Foyle must have heard me, as we were both behind the counter - here is Foyle's entry of the parcel, "No. 8, Robinson, 535l. insured, 2l. 4s. 6d. paid."

RICHARD EVANS . I was guard of the Birmingham old post-coach. On the 11th of April Larkman gave me this parcel - it was directed to Robinson and Co., Birmingham; he gave me particular directions about it; I put it into the back seat inside the coach; a man got into the coach unknown to anybody, at the Bull and Mouth - I

cannot myself say that Edward Archer was in the coach. When we got to Birmingham the parcel was gone. I was taken into custody, and detained seven weeks, till inquiry was made; the coach stopped at Market-street, to supper; a young man who was inside left the coach at Stoney Stratford - he gave me and the coachman 1s. each.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many inside passengers had you? A. Three from the office, but I had four before I got out of town; a young woman got out before we got to Market-street, and we took her up again beyond Market-street, the other three passengers got out at Market-street, to supper - they got in after supper, and were all three inside when the young woman got in again; I never had valuable parcels with that coach before, but I have with others; if this had not been too large I should have put this into the bottom of the front boot; I could not get it into my side pocket; I should have done the same on any other night.

Q. Did you not put it into your pocket when Larkman gave it to you? A. No; I put it under my arm, and took it to the coach; I did not put it inside my coat. The young woman left at Dunstable, and another passenger at Stoney Stratford.

AUGUSTUS FREDERICK STONEBRIDGE re-examined. I put two magazines into the parcel with the notes - it was five or six inches square; it might, perhaps, with difficulty, be put into an inside pocket.

MR. ADOLPHUS to JOHN BROOK LARKMAN. Q. Did not you see the guard put it into his breast pocket? A. Yes; I could not see his pocket, but he put it into his breast, buttoned his coat, and took it to the coach.

EDWARD HANNEL . I lived at the Rose and Crown public-house, Little Britain; Evans lodged there. I used to take his coat and luggage to the Bull and Mouth. On the 11th of April, when I took them, Edward Archer(who was convicted here) was inside the coach.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see anybody else there? A. Two gentlemen; I knew Archer before; he was shabbily dressed, in black, it was not dark.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long were you there? A. About ten minutes; the guard opened the door, and asked him for the money; he refused to give it him at first, but at last gave him two sovereigns.

COURT. Q. Did you know Archer intimately? A. No - he and his sister lived in Montague-place. I used to take them beer daily.

MR. JOHN CHASE . I am a surgeon, and live at King's Norton, Worcestershire. On the 11th of April I got into the Birmingham coach at the Bull and Mouth, about six o'clock; two persons were then inside - one of whom was Edward Archer, who was convicted here last Session; I had a considerable sum of money about me - he was meanly dressed in black; I asked how far he was going; he said to Stoney Stratford; I asked if he lived there - he said No, he was merely going to stop a few days on business. When we stopped at Market-street there were three persons inside (a female who got in at Islington had then got out - she got in afterwards again). I and the gentleman who sat opposite to me supped there - we did not see Archer till we came out; he was then drinking a glass of spirits: he got into the coach, and left at Stoney Stratford.

THOMAS MIDDLETON . I am a clerk in the Inspector's-office at the Bank. On the 12th of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, Edward Archer, who is convicted brought two hundred 1l. notes to the Bank, for a 200l. note; I took him to the Treasury - I delivered the notes there, and received the 200l. note, which I gave to Mr. Higman; it was given to Archer, to write his name and address - this paper was given to me with the person's address - (reads) - "Thomas Matthews, 21, Euston-square, two hundred 1l. - 200l." - he returned the note to the pay-clerk, but not in my presence.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Can you, from memory, swear to the 200l. note Archer brought? A. No; I received the 200l. note from Mr. Butler, at the Treasury.

JOHN BUTLER . I am cashier in the Treasury at the Bank. On the 12th of April, I issued a 200l. note, No. 5862, dated the 6th of March, 1826, in exchange for two hundred of 1l., in the name of Thomas Matthews, No.21, Euston-square.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the person? A. No. I asked if he wanted gold for it - he said Yes, so I gave him a 200l. note, as he could get gold for it as well as smaller ones, and prevent spoiling them.

JOSEPH GUMMER . I am a clerk in the Inspector's-office. On the 12th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner George Archer, (who was alone), presented me three hundred 1l. notes - he wanted sovereigns for them, and brought a ticket with them, as usual, with his name and address - here is the ticket - (reads) " Thomas Toob , Henley-upon-Thames, three hundred 1l." - the notes were inspected, and I went with him to the Treasury, to get three of 100l. each; I accompanied him to Mr. Higman, the pay-clerk, and then took him to Mr. Kingston, in the hall, to get sovereigns for them - he said he wished to go off by the coach. I was about a quarter of an hour with him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it a busy hour at the Bank? A. Not particularly. Our office is not crowded - very few strangers come there. I have a good recollection of person's features - he was dressed in dark clothes, as he is now; his coat was buttoned - he had top boots, I think, and a slouched hat, I swear he is the man - I cannot be mistaken.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You saw him for a quarter of an hour? A. Yes. I seldom have transactions of this kind- he appeared to be a countryman.

COURT. Q. Did any other person apply for three hundred sovereigns? A. No - it is not a common circumstance. I saw him at Bow-street about June; I desired his hat to be put on, and then felt certain of him; I did not like to decide till his hat was on. I most firmly believe him to be the man.

MR. BUTLER re-examined. On the same day I paid three 100l. notes, (Nos. 18,248 to 18,250, dated the 27th of February, 1826), in the name of Toob, for three hundred of 1l. - they were to be exchanged for gold. I remember Mr. Gummer coming, but he did not bring the person into the office, as we do not admit strangers.

WILLIAM HIGMAN . I am a pay-clerk at the Bank. -

On the 12th of April Mr. Middleton brought me a 200l. note; I gave it to the party he pointed out; I do not remember who. In the course of the same morning Mr. Gummer brought me three 100l. notes, which I gave the person he pointed out, and whom I believe to be the prisoner Archer.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. How many persons are at the desk with you? A. Only one. I saw him over the desk rail - we sit above the rail - I saw the whole of his person. There was nothing more than common to excite my observation.

THOMAS BENJAMIN KINGSTON . I am a clerk in the Teller's-office at the Bank. On the 12th of April I exchanged some large notes for gold - I have the notes - here is one of 200l., endorsed " Thomas Matthews , 21, Euston-square;" here are three of 100l., which were presented together before the 200l. - they are endorsed"Thomas Toob, Henley-upon-Thames;" immediately after I paid gold for these three, the same person presented seven 5l.; it was the prisoner Archer, I am certain; I saw him three different times that morning - the first time he put down a bundle on the desk, and said he had got ones which he wanted sovereigns for; I referred him to the Inspector's-office, to have them examined - he returned in about half an hour, with three 100l. notes, for which I gave him sovereigns, and in five minutes he came with seven fives; I have them here - they are Nos. 6538 to 6544 inclusive, dated the 8th of March, 1826; they were not examined when he brought them, and I directed him to the Inspector's, as before, and to write his name on them - he returned, and delivered them to me; Mr. Lugger, a teller, paid them, in my presence, in sovereigns; here is written on them "seven notes, 35l. - Toob, Henley-upon-Thames," in Lugger's hand-writing. I am certain of the prisoner's person.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You only saw him on one day? A. No; my attention was called to the transaction a few days afterwards, when Edward Archer was in custody. I paid particular attention to the prisoner, for at that time orders were given to take particular notice of persons bringing large notes for gold; I did not look at his dress; his face was sufficient for me; he had a brown great coat on; his hat was not slouched when I saw him.

JURY. Q. Did he come prepared with a bag for the sovereigns? A. I do not know; his saying he had three hundred ones induced me to attend to him; I think he had the notes in a handkerchief: it is an unusual sum for a private person to bring.

JOHN JAMES BOUQUET . I am a Bank clerk, and have an entry of the issue of five hundred 1l. notes, numbers 80,001 to 80,500 - they were paid on the 11th of April for a cheque of 535l., drawn by Moseley - they came into the Bank again next day, and were re-issued that day - there were also seven 5l. notes, numbered 6538 to 6544, dated the 8th of March, paid for the same cheque.

AUGUSTUS FREDERICK STONEBRIDGE. Here is the cheque for which I got the notes - it is drawn by Moseley.

WILLIAM SMITH . I keep the King of Prussia public-house, Somerset-place, Hoxton. The prisoner Archer came to my house in April, ordered a dinner, and inquired why a beef-steak and cod fish were not taken in for the dinner - they were sent back afterwards, and he dined there with some person, whom I do not recollect. Archer brought a parcel, in a small bag, with him, and said he had been to receive, or was going to pay away, some money - I cannot say which; he put the bag down on the bar door - it sounded as if something heavy was in it - I supposed it to be money - this was between twelve and one o'clock. I was called in afterwards and dined with them.

JAMES OWEN . I am Archer's son-in-law, and live at No. 51, Shoreditch - I am a silk-weaver. Edward Archer, who was convicted, is his son. Foyle came to our house before Edward Archer was in custody - he seemed in great agitation concerning where Edward Archer was - he wished me very much to tell him where he was, as he particularly wanted to see him; I asked his reason - he told me Edward Archer was going to fight a duel, and he wanted to get him out of the way; I went with him in a coach to Friday-street, Cheapside; I found young Archer there, and took him to Foyle; they had some conversation by themselves, and after that invited me to the theatre - Foyle paid for our admission; we supped together afterwards - I have not seen young Archer since - I think this was on the 13th of April; I never knew the prisoner Archer by the name of Bartlett.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Why do you say it was the 13th of April? A. I believe it was that day - I was not asked about it till last week. Archer left us soon after we left the theatre; Foyle and him stood a long way off in the street after leaving the theatre; then Foyle came back to me, and we supped together. Young Archer was a lawyer's clerk - his father is no business - I understood he did something by commission.

THOMAS MORGAN . I drive the Southend coach. In June last, the very day Edward Archer was tried here, I dined with Foyle at the Yorkshire Gray public-house, Stratford; he told me he was subpoenaed on a trial at the Old Bailey, and was out of the way - that he should not be seen; after dinner I was coming to town - he said "If any one asks for me say you have not seen me."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was then in service at the Spread Eagle, was not he? A. He said he was in the same concern, but stationed at Lincoln instead of town.

JOHN JACKMAN . I drive the Old Salisbury coach from the Bell and Crown, Holborn. I have known the prisoners fifteen or sixteen years; I never knew Archer by any other name - they were both servants at the Bell and Crown together - Foyle as book-keeper, and Archer drove the Old Salisbury coach - Foyle left twelve or thirteen years ago.

JAMES LEDGER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended Archer in Whitmore-lane, Hoxton: I said "Good morning, Mr. Archer - I want you;" he said "I heard from a friend of mine that there was a warrant against me - I suppose it is about those notes;" he asked if the name in the warrant was Archer, and said his name was Bartlett; that it was a rascally affair altogether, and his son had been innocently led into it.

GEORGE THOMAS JOSEPH RUTHVEN . I am principal

officer of Bow-street. I apprehended young Archer at Lewes, in Sussex, on the 9th of May, at a baker's shop - I took him into a room by the side of the shop, and the prisoner Archer was there; the young man had said his name was not Archer; the room door was open, and the prisoner must have heard it; his sister came out of the room, and he said to her "They want to persuade me my name is Archer"; I told her I was an officer, and not to conceal the truth; she said his name was Archer, and I took him. On the 10th of July the prisoner Archer was brought into my custody; I said "How do you do, Mr. Archer - you did not expect to see me so soon;" he said"My name is not Archer;" I said "Yes, it is - you remember my being at Lewes;" he said No - he was not there - his name was Bartlett. On the 12th of July I apprehended Foyle at the Cross Keys at Hull - it is a branch of the concern at London: I asked if his name was Foyle- he said Yes; I told him I had come on very unpleasant business - to take him for the robbery young Archer was convicted of; he denied knowing any thing of it; I said, if I had been informed right, I knew better, for I knew where he had received the two hundred sovereigns from the robbery; he said I must be a strange man for saying so; I took him to the House of Correction at Hull; he there asked if he might have his books, to make up his accounts before he left; I went with the keeper of the gaol to get them from the Cross Keys office; there was a little book some distance from the others - his wife took it up; I saw her open it, and saw a letter in it; I also found a card; his wife was taking the book away - I followed her to the door, and got it from her. Mrs. Foyle wrote on a slip of paper, and gave it to me; I took it to Foyle at the gaol - I did not give it but read it to him; he could see the hand-writing; I used neither persuasion or threat to him - this is the paper (reads)."Tell all, I entreat you - it is only adding to your trouble to act falsely - take care of your health - get the money from Mr. Walton - Mr. Sell and Mr. Chaplin will, I am sure, show you mercy; write directly you get to London." After reading this paper I asked if he had any thing to say; he said No, he should like to see Mr. Chaplin first; I said "You told me you had some money;" he said"Yes, 140l.;" I asked where it was; he said in the pocket-book he had shewn me; he had shewn me this pocket-book; I said I could not find it, and it would save a great deal of trouble if he would tell me where it was; he described a secret drawer in a chest of drawers in the office, and I there found 135l., which I gave his wife a receipt for - it was in notes; I told him afterwards there was but 135l. - he said he recollected changing a 10l. note; I saw him again next morning, and he said, voluntarily, he was very sorry he had done any thing wrong, but that old rascal had come to him several times, as others did, and asked him for a situation - that he had known him at the Bell and Crown, when a clerk there - that he asked if they did not carry a good deal of money at times; he said Yes, and he asked which coach carried most; he told him the Old Post carried a great deal. That these meetings occurred several times; he did not know what he meant, and when he did know he shuddered at it, and had not had a happy moment since. I asked him if Archer's brother had dined with him at the King of Prussia; he said No, that Archer brought him the two hundred sovereigns there in a bag, and nobody was present when he gave them to him, but when the money was paid the landlord was asked in, and partook of dinner with them - he said himself, that Archer and the landlord dined together there - that the landlord's name was Smith, and he had a defect in his eye. On our way to town, at Lincoln, he complained that he wanted money; I said if he applied to the Magistrate he might order me to give up the 135l., he said No, he did not want it - it was Mr. Chaplin's - let him have it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Will you swear he did not say, if it is Mr. Chaplin's. A. He said it was.

WILLIAM CHAPLIN. I keep the Spread Eagle , and have partners in the coach concern . Foyle came into my employ in 1820 or 1821, and was in my confidence; I went and saw him in Covent-garden watch-house, in consequence of a message from Ruthven, - Mr. Harmer was with me - he was brought into a room where we were - I did not say a word - he knelt down, burst into tears, and said, it was his first offence - that he had been drawn into it by George Archer, and was very sorry for it; he was much confused and agitated at first; a considerable time elapsed and I asked him if the guard, or any other servants, were concerned - he said not any - that he could not account for the manner in which the influence of Archer worked upon him to lend himself to so base an act; I asked how the parties could have stolen the parcel if the guard was not concerned - he said he informed George Archer where the parcel was placed; I asked why he continued his intimacy with Archer after he left London; he said it was through fear; the card produced by Ruthven is his writing, but the letter is very unlike his usual hand. He said some property had been taken from him, and there was other property, which he should expect me to have, and seemed desirous of doing all he could to restore the property; he said the money Ruthven had was mine - that he received 200l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he not bear an excellent character in your service? A. I never heard any thing against him. I have a share in the concern he was employed in when apprehended - I recommended him there. (Card read).

"Mr. Archer, butcher, Plumber-street, near the gate, City-road, London - by Steam Packet - carriage paid."

MR. CHASE. The prisoner Archer was not in the coach.

MR. HARMER. I accompanied Mr. Chaplin to see Foyle - he was told that any thing he said might be used against him. I have heard Mr. Chaplin's statement - it is correct; but he also said that he himself had received for the booking of the parcel, and saw another clerk deliver it to Evans, and saw Evans put it into the pocket inside the coach; that he then went over to Old Archer, at the Half Moon public-house, Leadenhall-market, and told him where it was; he said he had 200l. for giving the information, and sought to leave London, to avoid further interviews with Archer.

Prisoner FOYLE to RUTHVEN. Q. Did you not tell me you knew all about it the first time you came? A. I did. I did not say Mr. Chaplin would receive his evidence but

not Archer's; I said Archer was inclined to tell all about it, but his evidence would not be received; I told Foyle I could promise him nothing.

Prisoner FOYLE. It is useless to say any thing as Ruthven has sworn what is not true.

ARCHER'S Defence. I never changed a note at the Bank in my life.

FOYLE - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

ARCHER - GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-31

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1342. SAMUEL MAPPIN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , at St. Ann, Westminster , 25 knives, value 3l. 10s., and 25 forks, value 1l. 12s., the goods of John Thomas , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN THOMAS. I am a cutler , and live in Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster. On the 10th of June, about two o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop- one of my men came to attend to him; I had dealt with him before, but always for ready money; he had been a kind of warehouseman in the cutlery way - I dealt with him occasionally seven or eight years ago, but not since - it was always for ready money - I always deal for ready money. On the day in question he came about two o'clock - he had called about three months before with a petition, signed by several cutlers, and I gave him a shilling; I was surprised to see him come in on this day, but he said his father-in-law had taken a public-house for him at Hampstead, and had agreed to give him 1000l. - I knew his father-in-law was able to do so, and felt glad; he said he wanted a dozen small and a dozen large ivory-handled knives with forks and carvers, for a dinner he was going to have that day, on the opening of the house, which, he said was the Cock, at Hampstead; my man packed them up in the usual way - he knew my way of business; I told him repeatedly that he must pay for them when he had them; he made no objection to it; he always dealt with me for ready money. When the knives and forks were packed up he requested a bill; I ordered my man to make one; people often have bills, even if they deal for money; while the man was writing the bill he caught up the knives and forks off the counter, threw me down this forged bill, and ran away; he said it was a banker's acceptance for 19l. 10s. and was a security for me till tomorrow morning, at ten o'clock, when he would come for the bill, and pay the 5l. 2s. for the goods; he ran out with them, and I have not seen him since; he was apprehended this day month; one of my men met him in the street; I had tried all I could to find him before; I would not have parted with these goods to him, or any body, without ready money - I would not have taken this paper as a security; I should not have kept the bill but he ran away and left it behind - they were worth 5l. 2s. (The bill was here put in and read; it was dated London, the 2d of May, 1825,; drawn by G. S. Mappin on William Kenton , Highfield, near Sheffield, for 19l. 10s., and accepted payable at Messrs. Everett and Co., Bankers, London.

Prisoner. Q. When you lived at Stonesend do not you recollect my calling for 12l. 10s., due to our firm, and you said it was not convenient to pay? A. Never; I never saw you till you called at my shop in Oxford-street; I never saw him till within eight years, and owed him nothing; I have bought goods of him for ready money.

Q. Did you do business with Gregory Mappin and Co., in 1809? A. I do not know such a firm, but having been in business forty years, I cannot remember every body I have dealt with. I have lived in Oxford-street ten or twelve years.

FREDERICK WARDROPPER . I have been in Mr. Thomas' employ about two years.; I attend the shop, and work for him - I am his managing man - he deals for ready money only; he is very infirm, and when a customer comes, he calls me to assist him. On the 10th June the prisoner came to the shop, and wanted knives and forks to open his house with - he said he had company coming to dinner that day, and must make haste; I packed them up - he asked for a bill, and while I was writing it some more gentlemen came in; I was busy talking to them and making the bill out at the same time, at a little desk in the shop, and did not see him go out - but when I turned round to give him the bill, he was gone, and the knives also - master had this bill in his hand; he said he had taken the Cock, public-house, at Hampstead - I went there three or four hours after, and found there was no such a house.

JURY. Q. Did Mr. Thomas say, "He has gone and left the bill?" A. I asked master what he had got, when I had done with the gentlemen, and asked if he had paid - master seemed confused and gave me this bill - I said I thought it was a forgery, as the hand-writing seemed all one; I went to the banker's to inquire - they did not know the party; master then sent me to Hampstead.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not stand talking to him with them under my arm for half an hour? A. He was not in the shop a quarter of an hour altogether; I never said master took the bill as security for the knives; I did not hear his conversation with master, as I was busy with the gentlemen - it is a small shop; he might have left the shop ten minutes when I saw the bill; two gentlemen stood before me, I could not see him go out.

HARRIS SMITHHUNTER . I am in the first regiment of guards, but have worked for Mr. Thomas ten years, and am in his employ now when in town, and off duty. I was at Windsor when this occurred, but in August, Mr. Thomas told me if I could find Mappin, to take him; I was inquiring for him, and eight or nine weeks ago an account was sent to master, by a lawyer in Greek-street, and I found the prisoner there; I asked him to go with me to Mr. Thomas, he refused; I said, "Will you wait here while I fetch him?" he said he would; I went down to the door, having an officer there, but the prisoner was conveyed out of the house through some other door; I met him in about seven weeks after in the Seven-dials, and took him to Bow-street; I knew he used formerly to bring cutlery to master, which he was paid for directly - master always dealt for ready money; when I took him, I said, "What a foolish fellow you must be in sending this foolish lawyer

for money, master would be sure to find you;" he said,"I was in distress, and thought I should raise a trifle of money by it."

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer, and went with Smithhunter to Mr. Burnell's, in Greek-street, Soho, with a warrant against the prisoner for this offence - Thomas had given information at the office six or seven weeks ago. I waited outside the house, and sent Smithhunter up to see if he was there - he came down in a few minutes, beckoned to me, and said he was there; I went up and searched all over the place, but could not find him - there is a back door, which he must have gone out at; about three weeks ago Smithhunter brought him to the office.

COURT to THOMAS. Q. Did he remain in the shop after he threw down the bill? A. Not a minute; he took up the knives with one hand, and threw it down with the other, saying, there was security sufficient till to-morrow morning, when he would bring 5l. 2s., and take back the bill, and out he ran.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not in Horsemonger-lane? A. Yes, in 1810 - it was a conspiracy against me about an apprentice I had a dispute with, and he charged me with not giving him enough victuals, and indicted me for illtreating him - but plenty of people proved to the contrary, and I proved he had robbed me; I was never charged with felony.

Prisoner's Defence. I traded with Thomas when he lived at Stones-end; he owed our concern 12l. 6s. - I called for it, and he said he would pay us in a week; when I called, he had moved; I could not find him till I found him in Oxford-street; he always shuffled the account off; I have sold him odd things since, which he paid me for - I did this with intent to balance the old account with him, which has never been paid; I lost 10,000l. in the concern.

Mr. THOMAS. I lived at Stones-end twenty years ago.

RICHARD BURNELL . I am an house-agent and collector of debts, and an accountant. I have known the prisoner three or four years, and last April I put him in charge of 500l. worth of furniture; he mentioned to me, when he returned, that Thomas owed him some money, and in July or August, (I do not know which) I sent him a letter, applying for money due to the firm, (as this man informed me) - and stated, if it was not paid, it would be put into a Marshalsea lawyer's hands; this charge was made in consequence of my writing the letter - after I wrote it, Mr. Thomas' attorney called on me, and said Thomas was not in his debt, but Mappin was in his; on the following morning, which was on the 20th of July, I called on Thomas; his attorney was present; I said, I was informed there was money owing him by Mappin; "Yes," he replied,"and if he don't call and pay me, I will get a warrant for him;" in consequence of this, I left Thomas' shop, and in a few days this soldier came, and soon after Mappin came to my door; I have only one room there, as a place of business, but do not live there; the soldier said, "Is your name Mappin;" he said, "Yes," he asked him to go to his master, he said, No - he then asked him to wait till he fetched him - Yes, said he; they both left the room, and what become of the prisoner I do not know; he could not be found when the officer came; it was agreed I should call next morning and meet Mr. Thomas, and I did so, in the presence of an officer; Wardropper said, "I acknowledge Mr. Thomas told me he had received a bill of exchange for goods we sold Mappin;" Thomas said, in answer, "No, I said no such thing, I only said I would let him have the goods till to-morrow morning at twelve o'clock, when he was to call and pay me;" I took down, in this book, what he said.

Q. You took that book with you to put down what Thomas said? A. Yes; I did not keep a copy of the letter I wrote, and do not know the date of it; I cannot say when it was.

ROBERT DUKE. I remember this witness being at Thomas'. Thomas said nothing about getting a warrant for if Mappin did not call and pay.

RICHARD BURNELL. This witness was not present at the conversation.

ROBERT DUKE. He told me he had never been to Thomas' before.

Mr. THOMAS. I told Burnell nothing of the kind. I had the warrant before that, and wanted to find the man out; I received the letter long after the robbery; I do not owe him a farthing; this witness gave his direction, No. 6, Clerkenwell-close, and there is no such person there.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 53.

Reference Number: t18260914-32

1343. THOMAS MONK was indicted for a rape .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-33

1344. ABRAHAM JONAS was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-34

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee

1345. WILLIAM WATERS , THOMAS GARDNER , GEORGE DUFF , and WILLIAM ANDREWS , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Jane Lyons , spinster , in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, on the 31st of August , at St. John, at Hackney , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 bag, value 9d.; 1 scarf, value 5s.; 2 purses, value 3d.; 8 shillings, and 3 penny-pieces, her property .

Mr. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JANE LYONS. I am single, and live at Watford. On the 31st of August, at half-past two o'clock in the day, I was going down Hackney-marsh with Frances Low , to milk the cows; I had a bag containing a scarf, a pocket-handkerchief, eight shillings, two penny-pieces, two halfpence, and two purses - we had to pass over Lea-bridge, when we got on the bridge; the prisoner Waters came on the bridge to me, and asked for a halfpennyworth of milk - I told him we had none; he threw up the bag which I had in my hand, and the halfpence rattled, as they were loose - he went down to the other prisoners - there were six of them altogether; we went straight on down the Marsh - Waters and Andrews came up and pushed me down, and held me down till they got my bag from me - I struggled a great deal to hinder them, and was very frightened; the tuck was torn out of my frock when I got up; I then looked to see where they were gone, and the four prisoners were looking into my bag - I called for assistance directly, and they all ran together up the side of the river Lea, towards a public house; they were pursued and taking at Bow.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did they appear

to have been bathing? A. No; some boys were in the river, but not the prisoners - none of the six were in the river; some boys were bathing very near the spot where it happened - there were four bathing; I will not swear that neither of the six had his coat off.

FRANCES LOW. I live just below Hackney-terrace - my father is a cow-keeper, and had cows on the Marsh. On the 31st of August, I was going down the Marsh with Lyons - we went over the Wick-bridge, and met Waters, who asked for a half-penny worth of milk - we told him twice we had got none, and he threw up Lyons' bag, which was in her hand, and the halfpence jinked; he went away to the others - there were six of them; in about five minutes, when we had got a little way from the bridge, Waters and Andrews pushed her down, and took the bag from her by force - she resisted; the other two prisoners were coming towards them when they pushed her down, and met them, and all ran away together down the river side; I saw them do nothing with the bag; I raised an alarm, got on the river side, and my brother ran to the White Lion, public-house, and gave an alarm; he was not with us, but by the next bridge; I did not see them taken.

Cross-examined. Q. On which side of the river did this happen? A. The left hand, going to Homerton-bridge - I was close to the river - I saw no boys bathing - I saw none but these six; I do not think there could be any bathing; I saw none of their coats off; I was much frightened.

JANE LYONS re-examined. The boys in the river were by the side of the bridge; the prisoners were down by the side of the water with them; Low must have seen the boys in the water, for she said to me, "There used always to be boys on the river when I came this way." I saw some, and said, "Don't look this way."

Q. Then she did not look? A. Oh, yes, she did.

RICHARD DUST . I live in James-street, Globe-fields, and am 13 years old. On the 31st of August, I was going along the Marsh, walking towards Bow - I was not far from the Wick-bridge, and met six chaps running; Waters and Andrews were two of them; I saw Waters throw a purse into the water, and Andrews threw the reticule into the river - I got them out; I am sure they are the men - I knew Waters before by seeing him often at the corner of Slaughter-street, Brick-lane, where I used to work; I had never seen Andrews before; I saw Lyons crying, and asked if they were her things; she said Yes - I went with her; I gave the bag and purse to Hudson the officer, that night.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not a good many boys bathing? A. I saw one person in the river, and one outside; one of the prisoners had his coat off.

JOSEPH FOSH . I am a carman, and live in Well-street, Hackney. On the 31st of August, a young woman in the Marshes, gave an alarm - I stood and saw the prisoners leave her - they came by me; I pursued; Duff and Andrews ran up a yard at Bow, and into a privy, where I took them, and gave them in charge - this was a mile from the Marshes; while I pursued they turned round and pelted me with stones; I never lost sight of them; Gardner ran into the yard with the other two, and he was brought to me - I am certain of them all; I never lost sight of Waters till Lee took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see any boys bathing? A. No; but there might be; there is an officer to prevent it.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a carman, and live in Wick-street, Hackney. On the 31st of August I heard an alarm, went in pursuit, and took Waters at Old Ford, about a quarter of a mile from this bridge; brought him back to the Wick, and took him to Bow, where I found other three in custody - I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Homerton-bridge? A. Yes; there is no house near it; the White Lion is about four hundred yards from it; there used to be many boys bathing there, but it has been stopped a good deal lately.

COURT. Q. Where did you firt see Waters? A. The alarm was first given at the White Lion, Hackney-wick; I got into my cart, and rode after them, in the way I was directed, and saw six together, and Fosh pursuing them.

CHARLES NEWMAN . I am constable of Bow. I assisted in taking the three prisoners, who had run into the yard, which is no thoroughfare; two of them went into the privy; I saw a man in the privy; he had them in custody - I was within a yard of the privy, and saw him take this shawl out of the privy - it was down inside the privy; he gave it to me. I knew the man before - he works in that yard, and is a miller.

Cross-examined. Q. Is that man here? A. No; each of the prisoners had money in their pockets; I searched them in the yard; one had half-a-crown, another three shillings, and some halfpence; I forget what the other had. We had shut the yard gates, and could detain them without holding them; I had a headborough with me. I saw the man take it out of the privy.

ROBERT LEE . I am patrol of Hackney. I heard an alarm, and pursued part of the way. I took a man named Ambrose, who was discharged at Lambeth-street, Dust not being there to identify him. The spot where this happened is in Middlesex.

JANE LYONS. This shawl is mine, and was in my bag. The purse and bag are mine.

WATERS' Defence. Until the present time I was never guilty of a dishonest transaction. I hope your Lordship will take my case into your serious consideration.

One witness gave Waters an excellent character, and four deposed the same for Andrews.

COURT to JANE LYONS. Q. When Andrews and Waters pushed you down how far were the others off? A. Close by. I was on the bridge, but they were not; both pushed me, and I fell, and both endeavoured to get my bag.

WATERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

ANDREWS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of their characters, and believing it to be their first offence.

GARDNER - NOT GUILTY .

DUFF - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-35

Second London Jury - before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1346. RICHARD RANDALL was indicted for feloni

ously uttering and publishing as true, a certain forged bill of exchange, which is as follows, (i. e.) "Truro, September 16, 1825, Three months after date, pay to my order 142l. 7s., value received: Richard Thomas . To Mr. Robert Mitchell , Truro, Cornwall - and endorsed Richard Thomas" - with intent to defraud Stephen Wilson and others .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

Mr. LEA WILSON . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Wood-street, and have other partners. On the 21st of September, 1825, the prisoner came to our warehouse - he said he was in the habit of purchasing goods for cash, and travelling the country to dispose of them; that at present he had only bills, but could give satisfactory references of the drawer's respectability; he looked out about 150l. worth of goods, and produced this bill, saying he would call on the following morning for our decision; and said if we would go to John Lee and Sons, Newgate-street, we should be perfectly satisfied of the respectability of Thomas, the drawer and endorser. I went, and received a satisfactory account. He called next day, and I told him we were satisfied, and he should have the goods; he paid the balance in cash, for which we allowed him three months discount; the goods were sent according to his order. He called again in two months, for more goods; I made inquiry, and would not give him further credit. - The bill was presented at Sir Richard Carr Glyn's (where it is made payable), when due, but not paid.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Are you sure of his person? A. Perfectly; I had full opportunity of shewing the bill to any one before he had the goods; he endorsed the bill in my presence, by my desire. He did not say he would refer me to the persons he had been referred to; he referred to nobody else.

Mr. EDWARD WILSON . I was present when the prisoner paid this bill to my brother, and am sure of his person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he would give the reference he had received? A. I did not hear that- I did not hear all that passed.

Mr. THOMAS LEE . I live in Newgate-street. I was not present when Mr. Wilson called about this bill. I receive letters from Mr. Thomas, but have no personal acquaintance with his writing - he is an upholsterer at Truro- I correspond with no other Mr. Thomas there.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you corresponded with him long? A. Many years; I acted on letters received from him, and could have spoken to his hand-writing if I had seen the bill, but I was from home; we are seldom without his bills. My clerk informed me that the prisoner himself had inquired about Thomas - that clerk is not in our employ now, and, I believe, is on a journey.

JAMES BONE . I have lived at Truro twenty years, and have been collector of the taxes three years. I know two persons named Thomas there - one is an upholsterer, and the other has been a Custom-house officer - I never heard of any others; there are two Robert Mitchells - one a merchant, the other is his son, and is in his office.

JOYCE THOMAS . I have been post-mistress of Truro five years, and lived there all my life. Richard Thomas, the upholsterer, is my brother - the other belongs to the Custom-house; the name, Richard Thomas, on the face and back of this bill, are neither of them my brother's writing; he does business with Messrs. Lee.

Cross-examined. Q. How many inhabitants are there at Truro? A. I cannot tell - some thousands. I know almost every body there - it is a small place. I live with my brother, and can speak with confidence to his writing.

CHARLES STRONG . I am clerk in the Custom-house at Truro. There are about seven thousand inhabitants; I have lived there all my life. I know Richard Thomas - he was a fellow clerk; this is not his hand-writing. I know no other person of his name, except the witness's brother.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am brother to Robert Mitchell. I only know two persons of that name at Truro - they are my brother and nephew. The name, Richard Thomas, on this bill, bears no resemblance to either of their writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you do business at Messrs. Glyn's? A. No. Vessels frequently come to Truro, but people in them do not remain there - it is a place for coasting trade. I have lived there thirty years, and only know two Mr. Thomas'.

The prisoner, in his Defence, stated that he had received the bill on the 20th of September, from one Charles Robinson , with 17l. 15s. in cash - that Robinson, being a dealer in contraband goods, did not wish to endorse it, as the officers were in search of him; but referred the prisoner to Messrs. Lee, for satisfaction as to the drawer's respectability.

WILLIAM TWISDEN . I now keep a general shop in Southampton-place, Walworth. In September last I kept a stationer's shop in Cleaver-street, Kennington. The prisoner came in with one Robinson, to purchase a 6d. receipt stamp. I saw the prisoner receive money from Robinson, and also a bill of exchange; I heard it was for a large sum. Randall said, "This is a swinging sum." I knew Robinson before, but not the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-36

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1347. HENRY SPIRING was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 tea-pot, value 3l.; 1 stand, value 1l.; 1 mustard-pot, value 15s., and 1 spoon, value 5s., the goods of Alexander Glennie , in his dwelling-house .

FRANCES FARQUHARSON . I am servant to Mr. Alexander Glennie, who lives in Great James-street, Bedford-row . On the 23d of June, about half-past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner go up the area steps, with a basket in his hand. I followed, and before he got to the corner he dropped it - he looked round, and I had a good view of him, so as to know him again, but could not overtake him; I returned, and found the basket moved about five yards from where he dropped it; it contained the articles stated in the indictment. On the 17th of July I saw the prisoner crossing from Bridge-street, Westminster to Great George-street, with another man; I watched, and in King-street he began to go down the area steps - I fetched a constable, and had him taken - he denied the charge, but I am positive to him. The basket was not master's - it was about three minutes out of my sight while I pursued him. I had not seen him come down the area. I

had been up stairs about five minutes. The plate was kept in the pantry closet - he had to go through the kitchen.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Were you acquainted with him before? A. No. I did not see his face till he looked round - he might be ten yards before me.

COURT. Q. When you saw him in George-street was he dressed the same? A. He had the same coat, but not the same trousers on.

JOHN LEWIS BATHGATE . I am a constable. On the 17th of July I took the prisoner and another into custody - they had each a basket - the prisoner had oranges in his, with a crooked nail; the other was shavings; he dropped a chisel in Princes-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-37

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1348. WILLIAM CURREY was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS TORKINSON SHUFFLEBOTHAM . I am servant to Mr. Wynn Ellis , silk-mercer , Ludgate-hill . The prisoner was his errand-boy . On the 26th of June , about three o'clock. I gave him a parcel, containing goods amounting to 8l. 9s., to take to Mrs. Grace, of Old-street; he was entrusted to receive money for parcels, and should pay it over to Cunningham, the cashier, when he returned, which was between five and six o'clock - he did not pay the money; he was not asked about it that night. He went away next morning, without any intimation; he was found in the neighbourhood in about a fortnight, and brought to us; he said he had been about the country; I asked what he had done with the money he received before he went away - he said he had lost it; I then asked about the particular sum received from Mrs. Grace - he said it had gone with the rest.

MARY ANN GRACE . I live at Stockwell. On the 26th of June I bought some goods of Mr. Ellis, and received them in Old-street. I paid the person who brought them eight sovereigns and a half, and took a receipt. I cannot say whether the prisoner is the person.

MR. SHUFFLEBOTHAM. This receipt is the prisoner's writing.

JAMES CUNNINGTON . I am cashier to Mr. Ellis. My duty is to receive money paid for goods; the prisoner paid me nothing for these goods; he had given no notice - he should have paid it that night or next day. I did not ask about it.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I took him in charge - he said he had lost the money.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-38

1349. JOHN JONES and RICHARD BRITTEN were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 17 nail bags, value 4s., and 1700lbs. of nails, value 17s. , the goods of Thomas Browne and John Dyer : and JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS BROWNE. I am in partnership with John Dyer - we live in Little Eastcheap . The prisoner Jones was several years in our employ; Britten was a stranger; we discharged Jones early in July, and in about a week I discovered that we had been robbed of ninety bags of nails - I found Jones standing in Fish-street, took him to our warehouse, and gave him in charge, and begged him to make a full discovery of the robbery, that I might discover the receiver; Britten and Griffiths were taken the same day: I was present on the 11th of July, when eight bags of nails were found in Griffiths' shop; the marks on the bags had been rubbed over with ink; some were marked B and B D, in pitch - they contained new nails, but had been cut open, and some taken out; they were precisely the nails we deal in - one bag is marked B D in pitch, and that I can distinctly identify, though attempts have been made to obliterate it; the pitch still remains - the ink is washed out. Griffiths keeps an old iron and rag shop - he said if the nails were mine I was welcome to them - that he had bought them several months ago. - The quantity found are worth 14l. or 15l.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are any of them your own manufacture? A. No; I do not know the maker. I send out perhaps twenty bags in a year; they were in the corner of Griffiths' shop, covered with a quantity of rags; he did not tell me of whom he bought them - I did not ask.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. I believe Jones used to lock up your warehouse, and deliver the keys to the clerks? A. He had possession of the warehouse two hours after I left, and used to take the keys to a neighbour.

JOHN DYER. I am in partnership with Mr. Browne. Jones had the entire care of the warehouse , and left the keys in Thames-street, and sometimes in Cannon-street. I discharged him on the 6th of July. I never saw Britten.

BENJAMIN HALL . I am warehouseman to Mr. Bolton, spice-merchant, of Little Eastcheap, nearly opposite the prosecutors' warehouse. About the end of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw Britten come out of the warehouse, with a heavy bag on his shoulder; Jones accompanied him to the door, and shut it after him. I did not give information till after they were apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You did not see the contents of the bag? A. No. I am certain of them both.

COURT. Q. Did you see Britten afterwards? A. I saw him pass the prosecutors' door two or three times after, but he never went in - it was just break of day. I mentioned the circumstance to my master. The bag was like those produced.

WILLIAM FORSTER . I am an officer. I went with a search-warrant to Griffiths' house, at the corner of George-yard, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; Fortune and Dalton were with me - I found Griffiths standing in the street- I called him in, and said we had a warrant to search for nails. I left Fortune and Dalten there while I went to take Britten - I saw him come out of a public-house, down from Osborne-street, towards Griffiths' house - he was fifty or sixty yards from the house; I told him I wanted him about some nails found at Griffiths' - he said he knew nothing about any nails; I took him to Griffiths'. We

found eight bags and a half of nails, about 2cwt. in each bag - a few were exposed for sale in a saucepan lid: they appeared to be a sample of those in the bag. Ink had been rubbed over the marks on the bags, but we could discover some pitch marks with the letters B D, after clearing away the ink. Griffiths said, "If they belong to the gentlemen take them away, and there will be an end of it;" there was a good deal of old iron and old nails in his shop, but all these nails were new. While I was locking Griffiths up, he told me he bought the nails of Britten. The bags of nails were covered with rags, except the half bag, which was under the window. Two days afterwards I found ten more bags at Wiggens' sale-rooms.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You knew Britten before? A. Yes - he worked as a porter, and lived in Wentworth-street. I am sure Griffiths said,"Take them, and there will be an end of them;" I said,"No, you and the nails must go before the Magistrate" - Mr. Browne was present; I cannot say whether the nails in the saucepan lid caught his eye - he inspected them after we found the bags. I call the bags concealed; they were behind the counter, with rags over them.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer, and went to Griffiths'- we found one bag in the left side of the shop, covered with rags and iron hoops; the rest were behind the counter - Griffiths said, "What about those nails - have they been stolen?" I said they had - he said "I will go" - I said "You won't go, for I must take you as well as the nails;" "Well then," said he "sooner than have a piece of work about them, I will give them up to the owner."

EBENEZER DALTON . I went with the warrant, and heard Griffiths say if Mr. Browne was the owner let him have them, and have done with it. Britten lodged somewhere in Wentworth-street.

WILLIAM BRIDGES WIGGINS . I live in Gilson-street, Lambeth, and know Griffiths. The ten bags of nails found in my possession were delivered to my servant; I was not present - they were to be sold at my auction-rooms, in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields. I had conversation with Griffiths about them - he spoke of them as being his.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you taken pains to find who they came from? A. My servant said they came from Griffiths. There was no concealment in the transaction.

ROBERT BLAND . I am Wiggins' servant. Griffiths brought the nails, with a card of his shop.(Bags produced and sworn to).

MR. BROWNE. We keep nothing but nails and chains in bags.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-39

1350. BROWN DOLPHIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 table, value 30s. , the good of Sophia Burgess .

SOPHIA BURGESS. I am a widow , and keep the Blue Boar, public-house, Sparrow-corner, Minories . On the 12th of August, about a quarter to nine o'clock, the prisoner and another person came and called for a pint of beer, which they drank in the tap-room. This table was in the back parlour; a person going into the yard might slip into the parlour. I saw the prisoner go out with it in half an hour; I ran out, and caught him under the bar-window, outside, with it under his arm. The other man ran away.

THOMAS MARKHAM . I am a bricklayer, and saw the prisoner go out with the table; the prosecutrix stopped him just outside the house - I assisted in taking him back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it out to have a drop of beer on, there being so many people in the tap-room, and nobody being in the parlour, it was dull - my friend laid me a pot of beer I could not get it out without being hindered.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-40

1351. ANN GORDON and SARAH BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , from the person of William Lane , 3 5l. promissory notes, his property .

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM LANE. I am a timber merchant , and live at Ipswich. On the 15th of July, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was walking along Bishopsgate-street the prisoner Brown overtook me - she came on my left side, took hold of my arm, and asked where I was going; I said home, where she ought to be, and at that instant I felt her hand in my trousers pocket, and having three five-pound Ipswich notes loose there, I drew back, and saw her go forward; I directly missed my notes - a gentleman named Proctor crossed to me - I informed him and went on, and passed Brown standing on the pavement talking to a gentleman; I saw a watchman coming, and gave her in charge, without losing sight of her, except for a moment- he took her to the watch-house - she was searched, but nothing found; somebody came into the watch-house - the officer went out and very shortly brought Gordon in - the officer searched her and said, "Sir, I have found your notes;" I said "If they are mine, I will tell you the name of the Bank and number;" they were produced, and were what I stated; I was quite sober, and had not spoken to her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you married? A. Yes; business brought me to town; I had been over Blackfriars'-bridge about some timber, and left there after eleven o'clock - only one woman came up to me; I must have seen if another had come up.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Why not seize her directly? A. I did not wish to make a disturbance till I found a watchman.

GEORGE TENANT . I am captain of an India-man, and live in Hackney-fields. I was in Bishopsgate-street, going home, and saw Mr. Lane by the church; Brown was holding his arm; he appeared to be shaking her off; they went on before me, and about Liverpool-street she left him abruptly, and turned towards me; Gordon met her, and they got into close conversation, within two minutes of her leaving Mr. Lane; Brown was taken to the watch-house; Gordon was brought in, and I recognized her as the same woman - the three notes were found on her.

Cross-examined. Q. She had left Lane two minutes before Gordon joined her? A. Yes; I saw them join each

other; Gordon had been standing by the church; I did not see her near Mr. Lane; I had dined with my sister, and was quite sober.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was Brown with Mr. Lane when you first saw him? A. Yes; Gordon stood not six yards off, and within sight, when he shook Brown off.

JAMES MITCHELL . I am a constable. Brown was brought to the watch-house, and in a few minutes a girl came in to inquire for her; the girl was questioned - an officer went out, who brought in Gordon in three or four minutes; she resisted violently on being searched; I got hold of her left hand, and she threw her right hand behind her, in which she said was a napkin, and, on the spot where she was, Lock picked up the three 5l. notes, which Mr. Lane identified; Brown had not been in that part of the watch-house.

GEORGE LOCK . I went out and took Gordon in Houndsditch, thirty yards from the watch-house - I picked up the notes in the watch-house - they were squeezed together.

MR. LANE. They are mine.

BROWN's Defence. I never saw the gentleman till he gave charge of me.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

GORDON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-41

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1352. GEORGE MORGAN and CHARLES HAYCRAFT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Heeley , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 27th of June , at St. Andrew, Holborn , with intent to steal, and stealing 228 smelling bottles, value 16l.; 2 decanters, value 18s.; 23 ink-bottles, value 15s.; 13 ounces of silver, value 2l. 12s., and 1 sugar basin, value 4s., his property .

JOSEPH HEELEY. I am a silver and plate mounter , and live at No. 58, Saffron-hill , in the parish of St. Andrew Holborn. On Tuesday, the 27th of June, I went to bed' about eleven o'clock; I was the last person up, and fastened every place secure; I fastened the window in the shop door; I was alarmed by Mrs. Hudson about five o'clock in the morning; it was quite light; I came down, opened the shop door, and found the shop all in confusion- two panes of glass had been cut out of the back door of the shop, a spar cut out of the window, and the two bolts undone; they had got in that way; this shop door looks into the back yard, which leads to the workshop, and has no shutter to it; they must have got over a wall in a court into Hudson's yard, then over another wall into my yard; I found on the water-butt in the yard, a basket in a sack containing this property - the sack was not mine - the basket was in my shop the night before - it contained two hundred and twenty-eight smelling bottles, two decanters, twenty-three ink-bottles, and thirteen ounces and a half of silver, which were all packed up in different drawers in the shop when I went to bed; eight drawers were broken open; it must have taken some time to get them; they must have been in the house at least two hours; my iron chest was moved out of its place, and put on the counter ready to be taken away; the property is worth above 20l.; here is a bottle which had two or three spots of tallow grease, which was not on it the night before - I found a phosphorous box and matches coucealed among some ink bottles; the thieves must have dropped the tallow on the bottle - it laid behind the counter - they must have used a candle.

JOSEPH HUDSON . I live next door to Heeley - my yard is the first from the court. I got up at five o'clock on this morning, and about twenty minutes past five I was at the first floor back room window, where I sleep, and saw three men in the yard, one was a red headed young man, who I knew lived in the neighbourhood; it was Haycraft - I knew him well - he was waiting in my yard - the other two were in Heeley's yard - they were strangers; I was within six yards of them, and had them in sight for a minute or a minute and a half; I looked at them particularly; I came down stairs directly without giving any alarm; I went into the street, and saw Haycraft with a pair of half boots in his hand, standing at the corner of the street; I suppose he had heard me speaking to my wife, and had got out of the yard; they had opened my yard door, which was bolted the night before; I had only got my trousers on; I ran up to finish dressing, which did not take two minutes; I looked out of window, and saw two men come out of Heeley's house - one of them was sitting on the water-butt by Heeley's wall, handing the sack to the other, who was sitting on the wall; it appeared very full and heavy; I believe them to be the same two men as I saw before; Morgan was the one who sat on the wall handing the sack to the other; I am certain of him; by that time Haycraft had returned into the yard; I ran down stairs again; I sent my wife to alarm Heeley; I gave an alarm, and they all three ran off immediately; I did not pursue, but went to the yard door; I found Morgan in the watch-house half an hour afterwards; he was in the same dress, and I am positive of his person; I saw Haycraft in prison eight days afterwards, and am positive he is the man.

JOHN POTTINGER . I am an officer. On the morning of the 28th of June, about half-past five o'clock, I was coming off duty at White Conduit-house, and on Clerkenwell-green I saw the two prisoners with another man, without shoes - they were walking sharply, and about three minutes walk from Saffron-hill; I saw the one who escaped with his hand in his pocket, and said to Loadsman, "We will follow these men, there is something wrong;" they were all three in company - they turned down a court - we followed them into Turnmill-street, got before them and desired them to stop; they immediately buttoned up their coats, and began to shew resistance, and threatened to strike us; Haycraft and the one not taken ran; I followed the one who escaped, and lost him - he saw us close behind him, put his hand into his pocket, and threw out this sugar basin over a wall; I got over and fetched it; I am sure he was in company with the prisoners; I ran back, and assisted in securing Morgan, who was taken on the spot.

JOSEPH HEELEY. This sugar-basin is mine, and was safe in the shop the night before.

JOHN LOADSMAN . I am an officer of Clerkenwell. I was with Pottinger - his statement his correct - the pri

soners were in company with the other man; I had a dreadful struggle to take Morgan when we went before to stop them; Haycraft and another ran - I seized Morgan - he attempted to resist; I drew my sword-stick on him - he snatched it out of my hand, and made a blow at me - I warded it off - he threw it away and ran; I forced him into a little wicket, and caught him by shutting a gate upon him - we were twenty minutes fighting; Haycraft was apprehended afterwards; I am sure of him, and that they were all three in company.

MORGAN'S Defence. Two men were going on before me - the officer came and told me to stop, saying he wished to search me, as he did not like the looks of the two persons before; I stopped to be searched - the other two ran off; I crossed the road, and he pulled out his sword, and said if I did not stand he would run me through.

HAYCRAFT'S Defence. I never saw this prisoner before.

MORGAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

HAYCRAFT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18260914-42

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1353. HENRY RYDER was indicted for the wilful murder of John Nicholas .

HENRY CASEY . I am a surgeon, of Westminster Hospital. The deceased was brought there on Monday evening, the 28th of August , about seven o'clock, in a fit of intoxication, and insensible; he had a wound at the back of his head, and one on his lip. He began to be sensible on Tuesday, on Wednesday became delirious, and died on Thursday; I opened his head, and found a crack on the skull, which had caused his death - it might have happened from a fall - it was certainly not from a blow of the fist - falling himself, or from a blow, would occasion it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was he extremely intoxicated? A. Being insensible I could not tell; whether that arose from the injury or intoxication I cannot say - intoxication would certainly increase the inflammation - he might also have got the wound in the face by falling.

COURT. Q. Did he die from inflammation, caused by intoxication, or from the injury? A. It is impossible to tell; the injury might occasion it, independent of intoxication.

GEORGE SHWAMENKRUG . On the 28th of August, about seven o'clock, I saw the deceased in York-street, Westminster ; he appeared very much in liquor: the prisoner said to him, "How are you, old Chelsea, you seem drunk enough?" Nicholas said "You are any thing but one name;" Ryder said "What is that?" he said "jorrock;" Ryder said "I always was jorrock to you;" Nicholas directly put himself in a fighting attitude - he could hardly stand; Ryder put his hand out and pushed him down, without any injury; he got up - several people advised Ryder to go away, but Nicholas called him to come back and have some more of it; Ryder told him to go into the middle of the road, and he would give him a good one; Nicholas stumbled into the road as well as he could, with his hands in a fighting posture - Ryder met him and gave him a violent blow in the month, knocked him down, and his head either hit the curb or close by it- he became quite insensible, and was taken to the hospital - Ryder was brought there afterwards and given in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you drank with the deceased? A. I took part of a pot of beer with him at two o'clock, and advised him to go home at seven, he was so drunk then. He did not strike Ryder in the road - he meant to fight him certainly - he did not trip up, but was knocked down.

GEORGE PAUL . I saw the deceased go to meet Ryder, as if to fight him - Ryder struck him a blow on the mouth, which knocked him down - I was forty yards off but heard his head strike violently against the curb; I went and told Ryder he had done the deed and must answer for it. He wished to go to the hospital to see how he was.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see the first of it? A. No - his hands were up ready to strike Ryder - there appeared no ill blood on Ryder's part.

DANIEL BEST . I was in York-street and saw a man in the road - Nicholas staggered towards him, with his hands in a fighting position - the man struck him and he fell.

WILLIAM WESTWOOD . I was in York-street, and heard Nicholas say Ryder was anything but jorrock - they put themselves in a fighting attitude; I put my hands between them, and persuaded Ryder to go away, as Nicholas was drunk; Nicholas struck at him twice, across me, and Ryder shoved him down - Ryder went a short way - what was said by Nicholas I do not know, but Ryder turned back, and said "If that is what you mean come into the middle of the road, and I will give you a rum one; Nicholas staggered into the road - Ryder knocked him down.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the meaning of jorrock? A. No; I believe it is a term of reproach; Nicholas put himself in a fighting attitude both times, and certainly wished to fight, but if Ryder wished to avoid it he could have gone away.

ELIZABETH TATLOW . I live in York-street. I was at my window and saw Nicholas, very much intoxicated - he said something to Ryder, who asked what he meant - he said jorrock, and went up to fight him, but they were parted; after Ryder went away he returned back, and the deceased told him to go into the road and he would fight him - Ryder said he would give him a rum one - when he got into the road Ryder met him and struck him, but previous to that I called out and begged him not to strike him, as he was intoxicated; I ran down, took Ryder by the arm, and said "You good-for-nothing wretch, you have killed the poor man;" he said "If it had been my own father I would have served him the same; he was secured.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Nicholas in the wrong? A. Certainly; Ryder turned to go away, and he called him back to fight, but he was so intoxicated I do not think he had raised his hand to fight when he was struck.

WILLIAM FIELD . I was present in York-street; both were in a fighting attitude when in the road; Ryder hit the first blow, and knocked him down.

Cross-examined. Q. Then they were drawn up for

fighting? A. Yes; Nicholas was very much in the wrong.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that the deceased had provoked him to fight, and struck the first blow - that his foot caught in the stones, which made him fall.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-43

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1354. JOHN WILLIAM WILSON and THOMAS WALKER , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Harley , about six o'clock in the afternoon of the 9th of July , in the parish of St. Luke , (no person being therein) and stealing 4 teaspoons value 8s.; 2 gold rings, value 4s.; 1 cruet stand, value 2s., and 4 cruets, value 2s., his property .

SAMUEL HARLEY. I live in Bunhill-row , in the parish of St. Luke, and keep a china-shop . On Sunday morning, the 9th of July, about half-past nine o'clock, I went out with my family, leaving nobody in the house - I fastened it up myself; we all returned at half-past eleven o'clock at night, and found about two hundred people round the house - it was shut up; I was confused, and do not know whether I gave the key to the officer, or opened it myself; when I got in I found four silver tea-spoons taken off the breakfast table, and a plated cruet-stand from the side-board, four cruets laid on the table, (they had been on the side-board when I went out) two gold rings of my daughters had been taken from her drawers on the second floor; I found the spoons, cruet-stand, and rings, at the watch-house, and Lock took the cruets there.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. It was dark when you returned? A. Yes; I am confident I shut the door in the morning, and tried it after me; I have no lodgers - I found nobody in the house.

MARY ANN READ . I am servant to Mrs. Young, of No. 3, Bunhill-row, which is about thirty yards from Mr. Harley's house, on the opposite side. On Sunday, the 9th of July, at twenty minutes to six o'clock, I was standing at the parlour window, which was open, and saw the prisoner Wilson and another come out of the public-house opposite - they walked to Harley's door, then shook hands, and parted; Wilson came on the opposite side by me, continued there two or three minutes, when Walker and another man came out of the public-house - they went and stood at Harley's door, and Wilson crossed over to them; I then saw Walker take something out of his pocket, and put under the door - it did not appear to open it, and he took out something else, which opened the door - I immediately went from the window to the street-door, and saw one of them knock violently at the door three or four times, though they had it open - the three men still stood there with the door open, but they saw me looking hard at them - they had not gone in; I immediately ran across to the public-house which they had come out of, and gave an alarm, but they said, Nonsense; I came out, and missed them all; I went to Mr. Dix, who lives next door to Harley, at the corner house - he came with me directly to the house - we found the door shut - Dix rang both the bells, and we heard some one run down stairs - the prisoner, Wilson, opened the door to Mr. Dix, and asked his business - Mr. Dix said, "My business is with you," and immediately collared him - Walker then rushed out from behind Wilson; I hallooed Stop thief! and he was caught by a young man at the opposite corner, without being out of my sight at all.

Cross-examined. Q. They knocked at the door? A. Yes, when they saw me observing them - I missed them from the door when I came out of the public-house - I only went in and came out directly; they had time to run into the house while I was in there; Mr. Dix was at the door within five minutes; the public-house is not more than four yards from the prosecutor's; I saw Mrs. Dix first, and she called him.

JOSEPH DIX . I went with Read to Mr. Harley's, and rang both the bells violently; I heard footsteps coming down stairs - Wilson almost immediately opened the door - I seized him, and Walker got out behind him; I called Stop thief! and he was taken on the opposite side; I did not lose sight of him; I saw Cattle, whom I knew, and put him in possession of the house; the prisoners were taken to the watch-house, and given in charge of Brown; I went back - found nobody else in the house; Margetts, whom I had placed outside the door, gave me four tea-spoons, which I gave to Brown.

HENRY BOUSHER . I secured Walker, whom I saw come out of the house; I saw Dix holding Wilson.

JOHN CATTLE . I live at No. 1, Type-street. I was opposite Harley's house, and saw Mr. Dix holding Wilson by the collar; he asked me to go into the house - I went up stairs to see if there was a third person there, but found nobody; about half-way up the first flight of stairs I saw a cruet-stand, and as I came down stairs, Duplex, who was with me, picked up the cruet-stand, which he gave Mr. Dix; the room up stairs seemed very much in a litter - some of the drawers were open.

GEORGE DUPLEX . I was with Cattle, and saw the cruet-stand on the stair-case - I gave it to Mr. Brown, I think Dix was present.

Cross-examined. Q. Did many people go in? A. No; a man was left in charge of the door, to let nobody in.

JAMES MARGETTS . I live at No. 129, Bunhill-row. I heard a cry of Stop thief! ran down stairs, and went to Harley's house; I saw Dix holding Wilson by the collar; he said, "I know you, take care of the door while I take them to the watch-house;" I stood at the door, and in putting it back, I cast my eye down and saw a spoon - and in pulling the door to, (being inside) I found three more laying in the corner, I put them into my pocket, and delivered them to Dix; Cattle and Duplex were in the house - there was a mob round, but I let nobody else in - I am confident nobody went in.

JOHN BROWN . I am watch-house keeper. I heard the alarm, and met the parties coming to the watch-house; I found a knife on Wilson; and a small jemmy or wrench, two pick-locks, three drop-keys, and two gold rings, on Walker; I received four tea-spoons from Dix, and a cruet-stand from somebody; I found a caddy-spoon on Walker, which has not been claimed.

JOSEPH DIX . I am not certain whether I gave the cruet-stand to Brown.

ROBERT LOCK . I found the cruets on a table, and produce them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SARAH MARY HARLEY . I am twenty-seven years old;

these rings are mine - I left them in the corner of my drawer that morning - I am certain of them - one has been mended.

OWEN OWENS . I was passing the end of Bunhill-row, heard an alarm, and saw Walker run out of the door, and Bousher collar him; I helped to take Wilson to the watch-house.

One witness gave Wilson a good character.

WILSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

WALKER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Reference Number: t18260914-44

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1355. THOMAS TONKS , WILLIAM MANN , and ROBERT SANDERWICK , were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Arden , on the King's high-way, on the 7th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 chain, value 6d., and 1 seal, value 4d., his property .

JAMES ARDEN. I am fourteen years old, and live in Great Ogle-street, Fitzroy-square, with my father, who is a brewer. On the 7th of July I was coming along the New-cut, near the tunnel , and saw the prisoners and another - I had never seen them before; Sanderwick took my hat off, and handed it to the fourth person; I cried for it, and Sanderwick gave me an old one; I said, I would have my own, and in a little time he gave it to me; he then said, "Have you got any thing in your pockets?" he felt down outside, and felt the watch; he then said,"You may as well tell me what is o'clock before you go." I refused, but said, I would shew him what it was o'clock, if he stood two or three yards off - but he said, "No, we can't see if we stand so far;" and after a little time, I was pulling my watch out - I had got it quite out of my fob, and held it tight, but he got hold of the chain, and wrenched it from me; I said, "No larks," and he handed it to Tonks, who was about a yard off, and I saw no more of it; Mann was talking to them - they were altogether, not half a yard from each other - the three went away; Tonks remained behind, and said, "If you come under the bridge I will try and find your watch for you." I had said nothing to him - I was crying, but said nothing about my watch - I said, I would not go; some boys came round, at last two bakers came, and Tonks was detained; the other three were then out of sight; when Sanderwick gave him the watch, I thought I saw him put it into the flap of his breeches.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. How long were you with them? A. About five minutes; Mann and Sanderwick were apprehended in about a fortnight - I was certain of them; I think they had been in the water, for Mann was putting his stockings on, and sitting about half a yard from the other two; he had every thing but his shoes and stockings on, and by the time they got the watch, I suppose he was ready to receive it; he went away as soon as he was dressed - he was in the water when I first went up.

COURT. Q. Did Mann go away alone? A. He went with the stranger - I do not know whether he saw the watch taken - he was sitting down - I did not see him in the water; the watch was my father's - I had worn it twelve months; the seal, chain, and key, were mine.

Prisoner TONKS. Q. Where did I stand? A. By the side of the Cut, talking to the two prisoners; I am certain I saw the watch in your hand; if you were on the bridge, it must have been before you came up.

WILLIAM SEWELL . I am eleven years old, and know Arden. On the 7th of July, I saw the prisoners and another, by the Cut; Sanderwick stopped Arden, and pulled his cap off; he cried for it, and Sanderwick said, if he would let him look what o'clock it was, he would give it him - he pulled it out - Sanderwick snatched it out of his hand, and gave it to Tonks, who put it into the flap of his breeches - then gave it to another boy, not in custody, and he gave it to Mann - I saw it in Mann's hands; Mann said, "Good bye, I shall see you to night;" and ran down the grove with it: Sanderwick, and the one not in custody, went away after Mann - Tonks remained, and was taken. I knew them all before.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. Sitting at the top of the bridge, about five yards from them, seeing the boys bathe; Arden saw me - Mann was on the top of the bridge at first, putting his stockings on; Arden had as good an opportunity as me, of seeing what became of the watch - he was two or three yards off - I do not know whether he saw it; I ran into the grove, and saw Mann put it into his pocket.

WILLIAM BETTY . I am a constable. I was sent for and took Tonks; Arden and Sewell were there - he said he had not got the watch; Sewell said, in his hearing, that a boy, named China Bob, snatched the watch, and handed it to Tonks who gave it to Mann.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not say he gave it to another boy, who gave it to Mann? He said it was given to Mann, who had been gone away about five minutes with it.

JAMES GIBBS . I apprehended Mann a week after the robbery; he cried, and said he was bathing, and knew nothing about the watch; Sewell said, that was the boy.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Mann's parents? A. Yes; they are honest people, and I never heard any harm of him.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I apprehended Sanderwick on the 2d of September - he was much confused - I told him the charge - he at last said, "Well, what do you think will be the consequence of it?" he afterwards said he knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am shopman to Mr. Smellie, a pawnbroker. On the 7th of July this watch was pawned in the name of Barratt; I do not who by.

TONKS Defence. I sat on the bridge, seeing the boys bathe, a man came by with some beer, and I had a pint; I then saw a parcel of boys as if they were going to fight - I went to see what was the matter, and was charged with taking the watch; I heard a boy say, the boys who took it, had gone under the bridge, and I asked him to go there and look for it.

MANN's Defence. I was bathing and hearing a row, I dressed, and went up; they said a boy had stolen a watch.

SANDERWICK's Defence. I was bathing, and went up on hearing a noise; I asked what was the matter, nobody answered, and I went away.

JOHN MOORE . I live in Carlisle-street, Edgware-road, and am a marble-polisher. On the 7th of July, I was at the New-cut, minding Mann's clothes, he was in the water - Arden was crying about his watch, and after

Mann had done bathing, he went to see what was the matter; he called to me for his clothes, and as I went up, I saw a boy put the watch into his waistcoat-pocket; I do not recollect seeing any of the prisoners there.

TONKS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SANDERWICK - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Of stealing from the person only.

Transported for Seven Years .

MANN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-45

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1356. JOHN KING and ELEANOR KING were indicted for feloniously assaulting Frances Smith , spinster , in the King's high-way, on the 13th of August , at St. James, Clerkenwell , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 reticule, value 6d.; 1 book, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 1 cake of soap, value 1d.; 1 half-crown, and 3 shillings , her property.

FRANCES SMITH. I live in Lower-street, Islington, and am single. On the 13th of August, about half-past eight o'clock, I was coming from church, and in Smithfield, the male prisoner hustled me, I desired him to go away, and thought he was gone, but when I got into St. John-street-road , he knocked me off the pavement, and struck me several blows; the woman assisted him, and between them they got my bag from me; I resisted as much as I could - he came behind me, struck me on the back, and threw me off the pavement on the ground - I called for assistance, and Day rescued me from them; I was led out of the crowd; the bag contained a handkerchief, a pair of gloves, a cake of soap, a prayer-book, half a crown, and three shillings; this was a quarter of an hour from the time I first saw them - they had followed me all the way - I saw him behind me, but I thought he was gone, till he knocked me down in the wide path of St. John-street; the woman held me while he took the bag.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. I am told there was a croud of people looking for something? A. No such thing; they did not accuse me of having their money when they hustled me - they said nothing of the kind.

JOHN DAY . I live in Drury-lane, at Mr. Wilson's. I was in St. John-street-road, with Hinkley, and saw the prisoners strike the prosecutrix, and push her off the pavement, they knocked her down; I assisted in securing them, and in getting the reticule; Boyd came up and got it from the man - he gave it to Hinkley, and she gave it to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the prisoners sober? A. They were both sober; after they had stolen the property, they complained of losing a small purse with 2l. in it.

HIGATT BOYD . I assisted in taking the reticule from the male prisoner, and delivered it to Hinkley.

ANN HINKLEY . I received it from Boyd, and delivered it to Day.

JAMES CONNOR . I am a constable. Day gave me the bag - I have had it ever since; I have inquired, and believe the prisoners are married; I heard that from the gaoler.

FRANCES SMITH. This is my bag - the prayer-book, handkerchief, and soap, are in it now, but not the money.

JOHN KING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged

ELEANOR KING - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-46

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1357. MARY ANN KING , LOUISA KING , and MARY CARTER , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Susannah Langford , on the 3d of September , and taking from her person, and against her will, 3 sovereigns; 1 half-crown; 1 ring, value 2s.; 1 bonnet, value 1s., and a pocket, value 1d., the property of Arthur William Langford .

SUSANNAH LANGFORD. I am the wife of Arthur William Langford - we live in Bateman-street, Bethnal-green. I have known the two Kings eleven years, and Carter three. On Sunday, the 3d of September, about a quarter to one o'clock in the day; I saw them in Shoreditch, coming towards me, and tried to shun them - they caught hold of me, and asked if I would have any thing to drink; I said No, but Mary Ann said, "Oh, come in, and have something;" I went, and we had a glass of gin each by the turnpike - Mary Ann then asked me to walk home with her - we went into the Green Man public-house, but drank nothing; we then went to the Salmon and Ball public-house, Chequer-alley ; I went in with Louisa, and had half a quartern of gin between us - we went out the back-way of that house to a passage, where Mary King lodges on the ground floor - directly we got into that room they all three threw me down, Mary Ann took my pocket from me, and, as I laid on the ground, I saw my three sovereigns in her hand; she then went out - Louisa directly forced a gold ring off my finger, and said, "Let go of your shawl and handkerchief;" I said, I would die first; she then went out - Carter untied my bonnet and took it; I screamed Murder! several times, but nobody came - Carter said "If you offer to halloo or resist, I will smash you;" she scratched my face a good deal, and then went out; I got up as well as I could, picked up Carter's bonnet, not knowing but it was my own, and went home; I felt my money safe at the Salmon and Ball.

Prisoner LOUISA KING. Q. Were you not very much intoxicated, and laying on the bed with us? A. No; I was as sober as I am now.

WILLIAM COX . I apprehended the prisoners on the following day, but found no sovereigns.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am headborough, and was with Cox when we took the prisoners in King's room, Stone-yard , near the Salmon and Ball - Mary Ann King and Carter were laying on the bed very drunk - Carter took a bonnet off the table, and put it on; I asked if it was hers - she said Yes - the prosecutrix claimed it - Carter then said,"If it is your's you have got mine."

SARAH PERKINS . On the 28th of August Mary Ann King took this room of me in Stone passage. On the 3d of September I was at home all day, and about a quarter past three o'clock I heard a scream; I ran into the yard, but all was silent.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On Tuesday morning I went with Langford to Stone-passage, Chequer-alley, to King's room - Perkins' room is four yards from King's.

ARTHUR WILLIAM LANGFORD. On the 3d of September I gave my wife three sovereigns and half-a-crown - she came home about five o'clock with her face scratched and swollen.

ELIZABETH HERBERT . I keep the Salmon and Ball.

On the 3d of September, at a about a quarter past one o'clock, the prosecutrix came with Louisa King, and had half a quartern of gin - they were both sober; Langford gave me half a crown - they went out the back way - returned with Mary Ann, and had a quartern, which Mary Ann paid for - they all went away together towards Chequer-alley, and about two o'clock the two Kings came into the passage, and had a quartern of gin to take home - they were just going out when Carter came and fetched them, and about three o'clock Louisa came in at the front door quite tipsy.

JOHN JOHNSON . On the 3d of September I was at the Green Man, James-street, Featherstone-street, and saw the three prisoners and prosecutrix at the bar of the Green Man - they appeared sober.

SUSANNAH LANGFORD. This is my bonnet - Mary Ann tore my pocket from my side - I was quite sober.

CARTER's Defence. I met her, and knowing her to be an unfortunate woman as well as ourselves - I asked her to drink - her eyes were swollen - she said she had been quarrelling with her husband - we drank a good deal, and got to words - she bit me on the shoulder; Mary Ann King had stabbed herself at the time, and was in bed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-47

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1358. JOHN SHACKLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 6 pieces of printed calico, containing twenty-eight yards each, value 7l. 9s. 6d. , the goods of John Wheelton , John Brewer , and George Alexander Buckland .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN WHEELTON. I am in partnership with John Brewer and George Alexander Buckland - we are callenderers and packers , carrying on business in Bagnio-court, Newgate-street - the prisoner was about eighteen months in our employ.

ROBERT THOMAS FORD . I am clerk to the prosecutors - the prisoner's duty was to go out with a light cart to collect goods to be finished, and return them to the party when done; I produce the day-book - here is an entry made by myself on the 22d of July, "White and Greenwell, 2 7-8ths, furniture 28-14 9-8ths jacconet;" the name of Shacklock is written against this entry in his own writing, and signifies that he has returned the goods - here is another entry of the same date, of four pieces of 7-18ths furniture the prisoner has also signed that.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You make the first entry yourself? A. Yes; from the prisoner's mouth when he brings the goods - he signs the book when he takes them out to return them, and brings a receipt back when he comes home - I have no recollection of seeing the goods - he has written July 25th, against them, as the day he returned them; I am certain "Shacklock, July 25," is his writing.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. When he brings goods home what is done? A. He calls them over, and I enter them, and when he takes them back he signs the book with his name and the date, as haring returned them.

CHARLES JAMES HOGG . I am in the service of White and Greenwell, of Blackfriars-road. The prisoner used to call from the prosecutors' for goods; I remember delivering these goods to him - here is an entry in my writing of delivering him these pieces of furniture with other goods, on the 22d - the six pieces of furniture have never been returned - they were to be rolled and callendered.

Q. Look at this receipt - here are the initials C. J. H. to it, is there any other person in Messrs. White and Co.'s employ answering to those initials except you? A. No; this receipt was never signed by me or my authority - it is dated 25th of July - I was at the house that day, and went out of town on the 26th, at two o'clock, for three weeks and three days - the furniture was never returned to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you conclude that because you find no entry of them? A. I have crossed off the jacconets, and recollect that they came without the furniture - my recollection was called to it when I came from the country; I also inspected the stock, and found they were not in it; I always cross off goods at the time they come in; I never omit it.

Q. Has any person inquired of you whether White's stock was all right, and you said Yes? A. Two females made some inquiry on behalf of the prisoner, after he was in custody; I told them as I had not then taken stock, I knew nothing against him on, White and Co.'s account, I did not say the stock was all right; I had not examined it when they called.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long after you returned did these women call? A. A day or two; I am certain I had not then examined the stock; I believe it was his wife and sister who called - we had, perhaps, fifty or sixty pieces of furniture at that time, and, at that time, might not sell above a piece or two in a week.

MR. JOHN BREWER. I am one of the prosecutors. When the prisoner brought in goods he gave them to some person to be entered in the day-book, and when he took them out his duty was to fill up a receipt for them. The name "Shacklock," to this entry, is his, and is done when he takes the goods out: his duty, when he returns, is to bring us a receipt from the customer; he produced to me this receipt for these goods (reads) - "July 25, delivered White and Co. six pieces of 7-8ths furniture, twenty-eight yards each, rolled and glazed; received by C.I.H." and in the corner are my initials, which I put on when he gave it me - the receipt is his writing.

Mr. BRODRICK to HOGG. Q. Does not one clerk sometimes put the initials of another? A. Never; it is my duty to receive goods; if I was absent whoever received them would put his own initials.

ISAAC JEFFERSON . I am warehouseman to White and Co. I did not receive these goods - I do not know the initials to this receipt.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the stock examined before Hogg came home? A. No; we sometimes sell fifty pieces in a week; I should think the average sale in July might be from twenty to twenty-five pieces.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Can you sell goods you have not got? A. No. Hogg, Powell, and I are the only persons who receive goods.

JAMES POWELL . I am in White and Co.'s employ. I did not put these initials to the receipt - they are not Hogg's writing - I never received the goods.

Cross-examined. Q. If you three were absent would not somebody else put your initials? A. No; one of is always in the way - the initials are in pencil.

MR. BREWER. The prisoner left our service on Satur

day morning, the 29th of July, without notice: I received this letter the same day - it is his hand-writing - he called on me on Monday evening (read).

"To Messrs. Wheelton and Co. - Gentlemen - Unfortunate circumstances have occurred which render it impossible for me to attend to business to-day, but I hope on Monday to explain all to your satisfaction - till then I do hope you will suspend your judgment, as I am entirely the victim of circumstances. J. SHACKLOCK."

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of receiving many goods, and in the hurry of business Hogg has taken his pencil out, and signed his name in great haste, so that there are not two signatures which any body could identify as the same; I certainly delivered them to him that day; it is impossible they could miss them out of their stock; I knew nothing of this indictment till I came into Court.

MR. BREWER. We did not prefer this particular charge before the Lord Mayor.

SUSANNAH MARY BARTON . I am not related to the prisoner. I went with his wife to White and Co.'s on Sunday, and was told Hogg had not returned; we called again on Tuesday, and asked if he knew any thing to the disrepute of Mr. Shacklock - he said No; I said Mrs. Shacklock was anxious to know whether all was correct - he said "Quite correct."

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Why, according to what we have heard this charge was not known? A. No, but I understand Mr. Wheelton told his wife three parties were concerned, but he would not deliver up their names; she was anxious to know who were his accusers.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-48

1359. JAMES FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , at St. Sepulchre , 1 mare, price 8l. , the property of William Head Johnson .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HEAD JOHNSON. I live at Enfield. On the 16th of June I sent my servant Brereton to town, with a grey mare - he was to take it to Smithfield and deliver it to Mr. Wignell, the agent there, for sale; he was only to sell it himself if he was offered a price on the road, and not to take less than 8l. for her. He returned between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, and brought neither the mare nor money; I saw it, about eight days after, in possession of the officer, and knew her well again - I conside her worth 8l.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. He is a stranger to me.

HENRY BRERETON . I am servant to Mr. Johnson, who is a farmer . On the 16th of June I brought this mare to town. I was to take it to Mr. Wignell, the horse-dealer, to sell; the lowest price was 8l.; I had liberty to sell her on the road if I met with a customer; I overtook the prisoner about three miles before I got to town; I knew him and said "How do you do, Jem?" he was on the footpath; he said "How do you do?" and came by the side of the mare - he asked me if I was going to Smithfield; I said Yes, and asked if he was going; he said he was, and asked whose horse that was; I said it was master's, Mr. Johnson's; he asked if I was going to sell it; I told him I was taking it to a horse-dealer at Smithfield (I did not mention his name), and that master told me if I could get a price for it on the road to sell it; he asked the price - I told him 8l. was the lowest; he said he thought it would not fetch that; he went with me to the Ram inn, at Smithfield, where I put the mare up; we then walked into the market; he said he would go and have a pot of beer - I went and had part of a pot with him; he said "I have got a sovereign, and do not wish to change, if you will pay for the beer I will treat you when I get change" - this was about twelve o'clock; he said "I can shew you a fine place, where there are a great many second-hand clothes; we took a walk round there - it was a long-lane, near Smithfield; we then came back to Smithfield (the market does not begin till three o'clock); he left me a short time, and I saw Wignell, the horse-dealer, took and shewed him the mare, and told him 8l. would be the lowest price; he said he did not think it would fetch so much as the market was dull. I walked about till three o'clock, then took the mare from the stable to the market, and walked her round to get a customer; the prisoner was with me several times, and when a gentleman was talking to me about buying her, he came up, took her, and walked her backward and forward; he took her up, with my leave, to trot her, to shew the gentleman; I do not know that gentleman; I took her from him again, walked her about the market, and this man, who afterwards bought her of Field, bid me 5l. 10s. for it; I asked him 9l., and got as low as 8l., and just as I was going to turn away with the mare, I said "Will you give 7l.;" I said that just to see what he would give; Field stood close by- this was between four and five o'clock - I loitered about till half-past five, when Field came and asked if he should trot her up and down the market - I had hold of her then, and said he might if he liked, and, if asked the price, to say it was eight guineas; but he must see me before he sold her; he took her away - went up the market - I stopped in that place about five minutes, and then, as he did not come back, I walked up the market after him, but could not see him - I expected he was only walking about the market to shew her - I had given him leave to do nothing else - I told him he must see me before he sold her - I saw no more of him - I went all round the market, saw Mr. Wignell, and told him what had happened; I kept looking about for him for two hours, but could not find him or the mare: I saw one Ellis, who lives at Enfield-chase, and told him the story; I at last went home and told my master. I afterwards found her at a public-house in town, took her home, and master has sold her since.

Cross-examined. Q. You first spoke to the prisoner? A. Yes - I have known him some time. I believe he is known at Enfield; he does not live near master. I do not know the man's name who I first offered it to; one man bid me 6l. for it - the prisoner was not with me then. - While I was talking to another man, who asked me the price, the prisoner came up. I do not know whether the other man's name is Jude. The prisoner did not ask 8l. for it.

Q. You told him he was to sell it for not less than eight guineas? A. No; I told him to say eight guineas was the price, but he must not sell it before he saw me; if he had sold her, and brought me eight guineas, I dare say all would be right; I dare say master would not have

said any thing, but my orders were that he must see me before he sold her; he was not with me all the time I was in the market; he went away, and came several times; I did not ask him to walk the horse about; he asked if he should; I knew his name, and used to see him two or three times a-week. I do not know much of his character - I never heard any thing against him.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you give him authority to sell her without coming to you? A. No; he lived at Enfield, and master lived at Bush-hill, not half a mile from him; I told him I lived with Mr. Johnson.

COURT. Q. Did he come to you before he was taken up? A. No; I looked about for him, but he could never be found at Enfield.

JOHN WILSON . I am a constable of Enfield. In June last I heard Mr. Johnson had lost a mare; I sent Pye after the prisoner, and on the Thursday following he brought the prisoner to me at Enfield; I knew he was a labouring man, and lived at Enfield. I took him to the Mansion-house, and on our way to town he asked if I thought it would be of any use for me to go to Mr. Johnson, to try, if he got the money whether he would make it up, and if so I was to go to the prisoner's father - I told him I thought it would be of no use; he said he had sold the mare, and after he had sold her he went into Smithfield to find the lad who he had her from, but could not find him; I asked if he had got none of the money - he said No, he had got into a brick field with some girls, and there lost the money among them - he said he had sold the mare to Jews, who lived near Reid's brew-house, for 5l. odd, and did not know the name.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he had sold it to a Jew or Jews? A. To some Jews - to a Jew.

Q. I am told he said to Jude? A. No; he said "To some Jews;" I swear he did not say Jude; he said they lived near Reid's brew-house, Saffron-hill; I said the brew-house was in Liquorpond-street. I went to Isaac's, in Laystall-street; I got his direction at the Mansion-house - I do not know who wrote it.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When he said he sold it to Jews, was he speaking of one person or more? A. I considered him as speaking of two; he said to some Jews.

ISAAC PYE . I am a constable. In June last I received information of the loss of this mare, and a description of the person. I went to Hertford, and received the prisoner in charge at Ware, on the Wednesday after the robbery. I found him at his father's house - his mother-in-law answered the door; I asked for James Field - she said he was not there; I insisted on going in, and found him concealed under the furthest bed in a room which had two beds; I told him I took him for stealing Mr. Johnson's mare, of Bush-hill; he told me to hold my tongue, for he did not want his wife to know any thing about it; I said no more till we got out of doors - he then began to say he had sold the mare to a Jew, near the brew-house on Saffron-hill, for 5l. 15s., and that he had come back to Smithfield with the money, and from there went to a brick field, and there lost it with a girl - from there he went to Kingsland-road, and rode down the same evening, by coach, to Hoddesden, and intended to return Mr. Johnson the money, but could not raise it again.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not tell you where the horse was sold? A. He said to a Jew, near the brew-house, and that I knew where the brew-house was.

JOSEPH ISAACS . I am a Jew. The prisoner sold me this mare, for 5l. 15s., in Smithfield, a little after five o'clock; he took it home to my house, in Liquorpond-street; he took it through the passage into my yard; we made the bargain opposite Long-lane; Brereton was not present. I paid the prisoner for it when he brought her home. I went back to Smithfield again that afternoon, as a young man asked me to go with him - when I got there I happened to see Brereton walking about there, and asked what he was looking for - he said after a mare - I told him I had bought it, and got her at home; he said I had not - I told him I had, and left him my address - the same mare was afterwards taken away by Johnson, on the 26th of June.

Cross-examined. Q. This was about five o'clock in the evening? A. Soon after; I had seen them both walking together all the afternoon, and bid 5l. for it - in the presence of both; the prisoner wanted 6l.; I offered 5l. 10s. to Brereton; the prisoner wanted 6l., and he(the prisoner) said Mr. Johnson had told him to take 6l. for it; Brereton asked would I give 7l. - I said I could give no more.

Q. He appeared willing to sell it for 7l.? A. I suppose so. I afterwards went up to the prisoner, and asked him if he would let me have it for the money, as I was going home - he was walking up and down; this was about three-quarters of an hour after I had seen Brereton; I was five or ten minutes with him the last time; there appeared no hurry in his conduct. The mare has been resold since for 6l., as I have heard.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. At what time did you bid Brereton money for the mare? A. A little after three o'clock - I offered him 5l. 10s.; he asked if I would give 7l.; the prisoner was present. I saw Brereton up and down Smithfield for two hours; he was not present when I bought the mare. I knew Brereton had the sale of it - I asked who it belonged to - he said to Mr. Johnson, of Enfield.

COURT. Q. What part of the market did the sale take place in? A. Opposite Long-lane; Brereton asked me 9l., and then said would I give 7l.

Prisoner's Defence. After selling him the horse I took him to the Bear and Ragged Staff, public-house, to receive the money; he had not got it, so I took it home; he called a man to look at it, who said if he had given more than 4l. 10s. it was too much; I said I would take it back if he liked; Brereton had said if I could sell it he would give me half-a-crown.

JURY to HENRY BRERETON. Q. You was to deliver it to Mr. Wignell? A. Yes; but Mr. Wignell told me to get a customer for her, as he had to find another horse for master. I did not promise the prisoner any thing to sell it. Wignell did not tell me to take less than master told me.

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character, and believing it to be his first offence.

Reference Number: t18260914-49

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1360. WILLIAM HAYER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Frances Howell , on the King's highway, on the 18th of July , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 9d.; 3 keys, value 3s., and 17 shillings, the property of John Howell .

FRANCES HOWELL. I am the wife of John Howell, who lives in Waterloo-town, Bethnal-green. On the 18th of July, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night, (my husband had lately returned from sea, and spent a good deal of money) I went to look for him, as he had been absent a night and a day - as I came up Brick-lane, to the corner of Phoenix-street, about a dozen men stood there; Davis, who was with me, happened to slip; I stooped down to pick her up, and a person came up and asked me to treat him with drink - the prisoner is very much like that person, and I believe him to be the man, but I have since seen a person very much like the prisoner; he followed me down Hare-street - we went into a public-house and had some drink together - as I crossed the fields a tall man stood with his back towards us, and his hands before his face; as I passed him the person who I believe to be the prisoner, shoved me round; I felt my pocket go from me as I fell - it was tied round me; they both ran away - I was too much alarmed to call out. The prisoner was taken in about a month; it was done in a darkish place, and I cannot be certain he is the man. I had seen a person like the prisoner many times before.

SARAH DAVIS . I was with Howell. I have no idea who the man was.

PHILIP PARISH . I am an officer. The prosecutrix told me she had been robbed by a man she had known six years, and his name was William Hayer - I said I knew him, and apprehended him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-50

1361. CATHERINE PARMENTER , SARAH JARVIS , and WILLIAM STURDY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Aloysius Last , on the King's highway, on the 24th of August , at St. Mary-le-bone , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, I watch, value 20s., his property .

ALOYSIUS LAST. I live in Grove-street, with my parents. On the 24th of August, between 8 and 9 o'clock in the evening, I was in Lisson-grove , with my younger brother, who is about nine years old - we were going towards home; the two female prisoners, with two men, came up to me, and the two girls made a kind of curtsey, and said, "How do you do?" (Sturdy was not one of the men); they met us. The two men appeared as if they were walking on, but all of a sudden one struck me in the jaw, and the other under the eye; the two girls were then standing before me, and all four were in company; I did not answer the girls - the men had passed, and come behind me; the girls saw the blows given, and I immediately felt a tug at my watch, and it was taken out of my fob. - I am certain it was taken by one of the women, for I saw their hands moving, and saw it in one of their hands; the blow rather overpowered me, but in a moment I saw Parmenter before me; where the other three went I do not know; they were gone. I ran after Parmenter as hard as I could, as far as Lisson-street, which is about a quarter of a mile, and called Watch! - as I followed her she spoke to two boys; I could not hear what she said, but they went into a public-house, and fetched Sturdy out; in passing the public-house (which he came out of) in pursuit of Parmenter, he stopped me, and seized me round the waist; a great many people assembled, and released me - I ran after Parmenter again, having seen the road she took; I had not lost sight of her. Sturdy followed me, and when I got within three yards of Parmenter he overtook me, and knocked me down; I got up again, and ran after her; I pursued her into George-street, and there I thought she had turned into a house, but a man said she had turned down a corner; I lost sight of her. I stood a moment, inquiring where she had gone, and presently Sturdy came up, with a gang of boys, and again struck me several blows. I got away, and went home. I have not recovered my watch. I described the prisoners to Hewett and Webster - they were taken next morning, and I was certain they were the three, and am so now: I looked at them when they asked how I did, and am quite certain of them; it was twi-light - the lamps were not lighted. The public-house Sturdy came from is a quarter of a mile from where I was robbed.

JAMES PROCTOR . I live in Upper Lisson-street, where this public-house is, with my father, who is a grocer. On the 24th of August I was in doors, and heard a cry of Watch! I went out, and saw Sturdy holding Last round the waist; some people came up, and he let him go; he ran after the woman. I then saw Last on the ground - Sturdy had knocked him down - he got up, and ran into George-street, after the woman; who was Parmenter - I am sure of her; I had seen her before, and knew her well - I saw her run round the corner of George-street, but do not know where she went to at last. I saw Sturdy give Last several blows. Parmenter lived in the neighbourhood. I know Jarvis, but never saw them together.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I received information of this robbery from Hewitt, and went with Webster and Last to where the prisoners lodged; I knew Parmenter and Sturdy before - they lived together as man and wife, in Lisson-street. Webster went up stairs to the room they occupied; Last and I opened the room door below, and Jarvis was sitting by the window; upon seeing Last she ran and hid herself behind the bed; he said, "That is one of them;" Sturdy sat at the further end of the same room, with nothing but his trousers on, with Parmenter on his knee - I said, "Now be very particular." Last said, "These are the parties - I am certain."

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I was informed of the robbery, and, from Last's description, I and my brother officer went to this house, in a court leading out of Lisson-street; I went up stairs, leaving them below - there was nobody up stairs; they were all three found in the room below - Last spoke positively to the three. I found twenty-five duplicates up stairs, which Parmenter claimed.

Prisoner PARMENTER. He said I was the woman, but he thought Jarvis was one; Webster said, "We must

have Sturdy too - look at him - can you swear to him?" he said, "I think so."

ALOYSIUS LAST. I never said so - I said they were all the parties.

JARVIS' Defence. I had just come into the room, and know nothing of it.

PARMENTER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

JARVIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

STURDY - NOT GUILTY .

Sturdy detained to be indicted as an accessary.

Reference Number: t18260914-51

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1362. THOMAS HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , one 100l., one 50l., and five 5l. Bank notes, the property of Emanuel Allen , in his dwelling-house ; and ELIZABETH HALL was indicted for feloniously receiving the said 100l. note, well-knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. EMANUEL ALLEN. I am a solicitor , and live in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster . The male prisoner was in the employ of my son and Mr. Gylby, whose office is in my house - I had retired, but live in the house. On Wednesday, the 9th of August, I paid some money away, and supposed I put the rest of my notes into my cash-box- but on Saturday I found in my hurry I had left 170l. or 175l. in notes on the desk in the office, instead of putting them into the cash-box; I missed a 100l. and a 50l. note among others - I had received the 100l. note from my son, Charles, that morning, and the 50l. from Mr. Humphrys; it was part of a sum he had received from Messrs. Hoares'. The prisoner continued in my son's service till the 9th, and came on the 10th, but was absent on Friday and Saturday - on missing my notes his absence made me suspect him - he never returned.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had the prisoner and Mr. Gylby a dispute on Thursday? A. Not a dispute - he admonished him mildly about some neglect, and said he suspected he drank, which, if he discovered, he should discharge him - he did not turn him out of the office.

CHARLES PETIT ALLEN . On the 9th of August I received a 100l. Bank note from Mr. Gylby, and gave it to my father in a few minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you give it him? A. About ten o'clock in the morning - the house is my father's dwelling-house; we pay him rent for the office.

JOHN PARKER GYLBY . On the 7th of August Humphrys, my clerk, paid me a 100l. Bank note, which I gave Mr. Charles Petit Allen on the 9th.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not, on the 10th tell the prisoner he had been too long in the office, and should leave? A. I said unless he changed his conduct I should dismiss him, as he had been long enough; I had blamed him about a parcel-book which was lost; we have twelve clerks - they all have access to the office. There is a railing which separates the desk from the other part of the office. Mr. Allen is vestry-clerk, and uses the office for his business.

JOSIAH HUMPHRYS . I am clerk to Mr. Gylby. On the 7th of August I received a 100l. note from Messrs. Martin and Co., Bond-street, for a cheque, drawn by Jay, and paid it to Mr. Gylby. On the 9th I received a 50l. note from Messrs. Hoares', and delivered it to Mr. Allen, senior.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not take the numbers? A. No - I had no other notes of the same amount. Mr. Allen was within the enclosure of the desk when I gave it to him.

JOHN WARD . I am clerk to Messrs. Martin. On the 7th of August I paid a cheque of 100l., drawn by Jay, in a 100l. note. No. 4103, dated the 20th of July, 1826.

THOMAS BENJAMIN KINGSTON . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I have a 100l. note, No. 4103, dated 20th of July, 1826, and a 50l. No. 2307, 15th of June, 1826- the 100l. note was brought into the Bank by the female prisoner; I gave her seventy sovereigns and a ticket for a 30l. note for it; I asked the name and address - she gave me Elizabeth Robinson, 8, Theobald's-road, which I have written on it; I met her the same day in the street, and am certain of her.

FREDERICK MORTYN . I am clerk to Messrs. Allen and Gylby. On the 9th of August, about a quarter past four o'clock, on my returning to the office, I found the male prisoner sitting there alone; I mentioned, among other things, that I had been into the City and collected 20l. or 30l.; he said he had got four or five times as much as that in his possession; I asked how much - he said 150l., and in a few minutes he said 170l., and that he could shew it to me; I said, I suppose he was going to pay it into the bankers; he said No; I said "I suppose then somebody has left it here for the firm;" he said No; I asked how he became possessed of it; he said it had been left loose on the desk, and might have been lost as the door was open, therefore he had taken it up, and got it in his possession.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not inform Mr. Allen of this till the 12th? A. No; I had no idea of his stealing it - he said he should give it to Mr. Allen when he came in- I thought he had done so; I thought no more of it; he left about five o'clock on the 10th, as he had to go into the City; I told Mr. Allen the moment the loss was discovered.

RICHARD PRICE . I live in St. Ann's-court, Soho. On the 9th of August the prisoners took a furnished attic at my house - they slept there on the 9th and 10th, and then left.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I lodge in the back garret at Price's. The prisoners slept in the next room - the second night they slept there I was awoke by their coming to bed, about half-past twelve o'clock - the man appeared much intoxicated - soon after I heard a conversation between them, but I was not thoroughly awake; all I could gather was, that he was much surprised, after being in the gentleman's employ so long, that he should be accused as he had been that afternoon; just after that I heard a rattling of paper, and the female expressing her surprise, in a kind of shriek - she asked him how he came by it - this thoroughly awoke me, and excited my curiosity; I got out of bed to listen; I went against the wainscot - the woman asked how he came by that money - he said it was no odds to her, that it was his own, and he intended to leave London, and asked if she would go with him; that he should first go to Dover, then to Calais, and two or three other places - she said she would not, and wished him to take the money back to Mr. somebody, whose name I did not hear;

he said he should go whether she would go or not - she said he had better not, but return the property, and not defraud so kind an employer or benefactor.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you lodged there? A. A fortnight - nobody else lodged in the room in my time; I had been asleep and did not see them enter the room or come out; I did not mention this for two days when I returned home.

JOSEPH DOWNER . I am shopman to Mr. Kirkham, of the Borough. On the 11th of August I changed a 50l. note for the male prisoner, who bought two watches, a gold one for 12l., and a silver one for 2l. 5s., this is the note (looking at it, No. 2307, dated 15th of June, 1826.) I asked his name - he said "Williams, No. 29, Camberwellgrove," which I have written on it.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time of the day was this? A. About four o'clock in the afternoon - our shop is not dark; I was questioned about this the next week, and said I should know him if I saw him - that he wore a dark coat, but I would not be certain of the colour; I did not say it was green; he might be a quarter of an hour in the shop - selling two watches to one person enables me to recollect him; I swear positively to him.

WILLIAM DODD . I am clerk to Messrs. Hoares. On the 9th of August I paid this 50l. note, among other notes, for a cheque of 254l. 19s. drawn by White and Co.

MR. HUMPHRYS. I received this money from Mr. Dodd, and paid it to Mr. Allen - there was only one 50l. note among them.

MR. ALLEN. It is the note I lost; I had no other of that amount.

JOHN ROYLE . I am clerk to Mr. Allen. On the 23d of August I met the prisoner near Marsh-gate, Lambeth, and gave him in charge - his wife was taken the same day; I heard her tell him, in Mr. Allen's office, not to tell of any body to whom he had paid money.

JAMES HACKWELL . I received the prisoners in charge, and heard the female say, "Say nothing of any body to whom the notes were paid."

THOMAS HALL - GUILTY. Aged 32. Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Confined One Year .

ELIZABETH HALL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-52

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1363. ELIZA LUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 1 shift, value 5s.; 10 aprons, value 8s.; 1 gown body, value 5s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 8s.; 7 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 1 night cap, value 2s.; 6 napkins, value 6s., and 6 towels, value 6s., the goods of Lawrence Wright , her master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ANN WRIGHT . I am the wife of Lawrence Wright, a baker - we live in Princes-street, Westminster , and rent the house. The prisoner came into our service on the 17th of May, as servant of all-work ; she left on the 22d of June, about six o'clock in the morning, before I was up, without any notice - some time after Holton, the patrol, came to me; I had before that missed some apparel, and upon searching further missed more.

WILLIAM HOLTON . I am a Bow-street patrol, and live in Harriet-street, Lambeth-marsh. Mrs. Daly, who lodged at my house, brought the prisoner there to lodge with her - one morning I heard them quarrelling, and heard Daly say, "You know you are wanted, there is 10l. reward for you;" upon that I made inquiry, and went to Wright's, and then to Hallaghan, another lodger of mine, who gave me an apron and handkerchief marked with Mrs. Wright's name, as the prisoner's property, also two gown bodies, a pair of drawers, and a pocket-book with four duplicates.

MARY DALY . I am the wife of John Daly. The prisoner came to lodge with me, and gave me a gown and some stockings, which I pawned for her at Barnet's, and gave her the duplicates; I have seen that pocket-book in her possession.

MARY HALLAGHAN . The prisoner slept one night in my room, and left the things there in the morning, which I gave to Holton; she was to return at night, but did not.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see them in her possession? A. Yes, and washed them for her.

WILLIAM HAWGOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Barnet, New-cut. On the 23d of June Daly pawned a gown, a pair of stockings, and two handkerchiefs for 5s. - I gave her the duplicate produced(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mistress left me in care of the house for a fortnight without losing any thing - I left her as we did not agree.

GUILTY. Aged 22. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18260914-53

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1364. HENRY DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , at St. Ann, Westminster , 3 robes, value 3l.; 130 yards of silk, value 29l.; 1 spencer, value 8s.; 3 caps, value 30s.; 4 collars, value 30s.; 11 handkerchiefs, value 40s.; 11 pairs of stockings, value 40s.; 14 pairs of gloves, value 14s.; 44 yards of printed cotton, value 3l.; 9 shawls, value 13l.; 2 scarfs, value 30s.; 1 parasol, value 17s.; 2 veils, value 50s.; 1 piece of gingham, value 10s.; 4 yards of cloth, value 40s.: 10 yards of muslin, value 13s.; 26 yards of linen, value 30s., and 1 hat, value 10s., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , his masters, in their dwelling-house , and MARTHA SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, at the same parish, the aforesaid goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , and against the statute.

MESSRS. ANDREWS and LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS CROSS. I am in partnership with George Drake Sewell, we live at Nos. 44 and 45, Old Compton-street, Soho , in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster. The two houses communicate - the rates and taxes are paid out of the partnership funds, and we both reside there; the prisoner Dunn was our shopman . On Sunday, the 30th of July, in consequence of suspicion, I watched him out of the house; I ran up stairs, and saw him crossing the street - I pursued, caught him, and brought him back - after that I went with Clements to No. 107, Brook-street, Lambeth, and found the prisoner Smith there; I saw Maria White , her servant, there; Clements told Smith that Henry was in custody; we then made search, and found a crape handkerchief, an embroidered collar, and several other articles, which I knew to be ours; Clements took them, and has

had them ever since; some dresses were also found there; Smith said they were all presents brought her by her Henry; that the muslin of one dress was her own, but the trimming Henry brought her; I afterwards went to Mrs. Bradley's, and found a piece of silk, which is our property.

Cross-examined by MR BRODRICK. Q. Have you the least doubt but the articles were taken at different times? A. No doubt.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Within what space of time do you think? A. Within the last three or four months; I did not know Dunn ever lived at Lambeth till I received information; I entered Smith's room a moment after Clements - it was about one o'clock in the day - he did not ask if she knew Dunn.

Q. Did not she give up her keys, and say "You will find the things Dunn has given me, in these drawers? A. Yes: Clements said "You had better be candid for we have information;" and she said every thing her Henry had brought were in the drawers.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On Sunday, the 30th of July, I took Dunn into custody, and went the same day to Brook-street, West-square, Lambeth; I got into the house by sending somebody with beer; Smith let us in, and when I entered the parlour I told her Henry was in custody, and said "You know who I mean. Henry Dunn;" she said "Good God, what is it?" I said "I hold a warrant to search the house, and expect you will be very candid in your answers to me;" she said she had received many presents from Henry at different times; I asked where they were - she pointed to the drawers, and said "Some of them are made up in those drawers," and some she had pawned, the duplicates of which were in the drawers - that some of those pledged, were as she had received them from him, and some were made up; she then gave me the keys - I unlocked the drawers in Mr. Cross's presence, and found a quantity of goods - silk and muslin dresses, silk gloves, and a quantity of duplicates - the silk and muslin dresses were made up - some gloves were new and some worn - Mr. Cross claimed them; we went up stairs to search a bed-room with her, and there found some of the articles - she said she had received them all from Henry; I took White, the servant, into custody. I was present at an interview between Mr. Cross and Dunn, at Marlborough-street - it was not in the Magistrates' presence - I believe Mr. Cross had not seen him before.

MR. CROSS. I had not seen Dunn since his apprehension, till this interview, at which Clements was present - it was on the Monday; I held out no threat or promise of mercy to him, from first to last.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you not say to him "You had better be candid, for I always treat people as they treat me? A. Certainly not - nothing like it; I never said I should have his parents in the country, or his relations, taken up; I said I was going to send an officer there, to see if there was any property, as I had found some letters.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I held out neither threat or promise to him - I cannot state the conversation between Mr. Cross and him at Marlborough-street, but I saw him again in prison on the 3d of August, in consequence of finding some lettres - Mr. Cross was with me; I said "Dunn, now have you any thing to say to Mr. Cross, for we find you have been sending presents to Hull, and Mr. Cross or I must go down to Hull;" he burst into tears and said,"For God's sake do not go there, to bring my relations into disgrace, for they are respectable - let it all fall on my shoulders;" I said "Then what have you sent?" he said he had sent a piece of linen to Hull, to be made into shirts, which were sent back, and he afterwards sent his two sisters a shawl each, and (addressing himself to Mr. Cross, said) "It was only two of those marked in your shop at 16s. each and it was all your property." He said that the time he had given him to go into the country for his health, he had passed with Smith; that he frequently felt great remorse for what he had done, but whenever he offered to retract, she said to him "I will serve you as I did young Shepherd." I told him what had been found at Smith's - he said "It is all yours;" he was in great distress of mind; he said two of the parcels had gone from the shop in a peculiar way - that he had packed them up in the usual way, directed them to Mrs. Smith, and sent them out by their own porter to Mrs. Smith, in the way of trade; he said he wanted to get out of the country. I afterwards went to Mrs. Bradley of Holborn, and got from her a white robe dress and a piece of silk.

Q. He acknowledged that the things found at Smith's came through him? A. Yes; Mr. Cross described them to him; Mr. Cross said "There was some cloth too?" he said "Yes, it is yours, and the silks which are pawned, are all yours." Mr. Cross mentioned some India crape shawls, ladies' collars, silks, and printed cotton - he said"They are all yours;" Mr. Cross mentioned all the property found at Smith's, and he said they are all yours.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Will you swear that Mr. Cross enumerated every article? A. Yes, this conversation was in the New Prison, after he was committed for re-examination. We went (in consequence of two letters found in his box) to learn what had been sent to Hull; nothing was said about his friends being prosecated or taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You advised Smith to be candid? A. Yes - Dunn said he had sent the things to Smith, and carried some himself; we found no whole piece of goods - the silks were mostly made into dresses - there were some silk handkerchiefs; I remember nothing being said about a warrant being sent to Hull - we were to go to learn what had been received - not to apprehend any one.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you ever hear of any intention of prosecuting his relations? A. Certainly not. I produce the silk found at Bradley's, and the goods found at Smith's.

HANNAH BRADLEY . I am a dress-maker, and live in High Holborn, and worked for Smith at times. She delivered me this robe-dress herself, with some black sarsnet; I afterwards fitted it on her, and after that I received this brown silk from my work-woman; I afterwards saw Smith about it - it was left with me instead of a bill of 2l. 3s. 6d., which she owed me - it was not in her presence when I spoke to her about it - it was in my drawer - I agreed to take it of her instead of the 2l. 3s. 6d.; I had no other silk to which our conversation could refer; she said it was twelve yards and a half; I had measured it before, and that was the length - it was the only piece I

had; I was to write a receipt to her bill when I delivered the robe; I gave these goods to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. From whom did you yourself receive her white dress? A. From herself, three months ago; my woman delivered me the silk about a fortnight before she was apprehended - I should think I had the white dress a month before that; I kept it in my possession till the officer came.

FRANCES ROWLAND . I am the wife of John Rowland - we live in Waterloo-road. The prisoner Smith lodged with me a year and a half, till a fortnight before the 24th of June; Dunn came there very often, principally on Sundays, and for a month he was constantly with her; they co-habited together. Smith sent me to pledge several things for her - she always said Dunn had the principal management of a linen-draper's shop; I have heard him say he was always obliged to be at home before eleven o'clock, or he could not get in; and I once remember his coming back after leaving; he said the gates were fastened, and the porter would not let him in; Smith was present when he said so; Smith told me he was a great friend to her, and brought her different kind of things, and I have seen them - there were silks, stockings, lace, caps, handkerchiefs, muslin for dresses, and a great many shawls - these things came very frequently; she had shewn them to me, and spoken of them; I took a veil in myself; she said they came from her master - her Henry; she once shewed me a letter, and particularly wished Mr. Rowland to take down the direction of it, and the post-mark, but he could not make it out - she said it came from Dunn's father.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. She made no secret of it? A. No.

ELIZABETH MILLS . I am a widow, and live in Brook-street, West-square, Lambeth. I was servant to the prisoner Smith, for about six weeks; I went to her in May, and left in June; Dunn used to come and see her on Sundays; I remember when I had been there eight days, on a Wednesday, about six o'clock in the afternoon, he brought some bed-furniture - he came in through the shop up into the sitting-room, and threw them down on the table; I saw two or three pieces of printed cotton; he said he had brought them for her to choose; she seemed very much pleased - he cut off a piece to make a sofa cover; he staid a short time, and left the sofa cover behind - whether he left any more, I cannot tell - he took some away.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When was this? A. In May; this was in Waterloo-road, over in Surry.

HARRIET EBELS . I have known Smith four years; I lived in the same house with her three years ago, and visited her at times; I saw Dunn and her together about a month before he was apprehended, at Mrs. Rowland's, in Waterloo-road - I called there, and found them together; Dunn said he was going into Yorkshire to see his friends, but was ill, and could not go; after that Smith produced a letter to me.

Mr. BUTLER, clerk to Mr. Harmer, solicitor tor the prosecution, here proved the service of a notice on the prisoner to produce the letter in question. (notice read.)

ELIZABETH MILLS. She asked me to read the letter, as she could not make part of it out - I read it to her aloud; it was signed, "Your affectionate father, Dunn," and directed to Mr. Dunn, and stated that he had sent him 3l., which was all he could send at present, but he would send more in a short time; after I had read it, she said she wanted to know where Henry's friends lived, and asked if I could make out the post-mark; I said, it was faint, and could not; she shewed me a piece of Esterhasey silk once, and said it was about fifteen yards, and was to make a dress and bonnet; I knew she meant Dunn when she spoke of Henry - she said he was very kind to her, and a very good friend, and that he was in the linen drapery line - a sort of foreman at a shop; I often heard her say he could get the things at the wholesale price, and would pay for them when he got his quarter's salary; she once shewed me two or three pairs of gloves.

MARIA WHITE. I live in Brook-street, West-square. Lambeth, I lived servant to Smith for five weeks, up to the time she was taken, which was in July. On a Tuesday, about a fortnight before she was apprehended, I remember a parcel coming once; she said it came from Mr. Dunn; I saw it opened, it contained two pieces of silk, some gloves, and a worked collar; I think the silk was like the brown silk produced; I was taken into custody myself, and when in Pancras watch-house, she told me she had received the property from Mr. Dunn, and did not know it was stolen; I have since been to see her in Newgate; Mrs. Bonny was present there once or twice; she said, "Bonny, you have a duplicate of nine of a piece of silk, don't you mention it to any body, for if you do it will sell me."

Cross-examined. Q. How long ago was this? A. About three weeks.

Mr. CROSS, (examining the brown silk found at Mrs. Bradley's.) This is ours - I know it well by the selvage; I will not swear that I missed this particular piece, but I know it to be ours - it cost me 4s. 6d. a yard - it cost 54s.; the muslin dress is worth 30s., and is ours.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. By what marks do you swear to the silk? A. By the selvage, and its appearance altogether - we had a piece of about forty yards of it - we only had one piece of this colour - it is not a common colour, and I do not believe it can be matched exactly - here are two blue cords in the selvage; Dunn told me some of my silk was at Bradley's; we allow shopmen to buy things at the wholesale price, but they should take them into the counting-house, and be debited for them by the clerk; the only charge in the books to him, is 19s. 6d.

Mr. LAW. Q. Is it not very difficult to get an exact colour, except goods are died at the same time? A. Very; I owed him the current quarter's wages; he had 45l. a year, with board and lodging - it was increased from 35l.

CHARLES CRUSE . It is my duty to take an account from the shopman of the sales - I have the books here; the amount charged to the prisoner is 19s. 6d; if he took goods, he must charge himself for them; it is my duty to enter them.

THOMAS COLE . I am a pawnbroker. I have five yards and three-quarters of silk, pawned on the 8th of April, for 10s., by Rowland, in the name of "Rowland, for Smith." On the 12th of April, six cambric-handkerchiefs, for 8s., by "Rowland, for Smith;" on the 6th of June, five yards of silk for 12s., by Mills, in her own name, for Smith;

I have a parasol pawned, on the 10th of June, and a veil, on the 8th of July, in the name of Smith.

Mrs. MILLS. I pawned that silk for Smith.

Mrs. ROWLAND. I pawned the silk, cambric-handkerchiefs, and veil, for Smith, by her order.

WILLIAM DICKERS . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Lambeth Marsh. I have seven shawls, pawned on the 18th of May, 1st of June, 5th, 13th, and 15th of July; a cloak pawned on the 22d of April, some remnants of silk and muslin, some cloth, twelve yards of cotton, and a pelisse; some where pawned by Smith herself, some by Rowland, and some by Mills; I did not take them all in myself.

Mrs. ROWLAND. I pawned several of these articles by Smith's direction, and received them from her.

Mrs. MILLS. All I pawned was by Smith's order; she told me to pawn them in her own name.

WILLIAM HORGOOD . I am apprentice to Mr. Dickers. On the 6th of March, the prisoner, Smith, pawned a remnant of silk for 33s., in the name of Sarah Smith; on the 11th of March, she pawned a piece of silk for 28s., in her own name, and on the 29th of May, a coat for 29s.; on the 9th of May she pawned two waistcoats and two shirts, for 21s. 6d., the shirts are marked E.H.W.; on the 6th of June she pawned a shawl, on the 15th another; on the 6th of April, two petticoats, and a remnant of linen, and some silk-hose.

Several other pawnbrokers were in attendance with property, but the Learned Counsel declined examining them.

Mr. CROSS. I have seen all these goods in possession of the various pawnbrokers, and believe the whole to be ours - I can identify the greater part of them; the pieces of brown silk, containing fourteen yards, I am certain is ours - it is not quite a whole piece; the piece produced by Mrs. Bradley, is thirteen yards, and cost me 4s. 6d. a yard; I have brought a piece from the shop exactly corresponding with the fourteen yards produced by the pawnbroker; I cannot identify the calico, but have no doubt of any of the articles - I know the muslin dresses; it is impossible to keep an account of my stock; the total value of the property found, is 120 or 130l.; Dunn said he had taken a remnant of about five yards of cloth from my shop, and had it made into a coat, two waistcoats, and cloth for a pair of trousers, which Smith had pawned - he described it as a length about 12s. a yard; he said this in the New Prison; I named to him the articles found as well as I could; I named the embroidered collar, a crape handkerchief, and a quantity of gloves. I gave him leave of absence about the middle of May, to go to Yorkshire, to see his friends; he told me, in prison, that he had not been, but was over the water, in Brook-street, all the time, and when he was out of money, he wrote to his friends, and a letter came containing money which she opened, and took out.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When did the silk, found at Bradley's, come into your possession? A. I really cannot say, I think about three months from the time he was taken, about May or June; I told him a quantity of silk had been found; he said he knew she had silks - that some she had by her, and some were pawned.

Q. Have you the least doubt but these were taken at different times? A. It is impossible for me to say - several might be taken at once, but I think all could not be taken together - I should not have missed them if they had.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you keep silks in pieces or cut? A. They would be pieces in our house; the quantities produced are such as would make a dress - it is rather more than the usual quantity; this muslin-robe was taken, worked as it is now - I know it by the pattern, and being soiled; I will not swear this silk has not been sold - we sold some of it. I recollect remarking that it was gone very quick, and I thought it could not have been sold.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Did you sell it to either of the prisoners? A. Never; the whole quantity of goods produced, I think, could not all be taken at once.

COURT. Q. You have alluded to some conversation you had with Dunn? A. Yes, in Clerkenwell-prison; I told him I was going to Bradley's, as I was informed there was silk there; he said there was silk, and a white robedress - that some silks were made up and pawned, but no doubt she had some not made up; the two lengths of brown silks produced are from different pieces.

WILLIAM DICKERS . The fourteen yards of silk spoken to by Mr. Cross, was pawned by Smith in July.

SMITH'S Defence. The property was given to me by Henry; I did not know it to be stolen - he gave it me for my own use; I was very ill, and obliged to pawn some.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner Dunn a good character.

DUNN - GUILTY Aged 21.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Judgment Respited upon a point of law.

Reference Number: t18260914-54

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1365. JOHN KNOTT was indicted for feloniously sending a letter to William Knott , Esq. , threatening to accuse him of a crime punishable with death, with intent to extort money from him .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-55

1366. JOHN KEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 2 coats, value 4s. 6d.; 2 waistcoats, value 18s; a pair of trousers, value 2s., and a basket, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Chubb .

RICHARD JAY . I am thirteen years old, and am servant to Thomas Chubb, who is a tailor , and lives in Spital-square. On the 1st of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, he sent me with these clothes in a basket to deliver in the City; the prisoner came up to me in Bishopsgate-street , about two doors from Houndsditch, and said"I wish you would go on an errand for me;" I am sure he is the boy; I never saw him before; I said I could not, because I was in a hurry; he said he did not like to go, because they would beat him; I said I would not go, because I had a basket; he said it was to Mr. Atkins, the second door down Houndsditch, for two baskets of silk, and said "Put your basket down here, I will take care of it;" another boy came up, who he said would help me to bring one basket; I was to say I had come from Mr. Jones for the silk; I could find no such name as Atkins, and, on returning, he was gone with my basket; I saw him at Guildhall a few days after, and was quite certain of his person; the clothes have not been found.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How was he

dressed? A. He had flash-worked shoes, a blue coat, and blue trousers; I never said he had corderoy trousers; he had either a hat or cap; he was about five minutes with me; I said I believed he was of a light complexion, but then the other boy was very dark; I said this was lightest - the prisoner was brought to master's two or three days afterwards on this charge, but was let go, as master said he should know where to find him, and, in about seventeen days he was taken; I looked particularly at his face.

FRANCIS KING . I am foreman to Mr. Chubb. On the 1st of July I sent the witness with these clothes - he returned about four o'clock without the basket; Forrester brought the prisoner to our house three or four days after- Jay saw him, and said he was the boy - he was allowed to go away; I think he had on a blue coat and a cap.

Cross-examined. Q. How long after this was Jay in your service? A. About three weeks; I did not hear him say any thing about flash shoes when the prisoner was brought to us, but I was not present all the time.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner the beginning of July; Jay had given me an account of the robbery - I took the prisoner with another boy, and took both to Mr. Chubb's; Jay said the prisoner was the person who took the basket; he was allowed to go home, as Jay had described him as a fair lad, and the one with him was fair. On the 24th of July I took him again, with two others, in Smithfield.

Cross-examined. Q. The other boy was much fairer than the prisoner? A. Yes - I took that boy by Jay's description - he said he had corduroy trousers on, and a round hat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-56

1367. RICHARD LARMOTH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 11 yards of paper-hanging, value 4s. 6d., the goods of John Geldart , his master .

ROBERT DEVER . I am servant to John Geldart, a paper-stainer , of Old Fish-street . The prisoner was in his employ. On the 21st of July some flour was missing; I got Smith, intending to have every man searched, as he went out, about half-past seven o'clock - the prisoner was the third man who came out, and in his hat was 2lbs. of flour, which we use for paste; I told him never to come there again, but the officer thought it right to search him further - he fetched him back, and found eleven yards of paper-hanging concealed under his clothes; he earned about 27s. a week, but could earn 35s. if he chose.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer, and found the property on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-57

1368. THOMAS COE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry Wallis , from his person .

HENRY WALLIS. I am an engraver , and live in Pultney-terrace, Islington. On the 27th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was nearly opposite St. Dunstan's church , and felt something at my pocket; I turned round instantly, and observed the prisoner running across the road, about two yards from me; there were a number of persons near me; the prisoner was the only one who ran; I pursued, and saw him take my handkerchief from his breast, and throw it down; I only lost sight of him while I picked it up, and saw him again in a moment - he had been stopped; I am certain he is the person who threw it down; he denied the charge, and his mother came up in a short time - he appeared to be alone.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not see him take it? A. No; I stood looking into a shop window; several people were passing - it is a new handkerchief, and might hang partly out of my pocket - I felt a pull at it; his mother asked what he had been doing, and said he had parted with her in anger a very little time ago; I find he is respectably connected.

COURT. Q. In what part of the street did he throw it down? A. In the carriage way.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a constable, and received him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you made inquiry about him? A. Yes, and understand he is highly respectable; his mother came up in two or three minutes.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with my mother to the General Post-office, and as we returned we were talking of a female I kept company with; she said if I said any more she would give me in charge. I immediately left her, and seeing this handkerchief on the curb-stone picked it up - I heard an alarm, threw it down, and kept running, fearing my mother would give me in charge.

SARAH COE . I am the prisoner's mother, and live in Conduit-street. He had not parted from me five minutes when I was fetched, and found him in custody - we had rode to the Post-office, and were walking home; I had heard he was asked in marriage to a girl - we quarrelled about it; I told him if he was saucy, and would not be ruled by me I would never look upon him, but would give him in charge - he then ran away: he never had a charge against him before.

COURT. Q. Where were you fetched from? A. I believe I had passed the Bolt-in-Tun - he had left me a few doors before I got there.

Three Witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18260914-58

1329. SUSANNAH BURNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 3 yards of jean, value 5s.; 1 child's cap, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 frill, value 6d.; 5 yards of lace, value 7s. 6d., and 3 shillings, the property of Lewis Israel , her master .

SARAH ISRAEL . I am the wife of Lewis Israel, who is a butcher - we live in Duke-street, Aldgate . The prisoner was three weeks in our service. I missed money from a small cupboard adjoining the shop, and on the 15th of August we marked some shillings, and afterwards, as I missed three shillings, we asked her to lend me 2s., which she gave me, and they were two of those which my son had marked; I then searched her box, and found the other marked shilling; she said she had taken it. Mr. Israel would not prosecute her, and we sent her away, telling her to send her father for her box in the morning, and after she was gone, when I was putting the things back into her box I found the articles stated in the indictment, which I had

not missed - she had lived with me before three years ago.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. You let her go and changed your mind afterwards? A. Yes, when we found the other things; the constable was present; she gave up her key willingly - there were so many things that I did not notice them, as I turned them out, but on putting them in I found them; I had not left the room before I found them.

HENRY ISRAEL. I am the prosecutrix's son. I marked nine shillings at three o'clock, and put them into the parlour cupboard, and in half an hour I missed three; a constable was fetched, and when the three shillings were found she said they were our's. My father allowed her to go, and detained her box, wishing to tell her father what she had done. These three shillings are what I marked.

WILLIAM TRIP . I am a constable, and was sent for. Mrs. Israel gave me two shillings, saying she had borrowed them of the prisoner, and they were marked - the prisoner denied taking them at first; I searched her box, in her presence, and found a shilling marked in the same way; she had 24s. in her box; she said, voluntarily, that the three shillings were her mistress's, and was sent about her business; nothing else was found while I was there. I took every thing out of the box, but it was nearly dark. She came to Israel's three or four days after, with her father, and was given in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Mrs. Israel examine the things as you took them out? A. Not closely.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22. Of stealing three shillings only .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-59

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1370. SARAH CURZER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Bunning , on the King's highway, on the 11th of April , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, 1 shawl, value 2s.; 19 sovereigns, and 18 shillings, her property .

SARAH BUNNING. I am single , and work ladies' veils . On the 11th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Edgware-road, near Bell-street , going to my lodgings, in Duke-street, Lisson-grove - the prisoner overtook me; I asked her the way to Devonshire-street, as I had to call in the next street to that; she said she would go and shew me; we walked about ten yards, then she took me across the shoulder, and took my shawl of; she unpinned it. I had nineteen sovereigns and eighteen shillings, tied up in the corner of it - she held me round the shoulders while she took it; I turned round, saw it in her hand, and said, "Where is my shawl?" she said, "I have got no shawl," and ran away; the money was tied in a little bag, and tied in my shawl, as I did not like to leave it in my lodging; she escaped, and was taken three or four months afterwards.

Q. Did you give an alarm at the time? A. Yes; I did not go to any officer; I did not know where to find one; I do not go out above once in three weeks - I told nobody in the neighbourhood about it; but three or four months afterward I was in Lisson-grove, and met Mrs. Betty - she asked if I did not lose a red shawl about four months ago; I said Yes, with nineteen sovereigns and eighteen shillings;" she said she could swear to the woman who she saw strip me of it, and she caused her to be taken; she is a stranger to me - I did not know Betty before.

CHARLOTTE BETTY . My husband is a constable - we live near Edgware-road. On the 11th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prosecutrix - the prisoner was walking with her; I heard the prisoner say,"You are a young woman from the country, and have been taking a glass;" the prosecutrix said, "No, it is trouble;" they walked on together, and the prisoner said,"Mary, you shall go home and sleep with me;" I noticed that, as she had before said she was a stranger; I looked round at the prisoner, and said, "If you know where the poor woman lives you had better see her home;" she said"I know very well - she lives at a bad house in Molineux-street, and I have got a bad husband and two children" - I took no notice, but followed them to the Coach and Horses public-house - they walked together for half an hour, but walked very slow - they made a stop there, and the prisoner said, "Mary, have you got any money in your pocket?" she said Yes; "Then," said she, "you must give me 3d. to get a glass" - the prosecutrix put her hand into her pocket, under her shawl, to take 3d.; the prisoner then put her arms round her neck, unpinned her shawl, and took it off; the prosecutrix said, "Give me my shawl;" she said, "I have got no shawl;" I said,"You have;" she said, "I have got none at all;" I turned to a woman, and said, "She has robbed this woman of her shawl" - the prisoner called Jack, and ran away with it; they were both strangers to me. I met the prosecutrix three months after, and asked if she was not the person who was robbed; I said I saw the woman who took it almost every day. I had frequently seen her after the robbery.

Q. Why not give her in charge? A. I did not know where the prosecutrix lived. I told my husband of it - he took her after I found the prosecutrix out.

Q. Why did you not cry Stop thief! at the time? A. There were a number of persons round, and I had a child in my arms. The prosecutrix said her shawl was gone, and ran away.

JOHN HOLDSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paddington-street. On the 13th of April this shawl was pawned, in the name of Davis, but I cannot say who by. I knew the prisoner well, and think if she had pawned it I should have put her name to it.

ELIZA MIDDLEBROOK . On the 25th of April the prisoner asked me to buy the ticket of this shawl, saying she was in want of bread for her children; I lent her a shilling on it, and sent my daughter to get it altered in my name - I knew her before - she lived near me.

ELIZA MIDDLEBROOK . I got the ticket altered in my mother's name.

WILLIAM BETTY . I am a constable. My wife informed me of this, and afterwards said she had found the prosecutrix - I apprehended the prisoner.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer, and was desired to look for the shawl.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know the prisoner? A. Yes; she used to carry water-cresses about regularly - I never missed her form her walk till she was apprehended.

MR. PHILLIPS to SARAH BUNNING. Q. Have you told us all the prisoner said to you? A. I have. I had the money in my pocket when I went out, but put it into my shawl in the street, thinking it would be safer, as I was going through St. Giles's; Mrs. Betty says she was two or three yards from me, but I did not know her; I might be a quarter of an hour in the prisoner's company - we only walked ten yards; she was talking to me, but I could not tell all she said.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-60

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1371. WILLIAM FREEMAN was indicted for the wilful murder of William Britt .

Upon the evidence of Mr. Robinson, a pupil at the London Hospital, who deposed that the deceased died from diseased lungs, produced by natural causes - the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260914-61

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1372. GEORGE HOUGHTON , JAMES BOYCE , and HENRY BOYCE were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Fuller , on the King's highway, on the 11th of September , at St. Matthew Bethnal-green , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 case of surgical instruments, value 40s.; 2 cases of lancets, value 20s.; 1 hat, value 20s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pen-knife, value 1s.; 1 pin-cushion, value 1d.; 2 sovereigns, 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence, his property .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

Mr. HENRY FULLER. I am a surgeon , and live in Suffolk-place, Hackney-road. On the evening of the 11th of September, about half-past seven o'clock, or a few minutes later, I was returning home from visiting a patient, and when I arrived on a place called Fleet-street-hill , I heard footsteps behind me, and the word "Now," and immediately after a loud whistle - about twenty persons surrounded me all in a moment; my arms were immediately pinioned; several of them had sticks, and stood in front of me; the prisoner James Boyce is the person who seized my right arm; I could not observe the person who seized the other; my elbows were tied behind me with a rope; one of them said, "If the b-g-r speaks knock his bl-y brains out;" I do not know who that was. The prisoner, James Boyce, immediately said, "We won't hurt you - we will have what you have got;" I begged of them not to hurt me, and they might take whatever I had got; James Boyce said, "We won't hurt you - we will have what you have got;" James Boyce then took from my right-hand trousers pocket a case of surgical instruments, and two cases of lancets, and from my right-hand waistcoat pocket three keys, and a piece of ass's skin - my left-hand pockets were rifled by the person on the other side - from my trousers pocket he took two sovereigns, three shillings, a sixpence, and a pen-knife, which had a broken point - one of them took my hat off - that was neither of the prisoners; my cravat was then taken off; as soon as the man had taken my hat he said, "Now, give the b-g-r a rum one" - James Boyce said, "No, don't hurt the poor b-g-r," and they did not do me any personal injury. I am quite certain of James Boyce - Houghton came up to me, and felt my fob pocket; he unbuttoned the flap of my breeches, and felt to see if I had a watch, but James Boyce, who had examined it before, said, "The b-g-r has got no toy;" I had no watch. As they were about to leave me I asked James Boyce to give me my keys, as they would be of no service to them - he returned one key, and they all ran away immediately. On the following morning I went to the Police-office, and got Garton, Gleed, Armstrong, Hanley, and other officers, and after the prisoners were apprehended three persons called and told me I could recover my instruments - I communicated that to the officers, and the two cases of lancets were restored to me by Garton - I went with him to Dutton's, in Brook-street, Spital-square.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Nobody but yourself was witness to the transaction? A. One or two women say they were passing, and I believe, one of them is here. I was certainly alarmed - my attention was not much distracted till they threatened to give me a rum one - I then felt more alarmed; I think it impossible I can be mistaken in James Boyce's person; the parties were all strangers to me before. I am sure I am not mistaken - it lasted about two minutes or more.

Q. Was there much noise or conversation? A. Among themselves; I had plenty of light to see them. I heard voices behind me as well as before - persons were in front and behind; I was not alarmed till one of them took my hat and said, "Give the b-r a rum one;" as Boyce said I should not be hurt.

Q. If Boyce is the individual be interfered to protect you from injury? A. He did.

Q. Does it frequently occur to you to make mistakes in persons, or are you pretty accurate? A. I generally am - I could not speak to the whole twenty, but I observed several of them, so closely as to speak with confidence. I never made a mistake in the identity of a person to my knowledge; there were not twenty persons in my view; I observed several in front, who I can identify; I should know the one who took my hat in a moment if I saw him. - Boyce was apprehended on the Wednesday or Thursday following.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. You were much frightened? A. When I was threatened - I saw Houghton previously to the threat - he had searched my pockets while they were releasing my arms.

Mr. ALLEY. Q. Had you abundant opportunity of seeing them? A. Yes, and have not the slightest doubt of them all; Henry Boyce was present, but not active - it happened in the parish of Bethnal-green.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an inspector of the dismounted patrol. I apprehended Houghton on the Wednesday morning after the robbery, about six hours after I received the information - I took him in his bed; I told him he must get up and go with me; I asked where he had been on the Monday night before; he said he had had but 2 1/2d. in his pocket, and that he had been to the Angel and Crown public-house, opposite the church in the road (opposite Whitechapel church), spent it, and returned home;

the Angel and Crown is about three quarters of a mile from where the robbery was committed.

Q. When he was at the office, but not before the Magistrate, did he say any thing to you? A. He told me afterwards that he had been to the Angel and Trumpet public-house, at Stepney, on the Monday evening.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You said at first it was in Whitechapel-road. I understood? A. He said the Angel and Crown in the road, opposite the church.

Q. How came you to say "Whitechapel-road?" A. It is in Whitechapel-road; he said he went up Brick-lane to the Angel and Crown, opposite the church in the road, and spent it - he said nothing more on that subject - he said, "in the road," not Mile-end-road; Mile-end-road and Whitechapel-road are in a line - I cannot tell the difference. I swear he did not say the Angel and Trumpet - he said "in the road, opposite the church" but did not say what church.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Is it called both Mile-end and Whitechapel road? A. I call it both; the Angel and Trumpet is a mile from the other house, and not opposite a church.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When did he say it was the Angel and Trumpet? A. Not till after Mr. Fuller had seen him, about an hour and a half afterwards - he said full an hour and a half afterwards that he was at the Angel and Crown, and then contradicted himself, and said it was the Angel and Trumpet - he had spoken to nobody but Mr. Fuller and the officers.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street, I accompanied the prosecutor last Saturday to a girl, named Houghton, and she produced these two cases of lancets out of her bosom; Mr. Fuller claimed them; I do not know who she lived with myself.

THOMAS GOODING . I am an officer. I apprehended James Boyce in Brick-lane on the Wednesday night after the robbery; I apprehended Henry Boyce at his mother's door.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Where did you find James Boyce? A. In Brick-lane, about one hundred yards from where he lives.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I assisted in apprehending both the Boyces.

MR. FULLER. These are my instruments.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you recollect a woman, named Moore, coming to you that night? A. No; I saw her not the next day, but the day following; I have not the slightest doubt of any of the prisoners.

HOUGHTON'S Defence. I have witnesses to prove where I was at the time; I told Norris I was at the Angel and Trumpet, and there remained till I went home to bed.

JAMES BOYCE'S Defence. I have witnesses to say where I was.

HENRY BOYCE'S Defence. I can prove where I was.

MATILDA MOORE . I live at No. 3, Stevens'-buildings. Bethnal-green, at the top of Fleet-street-hill. On Monday, the 11th, about a quarter or ten minutes after eight o'clock, as I came out of my house I saw two young fellows following Mr. Fuller; there was a whistle given, and the word "Now;" then about a dozen surrounded him, and he was robbed; I staid there about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and was within about fourteen yards of Mr. Fuller; I did not see Houghton there; I cannot take upon myself to say he was not there, as there were so many; there might be thirty; Mr. Fuller did not fall, for I sat with my baby in my arms, and after the robbery was done, I went up, and saw Mr. Fuller, he was very weak and low, and was taken into a chandler's shop - I did not speak to him; I did not see his hat taken, but, as they ran from the gentleman, I saw a man, named Norton, come under our shop window with his hat in his hand; I had seen them hustling his pockets behind; I did not see either of the prisoners there; they said, "If you offer to resist, or make an alarm, we will knock your b-y brains out."

WILLIAM ADEY . I live at No. 15, Mead-street, near Shoreditch, in the parish of Bethnal-green, and am a journeyman shoemaker. I know Houghton. On Monday, the 11th of September, I was at the Angel and Trumpet with him; we started to go there at half-past six, and remained there till half-past ten; I will take my oath that he was not out of my sight five minutes during all that time; Sidebottom went with me and Houghton to the house; I do not remember seeing one Hawes there.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Who do you work for now? A. Mr. Pollock, of Shoreditch, near the church on the left hand side - I worked for him at the time of the robbery; I do the work at home with my father; I generally work till eight or nine, but sometimes leave off at dark; on Monday we generally do not get our work ready - we get it prepared - I generally go out earlier on a Monday; my uncle lives with us - neither he or my father are here.

Q. Did Sidebottom fall into a misfortune that night? A. Not that I know of - he was taken on suspicion of a robbery - I heard it was committed that night; I do not know whether he was taken that night; when I left the house I left him in company with a young woman at the door; I left the house at half-past ten o'clock; I know Hawes - I did not see him that evening; I know Fleet-street-hill; I was not there that night - I could go that way home, but I did not - I got home near upon a quarter past eleven o'clock; I saw no robbery that night - I never said I saw the robbery committed as I was going home - I swear that.

Q. Were you never taken up yourself charged with any offence? A. I was taken for a slight offence - they took me for going down a turning, and said I was hunting a bullock - I was fined - I was never in custody for any other offence - the bullock hunt was six weeks or two months ago - I have not seen the landlord of the public-house here - he was not in the house when I went in, but the servant was, and she knows I came in, but her master would not let her come.

COURT. Q. The landlord was not there? A. I did not see him for an hour or two - I did not see the landlady - I saw the female servant - she served us with what we drank, which was porter - we had no brandy or gin - we had two or three pots of porter - Houghton and Sidebottom drank with me - we each paid our own part - it came to 15d. - it was 5d. a pot - I went out on the opposite side of the way, and got some bacon and bread from a shop - I do not know who keeps the shop - I am not often at the Angel and Trumpet - I have been there six or eight times - we each paid 5d. - I changed a sixpence - I cannot say whether Houghton and Sidebottom paid in silver or copper; when I went in I dare say there were ten people in

the room, and more came in; I dare say there were fifteen or twenty there when I came away.

Q. Did Houghton call for you to go with him? A. No, I went from my residence at nearly a quarter past six o'clock, and met him down Brick-lane - we met Sidebottom at Hanbury's brewhouse, about one hundred and fifty yards from where I met Houghton - we went into the public-house together; I got the bread and bacon soon after I went in.

THOMAS SIDEBOTTOM . I am a weaver, and live in Cheshire-street, Hare-street-fields. On Monday week I was in Houghton's company; I met him in Brick-lane about a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening. with Adey, and we went to the Angel and Trumpet, at Stepney; we remained there till the publican would not draw us any more beer; he said it was time to be going - I was the last who asked him for beer, but not the last in the house - I went away first, and bid Houghton and Adey good night; they were in my company from a quarter to seven o'clock till half-past ten; Houghton did not leave our company all that time - not to my recollection; if he was out it was not for more than five minutes I am sure.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You have stated that you went away first; then Adey could not have left you behind talking to a woman? A. I went out of the house first - he did not leave me behind; I was taken up that night on suspicion - they said it was for stealing some pork; I was put into the watch-house, and discharged the next day; I know Fleet-street-hill - I went down Brick-lane that night about a quarter to seven o'clock; I do not know whether you call that passing Fleet-street-hill - it is at the end of the street - it was not a quarter past seven.

COURT. Q. Were you in company with any woman that night? A. I was speaking with a young woman at the door when I left the house; Houghton and Adey came out just after me, and left me at the door talking to the young woman.

Q. Who drank with you? A. Houghton and Adey, and another young man, who was in the house when I went in; we had two or three pots of beer; I will not be certain how many; I know what I paid for; I paid 2 1/2d. for a pint; Adey paid for the first pot himself; I think he gave a 6d.; he went out after asking for a newspaper,(which he could not get), and fetched some bread and bacon - the servant of the house served us with beer; I saw the landlord, but not when I first went in; I do not know whether the young woman who brought the beer was the landlady or servant; I had met them in Brick-lane.

Q. What makes you certain this was the 11th of September? A. I cannot be certain of the date, but it was on Monday - last Monday week; I had been ino the City about work.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You say there was another man at the house? A. Yes; he was not in our company at first, but drank with us; I do not know his name - I never saw him before.

JAMES BARRATT . I am a bricklayer, and live at Stepney. Last Monday week I was in company with Houghton and Adey, at the Angel and Trumpet, Stepney, kept by Smith; I went there a quarter before eight o'clock, and staid till half-past ten.

Q. Was Houghton there when you went in? A. Yes; we all went in together, and never went outside the door, not for three minutes, except for a necessary purpose.

Q. Do you mean you went in in company or at the same time? A. I went in at the same time as they did - they asked me to drink out of two or three pots of beer; I did not know them before - the two last witnesses were with him - we all went out together - the landlord would not draw any more beer.

Q. Who applied for more beer, which was refused to be drawn? (the witness Sidebottom here said "It was me.") A. It was that person (pointing to Sidebottom).

MR. ALLEY. Q. How lately have you been at work as a bricklayer? A. Yesterday; I do not know Fleet-street-hill - it was a quarter to eight o'clock when I went into the public-house.

Q. Can you run two miles in a quarter of an hour? A. I do not know; I saw no robbery that night.

Q. Did you happen to be taken up for stealing pork? A. No. I will take my oath, since I have been out of the country, I have not stolen a thing; I was never in custody.

Two witnesses gave Houghton a good character.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . On Monday night, the 11th of September, I saw James Boyce at the corner of King-street; it might be ten minutes past seven o'clock, but I will swear it was not later; I remained in his company till a quarter-past nine, by Hanbury's brewhouse clock; we stood talking there all that time; Chandler came up about a quarter-past seven, and remained with us till we went away, and during that time two other men came up - we were talking about the business at Bow - we are all silk weavers; I had left my work at dark, and was talking about the state of the business. I live in George-street.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What distance is King-street from Fleet-street-hill - close by - is it not? A. Not very close - I dare say it is four or five hundred yards; I will take my oath he was a yard from me all that time - both him and his brother were there; and about five or ten minutes after eight, two Bow-street patrols, one named Skilling, came up and saw up talking.

JOHN CHANDLER . I was in Boyce's company on the 11th of September - I fell in company with them, about a quarter past seven o'clock, at the corner of St. John's-street; the two Boyces stood there with two or three more men; I crossed over to them, to hear about the trade, and remained in their company till after nine o'clock.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When did you get up? A. At a quarter-past seven o'clock; I went with them down St. John-street, to go and have a pint of beer - they left me at the corner of St. John-street - I crossed over to an old lady, named Lowing, and heard of the robbery.

BENJAMIN WEEDON . On the night of the 11th I was going up Hare-street, and about five minutes to eight o'clock, I saw both the Boyces at the corner of King-street, and stopped talking there for three-quarters of an hour - I left them at a quarter-past eight.

GEORGE NICHOLS . On the night of the 11th of September I joined the Boyces, as near as I can say, about seven or eight o'clock - it was before eight - at the corner of King-street; I stopped there a quarter of an hour, or hardly so much, in conversation with them. Chand

ler and Nichols were with them - Wheedon and I went up together to them.

COURT. Q. How far is this from Fleet-street-hill? A. About three or four hundred yards, and about thirty yards from their own house.

Four witnesses gave James Boyce a good character.

HOUGHTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

J. BOYCE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

H. BOYCE - NOT GUILTY .

James Boyce was recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, having protected him from personal injury. - (Vide Ninth Day's proceedings.)

Reference Number: t18260914-62

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1372. CAROLINE FITZALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , at St. Pancras , one 50l. Bank-note, the property of Robert Brooks , in his dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BROOKS. I am a butcher , and live in Lee-street, Burton-crescent , in the parish of St. Pancras. On the 25th of July Mr. Revell paid me a 50l. note, which I put into my pocket-book, with other notes; I kept my pocket-book in a book-case in the parlour in the daytime, and at night my wife always took it up to the bed-room; I had a key to the book-case; I saw the 50l. note last about seven o'clock on Saturday evening, the 12th of August; it was the outside note of some others; I missed it on Monday morning, about six o'clock, out of the pocket-book, which was then in my wife's pocket, under the pillow, in bed; I had not touched the pocket-book since Saturday; I saw it on the book-case on Sunday morning; before I went to church, and locked the bookcase before I went out, taking the key in my pocket. The prisoner had lived three months in my service, and left on the Friday week before this Sunday - she had given notice; I missed a key of the book-case, and some other keys, before she went away, and a few days after had the lock taken off, and a new key made, but whether the lock was altered I do not know; I expected the prisoner at my house at twelve o'clock on the day I missed the note, but, as she did not come, I went with a constable to Mrs. Stanley's, No. 26, Corbett's-court, Brown's-lane, Spital-fields, about two o'clock, and found the prisoner lodging there; I told her of my loss - she said she was surprised, or sorry to hear it; I said I wished to search her boxes, for I suspected her of having robbed me; she said we might, for she knew nothing of it; I found a box full of valuable silk-dresses - some silk-mercers and tavern bills - she was afterwards taken into custody. I cannot be certain whether I or my wife wrote Mr. Revell's name on the note - we invariably endorse them - I saw his name on the top of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You saw it in the bookcase at seven o'clock on Saturday night? A. Yes; I know that Mrs. Brooks took the pocket-book up to bed on Saturday and Sunday, but it was not opened after Saturday; I sleep with my room door fastened - nobody comes into my room before I am up. I had parted on good terms with the prisoner - she said she was going to Bath to see her friends. I had no other 50l. note from the time Mr. Revell paid this to me till I lost it.

ANN BROOKS . I am the prosecutor's wife. I generally take the pocket-book and purse every night from the book case to the bed-room, and remember doing so on Saturday, the 12th of August - I brought them down in the morning, placed them in the book-case, took them up at night from the book-case, and put them into my pocket under the pillow - I did not open the book; on Monday morning my husband missed the note; we keep the bookcase locked - nobody can get at it without a key - I had put this 50l. note into the pocket-book about three weeks before, when Mr. Revell paid it to me, and we had no other 50l. note in the house; I wrote his name on it, to the best of my recollection.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you actually see the note in the book? A. I think on the Friday before it was taken; when the key was lost we had another made to the same lock; I never saw the prisoner at our house after she left till she was apprehended; it could not have been taken from under my head; I have the servant still with me who took the prisoner's place; she is not here, but the nurse maid is. When I came from church I heard the prisoner had been there.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What time did you go to church? A. About a quarter to eleven, with my husband - we returned about one; the prisoner had told me she was going to Bath, but should return in a week, and would call. and, if I was not suited with a servant, would come back.

MARY ANN WYER . On the 13th of August I was in Mrs. Brook's service, as nurse. Master and mistress went to church - the prisoner called between eleven and twelve o'clock; Butlin, the man servant let her in; I was going to clean myself, and asked her to go with me; we went into the second floor room, and in about five minutes, she said her stomach ached, and she wished to go to the watercloset, which is down stairs, and goes down two steps from the parlour door - she was down stairs about five minutes. When she went away she appointed to call next day about twelve or one o'clock, but did not come.

Cross-examined. Q. She was brought to your house on Monday afternoon? A. Yes; she was a very few minutes down stairs; I did not notice the time - she came up again to me, and returned into the kitchen - she was in the house about half an hour. I have lived there four years - master and mistress go regularly to church on Sundays.

GEORGE BUTLIN . I am in Mr. Brooks' service. On Sunday, the 13th of August, the prisoner came to the house about twelve o'clock, and stopped about half an hour; I agreed to meet her in Speldhurst-street afterwards, which I did - we went to Mrs. Stanley's, and passed the afternoon there; I left between eight and nine o'clock - she came as far as Bishopsgate-street with me and left me there.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you still Mr. Brooks' servant? A. Yes; I did not know the prisoner before she came to live there; I was never at Stanley's before I let her into the house, and met her afterwards in Speldhurst-street, about half-past two o'clock, as she asked me to go and drink tea with her; master blamed me for being in her company, but never charged me with being a party to the robbery; I did not see her at the house on Mon

day; I was in the house part of the time she was there; I was not blamed about the key being lost; I never saw what key the smith made.

MARY STANLEY . I am wife of Francis Stanley , and live in Corbett-court. The prisoner came to lodge with me when she left Mr. Brooks. On Sunday, the day before she was taken, she came home with Butlin (I think it was about half-past two o'clock) - he spent the afternoon there, and between five and six the prisoner gave me a 50l. note to change; I changed it at the Golden Harp public-house, kept by Mr. Astle; I gave her the change - it was a 10l. note, some gold, silver, and a paper of half-pence - I told her where I got it - she owed some bills, and on Monday sent me to pay them; I cannot tell the amount - I fetched some things out of pawn for her. After she was taken up I took her child to her in prison; she always said the note was Mr. Brooks', and I asked her about the note; she said if I was afraid of the note I might shift it from the public-house, and I did. I went to Mr. Astle, by her desire, and took a man with me, who gave Astle gold for it; I had left Astle 19l. before - that was the remainder of the money the prisoner had left in the drawer - the man I took paid the rest, and Astle gave him the note - the man gave me 4l., which the prisoner has had at different times, as she wanted it. I cannot read or write.

Cross-examined. Q. You were very much frightened about the note? A. I was when I heard Mr. Brooks had lost it; I was afraid of getting into trouble about it.

Q. Did not she say, "There is nothing wrong in it, but if you are afraid, let the note be shifted?" A. No; Mr. Brooks did not threaten to take me up; I have had her child four years, and have got it now; I do not know a 50l. note when I see it.

Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you tell how much money you got for it? No, it was counted into my lap; the prisoner told me it was a 50l. note; I was not taken up.

JOSEPH ASTLE . I keep the Golden Harp, public-house. On Sunday, the 13th of August, Stanley came to me - a 50l. note was changed, but not by me; my wife gave me a 50l. note that day, and in the evening I put it into my cash-box; I took down the number and date of it, (reads)"4760, 26th of June, 1826;" this is the memorandum I wrote, that evening, when I took it up stairs; on the Sunday following a friend of Stanley's came with her, and paid me thirty-one sovereigns, and I gave up the note, the rest having been paid to my wife; I should know the man again who paid the sovereigns - he was not a Jew, for he was a gentlemanly looking man.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that was the same note? A. I had no other 50l. note while I was in possession of this.

SARAH ASTLE . I am Joseph Astle's wife. On the 13th of August, Stanley came and asked for change for a 50l. note - I said I could change it, and she fetched it and gave it to me; I put it away in the bar till bed time; I gave her thirty-six sovereigns, a 10l. note, 3l. 5s. in silver, and 15s. in copper; I gave the note to my husband; a few days after she asked me if I had paid it away; I said, No; she paid me 19l. and on the Sunday my husband returned it to her; a man came with her - I think two men came with her.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot swear that the same note was given back? A. Yes; for we had no other 50l. note in the house; my husband put Stanley's name on it; I did not look to see whether any other name was on it.

JOSEPH ASTLE. I do not remember whether any name was on it; I wrote Stanley on it.

COURT. Q. Was not inquiry made whether you bad changed a 50l. note? A. Not till Limbric asked me; I did not deny it; I said, "I did not change it myself;" I did not say my wife had - he said Stanley was in custody - I said, "Bring her in," and then said I had.

AMBROSE BRADLEY. I am a pawnbroker. On Monday morning, the 14th of August, at a quarter to ten o'clock, Stanley bought some articles, and paid me some money on account of the prisoner, and redeemed some things; I think, altogether, she paid me near 20l.; I never saw the prisoner in my shop - the things had been pawned by Stanley - she looked out goods amounting to 7l. 10s., on Saturday, for Fitzallen, and paid for them on Monday.

MARY STANLEY . I got the money from the prisoner, which I paid Bradley; it was part of what I got for the note - it was kept down in my drawer; she lodged in my room; her trunks were up stairs.

Mr. HENRY REVELL . I live in Burton crescent. On the 25th of July. I paid Mrs. Brooks a 50l. note - it was one of six 50l. notes which I had received at the Bank for my dividend; I paid the others to different people; Mrs. Brooks did not write on it in my presence.

JOHN BRAMPTON . I am a clerk in the Dividend-office, in the Bank. On the 8th of July, I paid a dividend warrant in the name of Revell, and among other notes, paid six of 50l., Nos. 4755 to 4760 inclusive, all dated the 26th of June, 1826.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the gentleman? A. No; I paid them to a warrant in that name - my book does not state the year the notes were dated, but we always pay dividends in notes of the current year.

Mr. REVELL. This is the gentleman who paid me; I had no other 50l. notes.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce five 50l. notes, which have come into the Bank - they are all dated the 26th of June, 1826, and Nos. 4755 to 4759 inclusive - 4760 has not come in.

GUILTY . - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, as she did not take the whole sum, and he had received a good character with her.

Reference Number: t18260914-63

1373. ARTHUR THOMPSON, alias PENNELL , was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order for the payment of 25l., with intent to defraud John Vickris Taylor , and others .

THREE OTHER COUNTS varying the charge.

MESSRS. ALLEY and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MARK ANTHONY LIDDELL . I am fourteen years old next March, and live in Bow-lane, Poplar, with my father, who is a carpenter. On the last day of June, I was going to Hackney for my father, and when I came to a field opposite Canton-place, the prisoner came and asked if I was willing to earn a shilling - I said, Yes; he asked me if I knew where Dalby Williams lived - I said I did not

remember - he said he kept the Three Tons, tavern, at Poplar, and asked if I knew where Taylor and Co. the brewers lived - I said I knew the brewery in Ropemaker's-walk; he then said he was Dalby Williams' son - that he had borrowed 50l. of Mr. Taylor two or three weeks before, and was to pay him that week, but should not be able; that Dalby Williams, his father, had given him a cheque of 25l. to take to Taylor and Co's to be changed - it was enclosed in a letter - he shewed me the cheque and letter; I read the letter, but not the cheque; he took me to a corner of the field, where there is a hollow place - he stood in there, and said, "Now, suppose I was Mr. Taylor, how would you act when you got in?" I pulled my hat off, and shewed him how I would act; he then gave me the cheque in the letter to take to Mr. Taylor; I asked if he had any particular message - he said, if they asked who I was, to say I was Dalby Williams' youngest son; I told him, if there was any lies attached to it, I would have nothing to do it; he pressed me very much to take it - I thought there must be something bad in it, and refused; when I got home I told my father, who sent me next morning to Messrs. Taylor, and I informed them about it.

JOHN STANBURY . I am seventeen years old, and live in James-street, Limehouse-fields. On the 1st of July, the prisoner accosted me - I do not think he is the man;(looking at him) I am sure that is not the man.

Q. Was there a man afterwards taken into custody? A. Yes; he looks like the man who was taken; he was taken on the 1st of July, by Tuson, the officer.

Q. Did you point out the person who was to be taken into custody? A. I saw a person run across the road, and said, that looked like the man.

Q. Was the man who ran across the road, and whom you pointed out, the same person who had spoken to you before? A. He looked liked the same person - he was taken into custody - I am not positive that he was the person I had seen before - I was not positive then.

Q. Do you mean to say you were not positive, and that you did not swear to him? A. No - I was not positive- I never have been altogether positive; I have had no conversation with the prisoner's friends; I suppose I was about ten minutes with the person who gave me the note; I did not speak positively to the person when he was taken; I was sworn before the Magistrate, and what I said was written down.

Q. When that man was taken into custody by the officer, did you, or did you not, speak positively to him to the officer? A. No, Sir, I swear that.

COURT. Q. Do you believe the man, taken into custody, is the man who before had spoken to you? A. No, my Lord; I do not think it was the man; I did not say so to the officer; I was so frightened at the time.

Q. Did any body speak to you that day, and give you any thing? A. The man spoke to me, and gave me a note - I was to take it to Mr. Taylor.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. What Mr. Taylor? A. The brewer- I delivered it to Mr. Blaikie, at the brewery in Ropemaker's-walk; I was to return to the person at Poplargate. Mr. Sewell, the clerk, and Mr. Tuson, the officer, went back with me to Poplar-gate - when I got back I did not see anybody for five minutes; I then saw a person run across the road, and then I beckoned to Mr. Sewell, and said I thought that was the person; I do not recollect the person beckoning to me - Mr. Sewell and Tuson saw him running - I called them.

Q. Had you seen any person before you saw the man run across the road? A. I saw a great many walking up and down the road; I pointed out the man who ran across; Sewell and Tuson ran after him; I suppose he ran nearly a quarter of a mile before he was taken - I believe Stop thief! was cried - I cried out once, I believe. The man was taken in the King and Queen, public-house, Three Colts-street.

Q. Were the constable and Mr. Sewell up when the man was taken? A. No - I was up first; the constable came next - I did not point him out to the constable.

Q. Then how came this man to be taken? A. Because a man had hold of him by the collar; I did not point him out, nor say any thing to them.

Q. Did you say whether he was the man or was not? A. No - I did not point at all.

Q. Did you say he was the man or not? A. No - I do not recollect saying a word - I did not speak a word, or intimate in any way that he was the man - I did not think him the man - I had my doubt whether he was the man.

Q. Did you express to any body that doubt? A. No. The deposition made by the witness before the Magistrate was here given him to read.

COURT. Q. This signature is your writing, is it? A Yes.

Q. Now read to yourself, beginning at the words "I, the said John Stanbury, on my oath, say" - (he does so) - was the account you have now seen road over to you before you signed it? A. I do not recollect it being read over; I was asked questions; I believe I said to the officer what is written down.

Q. To what officer? A. To a stout gentleman at the office, and then it was written down; I do not recollect it being read over - I believe I signed it, without it being read.

Q. Now read it to yourself - (he does so) - having read that do you now know, who is the person who came to you in the morning with the letter? A. The man looked very much like the person at the bar, but that is not the man; I have seen a man since very much like that man.

Q. You believe that not to be the man? A. Yes - I do not recollect what dress he had on now.

Q. After you had gone to Taylor's, and Sewell and the constable came back with you, did you see the man who was taken up before he began running? A. No, Sir - I do not think he beckoned to me; I do not recollect his beckoning.

Q. Do you mean to say you do not think he did, or that he did not? A. No - he did not beckon; I do not recollect swearing before the Magistrate that he beckoned to me(the witness was here again desired to read his deposition) it says so there, my Lord, but I do not recollect his beckoning - I do not recollect saying so.

Q. Did you state before the Magistrate that the prisoner was the person who gave you that note? A. (hesitating) I had my doubts whether it was the man.

Q. Did you state that it was the prisoner who came to you, talked to you, and gave you that letter? A. I believe I did, but I was so frightened I did not know what I was swearing; I do not believe he was the man.

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I recollect the last witness being examined - his deposition was read over to him distinctly - it always is.

HENRY TUSON . I am a constable, of Limehouse. On the 1st of July I saw Stanbury at the brew-house, and went another way to the place appointed; he had told us where to go to look for a person; I went to that place - he pointed out the prisoner as the person who gave him the letter; I am quite sure he pointed him out; I had not observed the prisoner make a signal; I was across the road; it is impossible I could mistake the man he pointed out; I pursued, and he was apprehended in the King and Queen - I asked him why he ran - he said he was running for a coach for himself - he was standing still when the witness pointed him out - I told him it was a strange way to run for a coach up one street and down another - he said he was on very particular business, which he had to do before he went to the coach, and that was the reason of his running - he asked what was the matter; I said I would tell him when we got to the watch-house; I took him there, and Mr. Sewell gave charge of him, and, in the presence of two or three more, I asked the boy whether he was positive he was the man - he said he was; I asked him, moreover, if he could swear to him; he told me Yes; the prisoner then endeavoured to alarm the boy, by saying"Don't do so; you are not sure."

WILLIAM SEWELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Taylor and Co. On the 1st of July Stanbury brought a letter, containing a 25l. cheque; I went with a constable, and desired the boy to follow us; we went to Poplar turnpike - the constable went into the toll-house till Stanbury came - when he came he looked about for some little time, and presently I saw a man run across the Commercial-road - Stanbury called to us, saying, "Here he is, here he is;" the man was running, and continued running - we followed him; I was not able to keep us with him, he ran so fast; I went round in another direction expecting to meet him - he was afterwards taken at a public-house; I found him at the watch-house; I told him he had given me a very hard chance, and it was very likely the last chace he would give any body in this country.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I have a letter and cheque, which the Magistrate desired me to produce here.

MR. SEWELL. It is the letter and cheque the boy brought.

Mr. ANTHONY LITTLE . I cannot swear that this is the letter the prisoner gave me - I read it, but have very little recollection about it. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-64

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1374. JOSEPH HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Samuel Hoskins , from his person .

SAMUEL HOSKINS. I am a linen-draper , and live at Shadwell. On the 6th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was going through Eastcheap , towards the Tower, and felt for my handkerchief, and it was gone - it was safe five or six minutes before; I looked round and saw Mr. Orchard - he and I pursued the prisoner, who I first saw turning down St. Mary-at-hill, and just before I came up to him I saw him throw the handkerchief out of his cap; I picked it up.

JOHN ORCHARD . I am a baker, and live in Eastcheap. I saw the prosecutor pass my door, and three young lads together, following him - the prisoner was one of them; my house is right opposite the weigh-house; I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and pull out a handkerchief - the other two were with him; I have seen one of them in the press-yard, while waiting here; I ran up to Mr. Hoskins and told him to follow me- the prisoner ran across the road to St. Mary-at-hill, a different way from the others - he ran fast - I called Stop thief! he threw the handkerchief out of his cap, and was stopped by Hoskins; I only lost sight of him for a moment, and am certain he is the man.

WILLIAM HENRY BUXTON . I received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman stopped me and asked if I had his handkerchief - I said No - he picked it up and detained me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260914-65

1375. WILLIAM JOHNSON, alias Hawkes , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , at St. Giles-without-Cripplegate , 1 bridle, value 5s.; 1 saddle, value 2l., and 1 mare, price 15l. , the property of Thomas Burrell .

THOMAS BURRELL. I am a farmer , and live at Waltham Abbey. On the 7th of July, about seven o'clock, I got to Fairlop Fair , with this bay mare - the bridle and saddle were on - I gave it into the possession of Pearson, to take care of; I was going to return about nine o'clock and the mare was then gone; I was in Smithfield, looking round to see if she came there, and between seven and eight o'clock on Friday - that day week - I met a man on her in Long-lane - she had then only a halter on; I am certain of her - I had had her four or five years - I had not observed the prisoner at the Fair.

THOMAS PEARSON . I live at Loughton, in Essex, and am a bricklayer. I was at Fairlop Fair, and saw Burrell - he gave me this mare to take care of, about seven o'clock in the evening; I had her in my possession about an hour and three-quarters before I missed her; I tied a hempen halter round her head, and tied her to another cord; she had a bridle and saddle on; I had three more in my care, standing with her; I only lost this one; I was absent only five or six minutes, and on my return this mare was gone, and the rope taken away, with her bridle and saddle also - I had not observed the prisoner. Mr. Burrell came up in a quarter of an hour, when I was inquiring about it. I saw her again on the Friday week - she had been found then. The prisoner is a stranger to me.

THOMAS CHESSNEY . I am servant at Mr. Dixon's Repository, Barbican. On a Friday I brought this mare from Dixon's, and was riding it in Long-lane, when Burrell claimed it; she was brought there for sale; I did not see her till that Friday, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and do not know who brought her; she had no bridle or saddle on. Mr. Dixon had sold her, and I was taking her home.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. A great deal of business is done at your place? A. Yes.

EDWARD CLAUGHTON . I am foreman to Mr. Dixon. This mare was brought into our yard on Saturday, the

8th of July, by the prisoner; I think it was in the afternoon; I desired him to go into the counting-house for the clerk to book her. We only take horses in for sale. I am positive he is the person; I saw him three or four days afterwards; he called on the Tuesday, to inquire if she was sold; he sold her himself in our yard, to a man named Joseph Day, for 11l., on Friday, the 14th - it was not paid for till the following Monday - he called that day for the money; I had heard it was stolen, and gave him in charge; I told him it was stolen; he said it belonged to himself and his brother, and he had had her about six months; I am certain of that - it had no saddle or bridle.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain he said he had had her six months? A. Yes, I am. The transaction was public.

SAMUEL TURNER . I am a constable. I was waiting at Dixon's for the prisoner, and apprehended him; he told me he had had the mare in his possession three months, and it was his own; it was afterwards claimed by Burrell and Pearson - I delivered it to Burrell.

THOMAS BURRELL. I have had the horse ever since, and am certain it is mine - she had been constantly at work in my custody till I took her to the fair: the prisoner is a stranger.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday, when I took her to Dixon's, I did not see Claughton.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor on account of his youth, and having heard a good character of him.

Reference Number: t18260914-66

1376. JAMES SPENCER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Hill , about three o'clock in the night of the 23d of August , at St. Sepulchre , with intent the goods, chattels, and monies of the said Charles Hill, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

CHARLES HILL. I live at No. 17, West Smithfield , in the parish of St. Sepulchre. I am an agent and bookkeeper , and rent the house. On the 23d of August, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I went to bed; my female servant is usually the last person up; the house is generally fastened between ten and half-past ten - it was fastened as usual before I went to bed; about 3 o'clock my wife awoke me, saying she was much alarmed - there was a noise of somebody knocking at the top of the house- it was quite dark - I listened some time, and thought it was next door. I heard two or three voices outside the house; I listened some time, at last the noise approached my bed-room; we then got up - the rushlight went out as Mrs. Hill took it up - we struck a light and I looked up the chimney - the soot was falling down, and I could see nothing; I then went up to my children's room, but could find nobody; next day I went into Smithfield and spoke to my neighbour about his having the chimney-sweepers so early, and found he had none; it was remarked that my chimney-pot was broken; I sent a man up, and the prisoner was discovered in the chimney - he had stuck fast there - we were obliged to get him out with ropes; he must have been there before day-light, for all at once the noise of talking became confused and ceased, and, when I looked up the chimney, both soot and mortar fell down; we got him out of the chimney, and asked how he came there; he said he had lost some pigeons, and considering they had flown down there he came down to find them; I gave him in charge - he appeared a chimney-sweeper by his dress.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear whether I broke the chimney-pot, or was it broken before? A. I am in the habit of seeing it very often, being out in the market, and know it was sound a day or two before.

JOSEPH PORTER . I am a porter. I and the plumber went to Mr. Hill's to repair his gutter, on the morning the prisoner was discovered; I found him down the chimney; he told me he was running after the pigeons, and fell down the flue, and could neither get up or down.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I was informed a man was concealed in this chimney, and found the prisoner there, with his arm up holding by a brick; the chimney is breast high above the roof; the part of the pot which was broken off, had been carried and placed across the roof - about half of it was broken, and it appeared quite fresh.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a constable, and took him in charge with Matthews; nobody could have fallen down the chimney by accident; the tiles were taken off the roof, and put over the other pots, to prevent a noise going into the other rooms; we were obliged to cut him out of the chimney; I found in his trousers a chisel, which was all over mortar; he said he used it to scrape chimnies.

Prisoner's Defence. I had two pigeons, they were disturbed that morning by some cats, I suppose - they flew towards Smithfield - I followed them, and thought I saw them pitch on some chimney, and seeing a ladder against some houses, I went up, till I got to Mr. Hill's house, and seeing the chimney-pot broken, I supposed they were gone down there - I went down and stuck fast.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18260914-67

1377. JAMES CARTER and JOHN BIGNALL were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Manley , from his person .

Carter pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

THOMAS MANLEY. I am a wire-worker , and live in St. John-street. On the 11th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Cow-lane , returning home with my wife; a young man gave me information, and I missed my handkerchief, which was safe five minutes before; I looked round, and saw Bignall within a yard of me, and assisted Grummet in taking him to the watch-house; he was laid hold of instantly; Grummet went out with a watchman, and brought Carter in, and in five minutes my handkerchief was produced.

WILLIAM GRUMMET . I live in Vine-street, and am a light-porter. I was in Cow-lane, and saw Mr. and Mrs. Manley going towards Smithfield; I had been watching the prisoners for about a quarter of an hour, and am sure they were in company - I saw them both close by Mr. Manley; I saw Carter lift up the tail of Mr. Manley's coat, and take the handkerchief out; Bignell was close behind, and must have seen it - his arm touched him; Carter put it into his bosom, and ran back down a court - Biguall walked on before Manley; I informed him, and

immediately took Bignall - took him to the watch-house in Holborn - then went out and found Carter in West-street, with some girls, took him to the watch-house, and in his bosom found the handkerchief; I had seen them both try other people's pockets.

HENRY HUGHES . I am a watchman. Bignall was brought in - I went out with Grummet, and found Carter, and took the handkerchief from his bosom.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BIGNALL's Defence. I was a hundred yards before the gentleman; he came and asked where his handkerchief was - I never saw it; I was going to my aunt's.

BIGNALL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Both Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260914-68

1378. ANN BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 3 shirts, value 8s.; 1 pillow, value 18d.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s., and 1 pair of bellows, value 1s., the goods of John Morris , in a lodging room ,

MARY MORRIS . I am wife of John Morris, we live in Seacoal-lane . The prisoner took a second-floor front-room, furnished, on the 3d of May, and stated herself to be the wife of John King , who lodged with her all the time; he was a stone-mason, and she took in work; they paid their rent till the last fortnight; on the 6th of July they left the house without warning, and I missed these articles, which were let with the room - on the 21st of August, I met her on Snow-hill, and gave her in charge.

THOMAS KIRK . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, Newgate-street. On the 3d of July, a woman pawned two sheets for 4s. - I do not think it was the prisoner.

GEORGE HIGHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Cotterel, of Shoe-lane. I have a pillow pawned, on the 20th of June, for 1s., by a female whom I do not know.

WILLIAM WALL . I am shopman to Mr. Mulcaster, of Skinner-street. I have a sheet and a shirt, pawned by a man in the name of Livermore.

THOMAS HARRINGTON . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge - she gave me an old pocket-book, in which were twenty or thirty duplicates; those for the property produced are among them.

The several pawnbrokers here identified their duplicates.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

1379. ANN BURGESS was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , a shirt, value 2s.; a shift, value 1s.; a cup, value 2s., and a pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of David Ker .

MARIA KER . I am the wife of David Ker; we lodge at the same house as the last prosecutrix. When the prisoner left, I missed these things - I gave them to her to wash for me.

WILLIAM WAUGH . On the 3d of July, this sheet and shift were pawned with me in the name of Ann Smith; I do not know who by.

THOMAS HARRINGTON . I found a duplicate of these things on her.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260914-69

1380. ELIZABETH HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 1 tea-kettle, value 8s. , the goods of James Taylor .

ELEANOR TAYLOR . I am the wife of James Taylor, we keep a public-house in Huggin-lane . On the 8th of August, about one o'clock, the prisoner came in with a man, and had a pot of beer, in the tap-room; she had a large bag round her arm - I thought she had a bad arm; this kettle was on the fire full of boiling water - I left them there, and they moved to where they could not be seen - and soon after they left the house, I missed the kettle; my husband fetched the man back, but the kettle was gone; one of them must have taken it, as nobody else had been in the room.

MARY HARRIS . I live opposite to Mrs. Taylor. I saw the prisoner come out with a man - she had this kettle in a bag - the spout stuck out - she dropped it as if it was hot, then took it up again - it seemed heavy, as if water was in it; she shook hands with the man, and parted; she was brought back to the house in about two hours - I am sure she is the woman.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner in Kent-street, Borough, between six and seven o'clock; she said she had neither seen the kettle, nor been in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I never denied being in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260914-70

1381. ROBERT ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 5 baskets, called rounds, value 16s., and 200 pottles, value 6s. , the goods of John Bath .

JOHN BATH. I am a fruit-grower , and live in Kent. On the 21st of July, I sold to Messrs. Hale and Co., in the Poultry, 200 pottles of raspberries; the baskets and pottles were to be returned me.

RICHARD FRAZER . I am a warehouseman to Hale and Co. These three baskets, and 160 pottles, stood near our door empty; I saw the prisoner standing near the door, and asked what he wanted; he said he had come for the rounds for Mr. Bath, of the Borough-market; I told him to take them - he tied them up and took them away.

JOHN BATH . I knew the prisoner, but gave him no authority to fetch them; I had forbidden his coming to my place.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260914-71

EIGHTH DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1382. MARY HASTINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Moss , 24 sovereigns, and one 10l. Bank note, the property of John Samuel Storey and others , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same only stating it to be the property of Elizabeth Hillyer .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN SAMUEL STOREY. I am one of the executors to the will of the late Mrs. Margaret Dolway, and, in consequence of that, on Monday, the 28th of August, I went

to Mr. Moss' house, at Kensington, where she lodged, to take an inventory of her effects; she died on the 23d. I saw the prisoner there, and, in consequence of a communication which was made to me, I sent for her, and asked if she knew the object of my sending for her; she said she did not, unless it was in consequence of some papers being taken from under the bed (she had left the house at that time); I said that was not my object, and asked if she did not know she was sent for in consequence of Mrs. Dolway's money being missed - she said she did not - I asked if she had not been told that morning what was my object; she denied it, and I sent for Mrs. Moss and others; I repeated the same questions, and they said, in her presence, they had told her it was for that; she then admitted that was the fact - there are other executors to the will.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Who is Elizabeth Hillyer? A. An old lady, who lived in the house with Mrs. Dolway as a sort of companion, and had the care of her property; the will has not been proved: I have acted upon it, but not taken out a probate - the offence was committed before I began to act; Hillyer was a sort of confidential servant, who had lived with her, and had the care of her property for thirty years - it would be in her possession till it was delivered up to me.

HENRY ROUND . I am subscribing witness to this will- (looking at it) I saw Mrs. Dolway execute it.

The clause in the will, vesting the property in Samuel Storey and others, in trust, was here read.

ELIZABETH HILLYER. I lived with Mrs. Dolway twenty-six years, in the house of Mr. Thomas Moss, at Kensington - he lived there himself - Mrs. Dolway died on the 23d of August; I always had the care of her things before her death, and after her death took charge of the property left; she used to keep her money in the celeret drawer in the day time, and at night she always took it out and gave it to me to put under the bed - in the morning I used to take it out, and she herself replaced it in the celeret - that was her invariable custom for years; but on the Tuesday night, the day before she died, she gave me but two parcels of money instead of three, and, in the morning, while she was alive, I them out and put them in the celeret - then I saw a third took parcel there, which she had not taken out at night; she died between 2 and 3 o'clock on the Wednesday afternoon; I saw the three parcels in the celeret on Thursday morning: the prisoner came to the house about an hour before Mrs. Dolway died, and continued in the house till the Monday morning following; she had the care of the room and corpse day and night; the celeret was in the sitting room, but on the Saturday I removed it into the bed room, where the corpse lay - nobody was in the bed room except the prisoner and her niece - the celeret had a spring lock; I never opened it after Thursday morning.

Cross-examined. Q. You were servant to this lady till she died? A. Yes, and continued there; the money was all safe when the prisoner came.

Q. When you say you saw three parcels of money, you cannot say what sort of money it was? A. It was wrapped in paper - I was always informed there was gold; I did not open the parcels, but she always kept her money in that way.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you miss the parcel? A. On the Monday morning when Mr. Storey came - the prisoner had then left the house about an hour - the prisoner was only sent for to take care of the body; I never left the house - her business was to set up with the body; she had no possession of the property.

SUSANNAH RUST . I am servant to Mrs. Matthews, of No. 10, Haughton-street, Kensington. I know the prisoner - she lived in Newland-street, about five minutes walk from Mrs. Matthew's; I lived two years with her as servant, and she got me my place at Mrs. Matthew's. On Tuesday, the 29th of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I was looking out of window, and saw her in the street, and when I came down she gave me this parcel, and said, "Take care of it for me;" she did not tell me what it was; I put it into my box without opening it, and delivered the same parcel to Ellis on the same day as I received it.

JAMES ELLIS . I am a principal officer of Bow-street. In consequence of information I went to Mrs. Matthews', and received from Rust this parcel, containing twenty-four sovereigns, and a 10l. Bank note, No. 8048, dated 9th of June, 1826 - they were in a silk glove, and afterwards put into the leg of a silk stocking, and tied round with ribbon- Kensington is in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain this house is in that parish? A. Not positive; I afterwards took the prisoner into custody, and asked if she had any means of getting her living, except going out nursing - she hesitated, and, at last, I said I was an officer, and that where she had been sitting up with and old lady, who was dead, some money was missing; she said she had some property coming from a mortgage - that her brother, when he came to town, usually brought her the money, but she had received none for a considerable time - that he was in town in May, but brought her none then, nor had he sent her any since; I asked whether, when she went out nursing she left her money at home, or took it with her, or placed it in any other person's hands; she denied a dozen times having ever placed any money in any body's hands; I then took out this parcel, and asked if she knew it; she said she did, and she had given it to Rust.

SUSANNAH RUST. The parcel is now in the state it was delivered to me.

CLARK EDWARD TOMALIN . I am cashier at Messrs. Praeds, Fleet-street, bankers. I have two cheques, drawn by Mr. Alexander for 40l. and 50l.; I paid them on the 11th of July, in three 10l. notes, Nos. 8048, 8049, and 8050, dated 9th June, 1826, among other notes.

JOHN HUNT . I am clerk to Mr. Alexander, solicitor, Carey-street. I received the cash for these cheques, and paid Mr. Alexander the same notes as I received.

JOHN ALEXANDER . I am a solicitor, and live in Carey-street. Hunt paid me the notes for these cheques; I took them to Kensington, and left them at my house with my nephew, Mr. Brown, to pay 40l. to Mrs. Dolway, and 50l. to a Mrs. Shipman; Mr. Moss' house is in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts.

ROBERT FREDERICK BROWN . My uncle, Mr. Alexander, delivered me this money; I was to take 40l. to Mrs. Dolway, and 50l. to Mrs. Shipman; I perfectly remember paying but one 10l. note to Mrs. Dolway - it was on the 10th of July - the other money was in small notes and cash. On the 14th of September I got from Mrs. Shipman a 10l. note, No. 8049, dated 9th of June, 1826 - she is too infirm to attend here.

SARAH KEBBLE . I live at Bromley, Kent. I received

a 10l. note from Mrs. Shipman on the 29th or 30th of August, and paid the same to Mr. Illingworth.

RICHARD STONEHEWER ILLINGWORTH . I produce the 10l. note which Mrs. Kebble paid me - it is No. 8050, dated 9th June, 1826; I have written her name on it, and it has Mrs. Shipman's name on it.

COURT to ELIZABETH HILLYER. Q. How long did the prisoner remain in the house? A. Till Monday, the 28th- she was never employed by mistress - she was a perfect stranger to her; I was the confidential servant, and knew all her money transactions - there could have been no money transactions between her and the prisoner; she was quite insensible before the prisoner came; she was eighty-one years of age.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her character.

Reference Number: t18260914-72

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1383. GEORGE BEACHAM was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-73

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1384. JAMES GREEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Neam , on the King's highway, on the 3d of August , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 3 shirts, value 7s. 6d.; 1 shift, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of John Neam .

ELIZABETH NEAM. I am the wife of John Neam. On the 3d of August, about a quarter to nine o'clock at night, I was in Devonshire-street, Mile-end , and had a parcel containing three shirts and a shift; the prisoner came from behind me, looked me full in the face, and attempted to take my parcel; I held it very tight, but he forced it from me, and ran away; I cried Stop thief! and pursued, and so did others, but I fainted and was taken into a house, and when I recovered I was told he was in custody; I went to the watch-house with my husband, and am certain of him - my parcel was produced.

Q. Just look at your deposition? A. I see I there state that he snatched it; but he did it forcibly; I held it tight, as he looked at me viciously - there was no struggle for it.

JOHN WARD . On the 3d of August, about nine o'clock, I and Cooper (who is not here) were standing in West-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran, and saw the prisoner coming towards me - he passed several persons, and fell into my arms; I secured him; I saw him throw away the bundle, which Hubbard picked up; Mrs. Neam afterwards claimed it; I had not seen her when I took him.

JOHN WIDGATE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; Hubbard brought in the bundle - it was pinned up, and contained three shirts and a shift.

ROBERT HUBBARD . I picked up the bundle, and took it to the watch-house; I saw the prisoner throw it down.

JOHN BRADMAN . I was in West-street, and assisted in securing the prisoner; Hubbard brought in this bundle; I have had it ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. (written.) I was walking down Devonshire-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw several persons running in different directions; I also ran, and, in turning the corner, several persons rushed out of a public-house, and seized me.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Of stealing from the person only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18260914-74

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1385. ROBERT KING and JOHN ROBINSON were indicted for feloniously assaulting Lewis Myerson , on the King's highway, on the 14th of July , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 half-crowns, his property .

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

LEWIS MYERSON. I am beadle of the Episcopal-chapel, Bethnal-green , and am constable of Bethnal-green - I have been so nearly eleven years, and am well known in the parish, as beadle and constable - I live in the parish. On the 14th of July, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was going to Whitechapel-market, and had to pass through Fleet-street-hill - I am quite sure I saw the prisoners there, with several others; when I first went to a corner of a street leading into a brick field, about twenty of them were there - some playing at cards, and others tossing halfpence; I looked at them, but did not speak. When I had passed them ten or twelve yards I heard a voice say, "Here goes the bl - y beadle;" I then thought I was in danger, and walked on quickly, but presently I felt a quantity of stones, dirt, and mud, coming from behind me; they were thrown at me. I turned round a corner, where I was obliged to turn, and turned shortly round to see if I knew any of the men who were throwing the stones, and saw the prisoner Robinson very active in throwing stones - I staid for a little while. and six persons came from the rest - both the prisoners were among those six; King came and said to me, "I say they say you legged some of our chaps;" I understand legging means transporting, or convicting for different crimes; I am not certain whether they said chaps or palls - I made no answer; King then came and tapped me on the shoulder, looked quite close at me, and said,"Have you got any money for us?" I said, "None for you;" Robinson was close at his elbow; King said,"We shall soon have it all you b - r" - as soon as the words were out of his mouth he knocked me down with something which he held in his hand (it is a thing called a dumb-bell - a lump of lead with a nob at each end); an effusion of blood came running down the front of my face; I have the mark across my nose, and shall carry it to the grave; I did not fall from the blow, but stooped down, being in extreme pain, but sensible. I stooped down to let the blood run from me, and the pain was so great I put my hand to my face - I immediately felt King with his hand in my right-hand waistcoat pocket, where I had three half-crowns; this was while I was stooping - some of the half-crowns were out of my pocket directly; a kind of tussle took place between Robinson and King, and some of the money fell on the stones - I heard it jingle, and saw Robinson with some silver in his hand, but whether that was mine or not I cannot say - he said, "Look at this, you b - r?" he opened his hand, and I saw some half-crowns in it; I said, "What have I done to deserve this punishment?" they said, "That is the chap

that has legged some of our coves" - both the prisoners said so - they left me and dispersed. The whole six were round while this took place; I know the other four, but have not seen them since - I should know them again; I knew both the prisoners as well as I know myself - I had seen them several times. When they left me several inhabitants came round - I spoke to a woman, who is not here, first; I described their persons. King was taken next day, and Robinson the day after, but I did not see him till several days - as sure as I stand here they are the men.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see a person named Wood after this happened? A. Yes - I applied to him for some vinegar a few minutes after - I did not know him before; I pointed out to him, and others two persons who were running - they were not a great distance from me. I am not a Jew. I mentioned to Wood about losing money - I swear that I complained of being both robbed and ill-used. I was rather afraid, having no one to assist me; I was in a state of fear, but not so much as to make a mistake in their persons. Robinson threw stones at me - King gave me the blows; his hand was in my pocket - I generally keep silver in my waistcoat pocket.

Q. How long after his hand was in your pocket did you see Robinson? A. Not a minute; it was between six and seven o'clock, for when I was crossing Hare-street-fields I heard the clock strike six. I know Robinson's brother, but cannot say whether I saw him there, or spoke to him; I saw several persons, and spoke to them - I noticed particularly who the persons were who I spoke to; I should know the persons I spoke to if I saw them.

Q. Did you say to any person that you had not been robbed, only ill-used? A. I did not - I said to several"What I have lost is of no value, but I do not like to be ill-used" - 7s. 6d. is of value to me, but I would rather lose three times that than be ill-used. I was asked if I was robbed while Wood was gone for the vinegar, but did not say I had not been robbed; I told some of them I had only lost three-half-crowns - I do not know Denower, an undertaker, not by name; nor Tow or Low; these persons might have met me in the street after I was robbed. I told every body I had been robbed - I always said I was robbed of three half-crowns.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Are you a foreigner? A. A native of Saxony; I always spoke of being robbed; Norris was the first person I desired to assist me in apprehending them; it was about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour after I left Hare-street-fields - it was about twenty minutes past six o'clock.

JOHN NORRIS . I am inspector of the dismounted patrol. My district is about Bethnal-green. I saw Myerson about nine o'clock on this night - I was on duty with a party of men, to prevent bullock hunting; Myerson had a cut across the nose and the cheek bone, and his eye greatly swollen, in a shocking state; I could hardly see whether he had an eye - it had been washed with vinegar - he described the persons to me; I apprehended both the prisoners from his description. I took King the next night in brick-lane, coming up Spicer-street, about twelve o'clock- I took Robinson on the Thursday morning following, it of bed at his mother's house. I knew them from Myerson's account - he saw King in the watch-house the same night as I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to Robinson's mother's before? A. No - he was in bed; I had a difficulty to get in, being pelted with bricks and stones by a mob.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Were you before the Magistrate when these men were examined? A. Yes - they called no witnesses to my knowledge.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I am a patrol. I heard of this robbery the same night - I was with Norris when he took the prisoners; I heard Myerson describe their persons before they were taken, and by his description we took them.

RICHARD MEADOWCROFT . I am a patrol. I heard of this affair the same night, but did not hear Myerson describe the parties.

KING'S Defence. I was looking after work all day.

ROBINSON'S Defence. At the time of the robbery I was talking to Burdett, at his own door in Fleet-street-hill. I saw a mob at the corner of Wheeler-street - I looked down, and saw them round the gentleman - I turned round, and went to the door again.

JEREMIAH WOOD . I live in Ram-alley, Fleet-street, Bethnal-green. I am a weaver, but at the time this happened I kept a coal-shed in Weaver-street. After the prosecutor was robbed he came up to me - I went to the public-house close by, got a halfpenny-worth of vinegar and brought it to him in a basin - the side of his face was cut - it did not appear swollen then - I was standing at my gate when he came up to me; just before he came up I saw two young men run by - he pointed them out to me- just after he got off the ground he said, "See how I have been ill-used by them young rascals, or them young villains;" I will not be certain which.

Q. When he said that did he point to anybody? A. He put his arms out. I have known Robinson nearly two years, and used to see him frequently - I know both the prisoners; I am positive the men he pointed out were neither of them. I never heard him say a word of being robbed, nor did he inquire for an officer or anybody, to assist in apprehending them - he said he had been ill-used by them villains or rascals, and that he had done nothing to them.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Were you the only person by at the time? A. Another young man stood talking to me in the yard at the time they ran by - that was Abraham Robinson, the prisoner's brother; we both went out after these young men, to see what they were running after. Robinson is not related to me - I have known his family two years, and he has worked for a master whom I worked for; I had not seen John Robinson that evening.

Q. Mind what you are about? A. I saw him that afternoon come home to his mother's house, just after this happened, about ten minutes after the affair happened - that was as near five o'clock as could be; I stood at my gate at that time - his mother lives close on the spot where it happened, not a dozen yards from where the beadle was ill-used - it was near five o'clock, to the best of my recollection; I had not seen King that afternoon, I am certain-I was in Weaver-street that day, backwards and forwards about my business - I saw nobody gambling there.

Q. When did Robinson send to you to come to the Old

Bailey? A. About a fornight ago - his brother Tom came to me, not Abraham; he did not send to me before that. I did not go before the Magistrate - I was never before one in my life.

Q. Did you go to Myerson, in company with either of the prisoner's brothers, to offer him 10l. to throw out this bill before the Grand Jury? A. No, I did not; I went to him before the prisoners' second hearing - the mother asked me to be kind enough to go down - Thomas Robinson went with me; I went to tell him I thought him under wrong notions - he had taken up the wrong parties; I told him so, and that is all. I did not offer him 10l. to get the bill thrown out - no such thing was mentioned - I will swear the offer was not made by either me or the prisoner's brother; I never heard it made by anybody. I merely went out of friendship to the old woman, she being a neighbour.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you speak of time to the best of your recollection? A. Yes.

ABRAHAM ROBINSON . I am the prisoner Robinson's eldest brother. I am a weaver, but now keep a green-grocer's shop. I was with Wood in his coal-shed when this happened; we went out to the end of the yard, to the gate, together, and saw two persons running, and then saw Myerson picking his hat up; I did not hear him say any thing; he was twenty or thirty yards from me - neither of the prisoner are either of the two persons who were running - I did not see them in the street. Myerson made up to Wood, and while Wood was gone for the vinegar I asked him what they had been doing to him; he said he had been terribly ill-used; I asked if he knew either of them - he said No - he said he knew one who was in his shirt sleeves. I asked if he had been robbed; he said No, he was not robbed, but terribly ill-used, and he asked no one to assist to take them.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Where is your brother Tom? A. Outside.

Q. What day was this? A. What day? it was about five o'clock in the afternoon - I think it was on Thursday, between four and five o'clock; I had come from my home to Mr. Wood's - I lived in King-street, Spitalfields then; I have moved since; I was going to see my mother, but, Wood being an acquaintance, I called in to see him first. I saw nobody about gambling in the way I came - I came into Weaver-street; I did not come over Fleet-street-hill - I was not holyday-making - I had but little work, and my wife looks after that. When I left Wood's I went home to my own house; I stopped at Wood's three quarters of an hour, and it might be seven o'clock when I got home - I was not in Wood's company all that time; I sometimes chop wood for him; I was in the yard, but he was not with me; his wife and children might be there for what I know. I had seen nobody gambling that afternoon, nor had been with any - I never keep such company - I swear I had not; I did not know Myerson, the beadle, then; I did not know he was a beadle for six or seven days after. I went with my brother Tom to Myerson's, to ask him about the case - it might be six or seven days after, but I cannot say exactly.

Q. Who desired you to go? A. I went of my own free will, to ask him how he meant to manage the case, and acquaint him he had got the wrong person; I never mentioned a word about bribing him to throw out the bill, nor did my brother - I swear that.

Q. As you did not see Myerson robbed, why did you go to tell him he had got the wrong men? A. Because I knew it was not the two people he had taken whom I saw run away.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Do you speak of time as far as you recollect? A. Yes.

LEWIS MYERSON re-examined. Wood is the person who brought me the vinegar, but I did not see this man there.

Q. When the prisoners were in custody did any body come to make you an offer? A. Yes, Wood, Abraham Robinson, and a third man; they came and asked if I was Myerson, and if I was beadle of the Episcopal-chapel; they asked if I would go and take any thing to drink; I thanked them, and said I would rather not; Wood said,"Now, you know me?" I said "Yes, I know you are the person who brought me the vinegar;" he said "Yes, now you know the proverb, 'If one hand washes the other, they will both be clean;" "Yes," said I, "but give me an explanation thereof;" he said, "Now, it is a serious case of this young man - you have got a family, and so have I, and I am an acquaintance of this person's, and you don't know what your children may come to." -

Q. Without stating all this did they offer you any bribe of 10l., by any means you could, to throw out the bill? - A. They did - ten sovereigns. I mentioned nothing about shirt sleeves when I was robbed.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Who was present when any thing was said about ten sovereigns? A. My wife was at the door, but did not hear it; they came three times - Wood and a person not here came the first time, Abraham Robinson came the second, with Wood, and the third time they came to the chapel on a Wednesday - Wood came then with another person; it was only the second time that Wood and Abraham Robinson came together; there was another man standing a dozen yards or so off.

Q. Now where was this? A. At my house, one evening - I think about three weeks after the prisoners were apprehended - ten sovereigns was mentioned when they were both present. I have heard them both deny this.

COURT. Q. Was any offer made to you the first time? A. Ten sovereigns, if I would make a flaw in the indictment, and throw it out - they said the second time 10l. was at my service - they had before said sovereigns, and at the chapel they offered me ten sovereigns, and some thing handsome besides. I knew the prisoners by name before the robbery, and I mentioned their names to the officers when I described them.

JOHN DENOWER . I am an undertaker, and live at No. 18, Princes-street, Mile-end New-town. I was passing at the time the prosecutor was ill-used, and saw the persons who ill-used him - I was about one hundred yards off, and could see perfectly the persons who did - I am confident neither of the prisoners were present - I have known them from their cradles.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. As they did not do it, perhaps you can tell who did? A. No - I do not know the two, but can safely say it was not the prisoners, although the two men who did it ran by me; I should know them if I saw them; I was afraid they would serve me the same if I stopped them; I was going up to help Myerson, but be

fore I could reach him they came running by me - I only saw two - I know Robinson's mother; I did not see her that evening. I happened to call on her two or three days after he was taken; I heard they were taken, and of course, thought it my duty to right them as well as I could; I did not ask when they were to be examined, being an undertaker I am so much engaged; they had been examined when I was at Robinson's mother's; I do not know what day they were taken up, but think it was Saturday; I cannot say whether they had had their last examination. I told her I would come here with the greatest pleasure; I did not go before the Justice. I was going, on the 14th of July, to my brother's, about a bill he was answerable for - he lives in Fox-street, Pott-street, Bethnal-green-road - his name is Elias Denower - it is above half a mile from Fleet-street-hill, but that is the nearest way to it; I was endeavouring to get to my brother's about five o'clock; I went through Weaver-street - I saw nobody playing at cards or tossing; there were a few people at the top, but only two were near Myerson - I only saw two near him - they both had long coats on - neither of them was in his shirt sleeves. I saw Wood give Myerson some vinegar - I saw nobody go into Mrs. Robinson's house - if Robinson had turned into his mother's house while I was there, I must have seen him.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you go on to your brother's? A. Yes. As I went along I saw Robinson talking with a young man at his own house - that, of course, convinced me that it was not him.

Q. Did you know who that young man was? A. Yes, Robert Wilkinson - it was at Wilkinson's uncle's house.

Q. Two persons were ill-using Myerson - how far off were any other persons? A. Sixty and seventy yards - at the top of the street; only these two were about him - there was no other person within sixty or seventy yards of him at the time.

COURT. Q. How far was Wood's house from him? - A. As near as I can guess sixty or seventy yards; it was done opposite Mrs. Robinson's door - they were both taken when I heard of it - they had had their hearing; I did not notice the date - it was the second or third day after they were taken that I heard of it; I cannot say how long it was after it happened - I cannot say whether it was a week or ten days after.

ROBERT WILKINSON . My uncle lives on Fleet-street-hill - his name is Burdett. I was inside my uncle's room on this day; I heard a great noise, and came out to ask what it was - I did not see it begin, but I saw a mob at the corner of Weaver-street, and while I stood there Robinson came up to me from quite a different way - he was coming towards the crowd; he came to me as I stood at the door; I asked how he was, and if he had any work, and then he asked me what was the matter at the corner of the street - I advised him to stop with me till the crowd was gone away; he did so, and then went home.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see the man ill-used? A. No. I know Denower, and saw him pass my uncle's door, going towards where Mrs. Robinson lived - he was ear the house, but had to turn a corner before he could to her door.

Q. Then if the man was robbed opposite Mrs. Robinson's door he could not see it? A. He might see it after he turned the corner; he could not see her door when I saw him, but could directly he turned the corner. I am a weaver, and work for Mr. Huxtable - I live in Church-street; I was holyday-making that afternoon; nobody was with me - I had just come from home. After seeing Denower I went into my uncle's; I left Robinson to go home - it was on Friday, the 14th of July. I do not know when the prisoners were examined; I did not attend as a witness - I said I would attend here; I should have gone if I had been asked. I never saw Myerson before to my knowledge.

COURT. Q. When did you say you would come here? A. About three weeks ago - it was after the examination; I do not know where Wood lives.

Q. Did you see Wood when the prosecutor was there? A. Yes - he asked for a little vinegar, and Wood got it - the vinegar was there when I first went up; the prosecutor was asked if he had been robbed, and replied, No; he complained of being ill-used; I have known Robinson from his cradle, and always heard a good character of him; king was a carpenter, and has a good character.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. In what employ was Robinson when he was apprehended? A. A weaver; he manufactured lusterings for his brother, at his brother's house, which is a quarter of a mile from his mother's; I have seen King working at his father's; the prosecutor was ten or twelve yards from Mrs. Robinson's door, on the opposite side.

Q. And you saw it going on? A. I was going by at the time.

Q. Do not you know Robinson was taken up on a charge of robbery, six months ago? A. I know nothing of it - it was not for robbery; I did hear he was taken up, but what for I did not hear, whether it was for interrupting any body in the street, or what - I never asked.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see him at large afterwards? A. Yes.

ROBINSON. I was taken for assulting Wood, and officer.

COURT to NORRIS. Q. What time on Friday evening did the prosecutor describe the persons to you? A. As near nine o'clock as possible - he gave me both their names; I did not know where they lived - I found out where Robinson's mother lived on Tuesday, but understood he never lived at home, and did not go to disturb his mother till Thursday, at half-past six o'clock in the morning, when I took him; King had been taken before the Magistrates on Monday, when I took him, and both were finally committed on the following Monday.

Three witnesses gave King a good character.

KING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

ROBINSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18260914-75

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1386. GEORGE NICHOLLS and JAMES GOULBY , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Nicholls , on the King's high-way, on the 29th of June , at St. John, at Hackney , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 1s.; 1 basket, value 2s.; 2 cloths, value 4d.; 1 shilling, and 1s. 3 1/2d. in copper monies, his property .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS. I live at Hackney-wick . On Thursday, the 29th of June, I had been at the Adam and

Eve, public-house, at Homerton, and left there as near half-past ten o'clock, as I can tell; I had to go about 1200 yards to get home - I saw both the prisoners in the public-house- I had never seen them before; I drank out of a pot of beer in their company that evening, while I was waiting for a penny for some shell-fish, which I had sold to them, or their company; I sell shrimps and perri winkles ; when I got about half way home I was overtaken by the two prisoners - Nicholls laid hold of me by the back of my neck, and smashed me down, with my face to the ground; in struggling I turned round on my back - one came on my left-hand side, and the other on my right; I found Goulby's hand in my left-hand waistcoat-pocket, where I had my money; I cried out Murder! three or four times, and as I laid on my back I tried to kick the prisoners in the face, as well as I was able; the last word I remember saying to them was, "If you please, spare my life, for the sake of my wife and three small children;" I am sure I said so to them, and think it was the last words I said; they never spoke to me at all that I remember; I became senseless after that, and when I came to myself, and got up, I found my face all over blood, and my head also - my hat was gone, also my basket and two cloths, which were under my hat - I could see nothing of them, or the prisoners; I had no silver, but 2s. and 1d., or 1 1/2d., all in copper - it was all taken; there was a penny-piece among it, which I knew by a mark; as soon as I came to my senses, and looked round, I began to cry Murder! and Stop thief! and continued to do so till I got nearly home; I got home in ten minutes, and afterwards went in pursuit; Mr. Alger went in pursuit of the men; about a quarter of an hour after it happened I went with him to the White Lion, public-house, and saw the two prisoners there in custody, and said they were the men - I was positive of them as soon as I saw them - I said, "Stand up, you d - d rascals and villains, what could you think of, by leaving me for dead after you had taken what little I had got from me;" they made no answer at all; I am certain they are the men who committed the robbery, and who I had seen at the Adam and Eve.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. How far from home were you robbed? A. About 600 yards; I had been selling shrimps and perriwinkles that afternoon, and sold some in the tap-room of the public-house - I was there about half an hour, not more - I had been round Hackney-road, and through Haggerston, and called at two or three public-houses, to sell my goods, the Plough and the Shoulder of Mutton - I drank at the Plough, but at no other house, till I got to the Adam and Eve, and am quite sure I was sober - it got dusk about nine o'clock; I might leave twenty people at the Adam and Eve - I am sure I left the prisoners there; as soon as I got the penny, their companion owed me, I went out; there is not a house nearer to where I was stopped, than sixty yards; I do not know who lives there, but believe Thomas George does; I did not go there - I went straight home; I found my wife at home- I knocked at my door, asked my wife for another hat, and afterwards went back to acquaint the night officer; I did not return to the public-house, as I was as near my own house, and thought the alarm had been given, as I had cried Stop thief! and Murder! all the way home as I ran. Nicholls stood on my right side - I turned my head, and saw him - he put his hands round my neck - I am sure he is the man; they were kneeling down on each side of me, and kneeling on me at the time the money was taken - I had two farthing among my money; I did not see them in custody till I got to the White Lion - Mr. Algar had told me he had got the men in custody - they stood up in the passage; it was a very light night, light enough to distinguish their countenances; I was not struck, but thrown down - I never saw them before; it might last five minutes, perhaps - I cried Murder! three or four times, and was alarmed when I was thrown down; they were on each side of me, and not behind.

COURT. Q. Did they meet you? A. No, they came behind me; I turned my head, and saw Nicholls seize hold of my neck, and, as soon as I got down, Goulby was on the other side of me; I am certain they are the men, and have always been certain.

WILLIAM ALGAR . I am a shop-keeper, and live at Hackney-bay. On the 29th of June I was at the White Lion public-house, and heard a cry of Murder! coming in a direction from Homerton - there are fields at the back of the White Lion, and Nichols' house is not far from there; on hearing the alarm I went, in company with Bawm, towards the corner of Mr. Alsager's field; I heard the cry of murder just as I got up to the field, and presently heard footsteps coming toward me, having first heard the turnstile move; I then heard footsteps of two persons running towards us, as from Homerton - there is a footpath in this field - it is a short cut from the Homerton-road to Mr. Alsager's; I stooped down and Bawm stood on one side to prevent the persons from seeing us, and secured the persons, who were the prisoners; I took Goulby, and Bawm Nicholls - Goulby wanted to get from me, but I had a cricket bat in my hand, and told him I would knock him down if he did; I found two cloths tucked into the left side of his waistcoat; I gave them to Martin; some copper money was found on Nicholls, and 1s., in silver, which Cowling had. We took them to the White Lion, left them there, then went to see it - any one was robbed, and found the prosecutor, Nicholls, with another man, just against the place where he said he had been robbed - that is about ten yards from where the footpath leads from; he was all over blood - he told me of his being robbed, and that he knew the men who had done it - I told him they were in custody; he appeared to have been very ill-treated - indeed, when I got to the watch-house I observed marks of blood on both the prisoners' clothes; I rubbed fresh blood off the knee of one of them in the watch-house; the prosecutor had marks on the side of his head and throat - it seemed quite white matter in the morning; there were several marks as if a hand had been thrust into his collar.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner Nicholls taken? A. Yes; I did not see him attempt to get away- I saw them searched by the officers - a great many coppers, and two farthings were found on the prisoner Nicholls. The spot where I found the prosecutor is in a direct road from the public-house to his home; the prisoners were in a by-way to the public-house, and not the shortest way.

JOHN BAWM . I am landlord of the White Lion. I heard a cry of Murder! and went with Alger to this

field, and took Nicholls; we heard the footsteps within five minutes of hearing the cry; I afterwards saw the prisoners in the watch-house - their clothes were stained with blood, on both their knees.

Mr. BARRY. Q. Which is Nicholls? A. There he is; I have always said that is the man I took.

GEORGE MARTIN . Mr. Alger gave me two cloths on the night of the robbery, which I took into master's taproom, and left them on the arm of the prisoner, Goulby - I have not seen them since.

WILLIAM COWLING . I am a constable of the night. Mr. Algar brought these two cloths to the watch-house - I have had them ever since; the two prisoners were brought in with them; I have a shilling, seven penny-pieces, eight-pence half-penny, and two farthings, and a bag, containing two handkerchiefs, and a night-cap; these were found on Nicholls; on Goulby was found an iron shoe, and three half-pence - among the penny-pieces found on Nicholls, was one marked; there was blood on the knee of one of the prisoners, and on the trousers of the other; it appeared quite fresh; the prosecutor appeared in a very dreadful state indeed - literally covered with blood - he appeared almost to have been suffocated; his neck was marked either with fingers being thrust into it, or from the knee-buckles of one of their breeches; he said the prisoners were the men - Hill gave me a basket and Halmkin brought in a hat.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know who brought you the cloths? A. Not exactly; they were brought in with the prisoners, and smelt strong of shrimps; the iron found on Goulby is used by navigators; the marked pennypiece was among the rest; I said if he had lost money, there was a particular one, and very likely he could identify it, and the moment he saw it he identified it.

THOMAS HILT . About a quarter before eleven o'clock, on the night of the robbery, I found that basket in Wick-lane, which comes from Homerton to Hackney-wick - it was about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's house, and about forty yards from the foot-path leading across the fields - I gave it to Cowling.

CHARLES HALMKIN . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 30th of June, in the fields, which lead from the lane to Mr. Alsager's house, I found a hat, about twenty yards from the foot-path - a man in the foot-path could have thrown it there; I gave it to Cowling - that produced is the same.

JOHN GODDARD . I am a patrol. I searched Nicholls at the watch-house, and took from his person, the copper money which I gave Cowling.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to where the man said he was robbed? A. Yes; but found nothing.

HENRY GEORGE . On the morning of the 30th of June, as I went to work in the road leading to Hackney-wick I found 4d. in half-pence on the spot where Nicholls says he was robbed: there were marks on the ground as if persons had been scuffling there.

Cross-examined. Q. Who shewed you where the man was robbed? A. Nobody.

GEORGE WORLEY . I was at the Adam and Eve on he night of the 29th of June, and saw the prisoner Nicholls there, for I shook hands with him; I did not observe Goulby - I cannot say he was not there; the prosecutor went out first - Nicholls went out soon after him - I did not particularly notice the time, and cannot say whether any other man went out with him.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you been there? A. Ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; there might be ten or twelve men there; I do not know Goulby; I cannot say whether the prisoner Nicholls went out alone - he shook hands with me - I saw him go out of the door way, and observed nobody else go out; several persons were standing up at the time; I know the prosecutor.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS. These cloths are mine, and were stolen from me that night; I had them when I was robbed; I know this penny-piece - it is one I had - I took particular notice of it when I took it - it is marked and bent; the basket is mine, and the hat has my name on it.

Cross-examined. Q. You took a good many coppers that night? A. Yes, but no more like that - I particularly noticed its being beat round the edge and battered in the middle.

Mr. WILLIAM HARE . I am a surgeon. I saw the prosecutor on the night of the robbery; I was sent for about twelve o'clock, and found his face and head all over blood; I cut off his hair and found none of the wounds likely to prove mortal; but he was much bruised about the head and face, and pinched about the throat - that appeared to have been done by the fingers - he must have been very ill-treated, from the state in which I found him - I attended him about a week.

NICHOLLS' Defence. I was not at the place; I went no farther along the lane than the foot-path, which was in the road to the public-house.

GOULBY's Defence. When I came to the style I turned out of the road, and ran across the field.

Two witnesses gave Nicholls a good character.

NICHOLLS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

GOULBY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18260914-76

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1387. JAMES ARCHDEACON RICHARDSON was indicted for a libel .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

And entered into securities to keep the peace , and appear for judgment when the Court should be moved.

Reference Number: t18260914-77

1388. JAMES NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , 6lbs. weight of opium, value 5l., and 10 pieces of opium, value 5l. , the goods of the Master, Wardens, and Society of the Art and Mystery of Apothecaries, of the City of London .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Henry Field, and others.

Mr. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK LEFFLER . The prisoner was messenger at Apothecaries'-hall ; the opium was kept in an inner cellar, the key of which was always in my possession, except when I went to dinner. On the 5th of August I charged him with having concealed about him the key of the essential oil cellar; he said, "I have not got it, I do not know the key;" he refused to empty his pockets; I found the key on him, with three pounds of opium in his coat pocket

and hat: it was loose, and in lumps; I said "You are a pretty fellow to forfeit a character, and bread for the sake of a little opium - I am afraid you have been keeping bad company," and mentioned a name; he admitted that person had induced him first to rob the Company; an officer was sent for, who found 3lbs. more in his hat; it is worth 5l.; when I went to dinner I used to put the key of the cellar in a drawer in the chief Accountant's desk; he knew where it was kept.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was his hat on when you searched him? A. Yes; he bore a good character; I think the person I mentioned has led him into it; he was six or seven years in our employ; Mr. Henry Field is a member of the Company.

SAMUEL DOWDNEY . I am a constable. I was sent for, and searched the prisoner; the opium was found in his pockets, and several pieces in his hat; he had the key in his breeches pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18260914-78

1389. PATRICK BURKE was indicted for stealing' on the 27th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Peter Morrison , from his person .

PETER MORRISON. I am clerk to the Alliance Insurance Office , and live in Fenchurch-street. On the 27th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was returning home, and, at the bottom of Holborn-hill , I felt something at my pocket; I put my hand down, and my handkerchief, which was safe just before, was gone; I turned round, and found four or five people behind me, and the prisoner among them with two girls; I saw the handkerchief in the prisoner's hand, and seized him immediately; the others dispersed; Hughes came up and I gave him in charge, but, before that, he struck me a very severe blow in the mouth, when I took the handkerchief out of his hand; I reeled back from the violence, but did not lose sight of him till Hughes came up.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you collar him before he struck you? A. Yes; he said he got the handkerchief from a girl, but at Guildhall, he said he picked it off the ground; I am sure it is mine.

HENRY HUGHES . I am a watchman. I was turning from Fleet-market to Holborn-hill, and heard a cry of Watch! I ran towards the sound, and saw the prisoner strike Mr. Morrison; he was about two doors from the corner of Field-land; he had the handkerchief in his hand when he struck the prosecutor; by the time I got up he ran down Field-lane; I followed, and never lost sight of him till I took him; Mr. Morrison staggered from the blow, and seized the handkerchief at the same time; the prisoner said a girl gave it to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prosecutor collar him before he struck him? A. I did not see it; he was staggering back when I saw him; I might be thirty yards off - across the road; I saw the blow struck.

JOHN STUBBING . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with this handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260914-79

1390. HENRY WILLIAMS and STEPHEN DARK were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , 1 silk neckerchief, value 7s. , the goods of James Collier .

JAMES COLLIER. I am a hosier , and live in the Poultry . On the 23d of August, about five o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop with two females; this handkerchief was in the shop; I had seen it a quarter of an hour before, and nobody had been in afterwards; the women asked to look at some black silk stockings, which I shewed them; none suited - this handkerchief was on a line on the right hand side of the shop, and, in the mean time, Williams went to the bottom of the shop, where some other handkerchiefs lay on the counter; I saw him take hold of one piece, and put my brother on the watch; Dark observed me looking at Williams, and called him back; I was shewing stockings to the females all this time; Dark stood behind them, and Williams behind him; they bought nothing; I saw Williams take this neckerchief off the line, and conceal it about his person; he then tried to take a crimson one, but, observing me looking, he dropped it; he touched Dark, and they were out of the shop immediately, women and all; I took the stockings off the counter, put on my hat, and overtook them four doors off, all four in company, in the passage of a house in the Old Jewry; I had seen Williams pass the handkerchief to one of the women; I secured the prisoners, took them back to the shop, and gave them in charge; the women ran away.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Has it been found? A. Yes; my brother told the Magistrate that the women went out leisurely, and I said, very quick; I could scarcely take the prisoners; Dark resisted a great deal; he said to the women two or three times, "They are nice stockings, you had better take them;" it was a black handkerchief, with a crimson and white border; my brother did not see him with this, but with the crimson one; I saw Williams touch Dark.

GEORGE COLLIER . I am the prosecutor's brother. I saw the two prisoners and two women come in together - they looked at some black silk stockings, which the females looked at, but none would suit; I saw Williams go down to the further end of the shop, and lay hold of a silk handkerchief, as if to examine it; he came to the back of the shop - I saw him with a crimson one in his hand, which hung up by the black one; when he saw us looking, he dropped the crimson one; he then went behind Dark, and they went out of the shop together; I jumped over the counter, and saw the black handkerchief was gone; I remained in the shop - my brother went out, and brought the prisoners back; Dark said we might search them, for they had not got the handkerchief; the officer produced it on the Monday following.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any suspicion before they left the shop? A. Yes; my brother trod on my foot about five minutes after they came in; I knew what he meant; I looked most at Williams; Dart could reach the handkerchiefs easier, as he is taller, but he was not near where this handkerchief hung; he stood behind the women.

SAMUEL NEAL . I am a constable. Collier fetched me - I took the prisoners, but did not find the handkerchief on either of them; it was given to me on the Monday following, by the maid servant at No. 37, Old Jewry; it is the first private house on the left hand.

Mr. COLLIER. I took the prisoners in the passage of that house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS' Defence. I never touched it.

DARK'S Defence. I knew nothing of this boy taking it - I was talking to the women.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

DARK - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-80

1391. JOHN LUCKHURST and WILLIAM JOHNSON were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Thomas Tyas , ( Mary Tyas , widow, and others, therein being) about seven o'clock on the afternoon of the 29th of August , at St. Giles-without, Cripplegate , and stealing 1 pair of earrings, value 12s., his property .

WILLIAM THOMAS TYAS. I am a watch-maker and jeweller , and live at No. 36, Barbican , in the parish of St. Giles-without, Cripplegate, and rent the house. On Tuesday, the 29th of August, I went out, and on coming home, I found the house surrounded by persons.

JANE TYAS . I am the prosecutor's sister. On the 29th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was sitting at work in the shop - some ear-rings were in the widow for sale - I heard the cracking of glass in the shop-window - I immediately looked up, and saw the prisoner, Johnson, looking through the broken glass as sted fastly at me as he possibly could - the ear-rings were quite close to the window - there is a wire against the window for the card of ear-rings to hang on; the prisoner, Luckhurst, was in conversation with a woman - he was two or three paces from Johnson, but he left the woman, and came on the other side of Johnson, who was only looking through the glass, with his arms quite straight down - a piece of glass was cut out, and fell on the tray of ear-rings; the hole was large enough to admit a man's finger, so as to reach the ear-rings - my little brother was in the parlour; I called to him, and said, I thought that man had cut the glass; he immediately run out - both the prisoners were at the window when he got outside the door; he tapped at the window, and said, "Yes, Jane, it is cut;" upon that, the prisoner, Luckhurst, looked in and went away - he one way, and the woman the other - Johnson remained at the window; I went out and laid hold of him, and told him it was him who had done it; I had missed nothing then, but some of the ear-rings were disturbed - Payne came up, and Johnson seeing him, walked away, and Payne after him - he laid hold of him, and brought him back; I saw the ear-rings in the shop afterwards - they had been only partly got out of the window - I have no share in the business.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. Has your mother any share? A. No. It was quite light.

RICHARD HENRY TYAS . I am fourteen years old. I was in the parlour with my mother - my sister called me out; I had seen the window quite sound shortly before - I ran out, and saw Luckhurst at the window, where it was cut; I saw his fingers inside the pane of glass which had been cut; he had a pair of coral ear-rings between his fingers - he had got them half out, but not quite - he left them lodged in the pane of glass, half in and half out - he went away, and I after him - he went to the corner of Golden-lane, and crossed twice; I lost sight of him for about two minutes, but am quite certain he is the same person - I laid hold of him - he came with me, and said upon his word he was not on that side of the window; I am sure I saw the ear-rings between his fingers; I went for Payne, and my mother went out to Johnson, and he abused her very much, in my hearing when I came back, as she charged him with being concerned - he was at the window when I first went out - I said to my sister, "Yes, it is cut," and Johnson said, "So it is;" Payne took them both into custody; I cannot be mistaken in Luckhurst's person.

Cross-examined. Q. When you went out you saw Luckhurst? A. Yes; his fingers were full half of them inside the window - the ear-rings were between his fingers - he left them half in and half out - I pushed them in - they had laid close to the window - the breaking of the window would nearly have moved them - I saw them between his fingers - he was pulling them, but when he saw me, he went away; the breaking of the window could not have let them out, unless he had taken them out - they were supported by a wire, they would have fallen down flat, but not have gone outside - the bottom of the card was on the wood-work of the window, and the rest on the wire - but when he had them, they were quite off the wire - he walked away - I was soon after him - if he had offered to run, I should have hallooed out - if I had stopped to tell the people, he would have got away; when I took hold of him, I said, "You have cut the window;" he said, "No, upon my word, I was not on that side of the window;" he had got about three houses up Golden-lane, (our house is seven doors from the lane) he came back quietly, but I held him tight - a child, two years old, might have brought him back, he was so frightened; when I went out I saw a woman at the window - Johnson was by the side of the window, Luckhurst and the woman were talking together, and they walked different ways - the woman was near both the prisoners; Johnson was about two panes from Luckhurst, and the woman about one pane from Johnson, when I saw them - I did not see them speak - I saw the woman walk away, as I came out, before I got to the window - I was out in a moment - she was gone before I said the window was cut, but my sister watched them more than I did - Luckhurst saw me coming, and walked away just as I got to the door; when I got to the threshold of the door, I stood at the pane, and saw the ear-rings in his fingers, which were within the glass.

Prisoner JOHNSON to JANE TYAS. Q. You said you laid hold of me when you came out - was it not your mother? A. We both laid hold of him; my mother, seeing Payne coming up, let him go; he walked away, and Payne after him; the woman was next to Johnson; Luckhurst was at the other side of the window, and he was a few paces beyond Johnson.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a street-keeper. I was sent for, and found Luckhurst in custody, in Tyas' shop - I found on him a knife, a tooth-pick, and this piece of wire, turned round as it is now - a piece was broken out of the window; I tried the knife to the putty, and it fitted the marks, as if it had been used to break the glass. Richard Tyas pointed out Johnson, who was running towards Golden-lane; I ran, and brought him back - he said he knew nothing about it - he had only heard the boy say the window was broken; I found nothing on him. The ear

rings were left in the shop; I knew nothing of them till next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any thing particular in the knife? A. No, it is a pen-knife. The wire does not appear to have been used.

JANE TYAS. The ear-rings were marked 17s. 6d.; they cost 12s.

Mr. TYAS. The window was safe when I went out - the ear-rings were supported on wire; if that fell they must have fallen backwards.

LUCKHURST's Defence. I am innocent. I never saw this young man till I was taken.

JOHNSON'S Defence. I was passing the shop, and happened to look in; a woman and two young lads stood there - directly I came to the window the two young lads walked away - this boy came out, and said the window was cut; I looked at it, and said it was cut; they came and took this young man into custody. This girl's mother came and laid hold of me; I said I had nothing to do with it, and the people round said, "Young man - you had better walk on;" Payne came and laid hold of me.

JURY to WILLIAM PAYNE. Q. Was Johnson running? A. Yes - he tried to escape from me; I only live twenty yards from the place; Tyas pointed him out to me - I ran immediately, and stopped him.

JANE TYAS. My mother's name is Mary. The pane of glass which was broken is the one Johnson was looking through; I and my mother seized Johnson, but, on seeing Payne, we let go, and he popped off. When the pane was broken nobody was at the window but the prisoners and a woman; Luckhurst spoke to the woman, then separated from her, and came round.

Six witnesses gave Luckhurst a good character.

LUCKHURST - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury; Luckhurst on the ground of character and ready surrender; and both on account of the slight breaking, and small value of the property.

Reference Number: t18260914-81

NINTH DAY. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1392. JAMES GUDGER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 10s.; and 2 keys, value 1s., the goods of Matthew Wright , in the dwelling-house of James Hiden .

MATTHEW WRIGHT. I am a watchman , and lodge at James Hiden's house, at Chelsea . On the 11th of July I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning - my watch was then in the fob of my trousers, which hung by the bed; I awoke about half-past four o'clock, and it was gone. The prisoner slept in the room - he was a watchman once.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Grosvenor-row. On the 8th of July, in the afternoon, the prisoner pawned this watch - he wanted 1l. on it; I would only advance 17s.; he said he had redeemed it before for 1l.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I apprehended the prisoner that afternoon, and found 5s. on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that the prosecutor had sent him to pledge the watch, to obtain liquor.

MATTHEW WRIGHT. I did not give it him to pawn - I never gave him any thing to pawn.

WILLIAM COATES . I am a button-caster. I was in company with the prisoner and prosecutor at the Royal George, public-house, on the 8th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning - Wright paid for three or four pots of beer; I had heard him say to the prisoner the day before, "Go and fetch my things out of pawn, which you have pawned for me;" and on Saturday he said he had no money, and supposed he must pledge.

MATTHEW WRIGHT. I went over to the public-house that morning to get change, as it was pay-day, but did not stop long. I have given the prisoner a shirt to pawn, but never gave him this watch - he never brought me the money for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-82

1393. WILLIAM JOHNSON , ELIZABETH ALLENDER , and ANN ALLENDER , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Arnold , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 28th of June , at Willsden (no person being therein), and stealing 1 watch, value 40s.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 14s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 18d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 10s., and 1 shawl, value 10s., his property .

MARY ARNOLD . I am the wife of William Arnold - we live in the parish of Willsden. On the 28th of June, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I went out hay-making - I left my room all fast and secure, and nobody in it; I locked the room door with a padlock and another lock - I returned about eight in the evening, and found the door forced open; the staple was drawn; I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth 4l.; the house is let out in tenements - we rent two rooms up stairs. Between four and five o'clock that morning I saw the prisoner Johnson and Elizabeth Allender laying by the side of the road, when I went down for some wood to light my fire; they were about one hundred yards from the house. Ann Allender lodged in the back room of my house, down stairs - before I went out Elizabeth Allender came in, and went out with Ann, who is her mother, and had lived there about two months. Elizabeth did not live with her.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who keeps the house? A. Mr. Wilson, who lives in town - he has no room there; an old lady has the front room below; Elizabeth Allender and Johnson cohabited as man and wife; I heard the mother say they were going to be married. Ann had a key of the street door, to let herself in and out; the robbery was committed between six o'clock in the morning and eight at night; my husband went out before me; he had no key - I had it in my pocket. The property was all safe in my room when I went out.

COURT. Q. How many rooms are there? A. Four - we occupy the two up stairs; Ann Allender had the back room ground floor, and lived there with a man - another person

has the front room; it was my room door that was broken open, not the street door.

WILLIAM TRAILL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Edgware-road, about a mile from Willsden. I have a gown, a shawl, a shirt, and a handkerchief, pawned on the 28th of June, between ten and twelve o'clock in the morning, in the name of E. Smithers, Somer's-town; I believe Elizabeth Allender to be the person who pawned them.

Cross-examined. Q. You only believe she pawned them? A. It is the firm impression of my mind, that she did - I will not positively swear it.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Junction-terrace, Edgware-road. On the 28th of June the prisoner, Johnson, pawned a silver watch, the maker's name Collet, for 1l. On the following Monday he brought two men, and sold them the duplicate - they redeemed it.

Cross-examined. Q. You have not seen it since? A. No. Johnson came again in the afternoon, to pawn a waistcoat and a pair of shoes, but he behaved so rude I would not take them in. I have seen Collet's name on other watches.

COURT. Q. Was there a seal to it? A. It had a steel chain, a gilt key, and a small silver coin, such as a 3d. or 4d. piece to it - that is not an uncommon thing.

JAMES PAYNE . I am a constable. I apprehended Ann Allender on the 29th of June, at Paddington, with a gown and handkerchief, which she said she was going to pawn for a woman; the prosecutrix said it was not her's. I took her to the office; she was discharged, with orders for me to take her again if the other parties were found. I had seen the three prisoners in company together on Wednesday, the 28th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, at the Green Man, public-house, Alsden-green, Willsden, and a little after nine o'clock that morning I was on a coach coming to town, and saw them all three together in the Harrow-road, coming towards town, about two miles and a half from the prosecutrix. I am certain of them - Elizabeth Allender was behind the other two.

Cross-examined. Q. You only saw them as you passed? A. No - I knew she lived in the same house as Arnold. Ann gave her name at the office as Allender.

JOHN BYIAS . I am a patrol of Paddington. In consequence of information, on the 29th of June, I went in search of the prisoners, and, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I found Johnson and Elizabeth Allender at the Running Horse public-house, Harrow-road; Mrs. Arnold was there watching them, and gave them in charge; I told Johnson he must go with me - he asked what for; I said on suspicion of house-breaking; he said"I'll see you b-gg-d first;" I collared him, and, after allowing him a pint of beer, took him to the watch-house - I found 11s. 8 1/2d. on him, and 4 1/2d. on the woman.

SOPHIA HOARE . I lived at Willsden, in the next house to Arnold, where this happened. On the 28th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I came down for my milk, and went to Mrs. Lee's room, which is the front room on the ground floor of Arnold's house; Elizabeth Allender came in there with some fea; Johnson came in his shirt sleeves, and without his shoes, outside the house, and looked round the corner of a brick wall into Lee's room; he then went into Ann Allender's room; I saw no more, but I heard her singing in her mother's room, and dancing a child about; next morning, the 29th, I saw that Arnold's door had been forced open, and went with her and the constable to take Ann; she was afterwards liberated, and, on our way from the office, we found the bundle of clothes at Traill's, and, on going home, I met Ann Allender at the Red Lion public-house, Harrow-road; she said, "You and Mrs. Arnold had me locked up to day, and I had not so much as half a pint of water, but now I have got half a pint of beer;" I said, "You deserved to be locked up, for you knew of the robbery; I have found the things at Traill's;" she laughed, and said,"Ah, and you think to find the watch, don't you?" I said I hoped so; she laughed, and said "Oh, but you won't."

SOPHIA RICHARDSON . My husband works for Mr. Staple, of Paddington. I live next door to the Paddington watch-house; the watch-house keeper's wife was very poorly on the 29th of June, and I went to help her wash; I went to take in her clothes, which hung directly over the lock-up place! I had seen Johnson and Elizabeth Allender put in there that afternoon, and when I was taking in the clothes, I heard them talking, but could not see them nor they me; I was on the leads - I heard the man say to the woman, "We are done at last - I am a dead man; for the pawnbroker will do me;" the woman answered,"Yes, and if they find out where the gown and shawl is, I am a dead woman;" she said, "Never mind, we shall both go together, and, I hope, we shall meet together again;" she said "If we could let mother know, it would be all right enough," but she could not; he then said, "I put a shirt down the necessary;" she said he was to blame, but said "Never mind, it won't do us any harm."

Cross-examined. Q. Is the watch-house-keeper's wife here? A. No; she is not well - she has been here two or three days, but was not examined at the office, and thought she would not be wanted - the leads are directly over the lock-up place - they were separate from each other, and were looking through a trap door talking; they were talking when I went out there - when I heard them talking I listened - my husband has been a watchman - he has 14s. a week, and I have a mangle - I never heard of the parish giving a reward on conviction of house-breakers - I should not have come here if I was not obliged; they were in different cells opposite each other.

JAMES PAYNE . There is no reward given on conviction of house-breakers.

SAMUEL SIVITER . I am deputy watch-house keeper, at Paddington. Johnson and Elizabeth Allender were in custody on the 29th of June; I heard them talking together, but took no notice of it - on the 30th, between four and five o'clock in the morning, Johnson said to me, "Do you think I shall be hung;" I said I did not know - he called me again in a few minutes, and said "I don't think they can hang me; for I did not strike any one;" I left him again, and immediately after he called me again - I said"What do you want" - he said "I should like to have your opinion what I shall be done to;" I said "What have you done?" he said, "I have struck nobody, only prised a door open;" I said "Was the door locked" - he said he did not know - I said "The things are all found out

at the pawnbrokers - the watch, handkerchief, shawls, and different things; he said it was done, and could not be undone - I said he was to blame for pawning things so near hand, for they were sure to be found, and said "Why did you not go on the other side of town, and pawn them"- I left him - he called me again several times, at last I told him I was always a prisoner's friend, so much as to tell him I did not wish to have conversation with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they locked in separate cells? A. Yes - with a passage between - about six feet a part - their voices would be heard on the leads, as the passage between the cells is open at the top, and they speak through trap doors - about nine inches by eight.

MARY ARNOLD. All these things are mine - my husband's watch was silver, and had a steel chain with a 3d. piece to it, and the maker's name was Collet.

JOHNSON'S Defence. Every thing said against me is false.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

E. ALLENDER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

A. ALLENDER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 50.

Reference Number: t18260914-83

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1394. RICHARD STEVENS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Matthew Finch , on the King's highway, on the 26th of June , at Christ-church , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 1l.; 3 yards of crape, value 1s.; 1 walking stick, value 2s.; 1 half-sovereign, 8 shillings, and 1 sixpence, his property .

MATTHEW FINCH. I live on my property, in Chapman-street, Cannon-street-road, St. George's East. On Monday, the 26th of June, after eleven o'clock at night, on my way home with my wife, on coming through Brick-lane, at the corner of Hare-street and Brick-lane , six or seven young men surrounded us - we were very much alarmed; they went away from me, and I walked on up Brick-lane, - they followed us; I turned round several times, and then some of them went on the opposite side of the way - most of them had sticks - two of them had sticks tucked up their backs - I could see the end of them; I then became a little alarmed - they followed us to Truman and Co's. brewery, and then knocked me down, and knocked my wife down also, by the side of me; one of them got down on his knee, rather in the kennel - rather across me - and another knelt down on my right hand; my wife hallooed Murder! I bled most dreadfully on the head - I have the marks now, and shall as long as I live - there was several hands at one time in my pocket; they took out half a sovereign, and 8s. 6d. - I know I had eight or nine shillings in my pocket; I was knocked down with sticks - I received several blows - I think the second blow I had on the back of my head, knocked me down; the blow I have on my forehead, which was cut open, is the last blow that was given, and they left me; directly after the rattles began to spring - several blows were struck after I was knocked down - I lost a stick, and a new hat, that might have fallen off as I fell; the one, who I believe to be the prisoner, was the one down on his knee, and as I laid on my back, I struck him several blows in the face, with the head of my stick - it had a silver head, larger than half a crown - I struck him with all the force I could, and when they wrenched the stick out of my hand, I hit him several times - he was kneeling on one knee in the kennel - there were six or seven round me; I had not so much sight of the prisoner as I had of one who I can positively swear to, and who is here for trial, and it was him who almost caused Mrs. Finch's death - I do not recollect the man, I suppose to be the prisoner having a stick; I went to Spitalfields watch-house, and gave information, and I sent for a doctor, who dressed my wounds; I went to Worship-street on the Wednesday following, and saw the prisoner; he had several cuts in his face, on the side where I thought I struck him with my stick - he wore white stockings when he knelt down; a pair of white stockings were produced before the Magistrate - I have no doubt of his being the person who was on his knee; he knelt towards the curb, and in the kennel, or near it - there was dirt in the kennel, for I was all over dirt, both my trousers and coat; it was a fine light night, and there is a gas-light directly opposite.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. You reason about his being the man from circumstances, not from a recollection of his person? A. I have some recollection of his face, but not so as positively to swear to it; I had a sight of him while he was on his knee - if he had no marks on his face, I should say as I do now; I have some slight recollection, but do not positively swear to him; the marks on his face, certainly made a strong impression on my mind - I was most dreadfully ill-used - I received several blows after I was down - and struck the person who I take to be the prisoner, myself - he did not strike me; it might be a quarter of an hour, twenty minutes, or half-past eleven o'clock - it struck eleven when I passed Shoreditch-church; the brewhouse may be half a mile from there; it was a clear night - there was a gas-light opposite, and one on each side, right and left, fifteen paces off; they all had their hats on.

CHARLOTTE FINCH . On the 26th of June, I and my husband were coming home, after eleven o'clock - several men came about us in Brick-lane - we were both knocked down; I saw two or three of them over my husband, but was much terrified - there was one man beating me all the time; I have reason to think the prisoner is one of them who was across my husband, with the white stockings on, but I do not positively say so, but there is one man I certainly recollect very well.

Cross-examined. Q. Your attention was of course directed to the persons who were treating you in this brutal way? A. Yes; I was cut in a dreadful way.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am inspector of the watch. In consequence of information, on Monday night, the 26th of June, Barrs and I went up Brick-lane, as far as Hare-street. about twelve o'clock, and saw the prisoner sitting on a step at the end of Hare-street, with a young woman; he had been down on both knees, and his stockings were very dirty, and he had a blow or more on his face; the skin appeared grazed but did not bleed - it was red, as if fresh done; a young man, named Beedom, came up to him, and they spoke together; we took them both to the watch-house - Mr. and Mrs. Finch were not there, and not knowing where to find them, we let them go that night, upon their giving their address, and about twelve o'clock next day, Mr. Finch came to the watch-house; I asked him to describe the persons, and from his description we apprehended the prisoner that day; I

I and Hart took a pair of white stockings out of a pail of water; he owned them to be his; I believe them to be the same as he had on the night before - for one was a good deal more dirty than the other, from the knee downward.

Cross-examined. Q. It was a little after twelve o'clock, probably, when you found him in Hare-street? A. About a quarter-past twelve o'clock; I found the name and address he gave me correct; I should think this brewhouse is full a mile from Shoreditch church; Hare-street is near a quarter of a mile from the brew-house.

JOHN BARRS . I was with ALMOND. The prisoner's left leg stocking was much dirtier than the right; he said he would go any where with us, and gave his name and address correct.

THOMAS HART . I was with Almond on Tuesday, when he took the prisoner; I found a pair of white stockings in a pail of water - one was much dirtier than the other; when I took them to the watch-house he said, immediately, that they were his; his stockings were very muddy the night he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I have witnesses to prove my innocence.

JAMES BURMAN . I am a weaver, and live at No. 45, Brick-lane. On the 26th of June I was at the Three Sugar Loaves public-house, St. John-street, Brick-lane; my two brothers, Stevens, and Fox were also with me; I saw Willett there - I went there about half-past nine o'clock the - prisoner and Fox were then there, and about an hour after Stevens and Fox quarrelled - they continued there till about five minutes beyond half-past eleven o'clock - the landlord then turned us out; Fox had struck the prisoner just before eleven o'clock, as they sat there; the prisoner wanted to fight Fox - the landlord said he would have no fighting there; Fox went out first, and when Stevens, my brothers, and I went out, Fox began wrangling with the prisoner again, and struck him, and they fought for about a quarter of an hour; Fox got the best of it, and both fell down; in one round particularly, Fox threw himself down, and threw Stevens over his head, which occasioned his face to be grazed as it caught the stones; I and my brother persuaded Stevens to leave off, and they put on their coats: we stood talking round the Sugar Loaves for about five minutes; I then told my brothers, as they were not going my way, I should go home; I left Stevens there, and as I passed Truman's brewery, on my way home, I saw a number of watchmen, and some persons round the Black Eagle tap, and saw a great cake of blood on the pavement, nearly as large as the crown of my hat - the prisoner was very ill at this time, and had been bad some time - he is a looking-glass frame-maker.

COURT. Q. What had you to drink that evening? A. Part of two pots of beer between me and my two brothers; I believe we paid for it among ourselves - we all joined - my share was 3 1/2d. or 4d. - we paid for it altogether when we went away - we collected the money among ourselves; we drank with Stevens, and he drank with us- we had nothing to eat; nobody was in our company but those I have mentioned - there were several others in the room.

WILLIAM JOHN BURMAN . I live in Anchor-street, Shoreditch, and am a weaver. On the 26th of July I went into the Sugar-loaves, about half-past nine o'clock - my brothers were there; also Willett, Fox, and the prisoner; we staid there till half-past eleven o'clock; Fox and the prisoner quarrelled - we went out with the prisoner - he and Fox quarrelled outside sometime, and, I suppose, they fought for half an hour; Fox then threw Stevens on his face, which grazed it; the road was very dirty; I stood talking with Stevens for ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour after the fight; he then went away; I remained there; both he and Fox were in liquor; he had complained of being till before.

COURT. Q. How much did you drink? A. I think two pots; we paid for it among ourselves as we went away; we drank nothing but porter.

SAMUEL BURMAN . I live in St. John-street, and am a weaver. On the 26th of June I got to the Sugar-loaves, between nine and ten o'clock, with my brothers; the prisoner, Fox, and Willett were there; we remained there till half-past eleven, when the house closed; Fox and the prisoner were wrangling in the house; and when we got out, they fought till near twelve; Stevens got the worst of it, for he got his face grazed by the stones; it was a dirty night - they fell six or seven times; I strove to hinder their fighting, as Stevens was ill; I staid some minutes talking, and got home about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock.

COURT. Q. What had you to drink that night? A. Part of two pots of beer, and some gin and peppermint - Fox paid for that; I and my brothers paid for the porter; we paid for each pot as we had it; as it came in - not when we left.

JAMES WILLETT . I live in St. John-street, and am a weaver. I was at the Sugar-loaves on the 26th of June; I saw the prisoner and Fox there - Fox and the prisoner were wrangling about half a pint of gin and peppermint; I left before the house closed.

JAMES BROWN . I keep the Sugar-loaves. On the 26th of June the witnesses were at my house - Fox and the prisoner quarrelled - I cleared the house at half-past eleven o'clock - the prisoner was there then - I afterwards heard a noise, threw up my bed room window, and saw people fighting - this was about twenty minutes before twelve - the noise continued after I got into bed.

COURT. Q. What makes you remember the 26th of June? A. I heard of the prisoner being apprehended the next day - since he has been apprenheded I have taken the trouble to walk to the spot, where the robbery was committed - it took me twenty minutes; I could not see distinctly who was fighting, but I knew their voices.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-84

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1395. JAMES BOYCE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Matthew Finch , on the King's highway, on the 26th of June , at Christ-church , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 1l.; 1 half-sovereign, 8 shillings, and 1 sixpence, his property .

MATTHEW FINCH. I live in Chapman-street, Cannon-street-road. On the 26th of June I and my wife were going home, up Brick-lane , about half-past eleven o'clock, as near as I can say; I was at the end of Hare-street,

and was surrounded by six or seven men, some of them had sticks - they followed us; I turned round several times - they went across the road, on the other side, every time I turned round to look at them - they followed me up to Truman and Hanbury's brew-house, and there knocked me down - they gave me several blows on my head, and robbed me of a half-sovereign, eight shillings, a sixpence, my hat, and a walking stick; I saw the prisoner several times, with a stick in his hand - he followed me up closer than any of the rest - every time I turned round I saw him - I think he is the man who gave me the first blow - I am quite confident he is the man who gave me the last blow, after the rest had all ran away, and the rattles began to spring - the rattles sprang very much, and they immediately ran off; the prisoner had a very large walking stick; I was very much hurt - terribly cut; he gave me this blow on my forehead, which I shall never lose - my forehead was all cut open, and I had several blows on the back of my head; I was completely covered with blood, and in a dreadful state; I was on my back when my money was taken - there was one man down with his knee on the ground, and another by my side - both had their hands in my pocket; there were several hands in my pocket; I struck one of them several blows in his face with my stick; that was not the prisoner; my wife was knocked down at the same time as I was; she got up before I did, and by my striking the one in his face, they immediately wrenched the stick out of my hand; the rattles sprang - I rose up - the prisoner gave me the last blow, and away he ran; my money was in my left hand waistcoat pocket; I saw the prisoner standing up after I rose up, and he gave me the last blow - I called Murder! a number of times; it was a very fine night; there was a gas lamp directly opposite me; one fifteen paces on the left, and another fifteen paces on my right; there were six or seven surrounded me; I think seven; I think I shall be able to swear to one more as well as to the prisoner; I did not lose my watch; it was at the bottom of my fob; I had put the seals into my pocket when I first saw them; they unbuttoned my trousers, but the rattles began to spring, or in half a minute they would have had my watch; they were tearing my small clothes open; I was a good deal alarmed, but not so much as one might suppose, for they had followed me a distance, and I had turned round and faced them several times; I never lost my senses.

Q. Were you in a situation to be certain that you are accurate in recollecting the prisoner? A. I certainly am - before I was knocked down, and when I arose I noticed him particularly - he is the man who gave me the last blow; I gave information immediately I got to the watch-house - I saw Barrs, Almond, and the beadle; I described the persons to them, and, among others, described the prisoner; I said one was a tall one, who I could swear to - I did not see him afterwards, till last Thursday, when he was at Worship-street - he was not in custody when I preferred my bill against Stevens.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. What do you suppose to be the distance between where you first saw the croud of men, and where you were robbed? A. I do not think I was ever up Brick-lane before, but I have heard it stated as three hundred yards; I looked repeatedly about me - I turned round and faced them several times - I noticed other persons besides the prisoner - I think I should be able to swear positively to one more, who was with the prisoner, and had a large stick in his hand, the same as him; I do not think I could swear positively to more than one besides the prisoner - there were six or seven of them.

Q. Where did the person stand who struck you with the stick? A. On the left hand - they kept two together, two behind me, two in the middle, and two on the opposite side - I heard a low whistle, and then they came up; I had not so good an opportunity of observing the face of the man on his knee as I had of the prisoner - I was on my back, and rose up - that man's face was partly over me, but down at my pockets - the other man, who I should know, is the one who laid down on my right side, and who walked with the prisoner behind me - the one, I suppose to be Stevens, was more in the center - the man on my left was standing - that was the prisoner; and he beat Mrs. Finch; Stevens was down on his knee; they were all young men, and most had sticks; I had sense enough to know them; I was not stunned at all.

CHARLOTTE FINCH . I was with my husband on this night - he was knocked down by some men who followed us; there were six or seven, as near as I can tell; I was knocked down at the same time, and very much cut in the head and about the arms. I have a wound in my head now, which is not quite well. I have every reason to think it took away my senses for a moment, for I cannot say who knocked me down; they followed us from Hare-street to the brewery, and I frequently saw their faces while they were following us; they went backwards and forwards about us several times; the prisoner was one - I think he came round us, and stood nearly opposite us, at the time we were standing at the corner of Hare-street, for my husband was rather alarmed then; I have more recollection of him than of any one, for I saw him striking me; he was beating me when I got up - he struck me several blows on my arm when I got up; I did not see who struck my husband. When I got up the prisoner stood at stick's length from me, and gave me two or three blows - my husband at that time was on the ground, and men holding him. I am positive the prisoner is the man who beat me - I have no doubt whatever of him; I am sure he was one of the party. I looked round at them while they were following us, and have no hesitation in saying so.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you almost positive he is the man who struck you? A. I am quite positive; I had a better opportunity of seeing him than any other; I had hold of my husband's arm till he was knocked down. I let go of his arm when they came up, for several took him by the shoulders - he was knocked down before me; I cannot say who knocked him down.

THOMAS GOODING . I am a conductor of the Bow-street patrol. I received information that Boyce was wanted - I and Dickinson apprehended him in Brick-lane, Bethnal-green, last Wednesday week, about a quarter past nine o'clock at night; the prosecutor saw him next day. Truman's brew-house is in Middlesex.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. When did you receive the information? A. On the 13th, the day I took him; I did not know he was wanted before that day, not

for the robbery I took him for - I had met him an hour before I received the information. I know his mother's, but do not know whether he lived with her at the time.

Q. You have had no dispute with him? A. Some time ago I had.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am an officer, and was with Gooding on the 13th, when he apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - a previous arraignment, I trust, will not operate against me on this occasion, so far as to induce even a suspicion that I am in the most remote degree guilty in this case, than in the former; however, I feel that anxiety which every unfortunate individual, awfully situated as I am, ought to feel - that is, to exculpate myself, and procure a vindication of my character from a public tribunal of my country, to set at rest the public charge brought against me, placing me in the utmost jeopardy of my life, and at the same time involving my unhappy family in one continued state of disgrace. At the time specified in the indictment I was at the Ship, public-house, in Brick-lane, Spital-fields, and had been there, without removing, the whole of the evening, till the time of my departure to go home, which I did, and immediately went to bed at my mother's house, where I lodge, and whose residence is only the second door from the Ship; and from that period till last Wednesday, although I have been as regularly engaged at following my occupation as a silk weaver, and as easy of access at home, I never heard that even my name was in question, being perfectly conscious that I had not committed any offence against the laws of my country; it will, therefore, be readily conceived how I felt when a second charge of so serious a description was advanced against me, when before the Magistrate, with no other foundation than supposition, originating from the idea of the officer, that I had been one of the party - whereas, I was totally unacquainted that ever an offence of such a description had been committed, until it was thus laid to my charge; therefore, I rely, with full confidence, on that dispassionate view of my case, which it requires in my present situation, and justice demands; thus I submit myself to whatever decision the sacred tribunal before whom I now stand may come to.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25. See page 546.

Reference Number: t18260914-85

1396. JOHN GEORGE LEACH was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Brooks , with a certain sharp instrument, and stabbing him in his left arm, with intent to kill and murder, or do him some grievous bodily harm .

JAMES BROOKS. I am shopman to Mr. Careless, at his shop in Gilbert's-passage, Clare-market . On the 27th of June , about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop and inquired for me; I was standing outside; Kirby pointed me out; he called me in, and asked if I knew him; I said No; for I had never seen him before; he told me his name, and asked if I was willing to pay 100l. more for the maintenance of the child I had by Miss Murray, now his wife; I said I should pay no more, for I had already paid 50l., and had a bond of indemnity; he, at that time, had his hand under his coat-tail, and said something which I cannot recollect; he stepped back about two yards, I stood then with my back against the counter - he used some abusive language; I desired him to leave the shop; he, in an instant, made a rush at me; be aimed a blow at my breast with his right hand (he has but one arm) - I parried it with my left hand, and threw him out of the shop, and, I believe, struck him - I did not see any thing in his hand, nor did I know I had been stabbed till he was gone.

Q. When you parried the blow, did you strike his hand or arm? - A. No; I did not: the blow be struck me hit me in the left arm; I felt the arm bone stunned four or five minutes after he was gone; I went into the shop and found the blood began to run profusely, and went to a surgeon, as I found he had stabbed me in my left wrist through my shirt and coat - I had stopped his blow with my left arm - he made a blow at me, and came in contact with my left arm.

Q. Look at your deposition, and see if you say there that the blow reached you? - A. I was not asked - there certainly must be an error here - I told the Magistrate I had been stabbed - he aimed the blow at my breast - he made a straight forward rush, and I put up my arm - I was about three weeks getting well - it bled more after the first dressing - I did not discover it for four or five minutes after he was gone - it had then bled scarcely any - I discovered it first by the blood.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Was not your deposition read over to you before you signed it? - A. I believe it was, but I did not pay particular attention to it - I did not tell him he might go and be d-d, or that I would kick him out of the shop - immediately on receiving this thrust, I took him with my right hand and threw him out of the shop, and believe I struck him in the shop - he did not run into a butcher's shop for protection - I never said I would him kill or any thing of the sort; he went away within five minutes of my recovering the blow - I believed I told some of the neighbours I was stabbed - I do not know where I held him, when I put him out of the shop - I have not seen Mrs. Leach since I was at Bow-street - I do not know where she is.

THOMAS KIRBY . I am shopman to Mr. Careless. The prisoner came into the shop and asked for Brooks - I pointed to him outside the shop - he called him in, and asked if he recollected seducing a person named Murray - Brooks asked if he was the person who had married her - he said Yes; and asked if he had 100l. to pay down for the child; Brooks said he had paid 50l. and had nothing further to do with it - they had some conversation, and, I believe, the prisoner abused him - he afterwards made a rush at him to hit him, as I thought - he aimed at his breast - Brooks warded it off with his left arm, and they came in contact with each other - they closed together - Brooks put him out of the shop - after he was gone I saw Brooks' arm bleeding - I had seen nothing in the prisoner's hand.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? - A. Behind the counter; I had a perfect view of the prisoner; I did not hear all that was said.

EDWARD WEAVER . I am a surgeon, and live in Blackmore-street. On the 27th of June, about eight o'clock, I dressed Brooks' wound (my young man had dressed it before); the wound was near the left wrist, and not three quarters of an each long; it was a clean incision and must have been done with a sharp instrument; a small artery

was divided, which bled, and that caused me to dress it a second time; I told him to keep it quiet a few days or inflammation might come on; it was not a dangerous wound.

Cross-examined. Q. If an artery be divided would an effusion take place? - A. Immediately; in a clean incised wound it would bleed instantly.

COURT. Q. From what you saw of the wound do you think the effusion could be delayed a few minutes? - A. No; it would take place immediately; it would spout out directly, and must be perceived directly, and cannot account for his not discovering it for four or five minutes.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of June - I told him I had a warrant; he said he hoped it was his death warrant; there was an altercation between him, his wife, and her sister, in the street; when I took him, I said I took him for assaulting and maiming Brooks; he said, "Oh, ah! Brooks, I know, and I hope I have done enough for them to take my life, or I will take it away myself;" I asked what he had done with the instrument he had done it with - he said,"If I have done it, it must have been with a pallet-knife, but I did not know I had done it;" he said the pallet-knife was in his basket, which he had left in St. John-street, Smithfield, but he could not tell the number, or the peoples' names, but it was on the left-hand going from Smithfield, and he left it there last night; I went to the top of St. John-street, and found a basket with a pallet knife, and two others; he is a writer, and would use them in his business.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you think he was joking when you took him? A. No. I do not know where his wife lives.

GEORGE GREEN . I know the prisoner - he came into my shop four or five months ago, and asked me where Brooks was; I said I did not know - he said I did - we had a few words - he got into a passion, and placing his hand on his breast, said, "I have been and purchased an instrument, and intend to put an end to the existence of Brooks, and also my wife and child - I will leave you alone for the present;" he did not shew me any instrument.

Q. Had you known him any time? A. Yes; by his living at a cheesemonger's where I dealt; I had some business to transact about a child; he did not say people had been saying this, but said he should do it; I was not alarmed about it at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-86

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1397. WILLIAM STEWART was indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-87

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1398. HANNAH GORMAN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JAMES FORD . I am a waiter at the Bull's Head, public-house, Smithfield . On the 2d of September the prisoner came and asked me to give her a shilling for a sixpence and 6d. in copper, and she wanted half a pint of beer - she threw down a sixpence, and 6d. in halfpence, and a farthing; I gave her a good shilling, and asked her for a 1d. more for the beer - she said she had no more money about her - I took back the beer - she then wanted her sixpence and 6d. in halfpence back - I said she should if she returned me the shilling; she said I had not given it to her, and she had not got one about her - but as she spoke, I saw a shilling in her mouth. I said, "You have one in your mouth - perhaps, that is it;" she threw it on the counter, I took it up, and said it was bad, and returned it to her; an officer was fetched - I am sure I gave her a good shilling.

THOMAS PENNY . I was fetched to take the prisoner in charge, between three and four o'clock; in her right-hand I found this bad shilling, and in her pocket a good shilling, and about 3d.; she said she did not know the shilling was bad - she had just taken it in change for a half a crown - she was allowed to go away, and about six o'clock I found her in custody again - I kept the bad shilling.

CHRISTOPHER CLARKSON . On the 2d of September I was servant to Mr. Elliott, who had a stall in Bartholomew-fair; and between five and six o'clock that afternoon, the prisoner came and asked for half a pound of nuts; I handed them to her, and was to receive 4d.; she gave me a shilling, which I immediately said was bad, and kept it; she said she would return shortly, and pay for the nuts - she went away with them, and crossed the road, and there spoke to a man dressed in a fustian coat - she then went to another stall, and tendered another shilling for nuts - I told the man it was bad, and he sent her away - she abused me, and I gave her in charge; I produce the shilling she gave me.

ROBERT WAINWRIGHT . I took her in charge, and found 5d. in copper on her.

JAMES FIELD . I am inspector of the Mint - both these shillings produced are counterfeits, and from the same die.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties .

Reference Number: t18260914-88

1399. THOMAS JONES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ABRAHAM SAMUEL ROMAINE . I am a confectioner. On Friday morning, the 1st of September , I saw the prisoner come out of a house in Cobb's-yard, Petticoat-lane , which I knew to be a house of resort for dealers in bad money - a female followed him; I followed them into Widegate-alley, and Bishopsgate-street - he first went towards Shoreditch, but seeing me close to him, turned into Bishopsgate-street again, and tried to escape - I said, "You shan't go;" I caught hold of him, and said, in his hearing, "I suspect this man has got bad money about him;" he was secured by two officers; one of whom I knew by sight - I saw him searched, and money taken out of his pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not communicated with the solicitor for the Mint? A. Not respecting you at all, nor with the officers; I have been in gaol for not paying some duties to the Crown, and I was twelve or thirteen months in Giltspur-street, sent from this bar. I never lived in Hill-street or Paul-street, nor kept a brothel there, nor in that neighbourhood.

Q. Did you not receive money from a widow, under pretence of defending her son here; and he went without

his defence? A. Never a shilling. I have been a coach-master; I have worked as a confectioner last week; I do not expect a farthing for giving this information - I have done it for the good of the public. I work for different shopkeepers.

JOSEPH NEWSAM . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 1st of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was in Bishopsgate-street, and saw Romaine holding the prisoner by the collar - he said he suspected he had bad money about him; Payne came up, and we took him into the Black Raven, public-house, and in his right-hand breeches pocket I found a paper, containing forty counterfeit sixpences, and in his other pocket 5s. 6d. loose - I found a good sixpence, and about 6d. in copper on him; Payne picked up 3s. 6d., which I saw drop from his hand behind him.

JURY. Q. How far was Romaine from him when the 3s. 6d. fell? A. About a yard in front of him - I saw it drop from the prisoner's hand.

Prisoner. Q. Did you know Romaine? A. Yes, by seeing him about the office; I do not think I had seen him for two months before; I do not know how he gets his living - I never knew him as a common informer.

JOSEPH PAYRE. I am a patrol of Bow-street. I saw Romaine collaring the prisoner; we took him to the Black Raven; I saw the 3s. 6d. drop from him, and took it up; nobody but him could have dropped it.

Prisoner. Q. How came you there at that moment? A. It was quite accidental. I had had no communication with Newsam.

MR. FIELD. These forty sixpences are all counterfeit; the 3s. 6d. is three counterfeit shillings and a bad sixpence - the five shillings are counterfeit; the sixpences are all from one die.

The prisoner, entered into a long Defence, stating that Romaine kept several bad houses, and that he had been entrapped through his villainy; that he was continually laying bad money in the way of the unwary, for them to pick up, and that he had been convicted of getting 30l. from persons to get a bill thrown out by the Grand Jury.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-89

TENTH DAY. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1400. STEPHEN LEAKE , JAMES LEAKE , and JOSEPH GOULD were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Hobley , on the King's highway, on the 13th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 tea tray, value 2s. 6d., his property .

THOMAS HOBLEY. I live in Great Guildford-street, Southwark. On the 13th of September, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was returning from Brentford-fair - I was quite sober; I had been selling pastry at the fair , on this tea-try, and when I got between the fifth and sixth mile-stones the prisoners, who were all strangers, passed - it was a moon-light night; I am certain of them all: the tray was on my head - Stephen Leake tilted it, and it would have fallen, but I caught it in my hand, and placed it on my head again, saying, "What did you do that for?" he made no reply, but knocked it off my head - I picked it up, turned round, and he put himself in a fighting posture: I said, "If you strike me I will chop you down with the tray;" Wilson came to my assistance, and a contest commenced between him and Stephen Leake- he got the better of Wilson, and knocked him down, after repeated blows; I had in the mean time got the tray - he came up, and knocked me down; I got up, and received another severe blow, and endeavoured to protect myself as well as I could; I was knocked down again by Stephen, and when on the ground I was beat by three or four persons; I can swear to both the Leakes, but am not certain that Gould beat me, but he was one of the party; being by the tray, I was in the act of raising and taking it in my hand, one of them said, "Don't let the b-g-r have it;" James Leake gave me a blow, and I again fell and the tray was forced from me - after receiving repeated blows I escaped from them, leaving them in a contest with other people. I was going on to Turnham-green, for assistance, and when I got a little way I heard a cry of Murder! I saw the prisoners and another coming towards Turnham-green - I got assistance, and they were secured; I have no doubt whatever of them. I have not found the tray.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long had you been at the fair? A. From about noon; I was quite sober; it was not a general fight; I did not strike till I was knocked down - I believe my friends were looking on - one of them was in contact with Gould - we were not all fighting together; I saw Gould with his nose broken - I wished to put up with the insult and go home.

THOMAS WILSON . I am a baker, and live in Fann-court, Miles'-lane. I went to the fair about three o'clock, and was selling cakes; I was quite sober; I was returning but did not see the first of this; I saw the tray knocked off Hobley's head; Freeland, who was with him, callled out "Wilson, come up, we are attacked;" I went up - Stephen Leake immediately struck me, and I struck him in my own defence; we had a great scuffle, and I fell to the ground - they left me on the ground - I did not see what became of the tray; I am certain the prisoners were all of the party.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not a general fight? A. No: I fought in my own defence; the prisoners appeared in liquor. I believe I took off my coat, and had about three rounds; I believe there were six in the party - they came back and beat me a second time; I flew to a waggon for protection, and in about three-quarters of an hour, saw them in the watch-house. I lost 11s. but that might have fallen from me.

ANTHONY MAJOR . I am a baker, and live in East-lane, Walworth. I was returning from selling my goods at the fair - Wilson and I were behind with Hobley; the tray was knocked off his head - Wilson went up to help him; Stephen Leake fell on Hobley, and I cannot say what was done, for two lads were jawing me all the time; I saw both the Leakes attacking Hobley, but am not certain about Gould; I was terrified, and was returning to Brentford for safety, when these three men rushed out upon me, knocked me down, and tore the tail off my jacket; I am certain Gould attacked me then; this was a quarter of an

hour after Hobley was attacked; they afterwards tore my trousers off.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you go from the path into the road to fight? A. No - we were in the road; the prisoners' coats were not off; I saw nobody come up to separate them - one of the prisoners had a black eye and broken nose; I met Wilson returning with two tilted waggons, and I returned with him; I did not see the first of it - I saw no woman there.

HENRY FREELAND . I am a pastry-cook , and was returning from the fair; I saw Stephen Leake hit the teatray, which was on Hobley's head; Hobley turned round, and said "What's that for?" he said he would do it again, and directly knocked it off to the ground; Hobley picked it up, turned round, and Stephen Leake put himself in a fighting attitude; Hobley said if he hit him he would cut him down with the tray; Wilson came up and Stephen Leake fought with him, and Hobley was knocked down again.

Cross-examined. Q. What were you doing? A. Looking on; I was knocked down, and my cap taken - I saw no woman there, nor any body try to separate them; I heard murder called - I suppose it was Wilson - it was not a general fight.

BENJAMIN HUMPHRIES . I am a pastry-cook. I had been to the fair; we were all coming home together; Hobley was a stranger to me; the prisoner, Leake, knocked the tray off his head; he caught it as it fell, and put it on his head again; he knocked it off again with violence; Hobley picked it up, and Leake put himself in a fighting attitude; Wilson came to assist Hobley; two or more fell on him - I went to assist Wilson, and Gould struck me several times; three or four of them were on me all at once; Gould knocked me down three or four times; after getting away, I went to lift Wilson up; Stephen Leake then struck me, and said, "This is the b-gg-r in the black coat;" the confusion was very great; I saw Stephen Leake take away the tray, but what became of it afterwards I do not know - I did not see the end of it; I went towards London; the same party attacked me again, and knocked me down; Freeland came up, and asked if they were going to murder me; I got up, and escaped over a hedge there were more than three engaged in it; one boy had two large stones, and threatened to knock my brains out; I swear the three prisoners were active in attacking Hobley.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were engaged in the scuffle? A. There appeared seven or eight at first, but afterwards a good many more; there were seven of us; I heard nobody try to part them - none of the prisoners called Murder! we only defended ourselves; I laid behind a hedge till they had gone away, I was so alarmed.

JAMES LEAKE'S Defence. When I heard a call of Murder! I ran back a long way; one of them knocked my head against the bank, and would not let me go up.

HOBLEY re-examined, The prisoners were going towards Brentford - they met me - they were apprehended going towards Turnham-green; I had seen none of them at the fair. NOT GUILTY .

The prisoners were again indicted for assaulting H. Freeland , and stealing his cap , and acquitted , but detained for the assault.

Reference Number: t18260914-90

1401. JOHN WESTLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting William McDonald , on the King's highway, on the 11th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch-chain, value 6s., and 1 key, value 2s., his property .

WILLIAM McDONALD. I am an engineer . On the 11th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going up Lemon-street, Whitechapel , in my way home to Stratford; the prisoner rushed violently against me, and begged my pardon, but at the same drew out my watch - it did not make me stagger - the ring which joined the chain to the watch broke, and he got the chain and key; I caught my watch in one hand, and him with the other - I gave him to the watchman - the chain has not been found.

Prisoner. Q. Had you been in any company? A. I left some friends at the Rose and Crown public-house, Thames-street; I had been drinking, but was quite sensible - I was walking straight on, and did not fall against you. My chain was safe when he rushed against me, I am certain - I knocked him down instantly - he had no chance of resistance.

JOSEPH COLLUMBINE . I am a watchman. I was going down the street, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor in a skirmish - about six people were round by the time I got up; he said the prisoner had snatched at his watch, but only got the chain and key - the prisoner said he would go to the watchhouse and he searched; McDonald was calling Watch! he appeared to have been drinking, but was sober, and walked very well to the watch-house, which is half a mile, without staggering at all.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman was reeling along - he caught hold of me, and accused me of stealing his chain - I said I was willing to be searched - he threw me on the ground and detained me.

GUILTY. Of stealing from the person only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260914-91

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1402. THOMAS PARFIT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 sovereign, the monies of James Marlton , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-92

1403. ROBERT DAGLEY was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM MORRISON . I am clerk to Messrs. Hadden and Co. woollen manufacturers, Bow Church-yard. On the 15th of October last, between one and two o'clock, I paid the prisoner 18l. 16s. on account of Charles Stone; I paid him some sovereigns and some shillings; I saw him write this memorandum for it.

CHARLES STONE . I am a dyer . When this money was

paid the prisoner he was my servant , and authorized to receive money - he has never paid this money to me; he was taken on the 5th of August last; I asked him in morning of the 15th of October, what Messrs. Haddon said about their account - he said Mr. Haddon was out of town, and when he returned we should hear from him.

COURT. Q. How long had he been in your service? A. About twenty years - he settled his accounts with me every week once or twice; if a person paid money, he entered it in a book, which I have here - here is the week including the 15th of October - there is no entry on that day; the whole of this is his writing.

JURY. Q. Did he ever make payments on your account? A. No; I supposed this money to have been due about Christmas last, but I never applied for it, as it was the first transaction I had had with them.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Stone received part of the money with other monies; Mr. Stone has received money from me and not given me an account of it; I went after some other money, which the former clerk had not collected, and was proud to bring it to my master; I have been making him a reparation for some money I lost three years and a half ago.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-93

1404. GEORGE BOLTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 16lbs. of beef, value 10s. , the goods of Saint George Ashe .

WILLIAM DEXTER . I am a butcher, and live in Paddington-street. I sent some meat to General Ashe on the 15th of August.

JAMES SWANNELL . I was in the service of Mr. Dexter. On the 19th of August I was at the corner of Gloucester-place, and saw the prisoner, who asked me if it was our young man who was going down the area of No. 71, Gloucester-place, to Mr. Simpson's - I said I did not know - he then asked where I was going, and we went on together to General Ashe's gate, No. 15, Crawford-street ; I left a sirloin of beef there; I left the prisoner at the gate while I went down the area, and when I returned he was gone; I had known him before in the employ of some butchers.

ESTHER JONES . I was employed at General Ashe's as a char-woman. On the 19th of August Swannell came there, brought a piece of beef, and we ordered some more; the prisoner then came down the area with a tray on his shoulder, and a piece of beef in it - he asked me for the piece of beef which the young lad had left - he waited till the cook came down, and told her there was a mistake in the weight, he must take it back to have it weighed - he then took it away.

ANN COPE . I am cook at General Ashe's. I came down, and found the prisoner in the kitchen - he said Mr. Dexter desired him to call for the piece of beef just left, as there was a mistake in the weight; I gave it to him - I am quite certain of his person.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

COURT to WILLIAM DEXTER. Q. Where did he get the other beef? A. From Mr. Simpson's, in Gloucester-place.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-94

1405. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Leonard Wapshott .

LEONARD WAPSHOTT. I am a publican , and live in George-street, Portman-square . On the 24th of July the prisoner was taken with these pots, which are mine.

MARK CULLINGFORD . I keep the Duke of York public-house, York-street. About four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 24th of July, I was in Gloucester-place; the prisoner passed me - I heard some pots rattle; I put my hand against her pocket, and felt the pots - I took her to the Office where they were taken from her - she was about two hundred yards from Mr. Wapshott's.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am the officer. I found three pots on her.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-95

1406. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 half-crown, and 2 shilling s, the monies of Daniel Wadham, the elder .

DANIEL WADHAM, JUN . I am the son of Daniel Wadham, a baker , and live at Newington . On the 5th of September, I was in the back-parlour; I saw the prisoner come into the shop and look about him; he went round the counter, and drew out the till - I saw him empty the money out of the tin box in the till - he went out - I went to the till, and and saw the money was gone - I pursued him, and gave him to the officer - nothing was found on him - there had been two shillings and one half-crown, and some copper in the till - I had seen it about five minutes before, and nobody came into the shop after that.

THOMAS GARRET . I am a grocer, and live at Newington. I saw the prisoner go into Wadham's shop and come out - there was a person waiting for him about two yards off - I saw Daniel Wadham come out and seize him; I saw the prisoner give something to his companion, who ran off.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy a penny loaf; I knocked three times and no one came; I came out of the shop and walked away; I gave the other boy the penny which I had for the loaf.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260914-96

1407. MARTIN CARTY and THOMAS SPRUHEN were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 1 hamper, value 1s., and 32 bottles, value 6s. , the goods of William Henry Hilton and Nicholas Power .

WILLIAM HENRY HILTON. I am in partnership with Nicholas Power, we are wine merchants , and live in Regent-street ; Spruhen was our porter . On the 26th of July I remarked that some empty bottles had been removed from a bin in the cellar, where I had seen them the night before; I found a hat there, which Carty acknowledged to be his at the office - I believe this hamper and bottles to be our property, but I cannot swear to them; they are old bottles.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any mark on these bottles? - A. No.

FRANCIS HILL . I am a wine porter in the prosecutor's employ. On the 26th of July I saw Carty coming out of their premises, about five o'clock in the evening, with a

hamper, as I was turning out of Carlton-street; Spruhen was standing at the door; I went to Spruhen, and asked where Martin was going; he said it was an empty hamper which he had lent him to carry some things for his sister - that he was going to Wardour-street; but he had gone down Jermyn-street; I went in and sat down in the counting-house, and in about twenty minutes I saw Martin come back with a hamper hanging by a rope on his shoulder; he was coming in, but saw me, and turned back and went up Regent-street - when he was gone we locked up the place; I went home the next evening about six o'clock; I was going there again and saw Martin coming out with a hamper on his shoulder, which appeared to me to be full; Mr. Hilton had then left the place; Spruhen was standing at the door; I followed Martin down Jermyn-street to Duke-street; he crossed over to No. 10, a door with the name of Hodson on it; I saw him knock, and I went and stood at a door that he might not see me; he knocked two or three times, and sometimes sat down on the hamper; I sent for a constable, who went and brought him to me; he was then taken to the watch-house, and I went back to Spruhen; I asked if he had seen Martin that day; he said No; I said, "Are you certain;" he then said he had seen him about dinner time - I said "Have you not seen him since" - he then said he had seen him once; I said "Did you lend him a hamper to night to move crockery for his sister;" he said Yes; I said "Was any think in the hamper;" he said No; I said "There was straw in it, and was there any bottles;" he said No; I said "There was, and Martin was gone to the watch-house;" he said, "Lord, Lord, I have done wrong;" I said, "You should have considered that before."

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you in the prosecutor's employ? - A. Yes; Martin stood twenty minutes at the door, and any one might have seen him; I do not think he saw me; he returned openly with the hamper on his shoulder; I have had no quarrel with him.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I am an officer. I was sent for about half-past six o'clock; I came down King-street and saw Carty standing at Mr. Hodson's, a bottle shop; I went and asked what he had got; he said what he had got he had a receipt for; I found thirty-two bottles in the hamper; he had no receipt about him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Then he was standing publicly at the door? - A. Yes; this hat was found at Mr. Hilton's and was taken to Marlborough-street; I believe what was said there was taken in writing.

CARTY'S Defence. I declare myself innocent as to how they were got; I am a jobbing porter .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-97

1408. ELLEN DOW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 2 glasses, value 1s. 2d. , the goods of John Lowndes .

CHARLES MUNDAY . I am waiter to John Lowndes, who keeps the Painters' Arms, public-house . On the 19th of August the prisoner came and asked for a glass of gin; there was another glass on the table - she staid about ten minutes, and then went away; I missed the glasses, pursued, and took her about twenty yards off, with them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out for some bread for my children - I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-98

1409. WILLIAM DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 saw, value 2s., and 1 plane, value 1s. , the goods of William Oxley .

WILLIAM OXLEY. I am a carpenter , and live in New Round-court, Strand . On the 12th of May I left a saw and a plane in my shop, at five minutes before twelve o'clock, when I went into my back parlour, to dinner, and in a quarter of an hour a woman came and said a man had stolen my tools; I went out, but could not find him.

JOHN JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Clare-street. I produce a saw, which was pawned on the 12th of May, about half-past twelve o'clock, by the prisoner, I am positive.

WILLIAM DEMPSTER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a plane, pawned on the 12th of May, between twelve and one o'clock - I do not know who by; our shop is about ten minutes walk from Round-court.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 13th of July, and found a ticket of the saw on him; the ticket of the plane was sent by the master of the workhouse, where the prisoner was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had left some tickets in pawn for my lodging, and these were picked out from them.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-99

1410. HENRY EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 half-crown, 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of William Ryder .

The Prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-100

1411. WILLIAM RIPLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Prosser , from his person .

JOHN PROSSER. On the 5th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, I was opposite Buckingham-street, in the Strand - I was looking obliquely behind me, and saw two men recede from me; I turned round, and seized the prisoner, who was near me, and the other ran up a court; I am persuaded the other had the handkerchief, as I saw a motion of great velocity from him to the prisoner, which, I think was the action of throwing the handkerchief from him. I called the watchman, who was the only other person in the street, and he picked up the handkerchief close to where I had seen the action of the hand.

ISAAC MORRIS . I was crying eleven o'clock, and heard the gentleman crying out Watch! I saw this handkerchief laying in the middle of the street, and took it up - I said to him, "I have got your handkerchief;" I had seen it drop, but cannot say from whom; the prisoner was about two yards from it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-101

1412. MARY EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s.; 2 shawls, value 3s.; 1 yard of silk, value 2s.; 1 yard of lace, value 4s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d., the goods of Mary Bright , spinster .

MARY BRIGHT. I live with Mr. Thomas, in Claremont-terrace, Islington. I left a box, containing this property with Mrs. Hatton, at Mr. Rogers', in North-street , on the 4th of April; Hatton is a friend of mine, but she is now at Windsor. I saw the articles safe in my box on the 2d of June, and on the 15th of August I went to it again, and missed them - Mrs. Hatton was then gone. I took the officer to search the premises of the prisoner, who had lived with Mrs. Rogers, but had then left; she said she was innocent, and would take her oath that she had left the box locked - the lace and two handkerchiefs were found on her.

GEORGE BERKELEY HEWSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shift - I cannot say that the prisoner pawned it; I have a recollection of her person, but not with reference to this transaction.

HENRY DUPLEX . I am a pawnbroker. I have a petticoat, a bed-gown, and a shift, pawned by the prisoner, on the 15th of August.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I am an officer. I went on the 24th of August to the prisoner's lodging - I told her I had some suspicion she had taken some property from the prosecutrix's box, in North-street - she said she had not taken anything, and I was welcome to search her, and she opened different boxes, but nothing was found; we then came to some dirty clothes, and found among them this handkerchief; I said I must take her into custody; she then said, "I will tell you the truth" - she went to a box, and took out three duplicates, which answer to the articles produced; she then took a pair of stays, and took this lace from between the lining and the stays; the prosecutrix then said, "You have one of my handkerchiefs on your neck" - she said, "It is," and gave it her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-102

1413. GEORGE HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , 1 looking-glass, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Miller .

JOSEPH MILLER. I live at Somer's-town , and am a broker . On the 18th of August I put this looking-glass on a rose-wood table near my door, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - I went out, and on my return I was informed it had been stolen.

MARY HAWKINS . On the 18th of August I saw the prisoner standing about Mr. Miller's shop; he took this glass, and was walking away with it; I gave an alarm - he dropped it, and ran off; he was brought back, by the street-keeper, in about three minutes - I am certain of his person.

JOHN ARUNDELL . I was crossing the road, Hawkins gave an alarm - I cried Stop thief! and saw the prisoner throw the glass away.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am the officer; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the glass.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-103

1414. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 salt-cellar, value 2s. , the goods of Samuel Lahee .

SAMUEL BLOSS . I am porter to Samuel Lahee, who is an auctioneer , and had a sale at No. 2, Stratford-place . On the 13th of July, I was there in charge of the property; between eleven and twelve o'clock a person pointed out the prisoner to me, among several persons, on the steps; I followed him into Stratford-place, and said I wanted the salt-cellar - he put his hand into his pocket and gave it me - begged my pardon, and hoped I would forgive him.

JOHN PRATT . I was at the sale, and saw the prisoner take the salt off the side-board.

The prisoner pleaded extreme poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260914-104

1415. JOHN MALONE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 2 table-spoons, value 20s., and 1 silver fork, value 5s. , the goods of George Morris .

GEORGE MORRIS. I am a land-agent , and live in Dover-street . This fork and spoons are mine - the prisoner had been discharged from the service of a Miss Gibbs, who lived in my house.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know of the servants having been in the habit of playing tricks with the prisoner? A. No.

ANN LAWRENCE . I was in Mr. Morris' employ, and was discharged on Saturday morning, the 1st of July. He came that evening between seven and eight o'clock, and said if it was not an intrusion, he would take tea with me; I went up stairs, and while I was gone he went away, and between nine and ten o'clock I missed the spoons - I thought they had been up stairs, but next day we wanted them, and they could not be found - they were kept on the side-board in the dining-room.

JAMES BOND . I am a patrol. On Sunday, the 2d of July, I apprehended the prisoner in Lancaster-court, in consequence of the information I had received from Mr. Morris - he said he was innocent; I found these two spoons, and this fork, in his inside pocket - he then said he certainly did take them, but meant to bring them back the first opportunity.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-105

1416. GEORGE THOROWGOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 80lbs. of potatoes, value 2s.; 1 bushel of oats, value 3s.; 2 bushells of chaff, value 1s., and 1 sack, value 1s. , the goods of William Hobbs .

WILLIAM HOBBS. I am a farmer , and live at Enfield. On the 29th of August I sent out some potatoes under the care of Thomas Pipkin , who ran away after he had sold the property - I believe this sack to be mine - it has chaff and corn in it; I may have a hundred sacks marked with my name on them; I did not allow my man to take sacks from my premises.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Pipkin was a

servant of yours? A. Yes; the prisoner was not - I have seen him before; the prisoner lived at Enfield-highway, perhaps three-quarters of a mile from me.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Hackney. On the 29th of August, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I saw two carts coming along the road - Pipkin and the prisoner were in one of them - they were shifting some potatoes from the noses of the sacks into this bag; I and Ward followed them, and when they got to Kingsland-turnpike they began to shift some corn - a man on the road gave the signal that we were officers, and they removed the property from the cart they were then in to the prisoner's cart - Ward ran and took the prisoner's cart, and Pipkin ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you meet the cart? A. By the White Hart, public-house, at Newington , seven miles from Enfield.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a constable. I was with Brown at Newington. On the 29th of August, about half-past four o'clock, when I first saw them, the prisoner and Pipkin were both in Mr. Hobbs' cart, and were both taking the potatoes out of the sacks, and putting them into this bag, which was in the tail of the cart - they tied it up ready to take away - they then took this bag, and put the corn and chaff in it, and handed it to the prisoner's cart - I ran and stopped the prisoner, and said, "What have you got here;" he said, "Nothing but my own property;" I found this chaff and corn in it - he said he had to carry it for Mr. Hobbs' carter.

Cross-examined. Q. Then you did not see the prisoner nearer the place where thoy were stolen from than seven miles? A. I stopped them near the King's Head, public-house, at Kingsland.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-106

1417. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James Copsey , from his person .

JAMES COPSEY. I live in Northumberland-street, Strand. On the 7th of July, I was walking alone in the Strand , between five and six o'clock in the evening - I was going to Bedford-street, and was on that side of the way; Mr. Chapman, the chemist, came and told me a man had picked my pocket, and I missed my handkerchief, which was safe the prisoner running up into Round-court - Mr. Chapman pointed him out - I followed him, and caught him turning into Bedford-bury, without losing sight of him; Mr. Chapman came up directly with the handkerchief, which a little girl had given him; the officer came and took him.

RICHARD CHAPMAN . I was in my shop on this evening, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from Mr. Copsey's pocket; I did not see his face, but I went to the door and saw him turn into Round-court - I told the prosecutor, and we pursued him - he turned first to the right, and then to the left - I fell down, but I got up again, and pursued; he was taken in Bedford-bury; a little girl put this handkerchief into my hand, which she said she picked up on the stop of a door.

COURT. Q. How long was it after he took the handkerchief, that he was stopped? A. Not three minutes - I had seen his person, and am certain it was him; I pointed him out to Copsey before I lost sight of him.

CHARLOTTE WINFIELD . I live at a public-house in the Strand. I saw the prisoner pick the pocket - he had a blue jacket and trousers, like a sailor; I did not see him again till I saw him at Bow-street, on Saturday, the 8th of July - I have no doubt of his person.

THOMAS CUSS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner from Mr. Copsey.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with a young woman, who took me to the Strand, where I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260914-107

1418. MICHAEL RUSSEL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Hooman , from his person .

JOSEPH HOOMAN. I was in Queen-street on the 4th of July, and felt something at my pocket, turned round, and found the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - I took him towards the watch-house, and in Wild-street I was attacked by about twenty notorious pick-pockets.

Prisoner. Q. When you struck and kicked me, can you say I did not catch hold of another boy by the collar, intending to secure him? A. I am confident you did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home through Queen-street, when I saw three boys, one of whom was picking the prosecutor's pocket - who turned round and seized me; I took hold of the boy, but the prosecutor struck me, and knocked me down.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260914-108

1419. JANE OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , 3 shoes, value 4s.; 1 boot, value 2s.; 3 towels, value 2s.; 5 spoons, value 12s.; 1 fork, value 5s.; 8 tin patties, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissars, value 6d.; 1 book, value 6d.; 1 doll, value 2d.; 1 plate, value 6d.; 2 cups, value 1s., and 2 saucers, value 1s., the goods of William Hills , her master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH HILLS . I am the wife of William Hills, he keeps an inn - the prisoner was in our employ. I went into the scullery (in consequence of information) on the 28th of August, and saw her hurrying on the lid of a boiler - I asked what she was doing - she said, "Nothing Ma'am;" I took up the lid, and lifted out of the boiler a bundle, which proved to be a hat-box - I asked who it belonged to she said "To me;" I insisted upon seeing it opened; it was brought into the bar, and she cut the string and opened it herself - I found in it the articles stated - I had expected to find some other things, such as tea and sugar; I asked how she dare take even our plate; she said she thought it would be laid to the waiter, who had been discharged that morning.

THOMAS MEADS . I was present when the box was opened; the prisoner begged pardon of my master and mistress - she said it was the first offence, and hoped they would forgive her.

THOMAS WOODBRIDGE . I am clerk to the Magistrate,

and heard what the prisoner said at her examination - it was not taken down - she said, "I hope you will be merciful to me," and that it was the first crime she had ever committed.

JOSEPH FINCH . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody; Hall came and took charge of her.

JOHN HALL . I am a constable. The prisoner was in my charge; and the next morning I told her Mr. Hill thought the waiter had something to do with it; she said, Yes, he had; he gave her the box, and told her to put it against the window, and he would call for it at night.

Prisoner. My master said, if I would confess who I had taken the property for, or given it to, he would not prosecute me, but kick me out of the house, and discharge me. There is in the box, an apron, a handkerchief, and several things belonging to the waiter who was discharged that morning - he had given me the box to take care of, and was to call for it - mistress said he would never call, and what he had left might be divided among the servants.

COURT to MRS. HILL. Q. Does any part of this property belong to the waiter? A. Yes, this apron and this handkerchief - there was some tea and sugar left in a caddy, belonging to me, and I said the servants might have it between them; the prisoner came to me as a single woman, but I afterwards found she was married, and has four children; I went into the scullery, and saw her putting the lid on the boiler - I said, "What are you doing?" she said, "Nothing;" I lifted up the lid, and said, "Whose box is this?" she said, "Mine;" I said I would have it opened.

Prisoner's Defence. I was so horror-struck that I did not know what I said; the box is not mine, nor any thing in it - I never saw it till that day, nor ever saw the contents till it was opened in the bar.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-109

1420. WILLIAM SCANNELL and RICHARD RING were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 7 shillings, the monies of John Hill , from his person .

JOHN HILL. I was passing by the pump, opposite Westminster Abbey, in Parliament-street , on Sunday afternoon, the 9th of July, about half-past three o'clock; I had Britton, and another young man with me - Britton had some water thrown on him by some lads - he took off his coat, which was covered with water - he turned to ask what they did it for, when the whole of them fell upon him; the two prisoners were amongst them, and I saw one of them strike him, but I cannot say which it was - I went to assist him, and a number of them fell upon me, knocked me down, and picked my pocket of 7s. - my pockets were turned inside out. I did not see Scannell at that time, but I know that Ring struck me on the right eye - they then went on and went down Charles-street; I washed my eye at the pump, and went to a wine vaults, at Charing-cross, to inquire for an officer - I got Mr. Goddard, and we went after them to the Park - Scannell was taken there, but nothing was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What are you? A. A wine-cooper. I was quite close to Britton, and am quite certain he did not say he would fight any one of them; there was a fight with Britton, and I went up to assist him; I did not see Scannell at that time; I found him near the Horse Guards in the Park; I did not say he had taken a sovereign from me; I did not see him till I saw him in the Park.

NATHANIEL BRITTON . I was with Hill and another person, named Forrest; we had just passed the pump, where some young men were standing; I saw the prisoner among them; a young lad said to me, "Sir, there is some water on your coat;" I pulled it off, and the back was covered with water; he pointed Scannell out, as the one who did it; I said "Sir, what did you do that for?" he struck me in the mouth; Hill came up to take my part, but before he could look about him he was pulled down- I did not see Scannell at that instant, for some were on me, and some on Hill; I afterwards saw Hill lying on the ground; the two prisoners were upon him - I cannot say that I saw Ring, at that moment upon him, but he was in their company; as soon as they had knocked him down and took the money, Hill got up - he could not see out of one of his eyes, and his nose was bleeding - I had a white hat on, and they said "Fall on the man with the white hat on;" I retreated and they did not follow - we followed them at a little distance, and one of them used very bad language, and said "What are you going to do now?" I made no answer, but watched them; we followed them to some steps leading to St. James's Park - Goddard, the patrol, turned round the corner, and Forrest ran and told him - he followed them into the Park - they scattered and ran, and Scannell said "It is of no use- it is all over?" Goddard heard him say that, and took him. Ring was taken at his own house on the Monday following.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were there four of you when Scannell was taken? A. Yes; three of us and the officer. I am a saddle-tree-maker; I did not offer to fight any of them; Hill was near me, and he could very well see the boy who struck me; I took my own part, but they all came up to me, and fell upon me, before Hill got up; I did not strike them first, nor offer to fight Scannell; he had a yellow handkerchief on - there was nothing said about a sovereign - Hill did not say he had lost one; I did not see any money, but I heard it on the stones; it lasted about ten minutes; I never lost sight of Scannell - I followed him into the Park - they were walking in the Park, but they all ran and scattered - Scannell had been running but he gave himself up. I swear Scannell ran, and the officer saw him - this was near the canal.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You saw very little of Ring? A. No; I am sure he was of the party.

WILLIAM FORREST . I am a saddle-tree rivetter. I live at No. 15, Monmouth-street. I was with Britton and Hill - I heard a little boy come and tell Britton that some water was thrown on his coat - he pulled it off, and there was water all over it - he went up and asked which of them did it; one of them struck him on the mouth, but I cannot say which, because I was behind him; about thirteen of them fell upon him - Hill went up - five or six of them came away from Britton, and knocked him down - I

saw Scannell put his hand into Hill's pocket, and turn it out - the money fell on the ground, and Scannell, Ring, and another person, picked it up; I was going to help them, but one of them said "Pitch upon the other with his watch," meaning me; I drew back, and went to see for an officer; when I came back they had all got up - Hill was all over blood; he said he had lost 7s.; we followed them as far as Charles-street; they kept walking in the road, and turning round, and swearing at us, and asked what we were going to do now; when we got to Charles-street we saw Goddard, and we pursued them into the Park, and took Scannell there - they were all standing in a cluster, but when they saw the officer they all scattered.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Could you see the person who came up to Britton? A. No; not to identify him; I kept aloof - it lasted two or three minutes - there was a great confusion; we gave no alarm in the street, but we did in the Park.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You saw nothing more of Ring than his picking up the money? A. No; there were some small boys left standing round the pump.

WILLIAM POND . I am fourteen years of age. I was near the pump in Parliament-street - I saw the three witnesses walking, and thirteen or fourteen standing round the pump; Scannell had a mouthful of water, and he squirted it over Britton and Hill - Britton pulled off his coat to look at the water, and turned back to Scannell, to ask what he did it for - they made no reply, but formed a ring round him; Britton was then struck, and Hill went to assist him - he was knocked down, and they cried out"His pocket - his pocket;" Scannell put his hand into his pocket, pulled it inside out, and the money fell on the stones; there were some silver shillings; Scannell and two more stooped down to pick it up; I took notice of the prisoners but cannot swear to the other; Ring picked up some of the money - they all fought - I did not hear any challenging; Forrest was coming to assist Britton and Hill, and they cried out "His watch - his watch!" he then drew back; the others then got up, and Hill went to the pump to wash himself, as he was all over blood; I did not hear him say any thing about his money - the others then went away, and we followed them, and three or four of them asked what we were going to do; they turned down a street leading to St. James's Park, and Goddard came up - Forrest went and told him - he pursued them into the Park, and Scannell cried out "It is no use - it is no use;" and the officer took him; I went with Goddard on the Monday, and took Ring in Crown-street.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you been talking this matter over? A. No; I am sure I have not talked to the other persons about it; I was close by but I did not interfere; it lasted ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I had never seen Scannell before; he was taken in about ten minutes after, near the cannon in the Park; he was not standing looking at the canal; I swear he ran; the officer could see him run. I swear the prisoners were there.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you pick up any of the money? A. No, not 1s., nor the little boy's neither; it was only those belonging to the gang took it- there was nothing said about a sovereign in my hearing.

HENRY GODDARD. I am an officer. I saw Forrest, and, in consequence of what he said, I went into the Park, where I saw Scannell, with a gang of twelve or thirteen persons; they turned round and saw me, and ran in different directions - I took Scannell then, and Ring the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was not Scannell standing near the canal? A. No, he was going on, near the bomb, walking with the others; I did not hear any thing said about a sovereign; I saw them first in Charles-street; I swear they all ran - I overtook Scannell, and took him to the watch-house - nothing was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Who directed your attention to Scannell? A. Forrest and Britton - there were others mentioned, but I made Scannell the object of my pursuit - they were not within view at the time Forrest spoke to me; I asked who were the principal persons, and they pointed the prisoners out; they would not have known which way to have gone only I happened to see the gang running into the Park.

SCANNELL'S Defence. I and Ring, and two or three more, stopped to get a drink of water - the prosecutor and two or three others passed, and one of the boys there threw some water, which happened to go on one of their coats - a little boy went and told him, and he turned back and asked who did it; the little boy pointed us out, and he struck one of the lads, and they all got fighting - we then went into the Park, and the prosecutor and his companious came up, and said we had a sovereign belonging to them; the officer then came and took me.

RING'S Defence. I was coming from Millbank, and we stopped, and one of the boys took a mouthful of water, and squirted it over one of their coats; he turned back, and asked what they did it for, and one of them struck him; he then struck me, and my nose began to bleed - he struck me again, and I hit him in my own defence; the rest came up to assist him - the others struck them, and we all fell to the ground; we got up and walked into the Park; I was going towards home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-110

1421. SAMUEL SHARPE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 224 prints, value 50s., and 684 sheets of paper, value 50s., the goods of Charles Joseph Hullmandel , his master .

CHARLES JOSEPH HULLMANDEL. I am a lithographic printer , and live in Great Marlborough-street ; the prisoner lived with me about two years. On the 3d of July I obtained a search warrant and went to Graves' lodging; I found there a quantity of prints and paper which are mine; the prints are executed by me; I have such a quantity of paper that I could not have missed this.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Then at this moment you do not know but your stock is all right? - A. No; it may for what I know; Mrs. Graves has been employed about my premises for ten years; a great number of these prints had been sold; I printed a great number of them for other persons who sell them.

CATHERINE GRAVES . I was in the employ of Mr. Hullmandel; the prisoner has given me waste paper of no use, but never any of these prints.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there not a great quantity of paper spoiled and thrown into a bag? - A. Yes; and I have it as my perquisite; the prisoner never gave me one of these prints; he gave me some paper which I sold Laws.

JOSEPH LAWS . On the 18th of August Catherine Graves brought me about 17lbs. of waste paper to sell; I paid her 2 1/2 per lb. for it.

Mr. HULLMANDEL re-examined. I asked him what he had done with this paper; he said it was in a place called the Stranger's-hole, that he thought it belonged to nobody, and gave it away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-111

1422. THOMAS WILTSHIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 2 shillings, the money of William Stokes , his master .

WILLIAM STOKES. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Edgware-road ; the prisoner was in my employ. On the 26th of July I missed 1s. 6d. from my till, while I was gone into the parlour to speak to a friend, leaving the prisoner and a customer in the shop; I gave to Mr. Barker 20s. worth of silver to mark that evening; I saw it after it was marked; and at half-past nine o'clock on Monday evening, when no one was present, I put six of them into the till; and in about half an hour I missed two of them; the prisoner had been serving in the shop, and it was his duty to give change out of the till; I charged him with it, and he at last produced the two marked shillings from his pocket; the rest of the marked money had been paid away; my wife paid the prisoner his wages, and might have paid him in some of it.

CHARLES BARKER . Mr. Stokes gave me 20s. worth of silver to mark on Saturday evening, the 26th of August, I marked it with a C D and a cross; here are some that I marked.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Can you say how many shillings there were? - A. No; there was 20s. in amount.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I went to take the prisoner, but before I got there he had given these two shillings to his master; I found no more on him; he said they were the only two shillings he had, and he would give his master his week's wages to forgive him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-112

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1423. THOMAS NEWTON STANGER was indicted for embezzlement .

Mr. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WILLIAM NEILE . I am a colour and varnish maker , and live in Maiden-lane, Battle-bridge . The prisoner came into my service in August 1825; it was his duty to go out for orders and to receive money, which he was to pay as soon as he received it; he kept a travelling-book, which he delivered to me when full; John Stannard , was indebted to me 6l. 12s. for goods delivered by the prisoner on the 31st of December; on the 9th of January be writes in his travelling-book "John Stannard out of town;" on the 3d of February he writes "Stannard not at home;" on the 18th, he says "Pay the end of the month;" on the 1st of March, "Stannard not at home;" on the 13th, "Stannard in the country;" on the 6th of April,"Stannard not at home, pay after Midsummer;" here is no receipt of the money from Mr. Stannard; and I swear I have never received it.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY. Q. Was not he a sort of commission agent? - A. No; he was to receive something for getting customers, but he never got any; that agreement only continued till November; I never allowed him to take money for particular purposes without giving me an account of it; he never laid out any money for me; he was to give an account to me every night; a good deal of money passed through his hands; he received 30s. weekly from the 5th of November till the 17th of June; I never told him I would give him time to make it up.

JOHN STANNARD. I was indebted to Mr. Neile 6l. 12s.; I paid this to the prisoner, on the 9th of January last - I gave him six sovereigns and the rest in silver; this is the receipt he gave me.

Prisoner's Defence. This is an indictment for 6l. 12s., but it ought to have been for 6l. 6s.; after I wrote the receipt, he would not pay me without I gave him 5 per cent. discount; and I gave him the 6s.; I have never had any settlement since I travelled.

JOHN STANNARD. I paid him 6 sovereigns; but from the length of time I am not certain whether I had any discount.

COURT to Mr. NEILE. Q. Was there any new settlement in November last? - A. Yes; I then hired another traveller, because the prisoner was so very deficient in getting customers; and I said to him, "If you will drop any other commission you shall have 30s. a week;" he said, "I am much obliged to you;" before then he had had 25s. a-week, and 5 per cent. commission.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-113

1424. ELLEN DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 5 stockings, value 3s.; 1 pair of gown sleeves, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s., and 4 pieces of ribbon, value 1s. , the goods of Virginie Lauriere .

VIRGINIE LAURIERE. I am a teacher of languages , and lodge in the Quadrant, Regent-street . The prisoner was servant in the house. On the evening of the 22d of July I went out, and left my keys at home; I returned about eleven o'clock, and she said, "You left your keys at home, but I have taken care of them for you" - the next day she ran away; I thought she had taken a great deal of property, and sent for an officer - I did not then know what she had taken was so trifling.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. When you got home, about eleven o'clock, did you remain at home? A. No, there was a person waiting for me, and I went out with him in a carriage, and I did not return till the following evening; a lady and a little boy live in the house - the lady sent the prisoner out, that she might look into her box - she came to me with a lap full of things, and said,"These must belong to you, Madam" - the prisoner went away directly, with her own box and these articles in it: she had dressed me the evening before, when I went to the Opera - these articles were left laying about the room; I

believe they could not have been put into the prisoner's box by mistake, because her box was in the kitchen.

EDWARD WOODMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of July, in Union-court, Holborn, at her aunt's - I found the property in a box, which she said was her's.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what kind of place it was; it has been a common place for prostitutes - the servant was frightened away; the lady in the second floor searched my box; I was frightened, and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-114

1425. EDWARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 5 pairs of shoes, value 20s., the goods of William Jackman , his master .

MOSES PACKER . I am shopman to William Jackman, a shoemaker , of Oxford-street . The prisoner was his errand-boy . On the 31st of August I saw some shoes in his pocket - I asked what they were, and he said old shoes which he was going to take home to be mended - I let him go, and searched the stock - I missed two pairs of men's shoes and two pairs of boy's; on his return I asked where he had his shoes mended - he said at Jones', in Portland-street; I went there, and could find no such person; I told him I doubted whether he had told me the truth, and he then readily told me he had taken these, and had got one pair more.

EDWIN SOMES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street. I have two pairs of shoes, pawned by the prisoner, on the 26th and 28th of August.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was called to take the prisoner; he told me he had taken the shoes, and pawned them at two pawnbrokers', which he directed me to.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I will never do any thing of the kind any more.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, one of whom engaged to take him into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-115

1426. JOHN HOWARTH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 1 brass bearing, value 5s., the goods of Walter Hunter and Edward Borham , his masters .

GEORGE SANGRIDGE . I am an iron-founder. I work for Messrs. Walter Hunter and Edward Borham, in Old Gravel-lane . The prisoner was their labourer . On the 9th of August, at a quarter before seven o'clock, I saw him come to the well for some water; he took up the rope and cut a piece off, and put it round the waistband of his breeches - he took the piece of brass bearing, and tied to it; I ran and told the foreman, who came and took him with it; he said it was the first time.

THOMAS SHEPHARD . I am the foreman. I found this piece of brass in the waistband of the prisoner's trousers. I said he had been long suspected - he said it was the first he had taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was a piece of string I took to tie my braces, and here it is now; the foreman said it was the fifth time, and it was the first I had taken.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260914-116

1427. JAMES DULGARNER was indicted for embezzling, on the 13th of July , 2 shillings, and four-pence half-penny .

The coin paid to the prisoner being a half-crown he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260914-117

1428. JOHN FENCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown , from his perso n.

THOMAS STEVENS . I am patrol of St. Giles'. About half-past nine o'clock in the evening of the 6th of July I was in the Strand with Daniel Reardon ; we watched four persons from near Exeter 'Change to Arundel-street - the prisoner was one of them; they walked on towards Temple-bar, and followed several persons very closely, as if to pick their pockets; near Arundel-street they closed upon two gentlemen, who were walking arm-in-arm - the prisoner and another were in front, and the other two behind; we saw the two front ones with their hands to the gentlemen's pockets, and something was drawn; the prisoner and his companion then crossed the street - Reardon ran and seized the prisoner, and his companion struck him a blow in the cheek; Reardon called to me that he had got the right, and I ran and told the gentlemen to come back.

Q. Did you see the handkerchief taken from the gentleman? A. No - I could not see what was taken from the gentleman; he owned the handkerchief, but refused to give his address.

DANIEL REARDON. I was with Stevens. I saw the four lads - the prisoner and one more were in front; I saw them close on the pocket, and the prisoner took the handkerchief; they crossed the road towards me - I seized the prisoner with my left-hand, and the other with my right; the other struck me, and I let him go; I secured the prisoner, who had the handkerchief on his thigh; it appeared the same colour as the one taken from the gentleman - the gentleman came back, and the prisoner begged him not to prosecute him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-118

1429. MICHAEL CONNELL and JOHN BALL were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Davis , from his person .

WILLIAM DAVIS. I am a musical instrument maker , and live in Coventry-street. On Sunday evening, the 20th of August, I was at this end of Long-acre , walking alone - I did not know I was robbed till Boston ran after me in Queen-street, and asked me if I had lost my handkerchief - I said I had; he said, "Come along with me, here are the boys who have got it." I had not seen the prisoners before, but I had seen a person taller than them watch me.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was on duty in Long-acre; Boston and two or three others were with me: Boston came and touched me on the shoulder, and said, "Come this way - they have just got

the handkerchief," pointing to Connell, who was turning the corner; I went to him, and he put his hand into his pocket - I said, "Let your pocket be;" he put his hand into his pocket again, and I found this handkerchief in it; the prosecutor was then gone down Queen-street.

JOHN BOSTON . I am a patrol. I was in Long-acre, and saw the two prisoners; Connell took the handkerchief from Mr. Davis' pocket, while Ball was close by him, and he must have seen it; I had followed them from Mr. Bowditch's, the coach-maker; they turned into Drury-lane, and I told Cousins of it. I saw the handkerchief taken from Connell.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a patrol. I apprehended Ball, and found two handkerchiefs on him - one, he said, belonged to his sister, and the other to his brother.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CONNELL'S Defence. I was coming up Long-acre, and saw a great many officers; I saw a young man in a long brown coat drop this handkerchief, which I took up; Boston then asked what I had got - I said it was nothing to him; he said if I did not give it him he would get an officer. Soon afterwards the other prisoner was brought to me, but I had never seen him before.

BALL'S Defence. I was coming up Long-acre, from Queen-street chapel - I passed a great many officers, who caught this young man for something, and then they caught me, and said I belonged to him.

CONNELL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

BALL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-119

1430. ELIZABETH CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 watch, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Small , from his person .

THOMAS SMALL. I was coachman to Mr. Nottage, of Wandsworth. I was discharged from his service on the 13th of July - I met the prisoner on the 14th at the King's Head public-house, James-street, Covent-garden , a little before twelve o'clock in the day - she was quite a stranger, and was there before I got there; I sat down near her, and had a pint of ale - some other persons came in - I might be two hours in their company - I then went with her and three or four others over the way to the Ship public-house; I was not drunk - I took out my watch to see what o'clock it was, and the prisoner snatched it out of my hand - she ran away; when I turned out of the door, it was between two and three o'clock - I saw it the next day at the pawnbroker's - I was very little the worse for liquor; I can swear positively I had not given her the watch - there were three or four other girls about me.

ISAAC SAYER . I am an officer. I was sent for to the Fox-under-the-hill public-house, and there I received information that the prosecutor had been robbed - he appeared to be out of his mind - he related to me in substance what he has now - he described the girl, and I went to the King's Head, and took her up; I am quite certain she denied ever having the watch, and so she said at the watch-house - the prosecutor was sober - he could describe her person.

SAMUEL WINSCOM . I live with Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker, No. 49, Broad-street, St. Giles'. This watch was pawned there on the 14th of July, by the prisoner.

MARY NORTON . I am a poor woman. I saw the prisoner pass my door on the 14th of July - she took a silver watch out of her pocket - she said to two other girls, that she had got the watch, and 1s. 6d. - I did not know her, but I saw her again at the office.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that the prosecutor had sent her to pledge the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260914-120

1431. WILLIAM CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Ansell , from his person .

JOSEPH ANSELL. I am a butler , and live in Old Burlington-street. On the 24th of July I was crossing to Rose-street , and had a handkerchief in my right-hand coat pocket - there was a crowd of persons, and I was forced to go round them; I felt something at my pocket, and turned round; I saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - he was attempting to give it to another little boy, who said, "I will have nothing to do with it;" the prisoner then dropped it, and I took it up - the officer was passing, and took him.

JOSEPH WORMOLD . I am a Bow-street patrol. The prisoner was given into my custody; I saw him throw the handkerchief down and run - I took him into custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief lying down as I was coming from school, and was going to pick it up - I did not pick his pocket of it.

GUILTY . Aged 8.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18260914-121

1432. CHARLES HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 1 necklace, value 7s., the goods of Thamas Trickey, from the person of Maria Trickey , spinster .

ELIZABETH TRICKEY . I am the wife of Thomas Trickey - he is a surgeon . On the 30th of July my daughter Maria, was sent out to buy some fruit, between ten and eleven o'clock - she had a coral necklace on - in about ten minutes I went out to seek her, and found her without it; I received information from another little girl, who was with her; the prisoner was taken that afternoon - he had no shoes or stockings on; I saw the necklace at Hatton-garden.

ROBERT WOOLLEY . I am an officer, of Bow-street. I received information of the loss of this necklace. I went to Covent-garden, and found the prisoner; he had shoes on, but no stockings; I told him what I took him for - he was feeling in his trouser's pocket, and I put my hand in and found this necklace - he said he picked it up in Seven-dials; I asked him again where he got it, and he said I might find out.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-122

1433. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 5s., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s., the goods of Michael Townley , from his person .

MICHAEL TOWNLEY. My father is a labourer. On the

26th of June, when I went to sleep on the hay, in Mr. Baker's barn, at Willsden ; I put these things under my head - the prisoner worked there, and slept in the same barn; when I awoke in the morning he was gone, and so were my clothes; I did not see any of them again till the Saturday following, when he was taken - there were a few more people in the barn, who worked for Mr. Baker, but they were not gone.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Oxford-street, opposite Oxford-market - he was pointed out to me; shortly afterwards the prosecutor came up, and saw the handkerchief round his neck, and said it was his - the prisoner said he gave 3d. for it to a Jew at Hydepark-corner - there was nothing else found.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the handkerchief of a person who was selling old clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-123

1434. ELIZABETH READ and ELEANOR GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 pocketbook, value 6d., and 11 sovereigns, the property of Ralph Taite , from his person .

RALPH TAITE. I am a mariner . I belong to the Vintage, which was in the London Docks - I was paid off on the 19th of July - and on the 20th, I went in the evening to the Star public-house, near Wellclose-square - Read came in and spoke to another man, and then sat down by me; Green was in the house, but not near me; I had a little pocket-book and 12 sovereigns in it - I took out one sovereign and changed it, that I might satisfy Read, with whom I went home, about twelve o'clock, to a house at the back of Wellclose-square - I put my jacket down carefully on a chair, near the window - Read then came to bed, and put the light out - I felt the money safe in my pocket when I laid it down in the chair, and I hung my watch on a nail - we were in bed nearly an hour - Green went with us to the room, but she was going away - Read then said she was a poor girl; and I said I should have no objection to her laying down with us - Read then called to her "Bessy, come in;" which she did - I heard her speak, and knew her voice - I am certain it was Green - she had not been in the room many minutes before she went out again - I then began to get up; and Read got up and ran after her - I felt in my pocket and the money was gone - I ran to the door and found the officer, and told him - he brought back Read directly - I went to the office next day and saw Green.

RICHARD CARTER . I am an officer. About a quarter before one o'clock, on Friday morning, the 21st of July, I was passing Cable-street, and saw Green at the corner of North East-passage, and Read came down, putting on her gown - she crossed over to Green, and I heard her say"I have got it;" she was not dressed, but Green was - they went down North East-passage, and I went up Cable-street; when I saw the prosecutor standing at a door in his shirt - he said he had been robbed of his pocket-book and eleven sovereigns by two women, and should know them again - I went down the passage and took Read - I brought her back, and went up and searched the house - I found the watch and seals close to the window on a nail in the shutters; I put them into my pocket, and took Read to the watch-house; she said she should send for her child; I knew where her child was kept, and I went there to see for Green; I heard a man, whom she lives with, say"Is that you, Bet;" I took hold of Green, her apron was wrapped round her arm; I told her I wanted her for stealing eleven sovereigns; I found one sovereign in her hand, one penny in her pocket, and nine sovereigns, and this shilling, in the corner of her apron; the prosecutor was quite sober.

READ'S Defence. He said "Can you get me any thing to drink;" I said it was too late; but I went to the door to see, and the officer said he would dash my brains out if I did not deliver him twelve sovereigns and a pocket-book; I had been at the public-house, and the man drew me into his company, and persuaded me to go home.

COURT to CARTER. Q. What part of her dress had Read off? - A. Her shoes and her gown; I found her shoes in the room where the prosecutor's watch was; Green told me to be as easy as I could; and if I could not do without her, to say I found it in the entry.

COURT to RALPH TAITE. Q. Do you believe Green to be the girl called Bessy, who was in the room? - A. Yes; the other girl was talking to her; there was no other person in the room; Green left the room first, and Read in a moment after; I found the jacket on the floor; there was 20s. in silver in my jacket pocket, which they had not time to take.

READ - GUILTY . Aged 21.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing only. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-124

1435. WILLIAM MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th July , 1 necklace, value 5s., the goods of William Annandale , from the person of Elizabeth Annandale .

MATILDA JONES . I know William Annandale. On the 29th of July his child was at my house, in William-street , in my care; while she was in the passage, the prisoner, who lives in my neighbourhood, came and took the necklace from her neck and ran away; I gave an alarm, and he was taken between eight and nine o'clock that night.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Earl-street, and this woman came up and said to a boy, that was with her,"Now, which is the boy, I will give you a shilling to pick him out."

MRS. JONES re-examined. Q. Had you a boy with you? - A. I ran out after the prisoner, but lost sight of him; I went out that evening and found where he lived with two girls; he was quite alone; I found a boy, who was one of his acquaintance, and told him I would give him a shilling to tell me when he came home; the prisoner had been in my house several times; and I knew the other knew him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-125

SECOND DAY. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1436. MARGARET JOHNSON and MARY SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 1 watch,

value 3l. 10s.; 1 seal, value 1l. 15s.; 1 watch-key, value 14s., and 1 chain, value 1s., the goods of William Winter , from his person .

WILLIAM WINTER. I live at Pentonville, and am a plumber . On the evening of the 1st of September I was in Gray's-inn-lane , and met the two prisoners, who asked for something to refresh them, saying they had had nothing all day; I went to a house and paid for a pint of porter for them; I then walked out; they then came and attempted to pass me - Smith took me by the left arm - Johnson struck me, and took my watch, and handed it to Smith; I took hold of Johnson, and said "You are mistaken in the person to-night, and I shall fix you;" Smith then came up and struck me; I caught hold of her, and held them both till the watchman came; I saw Smith stoop to put the watch behind a hoard, and then return to help Johnson.

WILLIAM SCRIVENS . I sell shell-fish, and live in Baldwin's-gardens. I saw the prosecutor struggling with the two prisoners - he had hold of them, and asked them for his watch; he held them till the watchman came up - I got a light and found the watch opposite to where he was, by the side of a board fence, where the buildings had been taken down; I had heard the chain rattle when he called for the watchman; the prisoners were near enough to the boards to place the watch there.

GEORGE PARRY . I am the watchman. I took them in charge about eleven o'clock at night; I heard the cry and ran down - I saw them trying to get from Mr. Winter.

JOSEPH DURWAND . I am a constable. I received the two prisoners at the watch-house, and received this watch from Scriven.

JOHNSON'S Defence. We met this gentleman, who was very much intoxicated; we went into the house, and had something to drink - when we came out he said "Good God, I have lost my watch;" he then seized us both - I said "Don't pull us so, you had better call the watchman," which he did.

COURT to JOSEPH DURWAND. Q. When the prisoner came to the watch-house did he appear to be drunk? A. No - he swore so hard and fast to them that we were forced to lock them up, though it was not till after they were locked up that the man came in, and said he had found the watch - we had searched them before, and found nothing on them.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-126

1437. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 11 loaves of bread, value 6s.; 1 basket, value 8d., and 1 quartern measure of flour, value 6d. , the goods of Peter Colson .

PETER COLSON. I am a journeyman baker . I had eleven loaves of bread, and one quartern of flour, in my basket on the 29th of July, about ten o'clock, I left my basket in Kirkham-place ; I was gone to a customer's about ten minutes, and, on my return, Webb said a man had taken my basket; I went to the right hand, as she told me, and found the prisoner with it on his back - he said a person had given it to him to carry - he had turned two turnings, and was going on as fast as he could walk.

MARTHA WEBB . On the morning of the 29th of July, I saw the prisoner take up the basket of bread he went away with it; I told Colson, who went and took him - I certain he took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a baker, and asked him if he knew of a situation; he said, not at present; he had two baskets, and I asked him if I should carry one for him - he said Yes, I might take one to the end of Newman-street, and he would give me something.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-127

1438. THOMAS DALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1800lbs. weight of wool, value 100l., and 1800lbs. weight of drugs, value 20l. the goods of John Cooper and Joseph Spratt .

JOHN COOPER. I am in partnership with Joseph Spratt - we are warehouse-keepers ; our warehouse is in Tower-street , and the counting-house in Chequer-yard. This wool and these drugs are ours; the wool is part of a parcel of ten bags, and was in our warehouse, in the same state as it is now, on the 25th of August: the keys of the warehouse were in our counting-house the whole day, they were not out at all - but about half-past four o'clock that day, the officers came to me, and said they had stopped a cart with wool; I had my warehouse overhauled a few days afterwards, and then missed the drugs; I have known the prisoner as a carman - he has taken things from our warehouse.

Prisoner. Doyle and Dower, two men who had been foremen to the prosecutors, employed me; I told Mr. Cooper, the same night, that those men had employed me to take the wool; and they had employed me to take the drugs on the Friday before.

JOHN COOPER. The officer came and told me they had stopped the wool; I said, "Have you stopped the man?" they said, "No," but Mr. Cobbey, the master carman, said he knew where to find him; the prisoner was then brought - he said, "I loaded it from your warehouse this morning - Doyle and Dower gave them to me, and I took a load of drugs for them, last Friday, to an empty house in Bethnal-green, and the man lived within three doors of it;" he said he had booked the load on Friday.

THOMAS ALMOND . I took the prisoner, with this wool, about three o'clock on the 29th of July, in Brick-lane; I asked him where he was going to unload - he said he did not know - the man who helped him to load them had had gone away; I asked if he knew where to take them - he said, No; I asked if he should know the man again - he said, No; I asked where he had loaded - he said, "In Thames-street;" but after some further conversation, he said in Tower-street - he was stopping when I took him."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-128

1439. JOHN WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 3 sovereigns, and one half-sovereign, the monies of Cornelius Fay , from his person .

CORNELIUS FAY. I am a corporal of the Westminster Militia , and live in Windmill-street. I was in the Black Horse, public-house, Titchbourne-street , on the 1st of September, and had between 17l. and 18l., in sovereigns, half-sovereigns,

and silver, part of it in my waistcoat, and part in my trousers pocket - I had taken nothing that morning, but I was tipsy the night before, and had been in the watch-house all night; I soon fell asleep - the shopman came and awoke me, and said the man that sat next me, who was the prisoner, had been feeling about my pockets; I felt, and the money was gone - I seized the prisoner directly, and found in his waistcoat-pocket, three sovereigns and half-a-crown; he said the sovereigns were all he had got of mine, the half-crown was his own.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you been drinking with this man? A. I do not know, he must have been in the house while I was there; I got out of the watch-house about six o'clock; I might have taken porter, gin and water, and brandy, the night before; I was fined 5s. for being drunk - I might have drank two glasses of gin at the Black Horse; I cannot tell what the prisoner drank, for I went to sleep - when I awoke he did not appear to be drunk, for he immediately said, "That is all the property I have of yours."

THOMAS CODBROOK . I am waiter at the Black Horse, Titchbourne-street. I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor come there on the morning of the 1st of September - the prosecutor was intoxicated, or very stupid, and the prisoner led him in - he sat down and went to sleep; the prisoner had a small glass of gin and water, and went out - he returned in about a quarter of an hour - I saw him feeling about the prosecutor's pockets, and as he drew his hand from his pocket, I saw a bit of paper in it - I went round, and saw it was a note for him to attend some society; I awoke him, and told him the prisoner was searching his pockets - he took hold of him, and found three sovereigns, half a sovereign, and half a crown, on him; he said, "I have no more of your money; the half-crown is my own;" the officer was sent for, and a canvass bag was found in his hat - he said he had been to a shop with Fay, who left the bag there, and he took it up; the prosecutor said he had 17l. 10s., and had lost the whole of it - but at the watch-house he found the rest in his pockets.

Mr. PHILLIPS to FAY. Q. Why did not you tell us you was led in by him? A. I did not know it; I was sober when I got out of the watch-house; and I drank nothing till I got to the public-house; I swear I did not give it to him, but cannot say whether I was at a grocer's shop - the prisoner was there.

WILLIAM ARNOLD . I am a carpenter. I was in the Black Horse, Titchbourne-street, about half-past seven o'clock on this morning, and saw Fay asleep - I saw the prisoner put his hands into his pockets - the waiter awoke Fay, and he said, "That rascal has robbed me of 17l. or 18l.;" he put his hands into the prisoner's pocket, and took the money out, and then we found the bag in his hat; the prosecutor said, "I will swear to that bag;" the prosecutor did not appear drunk.

EDMUND PEPPER . I was constable of the night. I had Fay in custody - he was sober when he left the watch-house, and I took him to his own door - he promised to go home, but he went into the wine-vaults, I believe; I went to the watch-house again at eight o'clock, and then I found Fay there, and the prisoner, who appeared a little stupified; Fay was very tipsy.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, and had a glass of gin in Windmill-street, and then he said he wanted half a pound of sugar; we went to a grocer's shop - he pulled out this bag, which was empty, and laid it on the counter, and said "Take it up," which I did, but I never touched his pocket or his money; we then went to the Black Horse, and fell asleep; I went out for a few minutes and when I returned he was still asleep.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-129

1440. JOHN DEANE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Richard Jackson .

PHILIP PHILLIPS . I am a salesman. I know Richard Jackson - he keeps a shop in Air-street, Piccadilly ; I have supplied him with goods - I was in the shop on the 7th of August - the prisoner and another came to ask the price of a pair of trousers; I said 10s. 6d., and asked if they would try them on; the prisoner said, "I dare say they will do, try them round the waist," and, while I was measuring them round his companion's waist, the prisoner snatched this coat from a shelf, and ran away; I ran after him, called Stop thief! and the people ran after him - I returned to the shop to see for the other, but he was gone - the prisoner and the coat were brought back in about ten minutes.

THOMAS TURNER . I saw the prisoner running up Sherrard-street, and stopped him; he said he had done nothing - two or three persons said, "If so, why did you run," and a young man came up with the coat, and said it was him who stole it; I asked him if he would go back to the shop; he said Yes; but when I let him go, he ran away; I followed him, and took him again.

STEPHEN SIMPSON . I saw the prisoner running up Sherrard-street, about five hundred yards from Mr. Jackson's, with a coat under his arm, which he threw down; I took it up, and took it to Mr. Jackson.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded intoxication.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260914-130

1441. THOMAS CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of William Carter .

WILLIAM CARTER. I am in service , in Lower Berkeley-street. On the 7th of July I went to bathe with a friend in the Serpentine-river ; I met the prisoner near Hyde-park-corner - we all went in together - the prisoner came out first, and, when I came out, he had left the place; I missed my shoes - the prisoner's sold shoes were lying there.

THOMAS BRACE . I took up the prisoner in the Park - I told him he had taken a pair of shoes from my friend; he said he had not; I asked him if he would go back to my friend; he said No.

GEORGE ANDERSON . I am shopman to a shoemaker. The prisoner brought these shoes to my master's shop, about half-past eight or nine o'clock on the 7th of July; I bought them of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-131

1442. JOHN MATTHEW CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of John Jenner .

JOHN JENNER. I am a butcher , and live in Lisson-street . I lost these shoes on the 8th of July; I had seen them the night before standing on a cask; I cannot say whether they were there when I went out at five o'clock that morning, but when I returned at nine o'clock, and went to put them on, they were gone.

PHILIP WEBSTER . On the 8th of July, at eight o'clock in the morning, I was standing at the end of Homer's-row, and saw the prisoner and two other boys walking sharp up the road; I suspected they had something - the other two then sat down - I followed the prisoner into a pawnbroker's, and asked him what he had got - he said he had bought those shoes of a Jew, and he was going to pawn them for the purpose of getting something for his breakfast; I found 6d. in his pockets - I took him to the office, but I could not find the owner, and he was discharged; on the Saturday following he came to demand them - I had then found the owner.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-132

1443. DANIEL BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , 10 pieces of quartering, value 10s.; 11 deal boards, value 10s.; 1 bundle of lathes, value 2s., and 1 piece of moulding, value 3s. , the goods of John Warmsley .

JOHN WARMSLEY. I am building some houses at Acton . John Gelsthorpe is my foreman, and had charge of the premises; there is one piece of this property which I can swear to - I believe all the pieces are mine - this, which I know, is partly maple and part pine - it does not often happen that these woods are united - it was fixed in one of the windows.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How many houses were you building? A. Four; I have twenty altogether - any body might have gone there - the wood might have been sold to the prisoner for fire-wood - I have known him a many years, and always believed him to be honest and industrious.

JOHN GELSTHORPE. I was foreman to the work going on at Turnham-green. Several pieces of wood were taken away at different times; I know part of those produced.

Cross-examined. Q. Some of the workmen lodged at the prisoner's house? A. Yes; and cooked their victuals there - I have caught these men stealing small pieces of wood - I think it is more likely than not that these were so taken.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I went to the prisoner's house - I asked him whether he had any wood of the kind I described - he said he did not know, but he shewed me what he had got - Gelsthorpe was with me, and owned this.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-133

1444. JOHN BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Bannister , from his person .

JOHN BANNISTER. I live with Lord Bristol. On the 5th of July I was in St. James's-square, about half-past three o'clock - I had been to get change for a 20l. note - and in York-street I felt a large key I had in my pocket knock against my thigh - I looked round, and saw the prisoner puting my handkerchief into his hat - there were two other boys, who ran away.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I took the prisoner into custody, and the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-134

1445. JAMES BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 prayer-book, value 3s., and 1 other book, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Freek Flook .

THOMAS FREEK FLOOK. I am a bookseller , and live in Bloomsbury-square . I was in my shop on the 21st of July last - I went into a private passage for about half a minute; when I came back the prisoner was there; he asked the price of Burn's Works, but did not purchase them. Another gentleman came in - the prisoner went away, and soon after I missed a prayer-book, and another book - I went down Broad-street, and saw the prisoner walking with another person; I said, "You have stolen some books" - I did not find the property with him. When I got back to the shop I found the prayer-book on the chair; I did not see him take it from his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He did not attempt to run away? A. No. I understand his connections are respectable.

Prisoner's Defence. When I waited in the shop I had ample time to run away; when I came back the books he said were stolen were found, one on the desk, and the other in the chair.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-135

1446. LETITIA BOTFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 21 yards of printed cotton, value 15s. , the goods of James Withenbury Hawthorne .

JAMES WITHENBURY HAWTHORNE. I live in Clark's-place, Islington , and am a linen-draper . This is my cotton - I saw it the evening before it was stolen.

BENJAMIN SHILLINGFORD . I was in Clark's-place on the 20th of July, and saw the prisoner and another woman with her; the other woman took the cotton, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it under her shawl and ran away - I followed, and overtook her.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it given me carry, and I did not steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-136

1447. HENRY BURKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 17 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 3 shillings , the property of James Akerman and James Pickworth .

HENRY PICKWORTH. On the 20th of July I gave the prisoner seventeen sovereigns, a half-sovereign, and three shillings, in silver; I sent him to Messrs. Jones', in West Smithfield, to pay for a bullock to bring home; this was on the 20th of July - I did not see him again till the 23d of August.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I saw the prisoner last Monday fortnight, in Carnaby-market; I asked him what he had

done with this money; he said he had been to Blackwall, spent part of it, and lost part.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-137

1448. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 4 saws, value 18s., and 1 carpenter's plough, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Way .

THOMAS WAY. On the 10th of July I was at work in Prince's-street, Maida-hill . I lost four saws and a plough while I was gone to dinner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SEWELL . On the 10th of July I saw the prisoner running down Lisson-grove, with the tools, between twelve and one o'clock; I could see two saws under his coat, and pursued him - I never lost sight of him; when he got to the New-road he made a halt near a stage-coach, looked through the wheels, and then ran again; a great number of persons followed him till he got to Queen-street, Edgware-road.

CORNELIUS HURLING . I took him into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-138

1449. JOHN ANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 4 tea-spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Sophia Sass .

MARY FRANCIS . I am in the service of Miss Sophia Sass, who lives in Greek-street . On the morning of the 30th of June two dustmen were in my mistress' house - I was in the back drawing-room, and saw the prisoner running out of the room; I followed - a man stopped him, and took some spoons from him; there were four silver spoons taken from the drawing-room table - I saw him drop one on the stairs.

JOHN CHRISTOPHER CHILD . Miss Sass lives in my house. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and heard something fall on the stairs.

JOSEPH PREICE . I was turning round the corner of Carlisle-street, Soho, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw a man take the prisoner, and take three spoons from him; these are the spoons; the man gave them to me.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw a man running, and I ran after him; when the officer came up the man, who had the spoons, said to the one who took him, "Here are the spoons," and ran off.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-139

1450. THOMAS JENKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 pair of breeches, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Brown .

MARIA BROWN . I am the wife of Joseph Brown, and live in Stinge-lane . On the 11th of July I heard a noise at the door; I cried Stop thief! when I saw the prisoner running, and did not lose sight of him until he was secured.

JOHN DIXON . Hearing the cry of Stop thief! I stopped the prisoner, and took the breeches from him.

WILLIAM LIVINGSTON . I saw the prisoner take these breeches away from Brown's window - he snatched them down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260914-140

1451. DANIEL HEMMET was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 pistol, value 15s.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 2s. 6d., and 1 snuffer-stand, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Swan .

JOSEPH SWAN. I keep a broker's-shop , in Warner-street, Clerkenwell . On the 4th of August my son called me into the shop, and the prisoner ran out; I turned round, and missed a pistol and a pair of snuffers off the table - I saw the prisoner throw them away.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I stopped the prisoner, and saw him drop the property.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer. When I received the prisoner in charge; he said he was very sorry.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Red Lion-yard, and a gentleman desired me to take them to Gray's Inn-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260914-141

1452. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 1 sovereign , the money of Edward London Rodick .

EDWARD LONDON RODICK. On the 16th of August I took a coach, with another gentleman, from St. Paul's Church-yard, and ordered to be driven to No. 7, Jermyn-street ; when we got there I gave the prisoner, who drove, a sovereign, to take 3s. for his fare; my friend recommended me to get silver in the house, as I should, perhaps, get bad change; my servant went into the house to get 3s. - I gave it to the prisoner, and asked for my sovereign; he said I did not give him one; while the servant was gone I saw him go to the horses, which aroused my suspicion; as he persisted in the denial I called a watchman - no sovereign was found on his person - there was one thrown into the coach.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he object to your sending for change? A. No; I do not know whether the coach was opened while the servant was gone - I am sure I did not drop the sovereign in the coach.

JOHN CAIN . I took the prisoner into custody. The prosecutor said he had lost a sovereign; I then searched his pocket but did not find one; but found a sovereign among the straw, in the coach.

Cross-examined. Q. No gold was found on him? A. No; he was too anxious to be searched; I mean he did not express any disinclination; five or six shillings were found on him - it might be only three.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman never gave me any sovereign.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260914-142

1453. THOMAS FERGUSSON and MICHAEL ANDERSON were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 37 yards of cotton, value 23s. , the goods of William Brown .

JOSEPH GORDON . This cotton is the property of Wil

liam Brown, my employer, who is a linen-draper , in Edgware-road - it was put at the door, on the 12th of August, with other goods for sale, about half-past eight o'clock, and about ten I missed it; the officer called about a week afterwards with it.

GEORGE AVIS . I saw the two prisoners about eleven o'clock, on Saturday, the 12th of August, turning out of Bond-street, into Hanover-square - a girl ran after them, and gave them some plums; I asked Fergusson what this bundle was which he had - he said washing, which he was going to take to his mother - I took him to the office.(Property produced and sworn to.)

FERGUSSON'S Defence. I was coming down Oxford-street, and saw this bundle; I picked it up - I found nobody to own it; I was coming down South Molton-street, and met the other prisoner.

FERGUSSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

ANDERSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-143

1454. JOSEPH EMMERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 gown value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s., and 1 book, value 6d. , the goods of John Camplin .

ELIZABETH CAMPLIN . I am the wife of John Camplin, who lives in Globe-lane . On the 15th of June, on coming down stairs, I saw the prisoner going out of the street door, from the front parlour, with a bundle; I followed about two hundred yards, and then I lost sight of him - I called Stop thief! Crouch and Bagley went after him - I had seen him on the back premises about a quarter of an hour before - he worked for a gentleman there once; I returned home and missed the articles stated - the gown and handkerchief hung behind the front-room door.

WILLIAM CROUCH . On the 15th of June I saw the prisoner run by with a bundle under his arm; Mrs. Camplin came up, and I ran and saw him drop these things - I picked up the shawl - the other witness picked up the rest - I lost sight of him when I had gone about three hundred yards, but I am sure he is the person.

CHARLES BAGLEY . On the 15th of June the prisoner ran by me - he had a bundle under his arm - I ran after him and saw him drop it - I took up all the things but the shawl, which Crouch took up and gave me; I did not follow him any further. I think he is the man who dropped them by the jacket he has got on; I did not see his face - I saw Mrs. Camplin behind me, but she could not catch him.

PHILIP PARISH . I took the prisoner from the description given by Mrs. Camplin.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came there that day to get work, as I had had none a long time - I never was away at all.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-144

1455. EDMUND SAWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 sovereign , the money of William Baker .

WILLIAM BAKER. I keep the Cock public-house, Blandford-street, Manchester-square . On the 8th of July the prisoner came into my service as pot-boy , and went away with a sovereign, which had been given him by a person in the tap-room - he brought me a written character; I went to the Pewter-platter public-house, from whence it was dated, and they did not know him.

DANIEL CONNER . I live in Kelmel-buildings, Mary-le-bone. On the evening of the 8th of July I received my wages - I came to Mr. Baker's, and called for a pot of beer - the prisoner brought it - I gave him a sovereign to get change, and to take for the porter.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me go out with the sovereign? A. No; but he said at the office he would have given it me on the Monday morning.

JOHN THOMAS CONNER . I was pot-boy to Mr. Baker - I saw Conner give the sovereign to the prisoner, and heard him say, "Take for the pot of beer, and bring me change;" after a while he said to me, "Where is the change;" I said, "You did not give it to me;" he then said "It was your fellow-servant;" I went to the bar, and he had not been there - I saw him on the Saturday following in East-street, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the sovereign, went to the bar, and put it down, and a person was there who told me he knew of a situation; on the Saturday following I was going down to Mr. Baker's to get some things, which I had left there, when I met the two persons who have been examined.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-145

1456. MARIA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 3lbs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Morris .

RICHARD MORRIS. I live in Skinner-street, Somer's-town , and am a cheesemonger . On the 8th of July, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner outside my window; I saw her put her hand over the wire, take a piece of bacon, and look at it - my young man was nearer to her than I was, but his head was turned away; I kept my eye up on her - I just turned round, she was gone, and the bacon - I pursued, and took hold of her just by the watch-box - I said, "What have you got here"- she said Nothing, extended her arms, and the bacon fell down.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Had you lights in your shop? A. Yes; five in the shop, and one out - there were several persons outside the shop - I do not remember seeing a little girl, nor a woman - there were several persons outside - I did not ask any body if they had seen her drop any thing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD COOPER . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with having stolen this piece of bacon from Mr. Morris' - he did not attend himself.

SAMUEL MASON . I am the watchman. Mr. Morris gave the prisoner in my charge, and the bacon - as we were going along she said she would honestly beg Mr. Morris' pardon and mine, if I would not lock her up - I delivered her to the officer - a little girl came up as we were going there, who said it was not her mother that thieved the bacon.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you write down what the little girl said? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I told my daughter to get a basket, and to follow me to the green-grocer's - when I got to the green-grocer's there was a great crowd round the door - I passed round the crowd, and, not seeing her, I walked on- Mr. Morris' shop was within two doors of me, and there was a crowd before the door - I just stood for a moment, and saw Mr. Morris inside - I looked in to see if my girl was there, as I deal with him now and then - I nodded to him, came away, and turned back to the green-grocer's shop - before I got to the shop, somebody came behind me, and pulled me violently round; I turned, and saw Mr. Morris - he said, "Give me my bacon which you have stolen;" I said, "I have no bacon;" the watchman said,"I see no bacon on her," and he hesitated in taking me, but Morris said he gave charge, and he should take me.

COURT to SAMUEL MASON. Q. Did she speak to you in going along? A. She said she was not the person who stole the bacon, and Mr. Morris had given me the wrong person.

ELIZABETH TURNBULL . I live with my mother, in Greenwell-street, Somer's-town. I know Mr. Morris' shop. On the night Mrs. Smith was taken I was in Skinner-street, at a grocer's, opposite Mr. Morris'. I saw a woman, like a dustman's wife, stand at Mr. Morris', and take the bacon - it was not this lady who took it; there was a person passed me at the moment, and I did not see what the woman did with it; in two or three minutes I saw Mrs. Smith in the hands of the watchman; I took hold of his coat, and said, "Sir, that is not the person who took the bacon," but he went on to the watch-house- I could not get in, or I should have said the same there. When the woman took the bacon Mrs. Smith was at the green-grocer's, next door but one, taking some sallad up to price it; the person who took it went up West-street, in a line with Mr. Morris' - there was no one serving Mrs. Smith.

- TURNBULL . This little girl is my daughter. I sent her to buy some tea and sugar at Mr. Burridge's near Mr. Morris' shop.

COURT to SAMUEL MASON. Q. Why did not you tell the Magistrate what the little girl had said? A. It was settled so quickly I had not time to tell what I wanted.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-146

1457. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 1 silver milk-pot, value 30s. , the goods of Andrew Louroitti Andres .

The prosecutor's name being Andreas Louroitti , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260914-147

1458. JAMES MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 3 gowns, value 3s.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 9 aprons, value 3s.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 2 caps, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 1 petticoat, value 2s., the goods of Mary Ann Doswell , spinster ; 1 gown, value 2s., and 4 aprons, value 4s. , the goods of Ann Lynch , spinster .

MARY ANN DOSWELL. I live at the Brunswick Hotel, Hanover-square . On the 4th of August the hotel was robbed, and I missed these articles next morning.

ANN LYNCH. I live at the Brunswick Hotel. I lost an apron and some other things; I have only seen an apron since - I had folded it up, rough dry, with the others.

JOHN BIARS . I am a journeyman sweep, and live at No. 47, Duck-lane. On Friday morning, the 4th of August, I saw the prisoner go out of the room where I was asleep, at five o'clock, with a person named William Hope , who called for him - they returned in about half an hour, with a sack, with a brush, a shovel, and some cinder ashes in it, and a bundle of clothes upon the ashes - they laid it down in the room, where it remained for an hour and a half; I then saw them put in their hands, and draw out the bundle; they untied it, and examined the things one by one; they then tied them up again, and put the bundle in one corner of the cupboard. When they were gone I went and took an apron, which hung half out of the bundle, and carried it to Mr. Warne's, who is a master sweep; when I was there Mr. Blake came to speak about it; I left it there, in the room, where his boy sleeps.

WILLIAM WARNE . I am a master chimney-sweeper. Biars came to my house on the 4th of August, in the fore part of the day, and my lad found an apron in my premises, below, that afternoon, which he brought to me; I gave it to Andrews.

THOMAS ANDREWS . I received the apron on Friday evening, the 4th of August, between seven and eight o'clock - I took it the next morning to Mr. Blake's, when Ann Lynch identified it immediately - I gave it to Mr. Smith. The prisoner was not in my service.

JAMES SMITH . I am a constable. I have the apron; I went and took the prisoner the same day.

EDWARD WEBSTER . I live with Mr. Warne. My master sent me to find a piece of clothes leather, and I found this apron under the barrack-bed - it was tied up in a handkerchief.

ROBERT JOLLY . I am waiter at the Brunswick Hotel, kept by Mr. Blake. On the morning of the 4th of August the prisoner and another sweep came to the hotel at a quarter past five o'clock - they said they came to do the flue: I left them in the kitchen. They said they came from Angel-court, where Mr. Andrews lives; I did not hear of the robbery that day as I went to Lancaster.

RICHARD CHANDLER . I am a sweep. The prisoner lodged in the room under me - he and Thomas Hope came and knocked for me to go and get some dust, on the morning of the 4th of August; we all three went to several houses for dust, and when we got to Mr. Blake's hotel, Hope rang the bell; the prisoner and he went in; I stopped outside; when they came out they brought their brush, sack, and shovel with them; we went to No. 47, Duck-lane - Biars was then in bed; I saw the sack in the room; I had not been out with the prisoner before, but afterwards William Hope called and gave me 1s. 6d. for my trouble.

JURY. Q. Was there any thing in the sack when they came out? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my place, and came to lodge in that house; William Hope asked me to go to work with him; he took the witness with him; Hope took me up stairs to clean the flue - he went into another room - I

got some ashes, came out of the hotel, and stopped talking with the porter.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-148

1459. JOSEPH WEBB , WILLIAM SMITH , and THOMAS WILKINSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 6 1/2 yards of cloth, value 18s. , the goods of George Spencer .

GEORGR SPENCER. I live in Stanhope-street , and am a tailor . I lost this piece of cloth on the 11th of August, about half-past one o'clock - I had seen it about an hour before; I did not miss it till it was brought back by the officer, who had Smith and Webb in custody.

CHARLES JONES . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the afternoon of the 11th of August I was going through Broad-court, out of Bow-street, and Boston told me the three prisoners were about to commit a felony; I followed them to Stanhope-street, Clare-market, where I saw Wilkinson pop into the shop, and come out again; Smith then took the cloth, and gave it to Webb; I took Webb, and Boston took Smith; I took the cloth back to the shop.

JOHN BOSTON . I am a porter. I met Jones, and told him the prisoners were together, and I had watched them from Oxford-road; we followed them. I saw Smith take this cloth, and give it to Webb; Wilkinson had looked into the shop, and then went and stood at the next door. I took Smith, but Wilkinson got away.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I took Wilkinson on the 14th of August.(Property produced and sworn to).

Smith and Webb pleaded distress.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

WILKINSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-149

1460. WILLIAM ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 shawl, value 1s., and 2 napkins, value 6d. , the goods of John Corner .

JOHN CORNER. I live in Crown-court, Windmill-street , and am a boot clicker . This property was in my first floor-room, on the 8th of August, in a chest of drawers. I returned home from my employ about half-past nine or ten o'clock in the evening, and my wife told me the drawers had been forced; I missed the articles; I got the prisoner taken to Marlborough-street; he had been in possession of my house.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the prisoner after your property was missed? A. Yes. I had been distrained upon for rent, and he was in my house; he was so drunk I do not think he knew what he was about.

ELIZABETH CORNER . I am the wife of John Corner. I had left this property in the drawer locked, when I went out at six o'clock in the morning, to go to work; when I returned at nine o'clock that evening, it was gone; the prisoner was very much intoxicated, and was asleep on the table; he had been fighting.

JOHN REED . I am a publican. The prisoner left something at my house on the 8th of August; I did not open it; he was very tipsy; I put the property he left into my bar, till the officer came; it was two or three o'clock; he only said "Take care of this."

Cross-examined. Q. He appeared so far gone that you did not like to let him have any more? A. Yes.

GEORGE SMITH . I am the officer. I have had this bundle ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-150

1461. SAMUEL HALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 ring, value 5s. , the goods of James Sweetapple .

CHRISTIANA SWEETAPPLE . I am the wife of James Sweetapple - we live at Brompton . We took in this ring to repair on the 5th of September, between two and three o'clock; the prisoner and another boy came in to buy a half-penny worth of damsons; I got up to serve them, and felt the prisoner's hand behind me; I did not know but he was going to put the damsons into the measure himself; the ring was then lying on the board, close to the damsons - as soon as I had served him, he ran out of the shop; my husband came to the board and said, "Good God! he has got the ring."

JOHN LEADLEY . I am a constable, and live in the house of the boy who was with the prisoner; the prosecutor came there, and I went and took the prisoner the next day - as I was taking him to the watch-house he told me he and another boy had taken the ring over Westminster-bridge, and sold it for 6d. - I asked him no questions; I found it there.

THOMAS BYWORTH . I am a watch-maker, and live at the foot of Westminster-bridge. Two boys came to my shop and said they found this ring on the bridge - they asked if it was gold; I said it was jewellers' gold, and the full value of it was 6d., which I gave them for it - I saw the prisoner at Queen-square, but I cannot say he was one who came into my shop - I believe him to be one; the other was taller.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-151

1462. GEORGE SHANK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 watch, value 25s.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 1d., and 1 watch-key, value 1d. , the goods of Charles Shephard .

SARAH SHEPHARD . I am wife the of Charles Shephard, an undertaker , who lives at Church-fields, Greenwich; I live at Turnham Green , and keep a shop - the prisoner is distantly related to me - when he was out of a situation he resided with his aunt. On the 13th of July he called, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon - he wrote a letter in my parlour, and went away in about half an hour - I was in the kitchen part of the time - I had put the watch in the drawer in the parlour, about six o'clock that morning, and did not miss it till ten o'clock in the evening - I came to London, and gave information.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What relation is he of yours? A. My nephew married his sister - I do not live with my husband - many persons come to my shop on business.

JAMES GURNEY . I am shopman to Nicholas Morritt , pawnbroker, High-street, Mary-le-bone. I took in this

watch of the prisoner, on the 13th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - on the 15th, Reed came to look at it, and paid the interest; and the day following he fetched it out.

Cross-examined. Q. Why are there four duplicates for one article? A. Because we gave one to the person who pawned it, and another to Reed - I had never seen the prisoner before; I saw him again about ten days afterwards; he acknowledged in the office that he had pawned it.

AUGUSTUS REED . I am a pork butcher. I have seen the prisoner pass my door - one day, in July, he asked me if I wanted to buy a duplicate of a watch - I went to look at it at the shop - I paid the interest, and had a fresh ticket written - I brought it back to the prisoner, and said I did not like the watch, and would not have it; next day I went to a public-house and saw him again; he asked me again to buy the duplicate, and said I should have it for 4s.; I had not so much, but I gave him 3s. 5d.; I asked if it was his own - he said Yes, but it had been his brother's, but being out of place he wanted to get a few shillings - I went to Smithfield the next day to buy two pigs, and wanting money, I pawned the watch in Theobald's-road.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known the prisoner long? A. No; I had not seen him more than nine or ten times; this was the first time I ever spoke to him.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am shopman to Hadden and Royce, pawnbrokers. I produce a watch pawned by Reed, on the 21st of July.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. The prosecutor called at Mary-le-bone office on the 20th of July, and I took the prisoner on the 22d, in Regent's Park; I told him what it was for; he said he knew nothing of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JANE PHILLIPS . I live with Mrs. Shephard, and am her niece - I have known the prisoner five years; he came to my aunt's on the day in question, between two and three o'clock, and staid about half an hour - I was backwards and forwards in the room; after he had written his letter he came down into the kitchen where we were ironing; he then went out, and I went up to the street door with him; he did not come again; he was below about five minutes - some customers came to the shop that day.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-152

1463. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 book, value 5s. , the goods of William Bunting .

JOHN FLETCHER . I am in the service of William Bunting, bookseller , Clare-court, Drury-lane . I was at my dinner, on the 11th of July, and saw some one outside the shop; I went out, there was a young gentleman and the prisoner - he told me she had taken a book; I went after her and said, "Give me my master's book" - she said she had not had it; but I felt under her shawl, and it was there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260914-153

1464. JAMES WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , 1 jacket, value 2s.; 5 pamphlets, value 2s.; and 1 brush, value 1s. , the goods of James Chapman .

JAMES SMITH . I am a private watchman. On the 3d of August, about two o'clock in the morning, I was in the little box, at the end of Mr. Long's work-shop, in Westminster-Abbey Yard - I heard a rattling among the tools - I jumped up and pulled my door open; I felt round to my left hand, and felt the prisoner sitting on the box of a workman named Chapman - he said two men lifted him over the rails, and said he might sleep there with safety - he could not have got there without getting over the rails, which are six feet high. I found these things about a yard from the box.

JAMES CHAPMAN. I am a mason . I left my box of tools safe on the 2d of August, but the box was not locked - this jacket is mine, and had been in the box; it is an open shed, but there is an iron railing all round - I did not miss any thing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had arrived from Guildford too late to get a lodging; two men who said they belonged to this place, said I might have shelter there till morning, I declare I never touched any of the things.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-154

1465. ROBERT WESTWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 1 saucepan, value 4s. 6d.; and 2 books, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Mary Goode .

MARY GOODE. I live in Dean-street , and am a dressmaker . About six weeks before the 19th of August the prisoner came to lodge with me; I missed one book, and in about a week I missed another, and a saucepan out of my room, on the first floor; he had the lower room - I cannot be sure whether this property is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-155

1466. GEORGE VINGE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , 1 book, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH. I live at No. 33, Broad-street, St. Giles's , and am a bookseller . On the 14th of August, I lost a book; my boy gave me information; I ran after the prisoner, and saw him putting something into his pocket, ten or fifteen yards off - I took out my book; he said it was his first offence, and he hoped to be forgiven.(Property prouced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18260914-156

1467. CHARLES THOMPSON , THOMAS EVANS , and THOMAS EVANS, the younger , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 2 pillars, value 1l. , the goods of John Brown .

The articles being squares, not pillars, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260914-157

1468. THOMAS BOSPIDNICK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 3 sixpences and 5 1/2d. , the monies of Sarah Scott , widow .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Judgment respited.

Reference Number: t18260914-158

1469. JOSEPH TONBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 stove, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Taylor .

RICHARD TAYLOR. I am a smith , and live at No. 19, Maiden-lane . On the 5th of July I had a stove at my door for sale - I heard some one had taken it - I pursued the prisoner, who had got thirty or forty yards - he dropped the stove and went on - I pursued and took him; he was either intoxicated or appeared so - I believe he only appeared so - he made a dreadful resistance.

THOMAS BROADHEAD . I am a cutler. I saw the prisoner coming down with the stove, and Mr. Taylor in pursuit of him - he threw down the stove just by where I was and walked away three or four yards further, when Taylor collared him.

THOMAS CUSS . I am the officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and did not know what I was taken for,

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-159

1470. WILLIAM SMITH and JOHN MAHONEY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 saddle, value 30s. , the goods of John Rogers .

HENRY COOPER WOODHOUSE . I live in Oxford-street, and am a hosier. On the 28th of June, at nearly two o'clock in the day, I was in my gig, and the prisoners attracted my notice about a harness-maker's window, in Park-road - they were both in company and talking to each other; they approached near to Mr. Roger's shop, and touched the saddle ready to carry it off - I thought they meant to commit a felony - I drove by, and returned again; I then went into the second house, and from their window I could see Smith take the saddle; they had both handled it before, and put up the stirrups ready to carry it off; Mahoney was two or three yards from Smith when he took it; I followed him - he heard me run, and he ran too - after he had run thirty or forty yards with the saddle, he threw it down, and ran about as much further, when I overtook him, without losing sight of him for a moment - I brought him back, and looked to see which way the other had gone - I saw him about fifty yards off, in another direction - I sent two young men after him, and he was taken.

JAMES HOLE . My father is a butcher. I was in his shop, opposite Mr. Rogers', and saw the witness bring Smith back - he asked who would run after the other - I ran, and took Mahoney - he turned round and saw me run, and he begun to run - I then took him.

RICHARD CLARKE . I am in the service of John Rogers, a sadler . I remember this transaction, and Smith being brought back by Mr. Woodhouse; this saddle is my own making - I had put it out for sale - I knew nothing of either of the prisoners.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it outside? A. Yes; the stirrups were hanging down when it was put out.

EDWARD TURNER . I am the officer, and took the prisoners.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. This lad had nothing to do with it; I was coming from dinner, and he asked me the way to Portland-town - I told him, and he ran off immediately.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

MAHONEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-160

1471. ARTHUR SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 1 pair of scales, value 4s. , the goods of William Jackson .

PHILIP PARISH . I am an officer, and found the prisoner in Hare-street-fields, with these scales in his arms, wrapped up in a blue apron, on the 26th of July I took him on another charge.

MARY ANN PEACOCK . I live with Mr. William Jackson. I remember these scales standing on a bureau bedstead in the shop, in Dog-row ; they were safe between one and two o'clock in the day; I had not seen the prisoner there; I know them by two particular marks.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was crossing the fields I found these scales, and a rusty chissel.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-161

1472. JOHN BRIANT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 10 pairs of shoes, value 1l. 4s., and 1 pair of boots, value 4s., the goods of Patrick Moore , and 1 boot-hook, value 2d.; 1 awl, value 1d., and 1 rubber, value 1d. , the goods of Michael Ryan .

MICHAEL RYAN. I live in Kent-street, Borough, and am a shoe-maker . The prisoner worked for the same employer, Mr. Moore; I lost a boot-hook, awl, and a rubber, which were my property, from Mr. Moore's shop - I missed them the day after the prisoner was taken; I found the boot-hook and awl-blade in Rosemary-lane, at the shop of a man named Lovet.

THOMAS OBORNE . I went to search Lovet's house for tools, and Ryan found the boot-hook and awl there.

PATRICK MOORE. I am a shoe-maker , and employed the prisoner to work for me eight or nine days; I missed eleven pairs of shoes, and one pair of boots, after he left me; I had his wife taken while she was making away with three pairs of my shoes, but she was discharged.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-162

1473. JOHN BRIANT was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 8 pairs of shoes, value 18s.; 1 coat, value 4s.; 4 shoulder-irons, value 2s., and 2 jiggers and 1 rasp, value 6d. , the goods of Oliver Mason .

OLIVER MASON. I live in Monmouth-street , and am a shoe-maker . The prisoner had been in my employ about eight weeks before the 16th of June - he left me on that day, and I missed my articles from the shop next morning; I found the irons at the place where he was taken, at John Lovet's, in Rosemary-lane.

THOMAS OBORNE . I went with the witness to Lovet's to search for the tools; I found these three articles which the prosecutor owns.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left my own tools there, and took these in a mistake.

OLIVER MASON. He left no tools there.

JOHN LOVET . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Rosemary lane; the prisoner brought these articles to my shop to work with - he brought nothing but his working tools.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-163

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1474. ELIZA EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Coggan Bolton , from his person .

WILLIAM COGGAN BOLTON. I live in Furnival's-inn. On the evening of the 30th of June, about five o'clock, I was in Chandos-street , and felt some person push me on one side, and presently the prisoner came before me - she muttered something which I did not understand, and upon surveying me, she took my handkerchief from my breast-pocket, and ran away - I saw her run into a house; I found the constable, and she was taken.

Prisoner. You went home with me - you had no money, and left the handkerchief with me. Witness. I had not the slightest conversation with her.

THOMAS CUSS . The prisoner came to me, and gave me this information; I went into the house with him, and the prisoner was standing in the yard - I took hold of her, and behind her there was a cellar, and I saw the handkerchief down there - I got it up; she said, "For God's sake let the gentleman forgive me."

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-164

1475. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 gown, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of James Ramsey .

WILLIAM ANGUS . I am in the service of James Ramsay, pawnbroker , of Liquorpond-street . On the 11th of July I saw the prisoner fifteen or sixteen yards from the shop - I followed her, by Mr. Ramsay's desire, and took this gown from her, which had been hanging on the doorpost.

ELIZABETH HELDER . I was near Mr. Ramsey's, and saw the prisoner take the gown.

WILLIAM REED . I was sent for, and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was the first time I was in custody.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-165

1476. CHARLES BALLARD and JOHN BALLARD were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 8 shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Ebenezer Brittell .

JOSEPH EBENEZER BRITTELL. I am a shoe-maker . I live in Old-street . These eight shoes were safe on Saturday, the 15th of July; I hung them up on some nails, expecting a person to call for them - on the Monday morning I missed them. I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM MERRY . On the morning of the 17th of August I was in Old-street about two o'clock, with two other officers; I stopped the two prisoners; on John Ballard I found two shoes under his waistcoat, and in his breeches pocket I found four keys, one of which fits the padlock of the shop.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was with William Merry - I found three shoes on Charles Ballard, under his apron.

FRANCIS KEYS . I was of the same party. I found a shoe in Charles Ballard's breast pocket, and two in his hat.

CHARLES BALLARD'S Defence. We were passing down Old-street, and found several odd shoes on the step of a door, and in one of them we found the brass nob of a door and several keys - we took them up and were going home.

C. BALLARD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Four Months .

J. BALLARD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-166

1477. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 2 boots, value 12s. , the goods of John Reeve .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-167

1478. JOHN BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 coal-scuttle, value 10s. , the goods of Robert George .

ROBERT GEORGE. I live in Chaple-street, Lisson-green , and am a broker . On the morning of the 29th of July I placed a coal-scuttle on the step of my door - I went to breakfast in the kitchen, and saw a man come to the door - he called to know if I had not lost a coal-scuttle- I pursued in the direction he told me, and saw the prisoner running with it on his left arm - he dropped it, and I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged ,

Reference Number: t18260914-168

1479. CATHERINE ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 4lbs. weight of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of William Geary .

HENRY POTTER . I am in the employ of William Geary, a cheesemonger , of Broad-street, Bloomsbury . On the evening of the 25th of August the watchman brought the prisoner to the shop with this bacon, which I had seen about two hours before, and knew it to be Mr. Geary's.

FRANCIS REYNOLDS . I saw the prisoner pass the shop and take the bacon out of the window - I took her with it in her apron.

Prisoner's Defence. It was the greatest distress that made me do it.

GUILTY Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-169

1480. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , a hat, value 15s. , the goods of Charles Brake .

CHARLES BRAKE. I am a hatter , and live in Barbi

can . On the 3d of July the prisoner came and wished to be suited with a hat, and he desired it to be sent home with a bill and receipt; I sent it by my boy, who returned and said the prisoner stated he had paid me for it.

SAMUEL HOLMES . I took the hat on the 3d of July, by Mr. Brake's desire, to No. 30, Baldwin-street, City-road- I knocked at the door, and saw two ladies, who said"O, you have brought the hat - the young man is just gone - he has been here to say it was No. 3,;" I was going to No. 3, as they directed me, and I met the prisoner, who wanted to take the hat out of my hand; he said he had been to my master's and paid for it; I would not let him have it, but went on to No. 3, which is Mr. Francis' public-house - he then took the hat, went into the bar, and said he had paid my master, and I should find it all right when I got home. When I went back he was gone from the house.

JOHN LLOYD . I apprehended the prisoner in Oxford-street, where he was trying this trick on with another boy; I went up to him and said "Do you know Mr. Brake?" he said No; I said "Did you have a hat of him?" he said "I know I have, and I will pay you for it;" a woman was coming by, and he asked her to lend him the money; she said she had not got it - I then said he should go to Marlborough-street.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-170

1481. CHARLES WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 69lbs. weight of butter, value 20s., and 1 cask, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Augustus Muller .

CHARLES AUGUSTUS MULLER. I am a merchant , and live in White Hart-court, Bishopsgate-street ; this butter came to my warehouse on the 1st of May; there were two casks of this sort, and some of two other sorts; I am quite certain it is mine; here is the shipping mark.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many casks of butter had you marked in this way? A. About fifty; I had only parted with two of them, before July; and this was one; it was returned on the 1st of June.

JOHN BROWN . I am a watch-house keeper. I was in Bunhill-row, about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 13th of July, and saw the prisoner with this cask on his shoulder - I followed him opposite to the watch-house - I then asked what he had got - he said "A cash of butter;" I said "Have you a bill of parcels with you;" he said No; but he was going to the top of Bunhill-row; I said"You must go over to the watch-house;" he crossed over, and threw it down and ran away - he was pursued and taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he was carrying it for a person, who was going on before him? A. He said he had to carry it to the top of Bunhill-row for two men, who had given him 3s.; he did not tell me they were gone on before; a gentleman afterwards came and said he saw a man carrying a cask of butter in an awkward way.

EDWARD HAND . I am a watchman. I was at the corner of Bunhill-row when the prisoner passed me - I looked at him very much; he was sweating under the butter; he went up Bunhill-row, and I went to tell Mr. Brown; but he had stopped him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-171

1482. JOHN BECK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 2 saddles, value 1l. 10s.; 2 sets of harness, value 3l.; 3 bridles, value 1l.; 1 chaise-cover, value 3s.; 1 rug, value 1s.; 5 brushes, value 1s.; 1 towel, value 2d.; 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 sack, value 1s., and 1 looking-glass, value 6d. , the goods of Walter Hodsoll .

RICHARD SMITH . I am groom to Walter Hodson, of Haverstock-hill, Hampstead . On the 18th of August, I was at the stables at half-past seven o'clock in the evening; they were all safe, and these articles there - I went there the next morning at a quarter before seven, and I saw the coach-house door broken open, and the shafts set against the chaise; these articles were gone - I found this bit of a chissel, which I have compared with a chissel I have seen since, and it matches exactly.

GEORGE WHITWORTH . I was in Munster-place, Regent's-park, on the morning of the 19th of August; two men passed me, one of whom had a sack on his back, and the other was helping it from his back to his head; they went some distance, and I called a private watchman and another man to follow - I stopped them near the watch-house, and gave them in charge to the two men, while I went and brought out the watch-house-keeper; when I came back the two men were gone, but the bag was there- and I saw the prisoner running round a corner - I pursued and took him; I am quite sure he is the man I had seen before with this bag, which contains these articles - when I first stopped them I pulled the bag down, and said "What have you got here;" they said it was nothing to me, it belonged to their master; this broken chissel the watch-house-keeper found on him.

RICHARD SMITH . I am a watchman. I was at the watch-house when Whitworth came; I went out with him; the sack was there, but the men were gone; he said"There is one;" pointing to the prisoner; we pursued; he was walking very past, and looking about him; I caught him, and gave him a good shaking, and his hat fell off, in which were these brushes, a looking-glass, and towel.

THOMAS DOWNS . I am a private watchman. Whitworth came to me, and said "There is a sack, I should like to see what is in it;" I went up and pulled down the sack; and the prisoner said what was it for; Whitworth then left him in my care, while he went to the watch-house; he said "I'll be d - d if I will wait any longer from my master," and ran off.

JAMES GIBBS . I found this coat on the prisoner's back.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along at five o'clock in the morning, and met the other man, who had the load resting on the rails; he asked me to lift it on his head; and then said he would give me 2s. if I would assist him in carrying it; I went with him; he had the other things, and he said "These are ready to break my apron, I wish you would put them into your pocket;" I said I had no pocket; and he said "Lend me your hat;" I put them in.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-172

1483. HENRY ARCHBOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 2 shirts, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief,

value 1s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Ounsow .

RICHARD OUNSOW. I am waiter at the Coach and Horses public-house, in St. Martin's-lane . I had been ill a fortnight before the 25th of June, and had the prisoner to do my work; I returned to my work that day; I brought a bundle of clothes with me, containing these articles and some others; I put it into the kitchen, but I did not see the prisoner in the house that day; he was afterwards taken at the Saracen's Head yard with these things.

JOHN HUGHES . I am an officer of Bow-street. I went and found the prisoner, I charged him with taking the property; he had it on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-173

1484. MARY BARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 spencer, value 4s.; 1 bonnet, value 7s.; 1 frock, value 4s., and 1 shawl, value 3s., the goods of Margaret Osterman , spinster , and 1 blanket, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Osterman , widow .

MARGARET OSTERMAN. I live with my mother Elizabeth Osterman, in Long-alley . The prisoner lodged with us about six weeks with her husband - they paid the rent regularly - I missed a spencer, a frock, and a shawl, on the 28th of June, from a box, in a room next to the prisoner's - the lock had been forced open.

Prisoner. There were strange lodgers in your mother's house the night before - they went out at six o'clock the next morning, and the Saturday after I was taken - they ran away - I did not know they ran away.

ELIZABETH OSTERMAN. I lost a blanket and sheet on the 28th of June; there were some new lodgers came to my house with a good character, but they went away through her leaving her place.

GEORGE SAWORD. I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl pawned on the 28th of June, by a person about the prisoner's size.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the ticket of the shawl.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-174

1485. JAMES CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , 1 time-piece, value 15s. , the goods of William Foster .

MARIA FOSTER . I am the wife of William Foster. I had a time-piece on my mantle-piece in my parlour, on the 22d of August - a person called and told me a boy was running out of the house with something - I ran into the street, and saw the prisoner running with it; I stopped him, he threw it down, and broke it.

EDWARD CLARKE . On the 22d of August I saw the prisoner running in Johnson-street with the time-piece, which he dropped close by me; Mrs. Foster claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy gave it to me, and I threw it down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-175

1486. WILLIAM CROUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 1 basket, value 3s., and 8 loaves of bread, value 3s. , the goods of George Robinson .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-176

1487. ELIZA CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 book, value 2s., and 1 pair of silver spectacles, value 10s. , the goods of John Stonall .

MARY STONALL . I am the wife of John Stonall - we live in Charles-street, Westminster . On the 10th of July I lost my spectacles, and a book from my bed-room, on the ground floor; the prisoner has worked for me five years, and was at my house on the Monday; I went to her place on the Tuesday - she said she knew nothing about them - I asked what her pocket contained - she said she wore no pockets - the officer came and searched her - the duplicate of the spectacles and book, and a great many other articles, were found on her.

JOHN WILDMAN PAINE . I am the officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicates.

JOHN HARDING . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of spectacles, pawned with me, on the 10th of July, in the name of Mary Thomas - I do not know who by.

Prisoner. I was very much in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-177

1488. WILLIAM CASTLES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 plane, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Edward Sammes .

EDWARD SAMMES. I am a carpenter . On the 6th of July I was at work at the Asylum, at Clapton ; I had put this plane up the chimney about three weeks before.

JAMES PORTER . I was watching a house at Clapton. On the night of the 6th of July I saw the prisoner walking about - he went into the Asylum, and took this plane, which he put under his coat; I stopped him, and he struck me with it three times - I then took him.

JOHN GARROD . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and this plane.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-178

1489. CAROLINE COWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 1 1/2 yards of cloth, value 25s., and 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of David Treasurer .

DAVID TREASURER. I live in Monmouth-street , and am a tailor . The prisoner has been in my employ at different times; I left her in charge of my room on the 28th of July- I went out about two o'clock and returned at six, when she and the articles were gone.

JOHN COPE . I live in Whitecross-street, and am a pawnbroker. This coat was pawned with me on the 28th of July.

JOHN WYLES . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner, on the 28th of July, at the White Lion public-house, High-street, Pentonville, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, offering this cloth for sale, which she said she received of her master for wages; I asked where he lived- she said in Whitecross-street; I took her to the watch-house, where I searched her, and found the duplicate of the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am totally friendless.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260914-179

1490. MICHAEL DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , 34 pieces of copper money, called pence , the monies of Henry Keen .

HENRY KEEN. I keep the Cheshire Cheese public-house, at Pimlico . The prisoner lodged with me on the 22d of August - in the course of that day, I had put one pound worth of copper, that I had not marked, and twelve penny pieces which I had marked, in a bureau, which I locked, and hung the key up in the bar - I locked the bar, and when I went to bed, I went to see that it was safe; I went to a room under the prisoner's, and left the door open; when the watchman called four o'clock, I heard the prisoner get up from over my head, and go down stairs - I went out and listened, and heard a rattling of copper; I went down and seized the prisoner, who was taking copper out of the bureau, and putting it into his night cap - he had nothing on but his shirt; he had got 2s. 10d. out.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a watchman. I was calling four o'clock when Mr. Keen called me in - I took the prisoner - Mr. Keen said he had thrown the money somewhere, and not to let him stoop till he got a light; I found the money in his cap.

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to come down to go to the yard, and one of the men asked me to bring up some water; I went into the tap-room and could not find a pot; I put my hand against the bar door and it opened; I put my foot inside; Mr. Keen heard me and came down - I had not touched the money.

JURY to HENRY KEEN. Q. Was any marked money in the cap? A. Yes, and I have some more in my pocket to match it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-180

1491. HARRIET DAVENPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 19 spoons, value 5s., the goods of Henry John Edwards ; and 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Joseph Hales .

HENRY JOHN EDWARDS. I keep the Queen's Arms Tavern, St. James's-street . On the 11th of July, I missed nineteen spoons from my coffee-room - they had been on my side-board between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

JOSEPH HALES. I was waiter at the Queen's Arms Tavern. On the 11th of July I lost a blue coat, between a quarter before nine and a quarter before eleven o'clock, from near where the spoons had been; this is the coat.

JOHN GOOK . I was in Jermyn-street on the 12th of July, a few minutes before ten o'clock; I saw the prisoner take two spoons out of her apron, and offer them to a costermonger, who goes round with a cart; and he gave her a measure full of beans, which he emptied into her apron: I supposed they were silver, and I crossed over to her - I said to the man "What has she given you?" - he said, "These two spoons;" I told him to give her the spoons back, and take his beans, as I was going to take her into custody; I found the remainder of the spoons in her apron; I took her to the watch-house, and found the duplicate of this coat on her; she said she had the spoons of her husband, who was a waiter - but I find she has no husband.

CHARLES SANDERS . I am a pawnbroker. This coat was pawned with me on the 11th of July, by the prisoner, to the best of my recollection, about half-past eleven o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. A man, who appeared rather distressed in his mind, accosted me, and said, "You seem poor like myself - if you will go and pawn this coat for me, I will give you something;" I went and pawned it; he gave me the duplicate, and I was to see him the next day, which I did; he gave me these spoons to sell, and said I should have seven of them for myself if I sold twelve of them; I went and got some beans for two of them.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-181

1492. ELIZABETH DRYNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d.; and 2 frocks, value 6d. , the goods of Dominick Gollagher .

HANNAH GOLLAGHER . I am the wife of Dominick Gollagher; we live at No. 22, West-street, Smithfield . On the 24th of August, about half-past six o'clock in the morning. I missed these articles from a box.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. I went on the 3d of August, to the house of Mrs. Hill, who keeps a rag shop, at No. 22, Charles-street, Saffron-hill; she gave me some property, and desired me to take up the prisoner the next day, when she brought some more things to sell there; I searched the prisoner, and found this book in her pocket; Mrs. Hill is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-182

1493. JOHN DONOGHUE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Jeremiah Tool .

JEREMIAH TOOL. I live in Field-lane, Holborn . I lost a pair of shoes on the 31st of August - I had seen them safe in my shop that morning - I found the prisoner at the watch-house with the shoes; he said he took them for want; I went to where he said he lived in Grub-street, and there I heard a very fair character of him.

THOMAS TOOL . I was sitting in the shop about ten o'clock, and fell asleep - I looked up and missed the shoes; I looked out and no one was there but the prisoner - I went to him and he threw down the shoes - I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260914-183

1494. ELIZABETH EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 2 shirts, value 12s.; 1 table cloth, value 4s.; 1 pillow-case, value 2s. and 2 aprons, value 2s., the goods of Francis Brown ; 1 pair of trousers, value 7s.; 2 shifts, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 apron, value 1s., the goods of Martha Thornes , widow ; and 1 shift, value 5s. , the goods of Elizabeth Moles .

MARTHA THORNES. I am a widow; I live at No. 12, St. Martin's-lane . These two shirts and table cloth, and two aprons, are the property of Francis Brown - these others

are mine: they were all safe on the 19th of July, at half-past ten o'clock in my wash-house, adjoining my house - I missed them the next day at noon.

EDMUND DWYER . I am a watchman of St. Giles. I was in Seven Dials on the 20th of July; I saw the prisoner with a bundle of wet linen; I took her to the watch-house, and took the bundle from her - she said she got it from a namesake of hers, at Mr. Stevens, King-street, Seven Dials; I took her towards that house, but she said she would go back - I gave charge of her; I asked if she had had a bundle from them; they said no.

JOHN GREEN . I was at the watch-house; I took these articles when the witness brought them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home; a person said she was going out to work, and gave me them to hold, while she ran back to fetch her key.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-184

1495. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 1 carpenter's plane, value 15s. , the goods of Henry Hatchard .

HENRY HATCHARD. I am a carpenter . This plane is mine - I was working with it. On the 21st of August I went to dinner at one o'clock, and returned at two, and missed it - the prisoner was then in custody.

RICHARD WHITE . I was at work with Hatchard, and saw the prisoner take this plane - I followed him, and took it from him.

GEORGE BRIDGES . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and bring the plane.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-185

1496. PETER FENNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 1 great coat, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Rabbath .

RICHARD RABBATH. I live in Porter-street, Leicester-square . I lost a coat on the 27th of June - it had been safe in my room; I never authorized the prisoner to do any thing with it.

ELIZABETH RABBATH . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner came and asked for one Ryland, who occupied the second-floor - he went up stairs, and I supposed he went to the second-floor - but I did not see him come down; I went to the adjoining shop, and left my door shut; on the following morning I missed the coat, and saw it again at Victor Benjamin's door, in Monmouth-street.

VICTOR BENJAMIN . On the 27th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and asked me to buy this coat, which he had on; I said,"I will never buy a coat which a person has on;" he then took it off, and said he had tried to pawn it - he asked 7s. for it - I gave him 4s. for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a shopman, named Ryan, who lodged in the prosecutor's house - he said, "There is no work to day, come and have a walk;" I said, "I have no money;" we went to a public-house, (a frequent resort for tailors) where I found another man named Ryan - we had a pot of porter, and my friend having the money, we waited to borrow a trifle from him; he told us to come in the afternoon, and we should have it; I went to his house with Ryan, and saw the lady at the door, who sent us up stairs, but no one was there - we came down again, and Ryan said, "I want to go and see who is there;" he went up, and brought down this coat; he said, "This is his coat, he told me he would leave an article to pawn, if he was not there to lend me the money;" I put the coat on to exchange with the one I had on, that he might have his coat in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-186

1497. MARY EVANS and LOUISA BUSH were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 set of bed furniture, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Carew .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-187

1498. THOMAS GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 sovereign , the money of James Powell .

MARY POWELL . I am the wife of James Powell, we live in Paul-street, Finsbury - the prisoner lived in our house. On the 31st of October I gave him the sovereign to get me change, but he never returned till he was brought back on the 30th of June; he begged my pardon, and said he had spent it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-188

4499. JAMES GAYTON and JAMES LOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 tea-caddy, value 16s. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

Lock pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS JONES. I am an upholsterer , and live in Hoxton-square . This caddy was in my shop on the 29th of June - I turned round to speak to my son, and on turning back, I saw the caddy under the officer's arm.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a patrol. On the 29th of June I saw the prisoner and Lock together, for about an hour, in company with another person - they were near Mr. Jones' shop; I did not see any of them do any thing, but I saw Lock with this caddy under his apron - I stopped him, and took it back to the shop; I saw the prisoner turning round the corner, and I said, "This is one, take him;" and he was stopped by a carpenter; when I first saw them they were all close to the shop-window - when I saw Lock with the caddy, he was round the corner, not with Gayton; Gayton said he did not know Lock, and had not been with him - but I had seen them together an hour before.

JOSEPH PINE . I stopped the prisoner in Crown-street, within twenty yards of Mr. Jones' shop; I and Tyrrell had been watching the prisoner and Lock some time - the prisoner was running from the house when I took him.

GAYTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-189

1500. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 iron chain, value 1l. , the goods of Archibald Paris .

JOHN DUCKWORTH . I am bailiff to Mr. Paris, of Enfield . On the 24th of July, Bennett called and asked if I would buy a chain; he said he wished me to come and look at it - it was in his cart; I went and got on the

wheel, and said, "That is our chain;" I had not seen it for several months - it was usually kept in the shed.

THOMAS BENNETT . The prisoner called at my house, and said he had some old iron to sell; I sent to his house, and got this chain, and some other iron; he said he got it at Mr. Kayes's sale - and I said, "I shall call on Mr. Duckworth, to see if he can put it to any use;" he said he might be very likely to buy it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-190

1501. JAMES HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 19 napkins, value 1l. 8s., and 3 table cloths, value 10s. , the goods of Hannah Rees , spinster .

The articles being the property of Hannah Rees, widow, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260914-191

1502. FRANCIS HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , 1 bushel of plums, value 4s., and 1 basket, value 2s. , the goods of William Bate .

ANN BATE . I am the wife of William Bate, and keep a stall by Shoreditch church . On the 11th of September I bought a basket of plums, and left them for three-quarters of an hour, close by Mr. Sheffields', in Shoreditch; when I came back they were gone; I then saw the prisoner with them on his shoulder; I asked what he was going to do - he said to borrow a pint pot, and sell them at a penny a pint, in Shoreditch; I can swear to the basket, which the officer has got, but he is not here.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy saw me, and asked me to take these plums to Shoreditch, and he would give me 6d.; he said, "I am going to borrow a pint pot, and sell them."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-192

1503. JAMES HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 3 chairs, value 1l. 10s. , the goods of George Fielding Smith .

GEORGE FIELDING SMITH. I live in Bath-street , and am a chair-maker . On the 28th of August I missed these three chairs from my shop, which I had seen on Saturday, the 26th - they were chained together.

RICHARD TAYLOR . I am a cabinet-maker. On the 26th of August I was at Mr. Smith's, and saw these three chairs there.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a headborough. I found these chairs at the prisoner's lodgings - he was in bed with Elizabeth Ingram , a female he cohabits with; he said he knew nothing about them. I searched the place, and found a skeleton drop key in the cupboard, and some more on the floor; my brother officer took hold of these chairs, and asked whose they were - he said his own; I found this chain, and he said it was his dog's chain; I said,"Where is the dog?" he said he was gone; Mr. Taylor, who was with me, said, "Where are the bottoms of these chairs?" he said he had sold three chairs, and these were going to be bottomed.

JAMES TAYLOR . I was with Lock - he has stated truly what passed; I found a dark-lantern in the prisoner's room.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I had but these three chairs - as to the things that were found, there had been a parcel of bad characters lived there; I did not know they were in the room; the key was in a high cupboard, near the ceiling.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-193

1504. HENRY HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , 1 bottle, value 2d., and 1 quart of wine, value 2s., the goods of James Watkins , from the person of John Gibbs .

JAMES WATKINS. I keep a tavern . I sent John Gibbs with a basket and the bottles, to No. 24, North Bank; in about ten minutes the prisoner was brought to my house, by two men - Gibbs came with him, and said he had stolen a bottle of wine out of his basket; he said he was very sorry, and did not know why he did it.

JOHN GIBBS. I took out some bottles of wine. I felt the prisoner take one of the bottles of Port from the basket, and some gentlemen took him.

Prisoner's Defence. Another boy was with me, and he told me to take it, which I did - I did not know why.

JOHN GIBBS. A boy was at the corner who ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-194

1505. JOHN JOHNSON and JAMES CHRISTMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 1 cask, value 3s., and 380lbs. of white lead, value 6l. 10s. , the goods of Thomas Barwick .

THOMAS BARWICK. I am a plumber , and live in Shoreditch . On the 20th of July I lost a cask of white lead; I had seen it safe in the passage on the 19th - this is it; I have no doubt it is my property - I missed it about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, when I came home.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any mark upon it? A. Yes - B. W. L.; it is the usual mark put upon casks of this description, from the British colour manufactory; they supply many houses with these articles; here is the mark of the weight - I could swear to it, because the casks are not all of a weight - this is not an unusual size cask.

CHARLES BRETT . I am a watchman. At half-past five o'clock on the morning of the 20th of July, I saw the two prisoners and another man rolling this cask; I followed them from Fleur-de-lis-street to Phoenix-street; I knocked at a person's door to get assistance - they saw me knock, and all ran away; I took the cask to Mr. Beavis, at the watch-house, and left it with him; I knew the prisoners before then, and where Johnson had lived- the cask is more than two men could carry, but they rolled it.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A dyer. - Johnson did live in Spital-fields; the other man, who was with them, was Gront - I spoke to him, but they did not give me an answer; they did not go past any watch-house. I saw Christmas the same evening at the watch-house, about eight o'clock.

JOHN BEAVIS . I am a constable. I apprehended Johnson three days after, and took him to the watch-house- the watchman saw him, and said he was one of the men - he said he knew nothing of it.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am the watch-house-keeper. - Brett brought a cask of white lead to the watch-house; Christmas was taken by Cheshire the same day, in conse

quence of the description I had given of him, from Brett's account - he had described them both.

THOMAS CHESHIRE . I took up Christmas the same day, in consequence of the information I received.

JURY to THOMAS BARWICK. Q. Have you an invoice of the cask? A. Yes - this is it - it is charged 3cwt. 1qr. 20lb. - the cask is marked 3cwt. 2qrs. 8lbs. from which the weight of the cask is to be deducted.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

CHRISTMAS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-195

1506. MORDECAI JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 pair of shoes, value 11s. , the goods of John Hodson .

JOHN HODSON. I live at a public-house in Park-street. On the 5th of September I was working in a stable in Seymour-mews , and saw the prisoner and another person come down the mews; I told them I had some things to sell - if they would wait I would get them down; I went up stairs for them - when I came down the prisoner and his companion were at the stable door; I wanted 24s. for them, which they would not give - they went away, and in a quarter of an hour came back, and asked to look at my breeches; they staid about ten minutes - I went on the stairs and watched them; I saw the prisoner hold the bag open while the other put in my shoes, which had been in the manger, and which I had not intended to sell; I came down, and told them to put down the shoes; they said they had none, snatched the bag, and the prisoner ran off - I ran after him, and took him about twenty yards off.

Cross-examined by MR. FISH. Q. What hour was this? A. About twelve o'clock; he had half-a-crown in his hand, but I would not take it; I swear I had no money of him. I was going up the steps to fetch the breeches. They both ran away.

JOHN LEWIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and the bag.

Prisoner's Defence. He called me into the stable, and showed me some things, for which he asked 10s. more than their value - I said I could not buy them, but if he had any shoes or hats I would buy them; he showed me these shoes, said they were mis-fits, and I should have them for 6s.; I said I would give 4s. - he said I should have them for 5s. - I put them into my bag, and gave him 5s. for them - he then ran after me, and tapped me on the shoulder, and said if I did not give him 6s. he would give charge of me, because I was a Jew.

COURT to JOHN HODSON. Q. Did you ever mean to sell these shoes? A. No, I never received any money. I saw but one half-crown in his hand, and that I did not have: these shoes had been too small, but I had them stretched, and then they fitted me very well; I had no conversation with him about them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-196

1507. JOHN LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 jacket, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Richard Salt .

MICHAEL CAMERFORD . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Richard Salt, of Charles-street, St. George's . On the 1st of July a person came into the shop, and asked if I had sold anything from the door; I said No - they said they had seen a person unpin a jacket, and go down the street; I went out, and saw the prisoner drop this jacket, which I took up - I saw him stopped by another person; I had lost sight of him for one minute, but I am quite sure of his person - it hung about half within the door.

ELIZABETH PORTER . I saw the prisoner take the jacket from the door of Mr. Salt's shop; I gave the alarm, and told the witness where to go; I have no doubt of the prisoner's person.

Prisoner. She said at the office I was not the man.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-197

1508. MARY LIPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 1 watch, value 1l.; the goods of William Pollen Foothead , from his person ; and WILLIAM LONGMAN was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM POLLEN FOOTHEAD. I live in Kingsland-road and I am a labourer . On Wednesday night, the 9th of August, I saw Lippard at the public-house where I live- I agreed to go home with her, but I did not go - I walked about the road; I told her I had no money, but if she would come down on the Saturday night I would pay her, as I worked at the gas works - this she agreed to - she went into a cook's shop, and had two penny worth of pudding, for which she paid - I dropped asleep there, and when I awoke she was gone, and I missed my watch. I was sober, and am quite certain I did not give it to her - I intended to have gone home with her.

RICHARD HANDS . I am a watchman. I heard of the robbery, ran across the way, and took Lippard with the watch in her bosom - she put her hands into her bosom and passed the watch to the other prisoner, I believe.

THOMAS GOODING . I am conductor of the patrol. On the morning of the 10th of August, about two o'clock, I heard the cry on the opposite side of the way - I got up and saw the watchman holding Lippard - he said to me"Gooding, she has dinged the watch to one of these men;" meaning Longman and another; I laid hold of Longman, and saw the watch fall, which Furlong took up - Longman owned it at the watch-house, and said he gave 24s. for it; Lippard told me to go down to the public-house in Kingsland-road, and ask the hostler for the young man who he called his brother, as he was the person she had it of - Longman was very much in liquor, and got fighting- Lippard was with another person in a door way.

GEORGE FURLONG . I am a patrol. I saw this watch fall from Longman, while Gooding had hold of him; Longman said he had bought it for 24s. of a man who lodged with him, but he did not know his name.

LONGMAN'S Defence. I was very much in liquor.

LIPPARD'S Defence. He gave it to me.

LIPPARD - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

LONGMAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260914-198

1509. JOHN HARRAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , an iron stove, value 5s , the goods of John Pitts .

JOHN PITTS. There is an iron stove here belonging to

me. On the 5th of July I saw it in the possession of Mr. Grover.

THOMAS GEORGE GROVER . I saw the prisoner with this stove - he said he was going to take it to a gentleman in Grosvesnor-square.(Property produced and sworn to).

THOMAS WEBB . I am an officer, and took the prisoner up - he said he was going to take the stove to Park-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

1510. JOHN HARRAGAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 2 glazed window sashes, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas George Grover .

THOMAS GEORGE GROVER. I saw the prisoner take these sashes from Mr. Pitts - I made them myself.

THOMAS WEBB . After I took him to the watch-house I asked what he had done with the sashes - he refused to tell me.

GUILTY . Aged 33

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260914-199

1511. RICHARD CHINN and THOMAS DYER were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 truck, value 5l. , the goods of Stephen Palmer .

STEPHEN PALMER. I am a rocking-horse-maker , and live in London-terrace . On the 6th of July I missed the truck, and found it afterwards in the possession of Parker - I was with my apprentice in Union-street, Borough, and he pointed out the prisoner Chinn to me; Parker and Taylor were with me in a cart - we went up to Chinn, and asked him if he had had a truck from Hackney-road - he said No; I had the wrong man - we took him to Mrs. Parker, who said, "That is the man;" and, before I put him into the watch-house, he said he would tell me all about it - I had held out no promise or threat to him - he gave me this address, "T. Dyer, Lower-road, Islington," who, he said, was the man who sent him for the truck.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What had he had to drink in the public-house before he gave you the address? A. He had some dinner, and we had about three pots of porter between three of us - we had no spirits - I treated him because he said he had no money, and had nothing to eat all day - I began to talk with him, and got this information from him - he gave me the address.

RACHAEL PARKER . I am the wife of John Parker - we live in Union-street, Borough. Chinn brought the truck to our house on the 6th of July; Dyer was with him- we did not buy it then, but Chinn came again alone, and my husband bought it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean that Dyer came? A. Yes; another person came afterwards, named Druce - he had lodged there, and so had Chinn for one week.

JOHN PARKER . On the 6th of July the prisoners came to my house; my wife came and said they had brought the truck which Chinn had been speaking to me about eleven days before; he told me he knew a person who had a truck to sell, and he must sell it as his goods were about to be seized - I went and Dyer asked me if I would buy the truck - he said I might have it for 3l. - I said I should not give any such money - he said I should have it for 2l., and then 1l. 15s- I said I would give 1l. - Dyer said I should have it for 5s., more - I said I would not - it was brought back afterwards, & I got it for 1l. 2s. 6d. - I have a receipt for the money - on the Tuesday following it was at my door; Palmer came to speak about it; Leach was with him; I delivered it up - Chinn came home to his lodgings the same night at seven o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Druce present when the truck was sold? A. Yes; but he had none of the money.

ISABELLA PALMER . I am the wife of Stephen Palmer. Chinn came to borrow the truck, which we let out at so much an hour; he said Mr. Moss, of Shoreditch, wanted it.

Cross-examined. Q. Chinn was the person who came, and to him you gave it? A. I let it to him - he spoke to another person, but he said nothing to me; I did not see Dyer.

PAUL LEACH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Palmer. Chinn knocked at the door, and I came up stairs - he said"Do you let trucks;" I said Yes; and called my mistress - I saw Chinn again in Union-street, and am certain of his person.

EDWARD MOSS . I am a butcher, and live in Shoreditch. I never authorized Chim to borrow a truck for me.

CHINN'S Defence. It was Druce who borrowed it - when Mr. Palmer took me to the public-house he gave me brandy and beer, as much as I would drink, and the others too.

CHINN - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

DYER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-200

1512. WILLIAM MANLEY and ELIZABETH, HIS WIFE, were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 piece of printed cotton, value 1s.; 2 pieces of cloth, value 2s.; 1 shift, value 1s., and 2 towels, value 2s. , the goods of Jane Radford .

JANE RADFORD. I am a widow , and live in Prince's-court , and take in washing . On the morning of the 17th of August I missed these articles from a drawer in my room; the prisoner lodged in my house - I went down into the kitchen, and asked Mrs. Manley for my handkerchief - she said she had not got it; I said "Yes; you have, my daughter saw you with it;" I went up stairs with her, and saw this handkerchief hanging on a window-shutter in her room; I said, "This handkerchief, a silk handkerchief, a coat, and a piece of print, you took out of my drawers;" she made no answer - we afterwards found two towels between her bed and the sacking - the man was then getting up; he asked his wife if she knew any thing of the other things, and if she did, to tell me; she denied it - I had never lent her the handkerchief.

HENRY POULDON . I am the officer. I got these articles from Mrs. Radford.

Prisoner ELIZABETH MANLEY . I asked Mrs. Radford to lend me something to tie up a basin, as I was going out, and she lent me that handkerchief.

JANE RADFORD. She asked me to lend her a towel to tie a pie in, to go to the fair, and she came the next morning into my bed-room at six o'clock, before I was up, and I gave it her.

ANN GARDNER . My brother's box was at this house

and he asked me to go and get something out for him, which I did, and the day afterwards I found some of these articles in that box.

ELIZABETH MANLEY'S Defence. The room was not searched in our presence.

HENRY POULDON re-examined. Q. You should have searched the room in their presence? A. I should, but I had to go with another man - I went back after they were at the office, and found the articles, some under the bed, and some in a tool chest.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260914-201

1513. HARRIET MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Boyd .

GEORGE CHANDLER . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Boyd, jeweller , Oxford-street . The prisoner came to the shop on the 29th of August, and asked for some coral ear-rings - I shewed her the tray; she looked at several at about 1l. and a guinea a pair - I saw her lay one pair on the cushion, and then she took out her handkerchief and laid it on the cushion; she then said she wanted some of the same sort, at about 8s. - I said we had none so low; she then went away; I missed the ear-rings and overtook her about ten yards from the shop; I told her I had lost a pair of ear-rings; she said "Ear-rings! if I have them, I took them by mistake; they must be wrapped up in my handkerchief;" which she opened, and they fell out.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I took the prisoner. I found this purse with a half-penny in it, and two combs.

Prisoner's Defence. I had 2s., which I would not let the constable see; I meant to have paid them upon the ear-rings.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18260914-202

1514. DANIEL McCARTY was indicted for for stealing, on the 16th of August , 16s. and 1 1/2d. in copper monies , the monies of Peter Corcoran .

PETER CORCORAN. I live in Grub-street , and am a publican . The prisoner came, on the 15th of August, to my house with his son, and slept there that night; he was very drunk when he came; I went up into the room where he slept, and saw a parcel of torn pieces of paper, which my wife can swear she had in her pocket.

JOHANNA CORCORAN . I saw the prisoner; he was very drunk, and went to bed at seven o'clock in the morning. In putting on my pockets, I found I had no money in them; I had had 16s. the night before in them, 10s. of it was in a brown paper, and the rest loose; there were some half pence and farthings; I had counted them the night before; my room door was not locked; I can swear to this piece of paper as one that had been in my pocket.

FREDERICK TASMAN . I slept in the same room with the prisoner; I heard the clock strike four in the morning, and said to the prisoner, who was in bed, "How do you find yourself," as he had been tipsy the night before; I went to sleep again, till between five and six o'clock, and then he was standing in the room without his shoes; he walked backward and forward, and then laid down on his right side; I heard him count some money, which I thought was half pence; and then thought I heard some silver; I heard some paper tear, and saw his hand go over the head of the bed; I heard something fall on the floor - he said soon afterwards "I wish to God they would get up; where am I;" I said "At Mr. Corcoran's;" he said"What! Corcoran's in Grub-street:" I said Yes; and he said "I am all right;" I said "Your son was here last night, and ordered you not to go till he came between seven and eight