Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th February 1826.
Reference Number: 18260216
Reference Number: f18260216-1

>SESSIONS PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM VENABLES, MAYOR.

THIRD SESSION, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey. On THURSDAY, the 16th of FEBRUARY, 1826, and following Days.

Taken in Short-Hand (by Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall-Street.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1826.

>THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM VENABLES , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt.; one of the Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glynn , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; George Bridges , Esq.; and Robert Waithman , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

James Henderson ,

F. C. Aberdeen ,

James Stewart ,

John B. Austin ,

Cornelius Lawler ,

John Ellis ,

Wm. Church Bust ,

John Spooner ,

Geo. Hodgkinson ,

Wm. Robertsan ,

Wm. Blackman ,

Charles Alexander .

Second

Fred. C. Chapple ,

Wm. Isaac Vale ,

Wm. Dinmore ,

Thomas Corney ,

Richard Brown ,

Henry Woolet ,

Thomas G. Postan ,

James Simms ,

Thos. W. Smales ,

Wm. T. Nunn ,

John Ward ,

Thomas Gravel .

Third

George Murrell ,

Thomas Stevens ,

Joseph R. Baylis ,

Richard Disney ,

Francis Binks ,

Anthony Johnson ,

George E. Cook ,

Wm. Ford ,

Thomas Bywater ,

John Lainson ,

Robert Williams ,

James Hoars .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Stevenson ,

Wm. Howard ,

Wm. Impey ,

Wm. Miller ,

Nicholas Moore ,

Humphrey Sexton ,

James Savage ,

Peter Swain ,

Thos. Smith ,

Phos. Hughes ,

Thos. Marsden ,

George Morris .

Second

James White ,

C. S. Masterman ,

Samuel Norton ,

Samuel Noakes ,

George Shirwin ,

James Snellgrove ,

John Spooner ,

James Saunders ,

Wm. Servant ,

Jas. Tilley ,

John Tilley ,

John Watson .

Third

John Elgar ,

James Brown ,

Thomas Brown ,

John Brown ,

Samuel Butler ,

Isaac Herd ,

Joseph Clark ,

Wm. Elmes ,

Wm. Hewitt ,

Wm. Gale ,

Samuel Allen ,

Thomas Askey .

Fourth

Henry Bond ,

A. Carrington ,

Jph. Carpenter ,

Jesse Corster ,

Wm. Back ,

Thos. Baker ,

Thos. Bevan ,

T. Bridgeman ,

James Bright ,

Wm. Cook ,

Rob. Clements ,

Wm. Carter .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 16, 1826.

VENABLES, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18260216-1

Middlesex Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

362. FRANCIS JAMES RIGAUD and ELIZA BAKER were indicted for feloniously forging a certain deed, being a power of attorney, in the name of Eliza Foster , spinster, administratrix to the effects of Mary Foster , late of Brook-street, Holborn, spinster, deceased; appointing William Everett and others, attorneys, to sell, assign, and transfer certain 3l. Bank annuities, signed Eliza Foster , attested by Francis James Rigaud , gentleman, 17, Hayes-place, Lisson-grove north, Paddington, and John Green , Esq., Camden-place, Camden-town, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true.

SIX OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET , with MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW, conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GREEN . I held an appointment in the Customs, and am superannuated with a pension. I have known the prisoner Rigaud nearly two years - he lived over Westminster-bridge; I forget the name of the place. I first knew the female prisoner about May last, by taking her two letters from Rigaud; she then lived in the Borough - I saw her once there: she and Rigaud afterwards lived together, as man and wife, at Kentish-town. I frequently went there of a morning, and always found them both there - she went by the name of Rigaud. Last summer Rigaud proposed to me to go to Margate with him, as he was going to see a sick sister, at the baths at Boulogne - this was the Thursday before Sunday, the 10th of July. I at first objected, on account of leaving my wife, not being in the habit of ever leaving her. Rigaud said a sea voyage would be the best thing for my health - he prevailed on me to go. The two prisoners and I went down on Sunday, the 10th, and on Monday we went round the island, and to Ramsgate, to see after the packet, which was gone, or they would have started that day for France - we returned to Margate, and on Tuesday, the 12th, went to Dover; we got there about five o'clock in the afternoon, and while we were at tea Rigaud took a letter and a paper from his pocket, which he said was from Mr. Collins, whom I knew - Rigaud told the female prisoner it was a commission, and must be executed before they went to France, and that next morning he was sure of receiving a remittance, which he had written to Mr. Collins for; he immediately quitted his chair, and went out, and when he returned he said he had found two clergymen, and therefore should be sure - but we must make haste, as they were going out; he said I was to see the lady sign the commission, and to sign it also.

Q. You say you knew the female prisoner by the name of Rigaud? A. Yes, and also as Eliza Foster, in May or the end of April, before they lived at Kentish-town - he said her maiden name was Eliza Foster; I never called her Eliza Foster till we got to Dover, but there he informed me she was entitled to some property, coming from a deceased relation, I think an aunt, and the reason of his wishing to hide the name of Rigaud was that she was of age, and had been kept by Lord Oxford, and, as his wife had left him, they should be very comfortable together.

Q. When did he first tell you her name was Foster? - A. In April or May, when I first knew her. When we were at Dover I accompanied both the prisoners to a clerymen's house - he was out, and we went to the Rev. Matthew Armstrong's - the female prisoner was sworn - Rigaud and I witnessed her affidavit; we then went back to Payne's Hotel. Next day the prisoners set off for France, and I for London.

Q. Look at this affidavit - whose signature is this,"John Green," as a witness to it? A. It is not mine; the first time I saw this one, was in Mr. Freshfield's, the solicitor's, office.

Q. Did you see Rigaud at Hayes-place, Lisson-green? A. Yes, about the latter end of August; I was there one morning when he asked me to witness a power of attorney, for selling stock - I did so; this is it (looking at it) - it is signed Eliza Foster; I have attested - the signature I saw the female prisoner sign, and Rigaud witness it; I hesitated to witness it - he said it was merely signing the power of attorney, to avoid her going forward through the pressure of a crowd.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What do you represent yourself to be? A. I was formerly comptroller for the port of Xerumentra - I have ceased to be so six or seven years; since that I have been endeavouring to recover a large property, but have not succeeded. I am nephew of Mrs. Margaret Farmer, and have a suit before the Court of Chancery, upon that claim; that is not the claim in which I said I did not succeed. I have met with

>no opposition from the Bank solicitor on that claim, except being sent to the Court of Chancery. I knew James Scuddemore Oldham ; I have lost sight of him five or six years.

Q. Did he live at No. 9, Manor-terrace, Chelsea? A. I cannot swear that; I had given all my affairs into Rigaud's hands, as agent, to recover 50,000l. for me; he has mutilated my papers, and taken me in. I represented that Oldham lived at No. 9, Manor-terrace, at a Mrs. Day's - I believe he lived there, but never went to see.

Q. Did you not call at that very house, and desire Mrs. Day if anybody called to inquire for Oldham, to say he lived there, but was out of town? A. No. I went there for Rigaud - I did not at first recollect the place. I visited a Mr. Day there, but you said Mrs. Day - I saw several women there, but whether any of them was Mrs. Day I cannot say.

Q. You visited them? A. No - I have been there with Rigaud, but never eat or drank in the house. I believe I went there but twice - I do not think I ever went there alone - I might, but it was after Rigaud had taken me there. On my oath I do not recollect going there alone.

Q. Did you not call on Mrs. Day and say something about James Scuddemore Oldham? A. I went with Rigaud - he went into a house just by, and begged I would deliver that message to Mr. Day; Rigaud had no waistcoat, and was ashamed to go himself to the house, and begged of me to call and say if Mr. James Scuddemore Oldham was not in town, to inform any person who inquired after him that that was the case - I delivered that message to some woman. I have often seen Rigaud without a waistcoat - this was in April or May 1825; it was five or six months before we went to Margate, which was on the 10th of July.

Q. Now, did you know the prisoner Baker's mother, who lived at No. 3, Brandon-row? A. I never saw her mother. I took two letters to Brandon-row for Rigaud - he stood at the corner of the row at the time; we were walking into the City together, and he requested me to leave them, as he had promised to keep away from the house - I do not know that the name of the place is Brandon-row, but it was close by the King's Bench Prison. I saw a woman there, who immediately called the female prisoner down, on my saying I had a letter for Eliza; I do not know whether that woman was her mother - Rigaud said she worked for a Mrs. Baker, and I should see"Mantua-making done here" written up; I never knew the girl's name was Baker till she was a prisoner - I was told she was Eliza Foster when I went with the letter - I did not know her by any other name.

Q. Did you not say you knew her as Mrs. Rigaud? A. I never knew her go by any other name than Rigaud; I never thought her his wife, because I knew his wife. - When I delivered the letters to her, Rigaud told me she wanted two months of being of age. I entered into no bond whatever - I signed some papers. I do not know what a bond is - not an Ecclesiastical bond.

Q. On your oath did you not introduce a woman to Rigaud yourself at Dover, as Eliza Foster? A. Never in my life.

Q. Did you not represent to Rigaud that Eliza Foster, living at Dover, was entitled to property of her aunt's, in the Bank, and request him to manage the business? A. I never did in my life. On our arrival at Dover a letter was received from Mr. Collins, enclosing the commission to Rigaud; we went to Mr. Armstrong's about six or seven o'clock in the evening, I think, and were there ten or twenty minutes; there was a curtain put down, and candles in the room - I cannot say what time it was. Rigaud received a letter next morning, from Collins, with 25l. - they then set off for Calias and I for town; I did not see them again till about the end of August. I never wrote to Rigaud on this matter. The signature to the affidavit is not my writing. I have never said I did not see Baker sign her name. I gave evidence at Bow-street, and do not know whether my evidence was taken down - something was read over to me. I read the paper which Baker signed at Lisson-grove - it was left in Rigaud's possession. I first saw the paper with my name to it in Mr. Freshfield's office in November - he shewed me three or four papers; the affidavit was shewn to me, but I never saw the power of attorney.

Q. Do you know a person named John Alfrey ? A. I knew him about two years ago, when I had the misfortune to be in Whitecross-street prison, for about ten days; he was steward of the ward. About April 1825 I went to ask Alfrey to become one of my securities to a bond I was to give upon administering. I saw Rigaud in White cross-street prison after I made this communication to Mr. Freshfield - he gave me some duplicates in Whitecross street prison; I redeemed the property, pawned it again, and lost 6s. 6d. by it. I gave him the duplicates and a sovereign out of my own pocket.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How came you to go to Mr. Day's in Manor-terrace? A. I had met Rigaud with Day.

Q. How came you to call at Brandon-row? A. When I got to the Elephant and Castle Rigaud asked me to deliver a letter to a lady, and said he would give it to me when he got to the corner of the street - I delivered it without looking at the direction; I recollect the female prisoner had her thimble on, and her needle in her hand. This is the instrument that was executed at Mr. Armstrong's (looking at it) - it has my signature. I saw the other parties sign it; I thought it extraordinary that Rigaud read it instead of Mr. Armstrong.

FRANCIS FLETCHER . I am a clerk in the Prerogative Office, Doctors' Commons. I produce a commission, a bond, an oath of administration, and the act book; administration issued upon this oath.

Cross-examined. Q. The letters of administration are still in force? A. Yes.

THE REVEREND MATTHEW ARMSTRONG . I live at Dover. On the 12th of July, 1825, this commission was put into my hands - I administered the oath to the party described as Eliza Foster - the bond was then executed; the commission and bond were returned to the parties, who went away with it - I do not know any of the parties, - I perfectly recognize Rigaud's features, but cannot connect him with this proceeding.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you recollect what time of day this happened? A. No; I only recollect the transaction by having signed the papers.

The following documents were here read - the commission and oath, the bond, which described Eliza Foster as living

>at Dover, and Rigaud at Fir-tree cottage, Camden-town; also the letters of administration, and power of attorney.

MR. WATSON. I am a clerk to my brother, a proctor, of Doctors' Commons. Rigaud gave me instructions to extract these letters of administration - I afterwards received this letter from him, by the two-penny post; I believe it to be his hand-writing - I had seen him write before. I obtained the commission, affidavit, and bond, according to the letter - I received the bond back, inclosed in a letter, and extracted the letters of administration.

Cross-examined. Q. Had Rigaud employed you before? A. I had seen him several times before, as surety in administrations.

Rigaud's letter to Mr. Watson, with instructions for a commission, in order to obtain letters of administration, in the name of Eliza Foster, of Dover, neice, and only next of kin of Mary Foster, late of Brook-street, Holborn, naming Francis James Rigaud, of Fir-tree cottage, Camden-town, and John Green, of Camden-terrace, as sureties, was here read.

ELIZA SKINNER . I have known the female prisoner six years - we were fellow-apprentices; her name is Eliza Baker - I never knew her by any other name.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you apprenticed with her in Brandon-row? A. It was in Suffolk-street east, by the Bricklayer's Arms - it is now called Trinity-street.

HANNAH SKINNER . I have known the female prisoner five or six years - I never knew her by any other name than Baker; I have not spoken to her for twelve months.

Cross-examined. Q. You were apprenticed to a milliner? A. I went to school with her, and she was bound with me for two years, and has been out of her time about two years.

ELIZA DEVREE . The female prisoner was at my school for four years and a half, and went by the name of Eliza Baker. I have known her nine years, but have not seen her for three years - I knew her mother.

THOMAS HOPKINS . I have lived in Brook-street, Holborn, thirty years; I never knew such a person as Mary Foster in Brook-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Have many of the houses lodgers? A. Yes, I knew the most respectable lodgers.

HENRY MAY . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. - I have the stock ledger of Long Annuities, for 1814; I find an account there in the name of Mary Foster, Brook-street, Holborn. On the 14th of May she has a credit of 2l. a year - on the 8th of August 1l. more; it was transferred to the commissioners for the reduction of the national debt, on the 11th of October, 1824; that is always done at the end of ten years, if the dividends are not claimed. If was brought back again on the 8th of August, 1825, and on the 11th of August it is transferred to Eliza Foster, spinster, administratrix to Mary Foster, of Brook-street, by power of attorney, (granted to Messrs. Everett,) to Peter-Bacon, of the Stock-exchange.

Cross-examined. Q. What is Bacon? A. A stockjobber; the broker would apply to a jobber to buy it- he would pay the money to Messrs. Everett's broker.

MR. WILLIAM EVERETT . I am a banker. I acted on this letter of attorney - the transfer is signed by me: I received the dividends the same day. The money was paid to Mr. Collins' account.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am principal clerk to Messrs. Everett and Co. I find by my book that, on the 11th of August, a cheque, drawn by Mr. Collins, for 60l., was presented, which I paid to the bearer, having received a note from Mr. Collins, on that or the preceding day. I think it was made payable to a Mr. Rigaud.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know who it was paid to? A. No.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am clerk at the public office. Southampton-buildings. (Looking at an affidavit;) I swore this affidavit: the letter attached to it was with it then, for my initials are on it. I do not recollect the parties.

THOMAS PRATT . I am a clerk to Mr. Winlow, army-agent, of Craig's-court, Charing-cross. I know Rigaud's writing very well - (examining an affidavit sworn in the name of Green; a petition to the Governor of the Bank of England, signed Eliza Foster; and a letter, signed Collins) - all these I believe to be Rigaud's hand writing - the entry in this book is also his writing. The attestation to the power of attorney, and the bond are signed by him.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him for the last year? A. Yes, for six years; Mr. Winlow was his agent when he was a lientenant in the army; he always went respectably dressed.

THOMAS LEADBETTER . I am an attorney, and live in Bucklersbury. I have known Green ever since 1814 - the signature to this affidavit is certainly not his writing. I have corresponded a good deal with him.

CORNELIUS LEE . I am a clerk in the treasury of the Customs, and have known John Green about three years - he has a pension; I believe the signature to this affidavit not to be his writing.

ABRAHAM RUFFELL . I lived servant with Rigaud, at Worthing, for three months - Baker lived with him, as his wife. I know a person named Gardner - she was called Meek; she was taken into custody at Rigaud's house; upon her being taken Baker opened master's desk, and gave me some papers out of it, telling me to bury or burn them - I put two or three on the fire, and my fellow servant snatched them off.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the name Garner? A. No - she always went by the name of Gardner; I never saw it written.

MARY COLLINS . I am a widow. My husband lived at Calais, and was agent to Mr. Winlow; he had been in the commissariat department in the early part of the Peninsular war; Rigaud lodged at my house about six years ago, in the New Kent-road. In July, last year, both the prisoners came to me at Calais; Rigaud called on me alone, and next day introduced Baker to me, as Mrs. Rigaud - I had never seen her before; (looking at a letter, signed Mary Collins) - this is not my hand-writing; it bears a very trifling resemblance to mine: it is a better hand than mine; I know no such person as Miss Eliza Foster, of Dover, to whom it is addressed; it says, "Favoured by Thomas Jones, Esq.;" I know no such person; I do not know the aunt of Eliza Foster. No Mary Foster was ever in my service - I was never at Philadelphia.

The following documents were here read: - A letter to the Governor and Company of the Bank, signed Eliza Foster, dated the 25th of July, 1825, requesting the property

>might be transferred to her, as administratrix to her aunt, the late Mary Foster, who died in her passage from Philadelphia - an affidavit, signed John Green, deposing that he had known Mary Collins many years, and believed the letter signed Mary Collins to be her hand-writing, sworn on the 6th of August, 1825. The letter signed Mary Collins was dated Bordeaux, the 27th of June, 1825, addressed to Eliza Foster, Dover, informing her of the death of her aunt, Mary Foster, on her passage from Philadelphis, with the writer, stating that she had left a small sum in the Bank, Long Annuities, when she had left England in the writer's service, and advising her to administer, in order to obtain the same.

THOMAS ARCHER . I am acquainted with the officers in the commissariat of Bordeaux; no such person as Mr. Collins was in that department in August 1825.

The prisoner Rigaud, in a long address to the Jury, stated that he had acted in this affair without any guilty knowledge, as agent to the witness Green, who had employed him to recover this property for Eliza Foster, of Dover, and had introduced a female at Dover to him (not Baker,) as Foster, who made the affidavit in question, and that all the proceedings were under Green's direction, and that the transaction was entered in his (the prisoner's books) and he had received 10 per cent. for his trouble. His reason for giving his address at Fir-tree cottage was, that he had an unfortunate connexion with the female prisoner, whose friends were endeavouring to discover her.

BAKER'S Defence (written.) I can only account for being placed at this bar from an attachment existing between me and Mr. Rigaud. I never signed any papers except letters to my mother and sister.

SARAH BAKER . I am the prisoner's mother. I recollect Green leaving a letter for my daughter - it was addressed to Eliza Baker, not Foster.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-2

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

363. JOHN JONES and JOHN GARDNER were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , at St. Bridget, alias St. Bride, 22 watches, value 420l., and 1 wooden case, with a glass top, value 4s., the goods of John Grant , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES BANNISTER . I am servant to John Grant, a watch and clock-maker , who lives at No. 75, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Bride's . On the 19th of October, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners came into the shop; I am certain of them both; Gardner came twice that day. On the 20th, about the same time, they came again; I recollected them immediately - they asked to look at a watch which they had seen the day before; Gardner said he wished to have it - he left 5s. as a deposit, and was to call in a few days for it. I am certain of them both; Gardner gave his name as West, and after they had paid the 5s. they were going out together - they turned back short, and left the door a jar; Gardner then asked to see some watch-chains, which were in a glass-case by the side of the window; he paid me 2s. 6d. for the chain, and went suddenly out of the shop; I directly missed a case from the counter, containing fifteen gold watches, and about seven silver ones; the case had been put on the counter twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour before they came in; no other customer or stranger had been in the shop besides them, only a relation of Mr. Grant's. The case of watches was safe on the counter when the prisoners came in, and was within their reach; no one came in while they were there: I missed it a few seconds after Gardner left the door. The watches cost upwards of 400l. I immediately called the boy up, and ran into the street after them, but they were out of sight. The case was brought back to Mr. Grant's, by a ticket-porter the next day - I am sure it is the one which had the watches in it - here it is. I found Gardner in custody about a fortnight ago; I was taken into three different rooms, where there were thirty or forty persons - nobody was pointed out to me. I was told if I saw him to take no notice, but the moment I saw him the impression was so strong I immediately touched him on the shoulder. I saw Jones on the Friday following, at the Mansion House, among others, in the Justice room, and pointed him out to Mr. Cope, the marshal.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was not Jones at the bar, under charge? A. I do not exactly know where the bar is; several people stood before him; he stood at a bar, among five or six other persons; I was not told I should see him. I was sent for against a person suspected to be the man; he was brought in after I got there, but I did not see him brought in, norin charge of any officer. Mr. Alexander Gordon, a relation of master's, came in a quarter of an hour before them. I had seen the case while the prisoners were in the shop; there was something singular in their appearance; Jones had a fustian coat. I know him by his face; his dress was very different when he was taken.

COURT. Q. Did Jones appear to you, at the Mansion House, to be in a more forward situation than the others? A. No, my Lord - three or four stood in the same line; and when I first saw him I did not know it was a place for persons in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has your master any partner? A. No, nor any other Christian name. The case has a glass top; the watches were loose in it. I was behind the counter when they went out. The shop door is five or six feet from the counter.

Q. Might not the watches flap against the glass? A. They might, but if carefully handled I think a watch would not come against the glass. I suppose I was ten feet from the door - Gardner was very close to me at the counter, and intercepted my seeing Jones passing - He had a fustian frock coat on; I do not think the case would go into their pockets; he might put it under his frock coat; my back was to the door - it was broad day-light. Crown-court is two doors from our shop - it leads to Water-lane, and has two passages leading out of it. The case was not broken at all when it was brought back.

JURY. Q. Was your back towards them? A. Yes - only while I turned round to take the chain out of the glass-case; my back was then towards both of them; I only showed him one chain, and while I turned my back to get it Jones left the shop; Gardner remained, and paid for it. I had not time to put the cases in the window - there were four cases on the counter.

JAMES PEDLEY . I am porter to Mr. John Threader, a hatter, who lives at No. 74 Fleet-street, next door to Mr. Grant. On

>the 19th of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was cleaning the windows outside the shop, and saw two young men standing at Mr. Grant's window; Gardner was one of them. On the 20th I was again cleaning the windows, and saw Gardner with another person, whom I thought was the same I had seen before; they stood about the door; I saw them go into Mr. Grant's shop - I went in to breakfast, and saw no more. I afterwards saw Gardner in custody, at a public-house opposite the Mansion House, and was sure he was the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was between eight and nine o'clock? A. Yes, and the same time on the 20th. I went to breakfast in less than five minutes after they went into the shop; I might be twenty minutes at breakfast, and heard of this loss directly I came down, after nine o'clock. Gardner had a black body coat on, and the other a fustian coat, with pockets on each side; I cannot say whether it was buttoned; there is a court next door but one to Mr. Grant's. I do not think it possible for Gardner to put the case into his pocket.

THOMAS CONNOR . I am shop-boy to Mr. Grant. On the 19th of October I saw two persons, like the prisoners, come into the shop - I did not see their faces, and cannot positively swear to them; they left the door open, and I shut it by Bannister's order. I did not see them on the 20th, but was called up about twenty minutes to nine o'clock, and the case of watches was gone. I had left the shop about half-past eight; it was then on the counter, and contained watches. I saw the prisoners when they were taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw two men, whose faces you did not look at? A. I saw one of their faces, but did not take notice of them; the alarm was given before nine o'clock, I think - there were more cases on the counter, but they are of a different shape to this; I had dusted them, and know how many there were; when the alarm was given I looked and missed this one. The watches laid in the case, with a leather under them, but none on the top - they were not fixed; they would slide down if the case was turned up end-ways; it must be carried flat to keep them safe: they all had glasses.

JURY. Q. Are all the cases in the shop alike? A. No- they are all moveable; some of the others had watches in them.

THOMAS GARNHAM . I have been a ticket-porter at Fleet-market three years, and live at No. 3, Five-foot-lane. On the 20th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I picked up this case, with a bit of leather and paper by it, in Five-foot-lane, Old Fish-street, stuck in the window bars of Messrs. Yates and Hancock's premises, outside the window, by the area-grating; it must have been put there by somebody outside the house; it is a darkish place. I took it home, and at eleven o'clock that day took it to Guildhall, and was told to keep it till it was advertised. I took it to Mr. Grant's next morning, in consequence of what I saw in the paper; I left it there till to-day, and have now brought it here.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far is this place from Mr. Grant's? A. It is about three minutes walk - it is by Bread-street-hill. I am sure it was before nine, for the clock struck when I got in doors - it is not a public place, but it is a thoroughfare into Thames-street.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. Foster apprehended Gardner by my desire; I was sent for, and found him at Lambeth-street, and took him to the Mansion House.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I apprehended Jones in Cow-lane, on the 2d of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, and at the Compter I told him the charge - he said I was mistaken in the man.

GARDNER's Defence. I am innocent.

JONES' Defence. I know nothing about it.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

GARDNER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy on account of their youth .

Reference Number: t18260216-3

364. JAMES LARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 3 stone saws, value 10s. , the goods of John Mallcott .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS RIVERS . I am a watchman. On the 6th of February, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner pass me, and saw that the gate of the New Post-office had been opened - he walked on, looking back, then crossed, and attempted to take something, but a gentleman passed, and he went away. At a quarter past ten o'clock I saw him go and draw these saws from under the gate; I followed and collared him - he threw them at me.

JOHN MALCOTT. I am contractor for the stone work of the Post-office , and have about one hundred men employed there; I believe these three saws to be mine.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They are my property - I bought them in Houndsditch last May, when I worked for Mr. Dodd, who failed, and I gave them to a mason to put in his yard - I met him on this night bringing them back to me; I hid them under this gateway while I went and drank with him.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-4

365. JOSEPH JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 sixpence, 8 penny pieces, and 6 half-pence, the property of James Timbrell , from the person of John James Timbrell .

JOHN JAMES TIMBRELL. I am twelve years old - (the witness appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath). I live in New-cut, Blackfriars-road. On Saturday night, the 14th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, I was going to get a spencer out of pawn from Shoreditch, and in Bishopsgate-street, opposite Acorn-street , I was looking into a tobacconist's window, and felt something at my basket; I looked round, and saw it was the prisoner - he was a stranger, and appeared alone. I missed a purse out of my basket, with a sixpence, eight pence, six half-pence, and a duplicate in it; I followed, and did not lose sight of him till he was stopped. I saw Morris pick up the purse, with the money and duplicate in it, in Union-street. The top of the basket lifts up.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see it taken? A. No, but I ran after you; I was in the road, and did not lose sight of you.

JANE TIMBRELL . I am the wife of James Timbrell, a carpenter. I sent my son to redeem a spencer, between five and six o'clock; he had the duplicate and money in

>a purse in his basket; he returned at ten o'clock; I know the purse very well.

ABRAHAM STANNARD . I am a carpenter, and live in Newman's-place, Bishopsgate; the tobacconist's is opposite our gate. I heard an alarm, ran out, up Union-street, and the prisoner was taken - the boy was crying. I saw the prisoner drop the purse from his hand - I told the officer, and found it on the spot, between the kennel and curb stone.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am an officer. This tobacconist's shop is in the City. I was at the corner of Sun-street, heard a cry of Stop thief! several people crossed into Union-street, and a man seized the prisoner; I collared him, and the boy who was close by, crying, said he had robbed him; Stannard called out that he had dropped something, and on the spot we afterwards found the purse.(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The lady brought her daughter to swear to it at the Mansion House, but she would not; the mother always said it was not her's. I was in Bishopsgate-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! my cousin said somebody was robbed; I went to the lad with my cousin - I had not got many yards before I was stopped; my cousin asked what they took me for, and they took him as being concerned.

PROSECUTRIX. On my oath the purse is mine, and the duplicate I know also.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260216-5

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

366. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Flave Hill , widow , on the 7th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, 5 half-pence , her property.

FLAVE HILL. I am a widow, and live at No. 5, Providence-court, near Hanover-square - I keep the house. On the 7th of February, about nine o'clock at night, I was in my parlour - two men came in, but I could not see them - I know there were two men; somebody came in and put both his hands suddenly over my eyes and mouth. I know there were two, because I heard the other shut the door while the other held me - neither of them spoke a word; the first continued holding his hand over my eyes and mouth, while the other stepped up, put his hand into my pocket, and took out five half-pence, which was all I had about me; they still held me - I could not call out as he stopped my breath - they were about five minutes in the room - I made a kind of moan, as well as I could, and the lodgers came in - they ran out - one escaped, and the other, who was the prisoner, was taken in the passage. - I could not move the protect my money.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I suppose your sight is bad? A. Yes, being old. The prisoner had no business whatever in my room - he once lodged in the house.

GEORGE SIMPSON . I am an hostler, and lodge in the prosecutrix's house. On this night, about nine o'clock, I was with my wife in my room, which is exactly over the parlour; I heard a groaning noise, like a person in an apoplectic fit - my wife followed me down with a candle; I tried the room door, and asked Mrs. Hill, three or four times, what was the matter, but got no answer. I burst the door open with my feet, and the first man I attacked was the prisoner; there were two of them, but the moment I seized him the other man rushed out, and snatched the candlestick out of my wife's hand: the prisoner and I were down in the passage for five minutes, and the other man was five minutes before he could find the door. I succeeded in detaining the prisoner - he had no right in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Could you tell whether the other man was older than the prisoner? A. I consider him younger - he left his hat behind, and it would hardly fit a boy sixteen years old.

MARY ANN SIMPSON . I heard a groaning, and came down with my husband. The man took the candle out of my hand, and threw it away - he gave me a blow in the mouth or I should have detained him.

WILLIAM KIMBERLY . I am a constable of St. George's, Hanover-square. About half-past nine o'clock I was sent for - Simpson gave the prisoner into my charge; on the way to the watch-house I asked what induced him to go into the old lady's premises - I neither threatened nor promised him; he said with intention to steal - that he was out of work and could not starve.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18260216-6

367. JAMES GREEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Catherine Hanger , widow , commonly called Lady Coleraine , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 18th of January , at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 2 blankets, value 12s.; 2 sheets, value 8s.; 2 counterpanes, value 8s.; 1 set of bed furniture, value 14s.; 1 footman, value 3s.; 2 candlesticks, value 18d., and 2 pictures, value 18d. , the goods of Mary Pettit , spinster .

MARY PETTIT. I am single, and go out charing . I was taking care of Lady Coleraine's house in Alburn-street, Regent's-park, in the parish of St. Pancras - her name is Mary Ann Catherine Hanger. On the 18th of January, between six and seven o'clock, I saw this property all safe. I went to bed between nine and ten - the house was all barred and secured; I was the last person up - I got up about six o'clock - it was then dark, and about seven I missed this property from the stable room, which communicates with the dwelling-house - they were all mine, and are worth more than 40s., I found the front door open - it was secure the night before.

JOHN BEETON . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Woburn-place, on the 19th of February, at six o'clock in the morning, and met the prisoner in Woburn-buildings, carrying two baskets - I asked what he had got there - he rather objected to shew me - I took him under the gas light, as it was dark, and found the property stated in the indictment in his basket.

JAMES BAYTON . I was serjeant of the night. I saw Beeton with the prisoner - he asked what he was shifting

>the basket for - he said he was going to change shoulders - I took the basket from him.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am an officer. I searched the basket and found a bag at the bottom of it, containing a chisel and screw-driver, which I applied to some boxes which were broken open at this house - they exactly tallied with the marks - there was also a dark lantern, phosphorus box, and matches, in the basket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a stranger in London. I met a man in Smithfield who asked me to meet him at this place in the road, and take the property for him to his vessel at London-bridge - I accordingly took it - the watchman asked what I had got there - I put the basket down, and said I must meet the man at London-bridge by half-past seven o'clock.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18260216-7

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

368. DAVID SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , at Hendon, 1 sheep, price 30s. , the property of John Allen .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Nathaniel Gilson .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

NATHANIEL GILSON. I live at Hendon, in Middlesex . Some sheep were sent to my farm by Mr. John Allen, in November last, to graze - I did not miss any of them, but I received information from the shepherd. I afterwards saw some mutton, which had part of the skin on it.

JOHN WILSHIRE . I am shepherd to Mr. Partridge, who lives at the adjoining farm to Mr. Gilson. A man, named Sharp, came to me to look for a sheep - I looked into my flock, but it was not there - I then went away. I did not see the skin found, but he came to me afterwards on a Sunday, to help him to get a down sheep-skin out of a pond; I looked at the head, which was on the skin, the tail and the entrails were wrapped up in it. I have not seen the skin since that Sunday, when Sharp's son came and took it away. I am not sure I should know it now. Sharp is since dead - I did not see the constable.

JOHN TOMLINS . I am constable of Little Stanmore. The prisoner lived by the poor-house; I went to search his house on a Sunday in November, and found nearly a whole sheep in a drawer where he kept his victuals; it was undressed; it appeared not to have been cut up by a butcher, as they would have cut it more handsome. I kept it till it was quite tainted; the skin was afterwards brought to my house by Sharp; Mr. Gilson was not there when it was brought, but he came there on Monday, and saw the same skin and meat that were brought to me; I saw them putting it together to compare it, but I did not take notice of it. I heard the prisoner was at Paddington and went there on a Saturday night, five or six weeks afterwards, to apprehend him; I told him what I took him for - he did not say a word - I know he has worked hard and maintained his family.

NATHANIEL GILSON re-examined. I went to the constable's house on the 30th of November, as near as I can recollect; I saw some skin and some mutton there - I assisted in comparing them - they tallied together in my judgment - the joints were not cut off as a butcher would have cut them; the joints of the legs and shoulders fitted with the parts left in the skin, and there was part of the fleece left on the breast of the mutton which was found; I think it was the sheep belonging to that skin - the skin was marked I. A. - the same as the sheep which were left in my field - it is here now - I had not missed the sheep, but the shepherd told me of it.

COURT. Q. How many sheep did Mr. Allen send you? A. Forty-two; I saw them all right on Saturday the 26th of November, in the evening; the shepherd told me on the 27th, that one was lost; I saw the skin and meat at the constable's house on Wednesday, the 30th; I counted the sheep on Monday morning, the 28th, and there were but forty-one. Mr. Allen lives about forty-six miles from me - I had none from him this season before this flock. I do not know whether there are any flocks in the neighbourhood marked in the same way - it was a Down sheep - there are other South Down sheep in the neighbourhood, but not marked in the same way to my knowledge, Sharp was Mr. Allen's shepherd - I should think the sheep I saw had not been killed within the time I had heard it was missing - I have no doubt that it was one of the forty-two.

JOHN TOMLINS re-examined. Q. What was the state of the meat when you saw it? A. It looked manled about, and did not appear very fresh; I kept it till it became rancid and bad - I saw it on the Sunday but cannot say when it had been killed.

COURT. Q. Could you judge by the skin how long it had been taken off. A. No.

JOHN PITKIN . I am a shepherd, and have been so many years - I live with Mr. Jones. I compared some mutton, and a skin, at Mr. Tomlins' house - the meat fitted the skin exactly - every joint as firm as possible - I did not notice whether any of the fleece was left on the meat - it was a South Down sheep - there were the two legs, two shoulders, two breasts, and a piece of the loin - nearly the whole sheep - the head was along with the skin - there was a mark but I did not notice it. (Looking at the skin). I am sure this is it - the leg is cut off at the arm instead of the fetlock.

COURT to JOHN WILSHIRE . Q. What day did the witness come to you, and you take the skin from the pond? A. It was on a Sunday morning. Sharp has been dead about a month.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a most unfortunate man; I have four small children. About fifteen months ago I lost an affectionate wife; I was very bad, and have the misfortune of a heavy rupture; I was at work on the Saturday and came home in the evening, when my eldest child, not twelve years of age, said "Father, some man has been here with a bag of meat, and he said he should call and see you again to-morrow or the next day;" I said"Pooh! pooh! he will call for it again;" "No, (he said) you are to fill our bellies." I gave them a part of it, and put the rest in the drawer - the constable knows I worked hard.

JOHN TOMLINS . He has been a hard working man, and had an honest character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Strongly recommended to Mercy on account of good character, and the distress of his family .

Reference Number: t18260216-8

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

369. EDWARD LAWSON and JAMES LAWSON were indicted for, that they, on the 25th of January , upon one Joshua Armstrong , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and that the said Edward Lawson, with a certain sharp instrument, to wit, a certain pike, feloniously, &c. did stab and cut him in and upon his left hand, with intent to obstruct, resist, and prevent, the lawful apprehension and detainer of him, the said Edward Lawson, for a certain offence, to wit, for assaulting and beating one William Smith, for which said last mentioned offence the said Edward Lawson was liable by law to be apprehended and detained; and that the said James Lawson feloniously, &c. was present, counselling, aiding, and abetting, comforting, and assisting the said Edward Lawson, the felony assisting, in manner aforesaid, to do and commit, he knowing of and being privy to the same, against the statute , &c.

2d COUNT, the same as the first, only omitting the words in italies.

3d and 4th COUNTS, stating the intention to be to kill and murder him.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the intention to be to maim, disfigure, and disable the said Joshua Armstrong.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating the intention to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BERNARD conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GARTON . I am head constable of Worship-street-office. On Wednesday, the 25th of January, I received information at the office, which I communicated to the Magistrate, who directed me to go to Mr. Edward Lawson's house, Brown's-lane, Spitalfields , and take away a placard which was nailed against the window shutter - I went with Kennedy and Vann, two other officers; the window shutter was closed - I ordered Vann to take the placard down; we took it to the office - there were forty or fifty people in the street at this time; I was then ordered by Mr. Bennett, the acting Magistrate, to go with sufficient force to execute an assault warrant, which was in possession of Armstong, an officer, who went with us - seven officers, besides myself, went - we were to execute the warrant if we could ascertain whether Mr. Edward Lawson was on the premises; he is a currier; his brother was in the house with him. We proceeded to the front of the house in Brown's-lane - it was shut up - we went to the side door, in a wall in Corbett's-court, leading to the back premises; there is a yard on the other side of the wall - Armstrong tried to obtain admittance at the side door, but no answer was given; at that time I heard a great noise, as if they were placing heavy articles against the door. I went into Mr. Bennison's hay-loft, adjoining the premises, and looked through several holes into Lawson's premises, saw eight or ten persons walking up and down Lawson's second floor loft, which adjoins Mr. Bennison's loft - it is an open loft, where they dry leather; the holes were so small I could not ascertain how many there were; I heard a great noise, as if they were moving tables to the side of the shed, to barricade it - that hindered our view. Attfield called me to look through a hole - I there saw a pole, with something at the end of it, standing against a post in the shed; Armstrong had a dog which went through one of the holes, as far as his head and shoulders - it immediately yelped and drew back - next morning I found it had received a cut in the right shoulder; we then left the loft; I went to the office, to Mr. Bennett, and on returning, met Armstrong, and from what he said, I went with him, Kennedy, Attfield, and several officers, into the hay-loft again. I looked through a hole, and saw several men in the loft; I asked them to kneel down that I might speak to them more conveniently - two of them did so; I told them what I had come about, and charged them, in the King's name, to aid and assist; after that I left the loft, went to the side door, got my officers round, and ordered them to draw their cutlasses, which they did - there were eight of us - but I had no cutlass at that time. I tried to break open the side door with two crow bars, but could not succeed. I fetched a ladder from Mr. Bennison's yard, and placed it against the top of the wall - Armstrong immediately went up the ladder, with his warrant in his left hand, and his constable's staff in his right, and when he got to the top of the ladder I observed a pole, with a sharp instrument at the end of it, jobbing at his head and neck - he standing on the ladder, with his head above the wall; the jobbing was repeated, and he parried it off as well as he could; Hanley then gave Armstrong a pistol, which he fired. I then heard a noise in front of the house, and immediately went to see what was the matter; I saw the first floor window up, and a female standing there - she said to the mob"My brother is shot, why don't you come forward and protect him;" she then put the window down, and withdrew. I went to the office, and as I returned met the officers in Spital-square, with the prisoners, and one of Lawson's men in custody; I took them to the office, and sent for a surgeon to Lawson, who had a slight wound in the thigh, as I afterwards found. Vann, Hanley, Attfield, and I, returned to the premises, and in different parts of the premises found twenty-four of these poles, with sharp instruments at the end of them; also fourteen currier's knifes, with the cross ends broken off. In front of the house were currier's tables heaped up from the floor to the ceiling, and behind them were hogsheads, filled with bricks and stones - it was blockaded every where to prevent access.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had your first communication with the Magistrate any thing to do with the execution of the assault warrant? A. No; my instructions were to fetch away the placard - the Magistrate afterwards ordered me to go and execute the assault warrant. I believe it was granted on the 29th of December - it was the duty of the officer who had it to execute it immediately.

Q. Was it not arranged that you should use this warrant as the ostensible reason of your going there, when your real reason was on account of the placard, and the people being gathered? A. I received my instructions from the Magistrate, and cannot state their reasons. I had no warrant when I went to take the placard down, and did not then know of the house being fastened furthen then the shutters being up; I had not heard that it was barri

caded. I had heard that Lawson had turned the taxgatherer and exciseman out. I stood about two yards from the bottom of the ladder when Armstrong went up- the wall is above twelve feet high; the ends of the ladder were a foot or more above the wall. Armstrong's head and shoulders, and part of his breast and arms, were above the wall.

Q. Will you swear he did not go up the lndder with a cutlass in his hand? A. I will not, for my attention was divided with the men above and below; I saw his hands scuffling with the pole, but will not swear whether he had a cutlass or not. I did not hear him say "I have killed one man, and now give me another pistol."

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 29th of December this warrant was given to me to execute against Edward Lawson (read); I attempted to put it in force several times but could not, because the premises were shut up. On the 25th of January Mr. Twyford and Mr. Bennett inquired about it - I said I could not find the man; they directed Garton to take all the officers with him; I went with them; I went into Mr. Bennison's loft, and, after remaining there some time, Adams and Hanley came, and in about twenty minutes Adams pointed out Edward Lawson to me in the loft - several others were there; the warrant was then in my hand; I said "Mr. Lawson, I have a warrant against you for assaulting and beating Mr. William Smith;" there is an open board all along the loft, about nine inches wide - I read it through the hole quite loud, and mentioned my name, with the name of every officer with me, and then said "Mr. Lawson, if you will give me your word, as a gentleman, that you will come to the office with two housekeepers, and put in bail, we will leave, and send the mob away;" he said "I will not;" I said I would give him ten minutes to consider of it, and if he did not I would break open the promises. He said "You may do as you like;" I then went down from the hay-loft, with the other officers, to the side door in Corbett's-court. Two of Lawson's men were on the wall; I told one to come down and I would shew him the warrant; he came down and read it; I assisted him over the wall, to acquaint Lawson; I waited ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, then kicked the door loudly, and knocked twenty or thirty times - a ladder was then brought - it reached about four feet above the wall; I went up with my warrant in my left hand and my staff in the right - I had nothing else. When I got to the top of the wall I perceived Mr. Edward Lawson and three men, in the yard - the prisoner, James Lawson, was one of them; but I did not then know who he was. I said "Mr. Lawson, here is the warrant against you, and surrender;" he had a long pike in his hand - this is the very one (pointing it out); it has a knite at the end of it- he pushed at me, and the first push missed me; he gave a second push, aiming at the hand with the warrant in it, and cut my hand just at the back of my little finger - it went into the palm of my hand - he pushed at my head and body, and pushed at me four or five times afterwards - he did not say a word to me, nor I to him, during this time. The wound did not affect me at all - it bled for two or three hours - he made two or three other thrusts at me - one came very near my head - I warded it off with my staff - Vann was at the bottom of the ladder, and said"Josh, why don't you shoot him?" I said I had no pistol - Hanley came half way up the ladder, and gave me one - it was ready cocked; I saw Lawson making another attempt at me, and I shot him; he ran backward into his house - I thought he was stunned - he staggered - I said"I have shot him, but keep on breaking the wall that we may apprehend him." In less than two minutes he came out of the house, and said "Armstrong, you have shot me;" he then took up the pike which he had left against the wall; I said "Ah, and if you come out of that door I will shoot you again;" his brother was walking about, close to him, with his hands in his pockets - he had never offered to come near at all. The wall was nearly broken down, and Edward Lawson said "Armstrong, come down and I will surrender to you;" I said "Put that pike out of your hand, and I will;" he gave it to his brother, who came to the door and gave it to Vann. I said to the officers "Mr. Lawson has surrendered to me - I will go in;" I jumped off the ladder; he said "I put myself under your protection," and walked to the office with me.

Cross-examined. Q. You shook hands together? A. Yes, and drank together. I received the warrant on the evening it was signed. Mr. Smith never directed me to withdraw it; about a week after it was issued he told me the business was in the hands of the commissioners, and I had no occasion to execute it. I did not see him afterwards till Lawson was in custody; if I had met Lawson in the street I should have taken him, because the Magistrates never allow an officer to discharge a warrant; it was the same warrant as I at first received, for I kept it all the time - when warrants are discharged we file them in the office, but never destroy them.

Q. James was walking about with his hands in his pocket - was he in agitation? A. He was, and he appeared interfering to prevent any thing; he spoke to the men, and they went away; he spoke to his brother several times - I cannot say what he said, but there is no doubt of his wishing his brother to give in.

JAMES HANLEY . On the 25th of January I went with Garton and other officers to Mr. Lawson's premises - we at last forced through the door in Corbet's-court, got into the yard, and saw both the prisoners there; we brought away two or three pikes from the yard; I seized James Lawson, took hold of a pike which stood in the yard, and said to him, "You villain, what made you use such a villainous instrument as this?" he said, "I thought," or "I considered I had a right to do it, in defence of my brother"- he made no resistance.

Cross-examined. Q. You were not on the top of the wall? A. No. I said, "Who is your brother?" he said"Mr. Lawson" - he was in his working clothes, and I did not know who he was.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I accompanied the others to execute this warrant - I stood at the door in Corbett's-court, with my cutlass; some persons were breaking the door down with crow-bars, and as soon as a hole was broken through at the bottom a spike darted through the hole, and went very near the legs of the person who was breaking the wall down; he broke the knife off the end of it with the crow-bar. On the 30th of January I saw Edward Lawson in the public-house next door to the office - some conversation took place, and he

said he was very sorry we did not fire at the first onset, for if we had, his men would all have been staunch to him - I mentioned to him about the spear coming through the hole in the wall - he said, "That was me - the knife was broken off, and I got another spear."

THOMAS VANN . I was with the other officers. Twenty-four pikes were taken from the premises; most of them are shorter in the handle than the one produced.

THOMAS COOK . I worked for Mr. Edward Lawson. - On the 25th of January I was there, when the officers came - I think it was between twelve and one o'clock; we were at dinner; the premises were barricaded - I was in the loft with master, and heard the officers speak to him; he was in the loft when the warrant was read - we heard it read through the opening; I afterwards got over the wall to the officers - I read it then, returned, and told master it was for a common assault, and wished him to surrender - he wished till seven o'clock to consider of it. I made my escape through the window into a neighbour's house.

Cross-examined. Q. Before you told him he did not know what it was for? A. Yes - it was read to him.

EDWARD LAWSON. I have consented to forego my defence, and leave it to my counsel, but I will say I had no malignant intention towards Armstrong, or any of the officers; I knew they did not come to execute the warrant, but, however, I have consented to withdraw my defence. I did not stab him - he received the wound in grasping the blade.

JAMES LAWSON'S Defence. I did not say I had a right to protect my brother.

DANIEL GARDNER . I am a brush-maker, and live at the corner of Corbett's-court - my premises overlook a great part of Lawson's. On the 25th of January I saw the officer come, with some papers in his hand; I stood at my window, which was open, opposite the wall where the ladder was placed; the window is on the ground floor, but a little elevated, as the pavement is above the road; I was above many of the people's heads. When the ladder was brought I saw Armstrong go up, with the papers in his hand; the ladder projected above the wall, and while he was going up I saw a dirty looking pole put up, from behind the wall; the person using it was endeavouring to push the ladder aside from the wall; this was while Armstrong was going up, for he slipped in going up - the pole worked up and down to catch the step of the ladder; when Armstrong got to the top of the ladder I saw him perfectly clear - he had his staff slung on his wrist, and a cutlass in his hand, and in his left hand were some papers - the staff hung on his wrist, by a piece of string, and the moment he got to the top he cut at the pole, and hit it, and, I think, he cut it; he then grasped at the pole with his left hand, and caught it in his hand at the third grasp; he immediately let go, and turned his hand round to shew his brother officers, and I saw the blood - I am certain he got the cut by grasping at the pole; his shoulders were not above the wall; he had to raise himself to chop at the pole; he peeped as it were into the yard; his head was a little above the wall; there was nothing to prevent their poking the pike into his face if they were so disposed; he came half way down the ladder, and got a pistol from another officer.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Armstrong's back was to you? - A. Yes. I am quite positive he had a cutlass in his hand.

Q. Now when he came down the ladder for a pistol, in which hand did he take it? A. I am not certain, but he had it in his right hand when he went up; he shifted the cutlass out of his right hand under his arm; when he got to the top of the ladder he had the pistol and cutlass also, both in one hand; I cannot say where the staff was then; it hung to his wrist when he cut at the pole.

JAMES EATON . I am a plumber. I was in the street when the officers came to Mr. Lawson's door - I went up to the first floor window of a neighbour's house, which is opposite, about thirty yards from the house, and could see plainly - I was about two feet higher than the wall; the ladder was placed considerably above the wall; I then saw a pole, with some instrument at the end, pushed against the ladder, trying to push it away; the shoulder part came against the step of the ladder - this was before the officer went up. I then saw Armstrong run up very fast - he slipped in going up, he ran so fast; he had a cutlass in his right hand, a staff and a paper in his left; I saw nothing in his right hand but the cutlass; I was looking at him in an oblique direction; his left arm was nearest to me.

Q. Was it easy for you to tell in that direction whether the staff was on his right or left arm? A. I think so; immediately as he got to the top he saw the pole, and made a cut at it; he attempted to cut it again, and with his left hand tried to catch at something, and succeeded in grasping it - he immediately turned round, and said something to the people, and came down partly; a pistol was handed to him, which he afterwards fired.

Q. How far was his head above the wall? A. About midway.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. What did he do with the catlass when he took the pistol? A. I think he had both in one hand, but I was agitated at the time, and seeing the pistol I directed my eye down into the yard, to see the consequence. I live in Lamb-street; I have nothing to do with the prisoner, except being a creditor of his.

RICHARD THORTON . I am fifteen years old, and live with my mother, next door to these premises. I was at our first floor back window, looking into Lawson's yard, and saw a sword or cutlass and a staff in the officer's right hand, and a paper in the left; as he ascended the ladder I saw a staff slinging, I think, to his right wrist; I was about five yards from where Lawson stood; when the ladder was put to the wall Edward Lawson put up a pole, and pushed it, before Armstrong shewed himself on the wall, and when he came up Lawson put up the pole two or three times, as with intent to push at the ladder; Armstrong tried to lay hold of the pole, and at last he laid hold of the knife part of it, and tried to wrest it from Lawson's hand - Lawson held it fast, but did not attempt to pull it away; Armstrong let go, and his hand bled; he descended the ladder, and returned with the pistol; he cocked it when he was on the wall.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What did he do with the cutlass when he took the pistol in his hand? A. I believe he took it in his right hand, which had the cutlass; they

were both in his right hand - he had nothing in the left when he fired.

Q. If he held both in his right hand how could he cock the pistol? A. He fell back, and pulled the cock back cautiously, for fear the pole should come up again.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was there any thing to prevent Lawson stabbing him in his head or breast? A. Nothing - he did not attempt it, but lodged the pole on the wall, and pushed it two or three times.

WILLIAM PEACOCK . I am a scale-maker, and live in Brown's-lane. I was on Lawson's back wall, which parts his premises from Butcher's; I heard something said about a ladder, and saw one three or four feet above the wall; I could only see the part which was above the wall; I could see into Lawson's yard - I saw him take up a pole to shove the ladder aside; I then saw Armstrong get up the ladder, and make a chop at the pole with his cutlass; he then put his hand out to try and catch hold of the pole once or twice, and at last caught hold of it - I observed nothing further.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What were you doing on the wall? A. Looking on, the same as others; I was not on Lawson's premises before I got on the wall. I saw the pistol in Armstrong's hand on the top of the wall; I do not know whether he had it in his right or left hand; the pistol was in one hand, and the cutlass and staff in the other. I am certain he had a cutlass or sword, and his staff on his wrist.

GEORGE LINFORD . I am a butcher, and live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields. I was in Brown's-lane, at the top of Corbett's-court, about thirty feet from the spot, and saw the ladder put against the wall - the spear was put up with a view, as I thought, of putting away the ladder, or to intimidate any person from coming up. I saw Armstrong ascend the ladder, with a cutlass in his hand, and, I believe, a staff; I am positive of the cutlass - I was on his left side. The moment he reached the top of the wall he chopped at the spear, and then made a grasp at it with his left hand, and at last got hold of it; he let go, shook his hand, and I saw a stain of blood; he then received a pistol from below, and fired it over the wall, with his right hand. I saw him cock it first.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What did he do with the cutlass? A. I will not swear what he did with it - he cocked the pistol with the thumb of the same hand as he had it in.

JAMES THORP . I am a silk manufacturer, and live in Brown's-lane, directly opposite Mr. Lawson's. I was present all the time the officers were there, in my first floor room, directly opposite Corbett's-court. I was about twenty yards from the ladder, and was on the second floor part of the time. When the ladder was put against the wall I saw a pike put up, and on Armstrong's ascending it was slightly moved - he then struck at it with a sword or dagger, once or twice, and then grasped it with his left hand; he let go, reached down, and received a pistol from a brother officer, and fired; his head and shoulders were above the wall when he cut at the pike; they could have struck at his head or body; I think I could have run it through his body if I had been there; I was astonished he did not strike it through his head; it appeared to be directed strait to his head - it only appeared to be placed there for defence.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. Which hand did he take the pistol in? A. The right - I think he still held the cutlass, but really I cannot say; I could not see whether the pistol was cocked. The pike being so long I was astonished he did not run it through his head, having an opportunity to do it.

WILLIAM BULL . I am a brush-maker, and live at No. 59, Crown-street, Westminster. I was by Lawson's premises when the officers were there; I was in Mr. Gardener's workshop, where I work, and could see where the ladder was placed; I saw a pole, with a knife at the end of it, put up; Armstrong got to the top, and called out for somebody to hold it, for attempts were then making to poke it away; after that he made two or three cuts at it with his cutlass - he then ascended higher, and grasped at the pole, to wrest it away; he turned his hand round, and I perceived it all over blood; he came down, and received a pistol, which he fired.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Had he any thing in his left hand? A. When he first went up the ladder I believe he had the cutlass in his right hand, and the staff in his left, and, I think, the warrant was in his right; he fired the pistol with his right hand. I believe he had given the cutlass and warrant to the person below.

JAMES HANLEY re-examined. I cocked the pistol myself, and then handed it to Armstrong; he had his staff and warrant in his left hand then - I believe he shifted his staff from his right to his left hand, to take the pistol - he had no cutlass then; one was handed up the ladder to him after he fired the pistol.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did Garton order you all to draw your cutlasses? A. Yes, when he had broken in - I believe we all drew them. After he had fired he came down and gave me the pistol; I had no ammunition, and shortly after handed him up my cutlass; I had not seen him with one of his own; he beat at the pike with his staff.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I had no cutlass, but after I had fired Hanley or Vann put one into my hand. I have not had one for this twelvemonth.

Several highly respectable witnesses gave the prisoner Edward Lawson a most unexceptionable character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-9

London Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

370. WILLIAM NORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , a pair of bullock's horns, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH. I had a pile of horns laying in Leadenhall-market , near the Lamb public-house, on the 3d of February.

SAMUEL SANDERS . I am in the employ of Messrs. Tretfield and Lawrence, leather-factors. On the 3d of February I was at work with Nash, in Leadenhall-market - I saw the prisoner take a pair of horns from this pile, near the Lamb public-house, and put them under his apron - he went away towards Mr. Osborn's warehouse; I told Nash, who went after him - I went in afterwards, and found a pair of horns behind a pile of leather.

FRANCIS NASH . I was with Sanders, about a quarter before five o'clock in the afternoon; I followed the priso

>ner into Osborn's warehouse, and saw him throw a pair of horns, from under his apron, behind the leather; I spoke to him - he appeared rather agitated, and said "Don't say any thing about it; I took the horns, and I can't deny it - I will never touch a horn again;" I said, "I don't know whose they are?" he said, "I know they are Mr. Smith's."

JOSEPH MARTIN . I took the prisoner on Saturday last, at the King's Arms, public-house, Leadenhall-street; Mr. Lawrence said, "We want you - you know what it is for Bill - I should not have thought of your robbing us, as you are set to watch others;" he said, "I never took a horn out of the market in my life."

Prisoner's Defence. I was going across the market, and threw a pair of horns into the warehouse; I did not know they were Mr. Smith's till Mr. Nash said there are no horns put in there, nothing but leather, and I know that Mr. Leaf Hooper had forty-eight heads put in there that day.

FRANCIS NASH re-examined. Q. Is that a place for horns to be put? A. It is not, but they are put there almost every day.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-10

371. GEORGE COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 24lbs. of beef, value 9s. , the goods of Nathaniel Solomons .

RICHARD WALKER . I am a watchman. On the 14th of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner coming through St. Paul's Church-yard, with a piece of beef in one hand, and his shoes in the other; I asked how he came by it - he said what was that to me - he would not tell me; he then threw the beef on the ground; I sprung my rattle - De Buss came out of Paternoster-row, and picked it up.

JOHN DE BUSS . I am a watchman. I heard the rattle; I came into St. Paul's Church-yard, and found the prisoner in the custody of Walker; the beef was on the stones close by him - he appeared to be drunk.

THOMAS GREEN . I am servant to Mr. Nathaniel Solomons, of Duke-street, Aldgate, who is a butcher . I saw a piece of beef at the watch-house - I should think it belonged to my master - I had cut it out of a quarter of beef myself - it weighed about 24lbs. Mr. John Swan is a commission salesman, and lives in Newgate-market; my master carcases beef, and sends it to him to be sold; there is no one here from Mr. Swan's. I weighed the piece of beef when it came back from the watch-house; it weighed rather more than I have stated; it had not been weighed before. I think there is no doubt it was the same piece of beef.

THOMAS BOND . I am constable of the night. When the prisoner was brought to the watch-house I asked him where he got the beef - he said he should not inform me. I told him then he should inform somebody else.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the market for a few things; I then went into the Hope public-house, and there I saw a friend - I went with him, and had some more beer, and stopped till about half-past eleven o'clock; a man stood at the end of Newgate-market - he said to me,"Do you want to buy a good piece of beef?" I said, "I do not know;" he said, "You shall have this for 4s., and I gave it him for it;" the watchman detained me, and I being in liquor gave him the answer I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-11

372. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 30 yards of drugget, value 3l. 2s. 6d.; 119 yards of silk Persian, value 7l. 3s. 9d.; 60 yards of bombazeen, value 3l. 9s. 6d., and a wrapper, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Boyd and others, his partners.

JOSEPH BIRD . I am clerk to Thomas Boyd, Thomas French , and others - they live on Snow-hill, and are wholesale linen-draper ; they have two doors - one is on Snow-hill. On the 1st of February I sold these goods to Messrs. Hodges and Norman, of Regent-street; I entered them in our day book, and gave them to the porter about half-past five o'clock, to pack up, but I did not see the package after it was made; they were to be conveyed by our carter, (Bolton), and the porter was to go to see them delivered. I saw them in the Justice-room on the 11th of February - they were then inclosed in a cotton wrapper, and I knew they were the goods which I had booked, by the marks.

Cross-examined by Mr. CARRINGTON. Q. These goods you had sold to Messrs. Hodges, and had entered them to his debit? A. Yes.

JOHN PAVELY . I am porter to the prosecutors. I received the goods from Bird - there was a piece of drngget and two paper parcels; I gave them to Bolton, our carman; I saw him pack them up into a cotton wrapper, and I put the name of Hodges on them - they had been sold to Messrs. Hodges; I put them in the cart, which was standing at the Snow-hill door, and gave them into the hands of Bolton; I told him to put them on the near side of the cart, over the horse's back; I saw no more of them till I saw them at Guildhall, on the 11th of February - the paper, with the mark of Hodges upon it, was there. I have no doubt whatever that it was the same package; I had not seen the prisoner near the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was this? A. In the City; Bolton is a carman, and is generally employed for Boyd and Co. It had ceased to be the property of Messrs. Boyd and Co. - they were in my care; I go with the cart, or some other person does; the goods had been delivered to Bolton to carry to Hodges, and the cart was his property.

COURT. Q. Were you to have accompanied these goods to Hodges'? A. Yes. I went back to get the bills, while Bolton was tying the cart tail, and heard they were stolen as soon as I came out.

JOHN BOLTON . I am a carman. On the 1st of February Pavely delivered a package to me, and asked me to tie it up, which I did, in a wrapper; I left it on the counter, and asked Pavely to put the name on it; he then put it into the cart, and I placed it on the copse, on the near side - the cart was then close to the door; the porter told me to get down and tie in, which I did; I then came round, and missed this package in a moment - while I was at the back of the cart any person might have gone on the front, and taken it, as I had a high load, and could not see the front; I gave immediate notice to the porter when he came out. I saw the package at Guildhall, on the 11th

>of February, and am quite sure there was the same quantity of pieces in it as in the package in my cart; I saw the direction in Pavely's hand-writing, but I could not swear to it; a servant of the house generally goes with my cart, and Pavely was to have gone with me then; I had goods of Messrs. Boyd's to deliver at different places. I did not miss any other package, nor see any person about the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a carman? A. Yes. I am not a servant of Messrs. Body and Co.'s The cart and horse are mine; they generally send a person with the cart - I have sometimes gone by myself, but at night they always go with me; this parcel was lost about six o'clock in the evening; the porter was to go with me to deliver the goods at the west end.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. On Wednesday, the 1st of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was on Holborn-bridge, near to Snow-hill, and saw two persons, one of whom I believe to be the prisoner; the other person had white stockings on, and a thick stick in his hand, which he leaned upon as he walked; I followed them, and observed them looking at different carts on Skinner-street and Snow-hill; they then ran after a curricle, which went up Snow-hill pretty quickly; I went after them, and went up Cock-lane - I returned back, and passed the prisoner, I believe, standing on Snow-hill - I went down to Holborn-bridge, turned back, and saw the prisoner with this package on his shoulder, at the corner of Snow-hill, about thirty yards from No. 6, going towards Holborn-bridge; I looked round for the other man, and saw him coming along, about 10 or 15 yards behind him - he appeared to be the same man, by his dress, whom I had seen with the person who, I suppose to be, the prisoner; I let the prisoner go to the light part of Fleet-market, when I pushed sharply on, and got up to him; the other man then cried out Oh! and the prisoner let the pack fall down on the ground; I had my hand on him at the time, and took him to the Compter; I got a person to take the package first to the Compter, and then to the Mansion House. I did not know who the package belonged to till Thursday or Friday week - it was then claimed by a person from Messrs. Boyd and Co.'s. When I took the prisoner he said he had picked it up; it is rather more than one hundred yards from Messrs. Boyd's where I took him.

JOSEPH BIRD . These are the articles - I know them by the number and mark, which I gave to John Pavely - they are charged 13l. 15s. 9d.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know them by any thing but the number of yards? A. Yes - there is a private mark on the bombazeen, and a number on the roller; pieces we sell go out with our marks on them.

JOHN BOLTON . I saw the package at Guildhall, and I believe it was the one that Pavely gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know it by any particular mark? A. Yes - I should have known my own packing if I had picked it up in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-12

373. WILLIAM MANBY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Sims .

RICHARD SIMS. I live in Upton-place, West Ham , at Mr. White's. I had seen my shirt in the harness room about six o'clock in the evening of the 6th of January - I went there again the next day, about twelve o'clock, and it was gone. On the 17th I saw it on the prisoner's back, in the Compter. I had seen him about the neighbourhood - it has my initials on it, and a private mark.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Are you a servant? A. Yes - and the prisoner was in my place before I went there; this was on twelfth-night, and I understand there was a party at my master's, but I was in town that night - I do not know that he had been there.

DANIEL JEWSON . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner on Sunday, the 15th of January; Sims said to him, "William, you know you have robbed my master" - he denied it. I went with Sims to Mr. White's, the Edinburgh tavern, Sweeting's-court - he was not at home, and I went again at two o'clock; I then found the shirt, which was claimed by Sims, on the prisoner - he said nothing about it. He was charged with robbing Mr. White, but nothing was found upon him.

COURT to RICHARD SIMS . Q. Is the harness room under the same roof with your master's house, or is it in the yard? A. Under the same roof.

JAMES BAXTER . I live in St. George's East. I have known the prisoner from his infancy - he has been an honest faithful young man. I met the prosecutor at Bow, and heard him ask the prisoner if he was not going to return his things back which he had of him at "His high life below stairs," at his master's, at Upton-place.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-13

374. CATHERINE CULLINAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , a lace veil, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Billbrough , her master.

THOMAS BILLRROUGH. I live in Golden-lane , and am a cow-keeper . The prisoner was in my employ for about six weeks - the veil was my wife's; she is not here; I had not seen it for a long time; we did not miss it till it was found at Mr. Butler's, into whose service the prisoner had gone; I know it by a piece which was cut off when it was a net - I compared the piece which I took from my house with it, and it matched exactly - the flowers corresponded just as they were drawn.

SOPHIA BUTLER . The prisoner was in my service; she came from the prosecutor, and had been with us about six weeks; I found this veil in a drawer in her room; we have no other servant, but my youngest sister slept with her; I had never seen her with it, and did not know it was there till my sister told me - she is not here; the drawer is appropriated entirely for the servant's property - it was an open drawer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-14

375. THOMAS OTFERY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 9lbs. of sugar, value 8s. , the goods of William Allen .

WILLIAM ALLEN. I am a grocer , and live in Kingsland-road. Nine pounds of sugar were stolen from my truck as it was being brought home.

HENRY DUNKIN . I am porter to Mr. Allen. I was bringing some goods home on the 17th of January - there was a small parcel, and some sugar, in separate packages

- I was bringing them from Messrs. Travers in Swithens-lane - when I got to the corner of Birchin-lane a young man gave me a sudden push up the hill - I had some suspicion and turned round - I thought I saw something under his arm - I put the truck down, and saw it was the prisoner with a loaf of sugar under his arm; I did not then notice whether there was one taken from the truck, but, when I came to examine, one was gone; I did not lose sight of him till he was taken; I saw the loaf of sugar, and know it to be one of those I had from Messrs. Travers'; I put it into the truck again, and went home with it; he dropped it on the ground and I took it up. I am quite sure I saw it under his arm, and saw him drop it by the watch-house.

COURT. Q. Did you ever say to any person that you doubted whether it was the prisoner who took it? A. No, not to my recollection. I do not know that he was the person who pushed the truck. When I first saw him he was about a dozen yards from the truck - there was no other person near it.

ROBERT FORREST . I am messenger to the Guardian Fire Office. I was in Lombard-street a little after seven o'clock - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and looking round I saw the prisoner running from Cheapside towards Gracechurch-street; a gentleman tried to stop him but missed his hold - I jumped off the curb and secured him- he had nothing in his possession - I did not see Dunkin while I had the prisoner; he tried to get away but I held him till Rogers took him in charge - I then left them altogether.

JURY. Q. What distance did you run? A. About three yards.

DAVID ROGERS . I am a constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I had seen the prisoner running about forty yards from the corner of Birchin-lane - he ran past me and I cried Stop him! Forrest stopped him in my sight - I ran and took him into custody - I kept him till I saw Dunkin, and asked if this was the person who stole his sugar - he said he had stolen a loaf of sugar from his truck. I did not see the sugar till the next morning - it was dirty weather, and the outside paper was rather dirty - Dunkin said "That is the man who stole the sugar" - I am not quite certain whether the prisoner made any reply or not. Dunkin took the sugar home, and I saw it at Mr. Allen's the next morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The officer asked if I was the person who stole the sugar, and he said some one had, but he did not know that I was the person.

DAVID ROGERS . He never said so to my knowledge - I asked him if the prisoner was the person, and he said he was.

JURY to FORREST. Q. What distance was it from the watch-house that you first saw him? A. Just by the watch-house - I had not an opportunity of seeing him drop any thing - I could have seen from the corner of Birchin-lane by means of the gas light.

COURT. Q. At the time you first saw him, and heard the cry of Stop thief! was there any other person near him? A. Yes, there was a person coming towards Cheapside, and there was a person who tried to catch the prisoner but he missed his hold - I did not see any other person.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-15

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

376. JOSEPH COSSIO was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , at St. Pancras, 2 sovereigns, and 4 half crowns, the monies of Juan Antonio Covian , in the dwelling-house of Delia Bailey , widow .

JUAN ANTONIO COVIAN (through an interpreter). I have lodged six months at Delia Bailey's house - and keep my money in my bed-room closet. About eight days before this robbery the prisoner came to my house to inquire for another Spaniard - I did not know him before. On the 21st January I was out all day - I returned about six o'clock in the evening and took some money from the cupboard, to get my dinner; I then left two sovereigns and four half crowns safe in the closet, which was not locked. I returned from dinner at seven o'clock, and missed it all.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Had the people of the house access to the room? A. Yes.

ANN STANLEY HARPER . I am niece to Delia Bailey, who is a widow and rents the house, No. 24, Bridgewater-street, Somers-town, in the parish of St. Pancras . On Saturday, the 21st of January, after six o'clock, the prisoner called, and asked for Covian - I said he was not at home, and it was uncertain when he would be in - he said if he waited till eleven o'clock he must see him - I then shewed him into Covian's bed-room, staid a few minutes with him, then went into the front room on the same floor - I had not been there more than five minutes when I heard him rattling money; I entered the room and saw some half-crowns in his hand - immediately on my entering the room he said "I cannot wait any longer, and will see Mr. Covian to-morrow morning" - he then went away, and nobody else entered the room till Covian returned, nor had any body, except me, been there since he went out - he missed his money immediately he returned.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you remember when Covian went out? A. About six o'clock - I was in his room, or the adjoining one all the time he was out - I am quite certain nobody but the prisoner was in the room. Next morning Covian missed some shirts and handkerchiefs from his linen - I did not observe that the prisoner had any bundle - the room door remained open while he was there.

JUAN ANTONIO COVIAN . I missed three shirts and a handkerchief next morning - I had not looked for them the night before.

DANIEL BAILEY . I am a watchman of Westminster. Covian informed me of his loss about ten o'clock at night - I took the prisoner in Great Windmill-street, at two o'clock in the morning of the 22d of January, and at the watch-house two sovereigns, two half-crowns, a shilling, and three half-pence, were found on him - he was in liquor. On the way to the watch-house I asked if he knew Covian - he said Yes; that he lived in Bridgewater-street, Somers-town; I said "That is the gentleman you have

>been robbing;" he said "I was drunk - I did not know what I was doing."

THOMAS SUTTIE . I searched him at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a native of South America, but have lived in very respectable situations in this country for many years - I received this money from former employers - I had received three sovereigns from a Mr. Holland - George Baring, Esq. also, in the same week, gave me some money, and Mrs. Sharp, of Park-lane, did the same. My landlady can swear to my having a considerable sum about me the whole of the week. Some clothes were lost at the time, and the servant knows that I had no bundle when I left the house. Is it not likely that the person who stole the clothes also stole the money. My business with the prosecutor was to gain a situation. My character could be borne testimony to by George Baring, Esq. (I was his butler eight years); also to William Baring, Esq. - also Mr. Johnstone, deceased, of Gloucester-place, and in the establishments of Mrs. Sharp and General Taunton, both of Park-lane.

HANNAH CAREY . The prisoner lodged three weeks with me, and bore a good character - I saw him with money every day, and on the morning he was taken I saw him with sovereigns and silver.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Reference Number: t18260216-16

First London Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

377. GEORGE WILLIAM KERRIDGE was indicted for feloniously forging a receipt upon a certain bill of exchange, with intent to defraud Abel Jenkins and Charles Thelwall Abbott .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am clerk to Messrs. Wilton and Co. attornies, at Gloucester. Mr. Wilton was sub-sheriff in 1823, and did business with Mr. Abbott. I sent this letter by post (looking at it) with a draft for 58l. 8s. 4d. in it, on the 23d of February, 1823.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you put the draft in yourself? A. I believe I did - I do not leave my letters for other persons to seal.

JOSEPH KING . I am cashier to Messrs. Jenkins and Abbott. I believe this letter to be the prisoner's handwriting.

This letter was here read - it was dated the 25th of February, 1823, and acknowledged the receipt of the draft in question.

RICHARD GARDNER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's house on the 30th of December last, and found a letter, which I produce.

WILLIAM BROWN . It is the letter I wrote and enclosed the bill in - I cannot be certain that this is the bill.

JOHN TEWSLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co., bankers, Lothbury. This bill for 58l. 8s. 4d. was presented at our house, and paid, on the 6th of March, 1823 - I cannot say who to - there is a receipt on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you say whether the receipt was on it when presented, or whether it was written at your house? A. No - receipts are often written before they are presented - it says "Received, for Jenkins, James, and Abbott - C.N. James."

JOSEPH KING . This receipt is in the prisoner's handwriting - it was his duty to account to me for all money received for the prosecutors, whose clerk he was - he never accounted for this.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-17

378. ELIZABETH MEEK and FRANCIS JAMES RIGAUD were indicted for feloniously forging a certain administration bond, with intent to defraud William, Lord Bishop of London .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true.

OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, with MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW, conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am a broker, and live at No. 36, Windmill-street, Tottenham-court road - I lodged at No. 32, for fourteen or fifteen years - Joseph Ricci was landlord of the house - he was an Italian and a teacher of languages - he died in March 1816 - he lived in the house about ten years while I was there, and before me - we were particularly acquainted - I visited him - he had a wife and one child, but not other relations of his own; his wife had a niece, Mary Joblin , and a nephew, who is dead. I never saw any body there who passed as Ricci's relations. I never saw a woman, named Gardner, there, but several persons, of course, called to see them. He was a Roman Catholic. I am perfectly acquainted with his writing - here is a paper in his hand-writing. Mrs. Ricci died about two years after him - they had been married forty years.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had no acquaintance with his family except from lodging in the house, and seeing people come to him? A. Nothing more - I always understood he had no relations - he was seventy-two or seventy-four years old.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see any persons treated as relatives, except the nephew and niece? A. No, my Lord.

THOMAS SAVINE . I live in John-street, Tottenham-court-road. I went to lodge at Joseph Ricci 's house at Midsummer, 1815, and left in April, 1816. His wife had a niece, named Mary Joblin - she had a brother. I never saw any other persons treated as relations - I never knew of his having a relation named Gardner - we were very friendly, and visited in each other's rooms.

MARY JOBLIN . I live at No. 23, Duke-street, Manchester-square. I knew the late Joseph Ricci, of Windmill-street - his wife was my aunt - they were married thirty-four or thirty-five years - their home was mine - my uncle sent for me out of the country in 1809 - I lived with him six weeks, then got a situation in the city - I visited them frequently at every opportunity, and, in five years, was with them for six weeks again, and knew my uncle till he died in 1816 - my aunt died in October 1818; (looking at a paper) I believe this to be my uncle's writing. I never saw any of his relations or heard of them. My brother is dead - I never heard of Ricci having a relation named Gardner, nor saw a person of that name.

Cross-examined. Q. How old was you when you came

>from the country? A. Twenty-five years. They used both to call on me in the city - I only lived at their house twice.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am clerk to Mr. John Wills , proctor, of Doctors Commons. Rigand sent instructions to our office to take out a commission, and on the 11th of August, he called, and said the commission would not be necessary - that Eliza Gardner would attend in person that morning, to be sworn - (I had drawn up a warrant for the commission from instructions I received from Mr. Wills). - Rigaud then gave me instructions, written on a small piece of paper, which we cannot find. In consequence of this interview, I prepared the necessary documents for the party to be sworn, and, about two o'clock that day, delivered to Rigaud the letters of administration; he paid for them and took them away.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is yours an office of considerable business? A. Yes; we had done business once or twice before for Rigaud, and once since; I never heard that he was agent for obtaining letters of administration. When he first applied he said he had a friend who wished to take out administration.

WILLIAM LANCASTER . I am clerk in the Registry office of the Consistory Court of the Bishop of London. I have the proceedings of the Court here; letters of administration were granted to Eliza Gardner, to the effects of Joseph Ricci - here are the affidavit and bond - I am subscribing witness to this bond, and saw it executed on the 11th of August, 1825, at Doctors'-commons. I cannot identify the parties - the warrant is at the foot of the affidavit.

Cross-examined. Q. The letters of administration have not been repealed? A. No; the surrogate sigus the affidavit, not the party swearing it.

HENRY TAYLOR re-examined. All the body of this bond is my writing, except the word "Spinster," which was afterwards inserted by a clerk in our office. I prepared this instrument from the warrant - Rigaud and the administratrix were there when I prepared it - I saw them both execute it - but who the administratrix was I cannot say.

Cross-examined. Q. You prepared it from the warrant? A. Yes; the body of it; but the names and addresses I got from the party themselves - I asked Gardner where she resided.

Q. Did you receive the names and descriptions from written instructions? A. I cannot exactly charge my memory, but think it was from word of mouth - they could see the warrant.

MR. LAW. Q. Who produced the warrant in their presence? A. I brought it into the office - they accompanied me to the surrogate; the oath was administered to the same person who signed the bond - [Samuel Trueman here produced an affidavit of property from the Legacy Duty office] - this affidavit was prepared by me, by direction of Rigaud - they were written directions - I read the affidavit over to the administratrix who signed it in Rigaud's presence - it was done at the same time as the bond was signed.

Dr. COOPER. This warrant is signed by me. A person, calling herself Eliza Gardner, appeared before me, and swore to this affidavit of property; the same person took both oaths within a few minutes of each other.

Mr. JOHN WILLS . I am a proctor. I did not see Rigaud on this business. When I came to town all the parties had been sworn - my clerk handed a paper of instructions to me which I cannot now find - they were not in my clerk's writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen Rigaud on these sort of transactions before? A. Several times; I have known him four years; he represented himself as employed by parties to obtain administrations, and has done so through me four or five times - he has since applied for administration to the goods of John Richmond.

Mr. SERJEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Did he bring an instrument to you for that administration? A. Yes; it was signed Eliza Baker - but letters had been granted - he called and took those papers away - I could not get them back again.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. I suppose the name is immaterial when letters are applied for? A. If persons take the oath we take it for granted they are the parties.

JAMES WILLIAM CARPENTER . I am overseer of the poor at Putney: I have lived there all my life. I know of no Eliza Gardner there - I have made diligent inquiry, and cannot find that any such person ever lived there - I do not know the female prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your business is with the housekeepers? A. Yes. I cannot swear there never was a lodger of that name there - I should think there are about five hundred houses. I have made diligent inquiry at every house where I knew there were lodgers.

HANNAH STRETCH . I am a widow, and live in Goswell-street. I have known the female prisoner from her birth, about thirty years, and knew her father and mother - they went by the name of Meek - I saw the prisoner last about July or August - she always went by the name of Meek - I never heard of her having a relation named Ricci, but I had very little knowledge of her relations - I never heard of a person named Gardner.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not she absent from your sight some time? A. Yes, for seven or eight years - I think she lived at Brixton when I saw her last.

LYDIA BENNETT . I lived servant to a person calling himself Captain Irving, in Amelia-place, Camberwell - it was the person indicted as Issitt;* Mrs. and Miss Irving lived with him; it was the prisoner Meek who passed as Miss Irving; I never knew her by any other name; I left them the middle of last summer, after being there twelve months; she was there all that time; we had removed from John-street, Paddington - the family was the same there - I never saw Rigaud at either place.

* See the 6th day.

SAMUEL MAYHEW . I am shopman to Mr. Barwise, watchmaker, St. Martin's-lane. I know the prisoner Meek - she always represented herself by that name - she made several purchases at our shop - I have seen her there several times. (Looking at the boud) I believe the name, Eliza Gardner, to this bond to be her writing. (Looking at two powers of attorney and the affidavits) these are also signed in her writing. (Mr. Fletcher here produced another bond, signed "E. Garner") I believe this name to be in Meek's hand-writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you known her? A. From 1820; she lived in the family of a customer of ours, and was afterwards a customer herself; she wrote an order for a clock in my presence, about the end of 1822, and signed the name of Meek - I have seen her write several times since; I have no doubt whatever of these signatures being her writing; I remember her writing from circumstances which made a strong impression upon my mind. I have had several letters from her upon which I have acted - one of them returned 8l., which she had borrowed.

JOHN BARWISE . I am a watchmaker. I have had dealings with the female prisoner - her name is Meek; I do not know that I have seen her write, but I have received letters from her, upon which I have acted, and which she has acknowledged. I believe the signature, E. Gardner, to this bond, to be her writing; (looking at the affidavit and two powers of attorney) these are the same.

Q. Here is a paper signed "Eliza Garner?" A. I believe that to be the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You seem to have some doubt about it? A. It is four years since the transaction; I should like to compare it with some letters- but, without comparison, I firmly believe they are her hand-writing.

THOMAS PRATT . I am clerk to Mr. Winlow, an army agent; he was Rigaud's agent when he was in the army. I have known Rigaud seven years, and am acquainted with the character of his writing - (looking at a bond signed Eliza Garner) the attesting signature "Rigaud" to this is his - the body of these two powers of attorney are his writing - (looking at thirty-eight dividend warrants) these are his writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him when he was in the army? A. Yes; and when he held a situation in the South Sea House. I never knew him act as agent for other persons.

CHARLES BENNETT . I am a stock-broker. On the 16th of August I received these two powers of attorney from Rigaud, enclosed in an envelope; the signature to the demand to act is his hand-writing; I acted on these powers and made transfers accordingly; I saw him at the Bank on those occasions; he ordered me to sell the stock, and I did so; one of them relates to 3 per Cent. Consols - I find by my book that they produced 89l. 12s. 6d., and the other, for New 4 per Cents., 108l. 5s. 7d. I paid him the money by a draft on Messrs. Everetts - I have the cheque here; there were dividends received on this stock besides, but they were not paid by me.

Cross-examined. Q. This was a perfectly open transaction? A. Yes; I think I have attended him before, to receive dividends - I dealt with him as Mr. Rigaud.

SAMUEL FRIEND . I am a clerk in the Consols office, and have the ledger containing the account of Joseph Ricci. In August. 1813, the sum of 100l. stood to his credit in the Consols, and, till the 17th of August. 1825, when it was transferred to Mr. M'Neil, a jobber, by Francis James Rigaud, attorney for Eliza Gardner, administratrix to Joseph Ricci - here is the power of attorney, by which it was transferred - I have witnessed the demand to act.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a clerk in the New 4 per Cents. office, and have the books here. In 1814 100l. Navy 5 per Cents. stood to the account of Joseph Ricci. In 1822 it is transferred to the 4 per Cents - the amount there is 105l.; I find by the transfer book, that on the 17th of August, 1825, it was sold by virtue of this power of attorney (looking at one), by Francis James Rigaud - I have attested his signature - I paid him the dividends on it the same day; the warrants have my signature - there are some for Navy 5 and some New 4 per Cents.

JOHN FISH . I am a clerk in the Consols dividend office - I paid these warrants.

MR. CURTIS. I am clerk to Messrs. Everett and Co. bankers - I paid the draft produced by Mr. Bennett, in one 5l. note, number 7987, and nineteen of 10l., numbers 12,971 to 12,989, inclusive, on the 17th of August - I have not got the dates of the notes.

JOHN KINDER TATHAM . I am a clerk in the Dividend Pay-office. The clerk who paid these dividend warrants is dead - it is his duty to enter what particular notes he pays; I find an entry, in his writing, on the 17th of August, 1825, of seven 10l. notes, numbers 2937 to 2943, inclusive, and 3l. 10s. being paid for these warrants.

Mr. JAMES WILLIAM FRESHFIELD (solicitor for the prosecution). I obtained these warrants from the cheque office at the Bank, where they are deposited till they go to the Exchequer.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Were the prisoners charged, before the Magistrate, on this particular case? A. The bond was produced on a charge of forging the letters of administration - evidence was given of the forgery of the bond - they were committed on account of a true bill being found. I knew Rigaud had been residing at Worthing; I went down there on the 16th of November, and seized his papers - I did it on my own authority. Meek was taken into custody there, on a charge of misdemeanor; some papers, partly burnt, were brought to me, and they brought to my knowledge these felonies - there was no charge of felony against them then; Rigaud was in London at that time; he did not send me word that he had surrendered to Whitecross-street. I gave directions for his apprehension, and an officer brought me ward that he was taken by the Sheriff. I saw him at my office four or five times between the 4th and 16th of November, respecting the claim of one Eliza Garner, to property in the Bank, in the name of Baylward.

Mr. LAW. Q. What claim was it? A. The claim of a young woman, described as twenty-one years old, by the name of Eliza Garner; this bond was given in evidence before the Magistrate; I gave Rigaud notice of this bill being found before the last Sessions.

FRANCIS HAYWARD SINDERBY . I live in Bull-and Mouth-street. (Looking at two 10l. notes, numbers 2942 and 2943) I know Rigaud - I received these notes from him for a gold watch, seal, ring, and key: I have written on them "Mr. Rigaud, August 17 - F.S."

JOHN ILOR . I live at the Sussex Hotel, Beuverie-street. Rigaud frequented the house, and was there about a week - I gave him change for this 10l. note (number 12887) about the end of September - I have written his name on it.

PHILLIS WHITBOURN . I am servant to Mr. Elms, who lives about a mile from Worthing. The prisoner Rigaud took his house, ready furnished, for three months; the

>other prisoner went by the name of Gardner - she came two or three days after, remained there till the 16th of November, when she was taken up. Rigaud was absent at times, and left for good on the 17th of October; they lived in an expensive style for the first six weeks, and afterwards not so expensive - there was a great difference towards the last.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Was there a lady with him who passed as Mrs. Rigaud? A. Yes, that was not Meek - Mrs. Rigaud continued there till November, when Meek was taken.

The following documents were here read: - Letters of administration, granted to Elizabeth Ricci , widow of Joseph Ricci, on the 23d of November, 1816 - an adminstration Bond, entered into by Eliza Gardner, of Putney, lawful niece, and only next of kin to Joseph Ricci, late of Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road - Francis James Rigaud, of Hayes-place, Lisson-grove, and John Green, of Camden-town, dated the 11th of August, 1825.

The affidavit of Eliza Gardner - that she was so related to Joseph Ricci, praying that letters of administration might be granted, and swearing the effects to be under 300l. - two powers of attorney, from Eliza Gardner, to Rigaud, for the sale of the stock - another administration bond, describing Eliza Gurner neice and only next of kin of another person, which was also proved to be signed by both the prisoners.

MR. LANCASTER re-examined. The bond was executed in my presence, in the registry, where they are always deposited - I brought it here to day.

The prisoner Meek put in a written Defence, denying that she had ever signed any of the papers, and all knowledge of the transaction.

Rigaud, in a long address to the Court, went through the same line of Defence as on the former trial (page 139), representing that he had been employed by several persons, as agent, to recover funded property, and that a Mr. Issitt applied to him to procure this property for Eliza Gardner, and upon inquiry he had no reason to doubt the statement; he complained of an illegal warrant being issued against him by the Bank solicitor, whom he had frequently called upon respecting this claim - that the expenses paid for administering, together with his own charges, would amount to the notes traced to him.

HENRY TAYLOR re-examined. I remember the prisoner bringing back the letters of administration, to have the word spinster inserted.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-18

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

379. THOMAS CHILMEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 100 printed bound books, value 25l., and 100lbs. of paper, value 2l. , the goods of John Bayly Moore , his master.

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BAYLY MOORE, ESQ. I am a special pleader - my chambers are No. 1, Inner Temple-lane . The prisoner has been three months in my employ; I have an extensive library of law books, worth 700l. or 800l. I left town on the 24th of January, and, I believe, my books were all safe - I returned on Sunday, the 5th of February, and on Monday evening, after a consultation which lasted till ten o'clock, I went to Inner Temple-lane, and saw a great light in my room - I thought they were on fire; I went up, and found both doors were closed; I had told the prisoner always to shut the chambers at dark, and take the key to my house, in the New Kent-road. I knocked at the door, and receiving no answer I went to the gate watchman, returned to the chambers, and met James Sullivan (whose brother had formerly been my clerk), in the passage, with a law bag of books - papers were hanging out of it; I passed him, and went up, but did not succeed in getting into the chambers - we got a smith, who could not pick the lock; we heard a boy inside cry out, "Who is there?" and as we were drawing a bolt the door was opened from within; I found the prisoner there, and Wilson, who is a stranger; nobody could get to the chambers without Sullivan letting them in; I ordered them both to the watch-house, and as there was no constable there I let them go. I returned to my chambers, lighted a candle, and found the leaves of a volume stripped of its cover, on the desk, and next morning I found several book covers on the top of the book-case. Chilmead afterwards came to my house with his mother - he was taken to Guildhall. I went with a search-warrant to John Torkington and Son, cheesemongers, No. 93, Chancery-lane; I saw a portion of"Pickering's Statutes" round a pound of butter; the work cost forty guineas, also a brief, which I knew had been at my chambers; I missed half my books; twenty volumes of Pickering's Statutes were gone. I found four pages of Horace there - I missed the whole volume; I also found a volume of "Wentworth on Pleadings," with notes of my own writing; I missed six volumes out of ten. We found in the shop a large quantity of my book, and a large butter flask full of my books; there were three hampers full of leaves of books; most of them in my own hand-writing; I lost between three and four hundred volumes; they must have cost me 700l., and many of them cannot be replaced; there were manuscripts, which I had been preparing twenty-two years; there were nine volumes just ready for the press. In consequence of further information I sent to Mr. Parker's pork shop, at the corner of Fetter-lane, Fleet-street; I went myself in the evening, and saw a large handkerchief full of my own volumes - also confidential letters, and valuable securities, which had been in a cupboard under the book-case.

JOHN M. COPPINGER . I am pupil to Mr. Moore. In consequence of information I went to Parker's, with a search-warrant, about two days after this discovery, and found several reports, some manuscripts, receipts, and papers, in Mr. Moore's hand-writing; the reports were torn into different leaves - some had a considerable portion still together; I took the prisoner to the chambers, and told him I would give him into the custody of a Bow-street officer - he said nothing to it; I asked if he had taken books out of the library; he said he might have taken six or seven or eight.

WILLIAM PARKER . I live at the corner of Fetter-lane. I bought this paper of Sullivan, at three or four different times; the first quantity was three weeks or a month ago, and the last about a week before Mr. Coppinger came; I gave him 4d. a pound for it, which is the usual price; I told him, when he brought so much, to bring no more, for I did not want it.

>COURT. Q. Did you look at the books and papers? - A. I never particularly examined it; it was brought as waste paper generally is, and was thrown into a cupboard- I was not aware what books they were; I asked where he brought it from; he said, from his brother, in Bellyard: I made no inquiry as to whether he had a brother. I saw it was clean, but did not read it, to judge what it was.

JAMES SULLIVAN . I am ten years old, and live with my mother on Clerkenwell-green. I have known the prisoner three or four weeks, by my brother having been clerk to Mr. Moore, and I went to the chambers for his coat and knife; the prisoner asked me what he should do with some papers in a cupboard, as he thought he should sell them - I told him I did not know; he said he thought he should sell them; he told me to come and sit with him some day for a good while - I went on the Saturday - he said he had sold the papers for waste at the corner of Fetter-lane, and if I would sell some, he would give me part of the money; I said I would not mind if his master did not want it; he got some paper with writing on it from the cupboard, and took some books off the shelves; I asked what he would do with the covers, as his master would see them - he said he could burn them - we both tore off some covers and put the leaves into a bag, this was about half-past two o'clock - some of the books were whole except the covers, and some torn apart - I took them to Parker's, and asked if he would buy some waste paper - he said he would give fourpence a pound, and weighed it, he gave me 4s. 2d.; I do not know what it weighed - there were about eight books in that bag besides paper. Parker did not examine it - he asked where I brought it from - I told him from my brother in Bellyard - I have no brother there; I took some more on the Monday to Torkington's, Chancery-lane - Mr. Moore met me on the stairs with them; some were long books - I rereceived 8d. for them - he said he gave three halfpence a pound; I was taken up next night, and told what had happened.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am twelve years old, and live with my father, who is a carpenter, in Alfred-place, Blackfriars-road. I have known the prisoner about six weeks - I went to Mr. Moore's chambers on Monday evening, and saw a large fire in the grate, like paper ashes - the prisoner was on a chair at the library, putting up books - Sullivan had taken a very large one from the bottom shelf; he ripped the leaves out, burned the cover, and put the inside into the bag, which was half full when I got there - Sullivan went out and sold it; he brought the money, and threw it on the table; I do not know how much, but we could only find 6d. - the prisoner and I spent it as we went home; Mr. Moore came and knocked at the door; the prisoner said, "It is master, don't speak a word or he will put me into the cage;" I at last said, "Who is there? open the door Thomas;' he opened it, Mr. Moore came in, and we were both taken to the watch-house, and as the constable did not come, Mr. Moore discharged us; the beadle fetched me next morning, and I have been in custody ever since.

COURT. Q. How did you become acquainted with him? A. One day he came and played with us in Alfred-place; his mother lived next door to me.

Prisoner's Defence. All Sullivan has said is false; I never thought of stealing till he came and said, "Do you sell waste paper?" I said, "No" - he said, "Why don't you tear up old books, many get a good many shillings by it;" I said that was no reason why I should, and he called me a fool.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy .

Transported for Seven Years to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18260216-19

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

380. THOMAS RHODES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , at St. Martin in the Fields, 1 silver shaving-box, value 2l. 18s.; 2 silver tooth-powder boxes, value 2l. 12s.; 1 silver tooth-brush box, value 5l., and a silver shaving brush, value 1l., the goods of John Lambe , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LAMBE. I am the nephew of John Lambe, who lives in Cockspur-street, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields , and rents the house. On Saturday, the 14th of January, about half-past eight, or twenty minutes to nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop and asked the price of a silver shaving-box in the window - it was five guineas; he said it was too expensive - I took out a dressing case with silver boxes, and handed him the soap-box out of it, that came to 3l. 10s.; he said that was too much, and asked the price of a plated one, which we had not got; he said he was recommended by a customer of ours, and wished to see one about six guineas; I shewed him two or three - I got a dressing case which was fitted up at 16l., saying I could put glass boxes instead of silver, which would reduce it to nine guineas - all the fittings up were then safe; I shewed him another, he then said he would have the one at nine guineas, but wished to see the plated articles in it; I said it would take an hour or two to fit it up - he pressed very much to have them in - I went to the back of the shop to get them, and was there some time - when I brought them they would not fit the box; he said, "You can fit them up and send them to me at twelve o'clock;" and while he was giving his address, one of our workmen came in - he immediately left the shop, leaving his address, "Mr. Johnson, 13, Norfolk-street, Strand;" the instant he went out, in consequence of what the workman said to me, I looked and missed the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth 11l. 10s.; they were all safe two minutes before he left; he was about a quarter of an hour in the shop; I am positive he is the man - I have found none of the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. He went out immediately as the young man came in? A. Yes, in a minute or two, as soon as he gave his address - he was writing it when the workman came in - I am confident he is the man - when he was first taken, I saw him by a different light, and said if he had been in the same dress I should know him better, but I had a shade of doubt about him.

Q. On your oath did you not say you did not believe him to be the man? A. I did not; I said, if he was in the same dress I should know him better - but at that

>time he was in a disguised state - he had a loose handkerchief tied round his neck, it came over his chin, and he was quite florid in the face, which was not the case when he was in the shop, but I understood he was taken in a public-house; I pointed him out instantly from two other men who came into my shop with him - I discovered afterwards that they were officers, but did not then know it; Mr. Herring came in, told them to pull off their hats, and said, "Now, which of these three is the man?" and I pointed him out - I was confident of him - I did not express a doubt - I had a shade of doubt that night on account of his florid appearance.

Q. Do not you know that several depredations had been committed with goods of this sort? A. Yes; he was remanded, and one shopkeeper I know came forward, and could not identify him; I am confident he is the man - I had seen him at the shop window before he came in.

JAMES GOUGE . I am a journeyman pocket-book maker. On the 14th of January, nearly at nine o'clock in the morning, I came into Mr. Lambe's shop, and saw the prisoner there for a minute or two - I saw nobody there but Lambe and the prisoner - he was a stranger, but I am positive he is the man; I went in pursuit of him within a minute or two of his leaving the shop, but could not find him; I saw him at Bow-street on the Tuesday morning after, and pointed him out in the office; I have no doubt whatever of him - when I went into the shop he was giving his address - I made an observation to Lambe when he went out - I heard him tell Lambe to send the things home.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a perfect stranger to you? A. Yes; the office was full of people - the officer touched me on the shoulder - I turned round and said, "That is the man;" he was among a dozen people - I did not see him come in - I was attending to another case, and the moment I saw him I recognised him - I was wiping my shoes on the mat when he was in the shop.

COURT. Q. Did you go to No. 13, Norfolk-street? A. Yes; there was no such person as Johnson ever lived there.

DAVID HERRING . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 14th of January, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I was coming along Pall-mall, and met Lambe's servant - I went to the shop, Gonge and Lambe informed me of the robbery, and described the person to me; I met the prisoner the moment I came out of the shop - he answered their description - he was crossing from Northumberland-house to Messrs. Drummond's bank - I said, "Tom, I want to speak to you;" he said, "I am going sliding, master;" I said, "Tell your woman I won't keep you a minute;" (his girl was with him); he turned about two yards from me to speak to her, and off he ran as hard as he could - I was not two hundred yards from Lambe's - a great number of people were passing in the street; I went back to Lambe's and told them to attend at the office; I spoke to two or three officers, and on Monday night, the 16th, I found him in custody, and took him to Lambe's shop - the witness Lambe was in the shop - I told him I had got Rhodes, and to be very particular whether he was the man or not, and if he had any doubt to let him have it; when the prisoner was produced, he certainly expressed a little doubt, but at that time his dress was altered, his hair was combed straight over his forehead, different to what it generally is, and he kept spitting as if he was half and half - he had two handkerchiefs on his neck, different to the way he was dressed on Saturday morning; he was taken to Bow-street next morning, and the two witnesses swore positively to him; I was in the office - Gouge called me, and said,"There is the man;" and said he had no doubt whatever of him; there were about twenty persons in the office, prisoners and strangers, when he pointed him out.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not at the bar? A. No, he was in custody, but a person coming into the office could not know that; he was on the platform.

Q. When you met him, do you know that he ran away, except that you lost sight of him? A. I am sure he ran, but I could not tell which way - I did not see him run, but he was gone in a moment; when he was in the shop, I told all three to take off their hats - two officers were with him - it was a cold night; it is not uncommon to wear an extra handkerchief.

JOHN MASON . I am an officer. From the description Herring gave me, I apprehended Rhodes in a public-house in James-street, Covent-garden, on Monday night; Gouge pointed him out from among others at Bow-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in Lambe's shop? A. Yes; Lambe expressed a doubt about him there.

Prisoner's Defence. They have mistaken me for some other person - I solemnly deny the charge.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18260216-20

First London Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

381. FRANCIS JAMES RIGAUD , ELIZABETH MEEK , and CHARLES GORMAN ISSITT were severally indicted for for forgery .

Mr. SERGEANT BOSANQUET declined offering any evidence,(see pages 139, 153.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-21

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

382. JAMES BEECROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , at St. George, Hanover-square, 1 clock, value 5l.; 10 books, value 2l.; 2 rugs, value 1l.; 1 carpet, value 5s., and 2 cloths, value 5s., the goods of William Finch Palmer , in his dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM FINCH PALMER, ESQ. I live in Berkeley-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square ; the prisoner was two years in my service, and part of that time in this house; he left about a year and a half ago, and went into another gentleman's service.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. You gave him a good character? A. Yes; he behaved perfectly well with me.

ELIZABETH FRYER . I had the care of Mr. Palmer's house, in Berkeley-square. On Sunday, the 8th of January, I went into the back drawing-room, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and found the window thrown up, the shutter open, and the bar down - the door was fastened as I had left it; I had not been there since Friday morning, the 6th - the window was then down, and the shutters barred; I missed a hearth rug from the front drawing room, also ten books, a clock, and hearth rug from the back drawing-room, and a carpet, belonging to a closet between the two

>rooms; a person could get from one room to the other - I also missed two cloths which covered the furniture; there is a garden behind the house.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot tell when the things were taken? A. I had seen them all safe on the 6th; I must have missed them if they had been gone, as I dust the place round; a dozen books could not have gone without my missing them. I am sure the window was down.

EDWARD CUTLER . I am servant to Mr. Palmer. On Sunday, the 8th of January, I went out - I came home in the evening, went into the drawing rooms, and missed the rugs, cloths, clock, and ten volumes of Shakespeare's works; the 7th volume was left behind. I have seen the prisoner at master's house - the first time was about a year ago, but not for the last six months - he used to visit the servants.

Cross-examined. Q. When had you been in the room? A. On the 4th. The books were there then.

THOMAS EDWARD BOLDING . The prisoner came to lodge at my father's house, No. 40, Clipstone-street, at Midsummer, and stopped there till he was taken up - he ented both the second floor rooms in January, and had the cellar for his coals - he kept the key of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you another key? A. No.

WILLIAM WREN . I am a carpenter, and live in Great Titchfield-street. On Saturday, the 14th of January, a clock was brought to me to repair the frame work - I think the prisoner is the man who brought it, but cannot positively swear to him; he was to call for it on the following Tuesday, on which day Ballard came, and I delivered the same clock to him. My wife let the man in with it.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot swear to him? A. No - it was nearly dark, and I did not take much notice.

SUSANNAH WREN . I am the wife of the last witness. - On Saturday, the 14th of January, I let the man in with something under his arm, about five o'clock - he asked if Mr. Wren was at home, and I called my husband into the passage to him. I cannot swear to the prisoner, but believe him to be the man.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 16th of January, about twelve o'clock in the day, I went with a search-warrant to No. 40, Clipstone-street, and searched the second floor front room; Cutler, who was with me, found ten volumes of Shakespeare's works in that room, and among the dirty linen this cloth; I drew the staple of the cellar door, which was locked, and found two hearth rugs, a small carpet, and a cloth, in a sack; I waited till half-past ten o'clock at night, when the prisoner came home, with his wife; I followed him up stairs, and walked in after him - I told him I wanted him, and to put up his hands that I might secure him; his wife begged to know why I took him; I said he knew - he said he did not; I told him it was on suspicion of having robbed Mr. Palmer, and did he know such a person - he said he did not; I told him I meant Mr. Palmer, of Berkeley-square - he again said he did not know him; I took him to the watch-house, searched him, and found two clock keys in his coat pocket; I asked him where the clock belonging to them was - he said he knew nothing about it. When I took him to the office next day, I asked where the clock was - he said he did not know; I said he might do as he pleased about telling me, but his wife was in custody, and though I thought her innocent, I feared I should not be able to persuade the Magistrate so, and she might be committed, but if the clock was found in all probability she would be discharged, but if it was not she would not, and he might do as he pleased about telling me; I said, "I don't wish you to tell me," and was about to lock the door to leave him; he said something in answer, and in consequence of what he said I went to Wren's, in Great Titchfield-street, on Tuesday morning, the 17th, and there found the clock, which I produce; I knew nothing of Wren before. I found the small key opens the clock case, and the larger one winds it up- the keys are numbered 430, the same as the clock. He said to me, "Stop, I will tell you where the clock is - it is at Mr. Wren's, a cabinet-maker, in Titchfield-street, where I took it to be repaired." I found a boot in his bed-room, which I took to Mr. Palmer's garden, which the back drawing room looks into, and compared it with a vast number of footsteps; the boot exactly tallied with the marks - some of them had left an exact impression - it fitted them. I found a ladder in a small yard between the garden and stables; there is a coach-house between the garden and mews; there were marks of dirt by the coach-house door, as if a person had been over there; I could get in that way, by getting on the coach-house gates into a small yard, over the top of the stable, on to a shed, and that is the way the footsteps went; there was mortar broken down by the shed wall.

Cross-examined. Q. You found a ladder and marks too? A. Yes - he must get over the wall to the ladder. - The boot is a common size, but the heel is flat like a shoe. I searched his lodgings for a clock, but found none.

ELIZABETH FRYER . I know the clock, the rugs, and cloths, and carpet to be Mr. Palmer's.

EDWARD CUTLER . I can swear to these ten volumes of Shakespeare; I have brought the seventh volume. I also know the clock and rug - the keys were kept under the clock.

MR. PALMER. I believe the clock to be mine - it was bought by a relation, and, I understand, cost twenty guineas; it is certainly worth 5l. Shakespeare's works are worth five or six guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought these things in the way of trade on Thursday, the 12th, at the door of Machin and Debenham's sale rooms, King-street, Covent-garden, of a person appearing to be a porter; he told me he had bought them there, and had frequently seen me buying things there, but I did not recollect him - I gave him a 5l. note, two sovereigns, and five shillings - 5l. for the clock, 1l. for Shakespeare, and 25s. shillings for the rugs and carpet. I put the rugs and carpet into the cellar, which I frequently use for that purpose.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18260216-22

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

383. BENJAMIN SIMS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Uriah Lane , on the night of the 4th of February, with intent to steal, and stealing 70 muffs,

value 150l., the goods of Edward Harris ; and 80 bonnets, value 100l. , the goods of the said Uriah Lane.

THOMAS JONES . I live in Bell-court, Gray's Inn-lane, and am a watchman. On Saturday, the 5th of February, I was calling the hour of four in Long-yard, Lamb's Conduit-street, and saw the prisoner standing by two bags by the wall, at the back of Mr. Lane's house, which is No. 36, Lamb's Conduit-street ; the bags laid on a dung heap - he was about two yards from them; there was a ladder in Mr. Lane's yard, against this wall; when the prisoner saw me he said, "Watchman, there are thieves over in the yard - don't you see the ladder;" I took my lantern, looked in his face, and said, "I dare say you are one of them," and collared him; he said he would go wherever I liked, for he knew nothing about it, but as soon as he saw me put my hand to my rattle he got from me, and escaped. - Lloyd came up; I left him in care of the bags while I went to the house; the street door was open - I alarmed Mr. Lane. I had never seen the prisoner before, and did not see him again till the 6th of February, when he was at Hatton-garden - it was dark when I saw him; I was hardly two minutes looking at him, but am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. You held the lantern in his face - did you look at any other part of him? A. No. He had a white coat on - there is a gas-light about fifty feet off. I said at Hatton-garden it was a man rather taller, or about my height; he had a green coat there.

JOHN LLOYD . I am a watchman. I heard a rattle sprung, and saw Jones in Long-yard - he left the bags in my care - they were full - one was tied up, and I think, the other; I carried one of them into Mr. Lane's house - another watchman carried the other. I saw them opened - one contained furs, and the other bonnets and a few furs - Mr. Lane took them up stairs.

URIAH LANE . I live in Lamb's Conduit-street, and am a straw hat manufacturer - Edward Harris rents my shop and back parlour, for the winter season - his man sleeps there, but was out that night; my bonnets were in his warehouse. On the 5th of February, about four o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed, and discovered three locks broken, and the property gone - it appeared that the thieves had come over the wall in Long-yard, through the kitchen window, and into the warehouse; the kitchen door was cut to let them through. I untied one of the bags, and saw the furs in it; I believe both were tied - one contained bonnets; they were all safe the night before.

EDWARD HARRIS . I rented this shop, and live on Ludgate-hill. I went to the premises at half-past nine o'clock in the morning, and found about two hundred muffs in one bag; I had seen them safe three or four days before. Next day, about half-past twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another young man by a public-house, about thirty yards from the premises - he appeared to answer the description given by the watchman: they passed my door, and appeared to be idling about the place. I had them secured after following them to Keppel-street.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found a piece of cord on him, like that which the bags were tied with - it is common cord.

Prisoner's Defence. I never wore a drab coat.

WILLIAM SIMS . I am a butcher, of Newgate-market. The prisoner is my nephew; I lodge at his father's, in Black Horse-square, Aldgate; he sleeps with me; I have lived there about three years. On Saturday, the 4th of February, I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock - he went to bed with me, and got up about eight o'clock in the morning; he could not have left the bed without my missing him; his mother generally takes the key of our room. I never saw him wear a light coat.

COURT. Q. What business is he? A. He works for his father, who is a tailor.

Q. How often do you go to Newgate-market? A. Two or three times a week. I have no stall; I cut a little meat, and sell it there on commission. I pay any one who lets me cut it on their stall. His father sent him out on Monday, after a man who owed them money.

MARY ANN SIMS . I am the prisoner's sister - he was at home on the 4th of February, and did not get off the work-board till the clock struck nine; he went to bed between eleven and twelve - he sleeps with my uncle; I saw them both in bed - my mother locked them into the room, and kept the key till between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, when I went to the bed side, and called my brother and uncle up - my brother never wore a great coat of any description. On Monday morning my father sent him to look after a young man, who was in our debt, and we had heard he lived somewhere about Bloomsbury - my father told him to search every public-house about there. My mother is now confined to her bed, in a dying state.

COURT. Q. Who is the man who owed you money? A. William Hullen - he did live in Ayliff-street. My mother always locks them into their room, and never will trust me with the key - they never get up till they are called.

JOHN SIMS . I am the prisoner's father. On Saturday, the 4th of February, I left work at eight o'clock, leaving my two sons to finish a coat; the prisoner left work at nine - he went to bed at eleven, with his uncle - they were locked in, and my wife had the key; he got up about eight o'clock. I sent him on Monday to look after a man who owed me money, which I was to have by instalments - he was a wine porter, and I heard he had got a situation about Bloomsbury. I told my son to search every winevaults and cellar, and if he saw a wine-cellar to stop till somebody came out; he never wore a great coat. My wife has not been out of bed since she heard of this.

COURT. Q. Is it your wife's custom to lock up your son and brother every night? A. Yes. My brother is out of business - he used to carry on business at Newgate-market, and was a carcase butcher in Warwick-lane - he has left off business this three years, and lives with me.

WILLIAM SIMS re-examined. I have been a carcase butcher - I do a very trifling business now. I never said I had the key of the room - I did not tell the Magistrate so; his mother generally takes the key, and I am pretty sure she did so on that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-23

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

384. ELEANOR WELCH was indicted for stealing,

on the 27th of January , 1 canvass bag, value 1d.; 12 half-crowns, value 30s.; 65 shillings, and 31 sixpences, the property of Abraham Israel , her master, in his dwelling-house .

HANNAH MICHAEL . My son, Abraham Israel, is a hatter , and lives in Ratcliff-highway - he also keeps the White Lion, public-house, White Lion-street, Whitechapel - I manage the business for him. The prisoner had lived servant there for three months. On Friday, the 7th of January, the tax-gatherer called for 1l. 17s. 6d.; I paid him, and left some silver in a bag, which I put on the rum cask, behind me, while I served two or three people - it contained half crowns, shillings, and sixpences, but I cannot say how many. When I turned round it was gone; this was about one o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner was at that time taking dirty pots up stairs, and bringing down clean ones; she came down in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I said, "Eleanor, have you moved my bag?" she said she had done nothing of the kind; I said nobody but I and her had been in the bar - she said she knew nothing of it - my brother came in at that time, and sent for a constable; eight pence was found tied in her handkerchief.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I am an officer. I was fetched, and found 8d. on the prisoner, and took her to Lambeth-street.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the office and remanded - I was taking her to prison - I said nothing to her, but she told me she was very sorry for what she had done, and if I would go to the house, and look under the club-room stairs, I should find the money, for she had put it there; I went, and found the bag under the stairs - it contained the money stated in the indictment; it was among a parcel of old rubbish.

Q. Was this said quite voluntarily? A. Yes; she said nothing of having done it in a joke, or that the appearance of the officer had frightened her, and prevented her returning it.

HANNAH MICHAEL . I know this bag by its general appearance.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not this have been done in a joke? A. It might - I cannot say; we were on good terms.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-24

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

385. WILLIAM WHEATLEY and FREDERICK LOWERBANK were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 coat, value 4l.; 1 snuff-box, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Robert King , in the dwelling-house of John Sibel .

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable, and live at Battle-bridge. On the 28th of January, about half-past one o'clock, I saw the two prisoners pass my door; I followed them. Wheatley knocked at Mr. Sibel's door, in Brewer-street, St. Pancras - Lowerbank stood about two doors off- I saw the door open; Wheatley went into the passage, brought out this coat, and gave it to Lowerbank, who immediately ran away with it. I followed, and caught him in the Pancras-road, with it under his arm; he had ran about two hundred yards; I left him in a shop, and met Wheatley walking down a street, about 50 yards from Mr. Sibel's, towards where Lowerbank had run. I secured him, and took them both to the office, with the coat; there was a snuff-box and handkerchief in the pocket.

SOPHIA PIKE . I am servant to Mr. Sibel. Wheatley knocked at the door about two o'clock - I opened it - he told me to go down stairs for 2d., which we owed him, for fetching water; I went down, leaving him on the threshold of the door; Mrs. Sibel told me to tell him to call on Monday - I came up, told him so, and he went away. - Some great coats hung in the passage; I did not miss them, as I did not look at them.

ROBERT KING . I lodge at Mr. John Sibel's. My great coat hung in the passage at half-past one o'clock, with the snuff-box and handkerchief in the pocket - I missed it at half-past six, when I wanted to put it on. It cost me 4l. six weeks ago.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WHEATLEY'S Defence. I had eat nothing but a 2d. loaf all day.

WHEATLEY - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

LOWERBANK - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Reference Number: t18260216-25

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

387. MARY McMAHON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 3 forks, value 30s.; 1 spoon, value 15s.; 3 sheets, value 15s.; 10 towels, value 7s., and 4 pillow cases, value 3s., the goods of Mary M'Beath , in her dwelling-house .

MARY M'BEATH. I live at Nos. 24 and 26, Norfolk-street, Strand - the prisoner was my servant for about four months, and left about three weeks ago for four days, being ill, and intended to return. On Thursday morning, when I expected her, the officer brought me this property, which I had not missed before.

WILLIAM DEMPSTER . I am shopman to Mr. Newbery, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. On Monday evening, the 16th of January, the prisoner pawned two silver forks - she asked for 10s.; I said I could lend more, and she said"Make it 15s." - I am certain of her.

MARY MACK . I have known the prisoner about nine months. Two days after she left the prosecutrix I saw her at Mrs. Rafferty's, in Brewer-street - I met her afterwards in Drury-lane, and she told me she had bought a box in Brokers'-alley; I went to Brokers'-alley with her, and carried it for her to Lombard-court, to Mrs. Dunn's - it was empty - she put the key into her pocket; she told me to come there again at six o'clock, to carry the box to Rafferty's; I left her there, went at six o'clock, and took it to Rafferty's in King-street, but, as Rafferty was out, we took it to No. 30, King-street - it was very heavy then - it remained till three o'clock the next day, when I took it to Rafferty's: the prisoner then had the key of the room, and let herself in - she gave me a silver fork out of a basket which she had in her hand, and told me to pawn it for 8s., in the name of Mrs. Cook, and to say Mrs. Cook was my mistress, if I was asked about it. I took it to Newbery's, who detained me - I asked him for 9s. on it - I told him who I had it from - he sent his clerk with me to ask the prisoner if it was all right - she said Yes. I

>have been in custody ever since - I am a servant out of place.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am shopman to Mr. Newbery, of Drury-lane. Mack came to pawn a fork on the 26th of January - I detained her.

MARGARET DUNN . I live in Lombard-court, Sevendials, and have known the prisoner two or three years - she and Mack came to my house on Wednesday, the 25th of January, about one o'clock, with the box - the prisoner said she was better, and hoped to go to her place that night; Mack went away, the prisoner remained there - I went out at two o'clock, and returned at four - she went out and returned between five and six o'clock - Mack and her took the box away between six and seven o'clock - I had not seen it open.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am an officer. I apprehended Mack at Mr. Newbery's, and took the prisoner the same night at No. 30, New Compton-street. I said "How do you do, Hannah?" she said there was no Hannah there; I said "Well, Mary M'Mahon, how are you?" she made no answer - I said she must go to Bow-street, on suspicion of having stolen property, and I must search her box; she said she had no box but that I had been to; I said"What box did you mean?" she said "That box at Mrs. Rafferty's;" I searched her, and found two keys - she said they did not belong to the box; I then shewed her a key which she said belonged to the box I had been to at Rafferty's, and she had left it in her basket at Rafferty's; I told her she had sent a fork to be pawned, and I had found a spoon in her box, which seemed to have the name of M'Beath on it, and I had found several things with the same initials; she made no answer; I said it appeared there was a party connected in this; she said "No, I did it all myself" - that Mack knew nothing about it - she had given her the fork to pawn - that she had been a servant, and lived in Adam-street, but could not tell me where she lived last; Mack had shewn me the box at Rafferty's the evening before - I found in it a silver table spoon, three sheets, two table cloths, ten towels, four pillow cases, and two finger glasses, and a few things which she claimed herself at Bow-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-26

London Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

387. JOHN FREDERICK SCHUTTE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 21/2 yards of linen cloth, value 1s. 8d., the goods of William Bousfield and John Bousfield , his masters .

Mr. WILLIAM BOUSFIELD. I am a slop-seller , in partnership with John Bousfield - no other person is interested in this property. The prisoner was nearly two years in our service. On the 19th of January, about eight o'clock at night, as he was leaving work, I stopped him at the gate, and said he must be searched, but nothing was found on him; I accompanied the officer to his premises, leaving him behind; they brought down two yards and a half of linen; he immediately said "This is my master's property"- the officer said "We do not want you to implicate yourself." I could not identify it myself - he was employed the day before in cutting linen of this description, and in a book, in his own hand-writing, he has entered forty-eight garments cut from this duck, which three pieces would make, and by cutting them rather small he might leave two yards and a quarter over - it was of the same quality as the garments cut.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you two or three different firms? A. No; the names of Favel and Bousfield are over our door, but the first is only there by courtesy.

JAMES HARDING . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge, but found nothing on him; I then went to the second floor front room at No. 47, Duke-street, Aldgate, and found three pieces of Russia duck - I took them to Mr. Bousfield's, where the prisoner had been detained; he said "They are my master's." I cautioned him to say nothing that would hurt him.

WILLIAM PLAISTOW . I am an officer. I heard the prisoner say "I admit that is my master's property."

Prisoner's Defence. I have no recollection of saying any thing of the kind.

JURY to Mr. BOUSFIELD. Q. It is usual for you to expect so many garments from a piece, and for him to have the rest? A. No; we allow no perquisites - the remnants should be used up in the next quantity cut - we allow nothing to be taken off the premises; I had cautioned him against taking any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-27

388. JOHN FREDERICK SCHUTTE was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 2 un-made children's dresses, value 4s. , the goods of William Bousfield and John Bousfield .

Mr. BOUSFIELD. These dresses were given to him to make at his leisure - he took them home, by consent, in June or July - I never saw them afterwards till they were found in pawn. I only know they were delivered to him by an entry in the books, which is not in my writing.

JOHN SAVAGE . I am journeyman to Mr. Aaron, a pawnbroker. I was present when these two dresses were pawned, but cannot say who brought them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-28

389. JAMES PEARCE and JAMES PAYNE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , a great coat, value 2s. , the goods of a certain person whose name is unknown.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 21st January, about half-past five o'clock, I had been following the prisoners, and saw Pearce and another, who is not here, go down the gateway of the King's Arms, public-house, Leadenhall-street; a cart pulled up, and I saw Pearce get on the wheel, and take something from the cart; the other two followed and joined him. I saw Pearce give this coat to Payne, who put it on. I cannot say they had not got a coat before the cart came up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-29

390. WILLIAM SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Frederick Augustus Griesbach , from his person .

JOHN FREDERICK AUGUSTUS GRIESBACH. I live in Nicols-square, Falcon-square, and am in the lace trade . On the evening of the 28th of January I was in Fleet-street, going towards Exeter-change; I had left home about half an hour, and near Temple-bar , on the Chancery-lane side of the way, I felt a pull at my pocket; I saw the prisoner running, and pursued; a friend, who was with me, stopped him in Essex-street; the handkerchief lay within two yards of his feet - nobody else was passing.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a watchman, and took him in charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the Strand - the gentleman charged me with picking his pocket - a young man picked a handkerchief up a few yards off.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260216-30

391. THOMAS BURLEY was indicted for stealing, on 30th of January , at St. Bartholomew the Great, 2 cows, price 30l. the property of Elizabeth Johnson , widow .

WILLIAM HENRY JEAL . I live at Plumstead. I am in the employ of Elizabeth Johnson, widow - she is a gardener and grazier , and lives at Plumstead, in Kent; these cows were kept in an enclosed yard on Plumstead-marsh - I saw them on Sunday, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the 29th of January, in the yard - the gate was shut - they could not escape of themselves; the servant went to the yard in the morning, and about eight o'clock gave me information - I went to the yard and found that two were gone - their lowest value is 30l. - they would fetch much more; I rode up to London, and found them in Smithfield-market, about a quarter past ten o'clock that morning, in possession of Caleb Whitbread, the salesman; I immedidiately got off my horse and told an officer to take care of them; I saw the prisoner in custody at the Compter, in about an hour and a half - he lived in the neighbourhood four or five years ago, but not then.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Were they in an open yard all night? A. Yes; I have the charge of them, and left the gate shut, but not locked; there was plenty of victuals there - they would not want to get out.

EDWARD JEAL . I am in Mrs. Johnson's service. I saw the cows safe, and the gate shut, at half-past four o'clock on Sunday afternoon - next morning, at half-past seven o'clock, I went to the yard and missed them - I had left the gate tied with a band, which I found broken; I have known the prisoner all my life, but had not seen him about lately - he is a labourer; I saw the cows again on Tuesday, and am quite certain of them.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I am a widow. I left the cows entirely to the witnesses' care; I have known the prisoner from his infancy, and never knew any thing amiss of him.

CALEB WHITBREAD . I am a salesman of Smithfield. On the 30th of January, at a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I found these two cows tied up to my rails with many others - I did not see who brought them - the prisoner came to me in about half an hour, and said there were two cows for me to sell, and he did not wish to have then turned out, as he wanted money to take up a bill; I sold them for 33l. to Mr. Marsh, who was to send his drover for them, but Jeal claimed them in about half an hour; I pointed the prisoner out to Branscombe, the officer, in the market, and he took him; I saw nobody else claiming any right to them but him.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see them brought to your stall? A. No; I am certain he did not say he had only come for another person - he said, they must be sold as early as possible, for he wanted to pay a bill; he neither said they were his or they were not - I paid very little attention; I should have paid the money to him, for I have known him personally for many years, seeing him three or four times a day in the market, and considered him a very respectable man; I considered him a jobber.

JAMES CARLEY . I am a shepherd, and live at Woolwich - I know the prisoner. On the 30th of January, just before one o'clock in the night, I saw him at Plumstead, nearly a mile from the marsh - he had two cows, driving them towards London - it would take about three hours and a half to drive them to town - I saw nobody with him; I walked after him about one hundred and sixty yards, then went across to him and said, "Hallo, what are you for market?" he said, in a coarse way, "Yes;" I walked by his side some distance, till I got up to a light, and then knew his person well - I did not know his voice; I am quite sure he is the person - I have known him three or four years.

Cross-examined. Q. By what light did you see him? A. By a gas-light - I left him immediately I went by the gas-light; I did not call him by his name; I knew who he was when I got to the light.

COURT. Q. When did you mention that you had seen him? A. On Monday afternoon, when I heard the cows were lost; I merely said I had seen Burley driving two along the road.

THOMAS BRANSCOMBE . I am an officer. Jeal pointed some cows out to me, and said, they were stolen from him; I took him to Whitbread, who walked round the market, and in three-quarters of an hour pointed the prisoner out - he went up to him, and said "I have sold your cows;" I said, "You must go with me" - he asked what for - I said, "You have stolen those cows" - he said he did not steal them - he did not say a word more; I took him to the Compter - they have been returned to the prosecutrix, being heavy in calf.

The prisoner made no defence, but three witnesses gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Strongly recommended to Mercy on account of his good character by the Jury and prosecutrix .

Reference Number: t18260216-31

392. THOMAS RARES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of James William York , from his person .

JAMES WILLIAM YORK. I live in Gloucester-street, Commercial-road, and am a corn-chandler . On Sunday, the 29th of January, about three o'clock in the morning, I was crossing from Holborn-bridge to Snow-hill , with a handkerchief in my pocket - I felt for it, and missed it - I turned round, and saw Hughes coming after me with it;

>he had the prisoner in custody - I asked how he came by it - he made no answer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a lapidary. I was coming from St. Bartholomew-hospital, and saw Mr. York on the other side of the way - the prisoner and another were behind him; I saw the other pull a handkerchief about six inches out of York's pocket - a gentleman passed who obstructed my view - I then saw the handkerchief was gone; the prisoner was putting on his hat - the other ran across to Fleet-market; I immediately seized the prisoner, and found the handkerchief in his hat; I called to Mr. York, who claimed it.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260216-32

393. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , a paper box, value 1d., and 2 gold neck chains, value 20l. , the goods of Robert Rickards .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Chaplin .

EDWARD BYASS . I am servant to Mr. Chaffers, pawnbroker, of Watling-street. On the 6th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop to sell a gold neck chain for 1l. - I knew it to be worth more than 8l. as old gold, and detained him.

RICHARD GEORGE STATHAM . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge at Chaffer's shop; I asked him where he came from - he said from the Bull and Mouth - I found a paper box on him, and 3s. 6d.

RICHARD ROBERTS . I am porter to Messrs. Rickards and M'Intosh, East India merchants . I delivered a parcel at the Spread Eagle, Grace-church-street, directed to Colonel Houghton, Fairley-castle, near Bath.

JAMES FOYLE . I am book-keeper at the Spread Eagle. I received a brown paper parcel, directed to Colonel Houghton, and delivered it to the guard of the Shamrock, Bath-coach.

CHARLES LEWIS SPITTAR . I am a clerk to Mr. Richards. On the 21st of January, Mr, Rickards delivered me two gold chains - I put them into the paper box produced - packed and sealed them; I am certain the chain found on the prisoner is one of them; the two would cost fifty guineas if bought here - they are foreign chains; I saw the other at the Mansion-house the same day.

ROBERT RICHARDS , ESQ. I am a merchant. These chains were sent to me from India to be forwarded to Colonel Houghton; the other one was found at a shop in Fleet-Market.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18260216-33

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

394. JOHN JACKSON, alias ISRAEL MIELHEIM , was indicted for stealing a variety of property, the goods of Philip Lawton , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-34

395. RICHARD ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, 1 tea-pot, value 5l., the goods of John Samuel Gaskoin , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SOUTHWELL . I am servant to Mr. John Samuel Gaskoin, who is a medical man , and lives in Clarges-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On the 13th of February, about a quarter to eleven o'clock in the morning, I put this silver tea-pot into the pantry - our area gate is kept open - in about a quarter of an hour I caught the prisoner in the pantry, and asked him what business he had there; he said he came to sell oranges; he had some in a basket; I told him that was not the place to sell them - he said if I disputed his word he would go to my fellow servants for they knew him; they denied all knowledge of him; I said he had better go back, but on looking into the cupboard I missed the teapot. I went after him as he was going out of the area, with the door in his hand, brought him back, and found the teapot in his basket, under the oranges - it is worth 5l. and has master's initials on it - he was given in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I searched the prisoner and found 3s. 6d. on him - I have the basket and teapot.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18260216-35

396. ROBERT CLINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 2 coats, value 3l., the goods of Daniel Gunston , in his dwelling-house ; and MARY CLINTON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

DANIEL GUNSTON. I live in Percival-street, Clerkenwell , and am a cheesemonger . These coats were kept in the drawers, on my second floor - the prisoner Robert was three months in my service as errand boy - I had discharged him about three weeks; I pulled them off on Friday, and missed them on Saturday, the 11th of February, at eleven o'clock at night; a person coming in at my yard gates might easily step up stairs - I have found one coat; I apprehended him at his mother's, in Falcon-place, Ray-street.

JAMES COPPIN . I am groom to Mr. Wills, of Percival-street. On Saturday evening, the 11th of February I was by master's stables, behind his house, and saw the prisoner about twenty minutes to eight o'clock - the gas was lighted - I cannot be mistaken in him - he said he had a place at 6s. a week, and would get me one at 8s. - I said I was satisfied with the one I had got - nothing more passed - he had got nothing.

JOHN CLINTON . The prisoners are my mother and brother - our father is a gardener - we live in Falcon-place, Ray-street. I know nothing about this.

Q. They have taken down that you swore before the Justice, that you saw your brother bring in a coat on Saturday night, and said he picked it up - that your mother said it was a lie, and she would keep it to find the owner? A. I never saw him with a coat.

JOHN CROSS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Turnmill-street. The female prisoner pawned a coat for 8s., in the name of Bond, Ray-street.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable. On Monday morning I took the prisoner, Robert, at his mother's house- I found nothing there - the woman denied all know

>ledge of it; I said I would take her to where she had pawned it; she then said "Well, let me give the boy a penny;" she pulled out her handkerchief, in which I found the duplicate of this coat among others.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-36

397. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Bowley , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 1st of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 3 live tame fowls, price 7s. his property.

SAMUEL BOWLEY. I keep the Red Lion public-house, Coppice-row, in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell . These fowls were in a building adjoining my house - it is part of the house and enclosed by a wall outside. I went to bed at a quarter past twelve o'clock at night on the 1st of February; the house was all secure; I went into the yard, unlocked the door, and saw that the fowls were all safe at a quarter past twelve o'clock - I had locked the outer door myself - every thing was secure; I got up at six o'clock in the morning - it was just break of day - there was not light enough to distinguish a man's features - I found the door open - there is no wall round the yard - there is a communication round the house; I have a back door which opens into my house, and near that is a door leading to this building; I found the hasp of the staple of that door broken off, and two bags and a small iron bar left in the house; I missed three fowls out of twelve; I went to Newgate-market between nine and ten o'clock that morning, and there saw my fowls - one had been sold to a porter in the market, and the other two to a poulterer - they were all alive; I had reared and fed them every day, and knew their plumage - the cock had a hurt on one of his spurs - I cannot be mistaken in them; I have seen the prisoner about Turnmill-street before, and apprehended him at the Horse and Groom, public-house, there, concealed in the tap-room, with about twenty bad characters - I was afraid to go in; as soon as we went in they concealed him under their seats - sitting before him, with him under their legs; I sent for five or six people from my house to assist, and we secured him.

WILLIAM BEDFORD . I am a poulterer at Newgate-market. Mr. Bowley claimed two fowls which I had, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; I had bought them a little after eight; I saw them first about seven o'clock- the prisoner and another were in company - they had three fowls - they were shifted Irom the hands of one to another; the prisoner had the cock in his hand; I bought the two pullets of the man who was with him; the prisoner had the cock on the board at the same time; I gave 3s. 3d. for them - they were not fit to kill but to lay; I put them inot the coop. The money was paid to the other man - I knew the prisoner very well.

CHARLES MALLARD . I am a porter of Newgate-market. About half-past eight o'clock on this morning, I bought the cock of the prisoner for 1s. 2d.; I am certain of his person - I knew him well before, by seeing him with fowls and rabbits - I paid the other man for it; he was an old man - they both went away together; I bought it of the prisoner - they both agreed for me to have it, and said they should bring me some more to-morrow - both joined in the bargain, and wanted me to buy the three; the prisoner asked me 7s. for the three - both appeared to be owners.

SAMUEL BOWLEY . One was a cock and the other two pullets.

GEORGE THOMAS . I am an officer of Clerkenwell. I apprehended the prisoner at the Horse and Groom, concealed under the seat - other persons were sitting over him, hiding him with their legs. It is a very bad house. I went to the prosecutor's premises - the door had been forced open - here is the iron bar.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards the City to mind horses and carts, to gain a livelihood; I met this old man, who asked me the way to Newgate-market - I directed him - he offered me 6d. to shew him the way - he then said if I would hold one of the fowls he would give me 6d. I held one till he sold the other - then gave it him, and he took the money. I have worked for Mr. Hagne, a tailor, in Hosier-lane.

WILLIAM BEDFORD re-examined. I saw the prisoner shew the fowls to two or three people in the market - they acted as joint proprietors in them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18260216-37

398. WILLIAM BEAN and JASPER SWILE was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling house of William Allford , in the night of the 7th of December , and stealing 2 coats, value 20s.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s.; 3 pairs of breeches, value 10s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 1 pelisse, value 20s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 yard of linen, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 3s.; 3 boxes, value 2s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 1 cap, value 6d., and 1 apron, value 1s. , his property.

WILLIAM ALLFORD. I live in Duck-in-pond-lane, Whitechapel , and deal in fish . On the 7th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out with my wife, leaving nobody in the house; it was just dark when I returned; I had left the front door locked, and the windows fastened; I found the window sash taken out, and a box, which contained the articles stated in the indictment, were taken from under the window; they were worth 3l. 9s. 6d.; I have not found them. I know the prisoners well by sight; I had not seen them near my house that day - I saw them in custody on the 27th of January.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Was it a large dark box? A. No; a smallish old box - it had been painted red, but the colour was a good deal worn; the lid had been joined, but not painted; I do not know Harry Lane; there are only two rooms to my house - there was a broken pane of glass which they could put their hands through, and take a pane out; nobody could get in without taking the sash out.

HENRY SUMERS . I am eight years and three months old, (this witness, upon being questioned, appeared perfectly aware of the nature of an oath); I live next door but one to Allford. I was standing at the top of Wood's-buildings, about ten yards from Allford's house, and saw two persons at his house; there was a gas-light at the top of the court, but I could distinguish their features without the lamp at first, as it was not dark when I first saw them

- I saw them for about half an hour; I am quite sure the prisoners are the persons; there was a hole in the window - they put a hand in, drew the nail out, and put it down the gully hole - the window remained in its place; they lifted it up and got into the house - one of them got inside the house, and the box was shoved through the window - they put it into a cart and drove away with it - there was day light enough to see them when they opened the window; I saw them again about week after, in Devonshire place; I had seen them before the robbery, and am quite sure I cannot be mistaken in them.

Q. When did you first mention that you had seen persons get into the house? A. Allford's wife was at the water cock next day, and we told her of it - I told her I knew them and their names - William Bean, and the other is called Taylor - we called him by that name.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know where they lived? A. No; they were taken up a good bit afterwards - it was a fortnight after, I think.

Q. Was it not seven weeks before they were taken? A. Yes; they were taken in Devonshire-place - I did not see them afterward till then - one had a black coat on, and the other a light white one; I could only see Taylor's waistcoat, as Bean's coat was buttoned up - they had their hats on all the time; I was rather further from them than I am now; I did not go home, but played about with some other boys - it was dark when they went away - there is a gas-light at the top of Wood's-buildings; I went round to the front of Allford's house, and saw them - I peeped round the corner; I do not know Harry Lane; Shipley and two or three others were playing with me.

JOHN SHIPLEY was called. but not understanding the obligation of an oath, was not examined.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer. On the 26th of January, I heard of this house being broken open; I saw Sumers and Shipley on that day; on the 27th of January I took up both the prisoners, from the description Sumers gave me; I told them the charge - they denied it - Allford was with me; they had a cart and donkey with them when I took them; Summers called Swiles by the name of Taylor - he is called so by the boys - he is a tailor - and they call him mad tailor.

SWILES' Defence. We have evidence to call.

AMELIA ANN BACON . I live at No. 5, in North-street - about the length of a short street from Allford's. I heard of this robbery about three hours after it happened - about half-past four o'clock that afternoon, I was going out of my room door to call my children into tea - it was nearly dark - I saw a young man whom they call Harry Lane, with a box - it appeared to be large - I could not see the colour - and by the time I had shut my door I heard somebody going up stairs, and heard a woman say, "What have you got there?" my children made such a noise, I could not distinctly hear - but I heard her say to the man,"Take it down, or I will kick it down stairs;" after that I saw the man go by the window with a box - I think, by the light, it must have been brown or black; I did not give information about it - but when I heard the prisoners were taken, I mentioned it to their friends.

COURT. Q. Did you know the prisoners before? A. Yes, for a long time; Swile is a tailor by trade, but sells things in the street - he has an ass and hampers. Bean gets his living in the same way.

JURY to JAMES LEA. Q. Did you take the prisoners from the description which Sumers gave of their persons or only their names? A. He described their persons as well; he said one was dressed in black, and the other in a light coat; they were so dressed when I took them.

BEAN - GUILTY. Aged 18.

SWILE - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, and not of burglary .

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18260216-38

399. JOHN BARRETT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Caroline, the wife of James Meyers , on the King's high-way, on the 14th of February , at St. Luke, putting her in fear, taking from her person, and against her will, 1 umbrella, value 1s., and a pair of pattens, value 6d. the goods of the said James Meyers.

CAROLINE MEYERS . I am the wife of James Meyers, who is a clerk - we live in Rahere-street, Goswell-road. On the 14th of February, a little after seven o'clock in the evening, I was going home from Old-street, and as I was walking along Brick-lane , with my umbrella and pattens in the same hand, a boy came up and pushed me, saying, "Halloo, mistress!" two other boys instantly came up, they pushed me from one side to the other, and pulled my shawl, but did not get it; I begged them to go on, like good boys - they would not, but still kept round me - and in the scuffle I lost my pattens - they might have knocked them out of my hand, or they may have dropped; I asked them where their mother lived - they told me at No. 20, and I think they said in Seward-street; in order to get rid of them, I went into a chandler's-shop in Seward-street - I then had my umbrella safe; I was there a few minutes, and when I came out, the boys stood waiting for me; they followed me - and when I got to Rahere-street, which is about ten minutes walk, there is a dark dirty place there, one of the boys then pulled my umbrella away from me - two of them pushed me down, and kicked me; I had a tooth broken, and my nose bled; I was much bruised by their kicking me - I felt very ill next day, and was not able to get up till night; a person picked me up; my pattens were not found after they were dropped; I have every reason to believe the prisoner is one of the three boys, but will not venture to swear it; I have not found the umbrella.

Q. When you went into the chandler's-shop did you tell the people what had happened? A. No; I only bought a candle; I had not been hurt then. This happened on Tuesday night, and on Thursday I saw the prisoner in custody - I then had a strong belief that he was the person, but could not swear to him.

CHARLES TAPPS . I am nearly fourteen years old, and live in New-court, Brick-lane. (The witness being questioned appeared perfectly aware of the obligation of an oath.) I live with my parents - my father is a hempdresser. On Tuesday night I was in Brick-lane, and saw Mrs. Meyers; a boy came up to her, and said, "Halloo! mistress," and one of the others pushed her - there were four of them; she had an umbrella and pattens in her hand; this was just by New-court; I do not know who the boys were, or whether she lost any thing then - she told them to go on, like good boys; they stopped by her; I stopped at the end of Seward-street, and saw her go into

>a chandler's-shop, and when she came out the boys were standing by the window - they made a pull at her shawl; she went up to Rahere-street, and there they pulled her down, and took her umbrella, saying "Pulley, hoy" - I did not see them do any thing more to her. A gentleman picked her up - she held by the rails, and could hardly stand. When they had got the umbrella one of them was standing under a baker's window, whistling; this gentleman was coming by. I pointed him out to him - he had not got the umbrella, but was one of those who illused her, and pulled her down - the gentleman laid hold of him; I am sure he is one of the party; the prisoner is the boy I am quite sure; I had never seen him before, to my knowledge - he was with the boys all the time - it lasted about an hour, I think. I stood some distance from them - he is one who waited at the window for her; there was a light in the window; I am positive he is one of them. There are oil lamps in Rahere-street; I am sure he went with the other boys from the window to the spot where they robbed her - he did not take the umbrella - I should know that boy again.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me touch the lady? A. I will not swear that he did, but he was with them.

MARY TAPPS . I am the last witness's sister, and am eleven years old. (This witness also had a compelent knowledge of the obligation of an oath.) I was with my brother, standing at the top of the court, which is next to Seward-street; I saw Mrs. Meyers walking along - one boy came up to her, and said. Halloo! mistress," and the others shoved her - she told them to go on like good boys - there were four of them - they walked behind her- she had an umbrella and pattens in her hand; they kept walking behind her - she went into a chandler's-shop, and came out in a few minutes; they stood at the window while she was in there - I and my brother stood at the corner was one of them - I saw their faces while they stood at the window; I never saw him before, but am certain of him, because he had no hat on, and a little thin shortish stick in his hand - the others had hats on. Mrs. Meyers came out of the shop, and as she went down Seward-street they tried to get her shawl off; they followed her into Little Rahere-street; I said I would follow my brother - they knocked her down, and pulled her umbrella from her, saying, "Pulley hoy," and then two of them, who had got the umbrella, ran down that street, and down another; I and my brother were going home, and we saw the prisoner under the baker's window, whistling - I am sure he was with them when Mrs. Meyers was robbed - he did not take the umbrella; my brother and a gentleman helped to pick her up - she was bleeding at the nose, and seemed hurt - she could hardly stand. I and my brother were going home after picking her up, and saw him whistling under the window - we pointed him out to the gentleman, who took him - we went with him to the watch-house, and told the same story there.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me touch the lady? A. No - he did nothing himself. There were three other boys- I should know the one who took the umbrella; he had a white jacket and leather apron on.

JAMES NEW . I live at No. 63, Rahere-street. I was leaving my own home, and found the prosecutrix laying on the pavement, bleeding - a woman stood by her, and asked my assistance to pick her up; I think there was a boy or two there, who went away. I believe the two witnesses were there, for I asked how it occurred, and they told me. I left the prosecutrix in care of the woman, and went round the corner, where the two witnesses pointed out the prisoner, standing under the baker's window in Goswell-road, about two minutes walk from where the prosecutrix was; I secured him, and took him to the watch-house - they went with me, and gave the same account as they have now - word for word; the prisoner denied it - he had no hat on, and dropped a shortish stick on the way to the watch-house.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house; the witnesses said they were sure he was the boy, because he had no hat on.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Brick-lane - this lady was in a public-house, and a lot of boys playing with her - she was dancing; I asked what was the matter - they said only a woman drunk; she went down the street - I went in, and bought some potatoes; but, having no money, they would not let me have them. She went into a chandler's shop, to buy a candle - she only had a half-penny to pay for it; the other boys were playing and shoving her about.

CAROLINE MEYERS. I took nothing that night - I was perfectly sober.

CHARLES TAPPS. She was not tipsy, but walked along as anybody else would - there was nobody saying she was drunk, or crying after her.

MARY TAPPS . Mrs. Meyers was not dancing - she was coming along quite quiet - nobody said she was drunk.

JAMES NEW. I did not think her at all in liqour. I knew her well before, but she was all blood, and so exhausted, I did not recognise her then; she is a very sober woman.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18260216-39

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

400. JOHN TORKINGTON and OSGOOD TORKINGTON were indicted for feloniously receiving 10 printed books, value 20l., and 100lbs. of printed paper, value 2l., the goods of John Bayly Moore , of which Thomas Chilmead has been convicted of feloniously stealing .

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

The record of the conviction of Thomas Chilmead was here put in and read (see p. 156.)

JOHN BAYLY MOORE, ESQ. I am a special pleader - my chambers are in Inner Temple-lane. I had a library of valuable law books and manuscripts. On the 24th of January I went into Devonshire, on account of my father's illness; I returned on Sunday evening, the 5th of February, and on Monday evening, the 6th, about ten o'clock, I was passing my chambers, and on looking up at the window I saw a much greater light than a candle would give- I went up stairs, and knocked loudly at the door several times, but received no answer; I then went to the gate watchman, and on returning up stairs I met a boy, named Sullivan (whose brother had formerly been my clerk) -

>he had a common law bag quite full of books and papers- I am sure it was then past ten o'clock. I had Sullivan, Chilmead, and Wilson taken up afterwards, and from their account before the Magistrate, I procured a search-warrant; and on Wednesday or Thursday morning I accompanied Cousins to No.93, Chancery-lane - the name of Torkington and Son is over the door. On entering the shop the first thing that struck my attention was a page of the octavo edition of "Pickering's Statutes," round some butter, which a person was about to take out of the shop- the youngest prisoner was in the shop. The work consists of forty-two volumes; I have lost seventeen of them; they were all safe when I left town, I believe - I can sefely swear that full one hundred and fifty or one hundred and sixty volumes have been taken while I was from town- [four large hampers of books were here produced] - these are all full of books, parts of books, and papers; here is aprt of "Wentworth on Pleadings" - I lost six volumes of that work; here are several parts of volumes of that work; several of these have my own writing on them- here is "Pickering's Statutes," and

"Cummins' Digest"- I had seven volumes interleaved - they are all here except a volume and a half; here is a manuscript of my own, and another of a late pupil of mine - they were intended of publication. I believe all the papers in these hampers are mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY. Q. The property to a stranger, in its present state, is only waste-paper? A. Pecisely so.

COURT. Q. Among thses papers do you find considerable portions of a volume not disjointed? A. There are in many cases volume after volume still cannected together - most of the books are octavo; here are two volumes ouly stripped of their covers, not at all disjointed. I believe the prisoners bear a most irreproachable character.

JAMES SULLIVAN . I am ten years old, and live with my mother, who is a tailoress on Clerkenwell-green. On a Monday night I went ot Mr. Moore's chambers, and saw Chilmead, who was convicted on Saturday night; we put some books into a green bag there - the covers were torn off; Thomas Chilmead and Wilson tore them off; we put seven or eight books into the bag - some were large, and some small; the bag was almost full; we could not conveniently carry more. I met Mr. Moore when I had the second bag full - that was as full as I could carry it; I carried it to Mr. Torkington's, in Chancery-lane; I saw Osgood Torkington in the shop; the father was weighing butter on the other side of the shop - there are two counters; I think he could hear what I said to Osgood; I only said I had brought some more paper - he said, "Let me look at it" - I put the bag on the counter - he took some out, and I put some in the scales, and he put some into the scales too; he put in a large and small weight, and paid me 8d. for it; that was for both bags full.

Q. The bag you took before and the one you took then? A. Yes - he gave me 8d. for each bag - I amd sure of that- I do not know the weight; he gave me a 6d. and 2d.; I delivered him the same quantity as Mr. Moore met me with. When I took the first bag I saw Osgood Torkington; the father was weighing butter then; I asked Osgood if he would buy that paper; he said, Yes, and asked what I wanted for it - I said 4d. a pound; he said he could not give so much as that, he could only afford three half-pence per pound; we put it in the scales, and he gave me 8d. for that also.

Q. At this time was the father near enough to hear what was said? A. Yes - I believe he heard. I do not recollect anything more that was said; he asked me where the second bag came from - I said from my brother, in Bellyard; he did not ask my brother's name, nor mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not been spoken to on this subject at Bow-street, and other places? A. Yes; I have been in prison a fortnight to night. I was accused as a thief at Bow-street. My brother was formerly a clerk at Mr. Moore's - he is now a writer, and lives at Westminster. We all three tore the covers off the books - I am sure of that; we burnt most of the covers.

Q. That is as true as all the rest you have said? A. Yes. Wilson said he tore none off, but he did. I had sold some before to Mr. Parker, and knew what he gave me.

Q. On your oath did you not get 31/2d. a pound for each bag at Torkington's, and return to your companions and say you got but three half-pence? A. No, I did not, on my oath.

Q. Were you not accused at the office of eating cheescakes and custards oftener than they could get them? A. No; I used to eat custards. I sold the paper for 11/2d., because Chilmead said it was better to get that than nothing, and that he did not know any other place where they would buy it. I did not get 31/2d. a pound for it, upon my oath.

Q. Did you not, for one of these bags, get half a crown and two shillings? A. No - I got but 16l. for the two bags. My brother has not told me what to say here; he was in the coach which took me to Bow-street, but Mr. Moore and the constable were with us - also Chilmead and Wilson. I work for my mother, at sewing.

Mr. CARRINGTON. Q. Why did you not take this paper to Fetter-lane? A. They said they did not want any more. I went to Torkington's by Chilmead's direction; I took the second bag about a quarter past ten o'clock - they were just shutting up the shop.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I accompanied Mr. Moore to the prisoners' house, with a search-warrant, and found three hampers full of books and papers; the other hamper Mr. Torkington lent me, to put the loose papers in, which I found in drawers, and some on a side-board.

Cross-examined by Mr. CURWOOD. Q. Does not the whole appear to you to be waste paper? A. I should conceive it might be bought for waste paper; I do not know their value; it was produced as soon as time would permit; we generally find stolen goods concealed, but they are generally given up when asked for.

MR. WALTER M'DOWELL . I am a printer, and live in Gough-square. I sell a good deal of waste paper - if sold in the ream it is 5d. or 6d. a pound, but in the state this is in 4d. a pound; worse than this is continually sold for 4d. - we sell the author's proofs; 11/2d. is greatly under value - we get 4d. a pound for worse. I should think the bag produced would weigh 8lbs. or 10lbs. if well filled.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You sell proofs and works which are spoiled? A. Yes. It is ca

>pable of being used for many purposes, which this is not. I know nothing of the sale of old books; all this would fetch 4d. a pound. I have seen books at the booksellers', with the covers cut off, but for what purpose I cannot say. I should not consider this paper, in the state it is now, fit for anything but waste. I should not feel surprised at seeing it sold for waste.

COURT. Q. Should you expect to see, as waste paper, books, not only without covers, but still adhering together by their backs - should you think it strange? A. I should certainly require to know where they came from; some of these leaves are connected, but not many; here is one that appears new, but the title page is torn off; here are pages from 913 to 1916, progressively. As a printer I should inquire about this, but what a cheesemonger might think I do not know.

WILLIAM WILSON . I know Sullivan and Chilmead.

Cross-examined by Mr. CURWOOD. Q. Who cut the covers off the book? A. Sullivan. I did not cut any.

COURT. Q. Were you present when they were cut off? A. Yes, and so was Chilmead, but neither of us cut the covers off. Sullivan took the books away in a bag - he brought the money, and laid it on the table; he said he brought 8d., but we could only find 6d.; Chilmead said there was only 6d. - he said he had got three half-pence per pound.

JOHN TORKINGTON'S Defence. I know nothing about purchasing the paper - it was all left to my son, who managed the shop.

OSGOOD TORKINGTON'S Defence. I bought the paper at 31/2d. a pound, the usual price, openly in the shop.

JOHN TORKINGTON , JUN. I am the eldest prisoner's son; he was a grocer, and retired from business, but took this shop for my brother; he afterwards came to live there, and helped my brother a little; we usually give 31/2d. and sometimes 4d. a pound for waste paper. I know Sullivan; I cannot exactly say what day it was that he came to the shop - it was one evening, about an hour before the shop was shut up, I think, but cannot exactly say- my brother dealt with him; I saw him pay 5s. 3d. for the paper - it was for one bag; I do not know whether any one else was in the shop except my father; after Sullivan was gone I calculated, by the Ready Reckoner, 18lbs. at 31/2d.

MR. CARRINGTON. Q. How long was this before the shop was shut? A. It might be about an hour - somewhere about eight or nine o'clock; the paper was in a blue bag. The 5s. 3d. was paid for the contents of one bag - it is a large shop; I did not notice whether any one else was there. I was sweeping by the door as this boy came in; the door-way is about three feet wide - a person might pass me without my knowledge.

HANNAH BARKER . My husband is a supernumerary porter of Lincoln's Inn. I was at Messrs. Torkingtons' shop, and saw a boy there, who I think was Sullivan; Osgood Torkington and him were weighing paper at the further end of the shop. I was waiting to be served. Old Mr. Torkington was standing at the desk on the opposite side- I saw old Mr. Torkington lay down 4s. 6d. to the boy; when he went to the counter the son had laid down no money. The boy refused the 4s. 6d., saying it was not enough; he went to the scale, and pointed to one weight, and asked Osgood what that weight was; I believe it was between nine and ten o'clock. I heard Osgood call out, after he had weighed the paper, "Eighteen pounds;" that is the reason Mr. Torkington laid the money down, I think- when the boy refused it I heard Osgood say, "Eighteen pounds," pausing a moment, as if he was reckoning, and then say, "five shillings and three-pence;" he went towards the till, and I do not know who gave the remainder of the money; old Torkington laid down half-a-crown and two shillings; I did not see the boy take it up - I saw him leave the shop, and the money was gone then. I should not have taken further notice of it, but my husband saw this affair in the paper, and that brought it to my mind.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-40

401. SARAH SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a pair of clogs, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of William George Parrott .

WILLIAM GEORGE PARROTT. I am a salesman , and live in Clement's Inn-passage . These clogs were at my shop door; I missed them, went out, and found the prisoner in Clare-market, with them on her feet - I knew her as a customer twelve months ago; she said she had bought them at my house that day - I had seen them safe five minutes before; I asked what she gave for them - she said 1s. 4d.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of him at twelve o'clock that morning, and about half-past five he accosted me.

WILLIAM GEORGE PARROTT . I had sold a pair of spring clogs that morning, for 1s. 9d., to two ladies, but this pair were safe five minutes before; my wife serves in the shop - she was there when the prisoner was brought in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-41

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22.

London Case, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

402. FRANCIS JAMES RIGAUD , ELIZABETH MEEK , CHARLES GORMAN ISSIT , ELIZA BAKER , and JOHN COLLINS , were indicted for a conspiracy .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, with MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW, conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES NORRIS . I was a clerk in the Bank of England. I produce a transfer of 200l. 15s., Navy 5 per cents, from the account of Samuel Groome Bailward, of Adam-street, Adelphi, to the Commissioners for the reduction of the National Debt; the transfer is made by Mr. Dawes, Accountant General, dated the 7th of July, 1818.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Does it stand now as Navy 5 per cent.? A. It is transferred as such -(reads the transfer.)

MR. SAMUEL HIGHAM , secretary to the Commissioners for the reduction of the National Debt, proved the chustian and surnames of the several Commissioners.

SAMUEL JOHN MASON . I am clerk to Mr. Reuben Fletcher, a proctor, of Doctors' Commons. Rigaud applied to me on the 21st of September last, to obtain letters of administration to the effects of S. G. Bailward; he brought written instructions, which I produce; he

>said he came from Mr. Collins, and wanted a commission to be sent, if possible, that day, for the purpose of administering the oath to a party in the country. When I began to prepare the papers I found I had not sufficient particulars, and wrote some queries on the paper which I have produced, and sent them to Mr. Collins' office, and received them, with the answers, on the following morning. In the course of that day Rigaud called, and desired the commission might be sent to him at the Sussex hotel, Bouverie-street. I sent it on the 22d, with the bond and affidavit.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have been proctor for Mr. Collins on many occasions? A. Mr. Fletcher has transacted business for him before.

FRANCIS FLETCHER . I produce the commission, with the affidavit - also an administration bond to the effects of Samuel G. Bailward; here is the account-book, which shews that administration issued upon these documents, on the 5th of October, 1825, to Eliza Garner, spinster, lawful niece, and only next of kin to Samuel G. Bailward.

Prisoner RIGAUD. Q. Would not administration have issued to any other name as well as Eliza Garner? A. Yes.

REUBEN FLETCHER . I am a proctor. I was absent when these instructions were given. On the 3d of October I received the commission bond and affidavit, swearing the effects under 450l., enclosed in a letter, dated the 2d of October, from the defendant Collins; I had letters of administration extracted in consequence of these documents, and sent them on the 4th or 5th of October, to Mr. Collins, at Captain Rigaud's, post-office, Worthing, enclosed in this letter, (looking at it). On the 27th of October I received instructions from Collins to enter a caveat against any other letters of administration being granted to the effects of Bailward. On the 3d of November I received verbal instructions at my office, from Collins, to take out another commission, to reswear the administratrix under the sum of 18,000l. - and on the 8th of November I delivered that commission to Collins.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you before that received instructions from Rigaud to increase the amount? A. None; it is not unusual to enter a caveat. The great increase of the amount from 450l. to 18,000l., naturally excited my suspicions - and I saw the Bank solicitor between the 3d and 8th of November; I was not desired not to caution Collins about it - but considering our communication was confidential, I did not think myself at liberty to inform Collins; I have done business for him on one other occasion; I live opposite to him - he is a solicitor - I considered him respectable; it is not unusual for strangers to apply for administration, but we generally subject them to inquiry; there is no occasion for an attorney to be engaged.

JOHN BRADLEY RIPPON . I am a clerk in the Will-office at the Bank of England - these letters of adminstration were left at the Bank on the 10th of October, with reference to 200l. 15s., Navy 5 per cents.; they are granted to Eliza Garner, niece, and only next of kin to S. G. Bailward, late of Adam-street, Adelphi.

Prisoner RIGAUD. Q. Were they registered at the Bank? A. No; I cannot say why; they were sent to the Chief Accountant's office.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I am deputy accountant at the Bank. Here is a petition and two affidavits which were left at the Bank - I cannot say who by. Mr. Collins called frequently to know whether this claim was in a state of being admitted; I told him from time to time that it was not satisfactory, and further evidence would be required; (looking at four letters), I believe he brought these after I told him that; they were annexed to the first papers - I gave them all to the Bank solicitor, and finally referred him to them.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Can you tell me at what time you saw Collins? A. The latter end of October - nothing more particular passed; I have no recollection of his saying the parties could all be produced if it was required.

DENNIS HUDE . I was a waiter at Osborn's hotel, Adam-street, Adelphi. I knew Mr. Bailward perfectly well - he lived in Adam-street, and in 1807 was taken ill at our hotel, and rather out of his mind - he had a fever, and was rather violent.

JOHN BUSH . I am a solicitor, and live at Bradford, Wilts. I have known Mr. Samuel Groome Bailward from a child; I was in the office of the late Mr. De Barry, who acted as agent to the solicitor in the cause of Bailward v. Bailward, upon Mr. Bailward becoming of age; I know some money was transferred to him by the Accountant General at the termination of that cause - he is now forty-one or forty-two years old; I have known all his family intimately all my life - he has several brothers and sisters; he had no sister named Garner or Gardner - his sisters are all living except one, who died single; Mr. Bailward is still living, but labours under an infirmity, which prevents his receiving his dividends, or authorising any one to do so - I saw him three weeks ago.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know him at Osborn's hotel? A. No; I knew he was there - I only know of the stock being in his name from the documents; neither he or any of his family ever married.

Mr. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Do you know whether Mr. Samuel Groome Bailward is the person for whom Mr. De Barry was concerned? A. Yes; Mr. Bailward was plaintiff in that suit.

GEORGE THOMPSON . I was clerk to Mr. De Barry, who died about a month ago; he had the conduct of a suit in Chancery, Bailward v. Bailward. I produce an order made in the cause for the transfer of 200l. 15s., Navy 5 per cents. among other funds, from the name of the Accountant General to Samuel Groome Bailward. I was in the office part of the time the cause was in hand.

STEPHEN GODEN . I am clerk at the Bank. I produce a book containing the transfer of 200l. 15s., Navy 5 per cents., from the Accountant General to Mr. Bailward, by order of the Court of Chancery, on the 27th of November, 1807.

GODFREY SYKES , ESQ. I am acquainted with the defendant Issit, and am acquainted with his signature, (looking at two powers of attorney, dated the 15th of August, 1825), the signature to the attestation of these two warrants are both his hand-writing.

HANNAH STRETCH . I am a widow, and live in Goswell-road. I have known the prisoner Meek from her birth -

>she is thirty-one or thirty-two years old; I always knew her by the name of Meek - I knew her parents.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know her mother's maiden name? A. No; I did not see her for seven or eight years while she was abroad - our acquaintance was renewed about three years ago, when she returned; she had been somewhere in France, I understand, with Lady Hillary.

Mr. LAW. Q. When your acquaintance was renewed, by what name did you know her? A. Meek.

Mr. BULLEN. I know the prisoner Meek; I have seen her visiting Mr. and Mrs. Issit both in England and abroad- I first saw them, I think, at Ostend; I always understood she was Mrs. Issit's sister - I never knew her by any other name than Meek; the last time I saw her was two or three years ago.

SAMUEL MAHEW . I am shopman to Mr. Barwise. I have known Meek since 1820, and frequently had transactions with her - I always knew her by that name; I have seen her write, and had letters from her, upon which I have acted. (The witness here examined an administration bond, signed E. Garner - a petition, some documents, and several letters, signed Garner - the signatures to which he deposed to be in Meek's writing - also the body of the letters.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How long is it since you saw her write? A. Not since September 1823; here are two E's., the characters of which are different from each other - if I saw the E alone, I might express a doubt about it, but I believe the character of hand-writing to be the same.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. What is your belief, on looking at the whole? A. I believe the whole to be her writing.

PHILLIS WHITBOURN . I am servant to Mr. Elms, of Great Heene, near Westbury. Rigaud took the house ready furnished, on the 19th of August; Issit, Rigaud, and Baker (who was called Mrs. Rigaud) came first, with a servant boy - Meek came on the Thursday after - they lived very expensive at first - Issit and Meek used to sit with the family; Issit was usually called Mr. I - I thought it was Hie till to-day; I have heard the trades-people in the town use the name of Routledge. Mr. Collins, the defendant, came down on the 29th of September, and staid a week or rather more - all the defendants were in the house that week - they lived in one family; Meek (who passed by the name of Gardner) went to Broadwater with Issit - it is nearly two miles off - the Rev. Mr. Wood lived there: I acted as servant at the house all the time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They walked out together the same as any one else? A. Certainly. The only time I heard the name of Issit was when a Mr. Evans, of Little Hampton, called to see them twice.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was not Meek always called Miss G.? A. Always G. or Gardner; they frequently spoke to each other by their initials. I believe Issit passed as Mr. Routledge at Worthing. Mr. Collins came on Michaelmas day - he appeared in health.

Q. Did not many respectable people visit there? A. Only Mr. Evans, a surgeon. Rigaud had a sister at Little Hampton - she was at Worthing once for the benefit of her health, and Miss Evans, the surgeon's daughter, visited there; the elergyman of Little Hampton dined there once or twice.

Q. While Mr. Collins was there was Meek called by any other name than Garner? A. No; it was always pronounced with a d; I have seen that on her directions; my master dined there once or twice, seven or eight weeks after they had been there.

Mr. JAMES WILLIAM FRESHFIELD . I am in partnership with my father - we are solicitors to the Bank of England. I received from Mr. Hutchinson the petition, two affidavits, and a letter, dated the 31st of October, signed Collins, enclosing one signed Eliza Garner, and an extract from one signed Green. Mr. Collins called on me on the 3d of November, saying he had been referred to me from the Chief Accountant's office, upon the claim of Miss Garner, as administratrix of Bailward; I told him the Bank required further evidence of the beneficial interest of Miss Garner, and for that purpose required a pedigree of Bailward, vouched by certificates. I shewed him a paper, stating the certificates they required; he said he had seen that at the Bank; and that, from the length of time it was impossible to procure these documents, as it must have been a hundred years since the 'marriage of Bailward's father, or nearly so; he then shewed me a letter signed James Green, stating, that the Bank might as well require the marriage certificates of Adam and Eve. I said it was an impertinent letter, and did not receive it; I told Collins he had better give the best evidence he could. Next day, the 4th, he called on me with a letter signed James Green, which I produce (read).

Camden Town, Thursday evening.

SIR, - In reply to your's, relative to Mr. Bailward's family, I can only reply from recollection of a conversation that took place at Quebec. Mr. Bailward there stated to me that he had some brothers or sisters besides Mrs. Garner - that he was the survivor; in fact Miss Garner is the only representative that I ever heard of. I am sorry it is so long delayed. Your's, &c. JAMES GREEN .

P. S. Have the goodness to call on Mr. Jones, and he will pay you 20l., which I shall thank you to send to Miss Garner - this letter will be a sufficient authority. J. G.

To John Collins , Esq.

This letter was proved to be in Rigaud's hand-writing.

Mr. FRESHFIELD. Collins told me he wanted this letter, as it contained an order for money; I said I would take it over to the Bank and he should have it next morning - but he has never applied for it. On the 5th of November Rigaud called, and said he called from Mr. Collins for an answer to his application; I told him I suppesed he wanted that letter, and offered it to him; he said he did not want that; he was going to Brighton, and should see Miss Garner, and was anxious to take her some good news. I then asked if he knew the lady himself; he said he did - that he had lodged with a Mr. and Mrs. Collins three or four years ago, and that Miss Garner, at that time, lived with a Mrs. Brent, Mrs. Collins' sister - that Mrs. Brent frequently brought Miss Garner over to Collins' house, where he saw her, and he always understood she was entitled to some property from her uncle, when she became of age. I told him one difficulty was we had seen no ostensible person except the solicitor, and, if he knew the lady, personally, he had better put what he had to say

>in writing, and I would communicate it to the Bank; he proposed to make an affidavit - I said a letter would answer all the purpose, and he said he would write from Brighton. I intimated that probably a bond of indemnity might be required; he said he was her bondsman for the administration; I then said, as the Bank were indemnified I did not think a bond would carry it further. I received a letter from him, by post, from Brighton, on Tuesday morning, the 8th of November, and on the 9th Rigaud and Collins called together - I told Rigaud I had received his letter - he did not deny writing it (read, see note A.) On the 9th I saw Collins and Rigaud, and knowing then that instructions had been given for a commission, in order to increase the amount, I told them we had reason to believe there was other property in the same situation, and if so, it was very uncandid to ask the Bank to transfer this without going to the Court of Chancery, on account of the smallness of the sum, when there was considerable property behind; Rigaud immediately exclaimed that he knew of nothing more. I then turned to Collins, and asked if he knew of more? he said he did not, but he supposed we had good information on the subject. I said it was not surmise on our part, and it would be necessary to have it distinctly stated whether there was more property or not, and until that was done we could proceed no further. On the 11th, Rigaud came alone, and produced a letter to me from Collins, enclosing another signed Eliza Garner - (read, note A.) Rigaud stated, that the poor

(A.) Gloucester Hotel, Brighton, Nov. 6.

DEAR SIR, - In consequence of the conversation that passed between us at your office on Saturday, on my arrival here I called upon Miss Garner, and I cannot recollect any thing more than what I informed you at our interview. I knew Mrs. Robina Brent, about four years ago; she was in the habit of visiting at the house I then boarded at, in the New Kent-road; Miss Garner was also an occasional visitor, and, in the course of conversation, I was ofter informed that she was intitled to some money in the Bank of England, when she was of age to claim it, and that the same was derived from an uncle who died at sea - his name I did not know until lately, when she applied to me to be her bondsman. From what I have ascertained, and what I believe to be the fact, she is the party entitled to the money left by her uncle; indeed so fully convinced am I of her right to the cash in your hands, that I am willing to enter into the security you required, if that will serve her. I will wait on you in the course of Tuesday, as I purpose being in London on that day. I am, &c.

(signed) F. J. RIGAUD.

P. S. You will bear in mind that I am only on the half-pay of his Majesty's service.

To J. W. Freshfield, Esq. Solicitor, London.*

* This is a Letter proved to be in Issit's hand-writing.

(B.) Re-Bailward.

SIR:- I have called twice this morning, and waited a considerable time, but have not been fortunate enough to see you. A press of business obliges me to trouble Mr. R. to make the inquiry as to the result of this application. I enclose you a Letter of Miss G.'s, whether it will be of any service or not I do not know. I remain, Sir,

(signed) JOHN COLLINS.

Doctors Commons, Nov. 11, 1825.

Nov. 11, 1825.

MY DEAR, SIR, - I thank you for your Letter received by girl had been racking her brain to find out what other property there could be - he said he supposed there was some 50l. or 100l. more, and it was very hard to keep her out of this property because she could not find that out - he had used nearly the same expressions on the 9th. On Saturday, the 12th, he called again, alone, and said he saw we never should get through this business unless he gave a bond of indemnity, and, to save all further trouble, it might be expressed in the bond, that if there was more property, they should go to Chancery. I asked him to sit down, and write instructions for the bond, which he declined, saying he should remember it very well, and he left. On Monday, the 4th, he brought a letter from Collins, enclosing the draft of a bond of indemnity (read, note C.) I went down to Worthing on the 15th, by the mail, and found Meek living at a house at Great Heene - Eliza Baker, another female, two female servants, and a boy, were also in the house. Meek was taken into custody, and after that some papers were brought to me, half burnt. I insisted on seeing the desk from which they were taken - Baker shewed it me - it is now in court- the initials, F. J. R., are on the brass plate - I found this letter there, which I produce (read, note D.)

this day's post, though I feel much disappointed; instead of receiving the money, as from our interview on Saturday evening I was led to expect I should, I find there are more queries still to answer, but which I can do in a few words, namely that I am not aware of there being more money in the Bank of England, placed there by my late uncle, than what I have laid claim to, and I trust the gentlemen of that establishment will put me in possession of my just rights - you know my situation is very different to what it was during my uncle's life time. Do pray see the gentlemen, and use all your influence with them, for the little I now have will soon be expended, and after that how am I to return to the Continent. I shall be most anxious till I have your reply to this. Give my kind love to my friend Mrs. B., and believe me yours truly. (Signed) E. GARNER.

Brighton, Nov. 9, 1825.

Since I wrote I open the letter to say that I have received a letter from Mrs. B., in which she has given me a particular commission, therefore I shall send a parcel immediately to your solicitor.

(C.) Re-Bailward.

SIR, - I send you the bond hastily prepared from the vague instructions I have received through Mr. R. I presume, however, it will answer the purpose; you will make what alteration you think proper. I am going out of my usual mode in signing a bond for my clients - but if this is insisted on, rather than Miss G. should be put to the expense and delay of applying to Chancery for so small a sum, I will do it. I think you should be content with Miss G's. bond. Perhaps you will be able to look at the draught while Mr. R. waits, as every day is of importance after the delay which has taken place.

12th of November, 1825. JOHN COLLINS.

(D.) Heene, Friday.

DEAR R.: - I hasten to answer your letter of yesterday's date and to acknowledge the documents, but I shall not proceed in them until I see you, as under present circumstances the introduction of my name would be imprudent, and, in fact, I have not the means of carrying the expenses,

>Prisoner RIGAUD. Q. Pray what charge had you against me when you took my desk? A. A charge of being concerned in taking out false letters of administration. Bishop, the officer, had a warrant against you - there was a warrant by a Sussex Magistrate. I had no search warrant; I took the desk upon my own responsibility: you always represented yourself to me as an half-pay officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know Mr. Collins when he called on you? A. I knew he was an attorney. There was about eight years interest due on

which will necessarily accrue in the completion; therefore I think it the most advisable to wait your arrival, and I trust we shall see you on Monday afternoon. The recent affairs, which the Papers have themed with, must cause great agitation in a certain quarter, and caution must follow, as a matter of course; the late "Decision" carries fully the appearance you hint at. I am fearful some screw is loose in Oxford-street. You acted very judiciously in the matter, and, of course, you will not repeat your visit there. I am hurt to hear your half-pay is under stoppage, and that you are hard up. I cannot state positively the time of S. G. B's death, or where he was buried, but from what I have been able to glean, St. Martin's, about 1809 or 1810. I was aware that no will or administration had been granted, and I told you so. I am glad to hear Margaret's affairs are proceeding in. Mrs. R. is going to Hampton this afternoon, by invitation, and will return on Monday, and she will take charge of any letter for E. B. You had better call on Watts, and make some excuse, which surely your fertile brain is capable of, for I think him a host with us. When - last was at Brighton I saw a fellow I did not wish, so you can take a trip over with Betsey, and do the needful there, as she is willing to go into it. I like the letter D being out. Mrs. R. desires me to say, with her love, that as your stay will be so short in London she shall not forward the things you wanted, but fully expects to see you at home on Monday. How will you manage at the Sussex unless you are able to raise the wind - if it will not be inconvenient to you send down those clothes of mine, or bring them with you; that tailor surely would not stand tick. Now, in case your friend Collins comes down, would it not be better for him and you to see the affair Betsey has to do, completed at Brighton, as every caution must be observed throughout our multifarious transactions. Have you been able to get the Richmond's completed. I am glad our sable friend is to be soon related to a fair dame of yours, name Collins; our larder is well supplied, and I wish I could say as much for my purse and our wine cellar - they are to let, unfurnished - however, the hare will come very acceptable, and shall wait your arrival to wash it down with a glass of port. I hope your friend Collins will breech you before you leave London, as we shall be queered - for 5s. is all our stock, and black Monday will soon arrive - however, d - n all gloom, Expecting to hear on Sunday, I am yours, faithfully.

You have neglected to name our friend Mr. Collins was to inquire about, at Whitchall - "the seven years." No letters from our correspondent in reply to those you took to London.

Call at the post-office in Dorking, and ask for letters for A. B. C., and also call at the post-office at Mickleham, and inquire for Captain Kent.

To Captain Rigaud, Sussex-hotel, Bouverie-street, Fleet-street, London. this sum. The Bank would not transfer that sum alone, having more. Mr. Fletcher came to me about the 5th of November - I saw Mr. Collins once after that - I did not caution him about it. I think Rigaud proposed that Collins should enter into the bond - I did not press him for the bond - I will not swear that I did not propose Collins signing the bond - it was our business, as solicitors, to draw the bond, but considering it useless myself, I had no wish to have it. On the 3d of November I asked Collins if he knew any thing of the parties; he said they were introduced to him by a friend; he did not name Rigaud since this charge; he has said he only knew them by being introduced by Rigaud; I saw him on the 3d or 4th of November; I did not then know Rigaud; I saw Collins again on the 9th - no such communication took place then. I went to Worthing on the 15th, and obtained a warrant against Collins that day - there were two warrants - I filled up one, and the clerk of the office the other.

Q. Charging Collins with conspiracy, and gave it to the officer to bring him to the office on that charge? A. Yes: Mr. Hall, the Magistrate, certainly never told me the warrant was given on an understanding that it was not to be executed; if it was said it was in my absence. I know Collins was discharged - I told him at the office I had a charge of felony against the others, and did not wish to enter into the conspiracy - he said he was very unwilling to have his name mixed up with them, and whatever information he could give, without violating his professional duty, he would; he called on me twice afterwards - I told him it must be distinctly understood I could make no promise beyond this, that any thing he said to me should be confidential, and should never be given in evidence against him - he did not ask for that promise - I know he requested an interview with the Governor of the Bank. When this bill was found he wrote to me to know what bail should he put in.

JOHN WEST . I am acquainted with Issit's hand-writing; (looking at a letter) this is signed Rigaud, but is Issit's writing; I have known him twelve years, and have been in the habit of seeing his writing for three years - I have discounted his bills, and had letters from him - here is another letter, addressed to Rigaud, without a signature - I believe that to be Issit's writing - (This letter is the one set out in note D. p. 172, dated Heene, Friday.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Look at the direction? A. I believe the direction of one to be his writing - I have not seen him write for seven years - I do not think that time would make a difference in his hand. I think it was in 1817 that I saw him write last - I live in Golden-square.

EDWARD ROWLAND . I am clerk to Mr. Burton, a gunpowder manufacturer. I have had transactions with Issit, seen him write, and had his acceptances - I have had forty or fifty letters from him - the letter to Mr. Freshfield, signed Rigaud, is in a disguised hand, but I think it is Issit's writing - it is extremely like it - I believe both letters to be his writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you believe the direction of this one to be his? A. The hand is disguised if it is; I saw him write last in 1823.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. Does the unsigned letter appear in a disguised hand? A. No.

ISRAEL ALEXANDER . I am acquainted with Issit's writing - I live in Chiswell-street, Finsbury. I should not think the letter signed Rigaud, to be his, but the other I consider to be his writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. A horse-dealer. The last time I saw him write was ten or twelve years ago - I think the two letters very different.

THOMAS PRATT . I am clerk to Mr. Window, an army agent, and have frequently seen Rigaud write; (looking at two letters, signed James Green) I believe both these to be Rigaud's writing, and the signature to be his. (One of these letters is that set out in page 171 The following documents were here read).

The instructions for the affidavit, and the petition of Eliza Garner, of Great Heene,niece and administratrix to samuel Groome Bailward, to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England - stating that she had lately become of age praying for the transfer of the property to her; to this was annexed an affidavit, purporting to be sworn by Robina Brent, widow of Captain William Brent, of the United States' army - deposing, that in 1809, Samuel Groome Bailward called at her house in Church-street, Philadelphia, where she kept a school, and placed Eliza-Garner under her care, and contracted to pay for the same for two years and a half - and on his leaving Philidelphia for Quebec, he paid her one year in advance - that she had not seen him since, but was informed by a letter from Mr. James Green, that Mr. Bailward died on his passage to England in 1814 - that Eliza Garner continued to reside with her till within the last two months - when, from her ill-health, she had gone to the sea-side - also an affidavit purporting to be sworn by James Green, of Camden-terrace, Camden-town, deposing, that in 1814, he embarked with Samuel Groome Bailward for England, and that Mr. Bailward died on his passage - also an affidavit, made by Elizaa Garner prior to the administration being grandted, describing her as residing at No. 45, Portman-place, New-road.

ROBINA BRENT . I am a widow, and live in North-street, Westminster - my husband was a silversmith; he was never a captain in the United States' army, and was never at Philadelphia, nor was I ever there. My husband died in a lunatic asylum at Hoxton; he was thirty years old when we married - I had known him two years before, and he died two years after our marriage. Rigaud lodged for two years with Mrs. Collins, a sister of mine, about six years ago - I saw him there - I do not know Eliza Garner, or Gardner - nor Mr. S. G. Bailward. I never swore the affidavit produced, and do not know Meek- I never saw her at my sister's.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Mrs. Collins is not related to the defendant? A. No.

THOMAS POND . I am a tax-gatherer of Camden-terrace, Camden-town, and have been so eight or nine years. I know of no James Green there in October - there was no such person in my book.

ANN STEVENSON . I am servant at No. 45, Portman-place, Edgware-road, and was so on the 30th of September - no person named Eliza Gardner, lived there - I do not know Meek - I have lived there two years.

THE REV. PETER WOOD . I am a clergyman, and live at Broadwater, near Worthing. on the 30th of September last I received a note, and appointed to be at home at ten o'clock next morning; I do not know the date - this bond was then executed by a person calling herself Eliza Garner - there was a man with her; I have attested her signature, and as such, I conceive I administered the oath to her - I do not remember it, but have no doubt of it. The commission directs me to administer the oath; I do not think that I did adminster it; I have certainly attested the oath, but cannot declare that I gave her the oath - and yet it is not likely that I should attest it without I swore her - a solicitor generally comes with these matters. I do think I administered the oath, but cannot be positive; there is a fee of 10s. or 10s. 6d., for administering the oath - I received that fee, which I should not do without swearing the person. On the 12th of November a servant boy brought me a note, signed Eliza Garner - I cannot find that note; I sent a verbal answer by him to Miss Garner, that I should be at home at the time she wished, which was half-past five o'clock - at which time I had the Rev. Mr. Davison in my room, also a clerk of Mr. Freshfield's. Eliza Garner, as she called herself, came; I believe it was Meek, although she is now much altered; I asked her what she came for - she produced a bond and an authority to swear her, and attest what she brought - I looked at it and handed it to Mr. Davison, saying, "My eyes are not very good, I wish you to see what this contains" - he read it over, and said the signatures are put to it, which ought not to be there; she said she knew nothing about it, that she was directed to come for me to attest her signature - I did not remember her, but I said, "I think you were here some time before on business of this nature?' she said she was; I returned her papers, refusing to attest them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Your receiving the fee makes you think you swore the party? A. I do not conceive I should receive it without swearing ber, as it is for administering the oath, not for signing my name; it took place in my dining-room, at ten o'clock in the morning. I remember having the fee perfectly well, as I applied it to a found I was raising to improve my chancel; the man paid it to me, I am certain; I do not think I have administered an oath since - it is a very rare thing with me. When she came on the second occasion she had a bonnet and veil on - she kept her veil down all the time.

Q. How did she kiss the book? A. She was not sworn that time.

THE REV. WILLIAM DAVISON . I am a clergyman, and live at Worthing. I was at Mr. Wood's house on Saturday, the 12th of November, between five and six o'clock, when a person, calling herself Miss Garner came - she was alone, but said a person was waiting for her at the gate; Mr. and Mrs. Wood, Miss King, Mr. Jeffrey, and I were in the room; she produced a document from the Prerogative Court; Mr. Wood desired me to read it over - he said, "I think, when you were here before, there was some person with you" - she said there was; I said there were two names signed to the bond, and as those persons were not present Mr. Wood could not attest it; he asked her how that happened - she said she was unacquainted with the matter - the paper had been sent to her from London. I believe the prisoner Meek to be the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever

seen her before? A. No; she wore a large leghorn bonnet - she had a veil; I think it was a black one; her countenance was quite clear to me, I am certain of that. To the best of my belief she drew her veil aside.

THE REV. MR. WOOD re-examined. I believe her veil was down all the time. When she came in the fire was stirred, and candles snuffed; I was anxious to discover her countenance, as I had heard something irregular was going on.

Mr. DAVISON. When she entered the room, to the best of my recollection, her veil was down. I sat opposite her - Mr. Wood was at her side; she did not put her veil up, but drew it on one side; her face was partly exposed to me, but not to Mr. Wood; the veil was between him and her. We were desirous of seeing her countenance, and the fire was stirred, and candles placed, so that we should have a full view of her; we had agreed, before she came, to ask if she had been there before; we had a good deal of conversation with Mr. Jeffrey.

JOHN ISAAC JEFFREY . I am clerk to Messrs. Freshfields, and was at Mr. Wood's on the 12th of November; I had been sent down to make inquiry - Meek was announced at Mr. Wood's, by the name of Garner, and I believe Mr. Wood asked her if her name was Garner - I understood her to say "Yes, I was here in September with Captain Rigaud."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who suggested the question? A. I had suggested it previously; I talked the affair over with Mr. Davison, but not with Mr. Wood. I and Mr. Davison sat opposite to her; Mr. Wood sat by her side - she was asked to take wine, but refused; she threw her veil aside about five minutes after she came in; I could see her full face; I had never seen her before. I saw her in company with Issit on the 15th, at Great Heene - she is much altered now.

MR. LAW. Q. Was there much difference in her when you saw her on the 15th? A. None at all - I am sure of her person. I expected her to call at Mr. Wood's, on the 12th.

ABRAHAM RUFFEL . I was three months in Rigaud's service, at Heene - Mr. and Mrs. Rigaud, Mr. and Mrs. Issit, and Miss Gardner (Meek) lived in the house. On the Saturday before Meek was apprehended I went to Mr. Wood's with a note; Mrs. Rigaud, or Miss Gardner, gave it to me; I took it to Mr. Wood - he said he should be at home; I gave that answer to Mr. Issit, and between six and seven o'clock in the evening Issit and Miss Gardner went out, towards Mr. Wood's. I was present when Miss Gardner was apprehended, and took a desk produced out of the parlour, by Mrs. Rigaud's (Baker's) direction - she opened it, and gave me some papers, telling me to burn or bury them; I put two on the fire - my fellow-servant took them off.

JAMES FENN . I am a clerk in the Bank, and have the Navy 5 per cent. ledger - there were 200l. 15s. Navy 5 per cents. in the name of Samuel Groome Bailward; there is also Bank stock in his name, transferred by order of the Court of Chancery. to the amount of 2676l. 13s. 4d., since which a bonus of 669l. 3s. 4d. has been added - he also had 242l. 13l. 4d. 5 per cents., and 2684l. 8s. 8d. Consols. The value of all except the Bank stock is transferred to the Commissioners for the reduction of the National Debt.

RIGAUD'S Defence. Gentlemen of the Jury, I have been four times at the bar, prosecuted by the Bank of England, under prosecutions arising out of the same circumstances - I can only positively deny that ever I wrote a letter in any other name than my own, and every witness that has appeared in the box has witnessed that I never went by any other name; thus giving every clue to find me. - Mr. Freshfield knows that I told him when I suggested a bond, (which he urged me to sign), that it was ridiculous for him to desire me, who was but a half-pay officer, to sign a bond for 500l., and he said, "You will find out that Lord Palmerston will stop your half-pay if you don't." I know nothing about the transaction. I trust, if I do not call witnesses to charactor, you will consider that I have been months in prison, and I have not 1s.; I have exhausted every 1d. I have in the world; if I have not called persons it is for want-of means, and that is the only reason. I have stood here four times - and this I hope will be the very last.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS AND PHILLIPS addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendants, Collins, Issit, and Meek.

RIGAUD - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Years .

ISSITT - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Years .

MEEK - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

BAKER - NOT GUILTY .

COLLINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-42

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

403. AARON ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 set of harness, value 2l.; 1 saddle, value 10s., and 1 bridle, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Mitchell , James Mitchell , and John Chandler .

THOMAS MITCHELL. I am in partnership with James Mitchell and John Chandler - we have a stable in Millbank-street, Westminster . On Sunday, the 18th of December, about two o'clock, I hung a gig harness in the stable; I left the door latched, but not locked - a little before eleven o'clock that night I was called on by two patrol, who asked if I had lost any harness - I then went to the stable, and missed it - the door was in the same state as I had left it. I found the harness at the watch-house.

WILLIAM FUDGE . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I was on duty in Vine-street on the 18th of December, with two officers, and met the prisoner, whom I knew before, with a sack on his back - I detained him, and found in the sack this set of gig harness, complete; he said a man had given it to him, but could not tell who the man was.

WILLIAM BATES . I am horse-keeper to Messrs. Mit

>chells - I left their stable about half-past eight o'clock on the night of the 18th of December; this harness was then safe - there is no lock to the door.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-43

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

404. GEORGE HORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 goose, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Foxall .

CHARLES FOXALL. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Cannon-street, St. George's East . On the evening of the 31st of December a lady came in, and ordered a pair of fowls - I dressed them, and took them home, leaving my daughter to mind the shop; I lost a dead goose out of my shop window while I was gone. I had not seen the prisoner near the shop.

MARY ANN FOXALL . I am the prosecutor's daughter. My father left me to mind the shop; I turned round to answer my mother, who had spoken to me, and the goose was taken - I looked round, and saw the prisoner within a yard of the shop, with it in his hand - I had seen him at the shop before; he was taken to the watch-house soon afterwards.

JOSEPH SAVAGE . I am a watchaman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and took the prisoner, who was running; the goose was picked up on the spot where I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-44

405. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-45

406. JOHN HAWKES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 2 pairs of boots, value 17s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 7s.; 4 skins of leather, value 32s.; 124 pieces of leather, value 5l., and 4 pairs of boot-tops, value 16s. , the goods of George Waite .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE WAITE. I am a currier , and live in Gray's Inn-lane. The prisoner was in my service for five years, and left me on the 26th of November. In consequence of information I and my solicitor set off for Swaffham, by the coach, on the 2d of December; the prisoner bailed the coach at the Cherry Tree public-house, Kingsland-road; I was on the top - I got down, and put my hand on his shoulder while he was taking a glass of gin; I sent for Armstrong, the officer, who took him into custody. I saw this box and its contents, which was taken by Mr. Johnson, on the 10th of December - it contains the articles stated in the indicted - they are mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was it that you went? A. On the 2d of December; I was on the top of the coach, but it was dark - I heard his voice, and then saw him. I had dismissed him on a Saturday night, and received information on the Monday following. I saw this box on the 10th of December, six or seven days afterwards. I prosecuted his brother last Session, for having some leather of mine, but he was acquitted.

JOHN GALE GARRETT . I am a solicitor, and was with the prosecutor, going to Swaffham; I assisted in taking the prisoner into custody; when the coachman asked him where he was going, he said to Swaffham.

EDWARE JOHNSON . I am governor of Swaffham gaol. In consequence of information I went to the Greyhound inn at Swaffham, on the 10th of December, and got this box, which I have shown ot the prosecutor; a direction was nailed on it, "To Mr. Knight, to be left at the Greyhound, Swaffham, till called for."

JOHN GODWIN . I am a currier. I know the prisoner's hand-writing - this direction is his writing.

THOMAS MOLYENAUS . I am a shoe-maker. I believe this direction to be the writing of the prisoner, but cannot swear to it.

GEORGE WAITE re-examined. I have seen the prisoner write many times; I am sure this is his writing. I know this pair of boots - I have worn them once; they pinched me in the toe, and I gave them to the prisoner to stretch for me; I asked him some time after where they were, and he said he did not know; I did not see them again till I saw them in this box - I cannot swear to these pieces of leather, but I can to the paper they are in. Those others have my mark on them

Cross-examined. Q. Are not these marks common to all curriers? A. Yes. I believe a man of the name of Nelson made the boots, but I cannot be positive, as several persons work for me.

Mr. ALLEY. Q. Have you any doubt of their being made for you? A. No; I took them out of a lot; I can swear I had worn them, and gave them to the prisoner to stretch.

COURT. Q. Were they taken out of the lot or made for you? AS. I believe they were made for me, but I cannot be positive - these are the boots I wore.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . The prisoner was given into my charge for stealing a quantity of leather and other articles- the prosecutor told him so in my prisence, and he said," I have nothing to fear - I was going to Swaffhm."

THOMAS MOLYNEAUX . I know this pair of slippers to be the property of Mr. Waite, and the pair of lady's boots.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you make them? A. No - I cut them out, and I know them by the mark; Mr. Waite has about six people work in his house, but the prisoner and myself were the only persons in the shop.

RICCHARD SMITH . I was in the prosecutor's employ, as foreman. I know these two pair of boot legs - they were my own dressing and marking; they were Mr. Waite's property.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in his service? A. Six years, and left him last January twelve-months. I had access to the shop - I both bought and sold while there, and went through the shop to go to work. I do not think any other person had access to it.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

HUGH NELSON . I am a boot-maker. These boots are not my making; I have made about twenty pairs of boots for Mr. Waite; I once cleaned the bottom of a pair of boots for him, which had been on his own feet - he brought them to me, and said, "They are tool little for me - what can I do?" I said, "All you can do is to have them cleaned." Which I did, and had 1s. for doing it - they were dirtied as these are.

COURT. Q. How long is this ago? A. It is more than

>six months ago. I have not worked for him since; these are not the boots I cleaned for him.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-46

407. RICHARD WILLIAM BRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 boy's suit of clothes, value 20s., and 1 coat, value 9s. , the goods of Thomas Thwaites , his master.

THOMAS THWAITES. I live in Broad-street, St. Giles's, and am a tailor . The prisoner has been my errand-boy about four years. I did not miss anything, but on Friday last Mr. Philips, a salesman, of Holywell-street, gave me information; the prisoner was not then at home, but on his return I had him taken into custody, and charged him with taking two boys' suits and three great coats, which he had sold to Mr. Philips, and he said it was the first time. I afterwards went and found my property.

LEWIS ABRAHAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Philips, of Holywell-street, Strand. The prisoner came there on Tuesday week, and brought a boy's suit and a great coat. which he said he wished to dispose of - he said he was a master tailor, and had them returned as mis-fits; I asked what he wanted for them - he said 2l., which I gave him - I knew him before; a young man had brought him to buy a pair of small clothes; he called again twice afterwards, and I referred to the young man who brought him, who referred to Mr. Thwaites.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-47

408. WILLIAM BRUNDISH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 jacket, value 16s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of William Mykoff .

WILLIAM MYKOFF. I am apprentice on board the brig Hedley, which was in the West India Dock . On the 11th of February I had a bundle near my bed, containing a pair of trousers, a jacket, waistcoat, and handkerchief - in the morning when I got up, I left the prisoner in bed - and in about three-quarters of an hour I missed the bundle, and the prisoner was gone; I did not see him again till last Saturday morning, which was eighteen days after - he was then brought back by a carpenter, and had my waistcoat and trousers on - I had never given him leave to take them.

WILLIAM TASKER . I met the prisoner accidentally last Saturday morning at Limehouse, and having heard of the robbery, I asked him to come on board to clear his character - he did so, and had the trousers and waistcoat on.

THOMAS SYMONDS CROCKLEY . I am the master of the brig - the prisoner was on board working for me about three weeks - I had not discharged him; he neglected his duty by leaving the vessel.

JOHN ROEBUCK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the property.

Prisoner's Defence. The mate of the brig told me he could not afford to give me any wages, and I might go away or stop, just as I liked - I took the clothes meaning to return them.

JOHN HADDON . I am mate of the brig. The prisoner had not been discharged - he was hired by the day or week, to work while we had any thing for him to do; I told him that the captain had said he might stop on board for his victuals or not - and he said it was better to do that than to walk the street and starve.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18260216-48

409. ELIZABETH COLLINWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 candlestick, value 5s. , the goods of John Hutchings .

JOHN M'KENZIE . I live in Larnder's-court, Carnaby-market , with Mr. John Hutchings, a tin-plate worker . The prisoner came to our shop on the 13th of January, and bought a half-pint tin pot, which she paid for - when she was gone I missed a brass candlestick from the counter - I rang the bell for my fellow-apprentice to come down, and I pursued and overtook her, and asked if she had got the candlestick - she denied it; I then asked her to let me look into her apron - she said she had nothing there but some potatoes - I put my hand in and took hold of the candlestick.

Prisoner's Defence. The other lad came up with it in his hand - I had not had it in my possession.

- LEACH. I am fellow-apprentice with the last witness. I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and saw him search her apron; I saw the candlestick found - I made a snatch at it, and took it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18260216-49

410. JOHN DALE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 3 hats, value 3l.; 3 bonnets, value 12s., and one bag, value 6d. , the goods of William Hart .

WILLIAM GAMBLE . I am errand boy to Mr. William Hart. I received a parcel containing three hats and three bonnets, from Mr. Samuel Halls, one day last month, to take to my master's; I met the prisoner, whom I knew, in Union-street - he had been in Spital-fields school with me - he asked me to go to a dye-house in Duke-street, for him, and he would give me twopence, and mind my bundle; I said, "Never mind the twopence, I will go for nothing, but why can't you go yourself?" he said he had cut the boy's head with some glass, and he did not like to go; I went to the place which he described, for some kno's of silk, but there was no dye-house there - when I returned he was gone, and my bundle too - this was on a Saturday, he was taken on the Monday.

WILLIAM HART . The parcel was mine - I had paid for it at Messrs. Hall and Son's, Cripplegate.

SAMUEL GODFREY HALL . The parcel was given to Gamble to take to Mr. Hart, who had bought and paid for it.

JOHN BARR . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-50

411. JOHN GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one pair of bellows, value 2s. , the goods of Moses Simmons .

MARGARET SULLINAN . I am servant to Moses Simmons, who lives in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields , and is a tinman . On the 14th of January, about half-past eight

o'clock in the evening, I was in his shop, and saw a man put his hand inside the door, and take a pair of bellows - I believe it was the prisoner; I alarmed my master, who ran and brought the prisoner back with them.

MOSES SIMMONS. I heard the alarm, and pursued a man whom I saw running with a pair of bellows into Redlion-street, and then into Dorset-street - he turned back, and was taken by a man - I came up to him, and he hit me three or four times on my head, and said he would not go with me as I was not an officer - I threw him on the ground, and took him; I then got a light, went back to the place, and found the bellows there - I believe the prisoner is the man whom I saw with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Paternoster-row - a butcher laid hold on me first, and said, "You have stolen a pair of bellows;" I said, "I have not," and he threw me on the ground, and hit me very much - the witness then came up, and I said, "Are you an officer? if you are I will go with you;" in falling I happened to touch him in the face, but not with an intent to hurt him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-51

412. JOHN MORPHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1,200 pairs of scissars, value 150l., and 1,200 pen-knives, value 150l., the goods of John James Thornhill and others, in a ship in the port of London .

THREE OTHER COUNTS stating them to belong to other persons.

WILLIAM DEALTRY JACKSON . I am clerk in the house of Job Matthew Raikes and others, of London-wall, general merchants - they deal with Mr. Thornhill, a cutler of Bond-street - an order was sent to him for some cutlery to be shipped to Manilla, on board the brig Hedley. Captain Crockly, then lying in the West India Docks.

WALTER THORNHILL . I am in the employ of my father, John James Thornhill. I recollect this order being given and executed - there were a hundred dozen of pen-knives, and a hundred dozen of scissors - they were packed in cases, one case was marked M. 93. - they were delivered at Messrs. Freeman and Pontee's, in Pall-mall; I went with them.

JOSEPH NEWMAN . I am in the employ of Freeman and Pontee, of Pall-mall; when I came home I saw six cases at their house - I was not there when they came - one of them was marked M. 93.; they were put into a cart on the 2d of January, and taken to the West India Export Dock, to be shipped - I went with them - they were delivered to No. 1. shed; Thomas Shanks gave me the receipt for them.

EDWARD POWTALL . I am in the employ of Messrs. Freeman and Pontee - I saw the cases put into the cart.

THOMAS SHANKS . I am wharfinger of the West India Docks. I received the case marked M. 93, with four others, on the 2d of January; I shipped them on the 7th, on board the brig Hedley, lying off No. 1. shed, in the Export Dock - I delivered it to Haddon, the mate of the vessel - it had not been opened then.

JOHN HADDON . I am mate of the Hedley. I received the packages, one was marked M. 93, and was in a perfectly sound state; I entered it in the usual way, and put it into the aft-hold on the 7th of January; the prisoner was the steward of the vessel, and had access to the hold where this package was - no other packages were put into that hold after these; on Saturday the 28th of January, Mr. Thornhill and Mr. Jackson came on board the vessel, and in consequence of what they said, I looked for the package, and it was gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Had any other person access to that place? A. I do not know.

JOHN ROEBUCK . I am an officer of the Thames Police. On the 21st of January I stopped the prisoner coming out of the gate of the West India Export Dock, about twelve o'clock at noon - I searched him, and found in his hat three paper parcels, which altogether contained twelve dozen pair of scissors, and five dozen pen-knives - I asked where he came from - he said he was steward of the Hedley, and he had brought these things from there; I asked whose they were, and he said his own, and they were the remains of a venture he had taken out on a fromer voyage in another vessel - the property was taken before the Magistrate, but no person appearing to claim it, it was returned to him - I asked where he bought the articles - he said of a person in the neighbourhood of Smithfield, about eleven months ago; I went on board the Hedley on the 28th of January, and asked the mate if he knew the steward had those things when he left the ship - he said he did not; I then asked if there was any cargo of this description on board - he said he did not believe there was; I apprehended the prisoner while on board, and asked what he had done with the property which I had stopped him with before - he said he had sold them to a jew, in Mileend-road, for 12l.; he then took me to his lodgings and I searched his box, and found thirty sovereigns, and six half-sovereigns, which he said was what the property had been sold for; I found some cotton prints and other articles, but nothing relative to this charge - and on the 1st of February I found this piece of tin by the side of the ship Hedley.

WILLIAM HEMS . I live at No. 30, High-street, Whitechapel - I am a cutler. The prisoner brought some articles to our house on Friday, the 22d of January - he asked if I wanted to buy any scissors - I asked where he got them - he said they were the remains of a venture he had taken out to the Brazils; that he had sold the table-knives and pen-knives, but the scissors were too good for the market - I said they had not the appearance of having been to the Brazils, and asked where he bought them; he said in the vicinity of Smithfield; I found they were scissors of a superior quality, and asked what he gave for them - he said 14s. a dozen, but could not tell the man's name, or in what part of Smithfield he bought them; he said he bought them all at a price; I saw there was at least 10s. a dozen difference in them - the average value was, I think, 25s. a dozen; I kept him in conversation till I opened the whole of the papers, and then I found one dozen which had the name of Gibbs on them: I asked if he bought this dozen with the rest; he said, Yes; I asked him his name, he said, "Harris, 39, High-street, Poplar;" I then said, "I shall have nothing to do with the twenty-two dozen of scissors, but I shall detain this dozen, as I know the person whose name is on them, and I have no

>doubt they are stolen;" he said, "Surely I am not to lose the dozen of scissors." I said, "Certainly not - if you call on me to-morrow evening, if I find you have told me a true story, you shall have them again, or I will purchase them." I then communicated with Mr. Thornhill, who is the successor of Mr. Gibbs, and he went on board the ship the next day.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you kept them ever since? A. Yes; I have shown them to Mr. Thornhill, but they were not out of my sight; I have kept them locked in my own desk.

GEORGE MORLEY . I am a general salesman, and live at No. 95, High-street, Whitechapel. The prisoner came to my shop on the 24th of January, and brought twenty-one dozen pen-knives, which he said he wanted to change away; I asked how he got them - he said he had taken them out to the West Indies eleven months ago - that his name was John Morphew, and he lived at No. 9, Samuel-street, Limehouse-fields; I do not pretend to understand the value of them, but I bought them of him for six sovereigns, a fowling piece, and a pistol; I afterwards found they were of more value, and advertised them in the Times newspaper, to find the owner of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you deliver them to the officer? A. I saw them given to the officer at the house of a friend of mine, a cutler - they had not been in my possession all the time; I did not count them to see that they correspouded.

JOSEPH SMITH . I live in whitechapel-road. The prisoner came to my house on Wednesday, the 25th of January, and left three paper parcels with my daughter - I was not at home - he came again at eight o'clock in the evening, and I saw him - the parcels contained pen and pocket-knives - in the evening he brought some more pen-knives, and some scissors - and said he had that cutlery to dispose of; he had taken it to the Brazils and the West Indies, and could not dispose of it - that he disposed of some ivory handled-knives, and some sailor's knives, but could not dispose of these; I asked where he bought them, and he said in a street leading to Smithfield - he asked 8l. for them - I offered him 7l.; he packed them up in his handkerchief, and said he would try further; he went out, then returned, and said I should have them for 7l. 10s. - for which I bought them; I saw Mr. Morley's advertisement on the Wednesday - and Mr. Jewis advised me to go to No. 39. High-street, to see if the prisoner lived there - I found it was a house nearly fallen down - but I found a person named Cripps, whom the prisoner said he lived with, but she said she knew nothing of him - she knew a person named Harris, which was the name the prisoner gave, but he died at sea. I gave the property to the officer.

MARY SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith , a turner - we lives at No. 1, Osborn-place, Brick-lane. The prisoner came to our house, I think, on the 24th of January he brought a bag full of what he called cutlery - he said he had been to a shop in Smithfield, and given 31l. for them - he sat down, and separated the property that evening - it was pen-knives and scissors; he put them into different parcels, in the same papers as he brought them in - and took some of them away every evening till the following Friday, when the officer came, and took the remaider in the bag.

JOHN OVERTON . I am the officer. I received some parcels containing, I believe, knives and scissors, from Mr. Smith and Mr. Morley; the Magistrate ordered me to leave them at the office, and I did not see them opened.

JAMES EVANS . I am a police officer. I produce a bag containing twenty-seven packages of cutlery, which I received from Overton - and a handkerchief containing seven packages.

BENJAMIN BLABY . I went to the house of Mr. Smith, who delivered me this parcel, which I have had in my possession ever since - the numbers are on almost all the packages.

THOMAS SYMONDS CROCKLEY . William Hedley and Daniel Williamson were owners of the ship Hedley, and the property on board was theirs.

WALTER THORNHILL . I know the dozen scissors to be part of those which I put in the package; I knew them by the kind of scissor - we had not a dozen of this pattern, and put in two others to make up; I know all these parcels, and this No. 28, I can identify in particular.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-52

413. MARY BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 4 buckets, value 4s. , the goods of Freeman Urquhart .

FREEMAN URQUHART. I live in Wapping Wall, and am a cooper . I lost four buckets from the gate of my yard, which is always open in the day time - I understood they had been taken to No. 2, Coleman-street, just by; I took an officer there, where I found the prisoner and her two daughters, who are children - I found my buckets there; I asked how she came by them - she did not answer, but one of the children said a man in a leather apron left them there.

JAMES CRAGIE . I am an officer. I went with the last witness, and found the buckets in a cupboard; the prisoner is married, and lives with her husband.

ELIZABETH WHEATLY . I live next door to the prisoner. I saw her go up the street with nothing in her hand, last Monday fortnight; when she returned she had a parcel.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-53

414. JOHN BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 8 sixpences, and 1 shilling , the monies of John Price .

ELIZABETH PRICE . I am wife of John Price, who lives in Park-street , and is a green-grocer . I knew the prisoner by seeing him in the neighbourhood. On the evening of the 6th of February, a person came to the door and called my husband - he went into the shop, and found the prisoner behind the counter - he called me, and I saw the prisoner standing near the till - he said he came for a half-penny worth of stale fruit - my husband told him that was not the place for it - he said he had dropped his halfpenny, and came there to look for it; I then took the candle, and found the till nearly out; I had put in seven sixpences there, and one was very much battered - I missed some sixpences, and among the rest the battered one; my husband then went to fetch an officer, and left the prisoner

>with me - he made one step to the right, and I heard some money fall - I took hold of him, held him fast, and told him he should not stir a step till the officer came - the officer found this money on the floor, and the battered sixpence is among it.

KENNET M'KENZIE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in for a halfpenny-worth of stale fruit, and dropped my halfpenny behind the counter.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-54

415. ANN COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one bounet, value 12s. , the goods of John Ward .

ELIZABETH MARY WARD . I am the wife of John Ward, who lives in Church-street, Bethnell-green - I am a milliner. The prisoner came to my shop on the 28th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and asked the price of a bonnet - I said 14s.; she then asked if a young woman had been there - I said, No; she said she would be there in few minutes - she stopped to see her - and while I turned round to speak to my sister, the prisoner got out with the bonnet - we pursued her, and my sister took her down the next turning, with the bonnet in her hand.

ANN SUSANNAH KEENE . I was in the shop - I pursued the prisoner down Club-row - I took her three doors down the turning, with this bonnet in her hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman called me while I was in the shop, and I went after her.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-55

416. HENRY DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 coat, value 2s., the goods of John Spencer , and 1 coat, value 2s. , the goods of William Jenkins .

WILLIAM JENKINS . I am horse-keeper to Mr. Tucker, who lives at Ponder's-end . My coat hung in the stable on Saturday, the 14th of January, with one belonging to John Spencer - I left them about half-past five o'clock that morning - the prisoner, who slept in the stable, was then standing there - I returned about seven o'clock - he and the coats were gone - he was to have worked for my master on the Monday following.

JOHN SPENCER . I was with Day, and saw the prisoner in the stable when I left my coat there.

WILLIAM GAYTER . I am a carter. I bought this coat of the prisoner, at Waltham Cross, for 1s., about nine o'clock on the Saturday morning - I gave it to the officer.

THOMAS LEWIS . I bought a coat of the prisoner at Waltham Cross for 3s., at the same time with Gayter - I had never seen him before.

RICHARD WALTER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took the prisoner - and produce a coat which I got from Gayter.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I have a coat which I found in the possession of Lewis's father-in-law.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260216-56

417. JOSEPH DIGBY and GEORGE EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 30 dozen rabbit skins, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Norman .

EDWARD NORMAN . I am the brother of Thomas Norman - he is a rabbit-merchant . I keep a pony in Plough-yard, Shoreditch - and my brother keeps some rabbit-skins in a loft there - I was at the stable about ten o'clock in the morning of the 31st of January, and missed the skins off some nails - I went into the loft, and missed some from a box - the wall was broken through which parted Mr. Austin's stable from mine.

JONATHAN NORMAN . I am the prosecutor's son. I remember seeing these skins, all safe, about eight o'clock the night before - there were at least thirty dozen; I went there again next morning, and nearly all of them were gone - the wall was broken through between the loft and Mr. Austin's - we went to him, and he said he knew nothing about them, but he would ask his boy - my father and I, and Austin's boy, went in search for the prisoners - we found them together a little way from the house; they appeared to be quite intoxicated - Mr. Austin's boy said,"They are the two;" my father took hold of one, and I the other - we brought them back to Mr. Austin, who accused them of taking the skins - Edwards said, "Yes, we have taken them;" he then asked them where they had sold them - they said they would show us, and took us to a Mr. Joseph's, in Petticoat-lane - we found him there, and asked if he had bought any skins - he said he had not, but he did not know whether his son had, he would call him down - the son said he had bought some skins of the prisoner that morning, but he did not say at what price - Edwards said he had taken one lot first, for which he had given him 16s., and sixpence for himself - and he told him he would fetch him some more, which he did, and received for them 22s.; this was said in presence of the other prisoner; Mr. Joseph said, "I can't say any thing to it, you must talk with my father," and went up stairs again.

JOHN SHORTER . I live with Mr. Austin. Digby had slept in his loft for some time, and I have seen Edwards about the premises, but he did not live there; I locked Digby in the stables last Monday week, and George Edwards was with him; I saw them again on the following morning, and I remarked that they were better dressed than usual - they were quite intoxicated - they said they had found 2l. 5s. on the Monday night, and asked if I would have any pudding - I said No, and Edwards said"You shall have some;" he ran back to the shop to get some but they had none hot, and he gave me a penny to buy some.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . The prisoners were brought to me, and I said to Edwards "Do you know any thing about these skins?" he said "If you will go with me I will shew you;" I said to Mr. Joseph "Did you buy any thing of these boys?" he said "No; I never deal with boys;" he then called his son, and Edwards said "That is the person."

SIMON JOSEPH . I live at No. 25, Petticoat-lane, with my father, who is a furrier and skinner. Edwards came to our house on the 30th of January, between four and five o'clock, with five dozen and four rabbit-skins - he wanted 5s. a dozen for them - I said I could give him but

>3s. - he went away, and came again between five and six o'clock, and said I should have them; I did not ask him where he got them, because we have many persons who go about collecting skins, and sell them to us; he came the next morning, and brought eight dozen and two skins, for which I gave him 1l. 4s. 6d. - I gave him the 1l. 4s. first, and objected to give him the 6d. because they were rather inferior to the others; but he said if I would give him the sixpence he had a lodger in his house, who had some skins to sell, which he would bring.

DIGBY - GUILTY. Aged 17.

EDWARDS GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18260216-57

418. JOHN FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 coat, value 4s., and 1 case of instruments, value 6s. , the goods of John Hodgkinson .

MICHAEL DONAHO . I am day-watchman, of Woburn-place . I saw the prisoner go into one of the unfinished houses about three o'clock on the 28th of January; he asked me if that was Mr. Cubit's building - I said Yes, and he asked for the foreman of the plasterers; I said he was somewhere about the premises; I went into the kitchen and, while I was there, he went out with this coat and case of instruments - I pursued and took him - he threw down the coat.

JOHN HODGKINSON . I am a carpenter. I was at work at this building, and had my coat and case of instruments in the parlour - I was up stairs when it was taken.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-58

419. ANN HOPE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 4 yards of cotton, value 4s. , the goods of William Hodson .

MARIA HODSON . I am the wife of William Hodson. The prisoner came to my shop on the 24th of January - I did not see her come in, but I saw her going out; I followed and did not lose sight of her till she was stopped by a watchman, and this piece of cotton found on her, which I had been shewing to a customer just before - she was quite a stranger.

JOHN JONES . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutrix pursuing the prisoner; I stopped her, and found this piece of cotton on her - she said she had it given her, but could not tell where.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it given me by a friend - it is not the prosecutor's - I had gone into the shop to buy some tape.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-59

420. ABEDNEGO MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 60lbs. of iron, value 10s. the goods of George Hone .

GEORGE HONE. I live at little Stanmore , and am a wheelwright . I heard the noise about five o'clock in the morning of the 3d of February, and gave the key of my yard to Franklin, and ran down to assist him in apprehending the prisoner; I then got my clothes on, and searched the premises; I missed thirteen pieces of tier iron, which were safe between three and four o'clock, the day before - my gate is always locked - I found part of the iron in Mr. Perkins' garden - some of it was in a sack - there was a fish cloth with it - the prisoner comes there to sell fish two or three times a week.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. What does it weigh? A. About three quarters of a hundred - a man could not have taken it all at once.

JOHN FRANKLIN . I am a watchman. I went to Mr. Hone's yard, and found the prisoner behind a log of wood. I took him into custody, and got him outside the gate. Mr. Hone assisted me, and we put him into the cage.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say how he came there? A. No; I did not search him - there was nothing near him - we found the iron in the garden about half-past five o'clock - I shewed the cloth to him but he did not own it.

COURT. Q. Is this an enclosed yard? A. Yes; with palings - there is a gate to it, which was locked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-60

421. EDWIN JAMES PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 20lbs. weight of lead, value 6s. , the goods of William Robert Fry and George Watkins , the younger.

JAMES WHITE . I am a painter. On the 24th of January, about half-past four o'clock, I was at work at some houses in York-square, Commercial road , which belong to Messrs. Watkins and Fry; I saw the prisoner at the corner house, standing on the rafters, and cutting off the lead from the back dormer window; I went to where he was - and asked him what he was doing - he said Nothing. I said, "Come down; I saw you cutting the lead;" he then attempted to run away, and got on the third house, where he hid himself for about five minutes; I got on the roof; he jumped out of the window, and was taken about one hundred yards from the place. I have seen the lead compared with that on the roof, and it corresponds exactly; he was quite a stranger, and had no right there

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it day-light? A. Yes; enough for me to discern who he was; I had not been in the house from which the lead was taken for a week or more; he was two or three seconds cutting the lead, but I had seen him about the premises before - his face was towards me, and his hat was on; there was no knife, or any thing by which he could cut lead, found upon him; he was three stories up from the ground - I picked up the lead, but there was no knife with it.

WILLIAM BURNET . I am servant at the Duke of York, public-house; our back window looks over these premises - I was coming through the square - James White told me there was some one cutting the lead; I got into one of the houses, and saw the prisoner - he ran out and got away; I saw three men coming up, and called to them Stop thief! he knocked down one man, and then another - by that time I got up to him; he was taken into our house, and put into the parlour; when I first saw him he was cutting lead; he dropped it through the joists with one hand, and the knife with the other.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the man who found the lead, see the the knife? A. Yes; I did not see the lead found; I was with the prisoner while they went round, and picked it up; I spoke about the knife at the office,

>and it was produced - it was found the day after by a little boy.

GEORGE WATKINS , JUN. I am in partnership with William Robert Fry - the building belongs to us; I have seen the lead compared, and it corresponds exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have a pot of porter, and I waited there for another young man, who was to have a job: I was a little in liquor; I went into the yard, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran out at the side gate - the pot-boy pursued me and said I was the thief - I said I was not.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-61

422. GEORGE PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 pair of bedsteps, value 25s. , the goods of John Gebhard .

AMBROSE HARLEY . I live opposite to Mr. Gebhard, a cabinet-maker , in the Commercial-road. Between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 1st of February, I saw the prisoner go into his shop, and take a pair of bedsteps from about two yards with in the shop; he went down Morgan-street; I pursued and overtook him about thirty yards down the street; I told him he had better take them back; he said he should not; I collared him, and told him he should go back.

GEORGE KOHLER . I am in the employ of John Gebhard. These steps are his property; they were about two yards within his shop. On the 1st of February the prisoner was brought back with them; he was quite a stranger, and had not bought them - I was at breakfast when they were taken.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-62

423. MARY RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 6lbs of pork, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Ward .

ELIZABETH WARD . I am the wife of Thomas Ward - he is a butcher . The prisoner came to our shop on the 8th of February, and bought a quarter of a pound of sausages; we missed a hand of pork while she was in the shop; I stopped her and asked her to put down the hand of pork; she said she had not seen it; I found it under her apron and gown; shen then begged my pardon, and said she was sorry she had taken it.

GUILTY. Aged 67.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18260216-63

424. ANTHONY RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 towel, value 1s.; 2 shifts, value 10s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 bed-gown, value 2s., and 2 caps, value 6s. , the goods of Ann Adams , widow .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Mary Taylor , widow .

CHARLOTTE JEFFERY . I am servant to Mr. Lee, who lives in Store-street. I know Mrs. Ann Adams, a widow; she gave me a bundle to give to the laundress Mary Taylor.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. Whose were those things? A. Mrs. Adams' - she lodges with my mistress.

MARY TAYLOR . I take in washing. I received this bundle from Jeffery - it contains the articles stated in the indictment; I put it into a cart - a man drove the cart, and I rode in it; I lost the bundle about the middle of Museum-street; I gave an alarm, and the prisoner was taken immediately.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I am a widow.

SAMUEL COLE . I am a plumber, and live in Museum-street. I saw the cart go along the street at a gentle trot, and the prisoner ran from off the pavement, made a jump, and took this (which seemed to be the top) bundle, and ran off with it. I thought, at first, it was a joke, but when he ran I pursued him, and cried Stop thief! He dropped the bundle, and the officer took him.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. About eleven o'clock in the day; I was about twelve yards from him; I had not known him before, but I saw his face for about three minutes; I did not lose sight of him for more than two or three minutes, after I had got the bundle.

RICHARD SEEKINGS . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner running with the bundle under his arm; I pursed and took him into custody - Cole went after the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see this man get into the cart? A. No; but I saw him drop the bundle - he had got about three hundred yards from the cart, to the end of Great Woburn-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The constable has taken a false oath.

RICHARD SEEKINGS re-examined. Q. Did not the Magistrate say to you, on your second examination, "When you were here before you said you did not see the man take the bundle, and now you say you did;" A. No; it was not so - I did not see him take it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18260216-64

Middlesex Cases - Fourth Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

425. SAMUEL NORTON was indicted for manslaughter .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

DEBORAH PITMAN . I live in Jane-court, Richard-street, Commercial-road. I was at work at the Masons' Arms, public-house, in Wotney-street , about half-past ten o'clock in the evening of the 17th of December , and saw John Murphy , who was a stranger to me, and several other persons there; I did not see any dispute between him and the prisoner in the course of that evening; I saw the prisoner go into the tap-room, and take John Murphy under his arms; he carried him from the fire to the street door, and threw him down the steps; this was about half-past ten o'clock - I had not been in the house half a minute - there was not a word said, and no blow struck by any one - John Murphy seemed very quiet - he was standing by the fire, and appeared a little in liquor, but he did not say a word - I came out of the tap-room when he was brought out - the prisoner threw him down the three steep steps at the door - he fell on the curb stone, and the blood instantly flowed from his head - he groaned three times hitterly, but did not speak - he lay there about twenty minutes, when I saw him taken to Mr. Westbrook's, the surgeon, I did not hear the prisoner say any thing all the time -

>he went into his house, and brought two rummers from the parlour to the bar - when the man was taken up the prisoner brought out a pail of water to wash away the blood from the door - there was a great quantity of blood.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. You did not know the poor man's name? A. Not till I heard it mentioned in the tap-room; the watchman came by, crying eleven o'clock, when the man was lying there; while Mr. Norton was putting him out I went and stood at the door - the deceased did not try to get hold of the door - he had not power to do it - there were very few people there, and no noise in the tap-room while I was there; I went there, at first, to see if my husband's brother was there, and then I stopped at the door to see the man in that state - a great many people stood there, who said what a pity it was.

WILLIAM SNOOK . I live in North-street, Globe-lane, Mile-end, and am a stone-mason. I have seen the prisoner two or three times at his own house - I knew the deceased by seeing him on the building where I work - I never spoke to him - I went to the Masons' Arms on the 17th of December, about a quarter past nine o'clock - I went into the parlour - I went out in about twenty minutes or half an hour, and saw the prisoner rush from the bar into the tap-room - I opened this door and looking in saw two men scuffling - one was a labourer - I cannot say whethere they were fighting or not - I did not see the deceased then; I then saw the prisoner take the deceased by the collar and by the back, carry him to the door, and send him off the steps into the street - he had not time to resist nor did he offer - it was done in a moment, and the door clapped to - some persons came in and said there was a man dead at the door - I then went out and spoke to him, but he could not speak; I then lifted him up, but he could not stand; the watchman then came up; I went and got a candle, and saw two streams of blood running from him- one of which was as wide as my hand; I had heard the prisoner say, a few minutes before, to one of the labourers, I will give you sixpence to take him home. The prisoner then called a servant to get a pail of water - he and the servant washed the blood from the door, while I and some others took the deceased to the surgeon's, and I held him while the surgeon examined the wound; the prisoner came there about ten minutes afterwards, and brought a handkerchief, to tie up his head - I suppose some person had been to tell him of it; I staid there while the doctor dressed the wound, and then some persons went away with the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Was the door shut as soon as the man was put out? A. Yes. Upon notice being given that he was injured, Mr. Norton said he would give sixpence to a man to take him home. It was not by Mr. Norton's desire that I took him to the doctor's - he did not desire to be taken home - he could not speak - I do not know whether Mr. Norton paid the man who took him home - there were several women there, and I know Mrs. Pitman was one - he was certainly very much in liquor - he had been drinking from ten o'clock in the morning.

COURT. Q. Did the man appear alive when you went to him in the street? A. Yes, but he could not speak; when the wound was probed he groaned - that was all the noise the made.

LAWRENCE M'CARTHY . I am a labourer, and live at Mile-end. I was at the public-house on the 17th of December, and saw the deceased and another drinking together, between seven and eight o'clock, but there was a bit of an objection between him and the prisoner about paying the reckoning; the deceased paid him 1s. and then 6d., and afterwards Norton and a man named Green took hold of the deceased and pushed him out of doors, but that was not when he met with his accident. I was coming home between ten and eleven o'clock, when I saw the watchman, who had got the deceased up, and he was sitting on the step of a door - my master was there, and told me to lend a hand to take him to the doctor, I took him there on my back; Mr. Norton came in shortly, and asked if there was any thing the matter; the doctor, said it was a very serious matter - my master asked if there was much the matter; the doctor said the man's blood-vessel was broken; Mr. Norton said, "If you will take him home I will satisfy you;" I said I would if he could get another sober man, which he did - we took him, but we could not make him speak, and could not find his home; two watchmen came, and we took him first to Ratcliff watch-house, and then to the hospital. Two or three of the doctors came, and said he was very bad.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. The deceased was quite tipsy? A. Yes, when he was first put out, and when I came up the second time he was in the street.

TIMOTHY MURPHY . I am the deceased's brother. I was at the Mason's Arms that night; my brother was drunk when he came into the house; he and another man had gin and beer till the reckoning amounted to 20d. each - there was a dispute between him and the prisoner about the reckoning; there was a difference of 6d., and I told the prisoner I would pay the 6d. if he would say nothing about it; a man, named Green, then came, and pretended to be an officer. I then went away, and left my brother there. On the Sunday evening following one of the carpenter's came and told me my brother was taken dead to the hospital - I then went to the hospital, but they would not let me in; I went to the prisoner's house, and said I heard my brother was dead, and it was a very sad thing; he seemed very well satisfied about it, as if he had a bullock to kill in Smithfield. I went to the office to get a warrant, but could not. I went afterwards to the hospital, and saw my brother dead; an inquest was held on the Friday, but the Coroner would not examine me.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Do you know John Maynard? A. Yes.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did you not tell him to ask the prisoner to give you some money? A. Nothing of the kind came out of my lips. I never proposed that if money was given I would not prefer my indictment, nor propose not to appear when the bill was found. I preferred the indictment as soon as I heard of the Session coming on. I went to a solicitor down Whitechapel - I did not take my brother away from the house, because I had other business to mind.

Mr. BARRY. Q. What am I to understand from your going for a warrant directly? A. Directly I heard of my brother being dead I went to Lambeth-street.

SAMUEL WESTBROOK . I am a surgeon, and live in Collet-place, Commercial-road. On the night of the 17th of December, John Murphy was brought to my house by three or four men; he appeared to have been intoxicated. I found a confused wound on the upper and back parts of the head, which was flowing with blood; his clothes were very bloody. I conceive that the confused lacerated wound had taken place from the severity of the fall or a blow - he could not speak, but when I probed the wound he made some noise - I was convinced the skull was not fractured; I said no doubt serious mischief to the brain must ensue from the wound; he was taken from my house to go to his home, but the persons could not find it. Mr. Norton came in when he had been in the shop about ten minutes - his house is not more than two hundred yards from mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Are you a surgeon? A. I have not a diploma, but I have served a regular apprenticeship - I have walked the hospitals and practised as such for seventeen years.

Q. Were you on good terms with Mr. Norton? A. I do not know that I ever saw him before.

COURT. Q. Supposing there had been a recent fall, were there any symptoms which made it likely that death would ensue? A. No. I said he would never be able to get his bread again; there was no indentation or injury on the skull that I detected; the wound was laid open to the skull, and it was quite visible.

RICHARD CLEMENT HEADINGTON . I am surgeon of the London Hospital. John Murphy was brought there on the 18th of December - I attended him, but did not examine the head, as it was already dressed. I heard the account of it from the pupil, and I thought the man would certainly recover. I examined his head after death, because his death was to me rather unexpected - he died of apoplexy, which, I presume, took place a few hours before his death - I should think it was occasioned by intoxication and the blow; I should not think the blow alone was sufficient to have occasioned it.

JURY. Q. Was it apoplexy alone, or the effects of the blow? A. The united effects of both.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-65

426. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 7lbs. of bacon, value 3s. , the goods of Elizabeth Howe .

ELIZABETH HOWE. I am single . I live in Cursitor-street, and keep a chandler's-shop . On the 21st of January, between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, to purchase a small quantity of tea and sugar - he paid me for them, and then asked what coffee was an ounce, and while I was grinding some for him I saw him move from the edge of one counter to another; I suspected he had got something - he went out afterwards, and I missed the bacon. I went to look after him, but could not see him - but in about a quarter of an hour I saw him go by the house, leading a dog; I sent a woman to bring him back to the shop, which she did, and he had the bacon in his apron.

SAMUEL CHALLENOR . I am an officer. I received this bacon and the prisoner in charge. I found on him a small quantity of tea, coffee, and sugar.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-66

427. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 3 planes, value 15s.; 2 saws, value 2s.; 1 stock and rule, value 1s., and 1 chisel, value 6d., the goods of Patrick Conner ; 1 plane, value 2s.; 1 saw, value 3s., and 1 basket, value 6d., the goods of John Burke ; and 2 planes, value 10s.; 1 saw, value 2s., and 1 carpenter's plough, value 8s. , the goods of Daniel Grady .

PATRICK CONNER. I left three planes, two saws, a stock, a rule, and a chisel, in the kitchen of the house, No. 53, Clarendon-square, Somer's-town , about half-past five o'clock on the 7th of February. I received information about a quarter before nine that evening - I went there, and the property was gone - I found part of them in pawn.

JOHN BURKE. I had a plane and a basket in the same house; I left them a quarter before six o'clock and missed them the same night.

DANIEL GRADY. I was working at this place - I left my tools there at six o'clock - I went the same evening, and they were gone. I saw them next day, in the possession of the officer.

WILLIAM DEMPSTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane. I took in this saw and plane of the prisoner, on the 8th of February, between eight and night o'clock in the morning.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer. I went to the Black Lion public-house, Castle-street, on the 8th of February, between three and four o'clock, and found the prisoner just coming out, with this basket, and a quantity of tools in it.

CHARLES CARLE . I was in the tap-room of the Black Lion on the 7th of February, and saw the prisoner - he went away about half-past eleven o'clock at night; he had no basket with him then - next morning he came again about half-past ten o'clock - I saw him; he had no basket then - he went out about twelve o'clock, and brought the basket with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home through Bloomsbury-square - I met a man with this basket, who was quite intoxicated - he asked me to carry it for him, and he would give me 1s. or 1s. 6d., and said he thought he could help me to work the next day, if I would meet him somewhere; I asked him if he knew the Black Lion; he said he did, and I went there, expecting to meet him, but he did not come. I must acknowledge I pawned the saw and plane, thinking I should take the money which he had promised me, and get them out.

COURT to JOHN GREEN . Q. Did he give you any account of the tools? A. Yes - he said he had been at work, but refused to tell me where.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18260216-67

428. THOMAS SHEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 13lbs. of lard, value 9s. , the goods of William Geary .

EDWARD UNDERWOOD . I live with Mr. William Geary - he keeps a cheesemonger's-shop , in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. I saw the prisoner come into the shop on the 17th of January, about half-past nine o'clock at night; he took a bladder of lard from off a pile of cheese, about two yards within the door, and ran out with it; I pursued him, and saw the officer bringing him back, and another man had the lard.

WILLIAM REED . I was coming down Broad-street, and felt some person run against me; I turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me, and the lard rolling on the ground - he crossed the street, ran against a woman, and then walked on; I pursued, and took him.

Prisoner. I am a poor man.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-68

429. CATHERINE SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 coat, value 4s., and 2 waistcoats, value 2s. , the goods of Henry West .

HENRY WEST. I am a salesman , and live in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials . The prisoner was taken in my shop on the 4th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, with these articles; they have my private mark on them; I had seen them on the chest of drawers near the parlour door. I saw her throw them out of her hand.

ELIZABETH ADAMS . I am nurse to Mrs. West. On the 4th of February I saw the prisoner come in, and put her hand on these things, and then put something under her arm; I went and asked what she had got - she said nothing. Mr. West then came in, and the prisoner threw the coat on the counter, and the two waistcoats behind it.

PHILIP RILEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and she denied the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a small family. I am innocent of the charge; there were plenty of things in the shop if I had a mind to have stolen them - I never touched any of them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-69

430. MARY REGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of John Palmer .

WILLIAM PACKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. On the 16th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned a pair of woman's shoes, in the name of Mary Regan, for 1s. 6d. - she came again in about three quarters of an hour, with another pair - this excited my suspicion, and I stopped her- I asked where she got them - she said they were her sister's, who lived at No. 10, Oxford-buildings - I told her to go and send her.

Prisoner. I went for my sister - she was gone out, and I did not return till the officer came for me.

DANIEL HOWSDEN . I am in the employ of John Palmer, a shoe-maker , of Oxford-street . I remember seeing the prisoner at his shop one day, three or four weeks ago; she looked at some shoes, but we had none to suit her; I did not see her again till eleven or twelve days afterwards, when I saw her with the officer; I did not miss any thing, but I know these shoes to he my employer's - I cannot state that they were in the shop when she came in - I might have sold them.

MATTHEW PATISSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on Friday, the 24th of January - I told her I wanted her to walk with me, and she said, "What is it for? is it any thing about the shoes?" I said it was - she said she took the shoes, but was in a state of intoxication at the time; I took her to Mr. Patisson's shop, and sent for Mr. Palmer; he could not say whether he had missed any shoes, but he swore to their being his.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-70

431. MARY REGAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Edward Patisson .

JOHN LATHAM . I am in the employ of Mr. Edward Patisson, who lives in Oxford-street . The prisoner came there about six o'clock in the evening of the 16th of January, and asked to look at some shoes, but none of them suited her; I was trying some shoes on her, and she appeared to put her hand to a glass-case which was near her- I looked up, and saw a pair of shoes under her shawl; I looked at them - she then took them from under her shawl, and seemed to be looking at them - she then put them down, and went out. Mr. Packer shewed me this pair of shoes the same evening, which I knew to be my employer's - I had not sold them.

Prisoner. I bought these shoes of him for 3s., for my cousin. Witness. It is quite false - we never sell a pair of shoes of this description under 7s. 6d.; these were on a table near to where she sat.

WILLIAM PACKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner pawned these shoes on Monday, the 16th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, for 1s. 6d.; she came again with the officer some days after.

MATTHEW PATISSON . I am the officer. I took her up, and asked her to walk with me; she said was it about the shoes - I said it was, and I took her to Mr. Patisson's, where Latham recognised her.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer said he wanted me - I said, for what, and he said some shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-71

432. ROBERT COCKRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 14 metal-cocks, value 2l., the goods of Richard Snell , to whom he was a servant .

ALEXANDER HUNT . I am clerk to Richard Snell - he is a canal carrier from Liverpool. On the 15th of January I went to the canal, about one o'clock - I saw the prisoner, who was a porter in our employ, in Mr. Snell's warehouse - he saw me, and stooped down behind some crates of earthenware; I went up to him, and asked what he wanted there - he said he was to watch - I told him he could not, and as he was going away, I saw something out of his coat-pocket, and asked what it was - he said, "A bottle;" I said I would see what sort of a bottle it was - he went to go on, and I took hold of his coat - he threw his arms back, and left his coat in my hands; he then ran towards the gate - I ran after him, turned the key, and called the watch, and then went through the house to get an officer;

as I was coming out, I heard a noise as if the gates were opening; I saw them opened - the prisoner ran out, and went down Macclesfield-street - I pursued him, and took him into the King's Arms, as I could not get an officer; I returned in about an hour and a half to get the jacket - it appeared in the same state as when I left it - it was taken by the officer in my presence - and several brass-cocks were found in it; we found on the prisoner three brasscocks - one was in his breeches, near his knees.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did the prisoner appear tipsy? A. Yes - and said at the watch-house, that Harrison had taken these things, and had given him some to take back - and he told me if I would promise he should be forgiven, he would tell me of a long string of robberies. Harrison ran away afterwards, but I believe he has now made his appearance - he is not here, nor is the watchman.

WILLIAM WOOD . I was in the employ of Mr. Snell. On the 17th of January I saw the prisoner taken by Mr. Hunt - he threw back his arms, and left his coat in Mr. Hunt's hands - when Mr. Hunt went through the house, he told me to keep the prisoner, but he opened the great gates, and got out - I saw him hold up his fist to Mr. Hunt, and appear as if he was going to knock him down; he had been in Mr. Snell's employ, and so had Harrison - but I had not seen him that day.

WILLIAM COATES . I am an officer. I have three brasscocks, which I found on the table at the King's Arms - I took charge of the prisoner, who was without his coat and hat - he begged us to let him have them; I went back with Taylor, another officer, and found his coat on one of the crates, and his hat in another part; we found six cocks in his pockets.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am an officer. I took the prisoner's coat, and found these cocks - he seemed tipsy, and said the crate was his.

THOMAS VANN . These two cocks were found in one part of the warehouse, and three in another, near a box, the lid of which was broken; the papers in which the cocks had been, were strewed about.

WILLIAM WOOD re-examined. Q. Had Harrison been there that morning? A. Yes - and then he went away.

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to be going up the City-road, and Harrison (who had been in the warehouse) - one of the porters, and a boatman, were drinking gin; they called me in to have some porter, which I did - I then went to a public-house - the watchman stood at the gate, and asked me what they had better do - I said, if the cocks were re-placed, it would be better - and they asked me if I would take them - I being in liquor, took them, and that moment I was taken by Mr. Hunt; I had no notion of stealing them.

ALEXANDER HUNT re-examined. The watchman was dismissed by the Magistrate, and we have discharged him since - the prisoner had been but a fortnight in our service.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-72

433. ANN FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the monies of John Loveridge , her master .

JOHN LOVERIDGE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Crawford-street . The prisoner was in my service on the 3d of February. I take the money out of my till every evening, which I put into my desk, in the counting-house, and lock it; the counting-house is partitioned from the shop; on the 31st of January, I put 3l. 10s. 6d. into my desk - on the following night I put some more money in - and on the 2d of February, I put 2l. 1s. 6d., in sixpences and shillings, which a neighbour of mine had marked; the next morning, between six and seven o'clock, I went to a cupboard at the corner of the counting house, (I had made a hole to look through into the counting-house), and saw the prisoner come in there with a light to light the fire; she put the light on the table, and went to the fire-place and listened, as if to hear where the shopmen were - she then went towards the desk, and I heard a noise as if a key was going into the lock of it, but I could not see it, as it was behind the door - I then heard some silver chink - my wife came down, and I sent for the officer, who took her, and found two shillings and two sixpences, which had been marked the night before - I believe this is her first offence, and I would willingly pay her expenses back to her mother.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am the officer. I went to the house and took the prisoner - I told her she had been robbing her master's desk - she said she had not; I asked where her pockets were - she said, "Below;" I then put my hand down her side, and found she had a pocket on, in which I found 5s., and this marked money was among it - she said she had not opened the desk, but had taken the silver out with a knife, and shewed me how she did it, by putting the knife under the lid.

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-73

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant

434. ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 coat, value 2s.; 1 basket, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., and 1 pinafore, value 6d., the goods of Sarah Thomas , widow , from the person of Mary Thomas , spinster .

SARAH THOMAS . My daughter Mary is seven years of age - I live in Compton-street. I sent my daughter to Mr. Brooke's, in Grafton-street, for whom I work, to take a pair of shoes - this was three weeks ago last Tuesday, about ten minutes before four o'clock in the afternoon - she had a dark blue pelisse on, and a pinafore - she returned in about an hour, without basket, shoes, pelisse, or pinafore - I went with her next morning to the clothes shops, to see if I could get any intelligence of the things; as we were coming home, she pulled me by the shawl, and said, "There is the young woman who took my things;" I took hold of the prisoner by the shawl, and said, "You stripped my child last night" - she said, "Let me go into your house" - and then she said if I would go up stairs, she would tell me - she then said she had pawned the shoes at Lambeth, and pulled the ticket out of her pocket; I cannot read, and I got my next door neighbour, Mrs.

>Sutton, to read it - I heard her read the direction, which was in Paradise-row, Lambeth, but I forget the name - I gave the direction to the officer, but the ticket was lost; I saw the shoes at Mary-le-bone office, and know they were those I had given my daughter to carry - these are the shoes.

MARY THOMAS. I am seven years of age. I know my duty to God and my neighbour. I was going with the shoes, and saw the prisoner, who asked me to lay hold of her arm, which I did - and she took me down Howland-street - she then asked me to let her take off my pelisse; she then went down to Charlotte-street , and pulled off my pinafore - she took me to the corner of Titchfield-street, and told me to go down there, and I should see a large shop at the corner of the second turning, with dresses in the window, and I was to ask for Miss Murray's dress; I asked her to let me take the basket with me, which had got the shoes in it - she said she could mind the basket -- she took it while I went to look for the great shop, - she told me she would wait at the large haberdasher's shop; I went, but could not find the shop - when I came back to the place, she was gone - I saw her the next day in the street, and told my mother it was her.

JOSEPH FISHER . I am shopman to Mr. Savage, a pawnbroker, who lives in Paradise-street, Lambeth. I have frequently seen the prisoner - she pawned this pair of shoes at our shop on the 24th of January, in the name of Ann Brown, about five or six o'clock in the evening; I gave them to the officer.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I was directed by the Magistrate to go to the pawnbroker's on the Thursday, and found the shoes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutrix, her mother having turned her out of doors.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18260216-74

435. JOHN WYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 coat, value 3s.; 1 flute, value 5s., and 1 book, value 3d. , the goods of Thomas Hardcastle , his master.

THOMAS HARDCASTLE. I am a carpet weaver , and live in James-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner applied at the manufactory where I work, on the 3d of January, and I hired him on the 20th to weave carpets; on the morning of the 30th of January, I missed a coat, a flute, and a book - I had seen them all safe the night before; the coat was lent to him on the Sunday, to go to a place of worship - and the flute had been on the mantel-piece; he did not return - I did not see him again till the Monday week, when I saw him in the prison - the coat was then on his back, and the book in his pocket.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in Giltspur-street Compter, where he was taken for an assault; I found the duplicate of the flute, by which I got it.

WILLIAM JOHN SMALLSHAW . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch; I took in this flute of a person, who I believe was the prisoner, on the 30th of January; I gave this duplicate at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get on to do my work, having bad materials, which made me do what I would not.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing the flute only . Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-75

436. SARAH HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a 5l. Bank Note, the property of Henry Meldrum , from his person .

HENRY MELDRUM. I am a weaver , and live at Strutton. On the evening of the 13th of January, I was at a public-house in Wilkes'-street, Spitalfields ; I had a pocket-book with a 5l. note in it - I took it out of my pocket and saw it safe - there were several persons about, and I think William Wright was one; I took it out a second time, and the prisoner snatched it out of my hand; she said she would get it changed, and pay for a quartern of gin; she went to the landlady, asked for change, which she could not give her; I asked for my note again, and she would not give it me; I took hold of her hand, and she said if I would let her go, she would give it me; I let her go, and she threw a piece of paper in the fire, and said that was my note; I took it out of the fire, and it was a piece of waste paper.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-76

437. ELISHA JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 coat, value 4s., the goods of Mary Botheroyd , from the person of David Botheroyd .

MARY BOTHEROYD. I am a widow . On the 31st of January, about two o'clock, I sent David, my son, to school; I heard, in about a quarter of an hour, that he had lost his coat; I found him in the field without it.

WILLIAM FRANCIS . I was in my stable, at Mile-end Old-town, on the 31st of January, about two o'clock, and saw the prisoner jump across a ditch, and come into the yard; he took the handkerchief off his neck, and tied up this coat; I took him, and asked him what he had got; he said, "I have found it in the field;" while I was there, my wife and the little boy came running round, and said,"Oh! Mr. Francis, that man has stolen my coat."

SARAH FRANCIS . I was looking through my window, and saw the prisoner take hold of this little boy, who was crossing the field, and I thought he was going to beat him; I saw him take the coat off with assistance - he appeared to be trying to conceal it in his small-clothes, or his apron, and then he ran - I got out of my house, and while I went one way, my husband caught him the other.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fine One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-77

438. JOHN NEIL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 hat, value 5s., the goods of James Lee , from his person .

JAMES LEE. I am a servant . I was in the fields, near Gray's-inn-lane, on Sunday, the 29th of January, at a quarter past twelve o'clock at night - my wife was with me, and just as we got across Hunter-street, into Compton-street , we saw a man coming from the buildings - my wife looked back, and said, "There is a man coming behind us" - I turned and looked at him, but we walked on; soon after I heard a quick pace behind us - he then made a grasp at me, and tried to get my watch but could not -

he then took my hat off my head and ran away - I ran after him and fell in a gutter, and while I got up he got a great way from me - I then got to another gutter, and jumped into it - when I got out I lost sight of him - I ran again, and cried Stop thief! some man stopped him - when I saw him again he had my hat.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. How long was it before you saw your hat again? A. About ten minutes - he appeared to be sober.

ANN LEE . I was with my husband and saw his hat taken; I saw the man running with it, but cannot be certain that it was the prisoner - I could not see his face.

THOMAS DICKERS . On the night of the 29th of January I was in Harrison-street, which is about a quarter of a mile from Compton-street, east; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and we ran to see what was the matter; we met a man running very hard - he seemed out of breath; he had a hat on his head but nothing in his hand - we followed and asked him if there was any thing the matter - he could not speak to us, and we ran after him into Gray's-inn-lane - we looked into some new buildings, and found the prisoner in an area - he had a hat on his head - this was about five minutes after I first saw him; we took him and delivered him to two officers, and the prosecutor came up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the man pass you in a great hurry? A. Yes; he had a hat on his head - there was no other hat in the area - he appeared much agitated.

JOHN LEE re-examined. He threw his hat away in the field; I did not see it but it was found by a watchman - he said before the Magistrate, that he was drunk, but denied the charge.

BENJAMIN EATON . I am a brick-maker. On the night of the 29th of January I was with Dickers, near Gray's-inn-lane; when I took the prisoner he said he had been with a girl of the town, and he would give me any thing to drink to let him go - he appeared to be sober, and could walk steadily enough.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street officer. On the night of the 29th of January I was in Gray's-inn-lane, and saw two men coming out of the fields with the prisoner; I met the prosecutor, and took him to where I had met the prisoner - he snatched at the hat, and said "You shan't have my hat;" I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

HENRY MASTERS . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Watch! and ran into the field; I went to look for the hat, but could not find it; but about half-past three o'clock it got a little moon light, and I found this hat about two hundred yards from Compton-street, east.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with a girl, and had been drinking; she left me in this place - I had been there about a quarter of an hour when these two men came and awoke me, and said what did I want there - I told them nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-78

439. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 bed, value 12s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 1 pillow, value 1s.; 3 blankets, value 1s. 6d.; 2 sheets, value 2s.; 1 pail, value 6d.; 1 basin, value 6d.; 2 chairs, value 2s.; 1 tea-tray, value 6d., and 1 set of fire-irons, value 1s., the goods of William M'Crobie , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM M'CROBIE. I live in Cornwall-court, St. Pancras . I missed my property one Saturday night - there was a bed, bolster, and several other things; I had seen them safe the day before, in a room which I had let to the prisoner a week or ten days before.

BEATRICE M'CROBIE . I am wife of William M'Crobie. I let the room furnished to the prisoner - the articles stated were in it. I went up stairs on Saturday night - the door was open, and the things gone; I do not know how she took them away; I saw these two chairs at the office.

MARY ANN MOSS . I live in Cornwall-court. The prisoner lived in the next room to me. I went with the constable to a house in Parker-street, and saw the fender and some fire-irons, which were Mr. M'Crobie's, who took them to his own house again. The prisoner did not say how she got them. I was sworn before the Magistrate, and stated that she told the constable the property belonged to Mr. M'Crobie, and she had pawned the quilt for 1s. 6d.

JOSEPH WEEK . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner; she said she was very sorry, and gave me the key of the room which she had taken in Parker-street. We found the bed and bolster, the fire irons, and other things, which, she said, were Mr. M'Crobie's, and she had pawned the quilt for 1s. 6d., but she hoped I would take it out and she would pay me - these two chairs were found there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young person who was with me took the things out; I paid Mr. M'Corbie 7s. a week the first time I was with him, and then I was away for a fortnight, and returned with the young woman, who took away the things - I took only my own things away - I had paid 5s. of the week's rent myself, and this young woman would not pay the 2s.; but she said if I would go on with the things, she would give up the key and follow me; I saw her again on the Friday evening or Saturday morning, and she told me what she had done; I then took the key, and took my things to the room where hers were; another person persuaded me to return them, which I should have done on the Monday, but I was taken on the Sunday.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character, one of whom said she would take her into her service immedidiately.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-79

440. WILLIAM BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 coat, value 10s.,; 1 waistcoat, value, 14s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1d. , the goods of Samuel Bratt .

SAMUEL BRATT. I am a calenderer , and live in Whitecross-street, St. Luke's. I was at the Jack of Newbery, public-house, on the 28th of January - there were several persons in the tap-room and the parlour, whom I have known many years; I went and sat down by him,

and put my bundle, which contained a coat and two waistcoats, between us; I went to the fire and said, "Give an eye to my bundle" - he said "I will;" I remained about half an hour, and when I returned, he and the bundle were gone; I have known him many years - he had a good character.

JOHN BRICKET . I live at a pawnbroker's in Cripplegate. The prisoner pawned these things with me on the 28th of January, about eleven o'clock at night.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-80

441. ELIZABETH CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 2 shirts, value 4s.; 1 shift, value 1s., and two waistcoats, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Speller .

CATHERINE SPELLER . I am the wife of Richard Speller - we live on Clerkenwell-green . I was up stairs about five o'clock in the afternoon of the 22d of January, and heard my bed-room door shutting; I went out and saw the prisoner on the landing-place; she said she came with a Mary Martin, to see a cousin of hers - she attempted to go down stairs but I prevented her, and she dropped a bundle which contained this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer, and took her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up with the other person; she went out again - the lady came out and found the things at my feet - I had not had them.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-81

442. SAMUEL BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 4 spoons, value 30s., and 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 9s. , the goods of James Gann .

THOMAS ATKINS . I am headborough of Stoke Newington. I received the prisoner in custody on the 7th of February, with these spoons and sugar tongs, which have the letters J. G. on them. Sarah Barnet , who is servant to Mr. James Gann, of Stamford-hill, stated to me, in the prisoner's presence, that she saw him coming out of their yard - ran after him, and said "You rascal, you have robbed my master of some spoons, and have got them in your pocket;" he then gave them to her. I took him into custody, and she delivered the spoons and tongs to me. No other person is here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-82

443. THOMAS DANIEL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 30lbs. of beef, value 15s. , the goods of William Fincham .

WILLIAM FINCHAM. I am a butcher , and live in Longalley. On the evening of the 27th of January, Cheshire brought the prisoner to me with a piece of beef, which had been on my stall board; I had cut a steak off it a quarter of an hour before.

THOMAS CHESHIRE . I am an headborough. I saw the prisoner pass my door with the beef in his lap - I ran out and stopped him with it.

WILLIAM WILLIS . I saw the prisoner in Long-alley, with another person - he went up to the stall-board, and I went and told the officer there were two lads trying to steal some beef.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-83

444. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 3lbs. of cheese, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Lovelock .

WILLIAM POOL . I live in Homer-place, Spa-fields, and sell cheese for Thomas Lovelock. On the 6th of February the prisoner came into the shop and took this cheese - I was in the parlour - I pursued him - he was caught in my sight, about seventy yards from my door - I am certain of his person - a boy took up the cheese in the street, and brought it in.

GEORGE HUMPHRIES . I stopped the prisoner at a little distance from the shop - he was running.

Prisoner's Defence. I never went into the shop at all - I had been looking for work.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-84

445. JASPER HITCHCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 2 handkerchiefs, value 6s. , the goods of John Cummings .

ELIZA CUMMINGS . I am the wife of John Cummings, and live in Eastfield-street . I left these handkerchiefs in washing-tub, at the back of my house, on Saturday evening, the 21st of January, and missed them next morning.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am an officer. On Sunday morning, the 22d of January, about one o'clock, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found these two handkerchiefs in his apron - they were quite wet at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260216-85

446. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 coat, value 7s.; 2 gowns, value 7s.; 1 shirt, value 3s.; 2 table cloths, value 6s.; 3 sheets, value 7s.; 2 shawls, value 2s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 book, value 1s.; 3 candlesticks, value 4s.; 1 pelisse, value 1s.; 1 pair of buckles, value 3s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d. the goods of Owen Jones .

OWEN JONES. I live in Greenhill's-rents - I occupy the front room on the first floor, and the prisoner (who is my son), lodged in the back-room, on the same floor - he is a brush-maker by trade. I missed my coat on the 29th of December; I never allowed him to pawn any of these articles, nor did I know they were pawned.

RICHARD JONES . I am the prisoner's brother. On the 31st of January my father gave me leave to go into my brother's room - I found twenty-six duplicates in a glove, which related to my father's property, which had been missed at different times - I found one for my father's coat, which had been pawned on the 26th of December; there was a duplicate of a sheet, a table-cloth, a gown, and many other articles.

JAMES PALMER . I am an appretice to Mr. Armstrong, a pawnbroker, of Baldwin's-gardens. I have a sheet and a pair of stockings, which I took in pawn of the prisoner on the 26th of December.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of employ for the last eighteen months, which led me to do what I have.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-86

447. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 saw, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Martin .

THOMAS MARTIN. I am a carpenter . I was at work in an unfinished house in Stamford-grove . I went to dinner at twelve o'clock on the 18th of January, and returned in about half an hour; I met the prisoner coming down the grove, with my saw in his hand; I asked what business he had with it - he made a stroke at me, and said what was that to me; I ran into a house, and got James Lynes, one of my shop-mates, to go after him; he threw down the saw, and Lynes took it up, but finding the prisoner gained ground on him he threw it down, and collared the prisoner.

JAMES LYNES . I was called, and saw the prisoner with the saw - he threw it down, and I took it up; I followed, and took him in Mr. Gibbs' garden - he was quite a stranger.

RICHARD YATES . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged

Reference Number: t18260216-87

448. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 waistcoat, value 10s. , the goods of John Girton .

JOHN GIRTON. I live at Stepney , and am a draper . - On the 24th of January, about three o'clock, I heard an alarm, and missed a waistcoat; I went into the Church-yard, and met Robert Beck - we pursued the prisoner, who was running, and I took him.

ROBERT BECK . I saw the prisoner take something from Girton's door, and run into the Church-yard. I saw him throw this waistcoat among the tombs; I went, and took it up.

WILLIAM PICKETT . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-88

449. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 washing tray, value 3s. , the goods of James Bailey .

ELIZABETH BAILEY . I am the wife of James Bailey - we live in Phoenix-street, St. Giles's . On the 20th of January I left my washing tray between the two doors of the front and back rooms on the first floor, about four o'clock- I went out, returned about half-past seven, and it was gone.

ESTHER SOLOMON . I bought this tray, for 9d., of the prisoner, on Friday afternoon, the 20th of January.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-89

450. WILLIAM MOODY and WILLIAM HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 brass ornament, value 20s. , the goods of John Limbert and William Limbert .

JOHN LEWIS . I am an officer. On the 27th of January I saw the two prisoners in Oxford-street , in company together; I saw them go to Messrs. Limberts', and look into the shop for about five minutes - when they went away their hands were in their pockets; I saw Moody cross the street to the side where I was, with something in his hand - I asked what it was; he said he did not know, but a man gave it to him to carry; I brought him across the road, and pushed him and Harris (who was still standing at the window) into the shop; I took this piece of brass from Moody's right hand; the people were passing at the time, which prevented my seeing who took it.

Cross-examined by Mr. CARRINGTON. Q. Did not Moody say it was given to him by another man? A. Yes. He made no resistance - he carried it openly. I do not think he is known to the Police.

WILLIAM LIMBERT. I am in partnership with my father, whose name is John. This is a piece of brass which we screw on for the shutters.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not fixed to the house? A. Yes - there is a screw goes to the window in one part, which holds it fast; this part of it could be got away without being unscrewed or wrenched - it is of no use - it is an ornament.

MOODY's Defence. I saw this young man picking up this article, and told him I would have half of it.

HARRIS' Defence. I found this on the pavement, close by the window.

MOODY - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

HARRIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-90

451. GEORGE MORGAN and GEORGE JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 chair, value 25s. , the goods of George Watson .

GEORGE WATSON. I live in Great Earl-street, Sevendials , and am a horse hair manufacturer . On the 3d of February Mrs. Dorrington came into my shop, and asked if I had missed a chair; I missed one, which I had seen about an hour before; I went out in consequence of what she said - I could not find any boys; I came back, and still found her by the door; I went into the shop, and she called me out again, saying, "Here are the two boys coming - I suppose to take some more."

ANN DORRINGTON . I was passing the shop, and saw Jones standing next door, and in a few minutes I saw Morgan run by with a chair - Jones followed him; they ran down Great St. Andrew-street - I went and told Mr. Watson.

MORGAN's Defence. I was going down Little Earl-street - the prosecutor came out and collared me; the lady called out, "Go, collar the other," who was about three yards before me.

JONES' Defence. I know nothing of it.

MORGAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-91

452. THOMAS PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 5 planes, value 17s.; 2 saws, value

10s.; 1 chisel, value 6d.; 1 jacket, value 6d., and 1 basket, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Paine .

HENRY PAINE. I am a carpenter . I was working at an unfinished house, No. 279, Regent-street . On the 8th of February I went to dinner at twelve o'clock; I locked the door, and took the key - I left my tools on the bench in the under ground kitchen; I heard an alarm while I was dining, and Mr. Atkinson brought the prisoner and my basket of tools into the cook-shop.

WILLIAM ATKINSON . I am foreman to Mr. Baxter - Paine worked under me. I came down the street, and knocked at my own door, when I saw the prisoner coming out of No. 279, with the basket of tools. I asked where he got them, and he said they belonged to a young man, named Johnson, who had gone to Castle-street, to dinner. I asked him to go with me to the cook-shop, which he did - I called Paine out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not he say a person gave him the tools? A. He said a person had gone out of the window, and he had taken up the tools.

WILLIAM RIDDING . I am an officer. I produce the tools and the basket, which I got at the cook-shop in Castle-street; they were laying on the floor, and when I came in Paine said, "That is the man" - I took him, and as we went to the office he said he saw a man go into the house, that he followed him, and took the tools, and was going to take them to some man in the cook-shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man loitering about - I watched him into three or four houses, and saw him get into this window; I followed him, and as I was going down the kitchen stairs he was in the passage, and threw the basket of tools down. I took them up, and the witness came and said, "What do you do with them?" I said a man had taken them up, and had left them there, and he desired me to take them to the cook-shop. I had not touched them before he told me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-92

453. DANIEL ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 15 yards of cotton, value 25s. , the goods of Thomas Davies .

THOMAS BUCKLE . I am in the employ of Thomas Davies, a linen-draper , of Holborn . On the evening of the 23d of January, I saw a man of a dark complexion, in a dark coat, looking through the window, very earnestly, at me; I saw a piece of cotton taken from the inside of the door; I came to the door, and saw the prisoner with part of it under his arm, and part dragging in the mud; I followed him down Southampton-buildings, and in Chancery-lane he threw it down - two persons stopped him - I returned with him, and took the print up.

Cross-examined by Mr. CARRINGTON. Q. What time was this? A. About half-past six o'clock - our house is near Middle-row; there might be fifty or one hundred persons about. This print was on a bar about a yard within the door. I first saw the prisoner when he was running with the print; there were not persons enough about to intercept my sight of him.

CHARLES OLDHAM . I am a watchman. I saw a crowd, and went down. I found the prisoner, and took him to the watch-house - we found 5l. 3s. 43/4d. on him.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am a constable, and took the prisoner to Hatton-garden.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to receive this money for my brother, and on my return home I was apprehended; I acknowledge I had been drinking a little too freely.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260216-93

454. WILLIAM COX and WILLIAM WEEDON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 coal skuttle, value 3s.; 1 kettle, value 1s.; 4 ozs. of worsted, value 1s., and 4 ozs. of thread, value 1s. , the goods of John Simpson .

ROBERT YOUNG . On the evening of the 2d of February, about nine o'clock, I was going down Uxbridge, and saw Cox, whom I knew, with something under his arm, in the shape of a coal-skuttle, and another parcel; I went down the town a little further, and told a young man what I had seen; I then heard of the robbery. I believe Weedon to be the person who was with Cox, but I cannot swear to him.

JOHN SIMPSON. I am a carrier , and live at Iver. I was at Uxbridge on the evening of the 2d of February - I put up my horse and cart at Mr. Glover's, who keeps a shop in the town. I bought a coal-skuttle and a fish-kettle, some worsted, and thread, which I put into my cart; I missed them about nine o'clock, and went to look for them - I came back again, and made some inquiries; I then went to Mr. Farrow, the constable - just as I got to Uxbridge I had seen Cox looking over the tail-board of my cart - I mentioned this to the constable, but did not see Cox any more that night. I went with the constable to Cox's house, but did not find any thing.

JOHN FARROW . I am the constable. On this night I searched Cox's house, and found nothing - he denied all knowledge of it, but from the trepidation in which he was, I thought he had had it. I went down to a young woman in Chequer-yard, with whom he cohabits - she said he had been in company with Weedon; I then went to Weedon's and accused him of having taken the property; he said he had not; I said he had, and Cox said so - Weedon said,"What a d-d liar he must be, for he had taken it himself" - that he (Weedon) had drawn the cart from Mr. Johnson's to another house, which was in the dark, and there Cox took the property out; Cox said afterwards that Weedon drew the cart on to the place in the dark, and then Weedon took out the property. I then told Weedon to go with me to where it was, and he took me to a hay-rick in a field, where I found it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Cox's Defence. I know nothing of it.

COX - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WEEDON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-94

455. WILLIAM ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one spoon, value 8s. , the goods of George Frederick Vorwerg .

GEORGE FREDERICK VORWERG. I live in Little Aliff-

street, Goodman's-fields . On the evening of the 24th of January, about twenty minutes before five o'clock, the prisoner came to my house, and said Mr. Jarman wished to know what time he could see me on the morrow; I said,"Any time;" he said, "That is no time;" I said, "Well then, between eight and nine o'clock;" I said, "You mean Mr. Jarman, down Mile-end-road" - he said, "Yes;" I said,"Is it about the German church;" he said he did not know; he then asked me for a glass of water - I went up stairs, he came to the foot of the stairs, and asked if he was to come up - I said, "Yes;" I went to a cupboard to get a glass, but it was not clean - I put some water into it, to wash it - went to get a cloth to wipe it - I then heard a jingling of spoons in the cupboard, from where I had taken the glass - I rushed forward, and said "What is that?" he said, "Nothing at all;" I said, "This will not do for me, you shall not go" - he had his hands behind him - I looked round, and saw part of this spoon in his hand, I seized it, and said, "What! did you come to rob me?" he said, "Oh no, I only meant to show you, how easily you might be robbed;" I said, "That won't do for me, you shall prove whether you know Mr. Jarman or not;" he then said, "I don't know Mr. Jarman - don't you teach German?" I said, "Yes, I did;" he did not know what to say, and I sent for an officer.

Prisoner. Q. When you first came into the room, and asked what I was about, did I not take the spoon in this direction, and say how cautious you ought to be of exposing your property, when there is a stranger in the room? A. No; he did not say that till I had taken it from him; there were about five more table-spoons, a silver pint pot, half a dozen tea spoons, and a milk-pot; these spoons lay on the top of one another; you could not have taken more without making more noise.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I went to the house and took the prisoner; I went to Mr. Jarman's, by order of the Magistrates, he said he knew nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. When you took me, was not I drunk? A. He was a little in liquor, but not much so.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-95

446. RICHARD WRIGHT and JAMES HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 2 glasssalts, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Peter Smith .

PETER SMITH. I keep an earthenware-shop , at No. 61, Earl-street, Manchester-square . The two prisoners came into my shop one evening, I was in the parlour, and my son in the shop - he called me out, I went and asked the prisoners what they wanted; Wright said, "A black-lead pencil;" I laid them on the counter - they seemed to want some more, and I got some; Mr. Allen then came in, and said, "Don't let them go, they have robbed you of a glass;" the watchman was sent for, but before he came I heard Wright let something fall - I looked and saw it was a salt-cellar, which he dropped at his feet - and I saw it lay broken; I said, "That has fallen from you;" he said, "No, it fell from a shelf;" the witness then said, "He has got another" - and I immediately heard another fall;" I said,"There is another;" Harris said, "No, it is not a salt-cellar, it is my top.'

JOHN ALLEN . I saw the two prisoners in the shop. Wright took the salts out of the window - I went in and told Mr. Smith of it.

WRIGHT'S Defence. I went into the shop to buy a pencil, the man came in and said I wanted to steal a glass - I stepped back and trod upon a glass - and he said I had dropped it.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-96

457. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 5 spoons, value 20s., and 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s., the goods of Matthew Raper , and 2 pocket-books, value 6d. , the goods of William Evans .

WILLIAM EVANS. I am butler to Mr. Matthew Raper, of Wimpole-street . I was in a vault, in the area, on the 2d of February, and heard a foot-step - I opened the door, and saw the prisoner advancing towards the area steps; I said, "What do you want here?" he held up a bottle, and said, "Do you want any blacking?" I said, "Come here, sir;" he then got into the street, and I followed; he dropped the basket, which he had in his hand, in the area; I pursued him down several streets - he got out of my sight, but he was taken; I saw him again at the watch-house, with these five spoons, sugar-tongs, and books - the spoons and tongs are the property of my master - the books are my own; the plate had been on the right-hand side of the pantry - when I returned to the pantry, I found some hay, and a bottle of blacking in the basket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any opportunity of seeing the man before he left the area? A. Yes; he spoke to me for about a second or two; I saw him about three minutes afterwards.

GEORGE CULL . I am a beadle of St. Mary-le-bone. I was at the court-house door when the prisoner ran by, he was stopped just by the watch-house, and fell down - I came up and took him to the watch-house. I found all these things on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the office, and he brought some spoons to match them, and I think he put them all together.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-97

458. THOMAS WELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 2 stoves, value 1l. , the goods of Richard Speller .

RICHARD SPELLER. I am an iron-plate worker , and live on Clerkenwell-green . These two stoves are mine - I had seen them standing in the passage, near my door, about nine o'clock on the morning of the 25th of January.

RICHARD JONES . On the 25th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I was going by Mr. Speller's shop, I saw the prisoner go into the passage and lift up the two stoves, and walk down the green - another person went after him - that person asked him were he got those stoves - he said they where his own - the person said, he thought they were not, and he had better take them back; he took them back, and put them down in the passage, and was going away, when he was taken; I understand he has

>been in great distress, and his friends are very respectable.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-98

459. ELIZA JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 sovereign, and 6 shillings, the monies of George Summers , from his person .

GEORGE SUMMEBS. I live in Gravel-lane, and am a butcher . On the 6th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in West-street, Smithfield , and stopped for a necessary purpose, when the prisoner came up and accosted me; she took liberties with me, and put her hand into my left-hand pocket, took out my money, and ran away - I followed her to a house, which she made her escape into - and another female ousted me out of the house, with some severe bruises - I had never seen the prisoner before, but I am certain of her person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where was this? A. In Brewer's-yard, West-street - I think it was a damp, and kind of winterish evening - I was perfectly sober; I went to the Rose-inn, afterwards, to give directions to my drover, but I drank nothing there - the prisoner came up in front of me in a very indecent manner - she was not there above a minute or two; I did not see her again for a fortnight afterwards; I did not offer to make this up if I got 10l.; she offered it to me, but I ejected it.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am the officer. I took up the prisoner on the 20th of January.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-99

460. JAMES FARQUHAR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the monies of William Shipton Browning , from his person .

WILLIAM SHIPTON BROWNING. I was on Clerkenwellgreen ; on the 9th of February I had a handkerchief in my pocket, which I missed - and saw it taken from the prisoner in about a minute - here it is - it has my mark on it.

JAMES BALLARD . I was on the Green - I saw Mr. Browning - the prisoner and another were following him - the other took the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it into his pocket; I took him - and took it from his breeches-pocket - there was a fire there, and I saw him very distinctly; he was a stranger to me.

JOHN LOADSMAN . I am a constable, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18260216-100

561. MARY ANN BEVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 7 sovereigns, the monies of Richard Lamb , from his person .

RICHARD LAMB. I am a mariner . On the 25th of August I was in Whitechapel, with a female, with whom I went to Wentworth-street, Spitalfields , to a house of reception, about a quarter after nine o'clock in the evening; the prisoner is the girl I first met - and gave her a compliment, and she asked me for something to drink - I said, the English girls poisoned themselves by drinking so much gin; the girl I gave the money to, transferred it to another - the prisoner did so - when she had robbed me she gave a signal, and the landlady came up - the prisoner then rushed across the room, down stairs; this all happened in three or four minutes; she took my sovereigns when I was standing with her along side the bed; I was as sober as I am now; I am certain she is the girl; I went up and down Whitechapel for two months to find her - there were other girls taken up, but I am positive she is the person - and I picked her out from twelve others in the office-yard.

THOMAS DREW . I am an officer. Mr. Lamb gave me information on the 26th of August, and described the person of the girl to me; he said he had been robbed of seven sovereigns, about nine o'clock the evening before - that the girl was a little pock-marked, and fresh coloured on the cheek-bone - the prisoner has been out of the way some weeks; I took several girls up before this, but he said they were not the persons; when I took this girl, she was in a place with twelve or thirteen men and women, and he identified her immediately.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent - I has never seen the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-101

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

562. THOMAS ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of a certain man, whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Wednesday, the 8th of February, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in company with another person, in High-street, St. Giles's - there was a gentleman passing them, and this is his handkerchief; the prisoner crossed over the way - took the handkerchief from the gentleman, and shoved it up his back - he afterwards ran away, and threw down the handkerchief, which my partner picked up - I could not find out who the gentleman was, for he would not give his name or address.

WILLIAM BALL . I am a Bow-street patrol, and was on duty with Pritchard - I saw the handkerchief thrown away - the gentleman would not give his name.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-102

463. JOHN GUEST was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a basket, value 2d., and 30s., in copper monies, numbered, the property of Philip Lewis , his master .

MARIA LEWIS . My husband's name is Philip - he keeps the Grey-coat Hospital, public-house , near Vincent-square, Westminster. The prisoner lived with us as potboy , for four or five months; in the evening of the 19th of January I sent him with 30s. worth of copper coin, to Mrs. Gibson's, who is a laundress; he did not return - I never saw him again until he was at Queen-square Police-office. I never got the money back.

ELIZABETH GIBSON . Mrs. Lewis supplies me with copper; the prisoner did not bring me any on the 19th of January last.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer, I was informed of this; about ten days afterwards I saw the prisoner at the

Ball and Horse Shoe, public-house, in Westminster; he asked how I did - and I inquired if he had made all right with his master - he said, No - and I took him.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Strongly recommended to mercy on account of his former good character .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-103

464. DAVID JOHNSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 2 half-crowns, the monies of Thomas Okens , his master .

HANNAH OKENS . Thomas Okens, my husband, keeps the Fountain, public-house, New-street, St. James's - the prisoner was his pot-boy . On the 27th of January, I locked up eight half-crowns in the till, in the bar, about three o'clock in the afternoon - I went to get change about an hour afterwards, and missed two, and found the drawer had been broken open - I sent for an officer, and had him searched - some money was found upon him; I am sure no stranger could get at it - three shillings were found in his pocket, and one of the half-crowns in his boot.

WILLIAM REED . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found three shillings in his pocket; I pulled off his high-shoe, with some difficulty, and found half-a-crown in it - he said it slipped there out of his breeches-pocket, but that could not be, for the pocket was sound.

Prisoner's Defence. The money was all my own.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-104

456. ELEANOR NESBIT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 pairs of gloves, value 2s.; 2 bed-gowns, value 1s.; 2 yards of sheeting, value 2s.; 2 remnants of muslin, value 3s.; 1 skirt, value 5s.; 2 pieces of flannel, value 1s.; 14 yards of printed cotton, value 12s.; 2 pieces of gingham, value 2s., and 1 piece of linen, value 18d. , the goods of Henry Howe , her master.

HENRY HOWE. I live in Bedford-place, Commercial-road , and am a linen-draper . The prisoner has been in my service four or five months. On Monday, the 16th of January, I saw a piece of ribbon in her bonnet, which I thought was mine. I found I had lost three or four pieces - I looked into the cupboard, which the prisoner puts her clothes in, and there found a night gown with my mark on it; I got an officer and then found the other things, stated in the indictment, - I afterwards went to a house in Sayer-street, New Gravel-lane, where her sister lived, and there we found fourteen yards of print, and several other things - the woman's name is Bell who keeps the house.

COURT. Q. Had the prisoner's sister been in the habit of frequently coming to your house to visit her? A. She came occasionally - perhaps twice or thrice.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. I went with the prosecutor, and searched the kitchen and a bed-room - he and his wife were with me - I found a great many things; after the prisoner was remanded I went to Mrs. Bell's, when the prisoner's sister gave me a bundle which contained a piece of print, and I found a piece of calico.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-105

466. RICHARD HENDERSON was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL WYLD . I am a baker , and live at Kentish-town, The prisoner was in my employ on the 28th of January; he was entrusted to receive money on my account; I have a customer named Harris; I keep a book in which I enter what he takes out, and on his return, from his mouth I enter what has been delivered and paid for; if he were to leave bread or flour at Harris's I should debit him as a customer. On the 28th of January he said he left six loaves and a quartern of flour there (the amount of which was 5s. 11d.) which was not paid for - Mr. Harris being a ready money customer I asked him particularly about it, and he said they had not paid. On Tuesday following he went to Mr. Harris's again, and when he returned he said they had paid for the bread and flour left that day, and said he had forgotten to mention the previous account. I went to Mr. Harris's, and found that they had paid at the time of delivery - I then got a warrant.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you never in arrears with him respecting wages? A. Never, and never gave him permission to stop any money on account of wages due.

CHARLOTTE HILL . I am servant to Mr. Harris. I remember taking six loaves of flour and a quartern of flour, on the 28th of January, of the prisoner; I paid him two half-crowns and a shilling, and he gave me a penny out - I am sure there was one shilling.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure it was two half-crowns and a shilling? A. Yes; I remember perfectly well - I am almost positive that I am correct.

Q. COURT. Why do you say you paid two half-crowns and a shilling? A. I am almost certain I did - I have no doubt of it.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-106

467. HENRY EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 shawl, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 9d., and 1 tippet, value 3d. , the goods of John Rich .

SARAH RICH . My husband works at Mr. Houlditch's, in Long-acre. About six o'clock in the evening of the 25th of last month, my little girl called out "Aunt, a boy has stolen some things;" I ran round the counter, and went out, when I found the prisoner in the hands of a gentleman, who said "Ma'am, there are your things - I saw the boy take them from the door' - the gentleman is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-107

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

468. CHARLES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 4 Leghorn bonnets, value 4l., the goods of George Jay , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE JAY. I live in Oxford-street , and am a Leghorn manufacturer . About nine o'clock in the morning of the 20th of January I was in the shop, and in consequence of an alarm from my servant, who is not here, I ran out, and overtook the prisoner in Poland-street, with these bonnets; I collared him, and said "Where are you going with these bonnets?" but I cannot tell his reply - he begged that I would not proceed against him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-108

469. GEORGE WILLIAMS and HENRY JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 boult of canvass, containing 39 yards, value 45s., the goods of William Thornton , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM THORNTON. I am a tarpauling-maker , and live in Broad-street, Paddington . About half-past one o'clock last Monday I went out for a short time, and when I returned I met my wife, who said somebody had been in the shop - I looked round, and missed a roll of canvass from the window; I was only out four or five minutes. I left the shop directly, and ran down Praed-street, into Market-street, where I met the prisoners, coming in a direction from my house; Williams had the canvass on his shoulder, and they were walking side by side. When I got within forty yards of them Williams put down the roll, and sat upon it; Jones proceeded towards me; I laid hold of him, and then Williams ran away. I gave Jones in charge, and pursued Williams, crying out Stop thief! he soon ran up a court where there was no thoroughfare, - I took him back to Jones, and from there to my shop, where I left them in charge until I fetched a constable. - When I got back the man who held Williams was gone. The value of the canvass is 2l. 5s. 6d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONES' Defence. I know nothing of this other young man. I was looking after work when I was apprehended - when the gentleman took me I was a great way from Williams.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

JONES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-109

470. JOHN THOMPSON, alias WILLIAMS , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Curry , about nine o'clock in the night of the 16th of January , at St. Matthew, Bethnalgreen, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 3 pillows, value 5s.; 2 blankets, value 5s.; 1 counterpane, value 2s., and 1 sheet, value 1s. , his property.

THOMAS CURRY. I am a broad silk weaver , and live in St. John-street, Brick-lane, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green - the first and second floor are occupied by me; the other part of the house is empty. I rent half the house of the landlord, who does not live in it. - The room which was broken open is on the first floor - in which I heard a noise about half-past eight o'clock on the night of the 18th of January, - it was something like a chair falling in the room under me, as I was in the second floor. I took the light in my hand, and went down; I found the prisoner standing at the door of the first floor room, which was broken open; it was the door of the room where the noise came from; I asked what he wanted - he seemed flurried, and said, "Does Mr. Thompson live here?" seeing the door open I immediately collared him, and said, "I'll Thompson you." He then struck me a violent blow on the left eye, which was black for a fortnight; I struck him again, and we had a hard fight together on the stairs, from the landing to the bottom - when we got to the bottom some one opened the outer door - I did not see the man who opened it, for he escaped. I kept hold of the prisoner, got into the street, and called out Murder! when several people came to my assistance, and took him to the watch-house. I then went back with the officers to examine the premises, having left the street door on the latch. The prisoner must have entered through the front door. About half an hour before I heard the noise I went down to see if the children were asleep, and I put out the light and went up in the second floor again to work, leaving the two children fast asleep. I knew the street door was on the latch. I found the bed clothes and pillow had been removed from the bed, but I missed nothing from the place; the bed clothes were drawn aside, and part lay on the floor, and part remained on the bed. The counterpane and all together had been partly pulled off; the children were in another bed in the same room; I cannot exactly swear whether the pillow was on the floor or not. The prisoner had no right to be in my house.

EDWARD JONES . I heard the cry of Murder! about half-past eight o'clock, near the Fighting Cocks public-house, in St. John-street, and about one hundred yards from Curry's house; I saw the prosecutor laying on his back, and the prisoner punching him as hard as he could. I immediately took hold of him, and threw him on his back.

THOMAS REID . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner to the watch-house - I was the officer of the night - I also conveyed him from one watch-house to another. I went to inspect the premises, when I found the lock of the room had been forced from its place, and part of the bed clothes were withdrawn from the bed; there was a hat found on the premises, and when I went the next morning I asked the prisoner whether it was his - he said, "Yes, that's mine" - he had no hat on when taken.

ROBERT FOWLS. I am a special constable. I was sent for by Reid, to assist in removing the prisoner from the town watch-house to the green watch-house; after I had put him into the latter I went with Curry to examine the premises; upon examination I found the catch of the door had been forced - a small knife might have done it, it was so weak. I have had the hat in my possession ever since it was found.

GEORGE NORMAN . I am a bricklayer. I heard the cry of Murder! and ran as fast as I could. When I got in the street I saw the prisoner on his back - I assisted in taking him to the watch-house; I went down to Curry's house, and got in at the back door; I saw a hat laying on the stairs, which I picked up. When I got up stairs I saw the bed clothes in the state described by the other witnesses.

ROBERT FOWLS re-examined. I cannot say whether I received the hat from this person, but I had it from some one in the house.

Prisoner. Q. When you went up stairs did you see the bed clothes lay on the floor? A. Partly so, and the pillow had been removed from the top of the bed to the bottom.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence, nor have I any friends.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18260216-110

471. EDWARD RYAN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Just , on the night of the 5th of February , and stealing 3 blankets, value 10s.; a quilt, value 2s.; a sheet, value 6d., and a piece of baize, value 6d. , his property.

WILLIAM JUST, JUN. I am fifteen years old. My father lives at Hoxton . On the night of the 5th of February I was in my father's yard and heard something like the smash of a window, which I mentioned to my mother. My father went out, for half an hour, in the evening - my mother then said the place had been stripped - upon which I went to fetch my father - as I was going along I saw the prisoner and another man - this was about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and only a few minutes' walk from my father's house - the prisoner walked before me and the other man over the way - as soon as the prisoner saw me he went on the other side of the road with a dark bundle; the man on the other side had a white bundle; I believe the prisoner noticed that I saw him cross over to his companion. I got before them and they looked at me very hard; I kept my eye upon them; when I got a little further towards the Whitmore's Head public-house, I saw my father and a boy coming, and I said "Father, here they are?" I saw the dark bundle pitched over the wall, where it was afterwards found - he ran away - my father laid hold of the prisoner, and gave him to a gentleman, and then ran after the other towards the Robin Hood, public-house. When my father returned back, he was about to let the prisoner go - he said he was a hard-working lad; my father looked at his shoes, which were not like a tradesman. My father said "Where do you work?" but he could not tell; he then gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. It was night when you were walking in the street, and saw the prisoner? A. Yes; the reason why I could see them behind me was because I kept turning my eye round all the time - I walked sideways - at this time there was no person nigh. The prisoner's shoes and breeches were all over mortar - he said the roads were muddy, and he had fell down, but I did not see him fall - I ran with my father after the other man, whom I saw about five minutes before I met my father.

WILLIAM JUST, SEN. This house is my dwelling-house. I went out to spend the evening, and owing to information I ran back towards home, and met my boy, who cried out"Here they are;" it was after seven o'clock when I went away from home - the property was taken from the ground floor; before I went I took a coat and waistcoat off the bed, and the property was perfectly safe then, - the windows of the room were fast, and the bed-clothes all safe; I did not find any broken glass about.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who did you leave at home? A. My wife and six children - the eldest is eighteen years of age.

MARIA JUST . I am the prosecutor's wife. I will not say whether the window was safe, because the curtain was down; when I heard the alarm I went into the room and saw the window curtain blowing in - I saw that the covering had been taken from the bed where the child lay - the window had been broke in through some paper which had been put over a hole - a person could put his hand through and take the clothes off the bed. The next morning I found a pane of glass had been taken out - the bed stood near the window - a person could not get the clothes off the bed without putting his arm in.

GEORGE WILMOT . I am a constable, and was sent for to the Green Man public-house, to take the prisoner. I told him just said he did not wish to prosecute if he could get at his property again. The next morning he told me a young man had been and informed him where the bundle was; he said it was thrown over the wall near the Whitmore's Head. I told the prosecutor of it, and believe he went and found it.

ESTHER GORE . I found the bundle in a garden at the next house to the Whitmore's Head - I gave it to the little boy who has been examined.

THOMAS VAN . I have the bundle - I found it under the table at a public house where the prosecutor said he had left it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-111

472. JOHN HINKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 2 watches, value 6l.; 1 chain, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 1 ring, value 5s., and a key, value 5s., the goods of Henry William Philpot , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ANN PHILPOT . I am the wife of Henry William Philpot - we live in Shoreditch parish . The prisoner is a neighbour, and visited at our house - we had two watches, which hung in the parlour behind the shop - I went out on the 24th of January, and saw my own watch a few minutes before, but I did not notice my husband's; my watch hung over the mantel-piece, and my husband's finger ring and a key, hung over it; I came home rather late, a customer asked what o'clock it was, and I was going to see when the prisoner ran out of the room, rushed by a customer, and got away. My servant told me he had taken the watch; I went and found my own was also gone - my husbands' has been found since, for the prisoner has been good enough to say where it was. I do not know the value of mine - my husband values his at 4l. - mine cost 3l., and he values it at 2l. - he had his watch in 1807.

Cross-examind by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Had you a seaman lodging in your house? A. Yes; the prisoner used to come and see us. I do not remember that he wanted ever to borrow money of me - I once heard my husband say he wanted to borrow 5s. of him - I did not see him there that day before my return. I never said to him "I cannot lend you any money but you may take the watch."

Q. Try and recollect, madam, and then say whether you persist in saying you never gave him such leave?. A. Oh, dear, no! I never did. I did not miss my husband's watch till he came home - only my own - when I missed my own it was about seven o'clock in the evening, as near as I can recollect. My husband keeps a general chandler's shop. I do not know what parish our house is in.

ELIZABETH BROUGHTON . I am eleven years old, and live with Mr. Philpot. The prisoner often came to my master's house. I remember the day the watch was miss

>ed, about seven o'clock in the evening - the prisoner had been there about half an hour before; while he was there he stood up by the fire-place all the time; there were two watches hanging over his head, by the mantel-piece: I saw him take the watch. He told me once to go out of the room to teize a little girl. When I was in the shop I could see through a window into the room; there was a key and a silver spoon on the mantel-shelf; I saw him take my mistress' watch down with his right hand. I then went into the parlour - he had his hand in his pocket- he then took up his hat, and rushed out of the room, ran by the customers in the shop, and nearly knocked them down; I saw my mistress' watch at tea time, about five or six o'clock - when I looked afterwards I found both the watches gone. I told little Harriet, and she told my mistress.

Cross-examined. Q. Was this young man at your master's once on the day before? A. Yes; my mistress was not at home, but my master was, and the little child; the prisoner had been there half an hour before this happened - he talked once about a young girl who was going to a mad-house; he said he would take her down to Gravesend. My master and mistress, and this young man, have been very intimate.

JOHN COWLEY CROUCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Norfolk-street. I have a watch, which the prisoner pledged on the 26th of January, for 2l. The chain and seals were pledged the day before, by him - the value of them is about two guineas.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you sure he is the man? A. Yes.

MOSES SOLOMON . I am a salesman, and live at No. 6, Vinegar-yard, Drury-lane. The prisoner left two duplicates with me on the 3d of February, which Vann, the officer, has got - I went to see the goods in pledge, but I did not take them out.

JOHN GREENHILL . I saw the prisoner in Golden-lane, and apprehended him in Beech-street; I asked him if he had delivered the property to the prosecutor - he replied that he knew nothing of it; I said if he would return it they would not hurt a hair of his head.

ROBERT ROBERTS . I received the prisoner in custody on the 3d of February.

MRS. PHILPOT re-examined. These seals belong to my husband.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Have you not been in the habit of going to the play with the prisoner? A. No; on one occasion my husband had a couple of orders to go to Sadler's-well - he intented to go himself with Hinkin. I never went with him more than once, and that was with my husband's permission.

Prisoner. You are the woman who kept me from sea, and said I should not want money. Witness. Good God! is there no law? Upon my solemn oath there is no truth in these insinuations. Before this I always thought him a good lad. I did give my daughter 2s. to give the prisoner, which she took to him in Newgate, because he said he was in want.

MOSES SOLOMON. The gentleman who came to me after the tickets said there should be no prosecution.

MRS. PHILPOT re-examined. Neither myself or husband have a residence in North-street, City-road - he has a freehold there, which is let out in tenements, and my uncle receives the rent altogether - we have let it to him, and he pays the rent to my husband. My aunt lives in the house when my uncle and his family are there; I have not been there for several days - for two or three days; there may be gentlemen and ladies lodge there for any thing I know. When I had the house I let it to ladies and gentlemen too - we gave it up because we did not wish to keep it any longer - it is not a house of reception for company.

THOMAS VANN . It is a house of reception for prostitutes and company - I know it well. Witness. It is not a house let out to gentlemen and ladies who choose to go there - it is let out to weekly tenants.

The prisoner put in a long written Defence, intimating that he cohabited with the prosecutrix, who kept a house of illfame - and that on the night in question she gave him the watches to pledge, not having any money to lend him.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-112

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

473. GEORGE KELLY and SOLOMON JACOBS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 box, value 6d.; 60 yards of straw plait, value 7s.; 1 gown, value 4s.; 1 skirt, value 4s.; 5 cakes, value 1s.; 3 pork patties, value 2s., and 2 books, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Stanton , widow .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of William Smith .

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

PHILIP TOWNSEND . I am a porter, in the employ of William Smith, of the Three Cups Inn, Aldersgate-street. On Saturday, the 21st of January, I received a trunk from my master, to deliver to Mrs. Stanton's daughter, at No. 21, Lambeth-hill; I lost it from my cart, which stood opposite to Messrs. Leaf and Co.'s gateway, Old-change , while I was delivering a parcel, about five o'clock.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. I saw the two prisoners on Saturday evening, the 21st of January, between five and six o'clock, in the City-road - Jacobs came down Featherstone-street, and beckoned to Kelly, who was on the same side as I was, with this trunk on his shoulder - he pointed to a turning; I passed Jacobs, and got pretty close to them; I had something in my hand, and while I was putting it into my hat they crossed to the other side of the City-road - I heard Jacobs talking, but I cannot tell what he said. I then crossed, and seized Kelly with the trunk; I asked what he had got there - he said what was that to me - it was his property. I told him I was an officer - he pulled out a stick and struck me on the head - we fought for about ten minutes - Jacobs got away.

Cross-examined by MR. FISH. Q. Have you any reason to think that Jacobs saw you? A. I do not know; I saw him speaking to the other prisoner, and directly I seized Kelly I saw him walk off at a quick rate.

COURT. Q. Was there light enough for you to see his features? A. Yes; he passed a gas light, and I saw him

>plainly - it was about twenty minutes before six o'clock; I am sure Jacobs knew me.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I apprehended Jacobs on the Thursday following.

SARAH STANTON . I am a widow - this trunk is my property, and the contents; I packed it up on the 21st of January, and delivered it to the coach at Hitchin, to come to the Swan inn, where the coach puts up; I gave it to Kershaw about eight o'clock.

JOHN KERSHAW . I am coachman of the Hitchin coach. I received this trunk from Stanton, wrapped up in a cloth - I left it at the Three Cups booking-office, about half-past twelve o'clock.

The Prisoner Jacobs called -

- JACOBS. I am Jacobs' brother - he had seven examinations before Mr. Bennet; I was called in on the sixth or seventh examination, and Mr. Bennet told the attorney and the officer that he should not commit them till he had facts before him - the attorney said he did not care for Mr. Bennet, and they went and found a bill - they were called before Mr. Bennet again, who said, "What do you mean by this, Vann - I have a great mind to let the case go to the ground - I have a great mind to let Sir Richard Birnie know of your conduct" - and they brought on the case yesterday morning before the Grand Jury.

KELLY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

JACOBS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-113

474. MARY TRIGG was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 bonnet, value 2s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

ESTHER JONES . I am the wife of Thomas Jones. On Thursday morning last I went out, and left the prisoner, who is my daughter, at home, with four other little children - while I was out I heard something, and returned home; I found the prisoner was gone, and had taken my gown, a bonnet, and two handkerchiefs, which I had not given her permission to take - I found her at a house of ill-fame, with my gown on; her own gown was at the foot of the bed; she was sitting on a man's knee, another girl was on his other knee, and a girl in her shift was blowing the fire, which was a dreadful sight to me, as a mother; I brought her out, and she thought she was coming home, but when I got to the office I pushed her in.

WILLIAM REED . I took her into custody, and asked her about the things, but she gave no answer.

Prisoner. I beg my mother's pardon.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18260216-114

475. WILLIAM WOODLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , at Hillingdon, 1 piece of fir timber, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Henry Cox .

JOHN WEEDON . I am bailiff to Mr. Richard Henry Cox, who lives at Hillingdon house. I saw the prisoner on the morning of the 29th of January, about half-past five o'clock, while I was watching in the shrubbery - he looked at this timber, then shouldered it, and went away; I followed him about two or three hundred yards, when he set it down against a tree, and I took him.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. Q. Was not he in the service of Mr. COX? A. Yes - he has been our carter about twelve years; this was about the time he should go to water his horses; the timber laid in a private road near the saw-pit - the wood is not here; it weighed 169lbs. Mr. Cox does not allow his workmen timber to burn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-115

476. JOHN ROBERTS and JAMES FLEMMING were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 portmanteau, value 15s. , the goods of Joshua Choat .

THOMAS WASHINGTON . I live at the King's Head, King-street, Hoxton. On the 21st of January, about twelve o'clock, I was in Holborn , going towards St. Giles's - I saw the prisoner passing along, just beyond Warwick-court - Flemming stopped and pulled at a trunk at a trunk-maker's door, at a corner; Roberts passed by and took no notice of him - Flemming did not get the trunk then, but he passed by me; I stood watching for about ten minutes - they then returned and after two or three attempts, Flemming took the trunk; there was a man, a woman, and a boy, in the shop - I stepped in and told them of it. I saw Fleming give it to Roberts - the officer then took them.

WILLIAM MORTIMER . I am shopman to Joshua Choat, a trunk-maker , who lives at the corner of Brownlow-street, Holborn. Washington came to our shop about a quarter past twelve o'clock, and apprised me that a man had stolen a trunk; I ran to the door and saw the two prisoners, whom I had seen loitering about for an hour and a half; I saw Flemming give the trunk to Roberts, who turned up Warwick-court; I seized Roberts with it in his possession, and desired him to bring it back to where he took it from; he said he had not taken it.

JOSEPH WORMALL . I was in Holborn on duty, and saw the mob at the door - I went in and took the two prisoners.(Property produced and sworn to).

ROBERT'S Defence. I was coming down Holborn; this young man asked me to carry this portmanteau for him.

FLEMMING'S Defence. I saw the portmanteau-standing about three yards from the door - I took it up after some time, and carried it about three hundred yards, and then I saw this young man whom I asked to carry it - he did not know where I got it.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

FLEMMING - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-116

477. JOHN PATTERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 2 saws, value 12s. , the goods of William Shapley .

WILLIAM SHAPLEY. I am a carpenter . On the 6th of February, I was at work in Ulster-terrace, Regent's-park - I went to dinner at twelve o'clock, and left my tools on the bench in the front parlour - the door was not locked - I returned in about twenty minutes and these two saws were gone; I had met the prisoner with them as I returned, and asked him how he got them, but he gave me no answer.

JAMES PARDY . I was at work and saw the prisoner go to the house where Shapley had been working, and before I got there he came out - I went in and missed the saws - I followed and collared him; I felt about him and felt the

>two saws - I took him to the foreman who gave charge of him.

THOMAS HOOKER . I received him in charge. I asked him where he lived, but he declined telling me.

Prisoner, I am sorry for the fault - nothing but the greatest distress could have induced me to do it - provided the Court would be lenient with me my friends would do their utmost to get me some employ.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character, and stated that his friends would find him employ.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-117

478. JAMES MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 gig cushion, value 4s. , the goods of John Tilbury , and others, his partners.

HENRY GATES . I am in the employ of John Tilbury, Son, and Clark. On the 13th of February I put a gig out to wash, which had this cushion in it; and as we were going to put the horses in one of the cushions was gone - my fellow servant and I had a few words about it. Mr. Clark said there must he some thieves about; I went afterwards and looked about, and saw the prisoner coming up the mews - I asked him if he had seen a cushion - he said"No Harry, do you think I should do such a thing?" I said 'Let me look into your bag for satisfaction;" he untied the bag, and said "You see it is not here;" I said"Let me feel in the bag;" I did so, and there I found it all cut to pieces.

Prisoner. I went down and had the sweepings of the shop, which I do every Monday - I saw this cushion torn to pieces in the corner, and took it up.

JOHN ROLFE . I received charge of the prisoner - he said nothing about it.

JURY to HENRY GATES. Q. Were you in the habit of allowing this man to take rubbish away? A. Yes; he came every Monday morning, and had the bits of iron and leather, and what was lying about.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-118

479. WILLIAM LEADHAM and THOMAS LEADHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 2 shoes, value 8s. , the goods of John Renwick .

JOHN RENWICK. I keep a shop at Stoke Newington. To the best of my belief these two shoes are my property - they are my own making - I missed two or three pairs from my shop window in January, and some of them were of this description.

GEORGE GRAVES . I am a constable. I went to William Leadham's house on the 26th of January, and found this woman's shoe in the cupboard - Thomas Leadham was there and said he was on a visit to his brother and knew nothing about it. I then sent for Mr. Renwick, and then found a man's shoe in the box under the bed, which Mr. Renwick likewise claimed - William Leadham said he found them in Black-horse field.

JOHN RENWICK re-examined. I understand their father is a very industrious man as a weaver, and I believe they are working with him, but the business being slack they were obliged to leave that and go to costermongering.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-119

480. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing on the 2d of February , 1 bedstead, value 1l. ; the goods of Mary Freeman , widow .

MARY FREEMAN . I am a widow, and keep a baker's shop in Red-lion-passage, Spitalfields . The prisoner came to me on the 2d of February, and asked me to go and buy eight chairs; I said I was very ill - he went away but returned about two o'clock, and said he had seven more to sell - I went with him - he left me in the street and took a porter with him, whom he met, and said he would go and get the chairs - I stood in the street about an hour, but he did not return to me - on going home I missed a bedstead.

MARY ANN FREEMAN . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. On the 2d of February the prisoner came and asked her to go and look at some chairs - he came a second time, and my mother went with him, and then he came and said my mother had sent him for a bedstead - I let him have it, and he took it away.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come and say "Here is one of the chairs, and I am going to take the bedstead that your mother said it was to be 1l.?" A. No.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and while he was outside I heard him talk about settling it - I said it should not be allowed, and took him into the office.

MARY FREEMAN re-examined. Q. Where did he take you to? A. To a public-house, and then he pointed to a place where some persons were moving, and I thought he was going to buy the goods - I did not know where he lived.

Prisoner's Defence. I went and left one of the chairs, and agreed for the bedstead for 1l.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-120

481. WILLIAM FARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , a bolster, value 9s. , the goods of John Denman .

JOHN DENMAN. I am shopman to Mr. John Harris, an upholsterer, of Tottenham-court-road. I received information about ten minutes before eight o'clock, on the 30th of January - I went into Percy-street, and from thence to Rathbone-place, where I took the prisoner with this bolster on his back; I asked where he got it - he said a great big boy had given it to him - I had seen it safe ten minutes before - it is my own property.

JAMES CUMMINGS . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. At the corner of Rathbone-place, a young man asked me to carry this bolster for him, and said he would give me some half-pence.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-121

482. JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 15 loaves of bread, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel Hallet .

JAMES WILMOTT . I am a constable. On the 13th of February, I was coming up Hoxton - I went to the watch-house, and took charge of the prisoner, with a bread basket, and fifteen quartern loaves - I then took him to Worship-street - he was remanded, and as we were return

>ing he said if he had not been hungry he would not have taken it.

DANIEL M'LAREN . I know Samuel Hallet, he is a journeyman baker . I went to assist him to deliver three loaves in Westmoreland-place, as he had a bad hand - we left the basket at the corner of the City-road - we returned in a quarter of an hour and the basket was gone - we went round the corner, and saw the prisoner with it - I asked him where he was going, and he said he did not know nor who it belonged to.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a mob of people, and the bread was rolling about the street - there was a baker, with two loaves, who seemed to belong to it, and he told me to carry it for him to the top of the street, and he would satisfy me.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260216-122

483. CHRISTOPHER COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 7 handkerchiefs, value 20s. ; the goods of John Scott .

JOHN SCOTT. I am a draper , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 24th of December a lad came into my shop and inquired for an article; I turned to get it, and saw him take seven handkerchiefs off the counter which were safe a minute before, and put them into his breeches - I jumped over the counter and secured him - I sent him to the watch-house, but he got out - he was about the prisoner's height, but I do not know that it was him.

JAMES JEFFRIES . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the boy, and was taking him to the watch-house when I met a watchman who took him - I asked him his name, and he told me Christopher Cook - I knew his father, and went to him on the Monday, to get the lad, but he was gone - I then offered a reward, and this boy was taken, but I do not think it was him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-123

484. SARAH BLAKENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 pair of scales, value 5s., and 1 weight, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Elliott .

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Elliott, a grocer , of Crown-street, Finsbury-square . The prisoner came on the 4th of February, about four o'clock, and asked for a pennyworth of Scotch barley - I was serving another customer, and then went to the further and of the counter - I stopped down to get the barley from the bottom of the drawer - I left the prisoner at the top of the counter while I went, and when she was gone I missed the scales, which I had used just before. I ran out and saw her going towards Bishopsgate-street - I asked if she had not taken the scales - she said No, but seemed rather confused - I said "Let me look," and they were in her lap.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am the officer. I took her in charge - she appeared the worse for liquor, but they seemed to think at the office that she was not so.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and did not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Three Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-124

485. CAHERINE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 bonnet, value 5s.; 1 gown, value 2s., and an apron, value 6d. the goods of Ellen Gurren .

ELLEN GURREN. I am a servant , out of place, and lodged at the prisoner's house, Exeter-street, Strand . My wearing apparel was there - I went out on the evening of the 26th of January, and returned a little after eight o'clock - my articles were then in her kitchen - the apron and stockings were in the box - the bonnet and gown were by the side - I went up stairs and when I came down they were gone.

GRACE LOVEMORE . I am the wife of George Lovemore. I know the prisoner. Last Thursday night three weeks she came to my house, about nine o'clock, and left a bonnet and a box, and said "Will you give me leave to leave this box till the morning?" I said I would, and asked her whose it was - she said it belonged to a young woman out of a situation, and she would call for it in the morning.

GEORGE LEADBETTER . I am an officer. On the night of the 26th of January, the prosecutrix applied to me - I went and took the prisoner at her own house - I put her into the watch-house - she was very tipsy in the morning; I sent the prosecutrix to find the things, which she did - I said to the prisoner "It is a hard thing that the poor girl should be robbed;" she said "She is a wretch;" I said I had found the things, and she said she had not taken them.

ELLEN GURREN re-examined. Q. What did you say to the prisoner that night? A. I asked her what she had done with the bonnet and box - she said she had not taken them - I told her to go to bed as she was intoxicated - she said she was not.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the things because I could not lock my door - I took them there for safety.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-125

486. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 tea-caddy, value 30s., the goods of William Aldons , privately in his shop .

JOHN WINSER . I am porter to Mr. William Aldous, an upholsterer , of Oxford-street . This tea-caddy is his property; I cleaned it about three o'clock on the 16th of of January, and placed it on a what-not - I was in the shop afterwards, but did not miss it till the officer brought it the next morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. Q. Is there any mark on it? A. No; there are marks in the polish by which I can swear to it - I have noticed them ever since we have had it.

THOMAS GOOK . I saw the prisoner about six o'clock in the evening, of the 16th of January, at the corner of Peter-street, in Wardour-street, a little more than five hundred yards from Mr. Aldous' shop - he ran by me with this caddy, covered with a handkerchief, under his arm; I said, "What have you got there?" he made me no answer; I took it from him, and he said he had bought it; I asked where, but he said he would answer no other question till he got before a Magistrate; he there said he had bought it of a man in Mary-le-bone.

WILLIAM HENRY COBBETT . I am in the service of Mr. Aldous. I know this caddy to be his - I had seen it about a week before.

>Cross-examined. Q. Do you know it by any particular mark? A. It is old fashioned, and we have had it for some time.

JOHN WINSER . When the officer came I missed the caddy, and pointed out where it had stood.

Prisoner's Defence. There were two men standing in Oxford-street, and one of them was bargaining for a caddy - I asked the price of it, and he said 26s.; I said I would give 25s. for it, which I did.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-126

487. CATHERINE ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 bullock's tongue, value 5s. , the goods of John Bowles .

THOMAS BOWLES. I am assistant to my brother, John Bowles, butcher , of Drury-lane. On the 23d of January, about half-past eight o'clock, a bullock's tongue was missing - Wilson gave me information - the prisoner was brought to the shop with it by Mason, the officer, in two or three minutes.

JOHN WILSON . I am a printer. I saw the prisoner go into the shop, and take up a bullock's tongue, which she put into her apron, wrapped it up, and walked on; I called the young man, and told him what had happened; I went after her, and met the officer - we stopped her with it before I lost sight of her.

JOHN MASON . I am an officer. I took her with the tongue - Bowles claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have two fatherless children, and it was distress made me do it.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260216-127

488. ELIZABETH MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 counterpane, value 4s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 2 blankets, value 4s., and 1 candlestick, value 9d. the goods of Edward Marshall , in a lodging room .

MARY MARSHALL . I am the wife of Edward Marshall, we live in Bennet-street, Westminster ; the prisoner came to lodge there about a month ago - she had the first floor; the articles stated in the indictment, were part of the furniture let with the rooms; she staid there three weeks, and left on a Wednesday, without notice; I went into the room on the Friday, and all these articles were missing; I found some duplicates in the table-drawer, which I gave to the watchman.

THOMAS BOYD . I am a watchman. I took the duplicates, and got these articles from the pawnbroker's - I have known the prisoner nearly twelve months as a girl of the town.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. This counterpane was pawned for 4s., on the 16th of January, by the prisoner.

JOHN JACKSON . I am a pawnbroker. This sheet was pawned for 3s., on the 16th of January - I do not know who by.

LEONARD GEORGE NEEDES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket and sheet which I took in from the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was real distress that caused me to do it - I intended to replace them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-128

489. REBECCA HINE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 hat, value 12s. , the goods of George Yates .

MARY YATES . I am the wife of George Yates, we live in Rose-street, St. Luke's , up two pair of stairs. On Wednesday week, I went out at a little after six o'clock, and returned before seven - Mrs. Peacock gave me information, and I missed my husband's best hat - I cannot tell when I had seen it; the prisoner lodged in the back room; I believe she was in great distress.

DAVID DAVIES . I keep a sale-shop in Field-lane. The prisoner came on the evening of the 8th of February, to sell a hat for 6s.; I said, "Whose is it?" she said, "My husband's;" I said it was worth more than 6s., and I must see him; I went to the door, and told Waddington.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I went to take the prisoner to her husband - she then said she could not take me to her husband, but that she took it from distress.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260216-129

490. THOMAS BANFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 Ottoman foot-stools, value 15s. , the goods of Charles Tollinton .

MICHAEL LANIGAN . I am a servant of Mr. Tollinton. Mr. Charles Tollinton lives in Gray's-inn-lane . On the 17th of January the prisoner came and took these two stools out of the shop, and went away. I followed, and collared him - and he threw them into the street; I got assistance, and took him.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . These stools were given to me by Lanigan; I do not think the prisoner was sober; he said he did it through distress.

CHARLES JONES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody; after the examination, as I was taking him down to prison - he said he was not sorry for what he had done, as he had been out of work three months - and he knew he should be provided for.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-130

491. JAMES FOWLER and ANN, his wife , were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 bolster, value 4s.; 1 blanket, value 1s. 6d.; 1 looking-glass, value 12s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 counterpane, value 3s., and 1 pillow, value 2s., the goods of James Curtis , in a lodging room .

MARY CURTIS . I am the wife of James Curtis. I let a furnished room to the two prisoners, in New-street, Golden-square ; these things were let as part of the furniture - they remained there nearly twelve months, and left on Saturday, the 14th of January, without notice - at half-past eleven o'clock, I found the door of their room open - I went down, and said it was not safe - we then went up and missed the things; my husband put a fresh padlock on the door - and about two o'clock the prisoners came home.

Prisoner JAMES FOWLER. Q. Did I not ask you on the

Saturday morning, whether it would do if I paid you the rent in the evening, and you said, Yes? A. Yes, I did so.

THOMAS BOYD . I am a watchman. I know the two prisoners - I met James Fowler in Tothill-street, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, on the Tuesday following; from the information I had received, I took him to the watch-house - he asked what I took him for - and I said something about his lodgings, but I did not properly know what - he said, "Oh! well, I am quite safe about that;" when I took the woman, she said she knew it was about the things of the lodging, and she intended to make it all good - and that the duplicates were in a corner cupboard, in a glove - I found them there.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I have a counterpane, a looking-glass, and 2 sheets, pawned by the female prisoner, in the name of Ann Wilkie, at different times.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a bolster and blanket pawned twelve months ago, in the name of Wilkins.

MARY CURTIS re-examined. Q. What way of life are the prisoner in? A. She used to sell apples in Covent-garden market - and they told us he was a stone-mason.

ANN FOWLER put in a written defence, pleading distress.

JAMES FOWLER - NOT GUILTY .

ANN FOWLER - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260216-131

492. PATRICK HAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 cap, value 7s., the goods of Charlotte Langford , widow , from the person of Edward Langford .

EDWARD LANGFORD. I am ten years of age. I was in Carlisle-street, Soho , on the evening of the 7th of February, about seven o'clock, with a little boy - the prisoner came up to me, and pulled my cap off; I hallooed out, and ran after him - I saw him stopped in Rose-street; I had not lost sight of him; I did not see him do any thing with it; he ran fast, and a boy said he had thrown it away - my mother is a window, and her name is Charlotte.

Prisoner. I only took the cap and threw it down in the street out of a bit of fun. Witness. No; he ran a good way with it.

THOMAS GOOK . I took the boy into custody at the witness's door - he said he had not seen the cap. I then went back, and left the young gentleman with the footman, and said the prisoner must go to the watch-house - as we were going there he said he would tell me where he had thrown it.

Prisoner. I did not do it with an intent to steal.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-132

493. ABRAHAM BANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 watch chain, value 6d.; 2 seals, value 6d., and 1 watch key, value 3d., the goods of John Curby , from his person .

JOHN CURBY. I am a dyer , and live in Ratcliff-highway. On Monday evening I was in Cannon-street-road ; the prisoner passed me, and drew my watch from me - he crossed the road, and ran up a street; I lost sight of him, as I could not run after him, being lame. I am quite certain of his person. The watch was found upon him.

CHARLES LORRAINE . I was in New-street, Cannon-street-road on Monday last; I heard the prosecutor cry Stop thief! and saw the prisoner run across the road - I followed close to him, till he was knocked down by a gentleman, who went away after he had given him in charge to a constable; the prisoner's hat fell off or was taken off, and partly in it and partly out of it was this watch and chain; he owned the hat, and said, "Now I will go with you."

PETER WILSON . I am a watchman. I received the prisoner in charge from Mr. Bearcroft.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-133

494. EDMUND UNDERWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 5 pairs of boots, value 20s., and 6 pairs of shoes, value 30s., the goods of Joseph Jackson , his master .

JOSEPH JACKSON. I am a boot and shoe-maker . The prisoner was in my service for several weeks - I took stock on the 26th of January, and missed a pair of Wellington boots, and forty-three pairs of boys' boots and shoes; I told the prisoner I thought he must he privy to it, as he worked in the shop, and I thought they could not go without his knowing it - he denied all knowledge of them.

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Westminster. I have a pair of half boots, pawned by the prisoner, on the 18th of January.

LEONARD GEORGE NEEDES . I am a pawnbroker. I have three pairs of boys' boots, pawned by the prisoner, at our house, at different times.

EDWARD DYER . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of boots; one pair was pawned by the prisoner - I do not know who pawned the other.

RICHARD BIRCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Lambeth. I have a pair of boots, pawned by the prisoner, I believe, but I am not certain - this is the duplicate I gave of them.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street. The prisoner pawned a pair of shoes with me on the 19th of January - here is the duplicate.

JOHN JAMES LLOYD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots, pawned at our house, but I do not know who by.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner from Henly, who is not able to attend.

JOSEPH JACKSON . I dismissed the prisoner on the day I missed the property; I found him at his father's the next day, and told him I had found eight pair of the boots at the pawnbrokers. I told him he was a pretty fellow - he did not attempt to deny it, but told me of four pair more - one pair of shoes I have not got - the pawnbroker would not deliver them up to me. The prisoner told me he had destroyed the duplicates.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor had promised not to prosecute if he would give information about the property.

JOSEPH JACKSON. I made him no promise whatever.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-134

495. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for steal

ing, on the 6th of February , 14 yards of carpet, value 25s., the goods of Griffith Foulkes , privately in his shop .

GRIFFITH FOULKES. I am a linen-draper , and live in Russell-street, Covent-garden - I have a carpet warehouse in Drury-lane . This carpet is mine, and had been in my stock - I had seen it the evening before it was taken.

JOSEPH WILMORE . I am a carpenter at Drury-lane Theatre, and live in Hampstead-road. On the morning of the 6th of February I saw the prisoner coming out of Mr. Foulkes' shop, about five minutes before nine o'clock, with a piece of carpet on his shoulder - he ran up Drury-lane - I followed, and stopped him; I asked him where he was going with it - he said, to No. 13, Lower Grosvenor-street, and that a shopman of the name of Smith gave him 6d. to carry it there; I said, "I know Mr. Foulkes very well, and if you will come back with me I will see about it" - he said, "You don't think I stole it?" I said, No, I had no right to think so. I went back, and asked the shopman if that was their carpet - they said Yes, that they had heard the door go, but had not seen the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was called into the shop to take it to No. 13, Lower Grosvenor-street.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-135

490. MARIA ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 54 yards of ribbon, value 25s., the goods of William Davies , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM DAVIES. I live in Chiswell-street , and am a linen-draper . I saw the prisoner in my shop between eleven and twelve o'clock on the 24th of January - she bought several small things of my assistant; I watched her for some time, and saw her put her hand into her basket two or three times, very quickly; she had a shawl on her shoulder, which did not quite cover the basket; when she left the shop I followed, and asked if she had not got some of my ribbons in her basket - she said she had not, and I was welcome to look. I found three lengths of ribbon in her basket; I took her back, and gave charge of her.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. Did you not state at the office that she resembled a person whom you had seen before? A. No.

EVAN GAMMON . I am the prosecutor's shopman. I served the prisoner with some little articles - she was about half an hour in the shop. I did not see her take the ribbons.

Cross-examined. Q. How were the ribbons laying before her? A. In a basket on the counter - they could not have slipped down.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-136

497. JEREMIAH DONOVAN and JAMES JENNINGS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 locket, value 2s., and 1 piece of ribbon, value 2d. , the goods of Henry Durtnall .

Jennings being deaf and dumb had the evidence explained to him by signs.

HENRY DURTNALL. I am a sailor . I was at a public-house at Poplar ten days ago, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening - the two prisoners were there, and we were all drinking together; I was rather in liquor. - Donovan and I got sparring - the waiter got hold of me by the arm, and wanted to lead me out; three or four rushed upon me, and knocked the waiter and me down at the door - both the prisoners joined in it; Donovan was by my side, and Jennings behind me; the waiter and I got up, and he said, "You have lost your watch;" I put my hand to my fob, and it was gone - I had looked at it three minutes before. I missed my hat, a piece of silk that I had in my trousers pocket, and a silk handkerchief.

Prisoner JENNINGS (by signs.) There was a little seafaring chap sparring with the prosecutor, and I saw him take the watch. Witness. I do not remember any such person - I did not spar with any except Donovan.

Prisoner DONOVAN. Q. Were you not sparring with two other men when you first came in? A. No - only I and Donovan sparred - I believe we fell several times.

JOHN FRANCIS . I was waiter at the public-house. I saw the prosecutor come in about an hour and a half before he lost his watch - he was net very drunk then; he had two friends with him, and he drank with them. I saw him and Donovan sparring; I took him by the arm to lead him out of the room; Donovan took him round the body to help him out, and the dumb man pushed him behind - we came to a dark passage which leads into the tap-room, and three or four rushed upon us, and knocked the prosecutor and me down - we were on the ground about half a minute; I arose, and asked Durtnall where his watch was, which I had seen as we came up the room, about a minute before. I did not charge anybody with taking the watch then, but on the Friday, (two days afterwards), I heard Donovan say the watch was pawned - this was in the tap-room.

JOHN BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Broad-street, Ratcliff. I have a watch, pawned by Jennings, on Saturday evening, the 11th of February; I asked him what he wanted - he held up his two hands twice, meaning 20s.; I answered, by signs, 14s. - I then wrote on a ticket,"Whose is it?" he pointed to his breast, meaning that it was his own. I then wrote, "What is your name?" he produced a ticket from one of his pockets, and pointed to the name on the ticket, "James Jennings," and gave his direction.

JAMES WAINING . I am a Thames Police constable. I went with the prosecutor on Monday last to the West India Dock - I saw Jennings in the hold. I wrote on a piece of paper, "Do you know this man?" he shook his head, and intimated by signs that he did not. I then showed him an old duplicate, and made signs to know if he had got any like that in his pocket - he showed me that I might feel; I searched him, and found this one for a watch, pawned for 14s., at Nicholas and Latter's - I then took him into custody, and afterwards went to the Green Man public-house, and found Donovan; I asked him if he knew the prosecutor - he said he might, and he thought he did; as we were going along I said, "I am certain you do, for you was at the Commercial tap on Wednesday last, with Dummy, and there the prosecutor lost his watch" - he said he knew nothing of the robbery.

DONOVAN'S Defence. I was in the tap-room half an hour or three quarters of an hour afterwards - I saw the prosecutor pull out some silver, and give to the landlord - he afterwards said he had lost his things; I saw

>this man sitting on the coal box; I went to work, and had not seen him till the officer came and took me.

JENNINGS - GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of stealing only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

DONOVAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-137

498. JOHN SPILSBURY and MARY, HIS WIFE , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 2 pillows, value 10s.; 1 bolster, value 10s.; 2 sheets, value 10s., and 1 blanket, value 5s., the goods of John Augustus Halcomb , in a lodging-room .

JOHN AUGUSTUS HALCOMB. I live in Diana-place, New-road - I let a furnished room to the female prisoner, about the 18th of January - her husband called the next day, and settled about it; when I was out they came in - these articles are part of the furniture; they left me on Saturday, the 28th of January, without notice. I found them afterwards, and gave charge of them. I received some duplicates, in a letter, of the goods, pawned at Mr. Wadmore's.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. Does that letter purport to come from the male prisoner? A. Yes, and he stated so when I took him into custody.

HENRY GEORGE WALLIS . I live with Mr. Wadmore, a pawnbroker. On the 27th of January I took in the two pillows, two sheets, and a table cloth, from the female prisoner - I had not seen her before, but I know she is the person.

WILLIAM CLULOW . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house - I found fifty-five other duplicates on them.

JOHN SPILSBURY - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fine One Shilling and Discharged.

MARY SPILSBURY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-138

499. SARAH BLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 2 pint pots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Chappell .

RICHARD CHAPPELL. I am a publican , and live at Pentonville. The prisoner was brought to my bar last Monday, by Wiltshire and Salisbury, with two of my pint pots.

NICHOLAS WILTSHIRE . I was in my room, and my wife, who is ill, said she saw a woman take two pots from the opposite door, and put them under her clothes - I saw this man, and asked him to assist in securing her - I ran and took hold of the prisoner. Salisbury found them on her.

ISAAC SALISBURY . I seized hold of this woman, and took two pots from her right hand pocket.

JOHN WILD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner - I asked her what she was going to do with the pots - she said she was going to sell them in Golden-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them off the flag-stones, and a person said I could sell them in Golden-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-139

500. JOHN EDWARD KING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of George Plant .

GEORGE PLANT. I am a shoemaker , and live in Kingsland-road . On the evening of the 27th of January, I received information from a boy, and went to the watch-house; I saw the two officers - as we returned the boy saw the prisoner and two other boys - he said those were the boys who took the shoes - I sent him back for the officer - and as soon as he was gone, they began to separate and run; I saw the prisoner had got something - I followed him pretty close - I took hold of him, and asked what he had got - he said, a pair of shoes which he was going to take home to his father - and while I was looking at them, he ran off - the two officers were coming along and stopped him; I missed this pair and three more; he had them tied up in this handkerchief.

RICHARD WARWICK . I am eleven years of age. About three weeks ago I was next door to Mr. Plant's shop, and I saw the prisoner and two other boys go and take some shoes out of his window; they ran down Wellington-street - and I went and told Mr. Plant of it; he went with me to several places - and as we were coming back, we saw the three boys - I told him they were the boys.

Prisoner. I picked them up at the corner of William-street.

JOHN JOHNSON . I was in Kingsland-road, and saw the prisoner running - I stopped him, as I suspected he was one of the boys.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-140

501. RICHARD TIGGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 30 yards of flannel, value 10s. , the goods of John Rodgers .

JOHN RODGERS. I live in Chiswell-street , and am a hosier . I heard a bell ring on the 27th of January, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran to the door, and missed a roll of flannel, which had been standing there with a line round it, which was attached to the bell; Doubell brought the prisoner to the house, and this flannel was brought to the shop.

WILLIAM DOUBELL . I was in Chiswell-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner run across the road from the shop; he dropped a large white parcel, about four yards from the door; I crossed over the road, and stopped him - the parcel was picked up.

CHARLES JEROME . I was in Chiswell-street, and saw a man snatch the flannel from the door - I lost sight of him for about a minute and a half, and cannot say that it was the prisoner; I stood in the middle of the road, and saw a young man take him.

JOHN BROWN . I am watch-house keeper. I was sent for to take the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Post-office - this young man came and asked me to go back with him which I said I would.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-141

502. THOMAS CURTIS and WILLIAM BOWYER were indicted for stealing, 1 carboy and basket, value 7s., and 8 gallons of spirits of turpentine, value 45s. , the goods of Thomas Flockton .

JOSEPH DUNFORD . I am carman to Mr. Thomas Flockton, who lives in Freeman's-lane, Horselydown. On the

>21st of January I received a carboy and basket, to carry to St. Martin's-lane, in a caravan - I stopped with it in Chandos-street , about half-past three o'clock, to go into a public-house - and when I came out, the carboy was gone.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a City-officer. I was in Fleet-market on the 21st of January, about twenty minutes past two o'clock - I saw the two prisoners and another man, following a cart down Bridge-street, and then they turned down Thames-street, and met Mr. Flockton's van, which they followed; I saw Curtis take the pin out of the back of the van, as they were going along, and in Chandos-street they took down the tail-board; Bowyer took out the basket, and Curtis put on a knot, and took it on his head- I followed him, and took it from him in a narrow passage at the end of the street - in the scuffle it fell down and broke all to pieces.

WILLIAM WORCESTER . I was with Forrester - what he has stated is correct - the prisoners were taken in a narrow passage leading from St. Martin's-lane to Bedfordbury.

CURTIS'S Defence. I was a quarter of a mile from the place at the time.

BOWYER'S Defence. I was hired to take it by a man, who told me he would give me 1s. for it.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BOWYER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-142

503. ESTHER BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 purse, value 2s., and 5 sovereigns, the property of William Mayger , from his person .

WILLIAM MAYGER. On the 20th of January, about five minutes past ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came up to me while I was looking in at a shop - she accosted me in a familiar way, and asked if I would go with her to a corner - I did so, and staid there a short time - I then missed my purse and five sovereigns; I looked about, and found her in about twenty minutes in Pimlico; she denied having seen me at all; in coming by a dead wall, near Grosvenor-place, she took her right hand from her pocket, and dropped something - I said to the watchman,"She has dropped something;" he found two sovereigns and a half; she begged very hard for mercy - and I said, if she would return me my money, I would satisfy her and the watchman; she said she could not, as she had thrown it away; she then desired the watchman to let her go, and she would give him what silver she had in her pocket; I then heard some money chink in her left-hand, and said she had got my sovereign; she said she had not - and I said she should go to the watch-house; and there she said she had thrown away the money, thinking it might be marked.

MICHAEL M'GRATH . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner, and I took her to the watch-house; there was another woman in her company; I walked between the two - the prosecutor said, "Watchman, she has dropped my sovereigns;" I turned round with my light, and saw the three pieces on the ground - he took them up; we went to the watch-house, and there she said she had thrown all the money away.

SAMUEL VORLEY . I was constable of the night. I took the prisoner into a private room to search her, but found nothing - she said she had thrown the money away.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-143

504. WILLIAM HENRY BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 2 shillings , the monies of Henry Stocks George , his master.

HENRY STOCKS GEORGE. I am a surgeon and chemist . The prisoner had been in my employ for about a month prior to the 4th of February; I marked 2l. 6s. 6d. in silver, which I put into the till on the 30th of January, and the next morning some of it was gone. On the 3d of February, there was 2l. 7s. in silver in the till, and on the evening of the 4th there was 2l. 7s.; but I can positively state I had put two shillings in on the morning of the 4th - I put more in, but I can positively swear to two shillings, which I took in my surgery and marked; the till was only locked at night; I went for a constable, who searched him in my presence - I said I had lost money out of my till - the prisoner said he had no money about him; the officer found three shillings on him, which had my mark on them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What mark is it? A. It is a small oblong mark below the chin of the head; the prisoner's family is respectable; I am not aware that he broke any tumblers in my house which he had to re-place.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am an officer. I was sent for to search the prisoner; I asked if he had any money - he said, No; I saw his hand go to his pocket - I took hold of it, and found three shillings in a bit of paper, with paper between them; he was a very respectable boy till this time; he has been to a Sunday school, and was much respected.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18260216-144

505. JOHN GEORGE DAFT was indicted for embezzlement .

But having left the prosecutor's service at the time the offence was committed, the Court held, the indictment could not be supported.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-145

London Case, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

506. GEORGE HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 pair of pearl ear-rings, value 20s.; 1 pearl brooch, value 20s., and 2 necklaces, value 10s., the goods of Mary Pullen , and 1 pair of pearl earrings, value 20s. , the goods of Anne Sophia Pullen , and WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MISS MARY PULLEN. I live with my father, at Cannonbury; I had occasion to come to town on Wednesday evening, the 11th of January, and came in a hackney coach, which came up to our door about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening; I cannot tell who drove the coach, nor the number - I brought some property to town in a small brown hair trunk, which was not locked - there was a little black case in it, which contained a pair of pearl ear-rings, a pearl brooch, and two necklaces of mine, and a pair of pearl

>ear-rings, belonging to my sister, Anne Sophia Pullen; I had put the property into the trunk, which I packed up, and delivered to a female servant attending us, to put into the coach - I did not see her put it in, nor did I see it in the coach; I got to my father's house, in Fore-street, City, about seven o'clock, but did not miss the trunk till the following morning; I saw the property again on the Tuesday after I came to town - I made some inquiries about the trunk, and it was brought to me by my servant about nine days after - but when I opened it, the little black case was gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. The box was not locked - and you have no recollection of the coach or the coachman? A. No, not at all.

ELIZABETH VANSUDA . I am servant to Mr. Pullen; his town house is in Fore-street. I remember Miss Pullen coming home on Wednesday, the 11th of January, and some inquiries being made about the trunk the next morning, it was not to be found; Hughes, the coachman, came to our house on Friday, the 20th of January, before eight o'clock. I had before that seen an advertisement about these ear-rings; I opened the door to the prisoner; he said he had brought the trunk which had been left nine days in his coach; I said, "I will call my master;" he said, "I cannot stay, but I will call again to see that the articles are all right;" - he went away, leaving the trunk, and never called again.

Cross-examined. Q. Has not Mr. Pullen other servants? A. One more, but I always open the door - and I can say, the person who brought the trunk, did not call again; he called on the Friday - the advertisement was in the paper on the Tuesday before; we had the number of the coach from the man servant - I had seen the trunk about three o'clock, when it was packed up to come to town, by Miss Pullen; I did not see it put into the coach.

CHARLES PAYNE . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves, pawnbroker, of Snow-hill. On the 13th of January, the prisoner Watson, came to our shop, and brought two pair of earrings, a brooch, and two necklaces; the ear-rings and brooch were pearl - and I asked if he wanted to sell them; he said, he did not particularly want to sell them, but what would I give for them; I offered him 5s., to ascertain if he knew what they were; he said, "You shall have them for 7s." I then questioned him as to where he got them - he said he had picked them up the night before in Blackfriars Road - I told him I should stop the ear-rings, as they were real pearl, and advertise them, and if there was a reward offered for them, he should have it - he said it was perfectly right - that he had picked them up the night before; I asked his direction, and he said his name was Thomas Watts, or Watson, No. 40, Thames-street, and said he would call again in two or three days; this was on Friday - they were advertised the following Tuesday, in the Times newspaper of the 17th of January; on the following Saturday, he came and asked if I had heard any thing about the ear-rings - I asked him to come inside the counter, which he did, and I told him if he would wait a minute, I would speak to him; I went to the further end of the shop, when he lifted up the flap of the counter, and ran out - I ran after him into Seacoal-lane, about two hundred yards - he ran as hard as he could - our apprentice, who was on first, caught him - I then came up, and he was taken into custody.

Prisoner WATSON. I did not exactly run, I was walking very fast. Witness. He ran, and I pursued him for two hundred yards - our apprentice can prove he ran.

THOMAS PIKE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner back to Mr. Reeves' shop.

JOHN PULLEN , Esq. I am the father of Mary Pullen; my town house is in Fore-street, in the City. In consequence of hearing of this loss, and seeing the advertisement in the Times newspaper, I accompanied my daughter to Mr. Reeves, and she identified the box and property; an inquiry was set on foot for the coachman; on the day before the trunk was delivered at my house, I sent two or three different people to inquire, and heard that the trunk was delivered at my house - the coachman said before the Magistrate, that he drove the coach and received the money.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a Marshalsman. When Watson was brought to Guildhall, on the 24th of January, he was remanded; Mr. Pullen gave me the number of the coach to find where the master lived, and to get the man if I could. The prisoner, Hughes, was out with the coach No. 154, but I took him about half past one or two o'clock on Tuesday morning; I went and searched his lodgings; he stated, without being asked, that he was the coachman - that he had brought the Miss Pullens from Highbury, and had had the trunk, which he had taken home himself to Fore-street. He said he had kept it, I thought he said five days, but I understood afterwards, it was nine days; that he had kept it in his lodgings, in a court just by Worship-street Office, but he knew nothing about the jewels - the next day he came before the Magistrate, and was committed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HUGHES' Defence. The servant said wrong about my keeping the trunk nine days in my coach; I took the box out that night, when I found it under the seat, close by the nose bags, in some straw; I gave it to my landlady to take care of till I took it home; she took it to my bed-room -Thomas White lodged and slept in the same bed; he asked me whether I had looked into this box; I said no, I did not mean to look into it, I should take it home; but I was very busy; I used to go out soon in the morning, and was out late at night, and my master was ill; but one morning I had my horses shod, and took it home, and delivered it to that young woman - I told her I had found the box in my coach, and had taken care of it, as I had not an opportunity of bringing it - she said, "I do not like to take it in, you had better wait;" I said, I could not wait, but I would call again - I had not an opportunity for two or three days, and then Mr. Harrison took me.

WATSON'S Defence. I was at Mr. Dixon's Repository, in Barbican, and met a young man named Thomas White; he said he was working in the Curtain Road; he told me he had found a little trinket case between Rowland Hill's Chapel, and Blackfriar's Road - I questioned him if he got them honestly, and he declared that he had; he asked me to go with him to ascertain the worth of them - I took it for granted he had got them honestly, as I had known him for eighteen months; he wished me to go to a Jew's, and I said that is a wrong place; we were going by Mr. Reeves', and I went in there; I told him they were picked up in Blackfriars Road, and wished to ascertain the value; he said they were only mock, and he would give me 6s. for

>them; I said I would have 7s.; and then I said, would he give me 6s. - he then went into the parlour, came out, and said he had been mistaken, they were pearl; I said, I would call again, and then I was taken ill, and was blooded; but I called again on the Saturday, and asked if he had found an owner - he said he had, but he did not know whether he was the right owner; he then went to the back of the shop, and I certainly was rather flurried, and did make an attempt to go away, but not because I was guilty.

CHARLES PAYNE . He gave this account at the office, and said he had been deceived by Round-headed-Tom; when he was at the shop, he said he had picked them up.

COURT to MISS PULLEN. Q. What was the value of the jewelery that you and your sister lost? A. I do not know; the other part of the property is of very little value indeed.

JURY. Q. Can you bring any body forward to shew it was put into the coach? A. I never saw it put in.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What time did you put the case into the trunk? A. In the middle of the day; it was not locked, and I did not look into it; I cannot tell whether it was opened before it was put into the coach; there were none but the servants in the house.

COURT. Q. How many servants have you? A. Two female servants; the young man who knew the number of the coach, lives in London.

JOHN GREEN . I live at No. 7, Devonshire Buildings, Worship-street; I have known Hughes three years; he has lodged with me two years, and bears a very honest character - there was a person of the name of Thomas White lodged in my house; he left me on the day Hughes was taken, and I have not seen him since.

JURY to Mr. PULLEN. Q. Had you any reason for not applying at the Hackney Coach Office? A. I did employ a person to go; but there were two coaches employed, No. 154, and 507; and it was not till after the articles were found, that I thought it right to apply again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-146

507. JOSEPH MANN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Francis Wonfor , from his person .

THOMAS FRANCIS WONFOR. I was passing Fleet-street , on the 2d of February, about four o'clock; some one tapped me on the shoulder, and inquired if I had lost a handkerchief; I said, I believed I had; the officer turned round and seized a man; but I cannot state whether it was the prisoner.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I was near Shoe-lane, in Fleet-street, on the 2d of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon - I saw the prosecutor going along, and a piece of the handkerchief hanging out of his pocket; the prisoner was close after him; I tried to get across the way, but I could not for the carriages; I got across as soon as I could, and saw him turn away from the prosecutor - the handkerchief was not then hanging out; I tapped him on the shoulder and then secured the prisoner with the handkerchief in his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-147

508. JAMES CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Pugh , from his person .

THOMAS PUGH. I was in Smithfield between twelve and one o'clock on Saturday last. I had a handkerchief in my coat pocket, - I felt something and turning round, saw the prisoner with another boy - the prisoner was close by me, and had my handkerchief in his hand - I collared him - the other boy escaped - the prisoner got away three times, but I kept him till the officer came - he did not get out of my sight at all - the handkerchief was given to me by a person in Smithfield.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a beadle. The prisoner was brought to my house by the prosecutor, and given into my possession with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going across Smithfield to see my aunt at St. Bartholomew's Hospital - the gentleman turned round and took hold of me - I made a little resistance, because I did not know what he took me for - I saw the handkerchief lying on the ground - he took it up himself and put it into his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-148

509. WILLIAM DAVIES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Sarah Keen, about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 31st of January , at St. Bridget, alias St. Bride, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 4 tea-spoons, value 8s.; 1 printed bound book, value 2s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 4s.; 2 glass salts, value 9d., and 1 pepper-castor, value 3d. , the goods of the said Sarah Keen .

SARAH KEEN. I am the tenant of the house No. 5, Goldsmith's-street, Gough-square, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Bride . I keep a chandler's shop there - I lost the articles stated in the indictment, on the 31st of January, from a small cupboard in the back room adjoining the shop - I went to bed about eleven o'clock that night, and my house was all secure - I am perfectly sure of that; I got up at seven o'clock next morning, the 1st of February, and found the shop door unlocked, and the padlock gone - the back door was open, and the sash of the back room window - the back door leads into my own private yard - it had been unbolted - it was bolted when I went to bed; it was getting light, but I had a candle in my hand, There was a strong suspicion that the person had been concealed in the lower part of the house, where there was a large cupboard, in which there was the print of some feet, and the ends of matches, which led us to suppose they had been in the house before we went to bed; the shop door had been locked with a padlock, and the padlock was gone - they went through the shop into the back room, and took the things from the cupboard; I slept on the first floor, but was not alarmed in the course of the night; I have seen the property since, and know it to be mine.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I lodge with Mrs. Keen. On the morning of Wednesday, the 1st of February, I came home, and had a large key to open the door, which I did, but previously to that, I observed a light in the shop, through the holes in the window shutters - it looked like a candle

moving about; but as soon as I opened the door the light disappeared - I took no notice but went up stairs to bed.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am a Bow-street officer. About half-past seven o'clock in the morning of the 1st of February, I saw the prisoner near a pawnbroker's shop in Broad-court, Long-acre - he took something out of his pocket which appeared like silver spoons - he then went to several other pawnbrokers' shops, which were not open, and kept repeatedly looking at the things in his pocket. After I had watched him some time, he got to Mr. Townshend's, in Russell-street - I saw him go in, and, after a little time I followed, and questioned him as to whose property those two spoons were which he was offering to sell- he said his name was King, and they were his own property - he had had them some time; he offered a prayer-book to pawn, which he said was his own, and his name was in it - I searched it, but could find no name - he afterwards said the spoons belonged to his mother, who lived near Hyde-park-corner. I took him into the back room, and found on him two glass salt-cellars, a pair of spectacles, and two silver spoons in his watch-fob, and a pepper glass; I asked him how he came by them - he said he was a poor unfortunate fellow; I again asked where he got them; he said "You know;" I said I did not know; he then said they came from Mrs. Keen's, No. 5, Goldsmith's-street, Gough-square. After he had had a hearing I found the prosecutrix out - I likewise found a phosphorus bottle and some matches on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

COURT to SARAH KEEN. Q. Was the padlock quite gone? A. Yes, and I had left it quite locked I am certain.

JURY. Q. How is your shop situated? A. It has a door in the passage - the lodgers have no occasion to go through the shop into the house.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of his apparent distress, and believing it his first offence, and by the prosecutrix, having lodged with her and conducted himself well .

Reference Number: t18260216-149

510, JOSEPH PUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 piece of silk, containing 30 yards, value 5l., the goods of George Hilditch , privately in his shop .

HENRY HONEYWOOD . I am in the service of George Hilditch, a silk-mercer , who lives on Ludgate-hill . About five o'clock on the afternoon of the 2d of February, Mr. James Hilditch was serving two gentlemen when the prisoner came in, and I spoke to him; he asked to see some black silk handkerchiefs, and I asked him to walk further in, which he did, and stood by the gentleman who was by the fire; I took some handkerchiefs, and asked him distinctly to walk further into the light, but he did not; I then went opposite to him, in that part of the shop which is rather dark - he said those handkerchiefs were plain, and would not do; I went to get some others - he said they would not do - he wanted a small pattern; and then he asked for some other patterns, but we had not got them. He was going away - I went to open the door for him and saw a piece of silk under his cloak; I got the key, locked the door, and called Mr. Hilditch. I lifted up his cloak and there was the roll of silk placed perpendicularly; James Hilditch took it from him - he was dressed very much like a gentleman, with a travelling cloak and fur collar.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. How many persons were in the shop? A. I, James Hilditch, the prisoner, and two gentlemen; the two gentlemen were in the shop at the time I made the charge - a number of rolls of silk were on the counter, but none were on the floor - the roll found under the prisoner's cloak was one of those which had been unrolled and shewn to the two gentlemen.

COURT. Q. Had your attention been drawn to this roll after the prisoner came into the shop? A. No, it had not.

JAMES HILDITCH . I am the prosecutor's son. I was serving in the shop - I showed the two gentlemen a roll of black sarsnet, but they did not buy it, nor move it at all; I had unrolled about three yards of this silk, twisted it up, and laid it on the counter, in the back shop, under the lamp. The prisoner came into the shop, and this piece of silk was found under his arm - he had not purchased it. I had seen him near the gentlemen - they had not left the shop when this occurred - they went out afterwards - there were thirty yards of this sarsuet - I saw it under the prisoner's arm.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you not bring the gentlemen forward? A. They said it was a very unpleasant thing to be in the shop, so I would not detain them - they said they would call again the next day, but they have not- I do not know whether the gentlemen saw him take it or not.

JAMES SNOW . I am the officer. I have the property, which was given to me at the time I was sent for, about half-past five o'clock.

GEORGE HILDITCH . I was at home at the time it was taken, a little after five o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it accidentally under my cloak, and was dragging it at my heels - it had been knocked off the counter.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-150

511. CATHERINE M'CABE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 table-spoon, value 10s. 6d.; 1 hat, value 4s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 1 child's coat, value 4s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 shift, value 2s. 6d.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d., and 1 napkin, value 6d. , the goods of William Dimes .

WILLIAM DIMES. I am Assayer to the Goldsmiths' Company . On Saturday, the 28th of January, between one and two o'clock, I was in the office, below where I live, and some persons gave me information - I went into my parlour - my wife, who was very ill, and lying on the sofa, said "The girls think there is a woman in the house;" immediately the girl said "Here she is;" and I saw the prisoner pass from the kitchen - she had come in at the lobby, and then through a private door, came up to the part of the house which I occupy; she was a perfect stranger to me, but I saw her dropping a number of things out of her apron under a table - they are now here. I took hold of her, and asked what she did there; she said"Oh, the gentleman, the gentleman;" she then said"Here is your property; I am a poor woman in distress -

I have got nothing;" I then sent for an officer, and when he came he proceeded to search her - a silver table-spoon dropped from her person.

ELIZA SMITH . I am the prosecutor's daughter-in-law - I live with him. I heard a gentle knock at the street-door, and then I heard the door open; I conclunded that my sister, who was in the parlour, would open the door; I went just afterwards towards the kitchen and saw the glimpse of a person in a white shawl, and a straw bonnet; I then went and asked my mother if any person was in the kitchen; I then went out and saw her going up stairs; I immediately called for Mr. Dimes, and gave her a push into the kitchen. The property she took was up stairs in the bed-room.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I am the officer. I have had the property ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

COURT to Mr. DIMES. Q. Could she have got to your rooms from the public stair-case? A. Yes, by opening a private door which leads to the stairs.

Prisoner's Defence. It is very false - I had no property about me - I walked in and this gentleman came and took me - the spoon that he said dropped from me was lying on the floor.

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-151

512. WILLIAM DRAPER was indicted for stealing, on the 23th of January , 3 pairs of shoes, value 30s. , the goods of William John Thompson .

JAMES THORPE . I am a cork-cutter. I was near William John Thompson's house, in Gracechurch-street , about three o'clock on the 23d of January. I saw the prisoner (as near as I could tell by his coat) untwist a piece of string at Mr. Thompson's door, and take the shoes, which hung on a nail at the step of the door. I had no idea of a theft till I saw him pass them into the apron of a man who was with him; I put my head in at the door and said "The man has taken your shoes;" "Which man?" said Mr. Thompson; "That man in the brown coat," said I. I did not pursue him but Mr. Thompson did. I believe it to have been the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Of course when you were looking into the shop, you could not be looking at the man in the brown coat? A. No, I could not.

WILLIAM JOHN THOMPSON. I keep a shoemaker's shop in Gracechurch-street. Mr. Thorpe put his head into my shop, and said "There goes the man who has taken your shoes" - I ran after him and pushed him into a neighbour's house - he had nothing upon him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-152

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Middlesex Cases - Fourth Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

513. JOSEPH WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 4 pieces of cloth, value 1l. 8s.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 2s., and 1 pair of breeches, value 3s., the goods of Joseph Haberfield , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-153

514. FRANCIS LAWS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 cask, value 5s., and 27 gallons of Holland Geneva, value 30l. , the goods of Richard Stones ; and HENRY STEVENS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

ANOTHER COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Johnson and John Tabor .

MESSRS. ALLEY and FISH conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD STONES . I live in Church-lane, and am a master carman . I was employed by Messrs. Tabor and Johnson, to carry some wine and Hollands over the water, on the 3d of February - I gave the papers to Laws, who was to drive the cart, about one o'clock that day, to go to get the wine from the London Docks - he was to call at Messrs. Tabor and Johnson's, in Savage-gardens, Crutched-friars, for the Hollands, I did not see him again till about half-past eleven o'clock the next day, when I met him at the docks - he said, "Master, this is a bad job - I suppose you have heard of it?" I said I had, and asked him how it happened - he said he had his tail rope cut on London-bridge, and somebody had taken the cask of Hollands out. I asked him to go with me to Mr. Johnson to explain it - he went. I went in while he waited, and told Mr. Johnson what I had heard. I afterwards asked the prisoner how it was to be paid for, and told him I should have to make it good. I have paid upwards of 30l. to Messrs. Tabor and Johnson for it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long has this man been in your employ? A. He never was in my employ, except by my hiring him when I was busy - I do not know where he lived. Messrs. Tabor and Johnson's cellars are in Savage-gardens; I heard of the loss the next day, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. I never saw the Hollands till I was at Lambeth-street; I do not know whether the prisoner keeps the cart - there are two names on it - it is one of the town carts that ply for hire.

COURT. Q. Was it hired for you? A. Yes - I was employed to cart the wine, and not having a cart I employed him; I was to be paid for the cartage, and was to pay Laws.

EDWARD STONES . I am the prosecutor's brother. I was present on the 3d of February when two pipes of wine were delivered to Laws at the London Docks - he took them into his cart, and I did not see him again till the next day, about twelve o'clock, at the London Docks. I got a warrant next day (Sunday morning), and searched the premises of Stevens, at the corner of Buckley-street, Whitechapel - Fortune, Foster, and Dalton were with me - we found the cask in the cellar - it was taken to Lambeth-street; I do not know that it contained Hollands.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the docks on Friday? A. Yes. Laws' cart left the docks about half-past three o'clock, and was to call at Messrs. Tabor and Johnson's afterwards. The wine was permitted there, and should, in the regular course of things, have been delivered there.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am servant to Messrs. Johnson and Tabor, of Savage-gardens. On Friday, the 3d of February, the prisoner Laws came to their warehouse about half-past three o'clock, with two pipes of wine - he left one there, and was to take the other to Symond's wharf,

in the Borough; he took with him a cask containing twenty-seven gallons and three pints of spirits; there was a permit nailed under a small tin on the head of the cask, so that it could not rub off. He went from our warehouse about half-past four or twenty minutes before five o'clock, and if he had gone at a fair pace he might have got to the Borough at half-past five o'clock. I saw the same cask afterwards at Lambeth-street office, on the 6th - the permit was not on it - it had Hollands in it, but I cannot say that it was the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it dusk? A. No - I do not think it would be dusk before he got over the water; he might have got to Symond's wharf in about an hour, but there are stoppages sometimes; he might have gone down Thames-street, but I should not have gone that way, because there are frequent stoppages there, and so there are in Tooley-street, and on London-bridge.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am a Police officer of Lambeth-street. I received a warrant to search Stevens' house - I went there about twelve o'clock in the morning of Sunday, the 5th of February, with two officers - I knocked at the door, and as we are frequently in the habit of going to see that they are shut up, the door was opened; I walked in, and looked into the tap-room, where I saw three persons; I asked what they did there, and they said they were lodgers. I called Stevens aside, and asked if he had not a cask of Hollands, of such a size as I described, in his house; he said he had one brought there the night before that, but it turned out to be Friday night, and the person had asked his leave to deposit it there till Monday morning, as it was too late to take it to the in it was to go to - he said he knew the two men who had brought it, and he gave their names to my brother officers. I told him I must see it, as I understood it had been stolen - he said,"I will show it to you immediately;" he then got some keys from the bar, took a candle, and went into the cellar, and shewed it to me and Mr. Stones, one of the proprietors, who identified the cask, which I took into my custody. Mr. Stevens was very desirous of seeing the Magistrate that morning; he let him go, as some gentleman passed his word for his appearance the next day. His house is directly in a contray way to the Borough.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Who granted the warrant? A. Mr. Wyat. He came next day according to his promise. I believe he has kept that house for two years or more. I do not think I asked him the men's names; I examined the cask - there was no tin or permit on it; there was a chalk mark on one of the beads - I do not know whether it was a letter or a figure; Foster went into the cellar with me, but I do not think either or them heard the account which Stevens gave me, because I called him aside.

Mr. ALLEY. Q. As there were customers in the house you did not, out of delicacy, ask him before them? A. No. I do not know what conversation passed between him and Foster; it was a person named Plant who passed his word for his appearance. I told him I had a search-warrant before I saw the cask.

COURT. Q. The permit, you say, was gone, and the tin also, if ever there was one? A. Yes - I saw on the head of the cask marks of nails, and there is the corner of a piece of paper under one of the nails; there are marks of nails that would have suited the permit, and the direction; Laws and another man (who was discharged) came to the house while I was in the cellar, and were secured by my brother officers - they were locked up, and examined on the Monday; there were three or four persons in the house. I do not know whether a publican takes off the permit from a cask, and puts it on his file.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I went to the house on the Sunday, and went into the cellar with Stevens; I asked how he came by that cask - he said it was brought by two men who lived in the neighbourhood; I asked him their names, and he said Dalton and Laws; I told him I knew the two men perfectly well; Dalton, I believe, is a carman, and has got a cart of his own. I know his brother, but I do not know whose service he is in.

COURT. Q. Did he mention what Laws it was? A. When I came out of the cellar Laws and Dalton were standing together - I took the handcuffs out of my pocket, and put them on them; they asked what it was for - I told them I would tell them at the office. I then looked round, and said, "These are the two men you mean," and he said Yes. I took them to the office - they asked what they were brought there for; I told them about some Hollands, and Laws said his tail rope had been cut on London-bridge, and he had lost it; Dalton said, "I know nothing about it" - to which Laws made no answer; Stevens was not there then - he was admitted to bail.

Cross-examined. Q. Who spoke first to Stevens? A. Fortune did - I did not hear what he said. I followed them down to the cellar. There were four or five persons in the tap-room. I suppose Laws came in while we were in the cellar - he was not there when we went down. - Stevens told us in the cellar that Laws and Dalton brought it - he did not refer to a man up stairs, and say he brought it. The Magistrate allowed him to go, and appear on the Monday. Stevens charged Dalton as one of the men, but he was discharged on the Thursday.

EBENEZA DALTON . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I accompained my brother officers to search Stevens' house on the 5th of February.

COURT. Q. How much out of the way would it be to go to his house, when the party was to go over London-bridge, to Symonds' wharf? A. Quite a contrary way. - Fortune and Foster were in the cellar, and I stopped up stairs in the parlour. The prisoner Laws and three more knocked at the door, and I unbolted it; they asked if they could have a pot of beer; I told them Yes, and desired them to go into the tap-room, which they did - I had every reason to believe that two of the men were persons suspected of stealing the spirits. Foster came up in a few minutes, and took Dalton and Laws into custody.

JOHN PRIESTLY . I am a carman out of work. I was in Whitechapel with James Stains on the 3d of February; I did not see Laws there - I did not come up Red Lion-street, nor did I see any horse and cart there. I have been examined by a gentleman who is here as to what happened. I was going along, but I did not see the prisoner. I saw carts and horses passing by, but I took no notice of any of them.

JAMES STAINS . I am a carman. I was in Whitechapel on Friday afternoon, the 3d of February - Priestly was

>walking a little way before me - I did not observe any thing particular; I did not see any cart carrying any cask, nor notice any cart going into Red Lion-street - it was dark, and I could not see. I told a gentleman who is here that I thought I saw a cart go down there, but I could not swear to it. I gave him a true account of what I saw.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a carman, and have known Laws some time - I saw him between five and six o'clock on Friday afternoon, the 3d of February, driving a cart in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel; it had in it three casks, and one case, which appeared to be a case of wine. If I were going from Savage-gardens to London-bridge I should not go through Red Lion-street.

WILLIAM TURNER re-examined. Q. What was in the cart? A. A pipe of wine and three casks of spirits.

HENRY JOHNSON . I am clerk to Messrs. John Tabor and William Johnson - they have no other partners; they have cellars in Savage-gardens and Crutched-friars.

LAWS's Defence (written). I had the misfortune to lose the cask on London-bridge - I did not miss it till I got to Tooley-street, when I found the tail rope had been cut; I could learn nothing about it, and when I got to Symonds' wharf I told them of my loss; I went to Mr. Stone early in the morning, but he was out - I met him on the docks at ten o'clock, and told him. I ascertained upon inquiry that a cask had been left at Mr. Stevens', and went there immediately, when Mr. Dalton opened the door.

STEVENS' Defence. When the officers came I gave them every information in my power; I told them two men certainly had left it there on the Friday afternoon; if I had had any idea it was stolen, I had time to have made away with it; I took it as smuggled goods, not having any permit. I have kept the house ten months.

Seventeen witnesses gave Stevens and excellent character.

LAWS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

STEVENS - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-154

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

515. STEPHEN SNELLGROVE and JOHN FROST were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 14 gallons of rum, value 9l. the goods of Richard Stones , to whom they were servants ; THOMAS DALTON was also indicted for receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, charging them all as principals.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD STONES. I am a master carman . On the 13th of January I was employed by Johnson and Co. to remove some rum from the West India Docks - three puncheons were to go to Symonds' wharf, and one to Beals' wharf; I attended at the docks to see it loaded in my waggon - there were eight puncheons in the waggon, which was to be driven by Snellgrove; he returned that night with the waggon, but I did not see him.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Where was it to come from? A. From the West India Docks, Middlesex - Symonds' wharf, and Beal's wharf, are both in Surry.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a cellarman to William Johnson and John Tabor , they live in Savage-gardens. The prisoner, Snellgrove, brought the waggon, with five puncheons of rum, to their door on the 13th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening - Frost brought an empty cart at the same time - I knocked the bung out, and guaged four of the puncheons; I guaged three of them the next morning, at Symonds' wharf, between nine and eleven o'clock - there was then a deficiency of fourteen gallons in the three.

COURT. Q. Did you guage them more than once? A. Yes; three of them I guaged again at Symonds' wharf - and there was a deficiency in them of fourteen gallons.

Q. Did you examine the casks? A. Yes - and they had been plugged with large plugs, close to the tin, which had not been in them when they were at our house; I saw Snellgrove drive the waggon from our house, and gave him the papers, to deliver them at Symonds and Beals' wharf.

FREDERICK BOX . I am foreman at Symonds' wharf On the 13th of January, some puncheons of rum were brought there by Stones' waggon - one of them appeared to be partly empty, and I desired Frost, who brought them, to put the bung up - I told him I should not sign his note till his master came to examine them; I saw on the wharf when they were guaged - there was a deficiency.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who drove the waggon? A. I do not know; I will swear Frost was the man I spoke to - I think it was about twenty minutes after nine o'clock; there was a gas-light close by the wharf, and I could see him sufficiently to speak to him.

Mr. FISH. Q. Who gave you the note? A. The watchman; the prisoner said, "As I received them, so have you."

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. On the night of the 13th of January, I was in Cable-street, Whitechapel; I observed a cart stop which took my attention, as the property was covered over in a singular way; it stopped a few doors from Back-church-lane, opposite the door of one Lewis - I saw Dalton go to the cart tail, and take this large stone bottle out - as he went towards the door, I heard Lewis say, "I will have nothing to do with it;" Lewis would have known my if he had seen me - I secured Dalton and the bottle, and put them into Lewis' door - there was a person in the cart when I first perceived it, but as I went toward the door again, a man got out of it in a hurry, and escaped - I went into the cart, and found two more bottles, covered with horse-cloths - I went to Mr. Stones', next morning, and apprehended the two prisoners; I cannot swear to their being in the cart.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Did not Dalton tell you, he was merely unloading it as a porter? A. It was words to that effect - that being on the spot, he was employed to unload the cart; I did not see him in the cart.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. Q. Did not Snellgrove come with you without hesitation? A. He would have come, but Mr. Stones brought him; I saw it was Mr. Stones' cart, and knowing him, I took it there; the place is in the county of Middlesex.

RICHARD STONES re-examined. Q. You have told us Frost and Snellgrove were your servants, and this cart and waggon both took out rum? A. Yes; the cart took out another puncheon of rum belonging to another merchant; these horse cloths belonged to Snellgrove's horses.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Then the cart was out with another

>puncheon of other rum? A. Yes; it was going to Beals' wharf - the cart and horse were mine, but these cloths are never used by other horses.

WILLIAM TURNER . I have examined the bottles - I do not know whether these samples match with what I saw at my master's - but it is fined with red-wine finings, which is a very unusual thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-155

516. JOHN CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 gate, value 5s., the goods of John Lindsay , and 8 pieces of wood, value 10s. , the goods of the Company of Proprietors of the Regent's Canal .

EDWARD MULLOY . I am servant to Mr. John Lindsay, who lives in Thornhaugh-street; he had a gate near the Regent's Canal ; I had seen it safe on Saturday, the 14th of January - it was afterwards found, but not on the prisoner's premises; he lives in St. Pancras.

Prisoner. Q. Did I work for you? A. Yes; from September till December.

Q. You state, that on the 14th, I stole that wood - did you not take me that day to the surveyor, to get a bill of 10l. cashed? A. Yes; I did not tell you to take this old wood and make fire with it; I might give him leave to take old wood but not posts and pales - there might be some broken staves; the gate was not fixed.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I keep a shop in St. Pancras; the prisoner came to me on the 14th of January, and asked to leave a gate there - I told him he might; it was an old gate, and I showed it to Mulloy the next morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-156

517. CHRISTOPHER ATTLEY TODD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February 2lbs. of sugar, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Colling , and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

EBENEZA DALTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of February - I searched his premises with Mr. Colling; the house was shut up, but we got in by knocking; the prisoner had been taken at the sugar-house, and he went with us; I found this sugar in the kitchen.

JOSEPH COLLING. I am a sugar-refiner , and live in Ratcliff-highway. I have two partners - the prisoner was in our employ, On the 16th of February, I had him apprehended - and searched his house; I was present when this sugar was found, and I have here some sugar which corresponds with it - it was refined last Tuesday week; I have no doubt whatever that it is ours; this lump was taken on Wednesday; he asked me some time ago, if I would allow him sugar - I said, "Certainly not;" I thought his salary very ample, but I would sell him a little, provided it was broken up, and entered in a book, and paid for; on the 17th of January we sold him seven pounds broken up into small pieces.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESWELL. Q. How long had he been in your employ? A. About six years; I have sold him rather better than seven pounds of sugar, but not without mentioning it to my partners, and its being entered in the book; these lumps are all numbered on the bottom, - the days they are made, or cut out, as we call it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18260216-157

518. MARY WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 15s.; 1 coat, value 1l., and one handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of William Dear , from his person .

WILLIAM DEAR. I am a navigator , and live near the Three Colts', public-house, Hackney. I was in Golden-lane , about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, at noon, on the 5th of February - I had a bundle containing this property; I saw the prisoner standing at the end of a court, and as I passed by, she snatched the bundle out of my hand, and run up the court into a house - I followed, and got in before she could shut the door - there was another woman in the house - I went up stairs into one room, and could not find her - I then came down and got an officer; we went to the house, and they would not let us in for some time - the officer looked through the key-hole, and saw them helping a female over the wall - he took the prisoner last week; I have not found any of the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. Q. Was the girl who got over the wall taken? A. I do not know; a man was standing at the end of the court, not far from her, but no other woman - she had a light gown on; the goods were taken in a moment - I had seen her face for some distance before I came to her - she was marked with the small pox; I swear she is the person.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to No. 39, Payne's-buildings; I knocked at the door - I thought they were keeping me a long time, and I looked through the key-hole; I saw some persons assisting a female over the wall to another person's premises - I then knocked again, and the person who had helped the woman over, ran up stairs, and asked who was there; I got in, but could not find the property; I sent for the prosecutor on the Thursday, and took him to the house - where we found the prisoner, two other women, and two men; I asked him which it was, and he pointed out the prisoner immediately.

Prisoner. I never saw him in my life, and the officer said, by the description the man gave him, he thought it was the other girl - and he asked me what the other girl got over the wall for.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-158

519. MARY ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one tea-spoon, value 2s. the goods of Sarah Biggin .

SARAH BIGGIN. I live in Fugen's-row, Harman's-rents . The prisoner lodged in my house, and worked for me - I missed this tea-spoon from a drawer on the 16th of January; she had been in my house that day; I spoke to her about it when she came in, and she went out immediately.

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a journeyman pawnbroker. I have a tea-spoon pawned by the prisoner on the 16th of January.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My intention was to have got it out.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260216-159

520. WILLIAM CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 pair of scissors, value 6d.; 4 yards

of lace, value 10s.; 1 box, value 10d.; and 20 sovereigns , the property of William Buckall .

JANE BUCKNALL . I am the wife of William Bucknll. On the 24th of January I was removing from Queen-street, Edgware-road, to King-street, Park-street; I took a hackney coach, No. 781, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening - I took the number at the time - a person named Jobbins brought it - he appeared to be the driver - the prisoner was not then present; I saw Jobbins take my things out of the parlour and put them into the coach, and among the rest was a box, which contained one pair of scissors, four yards of lace, and twenty sovereigns - there were a great many other things of value; Jobbins then got on the box and drove away - he stopped at the corner of Park-street, and took some person up, but I did not see who it was; when we got to King-street, I saw two men on the box; the prisoner was one of them - he took my things to the door, but I think Jobbins was in the coach, and gave them to him; the prisoner demanded the fee of me, and drove off from the door - I afterwards missed the box which contained the property - On the Thursday following, I offered a reward of 5l. to a waterman, and he gave me some information; I have seen the scissors since, which I can swear to.

BARNARD COHEN . I live in New-Court, Lower-marsh, Lambeth. I am a general dealer. Crane came to my house on Tuesday evening, the 24th of January, between nine and ten o'clock, with another person; they called me out of my back parlour, and offered a box for sale, similar to this, but I cannot say it was this; I said I would not buy it; I have known the prisoner for ten yeras, but I would never buy any thing from such kind of people.

Cross-examined by Mr. ROBERTS. Q. There was another man with him? A. Yes; but it was the prisoner who made the offer to me; I cannot tell whether the box was deal or mahogany; they caried it under their arms.

COURT. Q. You state in your deposition before the Magistrate, that the prisoner wanted to sell the box now produced? A. I did not say so; I could not say this was the box; I stated that the prisoner opened the box, but I did not buy it.

BENJAMIN ALEXANDER . I am a hatter and salesman. I was at Cohen's shop, and remember the prisoner and another man coming there, and offering a box for sale; I was sworn before the Magistrate, and asked if I recollected this box - I said, "I was in the shop, when this, or one similar to it, was offered for sale;" I have no doubt on my mind but it was this.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it opened before you? A. Yes; the prisoner opened it a little way for Mr. Cohen to see - he said, "I will not buy it, take it out."

WILLIAM PURCHER . I am a publican, and live at the Marsh-gate. The prisoner brought this box to me on the Tuesday evening in question, between nine and eleven o'clock - he said, "Will you take care of this for me, and the old lady will give it me in the morning - it is for sale, and I will take two guineas for it." I asked him where he got it - he said it was a find, and he got it eight miles off; he left it with me, and about two hours afterwards I turned every thing out, to see if I could find who was the owner; he called for it the next day, I believe, but I was not up; I can only account for taking it, from being in the habit of taking things for customers.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he came on account of another person? A. No.

HENRY WILLIAM FOWLER . I am a waterman, at the Red Lion, Marsh-gate. I know the coach, No. 781; I saw it on the evening of the 24th of January, about half-past six o'clock; Jobbins was with it - and the prisoner was the driver; I saw them again from half-past nine till eleven o'clock, in the rank; I wanted a coachman, and looking about, I saw Jobbins; I said, "You have been wanted, and where is Crane?" he said, "He is gone to get something to eat, and will you give me something to drink;" I said, "Yes;" he then said, "Here is a pair of scissors for your wife;" I saw Crane and him together afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was Jobbins when you saw him first? A. On the box.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 26th of January, at the Horse Grenadier, public-house, in Oxford-street; he then had this box in his possession; he said it was all right, the box was one he had found, and the lady did not suspect him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he know you was an officer? A. I told him so; I took him into the kitchen, where he said, in the presence of the prosecutrix, that he had not seen the box till the following morning, and it was as he had found it; there was a key in it, which would not open it, and I wrenched it open.(Box and scissors identified.)

B. COHEN. I cannot swear this was the box - it is similar to it; the prisoner has been in the habit of visiting me - he has bought clothes of me, and lived opposite to me, but I never bought any thing of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was the coachman, and gave the lady these things; Jobbins got on the other side the horses; the lady asked my number; she had the numbers of several other coaches taken before mine; I went to the Horse Grenadier - I stood there at the time, and the lady said it was not me.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-160

521. THOMAS BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 5 dozen black-lead pencils, value 8s.; 1 pack of cards, value 2s.; 2 books, value 2s.; 1 quire of paper, value 9d., and 1 piece of India rubber, value 8d., the goods of Richard Mason Wood , his master .

RICHARD MASON WOOD. I live at Islington, and am a stationer . The prisoner was my errand-boy in November last; I had reason to suspect all was not right, and went to his master's in Whitechapel, a few days ago with an officer; I had a pencil in my hand, which he had given to a person, and asked him where he had got it; he said he had picked it up in the shop; I said "Have you any more?" he said, no - I then asked him if he would let me search his box; he said, no - but he gave the key to the officer, and we found five dozen pencils, and some other articles of mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Are these pencils marked? A. Yes; - I sometimes sell them in dozens. the prisoner said he had taken them, and he must go to prison.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, having a good character .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged

Reference Number: t18260216-161

522. CATHERINE MULLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 coat, value 5s., and 1 waistcoat, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Wood , her master .

ANNA MARIA WOOD . I am the wife of Samuel Wood. He lives in Union-row, Bethnel-green . The prisoner was in my service for six or seven months; she was out of place, and used to come to my house to sleep sometimes: she came on the 13th of January, when I was out; when I returned, she said she must sleep in the street, if I did not let her sleep there; she slept there that night, and breakfasted the next morning; I missed these articles after breakfast.

EDWARD EDWARDS . I am a watchman. The prisoner was given to me at the end of Maiden-lane; she acknowledged she had taken the things from Mr. Wood, and had pawned them.

JOHN STOKES . I live in Tothill-street, Westminster, and am a pawnbroker - I have a coat pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM HENRY LLOYD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Strutton-ground - I have two sheets pawned by the prisoner.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I live with my father, in Chapple-street - he is a pawnbroker - I have several articles pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - I asked her where the articles were pawned, and she told me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-162

523. JAMES BURNELL was indicted for embezzling 1 half-crown, the money of James Brunton , his master .

There being no proof of what coin the prisoner had received, he was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18260216-163

524. SAMUEL MEADE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 20s., and 2 waistcoats, value 12s., the goods of Joseph Bowden , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . About twelve o'clock on the 28th of January, 1 watched the prisoner, in company with two others, up Tottenham-court-road - I saw him go into Mr. Bowden's shop - he came out in a few minutes - I went out and took him back; he had the trousers' under his arm, and the two waistcoats in his hat.

JOSEPH BOWDEN . I keep this shop - this is my property.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing only . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-164

525. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 sovereign, 5 shillings, and 18 pence, in copper monies, the goods of James Chiswell , from his person .

JAMES CHISWELL. I am a journeyman carpenter . I had been to the pay table at Paddington; on my return, at nearly twelve o'clock, I met the prisoner in Golden-place - she put her hands on my breast, and said "Young man;" I pushed her off, and said "Go along!" she came to me again, and clasped her hands round me, and before I could get her away I found her right hand in my breeches pocket; I called to two watchmen but they would not come; another woman came and the prisoner helf out her hand to her; I took hold of the prisoner and again called the watch, but they would not come; I dragged her along some distance, and said to a watchman "Will you take this woman, she has robbed me?" he said "I am not the right watchman, you will find him in Chapple-street." I held her some time, and then took her to Chapple-street - I could not find the watchman, and I brought her back- I could not find a watchman to take her, and left her with the other woman - I then met two Bow-street officers, who took her - she said she had not robbed me - she had got no money. As she was going to the watch-house she said she had got but 3s., and when she got there she took her money out of her pocket in her hand, and laid it on the table; the officer laid his hand on her's, and said"What money have you got here?" she said 3s.; he said"Are you sure of that?" she said Yes.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am a Bow-street patrol. The prosecutor complained to me that me could not get a watchman - he then pointed the prisoner out to me - she was very drunk, and had part of her things off - she kept saying she had but 3s., which was her own, and when she came to the watch-house she put her hand with her money down on the table; I said "What have you got here?" she said 3s. I found I sovereign and two shillings in her hand. The Magistrate gave me two summonses to find the watchmen, but the prosecutor could not identify them- he was perfectly sober.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-165

526. MARGARET HINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 sheet, value 3s., and 1 blanket, value 2s., the goods of Farinton Stephens , in a lodging room .

FARINTON STEPHENS. I live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields . On the 17th of December I let a ready-furnished lodging to the prisoner for 4s. a week. On the 11th of January my wife went up stairs and missed these articles - the prisoner was then in the room, but she was going out, and said she would bring in the rent.

SARAH STEPHENS . The prisoner came down to me and said she was going out to get my rent; I said "Before you got I will know that my things are all right;" she afterwards said she had pawned my property, but would get it me again - she brought a man whom she said was her husband.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MOGRE . I live in Bishopsgate-street - I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket and sheet pawned by the prisoner, I believe.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-166

527. RECECCA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 2 sheets, value 2s.; 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 1 saucepan, value 1s., and 1 flat-iron, value 8d., the goods of Richard Atkins , in a lodging-room .

MARY ANN ATKINS . I am the wife of Richard Atkins - we live in St. Ann-street, Westminster - the prisoner lodged in the house (before I was married,) in the second floor front room, with a foreigner, who called himself her

husband - a servant was in the house who had the care of the property - I did not lend it to the prisoner - she went into the dining-room and took them.

MARY EDWARDS . I lived with Mr. Atkins before he was married; I was present when the prisoner hired the two pair of stairs front room; she took another room about a fortnight before Christmas, for 4s. a week, and I am certain these articles were in that room - the quilt was missing off her bed, and I asked her what she had done with it - she said she had pawned it, but would redeem it if I would not tell my master, which I did not; but when other articles were missed from the adjoining room, I insisted upon going into her room, which was kept locked, and then I missed the other things.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. The whole of this property was pawned by the prisoner.

PHILIP JONES . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Tothill-street. I have a rug and a flat iron pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked Mrs. Atkins to give me liberty till nine o'clock, and she said she would.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-167

528. JOHN BOND and TIMOTHY MURPHY were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 coat, value 4l., and 1 handkerchief, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Candler .

JOSEPH PRICE . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Thursday last, about half-past one o'clock, I was passing down Crown-street, and saw Bond with this bundle in his hand; Murphy was with him; they were about three hundred yards from where Mr. Candler's chaise was - my partner stopped them, and I asked where they got this coat - Bond said some hostler had given it to him, but he could not say where he was, and he was to take it to a Mr. Gage, at No. 12, but we could not find such a person. Murphy ran away but was taken.

SAMUEL CANDLER. I am a wholesale confectioner . My servant had put a great coat into my chaise, and I sat upon it. I called upon several customers in Tottenham-court-road - when I got to the top of the road I missed the coat- I made some inquiries but could not hear of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOND's Defence. It was given to me by a man in a Brown coat, who said if I took it to No. 12 he would give me 6d.

BOND - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

MURPHY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-168

529. JOHN BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of William Lane .

WILLIAM LANE. I am servant to Mr. Nicholson, who lives at Epping. I was at Mr. Gurney's-yard, Limehouse , on the 21st of January, with my master's cart; my coat hung across the horse; I was absent about five minutes and on my return it was gone - the prisoner was brought back with it in about half an hour.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I live within twenty yards of the place. I saw the prisoner take the coat off the horse, and run down the fields - I gave information and he was brought back in about half an hour. I am certain of him.

ROBERT QUINTON . I was called to the place by William Young. I saw the prisoner running down the field- I pursued and stopped him with the coat on his arm; he said he had found it in the field.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the field, and picked it up, and put it on my arm.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-169

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

530. SARAH DAVID and HARRIET BLOOMFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 6 cups, value 4s.; 6 saucers, value 4s.; 1 cream-jug, value 7s.; 1 tinpot, value 8d., and 1 pair of salts, value 1d. , the goods of Mary Dickinson .

MARY DICKINSON. I keep a china-shop in Marylebone-street . The prisoner David was in my service - my sister Elizabeth Livesey , slept with me in the parlour adjoining the shop. On the morning of the 16th of January we heard a knock at the door, about eight o'clock, before I got up, while my sister was dressing; (it is usual for my servant to answer the private door on week days) - David came into my room, took the key, and went down, and unlocked the cellar door; when she came up I asked her what she had been for - she said to remove some pans- I said I was there on Saturday night and nothing wanted moving; she went up and down several times, and said she had done no harm - my sister then went to the water-closet, and said the door was fast; David was then in the parlour, and said she would go - she went and let Bloomfield out - my sister was standing by the parlour door - no could pass without her seeing them - these articles were taken out of Bloomfield's apron, in my presence, while David was there; I asked her how she dared to do such a thing - she said if she had taken them she meant to return something for them - I said now I know how my other things went - she said she would make me suffer for saying she had taken my salts.

ELIZABETH LIVESEY. I am sister to Mary Dickinson. On the morning of the 16th of January, about eight o'clock Harriet Bloomfield knocked at the door - David let her in, and then went down stairs, leaving her in the passage; I went and asked who she wanted - she said a person who took in needle-work - I went down the yard, staid some time, and then came back into the parlour; I could see who came from the water-closet, and I saw David let Bloomfield out. I then went to her and said "What have you got in your apron?" she made some answer but I did not hear what, but I felt there were some crockery ware; I took them into the parlour, and took them out - she gave no account how she came by them.

Prisoner BLOOMFIELD. The tea-pot and milk-pot were not in my lap. Witness. Yes, I took them out of your lap.

Prisoner DAVID. A man came into the shop for half an ounce of tobacco while they were in bed - I had these articles in my hand, and gave them to this young girl to

>hold while I went down to get the tobacco, and she asked me to let her go to the water-closet. Did not you receive the money for the tobacco which I took of the man, and gave to you. Witness. No - I have no recollection of taking a farthing - it was earlier than the shop was usually opened - the prisoner got up sooner than usual that morning.

SARAH DAVIES . I am servant to Mr. Phillips, of Woodstock-street. On the 13th of December David gave me a pair of salts to pawn.

WILLIAM LACEY . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner in charge on the 16th of December - I asked David if there was any more property - she said there was a pair of salts at Mr. Phillips', No. 4, Woodstock-street - she had given them to Davies.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVID's Defence. Davies had a cap and collar made by a woman in the kitchen - she asked for the money, and Davies said "If you will give me a pair of salts I will go and pawn them;" she kept one shilling, and I gave the woman the other shilling. I gave these things to the young woman to hold while I went down stairs - she saw my mistress, and did not want her to see her.

DAVID - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

BLOOMFIELD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-170

531. ROBERT EBRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 3lbs. of pork, value 2s. , the goods of William Youngs .

WILLIAM YOUNGS. I am a porkman , and live in Hoxton . Fielding gave me information on the 25th of January - I went into the street, and apprehended the prisoner, and this piece of pork, which he had under his arm, fell upon my foot - I had seen it in my shop within an hour, about a foot from the window.

WILLIAM FIELDING . On the night of the 25th of January I saw the prisoner near Mr. Youngs' shop; he then went in, and took a piece of pork off the hook - he went down Ivy-lane, and I informed Mr. Youngs - I followed, and saw him stop him - the piece of pork fell at his feet.

Prisoner. I was out of work; I met with two shopmen, who gave me some gin and beer. I was in a state of intoxication.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18260216-171

532. JOHN HEAD and THOMAS M'GRAW were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 ham, value 15s. , the goods of John Eustace .

GEORGE GALLOP . I am shopman to Mr. John Eustace, a cheesemonger , who lives at Islington . On the 30th of January, about half-past two o'clock, Lane gave me information, and I missed a ham, which I had hung up about eight o'clock - I went into the street, and saw Head with it, under his arm; I pursued him, and when he saw me he ran, and turned into a lane, where I saw the two prisoners together - Head had the ham, and the other had a bag or apron, which he was endeavouring to put it into; a witness was coming up the lane, and I called to him to stop them: they threw down the ham, and ran away. I lost sight of Head, but I knew him before, and know he was the person who had the ham. I took M'Graw, but he had no bag.

JOHN LANE . On the 30th of January I was at my master's, Mr. Astley's, who lives two doors from Mr. Eustace, and saw the two prisoners walking about, and looking into Mr. Eustace's shop; my mistress called me to get the things in from the door; I saw the prisoners notice me when I came out about the fourth time. I saw Head going away with a ham, and I told Gallop what I had seen.

JOHN MOXY . I was going towards Islington, and saw Gallop come down the lane - M'Graw had the ham under his arm - he threw it down, and away he ran; I took him, gave him to Mr. Gallop, and then took the other.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge.(Property produced and sworn to).

HEAD's Defence. I know nothing of M'Graw. I I picked up the ham, and saw the people run - I went to a ditch for a certain purpose.

M'GRAW'S Defence. I was going towards the Lower-road, Islington, and looked into a book shop; as I was going down the lane Head laid down the ham, and got over the bank; I stood talking to him, saw the people running, and I got over the bank.

HEAD - GUILTY . Aged 26.

M'GRAW - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-172

533. MARY HALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 child's dress, value 10s. , the goods of Andrew Haig .

ANDREW HAIG. I am an artificial-flower maker . The prisoner had formerly been in my service - the last time she had been with me four days only. On the 21st of January I missed a child's plaid dress from a box which was locked; I had seen it safe the day before. I accused the prisoner of it - she said she knew nothing of it. I then sent for an officer - she still persisted in saying she had never seen it, till the officer said he would inquire at all the pawnbrokers, and then she said she had taken it, and pawned it at Mr. Lowther's, in Tottenham-court-road.

BENJAMIN REEVE . I am shopman to George Lowther. This dress was pawned there on the 21st of January, by some person.

WILLIAM BATE . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner; she denied it at first - I told her I should go to the pawnbrokers, and at last she told where it was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They owed me 10s. wages, and some things were wanted, which I lent them my shawl to pawn for - they said they would burn it rather then let me have it.

ANDREW HAIG re-examined. There was some soap and other things wanted, and my wife gave her leave to pawn her shawl for them - I did not owe her any thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-173

534. RICHARD HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 sheet, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Bontor .

The articles being let to the prisoner with a lodging, and he not being indicted under the statute, was found

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-174

535. THOMAS SHEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Paston .

CHARLES PASTON. I live in Drury-lane , and am a shoemaker . On the evening of the 14th of February, about seven o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for a pair of shoes - he tried on a pair, and said they were too large; I shewed him another, and they were too small - he put on a third pair, and said they would do - he put his hand into his pocket, as if he was going to pay, and then said, "I think I will have the first pair" - as I turned round to get them he snatched the third pair off the board, and ran away; I ran after him into Broad-street - a patrol stopped him in a few minutes. He was quite a stranger, but I am certain of his person.

WILLIAM SUTTIE . Last Tuesday evening I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running up Plumtree-street; I followed him, and he dropped this pair of shoes at my feet.

Prisoner. I was running up the street, and this gentleman came and took me. I had not been in the shop at all - there were a number of persons running.

WILLIAM M'GREGOR . I was in company with Suttie, and saw the prisoner stopped.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-175

536. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 3 live tame fowls, price 7s. , the property of Joseph Blower .

JOSEPH BLOWER. I am a printers' warehouseman , and live in St. John-street-road - I keep fowls, which were all safe in my hen-house, behind my house, on Monday, the 30th of January - I missed these three at seven o'clock next morning - I know them to be mine.

JOHN BATES . I am a watchman of Clerkenwell. On the night of the 31st of January I saw the prisoner with three or four men; I followed them, and the next watchman stopped the prisoner - I came up, and took him - he dropped the fowls and basket at my feet. I took this light fowl and the prisoner to the watch-house.

JONATHAN BROWN . I am a watchman. I took up this fowl by the side of a wall - I took it to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner in custody.

GEORGE INGNEY . I have a fowl which I took at the corner of Bowling Green-lane.(Fowls produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and had not a bit of victuals.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-176

537. GEORGE JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 coat, value 2s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I lost this coat on the 11th of February - I left it on the box of my hackney coach, while I went into a grocer's shop at the corner of Devonshire-street, Mary-le-bone ; I had not been in there above a minute or two, when the officer came and told me of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM UNWIN . I live in Edward-street, Foley-place, and am a beadle. On the night of the 11th of February the prisoner and a man came to my shop, and I followed them to South-street - I saw them go to an eating-house, I suppose to see if they could get anything, but they could not; they then went to several other places. - When they got to High-street the man took this coat from the box; he gave it to the prisoner, and I stopped him with it. GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-177

538. ARCHIBALD NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 3 pieces of wood, value 3s. , the goods of John Yates .

JOHN YATES. I am a timber-merchant . These three pieces of wood are mine - they were safe about five o'clock on the evening of the 27th of January, on my wharf.

Cross-examined by Mr. CARRINGTON. Q. How do you know these to be yours? A. By either W. P. or S. P. being on both - the pieces I sell have the same marks on them.

COURT. Q. Then why do you say you had seen these three pieces? A. I have lost such pieces within the last twelve months.

WILLIAM BROOKES . I am clerk to Mr. Yates. On the 27th of January I sold some pieces of wood to Mr. George, but none to the prisoner. I know these pieces to have been my master's, by the marks.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I live in Wilson-place, Gray's Inn-lane. I was in the City-road on the 27th of January, and saw a man coming from the wharf, with two pieces of timber belonging to this gentleman; I do not know of any other timber-yard near there - I then saw the prisoner come up with these three pieces; I asked him where he got them - he said, "The foreman," pointing to the other man; I desired him to put the timber down, and sent him back with Greenaway, to see where he got them - they returned, and Greenaway said "It is all wrong;" the prisoner then said, "I will pay for it;" and he put his hand to his pocket to pay for it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say the foreman had paid for lit? A. No - he said "The foreman, - the foreman." I knew he was the foreman of Mr. Buxton, a baker, in Chapel-street, Islington; he did say the foreman would make it all right, and then offered to pay for it. I have heard that he is servant to Mr. Allerdine, another baker; he went back, and wished to have the foreman brought back, and when he found it was not paid for he offered to pay for it.

JOHN GREENAWAY . I was with Thompson. I went back with the prisoner, and asked the clerk if he had sold any timber - he said he had, and the man owed him three half-pence, but not these three pieces.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-178

539. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 trunk, value 5s. , the goods of George Marsh .

GEORGE MARSH. I live in Well-street, Oxford-street , and am a picture dealer . I had a leather trunk taken from my door on the 8th of February - I had seen it safe at two o'clock, and left my wife in the care of the shop. I went out the next day to look for it, and met the prisoner in Little White Lion-street, Seven-dials, with it

on his shoulder; I followed him to Belton-street, where a companion, who had been with him, went away; he put the trunk down soon afterwards, I went up and said it was mine - he said if it was I might take it - that he had it of his brother-in-law - he had not the key of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-179

540. JAMES SCRIVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 bag, value 6d., and 196lbs. of nails, value 30s. , the goods of Moses Robinson .

JOHN UPTON . I am one of the conductors of the Bow-street patrol. On the 14th of February I was on duty in Playhouse-yard, with Keys; I saw the prisoner there with a bag of nails - I asked him what he had in the bag; he said nails, which he had brought from his waggon in Whitecross-street, and was going to take them to his own home, in Green Harbour-court, Golden-lane - that he had been out delivering nails, and he had delivered twenty-nine bags, but had forgotten to deliver the 30th, and intended to deliver it in the morning. I asked if he had any papers to show what he had delivered - he said he had the papers, but they only showed the delivery of twenty-nine bags, and the prisoner said they had thirty of them - I sent Keys to go with him to Mr. Slater's wharf, but he was not at home - I went the next morning, and saw Mr. Slater; I then went to the prisoner, and told him I had seen Mr. Slater; and he said it often happened that he took a bag home to deliver the next day.

JOSEPH SLATER . I live at the wharf, in the City-road; I am agent to Moses Robinson; I received some nails from him lately. The prisoner came into my employ at Christmas; this bag of nails is one of the twenty which I directed to my warehouseman, to deliver to Mr. Hanton, in Whitechapel - it was in our warehouse on the 14th of February.

WILLIAM HAMPTON . I am in the employ of Moses Robinson. Slater gave me an order to put a certain quantity of nails into a waggon, to deliver, which I employed the prisoner to do; there were thirty bags in all, which was one more than he wanted - and had been put in by mistake - I told him to bring it back, provided it was marked with a certain letter.

FRANCIS KEYS . I was on duty in Playhouse-yard, and took the prisoner with the bag, which he said he was going to take home; I asked him why he had not delivered that; he said he had thirty to deliver, and had only delivered twenty-nine; he was going to take this home, and deliver it to the right owner the next day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-180

541. ROBERT MILLAR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 19lbs of lead, value 2s., the goods of Gerrard Wilkins Scudder , and fixed to a certain building .

JOHN HENRY SCUDDER . I am foreman to my brother, Gerrard Wilkins Scudder, who occupies a stable, on which this lead was safe - but I had not seen it lately; it was missing on the 13th of February.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am a constable. I was employed by Mr. Scudder, to watch at his stables; I went there about twelve o'clock on the Sunday night, with Jackson - we waited about an hour, and then heard some tiles moving - I waited about a quarter of an hour, and then we went out - and I saw the prisoner ripping up the lead - I told him to come down, or I would fire at him; I went out, and found this piece of lead separated, all but one piece about the size of my nail.

Prisoner. The lead was not cut away. Witness. It was all but this bit.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I was with William Summers; I heard the noise, and stopped below, while he went up - I believe what he has said is true.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it out of distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-181

542. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , at twelve o'clock in the night, 300 savoy cabbages, value 20s., growing in a certain garden ground of Joseph Field .

JOSEPH FIELD. I have a garden at Ealing , which is enclosed. On Saturday, the 21st of January, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I missed the savoys out of my garden - they were safe about dusk the evening before - and were worth about 30s.; I saw some marks of a wooden-leg, and I suspected the prisoner - I took an officer, and searched his house; we found five of the savoys - I then went to the turnpike, and asked the man there about them; the prisoner was brought to the office, and there I charged him with taking them; he said he had bought them from a cart, but did not say where.

JOHN DENGER . I am an officer. I went to the house and found the five savoys - I went into the garden, and saw the mark of a wooden-leg; I met the prisoner on the Monday - he said he was coming to give himself up, about these savoys, but he was not guilty; I told him about the print of the wooden leg - and he said, more men had wooden-leg besides him; when I found these savoys at his house, he said he had bought sixpenny-worth of a man in the road, and had sold five of them to the turnpike-gate man; the wooden-leg mark in the garden was of the left leg, and so is the prisoner's; he said he had been to see for in work on the night they were taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed on this night, as my mother swore before the Magistrate; there are three men in the parish who have left wooden-legs.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-182

543. SARAH CADWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 coat, value 20s., and 1 handkerchief, value 5s. the goods of George Davis .

GEORGE DAVIS. I am a butcher , and live with my father-in-law, in Coburg-street, St. Pancras : I did not know the prisoner till I went home, being out of place; she occupied a room in the house. On Friday, the 3d of February, I missed this property; I told the prisoner what I had lost - she said, "I have not got it;" I said I did not say she had got it - she then said it was the first time she was accused of any thing of the kind.

BENJAMAN REEVE . I am shopman to Mr. Lowder, pawnbroker, who lives at No. 23, Tottenham-court-road. I received this coat from the prisoner on the 3d of February.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicate in her room; she lived respectably with her husband, who is a Sheriff's-officer.

The prisoner pleaded poverty, and received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-183

544. FRANCIS BRIANT was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY SKINSLEY . I am a baker , and live at Enfield - the prisoner was in my service - he took out the bread - and if he received any money, it was his duty to deliver it to me; I gave him a bill of 1l. 18s., to deliver to Mrs. Anderson, on the 30th of January, and he told me in the evening, about nine o'clock, that she could not pay it, because she had a great deal to pay for washing.

SUSANNAH ANDERSON . On the 30th of January I paid the prisoner 7s. 41/2d.; I gave him a crown piece, and a half-crown - he gave me the change, but no receipt - this was about seven o'clock; I said nothing about washing.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not my intention to keep it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-184

545. JAMES BEW was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 gown, value 6s., and 1 pair of ornaments, value 5s. , the goods of James Jordon .

CHARLOTTE JORDON . I am the wife of James Jordon. I had seen this property safe about eight o'clock at night, when the prisoner went to bed; the trousers were in the drawer, in his room; he left before day-light on a Monday morning, in September; I met him in the street some time ago - I said, "Do you recollect me?" he said, "No;" I said, "Not lodging with me in Welton-street - and you robbed me?" he said, No; a man came up and said he had robbed him; he said he knew nothing of it - he was not the man - but I am sure he is - he came three or four times to me before he took the lodgings.

Prisoner. Q. If I recollect right, you said I slept with another person? Witness. Yes - there was another person in the bed on the same night - he sleeps there now - but he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-185

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

546. JOHN PEACOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 37lbs. of paper, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Stephenson and James Bateman .

JAMES BATEMAN. I am in partnership with Thomas Stephenson, we are stationers , and live in Southampton-buildings - the prisoner lived with us, as clerk , for five weeks. On the 14th of January, I saw a quantity of our paper at Mr. Bullock's - here is 37lbs. weight of it; I never authorized any one to take them - they were of very great importance indeed.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Had the prisoner live I with Messrs. Holmes and Co? A. Yes - and then he was out of place for some months; he has a wife and family; these papers were most likely not all taken at once - they are Chancery causes, and pleadings, some of which are going on now.

BENJAMIN BULLOCK . I live in Gray's-inn-lane, and keep a ham and beef-shop; I bought this paper as waste, of the prisoner, at 4d. per pound.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure this man sold it to you. A. Yes.

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress, and received a very excellent character from respectable individuals.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-186

547. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 56lbs. of hay, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Dale ; and GEORGE WHITMAN was indicted, for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS DALE. I am a farmer , and live at Enfield , Scott was my carter - Whitman was hostler at the Horse and Groom, public-house - I saw some hay which I knew to be mine - it was in the rick-yard on the evening of the 22d of January, and next morning it was gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe in these trusses of hay you put some tickets? A. No; those in the loft had - the prisoner had the care of the horses; he had one bundle of hay, and half a bushel of corn; I have no mark on this hay - but every description of hay is different to another.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable of Enfield. On the 22d of January I had some information, and the next morning, about half-past three o'clock, I heard a waggon go by my house, which is in the way from Mr. Dale's to London; I called up another person, and went with him to the Horse and Groom, at Edmonton - the horses stopped to drink, and Scott, who was with the waggon, went and opened a stable-door, and when the horses had done drinking, he moved to the stable door, and took out one truss, which he put into the stable, and then went on with only one truss in the waggon - I followed it some distance, then returned; we got to Edmonton about four o'clock - I waited till the landlord of the Horse and Groom got up, and then I asked him who kept the keys of the stable - he said, "Whitman." I then waited till he got up, and asked him whose the hay was that was in the stable; he said it was his own - that he knew it was there, and had been there ever since Saturday night.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Where were you? A. On the opposite side of the way - it was light enough for me to see it, but there is a gas light there; there was some other person in the stable; before Whitman got up, I was away some time - and cannot say whether any other person brought the hay during that time.

COURT. Q. Have you brought any hay that was found in the loft of the stable, to compare with this? A. No; there was other hay in a bin - I have only brought some from the truss.

Mr. PHILLIPS to THOMAS DALE. Q. Is not this a common quality of hay? A. No; it grew in a flooded meadow - I suppose there may be five thousand such meadows in the county.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I was with Mead, and saw Scott go

and unlock the stable - he then took a bundle of something out of the waggon, and put it into the stable; Mead was nearer than I was - I believe I was before the waggon - it was moon-light, but a hazy morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-187

548. THOMAS HEDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th December , 17 pairs of braces, value 8s.; 2 leather straps, value 2s.; 300 brace bits, value 7s.; 2 stocks, value 1s.; 1 piece of leather, value 1s.; 1 sash, value 1s.; 2 knives, value 1s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 6d.; 1 brad-awl, value 2d.; 1 chisel, value 6d.; 2 hammers, value 2s.; 1 pair of nippers, value 1s., and 1 sword knot, value 1s., the goods of John Deykin , his master .

JOHN DEYKIN. I live in Holborn, and am a sadler . The prisoner had been in my service as porter , for about six months - he was employed to receive money for me - he left me on the 17th December. I afterwards went to his lodgings in Drury-lane with an officer; the woman he lived with was there. I found various tools which I had not missed, including the articles stated in the indictment; they hung in his room by the side of his work bench; we took him up in about half an hour afterwards. I accused him of it, and he said if I would forgive him he would tell me all he had done. I said I should not make any promises - he did not then tell me any thing.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you give me these braces out to make? A. I gave him a quantity to make about twelve months ago, and about six months ago he brought in all he had as he said - he used to send the boy with them, and I accused the boy with being two dozen of braces short, and the prisoner said he had given them to my boy.

COURT. Q. Did you allow him to have work at home? A. Yes, but I knew these 17 pairs of braces were not taken in the course of that employ, because he had taken them all in - about one dozen pair of them were unfinished, and these five pair were some he had no hand in making.

Prisoner. These five pair had been put in promiscuously with work I had to take to my mother. Witness. No, he could not, his business was to tie these up. I packed them up, and he must have taken them from a basket in my warehouse. He had nothing to do with them at all, nor with these 300 brace bits - we give the bits and braces together - it is impossible we could have given them to him. He has had nothing to do with them during the last six months - he has been a porter in the house.

GEORGE LILLY . I am a watchman. On the 20th of January I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and these things were found there; the prisoner said nothing about them.

JOHN SCULTHORP . I went and helped to take the things; I found the prisoner near Somerset-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-188

549. HENRY ROWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 brass handle, value 1s. 6d., the goods of George Bellas Grenough , and fixed in a fence belonging to his dwelling house .

ROGER CONWAY . I am in the employ of George Grenough, who lives in the Regent's Park . I lived in the lodge at the end of the road. On the 28th of January, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon I saw the prisoner inside the gate, and two others outside - the handle of the gate was broken - I pushed the gate in and collared the prisoner - he dropped one of the knobs of the gate, and the constable found some of the brass on him; the gate is a part of Mr. Grenough's premises.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a constable. Mr. Conway gave me charge of the prisoner. I took from him this part of the brass handle and knob, which appeared to have been on the gate; it might be worth 1s. 6d. when new; some other knobs were found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. Gentlemen. I went on Saturday to see a funeral, but I could not get in; as I passed this door, I saw the knob rolling from the door; my hat fell off, and while I was stooping to pick it up, I dropped 1d. out of my hand; while I stooped for that, a boy came and threw something down, which appeared to be this knob.

JURY to CONWAY. Q. What did the other boys do? A. They ran away when they saw me coming - they had not time to give the prisoner any thing - he was inside the gate and did not speak a word.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-189

550. CHARLES TATHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 jacket, value 5s., and 1 pair of overalls, value 5s. , the goods of John Riches .

JOHN RICHES. I am groom to Messrs. Cowie; their stable is in Charles-street, Long-acre , and their house is at the corner of the street. On Tuesday night last I went to the stable to feed a horse; I saw a light there - a man ran into the necessary, and either the prisoner or his companion blew out the light; I said I had not got the key of the stable; I turned back and locked the outer door, and said to my fellow-servant, there is somebody in the stable - he said "Mind the place, and I will call my master." I went back, and saw the prisoner and his companion come out of the stable. I said "What do you want there," and tried to stop the prisoner, who got by my companion, but he afterwards pursued and took him in Bow-street - I am quite positive of his person; I went on to the stable, and missed my jacket and overalls, which I wore there at four o'clock.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am porter to Messrs. Cowie. I saw the prisoner running up into Charles-street, Longacre, near our door at the corner - I followed him and took him in Drury-lane.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner about eight o'clock last Tuesday night - I found on him eight keys, and two of them locked the stable door - I found one picklock key, a phosphorus box, and this sack.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man, - we got into conversation; he went to the stable and unlocked the door; he said "Just put these keys into your pocket;" he staid some time and I went in; I had not been there long when I heard a noise, - he put the light out, and as soon as this gentlemen was gone he opened the door - I was agitated and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-190

551. THOMAS DOWSETT , was indicted for embezzlement .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-191

552. SARAH ANN PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 frock, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Cook .

SARAH COOK. I am servant to Mr. Nagle, who keeps the Apple Tree public house, Clerkenwell . I went up stairs about four o'clock on the 16th of February and missed a frock off the table, which had been safe in the morning, - when I came down I saw the prisoner, who was detained in the house; I do not know whether she was there when I went up - the constable was sent for, who looked into her basket and found the frock.

ANN HURRELL . I lodge in this house. I heard a knock at my door, and went to look on the landing-place - I saw the prisoner and asked what she wanted - she said she was wrong, and then she said she wanted Mary - I told Mrs. Nagle she had been up stairs - she sent Sarah Cook up to see what was missing, the prisoner then took her basket off the landing-place, and went down.

THOMAS MARKHAM . I am a constable. I was sent for, and found this basket and the frock in it, - they told me they would keep the prisoner while the girl went up stairs - she missed the frock.

Prisoner's Defence. I came past the Apple Tree, and thought I would call and see a person who did not live there, but used to go there - she had a pair of stockings and a cap to mend for me - I sat about a quarter of an hour, and then had something to drink, and asked the landlady if there was a young woman there named Mary - she said she did not know - I went up stairs and knocked at a door - I found I was wrong - I saw the frock in the passage, and put it into my basket - I went down and waited some time.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-192

553. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 1 work-box, value 1l., and 1 needlecase, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Norris .

ELIZABETH NORRIS . I am the wife of Thomas Norris. We live in Black Lion-lane, Bayswater - he is a cabinetmaker . On the 22d of December I was removing, and hired a hackney coach, No. 602 - the prisoner was the driver; I had some parcels and looking-glasses in the coach; I gave him my work-box and needle-case to put in; he said the coach was quite full, that the glasses would be broken, and he would put it into the boot; when he put me down at my own house, he took every thing out of the coach, and four dish-covers which were in the boot, but he did not give me the work-box; I did not miss it till the next day; I have never seen it since; I made inquiries about the coach, and employed a man to find it - I applied at Essex-street about one month afterwards - the master of the coach attended, and the prisoner attended as the driver; he said he never saw the box; but I told the gentlemen I would be on my oath I gave it into his hand, and they fined the master 2l., for not registering the name of his man - they gave me the 2l.; and I did not hear of the prisoner being in custody till the Sunday before last.

WILLIAM Mc DOWALL . I am master of the coach. I attended before the Commissioners, but I had no proof then, and could not identify the man.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of February - I found nothing on him - I asked him where he lodged; he said with his mother, in Newcastle-street, Shoreditch - I went there with the prisoner, and in a box in his bed-room, I found a number of small articles belonging to a work-box.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I took this lady to Black Lion-lane, and stopped at the Yorkshire Stingo, and had some refreshment; we then waited above an hour for the van; I came back, and had some more household goods, and assisted in loading the van again; then the lady pulled up at a public-house, and had some rum and some porter - I stopped at Bagnigge-wells, and had some more to drink; after she had settled with me, I returned, and a gentleman hired me to come to Holborn; my master came, and said, "What have you taken?" - I gave him fourteen shillings; and then, as I was taking the nosebags out, the box came out - my master said, "What is that! a prize?" - I said, "I do not know - but whatever it is, it shall go to Essex-street;" - he said, "See what value it is, if it is of value, you may" - I then went and had some ale with him, and got rather tipsy; and as I was going home, I fell down, and broke the box into two pieces - I went with a man and had some more drink; I fell asleep, and when I awoke, the box was gone; I was called up to Essex-street, and attended with my master, who said, he knew nothing of it, though he had seen me with it; - they then asked the lady the value of the box - she said two pounds, though it is stated here to be worth only one pound - they asked my master what he gave me as wages; he said, none - they then put the penalty on him, and gave the lady the two pounds - my master owed me a grudge - and he said to me, in a day or two "Bring me the box;" and I said, I could not, on my honour, but I would pay him ten shillings a week; and on the Saturday fortnight he abused me - one word brought up another, and next night he sent for an officer, and I was taken into custody - it is done for spite and malice.

COURT to W. M'DOWALL. Q. Is it true that you saw the box that night? A. No - not till the Monday after we had been to Essex-street; when I saw a box and a gold bracelet, which the lady said she had bought in France - but I did not know it was the same box till afterwards, when we were quarrelling, and I discharged him. I applied for a warrant at Bow-street, as he threatened to give me a leaden pill, and all those kind of bravadoes.

COURT to ELIZABETH NORRIS. Q. Was there a gold bracelet in your box? A. Yes - which I had bought in France.

SAMUEL LACK . I apprehended him in Shoreditch; he said something about his master accusing him of it - but he cared nothing about that; - he did not say any thing about his master having known of it - he denied it altogether.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-193

554. JOSEPH DEARMAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 3 peeks of coals, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Shambrook .

THOMAS SHAMBROOK. I am a coal-dealer , and live at Endfield . The prisoner is a next door neighbour; on the 12th of February, I went out to chapel, and left my son at

home - I returned home about five o'clock, and he told me he had caught the prisoner taking coals.

GEORGE SHAMBROOK . I am the prosecutor's son. I was at home, and saw the prisoner's wife come and try to get the staple out of the coal-house door, but she could not; the prisoner then came, took it out, and took about three pecks of coals into his own house; he then took a hammer and drove the staple in again.

JOHN WILSON . I went on the morning of the 13th of February, and took the prisoner at his own house. I asked him if he had got any coals in the house; he said he had bought half a bushel of Mr. Shambrook on Saturday night, which was all he had - I then looked, and found these coals in a back place, under some hay. There was no promise or threat held out to him; but he told the Magistrate, he was very sorry for what he had done, and he hoped he would forgive him, and let him pay for them.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-194

555. ANN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal, value 6d.; 1 watch-key, value 6d., and one Bank note, value 5l. the property of John Haley .

JOHN HALEY. I am a sailor . I was at the Coach and Horses, public-house, King David-lane, Shadwell , on Wednesday night last. I was a little the worse for liquor; but not drunk - I met the prisoner there, and went with her to a house - but do not know where; I took off my jacket and waistcoat, and laid down on the bed, and went to sleep - when I laid down I had a watch, a seal, and key; a 5l. Bank note, a sovereign, half a sovereign, and 1s., in my watch-pocket. I awoke about half-past five o'clock in the morning; the prisoner was then gone - and also my watch and money.

DANIEL CHILDS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner last Thursday morning, about two o'clock; she said she was very cold, and wanted to know if there were any houses open, to get something to drink; I said, No - I met her again at four o'clock; she said she wished some house was open - I told her there would be one open in half an hour, which was the White Swan - I went there, and took down the shutters, as I generally do - we had a quartern of rum, for which she paid in halfpence; she then called for some brandy, and the young woman did not like to let her have it; she said, "I have got plenty of money," and offered a five pound note to change; but the young woman would not change it; she then to the White Hart, to Mr. Thomas, and he would not give her change; - she then went to the Coach and Horses, and there the gentleman took her, and kept the note.

HAMMOND NELSON . I saw this watchman and the prisoner, come to the White Hart public-house, and offer this 5l. note for change; I said it could not be right - she must have been robbing somebody - she went to the Coach and Horses public-house, and offered the note; I then gave her in charge, and went to her house, where I found the prosecutor, who said he had lost a watch and a 5l., note; I found the watch in her bosom at the watch-house - she said he had given it to her to take care of.

CHARLES HENRY CLIFFORD . I keep the Coach and Horses. The prisoner came and had a quartern of gin, and wanted change for a 5l. note; I asked where she got it - she said from a man at her lodging - I refused to give her change, and during the absence of Nelson, she produced a watch, which she said belonged to the man at her lodging - I believe I had seen her at my house with the man, the night before - she said he told her to put it under her pillow to take care of for him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The young man gave me the property to take care of till the morning.

JOHN HAYLEY . I did not - I gave her half a sovereign and one shilling.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-195

556. JOHN GEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 3 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 2 sixpences, the property of John Barnes , from his person .

JOHN BARNES. I am a mariner . I was at the Three Crowns, public-house, near the London Docks , on Wednesday last, playing with some girls and a boy; I lost half-a-pint, and gave the waiter half-a-crown to pay for it- he brought me the change, and one of the girls took hold of it - the prisoner struggled with her, and, I believe, got it from her; I asked what they did it for, and we fell out; the landlord then pushed me out of door - the prisoner and another came out, and persuaded me to go into a public-house, where I pulled off my jacket, and went to wash my face. When I went to put my jacket on again I missed my property out of the pocket - I went to the Blue Anchor public-house, and saw the prisoner there - I said "I suppose you know what you have done?" he said"It is all right," and pulled out the pocket-book; I said"If you have taken the money out give me the book;" he would not - the officer then came and took the book, but the money was gone.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I am an officer. I was sent for to the Blue Anchor public-house - I took the prisoner, and found this book, but it had no money in it - he said a young lad, less than himself, gave it to him.

Prisoner. The prosecutor came and played in the public-house, and lost two half-pints of gin - he would not pay for one - I said "Why don't you pay for it?" he then struck me, and the landlord turned him out. I afterwards met a young lad who said to me "Do you know the man?" meaning the prosecutor; I said No; and he said he had a pocket-book and 1s. 6d. which belonged to him, and he gave them me, to give to him if I could find him. I met him again, and he took me to the Blue Anchor, and said "You know what you have done?" I said "I don't know what you mean, but I have a pocket-book to give you;" he said "Give it me;" I said "I will, but won't you stand a pot;" and then he sent for the officer.

COURT to JOHN BARNES . Q. When had you seen your money safe? A. When I came out of the house where I first saw the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-196

557. JOHN HEATH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 3 sovereigns, the monies of John Barlow , to whom he was a servant .

JOHN BARLOW. I keep the Prince of Wales at Pentonville . I gave the prisoner, who was my servant, three sovereigns to get change, but he never returned to me - I gave information and he was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-197

558. WILLIAM BAYLIS and ALBION LODGE were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 200lbs. weight of grease, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Knowles , their master .

THOMAS KNOWLES. I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Orange-street, Red Lion-square. I have a warehouse adjoining my house, and a passage through to Kingsgate-street - I have a melting-place in Liquorpond-street - the prisoners have been some years in my service; they are melters , and we are obliged to do that early in the morning - in the other parts of the day they had little to do, and when they went to my customers with the horse and cart, they used to have my money to make purchases of grease from any person they might meet with, and on their return I paid them the market price for it, which was 18s. per cwt.; I received it in Kingsgate-street; they brought some on Wednesday, the 15th of February, in a cask, with 3qrs. 5lbs. wrote on it in chalk. I weighed it, and it weighed 3qrs. 5lbs.; I paid them 2l. 15s. for it, and said "What are you going to do next?" they said they had to go for some more to Clerkenwell. I filled up that tub in Kingsgate-street, and made it up to 5cwt. 18lbs. - it was then put into the cart by the prisoners, myself and other servants, to go to my melting house in Liquorpond-street; George Restall , my other servant, and the prisoners, went with it. I had seen a quantity in the warehouse in Liquorpond-street, that morning, in the pan- there was 2cwt. 2lbs. - the 5cwt. 18lbs. was to be added to it, and the weight of the cask deducted from it. Restall afterwards made some communication to me. I went with two men to Liquorpond-street, and weighed the fat very exactly - I found a deficiency of 2cwt, and 1qr. nearly. I did not see the prisoner again that day, though they said they should return with some more from Clerkenwell; they returned about noon the next day, and brought the same tub which they had taken, which then contained 4cwt. 1qr. and 16lbs. of fat; I weighed it, and said "You know I have been very uneasy, and uncomfortable about the losses I have had - what did you do with that tub of fat you took last night?" they said they had emptied it into the melting pan, which would have taken about twenty minutes. I told them I certainly must find out what they had done with the fat that was in the tub; they said they could bring people to prove where they had got the fat they had brought that morning; and Lodge said"No one saw it taken away;" I said they had. They then clenched their fists at the boy, and went away swearing; I gave information at the office, and they were taken in about six hours. I have never received any clue to know where they bought it - the value of the 2cwt. of greese would be 36s.; they get a profit by buying this grease and selling it to me. Lodge has been with me nearly five years, and Baylis three or four.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Do you collect your grease from different people? A. Yes; the last time I weighed the grease in Liquorpond-street, on the 16th, it weighed 4cwt. 1qr.; I had been there on the morning of the 15th, and there was some grease in the pan which I did not weigh - Reed, the officer, saw it weighed on the 16th. Restall and Freshingfield are employed in Liquorpond-street; when Restall is not there, Freshingfield locks the place, and brings me the key.

COURT. Q. What were they to do with the cask? A. They were to empty it clean out, and then weight it in the presence of George Restall; they were then to take it away empty, and get some more fat in it; if any part of it had been taken away I might have bought it again - it would have undergone no change whatever; I saw the grease on the 15th; it appeared to me to be 2cwt. and upwards.

GEORGE RESTALL. I am servant to Thomas Knowles. I have been so for three or four years. I was at his shop in Orange-street when the prisoners brought the grease on the 15th - it was taken out of the scale and filled up with the stuff on the board, to 5cwt. 18lbs. - it was then put into the cart, and I drove it to Liquorpond-street - the two prisoners walked; I had seen 2cwt. 2lbs. put into the pan the day before, which came from Mr. Bullock's, and on the morning of the 15th, it appeared to be the same quantity; when I got to the warehouse I turned the cart round, and they got the cask by the side of the copper, and Baylis got the fork to empty it; I took hold of the fork, and Lodge gave me half a crown to go and get a feed of corn. I went, and was gone about five minutes, or not quite so much; I had not to go one hundred yards - on my return I saw the cask in the cart, upon its beam ends; I went into the melting-house and locked into the copper, and thought all was not right - I said nothing to the prisoners; they went into the street, where Albion said to Baylis, "We may as well have something to eat;" Baylis said "I was to have gone home to dinner - my wife has got a meat pudding, but she must not mind its being cold;" they then went up the steps of a public-house - I locked up the doors - they said to me "Come in;" I said I did not want any thing to drink, but I went into the house and spoke to my father - they offered me some beer but I would not have it. I was in the house about eight minutes, and then came out; I left them going along the passage. I went home to master and told him what I had seen - he came to the warehouse and weighed the fat, and took the weights - there was 4cwt. 26lb. in the pan, which was less by 217lbs. than I expected. I had kept the keys from the time I locked the door till my master got there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you weigh the grease on the 14th? A. Yes, and gave my master the account of it. Mr. Bullock was there when it was weighed; Freshingfield went to the warehouse as well as myself; I did not weigh the grease on the 15th. The pan is a large surface, and it would be difficult, without trying, to know what quantity was in it. The stuff put in on the 14th was kitchen stuff - about the same sort as that put in on the 15th- I did not look into the cask when the prisoners were gone into the public house - it laid on its side in the cart, with its mouth towards the tail.

COURT. Q. You say you weighed it on the 14th? A Yes; and I saw it on the 15th - if there had been 2 cwt. gone, I should have missed it; I looked into the pan, and

>it appeared all right; after I left the melting house, I gave the keys to my master.

REDIT FRESHINGFIELD . I am servant to the prosecutor; I was present when the prisoner brought this cask to be weighed, in Kingsgate-street; I saw it loaded, and was in the shop when Restall came and gave information - we all three went and weighed the grease in the melting-pan - there was 2cwt. short of what there should have been; there was only 4cwt. 26lbs.; I had been there on the night of the 14th, when it was weighed - and we put upwards of 2cwt. into the pan, and 4cwt. and upwards was sent on the morning of the 15th; I saw the quantity on the morning of the 15th, before the cask was sent from the house.

WILLIAM BAYLIS' Defence. There was an opportunity for Restall to look into the cart, and it was his own offer to go and fetch the corn - he went and got some cat's-meat; a great part of the grease was emptied before he went away - when he returned he said nothing to us - we went and had some refreshment - he went home to his master's, as I suppose, after he had been with his father.

GEORGE RESTALL. They asked me to get some dog's-meat - and I said, "I might as well get some for the cat;" I was not absent more than five minutes - I went for the meat while they were measuring the corn.

JURY. Q. Was there a tail-board to the cart? A. Yes; it was as high as the sides - I could not look over it without raising myself up.

RAYLIS - GUILTY .

LODGE - GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-198

559. WILLIAM PARROT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 8s. , the goods of William Alderman .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18260216-199

560. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 wooden-till, value 1s.; 1 shilling, 3 sixpences, and 5s. in copper monies, numbered , the property of Abraham Holwell .

ABRAHAM HOLWELL. I live in Aldersgate-street , and keep a baker's shop . Last Friday I came from the parlour behind my shop, and found the prisoner at the corner of the counter, near the end, on his knees - he had the till in his hand, which was empty; there had been 5s. in copper in it, and 2s. 6d. in silver; I found a sixpence in his mouth - and when I put my fingers in, he made a gulp - and I think he swallowed the rest; there had been one shilling and three sixpences.

JAMES CLIFFORD . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, but found nothing on him.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18260216-200

561. ELIZA BLATCHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 2 sheets, value 8s.; 3 towels, value 6d.; 1 shift, value 3s.; 1 bed-gown, value 2s., and 1 pinafore, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Elizabeth Kelly , her mistress.

RACHAEL MAGUIRE . I live in High-street, Mary-le-bone - Miss Mary Elizabeth Kelly lodges with me; the prisoner was in her service, and left her on the 2d of February - I went to examine the bed where she had slept, and missed the sheet; I then found some duplicates in the kitchen, and missed the other articles from their place - they belong to Miss Kelly.

JOHN TRAIL . I am a pawnbroker. I produce this property, which was pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-201

562. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 coat, value 20s., and 1 key, value 2d., the goods of Samuel Compton ; and 1 bag, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Booth Smith .

SAMUEL COMPTON. I have retired from business, and live at Winchmore-hill . This great coat and key are mine - I missed the coat on Friday morning last, at six o'clock from my harness room, when my servant called me up - the window had been opened, and the shutter broken.

EDWARD ATFIELD . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner on Friday morning, near the Weavers' Arms, public-house, at Newington - he had a nose bag, and this great coat was in it.

WILLIAM WARD . I am an officer, and took him into custody - I found two towels in his pocket, and one in his hat, and this strap and key - they are Mr. Compton's property.

JAMES DEMAN . I am carman to Mr. Richard Booth Smith. I saw the prisoner in the road, with these things on his shoulder; I said, "You have got my nose bag," took him to the Weavers' Arms, and gave him to Atfield.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming to London, and saw a large bundle laying on the road; I walked with it, and thought when I got to a market place I would have it cried - I took a little towel or two out, because they hung out at the top.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-202

563. EDWARD PURSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 8lbs. weight of linen rags, value 2s., and 1 piece of carpet, value 6d. , the goods of Ann Hyde , widow .

ANN HYDE. I am a widow, and keep a shop in Pancras-place . On the 28th of January I missed some rags and a piece of carpet, which had been kept behind the door, in a box; I had seen them safe about half an hour before. I told Mr. Dowling, my next door neighbour, of it, and he sent his boy after the person.

ROBERT DUNT . I am servant to Mr. Dowling. On the 28th of January my master desired me to go down Gray's Inn-lane; I went to Mr. Parsons', where I saw the prisoner and another boy; some rags were in the scale, and a piece of carpet - I did not notice the pattern; the prisoner tried to get away, but I detained him; the other escaped.

SUSANNAH PARSONS . I keep a shop in Paradise-street. On the 28th of January the prisoner and another boy came and offered me some rags to sell, about nine o'clock at night; there was a bit of carpet among them; they were

put into the scale - the lad came in, and said, "Don't buy them - they are stolen from Mrs. Hyde."

WILLIAM COLTON . I went to the house, and took the prisoner; he said the other boy gave them to him to sell, but he has been out of the way ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of a street - a boy came and asked me to go with him to sell these rags.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-203

564. JOHN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 9 bundles of quick, value 18s. , the goods of George Gardner .

GEORGE GARDNER. I live at Feltham - I lost some bundles of quick - I had seen them safe on Wednesday week, about six o'clock in the evening; six bundles were in the ground, and three in the cart. I missed them on the Thursday night.

WILLIAM KEENE . I live at Teddington, three or four miles from Feltham. I bought eight bundles of quick of the prisoner on Thursday week, about seven o'clock in the morning; I showed them to Mr. Gardner the next day, who claimed them. The prisoner said he had not brought the quick according to the sample he had shewn me, as his father had sold all that, but he had brought some of a similar kind - he had sold it me by sample on the Tuesday evening.

WILLIAM HALL . I apprehended the prisoner - he said before the Magistrate, "All I have to say is I stole it from Mr. Gardner."

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me who stole it.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-204

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

565. MARY YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 1 piece of carpet, value 2s.; 1 comb, value 1s.; 2 quarts of wine, value 6s., and 3 bottles, value 9d. , the goods of John Mountford , her master.

ANN MOUNTFORD . I am the wife of John Mountford, a surgeon - we live in Gloucester-place, Queen-square . - The prisoner was my servant ; yesterday morning I saw under her bed a bundle handkerchief, in which was a piece of carpeting, and a bottle of port wine; behind her box I found two more bottles of wine, and under her mattress I found the key of my cupboard, which I had missed, and frequently asked her for; I called her up - she denied all knowledge of them. I waited for Mr. Mountford's return, who sent for an officer; he found in her box a comb of my son's, with his name on it; the carpet was rolled up, and tied in a bundle handkerchief belonging to me.

EDWARD MOUNTFORD . I know this comb, on account of a mark made on it when my brother went to school.

BENJAMIN REED . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I was sent for, and searched the box - I found the comb in it; this bottle of wine was in the carpet under the bed.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I picked up the key of the winecellar in the ashes in the kitchen.

ANN MOUNTFORD. I left the key of the wine-cellar on the table in the kitchen on Sunday. I have no other servants but a boy and the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Last Friday I was getting dinner, and removed the tops of some tent bedsteads - I saw a parcel, opened it, and found two bottles in it; I removed them close in the corner - the other bundle was under the bed when I came there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-205

566. BENJAMIN HATCHET was indicted for feloniously assaulting John South Guinili , on the 20th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 2s. , his property.

JOHN SOUTH GUINILI. I am a sailer - I am not married. I was about one hundred yards from the Rising Sun public-house, in the Hackney-road , yesterday - as far as I can recollect it was between one and two o'clock; I was going home to Berwick-terrace - I was in liquor; the prisoner and another came over to me as I was crossing the road, under pretence of assisting me, as I had fallen down - I found one of their hands in my right hand breeches pocket; I struck him on the breast, and told him it would not do. I had some money in my pocket, but I did not lose that - a woman came from a street on the opposite side of the way, which startled them, and they made away with my hat, which had fallen off while I was on the ground.

JOHN STEVENSON . I am a dismounted patrol. About a quarter before one o'clock I and two others were near Shoreditch church; the prisoner passed with something under his jacket - we went up to him, and took the hat from under his jacket; he said he had been having a bl-t-d lark with his companion; I asked who it belonged to, and he said to a bricklayer, and then to a bricklayer's labourer - I asked the name - he said, "I don't know that I have any occasion to tell you."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-206

London Cases, Second Jury.

567. JOHN WILLIAMS and HENRY MASON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 11/2 yards of cassimere, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Ingham .

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a box-maker. I was near Mr. Ingham's house on the 20th of January, about half-past eleven o'clock - I saw Williams come out with a bundle under his arm; Mason and another person went up to him, and Mason took the parcel from him; I followed till they came to the Minories, where they gave it to the other one - I informed the officer, and we pursued; the one who was carrying it got away.

JOSEPH INGHAM. I live with my father - he is a woollen-draper . I know this to be his property.

BENJAMIN FIGGINS. I am the officer, and took the prisoner.

MASON'S Defence. When the officer came the witness said, "They are not the boys - let them go - it is the other;" then the other went on, and he said, "These are the two - take them."

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-207

568. JAMES GERRARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. the goods of John King , from his person .

JOHN KING. I am a linen-draper . I was in Smithfield about noon on the 6th of February. I felt a twitch at my coat pocket - turned round and saw the prisoner close behind me, with my handkerchief in his hand - I desired him to give it to me, which he did immediately and ran away, but was secured.

JAMES GOULD . I was coming through Smithfield, and took the prisoner to the Compter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up and gave it to the gentleman when he said it was his - I have a family, and I hope you will be merciful. GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-208

569. THOMAS BAILEY and JAMES JENNER , were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Oatley , on the 23d of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 chisels, value 3s.; 1 slide rule, value 3s. 6d.; 1 plane iron, value 1s. 4d.; 1 hammer, value 2s. 6d., and 3 sovereigns , his property.

GEORGE OATLEY. I am a journeyman carpenter , and live at Greenwich. On the 14th of January I had been at work there till a quarter past six o'clock; I then went to the west end of the town and purchased some tools - I then went with a friend to the Two Brewers and Magpie public house, Shoreditch, where we had four glasses of rum and water; I was not so intoxicated as not to know what I was about - I went to the Spread Eagle to inquire for a coach about twelve o'clock - I had three sovereigns in my breeches pocket, and my tools in my coat pocket; I saw Bailey there, and another, who, I presume, was Jenner - they told me the coach was gone, - my friend said I was very tired, and asked if I could not have a bed - they said if I would go to Darkhouse-lane I should get one - I thanked them and went on - they came, one took hold of my arms and tripped me up near Monument-yard, and they both fell on me; Bailey took the tools out of my pocket and put them into his own; my friend, who was a little behind, came to my assistance, and told me he had robbed me; Jenner escaped, but we held Bailey fast, and gave charge of him to a watchman, who let him go - we then gave charge of him to another - he had got rid of the tools; we did not see him do it, but he confessed that he knew where they were, and we went back and took them from under a shutter; Jenner was taken in about a fortnight, but I did not know him.

JOSEPH HINCHCLIFFE . I am a watchman. About one o'clock on Sunday morning, the prosecutor and his friend came and gave me charge of Bailey; he said he had not taken the tools, but he knew where they were, and if they would forgive him he would give them up - he pointed them out under the window of No. 39, Little Eastcheap - I took him to the watch-house - the prosecutor was the worse for liquor - he was able to stand, but seemed to have been drinking very much. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-209

570. JAMES GAMBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 17 squares of glass, value 7s. the goods of Oliphant Samuel Sheen , his master .

The Prisoner pleaded. GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-210

571. EDWARD RHODES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Timothy Ross , from his person .

TIMOTHY ROSS. I am a hosier , and live at Leicester. I was on Ludgate-hill on the 28th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I felt something at my pocket, turned round and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief, which he put into his pocket - I collard him, and took it away from him.

WILLIAM WORCESTER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and the instant the gentleman turned round I told him so.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18260216-211

First London Jury.

572. HENRY EMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 fender, value 20s. , the goods of Uriah Briant , the younger.

URIAH BRIANT, Jun. This fender belongs to my father.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18260216-212

573. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 watch chain, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 4l., and 1 watch key, value 20s., the goods of Colin Ross , from his person .

Mr. COLIN ROSS. I have been a merchant , and live in Sizelane. I was passing through St. Paul's Church-yard about half-past ten o'clock on the 15th of February, with a friend, when the prisoner made a sudden snatch at my watch chain - he broke the ring and took the chain and seals; I pursued and took him within about twelve yards, without losing sight of him; I took him into an apothecary's shop, and sent for an officer - the property was found upon him.

MICHAEL LION . I am an officer. I found these two seals and chain on the prisoner - he handed them to me when I was about to search him.

LEWIS FACHE . I am night constable. I found a pair of scissors and two handkerchiefs in the prisoner's hat.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-213

574. JOHN FRANEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 purse, value 6d.; 10 yards of ribbon, value 10s.; 3 yards of tinsel lace, value 2s., and two sovereigns, the property of Nathaniel Dawson , his master .

NATHANIEL DAWSON. I live in Cornhill , and am a glover and hosier ; the prisoner had been my errand boy for two or three months - I had reason to suspect him, and on the 2d of February, I marked six sovereigns, and six half-sovereigns, which I put into the till, between two and three o'clock - I never suffer my lad to go to the till - I went out for an hour, and desired my wife to leave the prisoner in the shop for a few minutes; when I returned, she gave me information, and I sent for an officer; the prisoner was searched, and two sovereigns were found on him, in a small leather purse; one of them was one I had marked; the other articles were found in his box.

MRS. MARY ANN DAWSON . During my husband's absence I left the prisoner in the shop - I went on the stairs and looked through a window which is opposite the till;

>I saw the prisoner go to it, and heard the gold-box rattle; I then came down - he shut the till, and ran back to his place.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am an officer. I was sent for - and found on the prisoner a purse with two sovereigns in it, one of which was marked - I searched his box, and in the pocket of one of his coats, I found twelve or thirteen yards of ribbon, and a piece of tinsel lace.

Prisoner's Defence. The till was partly open - I hope my master will have mercy on me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18260216-214

575. HYAM PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 13lbs. of pork, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Weston .

RICHARD WESTON. I keep an eating-house , at No. 9, Minories . Last Sunday morning the prisoner came to my house for wash. I did not see him take any thing, but while my people were at breakfast, he went down to my salting-house, and took this leg of pork, which he put into his pail, and filled it with wash; as soon as he left the house, my waiter ran down to see if we had lost any thing. I then followed the prisoner, and when he got to Whitechapel, he put down the pails to rest - I asked him what he had got beside the wash - he said, nothing - I put my hand in and took out the leg of pork.

CHARLES DREW . I am waiter to Mr. Weston. We had missed several articles, and among the rest, two half rounds of beef. On the 12th of February, I marked eight legs of pork, and put them together - when the prisoner came, I went up stairs till he was gone - I then ran down, and missed a leg of pork - I told my master, who pursued him.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18260216-215

567. HENRY HOLDEN TURNER and EDWARD WRIGHT , were separately indicted for misdemeanors .

The prosecutors did not appear. NOT GUILTY .


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