Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th April 1826.
Reference Number: 18260406
Reference Number: f18260406-1

SESSIONS PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM VENABLES , MAYOR.

FOURTH SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 6th of APRIL, 1826, and following Days.

Taken in Short-Hand (by Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall-Street.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 51, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1826.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM VENABLES , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt.; Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and John Key , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Abraham Dehorn ,

Win. Dosseter ,

Edward Moxey ,

James Purcival ,

John Blackeler ,

Hugh Wood ,

John G. Mayer ,

Joseph Balfour ,

Andrew Taylor ,

Robert Hornby ,

James Tester ,

Robert Manning ,

Second

Michael Andrews ,

Hutchinson Bell ,

Eml. Richardson ,

Win. Grieve ,

Charles M'Alpine ,

Chas. J. Gilchrist ,

Robert S. Maskall ,

John Hunt ,

Nicholas Richards ,

Daniel Kelly ,

John W. Shaw ,

Charles Stele .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Payne ,

Rodger Rood ,

John Chas. Rowe ,

George Ratcliffe ,

Charles Revell ,

David Sage ,

Charles Tacking ,

Reuben Sparks ,

Chass. Straughan ,

Jessee Stanley ,

W. G. Tunnieliffe ,

Wm. Vorley .

Second

Paul S. White ,

Thos. Williams ,

Y. G. Watkinson ,

Wm. Young ,

Thomas Boucher ,

Henry Dun ,

Wm. Dowding ,

Edward Grant ,

Wm. Rathbone ,

Thomas Dean ,

Thomas Barber ,

Charles Beckett .

Third

Joseph Greathead ,

Wm. Brown ,

Joseph Bainbridge ,

Edward Linnell ,

George Crane ,

James Dan. Dale ,

Wm. Edwards ,

John Elliott ,

Vaughn Edwards ,

David Freeman ,

Wm. Giffith ,

Jonathan Harrison .

Fourth

John Hardiman ,

Henry Johnson ,

Josiah Jones ,

Richard Lamb ,

Job Kean ,

Thomas King ,

Richard Kiston ,

Richard Kearn ,

John Nicholson ,

Thos. Neestrip ,

John Nichols ,

Pailip W. Perkins .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 6, 1826.

VENABLES, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18260406-1

Middlesex Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

577. HENRY BROCKLEY was indicted for feloniously being at large, without any lawful cause, on the 28th of February , at St. Martin in the Fields, before the expiration of the term for which he had, at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 6th of December, in the 1st year of His present Majesty's reign, been ordered to be transported, against the statute .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18260406-2

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

578. ELIZABETH COSTELLO was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March . 8 shirts, value 3l., the goods of James Nance , in his dwelling-house .

JANE NANGE . I am the wife of James Nance - we live in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On the 8th of March, about a quarter past six o'clock in the afternoon, I saw these eight shirts hanging on a line in my front parlour to dry; they hung near the window, which was open - it was nearly dusk. I missed them about twenty minutes to seven. There is a garden in front of the house, which lays rather back from the road; a person could reach them with a stick, but not with their hands; there were marks of two persons' footsteps on the mould under the window; I cannot say whether they were men's or women's footsteps - I saw nobody about. I sent bills round to the pawnbrokers, and Lloyd produced one of the shirts to me; they belong to different gentlemen who I wash for - I cannot replace them for 6l. - The smallest footmark looked like a woman's shoe.

WILLIAM HENRY LLOYD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Strutton-ground, Westminster. On Thursday, the 9th of March, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to pawn this shirt, for 5s.; I observed the mark had been picked out, and asked her who it belonged to - she said her husband. She has pawned female apparel with me before. Having been informed of the robbery I gave her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate female. I met a man in the Broadway, who asked me to pawn this shirt, and to say it was my husband's, if they asked me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-3

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

579. THOMAS KINGSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , at St. James, Westminster, 1 clock, value 20l., the goods of William Porker , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Vane Paulet , in the dwelling-house of the said William Porker.

WILLIAM PORKER. I am a clock and watch maker , and live in the Albany, which is in the parish of St. James, Westminster - I live within the gates. On Friday, the 10th of March last, about eight o'clock in the morning, I left my shop - I saw this clock safe then, on the counter; I pulled the shop door after me, but think the lock did not catch - if it had it could be opened from without. I left nobody in the shop - I only went a few steps, merely across the avenue, and was talking to a neighbour, when the witness, Woodman, came up, and said something to me; I instantly went back to my shop, and the clock was gone; I have not seen it since - I would have given 20l. for it - it was a large table clock, and very heavy; it was rather antique, had a mahogany pedestal, with a great deal of brass work, and a silver face. The shop is part of my dwelling-house.

WILLIAM WOODMAN . I am servant to Mr. Paxton, of Warwick-street. I was in the Albany on the morning of the 10th of March, and saw the prisoner there; I first saw him in St. James's-street, with another young man, and followed them in to the Albany - the other young man went into Mr. Porker's shop; the prisoner stopped, and was looking in at the window; I saw the young man come out of the shop with a clock - he put it down at the entrance of the Albany; (the shop is close to the gate) - the prisoner said to him, "Cannot you carry it?" he (the prisoner) put his apron over it, took it up, and went away with it, down Burlington-gardens, and the other down Sackville-street. I asked Mr. Porker if he knew the man who had got the clock - he was inside the next shop. The other person was a young man - I am sure I saw them both together from St. James's-street to the Albany. I saw the prisoner again three or four days after, looking down some areas; and about two days afterwards I saw him in Charlotte-street, and told Bond, who took him.

JAMES BOND . I am a patrol, and took the prisoner on the 17th, by desire of Woodman.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18260406-4

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

580. MARY McCARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , at St. Martin in the Fields, 12 yards of lace, value 48s., the goods of Robert Orme , in his dwelling-house .

JANE ELLIOTT . I am shopwoman to Robert Orme, of Russell-street, Covent-garden, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On Thursday, the 30th of March, the prisoner came to the shop alone, and asked to see some lace edging - I shewed her some - she did not approve of it - I shewed her some more - she did not approve of them; and wanted to see some still broader, and while I was getting them I saw her take this card of lace from about half a dozen pieces, and put it under her shawl; I said nothing to her then; she took another card in her hand off the counter, and asked me the price, which I told her - she did not approve of it, and wanted to look at some which were in the window; I asked her to walk up the shop towards the window, and I would get it her if she would shew me what she wanted - she was about four yards from the door before she went to the window; I came from behind the counter, and went with her towards the window; the door was open; I could not understand which lace she wanted, and she was going out at the door - I then stopped her, closed the door, and told her she had a card of lace under her shawl - she said she had not; I drew her shawl back, shewed it to her, and told her to let it remain there till Mr. Orme, jun. came - he came, and I took it from her in his presence - he was in another part of the shop. Duke, the officer, came, and took her in charge, with the lace.

ROBERT DUKE . I took the prisoner in charge - Mr. Orme, jun. delivered me this lace.

JANE ELLIOTT . This lace is my master's property - I know it by the pattern and mark. There are twelve yards - we sell it at 4s. 6d.

MR. ORME. I keep this shop - it is part of my dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields. The lace cost me 4s. 3d. a yard.

The prisoner put in a petition, stating herself to be in distress, from her husband having been a long time out of employ.

Two witnesses gave her a good character.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18260406-5

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

581. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Hart, about two o'clock in the night of the 3d of March , at St. Mary, lslington, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 scent-box, value 30s.; 1 gold chain, value 30s.; 2 seals, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 7s.; 2 brooches, value 5l.; 1 gold pin, value 2l.; 2 silver thimbles, value 2s.; 1 time-piece, value 2l.; 1 gown-piece, value 3l., and 1 pair of spectacles, value 16s. , the goods of the said Joseph Hart .

JOSEPH HART. I live at No. 1, Lower-terrace, in the parish of St. Mary, lslington . On the 3d of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went out with my wife, leaving Ann Thomas, my servant, in charge of the house. We returned about three o'clock in the morning, and found the watchman at the door - he informed me the house had been broken open.

ANN THOMAS. I am servant to Mr. Hart. I sat up in the front kitchen for my master and mistress till nearly 2 o'clock in the morning, with a light; there is only one window to the kitchen, and that was hasped, and the shutter was closed, and fastened with a wooden bar; it is an inside shutter, lined with tin - I fastened it about eight o'clock; I bolted and locked the front door about ten. I went up stairs to lay down about two, keeping the candle a light; I thought I heard a knock at the front door - I went down, and found the door as I had left it - I opened it, looked about, and saw nobody; I bolted it again, then went to the back parlour door, which I had left nearly closed, and found it wide open - I went into the back parlour; and as I opened the door, between that and the front parlour, this man stood facing me behind the door; he had no light - I had a candle in my hand; I asked what he did there - he said,"I beg your pardon." I asked again what he wanted there; he said nothing more; I shut the door between the two parlours, went about half way up stairs, and cried out, "Murder!" he rushed out of the parlour, and ran down the kitchen stairs; I followed him - he jumped out of the kitchen window, which was then open - it looks into the area - I had left it shut and fastened. I went to the street door, and called the watchman; while I was speaking to him, another watchman and the constable of the night brought the prisoner along; I knew him again, and am sure of his person - I saw sufficient of him in the parlour to know him; they took him away: one of the watchmen remained at the door till they returned; I went into the back parlour, and found a small trinket box was taken off the mantel-piece, and put on a chair, and opened; I had seen it on the shelf before I went up stairs; I missed from it my mistress's scent-box, attached to a chain, seals, and key, also two brooches, and another seal; I had put them into the box that afternoon, after mistress left - a gold pin was also taken from the box. A box of papers had been opned, and the papers strewed about the table. I went into the front parlour, and missed two silver thimbles out of a cotton box on the table, and master's spectacles from the table drawer; the time-piece was taken off the mantel-piece, but not gone. I found a gownpiece taken out of the cupboard, and laid on the same table. I then went into the front kitchen, and found the shutter bar gone, part of the shutter broken away, and a pane of glass was broken near the hasp, which was broken off, and the sash up. I found a pair of men's shoes on the floor of the back kitchen. Price took charge of them. - I found the bar in the coal-hole.

JAMES PRICE . I am supervisor of the watch of Islington. About ten minutes past three o'clock on this morning I saw the last witness open the prosecutor's door, with a candle in her hand - she looked into the street, and shut the door again; I heard her two or three minutes afterwards, crying Murder! and saw the prisoner come out of the kitchen window, and over the palisades - I was then within two or three yards of the palisades; I and Haslop pursued, and took him, without losing sight of him; we brought him back to Hart's; the servant said she could swear to him, and we took him to the watch-house. I searched, and found on him two silver thimbles,

a gold pin, a small seal, a child's coral, and three kuives. I then went back to Mr. Hart's, and saw the shoes found in the back kitchen - he had no shoes on when I took him. I examined the window - a pane of glass was broken, so that they could reach the hasp, and throw up the window, then break a piece off the shutter, and lift the bar up. I took the shoes to the watch-house - the prisoner said, "Those are my shoes;" I gave them to him, and he put them on; we then searched him again, and found a gold chain, seals, and key. I took him in Cross-street, and as I returned from the watch-house the first time, between the house and the spot where I took him, I found a phosphorus box and matches.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me come out of the window? A. Yes.

PHILIP HASLER . I am a watchman, and was with Price. I saw the prisoner come over the iron palisades, pursued, and took him, without losing sight of him.

ROBERT BROWN . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. After Price searched him his coat was thrown on the ground - he had taken it off himself, but I do not know who threw it down - I afterwards examined the pockets, and found a pair of spectacles and case; he was put into the cage; I searched him there again, and in his mouth I found six shillings and two six pences, and tied under his garter I found a gold chain, with a seal, two keys, and a scent-box, in the shape of a watch attached to it.

JAMES PRICE . When I first searched him I found a half-crown in his waistcoat pocket.

ANN THOMAS . I know this scent-box - also the thimbles, chain, gold pin, and seal.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18260406-6

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

582. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Webb . about seven o'clock in the night of the 20th of March , at St. Paul, Covent-garden, with intent the goods and chattels therein being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

WILLIAM HENRY WYMAN . I am journeyman to Mr. William Webb, a hair-dresser , who lives in York-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Covent-garden . On the 20th of March, towards the afternoon, I observed that the shop window had been cut by somebody - it was not cut through, but what is called starred, by a knife being driven into the putty, which cracked it, but made no hole - I immediately went to Bow-street, and a little before seven o'clock the officer (Stevens) came; I went on the opposite side of the way about seven, and kept watch; it was rather dusk, but not quite dark; the lamps were just being lighted; it got quite dark before any thing happened. Samuel Rand, my fellow-shopman, was with me- we parted, and went in different directions, and in about twenty minutes I saw the prisoner and another come to the shop window; there were lights in one window, but nobody in the shop; they passed the window two or three times, did something, and went to the adjoining shop, which is a bookseller's, then returned, and looked into both our shop windows; I could not distinctly see what they did, but I saw one of them put his hand to the window - they went away, returned again, and afterwards I saw the prisoner's hand within the window, which was then broken; I am sure it was within, up to his wrist - I am quite sure of that - I did not see him take any thing: I went and seized him - the officer had gone away; I took him to Bow-street. The broken glass laid inside the window; some tortoise-shell combs laid near that glass, and when I took him I observed that a comb laid partly in and partly out of the window, and the ticket, which was on that comb was gone from it - it was found outside the window by somebody. The other man ran away; the prisoner had taken his hand out of the window when I seized him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Bow-street that nothing was removed? A. No.

SAMUEL RAND . I am journeyman to Mr. Webb. I observed the pane cracked in the afternoon, and in the evening I watched, and saw the prisoner and another go to the window two or three times, and then go next door. I saw Wyman lay hold of the prisoner - he called me; I had not seen his hand within the window.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a constable. On the 20th of March the witness brought the prisoner to Bow-street; I searched him, and found a penny piece on him, and a wire in his waistcoat pocket; there is no book to the end of it.

Prisoner's Defence. He says he saw my hand in the window - he was on the other side of the way; there were three or four more passing the same as I was.

WILLIAM HENRY WYMAN . I was on the same side as him - I had crossed over.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18260406-7

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

583. JOHN NORTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Hughes , on the King's highway, on the 22d of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l., and 1 watch-chain, value 2l. , his property.

THOMAS HUGHES. I am a coach-master , and drive my own coach. On the 27th of February, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was at a watering house in Smithfield, and had drank rather too much; I thought it best to go home; the prisoner spoke to me - I told him I lived at Pentonville - he said he lived that way, and would see me home; we both got on my coach box, and he drove; he drove me to Shoreditch church - I objected to go that way, and he then said he lived at Shoreditch church, and it was not much out of my way - when we got to Shoreditch he asked me into the Gun public-house, to drink - I said I had no money, and would rather not - he said he had money, and would treat me - we had three half quarterns of gin; I did not drink a glass of it; the deputy waterman drank with us; the prisoner paid for the liquor. I went back to my coach - he wished me to go back, and we again went into the public-house; he laid hold of my collar, and I went back with him; he ordered another quartern of gin - the publican said I had had sufficient, and would not allow them to give me any more, and I refused myself; he laid hold of my watch-chain twice while I was in the house, fumbling, as if he was playing with it- I buttoned up my coat, saying, "I won't give you half a

chance;" we went out to the coach again - it was then eleven o'clock; the coach was in the rank alone - the prisoner went out with me, and asked if I could spar any - I said, No, not that night; he immediately struck me in my left breast, and knocked me down; my hat fell off - I found him pulling at my watch-chain; I laid hold of my watch pocket - he pulled me along, knocked my head on the stones, and I became insensible. When I recovered I found myself on the ground; he had then absconded, and my watch was gone; the waterman and two gentlemen helped me up, and I went home in my coach - a man drove me home. I described him at the office, and he was taken on Good Friday. I am sure he is the man.

DANIEL LARTER . I keep the Gun public-house. On the 22d of February Hughes came there, with the prisoner and the waterman - I am sure of the prisoner - they had three half quarterns of gin, which the prisoner paid for; Hughes had part of one glass; he appeared to have been drinking a little; I thought he knew what he was about but if he drank more he might not - they went away in about ten minutes, and returned in about half an hour - the prisoner called for another quartern - Hughes refused to drink; the prisoner drank part, and the officer, who sat in my bar, the rest. The prisoner attempted to spar with Hughes, who did not wish him to do it; they left together- Hughes then appeared to know what he was about; I thought him able to drive home; he came next morning, and asked if I knew the man whom he drank with - I had seen him at my house two or three times before.

JAMES HACKWELL . I am a patrol. I was at the Gun, and saw Hughes, the prisoner, and another man come in; they had three half quarterns of gin, and then went away- returned in half an hour, and quartern of gin was called for - the prisoner wished Hughes to drink it very much, but he refused; the prisoner tried to pour it down his throat; I stepped up, and took it out of his hand - they went away together; Hughes appeared able to take care of himself; I went away in quite a different direction; I have seen the prisoner many times before. When Hughes came in the second time I saw the prisoner dragging him by the collar, and I thought I heard something jingle when he was pulling him about.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. I received information of this next day, but could not find the prisoner for a month.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw his coach in Smithfield he had nearly a hundred people round him; a person offered to see him home - he said "No, you will rob me;" at last I got on the box with him, and went with him as far as Sutton-street; he fell off the box six times - he would go down Sutton-street, saying it was his way home- he drove to Warburton's mad-house, as he would go there; it was no thoroughfare - he turned back, and drove to Shoreditch church; he was called for a job, and would not go with it; I bid him good night, and went home.

HENRY BAKER . I am a watchman - my beat is opposite to Shoreditch church. The prosecutor came up to me about ten o'clock, and said he was robbed - he was quite drunk, and was carried home in his own coach.

JOHN GEORGE BUSH . I am porter at the coach-stand, and saw Hughes about half-past eleven o'clock - he was laying at his horses' heels - two gentlemen stood by him; I got him up, and drove him home - he was rather intoxicated.

TIMOTHY TOWN . I am waterman of the coach-stand. I called Hughes out of the Gun for a job, but the people would not go with him he was so drunk.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a coachman. I was at the stand by Shoreditch church - the people would not go with Hughes, he was so drunk - he could not sit on his box.

WILLIAM ROSS . I saw Hughes at a public-house in Smithfield - he appeared very much in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-8

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

584. MARTHA PLUMB was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , at St. John, at Hackney, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 watch-chain, value 30s.; 1 slide, value 5s.; 3 seals, value 20s.; 1 watch-key, value 5s.; 1 scent-box, value 10s.; 3 rings, value 40s.; 1 brooch, value 10s.; 1 pencil-case, value 2s.; 1 smelling-bottle, value 5s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 5s.; 2 necklaces, value 20s.; 1 purse, value 1s.; 16 pieces of silver coin, value 8s.; 2 shirts, value 10s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Tickell , her master, in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH TICKELL, ESQ. I live at Clapton, in the parish of St. John, Hackney . The prisoner came into my service as lady's-maid to my wife, on the 17th of January last - my wife is not here; she waited on my wife. I was down in Cambridgeshire, and received a letter from my wife, which brought me to town on Wednesday morning. I sent for Foster, an officer, on Friday or Saturday, the 25th- I was not present when any thing was found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose she had a good character? A. She came to us with a very respectable character.

HANNAH LEDGERTON . I am house-maid to Mr. Tickell. I found a small box under a pair of steps in the passage leading from mistress' bed-room to the spare room, on Friday, the day before the prisoner was apprehended; I had never seen it before I found it there. I took it up to the nurse directly; there were two watch-hooks, two or three beads, and a hair ring in the box; it was given to Foster. Next day (Saturday) master told me to call the prisoner down stairs - I found her in her bed-room; I and two other servants slept in that room; I said, "Martha, if you please you must come down into the dining-room, master wishes to see you; she said, "What for?" I said,"I don't know - master wants to see us all together, in the dining-room;" she said she could not go down, for if she did she should faint; she had not been ill before; I said,"You must, for they are all waiting for you in the dining-room - master, and the rest of the servants; "she said she could not, or she should faint; she went down one pair of stairs with me, and then said she wanted her pocket handkerchief - I went up, and fetched it for her, leaving her there, and when I returned she was gone; I went down another pair of stairs, and saw mistress' bed-room door standing open, which was not usual; I went into the room and said, "Martha, are you here?" I got no answer - I said again, "Martha, are you here?" and then she answered from the closet where I had found the box; the closet has a door to it, and forms a passage. I said, "Come

Martha, we must go down stairs;" she said, "Oh! dear! I feel so faint - I must smell mistress' smelling-bottle," which stood on the mantel-piece - she did so. We then went down stairs - I met master and some of the servants on the stairs, with the officers; we then went up into our own bed-room, to have our boxes searched - the prisoner went up with us; I staid till my box was searched, and when the officer was going to search the prisoner's box I told Amy, the laundry-maid, I wanted to speak to her - I went down into the passage by mistress' bed-room with her (my mistress was in the breakfast room), and when I came out of the closet I observed the corner of the counterpane tucked in between the more than usual; I pulled out the corner to put it properly, and out dropped the smelling-bottle; I called Amy back, and shewed it to her- I then lifted up the bed, and there lay all mistress' things together, tucked between the bed and mattress. - Amy called Foster down - he came, and saw them there before I removed them.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. You went up and found her in the bed-room? A. Yes - she was alone- her box stands in that room; she has only one box; I did not leave the bed-room till she came down with me; I do not think she had any thing in her hand when she was coming down, but I did not notice her hands. We have a nurse, nurse-maid, footman, cook, laundry-maid, and several servants; I had been in mistress' room, and helped to make the bed about ten o'clock - it was about three when master sent me up for her. None of the other servants are here; four servants slept in the room up stairs, but the prisoner slept in an adjoining room; she goes through our room to get to her own. We all pass mistress' room to go down.

WILLIAM FOSTER . On the 25th of February I was sent for to Mr. Tickell's; I went up stairs, and searched the servants' boxes - the prisoner shewed me her box; she had got it open when I went to search it - the binges were broken; she had opened it herself: while I was examining it I was called down into Mrs. Foster's bed-room; the last witness shewed me some things in the bed, which I brought away - I went up again, and told the prisoner I should like to search her box again - she lifted it from under the bed, and I asked her for the key of it; she gave me two keys which laid in the window; I tried them, but neither of them would fit the lock; I said they were not the keys - she said, "I had them this moment," putting her hand to her pocket; I said, "I have two keys," and produced two, which I had found with the things in Mrs. Tickell's room; she said, "Those are my keys;" I tried them, and one of them opened the lock. I found eight duplicates in the box - one was for two shirts, three handkerchiefs, and two pairs of stockings, pawned at Beauchamp's, Holborn-bars - I went there. I produce the things found in the bed.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search her box entirely the first time? A. No - I was called down; I saw her open it for me to search; she had no opportunity of going down to the bed-room after that - another young woman was in the room with her; she said the keys were hers the instant I produced them.

HENRY JUE . I am apprentice to Mr. Beauchamp, pawnbroker. I produce two shirts, three pairs of stockings, three handkerchiefs, and a thimble, which were all pawned together, on the 23d of January, for 16s.; they are worth 24s. I believe the prisoner to be the person who pawned them. I gave the person the duplicate produced. I think I had seen her once or twice before.

Cross-examined. Q. Does your master do much business? A. Yes; a great many persons come there every day. The person had a bonnet on - I believe it to be the prisoner, but will not swear she is the woman.

HANNAH LEDGERTON re-examined. The prisoner had been up stairs some time before I went to call her down; mistress had rang the bell some time before for one of the children to be taken out of the parlour; we did not know Foster was coming to the house. I know these shirts to be master's, also one pair of stockings, and two handkerchiefs; I do not know who the other stockings belong to. I have seen mistress' watch several times, hanging at the head of the bed, and the necklace and brooch.

Cross-examined. Q. Whether your mistress gave her maid old articles you cannot tell? A. She has frequently - she is very generous. I never knew her give any but silk handkerchiefs away.

MR. TICKELL. I know the watch to be Mrs. Tickell's; it is worth 10l. - it cost 24l., and is gold. I know the seals - they were attached to the watch - they are gold - also the chain and slide; here is a ring, a vinegaret, and a smelling-bottle, all of which I knew.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her character .

Reference Number: t18260406-9

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

585. THOMAS JOBBINS and JAMES FRAZER were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster, 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 5s.; 1 pair of boots, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, 6 half-crowns, and 5 shillings, the property of Robert Ferguson , in the dwelling-house of Richard Calcott .

ROBERT FERGUSON. I lodge at Mr. Richard Calcott's, No. 69, Tothill-street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster - he lives in the house; I sleep in a two bedded room - both the prisoners slept in that room on Tuesday night, the 15th of February; the key of the room was kept in Calcott's shop; Jobbins lodged there before, but had left, and came back on that Tuesday night; I saw both the prisoners there on Tuesday night, and on Wednesday night, about ten o'clock, I went up to bed, and on touching my box, which I had left locked, the lid flew up. I found the screws of the hasp were wrenched; I missed two sovereigns, six half-crowns, five shillings, a blue coat, a black waistcoat, a blue silk handkerchief, and a pair of breeches. I went out that night in search of the prisoners, but could not find them - they did not come home that night. I gave information at the office next morning, and did not see either of them again till the Monday following, when I saw Jobbins in the park - I got Pace, an officer, to take him. I saw Frazer on Sunday, the 12th of March, at Millbank, and said to him, "Ayn't you a pretty fellow?" he said di

rectly, "I know nothing about it;" he then said his mother was waiting at my lodging, with three sovereigns for me; I said I should wait with him till his mother came back - he stood a good bit, and then said he was waiting for a person, and asked me to go round to his mother's - I had him secured; his mother lived about five minutes walk from my lodging.

JOHN STEELE . I am apprentice to Mr. Bowley, a carpenter. I know Jobbins by working down the stable yard, and Frazer by seeing him down the yard with him; Calcott's shop is at the corner of the stable yard. I saw them together in the yard about six o'clock on Wednesday evening, the 15th of February - they were at the foot of the stairs where the prosecutor lodged; I lodge in the next house - the foot of master's stairs and Calcott's both come together. Frazier went half way up stairs - Jobbins stood at the foot of the stairs; Frazer said, "Come on Tom - I have got the key - it is all right," and he then followed him. Next morning, at six o'clock, I heard of the robbery.

AMY TUFF . I am Calcott's niece, and live at No. 69 Tothill-street. On Tuesday night both the prisoners slept there, and on Wednesday afternoon, soon after six o'clock, Frazier came to me for the key of the room, which I gave him; I did not see Jobbins - Frazer had lodged there before, for three weeks, and Jobbins about six months; he came again on Tuesday night - Frazer brought back the key in about an hour - I kept it till Ferguson went to bed about ten o'clock - nobody had been in the room before that; I did not see either of the prisoners again till they were in custody.

JOHN ARCHBUT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brill-road, Lambeth. I have a pair of leather breeches, pawned on Wednesday evening, the 15th of February, about seven o'clock, by Jobbins.

ROBERT FERGUSON . These are the breeches I lost from my box.

THOMAS PACE . I am a constable. I took both the prisoners into custody. I examined the box - it had been forced open by a blunt instrument. I found a piece of iron in the fire-place on the 21st; the end of it exactly fits the marks on the box, and there is a little paint on the end of it, the same colour as the box. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster.

FRAZER'S Defence (written). On the night of the 15th of February I got the key of the room from the landlady, and went up stairs, for the purpose of getting my great coat - I then came down, and went to my tea, leaving the key in the door; I returned in an hour - the key was still in the door; I locked it, came down, and went to the theatre. I went home at twelve o'clock, and found the gates closed against me; I was forced to walk the streets all night, and next morning I met two women on Westminster-bridge, who said Fergusson had been robbed, and I was supposed to be concerned; I said I was not. I went home to my mother at night, and found it was true; she told me she could not let me remain there, for the officers were ready to take me up. I went to Gravesend to try for work - my cousin there could not give me work - I returned in about a week to my mother's- I met her in Francis-street; she said she dare not let me into her house, for the officers had been there, I was obliged to sleep in lodging-houses, and next morning I heard Jobbins was in custody. On the Sunday after I saw Furgeson - he asked if I was not ashamed of what I had done; I said I knew nothing of the charge; he gave me a pint of beer, and said if I would tell him who it was he would not hurt me - I said if I knew I would tell him - he then came down to my mother, and told her what I had said, and had me taken - I am innocent.

Two witnesses gave Frazer a good character.

JOBBINS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

FRAZER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Frazer recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18260406-10

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

586. GEORGE HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Falconer Atlee , from his person .

JOHN FALCONER ATLEE, ESQ. I live at Wandsworth. On the 1st of April, about a quarter past two o'clock, I was near the Mansion House, going towards Lombard-street - my handkerchief was safe shortly before; I felt a pressure, put down my hand, and missed it; a gentleman pointed three people out to me, and I seized the prisoner, who was one, and found it in his breast - he pulled it from his breast, and said, "If this is your's I picked it up"- I took him by the collar to the Mansion House.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Your attention was called to three persons? A. Yes; I found my handkerchief in his possession in about half a minute - he was separated from the other two; I did not see him in their company - he produced it himself on my collaring him; it was quite concealed in his breast; the gentleman directed my attention to three persons - two on one side, and one on the other.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up - two or three young men had walked over it. I walked by them, and passed the gentelman.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-11

587. MARY CONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 1 table clock, value 10l. 10s. , the goods of Thomas Shelton .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to other persons.

JOSEPH LOADER . I am a fellowship porter. On the 29th of March I was standing at the Queen's Head lavern, Billingsgate, and saw the prisoner with something bulky under her coat; she was tipsy, and dropped it - it was a table clock; I said, "Mary, what have you been at" - she said, "It is all right - come with me - give me a sovereign, and you may take it." I took her to a public-house with it till the constable was fetched; she said she had sold it to me for 1l., which was false.

JOSEPH VINCENT HALLAM . I am a lighterman. I know this clock to belong to the Waterman's Company; Mr. Thomas Shelton is clerk to the company, and appoints the housekeeper, who has the care of it; I have wound it up for several years; I am beadle of the Company - it was in the hall, on St. Mary-at-hill. The prisoner was a stranger.

ANN FLYGAR . I am housekeeper at Waterman's Hall; Mr. Shelton appoints me; I have the care of the clock for him; I went out at a quarter past twelve o'clock - it was then safe; I returned in two hours, and missed it; I had left the Court-room door shut, but not locked; a person could slip in and take it.

JOHN STARLING . I am a constable. I took the clock from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A man came to me in Darkhouse-lane, and said he would give me a shilling to carry it, and being in liquor I offered it to Loader.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-12

588. JAMES WOOLF, alias MORDECIA , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 pair of boots, value 10s. , the goods of James Haddan .

EDWARD DODSON . I live in Angle-court, Bartholomew-lane , next door to Mr. Haddan, who is a solicitor . On the 27th of March I caught the prisoner on the top of my house, with three boots - he had got in at my casement window - he is a stranger.

JAMES HADDAN . I live at No. 3, Angel-court. I found the boots at Guildhall; the pair is mine, and the other my servant's.

HAZALL SAVERS . I am servant to Mr. Haddan; three pairs of boots stood in the top-room on the 27th of March- the trap door stood open; about eight o'clock in the evening Dadson alarmed me; I missed the three pairs; only one pair and an odd one were found. I found two squares of glass broken in the next room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-13

589. CATHERINE FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 7 towels, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 1s., and 1 cap, value 6d., the goods of Bethia Upton , her mistress .

BETHIA UPTON. I am a widow , and live in Shoe-lane - the prisoner was my servant - I keep a public-house . On Sunday, the 18th of February, she wished to go out - I said if she did I should not take her back; she went and returned at half-past eleven - I refused to take her in. and she left - on Monday she returned for her things - I went up with her - a small waiter fell from her box - I then said

"I must examine it;" she objected to my opening it, but opened it herself - she took out these things of mine, and put them on the floor; they are marked and all old. I should not have taken notice of them but she had some money in her hand - she did not say how she got them.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. She had left her box behind? A. Yes; these things were in her care - they were not dirty - she lived seven months with me - I had asked her for the waiter several times.

COURT. Q. Did she attempt to return your things till you said she should not leave without your examining the box? A. No, my Lord.

ELIZA BURRETT . I live at Limehouse. I was at Upton's house - I saw the prisoner come into the bed-room, where the prosecutrix's daughter was in bed, with her box - she had not got the key - she went out and fatched it, threw the towels on the ground, and burst out crying.

Cross-examined. Q. She brought her box in herself? A. Yes, as her mistress would not let her take it out; she cried bitterly, and fetched the key and opened it - the constable was there. I saw her turn to go down stairs, but her mistress made her bring it into the bed-room.

JAMES CRICKELBY . I was sent for. When I entered the bed-room the things had been taken from the box - Mrs. Upton said she thought she had got things which did not belong to her; I took them up and Mrs. Upton claimed them - the towels and apron were marked.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had the towel for my own use - I did not cry - I gave the things out to her - I had nine sovereigns in my hand, which a young man had given to me - she asked how I got them, and said the officer should have them.

The prisoner received a very good character.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-14

590. JOHN STRONACK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 7ozs. of nutmegs, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Francis Kemble and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BEAZLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Kemble - the prisoner was their porter . On the 20th of March, in consequence of directions, I desired him to fetch some almonds from the spice cellar - I concealed my self in the cellar, and saw him come down, go to the almonds, and carry them up - he returned, looked round, then went to the nutmeg cask, took an handful, and put them into his breeches pocket - then went to the almonds - returned to the nutmegs, and put another handful into his pocket - somebody called above, and he went up stairs; I went up a different staircase, and informed Mr. Kemble - Forrester was fetched in about ten minutes.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Where were you? A. Under the stairs - I could not be seen - he bore a good character.

MR. JOHN TOWGOOD KEMBLE . I am in partnership with H. Kemble, Masterman, and Co. The prisoner was ten years in our employ - we placed confidence in him - the nutmegs are worth 2s. 6d.

JOHN FORRESTER . On the 12th of March I was fetched, and stopped the prisoner coming out of the warehouse door; I took seven ounces of nutmegs out of his pockets.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-15

591. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 1 she-ass, price 12s. 6d. , the property of Simon Simonds

WILLIAM SIMONDS . I saw my father's ass at four o'clock in the afternoon of the 26th of February, in the field, and about six, on the following morning, it was gone.

SIMON SIMONDS. I live on Sydenham-common , and kept my ass in a field - there was a gap in the fence. I found it on the Friday following, exposed for sale, in Smithfield - the prisoner asked 15s. for it - I said it was

mine - he said he had bought it of a man in Kent-street, but was not to pay for it till he had sold it. He could not tell the name or number where the man lived - I had him secured - he said he would have the ass locked up, for I should not have it.

Prisoner. I told him the man's name, and where he lived. Witness. He did not.

LUKE STREET . I am a cow-keeper on Sydenham-common. I was at Smithfield when the prisoner was taken - he could give no account of the ass - he told me he bought it in Smithfield the Friday before - it had only been stolen on Sunday - he said he lived in Kent-street himself.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am an officer, and took him in charge. He told me at Newgate he had bought it in Kent-street, of one Cadit; I have inquired, but find no such person - he said he lived at the last house at the corner of Ann-street; no such person was known there.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave 10s. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-16

592. ALEXANDER WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 snuff-box, value 30s., the goods of Jabez Benyon , from his person .

JABEZ BENYON, ESQ. I live in Gracechurch-street, and am a tobacconist . On the 24th of February, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was returning from Guildhall, and near the Bank I used my snuff-box, and put it into my outside coat pocket - it was worth 30s. - I missed it when I got home - I went to the Mansion House and got Forrester, and at the top of Cornhill he beckoned to me - I followed and saw him take the prisoner into custody; I felt the outside of his pocket, and thought I felt a box, and mine was found in that pocket - there were two boys, but the prisoner had the box.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How long after you missed it did you find him? A. About half an hour; I had not observed him about my person - I carry a handkerchief in my outside coat-pocket, but am not in the habit of carrying the box in the same pocket; I will not swear it was not in the same pocket - my outside pockets are pretty deep - I felt nobody at them.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. Mr. Benyon informed me of his loss - I walked up Cornhill with him, and saw the prisoner with another lad - I told Mr. Benyon to come with me, and make haste - the prisoner separated from the other - I caught hold of the other and gave him to Mr. Benyon, while I ran and caught the prisoner, and brought him back; Mr. Benyon felt his pocket - I put my hand into his smallclothes pocket, and found the box, which Mr. Benyon claimed; I asked how he came by it - he said a boy threw it down and he picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him take it? A. No. I know nothing of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I merely picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-17

593. JAMES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 2 pairs of gloves, value 3s. 4d. , the goods of William Hamper .

MATHEW GILSDERSLEAVE . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner with the gloves, in the prosecutor's shop - I found 1s. 6d. on him.

WILLIAM HAMPER , jun. I am the son of William Hamper, a glover , who lives in Bishopsgate-street . On the 28th of March the prisoner came into the shop and asked to see some yellow gloves, which I shewed him - he took off his hat, put it on the counter, with the top downwards; he then wished to see some drab ones; I went to the window for them, turning my back to him, and when I returned he had put his hat on; he said he would call again, and was leaving the shop, but I detained him and found two pair of gloves in it - they were part of the parcel I had shewn him; he ran out, I followed, took him, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. How long after you consider the prisoner had the gloves was it that you saw the officer? A. About ten minutes - I had thrown the gloves on the top of the parcel they came from, to follow him - I did not know him before - he came to buy half a dozen pair. I know these gloves to be the same as he took.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-18

594. GEORGE LIDDIARD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 wooden box, value 1d., and 200 segars, value 30s. , the goods of Lucy Ann Gale Scott , widow .

LUCY ANN GALE SCOTT. I am a widow, and keep a tobacconist's shop in Lombard-street . On the 8th of March I had about 200 segars in a box - I saw them in the window a quarter of an hour before I missed them. I found the prisoner in custody at the Mansion House next morning.

JAMES LOVELL . I am a constable. I stopped the prisoner at half past six o'clock on the 8th of March, coming into Birchin-lane from Lombard-street, within fifteen yards of this shop, with this box of segars under his coat - he threw it down as I laid hold of him, and in twenty minutes the prosecutrix's son claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it to me to take to Cornhill.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-19

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 7.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

595. JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, 1 watch, value 4l., the goods of William Oram Jennings , in the dwelling house of Margaret Jennings , widow .

JANE HALE . I am servant to Mrs. Jennings, who lives in Lower Phillimore-place, Kensington ; she rents the house. The prisoner came to mistress' house on Friday, the 10th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and brought a basket of earthenware, which mistress had ordered; he lived with Mr. Cullen, of Knightsbridge - I let

him in, and placed the earthen ware in the parlour; I went up stairs to mistress, leaving him in the passage; I was not absent a minute; this watch was on the parlour mantel-shelf; I had not seen it that day, but saw it the day before, hanging on a bronze image - that was its usual place; he had time to go in and take it while I was gone up stairs. Mistress said she would send the money down. I came down - he was then in the hall - he went away in a few minutes; the watch was not missed till ten o'clock at night - nobody else had been in the house, I am positive.

MRS. MARGARET JENNINGS . This is my dwelling-house- William Oram Jennings is my son - I rent the house - the watch has been kept on the image for some years - I saw it there at ten minutes past four o'clock, when I went up stairs - the prisoner came about five - I told the servant I would send down the money. My house is in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington - I never dealt with his master before. I am a widow.

HENRY DUPLEX . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Sloane-street, about a mile from Mrs. Jennings'. I produce a watch which was pawned at our house on the 11th of March, by the prisoner. I consider it worth 4l.

WILLIAM ORAM JENNINGS . I am the prosecutrix's son. My watch was in the parlour - it is usually left there - this is it - I have had it about three years - these appendages have been added to it since it was taken.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, understanding him to have been a dutiful son .

Reference Number: t18260406-20

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

596. EMMA FARROW was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , at St. Margaret, Westminster, 1 shawl, value 30s.; 1 veil, value 50s.; 1 pair of stays, value 20s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s., and 1 shift, value 2s., the goods of John Leggatt ; and 1 pair of stockings, value 8s.; 1 bonnet, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; 1 silk dress, value 2l., and 1 neckerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Williams , in the dwelling house of the said John Leggatt .

JANE LEGGATT . I am the wife of John Leggatt - we live in South-place cottage, Knightsbridge, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster - he rents the house. The prisoner was in our service for a fortnight - I hired her by the month - she left me suddenly on the 26th of March, without giving any notice whatever. When she was gone I missed a shawl, worth 30s.; a veil, worth 50s.; a pair of stays, worth 20s.; two petticoats, worth 2s., and a shift, worth 2s. of mine - Mrs. Williams also lost some things; she was apprehended next day.

THOMAS LARKING . I am a constable. I had information of the robbery, and met the prisoner at Greenwich on Monday, the 27th of March, about four o'clock, and took her into custody - two gentlemen were with her; I said the property she had on belonged to her mistress. I took a bonnet off her head, a cap, a veil, a pair of silk stockings, a shawl, and handkerchief, from her person.

HEBE WILLIAMS . I lodge at Mr. Leggatt's. About a quarter of an hour after the prisoner went away I missed a silk dress, a necklace, a bonnet, and a pair of shoes - the handkerchief found on the prisoner is mine, and the bonnet is my daughter's.

WILLIAM RAVEN . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took some property from the prisoner on the 27th of March - she had the clothes on her back. I produce a pair of stays, two petticoats, a shift, a silk dress, and a pair of shoes.

MRS. WILLIAMS. The silk dress is mine, and worth 2l.

MRS. LEGGATT. The shawl and petticoat are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The under-clothing is not mistress's.

JURY to MRS. WILLIAMS. Q. Did she leave her clothes behind her? A. She left a shawl, bonnet, and pair of shoes - her box had not come - she said they were to come in a few days - the property she left behind was of but small value.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be her first offence .

Reference Number: t18260406-21

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

597. FLORANCE McCARTHY and DENNIS McCARTHY were indicted for the wilful murder of Daniel Sullivan .

MESSRS. BRODRICK and LAW conducted the prosection.

GEORGE GROVER . I keep the Rose and Crown public-house at Bromley . On the evening of the 11th of March, the prisoners were at my house with other persons - Daniel Sullivan was there, but I did not see him while the prisoners were there; Florance Bryant was in company with the prisoners - Sullivan left the house about twenty minutes after eleven o'clock - the prisoners had left about half-past nine - I believe Bryant went out with them; Cornelius and Jeremiah Rearden were in the same box with Sullivan, and left with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Were there any other persons with Daniel Sullivan? A. There were two or three others. I had not supplied much beer - Bryant went out with the prisoners, or within two or three minutes after them. I remember Sullivan wishing Daniel Collins to pay for a pot of beer - Collins appeared to be the prisoners' friend - he objected to pay; the servant took the beer to them.

JEREMIAH REARDEN. On the 11th of March I was at the Rose and Crown with my father, in company with Daniel Sullivan, who lived at my father's house at Bromley. I know the prisoners and Florance Bryant - they lived between the public-house and our house - we pass their house to go home - I saw the prisoners and Bryant at the public-house between nine and ten o'clock - they went out a good while before us - I left with my father and Sullivan between eleven and twelve o'clock, and passed the prisoner's house in our way home - there is only another house between theirs and the pathway, and as I passed I saw Dennis McCarthy standing outside his door - another person was with him - I do not know who - I saw McCarthy put his head inside the door when he heard my father coming by - he was speaking - I do not know what McCarthy said, but I heard him speak. Florance McCarthy and Florance Bryant then came out with him, and Florance Bryant's wife, and Daniel Collins and a boy;

Dennis McCarthy had a stick in his hand - I saw nothing in Florance McCarthy's hand then; he caught hold of my father by the shoulder, and told him he was not going off so easy as he went off before; Dennis McCarthy got behind my father, with a stick, and hit him on the head with it - my father and him struggled for the stick, and Florance McCarthy hit my father with a poker - I do not know where he got it; I was helping my father and he struck me also on the cheek with the poker; I went away for assistance, to get my father from them, and at this time saw Daniel Sullivan leaning against a paling a little distance off - I left him there when I went away for help - I returned soon after without any further help, and found my father laying at the corner of a garden near the spot - I picked him up - he was bleeding very much - Daniel Sullivan was leaning on the same place - I had not been away five minutes - there was a ditch a little distance off from where the fight began - I saw the deceased and Daniel McCarthy in the ditch - they were standing about - I was afraid to go near the ditch, but I saw Dennis McCarthy hitting Sullivan a good many times - I do not know what he had in his hand - I did not see Florance Bryant nor Florance McCarthy when I returned. Dennis McCarthy kept striking him for a quarter of an hour in the ditch - I could not see whether Sullivan resisted - he had nothing in his hand while he was by the paling; there were several women about the ditch - they pulled him out - I and Lyons brought him home; just after I got home I went for a surgeon, as he was all over blood and dirty ditch water - he died on the Tuesday.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you been at the public-house? A. From six till between eleven and twelve o'clock - I only had two pints of porter. I have had a few words and blows with Daniel Collins, about Christmas, but it was made up before this. Sullivan made no observation about Collins paying for the beer. It was dark but there were lights brought when he was in the ditch - the ditch is not far from where the fight began.

Q. Who were fighting? A. Dennis and Florance McCarthy were beating my father - I and my father tried to prevent them as well as we could - McCarthy stood at his door, with his face towards us as we passed. I remember nothing about a challenge; I never swore I did not see them strike the deceased, or that I was not sure McCarthy was the man in the ditch; I could see that he was hitting him; my father was speaking to Sullivan when we came by the prisoner's house.

CORNELIUS REARDEN . I am a gentleman's servant. I was at the Rose and Crown with my son and Sullivan; we left the house between nine and ten o'clock I think; and when I got into Mann's building my son and another young man were before Sullivan and me - I observed Dennis McCarthy coming with a stick in his hand, and said to Sullivan "Dan, Dan, look out, there is something coming;" I had hardly spoken these words before Dennis McCarthy struck me with the stick on the head; I had had no quarrelling with him at all lately; Florance Mc-Carthy then came after me and struck me with a poker - I put my arm up - I was insensible - the blood spirted out of my arm - I got the sleeve of my coat torn with the point of the poker; I also received a blow with a fist in my right eye, and that brought me to the ground; I lay there some time, and cannot say what happened then to Sullivan; when I recovered my son stood there, calling out "My father is murdered!" The prisoners were at the public-house that evening, and went before us; my son took me home - the blood ran very fast from my head.

Cross-examined. Q. You had had no quarrel with Dennis McCarthy lately? A. No; we had a few words about three weeks before, but no quarrel - there were a good many persons in the public-house, but not drinking with us; Magan, who was with my son, and young Gay, came in; I cannot say whether Gay came out with us; Dennis McCarthy struck me the blow before he spoke a word to me, or I to him; it happened between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. Where were you from between nine and ten, when you left the house? A. Going home; I did not hurry myself - I do not think that I live half a mile from the house.

Q. Was not McCarthy's house shut up when you passed? A. I did not look at the house - I did not see him till he was coming up - nobody told me he was standing at the doorway - I heard nobody call out to the persons in McCarthy's house - I recollect hearing Mrs. Bryant's voice in the road, but not seeing her - I saw her just inside the Rose and Crown.

Mr. LAW. Q. Had you passed the house when you were struck? A. No, I was just coming up - we might stop on our way from the public-house and talk - we did not hurry.

MARY SULLIVAN . I am the deceased widow. On the 11th of March, between nine and ten o'clock, I went to fetch him from the Rose and Crown - he spoke to me outside the house, and I went home; a woman came to my house between eleven and twelve, and said something; I went out and found him laying down, and a man jumping on his back, about ten yards from McCarthy's house; I saw his face all over blood; just as I came up I saw Florance Bryant make a run, and leap on my husband's body - just on his side - I took him up and led him towards home; Florance McCarthy came up and hit him three blows with a stick on the back of his head; Jack Magan was with him; Florance Bryant tripped my husband up into a ditch - I cannot say where Florance Mc-Carthy was then - Dennis McCarthy jumped down upon him as he was endeavouring to get from the ditch - he laid hold of his head with one hand, and dipped his head into the ditch, and struck him for a full quarter of an hour he kept beating him - I stood by but could do nothing - when I saw him almost murdered I thought it right to take care of my life for my family. Mrs. McCarthy took my husband out of the ditch by the collar; I took hold of his shoulder, Lyons took hold of his legs, and we got him out of the ditch - got him home, and went for the doctor; he was not quite sensible till the doctor came; we carried him home - he could not walk - he died on Tuesday evening; I said to him on Sunday "Do you think you shall recover?" he said he did not know, but if he did he should never be able to do any thing; on the Tuesday, between twelve and one o'clock, he said "Take me out of bed and make the bed;" I did so; he said "Mary, make haste, for I am almost gone - I am a dead man;" he died about six o'clock; he said Florance Bryant, and his

lodgers, were the cause of his death; the prisoners are Bryant's lodgers.

Cross-examined. Q. Florance Bryant is the man who took a running leap on your husband's body? A. Yes; Magan's son was at the public-house that night; I cannot say whether the father was; Dennis McCarthy is the man who jumped upon my husband in the ditch - I knew him by sight but not by name; he jumped into the ditch, not on my husband; the water in the ditch was as high as my breast, I think.

MARGARET DODD . I live at Bromley. On Saturday night, the 11th of March, at twelve o'clock, I heard a noise - I jumped up and came out, and the first I met was Daniel Sullivan, all over blood; I asked who was that - he said it was him; I knew him by his voice; the prisoners were within hearing; I asked him what was the matter - he said Florance Bryant and his lodgers were after killing him - we were three or four yards from the ditch; I turned round to go home, and immediately heard a great plunge in the ditch; I asked who was in the ditch; a woman said it was Daniel Sullivan - Dennis McCarthy was in the ditch hitting Dan Sullivan - there was only a little of his head to be seen; Florance McCarthy was on the bank of the ditch.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear any noise before? A. The noise awoke me; I was not a moment getting up- I only put my cloak on; they were a good distance from McCarthy's house - nearer to Sullivan's; they live about 200 yards apart; I was not a yard from the ditch when Dennis McCarthy jumped in.

ELIZABETH GILL . I live at Bromley. On Saturday night, the 11th of March, about twelve o'clock, I heard a noise, went out, and saw Daniel Sullivan and his wife - Sullivan went towards the ditch, as if he was going home - he had to pass there; I went away for a little while, then came back and saw some fighting in the ditch; I saw McCarthy beating Sullivan in the ditch, with his fist; I could not see where he struck him; Margaret Dodd said something to Florance Bryant, who jumped into the ditch, and was releasing Sullivan out of the ditch, and while he was trying to get him out I saw Dennis McCarthy strike Sullivan with a stick. I staid till he was taken out and taken towards home.

Cross-examined. Q. When Dodd spoke to Bryant did you see Dennis McCarthy? A. I saw him in the ditch, striking Sullivan; Florance Bryant jumped into the ditch to help Sullivan out.

THOMAS BURFORD . I am constable of Bromley. A watchman applied to me at twelve o'clock on the 11th of March - I went to Rearden's house, where the deceased lay; I afterwards went to Florance Bryant's house - the door was bolted; I knocked two or three times, and at last, after threatening to break it open, somebody opened it; I went in - the first thing I saw was Florance Bryant going up stairs, on seeing me; I and the watchman followed him up; the door of the bed-room was fastened - I threatened to break it open, and a voice within said they would come down as soon as they were dressed; I came down, leaving the watchman at the room door, and heard a voice outside exclaim, "The e is somebody getting out of the window;" I went out - Florance McCarthy dropped from the window; I secured him - he then had a clean shirt and trousers on. Dennis McCarthy was secured in the house; he was also in clean linen. The ditch is very dirty, and had a great deal of water in it at that time. Mrs. Burke gave me a poker on Wednesday, the 15th of March.

HANNAH BURKE . On the morning of the 12th of March I found this poker, about break of day, on the footpath - I pointed the spot out to Townsend.

SAMUEL TOWNSEND . I am one of the parish officers. The spot Burke pointed out to me is a few yards from the ditch which Sullivan's widow shewed me - it is about 150 yards from Bryant's.

THOMAS ANSELL . I am a surgeon. On the 11th of March, at midnight, I was called to the deceased - I found him laying on a bed at Rearden's house, much exhausted, but sensible. I found several wounds on his head - one on the back of his head, one on the forehead, and another near the eye; I attended him till death, and afterwards examined his body; the whole of his back was one livid bruise - I opened the body - the small intestines were in a state of great inflammation; it appeared to me to have been occasioned by repeated blows; the inflammation of the intestines was the cause of his death - it became gangrene; he was quite a healthy subject, except a very old complaint in the liver, from which he had recovered - that had nothing to do with his death.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you discover any disease? A. None whatever; there was inflammation about the kidneys.

Florance McCarthy, in his Defence, entered into an account of a quarrel between Rearden, and one Collyer, a few weeks previous to this transaction, and stated, that on the 11th of March Collyer and Rearden quarrelled again at the public-house, about a pint of beer, when the deceased was going to strike him with the pot, but was prevented - that they went home, and about 12 o'clock Rearden and his party came to the door, and called Collyer out to fight - when Bryant asked why he made a disturbance at his house at that late hour - they got fighting, and the deceased attacked Bryant's wife, and tore her clothes; she called out Murder! and they went to her assistance, but used no violence to him; they went in doors, and in a few minutes heard a noise and went out, hearing the men were fighting in the ditch, and saw Florance Bryant and a woman helping him out of the ditch.

DENNIS McCARTHY's Defence. The first of this was Jack Barry and Con Rearden had been to Lambeth-street, about an assault; Collins was a witness, and Rearden said he would serve him out for it. He came to our lodgings once or twice, stripped, called us out to fight, and said he would have blood or something - and on the night this accident happened the deceased and Reardens were drinking at the Rose and Crown; Collins drank out of their pot and they wanted him to pay for a pot - he refused, and the deceased put up a pot, and said he would strike him with it. About twelve o'clock they came to our house, and called him all manner of names; the landlady came out, and was attacked: we went out - Rearden told me to go home to his lodgings with him - I did so, and as I returned I saw Sullivan near the ditch - he struck me and I struck him; we both rolled into the ditch, and I do not know what happened. I was all covered with mud and stuff.

MARGARET DRISCOL . I was in bed on this night, and heard a row at a quarter or half-past twelve o'clock; the watchman said Rearden and Florance Bryant's people were fighting, and he would have no hand in it, and in about two minutes I saw Sullivan pass by, going home - I moved towards the ditch, where there were two or three women; I saw Sullivan turn back with his wife - he pulled a rail out near the ditch, went and struck Mrs. Bryant with it three times - she called Murder! and somebody ran down to Florance Bryant's - Dennis McCarthy and another man ran down from their place - I made the best of my way home when I saw the people coming.

FLORANCE McCARTHY - GUILTY.

DENNIS McCARTHY - GUILTY.

Of Manslaughter only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-22

Before Mr. Justice Park.

598. JOHN BURKE , JAMES ROACH , and WILLIAM DONOVAN were charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition, with killing and slaying Timothy Driscoll .

Upon the evidence of Mr. George Baille , a surgeon, it appeared the deceased had died from apoplexy, not at all produced or accelerated in any way by the transaction in question.

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260406-23

Before Mr. Justice Park.

599. JOHN BRITTON was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Quye , on the night of the 25th of February , and stealing 1 counterpane, value 10s.; 1 shift, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 5s., and 1 night gown, value 5s. , his property.

JOHN QUYE. I live in Kingsgate-street, Holborn , and am in the East India Company's service . On the 25th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, in consequence of what my wife said, I went into the passage, and shut the private door, which I found open - it is usually kept shut; my wife keeps a chandler's-shop. I immediately went up, and found the prisoner in the first floor room; I asked what he was doing there - he said he came to look for one Atkins - no such person lived in my house - I saw a bundle at his feet; I collared him, and called down Shaw, a lodger, who was then beadle, and gave him in charge, with the bundle - there were other things on the floor; there were two new suits of children's clothes, two children's hats, and other things, which are worth 5l. together. I was in the passage a quarter of an hour before - the door was shut then.

MARY QUYE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had not been to the door for several hours. The bundle contains a shawl, a night gown, a shirt, and shift, which are ours.

SARAH BEECH . I lodge at this house. I went out at five o'clock, and shut the door.

ROBERT SHAW . I was a beadle at this time, and had just come home when this happened - I came in through the shop, and know nothing about the private door. I found on the prisoner two small skeleton keys, and a pipe key, which will open the door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a lock-smith . I made the two keys for a house, but they were mis-fits. I was drinking with a shopmate the day before this, and asked him where Atkins lodged, as I had not seen him a long time - he said he lived at No. 22, Kingsgate-street, and seeing this door open I went up, knocked at the door twice, and it flew open; I stepped in, and was stepping back when the prosecutor came up.

JOHN QUYE . I live next door to No. 22 - I never heard of Atkins living there.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-24

Before Mr. Justice Park.

600. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George William Deacon , about six o'clock in the night of the 19th of February , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 4 pairs of sheets, value 5l., and 9 table-cloths, value 4l. , his property.

GEORGE WILLIAM DEACON. I live at Stepney-green, in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stebouheath, or Stepney . - On the 19th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, in consequence of information I proceeded to the front door, which was open - it was light; I saw a bed tied up in a bundle, hanging over the parapet - the house is two stories high; I instantly went up stairs, and found the room in great confusion; I pulled the bed in, and got into the next house, which was empty - my gutter was strewed with things - I missed four pairs of sheets, and nine table-cloths, which were new, and worth 9l., and various other things. I went down the stairs of the adjoining house, and on the first floor found a looking-glass, which had come from my servant's room.

MARTHA PEARSON . I am the prosecutor's servant. I went out on Sunday, the 19th of February, for some milk, and as I returned I saw a man on the top of the house, dragging a large bundle along the parapet - I could not see his face, but he had a dark mixture coat on. A window curtain was taken away, which I know to be mistress'.

GEORGE THOMAS BROWN . I live four doors from Deacon. I went out on this evening between six and seven o'clock (nearer seven) - I went to the back part of the premises, and saw the prisoner and another man coming over the fence of the adjoining premises - it is a vacant piece of ground, attached to the bottom of the garden - they appeared to be coming from Deacon's premises; I called out Stop thief! they separated, and I took the prisoner after he had run about two hundred yards. I am positive he is one of the men who came over the paling; I never lost sight of him; his shoes were off; he had stockings on. I helped him put his shoes on - they were on the ground when I came up to him. I took him to the prosecutor's house.

Prisoner. He let me go twice, because Deacon would not give charge of me. Witness. I asked Deacon if he would give him in charge - he said he could not swear to his being on the premises, and he hesitated; I told the prisoner he was at large, but the crowd were round, he could not escape.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. I searched him at Mr. Deacon's, and found a shawl in his coat pocket, and a quantity of shavings with it, and there were shavings about in the unfinished house. I examined his feet at the watch-house;

they were dirty, as if he had been running without shoes; Deacon delivered me a crow-bar - a curtain was delivered to me by Mrs. Cowding, of the Alfred's Head public-house, and on returning from Cowding's I found a pair of shoes in the road.

HARRIET COWDING . I keep a public-house in Silver-street, Stepney, near the prosecutor's. King brought a man into my house, without his shoes (it was not the prisoner) - they took him into the kitchen, and I found a curtain laying on the table, which I gave to Christian. The prisoner was not there.

SAMUEL KING . I am a sawyer. On Sunday evening, the 19th of February, I heard a cry of Stop thief! as I sat in my own house; I ran to the door, and saw a man pass me - he was stopped, and I took him to Mrs. Cowding's, and saw him pull the curtain from his bosom; Cowding took it; a man named Edwards, who was in the house, pretended to be an officer - I left the man there with him.

HARRIET COWDING . I had never seen Edwards with the man before.

GEORGE WILLIAM DEACON . I found the crow-bar in the attic of my own house - it was applied to the front attic window, where they entered, and corresponded with the marks; the shawl found on the prisoner is not mine.

MARTHA PEARSON . The curtain is master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! there was a mob - two men came over the palings of the adjoining house; I ran towards the mob - my shoes were trod down at heel - I was trying to get from the mob: somebody said, "If you don't get away perhaps you will be taken, as you seem running;" so I stooped to put on my shoes, and this man took me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering .

Reference Number: t18260406-25

Before Mr. Justice Park.

601. JOHN McNICHOL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Larnder , about one o'clock in the night of the 25th of February , at St. Anne, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 table-cover, value 1s.; 4 table-cloths, value 12s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 4s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 2 coats, value 2l.; 1 pair of boots, value 15s.; 6 silver spoons, value 30s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 1 peppercastor, value 10s., and 10 quarts of wine, value 40s., his property; 1 pelisse, value 30s.; 2 pairs of boots, value 20s.; 1 writing-desk, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 10s.; 1 sugar-basin, value 3l., and 8 sovereigns , the property of Robert Osborne .

GEORGE LARNDER. I am a lighterman , and live at No. 33, Fore-street, Limehouse, in the parish of St. Anne - I rent the house. On the 25th of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was called up by the servant girl - it was day-light - I found the back parlour cupboard broken open, and missed ten or twelve bottles of Port and Madeira wine; I also lost a blue great coat, a pair of trousers, a waistcoat, a table-cover, four table-cloths, two pairs of shoes, a pair of boots, four silver tea-spoons, a pair of sugar-tongs, a silver pepper-castor, two table-spoons, and other things - they were worth full 10l.; the boots were worn by my son - I provide him with clothes. I found the hasp of the back kitchen window (which looks to the river side) was broken, and the window open - it was highwater, and the tide then comes nearly up to my house.

ROBERT OSBORNE . I lodge at this house. I was the last person up - I went to bed about twelve o'clock; the window and doors were all fast - I examined the kitchen window particularly. I got up first in the morning, about half-past six o'clock - it was just the dawn of morning; on going into the front parlour, which I occupy, I found the cupboard door open. I lost a silver sugar-basin, and a writing-desk, containing eight sovereigns and papers, a pelisse, and two pairs of boots. I saw the boots and the pelisse at the Thames Police Office the same morning.

JOHN BEAUMONT . I am a watchman of Aldgate. On Saturday morning, the 25th of February, about a quarter to three o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming off Tower-hill towards Rosemary-lane, about a mile and a half from Limehouse, with a bundle in his hand - I stopped him - he had two pairs of boots on his left arm; I asked where he came from - he said he was an apprentice, belonging to a ship at Gravesend, and the things belonged to the second mate of the ship; I took him to the watch-house - and saw a pair of trousers and waistcoat taken from him, and a table-cloth from his hat - the trousers were taken off him at the office. I found no plate on him.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I am headborough of St. Botolph, Aldgate. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I asked what he had got in his bundle - he said clothes; I asked where he got them - he said the second mate of his ship had given them to him to take to Captain Seabrook; I found a table-cloth in his hat - he had a black waistcoat on over another: I took it off, as it appeared too small for him; he had a pair of trousers on over his own. I took them off next morning, as he said the pair he had under them were torn.

GEORGE LARNDER . The table-cloth has my name on it; the waistcoat and trousers are my son's.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the Thomas Coote East Indiaman, and was coming from Gravesend; I met the second mate of the Posthumous, who asked me to carry these things to Ratcliff-cross - he said I might put the trousers and waistcoat on, and if any one stopped me to say I was apprentice to a ship.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18260406-26

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

602. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Patrick Crow , from his person .

PATRICK CROW. I live at Camden-town. On the 9th of March, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was in Cheapside , nearly opposite to Bread-street, and felt a jerk at my coat - I turned round, and saw the prisoner close behind me, with my handkerchief in his hand - it was safe five minutes before - he turned round immediately, crossed over Cheapside, and ran down Bread-street, concealing it in his trousers; I ran after him - he saw me pursuing, and ran faster. I called out Stop thief! he was stopped before I lost sight of him: he immediately pulled out the

handkerchief, and threw it behind him - I picked it up. - He knelt down, and begged me not to prosecute him.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am clerk to a merchant in Bread-street. I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him; he fell down, drew the handkerchief out, and threw it away.

JOHN WILLIS . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a mob in the street - I picked the handkerchief up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-27

603. HANNAH CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 damask table-cloth, value 5l., the goods of Robert Schooley , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT SCHOOLEY. I am a bookseller , and live at No. 46, Paternoster-row . The prisoner was my domestic servant for nearly three years. I lived a short way from town for a short time, for the benefit of my health, and she was left in charge of the town house. A table-cloth was stolen - I saw it since at Muncaster's, Skinner-street, in December. On the 7th of November I told her her mistress would sleep in town next night, and to prepare her room; and at half-past ten o'clock on the 8th of November, I went home with my wife, and my apprentice informed me the prisoner had left - she never returned; I did not see her again till Monday last, when a friend stopped her, and brought her to me; I gave charge of her. My name is on the cloth at full length - it was locked up; the drawer must have been opened by a false key; I had had it some years, but it was seldom used. I think I gave 10l. for it.

WILLIAM WARRE . I am servant to Mr. Muncaster. - On the 17th of September I took a table-cloth in pawn of the prisoner, for 10s., in the name of Jones - I am certain of her - it is worth 30s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HART . I am porter to Mr. Schooley. In November I was ordered to take some shavings out of the fire place, and I found a purse there, with a duplicate of the table-cloth - it was given to the pawnbroker.

WILLIAM WARRE. It is the duplicate I gave her.

WILLIAM ELLIOT. I am a grocer, and am acquainted with Mr. Schooley. Last Monday I met the prisoner on Holborn-hill, and secured her.

Prisoner's Defence. I missed some linen, and left the situation on that account.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Reference Number: t18260406-28

604. HANNAH CLARKE was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 1 tea-pot, value 15l.; 1 table-cloth, value 31s. 6d., and 3 sheets, value 30s., the goods of Robert Schooley , her master .

MR. SCHOOLEY. We missed these articles the day after the prisoner left; the sheets were taken from every bed in the house. I lost 40l. worth of property; I never gave her authority to pawn any thing.

HENRY VERE THREDDER . This tea-pot was pawned with me, in the name of "Mary Jones, for Mr. Schooley," for 6l. - it is worth 8l. - (looking at a duplicate) - this is what I gave the person, but I do not know who she was.

JAMES HART . That duplicate was in the purse with the others.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-29

605. STEPHEN STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 7 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of George Lecocg .

GEORGE LECOCG. I live in Throgmorton-street . On the 1st of April, in the morning, I missed seven handkerchiefs from a chest of drawers in the attic; the prisoner had no business in the house; the garret window is often left open. I found them at the Mansion House.

MARY MOXEY . I am servant to Mrs. Marriott, of Old Broad-street. I found the prisoner in her bed-room on the 31st of March, at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon - he was a stranger, and must have come in at the top of the house - he could go along the roofs from the prosecutor's to our house. I laid hold of him - he said he was after a pigeon which had flown over the house. These seven handkerchiefs were found on him.

JOHN BRADY . I am a constable. Several robberies have been committed in this way in this neighbourhood. I took the prisoner, and found these handkerchiefs on him - he said he took them from this house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw them laying by the entry at the fire in Broad-street.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-30

606. WILLIAM HITCHINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 27ozs. of tobacco, value 6s., the goods of Stephen Hale , his master .

STEPHEN HALE. I am a tobacconist , and live in Bishopsgate-street within . The prisoner worked for me three or four months; Beecham, my shopman, called me up early; I found him holding the prisoner in the parlour, and 1lb. 7ozs. of tobacco was loose in his hat - he fell on his knees, and begged for mercy.

JOHN BEECHAM . I am foreman to Mr. Hale. On Friday morning, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock, the prisoner went into the warehouse for water to sprinkle the shop; the tobacco laid there open - he returned with his hat on, went into the cellar, and beat the mats, still keeping his hat on; he swept the shop and pavement, and came in; I said, "Bill, where are you going?" he said, "Into the cellar - you have no suspicion - rub me down;" I did so, then took his hat off, and found the tobacco - he tried to get from me.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to Mercy .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-31

607. HENRY BENJAMIN and RICHARD PAINTER were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 7lbs. of salmon, value 17s. , the goods of Benjamin Clay .

BENJAMIN CLAY. I live with Mr. Curling, a salmon salesman. This salmon was in my care, to be weighed and delivered to master's customers; on the 14th of March - about ten minutes past five o'clock in the morning I

missed it from a basket at Billingsgate ; I saw Stephenson and told him, and, from what he said, I went down Dark-house-lane, and in about half an hour, Hurlock gave me information; I went and laid hold of Benjamin in Thames-street, opposite the market; he said he knew nothing about it; as I came out of the watch-house I found Painter in custody - the salmon was produced, with the basket; I have no doubt of it being ours, as there was none up that morning except what master had, and they were Irish salmon.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there none in the market but what you had? A. None; I did not go round the market to see, but I can tell without that - if any had been left the day before it would not be of this quality; they come from Ireland to master; I had sold a box and a half of salmon that morning to different people- there might be twelve in each box.

THOMAS STEPHENSON . I am a fellowship porter at Billingsgate. I saw both the prisoners that morning, a few yards from each other. I saw Painter stoop to Curling's basket: he appeared to have a fish in his hand; he went towards the bridge; whether he took the fish away I cannot tell - Benjamin followed him immediately. I heard in two or three minutes that a fish had been stolen and sold. Clay went in pursuit, and in half an hour I saw them standing close together opposite the market; Benjamin then had a tub with a salmon in it; I told Clay they were the men who I supposed had it; Benjamin was stopped first - I saw the kit and salmon at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Benjamin works about the market? A. Yes; he carries fish about sometimes.

JOHN HURLOCK . I am a salmon weigher. I saw the prisoners in the market - they were sometimes together; I saw Stephenson and Clay together, and in consequence of what they said I went round the market - in half an hour I saw the prisoners together - Benjamin had a salmon kit under his arm; I told Clay; Stephenson was close to me; Benjamin held his finger up to me - I saw him pass the salmon kit over to Painter, and, in five minutes, I saw Painter brought into the watch-house, with the kit and salmon.

Cross-examined. Q. It was half an hour after the fish was missed that you saw them? A. Yes; it is not common to see fresh salmon in a kit, I did not take them, as Stephenson did not mention their names; he only described their dress; the prosecutor had all the salmon which came that morning. I have known Benjamin twenty years - he was often in the market buying fish. The prosecutor had sold about twenty-two that morning, but had not delivered them.

BENJAMIN CLAY . I had delivered some of the salmon to customers before the prisoners were taken.

ISAAC CHURCHER . I am porter to Mr. Gurling. Clay told me a fish was gone - Stephenson pointed out Painter to me, and I took him, with the salmon in a kit which is used for pickled salmon; I took him to the watch-house - he said a man gave it to him to hold at the bottom of the hill.

PAINTER's Defence. A man gave it to me to hold while he went somewhere.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-32

608. SAMUEL MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 wooden chest, value 3s. 6d., and 52lbs. of tea, value 15l. , the goods of Thomas Cooper and Richard Cooper .

MR. THOMAS COOPER. I am a wholesale grocer , in partnership with Richard Cooper - we live in Duke-street, Bloomsbury. A chest of tea was coming to us from the East India ware-rooms on the 28th of February - it did not arrive - I found it at Guildhall on the 2d of March, and knew it by the mark and number; the prisoner was in custody - it is worth 15l.

RICHARD BETTRIDGE . I am carman. I put this chest into my waggon, in Cutler-street, Houndsditch, about half-past two o'clock - the tail-board was straight up, and when I was in the upper part of Holborn I looked over the waggon and missed a chest by Southampton-buildings - the tail-board was as I had left it; two persons might unbook it and do it up again. I found it on the 2d of March in Grub-street, at the officer's house; I knew it by the Excise mark - I had gone along London-wall and Fore-street.

RICHARD MILLS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 28th of February I was in Grub-street, about four o'clock, and saw the prisoner, with this chest on his head - I followed and saw him turn into a court in Haberdashers'-square, and going into the back door of a house where greens and fish are sold - I knew the house before; he was almost on the step of the back door when I said "What have you got there?" he said "I don't know, a man gave it me to carry from Turnstile;" and he was to have 1s. 6d. for it; I detained him, and found Messrs. Coopers' out by the Excise mark - I returned them the tea, and have the chest here.(Chest produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work and went out portering in the street - this man gave me the tea in Holborn to carry - I saw him behind when I was in Hatton-garden, but not afterwards.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-33

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 8.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

609. ELIZABETH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 4 silver spoons, value 20s.; 1 tablecloth, value 20s.; 1 sheet, value 10s.; 2 waistcoats, value 5s., and a pair of stockings, value 1s., the goods of John Jeremy , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN JEREMY. I am a linen-draper , and live in Thornaugh-street. The prisoner was eleven months in my service; I had a very high opinion of her. On the 7th of March I inquired for some articles which were missing - she said she would find them presently; a friend of mine went down to her, and brought me up some duplicates. I had been in prison for debt seven weeks, and left her to manage my concerns entirely - she had the keys of every thing. I am not a married man.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Had she not to pro

vide herself and your son with victuals? A. Yes; she got a friend to keep an account of what she laid out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-34

610. CATHERINE CLARK. alias PITT , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Stanley , spinster , in the King's highway, on the 3d of April , at St. John, Clerkenwell, putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, 1 muff, value 5s.; 1 tippet, value 5s., and 8 shillings , her property.

JANE STANLEY. I am single, and live at No. 17, Britania-street, City-road. I am a dress-maker , and work for myself. On the 3d of April, about one o'clock in the night, I was going home - I got out of a hackney-coach in St. John-street - I had come from Deptford; my sister, whose name is Thompson, came with me as far as Leadenhall-street, and I got into a coach; I got out of the coach in St. John-street , and paid 1s. 6d. for the fare.

Q. Why not go all the way in the coach? A. The fare would be 3s. 6d. I dropped a shilling as I was paying the coachman; after I was out I stopped for a moment to pick it up; I saw the prisoner - two men appeared to be in company with her - they seemed to be talking together; one of the men jerked my hand, and insulted me; I was afraid of them, and told them they might pick the money up if they liked, as I was afraid of them - I directly left them; the prisoner followed me about 300 yards from the coach - she walked by my side, all the way talking to me; I wished to avoid her; I never saw her before; she kept calling me names all the way, and asked me at last if I would treat her; I said I did not think there was any place open; she then caught hold of me, and knocked me down; she held me down by force, in a kind of dirty corner on the pavement; I did not know she was taking my money - she then tore off my tippet, and tore my muff from my hand; I struggled to keep them but could not - she ran off as fast as she could, and I after her - I called murder seven or eight times, when the watchman came running up. I picked up my tippet in the way, about fifty steps from the spot; the watchman stopped her in my sight, and picked up my muff. I have no doubt of her person. I said "This woman has knocked me down and robbed me," and gave her in charge - I had 8s. 6d. in my pocket - I had 11s. before I went into the coach; my pocket being nearly behind me the string was broken and my money gone. She was never out of my sight - the lining was torn out of my muff in struggling.

WILLIAM KNAPP . I am a watchman. I was on duty on Sunday night, crying the hour of one; two drovers met me by Wilderness-row, and said a lady had come out of a coach and dropped some money - I took no notice - they said "Go and look in the mud, you will find it;" I passed on and heard a female voice crying murder; I turned and ran up Wilderness-row, and stopped the prisoner, who was running from the prosecutrix; I said"Halloo! what is the matter, who cried murder?" the prosecutrix came up, and said she had knocked her down and stolen her tippet and muff - she had picked the ticket up; I found the muff at the prisoner's feet, behind her; the prosecutrix was perfectly sober; she gave charge of her.

JACOB HARRIS . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; the prosecutrix gave the same account as she has now. I have the tippet and muff.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Smithfield. I have known the prosecutrix for nine months - she walks the City-road, and used to walk the Strand; I am unfortunate, like herself; she came into the Bull public-house, tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me to give her part of some gin and peppermint which I was drinking with another female; I gave her some, and asked her to pay for some - she said if I would walk up St. John-street she would treat me; I did so; the landlord turned us all out, it being time to shut up; she would not pay for any gin; I slapped her face - she said she had no money - I slapped her face again; she screamed Murder, and dropped her muff; I never attempted to run - we were both in liquor, which the watchman well knows.

JACOB HARRIS . The prosecutrix was as sober as she is now.

COURT to JANE STANLEY. Q. Is there any cause for her saying you get your living in the way she says? A. I do not; my sister lives at Rotherhithe - her husband is a gardener, and keeps a shop also. I never saw the prisoner before; I had been spending the day with my sister.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18260406-35

Before Mr. Justice Park.

611. JOSEPH LONG and JOHN EADEN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Froggett , about ten o'clock in the night of the 17th of February , at St. Mathew, Bethnalgreen, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 2 coats, value 3s., and 1 blanket, value 2s. , his property.

JOHN FROGGETT. On Friday, the 17th of February, I lived in Twigg-folly, in the parish of St. Mathew, Bethnal-green - I am a shoemaker - the house is let out in tenements - the landlord does not live there. About half-past ten o'clock at night I was up - I heard my child cry out - I went with a candle into the bed-room and found I was robbed; I found neither the door nor window open; I missed a blanket, two coats, and a counterpane.

MARTHA FROGGETT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I put the children to bed about seven o'clock, in the backroom on the ground floor; the eldest is seven years old; this blanket, quilt, and two coats, were laid on the top of the bed; I brought the candle out of the room with me, and shut the room door - I bolted the back door in the passage leading to the garden, and the room window was shut; we were sitting in the front room - there is a room between that and the bed-room - the bed-room and street doors were shut.

JOHN NORRIS. I am inspector of the Bow-street patrol. On Friday night, the 17th of February, about a quarter or half-past ten o'clock, I was standing at the corner of Devonshire-street and Globe-lane, and saw the prisoners coming in a direction from Green-place, Twigg-folly, about 400 yards from the prosecutor's, each having a bundle - I knew them before - I went up and took hold of

Long - he had a bundle containing a blanket and counterpane; I tried to catch hold of Eaden but he slipped down, then got up and ran away, leaving a bundle and his hat behind him; I took them up and cried Stop thief! he was stopped in two minutes by a man who is not here, and both were taken to the watch-house; they made a most desperate resistance - Eaden's bundle contained wet linen - each of them had one of the prosecutor's coats on his back over his own. I am sure of Eaden - I knew him before.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am constable of the night. I found the prisoners at the watch-house; the prosecutor came in soon afterwards and mentioned his loss, and described the colour of his coats; I produced the prisoners to him and he claimed the coats, which they were then laying on.

JOHN NORRIS . They had these coats on when I saw them.

JOHN FROGGETT. I am certain both these coats are mine - I have had one of them eight years.

MRS. FROGGETT. I know the quilt and blanket.

LONG'S Defence. On this night a young man was about six yards before me - he turned round and asked which way I was going - I said to Bethnal-green; he asked me to carry two bundles to the Salmon and Ball, and he would pay us.

EADEN. I have no more to say.

LONG - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

EADEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18260406-36

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

612. WILLIAM MONTIER was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Banks , on the night of the 10th of January , and stealing 4 shifts, value 8s.; 5 gowns, value 40s.; 4 petticoats, value 8s.; 4 pillow cases, value 6s.; 1 umbrella, value 3s.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 1 nightgown, value 2s., and 2 towels, value 1s. , his property.

SARAH BANKS . I am the wife of John Banks. In January last we lived in Nelson-street, Cock-lane, Bethnalgreen , and rented the house. On the 10th of January I went out, about seven o'clock in the evening, locked the house up, and took the key with me - I returned at twelve, and found the door wide open, but no marks of violence on it; I missed the articles stated in the indictment; I found the pillow-case in possession of Parish, on the 15th of March, but have found nothing else.

JOHN BANKS . I came home about twelve o'clock on the night of the robbery, and missed the property.

PHILIP PARISH . I am a Bow-street officer. I searched the prisoner's house on the 15th of March; he had been apprehended the day before; I found his wife there; I told him afterwards of it - he did not deny its being his house; I found this pillow-case between the bed and sacking, with other property.(Pillow-case produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-37

613. WILLIAM MONTIER was again indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Richard Lefever , on the night of the 26th of February , and stealing half a yard of waistcoating, value 2s.; 1 yard of woollen cloth, value 9s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 night jacket, value 2s.; 1 yard of stuff, value 1s.; 1 yard of jean, value 6d., and 1 coverlid, value 10s. , his property.

HONOUR LEFEVER . I am the wife of Richard Lefever - we live in Satchwell-street, Bethnal-green . On the night of the 26th of February we left home between five and six o'clock; I fastened the windows, and doubled-locked the door, leaving nobody at home; it was dark - we returned about ten, found the street-door open, and a watchman there; there were no marks of violence on the door - my drawers were broken open - we missed this property; the jean, and a remnant of stuff, were afterwards produced by Parish.

PHILIP PARISH . On the 15th of March, I searched the prisoner's house, and found a piece of plaid stuff, a piece of jean, a piece of black calico, and several remnants of white calico; part of them were in a box.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. These are articles a woman was likely to have? A. Yes. I took him on the 14th.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My wife bought these things at Spitalfields-market.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-38

Before Mr. Justice Park.

614. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Emanuel Elkin , about eight o'clock in the night of the 15th of February , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 watch-chain, value 8l.; 2 seals, value 3l.; 1 watch-key, value 10s.; 1 ring, value 2l.; 1 knife, value 5s., and 1 pencil-case, value 2s. , his property.

CHARLOTTE GREEN . I live in Swan-street, Minories. On Wednesday, the 15th of February, between six and seven (nearer seven) o'clock, I went to Mr. Elkins', to spend the evening - it was dark - it is a private house; Mrs. Elkin let me in, and, to the best of my knowledge, the door was shut after me; I went into the kitchen, which is even with the street door - a door leads from the kitchen into the passage, and then into the parlour; Mrs. Elkin went into the back parlour to look for her handkerchief - Mr. Elkin was up stairs - I was alone in the kitchen; Mrs. Elkin left the kitchen door open and I had a view of the passage - I heard a rustling, and, knowing she was gone up stairs, I cast my eye into the passage, and saw a man come out of the front parlour - I called out Stop thief! and got up immediately; I cannot say, in my fright, whether he had to open the door, but he ran out - I ran out, calling Stop thief! but returned without catching him.

ELIZABETH ELKIN . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the evening in question I let Mrs. Green in; she knocked at the door - it opens with a spring-lock; I shut the door after her, to the best of my recollection - it always shuts very easy; I went up stairs for my handkerchief, and heard a cry of Thief! I ran down - I had put a key into the lock of the street door that day, inside, and when I came down we looked at the door and the key was just falling out.

EMANUEL ELKIN . I have been in the army, and occupy this house, which is in Stepney parish. On the 15th of February I had been out, and when I came home I took out my silver watch, gold chain, two gold seals, and a gold key, my gold chased ring off my finger, a silver pencil-

case, and pen-knife, and laid them on the front parlour table; I saw them there before dark, about half-past five - when I shut up the front parlour window. When I heard the alarm I came down and missed them all - they were worth 20l.

RICHARD TAYLOR . I am a boat-builder, and live at Limehouse. On Wednesday, the 15th of February, about eight o'clock, I was in the church-yard, within 200 yards of the prosecutor's house - I heard a cry of Stop thief! turned round and saw a person running very hard; I gave him a blow with a stick, and said Stop! he said "Don't stop me," and ran forward. I cannot identify him.

JAMES JEFFERY . I belong to the Thames police. On Thursday, the 16th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, I and Wilson were in Shadwell-market, and saw the prisoner there, with one Murray; one of them turned round - they looked at us, and spoke together; Murray then crossed over to the left hand side, and the prisoner went strait on; I took hold of him - he asked what I wanted him for - I said he knew, and told him about another robbery; I took him into a public-house, and when we got into the parlour, he said "Jeffery, I will give you what I have got;" he then pulled up his waistcoat, and pulled out a watch, which he said he had found last night; in his left-hand pocket I found a pen-knife, a gold finger ring, 4s. 6d. in bad money, and a good sixpence - he said he had found them all together. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I was with Jeffery, and took Murray into the tap-room of the public-house; I went into the parlour and asked the prisoner where he had been last night - he said he had slept with Murray - I asked where - he said at Murray's father's, in Shadwell-market; Murray had said something to me, in consequence of which I brought them together, and said to Murray "You told me you had only met Sullivan at the corner of the street, and that you knew nothing of him; Sullivan tells me he slept with you at your father's;" Murray then said "If he did sleep with me I know nothing of what he has got;" we had not told Murray we had found the watch on him. On taking them down to a public-house in Lower Shadwell, which had been robbed, I told Sullivan he had not had the watch the morning before; he said No, he had only had them an hour and an half; he told me on the road that he had found them in Stepney. I had seen them together the morning before the robbery, and searched them both. The bill against Murray has been thrown out by the Grand Jury.

Cross-examined. Q. When you brought them together Murray did not deny having slept with him? A. No; he said he knew nothing of what Sullivan had got, before I told him he had any thing.

MR. ELKIN. The watch, chain, ring, seal, pen-knife, and every thing, are mine.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Of Stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

Reference Number: t18260406-39

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

615. SAMUEL TRIVENS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Reeves , about eight o'clock in the night of the 23d of January , at St. Mathew, Bethnall-green, with intent to steal, and stealing, 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 chain, value 1l.; 2 seals, value 10s; 2 coats, value 20s.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 scarf, value 20s.; 6 gowns, value 4l., and 5 sheets, value 1l. , his property.

JOHN REEVES. I am a sawyer . In January last I lived at No. 1, James-street, in the parish of St. Mathew, Bethnal-green . On the 23d of January, about six o'clock, I left my house - my wife went out before me; I left nobody in the house - I double looked the room door, and took the key with me - I pulled the street door after me, on the spring lock, so that it would not open without a key - I am sure I made it fast; I returned home first, about eight o'clock, and found the door open; I found Mary Bigg there - the street door was open and my room door also; a strange key was left in the lock of the room door, but it would not open it, so they had forced away the box of the lock, screws and all. I missed a watch, a chain, and two seals, worth 4l. 10s.; two coats, a waistcoat, a pair of trousers, a scarf, some gowns, and other things, which were all safe when I went out. I had left my watch in the drawer. A pair of blue trousers were produced to me by Miller, the pawnbroker, about the 23d of March.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. When was the robbery. A. On the 23d of January.

ELIZABETH REEVES . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went out on the evening in question, about a quarter past six o'clock, leaving my husband at home - I returned at a quarter past eight - I had left the property stated in the indictment, all safe - my husband got home just before me.

MARY BIGG . I am acquainted with the prosecutor, and live near him. I went to call there on the evening of the 23d of January, I found the street door wide open, and the parlour door ajar - I knocked at the door but no one answered. I found a candle burning but nearly out. I remained at the door till Mr. Reeves came home.

PHILIP PARISH . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Sunday, the 12th of March, I apprehended the prisoner in Carlisle-street, Air-street-fields; I searched him and in his fob I found the duplicate of these trousers, pawned at Miller's, Kingsland-road; in his coat pocket I found a great black bag, such as weavers use to fetch their work, and two bundle handkerchiefs. I saw him throw away a bunch of skeleton keys and a phosphorus box, which Goodwin in picked up.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am an officer. I saw Parish with the prisoner, about three minutes after he was taken - I picked up six skeleton keys, a phosphorus box and matches - I shewed Parish where I picked them up - the keys will open street and room doors - I did not try them to Reeves' door.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were about this place? A. Perhaps thirty boys; I cannot say who dropped the keys - a gentleman pointed them out to me.

PHILIP PARISH. I picked up part of the keys myself, on the very spot where I took him - I saw him throw them away, and saw Goodwin pick the rest up in the same place.

PATIENCE WEATHERBURN . I have known the prisoner nearly twelve months; he lived in Bethnal-green-road when I first knew him; I lived with him there for ten

weeks; he delivered these trousers to me, and I pawned them at Miller's, for 9s., by his order. I gave him the money and duplicate.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Kingsland-road. The duplicate produced is my writing - it is dated the 28th of January, and is for a pair of trousers and handkerchief, pawned for 9s., in the name of Patience Trivens. I have seen Weatherburn, but cannot say whether she is the person or not; I produce the trousers.

SOLOMON BENJAMIN . I sold these trousers to Mrs. Reeves in November - here is the Hebrew character for 17s. on them.

Cross-examined. Q. How many pairs have you marked 17s? A. I cannot say.

ELIZABETH REEVES . I bought these trousers of Benjamin for my husband - I am sure they are the same.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know them? A. I examined them when I bought them, and I tied them behind with a piece of new tape, and here is the Hebrew mark on the fob pocket.

JOHN REEVES. I wore these trousers and know them - I examined them particularly, to see whether they were worth the money - I know them to be the same, for here is a mark I observed on the waistband; I have no doubt of them.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18260406-40

Before Mr. Justice Park.

616. JOHN CHICK and GEORGE BURKE were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Wardle , on the King's highway, on the 7th of March , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 gold watch, value 18l. 18s.; 1 watch-key. value 2l. 2s.; 1 chased ring, value 21s., and a ribbon, value 1d. , his property.

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WARDLE. I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Lad-lane. On the 7th of March, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I was going to Chiswell-street, and had just turned the corner of Type-street , when the prisoner Burke passed me sharply; I thought it was somebody who knew me, and I stared at him in the face, under a gas lamp, and almost at the same moment he took my watch from my fob; I could have caught it but I was pinioned behind by Chick; I saw Burke go away, and I had a scuffle with Chick for a few seconds; I had sufficient opportunity of seeing his face, and should have taken him if it had not been for a kick I received under the knee; I arose a cry of Stop thief! and ran after him as fast as I could; I lost sight of him for a minute while he turned the corners - he was secured - I have not found my watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Chick is not the person who snatched your watch? A. No; he pinioned me behind. I am sure he is the man; I saw him in custody, and followed him to the watch-house at Cripplegate; he was a stranger to me before. There was a strong gaslamp near the post.

Q. Have you not taken up one Rossman on this charge? A. I said he was very like the man, and I thought he was the man till I saw him in the watch-house - I described the man - I said he was like a man who went about the streets fiddling - the officer fetched the fidler to the watch-house, and I said immediately he was not the man - he was like him, but too stout - he was immediately discharged.

Q. Was he not detained till it was proved he was in bed at the time? A. Certainly not; his wife came to the watch-house and said he was in bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Your watch was snapped in an instant? A. Yes; I said Rossman, the fidler, was very like Burke, but not that he was the man.

COURT. Q. What was your watch? A. Gold, and had a gold key and ring. The first thing that happened was Burke pushing by me very quick - the pinioning of my arms was at the same time as it was snatched, not before; I saw Chick on the road to the watch-house a very few minutes after I lost my watch, and said, in his hearing, "That is the man who pinioned me;" he made no reply. I did not see Burke in custody that night; I described him to Horton, the constable, and, in consequence of that description Brown took me next day to the Salmon and Ball public-house, Bunhill-row - it is a very low house - there were fourteen or fifteen men down in a cellar, playing at skittles; I saw a man there with his coat off - the officer told him to put it on; I looked round and said "It is of no use his putting his coat on, this is the man," (pointing to Burke,) "who took my watch;" he heard me say so. I am quite certain he is the man; he was taken to the watch-house directly; I had described him as being like the fidler - when I saw the fidler at the watch-house I said he was very much like the man in the face but rather stouter.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How soon after the robbery did you see Burke? A. Next morning, before twelve o'clock- this cellar is used as a skittle-ground; Burke is not the man who had his coat off. The man who robbed me had a cap on, I think, but am not certain; I looked him strait in the face, perfectly, to recognize his features. I told the officer he was very much like a man who used to go about the streets fidling - I had known the fidler about ten years; there was a great likeness in the two. When the fidler was brought I said he was very much like him in the face, but stouter.

Mr. CRESWELL. Q. You told the officer he was like the fidler as a clue for him to know the man? A. Yes; I did not mean to say the fidler was the man.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I live in Bell-yard, Doctors' Commons, and am a conveyancer. On Tuesday, the 7th of March, I was going up Grub-street, about ten o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief! or Stop him! and observed a man running towards me with very great speed; I sprung forward to seize him, but he turned up a court; I followed up the court, and lost sight of him just before he was taken by a gentleman's servant - I had followed him through several courts, into Ropemaker-street, and into Moor-lane; it was Chick - I believe he had a hat on when I pursued, but when I came up he had none. I saw the prosecutor in Grub-street after Chick was in custody: I am satisfied he is the man I pursued, though I had him not always in view - no other person was pursued.

JOLLIFFE QUINTON . I am servant to Mr. Sanson Ricardo, of Angel-court. On the 7th of March, between

ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was going through a court from Moor-lane to Grub-street - people were running, and I heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw Chick running without a hat, as fast as he could, and several persons following him; he went to jump into a dust-hole, but I pulled him back, threw him down, and kept him down till the watchman came up - I delivered him to him. I saw the prosecutor afterwards, and told him.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. How many persons were running at this time? A. Several; he jumped to try to get into the dust-hole, which was open.

JAMES M'DONALD . I am a watchman - my beat is in Finsbury-street, Ropemaker-street, and Type-street. On the 7th of March I heard a cry of Stop thief! and followed down White's-court, White's-street; I followed a man, and in Putney's-alley lost sight of him for a moment - I kept him in pursuit, and took him in charge from Quinton and another in New-street - it was Chick; I took him to the watch-house; the prosecutor saw him in the watch-house, and said, in his presence, he was the man who robbed him - Chick made no answer.

KEAN JAMES MAHONEY . I am a cork-cutter. I was standing close by my lodgings, No. 6, Ropemaker-street; a person ran towards me at a quick pace, but when he came near me he rather loosened his pace, and said, "Do not stop me;" I made way for him to pass down the steps, and immediately after I heard a rush through Crown-court, with a cry of Stop thief! and I pursued him - it was Chick - I saw him in custody, and am certain of him; he had a hat on when I first saw him, but not when he was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you asked before the Magistrate whether Burke was the man you saw running? A. No - I know nothing about him; I had never seen him till he was before the Magistrate, that I know of; there was another man besides Chick ran by suddenly - I cannot say whether it was Burke or not. A person came in contact with me very suddenly at the corner of White's-court, and d-d my eyes - that was not Burke.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am constable of Cripplegate. On the 7th of March I was at the watch-house - M'Donald brought Chick in without a hat; the prosecutor came to the watch-house, and said, in his presence, that he and another man had robbed him of a gold watch; Chick denied it. I asked if he knew the other man - he said he thought he should know him - he was a man who played a fiddle about, and who he knew very well; I asked where the offence was committed, and was told it was in the County; I asked if he should know the other man if I was to bring him - he said Yes; I went to the fidler's house, and found a man answering the description; he was in bed. I brought him to the watch-house, and asked if he was the man; he said Yes, he was - I told him to look at him and be certain, for I had searched the apartments, and examined his shoes, and found no soil on them; he looked at him for a moment - I asked if he had any doubt of him; he said he had - I said, "Then give him the doubt;" he said,"I will," and I discharged him. I do not recollect any thing being said about his being stouter. Chick declared his innocence as he was going to St. Luke's watch-house; I asked what he ran for - he said because he saw other people run.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. He stated so positively, that he was the man, that if you had not observed his shoes you would have taken him to prison? A. Certainly.

COURT. Q. The moment he described the fidler you knew who he meant, and went for him? A. Yes - he is much stouter than Burke, and is the father of two or three children; he said he should know the man very well - it was a man who played the fiddle about the street - that is all the description he gave.

ROBERT LOCK . I am headborough of St. Luke's. I went with the prosecutor to the Salmon and Ball public-house the afternoon after the robbery; it is a house of resort for reputed thieves, and in the Worship-street district - there were about a dozen persons in the skittle-ground; I saw a man with his coat off, and told him to put it on, but Wardle said, "Never mind him - here is the man who took my watch," pointing to Burke, who was looking at the men play. I took him - he heard the charge, and did not say a word. When we came to the watch-house Chick said, "I thought he said it was the fidler?" Wardle said, "No, it was a man a good deal like the fidler."

MARTHA PARKER . I live in Ropemaker-street - my husband is a chair-maker. On the night of the 10th of March I heard a noise, but did not go to the door till five minutes after; I then found a hat laying at the door - I took it in, and on the Friday following gave it to Horton, who came for it.

JOSEPH HORTON . I produce the hat.

ROBERT LOCK . Burke had a cap on in the skittle-ground.

JOHN BROWN . I am keeper of Bunhill-row watch-house. On the 7th of March Horton brought Chick from the City watch-house. Next morning Lock and I went to the Salmon and Ball, and took Burke.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not somebody else brought in the night before? A. Not to our watch-house.

CHICK's Defence. I am not the person - as to my running I was in haste home.

One witnesses gave Chick a good character.

CHICK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

BURKE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-41

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

617. FRANCIS LECLAIR was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Dale , on the King's highway, on the 17th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 coat, value 3s., and 1 hat, value 7s. , his property.

JOSEPH DALE. I am a pensioner , and live at Chelsea . On the 17th of March, in the afternoon, I was at the Woodman public-house, where I had been billeted; I left there at a quarter past nine o'clock in the evening, finding I could not get a bed there; I asked a man in the street if he could shew me where I could get a respectable bed - he said he would; we walked on for about five minutes; he then knocked me down, stripped off my coat, and then my hat fell off - he ran away with them. I found them at Queen-square next day - I cannot swear to the prisoner.

JOHN TANNOCK . I am a constable. On the 17th of

March I apprehended the prisoner at Chelsea - he had this coat over his arm, and the hat in his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Sloane-street, who said he was going into the country, and had this coat and hat to sell - I gave him 5s. for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-42

618. FRANCIS LECLAIR was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 2 planes, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 sheet, value 3s. , the goods of Jerdmond Eblert .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-43

Before Mr. Justice Park.

619. JOHN GEORGE MUNNS and THOMAS LINDSAY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Isaac Dove , on the 21st of March , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 20s.; 3 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns , his property.

ISAAC DOVE. I am master of the Diana collier . On 21st of March I had three sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and a watch in my pocket; I went to several public-houses about Shadwell, and was robbed of them about three o'clock; I cannot tell who by, for I was very drunk.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know you were in Shadwell? A. I was in New Gravel-lane and Spring-street. I cannot say how many public-houses I was at.

DANIEL HAGERTY . I live with my father, in Union-street, Ratcliff-highway. On the 21st of March, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was playing about, and saw Dove - I think he came out of the Black Horse, public-house - he went to a corner for a necessary purpose; I saw both the prisoners - I knew them before by sight and by name; Munns is a salesman , and Lindsay a fidler ; I think they came out of the same house as Dove - I saw them coming behind him; I saw one of them knock him down; I saw them both go away to the middle of the bricks, and share something between them, but what it was I do not know. I and Bridges went up to them; Munns made a blow at Bridges; I went to the Black Horse, and told Mr. Tavernor; he came out after them - they ran away. When he came back from running after them Dove got up, and went into the Black Horse; he was very drunk. Tavernor sent five of us to watch him home: he went across the Dock-hill - Munns came up there again, and shoved him down; he laid down with him, searched his pockets, and put something into his own pocket; this was half an hour after they first went up to him. I went and told Tavernor, and while I was talking Munns came up the lane; Tavernor came out, and he ran off.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What kept you out so late? A. We were playing. I have never been in trouble myself.

JOSEPH TAVERNOR . My brother keeps the Black Horse - I live there. On the evening of the 21st of March Dove was in the house, very tipsy indeed. I saw neither of the prisoners there - he had his pockets turned inside out; he went out, and did not come into the house again; his right-hand pocket was inside out - his breeches pocket and one side of his flap was unbuttoned; his fob was hanging out, but I felt his watch in it; I followed him to the door; Hagerty and some other boys there said he had been robbed; I sent them to follow him. I went to the door, and saw two men standing by the bricks; I cannot say who they were; they run away when I went towards them - I followed 150 or 200 yards, then returned, as I had left nobody in the bar. The boys came back, and gave me further information - I did not then see either of the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. His watch was safe when you saw him? A. Yes; I cannot say whether he had a chain.

GEORGE JOHN BRIDGES . I was in the street on this night, playing with Hagerty, and saw Dove go into the Black Horse - his pockets were inside out, and his flap half down. I saw Munns, but cannot say who the other man was; they were dividing something; Hagerty and I went towards home - they were going to hit us - we ran away; I saw the shape of Dove's watch in his fob after I had seen them dividing something; he went down the lane; I did not observe whether any body followed him; Munns said to Dove, "This is the way to Old Gravel-lane," directing him down New Gravel-lane.

JOSEPH INKPEN . I live in Gravel-lane, near these bricks. I saw Dove coming from the bricks, with his breeches pockets inside out. I saw Munns standing by the bricks, with another man, but cannot say whether it was Lindsay, as I did not know him.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I apprehended Lindsay on the 22d, about nine o'clock in the evening, at the Ship and Unicorn public-house, Gravel-lane; I told him it was for a robbery which he and Munns had committed on the North country captain, and that I had information that he and Munns had done it; he made no reply. - I had not seen Hagerty then.

MUNNS - GUILTY. Aged 21.

LINDSAY - GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force & violence .

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-44

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

620. CLOS HALCKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , at St. Michael, Cornhill, 20 mourning hoop gold rings, value 25l.; 30 clasped hoop gold rings, value 25l., and 1 ring tray. value 6d., the goods of John George Fearn , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN STACEY . I am shopman to Mr. John George Fearn, who is a jeweller and goldsmith , and lives in the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill . On the 16th of March, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at some mourning rings, which were in a tray in the window, with others; I took the tray out, and put it on the counter, for him to examine; he tried several on - they were too small for his finger. I put the tray behind the counter: he pointed to another tray - I told him they were ladies' rings; he then asked to see the first tray again; I put it on the counter; he immediately snatched it up, and ran out of the shop with it - it contained between six and seven dozens of dif

ferent kinds of rings - they were worth about 120l. I immediately followed; he went down Pope's Head-alley; our shop is at the corner of the alley: I pursued him across Lombard-street into Sherborne-lane - he was stopped near the bottom; he had not got the tray then; some person, whom I did not know, handed it to me; I had not seen him part with it. There were mourning rings in it then. I recovered about two dozen, which were worth about 16l., not more. He was a perfect stranger - he spoke pretty good English.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. What distance is the shop from Sherborne-lane? A. Two hundred yards or more; it was darkish - we had just lighted the gas. He made three turnings before he was stopped; two or three boys collected; there was not a great crowd. The people appeared to me to be more stooping down than running, as the rings dropped from him as he ran. I have a pretty good recollection of persons; I am certain of him - I cannot be mistaken.

COURT. Q. Did you ever lose sight of him? A. Only as he turned the corner of Sherborne-lane, but I saw him in the middle of the road. He was in the shop nearly ten minutes; there were other persons in the shop; he is a very tall man - I cannot be mistaken in him.

MR. JOHN GEORGE FEARN. My house is in the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill. The rings were worth more than 120l.; those recovered are worth about 18l. or 20l.

WILLIAM HANCOCK . I am a coal-dealer, and live at No. 12, Sherborne-lane. I was in my own room, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went to the door, and saw the prisoner running, pursued with a cry of Stop thief! by full twenty persons; when he came nearly opposite my door I crossed over and collared him - another man came up - we took him back; he was charged with stealing Mr. Fearn's rings, and made no answer. I gave him to the patrol.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you not in too much confusion to know whether he gave an answer? A. No. When I took him the people had not come up; they were ten or twelve yards behind him.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a beadle. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Webb - I had him stripped, but nothing was found on him; he had a watch, two sovereigns, and some silver in his pocket. Stacey handed me the tray.

JAMES WEBB . I am a patrol. I was on duty in Walbrook, 'at the corner of Abchurch - at the end of Sherborne-lane I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner in charge of Hancock. I took him. Several boys were looking for the rings.

JOHN STACEY . Here are two chased rings - I have seven more, which were delivered to me; I know them by a private mark scratched inside - we do not take the marks off when we sell them; I know the pattern - they are new, and have never been worn. I swear I never sold these. The porter was in the shop when I ran out - he is not here; he was at the back of the shop; Mr. Fearn's son was in the shop, but no strangers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in the shop.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his character .

The prisoner being a foreigner, elected to be tried by a Jury composed of half foreigners.

Reference Number: t18260406-45

621. JAMES NEWHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 piece of Valentia, value 1s., and 1/4 of a yard of baragon fustian, value 6d., the goods of John Albert , his master .

JOHN ALBERT. I live on Fish-street-hill , and am a tailor . On Sunday, the 4th of March, the prisoner was leaving my employ: he had given me warning; I requested to search his box - he immediately produced the key; I thought I would search his person first, and inside his waistcoat I found 5-8ths of a yard of Valentia, and a quarter of a yard of fustian, worth about 3s. 6d.; I had a good character with him.

THOMAS KILBY . I am a constable. I was fetched, and saw the property found - the prisoner said nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

The prosecutor engaged to take him again into his employ.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-46

622. JOSEPH VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 wooden clock, value 30s., and 1 pair of boots, value 20s., the goods of John Snelgrove , his master, in his dwelling-house .

JOHN SNELGROVE. I live in Norwich-court, Fetter-lane - the prisoner was in my employ for five weeks. On the 17th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I missed a Dutch clock, and a pair of boots; he had worked in the shop the day before; and that evening, in consequence of information, I went to his brother's, in Spitalfields, and found him there; he said he had done wrong, and was sorry for it. I found the clock in the room.

JOHN BATEMAN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of March the prisoner pawned a pair of boots, for 5s., in the name of Harvey; I am sure of his person. Snelgrove claimed them. I would not lend above 12s. on the clock.

JAMES FIDGEN . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner in charge, and found the duplicate of the boots on him.(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-47

623. JOHN COX was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 17 yards of pearl edged sarsnet ribbon, value 7s. , the goods of James Morrison and others, his partners.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH SHERLOCK . I am warehouseman to Messrs. James Morrison and Co., haberdashers , Fore-street. On the 28th of February the prisoner was in the warehouse, on business; I observed a quantity of ribbons on his left hand - I watched him a few minutes, seeing him near the box, and when he removed from the spot I saw him take his hand from under his basket, and take a piece of ribbon; when he came down the warehouse I followed him, and at the door I saw him put it into his pocket - I took hold of him, and asked what he had - he replied nothing. I said, "Take the ribbon from your pocket" - but I took it from his pocket myself; he was given in charge.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did any body except you see the transaction? A. Not to my know

ledge. I have been three years and a quarter in the prosecutors' employ. The prisoner has been in the habit of coming there all the while I have been there; I never heard a blemish in his character. I have been assistant to a linen-draper at Southampton, and had a hawker's licence; I took it out at Winchester. I was never taken up on any charge in my life respecting the licence. I was once subpoenaed as a witness for some midshipmen, who were charged with a disturbance at a Methodist chapel, and they indicted me as a principal; I was in custody in Whitecross-street prison for the costs and fine; I have been arrested for debt. I have had a child sworn to me. The prisoner had a wicker basket, with ribbons in it, which he had bought - it is possible that the ribbon might stick to the outside of the basket.

JOHN TUCKER . I took the prisoner in charge with the ribbon.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-48

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 10.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

624. SARAH FORWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , at St. Luke, Chelsea, 6 sovereigns, and 3 half-sovereigns, the monies of Clara Eves , her mistress, in her dwelling-house .

CLARA EVES. I am single , and live in Sloane-square, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea , and rent the house. The prisoner was in my service for a fortnight - she went away between 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning of the 26th of February, without giving me any notice whatever; I had hired her by the week; I had counted my money about six o'clock the evening before, and left 20l. in my bureau, which stood in my front parlour - it was in sovereigns, half-sovereigns, and some silver; the bureau was locked, but I left the key in another drawer. After she was gone I went to the bureau, found it locked, and the key in the same place - I missed eight sovereigns and three half-sovereigns. I saw the prisoner a fortnight afterwards, at Marlborough-street; the Magistrate was not present; she said she had taken them for the purpose of being sent out of the country; nobody but her could have taken them; I have no other servant. She had not been in place before, and I had her character from her mother.

WILLIAM ALCOCK . I am a watchman. On the 12th of March I was calling half-past ten o'clock, and met the prisoner in Duke-street, St. James'; she said she gave herself up to me for being a thief - that she had stolen 7l. 10s. from her mistress; I asked who she was - she said, Miss Eves, of Sloane-square - that she and another woman had spent the money. I took her to the watch-house, and found her mistress out.

THOMAS GOOK . I took the prisoner in charge - she said the money consisted of six sovereigns and three half-sovereigns - her mistress said she had lost eight sovereigns and three half-sovereigns.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18260406-49

625. WILLIAM ROWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 looking-glass, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Robert Donaldson , in his dwelling house .

ROBERT DONALDSON. I live in Rathbone-place , and am an upholsterer . This looking-glass was stolen about six o'clock in the evening, from inside my shop - it was brought back to me with the prisoner; I should sell it for, three guineas - the trade price is 2l. 10s.

FREDERICK JERVIS . I am an upholsterer, and live next door to the prosecutor. On the 20th of March, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was at my door, and saw the prisoner go along with this glass under his arm; I ran into Mr. Donaldson, and understood they had lost one; I followed, and took him in Greek-street - I took the glass from him - he then ran away, but was pursued, and brought to the prosecutor's house. I never lost sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Rathbone-place - it was given to me by a respectable person to carry - he was behind me all the way to Greek-street; when the gentleman came up and said it was stolen I saw the man run away.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-50

Before Mr. Justice Park.

626. PETER NEADON and WILLIAM LEECH were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Moulton , in the King's highway, on the 11th of March , at Friern, Barnet, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 sovereigns, and 15 shillings , his property.

JOHN MOULTON. I live at Friern, Barnet. On Saturday, the 11th of March, I was at Colney-hatch - I had been at the Orange Tree public-house, in company, for seven or eight hours, and left about half-past eleven o'clock; I was not drinking all the time - I was perfectly sober - I was going home, and the two prisoners overtook me - I had not seen them at the public house: Neadon accosted me, and said, "We have been at Taff's, to get some beer,(Taff keeps the house I had been to,) but the bar was shut up." I said, "Have you?" he said, "We have been into the country to meet some sheep, and there are none up." I said "Have you?" I was then on the road leading from Colney-hatch to Muswell-hill - it is quite a retired road - they kept about a yard before me all the way for nearly half a mile - we walked on silently, and they began beating me about the head with two bludgeons like two men thrashing wheat - they repeated their blows till I fell flat on my back. I said, "For God's sake spare my life, on account of my wife and six children" - one of them pinned me down with his thumb and fingers in my throat - he squeezed my throat - I don't know which of them it was exactly. - he used one hand to do that, and had the other in my left hand pocket - I had from 10s. to 15s. in that pocket; the other man rifled my right hand pocket, in which were two sovereigns, at the same time; Neadon was at my right hand pocket, where I had the sovereigns, and he was fumbling round the waistband of my breeches, and asked for my watch; I was still on the ground flat on my back - I said, I have have no watch;" he said "Let me have none of your lies,

if you don't give it up easy I will shoot you;" the other did not speak a word - they left me flat on my back for dead.

Q. How do you know they left you for dead? A. They walked away quietly - when I was able to get up, I followed and saw them about one hundred yards before me - they went over a gate into a field, and I lost sight of them; it was not moonlight - there are no lamps there - I returned into Colney-hatch village, and came to Mr. Ely, a carpenter; I described their persons; I was very much bruised about my head - there is a wound there now; I bled a good deal - here is the smock frock which I had on (producing it) - it is covered with blood; on the following day (Sunday) I was going along a private road belonging to Mr. Bensley, on the other side Colney-hatch - I saw the two prisoners there; I could have sworn to them a quarter of a mile off in a straight line; I was within two hundred yards of them - they saw me - my head was bandaged up at the time - when they saw me they turned out of the road and walked across the fields - that was a different direction to what they appeared to be in when they saw me - they appeared to be going across the fields towards the Swan public house, near Whetstone; I went out at the New Road round by the Old North Road to meet them; I had them in my eye within about two fields of the road directly opposite the Swan, and met them exactly at the gate opposite the Swan - they had then two men with them - the two men had each a bundle of turnip tops - one of the two men asked me "Where are you going, are you going to the doctor's?" (I knew those men by name and by sight.) I said, "No, I am not going, but I have more need to be at the doctor's than here; I was stopped last night and robbed by these two men," and asked them to assist me, and we secured them, and took them to the Swan and delivered them to Simmons and Curry, the horse-patrol; I never saw the prisoners before that night to my knowledge.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had been at the public-house several hours? A. Yes; I drank some porter part of the time; I was dealing there with graziers about taking cattle on my land - that is my business; I tossed up for dry money, not for liquor - that took about three quarters of an hour; I went to the house between twelve and one o'clock, or perhaps later, and left at half-past eleven; I did not dine there - I had some bread and cheese; I took some roast beef about half-past ten, or not quite so late.

Q. Can you see one hundred yards before you? A. It was star-light - I could see their persons one hundred yards before me, not to distinguish their faces; I was quite sober; I returned to the village and described them by their dress and stature.

Q. Were you not told that Neadon and Leech had been in the house that night at that time? A. Not exactly at that time - I was told so.

Q. When you saw them next day did you not ask whether their names were Neadon and Leech? A. Yes; I said they were the men who robbed me before I asked that - Peat and Smith were with them; I wanted no assistance to take them - they said they did not rob me, and would walk quietly to the public-house, and did so - they were searched - about 6s. was found on one, and 4s. 6d. on the other.

LORKIN ELY . On the 11th of March, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, Moulton called me out of bed and said he had been stopped by two footpads, who robbed him of all he had got, and ill used him - he was all over blood - he had this smock frock on all over blood - my daughter washed him - he had a bruise on his head; I took him home - he described the men to me by their dress - he was as sober as ever I saw him - I have known him twenty years; I had been in bed about two hours.

Cross-examined. Q. The dress he described was I suppose common? A. Yes; he described their height - the prisoners are as near the height as possible - he said they were five feet three or four inches high.

JOHN JEWITT . I am ostler at the Orange Tree public-house. Moulton frequents our house; I saw him there as late as half-past ten on that night - the prisoners were both there this night; I knew them both before by their coming to the house - they came in at a quarter before ten o'clock, and sat on the same side of the room as Moulton - about four persons from him - they had a pint of porter; I took Moulton a plate of beef before they came in; I left him and the prisoners there when I went to bed - he was sober then; I am sure the prisoners were there.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say he was as sober as you are now? A. Yes, I am sure of it - I went to bed at half-past ten o'clock; Moulton did not show his cash about in my presence.

SAMUEL SIMMONS . I am a horse-patrol of Bow-street, and am stationed near Whetstone, two or three hundred yards from the Swan. In consequence of information I went to the Swan with Currie, and found Moulton there with his head glutted in blood - the prisoners were there - I took them in charge and searched them - they had trousers on - Leech's trousers and coat had several marks of blood - here are marks of blood on the sleeve of his coat, and here are his trousers - there was blood on the wristband of his shirt on the same arm as his coat - both legs of the trousers are bloody near the bottom in the front part; I did not observe any blood on Neadon's clothes; I had seen them several times before - one lives at Whetstone; Neadon's father and mother lives in the village, and Leech's mother lives in the village.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you be positive the stain on the trousers is blood? A. Part of it is blood - some of the stain is oak bark, but there is a stain on the back of the trousers and in the front, with blood and oak bark; I saw these marks about eleven o'clock on the Sunday morning, but did not take their clothes off till we brought them to Bow-street; the shirt was not clean - it had been worn before.

JAMES CURRIE . I have heard Simmons' account - I agree with his statement, but I saw some blood on Neadon's shoes.

Cross-examined. Q. Are they here? A. Yes; the blood is on the instep both inside and out.

Q. Might not a man walking by a market or slaughter-house have got such a mark on his shoe? A. It is possible - there are blood marks on both his shoes.

THOMAS JONES . I am gaoler of Bow-street; I took Leech's trousers and shoes off at the House of Correction, and have produced them here.

Leech's Defence. We are innocent.

Seven Witnesses gave Neadon a good character, and three deposed the same on behalf of Leech.

NEADON. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

LEECH. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of their character and youth .

Reference Number: t18260406-51

Before Mr. Justice Garrow.

627. JOSEPH LAWRENCE , ELIZABETH LAWRENCE , MARIA JOHNSON , JOHN ROACH , and JAMES WILLIAMS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Wright , on the 20th of February , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 15s.; 2 seals, value 15s., and part of an ear-ring, value 2s. , the goods of William Wright .

ANN WRIGHT. I am the wife of William Wright, a packer , who lives in Robert-street, Goswell-street. I was acquainted with Elizabeth Lawrence twenty years ago, but had not seen her for sixteen years till the 20th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, when I stood at the corner of Bath-street, City-road, talking to an old lady and she passed; I did not know her till she came back and spoke to me; we walked down the City-road together, and went into a gin shop at the end of Britannia-street, and had a glass of gin - we walked on and had a glass of gin each opposite the Laying-in Hospital - we stood at the door talking, and she asked me to go home to Britannia-street to tea with her; I did not know where she lived till I went; a woman, who she called her servant, opened the door - three or four children came into the room, and her son Joseph - we all drank tea together, and after tea she asked me if I would go to Whitecross-street, as she was going there after a woman who owed her some money, at a house which she let out in lodgings; while we were at tea she looked at her clock, and said it did not go right, and asked me what o'clock it was - I pulled my husband's watch out of my bosom, said it did not go right, and showed it to her - the glass was broken, and I said I was going to Whitecross-street to have one put in; we went out as far as Bath-street, and had a glass of gin at a public-house there - we then went on to Whitecross-street, and met a man named Crossley there; I have seen him before, but never spoke to him - he was a friend of her's - he came up to her - she told me he was the person who gave her away to her husband - he asked me to go and take something to drink - we went, and Mrs. Lawrence and I had a glass each there; I don't know what he drank; then Mrs. Lawrence asked me to stay a few minutes, while she went to speak to Mr. Crossley at the door, for she had something particular to ask him - they went to the door, and after that we three went together to Mrs. Lawrence's house in Whitecross-street, and found Joseph Lawrence standing at the door - he had got there before us - it was then night, but I cannot tell the time - I should think it was near seven o'clock; Elizabeth and Joseph Lawrence then began quarrelling; I don't know what about - Joseph ran away from her at the door - she, Crossley, and I went into the parlour - nobody else was there then, but Roach soon after came in, and Maria Johnson about the same time - they were strangers to me; Johnson went out to fetch more gin and a pot of porter; I tasted the gin - I drank very little, but no porter; Elizabeth Lawrence then went out - she told me she was going to a public-house after a person who owed her some money; Crossley went with her - I waited there; Crossley came back without her - Roach went to the public-house and brought her - the next person who came into the parlour was the witness Gearon - he asked for the key of a door - Crossley asked him if he would be a pot of beer to his pot - that was agreed to - Maria Johnson fetched a pot, and I believe some rum - I drank none; Gearon went and fetched his wife down stairs - she came and sat down with me, and soon after the prisoner Williams came in and sat down by my side, as Mrs. Gearon got up; I sat nearest to the door; some time after they began quarrelling about a bad half-crown - Mrs. Lawrence, her son, Crossley, and Johnson were quarrelling - I felt sick and called Maria Johnson , and told her I was taken ill - she fetched me a candle to light me up stairs - I went with her, and when I got to the top of the stairs, I turned round and saw Williams close behind - Johnson went down with the light - I went to follow her, but Williams pushed me down directly on the top of the stairs; I was then in the dark - when Williams had pushed me down, he put his hand into my bosom to get my watch - I got hold of it, and he got fast hold of the chain; I held it as long as I could, and felt somebody take my ear-ring out of my ear - that must have been another person; he got the watch; I laid hold of the bottom of his trousers - he went down stairs and I tumbled down after him - he gave me a blow on my head with his hand three or four times up stairs, and when I had tumbled down to the bottom of the stairs, he gave me a blow to make me loose him, and ran out of the street door; I had gone up two pair of stairs with Johnson, and fell down two pair of stairs - it is a house of ill fame; when I cried murder, Johnson came, and put her hand before my mouth, and told me not to make such a noise; Gearon ran out of the room, picked me up, and when I went into the parlour, I found Elizabeth and Joseph Lawrence, Johnson, and Mrs. Gearon; Roach was gone, they were all standing together quarrelling; when I went up stairs I told Mrs. Lawrence I had been robbed of my watch - she came up to me and said if I did not hold my tongue she would give me in charge; I was screaming then; I went to the door to run out - there was two strange young men there, one of whom knocked me down - I was obliged to go back again - two watchmen came, they went up stairs, searched and found my cloak and bonnet which were torn off.

Q. Was it a bed-room that you went up to? A. There was a bed in the room - the watchmen took every body in the house; I have not got my watch; part of my ear-ring was found at Bunhill-row watch-house. On Saturday I met a man in this Court with a silk handkerchief, on which was tied inside my cloak.

Q. After taking all this gin were you sober? A. There was a great while between the times I drank - I was not exactly sober but know all I have stated to be true - I never recollect drinking so much before - I was giddy in the head when I felt sick.

Q. Who sat nearest to you in the parlour? A. Williams - he was talking to me part of the time, and put his

arm on my shoulder for about half an hour, and said he had been acquainted with a son who I had lost at sea.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Mr. Wright here? A. No; we were married about nineteen years ago, at St. Pancras; the son I lost at sea was not his - I was never married before.

Q. Did it not strike you as too familiar for this man's arm to be round your neck? A. I was in trouble about my son, or I should not have been out; his arm was only on my shoulder; I did not pass a watchmaker's shop in the way to this house. I do not recollect having any liquor at the house in Britannia-street; the house I was robbed in is in Chequer-alley; I believe I had a drop of gin there out of a horn - it went round to every body. I just tasted something sweet - I do not think it was shrub - I only put it to my lips, as I did not like the smell.

Q. Did it not strike you that it was time to go home to your husband? A. I ought to have gone home - I had no notion of it being a house of ill-fame when I went there - I do not know how I came to stop - I was rather tipsy - I asked Johnson three times to see me home, and said I would pay her; I only went up stairs as far as the threshold of the door - I did not go into the room till I went with the watchman; I saw no door - I had just got inside where the door ought to be - but not into the middle of the room - my cloak and bonnet were found inside the room - I screamed violently - Mrs. Lawrence came laughing and told me to hold my tongue, for I should say presently I had been robbed of every thing, and there was a bit of my chain.

Q. Do you know a man called Charles the baker? A. No, my brother Charles is called Charles Baker sometimes - he was brought up to the baking business. I was the worse for liquor but not drunk; my ear was not torn to get the ring, but they hurt me.

COURT. Q. Did you never represent that when you got to the bottom of the stairs the sailor young man (meaning Williams) unlocked your ear-ring, then took you round your neck, pushed you down, and took your watch? A. Never; I thought at one time that he had one hand to my ear, and the other to my watch; he came up behind me - I saw no one on the top of the stairs.

Prisoner JOHNSON. Q. Did you not ask me to light you up to bed with Williams, and let you have the best bed? A. Never; it is false.

Q. Did I not stay while you took your bonnet and cloak off, and leave the light with you? A. No, my cloak was torn off - it is torn now at the strings.

COURT. Q. Did they keep you in the watch-house that night? A. Till four o'clock.

Prisoner WILLIAMS. Q. Did you ever go by the name of Hill? A. Yes, about three years ago; I used to work for Hill and persons have called me by that name; I was not living with Wright then - we were separated for six years, but have been together again twelve years and a half; my son was not transported; I do not keep a house of ill-fame; I had a room in Chequer-square twelve or thirteen years ago - my husband lived there with me.

JOHN GEARON . I am a journeyman carpenter. My wife was in service; I met her on the 20th of February, in the evening, and went to this house about ten or eleven o'clock; I did not know it was a bad house; I asked if we could have a lodging for the night, and was directed to an upper room; finding no key to the door I came down and found Mrs. Lawrence, Johnson, Wright, and Crossly, in the parlour; a man named Crossly came in, and soon after Joseph Lawrence came in, and, some time after, Williams - he drank some beer, and sat down by the prosecutrix - I believe they sat on one chair; he sat with his hands round her neck for half an hour; she did not object to it. Crossly proposed that I should stand a pot of beer - I fetched my wife down, sent for a glass of rum - some spirits were handed round - Johnson lighted a candle - Mrs. Wright and Williams left the room, and I thought they were going to bed together for the night; Crossly left the room in five or six minutes - Johnson came down in five minutes - I cannot say whether she brought the light - I heard nobody fall down stairs - if they had I think I must have heard it; I heard a call of murder, opened the parlour door, and found Wright on the floor; she and Williams appeared very loving together in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-52

Before Mr. Justice Park.

628. THOMAS GURNEY and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , at St. Mary, Islington, 2 sheep, price 4l. , the property of James Coleman .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously and wilfully killing 2 sheep, price 4l., the property of the said James Coleman, with intent to steal the carcases of the same.

ROBERT BROWN . I live in Paradise-place. Lower-road, Islington. On Wednesday morning, the 22d of March, about half-past six o'clock, I was going towards home from the watch-house - I am the watch-house-keeper - and in the Lower-road the prisoner Smith went by me with a basket on his shoulder, with something very heavy in it; I saw Gurney coming along, within thirty yards of him, with another basket, similarly loaded - I stopped Gurney, and asked what he had in his basket; he said"Meat;" I pulled the basket off his shoulder and found two fore-quarters of mutton; I asked where he was going to take it - he said to Mr. Salter, a salesman in Newgate-market; there was a chopper in the basket; I said it was not usual for men to carry choppers to market with their meat - he made no answer; I told him to carry the basket to the King's Head - I there searched it more particularly, and found a gamble hook, which they hang sheep up with, and half a sheep's head - I found the other half of the head in his pocket, with a liver; I left the basket there for twenty minutes, took him to the watch-house, then pursued and took Smith with his basket, by Sadlerswells; I asked where he was going - he said he did not know; I found in his basket both the hind quarters of a sheep together, and a knife, and in his pocket a piece of lights, and in the other pocket a gamble hook. When we came to turn the two baskets out together, there were two sheeps' heads, two lots of fat, two hearts, and two livers.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know whether either of them are butchers? A. No.

FRANCIS AYRES . I am servant to James Coleman, who lives at Upper Holloway, about two miles from the Lower-road. On Tuesday, the 21st of March, my fellow servant,

George, put eighty-one sheep into my charge, in a field nearly opposite the Red Caps public-house - one field from the road; I counted them, and saw them safe in the evening, at six o'clock; I shut the gate of the field and locked it - next morning, at eight, I counted them, and found only seventy-nine; I found the skins of the other two in the next field but one, a little after eight that morning, laying in a ditch; I saw Brown afterwards with the parts of two carcases; I compared the two hind-quarters and two forequarters, which he produced to me, with one of the skins - they corresponded with that skin in every point.

Cross-examined. Q. Were all the eighty-one sheep of one breed? A. No; different, I believe.

Q. Sheep of the same year's birth are about the same size? A. They are sometimes, but not always.

Q. How many hundred thousand sheep would have fitted these skins? A. I should not think they would correspond in every point to fit - the fat left on the skin corresponds with the carcass.

WILLIAM HALL . I met Brown, and assisted him - I did not see the meat compared.

ROBERT BROWN . I saw the mutton compared with the skin - my opinion is that the skin belonged to the carcass.

Cross-examined. Q. You think so? A. Yes - the sheep seemed of a common size.

JAMES COLEMAN . These eighty-one sheep were in my care - I saw the two skins - they had my mark on them; I was present when the meat was compared - it seemed to correspond with the skin.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is Sadlers-wells from your field? A. About two miles and a half. I am a grazier and salesman; I do not know the prisoner; the mutton appeared to be dressed as well as it could be in any slaughter-house; the sheep belonged to one Mossman - I was answerable for them - they went from me to market on Friday.

GURNEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18260406-53

Before Baron Garrow.

629. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , at St. James, Westminster, 12 sovereigns, the monies of George Kinnear , and 1 necklace, value 3l., the goods of Elizabeth Maria Kinnear , spinster , in the dwelling-house of James Smith Slaughter .

JAMES SMITH SLAUGHTER. I live in Berwick-street, Soho, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . Mr. and Miss Kinnear are related to me, and reside in my house - the prisoner was in my service as errand boy, for 14 days, and left on the 7th of February, without giving any notice.

ELIZABETH MARIA KINNEAR. I am Mr. Slaughter's daughter-in-law, and am single. On the morning of the 7th of February, about twelve o'clock, I missed my necklace from my bed-room; I had seen it safe at ten o'clock that morning; it was worth 3l.; the prisoner was missing soon after ten.

GEORGE KINNEAR. I live at Mr. Slaughter's. On the 7th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I examined my drawers, and missed a purse, containing two sovereigns and some silver, also a box of paints, with ten sovereigns in it - they were all safe when I went out in the morning; Kelly brought my paint-box to me three or four days after (looking at it) - this is it.

THOMAS KELLY . I succeeded the prisoner in his place, and found this paint-box in the copper-hole, two or three days after I came.

THOMAS GOOK . I am constable of St. James'. I was informed of this robbery, and met the prisoner on the 10th of March, in Carnaby-market; I told him I wanted him for robbing Mr. Slaughter; I took him to a public-house, and while searching him - (I neither threatened or promised him) - I asked him where the necklace was; after some hesitation he said he had sold it to a walking fence for 1l., and that he had spent the twelve sovereigns; I asked where the purse was - he said he had thrown that away, and was very sorry for what he had done.

Prisoner. I am sorry for it, and hope and trust you will have mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth and believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18260406-54

Before Mr. Justice Park.

630. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Dammery , in the forenoon of the 24th of February , and stealing 2 waistcoats, value 4s., and 2 pairs of shoes, value 3s. , his property. (See page 255).

CHARLES DAMMERY. I am a brick-maker , and live in a cottage in Mr. Sunter's field, at Pentonville - I and my servants live there - I pay 1s. a week for it. On the 24th of February, about ten minutes past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the field; my mother gave an alarm - I pursued the prisoner, who was running as hard as he could from the cottage; I saw him throw two pairs of shoes away. Allen stopped him.

ANN BAKER . I am the prosecutor's mother - he left me in his house - I came out about a quarter past eleven o'clock, and latched the door, leaving nobody inside; I had not gone away five minutes when the prisoner passed me, and said it was bad weather; I am sure he is the man. As I turned to come back I saw him coming out of my son's door, with my son's clothes on his arm. I gave an alarm, and saw him throw the shoes down.

ROBERT ALLEN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner running, and pursued - I stopped him, and found two waistcoats, a wet gown, and a silk handkerchief in his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The door was open.

ANN BAKER. To the best of my knowledge it was latched.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-55

631. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously shooting at Thomas Henley , with intent, of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

Mr. ADOLPHUS (on behalf of the prosecution) declined of

fering any evidence, feeling convinced that the indictment could not be sustained, in which the Court, (having read the depositions taken before the Magistrate,) concurred.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-56

Before Mr. Justice Park.

632. THOMAS MASON was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Hallett , with a certain sharp instrument, and feloniously striking and cutting him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or do him some greivous bodily harm.

WILLIAM HALLETT. I am a cow-keeper , and live in Tyson-street, Spafields . On the 24th of March, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner making his way out of my cow shed, with a bundle under his arm; when he saw me he turned to the left, and got under the manger, under a horse's head; I went to him with a candle, and sent for a watchman - he then came out to escape, leaving the bundle behind. I took hold of him, calling very loud for help; his leg was over a fence - I caught hold of it - he took a knife out of his pocket, and cut me; it took a small piece of flesh out of the joint of my finger; he did it to release himself; and cut the person who came to my assistance. There was nothing of mine in the bundle.

WILLIAM WILKINSON . I am in the prosecutor's service. I found a jacket and shawl in the bundle - the jacket is mine; the shawl belongs to a young woman who is here.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very tipsy, and went to lay down in this shed, it being open - when I came out Mr. Hallett caught hold of my leg, and in trying to make my escape I believe I touched him with the knife.

NOT GUILTY .

Not believing his intention to be as charged in the inment.

Reference Number: t18260406-57

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

633. SAMUEL WILSON and WILLIAM BAILEY were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Brice , on the night of the 4th of March , and stealing 1 cloak, value 3s.; 6 plates, value 1s.; 3 basins, value 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 4d.; 1 bolster, value 3s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 6d.; 7 candlesticks, value 7s.; 1 pestal and mortar, value 2s.; 1 ladle, value 1s.; 1 copper pot, value 2s.; 2 looking-glasses, value 6d.; 3 sheets, value 10s.; 1 warming-pan, value 1s.; 2 table-cloths, value 5s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 6d.; 1 yard of stuff, value 1s., and 1 saucepan, value 1s. , his property.

WILLIAM BRICE. I live in Bury-street, Edmonton , and am a labourer . On the 4th of March I had left my house for a fortnight; I locked it up, and had the key at my nephew's, where I was staying. On Sunday, the 5th, I received information, went there, and found all this property taken, and different places broken open.

JOSEPH GROVER . I am Brice's nephew - he had been ill at my house for a fortnight. I went to his house on Saturday afternoon, the 4th of March, between two and three o'clock; every thing was safe then - I locked it up, and brought him the key. Next morning, about eight, I received information, and in the afternoon I went to the house - I found every thing in confusion, the drawers open, and property gone. I had seen a great coat and copper pot there on Saturday.

LIDDA DUDLEY . I live next door to Brice, and make his bed and wash for him - he had been absent nearly a fortnight. On Sunday morning, about half-past six o'clock, I got up, and directly I got to the door I found his shutter and window open, and the drawers open. I sent my husband to his nephew.

GEORGE WALLIS . I am a watchman of Edmonton. I was with Sawyer in Mr. Smith's meads at Edmonton, and found a white petticoat and bolster in the hedge, about nine o'clock; I watched, and about eleven saw the prisoner Wilson go down to where they were; Bailey was about five yards behind him; they came away, and Wilson had something under his arm; they ran hard - I pursued for a mile, calling Stop thief! I secured Bailey, and under his smock-frock found a pillow-case, containing a black silk cloak, and several things; I locked him up, and returned to Sawyer, who was holding Wilson on the ground - he had six china plates and three basins in a bag.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. You found these things - what prevented their finding them? A. When I first saw the prisoners they were about fifty yards from the place, and they went strait up to where the bolster and petticoat lay.

COURT. Q. Did any body run from the cry of Stop thief! besides them? A. Only a gentleman, who pursued them. They started as hard as they could when they saw me.

GEORGE SAWYER . I was with Wallis, and saw Wilson go to the hedge; Wallis pursued - Bailey ran off as fast as he could; I pursued, and took Wilson, with a bag, containing 6 plates, and 3 basins, under his flannel jacket - I struggled with him till Wallis returned to my assistance.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BAILEY'S Defence. What Wallis has said is false - he did not follow us half a mile.

WILSON - GUILTY. Aged 40.

BAILEY - GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-58

Before Mr. Justice Park.

634. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Morris , widow , about eight o'clock in the night of the 26th of March , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal, and stealing 1 shawl, value 7s.; 3 gowns, value 14s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 1 piece of calico, value 4s.; 2 shifts, value 6s.; 1 ring, value 10s.; 2 sovereigns, and 24 shillings , her property.

JANE MORRIS. I am a widow, and live in Turnour-square, Hoxton-town, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch , and rent the house. On Easter Sunday, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I went out to my daughter-in-law's in Hare-square, to dine, leaving Ann Butler in the house; I left my daughter's about four o'clock, then went with her to another friend's, and did not go home till eight; it was not quite dark - I found my house shut up as I had left it; Butler had brought me the key at three o'clock - I opened the door, and the first thing I saw was my bureau broken open. I missed two sovereigns, twenty-four shillings, and my wedding ring, and from the bureau

drawer two new shifts, a piece of calico, three gowns, a petticoat, a shawl, two sheets, and several other things; the counterpane was taken off the bed and thrown over the table, and the bed clothes turned down to the foot of the bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. When had you seen the sovereigns? A. On Friday night; I put the twenty-four shillings in on Saturday night.

ANN BUTLER . I lodge at Mrs. Morris's. I went out on Easter Sunday, about 3 o'clock, leaving no one at home; I bolted the back door, shut the street door after me, and tried it - it was safe and fast. I took the key to Mrs. Morris.

SARAH MORRIS . I am the prosecutrix's daughter-in-law - I went home with her, and found the place robbed.

WILLIAM GOODBURN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. On Monday, the 27th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to pawn a gown, a sheet, and a silk handkerchief, for 16s. - I asked him whose property they were - he said his own - I asked how he came by them - he said he had bought them in Petticoat-lane, for 11s. I had information of the robbery, and gave him in charge.

JAMES CORCORAN . I am headborough, and received him in charge.

JANE MORRIS. I know these things to be mine - I have marks on them.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering .

Reference Number: t18260406-59

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

635. HENRY OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 lamp, value 10s. , the goods of Daniel Cornthwaite .

WILLIAM ROBERT IVES . I live at No. 3, Dean's-court, Doctors' Commons. On Friday, the 17th of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a breaking of glass - I was in an office on the ground floor- I went into the passage, and found the prisoner up five stairs; he said he had dropped some glass; I asked what glass it was - he said his own; he left the house very quickly. I instantly looked up, and missed the lamp from the stair-case. I ran after him, calling Stop thief! and overtook him with the lamp on Addle-hill, and secured him.

DANIEL CORNTHWAITE. I occupy a chamber in Doctors' Commons . This lamp is mine, and cost 18s.; I had seen it the evening before - it was kept on the stair-case; I saw it in the possession of Ives. The prisoner was a stranger.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260406-60

636. JAMES HAWKES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of Thomas Davis , from his person .

THOMAS DAVIS. On the 24th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Cow-lane , and had a handkerchief in my coat pocket; I felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw a person behind, and another behind him; the flap of my coat was turned round at the same time; I secured the person next to me, who was the prisoner. I have not found my handkerchief - his hand was in my pocket when I secured him; the other man was within reach of his arm: he ran off; I had used my handkerchief a minute before; he denied the charge.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Was you alone? A. I was with a friend; I gave the prisoner to a watchman, and desired he should be searched; I did not say I would let him go, if it was not found on him; my friend said so; it was about eight o'clock at night. He offered to compensate me for my loss if I would let him go.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you saw me pass something to the person who was by my side? A. I did see you pass something to the person behind; I was so confused I could not take the other.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I live in Thornaugh-street, and am a linen-draper. I was with Mr. Davis - the first thing I saw was Mr. Davis laying hold of the prisoner; he accused him of stealing his handkerchief, which he denied; he was given in charge.

THOMAS STALIAN . I am a patrol. I was sent for to the public-house, and took the prisoner; I found nothing on him. He said, "I hope you will not take me up, it will be such a disgrace - I will make you any recompense."

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-61

637. JAMES ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Good , from his person .

WILLIAM GOOD. I live with Messrs. Waithman, of Bridge-street. On the 23d of March I was in Smithfield ; my handkerchief was safe a minute before; I felt a pull at my pocket; I had an umbrella up, and on turning to the right I missed it; the prisoner passed me on the left, and got about a yard before me; nobody else was near me. - I laid hold of him, and told him he had robbed me; he produced it from under his coat.

Prisoner. Q. How far was I from any body? A. Fourteen or fifteen yards - nobody else was near me. The ground was very dirty, and the handkerchief was quite dry.

ABRAHAM GRIFFITHS . I am a constable, and was sent for. I found the prisoner at the Ram inn; Good produced the handkerchief - I found another in his hat, marked R. S. R., and about 5s. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. A. young man was following him round the corner of Smithfield-bars - he turned, and went back. I picked up the handkerchief just behind him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-62

638. JAMES ASHBY, alias FISHER , was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , 23lbs. of beef, value 11s. 6d.; 17lbs. of mutton, value 8s. 6d.: 2 iron hooks, value 2d., and 1 iron skewer, value 1d. , the goods of Robert Elliott .

ROBERT ELLIOTT. I am a butcher , at Leadenhall-mar

ket . On the 22d of March this meat was hung up, and made safe for the night; I left it there at seven o'clock, in charge of a watchman, in the shambles; I returned at half-past six o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner in charge, with the beef, mutton, and hooks; he has lived about the market. I had cut the meat, and knew it.

BENJAMIN SAVILL . I am a watchman of Leadenhall-market. About twelve o'clock at night I met the prisoner at the corner of the market, in Lime-street, about forty or fifty yards from the shambles, with this meat covered with a white apron - I stopped him, as he fell down with it - he was in liquor - he said a man hired him to take it home, but he was so much in liquor he thought he could not carry it.

ROBERT RIGGLESFORD . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - he could not tell who the man was, not where he was to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260406-63

639. BRIDGET DART was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 1 cloak, value 7s. , the goods of Robert Upsall .

FRANCIS WITTY . I am servant to Robert Upsall, a pawnbroker , of Barbican . On the 23d of February, between three and four o'clock, three women came into the shop together - one of them redeemed a ring; after that they appeared to be looking at a cloak, which hung up - they left the shop, and I missed it directly; I went after them - two of them went towards Redcross-street, and the prisoner towards Aldersgate-street. I took her about three houses off, with the cloak on her back - she said a woman had put it on her back, wearing it - I am certain it is master's - it was torn down, and the strings left on the nail; she said she did not know whose it was - it hung inside the shop.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer, and took her in charge - she said she was intoxicated, or she should not have done it - she had been drinking.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-64

640. JOHN GERRARD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 3 wooden boxes, value 2s., and 4lbs. of segars, value 6s. 5s. , the goods of William Ferdinand Sintenis .

WILLIAM FERDINAND SINTENIS. I am a tobacconist , and live in Langbourn-chambers, Fenchurch-street . On the 29th of March these boxes of segars were in my stock room on the third floor. I came out, hearing an alarm, and found the prisoner on the stair-case with them in a bag under his arm - he said nothing, they are worth 6s.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am porter at the Lungbourn-chambers. I saw my wife on the first floor holding the prisoner, who was trying to get from her; he pulled her down one pair of stairs; the property had been taken from him before; he had no business there.

ELIZA BROWN . I am the wife of William Brown, and live on the third floor. I was coming out of my room opposite the store room, and saw the prisoner coming out of the store room with a bag in his hand; I asked him what he wanted, he said he was come from Mr. Sintenis; I opened the door and saw nobody there; I had got a key of the room; I went down to Mr. Sientenis's shop on the second floor - he came out; I collared the prisoner - he made a stop, and my daughter took the bag from him; he made a sudden rush and fell upon me - I broke my arm in the fall.

BETSEY BROWN . I heard my mother say "Who do you want?' she called me and I ran down to Mr. Sintenis' workshop; I rand down and said to the prisoner, "What did you go there for?" - he said

"By Mr. Sintenis' orders;" I seized his bag with the boxes of segars in it.

JOHN JUDD . I received him in charge.(Properly produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of employ a long time; I heard he could get me a ship and I went there; this parcel laid in the way. I stumbled over it, and they laid hold of me; I never offered to get away.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-65

641. WILLIAM SHARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 pair of worsted stockings, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William James Porter , from his person .

WILLIAM JAMES PORTER. I live in Old Broad-street, with my father, who is a callenderer. On the 1st of April. these stockings were in my coat pocket in Bishopsgate-street , at half-past five o'clock in the afternoon; I felt them safe just before they were taken - on missing them I turned round and saw somebody holdign the prisoner; I asked him for them, he said he had not got them, and pointed down to the ground, where he had thrown them.

THOMAS MORGAN . I am an upholsterer, and live in Bishopsgate without. I saw Porter at my shop window - the prisoner and two others were about three yards from him; Porter stooped down to speak to my brother, and I saw the prisoner take a parcel out of his trouser's pocket, and walk out; I laid hold of him and said "You took that parcel out of that boy's pocket" - he denied it; I turned and saw it on the ground close by him - nobody but him cluld drop it.

RICHARD MORRIS . I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been on an errand to the grocer's; I was in a hurry, and accidentally knocked them out of his pocket as I passed.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for life .

Reference Number: t18260406-66

642. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 great coat, value 15s., and 1 other coat, value 15s. , the goods of John Henry Allen .

JOHN HENRY ALLEN. I am a tailor , and live in Spread Eagle-court, Threadneedle-street. The prisoner was in my employ about four months once, and came to me again; I delivered him these two coats to deliver to Townsend (Who I had repaired them for), at Mr. Myers', the fishmonger; in a day or two I saw Townsend - the prisoner did not come to work as I expected; I did not see him again till the 30th of March, when I met him in the City-road, and laid hold of him; I found one coat in pawn.

FREDERICK TOWNSEND . I live with Mr. Myers. I sent

Allen these coats to repair - they were never returned; I have seen the blue body coat.

JOHN DOE . I am a gardener. The prisoner lodged with me on the 11th of January in Caroline-street, Lambeth - he brought two coats to my house and offered them for sale - two or three days after that he told me he had pawned the body coat.

STEPHEN GRIMSEY . I am shopman to Mr. Maberly, pawnbroker, Vauxhall. I took in a blue body coat on the 12th of Jannuary of a man, and gave him a duplicate in the name of John Jones, for 5s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I had lodged at Doe's about a month, two men came to lodge there and robbed me of every thing - these coats were with them.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined 1s. and delivered to the prosecutor, who engaged to employ him.

Reference Number: t18260406-67

643. GEORGE IBORN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , at St. Dunstan in the East, in the dwelling-house of William Holman , 1 wooden till, value 2s. 6d.; 1 sovereign; 1 half-sovereign; 2 half-crowns; 20 shillings; 10 sixpences; 10s. in copper monies, and a 1l. bank note , his property.

WILLIAM HOLMAN. I am a baker , and live in Lower Thames-street, in the parish of St. Dunstan, East . On the 31st of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was at home; I opened the shop at seven, and saw my till safe about ten o'clock when I went up one pair of stairs to breakfast; it then contained a 1l. bank note, a sovereign, a half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, and about 30s. in silver - there were more that ten-shilling pieces, and six sixpences, and 10s. in copper or more; I came down from breakfast in three quarters of an hour, and went into the bakehouse; I saw a young man at the door, who gave me information; I then missed the till and money from behind the counter; the prisoner is a stranger - he was pursued and brought back in a quarter of an hour, and my till produced, and all the money, except the sovereign - he said he found it at the corner of Harp-lane.

WILLIAM MOSELEY . I am a plumber, and live at No. 9, Harp-lane. At a quarter past ten o'clock I came out of my door, which is near Thames-street, and saw the prisoner close by my door with the till - a young man came up, and we went to Holman, who missed his till; I ran and caught him in Rood-lane - he had all the money in his hat- as I brought him back he threw a 1l. note out of his pocket; I had it taken up - he then threw a tin box away, dropped some money, and I picked up a half-sovereign.

WILLIAM HOLMAN . The money brought back was a 1l. note, a half-sovereign, 5s. in silver, and 10s. in copper - the two half-crowns were found upon him.

WILLIAM MOSELEY . When I took him into the shop he said he found the till; I found Mr. Lucas's clerk had found the till - he delivered it to Holman.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am a street-keeper, and took the prisoner in charge. I found two half-crowns, ten shillings, and three sixpences on him; he said he found the till; Holman gave me the 1l. note; he said the 16s. 6d. was his own, but he said he had had nothing to eat that morning, and was very hungry.

WILLIAM HOLMAN . I have written on the note the name of the person who paid it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the till at the corner of the lane; I was going to Tower-street, where my father works.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18260406-68

644. THOMAS CROUT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 2 seals, value 30s.; 1 gold ring, value 7s., and 1 watch key, value 6d., the goods of John Scott , from his person .

JOHN SCOTT. I liven in Craven-square, City-road, and am servant to Mr. Sarson. On the 17th of February I went to meet a coach at the Peacock public-house, Islington, expecting a hare; I went from there to the Bull and Mouth inn, Bull and Mouth-street; I had a watch in my fob with gold seals and a ring - the ring was worth 7s., the seals 30s., and the key 6d.; it was safe when I got to the Bull and Mouth - when I got into Beech-street I saw four persons walking on the same side of the way; I tried to pass, as they appeared intoxicated - they made an opening for me to pass through them; I had a hare in my left hand- two of them said "D - n me, there is a good one" - they snatched three times at the hare, one of them kept my left hand up; I called out Watch! three times, being alarmed, and then felt three tugs at my watch; I saw a hand come round, and thought my watch was gone; I called Watch! - they said it was only a joke; I told them to return my watch - the watchman came up and asked me what was the matter, and I told him my watch was gone, and I thought so then; he asked me who did it - I said I could not swear, but these were the two men who had hold of me; I had then laid hold of two of them - he took one and I the other; I was then knocked back, but not by the prisoner, and my man got away; as I went along I found my watch left, but the ring part was bent - the ribbon and seals were gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What time in the evening was this? A. About twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, I had left my employ at eight o'clock in the evening; I went home to supper.

Q. The four men appeared very much intoxicated? A. Yes; they appeared so - they reeled about - two of them were getting away - they could have got the hare from me if they liked, without holding my hand up - that rather prevented them getting it.

Q. One of them held up your arm while the other three tried to get the hare? A. Exactly so - they all appeared very much intoxicated; when the watchman came up he asked who did it; I had hold of two men at that time; I really think they were very much intoxicated - I think so now.

Q. It appeared a drunken frolic? A. More like that than any thing else - I think so now.

Q. You now think it was, on the part of all of them, a drunken frolic? A. Yes; I was present when the prisoner was searched - nothing of mine was found on him - I was perfectly sober - it appeared to me a drunken frolic altogether; they could easily have got the hare from my hand without holding it up if they choose.

COURT. Q. They did not take the hare but your seals? A. Yes.

Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. They did their best to snatch the

hare from you? A. I told them it would not do, and they could not get it from me - it happened between Whitecross-street and Golden-lane; I am certain the watchman asked me who had done it - he did not at that time say who did it.

Q. I believe you have very little doubt that the prisoner was not the person who snatched at your watch? A. I do not think he himself did snatch it, as a hand came round; the watchman came up in two or three minutes - I called out three or four times before he came - I do not recollect whether it was under a light - the street is lighted with gas; when they said it was only a joke, I said"Give me my watch;" I found they still hustled me, and I called Watch! again.

Q. They might have knocked you down and robbed you if they liked? A. They certainly might.

COURT. Q. They did not take the hare, but some of them did take your seals, ribbon and ring? A. Yes; they used so much violence as to bend the part of the watch, which holds the ribbon. I have had no part of my property returned to me.

HENRY YOUNG . I am a bookseller and printer, and live at No. 4, East-street, Spitalfields. About half-past eleven o'clock, on Friday evening, I was coming up Chiswell-street, and heard a cry of Stop him! or Stop them! I stood under a gas light; I heard men running in different directions, and saw the prisoner running with all speed - I had a stick in my hand and stood in an attitude to stop him - whether he saw me I cannot tell, but he directly ran down Grub-street - I followed, collared him, and took him back - I gave him to a watchman - a patrol came up, who had been pursuing him, and I accompanied them to the watch-house; the prosecutor came in and stated that he was one of the party who held his hands while he was robbed of his watch; the prisoner said nothing in his defence - he heard this - he seemed surprised that he should be charged with it. I am sure he said the prisoner was one of them - whether he said he snatched the chain I do not know, but I understood him to say he was one of the men.

Cross-examined. Q. When the watchman came up he did not find the prosecutor holding two persons? A. This was after the transaction - I know nothing of the robbery; I did not see the prosecutor till I got to the watch-house; I saw no other person in the street - but it is a long-street.

Q. Did you hear the prosecutor say he did not believe the prisoner was the man who had touched him, or who took his watch? A. I recollect nothing of the sort - whether he said the prisoner was the person who snatched at his chain, or whether he was one that held him; but he described him as one of the party.

Q. Did not the prosecutor say he thought they were all drunk together? A. I do not recollect it. I mention all I heard; I heard him say at Guildhall that they were drunk - he thought they were all staggering about; Voll, the watchman, said, at the watch-house, that he saw the prisoner pull at the watch - he said that before the prosecutor.

Q. Mr. Scott has been sworn, and I suppose he was as sober as you? A. No doubt of it - he must have as full a recollection of the matter as me.

Mr. PHILLIPS to JOHN SCOTT. Q. I think you said the watchman came up to you when you called Watch? A. Yes.

Q. And that he did not say he saw any one do it? A. No; he asked me who did it - I should know the watchman if I saw him.

COURT. Q. You say you did not see any person do this - will you look at this paper, and tell me whether it is your hand-writing - read it over? A. This is signed by me.

Q. Have you looked over it? A. No (he does so).

Q. You have read that over, and you signed it? A. Yes.

Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Is that the watchman you mean(pointing to the witness Voll)? A. That is the person.

ABRAHAM VOLL . I am a watchman. I came up on hearing what was passing - the spot in question is in the City. I heard a call of Watch! at a quarter before eleven o'clock, and immediately came up to where the noise was - I saw two men standing on the pavement, and one having hold of Mr. Scott's left arm, in which he had a hare, and the prisoner at the bar was lugging at his fob; Mr. Scott had got his arm bent down to keep the watch in - Scott was completely swinging by the chain or ribbon.

Q. That is, it drew him round? A. Yes; they could not get it out, and at last they separated; their pulling swung him round; they could not get it out; Scott was in the road, and the men walked on the pavement - the prisoner was one of the party - Scott said directly to me"I have lost my seals."

Q. Or his watch, which did he say? A. His seals he told me. I laid hold of the prisoner, and immediately said "Have you got the gentleman's seals?" he said"No, I have not got the seals;" I said

"Then you must go with me to the watch-house - they were both agreeable to go to the watch-house (the prisoner and the one who had hold of the left arm); we went about three doors, and then he refused to go; I immediately said to Scott"You hold that one, and I will hold the other;" I gave him the man who got away - I had hold of the prisoner - as soon as Scott got hold of the other he immediately made a blow at Scott; I attempted to lay hold of him, and by so doing the prisoner got from me, and I ran after him - he ran very fast - I believe he was a little in liquor, but able to run very fast; I lost sight of him, I think, at the corner of Grub-street, as he turned round the corner, but caught sight of him again, and seeing him stopped by Young I held back, for I was quite out of wind; I came up, and he was taken to the watch-house. I am quite sure he is the person whom I saw tugging at Scott's watch.

Cross-examined. Q. You say you are sure this was in the City of London? A. Yes; it is in Beech-street - the spot is about three houses out of the county. I know the boundary of Cripplegate parish, and the boundary of the City - the officers have shewn me the boundaries of the different parishes.

Q. You know the man who had hold of the chain? A. Yes, I had a bull's-eye light - I saw him and know him.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Scott "I know who it was that was tugging at your watch," when you went up to him? A. No; I caught hold of the prisoner directly I asked Scott what the piece of work was; I had seen the priso

ner tugging at his seals - I was not obliged to tell Scott.

Q. Now, on your oath, and remember Mr. Scott has been examined, instead of your not telling him who did it, did you not ask him who did it? A. I did not ask him that question - I swear that - if he has sworn so it is not true, for I saw the prisoner pulling at the fob. I have been here many times - not as a witness - as a visitor many times, and I have unfortunately stood at that bar.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure you saw the prisoner pulling at the fob? A. Yes; I am positive.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home; there was a piece of work in the street - the gentleman said he had been robbed - this watchman came up, and said "What is the matter?" the prosecutor said "I have been robbed;" "Who was it?" said the watchman; he said "I don't know;" the watchman laid hold of me, and said"You have robbed the gentleman?" I said "I have not."

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-69

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, APRIL 11.

Middlesex Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

645. CHARLES THORN was indicted for stealing, on 20th of February , 28 yards of muslin, value 30s.; 84 pairs of gloves, value 4l.; 21 yards of trimming, value 16s.; 5 yards of velvet, value 50s.; 10 yards of silk, value 2l.; 15 yards of crape, value 2l.; 219 yards lace, value 15l.; 3 yards quilting, value 14s.; 575 yards of net, value 7l.; 2 veils, value 50s.; 22 pairs of stockings, value 4l.; 600 yards of ribbon, value 15l.; 14 handkerchiefs, value 30s.; 1 silk dress, value 30s.; 19 yards of satin, value 3l., and 20 yards of silk, value 4l., the goods of Richard Hodge and Henry Lowman , his masters, in their dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

HENRY LOWMAN. I am in partnership with Richard Hodge - we are linen drapers and live in Regent-street. The prisoner was formerly in our service, and last Christmas he wrote to us, saying, he wished to commence business for himself, but had rather got his hand out, and wished to be with us a short time without a salary, to make himself more acquainted with the trade. I afterwards saw him, and he came into our employ. A communication was made to me by Mr. Duthoit, a lace merchant, last February, and, on the 24th, I went to the prisoner's lodgings in Old Cavendish-street; he was then taken into custody; we searched his rooms, and found a variety of my articles, which I gave to Schofield - they were in a trunk under the bed - Mr. Duthoit gave me a piece of lace.

DANIEL DUTHOIT . I am a lace manufacturer, and live in Bow-church-yard; I sell goods to the prosecutors. In February I attended a sale at Mr. Bailey's, and observing some goods which I had sold, I bought two pieces of lace, which I am certain I sold the prosecutors; the prisoner was bidding at the sale, and the very article he bid for, I bought at the next day sale.

RICHARD FLOWER BAILEY . I am apprenticed to my father, who is an auctioneer. On the 16th and 17th of February we had a sale; the prisoner had brought about twenty lots of the goods, and represented them as being the remaining stock of his sister, who was a milliner in Old Cavendish-street; the lace in question was among them; I paid him the amount the goods sold for.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I took the prisoner in charge with the property.

MR. LOWMAN. I can swear to this muslin, and the gloves, and other things.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY. Q. Did the prisoner's wife never buy any thing of you? A. I did not know that he had a wife.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. He was constantly in your house? A. Yes, from Christmas up to the time he was apprehended; he might have taken the goods separately.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You paid him no wages? A. No, he boarded with us, and was our servant; I took him as a shopman, and boarded him.

COURT. Q. What was the contract you made with him? A. That he was to have his board, and to be with us till August or September, when he was going into business - he perfectly understood that his board was a remuneration for his services.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-70

646. JAMES ARMITAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , at St. Anne, 1 gelding, price 3l. 10s. , the property of John Gunn .

WILLIAM MONK . I am a licensed slaughterer of horses, and keep a slaughter-house in Buck's-row. Whitechapel. On Monday, the 13th of March, between 5 and 6 o'clock, the prisoner came to my premises with a gelding, and asked if I would purchase it; I said, Yes, and asked his price; he said 2l. I walked round the horse, examined it, and put several questions to him, where he got it, and whose it was - he said it was his own, that he had brought it from Brentford that morning. I said it was a long distance to come so early, and this circumstance excited my suspicion, for the horse was cool, and if it had come that distance it would have been warm. I then asked why he wished to part with it, as it did not ail any thing - he said, because it would not draw. I detained him - advertised it, and on the Friday following had it led about Smithfield, with a label on its forehead, stating that the owner might have it. Gunn saw it, and claimed it.

JOHN GUNN. I am a carman , and live at Limehouse. This gelding is my property. On Sunday, the 12th of March. I turned it out in the field at Limehouse - the gates were fastened. I saw it safe at seven o'clock in the evening, and missed it next morning, the 13th. I found it at Smithfield with a label on its head, and knew it to be mine - and Monk shewed it to me in his stable afterwards. I know nothing of the prisoner. It is worth 3l. 10s.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I came on shore from Mr. Kates' barge at the Regent's-canal-basin, and in the road to Whitechapel I was accosted by two men, one dressed in a woollen cap, smock-frock, and trousers, and the other in a brown coat and top boots; they asked

where I was going - I said towards home, Brentford; the one in the brown coat asked where I lived; I said, "With my father, near the Salutation public-house, at Brentford"- he asked if I would assist the other man to dispose of the horse, as he had another to dispose of, and as he was coming towards Brentford he would pay me. I was desired to ask 40s. for it, and say I brought it from the Salutation. I assure you I am totally innocent.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18260406-71

Before Mr. Justice Park.

647. THOMAS SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , at St. Pancras, 46 sheep, price 69l. , the property of John Wells .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WELLS. I live at Shenley, in Hertfordshire , about fifteen miles from Tyburn-turnpike. In February last Bennett was my shepherd; my sheep are marked with the letter W on the near hip, with pitch, and O on the far hip. I heard of these sheep being stolen on Saturday, the 18th of February, and on Monday, the 20th, Dalton showed me thirty-three sheep, in the stables, near Whitechapel - I can swear to two of them, and believe the others to be mine; they are marked with my mark.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. What distance is your house from where you saw the sheep? A. Eighteen or nineteen miles; they were kept about half a mile further from London then my house.

THOMAS BENNETT . I am shepherd to Mr. Wells. I counted all the sheep on the Thursday before I saw them in London - there were one hundred and fifty-one. On the Saturday I missed forty-six; I afterwards saw thirty-three in London, and know two of them particularly well - one was wry necked, and the other had been fly-galled, and the mark on the others was master's - they were master's sheep.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. At what time on Thursday did you see these sheep? A. About eleven o'clock - I missed them on Saturday morning, about eight o'clock, and found them near Whitechapel on the Friday.

EBENEZA DALTON . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On Saturday, the 18th of February, I went to a stable, No. 5, Warren-mews, Fitzroy square; I found the door fastened, and broke it open. Edwards, of Hatton-garden, and Shepherd, an officer, were with me; we found there thirty-three live sheep, eleven sheep's plucks, and a quantity of sheep skins cut to pieces, and tied up in a bag; I found three knives, two steels, and a chopper - the stable appeared as if sheep had been killed there; there was fresh blood about - it is a two-stall stable. The live sheep were all huddled together in one stall - I could not then see whether there were any marks on them. I left Edwards to mind them while I proceeded to what I was informed was John Shaw's stables, in Osnaburgh-street - I found a horse, cart, and chaise there, which I brought away; on the inside of the cart there was the marks of fat and blood- it was on the side of the cart, where the seat swings. I afterwards shewed the thirty-three sheep to Mr. Wells, at Flying Horse-yard, Lambeth-street, on Monday or Tuesday. I drove them there myself from the stable; I was obliged to carry some of them in the cart, as they were unable to walk. Bennett saw the same sheep.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. How far is Osnaburgh-mews from where you found the sheep? A. About a quarter of a mile. I believe there are livery-stables in that mews; I cannot be certain on what day Bennett saw the sheep, but I shewed them to Mr. Wells first, I think. I took them all at once to Flying Horse-yard, and was two hours getting them there.

RICHARD GARDNER . I am a constable of Bow-street. I went with Dalton to Warren-mews on Saturday, the 18th of February; I then went and found the prisoner at a public-house in Norton-street, Fitzroy-square, not far from where the sheep were found; it was between three and four o'clock. The prisoner's brother John was with him there; I spoke to John, and asked him to go up to his stable, and said, "Is that your brother with you?" he said Yes; I then asked him if he would go to his stable, and that his brother had better come with him; they wanted to know what it was for; I said it was respecting the horse that was in his (John's) stable; when we got them to the stable in Osnaburgh-street I and Dalton told them they must consider themselves in custody; they wanted to know what for; I said for some sheep; they said, "What sheep?" we told them the sheep in the stable in Warrenmews - they both said they knew nothing about them; the prisoner said he had let the stable to a man named Vincent, about six weeks or two months before; I asked him who Vincent was - he said he had seen him, and agreed to let it to him at 16s. a week; I will not be positive whether I asked him where Vincent lived - he gave no further account of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. How far is the public-house from Osnaburgh-street? A. About the same distance; they made no objection to go to John's stables; when they got there I told them they must consider themselves in custody.

Q. On your saying it was about the sheep in Warren-street, he said he had let the stable to Vincent? A. Yes. I did not question him further about Vincent.

COURT. Q. Did either of you ask who Vincent was? A. No - I did not hear that.

Q. Have you not sworn that he was asked, and said he did not know who he was? A. I think he did say so.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I went with Dalton and Gardner to Warrenmews, No. 5, on the 18th of February, and saw the sheep there. I afterwards went to Osnaburgh-mews, and found a cart - I do not know who it belonged to, but the premises belonged to John Shaw; the cart was chalked on the off side, and the name obliterated; I found the inside of it marked with a quantity of fat and blood; it was fresh. We afterwards went to Warren-mews; I did not see the prisoner there; I heard him say at the office that the stable did not belong to him - I asked him if he could find Vincent - he said he did not know, but he had let the stables to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. He was in cus

tody at that time? A. Yes - his brother was also in custody, nearly a fortnight, I believe.

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the wife of Thomas Davis , a corn-chandler, of No. 15, Warren-street, Fitzroy-square. I know the prisoner very well; he was at our shop, to the best of my knowledge, during the week before he was taken up - he came for a truss of straw and some oats - he did not say where they were to be sent; he dealt with us before - he was going out of the shop, and said to Capel, our shopman, "Do you know where to take them to, my stable in Warren-mews;" Capel said, Yes. I heard of his apprehension on Saturday evening or Sunday.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Was your husband in the shop at the time? A. No - only my daughter; Capel was not there, but was called to take the things, and then this passed. To the best of my recollection this was in the course of a week before he was apprehended - it was certainly under a fortnight - he has dealt with us some years.

THOMAS CAPEL . I am servant to Davis, and know the prisoner - he had a few things at master's; I took a truss of hay, and straw, and some oats to Warren-mews; I do not know the number; the prisoner took them from me at the stable; he ordered me in the shop to take them there; I saw him in the stable; he took them off my shoulder, and gave me the sack back - I did not take them inside.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Was not this three weeks before he was in custody? A. I believe it was as long as that.

Q. Have you not always said so? A. I think so.

COURT. Q. Did you take the oats into the stable or stand outside the door? A. I stood outside; I do not know whether he shut the door when he took them in, but I did not see inside; I had been there once a great while before, and he was there then; I do not know what business he was.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a hostler, and live at Clapton - my brother lives at Clapton - he was hostler to John Shaw in February; I was out of employ then, and slept in John Shaw 's stables, in Osnaburgh-mews; there was a horse and cart there - I do not know who it belonged to; I slept there on the Friday night before the prisoner and his brother were taken up; the prisoner and John Shaw called me up some time in the night to open the stable door - I do not know what time it was; I had gone to bed at eleven o'clock, and had been asleep; I opened the door to him - he and the prisoner were there; they came into the stable, harnessed the horse, and took it out; the cart was in the yard - I do not know whether they took that. I went to bed. I heard the cart driven out of the yard, and some time in the morning the cart came home - it was not quite day-light; they called me - they were both there. The horse came into the stable. A man named Samuel Mutton was with them. The horse was very sweaty and dirty, and the cart tiers looked as if it had been out - it was dirty.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Did you go to sleep directly? A. In a few minutes, and slept till the morning.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am a coach-wheel-wright, and live at No. 6, Warren-mews - the prisoner, I believe, occupied No. 5, until I do not know how lately. I do not know for a certainly that he did occupy it; I saw him there about a fortnight before the stable was broken open- I saw him come down the mews many times - I have a workshop opposite to No. 5 - he came to me about ten days before the officers were there, and applied to me to repair the wheels of a cart, which the officers have in their possession; he told me I should find the cart at his brother's, in Osnaburgh-street; he wanted me to repair the wheels, and wished it done well, but as cheap as I could, as it belonged to a poor man. I saw the cart in the possession of Dalton the same day as I took the wheels off(Saturday) - I am sure it was the same cart.

Q. When did you see him go into No. 5, Warren-mews last? A. I think it was a fortnight before that.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. You did not see the cart till it was in Dalton's possession? A. I took off the wheels that morning, and in the afternoon Dalton had it; he had applied to me about it ten days before - I am always at work at home. I had not seen him at No. 5 for a fortnight before, to my recollection.

COURT. Q. You do not recollect seeing him there for a fortnight? A. No, my Lord. I have seen two other men come backwards and forwards there in that fortnight; I do not know who they were; I never saw him do any thing there. The last time I saw one of them was on Thursday or Friday before this time - he brought a saddle on his back. The cart is about the size of a smallish butcher's cart - it would hold several dead sheep laying on each other.

JOHN BELL . I live in the New-road, and am proprietor of the stables in Warren-mews. I let the prisoner the stable No. 5, twelve months ago, at 7s. a week - he continued my tenant up to the time he was apprehended.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Whether he had under let them you do not know? A. No - it is frequently done. I never asked him for rent - he always brought it to me every fortnight.

COURT. Q. When was the last payment? A. Nearly a month before this happened.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare to God I am innocent of having any thing to do with the robbery; I could have made my escape - I knew the officers had been to my brother's stable.

BENJAMIN COLLINS . I was horse-keeper to John Shaw, and am Thomas Collins' brother. I never knew the stables in Warren-mews till after this happened. I have seen a man whom they call Vincent at John Shaw's stable; he and a young man named Samuel Mutton were together.

COURT. Q. When did you hear him called Vincent? A. He was never called Vincent in my presence.

JAMES BOWDEN . I live at No. 32, Warren-street, and have known the prisoner five or six years; he lodged at my house up to the time he was apprehended, for ten months, and bore a good character; about a fortnight before he was apprehended I asked him it I could lay down half a load of hay in his premises - I was refused - we were on good terms.

Q. You must not give his reason for the refusal, but you were refused? A. Yes; he slept at my house till he was apprehended.

Mr. CRESWELL. Q. What are you? A. I keep a

chandler's-shop, and deal in hay. I once kept a yard for it.

MARIA COOLEY . I lodge at Bowden's, No. 32, Warren-street, in the next room to the prisoner; I take in needlework; I have known him three years - he is a respectable, sober, and honest man; I slept in the next room to him, and he was in both nights previous to the robbery; on the Thursday evening before he was taken he came into my sister's room - he knocked at the door; I let him in, and he asked me to be kind enough to make him a basin of gruel; I did so; he was there till nearly half-past eleven o'clock; he then went into his own room, and I saw no more of him till between seven and eight next morning; I did not go to bed myself till half-past two; I was up finishing some work; I did not bear him leave his room before I went to bed; I should have heard him if he had; I saw him again about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I was going down stairs when he was coming up; I saw him next evening before ten - that was Friday - I saw him in my own room - he came in for a light, as he usually did - he did not stay more than half an hour - he then left us to go to bed; I heard him lock his door and saw no more of him; I saw him again next morning(Saturday) between seven and eight o'clock.

COURT. Q. At what time did you go to bed on Friday night? A. About half-past one o'clock; I was the last person up.

Mr. CRESWELL. Q. If he had gone out of his room you must have heard him? A. Yes; it is impossible for him to go without my hearing him - I believe so.

Q. You saw him next morning coming up stairs as you were going down? A. That was Thursday morning - we were both going down stairs together.

Q. Did not you tell us that you saw him at seven o'clock on Friday morning, and he was coming up stairs as you were going down? A. No; I said we were both going down together between seven and eight o'clock; he did not look at all fatigued on Saturday morning.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. You first spoke about Thursday night? A. Yes; I was in the next room - I did not hear him go down; I sat up till half-past one o'clock on Friday night, and did not hear him go out; I saw him on Saturday morning on the stairs.

MARY COOLEY . I am the last witness' sister, and lodge on the same floor as the prisoner. On Thursday, the 16th of February, two days before he was apprehended, about nine or ten o'clock he was in our room; I was in his company till after eleven - he went to bed after he had taken some gruel for his cold; I saw him next morning about eight; it was rather later than two when I went to bed; I am certain he could not have left his room before I went to bed.

COURT. Q. Where did you see him the next morning? A. I saw him go out of the house about eight o'clock.

Mr. LAW. Q. Did you see him again next evening(Friday)? A. Yes, about nine o'clock - he went to bed rather earlier; I went to bed about twelve that night.

COURT. Q. Who sat up latest, your sister or you? A. I did - I went to bed about twelve o'clock.

Mr. LAW. Q. What time did you see him next morning? A. About the same time; I am certain he could not have gone out without my hearing him - he had a drab great coat on on Friday night.

Fifteen witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his good character .

Reference Number: t18260406-72

Before Mr. Justice Garrow.

648. JOHN WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Joseph Goldsmith , on the night of the 24th of February , and stealing 155 combs, value 11l.; 4 silver spoons, value 14s.; 1 caddy ladle, value 2s.; 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 10s.; 4 pair of scissors, value 8s., and 12 razors, value 12s. , his property.

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS JOSEPH GOLDSMITH. I am a perfumer , and live in King-street, Seven-dials . On the 24th of February I went to bed about twelve o'clock, leaving my house quite secure - next morning I found a piece of glass removed from my fan-light - a bolt drawn and the fan-light opened- a man could then get in; I missed this property - when I went to bed the candle in my room had burnt very trifling, and in the morning I found it very much burned, and shaped as if for a dark lantern; I gave information at Bow-street, - some of my combs were afterwards produced to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was about a fornight after the robbery that you got information of the combs? A. Yes; I knew nothing of the prisoner.

JOSEPH GUEST . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Bear-street, Leicester-square. I saw the prisoner about three times previous to this transaction. On Thursday, the 9th of March, he came to be shaved, and when I had about half shaved him, he said that he had got some articles that would suit me - that they were tortoiseshell combs; I said I was not in the habit of selling them; he said he thought they would suit me, and I said if I saw them very likely I would buy them; after I had shaved him he called me aside, and said "I think they are the property of Mr. Goldsmith, who was robbed the other night - I think they are come by the cross;" he went away for them; I went to Goldsmith and told him of it - he went with me to Bow-street and got Cousins - we went directly to my house, and found the prisoner waiting there for me; I left Cousins outside - he shewed me some combs, and asked 5s. for the large, and the small ones were to be given in - they were worth 12s. or 14s. each; Cousins immediately came in and took him.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he believed they had been the property of Goldsmith, and believed they had come on the cross? A. He said they were the property of Goldsmith; I did not hear the word believe in it; I only knew him by his being occasionally a customer, two or three times.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am an officer. On the 9th of March I went with Guest to his house and took the prisoner there; I said "You are in my custody on suspicion of having stolen property in your possession," and at the same time took a parcel of combs from his hand; I collared him

- he said "Let me go, I will go quietly;" I let him go - he immediatley put his hand into his waistcoat pocket; I said "What are you going to do?" he said "I am a gas fitter; I have a burner there - I know you will find it;" I said "Keep your hand out;" I took him to a public-house - he put his hand in again; I took it out, and in that pocket I found a small crow-bar; I searched his lodgings and found two large and nine small combs, and two salt spoons; he said they were his lodgings; there was no marks on the prosecutor's fan-lights.

Mr. ADOLPHUS to GUEST. Q. Had the prisoner shown you the gas-burner that morning? A. Yes, but not the bar.(Property produced and sworn to).

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, protested his innocence, and stated he had obtained the combs in exchange for one dozen of brass bell-pulls and 5l. with a man who came to his shop, representing himself in distress, and that after he had purchased them, the man prevailed on him to buy the salt-spoons, and that the article called by the witnesses a crow-bar, he used as a scraper in his business as a gas-fitter.

COUSINS re-examined. When I took him he said he bought them of some man he did not know; he said nothing more as to that.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you the sum I gave for them? A. No; I never heard of an exchange of bell-pulls for them - he said at the office he bought them of a man- he was going to say something when Sir Richard Birnie told him he had better not enter into his defence there.

MARY STANDING . I live at No. 32, Brownlow-street, Long-acre. On Wednesday the 22d or 23d of February, I called at the prisoner's house and found him extremely ill - he complained of a violent pain in his head; I advised him to apply leeches, and applied them to his head myself, between five and six o'clock in the evening, and stopped there till they were off - till ten; I saw him again between eleven and twelve next morning in bed, and he appeared very ill then; Wilson was there part of the day - he lodges in the house; I sat up in the parlour two nights to attend the prisoner (Thursday and Friday); Wilson used to sleep in the parlour, but slept in the attic those two nights; I went into the Price's room several times in the course of those two nights, and always found him in bed; Wilson took the key of the shop and street-door up stairs; I returned home on Saturday between nine and ten o'clock; I occasionally went home in the day time as I am married.

Mr. CRESWELL. Q. You think it was on the 22d or 23d? A. It was on a Wednesday - he is married - his wife was there.

JAMES WILSON . I am in partnership with the prisoner as a brass-founder and gas-fitter; he was taken ill on Tuesday afternoon, about the 21st or 23d of February, with a pain in his head; Mrs. Standing came to visit him; I saw leeches applied on Wednesday night, about seven or eight o'clock; I was there when they were first applied, but went out; I came home and saw his head wrapped up about nine; Standing went home between nine and ten - she sat up in the parlour on Thursday and Friday nights, and I slept in the garret on that account; I took both the street and shop door keys up with me; the prisoner remained ill on Thursday and Friday; I went into his room every morning to see how he was - he was also ill on Saturday.

Mr. CRESWELL. Q. Do you recollect when he was apprehended? A. Yes; I was taken on this charge myself - I believe Standing or his wife bought the leeches; I am in partnership with him, but my name is not on the card because he is the only person appointed by the gas company; I carry on the business now, but not in the same place.

ELIZA BABER . My husband is a shoemaker. I called on the prisoner on the Friday on which the robbery was committed about nine o'clock in the evening - he was very ill in bed; I had seen him on Wednesday and Thursday - he was ill then - he was very ill indeed on Friday; I was there on Saturday morning before nine o'clock - he was in bed; I advised him to take a walk if possible.

- CONTENTAN. I am secretary of a Philanthropic Society, or the Sons of St. Andrew. I went to the prisoner on Wednesday, the 22d or 23d of February, to see him, as he was elected chairman of a branch of the society, and did not attend; I found him extremely ill - he had three leeches on, and was sitting up in a chair - his wife was sitting by his side, and his cousin Standing was there - it was about a quarter or half-past ten o'clock when I called.

JOHN NAGGS . I live in Piccadilly. On Saturday, the 25th of February, the prisoner called on me - he appeared very ill - his face was swollen.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-73

649. JOHN WILLIAM PRICE was again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 ring, value 30s. , the goods of John Pearl .

GEORGE PEARL . I live with my father, John Pearl, a jeweller , in Burlington-arcade . On the 10th of January, after shewing this ring to a customer, I replaced it on the glass-case - on the following day the prisoner was at work, fitting up the gas apparatus, behind the counter, for two or three hours, and on the 12th a workman, who had made the ring, called about it; I went to the glass-case, and it was gone - the case was not locked - it is but a small shop - people are continually coming in, and my attention was called away while he was there- only my father and myself serve in the shop - I am positive I never sold it; on the Monday following Cousins brought it to our shop (looking at it); I am sure this is it - I have the fellow on my finger - it is chased, and has a carved coral head.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did he come to your shop? A. About eleven or twelve o'clock; he was working near the glass-case, which draws out - the ring was in front - I do not think he was left alone in the shop - the ring is a new pattern and quite uncommon - it was made on purpose for us - we had had it but two or three days.

COURT. Q. Who made it for you? A. One Greswell; it was for a lady; I had not shewn it to her before Greswell called to know if it suited, and it was produced to me on the Monday after the prisoner was taken - not the Monday after I lost it.

JOHN PEARL. I know this ring to be mine - I never sold it - I have one like it, except that the head is a crysolite.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the same man make both? A. Yes; I received it from him as a new pattern - this was made a fortnight or a month after I selected it from his stock, to bring here; I do not recollect seeing any more of the same kind.

JOSEPH GUEST . I live in Bear-street, and have known the prisoner about three months; he offered me that ring, with about two dozen and a half or three dozen more, about six weeks ago, when he came to be shaved; he shewed them to me in a paper, and asked 7s. each for them; I examined them for a minute, then said I did not understand them, and should not buy them.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you undertake to swear this ring was among them? A. Yes; for there was no other like it; I picked it out, and it would not go on my little finger; he did not say how he got them.

GEORGE PEARL. The ring cost us 30s.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I searched the prisoner's apartment, and found four rings in a drawer, in the back parlour, and two more in a drawer of the bedstead in the same room; the ring in question is one of the four. When I produced it at Bow-street, the prisoner said it was one out of many others, that he had brought from France some years ago, and that it was French manufacture; this was on the 9th of March, and on the 18th, Mr. PEARL came and claimed it; he described it before he saw it, and picked it out from the rest.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the drawers locked? A. No.

The prisoner, in his defence, stated, that he had found this ring at the Opera House, and it was not the one he said he had brought from France, and concluded by asserting this prosecution to be a villanous scheme, on the part of Guest, to rain him.

Prisoner to PEARL. Q. Does not the adjoining shop communicate with yours? A. A milliner keeps the shop- I have occasionally got her to mind my shop.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-74

Before Mr. Justice Garrow.

650. JOHN MACINTIRE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Goer , about seven o'clock in the night of the 22d of March , at St. Luke, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 6 yards of woollen cloth, value 6l. , his property.

JAMES GOER. I am a tailor , and live at No. 1, Smith-street, King's-road, Chelsea, in the parish of St. Luke . On the 22d of March, about seven o'clock, in the evening, I was in the shop - it was dark - we had lighted candles - I heard a pane of glass break, and ran to the door, but could not open it; I got it open at last; I saw nothing tied to it; I ran to the left up Smith-street, and saw a man running about twenty yards from the window, with something under his arm; I and Fox, my apprentice pursued - he threw down this six yards and a half of woollen cloth, about ten yards before I got up to him; I then secured him, without losing sight of him - it was the prisoner - he struck me - I threw him down and secured him - I returned to the shop and missed the cloth from my window - the glass was broken - I delivered it to Young;(looking at it) I know it to be mine - I have a mark on it- it is worth 6l. 10s. - it cost me more.

CHARLES JAMES FOX . I am an apprentice to Mr. Goer. I was in the shop, heard the glass break, ran out with master down Smith-street - I picked up the cloth which was delivered to Young; it had laid near the broken pane, and could be drawn through.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I took the prisoner into custody with the property.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury on account of his youth and apparent destitute condition .

Reference Number: t18260406-75

Before Baron Garrow.

651. JAMES HOCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 9 sovereigns, and 13 shillings, the goods of Uz Hockley , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL HOCKLEY . I live at South Ockenden, in Essex - the prisoner and prosecutor are my brothers. On Saturday morning, the 1st of April, the prisoner came to my house, and having heard what had happened, I took him into custody; I told him he had been robbing his brother - he said it was not so; I said he had robbed him of nine sovereigns and thirteen shillings - he denied it- I persisted in it, and then he said he had taken it because nobody else should.

Uz HOCKLEY. I live in Orchard-place, Kingsland-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch , and am a corn chandler - I rent the house - the prisoner is my youngest brother - I took him in and protected him, considering I was the only friend he had, and he was in distress - I told him he was welcome to what I had till he got into service. On Sunday morning I always cast up my books, and put my money into a purse; On Sunday, the 5th of March, I put nine sovereigns and nineteen shillings into a red purse, which I put into a bag, and hung it by the mantel piece; he knew I kept my money there; I had got him into employment, and expected he was going to live with me; he went away that day, and I missed my money and purse. I informed my brother Samuel.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Reference Number: t18260406-76

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

652. GEORGE LAKE , JOHN JAMES , and JOHN CRUTCHMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 7lbs. of sugar, value 2l. 3s. , the goods of John Travers and Joseph Travers .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Richard Bailey and Thomas Bailey .

Mr. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD BAILEY. I am a master carman , and ply in Cannon-street - I am in partnership with Richard Bailey. On the 10th of March I sent a van to the West India Docks - Lake drove it - he was to fetch three hogsheads of sugar for Messrs. Travers.

DANIEL RYAN . I am foreman at the warehouse No. 2, West India Docks. On the 10th of March I delivered to Bailey's waggon three hogsheads of sugar; three of Bailey's waggons were loaded at the same time - I believe

Lake drove one van - the hogshead, No. 196, weighed 14cwt. 2qrs. 23lb. I delivered a ticket of the weight to the driver, with a pass note.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. What time was this? A. I think between three and four o'clock. I have entered the weight myself; the waggoner told me he wanted No. 196, in a particular part of the waggon.

JOHN COOK PRESTON . On the 10th of March I was warehouseman to John and Joseph Travers, of Swithen's-lane. On the evening of the 10th of March, at five o'clock, Lake drove a waggon in, with two hogsheads of sugar - he had left the other in Whitechapel, which was correct - one hogshead, at the tail of the waggon, was taken out - he delivered a ticket - No. 196 remained in the waggon; I told him to take that to Holborn-bridge, and gave him a copy of the dock note, with the weight - the original is lost: No. 196, W. L. weighed 14cwt. 2qrs. 23lbs.; he left me about ten minutes past five, to go to Holborn-bridge.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know that 196 was in your waggon. A. I know it by the Dock note which he brought, and I saw it there; I gave him a note of the number he was to deliver in Whitechapel. I saw No. 196 at Mr. Blincos', on Holborn-bridge afterwards - I was fetched there at eight o'clock - every man has his own waggon - they do not change them.

JOHN SMITH . I live in York-place, Commercial-road, and work at the West India Docks. On the evening of the 10th of March, about five minutes to six o'clock in the evening, I was in Newgate-street, and saw a van enter the street, with a hogshead of sugar in it; "Bailey, Great Trinity-lane," was on the van; Lake drove it; I saw Crutchman come up to him in Newgate-street: they appeared to be in conversation; after they had walked about ten yards Crutchman got into the van - the tilt was partly thrown up, and continued so while in Newgate-street - he laid hold of the cask, as if to move it, came out in a minute and a half, and went to Lake - the van proceeded; Crutchman remained talking with Lake. The van got into Skinner-street, and there James joined them; all three were in conversation; the van stopped about ten yards on this side of Fleet-market, on the left-hand; they were conversing from 5 to 7 minutes - the van then proceeded down the east side of the market, towards Ludgatehill, keeping on the wrong side of the way; nearly opposite the Braziers' public-house it stopped; Crutchman then got into the waggon - James and Lake were present- Crutchman pulled the tilt over himself, and placed the straw against the rails of the van, which prevented my seeing. James then drew into the market; Lake continued by his waggon - it stopped there twelve or fifteen minutes; Lake then drove the van slowly towards Ludgate-hill, keeping on the wrong side. I did not see Crutchman get out; I kept watching the waggon - it turned round, and went on the west side of the market, and on the wrong side; I then saw James walking with Lake. The van stopped nearly opposite the Angel, on the wrong side, for twenty or twenty-five minutes, and when I came up I saw Lake with a pint pot, standing by his horses; he took the pot in, made a motion with his whip on the cover of the waggon, and James came out of the waggon; I had not seen him get in. I had heard a knocking in the van, as if they were hitting tin on wood; a man came by, and spoke to him - the van proceeded to Mr. Blinkos' - James and Lake walked together. When the waggon turned round to go to Blincos' I was on the opposite side, and met Crutchman coming in a direction from Holborn-hill; I was opposite Blincos' door; I had not seen him get out of the van; James and Lake rolled the hogshead into the shop. I went towards Holbornhill; the waggon drove away. I then went into Blincos', and saw the hogshead there - they weighted it in my presence - it weighed 13cwt. 3qrs. 18lbs. or 20lbs. I did not observe the mark.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you mention this to nobody? A. I mentioned it to the beadle of St. Andrew's; he would not interfere, but laughed at me. The Lord Mayor repremanded him for it. I suspected they were plundering the cask - I was nearly an hour following them. - When I was on one side of the waggon a man could get out at the other, with any thing, without my seeing him; if the cask had weighed right I should not have accused them. I have known James and Crutchman for years; I was fifteen or twenty yards off when Crutchman got into the waggon. Lake was at the tail of his waggon when he got in; he then went on to his horses - I cannot say whether he saw Crutchman get out. James jumped out, and went on with Lake - he must have seen Crutchman get into the waggon.

WILLIAM DICKENS . I am shopman to Mr. Blincos - Smith came in, and gave us information just as Bailey's waggon had left a hogshead of sugar. In consequence of his statement I had it weighed; the weight was 13cwt. 3qrs. 18lbs.; Lake had delivered me a ticket of the weight- it was 3qrs. 5lbs. deficient; it was marked W. L. No. 196.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any particular appearance in it? A. The tin which covered the drawing hole appeared to be raised up - it did not look as they generally do; the nails have been taken out and put in a fresh place; there is a much greater vacancy in the cask than usual - I never knew one so empty - it could not have occurred by anything but by its being taken out; we sometimes omit to weigh casks if we have not sufficient hands, or are in a hurry.

LAKE's Defence. When I was in Newgate-street a porter asked me to take a job to Fleet-street, which I did; I pitched it at the end of Fleet-market - I had a pint of beer, and delivered the hogshead.

CRUTCHMAN'S Defence. Smith has sworn falsely against me.

LAKE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

JAMES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

CRUTCHMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-77

653. GEORGE FREDERICK STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , at St. Helen, 2 watches, value 12l. 12s., the goods of William Emery Nadauld and John Jackson , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Boughey .

JOHN JACKSON. I live at No. 24, Bishopsgate-street within, and am a watchmaker , in partnership with William Emery Nadauld. I was not at home when this happened

- we only have the shop; I sleep at Mr. Joseph Boughey's- the shop is in his house - I lodge there - he lives in the house - it is in the parish of St. Helen . I had not seen the watches for some time. Jones, the officer, brought them to me - I knew them to be ours - they are silver, and worth twelve guineas at least; they were kept in a glass-case in the shop, even with the street.

RICHARD SEXTY . I am shopman to the prosecutors. On the 7th of March, at a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to see a watch from the window, marked six guineas; I took it from the case, and gave it into his hand; I was alone; he looked at it, and wished to see another, which he described in the window, marked ten guineas; I delivered that into his hand - I had no sooner done that than another person opened the door; the watches lay on the counter; I looked up to see who was coming in when that person threw some snuff in my face. The prisoner snatched up the watches, and both ran away. I ran out immediately; the prisoner crossed the street, towards Threadneedle-street. I ran after him to the corner, but having left nobody in the shop I arose a cry of Stop thief! pointed him out, and returned to take care of the shop; he had been talking with me for about three minutes; I am certain of him. I put a neighbour in care of the shop, then went round, and found him in the charge of Gadbury. I am quite certain he is the person. I saw the watches produced - they are the same.

Prisoner. Q. When the person came in did you think he came for any sinister motive? A. No. You are the person: I suspected you when you asked for a second watch, and as you made an obervation about having one to go without winding up, I took particular notice of you; this was before I shewed you the second watch; I should not know the other man - he opened the door, and threw the snuff in my eye without speaking; our shop is not more than twenty or thirty yards from Threadneedle-street. I saw you both leave the shop together. I saw you take up the watches the moment the snuff was thrown in my face. I knew you immediately I saw you at the watch-house - you were not pointed out to me; I have not the slightest doubt of you.

ROBERT GADBURY . I am evening patrol of Broad-street ward. I heard a cry of Stop thief! when I was opposite the King's Head public-house, Threadueedle-street, which is about three parts of the street from Bishopsgate-street; I turned, and saw the prisoner running towards me, and a quantity of people after him - he appeared the only person pursued. I laid hold of him, and before I could speak to him I perceived him drop something; I turned round, and desired Crow to pick it up, which he immediately did - it was two watches; I had not moved him from the spot - he stooped down, and dropped them gently; I took him to the watch-house - Sexty came up while I was waiting for the watch-house to be opened, and said, "That is the man, I will swear." The watches were delivered to Jones.

Prisoner. Q. Did you pursue me? A. No; you ran to me - I was prepared to catch you. I never said I pursued you; I stopped you with my stick. I am confident Sexty said he would swear you was the man; I expeet no benefit from your conviction. I attempted to stop nobody before you came up.

Q. Were any persons between you and me in the street before I came up to you? A. None; the street was quite clear of carraiges, and you were in the middle of the road; there might be persons on the pavement - you made no resistance. I have not conversed with Crow on the subject.

THOMAS CROW . I am a journeyman shoemaker, and live in Butler's-alley, Grub-street. I was at the corner of the Flower-pot by Bishopsgate-street and Threadneedle-street, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running across from Bishopsgate-street; from the side from the Flower-pot - a person was behind him pursuing; the prisoner ran up Threadneedle-street - the person behind returned back - I saw the prisoner go on - I called Stop thief! - and when I came up I found the patrol had hold of him - I did not see him stopped; the patrol desired me to assist to take him - I laid hold of him and was thinking about moving him, when he stooped and dropped something; nobody was near enough to drop it, except the patrol or me - I picked it up, it was two watches; they were afterwards claimed - I had them in my possession till he was taken to the watch-house - I saw Sexty come up to us as we came along Threadneedle-street; but he went away again; the watchhouse is in Threadneedle-street; he was secured there; Sexty claimed the watches - I delivered them to Daniel Jones.

Prisoner. Q. Where did the watches appear to come from? A. From your hand - you stooped - with and your right hand dropped them - whether you took them from your pocket I do not know - I never said you took them from your waistcoat pocket - the person pursuing was about five yards behind you - he turned back - I did not pursue directly I heard the cry, but I called Stop thief!- Sexty came up as soon as you were in hold, but he went away and came again to the watchhouse - the watches were not pointed out to me - I saw you drop them - there were several persons round, but nobody near enough to drop them - it was impossible for any of them to drop them- I started in pursuit the moment I heard the alarm - I was only across the street - I do not swear you are the person I first saw running, but it was you who dropped the watches- persons came round to look on, but Gadbury and I were the only persons near you - they did not offer to lay hold of you; your back was to the houses - I saw you drop something - Gadbury did not point it out to me - I did not hear him desire me to pick it up - I saw you run almost to the spot where you were stopped, and came up in a minute after.

Prisoner to RICHARD SEXTY . Q. Where did you first see me after I left your shop? A. I did not see him till he got to the watch-house.

DANIEL JONES . I am a constable - these two watches were delivered to me by Crow at the watch-house - I have had them ever since.

RICHARD SEXTY. I am certain these are the watches.

MR. JACKSON. I know them to be ours.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, positively asserted his innocence, stated himself to be the victim ofdesigning men, and entered into the following narration of the circumstances:-" I was passing through Bishopsgate-

street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a man running whom I pursued, and, being a tolerabley swift runner, should doubtlessly have caught him had I not been stopped; the man attempted to stop him - he got from him; he then turned round, laid hold of me, and said I was one of them; I willingly accompanied him to the watch-house, not doubting that on my examination I should instantly exculpate myself; but, judge of my surprise, at finding it sworn that I was the man who came into the shop - the second swore he stopped me, and no one else, and the third, that he saw me drop the property. I have lately returned from France, my friends are in Dublin, and, relying on my conscious innocence I have not put them to the expense of coming here."

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18260406-78

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

654. DENNIS KELLY was indicted for feloniously being at large on the 13th of December , at St. Martin-in-the-fields, without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the term for which he had, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 16th of April, in the 57th year of his late Majesty's reign, been ordered to be transported against the statute .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged.

Reference Number: t18260406-79

655. ARCHIBALD MICHIE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , at St. Pancras, 1 box, value 6d., and 130lbs. weight of tin plate, value 2l. 15s. 6d. the goods of Joseph Reynolds the younger, and Joseph Reynolds the elder, in their dwelling house .

JOSEPH REYNOLDS, JUN. I am in partnership with Joseph Reynolds, my father; we are tinmen and furnishing ironmongers , and live in Cromer-street, in the parish of St. Pancras , and it is our joint dwelling house. On the 7th of March, about 10 o'clock in the morning, I went out; this box of tin plate then stood in the shop; when I returned I found the prisoner in custody with it.

JOHN HOLLIDAY . I am a bricklayer; about half-past 10 o'clock in the morning, on the 7th of March, I was in Cromer-street, within twenty-five yards of Reynolds's house, and saw the prisoner with a box on his shoulder - there were two persons behind him; I suspected and watched them; I saw another come and assist the box off his shoulder and put it down on some steps; the prisoner took his handkerchief and wiped his face; two more came up and assisted him to carry it as far as Lee-street. I sent Gerard to make inquiry at Reynolds' - I then went there myself - returned, and saw the prisoner coming down Lee-street with the box - I secured him, and asked where the property was? he said, what property; I said the box he took from Cromer-street; he said, "there it is," pointing to it over the way.

GEORGE GERARD . I saw the prisoner with the box - I went to Mr. Reynolds, then went after him, and he was taken.

BENJAMIN PARROTT . I am an officer, and produce the box.

MR. REYNOLDS. It is ours, and contains the tin plate; it cost us 2l. 15s. 6d. - it is dearer now than when we bought it.

Prisoner. - I had friends here, but they are not able to come to-day.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18260406-80

Before Mr. Justice Park.

656. WILLIAM HUBBARD was indicted for the wilful murder of David Garratt .

There being no proof of the deceased's Christian name, the indictment could not be supported.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-81

Before Mr. Recorder.

657. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of the Honourable Henry William Stanhope , about eight o'clock in the night of the 9th of March , at St. Luke, Chelsea, with intent to steal, and stealing 1 pelisse, value 5l.; 2 Ladies' dresses, value 10l.; 2 cloaks, value 10l.; 1 apron, value 1l.; 3 bolster-cases, value 10s.; 9 table-cloths, value 5l.; 2 necklaces, value 20l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 20l.; 1 garnet cross, value 15l.; 2 bracelets, value 5l.; 2 breast-pins, value 15l.; 2 seals, value 4l.; 6 boxes, value 6l.; and a silver thimble , his property.

CHARLOTTE GROVES . I am in the service of the Honournble Henry William Stanhope, who lives at No. 42, Hans-place, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea . On the 9th of March, at 8 o'clock in the evening, I was going up stairs to the garret with a hay of clothes; the doors and windows were closed; I heard a noise of persons going from one room to the other; I went down stairs, and by the drawing-room door I let the tray fall; my fellow-servant, being in the back parlour, came out - I said somebody was in the garret - I went to the street-door - she followed, and called Watch! - I then stood with my back to the door of the next house, which was uninhabited - and hearing that door open, I turned round and a man came out - Norman came up - I pointed the man out to him - he ran after him - he got out of my sight before he was taken - I did not see his features - Norman and a watchman brought a man back - I went up stairs with two or three other persons and found the wearing apparel and table linen, stated in the indictment, packed up in the back garret in a bag, which did not belong to the house. The property had been taken from the wardrobe in the front attic - the attics join each other - I found the back attic window wide open - I had not seen it after twelve o'clock - it was then open - the bag contained a silk pelisse, worth 5l.; two ladies' dresses, worth 10l.; two cloaks, worth 10l.; an apron, worth 1s.; three bolster-cases, worth 10s.; nine table cloths, worth 5l. Mistress kept her ornaments in a dressing-case on the second floor, which is under the attics - I cannot say whether the room door was shut - I am the only servant who attends in that room - I closed the door in the afternoon - I do not know whether her ornaments were there, they have not been found - I had seen part of them in the room the day before, when I assisted in dressing my mistress.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. - Q. At what time did you close your Mistress' door? A. Between twelve and one o'clock - the alarmw as soon after eight o'clock - it was dark - I did not look at the clock, but I had taken in the

beer, which comes at eight o'clock - I cannot tell whether any body had got in and secreted themselves - I found several phosphorus matches in the house.

ANN ROWLEY . I am cook to the Honourable Mr. Stanhope. Grove called to me - I ran into the street, and saw a man come out of the next house - it was dark, and I cannot identify him; Norman pursued him, and a man was brought back; I was in the back and front garrets at seven o'clock, and shut both the windows down - it was getting dark then. I went into the back garret after the alarm, and saw the property in a strange bag.

JOHN NORMAN . I keep a shop in this neighbourhood. I saw nobody come out of the house; a man was pointed out to me twenty yards from the house; I pursued, and never lost sight of him till Curley, the watchman, stopped him - the prisoner is that man.

Cross-examined. Q. It was dark? A. Yes. I had no opportunity of observing his features, but I never lost sight of him; there was no turning before he was stopped, except the oval railing of the square. I was about twenty yards from him all the time - he was not out of my sight at all; there was no other man in the street, I am certain; there was a young woman who is here.

COURT. Q. A man was pointed out to you running? A. He was not running when he was pointed out. I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

THOMAS CURLEY . I am watchman of Han's-place. I heard a call of Watch! and Stop thief! and saw Norman running after a man, and calling Stop thief! I never lost sight of that man, but stopped him - it was the prisoner; I took him to Mr. Stanhope's door, saw him searched, and a match box found on him, with matches in it. Maybank has got it.

Cross-examined. Q. Any one might go into the empty house and come out again? A. Yes; the house is in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea.

SAMUEL ELLIOTT . I am a watchman - my beat is at the back of Han's-place. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a parcel of people in the square; I found the prisoner in the charge of Curley and Norman; I went into Mr. Stanhope's house, and found an empty chaise box outside the back garret window - the servants claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you running after the man who came out of the empty house? A. No; I was at the back, in the New-road; I found several men and women round when I came up - that was while the pursuit was going on.

JAMES WARWICK . I am a watchman. I was coming down Exeter-court, leading to Han's-place, and heard a cry of Stop thief! when I came up the prisoner was in custody - I went and searched the empty house, went up, and found the back garret window open - a person could get on the roof - there is an eight - inch wall there. I found a dark lautern in the empty house, close by the back garret window. I found nobody in the house. I found a crow-bar in the square - it is here.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose a person on any of the adjoining roofs could get into Mr. Stanhope's house? A. I should think so. I searched every part of the empty house; I looked up the chimnies.

BOADICIA WILKINSON . I live at No. 5, York-street, near Mr. Stanhope's. I saw the man who was afterwards secured, going round by Han's-place garden - he was being pursued; I saw him throw something over into the garden; I could not distinguish what it was - I was on the pavemant.

Cross-examined. Q. You observed his hand move, as if he threw something away? A. I heard it sound - I was about twenty yards from him; there are trees and grass inside the railing; I saw the watchman, and told Norman of it, in their presence. I could see a man run by me, but not distinguish his features; he was twenty yards from me.

COURT. Q. What did it sound like? A. I thought it was keys.

REBECCA SHARP . I am servant at No. 44, Han's-place, two doors from Mr. Stanhope's; the empty house is between ours and his; Mrs. Stanhope was at our house at the time of the robbery; I went home with her to her own door on the alarm being given - I perceived the door of the empty house open - I pulled it too, but could not shut it, as the bottom bolt was pushed out, till I pushed it back. The door of that house was always shut whenever I saw it - it had been empty about two months.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was delivered to me on this charge; I searched him, and in his left - hand waistcoat pocket found a phosphorus-box, with matches; I locked him up, went to Mr. Stanhope's, examined the house, and found the two attic windows of the empty house open, and the appearance of persons having got from one house to the other; Mr. Stanhope's back garret window was open; there was water in the gutter, and, in the empty house there was marks of wet feet; I went into Mr. Stanhope's house, and found the property in a bag. Warwick gave me a dark-lantern; I desired Warwick and Elliott to go to where I was informed something had been thrown away, and Warwick brought me this crow-bar. I have the property here. The marks were of more than one person.

JAMES WARWICK re-examined. I found the crow-bar in the garden in Han's-place. I did not see the prisoner till he was brought to Mr. Stanhope's door.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner was not present when you gave it to Maybank? A. No; I found it on the gravel-walk in the garden.

SAMUEL ELLIOTT . When I came up the prisoner was taken; I first saw him just by the pump by the garden. I was informed something was thrown over the railing - I got over, and found a handkerchief; I went to the prosecutor's door, and produced it; the prisoner said it was not his, for he had his in his hat. I returned, and saw the crow-bar found in the gravel-walk, a few yards from where I found the handkerchief; the prisoner was stopped a good distance from that, but he must have run by in that direction - it was nearer to the prosecutor's house than where he was taken. Nobody had claimed the handkerchief.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I produce the property in the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. There were footsteps of many persons? A. Only from one garret window to the other. I did not examine along the roofs of the other houses; there is a back door to the empty house, by which others

might escape, and the back garden railing was broken down.

COURT. Q. Can you judge by the footsteps how many persons had been there? A. I should think two or three- I could not compare them with the prisoner's feet, because the marks were wet, and one on another. I do not think it was a wet night - I did not examine his shoes.

CHARLOTTE GROVES. I examined the property in the bag, and have no doubt of their being my mistress's property.

THE HONOURABLE HENRY WILLIAM STANHOPE. I had seen Mrs. Stanhope's ornaments two days before, and I think on the day before the robbery - they were kept on the toilet table in her bed-room, in India boxes; they have not been found. There are missing two necklaces, worth 20l.; two pairs of ear-rings, worth 15l.; a garnet cross, and two breast pins, and other property - they are charged at an under value in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent. The box is what I use of a morning when I get up; the first witness said at the office she was not sure whether I was the man who came out of the house or not.

JURY to MISS WILKINSON. Q. Can you swear it was the prisoner who threw something away? A. No, but I saw the watchman take the same man as I saw throw it over. I did not lose sight of him till I saw him taken.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character and youth .

Reference Number: t18260406-82

Before Mr. Recorder.

658. THOMAS FREEMAN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Francis Hammond , on the night of the 6th of April , and stealing 80 pairs of stays, value 25l., his property; 1 veil, value 50s., and a handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Mary Bean , spinster.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS HAMMOND. I am a stay-maker , and have a shop in Oxford-street , but live in Leicester-square - I only rent the shop - nobody sleeps there. I locked the premises up safely between half-past nine and ten at night, on the 6th of April, and left every thing safe; at seven o'clock next morning, a bag was produced to me containing seventy-eight pairs of stairs, which are mine, and worth 25l. or 30l., and some other property of Miss Bean's, my shop-woman; no force had been used to the door - I left it locked.

HUGH WYNN . I am waterman of the coach-stand in Oxford-street, at the corner of Argyle-street, opposite the prosecutor's shop. On Friday morning, the 7th of April, at half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner there, and watched him for three-quarters of an hour, walking first on one side, and then on the other, looking at Hammond's shop; I saw him look in at the key-hole twice, as he went by, and give a kind of cough - a waggon went by the last time that he gave the cough; I immediately went and informed a watchman - a watchman came up, crossed Oxford-street, and look him into custody, just as he was coming away from the door - about three yards from the door. I saw no person come out of the house, but saw a person running away on the other side of the way; the watchman called Stop thief! but he got away; I found a bunch of keys and a bag, like a clothes bag, on the step of a door, on the opposite side, a good distance from the house, near Queen-street, and delivered it to the watchman - the keys were under the bag - the prisoner could not have dropped that bag.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. You observed him walking about for three-quarters of an hour? A. Yes; he went to the door and looked through the key-hole - a coachman directed my attention to him - I did not see any one with him - he put his head down to the door and coughed - he walked on one side of the way, and then on another - the bag was found in the direction the other man ran.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. How often do you think he passed the prosecutor's door? A. I suppose twenty times; he did not look through any other key-hole, nor cough, except at this door - it was a kind of short cough, as if for a signal - I cannot find out the coachman.

JAMES BAIN . I am a watchman of St. James. Wyan called my attention to the prisoner. I noticed him for about five minutes, during which time he went to Hammond's door three times, and stooped down; I was too far off to say whether he made any noise the third time - as he came from the door I collared him within three yards of the door, and two men immediately sprung out of the shop door; when he saw them spring out, he immediately said

"I have nothing to do with them;" one man went down Argyle-street, and the other ran across by Queen-street; I saw him drop the skeleton keys and bag - the prisoner said nothing more to me.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him go into the shop? A. No; I could not hear him cough; I was about three yards off when the men rushed out - nobody else was there; his back was towards the door - one of them rushed by him but he could not see them come out.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. How far was you from him when he went to the door three times? A. Not near enough to hear if he had coughed; I was the width of the street from him - but the third time I was making towards him- within three yards of him - one of the keys opened the shop door - it was quite newly filed; I saw the property found behind the shop door.

EDWARD TURNER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with seventy-eight pairs of stays and other property; I asked his name - he was a long time before he would tell, but at last said "Freeman;" I asked his address three or four times - he made a terrible stammering, and, at last, said

"No. 21. Grub-street, Moorfields." Nothing was found on him relative to this charge.

ELEANOR DEVINE . My mother keeps the house No. 21, Grub-street - we have lived there four or five years - she has lodgers - the prisoner never lodged there - on the 7th of April or at any other time.

Cross-examined. Q. How many lodgers have you ever had at once? A. Seven; we live in the next house; there might be persons lodge there for a short time, and I not see them, but I know all their names - I receive the rents sometimes; I can swear the prisoner has not lodged there for the last two or three years.

WILLIAM DUYAL . I lodge at No. 21, Grub-street. I

have the shop and all the lower part of the house; I know all the lodgers - I have been there three years - the prisoner never lodged there.

Cross-examined. Q. Cannot people lodge there without your knowing them? A. No; it is impossible - they have to pass through where I work - I know all their names.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out drinking with a friend late, and was locked out, so I walked down Moorfields into Cheapside, and up to Oxford-street, and was coming by this house when the watchman laid hold of me.

HUGH WYNN . I was within six yards of him when he coughed - it was twenty minutes before the watchman came up.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-83

Before Mr. Recorder.

659. JOSEPH BAKER was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Robert Goodman , on the night of the 11th of March , and stealing 1 bed, value 2l.; 1 bolster, value 10s.; 2 pillows, value 10s.; 2 pillow cases, value 2s.; 2 blankets, value 6s.; 1 sheet, value 3s.; 1 coverlid, value 2s.; 1 hat, value 10s.; 1 gown, value 4s, and 1 table cloth, value 1s. ; his property.

ROBERT GOODMAN. I live in Sale-street, Bethnalgreen . On Saturday, the 11th of March, I went out about half-past two o'clock, returned about half-past eight, and all this property was stolen. I found three of my neighbour's children in the house - the door was not forced - it must have been opened by a picklock-key.

EMMA GOODMAN . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went out about a quarter past three o'clock; I closed all the windows and shutters, and double locked the street door. On the 16th I found the prisoner in custody, with a gown and table cloth.

WILLIAM SMALLSHAW . I am shopman to Mr. Russell, a pawnbroker, of Shoreditch. On the 11th of March, about nine o'clock at night, a woman pawned this gown and table-cloth, in the name of Trapping, for 2s.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 12th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Waterloo town, Bethnal-green, and saw the prisoner with three men - we took all four into custody, and in the prisoner's waistcoat pocket, I found a duplicate of this gown and table cloth. I told him he was apprehended for a burglary committed last night close by, and I had no doubt but the duplicate was for some of the woman's clothes which were stolen; he said "I had no duplicates;" I said "You certainly had; I found one in your right hand waistcoat pocket;" he said "If you will swear that, you will swear any thing."

WILLIAM SMALLSHAW . That is the duplicate I gave the person.

PATIENCE WEATHERBURN . At the time of the robbery I lived in Quaker-street, Spitalfields. I pawned these things in the name of Trivens, not Trapping; I was at that time living with Trivens, and the people supposed I was his wife; I do not know the prisoner - I was at home, in Quaker's-street, on the 11th of March at seven o'clock - a young man came and asked for Trivens - he spoke to him, but I was cleaning and did not hear what he said - he had a bundle, and when they had done speaking, the young man turned round and said to me, "Will you pledge these" - it was a table-cloth and gown, and by persuasion, I pawned them at Russell's for 2s.; I returne dand put the duplicate on the table with the money- he and Trivens were both there; I did not see him put the duplicate, and money into his pocket; I told the Grand Jury I thought the prisoner was the man - but I do not know whether he is or not.

ELIZA LUCAS . I am nearly twelve years old, and live three doors from Mr. Goodman. I was going on an errand and saw his door open - it was dark and the lamps lighted- I listened but heard nobody moving in the house; I saw three men standing close by the door outside, and left them there; I returned in five minutes, and they were gone.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-84

661. ELIZABETH COTTERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 4s., and 1 key, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Borridale , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-85

661. WILLIAM WEIR was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of James Holley , about ten o'clock in the night, on the 30th of March , and stealing 4 blankets, value 20s.; 2 pairs of sheets, value 20s.; 4 pillows, value 20s.; 1 bolster, value 5s., and a parasol, value 5s. , his property.

MARY HOLLEY . I am wife of James Holley, who lives in Rose-lane, Spitalfields . On the 31st of March, about ten o'clock at night, my next door neighbour informed me I was robbed; I went to my bed-room on the first floor, and found it locked as I had left it, but missed this property - they were safe between seven and eight o'clock; I found the window open - there were foot marks on the window ledge - the thieves had gone out that way; the prisoner lodged with me four or five months ago - he was brought to my house in custody, with the property, that night.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am night-beadle. About half-past ten o'clock on this evening, I was going down Essex-street, which leads to Rose-street, and met the prisoner with another young man, running down the middle of the street - no alarm was made; I kept them in sight for thirty or forty yards - when they had passed about twelve yards I heard a rattle sprung; I then pursued and secured the prisoner- he immediately shifted a parcel out of his coat and threw it from him; Mr. Holley claimed it - I had not seen him with the bedding.

MRS. HOLLEY. This parcel was in my bed-room with the bedding.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night in question I left work about half-past nine o'clock, and, after having a pint of beer, was returning home - when I got half way down Essex-street two men ran by me - I turned round to look at them, and saw them throw something down; I turned to pick it up when the officer struck me - he picked it up,

and took me into custody; I positively declare my innocence.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only, and not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-86

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

662. JAMES KNOX and GEORGE STEVERNSON WEST were indicted for a conspiracy .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-87

SEVENTH DAY. THURSDAY, APRIL 13.

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

663. ABRRHAM HOLLINGS and THOMAS BRAYSHAW were indicted for a conspiracy .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-88

664. JOHN CALLAGHAN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

ANN PERCIVAL . I am the wife of Thomas Bury Percival , a baker, who lives in Houndsditch. On Saturday, the 18th of March , between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop for a penny loaf - he gave me one shilling, and I gave him change - he told me to take the price of a half quartern loaf, and he should return for it in five minutes, but I did not take it - he returned for a twopenny loaf in five minutes, and tendered me half a crown; I thought it bad and refused it - he said something and walked out; I looked into the till and took out the shilling he had paid me - I had no other there - I went next door to Mr. Compton, and on returning shewed the shilling to my husband- it was kept separate from all other money; I have since given it to Forrester.

THOMAS BURY PERCIVAL . My wife gave me a bad shilling; I kept it by itself, and gave it to Forrester.

JOHN COMPTON . I am a publican, and live in Hounsdditch. On the 18th of March, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came in and had a pint of beer - he came again between one and two o'clock and had a glass of gin - he paid me a shilling - I gave him change - we were at dinner - he said "Mistress, save me two hot potatoes against I come back;" Mrs. Percival came in, and said something; I then examined the shilling he had given me - it was the only silver I had in the till - I gave it to my wife, who wrapped it in paper, and I saw her deliver it to Forrester; he was taken into custody at my house half an hour after.

JOHNSON. I live at Kidderminster, and was at Compton's when the prisoner was secured; I was obliged to assist - he had been sitting by my side when Mrs. Percival came in and said he had passed a bad shilling - she said he had got his hand in his pocket - I snatched at his hand and found a bad half-crown there - he resisted very much - a crown and half-crown dropped from him, and he kicked it aside.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I was called in - Compton and Percival each gave me a shilling, which I produce - I have kept them separate - Johnson gave me a half-crown - they appear dull.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of coin, appointed by the Mint; the two shillings are both counterfeits and of the same die - the half-crown is also a counterfeit; they grease them to make them appear to have been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had known they were counterfeits I should not have passed them.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years than to come .

Reference Number: t18260406-89

665. GEORGE LATHAM was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-90

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases - Third Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant

666. JOHN HUSKISSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 3lbs. weight of brass, value 20s., the goods of Richard Reyolds , his master .

The Prisoner pleaded. GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-91

667. SAMUEL CALVERT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 mattrass, value 10s.; 1 bed, value 10s.; 2 pillows, value 8s.; 4 blankets, value 20s.; 1 sheet, value 6s.; 1 shirt, value 6s., and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. , the goods of James Harland .

JAMES HARLAND. I live in Red-cross, Cripplegate , and am a broker . On the evening of the 11th of October, about half-past seven o'clock, I went to Dalston; I had shut up my shop and left the property safe; I returned about half-past nine o'clock, and found the property stated in the indictment gone, and my wife had eloped; I did not see her again till she appeared before the Magistrate to exhibit articles of peace against me; it struck me she was in the habit of visiting at Calvert's and I went there; I did not see the prisoner then, but I saw him the next morning; I stated what I had lost, and asked if my wife had brought any thing to his premises; he said no - they had not seen her for two months - which I knew to be false, as I had watched her in there on the Sunday morning; it occurred to me that the prisoner had a loft at Mr. Wilkins' premises in Old-street; I went there, and Mr. Wilkins told me to come the next morning at seven o'clock; I did so, and after looking about I found a large canvass bag did under some trusses of hemp; I pulled it

out and found some of my property in it; Wilkins' man then came up and knocked me down and took it from me- I fetched the officer, and met Calvert; I said to him,"You have acted the part of a villian towards me in keeping my property;" he said "There was nothing there belonging to me, and nothing should I have;" when I returned with the officer Calvert shut the door against us, and said we should not come in - we got in by force; he and a man were sitting on the bag - they resisted us and pushed us about; we got the property, and took it to the office; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Upon your oath do not you know that in consequence of you and your wife quarrelling, she was forced to take the mattress to sleep on? A. No; I never had but one indictment for assault preferred against my wife - the prisoner then became her bail, and arrested me for her board and lodging; I went to Worship-street, and made a charge of felony against him there - the charge was made before another Magistrate afterwards, but neither of them committed him; I then went before the Grand Jury; I never offered to settle the business if they would give me any money.

COURT. Q. Have you any proof that this man stole them? A. No; I have no doubt but my wife took them and put them in his care.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-92

668. RICHARD HUTCHINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 4 pewter pots, value 3s. , the goods of Owen Neile .

OWEN NEILE. I kept St. John's Tavern, in George-street, Islington . These pewter pots are my property; they have my name on them; I cannot say where they were stolen from, nor when I had seen them last.

BENJAMIN GARDNER . I am a butcher, and live in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove. On the evening of the 9th of February, about half-past six o'clock, I ran out to catch a thief who had stolen some pork; I saw the prisoner going into a marine store shop with something in a bag; I thought it was my pork and pulled him into my shop, but it was these pots which he said he had found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to see a fight and saw these pots under the hedge near the canal.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-93

669. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 5 pence , the property of John Langstaff .

JOHN LANGSTAFF. I live in Little Newport-street, Leicester-square , and am a hosier . On the evening of the 16th of February I heard a tinkling at the bars on which some stockings hung, just within my shop; I heard the cry of Stop thief! I went out and the prisoner was brought back; I did not see the property found on him.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. How do you know they were yours? A. By the make only; they hung in a sort of lobby open to the street.

COURT. Q. After you heard the cry did you look on the bar? A. Yes; and one pair was missing.

WILLIAM BYLES . I live with Mr. Coles, near to Mr. Langstaff's. I was standing inside our door and saw the prisoner walk up to the door and take a pair of stockings- I followed him to Grafton-street and took him, and brought him back.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not lost sight of him? A. No - not for a moment - it was dark; I am sure he is the man.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner - he was quite in liquor.

One witness gave the prisoner an excellent character, and engaged to give him employment.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-94

670. JAMES POVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Howard .

JOHN HOWARD. I live in St. Martin's-court. The prisoner was in my service for about a fortnight - I sent him on the 10th of March to take home this pair of shoes, which a gentleman had bought in the shop - he came back and said he had delivered them.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bridges-street, Covent-Garden. The prisoner brought these shoes to me on the 10th of March - he said he brought them from his father, and he lived at a fishmonger's shop in St. Martin-lane - I went with him to the house - he told me to wait, and he went up stairs - I waited some time, when he came down without his hat, and said "You cannot see my father, he is in bed" - I said "Let me see your mother" - he said she was out - I then went into the house and asked a woman if he lived there; she said No - he said he did - we went up stairs, and he knocked at a door, when some respectable people came out, and said they did not know him - we found his hat thrown on the stairs - I then took him back - met the officer and gave charge of him - his mother called the next evening at our shop - she is a widow and appeared very respectable - she has six children, and he is the eldest.

Prisoner's Defence. I went home to my dinner and found my mother and the children starving. I went to pawn these shoes to get some food, and intended to have redeemed them on Saturday evening, when I got my money.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor on account of his distress . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-95

671. WILLIAM CORFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of John Dell Pointer .

JOHN TRIMBY . I am a porter at Tetsell's hotel, Adelphi . On the 9th of March, about half-past eight o'clock, I brought a gentleman's luggage, and hung the coat on the ballustrade - I returned in a few minutes, and it was gone - this is it, it belonged to Mr. John Dell Pointer, who is too ill to attend.

ISAAC DAVIS . I am a salesman, and live in Holywell-street. On the evening of the 9th of March, the servant came to me about half-past eight o'clock, and said he had missed a coat - the prisoner afterwards brought this coat; I told him to wait - I shut the door and detained him - he said, at the watch-house, that two young men had given it to him to sell.

JOSEPH SANDERS . I am a constable, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - he said two young men gave the coat to him to sell.

Prisoner's Defence. On this night, a little before nine o'clock, I met two young persons, whom I had seen about twelve months before - they asked if I would as I was out of work, and a shilling or two would be an object to me - I waited - they went and fetched it - the two persons who gave it me were outside the shop, and the witness must have seen them.

COURT to ISAAC DAVIS. Q. Did you see the persons outside? - No; but some person said there had been two persons waiting.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-96

672. JOHN CORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 pair of tongs, value 7s.; 1 shovel, value 6s., and 1 poker, value 6s. , the goods of William Wilkins .

WILLIAM WILKINS. I live in Grosvenor-road , and am an ironmonger . On the morning of the 30th of March, I put these fire-irons against the door-post of my shop, about twelve o'clock - and about one I heard the cry of Thief! Mr. Ryley brought back the prisoner into my shop with them.

JAMES RYLEY . I am a cheesemonger, and live at Chelsea. I saw the prisoner and another man pass my house, which is about twenty doors from Mr. Wilkins'; they walked backward and forward several times, and I suspected them - another person came up to them, and they walked higher up - a man told me that one of them had gone into an ironmonger's shop - I saw the prisoner soon afterwards coming back with the fire-irons in his hand - he ran - I ran to try to catch him, and he threw them down, but I caught them in my hands - I then cried Stop thief! and a man took him, before I lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them outside the door, and took them up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-97

673. JOHN ACK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 9 loaves of bread, value 7s. and 1 basket, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Ellis .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-98

674. EDWARD CRAWLEY and HENRY ADAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 4 shirts, value 30s.; 2 shifts, value 10s.; 1 gown, value 5s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 2s. the goods of John Humphries .

JOHN HUMPHRIES. I live at Westminster , my wife takes in washing. About four o'clock, on the 7th of February, I saw her take some linen down from a drying ground, at the back of my house - it was put into a basket in the middle of the ground - she then came in to her tea - and in about seven minutes, we were alarmed by a cry that somebody had been in the ground, and taken some things- we went into the ground and found the basket, but the greater part of the things were gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. - Q. Who did these articles belong to? A. Three of them belonged to a gentleman of the name of Green - I have known Adams from his infancy, he lived near me.

JURY. Q. Has your ground any fence round it? A. It has a wall, but the gate is open for the use of the persons who live in the house.

MARY GREEN . I lodge at Humphries'. I was on the stair-case about four o'clock - and as I passed the staircase window, I saw Adams take some white linen from the basket - he took them out of the gate - I gave an alarm just as he got out of the gate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you run out of the gate to give an alarm? A. Yes; but he was not taken - I am quite certain of his person - he had a white hat on - I have never said I did not know him but by his having a white hat - I saw him plainly from the window (which was fifteen or sixteen yards from the basket), when he walked out with them - I had not known him before; I saw him again before the Magistrate, about three weeks afterwards- and was quite certain he was the man.

WILLIAM DEAN . I am an apprentice, in Regent-street, Westminster. I was in Fine-street, close by Humphries' drying-ground, between three and four o'clock on the 7th of February; I saw the two prisoners about two yards from the ground; I knew Adams perfectly well, and I had seen Crawley before; I did not see them do any thing.

ELEANOR WORMLEY . I live in Bowling-street, Westminster, some distance from Mr. Humphries'. I was going to an adjoining street between three and four o'clock, on the 7th of February and saw Crawley standing alone at Mr. Humphries' gate; I looked at him, and wondered what he stood there for; I then saw Adams come out of the gate with some things, which appeared part linen and part flannel, in his hand - he appeared to have dipped it out of a basket of linen; he then whisped them up, and took them away; I saw Mary Green coming down the staircase; she came out and said "Did these two men come out of here?" I said Yes; she said "It is Humphries' linen;" the men were then gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the persons ever brought to you afterwards? A. No; I was at the Police Office; I did not say there that I only knew the man I called Adams by his having a white hat on; I saw them both so plainly that I knew them.

ANN WHITROE . I live in Peter-street, Westminster. On the 7th of February, I saw three boys going toward Perkin's-Rents; Crawley was one of them, and he had a bundle of linen; I knew him before; his father and mother live near me; Adams, to the best of my belief, was one of those with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know how the third boy was dressed? A. He had a blue coat on, and a black hat; Adams had a white hat on; they returned shortly, and passed my door with some money, which they seemed to be dividing.

CRAWLEY's Defence. I was very ill that day; I had returned home ill from my master's, in Hampstead-road, the day before.

CRAWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

ADAMS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-99

675. WILLIAMS GOULDING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 4 prints, framed and glazed, value 20s. , the goods of Eve Barfoot .

EVE BARFOOT. I keep the Coach and Horses, public-house, Westminster . The prisoner was enlisted as a recruit at my house on Thursday, the 9th of March; he had some refreshment, and got tipsy - he went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock. I was alarmed in the night; I came down, and found four watchmen in the house, and the back door open. I went up stairs, and missed the prisoner - I then came down, and missed these four pictures from the parlour.

JOHN BELLAMY . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner in the street, about half-past two o'clock on the morning of the 10th of March, with these four pictures - he said he had been to Chelsea to fetch them for his brother, who kept a public-house near Shoreditch church.

VINCENT HOBBY . I am a watchman. I found the door of Mr. Barfoot's house open, about half-past eleven o'clock- I gave an alarm, and Mrs. Barfoot shut it. I found it open again at half-past two.

Prisoner's Defence. I got the pictures from a lodger in the house, who said they were his, and he was going in the morning to join his regiment, and wanted to dispose of them.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-100

676. MARGARET HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 1 frock, value 2s. , the goods of Emma Ryall , spinster .

EMMA RYALL. I am single, and live in Water-lane, Blackfriars. I lost this frock from a cupboard in my dressing-room, at Drury-lane Theatre - it might be in June or July last - the prisoner was our dresser, and was about the place.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you known her long? A. Yes, about three years; I believe she is the only support of an aged mother - her character has been respectable.

THOMAS SAMUEL RAVENSCROFT . I live with Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker. I produce a frock - I do not know who pawned it; the duplicate was written by a young man who has left us since.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and took from her a duplicate of a frock, pawned on the 15th of July, for 2s. - it answers to the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-101

677. MARGARET HARDING was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 Pair of drawers, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Elizabeth Grisdale , spinster .

ELIZABETH GRISDALE. I belong to Drury-lane Theatre - I was there in October last. The prisoner was a dresser there. These drawers are my property; they were missed from the Theatre on the night after I left them, when I went there to dress - I cannot say when it was.

THOMAS SAMUEL RAVENSCROFT . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these drawers of the prisoner, on the 27th of October - I have known her some time.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-102

678. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 knee apron, value 20s. ; the goods of Dennis Johnson and John Allen .

DENNIS JOHNSON. I am in partnership with John Allen - we are coach-makers . This apron has been cut off our pheaton; this small strap which I have in my hand was left nailed on the pheaton. I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS CARY . I had been to dinner, and on my return, between two and three o'clock, as I was crossing Long-acre, I saw the prisoner cutting off this apron; I came over to him, and he made the last cut with his knife just as I got over to him - he turned round, and walked off- I followed and took him.

CHARLES JONES . I took the prisoner. I found this apron and a knife on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was driven to the greatest distress, having a sick wife and two children, and myself out of employ.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18260406-103

679. ANN LUDWIG was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 drinking-glass, value 1s. 10d. , the goods of Henry Molloy .

JOHN CONEY . I am a porter to Henry Molloy, who keeps a tavern at the corner of Grosvenor-street . The prisoner came in on the 24th of February; she had half-a-pint of porter - I had been drinking a glass of rum and water. I was called away, and the bar-maid gave me information - she went away, but I pursued, and took her with the glass in her pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 69.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged

Reference Number: t18260406-104

680. JAMES MARONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 wooden till, value 1s., and 1 half-crown , the property of William Boult .

DINAH WOODHOUSE . I live with William Boult, in Cross-court - he deals in oysters On the 7th of March I was in the little parlour, and saw the prisoner come and take the till from behind the counter - he went to the door- I gave an alarm, and he was brought back in about two minutes, with the till in his hand; there was half-a-crown in it, and some copper.

FRANCIS WICKS . I live in Cross-court. I saw the prisoner coming out of the shop with the till in his hand - I overtook him in Drury-lane, and took him; there were some copper in the till.

JOSEPH SANDERS . I am an officer of the night, and have the till.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming through Russell-court I saw a boy running with a till - some person called out Stop thief! and I followed - he threw the till into a passage; I went and took it up - my father is ill at home.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-105

681. JOSEPH MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 2 gowns, value 12s., and 1 pelisse, value 12s. , the goods of Elizabeth Watkins , spinster .

ELIZABETH WATKINS. I am single, and live in Ar

lington-street . On the 16th of March, about one o'clock, I went into my bed-room - the prisoner was standing at the room door; he had not got any thing, but this bundle was close by him, just inside the room door; I took it up, and found in it two gowns and a pelisse, which I had seen about an hour before, hanging on a horse behind the door.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Does Lord Camden live opposite you? A. Yes. I have heard the prisoner has a relation living near me - he asked where Lord Camden lived. The door was not latched - he might have gone away.

GEORGE FIFE . I was errand-boy at Mr. Teasdale's, in Arlington-street; Watkins is his servant. I went up stairs to answer the door, and as I was returning I heard a noise in the bed-room; I looked, and saw the prisoner throw a bundle down - I asked him what he wanted, and he said, to know where the Marquis of Camden lived.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he not a cousin living at the Marquis of Camden's? A. I believe he has.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not offer to escape - she called me back, and told me to take the handkerchief with the things in it.

ELIZABETH WATKINS. Yes - I called him back - he said it was not him, and he did not take it.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

The prisoner received a good character, and was Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-106

682. JOHN HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of John Bann .

HUGH MILLER . I am in the employ of John Bann, a shoe-maker , of Bond-street . On the morning of the 18th of March I heard the shop door shut - I looked, and saw the prisoner take a pair of boots from the shop-board - I pursued, and took him.

RICHARD MOLD . I am in the employ of Mr. Bann. I was going towards the shop, and saw Miller at the door; I went after the prisoner, who had the boots in his hand - I asked him where he got them - he said he had been to fetch them for a person who had had them mended.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-107

683. JOHN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 2 pieces of muslin, containing 16 yards in length, value 20s., the goods of George Edward Woodhouse , privately in his shop .

GEORGE EDWARD WOODHOUSE. I live at the corner of Bond-street and Oxford-street , and am a linen-draper . On the 20th of March the prisoner came to the shop, and asked if a lady had been there, whom he described; I said not - he requested to wait there; he went into the back part of the shop, where he remained about twenty minutes - I did not suspect him - he then came out, and told me if the lady came I was to say he was gone to the Bazaar; the moment afterwards Mrs. Bates told me he had put something in his hat; I followed, and found two muslin dresses in his hat, which I knew to be mine; I brought him back, - he said it was the first time he had stolen any thing, and he hoped I would let him off.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Were you there the whole time he was in the shop? A. Yes; he said he belonged to a respectable family - he did not tell me that he had bought them in the morning, but did not like to carry a bundle through the streets.

JAMES WELSH . I am in the employ of Mr. Woodhouse, I was at the back part of the shop when the prisoner came in; I understood him to inquire for two ladies; I saw him brought back again, and as soon as he came to the back shop Mr. Woodhouse desired him to take his hat off, which he did, and Mr. Woodhouse took out two dresses, which I knew; I had one of them in my hand while the prisoner was there.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he been in the shop that day before? A. No; I had been there all day - many customers had been there that day; I have lived there thirty-four years, and know almost all our customers. I can swear the prisoner never bought any dresses there that day; I never make out the bills - this bill (looking at it) is the writing of Mr. Francis, one of our shopmen.

CLEMENT FRANCIS . I am in the employ of Mr. Woodhouse; this bill is my writing; it is for the sale of two muslin dresses, which I sold to a lady a few days afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Who produced this bill at the Magistrate's? A. I believe the prisoner's attorney; the prisoner said he had bought two dresses that morning, and a bill was delivered to him; it is very frequently the case that one person sells goods, and another makes out the bill.

JOHN MARTIN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, who appeared a good deal confused - be begged I would convey him in a coach, in the genteelest way, to the office - he said it was his first offence, and he was very sorry for it. I found eight sovereigns and some shillings upon him.

Prisoner. I deny that I acknowledged any thing of the kind - I bought the goods and paid for them, in two sovereigns and a half, and received the bill at the same time. I left the bill with the servant of the lady, and desired her to call for them - she was not at home, and I went for them myself; I charged the shopman with it, but he would not recollect that I had paid him for them.

COURT to GEORGE EDWARD WOODHOUSE. Q. Is the lady here who gave you the information? A. No, she is not; no lady called at my house; the dresses are not the price that is put down in that bill; (bill read,) "Bought of Messrs. Woodhouse and Son, two chintz muslin dresses, 2l. 10s."

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-108

684. JOHN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 8 pairs of stockings, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Cheslett .

THOMAS CHESLETT. I live in Portugal-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields , and am a hosier . On the 16th of March I saw the prisoner come and take these eight pairs of stockings,

and run off with them; I followed, and saw him drop them about one yard outside the door - I did not lose sight of him.

SAMUEL HALL . I was sitting with Mr. Cheslett. I picked up the stockings.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the street, and saw some persons going down Carey-street - I went with them, and stopped about twenty minutes, when a gentle man came and took me.

THOMAS CHESLETT. There were no people in Carey-street.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-109

685. MARTIN EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 snuff-box, value 10l., the goods of Nodes Dickinson , from his person .

NODES DICKINSON. I am a surgeon , and live in Wigmore-street. On the morning of the 6th of March, I was at Whitehall , nearly opposite the Horse Guards, when a person, who had been walking by me, said a lad had taken something from my coat pocket; I put my hand to my pocket immediately, and missed a snuff-box, which I think, I had used not many minutes before; I gave an alarm, and some person was taken, but I do not know who. The box was found, and I received it from Sir Richard Birnie.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you say how long it was after you had had it? A. No, I had left home about twenty minutes. I do not know the prisoner, and do not remember seeing him near me. I might have pulled it out with my handkerchief, though I think I should have beard it.

WILLIAM DALTON . I was coming up Charing-cross on the 6th of March, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him; he said "For God's sake don't stop me;" I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and then put something into the flap of his breeches; I took him into a public-house, and he got the box out somehow, and put it behind him; I took it up and took him to Bow-street. I believe this to be the box- I wrote my name inside of it - Sir Richard Birnie gave it up to Mr. Dickinson.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him near Mr. Dickinson? A. No; I saw him near St. Martin's-lane - it was about half-past ten o'clock when I took him.

Prisoner's Defence (written). On this morning on entering master's shop to work, he discharged me for being seen on Sunday in company with two girls of the town; I was standing opposite the Horse Guards, looking at the soldiers, and saw something shining close at my feet - I picked it up, and, feeling pleased with my good luck, I ran off, and was stopped by a cry of Stop thief! - I declare my innocence.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of Stealing only.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-110

686. RICHARD WILSON and WILLIAM BROUGHTON were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , ten handkerchiefs, value 20s., the goods of John Augustus Brooks , privately in his shop .

JOHN AUGUSTUS BROOKS. I am a linen-draper . I live at the corner of Parliament-street and Bridge-street, Westminster . On the 21st of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came and asked to look at some Irish linen - they bought three yards and a half, for which they paid me - they then asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs - I shewed them some, to which they objected - I got them some others - I saw a person at my door beckoning to one of my shopmen, who came, and told me the prisoners had got something in their hats - I went round, and in Broughton's hat I found ten black silk handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Did not Broughton appear to be a person of weak intellects? A. No; when I took the handkerchiefs from his hat he fell on the ground and appeared to be intoxicated; there was one handkerchief separated from the rest. I then sent for the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Wilson had no part of your property? A. No; he had bought the linen and paid for it.

COURT. Q. When you was looking for the handkerchiefs was not your back towards them? A. Yes; it must have been done in a moment.

JOHN LEWIS BATHGATE . I am an officer. I took the prisoners. Broughton appeared to be in liquor, and smelt of liquor when I spoke to him - he appeared tipsy.

WILSON's Defence. I went to buy a bit of linen, and met this young man, whom I knew; he was tipsy, and I asked him to step into the shop with me, and I would see him home. I bought the linen and then looked at some small handkerchiefs - I asked to look at some larger, which were 10s. - I had not got so much with me, and I said I would call again. I had not seen this young man take any thing. I had 7s. 6d. still in my pocket, which Mr. Brooks knows.

BROUGHTON's Defence. I was in liquor. The property, by some means unknown to me, got into my hat. I have a complaint in my head, and when I am in liquor it deprives me of my senses.

BROUGHTON - GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having an aged mother and a family . Confined Two Months .

WILSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-111

687. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Hazle Pain Twyford , from his person .

WILLIAM HAZLE PAIN TWYFORD. I was in Piccadilly about twenty minutes after three o'clock, on the 8th of March; a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and said the prisoner had taken my handkerchief from me; he had him at that time by the collar; I took hold of him likewise, and he immediately gave me my handkerchief from his pocket - I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner I picked it up, and put it into my pocket, the gentleman came, and took me. Witness. He did not say he picked it up.

THOMAS LOVEGROVE . I am the watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought to me there; he was begging

of Mr. Twyford not to prosecute him. There was another gentleman who said, in his presence, he saw him take it from the prosecutor's pocket - but he was obliged to leave town on business - a duplicate of another handkerchief was found on him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-112

688. MARIA HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 1 half sovereign, 1 crown, value 5s., and 10 shillings, the monies of Stephen Britten and Richard Read , her masters.

STEPHEN BRITTEN. I am in partnership with Richard Read - we keep the St. James's club-house - the prisoner was in our service. On the 20th of February I marked 10l. in silver and gold, which I put into my cash box, which was locked up in my bureau; on the 21st I missed a crown-piece from it; on the following morning I went to consult the Magistrate - while I was gone the prisoner took this money which was found in her pocket by the officer; she said it was the change of a sovereign, which her mistress knew of.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I went and took the prisoner - I found in her pocket this half sovereign, and these ten shillings; I found one crown, 50s. in shillings, seven half-crowns, and some six pences, by the side of her box up stairs.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court for the marked silver - the other was my own.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

The prisoner received a good character and was recommended to mercy . Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-113

689. JAMES HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 yard of woollen cloth, value 20s., the goods of James Nightingale , his master .

JAMES NIGHTINGALE. I am a tailor - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 15th of March I missed this cloth from my cutting-room - it was the remainder of a whole piece.

ALEXANDER SAMUEL BURN . I am in the employ of Mr. Nightingale. On the 21st of March he sent me to find a piece of cloth, like a piece which he gave me; I went to Mrs. Wilson's, and bought this cloth of her for 12s. - I brought it home, and left it on the counter in the cutting-room.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. Do you know it by any thing but the colour? A. No; but there never was but one piece made of this colour, and my master had it - I know it by the cuts on the edge.

MARY WILSON. I keep a shop. I bought this piece of cloth; I believe I bought it for blue, but it is a kind of episopal purple - I did not take notice of it, and I can not tell whether it is it or not - it looks like the colour, but I cannot tell whether it is the same texture; I did not measure it, and bought it between the lights - I believe it was brought by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. What day was this? A. I neither know the day, nor the property.

COURT. Q. When was it you went before the Magistrate? A. About a week after I bought it. I suppose I bought it of the prisoner - I believe he is the man; I had seen him once or twice before. I live in Good win's-court, St. Martin's-lane, where I have lived twelve years; I had been washing at the time, and was rather tired and out of temper, when the cloth was brought.

COURT to JAMES NIGHTINGALE . Q. When did you miss this? A. On the 15th of March - I did not say anything to the prisoner, but I sent Burn to make inquiries at different piece-brokers' shops - it being a very peculiar colour - this was the only piece that had been manufactured of the colour. I had the whole of my men examined, and went to Mrs. Wilson's, and requested her attendance the next morning - the prisoner did not work in my house, he had his work home - he was sent for, and Mrs. Wilson identified him.

Cross-examined. Q. What quantity had you of it at first? A. About twenty-eight yards and a quarter. To the best of my belief, in the whole trade, there was but this one piece of cloth made of this colour - it is possible that some others might have had some of this colour - I will not swear it must have been mine.

Prisoner. Mr. Nightingale visited me in prison on Monday, and said if I would tell him all I could about it he would not do me any harm - it was a sort of compromise.

COURT to JAMES NIGHTINGALE. Q. Is this true? A. No; before he was committed I went to get information from him; I told him my evidence was not of the consequence that Mrs. Wilson's was - but I wished to know what he could tell me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-114

690. ELEANOR NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 2 blankets, value 8s.; 1 sheet, value 1s. 6d.; 2 pillows, value 4s.; 1 flat iron, value 6d.; 2 saucepans, value 5s., and 1 looking-glass, value 1s., the goods of Sarah Holloway , widow , in a lodging-room .

SARAH HOLLOWAY. I am a widow. The prisoner hired a room in my house on the 22d of December; she left on the 1st of March without giving any notice - these articles were a part of the furniture which were let to her - I missed some of them before she went, and asked the man she cohabited with about them - the prisoner then came into the room and struck me - she said she would not mind two years' imprisonment to have her will of me.(Property produced and sworn to).

PHILIP JONES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket and two pillows, pawned by a woman, but I cannot say who.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I went to Mrs. Holloway's on the 6th of March; I found the prisoner there- we took these five duplicates from her pocket, which relate to this property - I asked her what had become of the coppers and looking-glass - she said Mrs. Holloway should never have them any more - she then flew into the room where the prosecutrix was, and struck her violently, saying she would not mind having two years for it.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-115

691. THOMAS JAMES DAVIS was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM TURNER . I keep a public-house in the Hay-market - the prisoner was my servant . I sent him on the 11th of March, to Hoares', in Fleet-street, with a check for 5l., which he was to receive, and bring back the money to me, but he never did; I found him at Westminster the next day, enlisted for a soldier - he had only been with me from the Monday before.

WILLIAM DODD . I am cashier at Messrs. Hoares'. I have a cheque for 5l., which I paid to some one, on the evening of the 11th of March, but I cannot say to whom.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner on Sunday evening, the 13th of march; I asked him if he had received the money for the cheque - he said he had received five sovereigns, and went Fetter-lane way home, where he stopped to look at a fight, and some one took the five sovereigns, which were loose in his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner. I lost the money.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18260406-116

692. CATHERINE MARY BRISSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 book, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Howard .

JOSEPH HOWARD. I am a bookseller . I keep a stall in Gray's-inn-lane - this book is my property - it was safe about twelve o'clock when I went to Fleet-street.

THOMAS EDWARD RICE . I live in Pool's-buildings. I saw the prisoner take a little book and look at it - she put it down and went to the top of the stall, she then took this book and put it under her shawl - she then went into the shop, came out and crossed the street; I was going after her but another witness stopped her.

DINAH BURKE . I saw the prisoner take up a little book and put it down, and then take this large one - she went into the shop and then came across to Gray's-inn gate - I was going to stop her but Mr. Scanes did.

THOMAS SCANES . I stopped the prisoner with this book concealed under her cloak - she said it was her own; I said she must go back to the shop; Mr. Howard then came back, and said it was his - I went to the stall and saw the two fellow volumes there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I thought it was very hard for me to be stopped by this witness with a book which my husband had bought before his death; I was going to sell it.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18260406-117

693. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Ansell .

HENRY ANSELL. I am a coachman . I lost my coat at half-past six o'clock on the 28th of March, in Oxford-street - I had seen it safe about three minutes before - it was brought to me by a man who is here now - the prisoner's wife came to me yesterday - he has three children.

HENRY POWELL . On the evening of the 28th of March I was standing on the pavement in Oxford-street; I saw the prisoner take this coat from the coach-box; I pursued and he dropped it - I never lost sight of him, but brought him to Mr. Ausell with it; he said he was much distressed and had had no victuals for two days.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and three children; I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-118

694. WILLIAM HARRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 5s. , the goods of William Michie .

WILLIAM MICHIE. I keep a public-house in Oxford-street ; the prisoner was in my employ as pot-boy - he slept in my house up to the 26th of March; these sugar tongs are mine; I had seen them safe the week before, in the cupboard in the bar parlour.

WILLIAM NATHAN . I am a pawnbroker. I took these tongs in of the prisoner on the evening of the 27th of March; he inquired if they were silver; we suspected him, and asked where he got them; he said he had been to see Mr. Michie's cook, and had found them as he was returning home; we told him to return again on the following evening, but he did not come till the Wednesday evening, when we had ascertained they were stolen.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he first said he had them given him by Ann, the cook; I told him not to implicate any other person, and he then said he had taken them from the tea-tray; his father is a very honest man - he is a watchman; I believe it is his first offence. GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-119

695. GEORGE SCOTT and BENJAMIN PEARCE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 15 oak staves, value 12s. , the goods of Richard Biggs .

RICHARD BRIGGS. I am a cooper , and live in Pennyfields. On the 18th of March I had some staves at Limehouse-hole, which came to my house in carts; I heard some had been stolen and counted them over, when I missed eighteen out of nine thousand; I have seen them since - I believe these are mine - they were exactly of this appearance.

Prisoner PEARCE. Q. Did you not hire me to get them out? A. Never.

Prisoner PEARCE. You did, and they were taken away in carts, and when they were nearly all carted you sent a truck with your two sons to get them, and I helped to push it. Witness. I never employed him in my life; I saw him dancing on a board, and then I saw him pushing the truck - I should have given him something, but I had no change about me.

SAMUEL WATTS . I am clerk to Mr. Hill, of Limehouse-hole. I saw a barge laden with staves on the 18th of March; they were landed close by our counting-house, and I saw the two prisoners assisting to unload them; I saw Pearce assist to put them into the cart, and in the course of the day I saw him take some and hide them behind a chain cable; I then saw Scott take a long stave and lay it on the ground, and stretch himself upon it; he had before that taken some and laid them behind an enginepipe; I afterwards heard them talking about the division of the staves - one said "You shall not have ten and me eight;" Pearce said "I stole them," and the other said "I watched, and I have as much right to them;" there was then about one truck load to go away, and Mr. Biggs' two little boys were there; the prisoners used to send

them away while they took them; I saw Scott take nine staves which I stopped him with; I then saw Pearce go down to the river at low water, and get up some long and short staves from the mud.

Prisoner PEARCE. Q. Why did you not report to the owner when you saw me take them? A. I did not know but that he was employed by Mr. Briggs, and I knew they would come back to take them from the place, where they had hidden them.

JOHN JAMES JONES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have brought the property.

PEARCE's Defence. It is false - I never took any.

SCOTT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-120

696. GEORGE STRICKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 8 half-crowns, 40 shillings, and 3 £5 Bank notes, the monies of Samuel Shepherd , his master .

SAMUEL SHEPHERD. The prisoner was in the service of the Traveller's Club , to which I am clerk . On the 2d of March I gave him three £5 Bank notes and 3l. in loose silver; he was to get the notes changed; I then went out; on my return he had not come back, and Mr. Davis asked if I had sent him any where else; I said No - on the following Saturday I was informed he was in the park, and I went there and took him; I asked him what he had done with the money, and as he was saying he was about to restore it Avis came up and took him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-121

697. THOMAS HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Edward Elliott , from his person .

EDWARD ELLIOTT. On the 26th of February I was in Leicester-square ; one of the witnesses touched me and gave me information; I then missed my handkerchief, and saw some persons running into Lisle-street; I called Stop thief! and the prisoner was taken with my handkerchief in his hat.

JOSEPH GIBBS . I saw Mr. Elliott in Leicester-square, and a person who was in his company took the handkerchief from his pocket and gave it to the prisoner; he put it into his bosom, and they walked away arm-in-arm together; I went and told the gentleman and pointed to the person who did it; he got away, and the prisoner was taken with the handkerchief in his hat.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from St. James's Park with another young man, when the handkerchief was thrown into my hands by a person who ran away.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, one of whom engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-122

698. FREDERICK WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 1 clock, value 20s., and 1 clock case, value 2s., the goods of William Weeks , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM WEEKS. I keep a broker's shop in Little Portman-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 2d of March I heard an alarm in the street; I went out and saw my clock - I had seen it safe half an hour before.

JOHN WEEKS . I am the prosecutor's son; I saw the prisoner about two doors from my father's running away with this clock; I did not see him take it - I ran after him, saw him stopped and took it from him; he turned round and hit me on the head.

MARY WARREN . I saw somebody take the clock while I was in my parlour opposite to Mr. Weeks'; I cannot swear to the prisoner.

ROBERT HOWARD . I took charge of the prisoner and have the clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to come down that street and two boys passed me - a man came up and took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18260406-123

699. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 chest, value 6d., and 50lbs. weight of tea, value 13l. , the goods of John Garnet and Joseph Underwood .

PETER PEASCOD . I am warehouseman to Messrs. John Garnet and Joseph Underwood. I deposited a request note in a box at the Excise-office about half-past ten o'clock on the 7th of February; I went afterwards, about three o'clock, and found a permit which I took to the Locker to get a chest of tea which we had purchased at the Company's sale - we sent our cart for it, but it could not be found.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you present when it was bought at the Company's sale? A. No; I cannot swear that I had ever seen this chest; I only know it by the marks on the chest and the documents.

JOSEPH BURLES . I am warehouseman at the Company's warehouses in Cutler-street - the prisoner brought a permit to me for a chest of tea, and I helped it on his shoulder - he told me he came from Mr. Young's, in Fenchurch-street, where I knew he had once lived; I took a note of the number of the chest in my yard-book, which I have here (reads) "A. Thacker, one chest, No. 44, Young's man." It had come by the ship Thomas Coutts.

Cross-examined. Q. Then it was out of the Company's yard you delivered it? A. Yes.

JOHN BENN . I am a hackney coachman and drive No. 654. On the 7th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, who had a chest of tea with him, hired my coach in Old-street-road - which is about a mile and a half from Cutler-street; I drove by his desire to the City-road, and then he desired me to drive to the Lower-road, lslington - at the turnpike-gate the man asked for the toll, and he would not pay it - he then desired me to let him out - I got down and let him out - he struck me and went away.

COURT. Q. Have you any proof that it was this chest of tea that the man had? A. No.

COURT to PETER PEASCOD . Q. Who was Anthony Thacker? A. He is a customer of ours in the country - the property was never on our premises.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-124

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

700. JAMES SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 421 combs, value 13l. , the goods of Daniel Deacon ; and FREDERICK MILLS was indicted for feloniously receiving 33 of the said combs, value 20s., well-knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. DANIEL DEACON. I am a carrier and inn-keeper , at the White Horse, Cripplegate . On the 25th of January a chest was missed from my yard, which had arrived from York the same day. I received information on the 2d of March, and got a search-warrant - I went to the premises of one Cole, in Rosemary-lane, where I found thirty-three dozen of these combs; I then went to the prisoner Mills', in Elder-street, Spitalfields - he is a bonnet-maker; I asked him if he had any combs - he said he had nothing of the kind in the house - we searched the house, and found thirty-three odd combs in his parlour, in a bag, under some pieces of flannel; from there I went, with the officer, to the prisoner Shaw's, and in a room at Mr. Biggs', where he works I found the chest, with part of the direction on it - I could not speak to it, because I had not seen it before.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you known Mills before? A. No. I do not know whether the combs were by themselves, or with other things; I do not know whether Mills uses flannel in his business; Shaw is in the straw bonnet business; as he wanted to go back for a coat I returned with him, and found the combs. I am answerable for the property.

FRANCIS DUKES . I am book-keeper to Mr. Deacon. - On the arrival of our waggon, about eleven o'clock, on the 25th of January, a chest was called off to me by the name of Thomas Goodbear, Wellclose-square, which I marked off in the way-bill: I entered it to the delivery man, to take out, but he, having too much to take at once, came back to fetch it, and told me it was gone.

LEONARD BARKER . I am porter at the yard. About eleven o'clock on the morning of the 25th of January, the York waggon came in; I got on the top of it, and unstrapped it; I saw the box directed for Mr. B. Goodbear, No. 9, Wellclose-square - I put it forward on the waggon - a boy got up, and called it over, and it was put down on the right-hand side of the yard; my mate came to take it about two o'clock, and it was gone.

GEORGE STEWARD . I am a comb manufacturer. I delivered a chest, containing a parcel of combs, for Mr. Goodbear - I saw it catered in the book, but did not see it put into the waggon; it was to come to Mr. Deacon's yard.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you pack them into that box? A. Yes - they were our manufacture.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I had a warrant against Cole, who lives in Rosemary-lane, and went there, with Mr. Deacon, about one o'clock on the 2d of March. I found a quantity of combs there; I then got a warrant against Mills; I went there, and his wife called him up - I told him I was an office, and had a warrant to search his house for combs, and I believed he was the man who recommended a person to Mr. Cole, in Rosemary-lane; he said, Yes he was - I asked the name of the person he recommended - he said, Shaw - I asked where he lived - he said he did not know, but Shaw's wife's sister was there at work, and she would tell me; I said I should search his house first; he said, "You may, for I have no combs." I searched the back room, and found nothing there; I then came into the front room, and saw the young woman come down stairs; I left Fortune there, and went with her to Shaw's house; he was not at home; I searched the house, and did not find any thing; I returned back, and asked where he worked - they said, there was a lad there who would tell me, and he took me to a bonnet shop in Bishopsgate-street; the lad went up stairs, and when I heard him coming down I pushed the door open, and went in; I saw Shaw, and said, "I want you;" he said, "What for?" I said I was going to put him into a coach, and I would tell him; I told him it was about some combs - he said, "What, those I found at Cripplegate?" I said, "Where?" - he said, "Near the White Horse;" I said that was near where the robbery was committed; he then said "I did not say I found them there - it was coming from there." I took him to the office.

Cross-examined. Q. You went to Mills' house, and found him at his business? A. Yes. I asked if he had recommended a person to Cole's - he said Yes; I then searched his house - he did not say there had been some combs, but his wife had sold them; all he said was true, except that he said he had no combs, and some were found there. Shaw did not say at what time he found the combs.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I went with Foster to Mills' house to execute the search-warrant; he left me there while he went to look for Shaw; I said to Mills, "Here is a search-warrant against your house - if you have any combs you may as well give them - it will save us the trouble of looking over your house;" he said he had not. I then asked his wife if they had any, and she said they had not; she appeared rather uneasy, which caused me to keep my eye upon her; I then saw her open a burean three times, and take something out; I said, "What are you moving there?" she said, "Only a little parcel;" I said, "Let me see what that parcel is?" she put it under a black bag, which I moved, and saw three parcels of combs; I then asked if there were any more - she said, if there were they were in the bureau, which I opened, and found more - there were thirty-three in all; I cannot tell how many of them were in the parcels.

SAMUEL BURN . I am in the employ of Mr. Biggs, of Bishopsgate-street. Shaw worked for Mr. Biggs, in the room where they say the box was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. How many others worked in that place? A. Four others, but not in that room; it was open, and they had access to it.

COURT to DANIEL DEACON. Q. Where did you find part of the direction? A. In the room where Shaw worked, at Mr. Biggs'; it is a room he has separate for himself.

GEORGE STEWARD . This direction is my hand-writing; I believe those combs found at Mills' to be our manufacture.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any mark upon them? A. No; I cannot swear they are those sent to Mr. Good

bear, but I have no hesitation in stating they are our manufacture - they are worth about 1s. each.

WILLIAM COLE . I keep a hardware-shop, in Rosemary-lane. Mills came to me about six weeks ago, and asked if I would buy a quantity of combs - he said he had got some which he had taken for a debt, and if I liked to purchase them he would be able to sell them to me cheap; I told him very well - he said he should not be able to send them that day, but he would send them the next, or the day after; two days afterwards Shaw came to my shop, with a sample of combs, which I took and looked at, and asked the price; I did not buy any at that time, but I did afterwards; I paid Shaw 4s. a dozen for them - these are them - they are worth 6s. or 7s. a dozen one with another; he told me he brought them from Mills, and when I offered him the money he said he should go back and ask Mr. Mills. The price which Mills had asked was 5s. a dozen, and I bid him 4s.; he said I should have them for 4s. 6d. I bought thirty-three dozen - these are the combs - they were found by the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not known Mills some time? A. Yes, about two years; he did not tell me he knew a person who had a quantity, and he would send him to me; I received them all from Shaw.

GEORGE STEWARD . I have not a doubt of these combs - they are the same sort as those found at Mills'.

SAMUEL JACOBS . I am shopman to Mr. Cole. I was present when Mills came and asked how business was; Mr. Cole said, "Very dull" - he then said, "Can you buy a lot of combs?" he said, "What sort?" he said,"A lot I took for a bed debt, and if I had not taken them I should have had nothing;" he said, "I will bring them down this evening if I can - if not, I shall not be able to come to-morrow, but I will come the day after;" on that day, shaw (who I knew had worked for Mr. Mills) came, and said he had come from Mr. Mills - he brought three dozen of combs - I went and called Mr. Cole from his dinner, and said, there was a man with the combs - he came in and opened them; he asked 5s. a dozen for the large ones, and 4s. for the small ones, but said he should have one with another at 4s. 6d.

COURT. Q. How long ago is this? A. About six weeks.

COURT to DANIEL DEACON. Q. What distance does Shaw work from you? A. About a mile and a half; I have seen him in the yard; he has brought goods from Mr. Biggs. I should have stated that Mills said, after Shaw was found, that there was an account between them, and the combs were taken in that account, but not entered to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you say at the office that Mr. Mills had acted very properly? A. No.

SAMUEL JACOBS re-examined. Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Cole? A. Two years. I had seen Shaw employed in carrying bonnets for Mills last summer - he worked for two persons. I was not examined before a Magistrate, nor before the Grand Jury; I was on the business, but I was not sworn. I came to day with Mr. Cole. I saw Mr. Deacon this morning in the street, and I believe the day before yesterday, at his own house. The bill against Cole was thrown out yesterday. I never was at Mr. Deacon's house but once in my life - I was not at the Grand Jury room.

MILLS' Defence. I have nothing to say, but, from the character you will hear of me, and the ignorant part I have acted in this business, I trust you will be induced to grant my acquittal.

ELIZABETH HANDLEY . I am Shaw's wife's sister. I have been in the employ of Mills three years last January - Shaw was employed by Mills two years ago but he has not since. In the course of last winter I took a dozen combs to Mr. Mills' shop, and told the work people I had them - I sold one to Smith, and one to Jay - my brother at that time owed some money to Mr. Mills, and he had said he intended to stop my wages if it was not paid - it was a balance of 18s. for some cloth; I mentioned it to my sister, and either two dozen and a half, or three dozen of combs were delivered to him in payment of the debt; I think the whole debt was 27s. - it is not necessary in the straw business to use flannel or silk handkerchiefs, but Mr. Mills had taken some for a bad debt in the City; I was at his house when the search was made - he had no claim to the combs, except the two or three dozen he took of my brother.

EDWARD SMITH . I work at the shop with Handley - she brought a dozen combs, which she showed publicly in the shop; I bought one of her on the 14th of February, for which I paid 1s. - I did not know of Mr. Mills having any of them till after his apprehension.

ELIZABETH JAY . I work at the same place - I saw Handley with some combs - I bought a plain one of her for 10d.

JURY to Mr. STEWARD. Q. Can you state what number of combs were in the box when it came from York? A. More by some dozens then have been produced.

Sixteen witnesses gave Mills a good character.

MILLS - GUILTY. Aged 30.

SHAW - GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of character .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-125

701. JOHN SHEFFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 book, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Mellows .

MARY ANN MELLOWS . I am the wife of Thomas Mellows - he lives in St. Ann's-court, and deals in books . - On the 1st of April I saw the prisoner near the house - I was cleaning in the back parlour, which is dark, and suppose he did not see me; he came into the shop, took a book, and went out with it - I ran after him, and he turned into Richmond-buildings, where I caught him, and gave charge of him - he threw the book down, and a carter, who was passing, took it up.

JOHN PROCTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the book.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed, and have a wife and two children.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-126

702. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 1 shawl, value 5s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

WILLIAM EVANS. I am in the employ of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross, of Old Compton-street ,

silk-mercers . The prisoner came last Monday week to look at some shawls, which a young man showed her - she asked to look at some others, and while he turned to get them, she folded up a shawl, and put it under her own - a customer said she had seen her do it, and when she was gone I followed her, and found it under her shawl; she came back, fell down on her knees, and said she hoped we would not be hard with her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never stole any thing before, and I did not take it to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-127

703. RICHARD WICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 7 live tame fowls, price 7s. , the property of Henry Hedges .

HENRY HEDGES. I live at Hayes, in Middlesex . On the night of the 18th, or morning of the 19th of February, I lost seven fowls out of one hen-house, and two from another - and, on the morning of the 20th, a constable informed me that a young man was in custody - I went to Uxbridge and gave a statement of the loss - but I did not choose to swear to more than one, which was a very fine cock, though I firmly believe the others were mine - the prisoner was perfectly acquainted with my premises - he had groomed a horse for a son of mine about two years ago - I do not know where the prisoner has lived the last few months.

JOSEPH HIGGS . I am one of the Bow-street patrol. I met the prisoner on the Sunday night, a quarter before eleven o'clock, with a person - the prisoner had a sack on his back, and I asked him, what he had got? his companion said, they had two pigs - I said, it was a strange time to carry pigs about - they said, it was no business of mine - I brought them to a public-house, and found the fowls in the bag - they were dead - I delivered the prisoner and the fowls to my partner - his companion escaped.

WILLIAM FAIR . I am a Bow-street patrol. I came up just after the prisoner had been stopped - he took me to the place where he had got the fowls from.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a native of Hayes, and I was going along the road - I found a man (with a sack on his back), who was going to Southall - he said, there were two pigs in it - I took it on my back, and the officer came and asked what was in it - I said I did not know.

COURT to HENRY HEDGES. Q. Where were these fowls? A. In the chicken-houses under a barn, near some cart-pens - they got into the barn from the cart-pens, and then through the floor into the chicken-houses.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-128

704. CHARLES ALLSOP was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 2 planes, value 7s., and 1 saw, value 5s., the goods of William Crowhurst ; and 1 saw, value 2s., and 1 plane, value 1s. , the goods of John Fisher Cheesewright .

WILLIAM CROWHURST. I am a carpenter , and work for John Fisher Cheesewright, of Berwick-street. The prisoner was his apprentice - I left two planes and a saw in the work shop, at the back of the house, on the 17th of February, when I was then taken ill.

JOHN FISHER CHEESEWRIGHT. The prisoner has been my apprentice about six years - I never authorized, or allowed him to sell, or pawn these tools - he was bound to me, but he has no parents - I would take him into my service again.

EDWARD BOOTHMAN . I am constable. I had the duplicate delivered to me at the watch-house, and found some other duplicates on him, which did not relate to this property - he acknowledged he had stolen them, and told me where they were.

JOSEPH KING . I am a pawnbroker and live in Tottenham-court-road. I have three planes, and a saw pawned at our shop - I cannot say by whom.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-129

705. ELIZA BEEVERS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 cap, value 4s., the goods of Janet Scott ; and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Elijah Seaward .

JANET SCOTT . I am a widow . The prisoner lived servant with me at different times. She came on the 3d of March, and went away on the 17th, without giving me warning - I missed a box, a shawl, and a cap, which have all been returned to me by her mother - I met her in the street a week after; she ran away, but a boy stopped her; I asked what she had done with the cap; and she said she had pawned it.

ELIJAH SEAWARD. I live in the second pair front-room of this house. My shoes were new, and hung up against the wall; I had seen them about four days before the prisoner went away; they were taken off her feet; I asked her what she had done with them, and she said she had them on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-130

706. JOHN BARRET and WILLIAM CAMPLIN were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , 25lbs. weight of lead, value 5s., the goods of John Henegan and James Hawkins , and fixed to a building of theirs .

JOHN HENEGAN. I am in partnership with James Hawkins - we have a house in the Circus, at St. Pancras . On the 22d of March, the lead from the gutters was ripped, and part of it carried away; the lead I got from the witness exactly corresponded with what remained; I had not seen it for perhaps a week.

JOHN MOUSLY . I am a carpenter. I saw the two prisoners lurking about the premises on Thursday week, about one o'clock, they went into the building, and I left them for (I suppose) half an hour; I then saw them go past my house, which is about 200 yards off, with each a piece of lead under his jacket; there was about a quarter of an hundred weight; I stopped them, and asked what they had got; they said, some lead which they had found; I took them to the watch-house; there were no knives found on them.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am an officer. I took the prisoners, and compared the lead with what remained on the building; it matched exactly, and all the cuts corresponded.

BARRET'S Defence. We were looking for work, and went into this house, because it rained very fast; we saw

the two pieces of lead; I took them to see if we could find an owner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-131

707. DENNIS BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 9s. , the goods of John Greenwood .

JANE GREENWOOD . I am the wife of William Greenwood - my son John has part of our shop in Spectacle-alley, Whitechapel . On the 16th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and asked to look at a pair of buckle-shoes, which were in the window; I handed him one; he then asked to look at the other, which I at last gave him; he asked the price, and I said 9s. 6d.; he said that was too much; I then called to my son, who was up stairs, and asked what he could take; he said 9s.; he asked to look at some others, and I called my son to measure him; I then turned round to put on a shovel of cinders, and the prisoner went out; I missed the shoes in a moment, and told my son of it.

JOHN GREENWOOD . My mother called to know what I would take for a pair of shoes in the window; I said 9s.; I was then called to take the measure of some one; and when I came down, I heard the prisoner was gone with the shoes; I met him in Whitechapel-road on the 18th; I told him I wanted him for stealing my shoes; he said he knew nothing about it.

THOMAS CRAZE . On the 16th of February. I saw the prisoner go into the shop: when he came out I saw the shape of a pair of shoes under his jacket - I live in Spectacle-alley, and had seen him about before.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-132

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 7.

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

708. JOHN WILLIAM BIRMINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 2 pillows, value 4s., and 1 sheet, value 2s., the goods of Anne Jarvis , widow , in a lodging-room .

ANNE JARVIS. I am a widow, and have nine children; I live in Upper Stanhope-street . The prisoner came to my house on the 25th of November, and took one back-room, furnished as a bed-room, for which he was to pay 5s. per week - he brought a woman with him, who passed as his wife - these pillows and sheet are mine - they are a part of the furniture I let him with the room - he left me without notice on the 25th of February, and I did not then know they were missing - I never permitted any one to pawn them.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the prisoner in great distress? A. I used to think he was; it might be temporary distress caused him to do it - he redeemed one sheet on the Monday, after he had been taken on the Saturday.

JAMES BARNES . I am a pwnbroker. I produce two pillows, pawned at our shop by the prisoner on the 29th of December.

LEONARD GEORGE NEEDE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street. I have a sheet pawned by some person, I do not know who.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledged before the Magistrate that I was compelled to do it, being in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-133

709. SARAH BECKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 1 pelisse, value 12s., and 1 yard of printed cotton, value 1s. , the goods of John Thorp .

MARY THORP . I am the wife of John Thorp, and live in Monmouth-street . This pelisse is mine - I had been at my box on the morning of the 8th of August, and saw it there - I went out about half-past nine o'clock, and did not return till half-past five; the box was not locked, but I had locked the door of the one pair front-room where it was - I lost several other articles - the prisoner was quite a stranger.

JEREMIAH BEACH . I am the officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the 10th of August on another charge - I found this piece of cotton in her apron, which led to a discovery of the other - the prosecutrix was put to bed before the prisoner was committed.

WILLIAM BEACROFT . I a am pawnbroker. I took in this pelisse from the prisoner on the 10th of August.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the House of Correction six months, and then there were two officers to detain me - I bought the bit of print at the Bee-hive, up Holborn - I never was in the pawnbroker's shop.

JEREMIAH BEACROFT re-examined. Q. Have you seen the prisoner since she pawned it? A. Yes, at the office; it was pawned about half-past twelve or one o'clock - I was at dinner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-134

710. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 4 sheets, value 8s.; 1 yard of napkeen, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 yard of cambric, value 6d.; 3 gowns, value 3s.; 1 veil, value 2s.; 4 yards of lace, value 1s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 2s.; 1 cloak, value 1l., and 2 parasols, value 2d. , the goods of Sarah Glover , spinster .

SARAH GLOVER. I am single, and live in Middleton-square . On the 6th of March I heard a cry of Thief! at the back of the house - I went up stairs, and called to Vickers, who lived next door - he climbed over the wall and helped Mr. Perkins to secure the prisoner; the property was found in the houses which were building - this box contains the articles stated in the indictment - it stood on the landing-place with the property in it.

JANE WRIGHT . I am servant to Miss Glover. I heard the alarm, and went up stairs to the back attic window - I found it open, and shut it down.

RICHARD PERKINS . I live at No. 12, Middleton-square, next door to the prosecutrix. I heard a noise in the new building, No. 13, about eight o'clock in the evening; I went into the back yard, and saw the prisoner and another person, on the parapet wall, at No. 11; I then saw them go into the attic window of No. 13; I laid myself on the garden wall; the prisoner came out of the parlour window - I jumped down and seized him; I said

"What are you about here?" he said he came to ease himself; I called for assistance, and Miss Glover sprung a rattle; my wife then called Mr. Vickers, who came to my assistance. As we were taking the prisoner out of No. 13, Vickers stumbled over a box, and I said "You villain, where did you get this - you have been robbing the poor girl of her property;" I called to Miss Glover, and told her she had been robbed - she looked at the box and said it was her property - I then took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS VICKERS . I assisted in taking the prisoner into custody - I stumbled over the box and found these things.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-135

711. EDWARD BROADFIELD and JAMES LLOYD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 3 loaves of sugar, value 20s. , the goods of William Jennings .

WILLIAM JENNINGS. I am a grocer , and live in John-street, Limehouse . On the 7th of March, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I shut my shop door and went up stairs - I heard the door open, hastened down, and saw Lloyd run out of the shop with two or three loaves of sugar - a young man came up to the door, and I called him to assist me - they knocked him down, and made a blow at me; I saw Lloyd drop one of the loaves, and told a woman to take it up, while I ran back to my shop, as it was then unprotected; the loaves were brought back with the prisoner; Broadfield ran before Lloyd, and wanted to take something from him. I think he is the person who aimed a blow at me - there were four or five in the gang - I missed three loaves of sugar from off my counter.

JAMES BARRETT . I live in Somers-place. I was near Mr. Jennings' shop, and heard the cry of Stop thief! - I saw Broadfield drop one loaf of sugar, and Lloyd drop two - I never lost sight of them till I caught them.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I was night constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house.

BROADFIELD'S Defence. I was walking down the street, and met Lloyd - some person called Stop thief! the witness made use of very bad expressions and struck me.

LLOYD'S Defence. I had been looking for work, and a man said "Take hold of that thief!" I ran to get away.

BROADFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

LLOYD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-136

712. JOHN BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 dressing-box, value 20s. , the goods of Henry Algar .

SARAH ALGAR . I am the wife of Henry Algar. We keep a broker's-shop in Princes-street, New Turnstile . About a quarter before six o'clock on the 14th of March, I was told that a boy had taken a dressing-glass and case - I ran down to Queen-street, and saw the prisoner with it under his arm - I gave an alarm - he turned and darted towards the pavement, when he set the glass down, and ran away - I never lost sight of him, but pursued him till he was taken - he said "Let me go, I have given her the glass."

THOMAS SHERWIN . I saw the prisoner coming through an alley with this glass; just as he had passed my window, I saw a suffle between him and the prosecutrix; I went to the door - he had then put down the glass, and got up the street - I lost sight of him then, but he was brought back in two or three minutes, in custody - a cart came between us in the road, but I am sure he is the lad.

RICHARD CHIVAL . On the 14th of March I was going up Queen-street - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw several people running - I went up and the prosecutrix had hold of the prisoner by his coat - he was praying her to let him go, as he had given up the glass, which was on the pavement.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I was entrusted to take care of the property for a person, and had not the slightest idea but it actually belonged to him.

SARAH ALGAR re-examined. I had dusted the glass about a quarter of an hour before - I looked round, and and missed it after the alarm.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character, one of whom engaged to employ him.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-137

713. FREDERICK CORRICK & JAMES HODGES were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 1 purse, value 2d., 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the property of Ann Davies , spinster .

ANN DAVIES. I am a servant , and live in Torrington-street . I left my purse on a work-box in the kitchen on Friday, the 3d of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, while I went up statrs - there was 1s. 6d. in the purse - Green gave me information - I went down and missed it - it was brought to me the same evening.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What kind of purse was it? A. It was a red leather purse - I was not absent five minutes.

LEWIS GREEN . I live in Wilson-place, Gray's-inn-lane, and am a shoe-maker. I was coming down Keppel-street, on the 3d of March, and saw the two prisoners walking towards Tottenham-court-road - they had each of them a basket - I saw Hodges stop at the corner of Torrington-street - Corrick went down the street, and down the area steps - I went on the opposite side and saw him come up; he met Hodges again, and they went towards Russell-square; I then rang the bell and the servant came down; I asked if she had lost any thing - she said she had lost a purse - I went after them to Heurietta-street, and got assistance to take them: 1s. 6d. was found on Corrick, and the purse in his coat pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at the office? A. Yes - my foreign name is Lewis Nicco, which I kept till my mother married again; I never was in any of the police-offices as a witness - I once went to apply for relief, when I was in distress, three or four months ago - it was before Mr. Rogers, at Hatton-garden - the beadle of the parish was with me; I was once taken up for stealing my master's money: I have not said this was a silk purse.

JOSEPH TATTEN . I assisted in taking the two prisoners in Henrietta-street, Brunswick-square; I found the purse

on Corrick, and the 1s. 6d. and 1s. more - the purse was given to Ann Davies - there was nothing found on Hodges.

Cross-examined. Q. How near was Green to either of the prisoners, while you were going to the office? A. He went close to them - they were hand-cuffed together, and he was behind them - they were searched in the watch-house - there was nothing in the purse - the silver was in his waistcoat pocket.

JOHN HUTT . I am watch-house-keeper. I came into the watch-house as they were being searched - the purse, the key, and the money were on the table; I said "Who did you take them from;" Green said "I took the key from Hodges, and the purse from Corrick;" I said to Corrick "Is this your purse?" he said Yes, he had it some time.(Purse produced and sworn to.)

HODGES' Defence. I was standing, with my elbow on the post, and was going home, when they came and took me; Green said "Let Hodges go - we don't want him;" the other man said "We may as well take them both."

Mr. BARRY to LEWIS GREEN . Q. Does not Hodges sell oranges? A. I believe he does - I live with my mother in the Colonade, and get my living by mending shoes, and cleaning knives and shoes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-138

714. THOMAS CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 11lbs. weight of nails, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Cubitt and others, his partners.

GEORGE WERNHAM . I superintend a part of Messrs. Thomas and William Cubitt's business - they are builders , and live in Gray's-inn-lane-road. These nails are theirs, the prisoner was two or three years in their employ, and was there on the 16th of March; the men went to dinner at twelve o'clock; we have nails of this description, but we could not miss them.

THOMAS BRIGGS . I am in the employ of Messrs. Cubitts, at their nail-room. The prisoner came there on the 16th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, and asked me for some nails - I gave him about the quantity here produced, of ten-penny and twenty-penny nails - he had no orders to have them - they are allowed to the carpenters for their work.

WILLIAM FORTY . I am a Thames police surveyor. On the 16th of March I saw the prisoner on Saffron-hill, with this basket, and 111/2lbs. of nails in it; I stopped him and asked what he had got there - he told me nails, which were given him by Messrs. Cubits' foreman, of the name of May, and he was going to take them to Hanover-square, to one of the carpenters; I told him he was going out of his way, and he said he meant to call on a friend first: I said I would go back with him to his masters', but when I got within fifty or sixty yards of the house, he said, that what he had stated before was not fact, and that he had taken them; and he told Mr. Cubitt, in my hearing, that Briggs had given them to him; the boy was called, and admitted he had given them to him to be used in the yard.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-139

715. MARTHA CLARE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 pair of pattens, value 6d., and two saucepans, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Francis Felto .

JOHN FRANCIS FELTO. I live in Upper East Smithfield, and am a hair-dresser . On the evening of the 11th of March, I received information, and went to the door - I saw the prisoner five or six yards from me, with two saucepans in her hand, and two pattens in the basket; I ran and brought her back with them.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I am not right in my head altogether - I was not in my right senses, which I am not at all times.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, and one offered to give her employment.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged

Reference Number: t18260406-140

716. CHRISTOPHER COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 jacket, value 10s. ; the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH. This jacket is my property - it had been hanging in the passage of my house at Blackwall - I had seen it safe about half an hour before I heard it was gone.

HENRY HUNT . I saw the prisoner, on the 6th of March, go into Mr. Smith's house with some matches, he asked if they would buy any - he came out, looked round the door and went in again three times - he then went in and came out with a bundle - I was in a house opposite - I ran out and called Mr. Smith, and asked if he had lost any thing - he said "Yes, my jacket;" I ran after the prisoner and he was taken - I had not lost sight of him - he threw the jacket on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-141

717. WILLIAM FITZPATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 18 pieces of borad, value 5s. , the goods of John Fuller .

JOHN FULLER. I am a builder . The prisoner was in my employ as a carpenter - he was working in Frederick-street on the 2d of March, I watched him; when he left the building he had a basket on his shoulder - when he had gone about twenty yards I stopped him, and asked what he had got - he said some victuals, but I found some boards and pieces of wood in it - he had no authority to take them - I had seen them on the premises the day before - they might be worth 5s.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had he been in your employ? A. About twelve months - I never gave him, or any of my men leave to take bits of wood as fire-wood - I have heard of men doing it, but it is not allowed - I had nearly a sovereign in my hands belonging to him for the time he had worked - he had told me, two or three weeks before, that his daughter was going to be married, and that he would leave 10s. a week in my hands - I went with the officer to his house - I found there a bit of board, about three inches square, which corresponded with some I had at home - there were other pieces there but none I could swear to; I have the fellow-piece to one of these - I cannot swear to any other.

Q. If you were offered half a crown for this wood would you not take it? A. No; they were in the same state

when on my premises, except this one, which was joined to another - this piece cost me 1s. 2d. a foot - no one was at work there but him.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, and took three pieces of timber - there were many others there.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him for this piece - I measured this piece, which was broken, and asked him for it - he said "Take what you want;" I had left half a sovereign of my wages in his hands since boxing day.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 11d. only .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-142

718. SARAH FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 gown, value 2s.; 2 shifts, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 child's robe, value 6d.; 1 tippet, value 6d., and 2 pieces of flannel, value 3s. , the goods of Mary Ann Barker , widow .

MARY ANN BARKER. I am a widow, and live in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove . The prisoner came to my house to visit a sick child - this property is all mine; I had seen it safe about a month before the prisoner was taken - I did not miss it till a person gave me information of the flannel(which she thought was mine), being in the prisoner's possession - I went and found all this property in her room in Devonshire-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you made any inquiries about her character? A. She has and aged father, whom she chiefly supports - I feel deeply for her situation.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's room and found all the things - the prisoner said they did not belong to Mrs. Barker; I am told she has a husband who has neglected her.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-143

719. JOHN GEAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 jacket, value 16s.; 1 pocket-book, value 1s., and one tobacco pouch, value 1s., the goods of John Simonds ; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of John Cole .

JOHN SIMONDS. I am a sailor , and lodge in Sun-yard . The prisoner slept with me on the night of the 23d of February - he got up first - when I got up I missed the jacket, which I had worn the day before - the pocket-book, and tobacco-pouch were in the pocket - I found him at the Three Crowns public-house, on the afternoon of the 24th- the landlord of my house asked him if he had not slept there the night before - he said he did not, for he had slept near the water-side; he afterwards said he did not sleep any where at all, but had walked the street all night - he then went into the privy, and the landlord watched him - when he came out he was searched, and my tobacco-pouch was found on him; I have never got the pocket-book again; a man of the name of John Cole slept with me - he is gone to sea - I heard him, say in the prisoner's hearing, that he had lost his waistcoat - the prisoner said he knew nothing about it - Cole said he was sure he was the man who slept there - he made no answer to that - I am certain he is the man.

ALEXANDER GURNEY . I am waiter at the Three Crowns. I saw the prisoner come out of the privy; I went in and saw a waistcoat down there - I got a broom-stick and got it up.

JOHN SIMONDS . I saw this waistcoat - it is Cole's.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I went and took the prisoner into custody on the 24th of February - I found this tobacco-pouch on him - he said he had sold the waistcoat to a man on Tower-hill.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the tobacco-pouch - the person who belonged to the waistcoat said I had slept in the house - the handkerchief is mine - I gave 7d. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-144

720. JOHN GUINAR and DAVID DEVINE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 400lbs. weight of iron, value 35s. , the goods of Sir Claude Scott , Bart. and Samuel Scott .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Armstrong .

JOHN HINSBY . I superintend the repairs of Sir Claude Scott's house, at the corner of Margaret-street, Cavendish-square - these articles were kept locked in the stable-yard behind the premises; I locked the stables and the outer gates on the night of the 9th of March, and when I went there next morning, I missed the ten sash weights, and twenty-two palisades - they were all iron; I got a ladder and traced some footsteps over Lord Duncannon's stable-yard - this was about half-past six o'clock, and the servants were not up; I went again at a quarter before eight, and then found the traces of some iron, which had been dragged along the leads, and then down into Lord Duncannon's yard - the gates of the yard were locked, and a person must have gone through the stables to have got into the new street - I saw eleven of the palisades next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any marks upon them? A. No; but I have some more of the same pattern in my stores - they could not be got out of the yard but over the gates - I saw no mark of any person getting out - if any of Lord Duncannon's servants had chosen they might have let them out through the house - the boundary of the yard was the last place where I saw the footsteps.

ROBERT SHARP . I am coachman to Lord Duncannon. I have known Guinar for two years, by seeing him work near the stable, as a bricklayer's labourer - on the 8th of March he told me he had some pieces of iron lying about, which he wished to take out without the two carpenters knowing it; I understood he worked at Sir Claude Scott's house - he said the trifle he should get for the iron would be so little among them all;" I gave him leave to get it out, and went away directly - the following night I was out with his Lordship, and when I came home, about half-past seven o'clock, I saw the two prisoners - they spoke to me, and said they had been on the premises, and got the iron, out - it was dark and I could not see what it was, but they took it away at three different times - it was bars of iron, they carried it on their shoulders through my stables - they went out each of them loaded first, and then one returned and carried the rest away - they came back in a short time with some liquor, which they pressed

me to drink, and I drank with them - there is a low roof adjoining our wall, over which they got the iron; on the following night Hinsby came, and saw some bars and some sash weights were lying there, ready for them to take.

Cross-examined. Q. You thought all this an innocent transaction? A. Yes; I went by what Guinar said; two servants besides myself saw them take the iron - they are now in Court. I considered the iron was their own, and the reason they were afraid to take it out, in sight of the two carpenters was, because they should get so little for it; they brought iron twice over the wall out of the premises - there were eleven or twelve bars, and ten sash weights; some of them were sold; I did not see the money, but I had some of the gin; I did not think they were stolen till the second time. I did not tell Lord Duncannon of it, but I sent word to him by the valet the next day. I opened the gates of the stable yard for them - it was between ten minutes after seven o'clock and half-past seven - the men were then gone from Sir Claude Scott's. It did not occur to me that they might have carried it through Sir Claude Scott's without the men seeing them. I did not keep watch, and tell them to be careful, as the watchman was passing by, but as Guinar was going out the first time, there were three watchmen going by, and he stepped back, but I did not give that a thought. I went before Mr. Dwyer. the Magistrate - I did not hear him say it was of no use asking me any more questions, as I had made a liar of myself. I related the transaction as I have here - I did not say I had nothing to say or do in the transaction, nor anything of that kind; I told him I took part of the gin - there had been a person living on the premises of Sir Claude Scott, but I have since heard they had gone away before this transaction. When the prisoners returned the second time, I suspected it was a dishonest transaction, by the time they were gone. The gin was only given once, and we were about ten minutes drinking it; there were the two prisoners, my two fellow-servants, and myself. Upon my oath I did not tell Guinar to step back for fear of the watchmen. I sat up till a little before eleven o'clock - we were four hours there.

COURT. Q. Did you help them with any of it into the stable? A. Yes, the second time, because Guinar sat down, and refused to help.

CHARLES COOK . I am second coachman to Lord Duncannon. On the evening of the 9th of March some iron was brought into the stable yard by Guinar and the other prisoner - Guinar had spoken to me about it, on the Tuesday before; he asked me where the coachman was; I said he was gone to Rochampton, with the carriage; he said he had a bit of old iron in the stable, which he wished to get away; I had been present the evening before, about seven o'clock, when the two prisoners brought it - I did not help them. I had some of the gin which they brought in.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the stable all the time? A. Yes, from seven o'clock till nearly eight - it was all over by that time; I stopped till I had done work - I cannot tell what time it was then, but the prisoners were then gone; they had taken out two lots before I left. I left the stable, and went with Sharp to the public-house, but I did not have above one or two glasses of ale - the two prisoners were there, and paid the money - Sharp drank with them; I was not near the gate when they went out. I do not know how much money they got, nor how much was drank - the prisoners and my two fellow-servants were drinking; I did not ask whose iron it was - I came to the stable door while they were taking the iron over the wall. I asked if they were taking any thing wrong, and they said No. Sharp was not there then. - Lord Duncannon received information of it.

WILLIAM LEVY . I am in the service of Lord Duncannon. I was there on the night of the 9th of March - I did not see Sharp let Guinar in - he came in at the gate from New-street. I did not see them get the iron, but saw them take it away from the yard.

Cross-examined. Q. How high is this wall? A. It is twelve or fourteen feet, and requires a ladder to get over it- they went out with the iron, and brought in the gin; I drank some of it - I only saw them take the iron once. I had been with a note from my master, and when I returned I saw the steward, but I did not tell him of it. I had seen one of them before - I went to the public-house, and they were there; we staid there till about half-past ten o'clock- I never suspected it was a dishonest transaction; I was at the office. I did not hear Sharp say he knew nothing about the transaction. Mr. Dwyer said it was no use to ask him any questions, as he had made a liar of himself.

Q. Was not that in consequence of his saying he had nothing to do with the transaction, and afterwards acknowledging he had? A. Yes.

GEORGE WALLIS . I am a tailor, and keep a rag and bottle shop - I live at No. 1, Margaret-court. I have known Guinar two years. On the 9th of March I bought some iron of him, about eight o'clock in the evening - I gave him 11/2d. a pound for it - it was taken away by the officer - this is the iron.

BARBARA WALLIS . I am the wife of George Wallis. - I saw the prisoners in the shop on the 9th of March.

SARAH WALLIS . I am Wallis' daughter. I weighed some bars which the prisoners brought - there were about 108lbs.; the value of them was about 5s.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. Sharp came to the office on the night of the 10th of March, and I went and took the two prisoners in Lord Duncannon's stables. I received some iron next morning - some from Sharp, and some from Wallis. I received eleven bars from one, and twelve from the other.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I was with Clements.

GUINAR'S Defence. I met the coachman one morning, and he told me if I would call on him in the afternoon he would give me a jacket; he told me he had a quantity of corn which he wanted me to take for him to a place, but as the watchmen were going by I would not take it, and then he would not give me the jacket.

GUINAR - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

DEVINE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-145

721. MARGARET HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 46 brushes, value 24s., 1 handkerchief, value 2d., and 2 aprons, value 2. , the goods of John Evans .

JOHN EVANS. I am a brush-maker , and live in Coalyard, Drury-lane . On the 25th of March I placed four dozen and a half of brushes in an old ragged apron, and over the holes of the apron I put a sheet of paper; I left them in my room at the top of the house, and missed them next morning - they are here now. I work for a person named Thompson, and I know they are the brushes I finished for him. The prisoner is a stranger.

MARY GRIFFIN . I am the wife of Edward Griffin, and live in Little Denmark-street. I met the prisoner in Monmouth-court; she told me her husband was a brush-maker, and asked me to pawn these brushes; I gave them to Mrs. Brice, as she was going to Mr. Simeon's Shop, where she took them.

ELIZABETH BRICE . I received eight brushes from Mary Griffin on Easter Monday - the prisoner was not there at the time. I took them to Mr. Simeon's, who detained them.

JOHN DAVID SIMEON . I am a pawnbroker. Elizabeth Brice brought me eight brushes, which I detained.

JONATHAN LIDDIARD . I am an officer. I bring the eight brushes from the pawnbroker, and one I found under the prisoner's bed.

MARGARET BERRY . I found thirty-nine brushes in the back kitchen of the house where the prisoner lives - there are other persons in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. The brushes were not there when I went on Easter Sunday morning - I did not get up till half-past nine o'clock, and I met two shop-mates - one Mary Scott went with me; there was a woman, who appeared in the family-way, there - she seemed ill. A man who was with her, said he would give anything if I would take her home, and give her a cup of tea. I took her home, and she recovered herself; the man said he had no money - he then took out one of his brushes, and made me a present of it for my hair; I put it in my bed, and there it was found; he then left eight brushes, and was to call again on the Monday, and pay the shilling which Scott lent him; he did not come, and I took them to pawn; the pawnbroker would not take them of me - I got Griffin to take them, and get a shilling, which was all I wanted. - The other thirty-nine brushes I know nothing about.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-146

722. HARRIET HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 tea-tray, value 4s. , the goods of John Andrew Bingham .

JOHN ANDREW BINGHAM. I am a general dealer , and live in Euston-Crescent . This tea-tray is mine - I missed it on the 11th of March - the prisoner had been in my house, but I had not seen her that night.

SARAH DIXON . On the 14th of March I was in my back-parlour - I heard a noise in the shop and went out, and saw the prisoner - I went to her apartment, No. 32, Euston-Crescent, and saw this tea-tray there - the watchman took away.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am an officer. I went to the house with Mrs. Dixon - I knocked at the door and inquired of the landlady if she lived there - I then asked if she had brought any chairs, and she denied it - the prisoner made some resistance, but I got into her room on the first-floor - she said there was nothing there but what was her own - I found the tea-tray, with other property, which she said was given to her by a woman.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you see them openly in the room? A. No; she stood before them to conceal them - the landlady of the house has absconded since then.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner say the landlady had given them to her? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. My room was never locked - a person came and asked me if I would allow her to put a thing or two in my passage, as the landlady had got a distress in, and she was afraid she should lose every thing she had got - I allowed her to do so - and she said, as the watchman was watching, would I shut the door, which I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-147

723. HARRIET HALL was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 2 chairs, value 5s. , the goods of John Dixon .

SARAH DIXON . I live at No. 29, Euston-street . I lost two chairs on the 14th of March, which I afterwards found in the prisoner's apartment, about twenty or thirty yards from where I live - the watchman went there and saw her in the passage - he asked if any thing was brought in there - Mrs. White, the landlady, said No.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon afterwards did you find them? A. In about five minutes - she said a woman had left them there - she had been out for some cheese - I begged the watchman not to take her.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I went with Mr. Dixon to the prisoner's apartment and found the chairs.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Dixon said she was perfectly satisfied, and begged the watchman not to take me - but the officer said, I behaved so d - d shabby he would take me.

WILLIAM HOOPER . It is utterly false.

COURT to SARAH DIXON . Q. Did any thing of this sort pass? A. There were a few words passed, but I cannot say what.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-148

724. ROBERT GEORGE HUTCHINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 pair of spectacles, value 20s , the goods of Henry Simms .

SARAH SIMMS . I am the wife of Henry Simms, he lives at the Lamb public-house, in Houghton-street . I have known the prisoner five years - he lodged at my house - I had lent these spectacles to Towers, who returned them one Monday morning when the prisoner was there at breakfast with my husband - he snatched them from me. and said "These are handsome; I have got a handsome case, and I will make you a present of it" - I said "I have a very good case" - he replied, "Mine is a very handsome case, and by dinner-time I will return them to you, and you will not repent that you have got it" - he went out and did not return till night - I then asked him for them - he said "I forgot to call, but the gentleman will call to have a pint of beer, and the will bring them" - he went to bed that night; in the course of that day I asked him for them, and he said the gentleman would call and bring a few friends - he continued to come backwards, and forwards till the

Friday, when he went with my husband about the license; when he came home I spoke rather roughly to him, and said it appears to me that you mean to rob me of them; he said "Do you doubt such a man as me;" he then pulled out a pair of old ones from his pocket, and said "You may see with them;" I then asked him where they were, and he said at a silversmith's and watch-marker's, and gave the child directions where to go; I have never seen them since, nor did I see him till last Saturday week.

Prisoner. I said you ought to have a good case for them; and you said I have and old case; I said I know a friend of mine who has several steel cases, and he will not charge me much for one; I had forgotten to call for them; when I took them, you said do not put them loose into your pocket; and your niece gave me a bit of paper to put them in. Witness. No; I deny that positively.

Q. Why would you not allow her to he sworn? A. You did not ask for her to be sworn.

JAMES TOWERS . I was present when the prisoner took the spectacles, and said he would get a pretty case for them; she said she had and old case that wanted mending; but he said he would take them; I went to the house of a watchmaker to get them, but I could not; I heard her ask him about them several times, and saw him produce another pair on the Friday night; and he said "Take them till I bring yours;" he went away on the Saturday morning, and we did not see him again.

COURT. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes; and there was a young girl there.

ROBERT BURGESS . I am a beadle. I took up the prisoner on the 9th of March; I asked him if he had had the spectacles; he said he had them in his possession, and some person took them from him in a joke.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to get a case; she gave them into my hand; I put them down by the side of my saucer, and said I did not know what to do with them; she said to her niece, "Mary, go and get a bit of paper," which she did; and she said, mind you do not break them. I got a little in liquor, and how I lost them I do not know, I came home from Wapping on Friday night, after being out on their business, and she asked me again about them, and went into a great passion; I said, I have mislaid them at present, and there is a pair which you may use, and if I do not find yours, you shall go to a friend of mine and suit yourself; I told her she might go and get a pair of a friend of mine, who was a watchmaker in Conduit-street.

COURT to SARAH SIMMS. Q. Did you get him to go to Wapping about your husband's business? A. Yes; he did not tell me that he had lost them there - he did not mention the name of a watch maker in Conduit-street, and say I might go and get a pair there - he said my own were there.

COURT to ROBERT BURGESS. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes; the prisoner did not ask there for the young girl to be examined.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the Magistrate say there would be an opportunity of examining her at another place? A. No, he did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-149

725. WILLIAM LEEDS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 17lbs. weight of printing types, value 17s. , the goods of David Sydney and Mary Elizabeth Sydney .

DAVID SYDNEY. I am a printer , in partnership with my mother, Mary Elizabeth Sydney - we live in Northumberland-street, in the Strand - the prisoner was in our service. I know this type to be ours because it is part of an act of parliament I printed last year.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What sort of type is it? A. It is called English - it is a common type - I have no particular mark upon it - the same sort of type would print a book, but I know this is part of the Bognor act - It is still set up in pages.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames police surveyor. I saw the prisoner in the Strand on the 21st of February, with this type on his shoulder in an apron; I asked him what it was; he said lead; I asked where he got it; he said his aunt, who lived in Buckingham-street, gave it him; I went to the house but the person said he had had nothing from there - I then took him to the office.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see his aunt that night? A. No; but I have heard she lives there.

SARAH FORSYTH . I am the prisoner's aunt - I live in Buckingham-street. I never gave him any type - I have known him from his child-hood - he has always been a very good boy.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he in the habit of making little fishing-nets for himself? A. Yes, he was.

COURT to DAVID SYDNEY. Q. Are you quite sure it is your type? A. Yes, from our having to print part of the act in large letter, and we were forced to take some of another sort to use with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it home to melt, to put at the bottom of a net to sink it.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, one of whom engaged to employ him.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-150

726. SARAH MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 tea-pot, value 10s. , the goods of Frederick Johns .

JOHN EVANS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Frederick Johns, tinman , of Drury-lane . On the 6th of March I was in the workshop and saw the prisoner come into the shop and take the tea-pot off the counter, which she put under her shawl, and went out - I followed and brought her back with it - I gave her to my master, who is a constable.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I produce the property. The prisoner said distress drove her to it. I then searched her, and found a key in her bosom; I told her I was satisfied that was the key of her room; I found her place afterwards, and she appeared to be in great distress - she had but 71/2d.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-151

727. JOHN MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 1 jacket, value 2s., and 1 gimblet, value 1d. , the goods of James Milne .

JAMES MILNE. I am an apprentice to a shipwright.

I left this jacket and gimblet on board the Caledonia brig, on the 23d of March, about eight o'clock in the morning, which was near the Dundee Arms; I saw them again about three o'clock the same afternoon.

JOHN ADSLY . I am a caulker. On the 23d of March I saw the prisoner in the Dundee Arms yard - he had nothing then - I saw him again in about a quarter of an hour, going towards Hermitage-bridge, with this jacket - I was then on board the Caledonia; I asked him how he came by it, and said I knew the person it belonged to, and said if he would go to our master's I would show him who it belonged to; he went to the door, when I went in, and ran away. I am certain he is the man - a person stopped him and brought him back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was poverty made me do it.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-152

728. MARY MURRY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 4 yards of cloth, value 28s. , the goods of James Tegg .

JAMES TEGG. I live in Well-street, Oxford-street, and am a linen-draper . On the 11th of March I left some woollen cloth at Mr. Spurgeon's, a publican, in Gerrard-street , where the prisoner is servant ; I called at the house and asked Mrs. Spurgeon for it - she gave it me, but some had been cut off it - she said she was not aware of that - I measured it, and found four yards and a half had been cut off - this is it.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. What cloth is this? A. It is called second cloth; I can swear to it by a cut which matched the other piece - the constable found it at the prisoner's mother's.

JOHN HOWARD . I am the officer. Her mother is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-153

729. THOMAS NICHOLS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 28lbs. of lead, value 6s., the goods of James Sweetman , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JAMES SWEETMAN. I am a publican . I have a dwelling-house with some lead pipes in it, in Berwick-street, St. James's, Westminster - on the 6th of March the lead was all right; I employed the prisoner and another to empty a drain - I went out for the day and knew nothing of it till next morning, when my wife told me that a Bow-street officer had brought the prisoner with it there.

CHARLES COX . I live in the house, and gave the prisoner the light to go down stairs between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and again between three and four in the afternoon - his master went down with it.

THOMAS SHETSWELL . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Tuesday, the 7th of March, I saw the prisoner go into a pewterer's shop with a bag under his arm, about eleven o'clock; I went in after him - he turned round and came out again; I asked a little girl if he worked for them - she said No - I pursued and brought him back - I then took out these pieces of pipe and asked where he got them - he said from a drain he was cleaning somewhere near at hand - I found he had been at work at Mr. Sweetman's - I fitted this pipe to the place and it matched exactly.

Prisoner. I worked for Thomas Higgins, the bricklayer - he told me to take these things to the shop, and he would call for the money - he is now in prison, but they have made the affair up I suppose.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Eight Days .

Reference Number: t18260406-154

730. WILLIAM PRESS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 3lbs. weight of emery, value 1s.; 1 glazier's diamond, value 5s., and 1 shilling , the property of Shakespeare Reed and others, his partners.

Mr. ROBERTS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MARSH . I am foreman to Messrs. Shakespeare Reed and Co. - they live in East Smithfield , and are plateglass manufacturers . On the 30th of March I stopped the prisoner at my master's gate, and found on him 3lbs. of emery and a glazier's diamond.

JOHN HOWARD . I know this diamond to be my master's property; I had seen it about the premises the night before - the emery was lying about in considerable quantities - there was a shilling found on the prisoner, which I had marked and put into my desk.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I searched the prisoner and found a shilling on him, which Mr. Howard owned by two marks on it.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-155

731. JOSEPH WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 sheet, value 4s. , the goods of James Pearce .

THOMAS CANDIE . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by a street-keeper on the 14th of March; Mr. James Pearce, who keeps the Green Man public-house in New Bond-street, charged him with going up stairs into his house and taking this sheet off a bed in the third-floor room - he said he hoped he would forgive him.

JAMES PEARCE . As I was coming up the cellar-stairs my son cried out that a strange man was coming down stairs - I ran and took him, and found a sheet in his apron.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-156

732. GEORGE REYNOLDS and WILLIAM WOODWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 ham, value 7s., and 5 cheeses, value 8s. , the goods of John Sayre .

JOHN SAYRE. I live at Shadwell , and am a cheesemonger . The prisoner Reynolds had been my shopman for some months - this ham and five Dutch cheeses are my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Had you a good character with him? A. Yes; I would take him back again.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am the parish-constable. On the 25th of February, in the morning, I saw Woodward coming past Shadwell Church with five cheeses and a ham - I asked him where he got them - he said he bought them at a shop, pointing towards Mr. Sayre's - I took him to the

shop, where I found Reynolds; I asked him if he had sold them to Woodward - he said No, he had not; I then took them from him, and took him to the office - as we were going along he told me Reynolds had given him the cheeses and the ham; I said "For God's sake don't bring an innocent man into trouble, as it is my duty to tell our Magistrate what you say;" he said 'What I tell you is true," and he said the same in the lock-up house; I then went back and told Mr. Sayre what he had said - Reynolds then fell on his knees, and begged Mr. Sayre and God to forgive him - he did not say how he came to take them; I found this handkerchief in his box - he then put a handkerchief round his neck, tied it very tight, and extended his arms - I believe, had it not been for his fellow-servants, he would have destroyed himself.

WOODWARD'S Defence. I had bought them of the prisoner - I went into the shop, and he said he had them to dispose of, and, situated as I was, I felt bound to do the best I could to get a shilling.

Thirteen Witnesses gave Reynolds an excellent character.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

WOODWARD - GUILTY. Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Recommended to Mercy .

Reference Number: t18260406-157

733. HENRY ROBEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d. the goods of James Palmer .

RACHAEL PALMER . I am the wife of James Palmer - we live in Portland-town , and keep a clothes' shop . On the 15th of March I was ironing in the back parlour, when I heard a noise - I looked round and saw the prisoner go out of the shop - I went to the door and saw him with several boys - I could not perceive whether he had any thing in his hand, but I sent my daughter after him - I then missed these boots from my shop, which I had seen just before.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I was in a garden by the fields, and heard the cry of Stop him; I saw the prisoner run across the garden and drop something - I followed him, but he was stopped before I got up to him - I then returned to see what he had dropped, and found these boots, which I took out of some water and gave the officer - I had never lost sight of him.

ANN PALMER . I am the prosecutrix's daughter - my mother told me the boots were gone - I ran and saw the prisoner with them in his hand - he was then walking, but when the cry of Stop thief! was raised he ran - I did not see him stopped, but I am quite sure he is the man.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I have the boots which I received from Mr. Simpson - he brought the prisoner and three others to the office, but the others were discharged.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the Park and some boys gave me a penny to hold while they tossed up for it - the one who lost wanted me to give it - when I refused, and they pulled me about - I ran from them; when I was taken and charged with stealing these shoes - a person about my size, in a blue coat, had ran by me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-158

734. CHARLES STERLING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 2 silver spoons, value 20s. , the goods of Richard Parr .

ELIZABETH PAGET . I live in Paget-street, Pentonville . On the 3d of April I heard a knock at the door - I went, and saw the prisoner, who asked for Mr. Parr; I said he was not at home, but he would not be more than ten or fifteen minutes; he walked in, and sat down, but soon afterwards rang the bell, and said he had to call in the neighbourhood at seven o'clock, and he would return at eight; he went away, and I missed the two spoons, which I had seen within an hour before. I went to the door, and saw him running in White Conduit-street - he was taken shortly afterwards.

RICHARD PARR. I lodge at this house. I never saw the prisoner till last Monday, when I dined in the same box with him at a tavern; I asked him to call on me, and gave him my direction; these spoons are my property - they were on a side-board.

WILLIAM DENNIS . I saw the prisoner in White Conduit-street on Monday last - he was on the full run, and I followed him, in consequence of Mrs. Paget calling Stop thief! I saw him throw two spoons over a board fence; I left them, and went on and stopped him.

FREDERICK LLOYD . I saw the prisoner on Monday last, running along the Back-row, Pentonville. I saw him throw these two spoons over a boarded fence - I went and got them.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I came up with the prisoner while he was struggling with Dennis; he dared me to strike him, which I did not do, but I put my handkerchief on him, and my partners came up and secured him.

Prisoner. I have only to say that the theft was the impulse of the moment - Mr. Parr having accosted me in a public place, I thought it my duty to call on him. The conversation commenced on his part, and he gleaned all he could respecting my situation in life.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-159

735. MARY WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 13 plates, value 2s. , the goods of William Denne .

SARAH CHARINGOLD . I am servant to Mr. William Denne, a publican , who lives in Monmouth-street . I was called into the passage on the 18th of March, and saw the prisoner there - a person told me she had been into the kitchen - I went down, and missed the plates - I found them tied up in the table-cloth, which had been on the table in the kitchen - I took them out of her hand in the passage; they are my master's property - she said a man gave them to her.

JONATHAN LIDDIARD . I took the prisoner - she said a man had given them to her in the yard; I went and examined the yard, and there was no way for a man to have got out.

Prisoner. I waited for the person who gave me them, and this woman told me to go away, but I would not - I waited for the person.

SARAH CHARINGOLD . I did desire her to go - I do not think she was sober.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-160

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

736. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 3 frocks, value 10s.; 4 aprons, value 2s.; 2 pinafores, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s., and 1 frill, value 6d. , the goods of Jane Riley , spinster .

JANE RILEY. I am servant to Mr. Smith, of Museum-street, Bloomsbury . On Monday, the 3d of April, the prisoner came down three pairs of stairs from the top of our house - she was on the threshold of the street door, and I called to know what she wanted - she made me no answer, but went out; I ran, and caught hold of her shawl, but she got from me; I followed her, and brought her back with a bundle, containing these articles, which are mine; they were in a box on the landing-place; she was a perfect stranger, and had no right in the house.

ANDREW SMITH . I am the master of Jane Riley. - The prisoner had no right in my house; she was left in my custody while I sent for the constable.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Billingsgate, and was stopped by a woman, who asked me if I would go and fetch a bundle - she said she had had some words with her husband, and she did not like to go in, for fear he should strike her; I wanted the gentleman to go with me, and I would have shown him the woman.

ANDREW SMITH re-examined. Q. Did she ask you to go with her? A. No - she did not; there was no person there.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-161

737. WILLIAM ROBERT WEBSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 19 sash weights, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Oliver .

THOMAS HANCOCK . I am a watchman. On the 28th of March I was on Clerkenwell-green, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner wheeling these weights in a barrow; I stopped him, and asked where he was going; he said to Bartholemew-close, and he had brought them from Hoxton.

JOSEPH LEADER . I was at work with a wheel-barrow on the 28th of March, in Spa-fields - I missed it the next morning - it had been locked by the wheel. I had seen the prisoner round that neighbourhood several times, but never spoke to him, and he had no right to take my barrow away.

THOMAS OLIVER. I am a builder , and live at Pentonville-terrace. On Wednesday morning, the 29th of March, I missed nineteen sash weights out of my garden - I traced the barrow mark a considerable distance from my premises, across the fields. I know they are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260406-162

738. RICHARD WALLER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of William Spink Cummings .

WILLIAM SPINK CUMMINGS. I am a surgeon , and live at Limehouse . On the 31st of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I left my shop for one or two minutes, and on returning I saw the skirts of a person's coat making out of my shop door; I turned round the counter, and made to the door, and saw the prisoner about twelve off, with the coat on his arm - I had left it in my surgery.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH ADAMS . I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-163

739. ROBERT BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Felix , from his person .

WILLIAM FELIX. I am a patten-maker , and live in Golden-lane. I was near Gray's Inn-lane, in Holborn , on the 14th of March, just after twelve o'clock at night. I had had a handkerchief in my left-hand coat pocket - I was going to make use of it, and missed it; I looked about, and saw the prisoner with it in his right-hand - I collared him, and he dropped it; I picked it up, and gave him in charge to the watchman - he said he did it to procure him a night's lodging.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MAGRATH . I am a constable, and took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-164

740. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 pair of wooden steps , the goods of John Hare and Joseph Hare .

No value being stated in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260406-165

741. THOMAS BYGRAVE was indicted for stealing on the 10th of June , 1 watch, value 2l. 15s., the goods of Thomas Butterworth , from his person .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BUTTERWORTH. I am a labourer , and live at St. Neots, Huntingdonshire. In 1823 I had a sunk wheel silver watch - it was in June or July that year; the minutehand was broken half off by my thumb nail in opening it, and there was a dent near the handle of it, worn nearly through - I know the prisoner well - I saw him in July 1823, when he robbed me - he used to be at the cook-shop of a night, and I had seen him at Squire Wyard's, at Pickler's-hill , where I was at work - the gardener let me lodge there, because I could not get a lodging - the prisoner came to me several times one night, and I said he could not come there because I was sure the gardener was about, and the place had been attacked before - I had the watch in my pocket when the prisoner came to the place - there were some trusses of hay - he asked if he could not lie down - I said No - I laid still till the prisoner, who was close by me on a truss of straw, or hay, gave me a blow on the head, which rather made me insensible, and cut my head and some of my hair off - he knocked my head against a rough brick wall, and I begged for my life, and gave him my leather purse - he took the chain of my watch to try to get it out, but he could not - he then put his thumb and finger in and got it out - he is the man, and the man only, who did it - there was another man there, but he did not interfere - the prisoner had been in the room about half an hour

- it was quite moon-light, as light as could be - I saw him before he came in, and when he got out - and have no doubt upon earth but that he is the man - the chain of the watch was afterwards found among the straw - as soon as he got the watch he was out of the place, and crossed the London-road, because he thought he heard the patrols coming - the other man went away with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. What time of night was this? A. When he first came I looked at my watch, and it wanted ten minutes to one - I was lying in a sort of shed, where there was hay and straw - there was no window, but some great holes - there was no door, one side of it was open, and that was where we got in - the only opportunity I had of seeing him was in this hovel - I never saw him from that time till about five weeks ago - I had seen him before - Warner, who is here now, came and told me he had got my property, and asked if I knew him - I said Yes - this was about a week before Bedford Assizes; Warner never told me that his brother was accused of horse stealing, nor any thing of the kind - he did not say the prisoner had accused his brother, and a man named Walker, of horse stealing - I never heard that Warner's brother, and a man of the name of Walker, were accused of horse stealing, and were to be tried at the Bedford Assizes.

COURT. Q. Did you ever hear that Warner's brother and Walker were tried for horse stealing? A. No; I heard a man named Monks was tried for horse stealing. but I never heard that Warner's brother and Walker were tried for it till this moment - I did not know the man who came in with the prisoner - upon my oath I have not prosecuted that man for this offence in Hertfordshire; I did not prosecute James Low for this offence; I went to the Hertford Assizes at Christmas, 1823, with this Hertfordshire fellow; but I did not charge him with this offence, as I charge this man now, with stealing my watch, and beating my head against the wall - I mean to stand to that.

COURT. Q. I caution you, if you do not answer fairly, we will commit you. Did you attend the Hertfordshire Assizes? A. Yes I did, at Christmas 1823 - I was sworn in Court; the man, who was the prisoner there, was James Low; he was accused of bringing this man to rob me.

Q. Was any thing said about this watch? A. No; it was not mentioned, neither money nor watch; there was a witness came who went against him and cast him; I did not say he was one of the men who had my watch, but he was the person who brought the man to rob me; that man, who worked with me, was drinking with me, got them to come and rob me, and said what money I had got, and what watch I had got, and said it would be well to part it among them; the gardener put that man in the cage; and his son came out with a blunderbuss and assisted him, but this prisoner had run away then.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did you charge a man of the name of Low with stealing your watch? A. No; I did not; I appeared as a witness against him for bringing this man to rob me of my watch; I cannot tell what happened to him; I heard he had two years' imprisonment; I did not accuse him with stealing my watch, but of bringing this man to rob me; I had not been at a public-house the night before - I always went to a cook-shop, and went to bed at eight o'clock. Low was taken as soon as this man had run away - he was going away after him, and I took him; I never saw my watch afterwards, nor the prisoner till, last Month. I cannot tell whether it was in June or July - it was in hay harvest - Warner never told me to say it was in July - he never told me any thing about it.

COURT. Q. Whereabouts was this? A. At Pickler's Hill, in Middlesex, just as you turn to East Barnet.

THOMAS WARNER . I worked with the prisoner - he went to buy a watch-chain; I asked him what he had got, and he said a chain for a watch, which he had won at a mountebank's at Barnet; two or three weeks afterwards he told me that he went to a little place in a garden, and a man took him and one more to rob a person; they waited while he laid down, and they thought he was asleep, and they set upon him, and tried to get his watch and money, that the man was too strong for him, and turned him over twice, but he knocked his head against the wall, and got his watch and money; I saw the watch - the minute-hand was broken off, and there was a dent in it, near the swivel; he said it was at Pickler's Hill, near Barnet, in a shed in a gardener's place; he said the man had a pair of buckskin breeches on, and the chain was off, and he had hard work to get his finger and thumb in, to get the watch out; I had a brother tried for horse stealing, but I never told the prosecutor so - the prisoner and I were brought up under one roof, and while we were sitting in my own house at home, one Sunday, he told me of this; I do not know the prosecutor - the first time I saw him was one Sunday, at St. Neot's - a man who lived at Holloway, pointed him out to me; I was not present when the prosecutor saw the prisoner; when the prisoner told me of what he had done, he said he wished he had such another chance; I know he sold the watch to his brother William, who is now in Newgate; I worked with his brother last wheat hoeing time. I know the prisoner never had a watch before in his life.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Was it in 1823 he told you this story? A. It was two years ago last hay time; I went down to where the prosecutor lives, to tell him; the prisoner continued to work in the same neighbourhood till he was taken; I did not go before a Magistrate to tell what he had told me; I think the prisoner was in Bedford gaol last - I am sure he was there last spring; in January or February, I think, he worked for a Mr. Fly, and now and then for a Mr. Goff; Walker and my brother were both charged with horse stealing by the prisoner; they were to be tried at the last Bedford Assizes - it was not till after they were in jail that I went to accuse this man - I was at their trial; another brother of mine contrived to get the prisoner in jail; before that he was at Bedford, committed on this charge, and he was removed here; he was taken on the Monday, as the Assizes were on the Wednesday - he had come down as a witness against my brother - the first time I saw the prosecutor was on the Sunday, as the prisoner was taken on the Monday; I saw the prosecutor at Bedford Assizes; he knew my brother was charged with stealing a horse; I had no conversation with him; the prisoner was to be a witness against my brother - he knew it - he was not in Court but below stairs; he had been in the Court, where my brother and Walker were standing at the bar, but he went away before the trial was over; I am quite sure

about that: I did not go with him - he went away from me out of the Sessions house, while my brother was on his trial - he did not tell me about the watch; I told him I knew the man, and had seen the property. I have been in gaol myself three times - the last time was last Midsummer, for that fellow stealing a watch, about twelve months before; and the first time was seven years ago. I had no spite against the prisoner for being put in gaol last time for what he had done.

Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you convicted at any of these times? A. No; the prisoner was in the same gaol with me, on another charge for a watch, but he was acquitted - the man did not know him when he came to the bar - I never shewed the prisoner to the prosecutor at all - I was present when he saw him at the Assizes, and he knew him immediately.

Prisoner's Defence. Warner and Day fetched Thomas Butterworth up, and they had me sent to gaol two days before they had their trial.

JOHN ALLMAN . The prisoner was at work with me at Biggleswade two years ago last June; he joined my company on the 18th of June, and worked with me one month - Thomas Newman worked there at the same time - I saw the prisoner every day that month - it was not possible for him to have gone a journey of sixty or seventy miles without my knowing it.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I live at Biggleswade, and worked with the prisoner in June 1823, at Biggleswade, in Bedfordshire - he worked with me every day, and could not have gone a journey of sixty or seventy miles.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-166

742. THOMAS DELOE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 1s.6d., the goods of James Andrews , from his person .

JOHN BALLINGHALL WHYTE . I am a cheesemonger. I was on Tower-hill about noon on the 11th of March - I saw Mr. Andrews standing by a crowd on the hill, and saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of his pocket - I lifted his hand up with the handkerchief in it, and took him into custody.

JAMES ANDREWS. I was on Tower-hill, and had a handkerchief in my left hand coat pocket; Whyte gave me information; I turned and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am an officer. I have had the handkerchief ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking over Tower-hill, and saw some persons assembled together - I went up, as another person would, and kicked against this handkerchief - I picked it up and was then taken.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character, one of whom said he would take him again into his employ.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-167

743. PETER FRAZER were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Charles Sowray , from his person .

CHARLES SOWRAY. I am waiter at Richard's coffee-house, Fleet-street. On the evening of the 20th of March, between eight and nine o'clock, I was going down to Waterloo-bridge , when the prisoner came and took my handkerchief out of my pocket - he ran across the road - I cried Stop thief! he ran over towards the English Opera house, and was taken - I had not lost sight of him for two minutes.

WILLIAM FORTY . I was watching the prisoner, with two others, for twenty minutes or half an hour; I saw the prisoner attempt to take a gentleman's handkerchief, but the gentleman looked over his shoulder, and he went away; I then followed them to Waterloo-bridge, when they went up to Mr. Sowray - the prisoner lifted up the pocket with his left-hand and took the handkerchief with his right; I saw it immediately thrown down, and the prisoner ran across the road - I attempted to catch him but I could not - he ran towards the coaches - I stooped down and waited till he came nearly abreast of me - I then collared him - I had not known him before.

Prisoner. I was going to my brother's, and this gentleman came and got hold of me - he said I had taken a handkerchief out of his pocket - I told him it was wrong, and then the officer came up - I did not run at all.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-168

744. DIANA McFALL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 watch, value 40s.; 1 seal, value 3s.; 1 watch-key, value 6d., and 1 watch-chain, value 6d., the goods of George Meek , from his person .

GEORGE MEEK. I am a seaman . The last ship I belonged to was a schooner, called the Nimble. On the 8th of March I was residing in Broad-street, Wapping - about eleven o'clock on that evening, I fell in with the prisoner opposite the Royalty Theatre - I was rather the worse for liquor; I asked what I was to give her - she said 5s.; I said very well, if she would give me something to eat out of it - we went to a cook-shop: she then went to Cobourg-street - we there disagreed, and I would not stop with her - I went away - after I got about 150 yards from the house I missed my watch - I went back, but I could not find it.

GEORGE GILES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Commercial-road East. I have a watch which the prisoner, and another person, brought to pawn on the 9th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning - I asked several questions, the prisoner said a man, or her husband, had sent her to pawn it. While I was talking to her, notice of the robbery was brought in - I jumped over the counter and secured her.(Property produced and sworn to).

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-169

745. SARAH WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 purse, value 3d.; 1 sovereign, and 4 half-crowns, the property of Frances Stringer , from her person .

WILLIAM BOWLER . I am a servant, and live in Theobald's-road. On the 16th of March I was in my master's gig, in Oxford-street , waiting for him, when I saw the prosecutrix pass by, with a reticule on her arm, which was unclasped; I could not see what it contained. I saw the prisoner, and another female with her, pass by her, about two or three yards - they then returned, and looked at her reticule; they returned again, and looked at it again

- two ladies then came by - the prisoner pushed between them, and took something out of the reticule, but I could not see what - she crossed, and gave something to her companion. I pulled my horse from behind a carriage, went up to Miss Stringer, and asked if she had lost any thing; she said she had that moment lost her purse out of her reticule; I said I could show her the person. Clements then took the prisoner in my presence.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was this in broad day-light? A. Yes - a quarter before one o'clock; there were two ladies not half a yard from Miss Stringer; they had a good opportunity of seeing the prisoner; she rushed between them, and put her hand into the open reticule, but they took no notice of it; they were close by the side of the prosecutrix, and going in the same direction; I do not know whether they saw it or not; I got out of my gig in about ten minutes - the ladies had walked some distance - I did not call to them to stop, nor did not call Stop thief! The prisoner was in the crowd, and a person (who is not here) had seized her - as soon as I got out he let her go, and I took her. I do not know what became of her companion; there was nothing found on the prisoner.

MISS FRANCIS STRINGER . I live in Marshall-street, Golden-square. I was in Oxford-street about one o'clock on the 16th of March - I had no servant with me - I had my reticule on my arm, and both my hands were in my muff - the money stated in the indictment was in a beaded purse, and 5d. in halfpence, which I had just received in change. I drew up to a window, and in a moment I felt the bag much lighter. I turned round, and found it was open; I am quite certain I had the money a few minutes before. As I turned, the witness said to me, "Have you lost any thing?" I said, "Oh, dear! I have lost my purse;" he said, "Cross over, and I will show you the girl who put her hand into your bag." I crossed the wide crossing, and stopped the prisoner; I told her I had lost my purse, and from what the young man had said, it must have been her who took it; she was much displeased at my stopping her, and in a moment I was surrounded by a great crowd, and a young man said, "Oh! here is your purse," showing me a beaded purse, which was not mine, and had only some duplicates in it. I have never seen my purse or money since; Bowler's master said he would drive the gig home, and he should go with her.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the purse shortly before? A. Yes - I had been in a shop in Regent-street; I think I must have left my reticule open, as the snap appears to be a very good one. I cannot say whether there were any ladies near me; I had not stopped - I merely drew up to a window; the purse was rather heavy, having the copper in it - I did not feel it taken.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, and this gentleman said I took the purse - there were many people passing. The purse the officer has got is my own - the lady said I had her purse, and I showed her mine.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-170

746. SOPHIA CORCORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 ring, value 10s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 10s.; 1 spectacle-case, value 2d.; 1 napkin, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 2 books, value 2s.; 1 yard of lace, value 1s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of Edward Lycett , her master.

EDWARD LYCETT. I live in Windsor-terrace, City-road, and am a book-binder . The prisoner lived with me, as maid of all-work ; she was hired by the year. We had lost many things, and I spoke to her about some articles which had been given by my wife to wash - the property stated in the indictment was found in her box, on Friday evening, the 17th of March - I had called her up, and told her we had missed such and such articles, and I wished to see her boxes - in the first box we found soap, tea, candles, and other things, which we could not identify - she then took her other box from under her bed - she could not find the key; she went to get a knife to open it, and as soon as it was opened I saw my silk handkerchief; Mrs. Lycett then said, "I should not wonder if my ring is there;" the prisoner then said, "Oh! ma'am, if you will forgive me I will tell you - it is all your property" - I know these articles to be mine.

GEORGE WALTERS . I am an officer. I found the box in Mr. Lycett's parlour, when I was sent for. I found the prisoner sitting on the stairs, crying; the articles were given into my charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I was cleaning my mistress' bed-room I found the ring between the wardrobe and the drawers - it was broken, and I thought I would keep it, and then I thought I would give it to my mistress - one of the napkins belongs to me, and I washed it with one of my mistress', but I did not know which was her's, as mine was not marked; I had taken the books to read, and I used the spectacles of an evening, but I intended to return them; the lace was on an old cap, and very dirty, but I washed it - the handkerchief I had put round my neck one night, when I went out to look for a situation, but I did not mean to keep it.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having behaved well in her situation .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-171

747. MICHAEL JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 half-crown, and 1 shillings, the monies of Jane Morris , his mistress .

JANE MORRIS. I live in James-street , and keep a greengrocer's shop . The prisoner was quite a stranger; I had ever seen him till I saw him in the shop; on the 27th of February, when I was at dinner, and through my little window I saw a boy in the shop; I ran in, and saw him there, and there was a piece of work at the door; some person said,"There are thieving boys about," and a young woman said, "Look if you have been robbed?" the prisoner stood there all the time, but when I looked round, and saw I had lost the money from my till, he ran away, and Mr. Lamb followed him.

JOHN LAMB . On the 27th of February I heard an alarm of Stop thief! I came out, and said, "What is the matter?" a woman said a boy had robbed a till, and directed me to follow him - I followed him into a house, then into a yard, and then into a place like a dust-hole -

he then went into a back kitchen, and got up a chimney - I found a short ladder, and put it up the chimney, and sent a man to the top, to take care of him if he got up, but he came down - he gave up the half-crown, sixpence, and three pence, which he had, and begged we would not prosecute him, as he might be transported.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing, not being a servant .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-172

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 8.

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

748. GEORGE KAYE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 1 reticule, value 8s.; 2 seals, value 2l.; 1 pencil-case, value 5s.; 1 knife, value 8s.; 8 sovereigns, 18 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Charlotte Roget , spinster , from her person .

CHARLOTTE ROGET. I am single. On the 3d of April, between twelve and one o'clock. I was in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury - I saw the prisoner as I was crossing George-street - he made a snatch at my bag, which I had in my hand, and took part of the chain; he then made a second snatch, struggled with me, and got it - I ran and kept up with him some time; I then saw him dart into a house. I was surrounded by a very great crowd, which impeded my progress - and when he was secured I got out of the crowd; my reticule contained the articles stated in the indictment. I saw him at Bow-street on the Monday following.

RICHARD GARDNER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found a sovereign upon him: I took him from the information I had received, that there had been a robbery committed - he said he knew nothing at all about it; I asked him where he got the sovereign - he said he had saved it by 2d. and 3d. at a time - he said he sold lamp cottons.

Prisoner. I know nothing about it. I had saved a sovereign, and was going to change it that day, to go to market with. I am innocent of the charge - my father and mother are dead; I was apprentice to a shoemaker, but my sight failing I could not follow it, but took to selling lamp cottons.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-173

749. CHARLES WETHERINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 5lbs. weight of tea, value 30s. , the goods of Samuel Candler and Thomas William Younghusband Collinson , his masters.

THOMAS WILLIAM YOUNGHUSBAND COLLINSON. I am in partnership with Samuel Candler, we are tea dealers , and live in Princes-street, Leicester-square ; the prisoner was an apprentice - he had been there two or three years. On Sunday morning last, I went into the warehouse and saw some tea scattered by the side of a chest - the prisoner was there, and I waited till he was gone out to breakfast - I then traced the tea to his drawer in the manufactory - it was not locked - I opened it and found about one pound of the same tea as that in the chest - I informed my partner of it - we sent for an officer - I had heard the prisoner say he way going to get his hair cut; and while I went for the officer he went out - I then went to his drawer again and found the tea removed; but I saw on the table the prisoner's clothes, which he was going to put on, and under them we found about two ounces of tea in a paper - I marked the paper and left it there - the officer went after him as he was going home to his parents - we afterwards found some more tea in another drawer, belonging to another boy, which the prisoner was told to look in - the value of all the tea was about 30s.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Had you a lad of the name of Palin in your employ? Yes; he is here - he is about eighteen or nineteen years of age - we have three apprentices - two in the shop, and the prisoner in the manufactory - Palin is a porter in the manufactory - any person might have put tea into the drawers; the drawer, in which we found the largest quantity of tea, was Palin's - it was in a canvass bag.

THOMAS GOOK . I am the officer. On Sunday morning I went to the house and saw the prisoner come out; I stopped him, and said I thought he had something about him not right; he said he had not; I said "What is in your bundle;" he said "Some paper to make caps;" I said I must take him to the watch-house; and as we were going along, I saw him trying to put something into his pocket; I put my hand in and took from him this small parcel of tea in this paper; I then asked where the remainder of the tea was that had been in the drawer; he said it was in another drawer in the manufactory; I desired him to go back with me and show me the drawer; he did so, and pointed out a drawer, in which I understood Palin kept some things; I found there between four and five pounds of tea; I asked who put it there; he said, after some hesitation, that he did; I then asked how far Palin was implicated in it; he said about as much as he was, and they did not intend to take it out of the house, but to make them some breakfasts and save a shilling.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say, in addition, that it was at Palin's instigation? A. Yes, and what he said induced me to take Palin into custody - but he was discharged.

THOMAS PALIN . On Friday morning I saw the prisoner take about four handsful of tea out of a chest, and put it into his apron.

Cross-examined. Q. Upon your oath did not you ask this poor lad to take some of the tea, that you might have it for your breakfasts, and save 1s.? A. No; I did not - I did not like to go and tell my master - I did not ask him to do it - nor know that he was going to do it - I did not say a word to him till he brought it in - I had a little bit of it. I have been in Newgate myself once for two days, but never any where else.

Prisoner's Defence. Thomas Palin was the first instigator of it.

MR. COLLINSON re-examined. The prisoner was with us some years - had a very honourable character - Palin and him were on terms of intimacy.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of good character .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-174

750. MARTIN McCARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 adze, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Briant .

CHARLES JACKSON . I am in the employ of Robert Briant - he is a wheelwright . When I went to breakfast, on the 10th of March, I put this adze behind some wood on his wharf - when I returned in about three-quarters of an hour I missed it - I found it again on the 16th, in possession of Thomas Salmon.

THOMAS SALMON . I am a shoemaker. I bought an adze on the 10th or 11th of March, of the prisoner; he said he found it in the mud-hole.

JEREMIAH GIDNEY . I am street-keeper. I have an adze. I asked the prisoner where he got it - he said he did not steal it, but another boy did; I went in search of the other boy, but he denied it; I brought the prisoner to him, and the boy said he did not steal it; the prisoner said "You did, and gave it to me to sell, and I sold it."

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to seek for work - I met these boys who said they knew where there was a nice adze; I said perhaps you stole it, and they said No, they found it, and had hidden it in the mud - they said"Will you come at night and get it?" I said I would if they had not stolen it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-175

751. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , four loaves of bread, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Hopkins .

DIANA HOPKINS . I am the wife of Samuel Hopkins - we live in a back garret, in Bird-street, Mary-le-bone . On the morning of the 16th of March, I was sitting in my room, and heard a knock at the door of the next room; I went to the door and saw the prisoner there; she then came into my room, and asked if a person lived there who bound shoes; I said No; she then went away and I went, in a few minutes afterwards, to my cupboard, on the landing place, and missed four quartern loaves, and some other things - this was three or four o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner was brought to me in the evening of the next day; I asked her if she had taken these things - she said No; the watchman told me to get my shawl and go to the watch-house, and as we were going along the prisoner said she had taken them, and if I would not prosecute her, her mother would make it up.

MARY ELLIS . I live in the house with Mrs. Hopkins. I saw the prisoner go out very quickly with a bundle in her apron, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of March.

THOMAS HENDERSON . I am a watchman. I took up the prisoner and took her to No. 1, Bird-street. As soon as Mrs. Hopkins saw her she said she was the person - she said she did not take it, but as we were going to the watch-house, she said she did take them, and if they would not prosecute her her mother would pay for it.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman, whom I met at the corner of Bird-street, sent me up to see if the old lady was at home, and said she could not take her caps to do - she then sent me to see if the shoe-binder was at home; I came down, with my hands under my apron - I know nothing about the bread - the watchman has many a night wanted me to go into his box, and to take liberties with me, and because I would not he owes me a spite.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18260406-176

752. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 1 half-crown, and 3 shillings , the goods of John Cater .

GEORGIANA CATER . I am the daughter of George Cater, a gardener - we live at Hackney . On the 3d of March I was in the parlour writing, when I saw, from the reflection of a glass-door, that a person was in the shop with his hand in the till - I went out and caught hold of the prisoner while he was in that position; I asked him what he had taken - he said Nothing, he wanted a half-pennyworth of nuts - I then shut the door and stood there till I saw a man pass by whom I knew - I sent him for a constable, and he took him - I examined the till and missed 5s. 6d. from it - I saw the prisoner searched, half-a-crown and three shillings were found on him.

JOHN ADAMSON . I am the constable. I searched the prisoner and found half-a-crown in his fob, and three shillings in his mouth.

JOHN GARVA . I was present when the prisoner was searched, and three shillings were found in his mouth.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-177

753. THOMAS WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of William Marsh .

WILLIAM MARSH. This coat, waistcoat, and breeches, are mine - I had them all safe in my room at the Red Lion and Sun public-house, Highgate , at six o'clock in the morning of the 2d of March - I returned at night and missed them - I saw them in the possession of the pawnbroker a few days afterwards.

ANN FIELD . My uncle keeps the public-house. The prisoner lodged there, for a night or two, some months ago - the prosecutor slept there on the 2d of March; I made his bed that morning between ten and eleven o'clock - I saw the lid of his box was partly off, and his clothes were in it - the prisoner came into the house between one and two o'clock, and dined, but I did not see where he went.

WILLIAM HELPS . I have seen the prisoner in the taproom drinking, and I saw him there on the 2d of March - he went towards the back premises about four o'clock - he had nothing with him then.

JAMES NEWIS . On the 2d of March I saw the prisoner, between five and six o'clock in the evening, between the Crown and the Horse and Groom public-houses - he had a bundle under his arm, which appeared to be either blue or black at the corner.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I apprehended one Miller in company with the prisoner, and from some information I got from him, I was induced to take the prisoner - I made him no promise or threat, but he said that it was a very hard thing that Miller should swear so hard against him, when he told him where the things were, and how to get them.

CHARLES EGGLETON . I went to the prison with Mr.

Marsh, to see the prisoner; I asked him if he knew where the clothes were, and he told me they were pawned near Shoreditch church, and the ticket was torn - I went and found them at Mr. Law's.

RICHARD LAW . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Hoxton. Those clothes were brought by a young man on the 2d of March, about seven o'clock in the evening; I have every reason to suppose it was the prisoner, but I cannot be positive of his person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence I did not take the things - I was not about the place at all.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-178

754. WILLIAM VINCENT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 tea-pot, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Heales .

RICHARD HEALES. I live in Tottenham-court-road , and am an ironmonger . This tea-pot was in my shop window on Saturday, the 25th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon; on Monday morning I missed it I saw it again on the Wednesday following - it has my private mark on the bottom of it.

THOMAS FOXALL . I am a watchman at the Seven-dials. Between nine and ten o'clock, on the evening of the 25th of February, I took the prisoner with this tea-pot under his coat - he was going down to a house where they buy such things - I took him into custody, and charged him with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Earl-street, and a boy asked me to take the tea-pot and sell it for him - the watchman took me - I turned round and shewed him another boy; he sent another watchman after him, and he was taken.

THOMAS FOXALL. He did point out a lad without a cap, who ran away - he said he (the prisoner) was going to sell it for him - he was taken but was discharged by the Magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-179

755. ROBERT SMITH and ROBERT LANGWORTHY were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 3 pairs of boots, value 20s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 10s., and 1 shoe, value 1s. , the goods of James Stunner .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a shoemaker, and live in Gray's-inn-lane. I am employed by Mr. James Stunner, of the King's-road . On the 4th of March I went home to dinner, at a quarter before one o'clock, and left the shop locked - I returned, in about half an hour; the top door was locked, and the bottom one open - the bolt was broken, and was hanging partly off - I went in and missed a pair of top boots, two pair of Wellington boots, and some shoes, which I had left on the counter there - they are the property of Mr. James Stunner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WELCH . I saw the prisoner Smith coming out of the shop about one o'clock - he had these boots and shoes tied in this apron round his middle - he was joined by Langworthy and another man, about twelve yards from the house - I followed them as far as the House of Correction, where I met the turnkeys, and gave charge of these prisoners - the other escaped.

GEORGE DAY . I took Smith in consequence of what Welch said, and took from him these articles in this apron - he said they belonged to his father, and he was taking them home.

FREDERICK WAGNER . I am a turnkey. I stopped Langworthy - he was in company with Smith when I first saw him.

SMITH's Defence. Langworthy was in Gray's-inn-lane - I asked him the nearest way to Spafields - he said he was going as far as the House of Correction and would shew me - we went together, and he told me to go straight on when we were taken.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Whipped and Discharged.

LANGWORTHY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-180

756. HANAH THORPE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 1 coat, value 10s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas William Coleman .

THOMAS WILLIAM COLEMAN. The prisoner lodges on the first floor of my master's house, in White Lion-street, Seven-dials . On the 23d of February I lost a coat and pair of trousers, which were in a box at the door of my master's room; the prisoner left the lodgings three or four days afterwards; I saw her again on the 5th of March - I then asked if she had stolen my clothes, and told her she had better tell the truth - she confessed that she had.(Property produced and sworn to).

GEORGH WEBB . I am a pawnbroker. This property was pawned by a female, but I do not know who.

THOMAS BINFORD KERSWELL . I am a constable, and produce the duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-181

757. RICHARD THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 piece of timber, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Corpe .

THOMAS CORPE. I am a timber merchant . This is my timber - it was safe on my premises on the 17th of March- I saw it from nine to eleven o'clock in the morning, and did not miss it till the evening of the 18th.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a plasterer, in Mr. Corpe's employ - he is a builder at Church-row, Limehouse. I saw the prisoner in East India-road, with a piece of timber on his shoulder, which I had had to work upon - he carried it across the roads, and into the Globe-road, Bethnalgreen, where he pitched it against a coal-shed, and then went on to Bethnal-green; he came back and offered it for sale to a coal-dealer, as he told me.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a bricklayer's labourer, as he appeared to be, in Mile-end-road.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-182

578. WILLIAM WEIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 3 squares of glass, value 5s.; 1 piece of sponge, value 1s.; 2 harness plates, value 1s., and 6 pieces of wood, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Corpe .

THOMAS CORPE. I am a builder and live at Limehouse - the prisoner was my carman . On the 11th of March I ordered him to take some squares of glass from my yard to

some buildings - I had seen the boxes of glass in my yard on the 9th of March - in consequence of information I went to the prisoner's lodgings and found two squares of this glass, which had been cut, and another which had not been cut - on comparing them they appeared to match exactly - I took the officer with me, who turned up the bed and found a number of pieces of timber, two brass harness plates and a piece of sponge, which I knew to be mine.

RICHARD LOVEJOY . I live at Bromley. I am Mr. Corpe's glazier - on the 9th of March the prisoner spoke to me to put some squares of glass in - I told him if he would buy the glass I would - he asked me where was the best place to buy it, and I told him at Mr. Tilt's - the next day he told me he had got it, and I put in two squares for him that evening - when I went I found they were larger than the size - I asked him how it was, and he said his wife made a mistake in the size, and he had given 1s. 6d. each for them - the next day the officers came - I went with them to the prisoner's house, and found this glass there - it was the same the prisoner had had put in, and the same I had been at work on for Mr. Corpe.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodgings on the 11th of March - I found this square of glass on the shelf, and two new squares in the window - the other things were found by my brother officer - I asked the prisoner where he got the glass, and his wife said she bought it in Ratcliff-highway - I said "Very well, I will go to where you bought it" - the prisoner was then eating his dinner, and said nothing about it, but begged I would speak to Mr. Corpe.

THOMAS GRAY . I went with the officer and found these two harness plates, marked T. C. and the other articles - the prisoner was in my employ about three years - I never found any thing amiss in him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWIN SMITHIE . I packed up some glass for Mr. Corpe on the 6th of March; I measured these pieces, and I believe they are the same.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-183

579. JOHN STARKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 1 pair of trousers, value 15s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I am a tailor , and live in High Holborn . On the evening of the 3d of March I went out, and, when I returned, my wife said a suspicious man had been in the shop, and the trousers were then gone; I have not seen them since.

ISRAEL DOWN . I am a porter - I lodge at Mr. Smith's. On the night of the 3d of March I was in the parlour behind the shop; I saw the prisoner come in and inquire of Mrs. Smith whether they sold second-hand clothes - she said No - he said he meant clothes made of second cloth; she showed him some trousers which were gathered in front - he said he wanted some plain - she went to get them and he leaned on the counter: he said he did not like them - he then arose up and put his hand behind his coat, and went towards the door, walking backwards; he said he would call in a quarter of an hour if Mr. Smith would be in the way; Mr. Smith came home soon afterwards, and missed the trousers; there had been another person called (a respectable gentleman), who is a regular customer of Mr. Smith's - I was not in the shop myself.

ROBERT SMITH . I am the prosecutor's brother. On the evening of the 3d of March he went out and left some mixed drab trousers on the counter - I saw the prisoner come in - he did not buy any thing, but went out with his hands behind him all the way backwards.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work for a fortnight, and then I got a day or two's work, and went to buy a pair of trousers - I did not want to give more than 15s. or 16s., for them - she said she had none so low - I said I would call again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-184

560. SARAH SARSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 2 gowns, value 6s.; 2 veils, value 6s.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 bed-gown, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 2s., and 1 Bible, value 1s. , the goods of Sarah Buckley , widow , since deceased.

ANN HARRISON . I knew a person of the name of Sarah Buckley - she was a widow, but is since deceased - she was in my service - I know these articles to have been her property.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Did you know her husband? A. No; he died in America.

MARY HEATH . I am matron of the Queen's Lying-in Hospital - Sarah Buckley came there to lye-in; she was put to bed on the 8th of January and died on the 16th: I found a small key and an old purse in her pocket after her death; the prisoner came to see her the day before she died, and she came after her deatl; and asked me if I knew what she died of; she said she thought it was of starvation, but she had got very good clothes, and she wondered she had not parted with them; I said it was not easy to get them out of pawn again - she said she was very sorry for her; I never saw the last witness till she came to the hospital after the decease of Sarah Buckley; she seemed to know her; I told the prisoner she must give up Buckley's clothes to the parish - she said she had not any clothes belonging to her, and she had nothing but what she stood up in.

ELIZABETH HILLYER . The prisoner and Sarah Buckley lodged at my house, No. 2, Edward-place, Seymour-place - they brought two boxes - I saw this Bible behind the water-butt on the 30th of January last - I had not seen it before.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner and her husband take the lodging of you? A. Yes; the deceased was a lodger of their's - they had a man lodger and a child beside; I did not know of the deceased going to the hospital; she was there from the 24th of December till January, when she went to the hospital; I never knew of the deceased being in debt to the prisoner; there were five persons slept in that room - the man and his wife, the man and the child, and the deceased.

ELIZABETH CUCKSTON . I remember seeing the prisoner during the hard frost - she came to my house in Upper Bryanstone-street, where I keep a chandler's shop- the prisoner and a girl came one Monday evening and brought a trunk - the prisoner said it was her own, and asked if she might put it in my shop, as her husband and her had had a quarrel, and she had brought them from him - I knew her perfectly well, and allowed her to put it there- she brought the box behind my counter and opened it; I asked her if Sarah Buckley was put to bed - she said Yes,

and as she had no box of her own she had put her things into her box, and she was going to take some of them to her in the hospital - she came again the same evening and took some more things out - she came again on the Wednesday and took the box away; I noticed a blue gown and a parcel, but there was no book, to my knowledge, except a Bible, which she took out of the box the first time, and put into my hands, but I cannot say whether it was this or not- I only noticed it had the Common Prayer-book with it- I cannot tell what day of the month it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Would you swear that she did not say that her husband had threatened to sell off every thing they had and leave her? A. No; I could not swear to any thing, except the Bible, from its having the prayer-book with it.

MARY SHEEN . I went with the prisoner to Mrs. Cuckston's house on a Monday, but I cannot tell what day of the month, nor what month it was - I helped her to carry the box, and saw her take some muslins and clothes out of it - I saw the Bible on the counter - I cannot read - but I heard the woman say it was a Bible.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you lodge with the prisoner? A. Yes; I saw Mrs. Buckley once; she lived there before I went; the prisoner told me she was gone to the hospital, and I was to have the lodging after her - I did not know that Mrs. Buckley was indebted to her for rent - I heard the prisoner say, after Mrs. Buckley's decease, that there was a week's rent due - there was one trunk and two boxes in the room - I did not see them open.

WILLIAM TODD . I am a tailor. I knew Sarah Buckley; I did not know her husband, but I have a letter which states that he is dead. I saw the prisoner on the 30th of January, and asked her for the clothes belonging to Sarah Buckley - she said she had not brought any property, except what was on her back - I asked about a leather trunk which she was known to possess, with her name in copper letters on the lid "S W," the initials of her maiden name: I asked if she could tell me where she came from, that I might trace the property - I could not find the trunk, but I know this Bible, it was mine before it was her aunt's, who gave it her.

ELIZABETH MITCHELL . I am aunt of the deceased. I gave her this Bible - her husband went to America; but he is dead.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not her husband in this country in March last year? A. I think he went away in that month - I had not seen her for one year and a half - I knew her when in service, and when out of place - I did not know that she was in distress.

JAMES GIBBS . I am a constable - I apprehended the prisoner. I went and got the things, which Mr. Harrison said had belonged to the deceased - the prisoner first said she had none of the things - but, when I threatened to break open a box, she gave them - Mr. Griffith said I had done very right.

JAMES ALDOUS . I am a pawnbroker. This shawl was pawned at my house by a woman on the 7th of May last, in the name of Sarah Williams . NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-185

761. JOHN SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 19 yards of printed cotton, value 18s. , the goods of Alfred William Larmuth .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-186

762. JOHN PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 19lbs. weight of cheese, value 15s. , the goods of Daniel Acocks .

DANIEL ACOCKS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Vine-place, Shoreditch . These half cheeses are mine - I saw them in my window about ten o'clock on the morning of the 6th of March, when I went out - I returned about twelve and missed them.

ROBERT TYRREL . I am a Bow-street officer. I stopped the prisoner on the 6th of March, in Church-street, Shoreditch - I asked him what he had got; he said some cheese which he had bought of a Jew in Petticoat-lane for 4s.; I set off to go there with him, but thought it would not be safe - I told him he should go to the Office; he said he would not - he struggled and got away; he ran, and I cried Stop thief! a gentleman stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. When he stopped me, he asked me what I had got; I said "Cheese; come to where I bought it, or else I shall lose a day's work;" he then struck me on the wrist.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-187

763. JOHN MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 6s., the goods of William Marks , from his person .

WILLIAM MARKS. I was walking near St. Giles' church on the 7th of March; I felt my right hand coat pocket fall down; I had a great many half-pence in it, and it was rather heavy; I turned round and saw the prisoner, who had pulled my handkerchief out; I ran after him; and he dropped it, and said "There is your handkerchief, but do not take me;" I took him back to the place, and some other person had picked it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. Q. What time was this? A. A quarter-past seven o'clock, it was rather dark; I did not see any boys playing about; I saw the handkerchief in his hands, while I was running after him.

THOMAS IRESON . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was playing; the gentleman ran after me, and dragged me into a shop.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-188

764. NATHANIEL NUTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of William Wakefield .

JOSEPH TILLY . I am shopman to Mr. William Wakefield, a pawnbroker , of Mile End-road . On the 23d of February I was behind the counter, and heard a noise - I jumped over the counter, and went out at the door, where I saw the prisoner making off as fast as he could, with these trousers, which had been hanging on a hook, about two feet within the door - he threw them down. I asked a gentleman to pick them up, and I followed the prisoner down Stepney-green. I never lost sight of him, except for about a second, while he turned the corner; this knife and stick were thrown upon a shutter, as he ran by, but I did not see him throw them; the trousers appear to have been cut down.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was near the end of Stepneygreen, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran - the gentleman came, and said I was his prisoner. I had been out of work three weeks. I saw a man rush past me, and into an empty house.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-189

765. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of John Cooper .

JOHN COOPER. I am a smith , and live in Clerkenwell . On the 28th of February, at three o'clock, I put my coat into a back parlour, which I use as a counting-house; a man came at half-past seven, and said it had been taken - I then missed it.

CHARLES BATH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street. On the 28th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned this coat.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. Q. Was it dark at the time? A. I had lights there - he went into one of the boxes; there were other persons there - he stopped about five minutes. I had frequently seen him before, and am certain he is the same man; another man was pawning a coat - the prisoner spoke to him - he did not appear to be pawning the coat for him - this is the ticket I gave.

JAMES GOLD . I am the officer. I went to Mr. Bath's shop to take the prisoner, one Friday in March, about eight o'clock in the morning. I found the duplicate of the coat and some others upon him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he pawned it for another person? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to a public-house on the 28th of February, and a young man had a coat for sale - he wanted 12s. for it; I said, "I have not got 12s., but if I can get 8s. lent on it I will give you 12s. for it," which I did. I went on Friday morning to pawn a waistcoat, and the pawnbroker said the coat I had brought was stolen - I said I did not steal it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-190

766. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 2 sheets, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Bransgrave ; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s., and 1 comb, value 6d. , the goods of John Norman .

THOMAS BRANSGRAVE. I am a publican , and live at Acton . The prisoner came to my house on the 23d of March, and asked for a lodging - I saw him about nine o'clock in the evening, in the tap-room - he took a candle to go to bed. The next morning my boy came up stairs, and said the man had stolen the sheets; I came down, and found the prisoner in the back parlour.

THOMAS PAYNE . I am overseer of the poor of Acton. On the morning of the 23d of March, I was walking at the back of Acton - I saw the prisoner turn a corner, and stopped him; I took him back, and kept him till the constable came, who found these articles on him.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found these things upon him; the sheets were in the bundle, and the trousers were under his own, next his skin - he pleaded great distress, and said he had got refuge in that house for a night's lodging.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work five months.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-191

767. JAMES HUTCHINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of James Bernard , Esq., commonly called Viscount Bernard .

FRANCIS SIMPSON . I am foreman to Mr. Darby - he lives in the Grand Junction-road . When I left the shop on the 9th of March, about half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner and two other persons standing between two stacks of bricks, examining the pockets of a livery coat - I asked what they were doing, and they said nothing - I said, "You have stolen that coat;" they said they had not, and the other two ran away; the prisoner had got his hand in the pocket of the coat, and could not get it out - he then brought it to me, and ran away. I made inquiries, and found whose it was; I left it at a public-house - the prisoner came afterwards, in company with another person, and demanded it - I said I would not give it up till I knew the owner; the strange man said it belonged to the prisoner's father; I then said I would go to the public-house, and give it them; I took them there, and locked them in the back parlour while I went for a beadle - while I was gone they got out of the parlour; I called Stop thief! and they were stopped by the beadle.

JAMES COCHRANE . I am the parish beadle. I heard the cry of Stop thief! about five o'clock on the 9th of March; I followed, and stopped the prisoner and another man. I had heard of the coat being found before.

WILLIAM LEE . I am groom to Lord Bernard - he lives at No. 3. Connaught-place. This is my livery coat, and is Lord Bernard's property - I had seen it safe in the harness-room, opposite the house, about three o'clock on the 9th of March; I missed it at five - it had been drawn out at the window, with a hooked stick.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the side of the canal, and a chap asked me if I would have the coat - I said Yes, and took it; I was going on the other side of the bricks, and the gentleman came and asked where I got it; I said I had it given to me; I thought I would come and ask for it again, as I had it given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-192

768. JOHN BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 clock, value 5s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I keep a broker's-shop , in Judd-street, St. Pancras . On the morning of the 27th of March, a woman gave me information, about a clock; I then looked, and missed one, which I had seen at ten o'clock, an hour before; she told me the direction in which they had gone; I went, and saw the prisoner and another person in company with him - the prisoner was tying up this clock in a handkerchief - I tried to hold him, but he got away; I called Stop thief! and a person stopped him, about two turnings from my house, within five minutes after I had received the information.

JOHN MILLER . The prosecutor and two of his neighbours brought the prisoner to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal it - it was given me by two other persons.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-193

769. GEORGE BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 1 counterpane, value 25s. , the goods of Mary Dow , spinster .

MARY DOW. I am single. Mrs. Gooding washes for me. On the 21st of March her boy called for a counterpane; I gave it to him, and he had it stolen from him.

ROBERT ZACHARY GOODING . I am a little more than nine years of age - I know I must speak the truth. I received the counterpane from Mrs. Dow one Tuesday - the prisoner took it from under my arm, and gave it to two others - I had known him before, and am quite sure he is the boy; I cried Stop thief! and some persons took him, in my presence - the others got away with the counterpane.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me give it to anybody? A. Yes. I told the Magistrate he gave it to the others.

GEORGE HEARD . On the 20th of March I saw the prisoner in a crowd at the end of Burton-crescent - I was in a cart, and saw this little boy, whom I knew - I asked him what was the matter, and he told me that boy (meaning the prisoner) had taken a counterpane from him. I took him to the little boy's mother, who sent for Reed.

WILLIAM REED . I am the constable, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Chelsea-common, and saw a crowd - this little boy was in the midst of it; he said he had lost a counterpane; I walked away; when I got half way down the crescent this gentleman came, took me into his cart, and said I should go with him - he said he would give me 5s. to tell him who took it, and where it was, but I could not.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-194

770. CATHERINE COUTY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 hearth-rug, value 5s. , the goods of William Scraggs .

ANN SCRAGGS . I am the wife of William Scraggs. - On the 25th of February I had a hearth-rug to wash for a person; I saw it safe between one and two o'clock, on the first landing-place - it was wet.

CHARLES WHITROE . I am a broker. The prisoner brought this rug on the afternoon of the 25th of February, between three and four o'clock, and asked me to buy it - she said she had been out charing, and it was given her where she had been at work, and that she had washed it on the previous Thursday; I knew her very well - she is a near neighbour.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have a witness who was with me in my illness - she went with me to Paddington on that day, from ten o'clock in the morning till five in the afternoon. I am blind, and quite innocent.

SARAH ANDERSON . I know nothing about the rug, but I know the prisoner; I attended her when she was ill, and on Saturday, the 25th of February, I went out with her at ten o'clock in the morning, to Mr. Woodhouse's, the minister, at Paddington - we did not return till about five o'clock in the afternoon.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-195

771. ELEANOR DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 3s. , the goods of James Shepherd .

ANN SHEPHERD . I am the wife of James Shepherd - he lives in White Horse-street, Ratcliff . On the 25th of February, about twelve o'clock, I was in the back parlour, and saw the prisoner come into the shop - she went towards the window, and her actions were so quick that I suspected she had taken something - she ran out, and I pursued; I missed the boots from the window, and found them on her person.

THOMAS HAYNES . I took the prisoner, who said she did it through distress.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Eight Days .

Reference Number: t18260406-196

772. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Jones .

JOSEPH JONES. I am a journeyman coach-maker . I lodge at the Grapes, public-house, in Castle-street, Oxford-street . I put my boots in the yard that morning, about half-past nine o'clock, and while I was getting breakfast, about ten, they were taken.

WILLIAM PRINCE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Riddy, a coach-maker, and live at the Grapes, which is kept by a relation of mine. Mrs. Reynolds, my aunt, called me out of the cellar, and told me to go after a man who had taken a pair of boots; I went, and stopped the prisoner - I brought him back, and took these boots from him.

THOMAS ADAMS . I am the watchman. I received these boots from Prince.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-197

773. WILLIAM CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 1 plane, value 9d., and 1 mallet, value 1s., the goods of William Baker ; and 1 plane, value 3s. , the goods of Roger Seccombe .

WILLIAM BAKER. I am a carpenter . I had been working in a building of Mr. Bishop's, in the Hertford-road, Kingsland ; I left this plane and mallet there; and on the following morning, the 22d of February, about half-past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner with them.

ROGER SECCOMBE. I was at work with Baker at Mr. Bishop's; I had left this plane there; I received it from Baker the next morning.

SAMUEL BISHOP . I was working at this place, and saw the prisoner, on the morning of the 22d of February, with these two planes and this mallet; I did not see him take them.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-198

774. ROBERT HUGHES , WILLIAM HAYNES , and JOHN SPOOR , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 17lbs. weight of ostrich-featers, value 43l.; 5lbs. weight of nutmegs, value 22s., and 29lbs. weight of sugar, value 20s., the goods of Henry Brookman and others, his partners, from a vessel in the port of London .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN COOKE . I am foreman of the warehouse No. 2, at the London Docks . I delivered some cases, which were numbered 1, 2, and 3, from that warehouse, on board the Lord Exmouth, on the 8th of February - they were unpacked and repacked in my presence - No. 1, contained 510 bundles; No. 2, 380; and No. 3, 486 - I took the note of them at the time - they were all replaced in the cases in my presence - I saw the packages again in the Searcher's office, about eight or ten days after they had been put on board the Lord Exmouth - one of them was then broken at the corner; but I cannot tell which.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When were they unpacked and repacked? A. I think about five or six days prior to their being shipped, quite the end of January or beginning of February - I put down the number of packages in this book - I speak from my recollection and from the book - I counted the number of bundles in one of the cases, but I cannot tell which, I think it was No. 2; the others were counted by one of the men in my presence - I stood over them very circumspectly to see what they were - none of the bundles were opened - they were tied round with string at the quill end of the feathers - I could see what they were - No. 3, contained 486 bundles; I have been in the docks seventeen or eighteen years - I do not know that there is any smuggling going on there - I do not know that sailors get feathers themselves to sell in England.

MR. LAW. Q. If I rightly understand you, you say you saw them counted, or counted them yourself, and this is the memorandum? A. Yes; I am not aware that sailors are in the habit of making these purchases.

SAMUEL NETTLESHIP . I am warehouseman to David Martineau and Co., they are sugar-refiners. On the 12th of January I packed some sugars, which I sent to the London Docks - there were fifteen hogsheads marked M, numbered from 1 to 15 - they were to go by the Lord Exmouth - I took a memorandum of the number of loaves in each hogshead - I have seen a hogshead, marked No. 5, in the possession of Fowler, the Custom-house officer - it was one of them I had sent to the docks - Mr. Fowler produced a sample of sugar, which corresponded exactly with that which I had packed in No. 5.

COURT. Q. Were there different sorts of sugars in the hogsheads? A. No; it was all one sort, double-refined sugar.

GEORGE LONG . I am foreman of the warehouse No. 4, at the London-docks. In November last seven cases of nutmegs were landed - I took the weight of them - No. 1, weighed 2 cwt. 3 qrs. 21lbs. - it was in good condition and was shipped on board the Lord Exmouth on the 8th of February - I have seen that case since in the possession of Mr. Fowler.

GEORGE DURCH . I am mate of the Lord Exmouth. These cases were received on board that ship - they were then in a perfect state - one of the hogsheads of sugar, three cases of ostrich feathers, and one of the cases of nutmegs, were afterwards taken out by the Custom-house officer - they appeared to have sustained some injury, to be broken and deficient - the prisoners, Hughes and Spoor, were sailors on board that vessel - Hughes joined the ship on the 8th of February - and the 13th of February was the last day of our receiving these things - Spoor was cabinboy - Haynes was employed as cook, and to do different jobs on board - on the 16th of February, I saw Hughes in a particular situation on board the vessel, and asked him what he had got in his hand - he said some sugar which he got from the Naples packet - the packages had been in the middle of the vessel, and Hughes was coming from the fore-part of the ship.

Cross-examined. Q. You were satisfied with that account, that he got it from the Naples packet? A. Yes: he had been with us three years - I believed him to be a perfectly honest man - we had made some voyages to the Mediterranean and to places where they get feathers - I never made any purchases myself on a venture, nor never heard it was common for seamen to do so.

Prisoner SPOOR. Q. Why did you let Hughes go down into the hold on Sunday? A. Because he said he wanted to look for a small bag of hair.

WILLIAM FOWLER . I am one of the searchers of the Custom-house. On a Monday or Tuesday, but I cannot say what month - I saw three cases of ostrich feathers, one hogshead of sugar, and one case of nutmegs taken out of the Lord Exmouth; I took them into my care - there were two cases of nutmegs taken out; but one was returned, because it was sound - the case of feathers, No. 1, contained 498 bundles - No. 2, 315; and No. 3 was perfect; the case of nutmegs weighed 2cwt. 3qrs. 16lbs., which should have been 2cwt. 3qrs. 21lbs., 5lbs. deficient; the feathers were 171/4lbs. deficient; the hogshead of sugar was three loaves deficient in number, and 29lbs. deficient in weight; it had the appearance of having been broken, not being full; and that was the case with the nutmegs and feathers; I have some sugar, nutmegs, and feathers, which I brought from the hogsheads and the cases; I showed the sugar to Mr. Nettleship, the feathers to Mr. Alven, and the nutmegs to Mr. Long.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the feathers taken from the cases? A. Yes; from Nos. 1 and 2, but I do not know which came from the different cases.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am a Thames-police officer. In consequence of some communication from Captain Mills, of the Lord Exmouth, I took Hughes into custody at Captain Mills' apartments, in Burr-street, Aldgate; I did not make him any promise or threat - he said "Go and fetch the boy Jack, the man John, and the Custom-house officer," and he would then tell us all about it; I left him in custody of a headborough and went to the ship, but I could not find them there; I got information about a house in Mordent's-rents, Nightinale-lane; I went there and found the other two prisoners - I asked which was Jack, and Spoor said he was; I said the ship had been robbed of some feathers - they both denied knowing any thing about it; I searched the house, and in a chest of drawers, which Emma Ratcliffe said was hers; I found 11/2lb. of nutmegs, and 1lb of fine loaf sugar; I asked Ratcliffe where she got the nutmegs - she said her husband brought them from the East Indies; Hughes was not there then, but

Haynes and Spoor were; I put the sugar and nutmegs into a handkerchief, and took Spoor to Captain Mills; I took Captain Mills backwards, and asked him if he had any nutmegs and sugar in his cargo - he said he had - I sent Gaskin, another officer, to fetch Haynes - I took them both up stairs in the presence of Hughes; Hughes said to Spoor "Jack, it is those feathers you handed me up out of the forecastle;" Spoor denied it, and said he knew nothing at all about it - we took them all down to the Thames-police Office, and Hughes said he could point out the house where he sold the feathers, but he did not know the name of the street - the next day I went with Spoor on board the Lord Exmouth; I made him no promise or threat - all I said was there was no doubt the nutmegs came from the vessel as well as the feathers; he said "I did not take them - Bill took them," meaning Haynes; I asked him which was his box, he pointed it out to me, but he had not got the key and I forced it open; I found in it a 1/2lb. of nutmegs, and 2lbs. of fine loaf sugar; there was another box in the forecastle, and I asked if it was Haynes' - he said it was - Haynes had given me the key, and I opened it - I found there 2lbs. of fine loaf sugar chopped up in a cannister; I sent for Haynes and asked if that was his box; he said it was - I asked him where he got the sugar - he said Spoor gave it to him - Spoor made no reply to that- I was searching the forecastle and found several nutmegs near the box - I then found that one of the forecastle boards lifted up, so that any one could go into the hold; came on deck and asked Captain Mills to open the hatches, and I went down and saw a case containing nutmegs, the side of which had been broken out - I then saw a case which the Captain said contained Ostrich feathers; I found it was stove in at one end. apparently with a crow-bar, but the bag, in which the case was, had been done up again - it looked all perfect.

Cross-examined. Q. Was this a feather case? A. Yes; I did not take Haynes to the ship, but he gave me the key of his box - he said the other gave him the sugar, and he did not deny it; Hughes had some conversation with Captain Mills, which I did not hear; as we were going to the office he said he could point out the house; I asked him what he got for them - he said he did not know.

JAMES EVANS . I am a Thames-police officer. On the 20th of February I was with Hughes in the Surveyor's room at the office - I asked how he got the feathers out of the dock - he said he saw a waggon come in, and he told the waggoner he would give him half-a-crown to lend his great coat, and take a bundle out of the dock for him - that he got the great coat and wrapped the bundle in it, and placed it in the waggon; he followed it as far as the Mint - he then took it to No. 92, Wood-street, Cheapside; I saw a person named Ball the same morning, who produced some feathers in Hughes' presence, which he said he bought of him on the Thursday before - they weighed 41/2lbs. Ball said, but who is to return me my money - I said I could say nothing about that - he said he gave 3l. 5s. for them, but Hughes said it was only three guineas - Ball then said "I believe that was the case;" I afterwards went to No. 21, Bath-street, Hackney - I brought away from there this bundle of feathers, weighing five ounces; and a little more than 1lb. of loaf fine sugar.

Cross-examined. Q. And so all this was told you that you might find out where they were? A. Yes; he did not tell me the feathers he took to Mr. Ball's were his own, nor any thing like it; I think it my duty to examine a prisoner who is brought under a charge of felony, when there was any property lost - I did not guard him in any way against telling me.

MARY ANN TRUDGET . I know the prisoner Hughes. On the 9th of February last I received from him a small parcel of sugar, and a bunch of feathers; I put them into my drawer. Lovell is my brother-in-law - he knew where I put them.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known him? A. About four months; I was told he last came from the Indies; he had not given me any thing before - he said he got these feathers from the ship in the London-docks, and I took them; I asked him if he could get feathers from the ship, and he said that each of his shipmates had a bunch given them.

WILLIAM LOVELL . I am Trudgett's brother-in-law. I saw her put the sugar and feathers away - I gave the same sugar and feathers to Evans.

MATTHEW MURRAY . I am a feather-maker, and live at No. 6, London-wall. On the 16th of February Hughes came to my house, with a parcel of feathers in a pocket-handkerchief, which he opened out - there were twenty-one bundles, and I considered they would weigh about 6lbs. - he asked but 50s. for them - I said I thought he had come by them wrongfully, as I should think they were worth 30s. a pound, as they appeared very good, and remarkably clean.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you get that in the market for them now? A. I do not know, there has been a great fall, but I would give that for them.

FRANCIS ALVEN . I have been in the feather trade for fifteen years. I directed some cases of feathers to be shipped on board the Lord Exmouth, and received the bill of lading on the 8th of February. The feathers produced are exactly of the same description - I shipped them at 40s., which was the limit I received them at - I would have given from 35s. to 40s. for them in the market.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you ship them? A. Because I could not get 40s. for them - the market was extremely dull, and it is now still worse; I do not affect to say these are the same, but they were of the same description as these - they are particularly clean picked. I offered them at from 46s. to 48s. in bond, but with the duty and expenses, they would have been nearly 60s.

THOMAS SHEPPERD . I shipped seven cases of nutmegs on board the Lord Exmouth, from No. 1 to 7, marked H. H. and Co., on the 13th of February, on account of Messrs. Stirren and Co. I have seen one of these cases since in the possession of Mr. Fowler; I have compared the nutmegs in that case with those produced - they appear to be the same sort, but those produced by the officer are rather darker, as if the powder had been rubbed off them - but they were as near the quality as possible. I have seen a great many nutmegs.

COURT. Q. Are these good sound nutmegs? A. Yes; there is a good deal of difference in nutmegs.

EMMA RATCLIFFE . I am the wife of James Ratcliffe. The nutmegs that were taken from the drawer in my room were given me by William Haynes - John Spoor gave me the sugar.

Cross-examined. Q. Why, I thought your husband

brought you the nutmegs and sugar? A. Yes, I said so at first, when in confusion - my husband is gone to Rio Janeiro.

HENRY BROOKMAN . I am a part owner of the Lord Exmouth, at the London-dock - Edward Mills is the Captain, and is part owner.

Cross-examined. Q. Then these things were not in your possession, but in his, as Captain? A. Yes; as part owner of the ship I considered them in my possession - I had no interest in the cargo except the freight - the Captain had the care and possession of them.

Mr. LAW. Q. Were you answerable for them as well as others? A. Yes; I was, from time to time, in the ship as well as the Captain; I have paid the duty for all the deficiency, to Government, and I have bills of the different articles from the proprietors, who have applied to me.

HUGHES' Defence. The last voyage I made was in the Comet, from Constantinople and Smyrna; I had not an opportunity of taking these feathers out which I had brought with me, and I put them on board the Lord Exmouth; Spoor was the man who gave them to me out of the forecastle, but he did not know what was in the parcel. Trudgett says she received the feathers of me on the 9th of February, but these were not shipped till the 13th. The mate says, it is not a common thing for sailors to make a venture, but I have been various voyages and I know that it is a very common thing for them to do if they can get them on shore.

HAYNES' Defence. I did not know the feathers were on board the ship - we were cleaning out the forecastle and found the nutmegs lying about - I got them together.

SPOOR'S Defence. I gave up a parcel to Hughes, but I did not know what was in it.

Hughes put in a written defence, protesting his innocence, and denying any knowledge of the transaction.

HUGHES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

HAYNES - NOT GUILTY .

SPOOR - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, who engaged to employ him .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260406-199

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

775. ABRAHAM BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 1 purse, value 1s.; 10 sovereigns, 12 shillings, and a 10l. bank note , the property of Andrew Gregory Johnston .

ANDREW GREGORY JOHNSTON, ESQ. I live in Suffolk. On the 3d of March I was in London, and took a hackney-coach at Hanover-square hotel, about twelve o'clock- the prisoner was the driver, and I directed him to go to Kensington-square; I had a lady with me - I took out my purse at the turnpike gate, at Knightsbridge, to pay the toll, but the man only asked 3d., and I put the purse down on the cushion, to take some halfpence out of my pocket - the purse contained a 10l. note, which had a mark on it, ten sovereigns, and about 12s. in silver - I had seen it all that morning; when we got to Kensington-square I paid the prisoner 5s. (which I had from the lady) and he gave me 6d.; I did not missed the purse for about two or three hours; on my return to town, when I recollected where I had left it, I went to the Hackney-coach-office, and got the address of the driver; I am quite certain the prisoner is the man - I did not see him again till half-past eleven o'clock the same night; I and an officer waited for him to come home to Devonshire-street - the officer told him to come off his box, as he wished to speak with him - he asked him if he recollected that morning having drived a lady and gentleman to Kensington, which he admitted - he then asked him if he had looked in his coach afterwards - he said No [we had been set down at a house, and the prisoner must have known it, because there was some difficulty in finding it]; the officer then asked if he had found any thing in his coach - he said he had not; the officer said I had left my purse there, and he must know something about it - all which he denied - he was asked which was the next fare he took up - he said a lady and gentleman on the road, whom he set down in Piccadilly, near the White-horse cellar, but not at any house - I told him to look at me, and see if he could recognise me, which he did, and said I was the gentleman he drove to Kensington-square, but denied all knowledge of the purse - the officer said he must see what he had about him - he then said he had found a 10l. note about two hours before, tucked under the cushion of the seat - the officer begged to have it, which after some hesitation he gave - it appeared to have been folded up in his right hand - the officer searched his person, and found, in one pocket, nine sovereigns and a half, and about 13s. in silver, and in another pocket 16s. which, he said, belonged to his master, but the gold and silver, in the first pocket, he insisted was his own, and he would give no other account of it; I then gave him in charge; we searched the coach but did not find the purse; (looking at the 10l. note) this is it - it has the name of Burrows on the face in my handwriting.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am the officer. This is the 10l. note; I accompanied the prosecutor, and heard the prisoner deny that he had got the money; he then said he had found the note two hours before, and the money was his own; I said I suspected it was the gentleman's, but he still said it was his own, and I had no business with it; I found 16s. which he said was his master's - and that was returned to his master; I searched the carriage, but nothing was found in it; I then took him to the watch-house, and next morning I asked if he could account for the sovereigns I found on him - he said it was all nonsense, he took them from the gentleman; I cautioned him that he had made a case of felony of it - but he said it was so, and said he had been drinking part of two pints of ale, which made him so foolish - in taking him to the office he made an excuse to go home to get half a sovereign, to make up the money; he said there had been ten sovereigns and twelve shillings, but he had changed one of the sovereigns.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. Did he appear sober? A. Yes; but in high spirits.

HENRY HOWARD . I heard the prisoner confess that he found the purse and money, and had thrown the purse away.

Mr. CRESWELL to Mr. JOHNSTON. Q. Was the man perfectly sober? A. He appeared so; I think he was sober when we saw him at the stable at night.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the coach; I did not know it belonged to this gentleman, as I had had two other persons in the coach.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-200

776. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 2 decanters, value 10s. , the goods of Mary Ayre , Spinster .

MARY AYRE. I am single, and keep a china-shop in Strutton-ground, Westminster . I did not see the prisoner near my house - but I had these two decanters in my shop-window on the morning of the 25th of March, and missed them between six and seven o'clock that evening; I informed the street-keeper, and he found them - I have had them these two years, and know them to be mine - my shop-window is not open; the prisoner is quite a stranger.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Dyer, who is a pawnbroker. These decanters were pawned by the prisoner on the 25th of March, between five and six o'clock in the dusk of the evening.

WILLIAM CROUDEN . I found the decanters and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge pawning them, but for another person who lodges in the house where I do.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-201

777. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of John Willis .

JOHN WILLIS. I am a watch-enameller , and live in Greenhill's-rents, Smithfield. On the 25th of March I sent Joseph Davis, my errand-boy, to carry home some watches- he had a list of the places he was to deliver them at - he returned in about two hours and a half, and said he had missed one parcel, which contained the watch in question; he said he could not tell how he had lost it.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I went out with a number of watches to different places; I met the prisoner, who went with me from my master's house nearly - when I got to my master's son's (who is an apprentice to a gold-beater), where I was to leave his clothes, the prisoner held out his hand to take the bag which had the watches in it, in a tin case; I let him have it, because I had known him before, and did not think he would have done such a thing; I told him to stand opposite the shop - when I came out we walked on to the end of Fetter-lane, where I asked him for the bag, which he gave me; I went on to several places, and when I got to the last place but two, I missed the watch; I asked him about it - he cried, and denied all knowledge of it. I said I would inquire if I had left it in mistake at any other place, which I did, but could not find it - I then told him he must know something about it - he cried, and said, if I said so again he would go home - I then went home and told my master; I afterwards saw the watch found on him; he said nothing then.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, asked him for the watch, and he said he knew nothing of it, but I found it in his jacket-pocket; I have known him five or six years; I never knew him in trouble before.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260406-202

778. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 1 bag, value 3d.; 2 songs, value 1/2d.; 4 half-crowns, 7 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 31/2d. in copper monies, the property of Edward Townsend , from his person .

EDWARD TOWNSEND. I live in Mount-street, and am a labourer . The prisoner and I slept at the Dog and Duck, public-house, in Tottenham-court-road , on Thursday the 2d of March; I had but just gone there to lodge: we went to bed together between eleven and twelve o'clock; I had four half-crowns, seven shillings and nine-pence half-penny, loose in my right-hand breeches-pocket, and two songs and a purse in the left; when I went to bed I looked at the money, and saw it was all right - he did not see me; I put my breeches under my pillow - he got up and went away about six o'clock - I got up between six and seven, when I found my breeches removed, and all the money was gone; there was another man in the room; we examined every where but could not find it; I saw the bag next day, but all the money was gone.

Prisoner. Q. Did not two other persons sleep in the room? A. Yes - and they were examined; they have slept there these two years.

Q. Did not some more men come into the room about twelve o'clock? A. No; those two men came in before we went to sleep - the door was fastened by a chair.

IVORY DEAN . I had a charge against the prisoner for stealing a great coat, and he was taken before Serjeant Pell, at Pinner. on Friday evening, but we could not make any hand of that; I then brought him to town to the Dog and Duck, and he was charged with this crime; this money had been produced before Serjeant Pell, and a purse, which he threw away in coming to town, but I did not see him throw it away; he was taken to Marlborough-street that evening.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I lie in Pinner-cage on Friday evening? A. Yes; as I returned home I found the bag down a privy - I brought it back to Marlborough-street the same evening.

GEORGE SIMMS . Schofield gave me information on the Friday evening, and I took the prisoner on Saturday, the 4th March; I took him into the Dog and Duck, and searched him - I found on him two half-crowns, two sixpences, threepence three farthings, and two songs, but no bag or purse.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . The prosecutor made an application at Marlborough-street. I went to the Dog and Duck public-house, and found the statement correct; I told Simms what to do; and on the following evening the prisoner was brought to Marlborough-street; I asked him what he had done with the bag; he said he had thrown it away at a house on the road; I directed the witness to go back and look down the privy; and on the following Tuesday he brought it.

EDWARD TOWNSEND . This is my bag; I had put some tobacco in it which still remains.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged there with another young man; on the Thursday night I lodged with the prosecutor,

I went out the next morning about six o'clock; and was taken into custody; I came to town and went to the Dog and Duck to shew where I had lodged, and there I was accused of having taken the money; I had bought the songs in Oxford-street; I had never spoken to the officer; but he said I had confessed that I had it; there were a great many people in the house at Kensull-green, which is a kind of half-way house for farmers who come to London.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-203

779. WILLIAM HATHAWAY and MARY, his wife , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 2 flat irons, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 6s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 bed curtain, value 1s.; 1 bolster, value 3s.; 2 pillows, value 2s.; 2 blankets, value 4s.: and 1 counterpane, value 3s., the goods of Frederick Strube , in a lodging room .

FREDERICK STRUBE . I have a house at No. 32, Castle-lane, Westminster . I let out four rooms ready furnished; the prisoners hired one room furnished of me about four months ago; they came together and passed as husband and wife; they owe me five weeks' rent; on the 24th of February they were taken into custody; I had asked them several times for their rent, and they answered me snappishly, that they would pay me one of these odd days; a number of loose characters came there, which I did not like, and I spoke to them about it; they said they would have who they pleased; I went up into the room when they were not there, and missed these articles stated; I spoke to an officer, who took them while they were at the street door, just going out; they said they should replace the things if I had patience.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. Were you the person who let these lodgings? A. Yes; I and my wife together; I brought in a new bed, which cost me 3l. 10s., the same night they said they would replace the things; the man was away nearly all day; I believe he had a good character; he worked for a Mr. Cundy.

PHILIP JONES . I am a pawnbroke, and live in Tothill-street. I produce a blanket and iron; the iron was pawned by the female prisoner.

THOMAS DEBENHAM . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Queen's-row, Pimlico. I have some pillows, sheets, and other things, the greater part of which were pawned by the female prisoner. I know she pawned the greater part of them, but I cannot say which; I believe she pawned the whole of those that were taken in by me.

JOHN WEALE . I am an officer. I have twelve duplicates which were taken from the female prisoner in my presence, by Woodbury; she said she would make restitution if the prosecutor would allow her; her husband was present, and expressed his surprise that the things had gone as they had.

FREDERICK STRUDE re-examined. I heard them say they would make them good, at the office - the husband said he did not know of the things being gone or he would not have allowed it; but he would make it good.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HATHAWAY'S Defence. It was through distress, my wife pawned them, unknown to me.

Mr. PRENDERGAST to WEALE. Q. Did the man say the same as he does now? A. Yes, he did; he has always borne an honest character - he said he was very sorry for what his wife had done; and if Mr. Strude would give him time he would restore them.

MARY HATHAWAY - GUILTY. Aged 31.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, believing it to be her first offence and done from distress .

Confined Three Months .

WILLIAM HATHAWAY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-204

780. THOMAS TALBOT and WILLIAM COSTIGANI were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of William Williams .

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I am a constable. On the 2d of March, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening, I was in King-street, Covent-garden , and saw the two prisoners, in company with another person, following the prosecutor, who had a lady with him; I saw the one who is not in custody take the handkerchief, and give it to Talbot - they then came on towards Covent-garden, where I lost them, but Costigani was still in King-street, calling out Jack; he then came down into Covent-garden, and I followed him to Broad-court, where I saw the three together again, with a fourth person; they were looking at the handkerchief under a gas-light; the third one got off - I attempted to take him, but he got from under my hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. Then you did not see Costigani till you saw him in Broad-court? - A. Yes; they were together when the handkerchief was drawn; I did not know him before.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I am a medical-man . I was going to the Theatre, and had this handkerchief in my pocket - the officer came to me, and told me I had lost it; I then gave him my address. I did not see the prisoners.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was in company with Bertraun the whole time, and saw all he has described; when we saw them looking at the handkerchief I went and took Costigani, who had then got the handkerchief round his neck.

Cross-examined. Q. How can you account for his having it round his neck? A. A handkerchief is tied round a neck in a minute; when I first saw it they were looking at it under the gas-light, but before we got to them he had got it on his neck; I suppose they did not see us looking at them - we got up to them in about a minute. Bertraun took it off. I am quite sure I saw Costigani in King-street, perhaps for five or six minutes.

COURT to ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN. Q. What time elapsed between your seeing the third boy take the handkerchief, and your seeing the three boys looking at it? - A. About a quarter of an hour; I did not lose sight of Costigani, except when he turned the corner. I took the handkerchief, which was tied round his neck; I did not see him tie it round.(Property produced and sworn to.)

COSTIGANI'S Defence. My mother lets out a room in Wild-court; she sent me to see if the lodger had paid the rent, and when I got to Covent-garden I saw a lad named Smith, who said he was going to Bedfordbury; he went to buy some oranges, and I went on - when I was in King-street a lad came and said, "Is not that William?" I said

Yes, and he said he would go with me to Wild-court, and a boy, they call Jack, the plasterer, came and asked him to buy a handkerchief - he said he had no money, but the boy pressed him to buy it; he said, "It is small - I do not think it will go twice round my neck;" I said it would go twice round mine. I then saw the two men coming up the court - when I saw the others run I ran.

TALBOT'S Defence. I met this lad, and walked with him - a lad came and asked if I would buy a handkerchief - I was looking at it when the officer came and took me.

TALBOT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

COSTIGANI - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-205

781. GEORGE PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Kinnersley Hooper , from his person .

JOHN KINNERSLEY HOOPER. I live at Queenhithe, and am a wine-merchant . I was in St. John-street, Clerkenwell , at a quarter before nine o'clock on the 2d of April, walking towards Smithfield, with a gentleman - I felt a hand in my pocket, and turned round, when I saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, which he immediately let drop - I took it up, and he ran away; we pursued, and never lost sight of him, after running two or three hundred yards, we took him.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am an officer. I produce the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-206

782. AARON PAINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 bag, value 2d.; 5 sovereigns, and 16 shillings, the property of Mary Ann Ward , spinster , from her person .

MARY ANN WARD. I am single, and live at Finchley. I was in St. John-street, Clerkenwell , with my mother, about seven o'clock in the evening of the 10th of March; I had a black silk bag in my hand, containing five sovereigns and sixteen shillings in silver, a little black apron, a thimble, and some keys; the prisoner stood at the end of Taylor's-row - he came up to me, and snatched my bag from me - he ran down the turning; I followed, crying Stop thief! and a gentleman stopped him; I asked him if he would give me what he took; he said he had nothing: while we were talking a little boy came up, and said,"Where are the ladies? here is the bag;" my mother took it of him. I am quite certain of the prisoner's person.

MARY WARD . My daughter had hold of my arm, and was carrying the bag in her right hand. I saw the prisoner take it from her, and run down Taylor's-row; we ran, and cried Stop thief! and a gentleman stopped him; I am quite certain of his person - the bag was brought back by a little boy.

ROBERT WATKINS . I was coming up Northampton-square, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I looked up Taylor's-row; the prisoner saw me holding up my stick - he then left off running; I went and collared him. I asked what he had been doing - he said nothing; the lady and her daughter then came up.

JAMES ROBINSON . I am nine years of age. I picked up a black bag in Taylor's-row, and gave it to the lady, and soon after the prisoner was taken into custody.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am a constable. I have the bag, with the trinkets, but the money was given to the lady.(Bag produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260406-207

583. THOMAS HICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of George Peter Phillips , from his person .

GEORGE PETER PHILLIPS. I was in Little Bath-street on the 22d of March, about three o'clock, I was passing a shop where some persons were collected; I felt something at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner within two or three feet of me - a person asked if I had lost any thing - I said, Yes, my handkerchief; I turned to look for him, but he had got round the corner - he was pursued and taken. The officer gave me the handkerchief.

JOHN BLAKE . I am a constable. I was coming up Coppice-row, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I looked round, and saw the prisoner throw the handkerchief away - he was then about thirty yards from me, and two young men were following him; I picked it up - he was brought back to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SMITH . I was passing up Ayre-street-hill about three o'clock on the 22d of March, and saw the prisoner and another person following this gentleman - he came to where there were some persons looking into a shop; the other then took the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, and gave it to the prisoner, who ran away - a cry of Stop thief! was raised - he was pursued and taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-208

784. JOHN SIMPSON and THOMAS SIMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 2 sacks, value 6s., and 8 bushels of malt, value 3l., the goods of John Cass and Edward Chuck , in a certain barge on the navigable river Thames .

DAVID LAMBERT . I am barge-master to Messrs. John Cass and Edward Chuck - they are partners and carry on the malting business at Ware, in Hertfordshire; their barge was lying at Chiswick-wharf , on the Middlesex side of the Thames on the 16th of March - there were three hundred quarters of malt in it, which was their property; when we came from home; whatever is in the barge I have to pay for, if it is lost, but still it was their property; I was to take this malt to Mr. Thompson's, opposite Turnham-green, about two hundred yards from the Thames - it was stowed on board in sacks, each sack containing four bushels; I got there about six o'clock; I went on shore and had a pint of beer; I returned on board at half-past nine, when every thing was all right; I went to bed on board the barge at ten - there were two men, a boy, and myself; at two in the morning the watchman called me, when I got up and ran out naked - my man ran forward and said there were two sacks gone, and two more lay on the gun-wale - they had been pulled from the bulk - there were six hundred sacks in all; the watchman said "Don't fret, I have

got your malt, and I know who the men are;" I have known the two prisoners very well - one of them was tap-boy at the house I use - they lived in the neighbourhood as labourers, but I only went there five or six times a year - John Simpson has worked on board the barge, but I do not know that Thomas has - John had nothing to do on board the barge or with the malt at that time; I had not seen him that evening near the barge; I saw the prisoner Thomas about eight or half-past eight o'clock that morning in custody; I did not see John till the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. What hour did you get to Chiswick? A. About six o'clock, and about a quarter of an hour afterwards I went to the Red Lion public-house, and there I saw John Simpson - he said "Halloo, master, you are up again;" I then drank out of his pot, and then had a pint myself - it was strong beer; I do not know how much I had afterwards - part of two or three pots, perhaps - it was porter or hock - three or four of us drank; I had no gin or spirits that night - I drank part of three or four pints of beer after that with old Middleton, the waterman; I went on board the barge again by ten o'clock.

COURT. Q. You know the sacks of malt that the watchman pointed out to you? A. Yes; they were part of my master's bulk, I am sure; I saw both the prisoners there that night, but Thomas did not come in till the latter end of the evening, just before I went on board.

RICHARD GEORGE . I am a watchman at Chiswick. On the 17th of March, after I had cried the hour of two, my dog barked a good deal; I then went to Dr. Turner's stable, and there I saw Thomas Simpson with a sack of malt on his back; I took hold of the corner, he threw it down upon another sack and ran away; this was about one hundred yards from the barge; I had known him from a child and have no doubt of his person - I said "I have got you now" - he made no answer but ran away; I sprung my rattle, and a man, named Davy, got up and came to a window to know what was the matter - I said a man had been stealing some malt out of the Ware barge - he got up and took one of the sacks into my house, and came back for the other; I then went down and called to the bargeman, but could not awake him - I met another watchman - he then went down and awoke the bargeman - he said "Get up, you will lose all your malt;" I did not see John Simpson till about twenty minutes after two o'clock, when he and his brother came to the place where the malt had been thrown down; I said "You are the two gentlemen who have been lifting off this malt;" John said "What malt" - I said "You will know in the morning" - he said "If you want me you know where to find me" - I showed the same sacks and malt to Lambert, and they are here now.

Cross-examined. Q. This was past two o'clock in the morning? A. Yes; it was not quite bright moon-light, but light enough for me to distinguish him - we went the next day before a Magistrate; I did not say before him that I could not swear to the man, as I did not see his features - what I said to Thomas Simpson was, "I have got you - but he got away - I had hold of the corner of the sack - it was about one hundred yards from the wharf; I had no lantern; I had seen him in the afternoon - he had a lightish jacket and blue trousers on; I mentioned to the foreman of the brewhouse that I knew the person who had committed the robbery; I heard that John surrendered himself, but I did not know it; I only communicated my intelligence to the watchman - I was at work at the brewhouse when the prisoner was taken - I had not stopped a man with a sack of malt half an hour before - I did not see the first sack of malt before Thomas threw his sack down upon it.

COURT. Q. You say you had known them from their childhood? A. Yes; and I swear positively it was Thomas Simpson had the sack.

ABRAHAM ORTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended Thomas from the information I received that morning, at his father's door, at Chiswick.

GEORGE HUNTLEY . I am a Bow-street patrol. I heard these two men were wanted for stealing malt; and I took Thomas Simpson to the cage - John then sent a person to say he had heard he was wanted, and he would resign himself up.

COURT to DAVID LAMBERT . Q. What was the value of this malt? A. Three pounds and six shillings the sacks; the first tier stood upright, the next longways, and the third athwart.

JOHN SIMPSON'S Defence. I was drinking with the prosecutor till near twelve o'clock at night, at the Red Lion; my brother came there a few minutes before 12 o'clock, and drank with us; he went to go home, and the door was locked; he then said he would go to the night-house to get a lodging; and I said I would go and awake his mother; he went on to the night-house, and I went and brought him back and led him to his mother's.

THOMAS SIMPSON'S Defence. I was intoxicated, and was at home when the officer came the next day, and said he wanted me.

COURT to RICHARD GEORGE. Q. When he came back did he appear intoxicated? A. No.

THOMAS SIMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

JOHN SIMPSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-209

785. JOSEPH HUBBERFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Hammond , from his person .

WILLIAM HAMMOND. I am a servant . About a quarter-past seven o'clock, on the 2d of March, I was in Holborn ; I had a handkerchief in my left hand coat pocket: I felt something at my pocket - I turned round and saw the prisoner close behind me - I did not see any thing in his hand - the officer pursued him to opposite Hand-court - he dropped the handkerchief in running, and the officer took it up.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty, and saw the prisoner near the prosecutor - there was a crowd, at the corner of Turnstile, looking at the pictures - I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his own - I tapped the gentleman on the shoulder, and told him what I had seen - the prisoner then ran across to Hand-court - I pursued, and saw him drop the handkerchief - he was not out of my sight.

RICHARD MILLS . I was with Waddington. I heard him cry Stop thief! - the prisoner ran towards me, and I stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Holborn and saw a crowd - I crossed and looked at the pictures - then crossed again - and, before I got twelve yards, a man knocked me down and took me into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-210

786. WILLIAM DENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Neville , from his person .

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 28th of March I was in the City-road , at the ascent of the balloon - I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from Mr. Neville's pocket - I seized him with it in his hand, and apprized the gentleman of his loss - the prisoner made resistance, and I called for one of the parish constables, who assisted me out of the crowd with him - I had been watching him some time - I did not know him before.

WILLIAM NEVILLE. I have been clerk to a corn-factor. I was in town on a visit - this handkerchief was in my pocket - I did not feel it taken.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. I was called to get the prisoner out of the crowd.

Prisoner's Defence. I had only just come from home with my father and mother - I was in the crowd and saw this handkerchief on the ground - I took it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-211

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 10.

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

787. ELIZABETH GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 jacket, value 4s., and two waistcoats, value 4s. , the goods of the Overseers of the poor of St. Giles-in-the-fields, and St. George, Bloomsbury .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-212

788. JOHN ELLIS and HENRY SCOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 24s., the goods of Charles James , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HENRY KEMP . I am shopman to Mr. Charles James, linen-draper , of Whitechapel-road . On the 4th of April I put this cotton into the window, and did not miss it till between five and six o'clock in the evening, when the officer brought in the prisoners with it.

JAMES WAYLING . I am a Thames' police constable. On the 4th of April, between five and six o'clock, I was with Blaby, and saw the two prisoners standing talking by the shop-window; I kept my head turned to look at them- I saw Ellis go into the shop, and come out with something white - he turned up a street by the side of the shop, and was followed by Scott - we followed - they joined, and Ellis had the white bundle on his shoulder - he walked very quick, till I came nearly up to him - he then ran - I came up to him, and saw something white in the kennel, which proved to be this cotton - he was stopped when I called Stop thief!

BENJAMIN BLABY . I am an officer. I was with Kemp - I saw the prisoners in the street and the bundle on Ellis's shoulder - I followed, and saw them talking together, about two or three hundred yards from the shop - Scott did not run, but I took him - he said he had done nothing.

ELLIS'S Defence. I do not know any thing of Scott.

SCOTT'S Defence. I am as innocent as a child.

ELLIS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

SCOTT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-213

789. BENJAMIN HITCHCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 seal, value 3s.; 1 watch-key, value 1d.; 1 crown, 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 91/2d., in copper monies, the property of Robert Norish , from his person .

ROBERT NORISH. I am a plasterer , and live in Paddington. On the night of the 24th of February, I was at the King's-head public-house, in Edgware-road - I spent two shillings, and changed half a crown, which I did not mention before the Magistrates - I took out my money when I came out - I had six half-crowns, one crown, and some other silver - I felt it in my pocket when I came into High-street, Mary-le-bone - I had come away with Robins, my employer - after leaving him I went into the Rising Sun public-house, and staid there about three-quarters of an hour - I was rather in liquor, and I drank some more there - I changed half-a-crown and paid for six-penny worth of gin and water - I saw some soldiers there, and gave them part of it - I arose up to go out, and asked the prisoner, who looked like a watchman, if he would drink; he came in and drank out of the glass - there was "7 D." on his coat - I think I remained there about twenty minutes, but he did not stay - when I came out I met him in the street - I dropped two half-crowns in the street, which I picked up and put into my waistcoat pocket - I recollect the prisoner then put his hand into my right hand waistcoat pocket, and then attempted to take my watch - I called out, and then missed my money, which was one crown piece, four half-crowns, and some silver.

COURT. Q. You say he endeavoured to take your watch, how did he do that? A. He got the watch out, but the string was drawn through the button-hole, and he could not get it - he had unbuttoned the waistband of my breeches to get it, but the ribbon would not draw - I gave an alarm - Williamson and two watchmen came up and the prisoner was taken to the watch-house, when I charged him with stealing my watch, but not my money, because I was rather tipsy, and did not recollect it - the watch-house keeper said, "You are drunk, come to-morrow morning at ten o'clock" - I went at eight o'clock, and saw the deputy watch-house keeper - I asked if there was not a watch there of mine - the prisoner had not taken the watch from me - I described the money by some marks of whitening on it before I saw it; Mr. Howard took out the crown, two half-crowns, two shillings, and nine-pence half-penny, and I saw the marks on it.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS Q. What was the sign of the first public-house you went to? A. The King's Head; I got drunk at the Sun; I was capable of walking

home; the watch-house keeper pointed out the watch upon my own person - the prisoner had his coat taken off, and he was dismissed for being drunk - the watch-house-keeper took the watch, and kept it the whole night for protection; he let the prisoner go about his business, and he came the next morning.

ROBERT WILLIAMSON . I am waiter at the public-house in High-street. I was out with beer in Paddington-street, and heard the cry of Watch! I went to the place, and found the prisoner holding the prosecutor up against some iron-railing - the prosecutor was crying Watch! and the prisoner was taking the watch out of his pocket - but it was fastened round his button, and he could not get it. The prosecutor was dead drunk, and I assisted in taking them to the watch-house - the prisoner was searched, and one crown, two half-crowns, two shillings, a sixpence, and some half-pence, were taken from him.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A waiter; I did not say at the watch-house that the prisoner had taken the watch; I said he took it out of his pocket, but could not get it, because it was fastened round the brace button - the constable did not say to me, "Then the man must have two watches, for there is one upon his person now" - there were two watchmen in the street; the prisoner was drunk - the prosecutor gave him in charge, and he walked with the other watchman to the watch-house.

COURT. Q. Did he speak when he gave him in charge? A. Yes; he ordered the other watchman to take him down to the watch-house, and said he had been robbing him of his watch.

EDWARD HOWARD . I am constable of Mary-le-bone. I was on duty on the 24th of February, and about half-past nine o'clock; the prisoner, who is a parish watchmen, was brought to the watch-house; the prosecutor said "I give this watchman in charge for robbing me of my watch;""Robbed you of your watch! has he, (said I), where?" he appeared to be tipsy, and said it was in Paddington-street; I said "Let us see if he has robbed you;" I lifted up his waistcoat, and said "You give charge of the prisoner for robbing you of your watch, and here is your watch - what time might it be?" he said it was half-past eleven, and the prosecutor said it was half-past twelve o'clock. I said to the prisoner "You are drunk;" he said"I am not;" the watch-house-keeper said "You are - pull off that coat, and go along about your business" - I searched, and found on him, one crown, two half-crowns, two shillings, a sixpence, and some copper - I saw the prosecutor next morning, when he said he had lost his money, and described it by the whitening on it - the prisoner was ordered to come down about ten o'clock, and he came at half-past eight.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Williamson come into the watch-house that night? A. Yes; he said nothing about the money being taken - he said, next morning, that he saw the prisoner had got the prosecutor against the iron-rails, with his small-clothes undone, and had got the watch out, but could not get it away, because it was fastened - he did not charge the prisoner with taking the watch that night - he heard what was going forward, and came with this story next morning: I took the silver from the prisoner; he had an opportunity of seeing what I took from him; the prosecutor, or the waiter, might have seen it - I took it out, and counted it on the table, and there was whitening on it; the prosecutor described it as having whitening on it in the morning.

COURT. Q. Did you refuse to take the charge upon finding the watch? A. Yes; as soon as I saw it on the prosecutor - Williamson did not say why he came in.

JOHN WALTERS . I keep the Rising Sun public-house. At nine o'clock on this night I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor together - the prosecutor took him into the parlour; I saw the prosecutor with a half-crown - I saw no other money - I saw him go away, and immediately heard a cry in the street - I went out and desired them both to come in again; I said "What have you to allege against the man?" he gave no answer, but still insisted upon knowing his number; he ordered a glass of gin and water, and gave me half-a-crown, which I changed - I then desired the prisoner to go, as the man had nothing to allege against him, which he did - the prosecutor stopped about twenty minutes, and then went away.

Cross-examined. Q. He could not make any charge against the man? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night in question I arrived at my post about twenty minutes before seven o'clock. I walked round my beat, and met the prosecutor at the corner of Beaumont-street and Devonshire-street, accusing a gentleman's servant of throwing water on him from a window - I inquired what house it was, and he pointed to an uninhabited one - I mentioned that to him, and he got quite pacified, and asked me to have something to drink - we went into the Devonshire Arms, and I had a small glass of rum - he took out his watch, and put it down to pay for the liquor; I said it was very strange he should call me in to have liquor and not have money to pay for it - I told him to put his watch into his pocket, and search his pocket, to see if he had got no money - he turned out his pockets, and in his right hand waistcoat pocket he had three half-crowns - he changed one, and I left him there about half-past eight or nine o'clock - I met him again in Devonshire-street, and he urged me to go to the Sun, and drink with him; I said go to the house, and I may call; when I got to the door he met me, and urged me to go in; I drank about two table-spoonsful - he met me again afterwards, and urged me to have more - I said I would not, but he urged me, and said he had some rum and water with some soldiers - I consented to have some, and that was all.

COURT to EDWARD HOWARD . Q. Did you take the money from the prisoner that night? A. Yes, and asked him how he got it - he said he had taken change that morning for a sovereign.

WILLIAM RAPLOR . I keep the Horse Shoe public-house, in Clerkenwell-close. On Thursday morning, the 23d of February, the prisoner brought a sovereign to change, and a little bottle for a quartern of gin - I gave him a crown piece, two half-crowns, and some silver - I am in the habit of keeping chalk in my pocket, and my money is generally marked with it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-214

790. ELIZABETH WOOD LLOYD was indicted for bigamy .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GEORGE PARR . I am clerk at St. Mary-le-bone, and registrar of marriages there. I have the register of the marriage of Thomas Lloyd , bachelor, and Elizabeth Wood Ducket , spinster, at that church, by banns, on the 2d of May 1814, by the Rev. H. Chapman, curate -(read.)

ROBERT BLACKMORE . I am an attorney, and am acquainted with the hand-writing of the prisoner. I have seen her write three times, and have numbers of her letters in my possession; the first time I saw her write was in December last - I have a sufficient knowledge of her writing to swear to it. I believe the signature "M. A. Ducket" to this register, to be her writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Are you not engaged as the solicitor in this prosecution? A. Yes; I never saw her writing till December last.

Q. Do you believe the other name "Thomas Lloyd" to be her hand-writing? A. No - there is certainly a great similarity; the a is turned over in the same way, but there is a difference. The only time I ever saw her write was when she came to agree upon the terms of separation from Mr. Truss - I saw her sign the deed, but I have letters which came from her.

DAVID JACKSON . I was a painter. I remember the prisoner and Thomas Lloyd, but I did not know him before he was married; I was at the Yorkshire Stingo tea-gardens about 1812, and saw the prisoner, whom I knew as Ducket's daughter, as I had lived opposite to her - she spoke to me, and asked how I did, and said she was married; I asked to whom - she said to Lloyd, the baker - I think she said that day, but I cannot be positive; while I was talking I heard somebody say, "Mr. Lloyd, there is Mr. Jackson joking with your wife - will you stand that?" I turned round, and saw three bakers standing together, but I did not know Lloyd; he was pointed out to me afterwards. Lloyd is now in Court (pointing him out). I do not know where they lived afterwards, nor do I know that ever I saw them walking together. I cannot say whether this is the man I saw at the gardens.

Cross-examined. Q. You say you have seen that man since? A. Yes - but I do not think I ever spoke to him.

JOHN YATES . I am a cooper, and live in Wade-street, Poplar. I know the prisoner - she took an apartment of me about October, 1822, by the name of Bligh; there was a seaman with her, of the name of George Bligh ; they lodged with me about a week. They both came again the following year, after he had made a voyage to the East Indies - they then staid a fortnight or three weeks. She came there again the following year, and went by the name of Bligh. I have seen her write frequently, and know well the character of her hand-writing. I think her present writing is much better than that in this register, but as far as I can judge, I think this is her writing - I believe this letter to be her writing (looking at one); I believe Bligh was mate of a ship - I was given to understand that after he went to sea, the first time, she was a companion to a lady of the name of Truss, in Claremont-place; she said that she was companion to her, on account of her being deranged.

Cross-examined. Q. Upon your oath is there not a considerable difference between the hand-writing you have sworn to, and the hand-writing in this book? A. I think her hand considerably improved, but I still think it is her hand-writing. I did not know any thing of her writing till 1822. I do not know whether she did live with a lady of the name of Truss or not; she went by the name of Bligh only when I saw her write.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did she say she was going back to this woman? A. Yes.

Mrs. YATES. I am the wife of John Yates. I have seen the prisoner write; I think the signature in the register is her writing. I believe this letter to be her writing; I have seen Bligh - he appeared to be a respectable man - he was mate of an Indiaman.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not her writing a much better hand than that? A. Yes, it is now; the name I saw her write was Bligh - there is no similarity in the names. I had no knowledge of her writing in 1814. I think this name "Thomas Lloyd" is her writing.

COURT. Q. Does she write a better hand now than she did at the date of these letters? A. Yes, I think she does - her present hand-writing is much better than this in the book.

THOMAS STEVENS . I am a baker, and live in Weston-street, Southwark. I have known the prisoner fifteen years - I knew her by the name of Ducket - I lodged in her mother's house - they lived in John-street, Mary-le-bone; I remember Thomas Lloyd coming to court her - he stood godfather to a child of mine; I believe they were married in May, it was at the time of Yorkshire Stingo fair - after that day she went by the name of Lloyd - they lived together as man and wife, and many a time I have heard her come and ask for her husband - I saw them together a good while; they lodged together as man and wife in the father's house - the last time I saw them together was about two years after they had lived together at a house in Rathbone-place - the prisoner was sitting on the knee of a sailor of the name of Bligh, who had come from sea with her brother - we drank together, and called for half a pint of gin; Lloyd then said, in her presence, "If you like the sailor better than me, you had better go with him;" the sailor then threw 5s. on the table, and he and the prisoner went off together, and left me and Lloyd to drink the gin.

Cross-examined. Q. There was 5s. thrown down by the sailor, a fellow of the name of Lloyd took up the money, and the sailor took the lady? A. Yes, the landlord took the money - I think that is ten years ago.

ROBERT DAVIES . I am a sawyer. I knew the prisoner's father - his name was George Ducket - I worked for him - this signature in the register is his hand-writing - he has been dead about twelve years.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you live in his house? A. Yes; I was apprenticed to him; I did not see him when dead.

COURT. Q. How long is it since you last saw him? A. Above twelve years; I heard by his wife that he was dead - I have lived in the neighbourhood since.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. How near did you live to George Ducket? A. In Stevens'-buildings, just by - I have lived just about there ever since - I have never seen him since I heard he was dead - I was quite a different way at the time; I had worked with him three or four years before his death; I have not the least doubt of this being George Ducket's hand writing.

MARY ANN PEARSON . I live in North-place, Back-road, Islington. I once lived in the prisoner's father's house; I recollect her by the name of Ducket, and Lloyd courting her; I recollect their going out one day and coming back again, after which she went by the name of Mrs. Lloyd; I had before heard her say she was going to be married; they lived together as man and wife in her father's house; I lived in the house for three or four months - I have heard her mention Lloyd as her husband; about three or four years ago she called at my house, very handsomely dressed, and said she had married a gentleman named Truss - this is Lloyd, (pointing him out.)

WILLIAM HENRY TRUSS . I hold a situation in the India House; I married the prisoner at St. Pancras Old Church, on the 28th of March, 1822 , by the name of Betty Wood Louther Bligh; she called herself the widow of a Captain Bligh; I first became acquainted with her in 1820, and parted from her in December last; I cannot say at what time I determined to separate from her - I agreed to allow her one hundred and twenty pounds a year.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you ever paid her one shilling? A. No; we lived together for two years before we were married, and after we were married, for four years; we lived very comfortably for the two years, but not so afterwards; our acquaintance first commenced in the street - we first lived in Chalton-street, and afterwards at the Polygon in Somers-Town; I did not know but that she was the window of Captain Bligh - I did not know a person of the name of Bligh; I have not taken any proceedings in Doctor's Commons; my object in bringing forward this prosecution is not merely to get rid of the marriage.

Re-examined. Q. When was the settlement made? A. In the latter end of last year - I had not, till after the deed was executed, the slightest reason to believe that she had deceived me - she conducted herself properly before our marriage, and it was her solicitation that induced me to marry her; she represented herself as the daughter of Mr. Graham, brother of Sir J. Graham, who was first cousin to the Lonsdale family - she mentioned Lady Styles and Mr. Bosanquet as relations on her mother's side - she spoke of a rich aunt of the name of Hearn, but did not say what her expectations were - it was not my proposal, but her urgent request that I should marry her; she frequently went away from me on visits - the trustee for her, under the settlement, was Captain Atkinson, the commander of the schooner St. Helena - he frequently visited at our house after the marriage.

ROBERT BLACKMORE . I produce an extract of the marriage register of St. Pancras; I examined it with the original - (read.)

"William Henry Truss, of this parish, batchelor, and Betty Wood Louther Bligh, of this parish, widow, were married in this Church by license, this 28th of May, 1822, by me, Wm. Tullfield, in the presence of Octavius Young Thistleton and G. Hamp."

JOHN AQUILA BROWN . I live in Bouverie-street, and am a silversmith. I am brother-in-law to Mr. Truss; I knew the prisoner about ten days after her marriage with him - she represented herself as the widow of Captain Bligh, and neice of Lady Stiles and Mr. Bosanquet; I went down to Bognor with the officer last Saturday four weeks, and found her in bed with Captain Atkinson - the officer drew back the curtain and saw them; I accompanied them to town - she was very free in talking - there was no threat or promise held out to her; she said she was married to Lloyd, and she would not deny it, but she had been sold by him to a sailor of the name of Bligh, for 5s. and a bottle of wine.

A letter was here read from the prisoner, directed to Thomas Lloyd, Pershore, Worcestershire Signed, Elizabeth Lloyd, dated Feb. 14, 1816. Also the address and signature of a letter read, dated Broadstairs, July 19, 1822, addressed to W. H. Truss, Esq., East India-house, London, Signed, E. W. Truss. The contents of these letters (which are those proved to be the prisoner's hand-writing) did not relate to any matters connected with this case, but were only produced to prove the prisoner had avowed herself by the names signed to them.

JURY to ROBERT DAVIES . Q. Did you say it was more than twelve years since you heard of the death of her father? A. No; I dare say it is between eleven and twelve years since I heard of it from Mrs. Ducket - she did not say how long he had been dead.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-215

791. MARIA FAY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 pair of boots, value 50s.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 2 seals, value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 knife, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Hart , from his person .

THOMAS HART. I am a smith , and live in Little Russell-street, Bloomsbury. On Sunday, the 5th of March, I met a woman in Rosemary-lane, but I cannot say it was the prisoner - I went with her to a room in Blue Anchor-yard - I did not intend to sleep, but I fell asleep there - I was very tipsy - the watchman called me about two o'clock - he asked me what I had lost; I told him I had lost a pair of boots, two seals, a waistcoat, a watch-key, a handkerchief, and a knife; I had the waistcoat and boots on the night before; I cannot recollect whether I had undressed myself - I had 16s. or 17s. in my pocket.

Prisoner. He came to my room with a young woman - the young woman gave me the waistcoat and two seals, and said he had left them with her - he was awake and heard what was said. Witness. I did not see any thing of the sort done.

JOHN TOLKER . I am a watchman of Rosemary-lane. I went into Blue Anchor-yard on Monday, the 6th of March - I found the prisoner with the waistcoat and seals in her pocket - my partner called to me to keep a look out - I saw something bulky on her side, and asked what she had got - she said nothing but a pocket handkerchief - I took her back to the room, and found the prosecutor in bed and asleep - I then found the other things.

JOHN DUNGATE . I am the beadle. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and the watchmen gave me the articles.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it, but the young woman told me he was to go and get the money to redeem these things - the watchman was so tipsy that the Magistrate would not commit me on his evidence.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-216

792. HANNAH KNIGHT was indicted for stealing,

on the 20th of February , 2 pillows, value 4s.; 1 sheet, value 3s., and 2 pillow cases, value 1s. 6d. the goods of David Quarry , in a lodging room .

MARY QUARRY . I am the wife of David Quarry, and live in Prospect-terrace, Gray's-inn-road . I let the prisoner a room, furnished with the articles stated - she came there four weeks before the Saturday as this occurred on the Monday - she went out with a bundle, but did not tell me she was going away; I went after her and saw her go towards a pawnbroker's shop - she turned her head and saw me; she then walked about the street; I followed her for an hour and a half - she then returned to my house, and I stopped her in the passage, and found on her a large blanket - my husband went into her room, and missed the other things.

DAVID QUARRY . I went into the room and missed the property - we found the duplicates in the room.

HARRY MASTERS . I am a watchman. Mr. Quarry gave me the duplicates; I asked the prisoner what she had done with the things - she said they were pawned.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - she appeared in great distress.

JOHN ABETTEFF . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a sheet and two pillow cases with me.

JOHN BUTTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Battle-bridge. I have a pillow pawned for 1s. - I do not know by whom.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260406-217

793. JAMES BOWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 6 pairs of stockings, value 20s., the goods of John Graham , privately in his shop .

JOHN GRAHAM. I am a hosier , and live in Holborn . The prisoner was my shopman . I cannot positively say these stockings are mine, but I had a great many goods of this description.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Then you cannot state that they are yours? A. Not for a certainty - there are such stockings in every shop in London.

ALEXANDER JONES . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Holywell-street. On the evening of the 18th of March, about eight o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and offered a pair of stockings for sale, for 4s. - he said if I brought them he would bring some more - they were worth a great deal more; I asked where he got them - he said he gave 6s. 6d. for them. I left the shop, saying I would get change, and got an officer.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I was sent for, and took three pairs of stockings from the prisoner's coat pocket. I found in his pocket a letter, with the direction of Mr. Graham's shop, No. 294, Holborn on it; he had said he lived in Gray's Inn-lane; I asked where he got these stockings, and he said he had robbed his employer of them; he saw that I had got his employer's address. I took him to Bow-street office - he confessed he had taken them from his master.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he told you he had robbed his employer? A. Yes; I had not said any more to him than asking him where he got them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my cousin's, to tell him of the arrival of my sister, who had sent a letter, stating that she was to be in town that evening; I met a sailor, who inquired the way to the Strand - he then said he had some silk hose to sell, which he had bought in France, and would sell them cheap, as he was in distress; I paid him 6s. 6d. a pair for them. I was induced to offer a pair for sale; I asked the man 4s. for them - he offered me half-a-crown, and said that was enough.

JURY to Mr. GRAHAM. Q. Are not these French manufacture? A. No, I think not, but I will not swear it.

MARY BOWEN . I am the prisoner's sister. I had sent him a letter, and expected to see him that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-218

794. CHRISTOPHER NICOLS was indicted for embezzlement

WILLIAM WHITE . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money for me - he never paid me 3l. 12s. 6d., which he received of Martha Spencer. I sent him to receive some money of her on the 21st of February - he returned; I was up stairs, as I had a child died that morning; he went away to Wapping, and I did not see him till the next day, when I went and asked him about it; he was going to Scotland; he had been with me seven months - I know nothing amiss of him.

MARTHA SPENCER . I paid the prisoner 3l. 12s. 6d., which settled Mr. White's bill, on the 21st of February; I gave him all silver; there was one or two half-crowns, I believe, but I am not positive. There were shillings and sixpences, but I cannot say how many.

EMANUEL WHITE . I took up the prisoner on Wednesday, the 22d of February, in Lower East Smithheld, about three o'clock in the afternoon - he was drunk. I found 5s. and a few half-pence upon him, and the following day the landlady of the Jolly Sailors public-house gave me some more money.

FRANCES WIGGERING . I keep the Jolly Sailors. The prisoner came there on the 21st of February, and asked me to take care of 2l. 17s. in silver for him till he went to Leith.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a friend, and spent two or three shillings, and was ashamed to go to my master.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-219

795. ABRAHAM RATCLIFFE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 6 live tame fowls, price 9s. , the property of William Vorley .

JAMES NICHOLLS . I am servant to Mr. Vorley, a beast salesman , who lives at Islington . I know these fowls, one of them in particular, from the claws being off - they were shown to me by the night constable, and I have not the least doubt of their being my master's; I had seen them all safe on Sunday evening, the 19th of March, and missed them about seven o'clock on Tuesday morning - one of their heads was pulled off, and thrown under the porch.

JOHN PENNINGTON . I am a watchman. On Tuesday morning, the 21st of March, I was on Wellington-terrace, and saw the prisoner and another man, walking at the end of a stable, near Barnsbury-park - I called the hour of six, and when I got on to Park-place, they made a bit of a stop till I crossed the road; I turned round, and came by Barnsbury-park again, and saw them - I asked what

they had got - his companion said, "What is that to you?" the prisoner had a smock frock on his shoulder - I put my hand on it, and felt something soft; his companion ran away; I took the prisoner, and the night constable found in the frock three cocks and two hens - one of the hen's head had beed pulled off - he said he did not know what it was- the other man had given it to him to carry.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a constable. I examined the bag, and found these fowls, which I showed to Nicholls, who claimed them - he described them before he saw them.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man with the smock on his shoulder - he said if I would carry it he would give me half-a-crown, as he was going with some beasts to Smithfield. I had not had it ten minutes when the watchman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-220

796. JOHN WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of Richard Best .

RICHARD BEST. On the 20th of March my cabriolet was in White's-yard, Whitechapel - my coat was in it; I went for a glass of beer, returned in five minutes, and the coat was gone; I informed Higgins, who found the prisoner with the coat - he said if he had known he should not have taken it.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I pursued the prisoner - he had got into a stable loft - I saw him drop this coat into a bin, where I found it.

JAMES LEA . I took the prisoner, and bring the coat - I have known him about as a dustman.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-221

797. ELIZA WOODFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 1 watch, value 18s. , the goods of Richard Tickton .

RICHARD TICKTON. I live at Somers-town. I went with the prisoner to her lodgings, between one and two o'clock in the morning, on the 13th of March, and went with her in the morning to the Three Crowns, where there was a dispute about my breaking a glass - I took my watch out, it fell on the ground, and to the best of my knowledge she took it up, and went away; I remained a little time and made my loss known - she did not come back - I am certain I did not give it to her, nor authorize her, or any one, to raise any thing upon it.

JOHN GOODWIN . I keep the Three Crowns in East Smithfield . I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor there- the prosecutor took out his watch and, I think, threw it down on purpose - the prisoner took it up, and went away with it.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am an officer. I found the prisoner at her lodgings, and asked her about the watch - she said if I wanted it I might find it - I afterwards found the duplicate in her table drawer.

ROBERT STUPART . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this watch on Monday, the 13th of March.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated - he authorized me to pawn it in my own apartments.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-222

798. MARY WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 6 yards of ribbon, value 6s. , the goods of John Collier .

EDWARD CHEAPER . I was shopman to John Collier, linen draper , Southampton-row . About three o'clock on the 1st of March, the prisoner came with a girl, about eight years old - she asked for some ribbons which I shewed her - I watched her very narrowly, and counted the ribbons before I laid them down - she went away in about five minutes, without buying any thing - I counted the ribbons and missed one - I went after her, and on coming back to the door she, or the child, threw the ribbon into the shop - I did not see it taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-223

799. HANNAH WHITELAW were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Paine .

SARAH NEALE . I am the wife of George Neale , a stonemason - we live in Somers-town . On the 10th of March the prisoner, (whom I knew nine years ago), came to my house, about nine o'clock, and I took her in for a few hours, as she was in distress, having been discharged from Hatton-garden - she left me, and procured lodgings in the street; I missed this handkerchief from a basket, about half-past twelve o'clock - it belonged to Mr. Thomas Paine.

ELIZABETH BARTLETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cromer-street - this handkerchief was pawned at my shop on the 10th of March, before one o'clock - I believe by the prisoner, by her voice - this is the duplicate I gave.

WILLIAM CLULOW . I searched the prisoner and found this duplicate on her.(Property produced and sworn to).

The prisoner put in a written defence, accusing the prosecutrix of having kept 5s. which had been sent her by her husband, and stating, that the handkerchief was lent to her.

SARAH NEALE . It is entirely false - her husband gave her no money, but her brother gave her 3s., and 2s. the officer, which I never saw.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-224

800. MARY WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 6 napkins, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Miller .

ANN MILLER . I am the wife of William Miller. I lost six napkins on the 29th of March, which I had put out to dry, about five o'clock - I missed them about six.

ISAAC LEVY. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to my shop on the 29th of March, about seven o'clock, in the evening, with six napkins, and I detained her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman asked me to go and pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260406-225

801. MARY ANN WATERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 1 shawl, value 8s.; 1 pelisse,

value 5s.; 1 gown, value 5s., and 2 yards of lace, value 4s. , the goods of William Cropper .

ELIZABETH CROPPER . I am wife of William Cropper; we live in Phoenix-street, Long-acre ; the prisoner is my husband's cousin - she came to my room on the 3d of April, and staid there from twelve o'clock till twenty minutes before one - after she was gone I went to take my husband's dinner, and returned about a quarter before two o'clock - I found the door unlocked, and the prisoner's mother in my room - I examined and missed this property- I went to several pawnbrokers' shops, and found my property.

SARAH THOMPSON . I live in the same house with Cropper. On Monday last I was at the door, and saw the prisoner come in between one and two o'clock - she had nothing with her, but she came out with a blue bundle under her arm, and went up the court.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. All these things were pawned by the prisoner, on Monday, between one and two o'clock; I asked if they were her own - she said they were, and told me what they cost. I have known her three or four years.

Prisoner's Defence (written). The prosecutrix was in the habit of lending me things to pawn. I went on this night, and as she did not come in, finding her box open, I took them to pawn, meaning to return them on Saturday night, as usual.

ELIZABETH CROPPER re-examined. I once let her pawn two articles, but she did not, last Monday, say any thing about it, nor did I give her leave to take them.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . She never pawned these things before, but has other things.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Eight Days .

Reference Number: t18260406-226

802. CHARLES WILSON and CHARLES DAVY were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 5 towels, value 10d.; 1 pinafore, value 4d., and an apron, value 4d. , the goods of Mary Hutchinson , spinster ,

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-227

803. RICHARD WEST and WILLIAM TOMS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 3 iron cramps, value 20s., the goods of James Kerr ; 3 saws, value 5s., and 1 vice, value 2s. , the goods of John McAlister ; and ELIZABETH TOMS and LOUISA FIELD were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES KERR. I am a chair-maker , and live in Clipstone-street , and have a workshop at No. 15 in that street. I missed three iron cramps on Monday, the 13th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning; the shop door had been broken open, and a piece of the lock broken off; there were three saws and a vice stolen belonging to my servant; I had seen them all safe on the Saturday night.

JOHN McALISTER. I am in Mr. Kerr's employ. I had been in the shop on Sunday, about five o'clock - I left it locked, and my tools were there; I went there next morning, about eight o'clock, and they were gone - a piece was knocked off the door, and a part of the lock was on the ground. Horne, the apprentice, was there before me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SARAH LIMBRICK . I am a widow. I know William Toms and Elizabeth Toms - she is his mother; I work for Mr. Kerr; on the Friday or Saturday I went with a chair to William Toms, the younger; and asked him to carry it for me; he waited at the shop while I went in; and I gave him something to drink; I went to his lodgings on the Sunday evening, just at dusk; to borrow a pail; he lives close by me in Earl-street, Seven Dials; but a good way from Mr. Kerr's; I saw Louisa Field there, and Richard West came to borrow a cart; the next morning I went there again, and saw William Toms, who had sent for me; he said he had sent Louisa Field out with three saws to make 8s. for his rent, and he wanted some more money for some gentleman, who was to come at twelve o'clock; I saw, under the bed, three cramps and a vice, which I believe to be those produced; he asked me to go with his mother to pawn these cramps; we took one to Mr. Simpson; the next was pawned at the same place for 7s.; I went back and gave him the money; he then asked me to take the other; I said I did not like to take it; his mother said she would go with me; I took the cramp, and she took the vice; I pawned the cramp with Maynard, and went back and took him the money; his mother brought the money for the vice, and said she could not pawn it, but she had sold it for 5s. 6d.; the duplicates were put on the table; and he gave me and Toms 1s. a piece - he gave me the tickets to do what I could with them; I sold them for 4s. to a young man; I received information and told William Toms, next morning, that the duplicates were stopped; he said they had broken open the place with a crow bar and got the articles from Mr. Kerr's, but did not say whether he did it himself; he sent Louisa Field to the pawnbroker's to claim the tickets, and told her to say they belonged to her husband; she said she would say she got them of a man she met in the street, who gave them to her to let him sleep with her.

Cross-examined by Mr. FISH. Q. West was not present at either of these times? A. No.

WILLIAM TOMS . Q. When did you give me a chair to carry home? A. It was on the Friday or Saturday; I would not carry it myself; I hired your cart to remove my goods on the 11th of February - you had come to move my goods before the chair was taken home - I live at No. 11, East-street - I asked how he got the things out, and he told me with a crow-bar - the place is in a mews - he took the chair to the door, and I took it in of him - when a person was there they could see what was in the shop.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I apprehended Elizabeth Toms on the 17th of February, at the corner of Short's-gardens, St. Giles'; I took her to a house in Stanhope-street, where I had seen this vice, and the woman said she had been there a few days before to sell it; I then asked the prisoner how she could tell such a falsity when I took her, as to say she knew nothing about it - she said she did not like to acknowledge it.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I am an officer. I took up West and Toms, at a public-house in Mitchell-street, St. Luke's.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I have two saws pawned by Field, and the cramps pawned by Limbric, on the 13th of February; the officer came the next morning, he told me if any one

came to stop them - Louisa Field came in the afternoon, I detained her - the young man to whom Limbric had sold the tickets had called before, and I stopped the tickets.

CHARLES JAMES MAYNARD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a cramp pawned by Limbric.

THOMAS PACEY BURTS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a saw pawned on the 14th of February, by Field.

JANE MACKLIN . I keep a broker's shop in Stanhope-street, Clare-market. I bought this vice of Mr. Toms for 6s. 6d.

WILLIAM TOMS' Defence. Mrs. Limbric came to me to hire a cart to move her goods to the Seven-dials; I took the cart and met her husband - he said he could not find his wife, and told me to come next day - I then took the things to Earl-street, Seven-dials, and she said she would serve her master out, for he owed her 9s., and had only paid her 3s., and she would have two chairs from his shop, which she could get ten guineas for in the trade - that he had several chests of tools in his shop, and she was sorry she did not go the night before, and get his watch which she saw hung up.

LOUISA FIELD and ELIZABETH TOMS put in a written defence, stating that the witness Limbric had given them the property to pawn for her, and that she had been convicted of felony at Westminster Sessions.

SARAH LIMBRIC . I was drawn into it by that woman, who is one of bad character. I was three weeks in confinement about eight months ago, through having a handkerchief that Mr. Toms put in.

WILLIAM TOMS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELIZABETH TOMS - GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

RICHARD WEST - NOT GUILTY .

LOUISA FIELD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-228

804. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 2 half-crowns, 13 shillings, 3 sixpences, and 1 penny piece , the monies of Thomas Seares .

HANNAH BYRNE . I am servant at the Yorkshire Grey, public-house, in Eagle-street , which is kept by Thomas Seares. On the night of the 4th of April I was at home; Twinam ordered a pot of beer and change for a sovereign, to be sent next door to the chapel - I took the beer and 19s. 6d.; there were two half-crowns and some other silver - the prisoner stood at the door - he said, "The beer is to come here, have you got change?" I said,"Yes," and gave it to him - he gave me a farthing, and said, "Go back and get half a pint of rum, and take for it out of the sovereign;" I said it was not a sovereign, it was a farthing; he told me to go along, but I would not; I took hold of him and kept him till he was taken.

CHARLES TWINAM . I am near eleven years of age. On the night of the 4th of April, I was running up the street, and the prisoner said to me, "Go and order a pot of beer at the Yorkshire Grey, for Mr. Harris, next door to the chapel, and change for a sovereign," and when I came back he gave me a halfpenny, and said he would give me more when he saw me again.

JOHN WOODERSON . I saw the prisoner with Bird, at No. 1, Eagle-street - the prisoner was trying to get from her - it is a house of ill-fame - she said he had given her a farthing for a sovereign - the prisoner took some money out of his pocket, which fell on the ground - I picked up two half-crowns, several shillings, and four or five sixpences - I took him to the Yorkshire Grey.

WILLIAN GARROD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found eight shillings and a half-crown on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I can only say I was on the spot and was taken - but I am not the person who took the money.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-229

805. WILLIAM STRAHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 sheet, value 9s., and 1 table cloth, value 10s., the goods of Mary White , widow ; and 1 pair of drawers, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 nightcap, value 6d., and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of George White .

MARY WHITE. I am a widow, and live in Ironmonger-street, St. Luke's . The prisoner lodged in my house for one month; I lost the articles stated, on the 9th of March, many of them belonged to my son George.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a table-cloth for which I gave this duplicate, but I do not know who pawned it.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found on him a duplicate of the table cloth here produced.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-230

806. ROBERT PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 2 shawls, value 1l. 15s., and 9 collars, value 9s. , the goods of William Cozens .

WILLIAM COZENS. I am a linen-draper , and live at Kensington . On the 1st of April I saw the prisoner come up the steps and snatch these things off my counter - he run off, I pursued and took him - I found the collars on him - he was in a crowd and had disposed of the shawl.

Two witnesses to the prisoner's character were called, one of whom engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged

Reference Number: t18260406-231

807. CHARLES REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 watch, value 30s., and 1 seal, value 1s. , the goods of William Gregory .

WILLIAM GREGORY. I live in Europa-place, St. Luke's . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to see my brother-in-law; he came on the morning of the 31st of March to breakfast; he said he was in distress, and had been in the watch-house all night - I let him lie down; he got up between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and I laid down - he then asked my wife to let him stop all night, which she did; the next morning my daughter brought down my watch, and put it on the table - the prisoner said it was a cold morning, and asked her to go and fetch a shirt collar which he had left up stairs - he then took the watch and went away; I had seen it safe about six o'clock that morning.

MARY GREGORY . I am Gregory's daughter. On the morning of the 1st of April the prisoner took up the watch, and desired me to go and fetch his collar - when I got up three or four stairs I saw him run out.

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned by the prisoner on the 1st of April, early in the morning; he came about eleven o'clock, with another man, and desired to see it - he recommended it to the other man to buy of him.

The prisoner pleaded distress. GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260406-232

808. FRANCIS RONE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 set of fire-irons, value 5s. , the goods of Cornelius Norris .

CORNELIUS NORRIS. I live in Leather-lane . I had several sets of fire-irons in my shop - I lost this set on the 4th of April.

JAMES BURNHAM . I was in Beacham-street; on the 4th of April I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Norris' door and take the fire-irons - he ran about twenty yards, and then dropped them - I tried to stop him but could not, as I had a basket and a crow-bar in my hand.

ANN NORRIS . I saw the prisoner take the fire-irons; I am sure he is the man - he threw them down and Mr. Burnham took them up.

JOHN HINSLEY . I stopped the prisoner - there was no one before but a good many behind him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the fire-irons drop and I ran on.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-233

809. SAMUEL RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 2 saws, value 16s.; 1 stock, value 15s.; 1 plane, value 4s., and 1 square, value 2s., the goods of Charles Meadwell ; 1 case of drawing instruments, value 2l.; 1 book, value 2l.; 24 pencils, value 4s., and 1 key, value 1s., the goods of William Harper ; 1 sash fillister, value 20s.; 1 stock and 36 bits, value 30s.; 3 planes, value 14s.; 1 carpenter's plough, value 13s.; 1 iron, value 6d.; 3 saws, value 18s.; 1 oil stone, value 1s.; 4 screw drivers, value 5s.; 16 chissels, value 10s.; 1 set of guages, value 4s.; 2 squares, value 6s.; 1 bevel, value 6d.; 1 pair of dividers, value 2s.; 2 hammers, value 3s.; 1 sash plane and templets, value 3s.; 3 guages, value 4s., and 1 basket, value 1s., the goods of John Stone ; 1 carpenter's plough, value 16s.; 4 saws, value 20s.; 2 squares, value 4s.; 1 plane, value 3s., and 6 chissels, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Fletcher ; 1 saw, value 6s.; 2 planes, value 5s.; 1 square, value 2s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 1s.; 1 pair of pincers, value 1s.; 4 chissels, value 2s.; 1 axe, value 2s.; 1 oil-stone, value 3s.; 1 box, value 1s.; 3 guages, value 6d., and 1 basket, value 3s., the goods Tempest Fletcher ; 1 carpenter's plough, value 18s.; 17 chissels, value 15s.; 9 guages, value 6s.; 6 gimblets, value 2s.; 4 brad-awls, value 1s.; 13 pincers, value 2s.; 2 screw-drivers, value 3s.; 1 plane, value 3s.; 1 rule, value 2s.; 1 mallet, value 1s.; 1 square, value 1s.; 1 oil-stone, value 2s.; 1 hammer, value 1s.; 1 saw, value 5s., and 1 basket, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Stoner , and 1 plane, value 3s.; 1 square, value 4s.; 1 screw driver, value 1s.; 4 chissels, value 4s.; 1 fore-pin, value 1s.; 2 guages, value 1s., and 2 brad-awls, value 2d. , the goods of Edward Stoner .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH TURNER . I am servant to Mr. Soane, of Lincoln's-inn-fields . On the 20th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw a man in black,(not the prisoner,) on the top of the ladder of a building next door - he went over the wall; I asked what business he had there - he made no answer; I went round and saw two men talking - I called my fellow-servant, and saw the prisoner go up the ladder with the basket of tools on his back; I asked him what he wanted - he said he came for his tools; I said "If they are your tools why did not you take them before the place was locked;" he said "They were his tools, and he should take them when he liked;" my fellow-servant asked him if he worked there - he said he did, which I knew to be false, as the key of the building was hanging up in our kitchen - the other person had then got away - my fellow-servant, Catherine Wirlow, took the tools from the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me get over the wall? A. No, going up the ladder with the basket at your back - you said that Mr. Payne had given you the key at eight o'clock that night to fetch the tools - you did not say a person gave them you to carry.

CATHERINE WIRLOW . I saw the prisoner standing with the basket of tools - I asked what he wanted there - he said it was nothing to me, that he was a carpenter and had come for his tools - I took the basket - I saw another person who looked at the prisoner and laughed; I pushed the prisoner into the yard and told him I would ask Mr. Payne in the morning if he sent him - the footman and the cook took the tools into the kitchen.

Prisoner. Q. You say you pushed me into the yard? A. Yes; you did not say there were two gentlemen who gave you the things to carry - a man came up and asked you what you knew of Mr. Payne; and you said you worked with him.

WILLIAM HENRICKSON . I was passing by - I asked the prisoner what he wanted - he said he was a carpenter, and two men had employed him to carry the tools; I asked him to go to the men - he went on to the corner of Carey-street, and there I saw two watchmen, and gave charge of him - he had attempted to run away.

CHARLES MEADWELL . I am a carpenter. I had left my tools, at No. 15, Lincoln's-inn fields - the men left work at half-past five o'clock, and no man had any right there afterwards - the key was hung up in Mr. Soane's kitchen - I had left the tools in my chest - they are worth more than a guinea.

WILLIAM HARPER . I am foreman of the works. I had locked the house, and given the key to the servant.

TEMPEST FLETCHER . Those articles are mine - I had left them on a bench in the building.

JOHN STONE . I claim this fillister; I had been at work with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to a sale at the next house, and cleared some of the things - a gentleman called on me and told me to go in the evening, and he would give me a job - I went about half-past seven o'clock and he called me to go up the ladder, which I did - he struck a light, and told me to take some baskets of tools into Carey-street to a public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260406-234

Middlesex Cases - Third Jury.

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

810. WILLIAM HARRIS and JAMES AYRES were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 20lbs. weight of lead, value 5s., the goods of the Duke of Northumberland , and fixed to a building of his .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS NEALE . I am bailiff to the Duke of Northumberland. I have the care of his out-house, from which this lead was taken - it is in the parish of Isleworth .

JAMES GARDNER . On the 15th of March I was in what is called the Whale field, catching birds with Nathan Adams and Alexander Allen ; we had been very quiet, and lying down; we got up to see if there were any birds, and saw the prisoner Harris, and a man named William Rowley , hiding something under a sand heap; after they were gone we went and raked the sand up, and found a sack with lead in it - we took and put it into a sand house, not far from the heap - we staid a short time longer, and then took up the nets - this was in the afternoon, but before dinner we went home, and returned in about half an hour to go bird's nesting, and saw the two prisoners sitting in the field with Rowley and White - they were swearing; I asked what was the matter, and Harris said some one had sprung the plant - I asked what he meant- he said some one had taken some lead of theirs - I asked what he would give if he knew who had it - he said"Two pots of beer and a punch of the head;" I did not stay any longer - next day I and a young man, named Hunt, were out bird's nesting - I told him what happened, and he said "We may as well go and get it" - we did so, and, as we were going down the town, we met Carver, the beadle, who stopped us - he took the lead - I went before the Magistrate and gave evidence.

NATHAN ADAMS . I was in the field with Gardner - I have heard what he has said, and it is true - I saw Harris and Rowley come to the spot; I saw Gardner and Hunt take the lead, but I was not with them when they were stopped - Ayres was not there the first time, but he was the second.

ALEXANDER ALLEN . I was with Gardner. I saw Rowley and Harris come into the field, and Earl stood at the gate - they put something into the sand - we went and took it out - it was then between twelve and one o'clock- I did not see the man come the second time.

THOMAS EARL . I was taken up about this matter, and examined by the Justice - he told me to say nothing, as it might hurt myself. I was at the Angel public-house, at Isleworth, on Friday evening, about nine o'clock- Harris, Ayres, and White were there; we all said, "Let us get a few turnips;" we walked by the Chaise and Horses public-house, and Harris said, "Let us go and get something worth while;" he took us up to Sion-lane - I did not know what he was going after till we came past Mr. Iron's; Ayres, Harris, and White then got over the pales - I could hardly get over, but Ayres eased me over, and we went on till we came to the cow yard - there are some pales round it, and some persons live in the little house by the side of the barn. Ayres and Harris got over the pales - White lifted me over; I waited there - Harris and Ayres got on the top of the cow shed; I heard them pulling the tiles off, and I ran to the other side of the pales. Harris called to White to ease it off the tiles - I did not then know what it was; I went up, and saw White under the tiles, with the lead on his shoulder. - Ayres and Harris got off the tiles, and carried it through the field, till they came to the hedge - Harris then lifted it on White's back, and they got on the sand heap in the Whale field, where they divided it into three pieces - this is one of them; Ayres sold one piece for 2s. 2d., and I sold one for 2s. 3d., and gave the money to Ayres, who shared it; the third piece was left in the sand house, under the straw; we went away; the next day Ayres, Harris, Rowley, and I, went birds' nesting; Harris and Rowley were a-head of us, and got into the Whale field, about a quarter of an hour before we did. I did not see the witness in the field; I heard Harris say somebody had sprang the plant, and I saw Gardner go and say, "What would you give to know who it was?" he said, "I would not mind two pots of beer and a punch of the head."

JOHN COE . I am a carpenter. I have compared this lead with that on the building of His Grace the Duke of Northumberland, and I have no doubt it had been taken from there - this is about a quarter of it.

JOHN CARVER . I am a beadle. I took the lead, and saw it fitted on the premises - it seemed to fit exactly.

COURT to THOMAS NEALE . Q. How lately had you seen the building before the lead was taken? A. Perhaps a fortnight or three weeks. I saw the lead fitted upon the building - the part that remains is fixed down.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

AYRES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260406-235

811. CHARLES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , at Hillingdon, 1 duck, price 6s. , the proper