Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th December 1825.
Reference Number: 18251208
Reference Number: f18251208-1

SESSIONS PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM VENABLES, MAYOR.

FIRST SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 8th of DECEMBER, 1825, and following Days.

Taken in Short-Hand (by Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall-Street.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1825.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM VENABLES , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt.; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; and Christopher Smith , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; William Thompson , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Charles Lawrence ,

Daniel Giles ,

Lewis Williams ,

Joseph Wood ,

James Jones ,

Benjamin Biles ,

Samuel Downes ,

Benjamin Lawn ,

Joseph Walker ,

Jenkin Jenkins ,

Charles Toms ,

John Binks .

Second

Wm. Cobb ,

George Barker ,

Wm. Oakes ,

John Williams ,

Isaac Waller ,

John Earl ,

James Middleton ,

Richard Evans ,

Wm. Tew ,

Richard Hurley ,

George Martin ,

Ridley Webster .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Ellis ,

Henry Bentham ,

John Collins ,

Thos. Geo. Kipps ,

John Mason ,

Richard Culverwell ,

George Caltan ,

James Hilbury ,

Wm. Gregg ,

George Rowland ,

Henry Gollop ,

George Tipper .

Second

Alexander Norton ,

George James ,

Robert Bell ,

Morgan Thomas ,

John Gladwin ,

Alexander Leslie ,

Christop. Bulstrode ,

Wm. Arlington ,

Wm. George ,

Thomas Powell ,

W. Davis Prichard ,

John Wilmott .

Third

Joseph Gibbons ,

Edward McGyan ,

Wm. Cooper ,

Thomas Girley ,

Michael Crouch ,

Thomas Claridge ,

Peter Matthews ,

Charles Mills ,

Thomas Clack ,

John Haslemore ,

John Parnell ,

Thomas Dawson .

Fourth

Thomas Barras ,

Thomas Butcher ,

Henry Stephens ,

Richard Hall ,

John Bailey ,

Charles Westley ,

George Kerridge ,

Joseph Pearce ,

Thomas Elsworth ,

John Mason ,

Wm. Smith ,

James Littlejohn .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 8, 1825.

VENABLES, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18251208-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

1. HUGH O'DONNELL was indicted for uttering a certain false, forged, and counterfeit certificate, with intent to defraud the commmissioners of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea .

MR. MERRYWEATHER (on behalf of the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-2

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

2. MICHAEL DAVIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Bennett , about five o'clock in the night of the 18th of November , at St. Luke, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 looking-glass, value 2l.; 2 pair of pliers, value 2s.; 1 pair of callupers, value 1s.; 40 pairs of stockings, value 3l.; 6 hats, value 5l.; 1 coat, value 30s.; 1 bottle jack, value 1l.; 4 candlesticks, value 12s.; 8 spoons, value 10s.; 1 pentograph, value 2l.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 sofa cover, value 5s.; 6 caps, value 6s.; 12 napkins, value 6s.; 12 towels, value 6s.; 6 shifts, value 18s., and 2 bed-gowns, value 4s. , his property.

ROBERT BENNETT. I live in the parish of St. Luke, Middlesex - I occupy a house there, with my family, entirely to ourselves. I am the parish school-master - the trustees pay the rent; none of the scholars live there. On Friday morning, the 18th of November, about ten minutes before seven o'clock, my daughter alarmed me - I got up, and found the kitchen and school room broken open; the school room is a detached building; I found a pane of glass in the kitchen window broken; the snap was pushed back, close to the broken pane - the window was open two or three inches, and resting on some linen, I had fastened the window myself, between ten and eleven o'clock the night before; the pane was then whole: there is no outer shutter to the window. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The school room door is opposite the kitchen - I found a hole bored in the back door of the school room with a centre-bit, which laid by the door, opposite the hole. A person could introduce an instrument, and unbolt the door; it was wide open - I had seen it secure about eleven o'clock the night before. I found part of a candle and a match there - I missed a chimney glass from the parlour, adjoining the kitchen - it hung on a nail over the mantel-piece, but was not fastened to the wall. I missed all the articles stated in the indictment (enumerating them); they were worth about 15l. The stockings belonged to the trustees - I had the charge of them; the rest belonged to me. I went to Worship-street that morning, and saw part of the things - here is the glass; I have had it many years; here are two hats, one of which I had worn the day before, and the other I believe to be the one left on the premises; here are two pairs of pliers, a pair of callupers, a file, and the tracer of the penograph; they are all mine. Here is the center-bit which I found on the premises. My desk was broken open.

JOSEPH SIMONS . I am a watchman. On the 18th of November, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner going down Golden-lane, about a hundred yards from Mr. Bennett's, and coming in a direction from there; it was dark - he had the looking-glass in a sack. I followed, and stopped him - I asked what he had got there - he said, "Why?" I said I insisted on seeing what he had got; he took the sack from his shoulder - I put my hand in, and felt the looking-glass; I said he must go to the watch-house - two other watchmen were with me; Williamson carried the sack; he tried to run away as we took him along, and Yates stopped him; nothing else was in the sack; he did not say where he got it. I found the callupers, tracer, file, and pliers in his pocket; I gave the glass to Bee - that produced is the same.

JOHN BEE . The witness Simons delivered the glass and prisoner to me.

THOMAS VANN . I received this old hat and center-bit from Bennett, and at the office I took the other hat off the prisoner's head - Bennett claimed it; the prisoner said he had bought it four months ago, in Bath-street, Old-street, for 4s., and he would bring the person whom he bought it of.

SAMUEL YATES . I stopped the prisoner when he tried to run away.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I took up the glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the care of that glass from one John Williams.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18251208-3

Before Mr. Justice Park.

3. JAMES SMITH was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of George Vose , on the night of the 5th of November , and stealing 1 carpet, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Simpson .

SUSAN SIMPSON . I lived in Holland-street, Wardour-street, St. Ann's . My husband's name is Joseph; we lodged there: George Vose is the landlord, and lives there - we occupied the shop and kitchen. On the evening of

the 5th of November, at ten o'clock, I was in the shop - the door was shut, and the shutters up, there was a light in the shop. Mr. Murrell was with me - we heard a noise of the kitchen window going up and down; I went out into the street, saw the kitchen window open, and called the watchman; I came in, and met the prisoner on the kitchen stairs, caught hold of his collar, and said, "This is the thief;" he said, "Thief! where is the thief?" and struck me in the face, broke my ear-ring, and tore my cap - I lost my hold, but caught hold of him again; he slipped out of his coat, leaving part of it in my hand, and ran off; I went into the kitchen, and unlocked the door - he must have come out of another passage-door. I found the window open, and a carpet about six yards square half out of the window, and half in - I had left it on a chair, and am sure I left the window down, and fastened with the snap. I found three of the centre panes broke, and the snap pulled back - the carpet was ours. I went to the watch-house, and found the prisoner there. I had a light in my hand when I collared him, and saw his face. I believe him to be the same man who had come into the shop in the afternoon. He said, "Pray have mercy - I was in liquor - it was only a frolie." I found a hat in the area - it was not returned to him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There is a passage-door, which was open? A. I think it was - he could go through that door, turn to the left, and get out into the area, and cut the glass - the kitchen door was fast: my char-woman had left about twenty minutes. I had been in the kitchen at seven o'clock, and fastened the window, but not after. I believe the charwoman was in the kitchen after me. I cannot say that I thought the prisoner in liquor; there was no appearance of his having been sick there. My husband has never lived there - he is in the country, for his health - we were married at Stepney-church.

Q. Are you really married? A. My name is Simpson, and the property is mine.

Q. Are you really married to any body? A. No - it happened about ten o'clock at night.

COURT. Q. They could not get into the area without coming through the house? A. No; he could not have entered the kitchen-door, for I found it locked; he must have gone through the passage into the area, and opened the window. I cannot tell whether the charwoman had done any thing to the window - she and the servant of the house had been in the kitchen together.

GEORGE MURRELL . I am a tailor. I was in the shop, and heard the window sash move up and down, and the glass breaking. Mrs. Simpson went out, and gave an alarm. I went to the door - a man presently opened the passage door, and came out without his hat - he passed me, exclaiming, "Where is the thief?" Mrs. Simpson, and the watchman caught him in the street; he slipped out of his coat; I followed, and saw him knocked down by the watchman; I had never lost sight of him, and am sure of his person; he got up, ran through another street, and knocked a woman down. A gentleman stopped him, and a watchman came up. I returned to the house - the carpet was partly out of the window; the sash was pulled down, and the glass broken.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not intoxicated? A. He did not appear so at all; he cried at the watch-house, and said he was intoxicated, and begged for mercy.

COURT. Q. How was he knocked down? A. By the watchman - he knocked a woman down by running against her; he had no hat on at the watch-house.

THOMAS CAPLIN . I live at Vose's house - his Christian name is George. I went into the area, and picked up a hat - there was a child's frock in it. I saw the Magistrate's clerk shew the hat to the prisoner; he said directly that it was his, and the frock belonged to his child.

WILLIAM WILMOTT . I am a watchman. I was calling ten o'clock, when the prisoner rushed out of the door, and knocked Mrs. Simpson off the steps into my arms; I collared him; he slipped out of his coat: I followed, and my fellow watchman stopped him, without coat or hat on. I gave him the coat - he claimed it; I saw him searched, 2s. 6d., and a tailor's thimble was found upon him.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am constable of the night - The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - he said he hoped Mrs. Simpson would forgive him - that it was a drunken spree. He did not appear to be in liquor, but very hot.

The prisoner, in a long address, stated that he had been drinking with his shopmates, and got intoxicated, and seeing this door open he went in to find a privy, and there being no back yard he thought it must be below - that he stumbled against the window, which broke it, and hearing a noise he ran away, but positively declared his innocence.

WALTER PHILLIPS . I keep the White Hart public-house, Little Windmill-street. I have known the prisoner six months. On Saturday, the 5th of November, he was drinking at my house, all the evening, with his shopmates - mine is the house of call for tailors. I called him out about nine o'clock, and advised him to go home to his wife, as I thought him in liquor. I did not see him go out, but I missed him soon after.

MR. PHILLIPS to SIMPSON. Q. Was there not on one side of the window a parcel of tea things set in a tray? A. Yes; they were not broken. There is no back yard to my house.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-4

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

4. FREDERICK THELWELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Frewin , widow , about eight o'clock in the night of the 20th of November , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent to steal, and stealing 7 pairs of stockings, value 7s.; 1 counterpane, value 4s.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 2l., and 12 shirt collars, value 6s. , her property.

ELIZABETH FREWIN. I am a widow and live in Dean's-place, Lisson-grove, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone , and rent the house. On Sunday, the 20th of November, I went out about one o'clock, leaving nobody in the house - I fastened all the doors and windows; the door fastens with a spring lock. I returned a little before eight, and found the door still locked; it would lock by being pulled too; the windows were still fast; I missed six or seven pairs of stockings from the ironing-board. I missed a counterpane that evening, and all the articles stated in the indictment (enumerating them); they be

long to people for whom I wash - I was answerable for them; some were my own. I have known the prisoner from a baby, and frequently saw him.

CHARLES GRIFFITHS . On Sunday, the 20th of November, about a quarter to eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming out of Dean's-place with a bundle of linen; I said, Halloo! and tried to stop him; he shoved me aside, and ran off, and I after him, but lost sight of him - I went back, and found Mrs. Frewin was robbed. I went with Morris, the officer, to different public-houses, and found the prisoner at the Pomfret Castle. I had known him for about six months. There was a gas-light, and I had a full view of him.

MICHAEL MORRIS. I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. - Griffiths came to me; we went and found the prisoner at the Pomfret Castle, sitting in the tap-room. I called him out, and said I wanted him; he said, "What for?" I took him out, and in his coat pocket found two pairs of stockings; he had some pieces of cloth, which he said he had found. I found five pairs of stockings in his hat, and in his coat pocket a skeleton key, which I tried to the door; it opened it. I asked what he had done with a sheet and shirt - he said he knew nothing of the sheet, but had left the shirt with a person whom he would not get into trouble, for he had trouble enough himself. I was taking him to the watch-house - he said, "It is a pity she should lose all her property - she has behaved like a mother to me - if you go to Haystack-lane you will find the counterpane among some shavings in a shed." I went with Griffiths, and found it among shavings, in the place he described.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met two young men, who gave me the key, and told me to go and open her door - I was over-persuaded, and went with them; I could not open it- one of them called me a fool; he opened it, and made me go in with him, and take some things; he left me there - they have since sent her back the other things.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury, on account of his youth and character .

Reference Number: t18251208-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

5. THOMAS WILLIS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Hancock , on the night of the 14th of November , and stealing 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 key, value 5s.; 3 seals, value 15s.; 2 bed curtains, value 4l.; 1 window curtain, value 10s.; 1 silk dress, value 1l.; 1 writing-desk, value 5s.; 1 pencil-case, value 7s.; 1 bell clapper, value 1d.; 1 ink-stand, value 6d.; 6 leaves of a book, value 1d.; 1 hat, value 18s., and 1 pair of glover, value 1s. , his property.

WILLIAM HANCOCK. I live in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square. On Monday, the 14th of November, a little before eight o'clock, I was in the second floor back room, with my wife and an upholsterer, putting up a bed - my wife went down for the curtains; she returned, and alarmed me. I went down to the back room on the ground floor, and missed the articles stated in the indictment; I opened a side door which leads into a mews, and saw my hat and gloves laying outside the door. I got a search-warrant on the 25th, and went with Ballard and Collins to the second floor back room of No. 9, Gilbert-street, Oxford-street; the prisoner and his wife were there; we found six leaves of the History of England, which I had been reading a night or two before. I found two metal seals - the clapper of a bell, a button, and an ink-stand. - The door leading to the mews is half glass, and slides up like a window, and was not fastened down - it would not keep up, having no pullies; the door was locked, and the key out; there was dirt on the side of the window of the door, as if they had entered there. There was no appearance of any one getting in elsewhere. The officer told the prisoner our business - he denied all knowledge of the things.

CHARLOTTE HANCOCK . I went for the curtains, and upon missing them alarmed my husband.

ISABELLA BROAD . I lived in Gilbert-street, in the next room to the prisoner. On the 14th of November, about eight o'clock, or rather later, I heard persons going up stairs, in a great hurry, and enter his room; I cannot say whether he was there; I did not see them, but heard them say, "There is money in there."

WILLIAM BALLARD . I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's room, on the 25th. I asked if his name was Willis - he said it was; I said I was come to search for stolen things, and asked if he knew any thing about a box and an unfinished silk dress; he said No; I searched and found a spectacle glass, and two pieces of one - he said the old one he had been in the habit of reading with. In a small box in a tea-caddy I found a button, two metal seals, and the bell-clapper, which Hancock claimed. I found some leaves of the History of England, between the bed and sacking. I went there afterwards, and found a glass ink-stand on the dust heap, which I had before seen on the mantel-piece, and shewn to Hancock, but he did not know it. Mrs. Hancock afterwards claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My family are in the habit of borrowing books, and as to the other things, people have seen the children playing with them for a long time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-6

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

6. GEORGE KELLY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Turner , on the 7th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 5 shillings, 3 penny-pieces, and four halfpence , his property.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD TURNER. I was servant to Mr. Thornton, of Grosvenor-street , and lived with him about seven months. On the 7th of November, between two and three o'clock, the bell rang, and on going to the door I saw the prisoner, and asked what he wanted - he said, "A little money;" I asked why he wanted money of me, and said, "Do I owe you any thing?" he said, "No - you know very well what it is for;" I said, No, I did not - he answered, "You do, you remember meeting me at Fairburn's picture shop, in the City, and you put your hand in an indecent manner on me, and promised to meet me at another time, but never came." I called him an insolent rascal, and asked how he could dare to say so, and I certainly should not

give him any money - upon this another man came up, took hold of me by the collar, and said, "D-n his eyes, that is the man; I know him - I know him;" I then became very much alarmed, and put my hand into my pocket, and gave the prisoner a shilling, and said it was all I had in my pocket; the other man then let go of my collar; another man then came up on the other side, and took hold of my waistcoat pocket, and said, "He has got more money than that," and said, "That is the man - I know him - his name is Turner." I put my hand into my pocket, and gave the prisoner 5d. - the other man called me a white-faced b-r before that. The other two men went away down the street; the prisoner remained, and said, "This won't do - I must have 5s. at least;" I told him he could not have it, for I had no more about me; he said, "I must have it, and if you don't get it I will write to your master, and expose you." I said I had no more money, but if he would call at five o'clock I would contrive to get the other 4s., he agreed to call at five o'clock, and went away - he called again about four o'clock, and I gave him the 4s.; he then said I must make it up 10s., for he had got a pair of trousers in pawn for that sum, and wanted to get them out. I asked how he could think of making such a charge, and said I certainly would not give him any more - he said he would write to my master if I did not give him the other 5s.; I said, "If you must have the other money call again to-morrow morning, at eleven o'clock, and I will contrive to get it;" he said very well, he would call at eleven o'clock, and left. My master was out at this time; but not when the three came - he was just going out then; I thought he was out, but when they went away he came down stairs with mistress - he came home about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour to five, and within twenty minutes I informed him of what had passed. I went to Marlborough-street office about nine o'clock that evening, as I had before that to wait at dinner and tea, and go out for master. I left a message at the office. On the next morning, about ten minutes before eleven o'clock, the prisoner came - nobody had arrived from the office then. I told him to call in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; Ballard was then in the parlour. I asked the prisoner to step inside, and as soon as he got in I shut the door on him. I then held out two half-crowns,(which Ballard had marked); he took them in his hand; I asked him what the money was for which he demanded of me - he looked round in a very suspicious way, and said in an under tone, "I only want to borrow it." I asked what he meant by saying what he did when he came the day before, and had the other 5s.; he said, "Oh! never mind, there is no harm in that." I then pressed him very much to tell me what the money was for; he said, "Oh! never mind, take the 5s. back, and for God's sake let me go out;" when he found I would not take the money back he laid it on the lock of the door. Ballard then came and took him into custody. I know one Fennell; he was servant to Mr. Cartwright, who lived opposite. I had seen the prisoner in his company in David-street, when I was out on an errand. Fennell spoke to me; I had no particular acquaintance with Fennell.

Q. What induced you to part with the shilling, and the fivepence to the prisoner? A. I was very much alarmed at what they accused me of, knowing myself innocent, and three men coming up - I had no other reason for parting with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your master here? A. No, he went to Brighton; whether he has returned I do not know - I am not in his service now - I saw him about a fortnight ago - he knew about this trial - he has four female servants, and a young lad as groom, about sixteen years old, but no coachman. I called the prisoner an insolent rascal when he first came - I was not much alarmed just then.

Q. Why did you not instantly give an alarm, and call the servants to your assistance? A. The other man came up directly and collared me - I held the door in my hand all the time - they were not inside.

Q. Why not shut it in their faces? A. I was so much alarmed I hardly knew what I was doing - the charge frightened me - I was not so much alarmed before the second man came up as after; I was perhaps three or four minutes talking to them - it might be five - the street is pretty public - I gave no alarm - I did not tell my fellow servants of it - I told master when he came home - mistress was with him when he went out, or I should have told him then - I did not see the groom till after I had told master.

Q. Why not seize the prisoner when he was left alone with you? A. I was afraid the other two might come back; I did not wish to do any thing till I had spoken to master. I was not so much alarmed the second time - I appointed for him to come at five o'clock because I knew master would be back. I was five or six yards from the parlour door when Ballard was in the parlour - he could not see Ballard. When I met him and Fennell, the prisoner said "How do you do?" I met him two or three times afterwards.

MR. LAW. Q. On all those occasions had you any more conversation than "How do you do?" A. The first time we met the prisoner said "I think I have some knowledge of you?" I said "Very likely, but if so, you have the advantage of me." This might be six weeks before- Fennell was with him in David-street. I left Mr. Thornton by my own wish - he said if I could not pay the solicitor in this case he would, and his brother took me to the solicitor - I applied at the police-office by master's advice.

COURT. Q. Is yours a corner house? A. No, there are houses on each side. I parted with none of my money willingly - I should not have parted with it unless the second man had come up, and collared me, and saying what he did.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer, and attended at Mr. Thornton's on the 8th of November. I had not seen the prosecutor the night before myself, but I was sent there at eleven o'clock in the morning, and went - I went into the house the back way, by the mews, and was introduced to the prosecutor and Mr. Thornton; I was placed in the parlour with the door open; I heard somebody come to the door, and heard a whispering in the passage, but could not hear what was said till I heard the prosecutor say "What am I to give you money for?" I could not hear the prisoner's answer; the prosecutor then said"You have got the money; now what is it for?" the prisoner said he wanted to take out a pair of trousers which

were in pawn; the prosecutor again said "You have got the money, and I want to know what it is for;" some answer was given which I could not hear; he put the same question again, and said "You said yesterday that I had taken indecent liberties with you, now what is it I have done;" and I heard the prisoner say "O never mind if I did," and something else, but I could not hear the whole; the prosecutor again said, "You have got the money, and I want to know what it is for;" he said, "I want to take out my trousers, and if you do not like to lend me the money take it again." There was more conversation between them, but the prisoner spoke in a half whisper, and I could not hear what he said. I went out and desired the prisoner to come into the parlour, which he did, and I asked if he knew any thing of the prosecutor - he said No- I asked if he had ever seen him before; he said Yes, about three weeks or a month before - he met him in Grosvenor-street with Fennell - David-street crosses Grosvesnor-street - I asked if he had seen him at any other time - he said he had seen him in Cheapside; that he merely saw him pass along, but did not stop to speak to him - I asked if he had seen him at any other time or place - he said not, he knew nothing further of him; I asked him who the two men were who were with him - he said he did not know who they were; I asked if he denied two men having been there with him; he said No, that he had seen the two men following him along the street but did not know who they were, nor where they lived; I took him to the office - the two half-crowns which I had previously marked, I found on the lock of the door.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the parlour door wide open? A. Yes, he could not see into the room; the prosecutor spoke loud enough but the prisoner whispared.

MR. LAW. Q. Did not Mr. Thornton communicate with you on this subject? A. Yes, he was at the office, and took a decided interest in prosecutor's behalf.

JAMES FENNELL (examined by MR. PHILLIPS). I once met the prosecutor when I was with the prisoner in David-street - the prosecutor asked the prisoner how he did- the prisoner said "Pretty well" - the prosecutor said"You don't look so well as when I last saw you;" the prisoner did not answer.

COURT. Q. Did the prosecutor say any thing about not knowing him? A. I understood the prosecutor that he knew him, because he told me his name was George Kelly - that was three weeks or more after we met - I had met him in Regent-street and Oxford-street about three weeks after the first time, and he asked me if I knew Kelly - I said not particularly, only by meeting him in the street: I had always understood his name to be George Reeve till the prosecutor told me it was Relly. I had met the prisoner about five minutes before we met the prosecutor in David-street. I do not know whether I or the prosecutor spoke first - I think I did; we stood talking about five minutes - the prosecutor asked how he did; I think the prisoner nodded when he first came up- they had no conversation but what I have mentioned and then we parted.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence, or putting him in fear .

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-7

London Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

7. JOHN HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 umbrella, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of George Payne , the elder.

GEORGE PAYNE, JUN. I am the son of George Payne, an umbrella-maker , who lives in St. Martin's-le-grand . On Thursday evening, the 17th of November, about six o'clock, this umbrella hung on the frame of the door; I saw a person's arm at the corner of the window - I ran to the door and saw somebody running in a direction from the door - I pursued and overtook the prisoner with this umbrella in his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-8

8. JOHN WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Robert Bradford , from his person .

ROBERT BRADFORD. I am a surgeon , and live in Shoe-lane. About a fortnight ago I left home in the afternoon, with my handkerchief in my pocket; I felt a pull at my pocket at the end of Little New-street, Shoe-lane , and on turning round saw my handkerchief falling on the ground between the prisoner and another, who was behind him - I was about a yard from it - I directly collared him, and snatched the handkerchief from the other man, who had picked it up, and he ran off - the prisoner denied it, and begged hard for liberty - I took him to the watch-house; I had lost one on the same spot, and I put this down: tight into my pocket - I had used it in Fleet-street.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You at first saw it on the ground? A. I saw it falling - I felt a violent pull at my pocket - when I turned round the prisoner was nearest to me. I had heard somebody close at my heels from Fleet-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-9

9. THOMAS GISMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , at St. Matthew, Friday-street, six gold seals, value 4l. 12s., the goods of John Banfield , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BANFIELD. I am a silversmith and jeweller , and live in Cheapside, in the parish of St. Matthew, Friday-street . On the 26th of November I left my shop and had just got as far as the curb stone, opposite to my own door, when I heard my wife call out; I turned round, saw several people round the door, and the prisoner, who had been seized by somebody - he was taken into the shop - I had left my seals on a tray on the glass-case - these six seals cost me 4l. 12s.; I found the seals scattered about the counter, and some on the glass-case; I gave him in charge.

MRS. REBECCA BANFIELD . I was in the shop, putting a tray of seals to rights - they were on the glass-case; I had noticed the prisoner walking backward and forward by the door - he came into the shop, and endeavoured to take away the tray of seals from me - he took hold of it, to take it - I took hold of him by the shoulder, and he

took hold of my shoulder; I was the only person in the shop; he did not get the tray from me - it contained two dozen gold seals and some gold keys - he scuffled very hard with me - I called for assistance - he then let go of the tray, and with his left hand grasped a handful of keys and seals - I saw six seals fall from his hand upon my screaming out; I could hold him no longer, and he ran out of the shop, but had not got to the curb-stone before a young man stopped him - he was brought back - my husband returned just as he was coming in at the door - I am sure he seized the seals in his hand - they were fastened on a card, and he squeezed them up.

THOMAS COUCH . I am a cabinet-maker and live in St. John's-street-road. I had been to a warehouse in Friday-street, and heard the prosecutrix scream; I looked round into Mr. Banfield's shop, and saw her and the prisoner struggling; I called Murder! the prisoner ran out of the shop - I laid hold of him, and took him into the shop - Mrs. Banfield charged him with taking the seals and keys - he said nothing, except that he could not run away. Mr. Banfield came in directly.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a constable. I was passing between seven and eight o'clock and saw a crowd - I went into the shop, and took charge of the prisoner - I found no money on him. I produce the card of seals.

MR. BANFIELD. My own writing is on the card - they cost me 4l. 12s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ, and in great distress.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 41.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of his not having used personal violence .

Reference Number: t18251208-10

10. WILLIAM MOULDS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 2 reams of paper, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of James Bullock .

JAMES BULLOCK. I am a printer , and live in Lombard-street, Fleet-street. On the 1st of October, hearing that the prisoner was in custody, I examined my stock, and missed several reams of paper - I saw two reams at Guildhall next day, and knew them to be mine - they have a mark on the wrapper - I never disposed of it - the prisoner is quite a stranger.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. On the 31st of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming from Temple-bar, and just at the corner of Fetter-lane I saw the prisoner with this paper on his shoulder; I looked him in the face - he turned round and went back down Fleet-street - I followed - he turned up Red-lion-court - he stopped at the top of the court, and put the paper down, as if he was going to do something necessary - I said"Halloo, what have you got there?" he said paper; I said"Where are you going with it?" he said to Holborn, and I think he said to Cross-street; I asked if he had a bill of parcels - he said No; I asked where he brought it from - he said from Mr. Davison's, in Lombard-street - Mr. Davison is a printer, living opposite to Mr. Bullock. I said I must trouble him to go to Mr. Davison's - he said "Very well, come along;" I asked if he lived there - he said No, that the porter, named Thomas James, asked him to carry it for him; I said I thought it very curious, and asked how long he had known him; he said from a child; We went to Davison's, and the prisoner said to the witness,"Did not you send this paper out about ten minutes ago?" he said "Certainly not; I sent none out;" I asked if he knew the mark on it - he said he thought it was Mr. Bullock's mark. Mr. Bullock's men identified it, and I locked him up. Mr. Bullock claimed it next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say the porter who lived at Mr. Davison's gave it him to carry? A. Yes; Thomas James was called down. I said, "Is this the Thomas James, who gave you the paper?" - He said - No.

ROBERT SPENCE . I am in Mr. Davison's service - he lives nearly opposite to Mr. Bullock's. I had seen the prisoner standing near Mr. Bullock's door without any paper, and in a quarter of an hour Herdsfield brought him in - he said a person named Thomas James had given him the paper - there is only one James in our service, and he is the apprentice, he was called down; the prisoner said, that was not the Thomas James he meant - no other person of that name had been on our premises. I told him he had been standing over the way - he said he had.

Cross-examined. Q. He said a man who called himself Thomas James had given it to him? A. Yes; a person had been to our door, and asked if we wanted a compositor.

MR. BULLOCK. I have no Thomas James in my service.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not a considerable quantity of this paper in your warehouse? A. No; there was about five reams - I have had more; I never sold it, but always printed on it - it has my own handwriting on it.

WILLIAM WILCOXON . I am warehouseman to Mr. Davison, and was in the warehouse when the prisoner was brought in - it was not Mr. Davison's paper - it was worth 25s. a ream.

THOMAS JAMES . I am apprentice to Mr. Davison, the prisoner was quite a stranger to me, until he was brought in by Herdsfield. I never gave him any paper.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not your father, Thomas James in the prosecutor's service? A. Yes; he has been dead this twelvemonth. The prisoner said I was not the person he meant.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person named Thomas James in Fleet-street; I had been to school with him - he took me to the Horse Shoe and Star, public-house, in Fleet-street, and gave me some beer. I went to the corner of Lombard-street with him - he told me to wait there while he went down to Mr. Davison's office. I saw him go into the office - and as he was a long time, I walked down the street, on Mr. Bullock's side - and as I returned he overtook me with the paper in Fleet-street, and asked me to carry it a little way - and in two minutes the officer stopped me, and on turning round he was gone. I told him Davison's was where I saw him go to.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-11

11. WILLIAM WHITTINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 2 tongues, value 4s., the goods of William Day and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

BUSBY DRAPER . I am beadle of Cornhill. On Friday, the 25th of November, I was fetched to Mr. Day's - I searched the prisoner and found two tongues, one in each of his coat-pockets. I said it was a bad concern; he said he should not have done it, if he had not been persuaded by another person.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He was errand-boy in the house? A. Yes; three persons were called into the counting-house to be searched. I asked where he was going to take them to; he said he could not tell. I said he had better tell all about it - and he said he should not have done it if he had not been persuaded.

MR. WILLIAM DAY. I have other partners - the prisoner was our weekly servant. I sent for the beadle - saw him search the prisoner, and take the tongues from his pockets - they are worth 2s. each - he had been nearly four years with me, and behaved very well.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-12

12. DENNIS HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 double barrel of anchovies, value 2l. 6s., the goods of James Houghton and Humphrey Messenger , his masters, in the dwelling-house of Humphrey Messenger .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

HUMPHREY MESSENGER. I live in Bartholomew-close, and am in partnership with James Houghton - we deal in anchovies . I occupy the premises exclusively - the prisoner was eighteen months in our employ as a cooper ; this property was in a warehouse on the further side of the yard, which is inclosed by a high wall. On Thursday, the 17th of November, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I observed a barrel of anchovies on a different side of the warehouse to what it ought to be - it was concealed behind two casks. I took it out, and particularly noticed the marks on it; it had the letter W. and a small blemish on one of the staves. I placed it between some casks of the same size - the prisoner worked in the yard near that warehouse. I did not miss it until he was brought back to me. I had given 46s. each, for one hundred of them. Mr. Nelme was the broker - they were all one price.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you opened the cask? A. No; I only bought them in October - the barrel is marked in a peculiar manner; I know it from any others. I noticed the blemish in the stave - we may have sold eighty of them.

COURT. Q. Did you ever employ the prisoner to take out barrels? A. We sent none out that evening - we do at times make allowances for damaged barrels.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. On Friday, the 18th of November, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Wilson-street, Shoreditch, with something in a bag on his shoulder. I went across, and asked what he had got; he said a barrel of anchovies - that he bought them at Billingsgate off the quay for 25s. I took him to the watch-house, and asked where he was going to take them - he said to Brick-lane, Spitalfields, and that he had brought them from St. John's-street, Goswell-street-road. I asked where in Brick-lane he was taking them to - he could not tell. Mr. Messenger saw the barrel on Monday.

MR. MESSENGER. We missed it on Saturday, when we took stock of them; I saw it safe on Thursday; it is worth much more than 25s.; the prisoner had a guinea a week.

RICHARD NELME . I am a broker, and sold the prosecutors one hundred double barrels of anchovies, marked W.; this could not be bought for 25s. - they are never sold at Billingsgate - ninety-nine out of one hundred that come to London, I think pass through our hands - we are the particular agents for this article.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-13

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

13. JANE M'EVOY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , at St. Martin in the Fields, 3 pieces of printed cotton, containing in length 54 yards, value 50s., the goods of Thomas Mainwaring and James Phillips , in their dwelling-house .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18251208-14

14. JONAS BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 3 jackets, value 2l. 5s.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 2l. 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s., and 1 shirt, value 5s., the goods of Edward Skeet , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD SKEET. I live in Margaret's-buildings, Shadwell . The prisoner is a seaman , and lodged with me three different times - there was a large chest in his room; it was double locked. On the 25th of November, I accidentally found that it was broken open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, which I had seen safe a fortnight before, when I had been to the chest. I apprehended him that night in New Gravel-lane.

JAMES WHALING . I belong to the Thames police-office. I found the prisoner at the watch-house, and found the things at different pawnbroker's which he pointed out to me.

JOSEPH MICKELFIELD . I am servant to Mr. Ashby, pawnbroker, Broad-street, Ratcliff. I have a jacket pawned by the prisoner on the 25th of November.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am a servant to Mr. Cording, of Ratcliff-highway. I have a pair of trousers and a waistcoat, pawned by the prisoner, on the 19th and 21st of November.

JAMES MESSENGER . I am a pawnbroker, and have a jacket and a pair of trousers, pawned by the prisoner on the 19th and 23d of November.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never broke the chest open.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-15

15. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , at St. James, Westminster, 26

yards of linen cloth, value 2l. 12s., the goods of James Gibbs , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY TOOTILL . I am shopman to Mr. James Gibbs, a linen-draper , who lives in Wardour-street, in the parish of St. James, Westminster , and rents the house. On the 12th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the parlour, Mrs. Gibbs gave me information - I ran out, pursued the prisoner down Wardour-street, Edward-street, and was directed down Duck-lane. I there saw him throw this linen cloth out of his blue apron - it was picked up in my presence - it had laid in the shop, about three feet from the door. I secured him immediately. I had not seen him enter the shop - there are twenty-six yards of it, and it cost us 2l. 12s.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not standing in Duck-lane, when you came and asked if I had been to the shop? A. No.

JOHN GRACE . I am shopman to Mr. Gibbs. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran in a contrary direction, and met the prisoner in the court. I saw Tootill collar him - I picked up the linen, but did not see him throw it away.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I received him in charge with the cloth; he had a blue apron on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near Wardour-street that evening.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18251208-16

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

16. JULIA BARRY was charged upon the Coroner's Inquisition only, with the wilful murder of her bastard child, by suffocation, and throwing it into a certain soil in a privy .

Two medical gentlemen deposed, that they were unable to state whether the child had not died in the birth; from natural causes, but were decidedly of opinion, that it had not died from suffocation.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-17

Before Mr. Justice Park.

17. ALEXANDER DOBIE was indicted for the wilful murder of John Dillon .

HANNAH PALMER . I am single, and live with my father, in Upper Dorset-street, Bryanston-square . On the 21st of July , between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a noise, and went to the window - I saw Mrs. Leach endeavouring to get the deceased, John Dillon, into a house; she seemed pressing him to go in, and he went in - he came out again, and stopped at the next door, where the prisoner kept a shop. I think he is the man. Dillon stopped at the shop window, and began, as I thought, to use very abusive language. I heard him swearing at the prisoner, who was at the back part of his shop, and seemed to wish to avoid him - he did not come forward. Dillon put his feet towards the shop door, as if to go in, but his feet did not touch the step - the prisoner then rushed out, and put himself in a fighting attitude. Dillon had been menacing, lifting up his arms, and saying, "D-n you," before that. Dobie struck him several blows, and he fell - he did not strike Dobie, he did not seem to have power - he fell on the back of his head in the road on the stones - he attempted to raise himself up, but fell back again. I did not see Dobie strike him any more - I saw him at his shop door afterwards. Dillon was an old man, and used to be a good deal with the prisoner in his shop at one time, assisting him in unloading coals - he kept a coal and potatoe warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You at first saw Dillon at the door of his own house? A. I have heard since that it is his house - he seemed in a passion, and his face was all over blood when I first saw him.

MARY LEACH . I have known the deceased six or seven years - he was a plasterer's labourer - he was rather in liquor at this time - he came to my door - took me by the hand, and asked how I did - his face was all over blood - I never knew him quarrelsome. I told him he had better go home than be in the street; I went with him to his own door - the door was shut, and before it was opened he loosed from me, and went to the prisoner's door. I called him back, got him into the passage, and shut the door; he came out before I could get to my own door, which is two houses off, and went to the corner of Dobie's house - he said something. Dobie came out, seeming in a great passion with him, wiping his own face with a towel, and struck Dillon on his side, with his double fist. Dillon lifted up his arms to strike again, but was too weak. Dobie struck him several blows in his body - and Dobie's mother called out "Give it him well;" then he struck him on the temple; he fell and never arose any more - he tried to arise but could not; the prisoner tried to kick him, and then went away - they carried Dillon into the kitchen of his own house - he died that evening between four and five o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. When he stood at the prisoner's door, could you hear what he said? A. No; his manner appeared agitated.

MR. BRYANT. I am a surgeon. On the 21st of July I was visiting a patient in this neighbourhood and saw a crowd; I saw the deceased lying on his face - I went away to my patient, and on returning saw two persons raising him - I saw a slight contused wound above, and over his left eye; I felt his pulse and considered him labouring under symptoms of a compressed brain; I had him taken home, and directed such treatment as I thought proper, and that the person who had given the blow should be secured, as I thought it a dangerous case. Two days after his death I opened his body, and found from four to six ounces of extravasted blood over the surface of the right hemisphere of the brain - that I consider the immediate cause of his death. I do not conceive the slight confusion to have caused his death; but that the concussion given to the vessels by falling with violence on the stones, produced the rupture of the vessels and caused his death. The vessels might be ruptured by intoxication, and his falling produce the same appearances.

Q. If he had before fallen down from intoxication, and his face bled, should you attribute the rupture to that or the latter fall, produced by this fight? A. The latter, for I think a man could not stand on his legs after such a rupture as this: he was laying on his face - vessels will very readily give way when a man is in a very high state of excitement from intoxication or anger.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Suppose him to

have been fighting, and his passion to be violently excited, would he not be more likely to have a rupture of the vessels? A. Certainly; a concussion might have been caused by fighting.

COURT. Q. If he had been fighting an hour before, and received a blow which caused coagulated blood upon the brain then, he could not have walked? A. No, nor stood. If it had been the effect of liquor it might not be produced immediately - if his brain got in that state by intoxication he could not have walked about.

THOMAS LEWIS . I saw the prisoner give the deceased one blow.

JOHN SHARMAN . On the 21st of July I saw Dillon - he was in liquor, but not drunk - he seemed vexed in his mind. I remember his coming up to Dobie's window - he said "I have come for recompence for the injuries you have done me." Words passed on both sides, which I took no notice of; Dobie was washing himself, and when he had dried himself he came out, took him by the collar, and flung him on the pavement - knocked him down with his face in the middle of the kennel - he never groaned - I set him up and got a woman to bring a basin and wash his face - the blood gushed out of his mouth, nose and all parts of his face, very freely.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not use very bad and shocking expressions to the prisoner? A. There was rough language on both sides - I did not see Dobie try to kick him.

Prisoner's Defence. I owed him no animosity whatever.

ANN HERBERT . On the day this happened, about two o'clock, I saw Dillon come to Dobie's house - he conducted himself very improper, abusing Dobie very much, calling him a bl-y b-r. Mrs. Dobie was in the parlour- he called her an old convicted bawd, come out of Newgate for robbing a gentleman - he was on the step of the door; Dobie desired him to go about his business - Dillon said he would knock him down - Dobie walked to the door to wipe his hands - Dillon walked into the shop - angry words were still going on - Dobie told him to go about his business - he then came into the shop and struck Dobie; he had been abusing him for two or three minutes before any blow was given. Dillon did not appear drunk - he walked across the road steady enough; he once worked for Dobie, who lent him both money and provisions, and was very kind to him.

COURT. Q. There were bad words on both sides? A. Dobie used no bad words - he took his abuse without returning any. I am positively sure that Dillon struck him first.

GEORGE DOBIE . I am the prisoner's brother, and was in the shop when the deceased came to the door - he used very abusive language, not fit to be mentioned - he remained outside using this language for about five minutes, and then attempted to come in - my brother told him to go home, and to go to bed, I believe; he uttered some had expressions, and said if he would come out he would serve him out; my brother came to the door and the deceased struck him a violent blow in the mouth - he immediately struck him again, and then they both went to fighting, and after fighting three or four minutes the deceased fell.

COURT. Q. Do you swear that blows were given on both sides before he was knocked down? A. That I swear. My brother had always been kind to him, and took him to lodge in his house when he had no where to go.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of Manslaughter only . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-18

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

18. MICHAEL BROWN and THOMAS DUNBEVEN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Frederick Shusler, on the King's highway, on the 1st of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 tuning fork, value 2s.; 1 gimblet, value 4s.; 4ozs. of wire, value 3d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and a regulator, value 3d. , the goods of John Frederick Shusler .

FREDERICK SHUSLER . I am the son of John Frederick Shusler, and live at Chelsea. I am eleven years old. On the 1st of November, at ten o'clock in the morning, I and my father were crossing Hyde-park - my father had stopped to speak to a gentleman - I walked on - the prisoners came across from the gate up to me, and hit me in the face with the back of their hands, and asked what I had got in my basket, which was in my hand - they knocked me down - Brown took a bundle out of my basket, put it under his coat and ran away with it - I did not know them before. I ran after them and got it from them - my father was only two or three yards from me - they both ran one way. I then went and told my father - he pursued and caught one and the officer the other.

Cross-examined by MR. ROACH. Where was this? A. Near Grosvenor-gate - it happened on the footpath; we were about half-way from the barracks - there were three boys together - Brown asked what I had in my basket - both the prisoners struck me; they did not resist my getting the parcel back - they had ran away with it towards Kensingtoh-gardens, about the length of this Court. I did not call out nor tell my father till I had got it back.

JOHN FREDERICK SHUSLER. I was with my son and gave him a bundle, containing these things; I stopped to speak to a gentleman and told him to go towards Cumberland-gate; I did not see the prisoners stop him, but after our talk was over I went on, and he told me he had been robbed of his parcel - he pointed out the prisoners and another boy, who were walking towards the powder-mills, and when they saw me pursuing they all three ran; I overtook Brown, and asked how he came to insult my boy - he said it was the other boys. Brown was then going to run, but I took him to Grosvenor-gate to inform the park-keeper; an officer brought up Dunbeven, and I gave them in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw nothing of the transaction? A. No, my son said he had been insulted and robbed of his parcel. He is a very quiet mild boy - my being near, I supposed, gave him courage to pursue them; I probably should not have given them in charge but the officer said I ought to do so for the sake of justice.

JOHN PERKINS . I am a smith. I was coming through Hyde-park, and saw the two prisoners and another, go up to this boy - they both struck him and knocked him down; I saw his father and a gentleman a few yards from him - they grabbed their hands into the basket, and took the bundle out, and ran away; he got up, went after them

and got the bundle from them - then went and told his father, who ran and caught Brown.

Cross-examined. Q. You were too far off to hear what passed? A. Yes; I did not run after them - there was no quarrelling between the boys.

THOMAS AMSDEN . I am an officer. I was on duty in the Park, and found the father holding Brown - Dunbeven and others were standing by, and from what Shusler said I laid hold of Dunbeven, and considered it my duty to take them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not the father's wish not to prosecute them? A. He wished to take them to the park-keeper - I did not persuade him not to do so - some gentleman said if he did justice he would give them in charge, and that I was ready to take them.

BROWN'S Defence. I was going to bathe with two boys - this little boy was picking up the mushrooms, the other boy said "Give us a mushroom;" and he said he would give him a slap in the face, and then gave him a kick, and offered to fight either of us; he ran to call his father and we were stopped - the officer persuaded him to take us to the office.

DUNBEVEN made the same defence.

SHUSLER, JUN. I was not gathering mushrooms, nor did they ask me for any - I did not say I would slap his face.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-19

Before Mr. Justice Park.

19. JAMES GREEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Thomas , on the King's highway, on the 29th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 2l.; four seals, value 1l., and a key, value 3s. , his property.

WILLIAM THOMAS. I live in Duke-street, Lisson-grove. On the 29th of October, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was coming from the pay-table, in Earl-street, Lisson-grove - I stopped at a watering-place, by the Brazen-head, public-house, for a necessary purpose; two boys were in the watering-place; I got them out, and when I came out myself they made an attempt at my seals, but did not succeed; a scuffle ensued: the watchman came up, and was going to take me to the watch-house for ill-using the boys; the prisoner then came up, and drew my watch from my pocket, without using any violence - the watchman stood four or five feet off at the time. I pursued the prisoner into the Brazen Head; I overtook him in the passage; he rushed into the tap-room - I held him by the collar, and said, "Oh! dear, I have lost my watch - you are the man who took it from me;" during that time I received a blow in my jaw, and on my nose, which cut me. I still held him, but in a little time his neck handkerchief was cut, and came away in my hand - he got from me, but did not get out of the room; my watch was then handed to me over their heads, by somebody. I am quite sure he is the man who drew it out of my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. ROACH. Q. Did you see the handkerchief cut? A. No - it must have been cut, or it would not have come away. I am a bricklayer. I was rather elevated, but not drunk. I did not beat the boys.

Q. Did not you accuse them of stealing your watch, and the watchman tell you it was in your fob? A. I do not recollect it - I remember his telling me it was in my fob; I was not above two feet from the public-house, and saw nobody but the prisoner come out - nobody but the watchman was near when he took the watch. I did not call out that I had lost it when I had it in my hands; when I got it I said I was perfectly satisfied - it was dark, but there were gas-lights there. I did not accuse any one else of it - I was beat about, but did not keep my bed in consequence of it. The officer came to my house on Monday, the 1st of November, but I was out.

HENRY LEDDY . I am a paper-stainer. I came out of the Brazen Head to go to the watering-place at the corner, and saw the prosecutor holding a boy - he told the watchman to take him; I did not hear what it was for. A mob collected - the boy got away, and he attempted to run after him; some words occurred, and the watchman collared Thomas, to take him to the watch-house - he was rather in liquor. The mob followed them to one of the doors of the Brazen Head; I went into the tap-room at another door, and saw him holding the prisoner by the neck handkerchief; he said he had robbed him of his watch, and that he had got it; the watchman stood by, looking at the prisoner, as if he was afraid to take him - in a little while his neck handkerchief came off, and the prisoner went into the mob which stood in the tap-room, and tried to go out; the watchman spoke to him, and then he went back into the room. I saw somebody put the watch into the prosecutor's hand.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him ill-treating the boys? A. No; I saw him holding a boy - he was not very drunk. I went into the parlour, where I was drinking, and saw no more.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I am a watchman. I heard a noise at the corner, and saw the prosecutor violently shaking a little boy; I said, "What are you about?" he said they had attempted to take his watch; a mob collected, and persuaded him to let the boy go - he did so, and then abused me, and said he would give the boy in charge - and for his abuse, and being in liquor, I took him by the collar, and he collared me; I could not take him by myself, and sprang my rattle - the prisoner and two or three more came out of the public-house, and in about a minute he hallooed out that his watch was gone; I let go of him - he collared the prisoner, and said, "You have got my watch; the prisoner made his way into the house, the prosecutor keeping hold of him, and when we got inside he called out for his watch; I said, "For God's sake, if any of you have the poor man's watch give it to him," and finding nobody would own it I said I must go out for assistance, and desired the landlord to let nobody out. I returned in about two minutes, and was told it was restored to him. I asked if he had got it - he said, Yes, but he wanted his hat, which was given to him, and he said he was perfectly satisfied; I escorted him off my beat, and he went into a pork-shop.

Q. You did not see him walking about with his hat in his hand, and saying he had lost it? A. No.

Cross-examined. Q. He was very drunk and troublesome? A. He was troublesome, and not sober. I never saw the prisoner with the watch.

JAMES CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am a Bow-street patrol.

On the Monday I was taking the prisoner to the office, and met the prosecutor in Chapel-street - he asked if I had heard of a robbery which was committed on Saturday night; I said No, not knowing he was the prosecutor in this case. He said, "There was a man robbed of his watch - I am the man, but I got it back again." I went on about a hundred yards, then returned, and asked his name - he said, "Thomas" - I then said he was the man I had been looking for, and pointing to the prisoner, asked if he was the man who had robbed him; he said, "That is the man who robbed me, and hit me on the side of my head;" he went with me to the office.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know how the prisoner got into custody? A. No - I found him in the watch-house. When I met the prosecutor, he came up, and asked what I had got that man for; I asked why he put that question, and he said what I have stated. I did not wait to finish the conversation, or he might have said he was the man before I left.

SAMUEL PRENDERGAST . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday, the 30th of October, at the Brazen Head, in consequence of information. I told him it was for robbing a man last night of his watch, by the Brazen Head; he said I was mistaken, for he was elsewhere, and could prove it; he wished to see the prosecutor, but I did not then know who he was.

Cross-examined. Q. Who gave you the information? A. Leddy and others - he asked to see the prosecutor; I said if I could find him before night he should; I could not learn who he was; I returned, and told him, from what I could learn, whoever he was, he was very ill-used, and most likely was a-bed.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask if I had robbed a man of his watch at eight o'clock? A. I do not remember saying eight o'clock.

Prisoner. I have a witness to call.

WILLIAM WILLIS . I was passing in Lisson-street, and saw a mob - the watchman and prosecutor were collaring each other; I went on, and heard an alarm that a man had lost his watch. I turned back, and there was a mob round the door - I went in in three or four minutes, and saw the prosecutor standing with his watch in his hand, and crying out, "Oh! dear, let me have my watch;" somebody said, "You have got it in your hand;" he then said he had lost his hat; somebody gave it to him; the watchman asked if he was satisfied; he said perfectly so; he was intoxicated, and did not know what he was talking about.

SARAH WINDRED . I was standing at my door, which is three houses from the Brazen head, on this night, and saw a man on the other side of the way, very much intoxicated; I afterwards heard the rattle spring, and went into the public-house; the prosecutor was holding the prisoner by the neck handkerchief, so that he was nearly black in the face - somebody cut the handkerchief - he then went to the prosecutor, and said, "Can you say I have got your watch?" I heard some one say "The man is crying for his watch, and he has got it." I then went out.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing from the person only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-20

London Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

20. JOHN CROSSINGHAM was indicted for stealing, pair of stocking, value 11s. 6d. ; the goods of Robert Romanis , his master.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18251208-21

21. JOHN BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 cloak, value 1s. , the goods of Frances Alexander , widow .

FRANCES ALEXANDER. I am a widow, and live in Thames-street - this cloak was up three pair of stairs - I missed it about half-past eleven o'clock on the morning of the 5th of December; it was safe an hour before. The prisoner is a stranger. I saw it again in an hour, when the officer called me down.

JAMES SMITH . I am a constable. On the 5th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Great Bush-lane, and saw the prisoner and another coming towards the prosecutrix's house - I watched them, and saw the prisoner enter this house - the other waited outside; I walked by, but he was not in the passage - in about five minutes he came out with this cloak in a wrapper; he went up Little Bush-lane; I went up Great Bush-lane, and stopped him - his companion was gone. I took him to the house; he said he had picked it up in the passage; I rung the bell, and the prosecutrix claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see if one of the postboy's mothers lived there, and found the cloak in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-22

22. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 22s. , the goods of Edward Phillips Doudney , and Edward Doudney .

JOHN DOUDNEY. I am the son of Edward Phillips Doudney, and brother of Edward Doudney, they are tailors , and have a shop in Lombard-street . On the 21st of November, about ten minutes past four o'clock, these trousers were at the door, inside; I was engaged with two gentlemen, and heard a pull, turned round, and they were gone; the prisoner ran by the side window; I ran out, and took him, without losing sight of him; he was tucking them under his coat - he made great resistance. The shop ticket is upon them.

JOHN JUDD . I am a constable, and took him in charge with the trousers; I have had them ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman came up, and said"What have you got?" I said, "Nothing but my waistcoat" - he was going to let me go, when a gentleman said,"Here are the trousers," but they never saw me drop them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-23

23. ANN WILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 17 pen-knives, value 25s. , the goods of John Baker .

JOHN BAKER. I am a cutler , and live in Bishopsgate-street . These knives were in a glass-case on the counter; they were safe on Saturday evening, at eight o'clock - and at a quarter past eight on Monday morning I found the prisoner in custody, in the shop.

ANN ANSTEY . I am twelve years old, and am neice to Mr. Baker. Between eight and nine o'clock I had gone out for butter, leaving nobody in the shop, and on my return I saw the prisoner standing at the glass-frame - I asked what she wanted; she made no answer; I went, and told my aunt, and from what she said I went out, and asked her to come back - she would not; a gentleman brought her back. She dropped the knives in the street; I picked up sixteen - my uncle saw and claimed them. - She was quite a stranger.

MARY ANN MORGAN . I live at Mr. Baker's. I sent Anstey out for butter; I was in the back room all the time; I saw nobody come in. The prisoner was brought back.

EDWARD COLE . I work in Primrose-street, Bishopsgate. Anstey came up, and asked me to stop the prisoner, which I did; Anstey had got the knives. The prisoner said that was all she had taken.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am a patrol, and took charge of the prisoner. Sixteen knives were given to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-24

24. WILLIAM HALFORD was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS (on behalf of the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-25

25. GEORGE JOHN HEWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1dwt. of gold, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William King , his master .

WILLIAM KING. I live at Bridgewater-square, and am a goldsmith . The prisoner was five weeks in my service. In consequence of losses I gave him in charge, as he came out to go to dinner, in the passage, and called him into the parlour, where the officer was; I said he was wanted; he immediately put his hand into his breeches' pocket, and there we found two pieces of gold, weighing 1dwt.; he did not work at home; he admitted taking them from the melting pot two hours before, to give them to the foreman, who has the charge of the gold - the foreman works in all the workshops - there are four; I think he was in the upper shop; he said he intended giving them to the foreman when he saw him: they are worth 2s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was gold which had been in the melting-pot? A. Yes.

JOHN SKIDMORE . I am foreman to the prosecutor. Two days before the prisoner was taken I was melting, and left the pot with a small piece of gold in it, and on Friday morning I told the boy to take the pot out; the gold was then gone; this was about one o'clock, and the workmen had just gone to dinner; I had not seen it for two days before.

Cross-examined. Q. He was going out at the usual dinner hour? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Was there any difficulty in his telling you where the gold was? A. No; I was in the melting-room; I do not know when I last saw him that morning.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am street-keeper of Cripplegate. The prisoner was coming through the passage to go out, when I stopped him. Mr. King said he had lost a great deal of gold, and told me to search him; he seemed agitated; I found the gold in his pocket; he did not tell me what he was going to do with it; he said he found it on the bench, and meant to return it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up on the forge, and put it into my pocket, to return it when I saw the foreman - I had not seen him when I went to dinner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-26

26. MARY CONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 11/4lbs. of pork, value 9d. , the goods of Samuel Hamson .

WILLIAM BLAKEY . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Hamson, Cheesemonger , of Fore-street . On the 4th of November this pork was in the window, and could be reached outside; about one o'clock in the afternoon Martin gave me information; I went out and saw the prisoner within six yards of the shop, brought her back with it in her basket; she said she was tipsey, but did not appear so at all.

HARRIET MARTIN . I am thirteen years old. On the 4th of November the prisoner came down Grub-street, and put her basket down, near Hamson's shop, took a piece of pork, and put it into her basket; the shopman was engaged; she put up her finger to me to be quiet, but I told of it; he followed and took her.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I took her in charge; she appeared to me to be intoxicated - I found nothing upon her.

GUILTY - Aged 45.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-27

27. THOMAS RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 shew glass, value 2s. , the goods of George James Ihler .

EMILY IHLER . I am the daughter of George James Ihler, of Jewin-street, a fruiterer . On the 9th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and took up the shew-glass, and went out; I followed and saw him stopped; it was empty.

THOMAS BURLEY . I am a cabinet-maker. I heard a cry of Stop thief! Ihler was pursuing the prisoner; I stopped him about the middle of the street; he then let the glass fall from his hand - the top was not broken.

THOMAS WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable, and received him in charge, with the top of the glass - I found no money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in want.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18251208-28

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

28. JOHN WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , at St. George's, Bloomsbury, 2 silver

candlesticks, value 6l.; 2 extinguishers, value 10s.; and 2 pairs of snuffers, value 10s., the goods of Mary Roberts , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE STACEY . I am footman to Mrs. Mary Roberts, a widow, who lives in Russell-square, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . On the 29th of November I had cleaned the silver bed-candlesticks, and put them into the pantry closet - I came down stairs about noon, and saw the prisoner standing at the pantry-door in the passage - our area gate is always left open - I asked what he wanted - he said he had lemons to sell - I insisted on looking into his basket, and there found the two silver bed-candlesticks, with candles in them, also the snuffers and extinguishers - they are worth 6l. - I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS BINFORD KERSWELL . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge with the property - he had some lemons in his basket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy; I was out of work, and took to selling lemons - I thought these of no value.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury .

Reference Number: t18251208-29

29. JAMES RYAN and JOHN CARNEY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Esther Jacobs , on the King's highway, on the 25th of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 purse, value 18d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 half-sovereign, and seven shillings , the property of Joseph Jacobs .

ESTHER JACOBS. I am the wife of Joseph Jacobs - we live in Little Catherine-street, in the Strand. On the 25th of November, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was going from home, and at the corner of Vinegar-yard, by Drury-lane Theatre , I was pelted with mud by four or five boys; four of them were quite lads, and the other rather tall - they pelted my face, and the back of my bonnet, as if to blind me; I turned round and saw Ryan picking up mud - he threw it at me; I was surrounded by the rest of the boys; I put my hand to my pocket for my handkerchief, to wipe it off, and caught Carney's hand in my pocket; I caught hold of his hand, and said "You little rascal, what are you about, you are picking my pocket;" my purse and handkerchief were gone from that pocket; the purse contained seven shillings and a half-sovereign; he tried to get away but I held him; a mob collected, and a woman held him while I ran to Bow-street for an officer; Ryan stood by his side till the officer came, and then ran away; the officer took them both.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you used to be pelted? A. Never before; I keep a house and let two rooms.

Q. Are your lodgers women of the town? A. I never ask them questions; they do not walk the streets to my knowledge; I have no company in my house; people live with them; whether they are their husbands I cannot say- it is not a house for the reception of bad women; I had no girls with me when this happened.

Q. Were you not pelted for behaving improperly to two girls who were with you? A. No.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer. The prosecutrix met me in Bow-street, and said her pocket had been picked; I went up and took the prisoners; her bonnet and cap were quite muddy; Ryan ran away when I came up, but I caught him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know this woman? A. I have seen her before; I did not know where she lived before; she keeps a bad house, for the reception of street-walkers; I did not ask why she was pelted; I certainly would not believe her on her oath, as I have heard her swear to day that she did not keep such a house.

JURY. Q. Before you met her on that day had you been in the habit of speaking to her? A. I believe I have; I have seen her in the saloon of the theatre, and in the boxes. I know that girls, who frequent the theatre, use her house, and have seen her night after night, in the saloon, as mistress of the girls there.

CARNEY'S Defence. I met her with two young women standing by the play-house; some boys pelted her; she bit one on the head with her patten; a crowd came up, and they went away; we remained; she went and got an officer, and pointed us out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-30

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

30. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , at St. George, 1 piece of woollen cloth, containing in length, 13 yards, value 13l. the goods of Gabriel Jacobs , in his dwelling-house .

GABRIEL JACOBS. I am a linen and woollen-draper , and live in the parish of St. George . Nathan lives two or three doors from me. I was not at home when this happened.

EMANUEL NATHAN . I live near to Jacobs. On Tuesday last, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner (whom I knew before) near the shop - I saw him go into Jacobs' shop, and come out with a roll of cloth - he went up Pell-street with it. I and my brother pursued; he did not run - he dropped it in Pell-street - we had not called out; he was pursued and brought back by a young lad - my brother was nearer to him than I was. I am sure I saw him with it.

MOSES NATHAN . In consequence of what my brother said I pursued the prisoner into Pell-street, where I saw him walking with the cloth over his shoulder. I walked sharply after him, but not so fast as him - he turned round twice, and looked very hard at me. I began to run after him then, and he ran - I called Stop thief! three or four times - he dropped the cloth, and continued running. I picked the cloth up - he was stopped by two or three persons, and got away again; a boy came down the street with a basket of coals, which he threw over him, and he fell down. I secured and took him back to Jacobs' shop, without loosing sight of him.

PRYCE JEHU . I am a headborough. Mr. Nathan gave the prisoner into my charge, with the cloth, which I produce.

GABRIEL JACOBS. I know this cloth by two holes in it - in consequence of this hole, I cut it at the head end - it measures 131/2 yards, and cost me 22s. 6d. a yard, and is worth that. I have often seen the prisoner bring patterns to match at my shop - my shop is part of the dwelling-house.

Prisoner. My life is sworn away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth, and having industrious parents .

Reference Number: t18251208-31

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

31. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Greenep , on the night of the 30th of November , and stealing 1 bed, value 2l., and 1 blanket, value 5s. , his property.

MARY HANTON . I am servant to Thomas Greenep, who lives in Chadwell-street, Clerkenwell . On the 30th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I went up to my room, on the third floor, and found the bed clothes on the floor; the bed and blankets were gone; the window was open - it was shut at one o'clock, when I was up there - the next house was empty - a person could come along the gutters to the window from that house.

WILLIAM CORDWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Walters, pawnbroker, of Goswell-road. On the 30th of November, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner pawned this bed and blanket for a guinea - he said he pawned them for William Hunter, his master, and that his name was Davis.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The window was partly open.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-32

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

32. EDWARD SEAMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Mills , on the King's highway, on the 2d of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 10l.; 2 seals, value 30s.; and 2 keys, value 10s. , his property.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE MILLS. I am master of a vessel trading to Petersburgh. Last Friday night, between nine and ten o'clock, I was about fifty yards up Dock-street , going to Mr. Webster's - four men came up from behind, and jostled me backwards and forwards. I shoved one of them off the pavement, thinking it was a lark, and that they were drunk. I am certain the prisoner was one of them; immediately after that he came up and said, "Sir, you have been abused." I said, "It appears so;" he instantly snatched my watch out - I got hold of the watch and of him by the collar - one of his companions put out his foot to trip me up, I immediately sung out for the watchman; they struck me on the left ear, and I lost my hold of the watch and him also; they got away - there was a light at some distance - the prisoner's face was so close to me I pulled him down, and held so heavily on him, that I had an opportunity of seeing him - he had a blue or a black coat on, and was in a working dress - nobody came to my assistance. I went up to the top of the street in four or five minutes, and saw the watchman in company with a man, and in three quarters of an hour I saw Downes and Davis; they took me to a public-house, where I saw the prisoner, with sixteen or eighteen other persons, and the instant I entered the room I pointed him out. I was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you dined? A. I had two glasses of grog between eleven and twelve o'clock, but nothing else. I never said I should not know him - he had a kind of coatee on, and I think a white handkerchief - it was partly white; I was not alarmed, having no idea of a robbery - the nearest light was sixty or seventy yards off; there was singing going on at the public-house; a number of persons told me he had not been out of the house. I am a stranger in town.

JOHN DOWNES . I am an officer. On the night of the 2d of December I and Davis saw Mills at Webster's public-house, Back-lane, between ten and eleven o'clock - I was fetched there - he told me and Davis that he had been robbed in Dock-street; I took him to the Sidney Smith public-house, in Dock-street; Davis went in first - Mills followed: I was behind. There were fourteen or fifteen persons in the tap-room - Mills pointed out the prisoner, saying, "That is the man who took my watch;" he was sitting down among others, with beer on the table. Davis beckoned him out, and Mills charged him with the robbery - he said Mills must be wrong, for he had not left the house; other persons in the room also said so; he was dressed like a painter, and I think wore a blue coat; 5s. or 6s. were found upon him, but no watch.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am an officer. I was with Downes. Mills described the prisoner to me, as wearing a dark coat, very much like a Jew, and of a low statute; several persons in the room said he had been out, and the landlady said she thought he had not. Mills persisted in saying he was the man, and he continued to say he was wrong. Mills was sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not several persons declare he had not been out? A. Yes. I have brought nobody here who said he was out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out of the house from between seven and eight o'clock.

COLEMAN COLEMAN . I live in Well-street, Wellclose-square, and am a ginger beer maker. On Friday evening, the 2d of December, I went to the Sidney Smith, about half-past seven o'clock; the prisoner came in before eight o'clock, and had not left the house from that time till the officers came; we were drinking, and he sang a song.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What part of the taproom were you in? A. In the box, near the fire and the yard door; four young men, and I believe, two women were in the box. There was a long bench; the prisoner sat by my side; he is a painter.

FREDERICK FLEMMING . I am a last-maker, and live in Worship-strret. On Friday, the 2d of December, about seven o'clock, I went to the Sidney Smith; the prisoner came in about eight, and was not out of the room from then till the officers came.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you use this house every night? A. I am there two or three times a week; he sat in my company, by the stove, near the yard door. I went to the office to state this, but they would not hear me; one or two women sat in the box; the prisoner sat on the bench, and I on a chair; we were smoking.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect who sat on the bench with the prisoner? A. Coleman sat next to him.

GEORGE SNOW . I am waiter at the house. On the 2d

of December the prisoner came in about eight o'clock - he has frequented the house for three or four years; he had not left the house before the officers came.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you watch your company to see if they go out for any purpose? A. No. I set in the tap-room when I am not serving - he might go out for a minute or two, and I not see him; he sat in the box by the fire, near the yard door, on a form - some women were in the room. About twenty minutes past ten o'clock some neighbours were saying a man had been robbed in the street, and when I returned to the room, the prisoner had just finished a song.

WILLIAM FLAPMAKER . I am a musician. I was at the Sidney Smith on the 2d of December - the prisoner came in between seven and eight o'clock, and had not quitted the room till the officers came.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you go about playing? A. No; I belong to the Artillery company. The prisoner was smoking his pipe, and was not out of my sight.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-33

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

33. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 11 sheep, price 25l. , the property of Joseph Basil Dixon .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL WALTON . I am in the employ of Joseph Basil Dixon, who has a field at Islington , where the country drovers place their sheep before they go to market. On the 17th of November, at half-past five o'clock, I saw thirteen sheep there; and at half-past seven that evening I missed eleven of them; the two remaining were lame. I and Cope went next morning to a stable in Sermon-lane, about three hundred yards off; we forced the door a little way open, and saw the sheep - I went to Mr. Young, who returned with me; we then forced it quite open, and I found the eleven sheep, and am sure they were the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who did they belong to? A. They were under my master's care; I was to deliver them to the owner - there were others in the field, but not with these, nor marked in the same way; I left somebody to watch the stable while I fetched Young. I was not absent two minutes, and did not lose sight of the stable.

JOSEPH BASIL DIXON. Walton is my servant. My brother Daniel rents the field; I look after the business for him, and am answerable for what is put there.

JAMES YOUNG . I belong to the stable in Sermon-lane - I let it to the prisoner on the 25th of July; he said he was a butcher, and attended Newgate-market, to carry home carcases to the butcher's, and kept a cart and horse for that purpose. I had one key of the stable to put my barrow in, and he had another. On the 17th of November my barrow was fetched from my door, which is not ten yards from the stable, but I did not see it put into the stable. Next morning I went there with Walton and Cope - I put the key into the hole, and found the lock was off - the door was tied with a string. I found the sheep there. I had found my barrow before my door about eight o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. You were not in the habit of going to the stable? A. Only at times. I cannot say that he had not lent the stable to anybody.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see anybody else go there? A. No. If my barrow had not been put at my door I should have gone to the stable for it. I seldom saw him there.

THOMAS COPE . I am street-keeper of Islington. I got to the stable at half-past nine o'clock in the morning, of the 18th of November - I watched at the stable for the prisoner to come till about one o'clock, then left Lock there. I was returning about a quarter past five o'clock, and met Lock, with the prisoner - I locked him up; he told me if I would go back and wait there, a tall man in a rough coat would come with a horse to fetch the cart and things away, and said, "Be particular about the horse." I waited, a man came, and was taken.

WILLIAM LOCK . I am an officer, and was left at the stable. The prisoner came there a little after four o'clock, with the key in his hand; I laid hold of him before he could put it to the door; he said there was no lock - he asked why I took him; I said, for sheep stealing; he wanted to stop there for an hour till this man came; I said I could not wait. He said a man would be there in an hour, but said no more.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say the man who put the sheep there was coming in an hour? A. Not to me. That man has been tried at Chelmsford, for horse stealing.

COURT. Q. Did not the prisoner say he knew nothing about the sheep? A. Yes, several times. I was present when the other man was taken.

MR. ANDREWS to THOMAS COPE . Q. Did not you understand him to mean that the man was answerable for what was there? A. No.

JAMES YOUNG re-examined. The cart found at the stables was not the one the prisoner used - I never saw it before that morning. The horse the other man came on was not Saunders'.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men, named Smith and Colburn came to me on Tuesday evening, and asked me to lend them the stable to put the horse and cart in - I said, Yes, if there would be room for mine as well; they said it would come on Thursday morning, and brought it; I said they must take it away, for there would not be room for mine; they said, if I could accommodate them till Friday they would pay me, and, as I worked for Colburn, I agreed to put my cart in a shed; I was to meet them at the Sportsman, public-house, in the City-road, to give them the key; I went and offered them the key - he said he did not want it, for he had taken the horse out, and left some things there, and had broken the lock off, and Colburn should pay me for it, and if I would meet him at five o'clock he would bring his horse and cart and fetch the things away. I am innocent of stealing the sheep.

JAMES SAUNDERS . I am the prisoner's father - he slept at my house, in consequence of his wife being ill; he came to my house about ten o'clock on the night of the 17th of November; I saw him go out after six in the morning.

COURT. Q. Where do you live? A. In Fletcher-place, Islington, about half a mile from the stable; he lived in Chapel-place, Pentonville. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-34

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

34. JAMES WHALLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , a 2l. Bank note , the property of John Foster .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of James Howell .

MR. GURNEY (on behalf of the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-35

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

35. SAMUEL SHARP was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the first eight counts of this indictment, hereinafter mentioned, was a person employed by and under the Post-office of Great Britain , in certain business relating to the said office, that is to say, in stamping letters and packets brought to the General Post-office in London, to wit, at St. Mary Woolnoth; and that heretofore, to wit, on the 24th of November , at the said parish, a certain letter, then lately before sent by the post, to wit, by the post from Liverpool, in the County of Lancaster, to the said General Post-office in London, for and to be delivered to a certain person at London, that is to say, to one Samuel Williams, and containing therein one bill of exchange, for payment of and value 1000l., one other bill of exchange, for payment of and value 1000l., one other bill of exchange, for payment of and value 1000l., one other bill of exchange, for payment of and value 67l. 16s., one other bill of exchange, for payment of and value 163l. 12s. 9d., came to the hands and possession of the said Samuel Sharp, whilst he was so employed, as aforesaid, and that the said Samuel Sharp afterwards, to wit, on the same day, at the same parish, being such person so employed, as aforesaid, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said bills of exchange, the property of Edward Clarke and David Badger , against the statute .

2d COUNT, the same as the first, only stating that the said prisoner feloniously did steal from and out of the said letter, the said bills of exchange, instead of secreting the said letter, against the statute, &c.

3d and 4th COUNTS, the same as the two former, only stating the bills of exchange to be contained in a packet, instead of a letter.

5th and 6th COUNTS, the same as the two first counts, only omitting to state whose property the bills of exchange were.

7th and 8th COUNTS, the same as the third and fourth, only omitting to state whose property the bills of exchange were.

9th COUNT, the same as the first, only stating that the two of the bills of exchange, value 1000l. each, were the property of Samuel Daner ; and that the other bill, value 1000l. was the property of John William Fenno ; and that the other two bills were the property of Timothy Wiggen , Joaquin Ruiz de Alzedo , and Henry Hughes .

10th COUNT, the same as the 9th, only stating that the said prisoner feloniously did steal from and out of the said letter the said bills of exchange, instead of secreting the said letter.

11th and 12th COUNTS, the same as the 9th and 10th, only stating the bills of exchange to be contained in a packet, instead of a letter.

13th COUNT, that he, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did steal from and out of a certain post-office, there situate, a certain other letter, then lately before sent by the Post of Great Britain, to wit, by the post from Liverpool, in the County of Lancaster, to the said General Post-office in London, to be from thence sent by the Post, for and to be delivered to a certain person at London, to wit, to the said Samuel Williams; and one other letter, against the statute.

14th COUNT, the same as the last, only stating it to be a packet instead of a letter.

MESSRS. GURNEY and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN VANDERGUCHT . I am one of the presidents of the Inland Department, at the General Post-office. - On the morning of the 24th of November, the prisoner was employed there as a stamper - I observed him put a letter before him, which he should have taken to the sorter - his duty, after stamping a letter, is to place it before the sorter; in a short time I saw two letters before him, one of which I knew it was his duty to take to the lobby. I watched, and observed him take both letters in his hand, and go towards the lobby with them in his hand - and when he got to the lobby door, I observed him hastily slip one of the letters into his right hand inner coat pocket: he then went into the lobby - and on his return, I told him I wanted to speak to him in the Inspector's-room - and when we got there, I desired him to empty his pockets, which he did - and produced eight letters out of his pocket - these are them, (looking at them) - they are all stamped, and bear the stamp of that morning; there was another stamper at that table, but he used a different stamp - these letters bear the impression of the stamp the prisoner uses; here is a letter among them, addressed to Samuel Williams, Esq. No. 13, Finsbury-square, London - it is taxed as double, and shows that it is double. I put my initials on it - it came from Liverpool, and is a ship letter; after marking it I left it with Mr. Wood, the Inspector of letter carriers, without breaking the seal. The prisoner said he had only taken the letters for the purpose of delivering them, and receiving the postage.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He was employed as a stamper, was he not also a letter carrier? A. Yes; they are both inferior situations in the office, and filled by inferior persons; the whole eight were not all ship letters, the other seven were single. It is easy to ascertain whether letters contain money or notes - the postage on this letter is 3s. 2d. - there is a postage on all the others.

Q. If the person wanted to take the letters, and deliver them to receiver the postage for himself, without putting them into the hands of the sorter, could he do so? A. He could - he is a letter carrier himself; the seven single letters could be of no use to him, except to get the postage on them. I did not open the letter - the lobby is a room adjoining the Inland-office.

COURT. Q. Where are the sorters? A. They stand at a table very near the stamper - he had occasion to take one letter into the lobby - it contained shipping intelligence, and should be delivered early, it was in a blue cover, which attracted my attention - that was not one of these eight.

WILLIAM WOODS . I am one of the inspectors of letter carriers, and was stationed at the Inland-office, in Lombard-street, which is in the city. On this day, the letter addressed to Mr. Williams was delivered to me, sealed by Mr. Vandergucht. I took it myself that day to Mr. Williams's, in Finsbury-square, and he opened it in my presence - it contained bills of exchange, which I did not examine. Mr. Williams sealed it up in my presence; the prisoner is a letter carrier - his walk is Titchfield-street, Mary-lebone.

Cross-examined. Q. Are the letter carriers generally known to the persons to whom they deliver letters? A. Very probably - I have since seen the bills of exchange.

COURT. Q. Is it the busines of a stamper to deliver them to the sorter? A. Yes; they then go through two or three different hands to the carrier.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. This is a ship letter? A. Yes; I cannot say whether Bank-notes usually come from America.

MR. VANDERGUCHT re-examined. The prisoner stamps the letters, and delivers them to the sorters - there are twenty-four sorters; they are first sorted into different divisions, then into subdivisions, until they come to the proper delivery; the sorter then delivers them to the teller, who reckons the amount of postage, and gives them to a messenger, who puts them into each letter carrier's box; the letter carrier is then called in to see that the account of postage agrees with the teller; he then takes them away.

COURT. Q. Is it unusual for the stamper, in taking a letter to the lobby, to carry a letter in his hand? A. It is not usual - but unless I had some particular suspicion I might not think any thing of it.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 24th of November, I received a letter from Mr. Woods, addressed to Mr. Williams - that produced is the same. I accompanied Mr. Woods to Mr. Williams', in Finsbury-square, handed the letter to him - he opened it, and took out bills of exchange, which I marked - these are the same - (examining them.)

MR. WOODS re-examined. The Titchfield district extends nearly to the New-road, and nearly to Oxford-street; it would be greatly out of a person's way to go by Finsbury-square to Titchfield-street - the stages go that way; one of these letters is addressed to Nortonfalgate, another to Somers town - which is not in the General Post-office delivery - it is not far from the New-road; here is another to Middlesex hospital, which is out of his district, but not far from it - he might go that way if he pleased; here is another to Buckingham-street, Fitzroy-square, which is in his district; one to No. 357, Oxford-street, which is a few minutes walk from his district - one to Gower-street, Bedford-square; he could go that way to Titchfield-street; and one to Cumberland-street, Portman-square. I saw him produce the letters from his pocket.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Are there more than one of these letters in the prisoner's delivery? A. Only one; the direct way to his delivery would be by Cheapside and Holborn. Norton-falgate is quite a different way.

MR. SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I live in Finsbury-square; the letter addressed to me, was brought to me by Mr. Wood and Ellis, (looking at it), here is a bill of exchange, drawn by Joseph Peabody, payable to the order of John William Fenno, for 1000l.; another for 1000l., drawn by Mr. Lyman, to the order of Samuel Daney, on me; and another, drawn by the same person, for the same amount, and the same order; one for 67l. 16s., drawn by Edward Thomas, on Daniel and Co., London, endorsed specially to me; and one for 163l. 12s. 9d., drawn by G. Ball, on Uriah Rowe, and endorsed to me; they are transmitted to me by Edward Clarke and Co., of America - his partner is David Badger; this is the letter which contained them.

Q. At the time of the receipt of this letter, you had unfortunately become a bankrupt? A. Yes; Mr. Wiggen, Mr. Alzedo, and Mr. Hughes, are my assigness.

Cross-examined. Q. Are these bills sent to you for acceptance? A. They are remitted to me by Messrs. Clarke and Co., for acceptance - here are three of 1000l. drawn on me, they are not accepted, the other two were accepted at the time. I know nothing of the hand-writing of the acceptors. I should think they could not be negociated by a man in a low situation of life; I generally receive remittances from America in bills.

MR. GURNEY. Q. None of the five bills were accepted when they arrived? A. No; the 167l., and 67l. 16s. 3d. have been accepted since; they are both specially endorsed to me.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. On what day did you receive the letter? A. On the 24th of November. These two bills, in my opinion, were not negotiable by a person in the prisoner's situation of life. Norton Falgate is a little to the northeast of Finsbury-square, and two or three minutes' walk from it - a person would come through Finsbury-square from Norton-falgate to go to Titchfield-street.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Are either Norton-falgate or Finsbury-square in the way to Titchfield-street? A. Certainly not.

JURY. Q. Is it your practice to pay the person who delivers letters to you? A. No, I have the early delivery, and keep an account against the postman, and pay him about once a week. I pay the regular man belonging to my delivery. I never saw the prisoner deliver letters to me.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you take in letters yourself? A. They are brought into the counting-house and laid on my desk; I am generally there, and know the postman who delivers them.

COURT. Q. You receive letters by the early delivery? A. Yes, a regular postman comes - they sometimes change their carriers. If a stranger brought a single letter I should pay him.

Q. Does it happen sometimes that letters are mis-sorted, and not all sent by the early delivery, and then sent afterwards? A. Yes, and then I pay the person who delivers it.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you, on the 24th of November, the control over bills of this kind? A. I had not - none of the bills are stamped.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Did you open all the letters which came to you? A. I did not; one of my assigness generally opened them; they remain unopened till Mr. Timothy Wiggen, one of my assignees, comes. Mr. Henry Hughes has once or twice attended - Mr. Alzedo never attended.

The letter, in which the bills were inclosed, was here read.

SIR, - We inclose the second of T. Lyman's bills, for 1000l.; also the first following bills, viz. Joseph Peabody , on yourself, 1000l.; Theodore Lynnan , ditto, 1000l.; Edward Thomas , on Thomas, Daniel, and Co., 67l. 16s.; G. Ball & Nicholas Murey , on Uriah Roe , of Davenport, 163l. 12s. 9d. - 2231l. 8s. 9d. which please to pass to our credit.

Your most obedient servant, ED. CLARKE & Co.

Prisoner's Defence. I never intended to steal the letters, but to transfer them as mis-sorted, and receive the postage of them.

JURY to MR. WILLIAMS. Q. Have you been in the habit of receiving Bank-notes from America? A. In a few instances, but not often; the probability is against their coming.

MR. VANDERGUCHT. This letter came from Liverpool - it is stamped "Liverpool, ship letter;" that is done at Liverpool; the charge is made in town - all the eight letters are of that morning's arrival.

MR. WILLIAMS. I receive a great many letters from America - they come by Liverpool - I know the handwriting of the drawer of the bills.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of secreting the letter, but only for the purpose of appropriating the postage to his own use.

This case is reserved for the consideration of the twelve Judges .

Reference Number: t18251208-36

Before Mr. Recorder.

36. JOHN WEATHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 watch, value 3l. 10s.; 3 seals, value 20s., and 1 key, value 12s., the goods of Richard Bryant , from his person .

RICHARD BRYANT. I live in King-street, Fetter-lane, and am a shoemaker . On the 30th of November, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, I was between Middle-row, Holborn , and Fetter-lane , going home; my watch was in my fob - it was silver; the prisoner came up, meeting me, and entered into conversation; we walked two or three yards, and then he snatched my watch from my fob - he remained by me, and I accused him of it - he said he had not had it; I laid hold of him and called Watch! he broke from me - I followed him, and never lost sight of him - he ran into Shoe-lane, and was secured. The watch was picked up two or three yards from him - he said nothing; I gave him in charge - he said at the watch-house that he was not the person. I was a little fresh but not at all insensible.

Prisoner. Q. Where do you accuse me of the robbery? A. Between Middle-row and Fetter-lane - it was not opposite the church; I did not say I was so drunk that I did not know where it was.

Q. When you met me did you not lay hold of my arm, and say "Good night, shop-mate?" A. No, I said nothing about my shop-mate, nor call to any body.

CHARLES ADAMS . I am a watchman of Holborn. On Sunday, the 13th of November, about ten minutes or a quarter to one o'clock, I was in Shoe-lane, near to Plumtree-court, and heard the cry of Watch! Stop him! the prisoner came running up Shoe-lane, in a direction towards me; I heard something fall - it could not fall from any body but the prisoner - nobody else was near enough, nor had any one passed for ten minutes; I was then twenty or thirty yards from him; I advanced and collared him - he said "What is the matter?" I said "You have thrown something away;" he said nothing to that; the prosecutor came up in four or five minutes; but before that Scott, a watchman, came up and held him, while I looked and found the watch in the gutter, ten or twelve paces from where I stopped him; the case was separated from it - the prosecutor came up and said, "Oh, you villain, you have robbed me of my watch." The prisoner said nothing - I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Is it possible for ten minutes to pass without somebody passing there? A. Yes, at that time - it was about one o'clock: after he was in custody, he said he had not taken the watch. I believe there was nobody at the watch-house but Edwards, Bryant, and the prosecutor - he was running when I first saw him, but when I stopped him he was walking - we shut the watch-house door to prevent any one coming in, but there was no crowd assembled.

HENRY EDWARDS . I saw the prosecutor collar the prisoner, twelve or fourteen doors above St. Andrew's church - I considered it a drunken frolic, and did not at first attend to it - I turned the corner into Shoe-lane, immediately as he was laid hold of, and saw the watchman stoop and produce the watch - the prosecutor charged the prisoner with having robbed him of it. I followed to the watch-house, and saw nobody about. I am a wine-merchant, and live in Crutched-friars.

Prisoner. Q. Was Bryant drunk or sober? A. Very drunk, as I thought - I thought him so drunk that he could not identify a man, but not knowing him I could not judge whether he was drunk.

JURY. Q. Were there many persons in or about the watch-house? A. When he was taken into the watch-house there might be seven or eight - I was let in by saying I could give evidence. I saw nobody near enough to rob the prosecutor but the prisoner.

JAMES SCOTT . I am a watchman on Holborn-hill. Between twelve and one o'clock I heard a cry of Watch! I looked towards Fetter-lane, and saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutor pursuing - nobody else was near but Edwards - the prisoner ran up Shoe-lane - the prosecutor fell in turning the corner - I pursued and called to Adams, who stopped him, and immediately said "You have thrown something away" - he denied it - I held him while Adams went and picked up the watch and case, two houses from where he was stopped - nobody else was near enough to throw it there.

Prisoner. Q. Was not Bryant close to the watch when it was found? A. No, he had hold of you, and said "You are the rascal who has got my watch."

Prisoner to CHARLES ADAMS . Q. Was not Bryant close by the watch, when it was picked up? A. He came up afterwards - he had not turned the corner when I heard it fall.

GEORGE THOMAS FORD . I was the officer of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - Bryant said he had robbed him of his watch - Adams produced it

- Bryant told me the maker's name, and described the initials on the key.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you order the watchmen to keep out several persons? A. No; the prisoner said there was another man in company with the prosecutor. The prosecutor appeared drunk, when he first came in, but answered my questions very sensibly, and soon appeared more sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Holborn, Mr. Bryant caught my arm; he mistook me for a shopmate, but finding he was wrong, he turned round, and called several times to somebody - a person came up, and left him in a few minutes, and soon after he charged me with the robbery; having been in a situation a long time, and master expecting me home, I thought it not fit to stop to be detained by a drunken man.

GEORGE THOMAS FORD re-examined. I did not think the prosecutor in such a situation as not to know what he was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-37

37. MARY ANN BRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 1 bed-gown, value 3s.; 1 towel, value 1s. and 2 sheets, value 10s., the goods of James Hazell , her master .

ANN HAZELL . I am the wife of James Hazell - we live in Jewin-street, and are trimming-makers . The prisoner was ten months in our service. I was continually losing things. I sent for an officer, and charged her with stealing a sheet and bed-gown; her box was searched - I saw the sheet found in it - my initials are on the sheet - the other sheet was found cut up into six aprons, which are here - she said she had made it into six aprons, and gave three of them to her fellow servant - she lived with me four years ago.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had she given you warning before you sent for an officer? A. Yes: the business is carried on at another place.

WILLIAM WORCESTER . I am an officer. I was fetched, and in the prisoner's box I found a sheet cut up for two shifts - the initials were picked out, but the marks were visible - she acknowledged cutting it up for shifts. I searched further and found three aprons.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-38

38. THOMAS REASON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 linen wrapper, value 2s.; 3 pieces of printed cotton, value 4l. 17s.; 2 pieces of Irish linen, value 2l. 8s. 4d., and 3 counterpanes, value 31s. , the goods of Charles Stuart Benton .

CHARLES STUART BENTON. I am a carrier from Ashford to town. On the 25th of November I brought a parcel to town. and left it safe in my waggon, in New Inn-yard, Old Change , about half-past six o'clock in the morning, when I went to deliver a small parcel. I returned about twelve, and in consequence of information missed a parcel, directed to Bishop and Hall, Borough; I had brought it from Charles Duke, at Charing, in Kent. I found it at Guildhall about half-past twelve o'clock, with the direction on it; it was opened, and contained the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There is nobody here who saw it packed up? A. No; it appeared in the same state as I received it.

RICHARD VENABLES . I am porter at the New Inn. - On the 25th of November, about six o'clock in the morning, Benton's waggon came in, and about eight I was informed a truss was taken from it; I ran into Carter-lane, and saw the prisoner walking, with it on his shoulder - he said a gentleman had sent him for it, and he would shew me the gentleman. I said, "Come with me;" he threw it down, and run away; I picked it up, and called Stop thief! I lost sight of him; I saw him in about half an hour, in custody, at the Albion coffee-house, Watling-street, and was certain of him. He hung his head down on seeing me.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw him before? A. No; he ran very hard; I saw him for two minutes before he threw it down - he wore a blue coat and yellow waistcoat.

GEORGE SALTMARSH . I am fourteen years old. I had come up with the waggon, and in about an hour and a half I was coming out of the stable, and saw the prisoner take the truss out, and put it upon his shoulder; I thought he might belong to it, but when I saw him run I called Venables, and pointed him out; I returned, and in about five minutes saw him come running by the Inn, without it; he turned down a street by Old Change. I saw him at Guildhall about twelve o'clock, and was sure of him.

Cross-examined. Q. He chose to run by the same place again? A. Yes.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a tailor. On the 25th of November I saw the prisoner in Carter-lane; he ran by me, with the truss upon his shoulder; the porter overtook him- he then dropped it down, and ran back, by me; I pursued, and lost sight of him, but saw him in ten minutes, and collared him; he said he was the person who cried Stop thief! I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him and the porter speaking together? A. Yes - I think he said a gentleman had sent him after it; he stopped just to drop the truss; I noticed him before he came up, seeing a respectable dressed man with a truss, and after he had passed I heard a cry of Stop thief!

JOHN COPPARD . I am a draper. These goods were sent to our house, Bishop and Co., Borough - we had sent them into the country, and they were returned to us.

GEORGE STATHAM . I am a constable. I received the prisoner from Edwards - he said they were mistaken.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-39

39. JOSEPH PERARA was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , six shovels, value 17s. , the goods of Samuel Clarke .

SAMUEL CLARKE. I am warehouseman to Mr. Saltwell, a nail-maker; I had four bundles of shovels, each containing six, on my truck; they were safe when I was in Mark-lane; I missed six in Great Ayliff-street , and

found them at the watch-house in about ten minutes - it was about six o'clock in the evening.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a patrol. On the 2d of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was turning into John-street, from the Minories, and saw two men drawing a truck; three persons were behind it, on the pavement, and in Mansel-street I saw the prisoner cross into the road, and bring something from the truck - he turned down Haydon-street; the other two followed him; I secured him in the Minories, with these six shovels on his shoulder; he said they were given to him to carry.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man offered me 6d. to carry them to Rag-fair.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-40

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 12.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

40. MARK BROOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , at St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 piece of silk, containing, in length, 35 yards, value 5l., the goods of William Britten and John Jackson , his masters, in their dwelling-house .

JAMES HULME . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Museum-street, Bloomsbury. On the 6th of December, in the evening, the prisoner brought some silk to pawn, in the name of George Burling , No. 16, Hart-street, Bloomsbury; I asked how much there was of it; he said about six or seven yards - I asked how much he gave for it - he said 2s. 6d. a yard - that it was his own, and he had bought it at East Grinstead, about a month ago - that he had been there three months. He said, "Why don't you think it is mine?" - I said, "No; I will send my boy to Hart-street;" he said he would go with him: I told him to wait there; he went to the door - I followed, and brought him back - he then said he lived at No. 16, Holborn, which I found was true. The silk measures thirty-five yards.

WILLIAM BRITTEN. I am in partnership with Mr. John Jackson - we are linen-drapers and silk-mercers , and live in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn; we both rent the house, and live there. The prisoner has been nearly six months in our service, as porter, and had access to the property. Hulme sent to me on the 6th of December - I saw this silk, and know it to be ours - it measures about thirty-five yards, and is worth between 5l. and 6l.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. No; it was in the warehouse, on a pile of brown paper.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it down in the dirt, among the rubbish.

One witness gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18251208-41

41. JAMES PINKETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Stevenson , about six o'clock in the night of the 21st of November , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, with intent to steal, and stealing 1 watch, value 1l. , his property.

JOHN STEVENSON. I live in Chester-place, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , and rent the house - I am a watch-maker . On the 21st of November, about six o'clock in the evening, (the lamps had been lighted some time; I had had a light in my window for an hour; it was dark) I was in my shop; my watches hung in the window, behind a wire guard; there had been a bullock hunt: I heard a shouting in the street, and thought the mob was returning with the bullock; upon hearing this noise I was going to the window to clear it, and at that instant the window was smashed - I was about three yards from the window; my lamp was extinguished. I saw hands thrust through the glass, and caught hold of them in strugglidg with them, or the window would have been cleared. I got out what I could, but lost a gold and a silver watch. I found the silver one at Worship-street next morning, when the prisoner was in custody.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a butcher, and live in Chester-place, nearly opposite to the prosecutor. On the 21st of November, about half-past five o'clock (it was dark - candles were lighted - my lamp hung outside the shop.) I heard the mob returning with the bullock - I was in my back parlour. I got up, and the moment I arose, I heard the smash of a window - I came to my door, and saw several people round Mr. Stevenson's window - two of them were busily employed in taking watches from his window; one of them was dressed in a white jacket, and that one I particularly kept my eye upon - the other was dressed in dark clothes. I immediately jumped out of my shop and pursued them - they ran away. I collared the one in the white jacket, and held him for nearly five minutes, calling loudly for assistance - nobody came - he struggled with me and got away; six or seven of them stopped and said, "Stand hard against the b-r, down with him," and for my own safety I pursued him no further - or I dare say they would have knocked my brains out. I have not seen the man in the white jacket since - I can swear to none but him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. There was a croud with them? A. Yes; it was the mob with the bullock that did it - some of them were dressed in blue coats and gilt buttons.

THOMAS MACKEY . I live in Chester-place, opposite to the prosecutor, and am a tmman. I was at my door, about half-past five o'clock, as the bullock passed Mr. Stevenson's window - I heard glass break immediately - looked over and saw two persons at the window - their hands were in the window very busy apparently - one had a white flannel jacket, and the other a dark coat on - it was too dark to see the colour - candles had been lighted three-quarters of an hour. I stood at my own door to protect my property - the shop light went out, and I could not see the one in the dark coat any more - but saw the one in the light jacket - he ran about thirty-five yards from the window - Harris laid hold of him; the mob came back and hit Harris, who let him go. I was sixteen or eighteen yards from them. I think the person in the dark coat, was taller than the prisoner - but that side of the way is higher than where I was.

WILLIAM HARRIS re-examined. I was not struck, but they had sticks with them.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I have been an officer twenty

years. On the 22d of November, a little after eleven o'clock in the morning, in consequence of information, I went with Garton to different houses round Bethnalgreen - and on going into the tap-room of the King and Queen, public-house, in Air-street, Bethnal-green, I observed the prisoner sitting alone, smoking his pipe. I saw his left hand move, towards his left hand trousers' pocket, immediately as I entered. He must have known me, and what I was; I immediately laid hold of his hand, and asked, "If all the property he had got about him was his own." He said Yes. I put my hand into his left hand trousers' pocket, and there found this watch. I found nothing else on him; I asked how he came by the watch. He said he had found it; I asked if he had shown it to any body - he said No. On going to the office, I asked where he was last night - he said he was at work until five, and after that was at a house in St. John-street - there is a St. John-street, Bethnal-green. I asked at whose house; he did not tell me; he was dressed in a blue coat; the watch was quite clean, and did not appear to have been in the dirt at all.

Cross-examined. Q. He put his left hand into his pocket? A. To his pocket, not into it. Air-street-fields is full half a mile from the prosecutor's house.

JOHN STEVENSON . This is the watch - it is worth 1l. - it could not have been taken without a person putting their hands inside the window.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury, on account of his youth and good character .

Reference Number: t18251208-42

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

42. CORNELIUS BRISNAHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , at St. Giles'-in-the-fields, 2 coats, value 2l.; 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 5s.; 3 shirts, value 1l.; 1 watch, value 1l., and 28 shillings, the property of Michael Lines , in his dwelling-house .

MICHAEL LINES. I lodge in Bainbridge-street, in the parish of St. Giles'-in-the-fields - the landlord does not live in the house - the prisoner lodged with me for twelve months, and I never wished a better lodger. On the 23d of November, about six o'clock in the morning I went out, leaving him in bed in the room; I came home about five o'clock in the evening, and he was gone. I missed the property stated in the indictment, and which I had locked up in a box, and kept the key in my pocket - I found it unlocked, but the lock was not broken - I had opened it the day before, and every thing was then right. I found them on the 2d of December, at Bow-street, in possession of Birchall - they are worth 5l. 5s.

JOHN BIRCHALL . I am an officer. On the 23d of November, about four o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Cockspur-street, with two coats loose on his arm, two waistcoats, a pair of trousers, a pair of breeches, and three shirts - he had a silver watch in his pocket, with 25s., and 101/2d. I asked where he got them - he said he had bought them at Chatham a month ago. Dawkins had stopped him, and brought him over to me - I have had the property ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL DAWKINS . I stopped the prisoner with all these things on his arm, and asked where he got them; he said in the Borough - that they were his own, and he was taking them to Oxford-place - that he had given 7l. for them. I took him over to Birchall.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18251208-43

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

43. PATRICK MAHONEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Keeffe , the elder, about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 22d of October ,(Elizabeth Holland and others being therein) and stealing 1 scarf, value 3l.; 1 waistcoat, value 18s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 14s., and nine shells, value 2s. , the goods of John Keeffe, the younger.

ELEANOR KEEFE . I am the daughter of John Keeffe, and live in Parker-street, Drury-lane - my father rents the house, and lets part of it - we live on the first floor - the prisoner used to live in the house. On the 27th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw him on the other side of the way with two boys, whistling up and down the street; I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon, and locked the room door, and then saw him opposite the door with the same two boys, and heard one of them whistle to him, as I went up the street; I came back at half-past five o'clock, and put the key into the lock, but it would not open the door - it was bolted - I called Elizabeth Holland down, who lodges on the second floor - we both pushed against it, and I got my knee in, and saw the prisoner through the crevice, placed against the drawers - he then unbolted the door and let me in, and placed himself against the drawers again; I saw a fork in his hand - I pushed him from the drawers, and missed a scarf from one of them, which was open - I had left it locked - I asked what made him come there - he made no answer; I said he had broken the drawers open and taken the scarf - he then knocked me down - Holland asked him to let her search him - he said he would see her ********* first, and then ran out; I then examined further and missed nine shells, a waistcoat, and two handkerchiefs of my brother's; I saw two shells in his coat, and two in his breeches pocket, as he went out; they rattled when Holland took hold of him to search him, and there was a bulk in his thigh, which I suppose was the scarf. He came back in a quarter of an hour, and said "Search me;" he let a little child, named Sweeting, search him, and she found two shells in his coat pocket; he then took an old shell off the mantelpiece, and put a new one in its place, out of his breeches pocket; he then went out; I sent Holland for Furzeman, but he would not come, as he said we were making game of him. The prisoner went out, and ran through the Sugarloaf public-house, with two more boys. Here is the shell he put on the mantel-piece - I am sure it was in the drawer before - those on the shelf were quite old.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not live with you? A. No, with his mother; he moved three months before this - he was not in the room at all that morning, and had not bought me any pears - he would only have one pocket searched, and when the little girl found the shells, he gave her money not to say any thing - I have not seen Holland since Monday week - her father will not tell us where she is.

JOHN KEEFFE , JUN. I live with my father. I saw these things safe the night before the robbery. I had brought the scarf from India, intending it for my sister, but had not given it to her. I came home about six o'clock on this evening, and heard what had happened, and about half-past nine o'clock somebody ran down the street, calling out "Jack Keeffe, have you found your scarf?" I ran out and met the prisoner soon after, crossing Queen-street, with another boy and girl, thirty or forty yards from the house. I know the shell found on the mantel-piece to be the one which I had left in the drawer - it is new, and those on the shelf were old. The lock of the drawer had been picked with a fork.

ELEANOR KEEFFE . The prisoner threw the fork behind the drawers - I gave it to Clements.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. Keeffe gave me the fork - I tried it to the lock of the drawers, and found it would force open the lock - I did not examine the room door.

Prisoner's Defence. For the last six months an intercourse took place between me and that girl - the friends proposed marriage, which I declined - since then there has been a little malice. I was passing the door on this day- this girl and three or four more, were at the window - they called me up stairs - she asked me to tea - I had dined with her the day before, and gave her 1s. to fetch some pears; I pushed her out of the room for two minutes, and she came in again, and said she saw me picking the lock with a fork - I said they might search me - she has given the witness money to swear falsely - witnesses came for me on Friday but she has frightened them away, saying they would be confined.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-44

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

44. JAMES NICHOLAS HENRY SCALLAN was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-45

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

45. JOSEPH RICHARDSON was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Knight , in the night of the 3d of December , and stealing 1 pair of stirrup irons, value 2s. , his property.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Knight, of Edmonton . On the 3d of December, about eight o'clock, I left the saddle, bridle, and stirrup irons, hanging in the stable. I am quite sure I latched the door, but did not lock it; the horse was there; I went there again about seven o'clock in the morning, and missed the stirrup irons - the door was open.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS KNIGHT . I was not in my stable after Brown - I had not seen the irons that day.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 4th of December, about twenty minutes past three o'clock, in the morning, I stopped the prisoner at Tottenham, coming towards town, with these stirrup irons, and a pair of pattens; I asked what he had got there - he said a pair of old irons and pattens - that the irons belonged to his pony saddle - that he had sold his pony and saddle, and was going towards town, to Greenwich for his pension - that his wife had given him the pattens in case he wanted money to pay his expenses - that he had come from Ealing, near Cambridgeshire, and his wife had come up by the carrier; I insisted on his going with us - he said if we took him to where he took the irons from he would: when we had got a few paces he slipped his arm out of ours, and ran away - I secured and took him to the watch-house.

RICHARD WALTER . I was with Thompson. The prisoner told me next morning, that he had the stirrup irons from Mr. Knight's stable, and that two men there gave him them.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of stealing only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18251208-46

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

46. RICHARD GODDARD was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Lane , in the night of the 29th of October , and stealing 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s.; 1 gown, value 1s.; 3 frocks, value 1s.; 3 petticoats, value 1s., and 1 spencer, value 9d. , his property.

JOHN LANE. I live in Swan-street, Bethnal-green . On the 29th of October, at eleven o'clock at night, I went out to fetch my wife's things from her stall, at the top of the street, as there was a piece of work there. I left my daughter Mary, who is thirteen years old, in the front room; two younger children were in bed in the back-room - I left the front room door open - I returned in three minutes, and sung out for Mary, to take a basket of me - I got no answer from her - put my hand to the lock, to feel for the key of the door, and found the door open, with the bolt of the lock shot out; I then went in and looked at my box - I found the lock of it wrenched off, all but one screw - I went into the back room and found the blankets rolled up towards the foot of the bed, off the children - my daughter came in from the top of the street; I then went and fetched the rest of my wife's things from her stall, then looked about and missed these other things from the back room - I had seen them all safe that evening - I had been in the back room half an hour before - the blankets were then spread over the children - they could not have kicked them down in the manner they were - Gibbs, the officer came to my house before I missed the things.

MARY LANE . On this Saturday night my father went to fetch my mother's things, and in about a minute I went out of the front room, locked the door, and went after my father, because there was a disturbance at the top of the street, and I was afraid my mother would be ill-used. I am sure I locked the door, for I shoved my knee against it after taking the key out - nobody could have come in before I went out, for I stood facing the room door, which was open; I heard my father call me - went back with the key, and found the door open.

Cross-examined. Q. Does the front room door open into the passage, near the street door, or a good way from it? A. A good way from it; when I went out I left the street-door open, close against the wall - nobody could have been behind it.

JOHN LANE re-examined. I had been sitting in the

front room - the street door is kept fastened back - the back room opens into the front, not into the passage.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I live at No. 8, Swan-street - twenty-five or thirty-yards from Lane. On the 29th of October, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going along the street and saw the prisoner, Needham, and Warren, coming from the Church-street end of the street; I knew them all three very well; I was within fifteen or sixteen yards of Lane's house - they came from the end of the street where Lane's stall was, and all three came up to his door - I stopped at the Swan (which is right opposite) for a necessary purpose - they all three went in, as I thought, to purchase something - they came out in about a minute and a half - Warren first, Needham and Goddard close after him - I could perceive, by the light on the opposite side of the way, that Warren had something under his arm, and when Goddard came out there seemed something bulky under his coat - he had nothing under it when he went in - he wore a fustian coat - I walked on the opposite side of the way towards my own house, in the same direction as they went - I then saw by a strong gas light, that Warren had something under his arm - I met Stapleton, who went with me - they were rather before me, on the opposite side- I walked on to my own house - there is a strong gas light, and the public-house at the corner has another gas light - I could see, for ten or fifteen yards, the two sleeves of a shirt dragging on the ground, and Goddard's toes nearly on them; I told Stapleton to follow them, while I went in to put my coat and boots on, which I did, and then went over to Lane's; the girl made a complaint, and I went after the prisoners directly and returned, not seeing Stapleton nor them; I examined Lane's door and found the box of the lock nearly wrenched off - I went into the back room and found the bed clothes folded up carelessly, and on the hinge side of the door there seemed to have been a small incision made with a small crow-bar - it was a very clear night - I told Lane I knew them. and I saw them all three again on the Sunday evening - I gave information to several officers, and on the Tuesday or Wednesday following, I was told Goddard was in custody; I believe I spoke to Goddard on Sunday - I went out to fetch another officer, to take all three; I saw them enter the prosecutor's passage - the room door could easily be forced. I have known Goddard eight or nine years - he lives about a minute's walk from me - they are all well known in the neighbourhood.

Cross-examined. Q. It struck you that they were going to buy something? A. I could not suppose they were going to rob such a poor man; I have been a constable several years, but did not wish to belong to it any more; the prisoner's father is one; I was always on good terms with him; I had no dispute with him about his having more of a reward than I had, for he was allowed none of it; I never said I would injure him; I was a witness against one Redman, tried here three years ago; I was not told that I prevaricated in my evidence, nor desired to leave the Court; I employ Stapleton to work for me at times- he has come from the House of Correction to-day.

WILLIAM STAPLETON . I live at No. 20, Turk-street, Bethnal-green, and am a cordwainer. I lived at No. 8, Swan-street, about four months ago. I lived in Turk-street on the 29th of November.

Q. How came you to be described as "William Stapleton, of Swan-street, Bethnal-green," so late as the 16th of November, when you were before the Magistrate? A. I suppose the mistake happened because I worked there then, as a journeyman to Gibbs. On Saturday night, the 29th of October, I saw Warren, Goddard, and Needham, standing against a coal-shed in Church-street, consulting together - I had been to the baker's, at the corner of the street, for a loaf, and saw Goddard turn into Swan-street; I left them there, and on returning towards Gibbs' house, I met Gibbs - he told me to follow them; I saw them two or three doors from Lane's - this was hardly ten minutes after I had seen Goddard go into Swan-street; I went after them down Bacon-street; Goddard had something bulky under his coat - Warren was close to him - a shirt sleeve hung down on the pavement from Warren's-arm - they walked on to Club-row, went through an alley there, and then stopped. I saw Goddard give something like a gown, away from his arm; there was a whistle from the bottom of the court, but I saw nobody. Goddard answered "Is it all right?" After giving the gown to somebody, he took hold of me by the shoulder, and turned me round twice; he would not let me go through the court; the man he had given the parcel to had gone up the court; I said if he did not let me alone I would tell my father; there was a whistle again, and he asked if it was all right; Goddard directly said to his companion, who was running,"Cut it, Dick; a nimble ninepence is better than a slow shilling;" they went on before me - I followed them into York-street, and into Church-street, again, and into Nicholl-street, where I met Gibbs, and told him they were gone into one of the houses there, but I did not know whether it was a public or private house - it might then be twenty minutes or half-past eleven o'clock; I went with Gibbs and one of the Bow-street conductors, to see if I could trace them through an alley which I thought they were gone into; we went to a public-house but saw nothing of them - this was on the same night; I went home to Turk-street.

Q. What are your usual hours of working at Gibbs'? A. Sometimes till ten or eleven o'clock; I was going to Gibbs' with the loaf - it was for him; he told me he had been over to Lanes while I followed the men, and after going to the public house I went and told Lane I knew the party, but did not tell him their names. I told him next morning that Needham was one; I have now come from the House of Correction, where I am for a misdemeanour, for leaving my master's work - he is Mr. Samuels, of Hatton-garden.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you ever go by any other name? A. Yes - William Glover. I am a chance child, and do not know my father nor mother; they call me Stapleton, Smith, and Glover - I do not know my right name.

Q. You were sent to the House of Correction for leaving you master's work, nothing more? A. And not taking all the stuff back again. The three men were together when I came up to them in the court; I said I would tell my father, because it would frighten him.

COURT. Q. Who was your father? A. I do not know - he is dead; they tell me his name was Tipson, or something.

WILLIAM GIBBS re-examined. Q. Have you not, in

the presence of William Middleton, sworn that you would be revenged, to the utmost of your power, on the prisoner's father? A. I swear I have hardly had any conversation with him. I never said so.

WILLIAM MIDDLETON . I have known Gibbs seven or eight years, and have heard him say, within the last two years, that he would be revenged, as far as it was in his power, on the prisoner's father; I think it is much less than two years. I am a labourer at the East India House, and keep an evening school.

COURT. Q. When was this conversation? A. One evening, about two years ago, at the Flower Pot public-house, in Brick-lane - I saw Gibbs and the prisoner's father there; a trial had taken place in this Court; the parish had allowed some remuneration to the officers, and Goddard said Gibbs had taken some money which should have been his; he spoke rather strongly about it, and Gibbs said he would do for him some way or other. I would not believe Gibbs on his oath, for I have acted as an officer with him; his conduct was such the church-wardens would not allow him to be sworn in again; they objected to his character the year before, but some friends spoke for him.

Q. Why would you not believe him on his oath? A. I have been with him when we have seen things at night, and in the morning his evidence before the Magistrate has been completely contradictory.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-47

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

47. WILLIAM ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Cornelius Berry , from his person .

CORNELIUS BERRY. I am clerk to a merchant, and live in the Kent-road. On the 15th of November, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-street , and felt a pull at my outside coat pocket, nearly opposite to St. Dunstan's church. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner and another exchanging something from one to the other - I immediately felt my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I took the prisoner into custody - his companion got away. I saw my handkerchief picked up at the prisoner's feet; he asked what I wanted of him; I asked him for my handkerchief. The officer immediately came and took him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me with the handkerchief? A. I saw him pass it to his companion when I turned round. I cannot be certain whether anybody was between me and him.

JOHN WOODWARD . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner, in company with another person, going up Fleet-street, behind this gentleman, about a minute before the robbery - I saw nobody between them; I was on the opposite side of the way, and saw one of the two lay hold of Mr. Berry's coat - a coach came between us, and I saw Mr. Berry lay hold of one of them - somebody who stood close by picked up the handkerchief - his companion passed on, towards the Strand. A coach passed, which prevented my taking hold of him.

JESSEE PHILLIPS. I live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, and deal in earthenware - my father keeps the house. I was in Fleet-street, with Woodward, and saw the prisoner and another person following the prosecutor, for about two minutes. I saw the prisoner have hold of the tail of the prosecutor's coat, endeavouring to take something out, but a hackney coach came between us, and I could not see whether he took anything. I picked the handkerchief up at his heels, and gave it to Woodward - we ran across directly we saw it - I got over before Woodward. I knew the prisoner before well. A silk handkerchief was found in his flap - he said it had no mark - it was marked E. B. I saw nobody pass between him and the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman was talking to me three or four minutes before the officer came up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-48

48. JOHN HOLMES and MICHAEL HYDE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Lewis Jedidiah Lyne , from his person .

LEWIS JEDIDIAH LYNE. I am clerk to Messrs. Lyne, Bailey, and Co., of Winchester-street. On the 29th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was stopped by a person at the corner of Fleet-street and Bridge-street , and asked if I had lost my handkerchief; I put my hand to my pocket, and missed it. The prisoners were taken into custody in five minutes, in a street leading out of Bridge-street - the handkerchief was picked up by the door of a public-house.

JESSEE PHILLIPS . I live at No. 6, Great Queen-street. I was coming to the Old Bailey on the 29th of October, and saw Mr. Lyne near the opening by St. Bride's church, and saw the prisoners following him, in a direction towards St. Paul's - I am quite certain of their persons. I was on the opposite side of the way, and watched - and when Mr. Lyne had got to the corner of Bride-lane the prisoners were close together, and both attempted his pocket, but Holmes is the one who took the handkerchief out of Mr. Lyne's pocket - they turned down Bride-lane; I ran after Mr. Lyne, and told him he had lost his handkerchief, and if he would come with me I could, most likeget it - he felt and missed it; he went with me round Bridge-street, to the end of Bride-lane, and saw both the prisoners talking together - I laid hold of them, and took them to a public-house, but could not find it on them. I left them in Mr. Lyne's care, went out, and found it in the road, just by where I had collared them; two or three yards from the public-house; there was nobody else near who could have dropped it. I thought I saw one of their arms move when I took them.

Prisoner HOLMES. Q. Why did you not take me at the time you saw me do it? A. I thought if I got the gentleman's assistance I could take both.

EDWARD JONES . I received the prisoners in charge at Guildhall, and have the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOLMES' Defence. The officers say that Phillips goes about taking lads up, with a constable's staff in his hand; he told me he was an officer, and showed me a staff; it would take him ten minutes to go the distance he says. - On this night I let two ladies out of a Hammersmith

coach, as I attend the coaches for a livelihood. I went down Bride-lane, and met this young man - he asked me the way to Gray's Inn-lane; Phillips caught hold of him, and hearing a scuffle I turned back, and he took me.

HYDE's Defence. I had come from my uncle's, in the Borough, and not knowing the way, I met three men walking down the lane; I asked them the way - they shoved me off the pavement; I met this lad, and asked him - this man came up and laid hold of me; he stopped to see what was the matter, and they took him, and as we went to the Compter he said a gentleman had offered a sovereign to let us go, as he thought us innocent.

JESSEE PHILLIPS . When I first took them Mr. Lyne did not wish to prosecute them, and offered me 5s. to let them go; I said I could not do it if he gave me 20s. The prisoners said, "Why not let us go - you only want to make a crown of us;" I said, "Why, the gentleman has offered me a sovereign, if I wanted money." I had a small staff in my pocket, but did not shew it. I did not hear him ask if I was an officer - if he had I should have said Yes, as I conceive myself one when I see a felony committed. I saw them try a dozen pockets before they tried this.

MR. LYNE. I did offer him money.

HOLMES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HYDE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-49

49. JAMES DREWER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 17lbs. of cheese, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Stevens .

THOMAS STEVENS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Fetter-lane . On the 10th of November this cheese was about two yards and a half inside my door - I was writing in the parlour - my wife and boy were behind the counter - the prisoner came and ran off with a cheese; he was pursued, and a gentleman caught him. I came up and took the cheese from him.

EBENEZA MILLEDGE . I am in Mr. Stevens' employ. The prisoner came into the shop, and asked mistress for charity - she said she had a large family, and nothing to give away; he swore at her, and said he would have a cheese - then he laid hold of one, and ran away. I followed him, calling Stop thief! and saw a gentleman stop him - master came and took the cheese from him.

JAMES SCOTT . I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-50

50. BOLTON WATKINS MACHIN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-51

51. BENJAMIN GEORGE VALOIS was indicted for perjury .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

Mr. Thomas Jas. Walters , clerk to Lord Chief Justice Abbot, produced an affidavit sworn before his Lordship at Guildhall, London.

AUGUSTUS DE FOISSEEY , JUN. I know the defendant's hand-writing, and have seen him write several times; to the best of my belief the signature to this affidavit is his writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. Q. Do you mean to say you have seen him write, or have seen what was said to be his writing? A. I have seen him write several times - about twelve months ago, or less - I know it to be his writing. I have seen him write at his lodgings at Westminster, and I think it was in John-street - and at a public-house in Holborn, he wrote a note to his attorney - and at Westminster he was copying something from a book, and frequently gave it me to read, to see if it was correct; and when he practiced as a doctor, he used to write bills to give to unfortunate women, and he used to sign his name to them - I saw that often.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Look at these two documents; are they in the defendant's hand-writing? A. In my judgment both are written by him - but only one bears his signature; I have no doubt of that one.

CHARLES LANGDALE . I am clerk to Mr. Dawson, of Camden-town, attorney for this prosecution. I took out a summons for the prosecutrix's solicitor, at Mr. Justice Holroyd's chambers, and was at the hearing of it on the 14th at Guildhall.

This summons was here read: - it was for the defendant to appear to shew cause why he should not be held to bail in a certain action of trover, brought against him by Mary Lee.

The affidavit was here read, in which the defendant swore, that on or about August, 1824, being a lodger with Mary Lee , at No. 2, Jewin-street, he agreed to purchase of her certain articles of furniture, which she declared herself compelled to part with, and for which he paid her 44l., in manner following: - on the 19th of August 3l., the 26th 2l. 10s., the 2d of September 2l., the 19th 1l. 10s., the 16th 3l. 10s., the 23d 2l. 5s., the 30th 2l. 10s., the 14th of October 3l. 5s., the 28th 2l., the 4th of November 2l. 10s., the 18th 3l., the 25th 2l. 10s., the 2d of December 3l., the 9th 2l. 10s., the 18th 4l. 10s., the 2d of January 2l., the 9th 1l. 10s. - that he continued to pay for his lodging at a reduced rent, in consequence of the furniture being his own, till the 12th of May last, when she informed him her circumstances had become embarrassed, and desired him to remove his furniture, and to take the charge of hers, which he consented to, and removed some of her furniture on the 21st and 23d of May, to No. 26, Upper Rosamond-street, Clerkenwell, and that on or about the 26th of May she called on him there, and took them away, and that he had detained none except what he had bought of her.

MARY LEE . I live in Shaftsbury-place, Aldersate-street - the prisoner lodged with me when I lived in Jewin-street; he came on the 20th of December, 1824, and left on the 6th of January; (he had lodged with me once before) - the furniture in his apartment was mine - I never parted with any of it to him; he occupied the attic the second time he lodged there, and paid 6s. a week - he only had one room - the rent was never reduced. I never had any conversation with him about selling any part of the goods - nor ever told him, I wished to part with them for my subsistence - I never sold him any of the goods at all. On the 20th of May, 1825, (a long time after he had left the lodging), I informed him I was in embarrased circumstances, and wished him to take an apartment for me to deposit my furniture in,

being apprehensive of an execution; he very readily agreed to take an apartment for me, and to superintend the removal - part of them were removed on the 21st, and the rest on the 23d; he told me he had removed them, and they were safe - but never told me properly where they were gone; he told me he had moved them into the Borough - but did not say where there - he had told me at first, that he had moved them to Somer's-town, but did not say where. We had received some information that they were in Upper Rosamond-street - he said it was better for my sister and I not to know where they were, under the circumstances of distress we were in. I went to Rosamond-street, on the 25th of May - I was in a coach in the street, and could see part of my sofa, as it stood across the first floor windows - I saw sufficient of it to know it - it stood on its feet under the window; the defendant had given me his address at No. 11, or 14, Margaret-street, Clerkenwell - my sister went there for me, as the coach could not get there, and being a cripple I could not walk. I saw the prisoner that day at my lodgings, which he had taken for me at Somers-town. I told him we had been about the goods - he was very angry - and said we had no business to go - that I had placed confidence in him, and ought to have waited till he came, without making inquiry. I told him we went to consult with him, but could not find him, for he had given a wrong address; he said he meant to move to the lodging where he had told us. He went to Upper Rosamond-street about the goods - he said he had been there - and if we went to the house again to make inquiry we should be insulted, and that he should remove the furniture; he called next day, and said he had moved them into the Borough, where we could not find them, as it was better for us not to know where they were, for fear of the landlord following them. I thought I had put myself in his power, and dare not be otherwise than on good terms with him; he frequently called, and said they were safe - and on the 23d of June, I applied to him for the keys of the apartment where they were deposited - he said he would talk to me at home, in Jewin-street - told me to make the best of my way home, and he would be there as soon as we were. I and my sister went, and waited about half an hour - he did not come - we went back to Clerkenwell.

Q. When did you see him next time? A. I saw him pass the house in Upper Rosamond-street, where the goods were, but did not speak to him - and did not see him again until I went to Guildhall, before Mr. Alderman Cox, to identify him, after I had preferred this indictment, which was in October. He had not called on me, and I did not know where he was - he never claimed the goods as his in my presence - but on the 25th of May, he made a claim to the people of the house where they were. When he went to take a room to move them to, I gave him a sovereign to pay a week's rent in advance, and while the van was at the door I gave him another. On the 25th of May he made me out a bill of 3l. 5s., and I gave him another sovereign - here is the bill, he wrote it in my presence.

This account was written in pencil, and much obliterated - it contained a charge for rooms 8s. 6d., for men 3s. 6d., for two vans, &c. - the total sum was 3l. 5s. - I gave him a sovereign, leaving a balance of 5s. I paid him 7s., for a lodging he had taken of a woman - but he said that when he took the furniture, her husband would not let them in without a reference - that he sent them to Houndsditch for one, and in the mean time the people next door took them in - this is charged in the bill. He made me a bill on the 23d of June, this is it (looking at it) - he did not deliver it himself - it is in his hand-writing; he was to have met me that day in Jewin-street, instead of which, Mr. Rushberry, his solicitor, sent me a letter. and he sent me a letter, requesting I would attend to Mr. Rushberry's letter. I tore that up. I never sold him any goods whatever - nor ever received any money from him for any thing except lodging, and money I have lent him at times.

The bill delivered to the witness on the 23d of June, was here read - as follows "Miss Lee, Dr. to G. B. Valois, Instructing Miss L - two quarters, 2l. 2s., Miss King, 1l. 1s., Master Staples, 2l. 2s., being employed in instructing pupils from the 10th of April, to the 23d of June, at 10s. a day, 36l. 10s. - total, 41l. 15s."

Q. Was he employed in your school as a teacher, at the rate of 10s. a day? A. He was not; I have but twenty-five scholars, and do not receive as much as 10s. a day for all of them together - not above half that; he was employed to teach French by the quarter in my school - I owed him none of this bill - Master Staples was not to pay me; I have the prisoner's receipt for the money - he wrote it in my presence: (read.)

Mr. Staples to B. G. Valois. - Instructing Masters J. and S. Staples, 1l. 2s.; French Grammars, &c. 8s. 6d. -2l. 10s. 6d.

Received, 25th Dec. 1824, B. G. VALOIS.

Q. In August 1824, did you see the prisoner at all, or did you ever sell him any furniture? A. No; he lodged with me then - several of the articles which I have recovered from Margaret-street, and which he swears I sold him in August 1825, I had not even bought at that time; I bought the bedstead and mattress in April, 1825, and many things which I cannot remember - nearly all the furniture in his attic was bought after August - I have the bills of some of them here - I bought the stair-carpet of Mr. Barber, in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden, the beginning of October - the bedstead of Mr. Richardson of Fore-street; and several of the kitchen articles I bought in September, 1824.

Q. From August to February did he pay you any money for goods by weekly instalments, or in any shape whatever? A. Never a shilling - here are the bills - some of the kitchen furniture was bought on the 25th of October, 1824 - I have no bill of that.

The bills produced being referred to agreed with the dates mentioned by the witness.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. These goods, I take it for granted, have been paid for? A. They have not, unfortunately; I have paid for part of them - I have had some of it four years; I first saw the defendant the latter end of July, 1824. When he took me an apartment at Somers-town, he said he was obliged to pass me as his sister, or they would not let the lodgings but to single men; but that was without my consent; I believe

the people took me for his sister for a few days. I remember his telling me he was about taking a house in Jewin-street.

Q. Do you remember saying any thing about the comfort and advantage there would be in you and him living together there? A. I do not; I know he took a house in Upper Clifton-street, Finsbury-square, for he referred to me - I answered the reference; nothing ever passed between us relative to marriage; I never sold him any goods; before I preferred this indictment I charged him with stealing these goods - he was tried here and acquitted, on account of my placing confidence in him.

Q. Do you mean to swear you saw your sofa in Rosamond-street? A. I do not - I thought it was mine, having been told it was there. I positively swear no money has passed between us for these goods, for I never sold them.

Q. Look at this paper, without opening it - is that signature your hand-writing? A. It looks like mine - I think it is - I will not swear that it is, or is not, but I swear I never put my name to any paper given to the defendant but one; I know he can imitate my writing; I never but once gave him a receipt, or any thing of the sort.

COURT. Q. You must know whether it is your handwriting or not? A. It is like mine - well, I will say it is, for it is very much like it (No. 1). I never gave him but one receipt.

MR. BARRY. Q. Here is another (No. 2), is this your writing? A. I know they are not both mine - this is more like mine than the other - I can only speak to one, and I think this one is my writing; I never gave him but one document bearing my name - (looking at another paper, No. 3,) I think this is not my writing.

Q. Now open all three of them, and say are they your writing? A. No, I swear that only one is, and that is No. 3 this was when he was in my apartment, the first time; this signature is mine, and it is the only paper I ever gave him with my name to. I recollect the document and dare say my sister will; I admit putting my name to a document of this sort on the 16th of November, 1824. I now say the signature to No. 2, is not mine; I never gave him a receipt when he left my apartment - nor is the signature to No. 1 mine.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When you speak of your handwriting, in the first instance, you had not seen the contents? A. No; when I see the documents I know only one can be mine, and on seeing them recollect the one I did sign - I never signed the others; the one I signed is a receipt for two weeks rent, and it is the only two weeks he ever paid me at one time; he wrote the body of it and I signed it; I believe the body of all three are his writing, but he writes two different hands; he did not live with us at Somers-town.

HARRIET LEE . I assisted my sister in Jewin-street. I attended to the household affairs. The defendant came to lodge there the second time on the 20th of December; when he was there before he had the second floor, at 11s. a-week, but afterwards the attic, at 6s. a-week; his rent was not reduced - he left in January, and called frequently afterwards. One afternoon in April, 1825 (I think) my sister asked him to take an apartment to deposit her furniture; he said he would - I left the room, and heard no more then. I remember the goods being removed; there was a stair-carpet, a bedstead, a mattress, some kitchen furniture, the drawing-room furniture, and all that was in the house - there was a sofa and sofa table - some were moved on Saturday morning, and the rest on Monday. I had bought part of the kitchen furniture myself - it was long after August, 1824 - I think it was in December. I did not hear the defendant give any account where the furniture was placed - he would not tell, nor give us the key; he said he had moved it three miles off; we went to No. 16, Upper Rosamond-street, and saw the sofa across the first floor window - we afterwards had the door forced open - it was not there then. I went to No. 6, Margaret-street, and saw some of our furniture in a van which stood at the door; I followed it to Fleet-market, and recognized the whole of it to be my sister's. The prisoner was there, managing the removal. I saw some of the kitchen furniture which I had bought in December, in the van; also the stair-carpet and bedstead; this was about five weeks after it was moved from Jewin-street. I am certain he had not bought it of my sister - he could not without my knowledge, because I am in constant attendance on her, as she is lame, and unable to go about the house - he never claimed any of it in my presence. He first took the apartment on the 2d of August, 1824, and left on the 16th of November, and on the 17th took his luggage away; he gave up the key, and made no claim to any furniture. - The rooms were let afterwards to two or three people - the second floor was let till we left Jewin-street, and the same furniture in it as when he was there; he never interfered with it. Some part of what he says he paid for, was not bought by my sister till the end of March, or the beginning of April; the bedstead was bought on the 9th of April, 1825 - here is the bill of it - I saw that bedstead in Margaret-street; the kitchen furniture was not bought till December; the prisoner never claimed the goods; he sent a letter to my sister when we were going to law with him, for the furniture - he then made a claim of debt, but not of the furniture. He professed to teach French, but was not engaged at 10s. a-day; she engaged him for one quarter, at a guinea, but found him incompetent. The Masters Staples learned French - I believe their parents paid the defendant for it. I know he got two sovereigns from my sister, and said Mr. Staples was to pay her; I saw her give him a sovereign when he took the first goods away, to pay for the van.

Cross-examined. Q. You are sure the kitchen furniture was moved with the rest? A. Yes. I knew all the furniture which was in the van. The prisoner never had but one receipt for rent, that was on the evening of the 16th of November, when he left. I never heard of his having any other memorandum - he said he owed her two weeks rent, and would not pay her unless she sent up a receipt. I never took particular notice of my sister's writing.

The witness was here shewn the three papers, and stated she thought that numbered two to be most like her sister's writing, but was unable to swear to either of them.

COURT. Q. When the defendant lodged in the second floor was he the only lodger? A. We had lodgers in the first floor, and the back parlour; Mr. Hattersley and Mr. Pearce lodged there. I never heard a word about my sister's being married to him.

ELIZABETH SWEITZER . I live in Rosamond-street. -

The defendant took a room there in May last. I saw the furniture brought - a sofa was put by the window; the prosecutrix and her sister came to inquire about it - the sofa could be seen from the ground; I told the prisoner so, and he moved it, and put up blinds. The sofa was taken away by the defendant at eleven o'clock at night. - The other furniture was afterwards taken away by Miss Lee's order. I had told the defendant they had been to demand it - he said it was his, and told me to tell them it was gone away; I said I should not say so till it was gone, and the sooner it went the better; I wished him to stay, as they said they should come on a certain day, and take it by force; he would not stay, but said then that the property was theirs, but he detained it for 41l. 15s.; he called two or three hours after it was gone, and said he should hold my husband responsible for it, as Miss Lee owed him 41l. 15s., and he considered it worth that.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he did not claim it? A. He said they owed him 41l. 15s.; not that he had paid that for it.

MR. LANGDALE re-examined. I received this letter,(which has been sworn to be the defendant's writing,) from a person acting as his attorney; with the bill which has been read. I saw the defendant at Mr. Walter's, in Fleet-market, the latter end of June, or the beginning of July; he said the furniture was his - it was there then.(Letter read.)

"MR. RUSHBURY. - If you think it necessary that I should put in an execution for the furniture, although I am in possession of it, please leave a note, stating the same, this evening. B. G. VALOIS."

MR. BARRY addressed the Court on behalf of the defendant. The three papers produced to the prosecutrix were then read.

No. 1 was a receipt, dated the 28th of December, 1824, for 4l. 10s., for goods sold Mr. Valois, signed M. Lee.

No. 2, a receipt for 10s., being rent due the 6th instant, dated the 5th of January, signed M. Lee.

No. 3 was a receipt, dated the 16th of November, 1824, for rent, and acquitting him of all demands, signed M. Lee.

JOHN DAVIS . I live at No. 6, Margaret-street, Spafields, and am a printer; the defendant took a first floor room at my house on the 23d of May, at 7s. 6d. a-week, and brought some furniture. I saw Miss Lee about a fortnight after - she asked to see the defendant; he was out; she then claimed the furniture; he sold the furniture in my house that day, and it was taken away.

- DAVIS. I am the last witness's wife. The defendant took the apartment on the 23d of May, and on the 25th (I believe) Miss Lee came, and asked for Mr. Valois - I said I knew no such person, but recollecting myself I thought it might be him; I followed, and told her - she said she had pronounced his name as it should be in French, which was the reason of my mistake; I said he had brought some furniture, and I was displeased at my husband taking him in, as I did not like weekly lodgers; she said what did it matter so that I was paid; she did not say the furniture was hers; she said he was a gentleman, and would pay honourably; she afterwards called, and said he was a swindler - that he had robbed and injured her, but never named the furniture. I was not present when she claimed it of my husband.

DEFENDANT. When I bought the furniture Miss Lee told me not to tell her sister of it; I was to receive part of the rent arising from it while I was in the country, and when I returned my rent was reduced to 6s. a-week.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-52

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

52. SARAH CUNNINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 17 phials, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Bryant .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-53

53. HENRY MESSENBURG was indicted for feloniously entering a certain orchard belonging to Jacob Phillips , and carrying away 200 walnuts, value 2s. , his property.

JACOB PHILLIPS. I have an orchard at Edmonton . - On the 28th of September I saw eight or ten boys there, bearing walnuts from several trees; I caught one, who was tried with three others last Session; I cannot swear

that the prisoner was one of them, but he confessed that he was the next day, when he came forward and gave himself up.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable. I was called to take up some boys; they said the prisoner was with them - I saw him next day, and asked whether he was one or no; he said he was there, and helped to take part of them away. I took him into the office - his deposition was taken down with the others; I heard it read to him, and saw him sign it.

JACOB PHILLIPS re-examined. Q. Were any walnuts taken away? A. Yes, about nineteen or twenty were found on one of the boys.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 6d. , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-54

Before Mr. Recorder.

54. MARY DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 gown, value 15d. , the goods of Robert Pettit .

ANN PETTIT . I am the wife of Robert Pettit - we live in Crawford-street . On the 10th of November this gown and some other articles hung in my passage to dry; the prisoner came between ten and eleven o'clock, to take some things to mangle; I was up stairs - my husband gave her the things; she made a stop in the passage, and my husband called me down; I missed the gown, which I had seen safe about an hour before. She had often come for things to mangle; she was frequently intoxicated, and(I think) was so then.

MARY ANN KEEBLE . I keep a clothes-shop at No. 58, Bell-street, Mary-le-bone. I bought this gown on Thursday, the 10th of November, about one o'clock, of the prisoner, for 1s. 3d. - it was exposed for sale, and was claimed on the Monday following, by Ann Pettit.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 14th of November, at her own lodging - she denied the charge at first, but afterwards told Mr. Pettit where it was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She called me out, and said if I would tell her where the gown was, she would not hurt me; I am very sorry, and hope you will be merciful.

GUILTY - Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18251208-55

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

55. JEREMIAH BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 3lbs. of bacon, value 18d. , the goods of Anthony Benson .

FRANCIS GOODSON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 5th of November, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was on duty with Eckett. I saw the prisoner near Mr. Benson's shop, in Tottenham Court-road - he took a piece of bacon from the window, put it under his coat, and went away; I pursued, and took him with it; he said he had bought and paid for it. I took him back to the shop, and he there offered to pay for it - I then took him to the watch-house; he was very obstinate, and his hat fell off - a piece of beef was found in it. He had 15s. in his pocket.

WILLIAM ECKETT . I am a patrol. I was with Goodson, and assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house, but did not see him take the bacon. I found the beef in his hat, and some mutton in his pocket.

JOHN SPENSLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Anthony Benson. The officer brought back the prisoner on the evening of the 5th of November, with this bacon which I knew to be my master's - it had been laying in the window. - He said at first that he had bought and paid for it; and then he wanted to pay for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought two pieces of beef, 11/2lb. of mutton, and 11/2lb. of bacon. and as I had no basket I I put one in my hat, and another in my pocket; when I went into this man's house I was tipsy - I asked what it was a pound - he said 6d.; I did, upon my soul, pay for it, and the officer then took me.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-56

56. WILLIAM CHESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 clock, value 1l.; 4 brass wheels, value 4s.; 6 clock movements, value 6s., and 1 dial plate, value 5s. , the goods of John Taylor .

SAMUEL ARKETT . I am a baker, and live in Paradise-row - Mr. Taylor lives about five minutes walk from me. On the 4th of November, about twenty minutes before one o'clock, I was with my barrow at the corner of Queen's-row, which is about half a mile from Taylor's, I saw the prisoner with this clock - there were two other persons on the other side of the way, who seemed to be in company with him, and I saw one of them make a sign to him to go down a turning, which he did; I followed, and asked him where he got the clock; he said a man had given it to him, and I might have it if I liked; he then got away, and ran very fast; I cried Stop thief! and he was taken before he got out of my sight. I am quite certain of his person.

PERCEVAL HEADLEY . I am a carpenter. I saw Arkett with his barrow - he said three suspicious characters had gone past with a clock; I went with him in pursuit - he came up with the prisoner first, and asked how he got the clock; he said it was given to him - he threw it down and Arkett caught it; I pursued and took him in the King's-road.

ELIZABETH BLEADEN . I am a pastry-cook, and live at Chelsea. Mr. Taylor is a neighbour of mine; he had left a clock with me, which I saw safe on the morning of the 4th of November; I did not miss it till it was brought back to my shop; I said I could not swear to it, but I believed it to be the one I had in the house - the prisoner was quite a stranger.

JOHN TAYLOR . I live in George-place, Chelsea. I left this clock with Bleaden.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was walking up Chelsea a clock-maker, with three clocks on his arm, gave me a clock, and a bag of nails, to carry to Pimlico, and said he would give me 1s. to take it; the baker stopped me and asked where I got it; I told him, and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-57

57. JOHN BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 4 books, value 13s. , the goods of John Poynton .

CHRISTOPHER GREAVES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bulstrode-street. I have four books which were pawned at three different times - one on the 1st of November, by, (I believe,) the prisoner, for 1s.; I did not take it in, but I was in the shop, and said I did not like his bringing it; another was on the 7th of November - I was in the shop, and can swear it was him. On the 9th of November he brought two volumes of Walton's Angler - I then detained him.

JOHN M'LAREN . I am a boot and shoe maker. I live next door to the prosecutor; I have seen the prisoner often about his shop, with other boys; I was going out one afternoon - he and another boy were near the shop - he took up a book, but saw me, and put it down again.

JOHN POYNTON . I am a bookseller, and live at Knights-bridge. I know these books to be mine - they were exposed for sale outside the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy took them, and gave them to me to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-58

58. WILLIAM FRANCIS and WILLIAM HOWSON were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a fixture, (i. e.) a copper, value 5s., of and belonging to Phillis Johnson , widow , and fixed to a dwelling-house of hers .

SECOND COUNT stating it to have been fixed to a building of hers.

AMOS BARNES . I did belong to Bow-street, but am now a labourer in the East India Company's service. On the 31st of October I was coming out of my own door in in Dorset-crescent, Hoxton New-town, about half past seven o'clock in the evening - I saw the two prisoners together - Francis had the copper and Howson had Francis' hat in his hand; I knew them and followed them; when they got some distance Francis shifted the copper to Howson; when they got to Old-street they crossed the road, and put it down; I went over and asked what they had got there; Howson said an old iron pot; I put my stick against it, and found it was a copper - Francis then ran off - I seized Howson, and took him with the copper to the watch-house. Francis was taken by Grafton the next morning - I had known them both before.

THOMAS GRAFTON . I am an officer. In consequence of information from Barnes, I took Francis in the brickfields, beyond Newington-green.

PHILLIS JOHNSON. I am a widow, and lived at No. 7, Edward-place, Ball's-pond . I now live at a short distance from there; I had been at that house on the Thursday before, and had fastened it up - no one lives there now, but I have to pay rent till Christmas. On Tuesday morning, the 1st of November, I passed the house and saw one of the shutters broken down; I went in and saw a stove taken from the fire-place, ready to carry away; I then missed the copper; it was brought to me the same evening. I am quite certain that it is mine - my husband was a butcher - I used to scald pigs in it, in doing which I placed a stick across it, which has made those marks.

FRANCIS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

HOWSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-59

59. WILLIAM GRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 4 prints, value 18d.; 1 sheet of paper, value 3d., and 1 box, value 3d. the goods of John Burgis .

JOHN BURGIS. I am a print-seller , and live in Maiden-lane, Covent-garden . In consequence of depredations being committed on my premises, I directed a watch to be kept: on the 3d of November I saw the prisoner loitering about, in company with three others; I directed a close watch to be kept on the four; but I was fetched in from a neighbour's by my servant.

WILLIAM LUCAS . I am servant to Mr. Burgis. He directed me to look out, on the 4th of November, and in the evening I saw the prisoner come into the shop, but he did not see me; he went to the counter, and looked about some time, then tok up the parcel once, and laid it down again; he took it up a second time, and as he was taking it towards the door, I stopped him; he might have got about two yards from the counter.

Prisoner. The shop is not two yards in length altogether? Witness. Yes, it is about ten feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to purchase a black-lead pencil; I knocked on the counter and called - there was no one there; I looked at some of the pictures for about a minute and a half, and on turning round I saw this parcel near the edge of the counter - I removed it further on, and leaned my elbow on the counter, and immediately the witness came and took me.

WILLIAM LUCAS re-examined. Q. Is there any truth in his assertion that he knocked and called? A. Not the least; I saw all he did, as I was behind the door.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-60

60. CHRISTOPHER GUDGION was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , 9 shirts, value 9s., and 1 shift, value 1s. , the goods of Hanah Watson , widow .

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames police-officer. On the evening of the 2d of November, between six and seven o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in the New-road, St. George's in the East, about half a mile from the prosecutor's house - he was carrying six shirts tied up together in a bundle. I asked him what he was carrying - he said shirts. I put my hand on them, and found them wet. I asked him where he was going - he said on board a ship lying off the Tower. I said they were wet - he replied, he had not time to dry them. I took him into a shop, and asked how many there were - he said he did not know, a man had given them to him to take to Tower-hill, and he was to meet him there.

HANNAH WATSON . I live at Shadwell , and take in washing . On the 2d of November, I had some of my son's shirts hanging in my yard to dry - I saw them safe at five o'clock, and about six, when I went to take them in, I missed nine shirts, and one shift.

JAMES WAYLING . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner taken from the lock-up-place to be removed. I thought he looked rather large, and I found these three shirts, and this shift - which were wet, tied round his body.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man met me, and asked me

to carry this bundle for him, he was to meet me on Tower-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18251208-61

61. ANN GOLDBOROUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 40 yards of flannel, value 30s. , the goods of Richard King Thomas .

EDWARD POWELL . I am apprentice to Richard King Thomas, a linen-draper , who lives in King's-road, Chelsea. The prisoner came on the evening of the 3d of November, and bought a quarter of a yard of muslin, and went away - a lady then gave an alarm at the door. I jumped over the counter, and saw the prisoner going off the step of the door with the flannel in her arms - it was at the door tied with a piece of string, about a quarter of hour before - a great many people had come in, and gone out of the shop - she said nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-62

62. THOMAS HYDE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 bushel of barley, value 4s. , the goods of George Winch .

JOHN BARNARD. I am in the employ of Mr. Winch, a farmer , at Shepperton, in Middlesex . I went to his barn, about 7 o'clock on Friday morning, the 2d of December, and found the back door had been unbolted; I missed some barley which had been threshed, and laid in a heap, partly cleaned - I should think more than a bushel was gone - I had seen it all safe about half-past eight o'clock, the morning before. I acquainted Mr. Roake, the bailiff, and went back with him; we saw some foot-marks leading from it, and some barley near them. I afterwards saw the prisoner's shoes applied to these marks, but I was not near enough to see if they corresponded - the barley found, and the sample are here - but I have not compared them - I am not a judge. He lives about two hundred yards from the barn.

JOHN ROAKE . I am bailiff to Mr. George Winch. I saw the barn all safe about the middle of the day before - there was a quantity of barley there, which had been thrown once. On Friday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I was called, and found the barn broken open, and missed about a bushel of barley. I proceeded to the back door, and saw some foot-steps leading from the door towards a meadow, with a great deal of barley in the steps which had stuck to the shoes. I took the measure of the footsteps, and counted five nails in the heel of each shoe. I then returned, and informed my master - he suspected the prisoner, who worked in the adjoining grounds. I got a search-warrant, and went with the constable to the prisoner's house - he was not at home; we went up stairs, and found about a bushel of barley concealed in a little box, which was locked - the prisoner's wife refused to give us the key at first, but we got it and found the barley in it; it appeared to me to be barley once thrown. I had taken a sample of what we had in the barn, and compared it with that in the box - it corresponded exactly. I could swear to it - I have been in the farming business all my life, and it appeared to me exactly of the same quality - we then took the prisoner's shoes, and compared them with the foot-steps - they had five nails in the heel, which just corresponded with the marks.

JURY. Q. Had the barley been in a round heap? A. Yes; if a mouse had gone over it it would have been discovered.

GEORGE BRIGHT . I am a constable. I went with Roake - what he has said is correct. I took off the prisoner's shoes, and compared them with the marks in the ground - the number, size, and position of the nails exactly corresponded - they appeared nearly new, and both shoes had precisely the same number of nails - they fitted the foot-marks in length and breadth.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked this barley off the green, where it grew in the summer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-63

63. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 vice, value 5s.; 1 piece of ivory, value 6s.; 2 sets of letters, value 12s.; 1 opera-glass, value 5s., and 1 snuff-box, value 4s. , the goods of John Jacob Holtzapffel , and Johana Gorg Deyerlein , his masters.

JOHN JACOB HOLTZAPFFEL. I am in partnership with Johana Gorg Deyerlein - we are engine and tool-makers , and live at Charing-cross. The prisoner has been our weekly servant for about eleven months - in consequence of information I went with the constable, on the evening of the 27th of November to his lodging, at No. 3, Turner's-court, St. Martin's-lane - he was not at home. We searched what we understood to be his bed-room, and found this parallel vice, and in a box this piece of ivory, two sets of letters and figures, and a pawnbroker's ticket for an opera-glass, which we got out - this is all my property - the prisoner had access to it all.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Where did he lodge? A. In the house of another workman.

Q. Was it from his information that you went there? A. Yes; the prisoner was a labourer - the landlord was a superior workman to him; the box in which the vice was, was open, the other was locked - these letters are made by a workman of our's out of doors. I cannot swear to any of this property.

COURT. Q. Had you missed these articles before they were discovered? A. No; there was one letter left behind in the place where these were taken from, and that was missing from these letters when they were found. I am able to say, that two sets of letters had been taken from the place where the letter was found - they were in a case of property which we have in trust. I had taken an account of it perhaps twelve months before; it had been regularly entered in our books by the clerk.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable, and went with the prosecutor to search the lodgings - what he has stated is correct. I found the prisoner next morning coming out of the house, and this snuff-box in his coat pocket.

JOHN IMESON . I am in the prosecutor's employ, and am landlord of the house where the prisoner lives. I was at home when the officer searched. I had received information on the Sunday evening, that the prisoner had some articles in his box, and I told the prosecutor. I saw this property found, (which to the best of my belief is my master's) in his bed-room; I found this key in the cabinet, which fits the vice which was in the prisoner's cupboard. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-64

64. JAMES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 7 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of George Walker .

ELIZABETH WALKER . I am the wife of George Walker, a haberdasher , who lives in Orange-street, Bloomsbury. On the 14th of November, the prisoner came to look at some black silk handkerchiefs - he said they were too small, and I was to get him some others by the evening. He returned in about ten minutes - during which time I had missed some handkerchiefs - I accused him of taking them. He said I hurt him very much by saying so - my husband came in, and I saw the prisoner take four handkerchiefs from his pocket, which he threw down and ran away - my husband pursued and took him in the square. I am certain of his person.

GEORGE WALKER . I came into the shop - my wife told me she had accused the prisoner of taking the handkerchiefs. I asked him to turn out his pockets - he said I should send for an officer - he then took four handkerchiefs from his pocket and threw them down - I pursued and took him.

EDWARD COOK . I am an officer. I took two handkerchiefs from the prisoner at Hatton-garden - and I have four which the prosecutor gave me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-65

65. TIMOTHY HUMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 silver spoon, value 7s. , the goods of William Heseltine .

MR. CRESSWELL conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am in the service of Mr. William Heseltine, of South Lambeth . The prisoner's mother is his cook; he came frequently to the house, and was there on the 13th of November; on the 14th a table spoon was missed; I went to Bow-street, and got Thompson, the officer; we went to the Rose and Crown public-house, Allen-street, Clerkenwell, and found the prisoner there - he said it was his lodgings; we then charged him with the robbery; he said, at first, he knew nothing of the spoon, so help him God: but afterwards he wished the officer to withdraw; he took me by the hand, and wished me to be his friend; I said I would not promise that; he then said he had the spoon in a pair of stockings in his hat, and did not know why he took it; I took hold of the stockings and the spoon fell out - he said "There it is."

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Griffiths has been in the habit of laying traps to catch people; some time ago a silver fork was found in the wash that was carried away, and he went to the house, the man was not at home, and his wife looked in the wash and found the fork.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS re-examined. I had suspicion some time ago, of some property being taken, either by the prisoner or the people who had the wash; I put the fork in the wash, and when I went to the house of the people who had it, the fork was found; I then told their little girl to take it home, and tell the other footman to give her 6d. for it. Various other property had been missed from the house.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-66

66. JOHN MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 gold pin, value 4s., and a cap and band, value 8d. , the goods of John Richard Shephard .

MARY SHEPHARD . I am the wife of John Richard Shephard, a painter - we live in Great Windmill-street, Hay-market. The prisoner is a shoemaker ; I employed him on the 13th of November to take two boxes to Little Cumberland-street - one of them contained a gold pin, a cap and bonnet; it was locked and corded round; I gave him 6d.; I went next morning and found he had taken only one of them; I then went to his house and found him at work - the cap was on his head - the remainder of the things were scattered about the room, and the box was there, broken open.

JOHN GUDGE . I am an officer, and have this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-67

67. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 20lbs. of beef, value 10s. , the goods of John Philip Waieck .

JANE WAIECK. I am the wife of John Philip Waieck, a baker - we live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 12th of November the prisoner came to our shop, and bought a biscuit - he went away; I went into the back parlour, and in about two minutes I heard a noise in the shop; I came out of the room and he was just going out with the piece of beef; I think it weighed full 37lbs. - I gave an alarm and he was brought back with it.

JOHN DIXON . I am a seaman. I was going by the shop and heard the alarm; the witness was asking several people to go after the prisoner, but no one would go; I said I would; I overtook him with the beef on his head, and took him back to the shop.

JOHN PURVIS . I am a headborough. The prisoner was given into my charge; I asked him how he came to take so large a piece of beef - he said he did not think it was so heavy when he took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, and a boy had the beef on his head - he threw it down and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-68

68. MARY MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 pair of scales, value 6s., and a brass weight, value 1d. , the goods of John Bennett .

CHARLES MILLER . I am in the employ of Mr. John Bennett, a grocer , who lives in Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner came in on the 10th of November, for half an ounce of coffee - I heard the noise of a pair of scales - I turned to the counter, and missed these - she was just gone - I sent our lad out who brought her back; I asked her about them, and she said "What scales?" - she had none; but I took them from her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you tell her to tell you the truth, and did not she say she had taken

the loan of them to weigh some eels? A. She said so at Marlborough-street, but not in the shop.

GEORGE FAUX . I live at Mr. Bennett's. Miller sent me to bring the prisoner back - I told her to come back, for she had taken a pair of scales - she said she had not - I saw them under her arm.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you say "You have stolen a pair of scales?" A. No: I did not hear her say that a carriage had gone over her scales, and a gentleman had offered to buy all her eels if she could weigh them.

JURY. Q. Were they concealed? A. There was a shawl on her shoulder, but I could see them under her arm.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18251208-69

69. JOHN MONNIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 cask, value 16s. , the goods of Richard Smith Bramwell .

MARY SANGER . I live in Mr. Bramwell's-yard - he is a wine-merchant , and lives in Greek-street, Soho . I was going for a pail of water when the prisoner came into the yard, and asked which was the rum puncheon - there were two puncheous there, and a man who works on the premises for a Mr. Hamilton, told him which it was; I then asked who gave him authority to move it - he said a person in Compton-street; and he was to have half-a-crown for taking it; I said it belonged to me, and I would not let it go; he then struck me three violent blows against the pump, and opened the gate, and took it out into Greek-street.

EDWARD COLLINSON . I am clerk to Mr. Richard Smith Bramwell. I heard the cask rolling, and went to see what it was; I found the prisoner with the cask, about ten yards from my master's premises; I asked where he was going to take it; he said to Mr. Jones's, of Hatton-garden- I gave him in charge.

JOHN PROCTER . I took the prisoner into custody - he said a person in Compton-street, had desired him to get it, and he was to have half-a-crown for his trouble.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been breaking stones in Regent-street; as I was coming along Compton-street, I met a man who asked me if I would earn a few shillings, he told me to go and get the puncheon, and take it to Mr. Jones', in Hatton-garden; I went and the yard was open - I said "I am come for this puncheon" - the man said"Take it," and he took the glass off it - the woman came and asked what I was going to do with it - I told her; she told me to stop while she went to the clerk. I declare to my God, I never struck her, but I waited till the clerk came, and took me into the office.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-70

70. SAMUEL RUDGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 2 loaves of bread, value 16d.; 1 pair of child's boots, value 1s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 4s.; 1 pair of boots, value 4s., and twelve pieces of leather, value 5s., the goods of George Cooper ; and a pair of shoes, value 4s., and a night cap, value 6d. , the goods of Joshua Mead .

HANNAH COOPER . I am the wife of George Cooper - we live in Crooked Billet-court, Long-alley . The prisoner lodged in our house about a week. On the 19th of November he came home at twelve o'clock at night, and I went to make his bed in the upper room; I had the articles stated in a cupboard in that room - I saw them all safe then - I came down, and went to bed in the lower room; there was only my husband, me, my children, and the prisoner in the house that night. At six o'clock the next morning I heard the street door unlocked and unbolted - I asked who was there; the prisoner answered, "It is me;" I asked what time it was, and he said half-past seven o'clock- it was rather dark, and I said, "I think you are a liar." As soon as he had banged the door to I got up, and went into his room - I missed all the articles - I have not seen any of them since.

GEORGE COOPER . I heard the prisoner go out on Sunday morning, and heard what he said; I went up to the room, and missed the property. I apprehended him on the Monday, at his father's house - he denied having taken them; I said if he would return me my master's work, I would say no more about it, as I had no way of convincing my master that I had lost it - he said, "Come to-morrow."

JOSHUA MEAD . I had a night cap and a pair of shoes in that room at five o'clock - I have not seen them since.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was not at all in distressed circumstances; and as such, not at all likely to commit the offence imputed to him, and that business called him out early that morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-71

71. JOHN SHEEHANE , JOHN TUNKS , and JAMES HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 brush, value 1s., and a piece of leather, value 15d. , the goods of James Clare .

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am a constable. On the 25th of November, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing in Portland-place, and saw the three prisoners coming down Weymouth-street, playing together; Sheehane had a hair brush in his hand - I stopped him, and asked where he got it: he said the other boys had given it to him - the others had then run away; I took it from him, and he made great resistance. I took him to the Police-office, and searched him. I found this piece of leather in his breast - I asked where he got that; he said he went about selling them, and had sold the fellow to it that morning, for 1s.; it was wrapped up in paper, and a direction written upon it, "No. 28, Marchmont-street, Burton-crescent." I went there, and they identified it. I took the other prisoners next morning, but found no property on them.

GEORGE FAIRBRIDGE . I live with Mr. James Clare, a brush-maker , who lives at No. 28, Marchmont-street, Burton-crescent . Tunks and Harris came to our shop between two and three o'clock on this day, but did not buy any thing; I did not see Sheehane near the premises. I did not miss the brush and leather till they were brought by the officer - I know they were on the counter when Tunks and Harris were in the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

TUNK's Defence. I had a parcel to carry for a lady just by there, to Charing-cross - she gave me 1s. for it. I went to the shop with Sheehane, to buy a mouth-organ, but they had none to please us.

SHEEHANE's Defence. I had done my work for Mr. Royal - I went about to see if I could find any one who wanted an errand boy; I saw these things on the ground- the other boys came up, and said they would have shares of them.

SAMUEL WRIGHT re-examined. Sheehane said the other boys had given them to him, to me, and before the Magistrate.

SHEEHANE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

TUNKS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-72

72. MARY CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 7 yards of printed cotton, value 6s. , the goods of James Shoolbred and Gregory Cook .

STEPHEN BRIDGE . I am in the employ of James Shoolbred and Gregory Cook, linen-drapers , of Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner came in on the 21st of November, and looked at some prints; she said she did not like any of them, and I got some others from the warehouse; when I returned I missed one of those I had shewn her; I then showed her what I had brought from the warehouse; she said she did not like them, and would call another day; I said it was odd none of them would suit her - she then said, "Cut me off seven yards of that," which I did- she paid for it, and went away. I went after her, and brought her back; Mr. Shoolbred said he thought she had got more than she should have; she said she had nothing but what she had paid for. We took her to the watch-house, and met the constable. As we were going along she dropped this piece from under her gown or her shawl.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I am the constable. I met Bride with the prisoner, and as we were going along I saw this print drop from under her arm.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-73

73. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , a rummer-glass, value 1s., and a spoon, value 1s. , the goods of Francis Jones .

SAMUEL CHALLONER . I am an officer of the Rolls Liberty. On Monday evening, the 7th of November, I was on duty; the prisoner was delivered to me by Mr. Moore, of Sams coffee-house; the beadle and I searched him, and found a poker, a shovel, a glass, and three spoons - one spoon was marked with the name of Jones.

FRANCIS JONES. I keep the King's Head, public-house, Ave Maria-lane, in the City . The prisoner, who was quite a stranger, came to my house on Monday, the 7th of November - I sent a person with some mixed liquors for him; he staid about half an hour, and after he was gone I went into the room, and missed the glass and spoon - the glass was brought to me in the evening; it is marked with my name, with a diamond. I have lost three dozen of these glasses within four months.

ROBERT SIMPSON . I was at Mr. Moore's on the 7th of November. I saw the prisoner come in there. I afterwards saw him searched at the watch-house, and this property taken from him.

THOMAS KERNEY . I was at the watch-house, which is in the County of Middlesex, and saw the property taken from him.

Prisoner's Defence. That spoon is my own - I am in the habit of selling them. If there is any mark upon it it has been put there since; the glass was half full of wafers when I had it.

GUILTY . Aged 74.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-74

74. RICHARD KING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Eli Read , from his person .

ELI READ. I live at Margate. I was in Holborn on the 9th of November, about twelve o'clock - I felt some person touch my left-hand breeches pocket, in which I had 90l.; I turned round, and saw the prisoner near me, and said, "What do you want with my pocket," as I was fearful he had taken my money, but he had not. The officer came up, and took his hand out of his pantaloons, and he had my handkerchief in it - he said he had found it - it was safe in my coat pocket just before.

THOMAS MORRIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner by the collar - I went up and took him, and found the handkerchief in his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was eight or nine yards behind the gentleman, and saw this handkerchief on the curb; I picked it up, and put it into my pocket: I wanted to pass the prosecutor, who was walking with a lady, rather slowly, and in passing I touched the lady's heel; she turned round; the gentleman said I had robbed him - I said I had found a handkerchief, and if it was his he might have it; the officer came up, and insisted upon his giving charge of me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-75

75. ELLEN TARRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a jacket, value 30s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Blight .

GEORGE STARLING . I am a serjeant in the Coldstream guards. On the 13th of November I gave a jacket to John Blight, to brush and clean. On the following evening I was out, and was sent for home, by the witnesses, who said they had received the jacket from the prisoner - she was quite a stranger to me.

JOHN BLIGHT. I am a private in the Coldstream guards . I received a jacket from Starling, and put it into my box - I did not miss it till it was found in the possession of the witnesses, who are here. The prisoner had lodged in the house for two nights, but she had no right in my room - I had not seen her before.

JOHN TUNNOCK . I am a constable of Chelsea. On the 14th of November the serjeant came to my house; I took the prisoner at ten o'clock that night.

ELIZABETH GAHAGAN . I live at Chelsea. The prisoner lodged at the next house; I met her in the street with a bundle; she asked me if I would have something to drink, which I did - she then went out, and came in with some College men - she afterwards came to my house, and

said, "Here is a jacket, which has been given to me by a friend - it will make your husband a good waistcoat" - she said I could take the lace off, and she would call for it at ten o'clock next day - when my husband came home he said it was too good to be given away.

THOMAS GAHAGAN. I saw the jacket, and over-hauled it - I saw the serjeant's name on it - I went and found him, and gave information.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That man gave me the jacket for 1s., which I had lent him when I took my dinner on Sunday in his room. I did not know what to do with it - I asked this woman, and she said she could take the lace off and make a jacket of it.

JURY to JOHN BLIGHT. Q. Did not you say she had no business in your room at that time? A. She had no business at all there; she lived in the lower room. I did not give it to her.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-76

76. JOSEPH WYATT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 27lbs. of lead, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Hurley .

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer. I met the prisoner about half-past nine o'clock on the morning of the 18th of November, in Oxford-street, carrying a basket slung with a cord, across his shoulder, and an apron was over it; I asked what he had got - he said some lead, which he had brought from a house in Upper Brook-street, which was his own perquisite, and his master, Mr. Hurley, allowed it to him. I went to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not tell you he got it from a house he was repairing? A. Yes, and said it was a piece of lead his master allowed him.

RICHARD HURLEY. I am an upholsterer , and live in Conduit-street, Hanover-square. I am repairing a house in Upper Brook-street ; I put the prisoner and his wife,(whom I have known some years,) in possession of that house, in June last. I have not seen this lead applied to any part of the premises, and cannot swear to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not property of this kind often made free with by plumbers and others? A. Yes; I believe it is considered as a very trifling offence.

JOHN FIELD . I am a surveyor and builder. The prisoner was in charge of this house - there was a quantity of lead on the premises, but whether this is any part of it I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-77

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

77. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a pair of shoes, value 8s. , the goods of Benjamin Burgar .

BENJAMIN BURGAR. I am a draper and salesman , and live in Hospital-row, Chelsea . Charlotte Ashton came to my shop on the 14th of November, about three o'clock, and pointed out the prisoner as having taken a pair of boots from my door. I followed, and found them on him- I had seen them safe on the story post of my door, about half an hour before - he asked me to forgive him.

CHARLOTTE ASHTON . I saw the prisoner cut the boots away from the door, and put them under his arm - he walked away, in company with another boy. I went, and told Mr. Burgar, who took him with them.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have had the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-78

78. LOTT HAYWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 16 loaves of bread, value 6s., the goods of James Jones , his master .

JAMES JONES. I am a baker , and live in Union-street, Middlesex Hospital. The prisoner was in my service for a fortnight, which ended on the 28th of November. My wife had sent him that afternoon, while I was out, to a Mr. Watkins, in Carnaby-street, with some bread; I was at home about four o'clock, and saw him return with an empty board; I said to him "There was a mistake in Mr. Watkins' account last week of three loaves, what have they had now?" he said "Eighteen now and sixteen this morning;" I booked them before his face; I went to Mr. Watkins in about an hour, and on my return I had him taken to the watch-house - he had nothing to say.

CHARLES REYNOLDS . I am a journeyman baker. On Monday, the 28th of November, I met the prisoner, who is lame, and I assisted him to carry twenty 2lb. and eight 4lb. loaves to Mr. Watkins'; he took six 2lb. and six 4lb. loaves; - he said he had got another customer to serve, and he would take them to him, as it would save him trouble - they all appeared to have come from one batch.

WILLIAM WATKINS . I keep a shop in Carnaby-market. On the 28th of November the prisoner and Reynolds brought the bread to me, between three and four o'clock; I took six 2lb. loaves, and six 4lb. loaves - he took the remainder away.

JAMES JONES re-examined. Q. What did the prisoner say when he returned? A. He said nothing about it; but I took him to the watch-house for embezzling nine loaves of bread.

Prisoner's Defence. My master serves a person named Corban; I went to take the bread there, and had the misfortune to slip, and throw it down; I was afraid to take it home, and I sold it for what I could; when I got home my master scolded me about something, and I was afraid to tell him then; I had not the money about me or I would have paid him; I meant to have told him in the night, when we were at work together. When I was taken to the watch-house I was not told what my charge was.

JAMES JONES re-examined. He told me to book the bread to Mr. Watkins.

GUILTY . - Aged 18.

Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-79

79. MARIA OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 4 sovereigns, and 18 shillings, the monies of George Kelly , from his person .

GEORGE KELLY. I am a sailor , and live in Gun-lane, Lime-house. I met the prisoner about two o'clock on the 15th of November, in Ratcliff-highway; I went with her to a house in Bluegate-fields , where we went to bed; I had four sovereigns and eighteen shillings, in my waistcoat pocket, which I saw after I got into the house; I put

my waistcoat under the pillow - I awoke between four and five o'clock - the prisoner and the money were gone; I made an alarm and the neighbours came round the door; in about a quarter of an hour I saw the prisoner - she had shifted her dress, but I am quite certain of her person; she said she had received no money from me; I said"No, but you have taken it;" I sent for an officer, who said she had better give me my money; she said she had none; but if he would clear the house of the mob we might settle it; the mob were dispersed, and she offered me 4s.; I said that would not do - I had been drinking a glass or two of grog, but I was perfectly in my senses.

ROBERT ELLIOT . I am an officer. I went to the house and found a mob there; Kelly gave the prisoner in charge for robbing him of 4l. 18s. She denied it, but said if we would clear off the mob she thought we could settle it - the people went out; I then advised her to give him his money; she said she had 3s. or 4s., and she would give him that to make it up, but he would not take it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Ratcliff-highway, and met the prosecutor (who was very tipsy) with two other men. I dined with him and he had some rum. I then took him to my lodgings, and he sent the woman for half a pint of rum, which he drank; he sent me for some beer, and when I was coming back with it I met a woman who said "There is a great row at your house;" I went there - he called me aside, and said if I would give him a sovereign he would let me go; I said I had not got one, but I had three or four shillings, which I would give him rather than go to the watch-house.

GEORGE KELLY . There was another woman in the house, whom I gave the constable charge of, as I thought it was between them - the door was not locked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-80

80. JOSIAH ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 saw, value 3s. , the goods of James Blackwell .

JAMES BLACKWELL. I am a carpenter , and live in Mill-place, Holloway. This saw was lent to me by George Harvey; I left it about twelve o'clock on the 12th of November, in a house in White-conduit-fields . I saw it at the office on the 14th.

GEORGE HARVEY . I lent this saw to Blackwell on the 12th of November - I saw it at the office on the 14th.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 12th of November I saw the prisoner at the corner of Golden-terrace, White-conduit-fields; he went down the area of a house in Simpkin-grove, and then came up, and went into an unfinished house in Brunswick-parade; he came out again with this saw wrapped up in an apron, under his arm; he had the apron on when he went in - I ran and told Harvey.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and went to carry it to a public-house, where I thought I could leave it.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-81

81. MICHAEL BRYAN and JOHN CONNER were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of John Brooks and William Brooks .

JOSIAH WORTHINGTON RYLE . I am in the employ of Messrs. Thomas Brooks and George Brooks - the executors of their late father are Messrs. John and William Brooks - they have two shops, one in Oxford-street, and one in Duke-street. On the 5th of November I received information and pursued the two prisoners, who were running together; I found two pairs of stockings on Bryan, which have a ticket of my writing on them; I took him back, and Conner was taken soon after by one of our young men.

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer. I took the two prisoners into the shop, and received the stockings, which the shopman said he took from Bryan's breast.

BRYAN's Defence. I was going up Oxford-street, and saw the stockings lying on the ground; I took them up. I know nothing of the other prisoner, but he came up and I ran on, for fear he should take them from me.

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

CONNER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-82

82. HENRY BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 7 dozen buckles, value 3l., 2 dozen of slides, value 20s., and 4 pairs of clasps, value 2s. , the goods of John Lee .

JOHN LEE. I am a steel toy worker , and live in Benjamin-street, Clarkenwell. On the 9th of November, after eleven o'clock at night, I was returning from Paddington, and had these goods in a bag slung over my shoulder, balanced by an umbrella in front; the prisoner, who was a perfect stranger, accosted me as a friend, in High-street, St. Giles', and we walked from there to Fleet-market ; I gave him my card as we walked along; when I got to the end of the market a young man ran against me, and my bag fell from my shoulder; I took hold of him and the prisoner took up my bag and umbrella, and said "That is no friendly or manly action - I will fetch you assistance." I said "Give me my property;" but he said "I will take care of it;" I saw that he did not go to the watch-house, and I tried to follow him, but I could not. I did not see him again till he was in custody, three days afterwards. I am quite certain he is the man. I found part of my property at the pawnbroker's.

Prisoner. The prosecutor was drunk and lying in the street - I assisted him up, and put his bag on his shoulder - he gave me a glass of gin and took another himself; there was a scuffle at the end of Holborn with him and another man - I saw the parcel fall on the ground, and kicked my foot against it - I had had his card but I threw it away. Witness. I was bad with a cough, and was sick and slipped off the pavement, but I was not drunk, that he knows.

CHARLES JAMES MAYNARD . I am a pawnbroker, and have some buckles which a woman brought to our shop, and I bought them of her.

ELIZABETH ADAMS . I was employed to take the buckles by the prisoner, soon after the 9th of November; he said he was distressed for money - the pawnbroker said he wished to buy them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable. I went to Mr. Skinner's, No. 3, Olive-street; he told me the prisoner lodged there; I found this bag and this umbrella there.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-83

83. ROBERT THORN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 4 bridles, value 3l., the goods of Morris Mellows , privately in his stable .

GEORGE MORRIS . I am in the service of Mr. Morris Mellows, of Gray's-inn-lane . On the 10th of November I went to his stable, about a quarter before five o'clock, and saw the prisoner there - he asked me where Mr. Osmond's stable was; I came to the door to shew him, and while I was there a ostler came up and asked me for a bit of candle; I turned round and the prisoner ran away - I pursued, and saw him drop one or two bridles as he ran - I took them up, but did not lose sight of him till he was taken: I know the bridles to be Mr. Mellows' property. when I went away I had left the door of the stable shut and latched but not locked.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not known him? A. No; I had never seen him before - he had not been talking to me, nor had I lent him these bridles to assist him in his emergency; he had not asked me for a loan of 10s. before - the ostler had not told me I was robbed.

CHARLES TURNER . I am servant at the stables in Gray's-inn-lane. On the 10th of November I saw the prisoner there, about a quarter before five o'clock, with four bridles in his right hand, standing on one side of the door, and Morris on the other. I asked Morris for a piece of candle- the prisoner then ran away, and said "Good night!" Morris ran after him, and sung out "Stop thief! I did not see any bridles taken from him.

Cross-examined. Q. You say you saw the prisoner and Morris talking to one another? A. Yes, and the prisoner had four bridles in his right hand - they were conversing together, not above a yard from each other; Morris could see the prisoner but not the bridles, as he held them behind him, and as he ran by me they hit me pretty sharply.

MATHIAS WELAHEN . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge, about five o'clock on the 10th of November; as I was coming along Liquor-pond-street he said it was the first time he ever was in trouble, and he could not think what induced him to take them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it possible for a man to hold these so that they could not be seen? A. No, it is quite impossible.(Property produced and sworn to).

MR. PHILLIPS to GEORGE MORRIS . Q. Did you see these bridles in his hand? A. No, I did not see them except in the stable. I did not see them in his hand at the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I have known the first witness two or three weeks; I was going home that evening - I called to see him, he was not there - I stopped till he came. I told him I was out of place, and out of money, and asked him to lend me 10s. He said he had no money to spare, but I might take three or four of the bridles, and pawn them until the next day, if I would replace them, which I fully intended to do; while I was standing at the door the other witness came up, and Morris told me to run off; he had said he would not tell his master anything about them if I would replace them by two o'clock - he now swears against me to hide his own disgrace.

COURT to GEORGE MORRIS. Q. Had you upon your oath, given this man leave to take them to pawn? A. No; I had not upon my oath. I had no suspicion of him when he was in the stable; he asked for Mr. Osmond's, and I was directing him when the other came up.

Q. Was the door shut when you got there? A. Yes; and the prisoner was inside. Mr. Osmond lives in the King's-mews, King's-road.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-84

84. THOMAS BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 15s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 6s. , the goods of Philip Lawton .

PHILIP LAWTON. I am nephew to Mr. Philip Lawton, a pawnbroker , who lives in Green-street, Leicester-square . On the 18th of November I was at dinner, I was called into the shop by the shopman. I saw two persons with him, and he told me to run after the prisoner, who had taken the trousers and waistcoat from the iron rod - I pursued the prisoner. I first took another person - then I took him, and found the trousers and waistcoat under his coat - they are new, and had been hanging on the rod outside the door. I had put them out myself about eight o'clock that morning - he told the Magistrate he had picked them up - but a gentleman who was there, said he had seen him take them off the rod - here they are.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I found them in the passage, which is a thoroughfare. Witness. I found him in Orange-court, about one hundred yards from our house. I think he had been down the court, and was coming up again, as he saw I had got the wrong man.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-85

85. JOHN BAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 2 live drakes, price 5s., and 3 live ducks, price 7s. , the property of Robert Lines .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18251208-86

86. SAMUEL DOVE and WILLIAM DOVE were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 7 live fowls, price 14s. , the property of Thomas George Barnes .

The witnesses being absent, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18251208-87

87, ROBERT EVANS and ROSINA ELSEY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 96 yards of gilt trimming, value 24s.; 2 hats, value 2l., and 22 yards of mock sable flounce, value 30s. , the goods of Charles Allsop .

CHARLES ALLSOP. I live in Zion-square, Whitechapel . I am a wholesale furrier - here are seven dozen of flounces which I have no doubt, are mine, and were manufactured by me. On the 4th of November, I left a number of gilt trimmings, some sable flounces, and two new hats at No. 4, Creed-lane, which is my warehouse - about four or five

o'clock in the afternoon, I bolted my warehouse door on the inside, and came out at the front door - I saw my man lock that door. I went there again on the 12th of November, and when I had been there about an hour, I found the property was gone - the inner door had been broken open, and on examining it I found some impressions of iron work about it. I then examined the street door, and the warehouse door - neither of which were hurt.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you in the interim sent any person to the warehouse? A. No; a bricklayer had a key that would admit him to the private part of the building, and he could get at the inner door to break it - he had had the key about a month before I left my trimming there. The prisoner is a stranger - no one lives at the house. I had not sold flounces there for a fortnight before - but I cannot swear that I had not sold these very flounces.

WILLIAM JAMES ALLSOP . I am the prosecutor's brother, and lodge in Creed-lane. I had been out on Lord Mayor's Day, and when I was returning down Creed-lane, I saw two persons standing at the corner of the court near the warehouse. I took particular notice of the prisoner Dove, as being one of them. I went home, but as my landlady was not there, I said I would take a walk for a quarter of an hour, and when I went out, I saw the two men again. I went down Ludgate-hill, and when I returned they were gone. In a day or two afterwards, I heard my brother say he had lost something, and I told what I had seen.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you see the young man standing? A. At the corner of the court, near my brother's premises. I had been out to spend the evening- I had been playing at cards, but had not been drinking. I saw the prisoners in custody, about the 16th or 18th of November. I had not seen any person whom I thought I knew between the time - but I saw two young men lurking about on the Sunday night.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am a bricklayer. On the 5th of November, I was at work at the cellar, No. 4, Creed-lane - I shut the door, and left every thing safe - the warehouse where the goods were is parted from the passage. I locked the street door, and left the key at the Rising Sun, according to my orders. I gave it to the landlady - she is not here.

JEREMIAH M'GURRINS . I am a provision-dealer, and live in Cow-heel-alley, Golden-lane. The prisoner Elsey took a two pair back room there, in the month of September. Evans used to be there, and I believe has paid me the rent twice. I have seen him come in of an evening, and go up to that room - but I have not seen him in the morning; they did not take it as man and wife. I will not swear he lived with her - I have seen him about a dozen times.

Cross-examined. Q. How many times did you see him? A. I saw him once or twice, when I called for the rent. I have seen other men come there frequently. I believe Elsey got her living by seeing men.

THOMAS VANN . I went to the Benbow public-house, in Golden-lane, on the 11th of November - I took Evans, and from information I took him to the house in Cow-heel-alley - he said, "Mind, Vann, I don't live here at all;" Elsey and another woman were there; Elsey said she knew nothing of Evans at all, and the room was her's; the other woman said she came to sleep there. I saw this flounce on the table, which Elsey said some strange man had left there - and in the table-drawer I found six skeleton keys, and a crow-bar - this key opened the street-door of the warehouse in Creed-lane, and the bar exactly fitted the indentures in the wood of the inner door.

Prisoner ELSEY. Q. Did not the woman say she lived with me? A. I think she said she slept there.

JAMES HANDLEY . I was with Vann. I found a letter in the room, directed to Robert Evans, and some duplicates in the drawer, and some upon Elsey. Vann asked if Evans lived there, and Elsey said he did not.

JOHN MOSS . I went to No. 4, Creed-lane, on Saturday, the 12th of November. I saw the door from the warehouse to the passage had been broken open, and the pieces laying down about the side; the muff boxes were down about the floor.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A dyer, in the employ of the prosecutor. I had been there between the 4th and the 12th of November, but I do not recollect going all the week before Saturday, the 12th, when I saw the violence done to the premises.

ELIZABETH LEE . I live in Cow-heel-alley, with the prisoner Elsey. I did not always sleep with her.

Prisoner ELSEY. Q. When I came home that night at eleven o'clock, did not I ask you how these things came there, and you said a young man had brought them? A. No; I saw them there, but I do not know who brought them. You came in in about an hour and a half, and asked how they came there - I said I did not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-88

88. SAMUEL GREENAWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 shirt, value 6s. , the goods of Henry Eade .

HENRY EADE. I keep the Barley Mow public-house . On the 5th or 6th of September I hired the prisoner to assist me in the bar; he left me on the Thursday previous to the 6th of November, and left his direction with my wife, at Mr. Barber's, a grocer, in Gray's Inn-lane. I went there on the 6th of November, with a constable - we waited till the prisoner came there, and I gave him in charge - he was searched. I went to the same place afterwards, and found this shirt, which is mine - it had my initials on it, but they are not here now; I had six of them, and this is one - it appears exactly the same to a thread. I missed it six weeks previous to the 6th of November - I have the other five at home.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you living at the Barley Mow now? A. Yes, but Sir Richard Birnie told me to alter the sign, which has been done. I found a young lady of the name of Carrol, who gave me this shirt and handkerchief.

ANN JEMIMA KIDDEY . I am the wife of Joseph Kiddey . I made this shirt, and marked it, but the mark is not here now - I did not put any buttons to it. I received six shirts together in the course of the summer, which Mrs. Eade had begun, but gave them me to finish. I made four of them, and have got the other two now.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you two of them unmade? A. Yes; he cannot have five of them at home. I cannot see any trace of the mark - it was new linen, which retains the mark longer than old.

HENRY EADE re-examined. Q. How came you to say you had five of them at home? A. I forgot that two of them were not made. I consider that if a shirt is cut out I have it.

ELIZA CARROL . My sister gave up this shirt to Mr. Eade - the prisoner had brought it up that morning, and said it was his dirty linen. I threw it on a box, and it remained there till the officer came; the prisoner had not been living at Mr. Barber's, but at Mr. Eade's - he had asked me to button it, and mark it for him, which I did.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon after it was left did the officer come? A. In about an hour; it was about six weeks before when he left it for me to mark and button, and it then appeared quite new. I do not think that it was possible that a mark could have been ripped out without some trace being seen; there is not the least trace of any mark there. I did not ask him how he got it.

SAMUEL N. DICKENS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shirt and a pair of stockings together, to go to Bartholomew-fair, of a man who kept the house before Mr. Eade took it.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-89

89. ROBERT ROPER and JAMES BLACKMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Thomas , from his person .

JOHN THOMAS. I was in Pall Mall about half-past seven o'clock on the night of the 6th of November - the officer, Bertraun, asked if I had lost any thing - I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which I had had half an hour before. I saw it the next morning.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I saw the two prisoners on this night, near Leicester-square - they followed the prosecutor to the corner of Pall Mall; they were together all the time. I saw Blackman take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Roper. I told Reardon to keep his eye on them, while I went and told the prosecutor, who described his handkerchief as a yellow one, with a red border - we had then lost sight of the prisoners, but we went to Covent-garden, where we found them, and Roper had the handkerchief on his neck. I am certain of their persons.

DANIEL REARDON . I was with Bertraun, and saw what he has stated. Blackman took the handkerchief, and gave it to Roper - they turned down St. James'-square, and I lost sight of them; we saw them again in about half an hour, under the Piazzas of Covent-garden; this handkerchief was tied loosely round Roper's neck; I took it, and shewed it to the prosecutor the next morning - he identified it as his.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROPER'S Defence. I was coming through St. Martin's-court, and kicked this handkerchief before me; I put it round my neck, having not so good a one on - as I was under the Piazza these two men came up, and said I was the person they wanted.

BLACKMAN'S Defence. I was going to St. Martin's-lane - these two gentlemen came and seized this lad; I stopped to see what was the matter, and one of them said"Take hold of the other." I knew nothing about it.

Two witnesses gave Roper a good character.

ROPER - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

BLACKMAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-90

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9.

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

90. JOHN HAYMAN and JAMES STEVENSON were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Henry Cook , from his person .

HENRY COOK. I was in Long-acre on the 21st of November, when a man tapped me on the shoulder, and told me I had lost my handkerchief; I felt my pocket, and it was gone. I had it a few minutes before.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was in Long-acre about half-past five o'clock, with Roberts - I saw the prosecutor and the two prisoners about the middle of Long-acre, coming towards Drury-lane; I watched them down Queen-street, to the corner of Wild-street, where I saw Stevenson take the handkerchief; I told Roberts to watch the prisoners while I told the prosecutor; he gave me his direction - I do not know what became of it. I took Hayman afterwards in Long-acre.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Bertraun. I saw Stevenson take the handkerchief and run down Wild-street; he dropped it there; I took it up, and he got away; Hayman was about a yard from him when he took it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAYMAN'S Defence. Roberts passed me twice, and almost knocked me down - he and the other man then came and took me.

STEVENSON'S Defence. This prisoner was not with me- I took it alone.

STEVENSON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

HAYMAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-91

91. SARAH JEFFERIES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 11/2 pint of gin, value 3s., the goods of Charles Chapple , her master .

CHARLES CHAPPLE. I live in Shoreditch . The prisoner was my cook . On Wednesday, the 16th of November, I got an officer, and searched a box, which she said was her's - she gave the officer the key. I found in it a bottle of gin, which I believe to be mine, by the flavour - it is a manufactory peculiar to myself - I am a distiller.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. I have carried on the trade of a distiller for many years, and have sold many thousand gallons of the same flavoured gin as this is - she might have bought it at some of the houses which I supply.

WILLIAM HANDLEY . I am an officer. I was sent for. The prisoner gave me the key of her box, where I found a

bottle of gin. I told her I was an officer, that she and another woman were suspected of stealing gin, and I was come to search their boxes; when I searched one box the prisoner said, "The gin you are looking for, you will find in the other box" - I found this bottle of gin there; she said, "Eliza and I took the gin the day before yesterday;" they both went down with me and pointed out the vat, No. 10 - the prisoner said the other drew the gin. The other woman was taken and discharged.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-92

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

92. CHARLES ASPENWALL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , an umbrella, value 2s.; 1 watch, value 30s., and a stand, value 7s. , the goods of Edmund Frier .

ELIZABETH FRIER . I am the wife of Edmund Frier, he lives in Great Titchfield-street . On the 30th of November, about a quarter past six o'clock, I was sitting in the front kitchen at work, and heard foot-steps in the parlour. I ran up stairs with a candle, and saw the street door open. I ran into the street - the prisoner then jumped out of the parlour window with this umbrella, which he threw down on the curb. I cried Stop thief! - and ran after him until I could run no further. I then returned, and took up the umbrella. I went into the parlour - he was brought back; when my husband came home, he said I had better look into the parlour again, and then we missed the watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What opportunity had you of seeing the prisoner? A. By the gas light in front of my house - I saw him while he was running, but his back was towards me.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am a constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I ran out, and saw the prisoner being brought back. I took him to the house, and searched him, but found nothing on him.

JAMES GIBBS . The prisoner was delivered to me at the office. I searched him, but found nothing on him; the next morning I took him before the Magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-93

93. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 umbrella, value 5s. , the goods of James Wakeman .

JAMES WAKEMAN. I live in Little May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane . I was returning home about one o'clock, on the 14th of November, and met the prisoner about fifteen yards from my house with an umbrella, which I thought I knew to be mine; I ran home, and asked if one had been sold. I then pursued, and when I came up to him, I took him by the collar and said,"That is my umbrella." He said he had bought it. I said, he should go with me. He then took me by the collar, and we walked about ten yards, when he attempted to strike me, and got away. I pursued him - he was taken in my sight. I am certain he is the man, and this is my umbrella.

EDWARD FLOWER . On the 14th of November I was going through Little May's-buildings, and heard the cry of Stop thief! - I saw the prisoner walking very fast up Bedfordbury. I took him by the collar - he said, "It is not me, let me go." The prosecutor then came up, and said, "Don't let him go, 'till I get a constable." When the prosecutor was gone - he asked, if I was a constable. I said - No. He said I had no right to collar him, and attempted to strike me. Gill came up and took him.

EDWARD GILL . I am an officer. I secured him, and have the umbrella.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased this umbrella opposite the Horse Guards for 2s., and I told the prosecutor where I bought it - he said, if I would give it up, he would not do any thing to me. He took me by the collar, and I said, I would not be collared by him, or any man but an officer.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-94

94. MARK BARRS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 29 packs of cards, value 14s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Hall , and Anthony Olddiss Bancks .

ANTHONY BANCKS . I am card-maker to Henry Hall, and Anthony Olddiss Bancks. The prisoner was a labourer in their service for four years. On the 29th of November I found six dozen and five packs of cards, upon the boards which compose the cieling of a privy which the prisoner uses - I found, by moving one of the boards, there was a space to put some cards. I then mixed a composition of vermilion and oil, and put it on the edge of the boards, so that no one could get the cards without marking their sleeve. The prisoner did not come to our premises until the following Saturday, when I watched him going to the privy - he staid some time - he then came through the front shop, and I asked him what he had been doing - he made some excuse, and wanted to go to the back premises. I then felt his pockets, and felt some cards. - I took him into the parlour, and found three packs of cards on him. I sent for a constable, but before he arrived the prisoner voluntarily emptied his pockets of twenty-nine packs. I then went to the privy, and the number left just made up the quantity I had seen there before.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had not this man been some time in your house? A. Yes; he has been partly out of work for some time, though he has occasionally worked for us - he has a wife and ten children. I do not know that he has been in distress - he came to try to get work - he might earn from 8s. 6d. to 25s. a week - he was not in our employ at the time. I have every reason to think he was an honest man until that time.

ROBERT CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18251208-95

95. JAMES BOWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Balmain .

JOSEPH BALMAIN. I came to town on the 23d of November, from Maida-hill. I went to a house in Golden-lane , and left my chaise, in which was my great coat, opposite to the house; in about ten minutes, a person came

to the door, and asked if the gentleman belonging to the chalse had left a coat in it. I went out, and pursued the prisoner. I did not see him for some time, and when I stopped him, he was running as fast as he could, but he had thrown down the coat.

JOHN POULSTON . I live in Golden-lane, and am a painter - the prosecutor was in my house. I went out with him, and pursued the prisoner. I saw the constable before us, who asked if we had lost any thing. I said, Yes. He said, "Come this way," and we saw the prisoner with the coat - when he saw me, he threw it down, the constable took it up. I pursued and took him.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner and two boys come past my house with this coat. I watched which way they went, and then pursued them. Poulston came to me in Goswell-street, and said, "They had lost a coat." I followed the prisoner, and saw him drop it - I took it up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-96

96. ANN BLAKIE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 watch, value 30s. , the goods of Giovanni Sabatini .

ELIZABETH SABATINI . I am the wife of Giovanni Sabatini - we live in Old-street , the prisoner lodged at our house for about a month. On the 24th of November, when I went down stairs for some water, I saw him at the top of the stairs. I came up in two or three minutes, and missed the watch, and the prisoner was gone up to her own room. I believe she was in great distress, and her husband was out of work.

JOHN HUGHES . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, he is a pawnbroker. I have a watch pawned by the prisoner, on the 24th of November.

JAMES GIBBS . I am a constable. I went to take the prisoner - she told me where the watch was, and produced the ticket from under the floor - she gave me 18s. 7d., which she said was a part of what she had got for it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

One witness gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18251208-97

97. JOHN CATLIN & RICHARD PHEEBY were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 leaden valve box, value 4s. the goods of Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I live in Crown-street, Drury-lane, and am a painter. Thomas Brooks is a plumber . On the 18th of November, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I saw Pheeby push a board out from a square, and take out a leaden valve box; Catlin was close to him- he took a handkerchief from his neck, and gave it to Pheeby to cover over the box - I followed them to Monmouth-street, where I took Catlin.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I saw the two prisoners in company, near the shop; I did not see them take the article, but saw them coming from the shop; Pheeby had the valve box and handkerchief - I took him, and Roberts took Catlin.

CATLIN'S Defence. Bertraun said at the office, that he saw the boy take it from the window, and now he says he did not.

PHEEBY's Defence. I was going up the gate-way, and saw the box; the other prisoner lent me his handkerchief to tie it up in.

CATLIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

PHEEBY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-98

98. CHARLES CURTWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 till, value 2s.; 2 sixpences, and 1s. 3d. in copper monies , the property of Lydia Fowler and Harriet Fowler .

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS. I am a constable. On the 17th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and another young man, who appeared older than himself, in company with him; one of them was at the door of Fowler's shop, and the other at the window; I watched, and saw them go a little distance from the door and exchange hats; the prisoner had a white straw hat, and the other a black one; the prisoner then went into the shop and brought out the till, which he gave to his companion, and they went on - I took them both - the elder man struck me, dropped the till and got away - I still kept the prisoner, and said I was sorry he was in such a job as that - he said the other had led him into it.

LYDIA FOWLER. I am in partnership with my sister Harriet - we keep a little shop - the constable came and told me the till had been taken - I saw it afterwards - it had two sixpences and some copper in it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-99

99. SAMUEL FERNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , two pewter pots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Edward Smith .

WILLIAM BALL . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner in Broad-street, St. Giles', on the 16th of November, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, he appeared very bulky - I found two pint pots round his body, and two in his bat - a quart pot dropped from him.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a patrol. I was in company with Ball, and saw the prisoner drop a quart, and a pint pot - two others were found in his bat, and another round his body.

EDWARD SMITH. I am a victualler , and live in Compton-street . Two of these pots are mine; I have seen the prisoner about the neighbourhood - he used to work at a livery stable opposite to me.

HENRY BELL . I keep the Grayhound public-house, Henrietta-street, Bryanstone-square - these three pots are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the misfortune to be here falsely last September, but was discharged - that has taken away my character, and I could not get a situation.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-100

100. MARY HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on

the 7th of November , 6lbs. of bacon, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Brown .

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a doll-maker. Samuel Brown is a cheesemonger , and lives in High-street, Whitechapel . I saw the prisoner near his shop about six o'clock in the evening, of the 7th of November - she walked up to the window, and looked at some rashers of pork; she then took a pig's head by the ear, brought it to the corner of Angel-alley, and threw it down - I suppose because she saw me there - she then turned her back to it, and looked towards the coaches - a young man took it up and carried it back.

SAMUEL BROWN . I keep this shop. The pig's face was brought back to me - we call it bacon in the trade.

Prisoner's Defence. I came to get a dozen Tracts to sell, being starved out - I went as far as Bow, and sold three of them; I had not been near the shop, nor did I take the head - the young man took it up, and seeing me a poor distressed creature, he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-101

101. CHARLES HOLDSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 pair of boots, value 20s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 6s., the goods of James Smitzer , from his person .

JOSEPH SMITZER. I live in Fore-street, City, and am a boot and shoemaker . On Wednesday, the 16th of November, the prisoner came and ordered a pair of Wellington boots, which were to be done by the Saturday following. I agreed to make them for 25s. I had seen him about four weeks before, when he bought a pair of shoes; he came on the Saturday following, and the boots were ready - he tried them on, and was satisfied with them; he then asked if I had any light shoes to fit him; he tried several and selected one pair, which I said would be 8s.; he said, "That will be one pound thirteen together" - but nothing passed about the money being paid at the time of delivery. I asked if I should send them - he said "Yes; to No. 30, Myrtle-street, Hoxton - the name of Smith." I wrote the name and direction on the bottom of one of the shoes - he saw me write it, and I took his name to be Smith - he said"Send a bill and receipt with them." I asked him what time I should send them; he took out his watch and said,"It is now half-past two o'clock, I shall be at home till half-past four." I told him I would be there by four o'clock; about that time I took them with the bill and receipt, to No. 30, Myrtle-street. I knocked at the door - he let me in; he asked me into the parlour, and I took the boots and shoes out of the bag, and put them on the table; he then asked me for the bill and receipt, which I gave him; he asked what discount I allowed, and I said they were charged at cash price; he took the boots and shoes with the bill and receipt into the back parlour, which appeared to be a bed-room - I saw a bed there as he opened the door. I supposed he was gone to put them away and bring the money. I waited about five minutes, but he did not return; an elderly man then came into the parlour, and asked who I wanted - I said I had brought a pair of boots for Mr. Smith, and he was gone into the back parlour to put them on - he then retired. I staid about ten minutes longer, when the landlady came and asked what was my pleasure. I told her I had brought the boots and shoes, and was waiting for the money from Mr. Smith; she opened the bed-room door, and said "Here is no Mr. Smith here." I went and looked, but he was gone, with the boots and shoes. I considered he was at home, and I went with a determination to bring the money or the articles back. I thought he was gone into the room to put the things away. I should not have parted with them, if I had not expected the money. I then went and gave information at Worship-street. I did not see him again till the 22d of November, a little before ten o'clock in the evening, when I was at the Eagle Gardens, City-road. I saw two persons coming from the back part of the house, and when they came to the light of the lamp, I saw the prisoner was one of them. I laid hold of him and said"You rascal I have got you;" he said "What do you want?" I said "Where are my boots and shoes?" he said"I will pay you for them directly." I took him into the house and said "This is the young man I have been looking for these three nights;" he pulled out what money he had, which was 17s. 6d. and he offered me his watch. I said that was not my property, nor his, and I should not let him go; he had my boots on, and the shoes he said were at the Poulterer's Arms, public-house, Honey-lane Market.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come four months before, and say I was recommended by Mr. Crutwell? A. You might, but I do not recollect it - you might have been a customer; when I brought the boots home, I reckoned it an order.

Q. When you took me at the Tavern, did you not say"Where is the money for my boots and shoes?" and that you only wanted the money? A. No, I said "Where are my boots and shoes." I took the money and put it in my pocket. I did not say the watch was to serve as part payment - you gave it up as part of payment, but I did not take it as such. I was desirous of bringing him forward, because I knew there were other indictments against him.

ELIZABETH NEWMAN . I live at No. 30, Myrtle-street, Hoxton. I never saw the prisoner till the 19th of November, when he came to my house for apartments, about a quarter before twelve o'clock. I let him my two parlours, but he was not to occupy them till the Monday following; he said he had just come from the country, and wanted the apartments for four months, as he was about to walk the hospital - that his name was Smith, and his father and him would call on the Sunday. I did not see him there when the prosecutor came - I was out. I never saw him but when he came to hire my lodgings, till he was in custody. When he came to hire the rooms, he looked at the passages in and out of the house, and went out at the back door; he said when he was going that he should probably send some luggage in - he never took possession of the rooms.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not take the lodgings from that day, and should you not have expected your rent that day week? A. No.

MARIA NEWMAN . I live with my mother, the last witness. I was not present when the prisoner hired the lodgings. On Saturday, the 19th, in the afternoon, my mother went out, and said if any luggage came I was to take it in, or if Mr. Smith came, he was to come in; about ten minutes past four the prisoner came, and said his name was Smith, and asked if any one had been for him - I said No; he said there would shortly be a man come in with some things; he then walked through the parlour,

and I left the room. I heard a knock soon afterwards, and saw Mr. Smitzer come in; he staid there till my mother came home, and she went into the parlour to him. I had gone down into the kitchen, and do not know what became of Mr. Smith.

THOMAS VANN . On Tuesday evening, the 22d of November, I went to the Poulterer's Arms, in Honey-lane Market, with Mr. Smitzer - I found these shoes there.

JOHN WESTBROOKE . I keep the Poulterer's Arms, Honey-lane Market - the prisoner lodged with me for about six weeks, till he was taken into custody; by the name of Holdsworth; when the officer came, I shewed him the prisoner's room - the shoes and other things were found there.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am headborough of Shoreditch. I was sent for on the 22d of November, to the Eagle, to take the prisoner into custody, at Mr. Smitzer's request - he gave charge of him for swindling him out of some boots and shoes. I found the boots on him. I found four duplicates in his possession, which he said were for his own property; he then said the prosecutor had 17s. or 18s. of his - the prosecutor said he had. I asked if he had kept it separate - he counted out 17s. 6d. and said the prisoner had given him this watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I bought the boots, I intended to pay for them. Mr. Smitzer knew me; when I met him at the Eagle, I gave him the 18s. as part of payment. I had called at the shop that evening, but it was shut up; he said if I could satisfy him where he could get the remainder of the money he should be satisfied.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

There were seven other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18251208-102

102. CHARLES HAWKINS and EDWARD SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 shovel, value 2s. , the goods of William Sinnott and James Sinnott

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am an officer. I was in the City-road on the 1st of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon - I saw the prisoners together - I watched them for a few minutes, and saw Hawkins take the shovel from a basket, and a ladder, which stood against some palings there - a scavenger's cart stood in the road - Hawkins carried the shovel some distance, and then gave it to Smith, who took it to Brick-lane; I followed them and saw a scavenger's cart, belonging to Mr. Sinnott - I asked the men if their master contracted for the City-road - they said Yes; I then told them to come with me - we pursued the prisoners, and Smith threw down the shovel - they were then taken.

GEORGE CULLAM . I am in the employ of William and James Sinnott, who are scavengers. The constable called me to assist in following the prisoners, who he said, had taken a shovel; I followed them and saw Smith throw it down, cross Brick-lane, and run away.

MATTHEW MULLINS . I was working in the City-road, for William and James Sinnott, who contract with the parish. I had two baskets and a shovel there - I missed this shovel - it has my master's name on it.

HENRY WILD . I was at work for Mr. Sinnott. The constable called me and Cullam to follow two men who had taken a shovel - I saw it thrown down, and took it up.

HAWKINS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-103

103. JAMES HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 flat, value 7s.; 1 lock, value 6d., and 36lbs. of butter, value 2l. 8s. the goods of Edward Cross .

SECOND COUNT stating them to belong to James Smith .

JOHN BLACKMORE . I am a porter, at the Green Man and Still, to Mr. Edward Cross. On the 23d of November, about half-past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner, whom I had known before, take up the flat of butter on his shoulder, and walk towards Newcastle-street; when he had got about forty or fifty yards I said to him "You have made a grand mistake with that butter - where are you going with it;" he said "To Mr. White's, in Newman-street;" I brought him back and sent for an officer, who took him - there was 38lbs. of butter in it.

JAMES SMITH . I am a cheesemonger . I expected a flat of butter to come to the Green Man and Still - this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who asked me if I wanted a job - I said Yes, and he took me to the place where the flat of butter was - he said if I would take it to Tottenham-court-road he would give me 2s. for it. The witness stopped me - the other man ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-104

104. CONNER HOFFERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 1 shovel, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James Bryan .

WILLIAM NORRIS . I was digging the ground in Edward-street, Manchester-square , about half-past two o'clock on the 3d of December - the prisoner, who was a stranger, came and sat down on a wooden pipe - I turned my head round, and saw him walking off with two shovels, one of which he had brought with him; I followed and asked him what he was going to do with the shovel - he said he thought it was his own; I took it from under his arm, and found it belonged to Bryan.

JAMES BRYAN . I was at work there. I had never seen the prisoner, and he had no right to my shovel. I had put it down while I was wheeling stones.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I came to look for a job - I had my own shovel under my arm - I thought this was mine.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-105

105. EDWARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 saw, value 4s., the goods of John Edwards ; 1 saw, value 3s.; the goods of Thomas Barker ; 1 square, value 2s., the goods of John Cooper , and 1 square, value 1s. , the goods of John Newman .

JAMES ABEL . I live in Phoenix-street, Hackney-road, and am a wheelwright. On the 7th of November I was walking in the road, and met the prisoner, (who was a stranger,) walking with another lad; he had a saw buttoned in his coat; I passed him, and then came back and asked him what saw that was; he said "Which?" and I

saw there were two of them; he said were they mine. I then took him to an officer. As we were going along two squares were picked up behind us, but I did not see them fall from the prisoner.

THOMAS GEORGE . I am an officer. While I was at the Salmon and Ball public house, the prisoner was brought in by Abel. I took him to Worship-street - I have two saws and two squares.

JOHN EDWARDS. I am a carpenter . I was at work at a house at Hackney - I went to dinner, and on my return I missed my saw.

THOMAS BARKER. I am a carpenter . I was at work at an adjoining house - I had left my saw there, and when I returned it was gone.

JOHN COOPER. I am a carpenter . I was at work in Durham-street; this square is mine - it was taken from the buildings.

JOHN NEWMAN. I am a carpenter . I lost this square from a building in Durham-street - I know nothing of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About half past nine o'clock on the morning of the 7th of November, I went up Church-row to Cambridge-heath turnpike - a man came up to me with some tools, and asked me to carry the two saws as far as Shoreditch; he gave them to me, and I went on - the first witness caught hold of me, and asked where I had boned the two saws; I said "They don't belong to you, nor to me;" as he was not the man who gave them to me. I had no other person with me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-106

106. JEREMIAH CONNEL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 14 plates, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Page .

HENRY ASHCROFT . I live in Lower Ormond-street, St. George's in the East, and am a cooper. On the 26th of November I was going to a tailor's, and saw the prisoner and a lad, less than him, stop at a baker's shop - I watched, and followed them down Bluegate-fields, and when they came to Mr. Page's shop in Ratcliff-highway, the prisoner took a pile of plates, which were standing by the door-post; I collared him as he was giving them to his companion; I said "I have got you young man - it won't do;" I kept him till the officer came - the other got away.

WILLIAM PAGE . I am the son of Edward Page. I was busy on this Saturday evening, and heard a scuffle - Ashcroft told me he had got a thief.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am the officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I searched him - he said it was not him who took them - it was the other boy.

WILLIAM CHESHIRE . I had headborough. I was sent for, and took the prisoner in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-107

107. JOHN JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 3 live tame fowls, price 6s. , the property of Joseph Astey .

MARTHA ASTEY . I am the wife of Joseph Astey - we live in Farnworth-street , and keep fowls. On the 5th of November I missed three fowls, which I had seen safe at four o'clock the afternoon before - they roosted in a little shed at the back of our house - the door appeared to have been lifted off the hinges, as the lock was not loose. I saw them again at the watch-house, and knew them to be mine- one of them was dead, and two were alive - I have no doubt they were mine - I had had them about six months.

JOHN SUTTON . I am superintendant of the watch. I met the prisoner at four o'clock on the morning of the 5th of November, with a bundle - I took him to the watchhouse, and saw the tail of a fowl sticking from under his coat - I then found another live fowl in his hat, and a dead fowl in the bag - this was about 100 yards from Mr. Astey's.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-108

108. EDWARD O'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 28lbs. of lead, value 4s., the goods of James Lavers , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

JAMES BROWN . I am a Bow-street patrol. I met the prisoner in Wood's-place, Chequer-alley, on the 28th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening - Swift and Medlicot were with me; the prisoner had a bundle of leaden pipe - I asked where he got it, and he said, at last, that he got it from Mr. Lavers' premises, and was taking it to his own house, to take care of for his master, Mr. Lavers, of Old-street-road, a bricklayer and palsterer; as it was tied up in an apron, and wrapped up in his jacket, we took him to Mr. Lavers, who said he had no knowledge of the lead; I went the next day with Medlicot to fit the lead to an old house in Chequer-square, used by Mr. Lavers for making up his mortar.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not he going to Mr. Lavers' shed? A. Yes; it was an old house of Mr. Lavers, where, as I have since heard, the prisoner lives.

WILLIAM SWIFT . I was with Brown when the prisoner said he had worked seven or eight years for his master, and it would be his ruin; he offered me ten shillings to let him go; I found a knife and a few half-pence on him.

JAMES LAVERS . I am a plasterer. The prisoner has been several years in my employ - he had the care of some empty houses in Chequer-alley, Bunhill-row - he lives in one, and lets the others when empty - they are all my houses; I have a shed, opposite his house, for my materials. I believe this to be my property, but I did not see it fitted. I went to the house and found the lead was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner been in your employ? A. About six years. I would readily employ him again.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the lead cut in the cellar, and was taking it to the shed to take care of - I never said I would give 10s. to make it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-109

109. JOHN PUNTER and WILLIAM WEBB were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 shovel, value 2s. , the goods of John M'Guire .

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. On the 21st of November I was at my house, in Brunswick-parade , and saw the two prisoners cross opposite to my door - I followed,

and saw them go into an empty house, which is a thoroughfare; they came out again, and Punter had the shovel. I followed, and took hold of them both; they got from me - Punter was taken by a young man, whom I called to, and Webb was taken afterwards.

JOHN M'GUIRE. I am a labourer - this shovel is mine; I had left it in a house in Payne-street, where I was working, at twelve o'clock. I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM DENNIS . On Monday, the 21st of November, as I was going back to my work, I met a young lad, who told me he saw a man stealing my tools, and he pointed out the place where he was concealed - I went and took him - it was Webb.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PUNTER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-110

110. WILLIAM ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 2 pairs of shoes, value 9s. , the goods of Francis Colwell .

WILLIAM CARDIFF . I am errand-boy to Mr. Francis Colwell. who lives in Bosher's-court, Tottenham-court-road . I was in his shop on the 9th of November, about half-past ten o'clock, and saw the prisoner come and take the shoes from the corner of the shop - he put them under his jacket, and ran away. I pursued, crying Stop thief! he ran into Great Russell-street, where a man tried to stop him, but he got away, and dropped them; another man stopped him - I had not lost sight of him.

WILLIAM VAUGHAN . I am the officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and joined in the pursuit. I saw the shoes picked up, and took the prisoner, who had been stopped by another person.

FRANCIS COLWELL. I keep this shop . I was up stairs when the shoes were taken, but I saw the prisoner brought back.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-111

111. ANDREW REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 jacket, value 30s.; 1 waistcoat, value 9s., and 1 knife, value 1s. , the goods of John Vickerman .

JAMES TIMMS . I am a Thames Police officer. I stopped the prisoner on Sunday, the 4th of December, coming out of the West India Export dock , about half-past twelve o'clock, with this bundle; I asked how he became possessed of it; he said he had been sent to get the bundle from a boy, who asked him if he came from William, and then gave it him.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am a sailor boy. I was on board the Thames, which was laying on the North side of the West India docks; my master gave me this jacket and waistcoat to take care of - I put them into my hammock, and put the clothes over them. I missed them on Sunday night, when I came on board. I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN VICKERMAN. I am chief mate of the Thames. I gave these things to Young, to take care of. The prisoner was a stranger, and had no right on board the ship.

Prisoner's Defence. I was eight weeks in the Hospital, and got out on the Saturday night; I had no way of getting my living. I have been but ten weeks in London, and used to go on errands.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18251208-112

112. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 watch, value 20s. , the goods of Daniel Fisher .

ELIZABETH FISHER . I am the wife of Daniel Fisher - we live on Great Saffron-hill . The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 7th of November, and on the 10th I went up stairs, at twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, leaving him in my back parlour, and the watch on the drawers - he called to me, and said, "Mistress, I shall be back at two o'clock, if any one wants me." I came down, and saw him going off the step; I ran into the back parlour as he was going out so suddenly, and missed the watch - I ran up the street, and overtook him in Hat and Tun-yard, in custody of a young man; I asked him for the watch, which he gave me out of his pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say you wanted to pawn the watch for 18s.? A. Yes; I sent for a woman to pawn it for me.

JOSEPH GURRIER . I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was running - it was as much as I could do to stop him. I saw him give Fisher the watch out of his breeches pocket. I took him to Hatton-garden.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of work some time.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-113

113. DAVID SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 whip, value 5s. , the goods of Sir Henry Cook , Knt.

WILLIAM SUMMERFIELD . I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone. I was in Cumberland-mews, Adam-street, West, at two o'clock in the morning of the 24th of November, and saw the prisoner standing under an archway - he came into the mews, and broke open the padlock of a coach-house door, with a stone, but he did not take any thing from there - I pursued him, and took him with a whip, which he had got from some other place. I asked him where he got it - he said he was employed at Mr. Dickens' livery stable-yard, and had brought it from there: he had been out late with a horse and gig.

WILLIAM HARVEY . I am coachman to Sir Henry Cook, Knt., of Charles-street, Berkley-square; this whip is his property - I lost it on the night of the 23d of November; I had been to our coach-house in South Portman-mews , about six o'clock in the evening before. I went about seven o'clock the next morning, and found the lock had been broken. The prisoner is a stranger to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I never broke the lock as the witness says. I found the whip in Portman-square, just before.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-114

114. WILLIAM SHANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 1 coat, value 5s., and 1 handker

chief, value 3s. , the goods of Nathaniel Gooding Clarke , Esq.

DAVID HERRING . I am an officer. On Saturday last I saw the prisoner about half-past two o'clock - I followed him down to the end of Little Newport-street; he had a bundle in a handkerchief; I asked him what he had got- he said a coat which he had bought at Davis's, a Jew's, in Mary-le-bone-lane. I took the bundle, and said, "I suppose there is nothing but a coat" - he said, "No, nothing but the coat, and handkerchief." I looked into the pocket of the coat, and found this silk handkerchief, a pair of gloves, and two letters, directed to Nathaniel Gooding Clarke, Esq.; he then said he found the coat where they were breaking stones, at Westminster-abbey.

HENRY HOWARD . I keep a coffee-house at Westminster. Mr. Clarke calls at my house, and I know this to be his coat, from this small piece of muslin being in it, which he ties round his neck; it was in a chair near the window, which was thrown open, and the coat taken.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I was in the employ of Mr. Nathamel Gooding Clarke. I know this to be his coat and handkerchief - he attended at Westminster that morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards Millbank, to get work, as a plasterer, and picked this coat up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-115

115. PHILIP SAVAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s. , the goods of William Mills and Mary Ann Carter .

WILLIAM MILLS. I live in the Strand , and am a tailor and glover - Mary Ann Carter is my partner. I was sitting in the parlour behind my shop, about six o'clock in the evening of the 1st of November, and heard an alarm - my brother pursued three boys who were running; he took one of them, and I stopped another who was coming back, but the trousers were not found then - they had been hanging up inside my door about five minutes before - they have been found since.

WILLIAM SAMUEL RICHARDSON . I was coming over Waterloo-bridge on the 1st of November - I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner and two other boys running; he threw something over the wall. I took the prisoner, and the prosecutor took another boy.

THOMAS HERRING . I am a night patrol at Somerset House. A man came to me to fetch a pair of trousers, which were thrown over the wall. I went and got the trousers, and gave them to a gentleman, who came to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-116

116. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 2 planks, value 4s. , the goods of William Rhodes .

JOHN THURLEY . I know Mr. William Rhodes - he is a brick-maker . These planks were taken from Haggerston. On Sunday, the 27th of November, I was in the gas-factory, and saw the prisoner go into Mr. Rhodes' premises, and fetch out a plank, which he carried into his own yard, and then into his house, at the back door. I gave information the next morning.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I was present when the premises were searched, and found the planks with Mr. Rhodes' name in full length upon them; they are about fourteen feet long.

NATHANIEL MERRITT . I am foreman to Mr. Rhodes. The planks are his property. The prisoner was occasionally in his employ - he had no right to take them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in distress. - The plank was broken, and laid in the road - I suppose the boys had been playing at see-saw with them. I took it to make a fire.

COURT to JOHN THURLEY . Q. Was this board laying actually within Mr. Rhodes' premises? A. Yes - they are enclosed.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-117

117. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 3lbs. of bacon, value 2s. the goods of Henry Harben , the younger, and Henry Harben , the elder.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 18th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was near Mr. Harbens' shop, opposite to St. Giles church - I saw the prisoner draw a piece of bacon off the counter; he walked three or four yards from the house, and I stopped him with it.

GEORGE SHARPE . I am in the employ of Henry Harben and Henry Harben, junior - they are cheesemongers . I know this property to be theirs.

GUILTY . Aged 10.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-118

118. WILLIAM WALLACE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 set of fire-irons, value 20s.; 1 tea-pot, value 6s.; 1 toasting fork, value 4s.; 1 toast stand, value 3s.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 4s.; 1 funnel, value 2s.; 2 knives, value 4s.; 5 brushes, value 5s.; 2 lamps, value 10s.; 1 candlestick, value 2s., and 1 flat iron and stand, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Beeston Thompson , his master.

GEORGE BEESTON THOMPSON. I live in Oxford-street, and am a furnishing ironmonger . The prisoner was in my employ about twelve months; he was to carry out goods, and clean goods in the show-room. In consequence of suspicion, I got a warrant to search his premises in the beginning of November - the officer Clements, and the prisoner went with me. I had told him I had a warrant to search his premises, which I knew to be in John-street, Fitzroy-square. When we went out, he was about to turn to the left hand instead of the right, and then I found he had left those lodgings, but his box was still there - we went there, and found the box, which was locked - the officer broke it open, and some of the property was in it - we then went to his other lodgings, where we found the remainder of my property.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I went to the house where the trunk was, and then to the other lodging at No. 24, Noel-street, where I found in a box, which he unlocked, these articles.

JAMES GURNEY . I am a pawnbroker, of High-street, Mary-le-bone. I have a tea-pot, and toasting-fork, pawned by the prisoner on the 29th of September.

MORRIS ARIA . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Lon

don-street, Fitzroy-square. I have a set of fire-irons, pawned by the prisoner on the 18th of July.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Several of the things I purchased myself.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-119

119. WILLIAM ROBERT MILWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 56 pairs of boots, value 14l.; 104 pairs of shoes, value 14l.; 4 yards of silk, value 12s., and 1 book, value 4s. , the goods of Samuel Eyland .

SAMUEL EYLAND. I live in Hanway-street, Oxford-street, and am a ladies' shoemaker . The prisoner was in my employ for three years - he was discharged on the 12th of November, for being insolent to one of the other servants. I afterwards received information, and got a warrant; I went with Avis to search his father's house, at Battle-bridge - we found him sitting by the fire, and I said "William, I understand you have robbed me" - he said he had never robbed me in his life. I said, "You have taken a pair of shoes, and other articles." He then said, he had taken a pair of soiled shoes, and looked about the house to find them. I then said, I heard he had taken tools to make shoes - he said he had bought them, but he could not give a strict account where. Avis then found three duplicates for boots and shoes, which were mine. - Avis told him three times that he was at liberty to make any confession he pleased, but he would neither make him any promise or threat - he then said that he would confess, that he had other duplicates, and he went with the officer into a back-room, and brought out of his box ninety-seven or ninety-eight duplicates, which he confessed were for my property. We took him to the office - I then went to the pawnbrokers, and got the articles. The prisoner is a cousin of my wife's, and she has a brother living within two doors of me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there any name over the door? A. Yes; the name of Bosley - he was my uncle - I bought the premises of him.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Eyland - what he has stated is quite correct. The Magistrate asked what he had to say, and he said the property was his master's.

JOHN TIGHE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Orange-street, Bloomsbury. I have five pairs of shoes, and a pair of boots, pawned, I believe, by the prisoner - I took in the boots, and four pairs of shoes. I asked the boy what he was - he said he lived at No. 4, Geodge's-street.

EDWARD YOUNG . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots, and three pairs of shoes, part of them were pawned by the prisoner. I asked if they were his own, and he said they were.

GEORGE POILE . I live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, and am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of women's boots, and two pairs of shoes, pawned by the prisoner.

MORRIS ARIA . I live in London-street, Fitzroy-square, and am a pawbroker. I have six pairs of shoes, pawned by the prisoner. I asked, if they were his own; he said Yes. I have put O.P., on the ticket - he came four times. I took in the last two pairs, and happened to stand by when he brought the others.

THOMAS BAILEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have four pairs of boots, and four pairs of shoes pawned, I believe, by the prisoner - they are all new.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Nine witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-120

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

120. MARY CUMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October ; 36 yards of ribbon, value 1l. 13s. , the goods of James Shoolbred and Gregory Cook .

WILLIAM WYBROW . I am an apprentice to James Shoolbred and Gregory Cook, who are haberdashers , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 15th of October, about two o'clock, the prisoner came and bought three yards of ribbon, at 8d. per yard, and while I was shewing her some silk I saw her hand suddenly move from the counter, and put into her pocket - I suspected she had got some ribbon - I went from behind the counter, to tell Mr. Cook of it - he sent my fellow apprentice, Ryan, after her, as she had left the shop - he brought her back in about five minutes, and she was taken up stairs, and in about five minutes I was called up stairs, when she said I had given her these two half-pieces of ribbon to shew to her sister, as patterns, but I had not given her any, and I denied having done so; I saw two half-pieces of ribbon, containing eighteen yards each, in Powell's hands.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever seen her there before? A. Yes, five or six times; she had dealt with me, but I had never given her any ribbon as patterns, nor had any of my fellow apprentices.

GREGORY COOK . I am in partnership with James Shoolbred. On the 15th of October, Wybrow came to me, and said he suspected the prisoner had taken something; she was gone out, and I sent Ryan to bring her back; I took her up stairs, into a private room, and told her I suspected she had got something which did not belong to her - I opened her cloak and she produced these two half-pieces of ribbon - they were then in her hand - I do not know where she got them from - they have my private mark on them; she then said the boy who had served her had given her permission to take them to shew her sister as a sample; I knew it to be false, as it is never allowed; I sent for the lad - he denied it. I sent her to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you no other rolls of the same pattern in your stock? A. No; I had never sold any of this pattern, but others are made of this pattern. The lad is not here who went after her. The prisoner insisted, before the lad, that he had given her ribbon to shew her sister. She came back very readily to the shop.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I am the officer. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought down.

WILLIAM WYBROW re-examined. Q. Had you ribbons of this pattern? A. Yes, I had sold none of them. The prisoner had left the shop about fives minutes when the lad was sent after her.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man entrusted me

with them, and I gave them to the gentleman directly. I came back before I went up stairs.

COURT to MR. COOK. Q. Did she shew them to you before you went up stairs? A. No.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-121

121. JOSEPH DUMBERLY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 jacket, value 5s. , the goods of John Gilligan .

JOHN GILLIGAN. On the 5th of November, between two and three o'clock, I was filling gravel on the south side of the West India Dock Company's yard ; the prisoner came in the yard, & while I was busy he walked off with my jacket - I saw it in his possession in about two minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. What distance was he from you? A. About fifty yards. I suppose he walked slowly for fear he should be taken notice of.

DENNIS O'KEEFE . I am a watchman at the West India Docks. I stopped the prisoner with this jacket, between forty and fifty yards from where Gilligan was; I asked what he wanted with it - he made me no answer.

Cross-examined. Q. How had he got the jacket? A. In a concealed manner, but I could see it plainly.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, one of whom stated he had no objection to employ him.

GUILTY. Aged 10.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-122

122. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of John Dovey .

JOHN DOVEY. I live in Monmouth-street, Soho , and am a boot and shoemaker . On the 22d of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and said he wanted a pair of light shoes- I shewed him a pair, and he said they were too long; I turned round and saw him tying on his shoes; I said"If you will wait I will shew you some more;" he said"I can't stop - I will call again;" he went away; Groom, the officer, came soon after, and asked if he had bought any thing of me.

JOHN GROOM . I saw the prisoner go out of Mr. Dovey's premises - he was concealing a pair of shoes between his shirt and his waistcoat - I took him back to Mr. Dovey, who claimed them.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Groom, and saw what he has stated.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-123

123. SAMUEL SAWER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 coat, value 10s. the goods of John Emmerton .

JOHN EMMERTON. I live at Hackney , and am a carpenter . This coat was laying on a chair, in my parlour, in Morning-lane; I saw it there on the 16th of November, and next day I was sent for, and found an officer had got it. I had not seen the prisoner near the house.

ELIZABETH EMMERTON . I am the prosecutor's mother. I saw this coat on the morning of the 17th of November, and missed it at three o'clock in the afternoon; the window was then open - any person could have reached it from the outside.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILILPS. Q. This window looks into the public way? A. Yes.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a constable. I was in Hackney church-yard on the 17th of November, about four o'clock - I met the prisoner with this coat tied up in a handkerchief, under his arm - I called a brother officer - we followed - I stopped him and asked his name; he said Clark, and that he had a coat there belonging to his brother, who lived in the Commercial-road - that he got it from a Mr. Jackson; I said I would go back with him - he then said it was of no use to tell a story, he might as well tell me, he bought it of a man in Hackney-marsh for 5s. - I said"That is not likely;" he then said he got it from the window of a house as he came along - that he had lost his tools, being a carpenter, and he wanted to get others.

ROBERT PESCOD . I was with Goodwin, and heard the prisoner say what he has stated.

Prisoner. The coat was not tied up at all.

GUILTY . - Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-124

124. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 counterpane, value 12s.; 1 blanket, value 1s. and 1 quilt, value 1s., the goods of James Frazer , in a lodging-room .

MARIA FRAZER . I am the wife of James Fraser. I let a furnished room to the prisoner in Albion-street, St. George's , for one week only, as I was going to move then. On the morning of the 11th of November, between seven and eight o'clock, I went up to her room, and found the bed and bolster rolled up - two sheets, a counterpane, blanket, and quilt, were gone - they were a part of the furniture I had let to her with the room - I saw her afterwards at the watch-house, and asked her about the things - she at first said she knew nothing about them, and then she said she was very sorry, and told where she had pawned them. The tickets were given to the watch-house-keeper.

JAMES COLE . I am the watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was given into my custody on the 11th of November - Mrs. Frazer told me she had robbed her that morning, but she denied it, and then said she had pawned the things - the sheets at Mr. Cording's, in Ratcliff-highway, and the others at Mr. Smallie's - I went and found them there.

JOHN LAWSON . I am shopman to Mr. Smallie, a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, a counterpane, and a quilt, which were pawned on the 11th of November, but not by the prisoner.

BENJAMIN BLABY . I have two sheets which were pawn - at Mr. Cording's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor keeps a house of ill fame. I was coming home - I was taken in by another girl, but I did not take the things.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-125

125. JOHN TYLER and MARK LYONS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Burden , from his person .

JOHN BURDEN. On the evening of the 27th of November, I was walking in Holborn, near Middle-row - Waddington, the officer, came and asked me if I had not had my pocket picked; I felt and missed my handkerchief, which I had safe in Fleet-market - he said if I would go back I should get it - it was found, I believe, in a passage, but I did not see it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not go into a public-house where you saw Tyler? A. Yes; he was standing there with a handkerchief in his hand; I examined it, and it turned out to be his own. The officer searched him in my presence, and no handkerchief of mine was found on him.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. I was in Holborn, and saw the two prisoners cross from the City bounds to go up Holborn. I saw Mr. Burden with Lyons close to him, and Tyler close behind him - Lyons put his hand into Mr. Burden's pocket - he then turned round and said something to Tyler; I then saw Tyler's hand pass towards him - he crossed into the road, and Lyons ran away; I told Burden his pocket had been picked, and desired Keys, who was with me, to follow Tyler - I took Mr. Burden back to the public-house, where Tyler was; he had a handkerchief in his hand, which I thought was the prosecutor's, but it was not - Keys then searched Tyler, but found nothing; I then found this handkerchief in the passage, close by where I had seen Keys push Tyler in.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Tyler with a handkerchief in his hand? A. Yes, both in the street, and in the house, but it was his own - it was a yellow handkerchief, not unlike this.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a constable. I was in Holborn, and saw Lyons close to the prosecutor, and Tyler behind him - Lyons stopped and said something to Tyler, and then put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket - he kept it there about ten paces, and then took the handkerchief out and gave it to Tyler; I saw Tyler folding it up in his hand; I took him into a public-house and found a yellow handkerchief in his hat, but not this. Waddington found this in the passage, about five minutes after he had taken it.

Cross-examined. Q. When you pushed him into the public-house had he any handkerchief in his hand? A. No, nor did I see any handkerchief about him; I pushed him into the parlour, and did not let him go at all. Lyons gave him one, but I do not know what he did with it - he had it in his hand doubling it up - he had no handkerchief in his hand when he got to the public-house.

COURT. Q. Did you take off his hat in the public-house? A. Yes, and I found a handkerchief there - I had it in my hand when Waddington and the prosecutor came in.

COURT to WADDINGTON. Q. Had you seen the other handkerchief pass from Tyler to Keys? A. No, I only saw it in one of their hands - there were three women in the passage.

TYLER'S Defence. I went to my master's to see if I should come to work for him; I came down Middle-row, and crossed the way to look for a young man I knew - Keys passed me, then turned back, and saw my handkerchief in my hand; he said "This is it - you will do - come in here;" he took me into a public-house, and I was searched, but nothing found; the other officer then said"The little one has bolted with it, for he has not got it;" then Waddington went out, and said he found this handkerchief behind the street door.

TYLER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LYONS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-126

126. WILLIAM JONES and HENRY DRICEMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Robert Monge , from his person .

ROBERT MONGE. I was in Bow-street, Covent-garden , about eleven o'clock in the evening of the 17th of November - I was going home to Hart-street, when I was told that I had had my pocket picked; I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I saw it in about a quarter of an hour, at the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JESSEE PHILLIPS . I saw the two prisoners following this gentleman under the Piazzas - I saw something passing between them; I went after the prosecutor into Hart-street - he gave me his direction. I then went after the prisoners to the Theatre, and gave charge of one of them to a watchman; I took the other myself; Driceman had the handkerchief round his neck - he at first said he had had it three months, and then that he had bought it that evening.

JOHN WOODWARD . I took the prisoners in charge, and the property was given up to me.

JONES' Defence. I know nothing of this young man. I had been to the playhouse, and was talking to a coachman when the witness, Phillips, took me and this young man, who was speaking to me about the play.

DRICEMAN'S Defence. As I was coming out of the playhouse I met a young man, who asked if I would buy a handkerchief, which I did, for 4s. I put it round my neck, and had not had it on five minutes before the witness came and took me. I asked if he was an officer - he took out a staff, and said he would knock me down.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

DRICEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-127

127. JOHN BYRNE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of George Monkland , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-128

128. ISAAC WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a plough, value 5s., the goods of Walter Haynes ; also for stealing on the 7th of November , a plough plane, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Marsden .

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-129

129. ISAAC WEBB was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 saw, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Jones .

SAMUEL JONES. I am a carpenter . I missed this saw on the 7th of November, from a shop in Gray's Inn-road , and found it at the pawnbroker's on the Thursday following.

JOHN BLAKE . I am a constable. I had information, and apprehended the prisoner.

GEORGE SMITH. I am a pawnbroker. These two saws were pawned at my house, by the prisoner - he came again afterwards, and got some more money on them.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Can you, upon your oath, assert that this was the boy who brought them first? A. Yes. I was in the shop, but did not take them in; he was in the shop five or ten minutes. I have not said, to my recollection, that I was not sure whether he was the boy who brought them, but he was the boy who came to get more money for them.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I received the prisoner in charge - he said, as he went to the watch-house, that he had stolen all the articles mentioned in the four indictments - the two saws at one time, and the two ploughs at another time.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you say it would be better for him to tell the truth? A. No. The Magistrate did not reprimand me for making him any promise.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to mercy on account of his youth.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18251208-130

130. WILLIAM STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 live tame pigeon, price 5s. , the property of John Shaw .

JOHN SHAW. I live in High-street, St. Giles , and deal in birds . I had a live tame pigeon in a basket at my window, on the evening of the 23d of November, about seven o'clock; I went up stairs, and was called down - the two officers had brought the prisoner and the pigeon into my shop. The prisoner said he would satisfy me for it if I would not do any thing to him.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was with Roberts in High-street, St. Giles's. I saw the prisoner and another young man pass Shaw's shop several times; the prisoner stood against the door; I crossed over, and saw the prisoner open the top of a basket, and take out something white. - I took him, and he threw the pigeon into the road.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Bertraun - what he has stated is correct.

Prisoner. The officer asked if it was me or the other young man who took it.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN. I did not.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character - one of whom engaged to take him into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18251208-131

131. THOMAS RONTO was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 3 silver spoons, value 15s., and 1 salt holder, value 5s. , the goods of James Thomas .

ROBERT SHIRWELL . I am principal waiter at the Garrick's Head Tavern, Bow-street , kept by Mr. James Thomas. I had missed a salt-seller and spoon. On the 4th of November, the prisoner came and ordered some steaks for supper, which were got for him, and immediately after he was gone, I missed a salt-seller and a spoon, similar to those which had been set before him at supper. I have not found them. On the 5th he came again - he ordered a rump steak for supper, and I laid before him four table spoons, two salt-sellers, two salt spoons, and knives and forks. While I was gone to cut the bread, one of the salt-sellers was missing. I then went into the kitchen to get the steak, and when I took it to him, I missed two table spoons. I came out and mentioned it to Mr. Thomas. Morris, the officer, was sent for; he went in and told the prisoner he wanted him - the prisoner said"You are mistaken, you don't want me" - he said he did; the prisoner then got up, and the plate was found concealed behind him; he said he had been out, but I said he had not - he was then taken in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had not some things been missed before? A. Yes; he could not have gone out without my seeing him - no part of the property was concealed about his person - he did not seem intoxicated - no other person had gone into that box.

THOMAS MORRIS . I was sent for, and found the prisoner there. I told him I wanted him, and he said "You are mistaken in the person." I said "No, I am not, you must come;" he got up, and I saw the property on the seat. I took him to the watch-house - he made no resistance.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. This being the first time I have been placed in an unfortunate situation, blasting my character, I am in want of words to express. I was up to this evening employed by my brother; I went to the theatre, and to the tavern, but there were three hats on the table, and I am totally innocent of the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-132

132. WILLIAM CROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Elizabeth Field .

ELIZABETH FIELD. I am a widow , and keep a secondhand clothes shop in Monmouth-street . Reardon brought the prisoner to my shop on the 4th of November, about half-past five o'clock in the evening - he had no coat on, and was rather meanly dressed; he requested to be allowed to put his coat on; Reardon said I had lost a coat, which he had got under his arm. I looked at the side of my door, and missed a black coat, which I had seen safe at five o'clock - I looked at the sleeves and collar, and know it.(Property produced and sworn to).

DANIEL REARDON . On the 4th of November, I saw the prisoner in company with two others; they went to this shop, and one of the others put his hand inside the door, and took the coat, which he handed to the prisoner; he took it into Nag's Head-court, and was folding it up. I ran over and took hold of him, and rushed forward and took his companion; they both struck and kicked me, and the prisoner's companion got away. I took the prisoner and the coat back to the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see this young man do anything about the shop himself? A. No; he went by two or three times. I did not tell him I would bellows him; the boy who took the coat got away by striking me.

PHILIP RILEY . I was near the place, and Reardon called me to take the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-133

133. ROBERT BAXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 basket, value 2s. , the goods of John Elam .

JOHN ELAM. I live in St. John-street, St. Sepulchre's . On the 12th of November, this basket was safe on a nail in my cellar about twelve or one o'clock; I went out, and did not return till night, when my lad told me it was gone.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner in company with two little boys. I passed on about ten yards, when I saw him take this basket - he crossed the street and ran away. I pursued, and took him with it in his hand.

Prisoner. I picked it up at the cellar head.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18251208-134

134. JAMES ALCOCK and THOMAS GARRAQUEZ , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Skurray , from his person .

THOMAS SKURRAY . On the morning of the 9th of November, I was in Holborn , going towards the City; the officer asked me if I had lost my handkerchief - I felt in my pocket, and missed it - it was safe two minutes before. I saw it again in a day or two.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I was in Holborn, and saw Skurray, and the two prisoners following him. Garraquez took the handkerchief, and gave it to Alcock. I got the prosecutor's address, and then crossed over and took Alcock in Hatton-garden - they were taken to the office. I had seen them following Mr. Skurrey about one hundred yards.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Bertraun, and saw Garraquez take the handkerchief, which he gave to Alcock. I took Garraquez - I am certain of their persons.

ALCOCK'S Defence. I came from my father's house up Gray's Inn-lane, and I saw my fellow prisoner, and two or three more - the handkerchief was thrown against me. I took it up, and asked who it belonged to - they did not own it, and I crossed over, when Bertraun came and took me. I said I had picked it up.

ALCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

GARRAQUEZ - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251208-135

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

135. RICHARD HARTFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 8s. , the goods of James Hulme .

JAMES HULME. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Museum-street, Bloomsbury . On the 5th of November, I was in my shop, and heard a piece of string break - I looked through the window, and saw the prisoner with a pair of trousers folding up under his arm - I followed him - he dropped them; a person picked them up - and I took him in Holborn. I did not see him drop them. I saw him distinctly - there was not any other person near him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-136

136. FRANCIS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 5 iron bolts, value 2s. 6d.; 5 brass knobs, value 6d.; 11 screws, value 3d., and 1 pair of scissars, value 9d. , the goods of James Dobson , his master; and ANN STANTON was indicted for feloniously receiving four of the said bolts, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES DOBSON. I am a paper-stainer and builder - I live in the Strand . The prisoner Jones was in my employ for three weeks - there were some bolts and screws in separate parcels locked up by themselves, in a room over the factory. I went with Cousins. the officer, to Jones' father's lodgings, in Cooper's-place - we found these articles there. I then went to Stanton's shop, and found some others - they are all mine. Those found at her shop were of little value.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I went to Jones' father's lodgings, on the 25th of November - we found these articles in the apartment - these ornaments had been fixed on a little pair of drawers. I then went to Stanton's shop, and found those other things - she said she had bought them nine months ago. Mr. Dobson said, his boy had robbed him to a considerable amount, and she had the whole of it - she said she had had none of it, and these things she had bought three weeks ago.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What shop does she keep? A. It is written over it, "Dealer in Marine Stores," but no name is up. The boy was taken by Mr. Dobson's man, and he came to inform me of it; but the watch-house-keeper said he was not justified in keeping him till I got to the watch-house. I asked him, why he did not return to his master's; he said he was afraid. I said, "I suppose you have done wrong," - he said he had. I told him I was an officer, and not to say any thing that would injure him - he then said, he had carried a pair of hinges to Mrs. Stanton's at first, and she gave him 2d. for them, and told him to bring any thing else, and she would give him a good price - that he had taken all the things there which he took from Mr. Dobson's, and she had given him 4d. the night before, and told him to go to Whitechapel and keep there; and if he was taken, not to tell where he sold them. I showed him these four bolts, on the Monday morning, at the office, and he said he sold them to Stanton.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this woman married? A. A man came to the office and asked for her - she was not present at this conversation.

CHARLES STEVENSON . My father lives in King's-street, Soho - he is a saddle-tree-maker. Mrs. Stanton keeps her shop in the same house. I saw Jones one day in November at her shop - there was a man in the shop, and Mrs. Stanton was serving him - he waited till the man came out. I went on, and did not stop - he had a paper cap full of brass bolts and nails.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONES. - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

STANTON. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-137

137. JOHN DOWNS was indicted for stealing; on the 3d of December , 30lbs. weight of brass, value 24s. , the goods of Edward May and Aaron Morritt , his masters.

JOHN OSBORN . I live with Mr. Edward May and Aaron Morritt. The prisoner was their porter - he was not authorised to sell any articles - these articles are their property - they are made of brass and gilded.

Prisoner. Q. How longbefore my apprehension is it since you saw that brass figure? A. A long time - perhaps two years; it was in a cellar - there is no private mark on it, but I can swear to it. I cannot swear there is not such a thing to be had in the trade. I do not pretend to swear to the other part of the property.

RICHARD PITT . I live with my father in Brownlow-street, Long-acre - he deals in metal. I saw the prisoner at our shop last Saturday - he brought 40lbs. weight of old metal - there was nobody at home but me - he offered it for sale, we had bought some metal of him a fortnight before, and having received some information, I stopped him. He gave no account of the property, but got away, and ran down the street - a neighbour stopped him about one hundred yards off. He had been in the habit of coming for about two months.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time of the fire in Mortimer-street, there were a great many things brought out of the kitchen, and I had a great many things given to me. I sold them at Pitt's-place - it is three months since, - Many servants have things given to them which are not worth repairing, and I have sold them for them.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-138

138. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of the Rev. Henry Daniels , clerk , from his person .

The prisoner being deaf and dumb the evidence was communicated to him by signs by his brother.

REV. HENRY DANIELS. On the 12th of November, I was looking at a shop window, in Broad-street, St. Giles' - I felt something press on my back, and on turning round, I saw the prisoner running away through a crowd of twelve or fourteen people. I put my hand to my side pocket, and missed this handkerchief, which had been safe about three minutes before - the prisoner threw it down in the street - I took it up and followed him; the officer came up in Church-lane - the prisoner got into an archway, and shut the door. I am quite certain he is the person - I never lost sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PHILIP RILEY . I am a constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! - and saw the prisoner running up George-street, with this handkerchief in his hand - he turned round, and threw it away. Mr. Daniels picked it up, and I took the prisoner at a public-house - he cleans boots and shoes on Sunday mornings. I believe he has been at the office before.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18251208-139

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

139. CRIGHTON BOYD , HENRY WILLIAM SPEARS , and MARY HOPKINS , were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 1 boy's dress, value 5s., and 1 waistcoat, value 5s. , the goods of John Savage .

CATHERINE SAVAGE . I am the wife of John Savage, a tailor - we live in Marsham-street, Westminster . On the 2d of December, about a quarter past one o'clock, the two boys at the bar came to my house, and Boyd asked me if I had a waistcoat that would fit him him - I thought they looked suspicious, and was afraid to venture it with them; Spears said, "Not a waistcoat to fit me?" I then shewed them an old one - they said it would not do; they went away, and said they would call between five and six o'clock - they looked in at the window, which attracted my attention, and I looked after them; they went towards Peter-street. In the evening, about five o'clock, Hopkins came alone, and asked for some pieces; I did not like to serve her, and told her it was a bad time to choose them; while she was talking I heard a drag at the window - some of the things fell into the shop, and some out. I ran round the counter, and saw Spears' head, but before I got out he and another boy with him had ran off; I know Spears was one. I did not see Boyd, but by the size I think it was him. I lost a man's waistcoat and a boy's dress, which were buttoned together - I had seen them safe just before. I have not got either of them again. The girl run off, suddenly while I was stooping to pick up the things, without having bought any thing; she went the same way as the boys. When my husband came home I described their persons to him, several times that evening.

JOHN SAVAGE. My wife described the prisoners to me. I met them on the morning of the 3d of December, in Dean-street, Westminster, about ten minutes past seven o'clock; I knew them by her description; I asked a man who was sweeping a door where there was a constable; I had them all taken, and told the constable to bring them to my wife to see if she could identify them. Two of them got away, but Boyd was kept, and my wife said she could swear to him.

THOMAS BRAY. I am a Bow-street-patrol. I took the three prisoners in Wright's-passage, Tothill-street. I was taking them to Savage's house; I had one of the boys in one hand, and the other in the other - when I got near Marsham-street Spears said if I did not let him go he would run a knife through me; Boyd then began to kick and fight, and got away; I let Spears go, and secured Boyd; I took him to Mrs. Savage, who said she could swear he was one.

RICHARD COLEMAN . Last Saturday morning Bray told me that Spears had got from him; I made some inquiries, and took him at his mother's, smoking his pipe. I found on him a knife and some trifling articles.

BOYD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

SPEARS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

HOPKINS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-140

140. MICHAEL BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Joseph Adams .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am an officer. I met the prisoner running up Regent-street, towards Piccadilly, about six o'clock in the evening of the 7th of December, with a box coat; I asked how he came by it - he said he found it at the corner of Hemmings-row; I took him to Jermyn-

street, and gave him to Lack. Adams claimed it in about two minutes.

JOSEPH ADAMS. I drive a glass-coach - I was ordered to Jermyn-street , two doors from Regent-street. I got down, and left my coat on the box; when the gentlemen were gone in, the servant left the door open, and I saw there were some hats and coats in the passage, and while I stood to watch the door my coat was taken from my box - I did not miss it till the officer came and asked if it was mine.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it by the hackney-coach rank, and was going to find an owner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-141

141. JAMES BELLINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of George Gould .

JOHN CRESSWELL . I am servant to Mr. Mason, who keeps the Running Horse, Piccadilly . On the 30th of November, about two o'clock, Mr. George Gould's gig stood there. I saw the prisoner go and take the coat out of the gig - he put it under his left arm, ran down the yard, and out of the gateway; I cried Stop thief! he threw it down at the corner of Dover-street, seeing some persons following him. I returned, and picked it up. I am certain of his person.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you when I came out of the yard? A. I was on the box, and got down as fast as I could - you threw the coat down before two ladies. I was in the yard when you were brought back.

THOMAS HOLMES . I am a coachman. Between two and three o'clock on the 30th of November I heard the cry of Stop thief! I pursued the prisoner, and overtook him in Harford-street; he said he had done nothing, and I had no business to detain him. I took him back to the yard.

THOMAS ROSAMOND . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running; Holmes knocked him down; I assisted in securing him.

CHARLES MASON . I keep the Running Horse. I know Mr. George Gould - I should have been responsible for this coat if it had not been found.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-142

142. ANN BRADWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 lock, value 10s.; 2 keys, value 4s.; 1 basket, value 3d., and 1 umbrella, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Goodliff .

ROBERT GOODLIFF. I am a carpenter . I was at Mr. Wing's eating-house, in Broad-street, Bloomsbury , with three other persons, on the 19th of November - I had a basket, with a brass lock and two keys in it, and an umbrella with me; I staid there a quarter of an hour, and left about eleven o'clock at night; I was not tipsy, but forgot to take my umbrella and basket - I went for them the next morning, but they were gone. I have not seen them since.

HENRY WING . My uncle keeps this eating-house. I remember Goodliff coming to the house - I did not see him bring the umbrella and basket there, but I saw him in the box; the prisoner and a man who was with her came in just as the witness was going out, and were waiting to take their seat in the box when he left; they staid about five minutes to eat their soup; I saw the prisoner take up the basket and umbrella, and say, "Whose is this?" While they were contending about whether the soup was paid for, she went out. I asked my uncle if those articles had belonged to her - he said, No, they belonged to the old gentleman who went out before. The prosecutor came the next morning about it; the officer came afterwards - I described the prisoner, and she was taken.

PHILIP RILEY . I took up the prisoner in consequence of some information, on Monday morning.

JURY to HENRY WING . Q. Did you see her take the basket-out? A. Yes, I did.

Prisoner. I did not take them.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-143

143. JAMES CLISS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 1 jacket, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of Andrew Stark .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-144

144. PETER FRASER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , two moulding planes, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Chandler .

THOMAS CHANDLER. I live in Lower Barnard-street. On the 3d of November I was at work at Mr. Dodson's foundery, Lower Shadwell , and missed two moulding planes from a cupboard. I went to Mr. Austin, the pawnbroker, who produced some tools, which much resembled mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Was there not a man named Brooks in your master's service, and was not he a doubtful character? A. Yes - he was seen in my shop at an unseasonable time, and was discharged. I cannot swear to these; the prisoner had been two or three months in my master's service.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I live at No. 34, High-street, Shadwell. In consequence of some information from the last witness I detained the prisoner, when he came on the 5th of November, to offer the planes to pawn - he said they were given to him by his brother; he was quite a stranger to me. I detained him, and sent for an officer.

JOHN LEATHERDALE . I am the headborough. I was sent for, and took the prisoner. I have had the property ever since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-145

145. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 26 yards of stuff, value 29s. , the goods of William Davies .

WILLIAM DAVIES. I live in Chiswell-street , and am a linen-draper . On the 30th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going into my shop, and met the prisoner going out; I asked her whether she was served - she said she wanted some calico; I saw the stuff hanging down under her shawl; I told her to come back to the counter, and she should be served; she had a basket in her hand. I was called to another part of the shop to answer a question; I returned, and she was gone. I

ran after her; she appeared confused; I said, "You are not served, come back, and you shall be served." I called Parry to serve her, and I stood behind her; when she put her hand into her pocket for her money, I saw the end of the stuff sticking out; a part of it was under her shawl. - I sent for an officer, and gave her into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you observe whether she was intoxicated? A. I did not notice - she seemed confused, and called for her sister. I did not notice whether she appeared wandering in her mind. I understand she has borne a good character. She appeared to put questions and answers in a rational way.

JOHN PARRY . I am the shopman. I was called to serve the prisoner with some calico; I showed her a piece at 61/2d.; she asked me to cut off two yards, lay it upon the shelf, and she would call in ten minutes for it; I took hold of her, and found the stuff - I said, "It is ours" - she said she did not know how it came there. It had been shown to a customer that evening. She did not appear to me to be confused at all.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

ANN RODEN . I live at the Castle Tavern, King-street, Cheapside - I am cook there. I have known the prisoner two years - she has had a hurt on her head, and was quite deranged on Wednesday week, when she called on me. - I have seen her for two or three days together, quite deranged, in consequence of being robbed and beaten dreadfully by a man, who was tried here for it. When she called on me that morning, she said her husband was dying, and she did not know whether she should make away with herself.

Another witness gave the prisoner an excellent character, and engaged to take her under her care.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-146

146. JOSHUA MILES and CHARLES CARTER were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 bushel of oats, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Booth Smith .

RICHARD BOOTH SMITH. I live at Edmonton , and am a farmer . The prisoners were in my employ - Miles was a carter , and Carter was thrasher and binder . On the 8th of December I had some oats which had been threshed, and were in bulk, in an old barn, where Carter was threshing. I sent Miles with a load of straw - this barn was in his way - I followed him and saw him stop at the barn - he had no business there, and I suspected he was taking some oats. As I got up to the cart he came out with a quantity of oats in a sack, and his nose bag; he could not see me till he came out of the barn - I told him how wrong it was- that I had caught him at last, and had long suspected him; he begged my pardon; I told him to go home - I got another man to go on with the load; Carter was in the barn, and I do not suppose he heard what I said; I then went in and asked Carter about it, and he said Miles was determined to take them - that he had told him not, and he would take them; I then took him before a Magistrate - he was doing his work, and was paid by the bushel.

JURY. Q. Do you permit them to put oats into a sack or a nose bag? A. Yes, but not from that barn; I never give my horses oats which are not clean; there had been some measured out for him that day - the corn is measured out for him twice a week, and he takes what he thinks sufficient for the horses.

JOHN FOOT. I am the constable. I took Carter before the Magistrate. I heard him and Miles examined; I saw them sign these depositions (read).

Joshua Miles being asked what he had to say, says 'I took them from the barn for the use of my master's horses.'

Charles Carter being asked how he came to suffer them to be taken, says 'Joshua Miles would take them against my will.'

CARTER's Defence. He came to me for some oats - I told him I was not going to be blamed for it - if master knew it there would be a piece of work - but he took them against my will.

MILES' Defence. I took them for my master's horses.

MILES - GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy .

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

CARTER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-147

147. AARON KATCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , three pecks of oats, value 3s., and two pecks of chaff, value 6d. , the goods of Sir George Alderson , knight , and Thomas Dean Alderson ; and JAMES GILLMAN was indicted for receiving the same, wellknowing it to be stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM CHECK . I am a servant to the prisoner Gillman - he lives in Castle-street, Oxford-market - he is a green-grocer and coal-merchant . On the 29th of October, in the evening, I had been to put my master's horse up and Graves called at the shop; my master was ill in bed at the time; in consequence of what Graves said, I gave him a bag of my master's, which I got out of the shop - I then went back for my jacket, and followed him to Mr. Freeman's stable, in Wells-mews, where Sir George Alderson keeps his horses, and Graves gave me the corn in the same bag which I had given him; it was then about half past seven o'clock in the evening - I did not see the corn but it appeared to be corn - there might be about three pecks; I took it home and put it into master's back kitchen - I saw no more of it - I had no conversation with my master about it. I was examined at Marlborough-street, on the Wednesday following.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your master was ill in bed, and you received something you do not know what, put it into the kitchen, and never spoke to him about it? A. Yes.

EDWARD GRAVES . I am in the employ of Sir George Alderson - he lives in Great Marlborough-street, and keeps his horses in Wells-mews, Wells-street. On the 29th of October the prisoner Katcher, gave some oats and chaff to Check, in a bag, which he brought - they were Sir George Alderson's; it was not me who gave them to him - it was Katcher; I do not know what quantity there was - perhaps one bushel.

MR. GEORGE FREEMAN . I am the prosecutor's nephew. On the night in question I saw Graves go out and return with a sack under his arm; I did not see it taken out - I saw Check go into the stable but did not see him

come away. I afterwards saw him in the street, with the sack on his shoulder.

KATCHER's Defence. Sir George never found any thing wrong of me - I am not guilty.

COURT to CHECK. Q. Who gave you the corn? A. Graves. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-148

148. MICHAEL KAVANOR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 3lbs. of bacon , the goods of Henry Harben , the younger, and Henry Harben , the elder.

PHILIP RILEY . I am street-keeper. On the 24th of November I was in High-street, St. Giles' , about half-past five o'clock in the evening - I saw the prisoner and anothere come up to Messrs. Harben's window - they are cheesemongers , and live in High-street; the other boy attempted to take a piece of bacon, but he failed, and in a few minutes the prisoner went and took it, and ran up Hampshire-hog-yard; I pursued; when he turned and saw me, he dropped it, and I took him back to Mr. Harbens.

GEORGE SHARPE . I am in the employ of Henry Harben and Henry Harben the elder. I remember the officer bringing the prisoner back. I knew the bacon to be my masters. I was down stairs at dinner at the time - it had been laying in the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and a young man came and knocked me down, and the officer came and said "This one will do."

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18251208-149

149. JOHN NEW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 sack of parsley , the goods of James Ponpart .

JAMES PONPART. I live at Fulham . I lost about a sack of parsley, and the prisoner was taken the same morning with a sack of parsley - the parsley had been growing in my garden - it had not been cut off - it had been torn off by the hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-150

150. CHARLOTTE TAYLOR and ANN FOWLER were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 2 pairs of shoes, value 14s. , the goods of William Clewlow .

WILLIAM CLEWLOW. I live in Somers-town , and am a shoemaker . The prisoner came to my shop on the 23d of November, between twelve and one o'clock - I was at a public-house opposite; they looked at the shoes, and then Fowler walked away - Taylor was left at the door. I then saw her put a pair of shoes into her apron, and go after Fowler. I followed, and heard Fowler say "I have got a pair too." I said "They are my shoes," and Taylor gave me a pair out of her apron, and told me the other had got a pair. I sent Patterson after her.

WILLIAM PATTERSON . I am the prosecutor's servant. I saw the two prisoners - I went after Fowler, and took a pair of shoes from under her apron, and brought her back. I knew the property to be his.

TAYLOR - GUILTY. Aged 23.

FOWLER - GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-151

151. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of John Kelly

JOHN KELLY, ESQ. The prisoner lived with me, to attend my horse - he had been with me about two months, and left very abruptly one Sunday morning, and shortly after I missed my own driving coat. I suspected him, and one day passing in the neighbourhood of Mary-le-bone-lane, I remembered that a Mr. Cay there was the person to whom the prisoner referred for a character. I asked him if he had seen him - he said he had; he looked among his stock and found my coat - I believe he was in distress.

ROBERT CAY . I am a stable-keeper, in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square - the prisoner drove for me about four months last year; he came to me three weeks ago to borrow 15s. to get a coat out of pawn - I sent a boy with him to get it - he brought it to me.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I live with the last witness. I went with the prisoner to a Jew's, in Mary-le-bone-lane, who gave the prisoner the ticket - he then took me to get the coat, and I took it to my master.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18251208-152

152. STANLEY DE COURCEY IRELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 6 dozens of knives, value 10l.; 6 dozens of forks, value 10l.; 1 snuffer-stand, value 20s., and 1 cork-screw, value 10s. , the goods of Joseph Danell .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH DANELL. I live in Oxford-street - I am a cutler and silversmith . Application was made to me for the articles stated in the indictment - the officer has the card which was left, at the time the goods were sent to No. 91, Gloucester-place. I have seen the prisoner on the subject of payment, but I have not been paid.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were they sent as a genuine order? A. Yes.

Q. Did you say they were not to be left without the money? A. No; they were entered in my book by my wife.

LOUISA ANN DANELL . I am the prosecutor's wife. Part of these goods were sent; and three dozen of dessert knives and forks, I took afterwards myself, to No. 91, Gloucester-place. I saw a servant - he told me to call the next morning before eleven o'clock, or before six in the evening. I went the next morning - he said his master had been gone out twenty minutes - I was to call in the evening. I went in the evening, and he called the prisoner, who gave me a dozen forks, and said they were sent instead of knives. I told him he should have the knives in the morning - he said there was no hurry for them. I went there two or three days afterwards, and took the knives, which I gave to the servant, who said his master was at dinner. I went again that evening, and saw the prisoner, who said he had my bill, but he was not prepared to pay me, as he had no money in the house, and he must go to his banker in the City to get it, but would call and pay me next day - he did not call, and I went on the following evening - I told him I called for my money; he said "I have nothing to do with the transaction; I do'nt even know you - my name is not Ireland; Mr. Ireland is at

Richmond, but he will be in town on Saturday or Monday, and I will speak to him on the business, and he will call on you." I went and told Mr. Danell, who made some inquiries of the Magistrate. I went to the prisoner's house on the Monday, and saw him; he said Mr. Ireland had not been in town, but if I would take his word till Wednesday, at five o'clock, I might depend upon having the goods or the money. I asked him if he would let me have the goods, or part of them - he said he could not do that. I looked at him very hard, and said "Pray Sir, what is your name" - he said "Ireland."

COURT. Q. Had you seen Mr. Ireland, when the order came to your house? A. No.

Q. Had you said you insisted upon having the money when the goods were left? A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-153

153. SOPHIA SLAUGHTER , ANN SLAUGHTER and WILLIAM GERRARD , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 3 pillows, value 6s.; 1 tea-pot, value 3s.; 1 coat, value 25s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 sheet, value 1s.; 7 yards of silk, value 11s.; 1 pair of hose, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 20s.; 3 yards of calico, value 18d.; 2 blankets, value 6s.; 15 plates, value 2s.; 2 dishes, value 18d.; 2 looking glasses, value 2s. 6d.; 3 wine glasses, value 1s.; 6 mugs, value 18d.; 8 chimney ornaments, value 4s.; 2 basins, value 1s: 2 waiters, value 6d.; 2 prints, value 3d.; 2 spoons, value 6d., and 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Williams .

ROBERT WILLIAMS. I am a labourer . I had lodged at Mr. Gerrard's, in Brighton-street, Grosvenor-square , on the second floor; I left some time ago, one Sunday morning, and staid out for one month. I left all thearticles stated in the indictment, locked in a trunk in my room, and the room door was padlocked. I left the key with Mrs. Gerrard, because my wife would come home in the time. I returned three weeks ago, and found something had been done at my door, but it was fast again; the trunk had been broken open, and all the property taken away; William Gerrard was my landlord's son - he lodged in the room next to mine; his father did not lodge in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you known him long? A. Yes; ten years. He went of his own accord to the Police-office.

MARY POULTER . I live in Holbrook-court. On the 11th of November Ann Slaughter brought me some chimney ornaments, two mugs, a sugar-pot, a spoon, sugar-tongs, a salt-seller, a looking-glass, and a picture - I did not see her again till the Monday morning. when I went to Cromer-street, where she lived; she did not then say anything to me, but Gerrard called the same morning, and told me they were stolen. When she left them she said they belonged to William Gerrard.

JOHN BRIDGES . I am a law-stationer. I carried the articles from Poulter's house to the house of Richard Gerrard, the prisoner's brother, in Little Brook-street, Regent's Park.

MARY WATTS . I live in the City-road. On Tuesday, the 15th of November, I went with Bridges, by the desire of Mrs. Poulter, to Richard Gerrard, to know who the property belonged to. I never saw either of the prisoners.

RICHARD GERRARD . I received part of this property from Mrs. Poulter's, by Bridges - I returned them all the next day - I spoke to my brother on the subject, but I never spoke to either of the women.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you saw your brother, was not your mother with you? A. Yes; she said, "Now, William, tell me all about this, and you shall not be hurt."

MARY PRINGLE , I live at No. 12, Brighton-street. On the 11th of November I saw Ann Slaughter come out of her own lodging, at No. 7, Brighton-street, with two bundles or parcels; she took them away. I saw something like pictures in one bundle, but I only saw the frames. I saw her come out of No. 16 about two days before, with a bundle.

JAMES GARDNER JESSOP . I keep a broker's-shop. I bought some articles on the 12th of November, of a person, who I believe was Ann Slaughter; there were three wine-glasses, a small looking-glass, two or three mugs, and some prints; the prints were sold, and the officer had the rest; she said they belonged to her.

HENRY GEORGE WALLIS . I live in Tottenham-court-road, with Mr. Wadmore, a pawnbroker. On the 10th of November two pillows and a tea-pot were pawned, by the prisoner, Ann Slaughter, I believe.

THOMAS BLACKMORE . I am a pawnbroker. I have two blankets, pawned on the 10th of November; I think, by Sophia Slaughter, but cannot be positive.

GEORGE GRAHAM . I am a pawnbroker. I have a variety of articles, in two parcels, pawned on the 10th of November, by Ann Slaughter, I believe.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I apprehended Gerrard and Sophia Slaughter on the 14th of November, in Cromer-street; I understood they lived together I apprehended Ann Slaughter at No. 17, Brighton-street, next door to the house the property was taken from. - I understand that Ann Slaughter is the mother-in-law of Sophia. The father and mother kept saying it would be better for them to tell what they could. I found three dishes in the room, where the two prisoners were apprehended.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. PHILLIPS to ROBERT WILLIAMS . Q. How many lodgers were there in the house? A. Seven.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-154

154. MARGARET WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 earthenware pan, value 2s.; 1 glue-pot, value 2s.; 1 hammer, value 1s., and a mallet, value 2d. , the goods of Arthur Buckley .

MARY BUCKLEY . I am the wife of Arthur Buckley - we live in Ball-yard, Golden-lane . On the 31st of October I left home, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and did not return till six in the evening - I had left these articles in the top room, which was locked; when I came home they were all removed.

PATRICK BUCKLEY . I am twelve years of age - I know the nature of an oath. On the day my mother was oat, I saw this woman come at six o'clock, just before my mother came home; she went into the second room, coming

down from the top room, with the pan and the other things under her arm. I went and alarmed my father, who was ill in bed; he could not get up: she said if I made a noise she would knock my brains out. I got over the balustrade, and shut the street door, to keep her in - I called to Mrs. Catlin - she got into the cupboard, and was pulled out.

MARY CATLIN . I live next door. I heard an alarm about a quarter before six o'clock - I knew the poor man was ill, and his wife was out. I ran out, and saw the little boy crying in the yard - he said there was a thief in the house; I waited till two young women came, and asked them to go in with me; I called for a light, looked about the room, and saw a hand holding the cupboard door to - I pulled it open, and saw the prisoner; she said she was looking for her husband; I said that was not the place to look for a husband, and pulled her out - she said the man up stairs was her brother; the poor man, upon hearing that, got out of his bed, and came to the top of the stairs; the things then stood on the top of the first floor - she was very resolute, and we could not do any thing with her. The little boy fetched an officer.

JANE ROBERTS . I heard the alarm. I ran down, and went into the house with Catlin - we found the prisoner in the cupboard. I heard the poor man get out of his bed, and say he was not her brother.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. and have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw these things.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-155

155. JOHN JACKSON, alias ISRAEL ISAAC MIELHIEM was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , at St. Martin in the Fields, 1 diamond brooch, value 5l.; 1 diamond locket, value 9l.; 1 pair of gold watch cases, value 7l. 10s.; 1 watch movement, value 7l. 10s.; 1 watch chain, value 3l., and 2 seals, value 2l., the goods of Philip Lawton , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

PHILIP LAWTON. I live at No. 21, Green-street, Leicester-square, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . I am a pawnbroker and silversmith . I sometimes sleep there, but my servants always do. I have known the prisoner sometime, by the name of John Jackson - he has often pawned goods at my shop. I have no partner - all the property is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Was the prisoner a friend of your's? A. No; I never lent him money on his simple I.O.U.

JOSEPH BURGESS . I am in Mr. Lawton's employ - at his house in Green-street. I remember the prisoner coming there on the 7th of March last, and producing duplicates of property to the amount of 34l., which he had previously pledged there; he desired the property to be brought up, and a light, as he had some diamonds to seal; he then produced a small packet of diamonds, which he desired me to look at, and advance the most I could upon them; I looked at them, and agreed to advance 160l. upon them; I then, at his request, having agreed to advance that sum, handed them over to him to seal up, which he did, in my presence, and returned a packet to me, which I supposed to be the one containing the diamonds, as it resembled it in size and composition of paper, and every other respect. I put it into my breast coat pocket, and opened the parcels containing the other pledges; there was a diamond locket, which had been pledged for 9l. - a diamond brooch, for 5l. - a pair of gold watch cases, for 7l. 10s. - a watch movement, for 7l. 10s. - a gold chain, for 3l., and two seals, for 2l.; they had all been pledged on the 4th or 5th of March, and as such, were the property of Mr. Lawton. I cast up the whole amount which, with the interest, was 35l. 2s., and deducted it from the 160l. - I then left the parlour, and fetched him the balance of 124l. in gold and Bank notes, and some silver, which, with the goods, I handed over to the prisoner, for the diamonds, which I supposed I had got. Here is the packet which he deposited with me - I opened it about the first week in June - it contains coloured stones, called rubies and emeralds - the full value of which is 4l. I took out a warrant at Marlborough-street, and he was taken in November. I had no authority from my master to lend money, except upon pledges of an equivalent value.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he took you in? A. Yes. I delivered the money and property, supposing I had an equivalent for it in the diamonds, which I had in my pocket.

COURT. Q. When you delivered these goods to him, to the value of 35l.; you parted with them entirely, thinking you had your master's consent so to do, thinking the diamonds left with you were of sufficient value to cover the value of them, and the cash you advanced? A. Certainly - impressed with the belief that the diamonds shewn to me in the first instance, would cover what I advanced in money, and the pawned goods, I parted with the goods stated in the indictment; and before I parted with them I had received the parcel containing, as I supposed, the diamonds.

Mr. LAW. Q. Had you examined the genuine diamonds? A. Yes, and I might then have detained them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you at that time given any thing for them? A. No, and he might then have put them into his pocket and gone away if he chose.

COURT. Q. You had looked at these diamonds, and believed them to be of genuine value, and given them back to him to seal? A. Yes, from a pre-arrangement made between us, as he said they might go through the hands of a second person, and he changed; I then received the sham diamonds (which I had not an opportunity of seeing without breaking the seal) and then handed to him the pledges, worth 35l. and the money - I had only delivered the genuine diamonds back to him, for the special purpose of being sealed.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. What became of the parcel of false stones? A. It was put into the plate closet, which two persons besides myself have access to - one of them is here. The packet is in the same state as when I received it; it has part of the seal on it now - it was not opened till I opened it in June: it was then in the same state as when I received it - I had enclosed it in another paper, which I sealed with my own hand; it had never been disturbed. - I never lent him money on his I.O.U. I have no share in the business.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you the key of the drawer in your possession? A. Yes, part of the time. All the

time it was there it had the outside paper on it, which was put on and sealed by myself; it had not been disturbed or altered till I opened it myself in June, and the inner paper had this seal on it then; it was exactly the same in every respect, wafer, seal, and all.

JURY. Q. In whose presence was it opened? A. There was no one present.

MORRIS EMANUEL . I am a silversmith and jeweller. I have known the prisoner some years - he is a dealer in jewels. I have entrusted him. I cannot say what character he has borne.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long is it since you had dealings with him? A. It may be twelve months; I know nothing of the character he has borne in the world. I have taken bills of him with his own name on them.

PHILIP LAWTON , JUN. Mr. Burgess is not a partner in the house.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you in the house? A. Yes. I never changed or did anything to this packet of diamonds. Mr. Burgess is my father's managing man.

Prisoner's Defence. I became acquainted with Mr. Lawton at Newmarket horse races, where he used to bet upon horses, and after that he accommodated me with money; I have had as much as 1000l. a-week, and he charged me 15 per cent., and when I have not been there from one to six weeks, he used to meet me at certain places, and ask me why I did not come, as he was anxious to do business with me; at last he offered me money to take-shares in a gaming-house - he said the profits belonged to him, and he promised me 20 per cent. profit - at last I ran in debt 900l. to him, which I have not the means of paying, and he and his shopman have conspired, and invented this, gaming debts being illegal. When I had nothing of my own he used to lend me money on a ring, or a key, which he took from his own shop; he has made a ticket on his own ring, and lent me, perhaps, 20l. upon it, to make money on the ticket, and thus he took things out of the shop, and made tickets of. I am labouring under great disadvantages, because he took me into his back parlour, and let no one know what we did. I cannot, therefore, prove his conduct to have been illegal.

COURT to PHILIP LAWTON. Q. Have you ever kept a gaming-house? A. No. - nor have I ever spoken to the prisoner in my life. I do not think I ever saw him ten times.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you never live in Bury-street? - A. No, never, I swear that.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18251208-156

156. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , at Fulham, 1 watch, value 5s.; 5 sovereigns, and a 10l. Bank note, the property of Cornelius Fryer , his master, in his dwelling-house .

CORNELIUS FRYER. I live at Hammersmith, in the parish of Fulham . The prisoner was in my service for a year and three quarters - he left me on the 1st of November last, but not on account of this charge. On the night of the 9th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock, on Mrs. Fryer's retiring to her bed-room, she found several drawers were open - she immediately called to me, and on going into the room I found my wearing apparel scattered about the floor. I examined the drawer in which my cash had been deposited, and discovered that a small bag, containing a 10l. Bank of England note, five or six sovereigns, and an old watch, had been taken away. I also missed a sabre from the room. I had seen my money safe on the 5th of September, when I took some out. I know I left the note and five or six sovereigns in it then, to the best of my recollection. The note was dated the 5th of August, 1825, and was No. 12,850; I had received it at my bankers, Messrs. Cottrel and Trails; I stopped it at the Bank, I think, on the 19th of September - I did not think of it before, but it was suggested by a friend, and I did it. The prisoner remained in my service about seven weeks afterwards.

JOHN RAWLINS . I am in partnership with Mr. Robert Evans - we are linen-drapers, and live in Oxford-street - a person of the name of Trieves came to our shop on the evening of the 8th of November, and bought goods to the amount of 15s., and gave me a 10l. note in payment - I gave her the change, and she gave me the address of Susan Clarke, No. 24, Knightsbridge. I put my name on the note; this is it - (looking at it.)

SUSAN TRIEVES . I am the wife of Henry Trieves . - The prisoner married my daughter. On the 8th of November he came to our house, and asked my husband to go with him to town that evening, but he could not, as he had to go to work early the next day. I came with the prisoner to town, and we went to Oxford-street, and there I bought eleven yards of calico, for a pair of sheets, and one yard of net, at Mr. Rawlins' - they came to 15s., and I gave the 10l. note, which the prisoner had given to me about twenty yards before we got to the shop, when he desired me to go and buy the articles, which I did; when I came out I gave him the whole of the change, and the parcel of linen; I then asked him how he got the note - he said he had found it; I gave Mr. Rawlins, the name of "Susannah Clarke, No. 24, Knightsbridge," because I had understood the prisoner that he had it from her.

GEORGE HULL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner. I did not, in the first instance, tell him what I took him for; I asked him if his name was Edwards, and he said it was; I then asked him to come with me a little way, and brought him to the Adam and Eve public-house, where a Magistrate was sitting to hear the case - I afterwards took him to Bow-street.

CORNELIUS FRYER re-examined. Q. Did you say any thing to your servants about your loss? A. I mentioned it that night; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it, but he supposed they had got over the wall. The sabre was found on General Loveday's ground. I never had any particular conversation with the prisoner about it. I never suspected him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the note at a distance from the house; I took it up, and thought it was a bill; I understood my master on the night he lost it that his name was on it: there was no name on this, and I kept it a few days, and then got the witness to pass it.

CORNELIUS FRYER re-examined. Q. Did you say your name was on it? A. Not that I know of. I used to put my initials on the notes when I paid them away; I do not

see my name on this note. The drawer in which the bag was was unlocked.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having conducted himself in the most exemplary manner while in his service .

Reference Number: t18251208-157

157. ROBERT ROWBOTTOM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 7 sovereigns, 1 half sovereign, and 2 crowns, the monies of John Petter Dick , in the dwelling-house of William Ham .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PETTER DICK. I am servant to Mr. Ham, who keeps livery stables in Gray's-inn-lane . I occupy a room there; the prisoner's father sleeps in the same room as I do. On the 8th of November I had eight sovereigns, a half sovereign, and two crown pieces, in a little leather bag, locked up in a trunk in my bed-room. I looked into my pocket for the key, about the beginning of November, but could not find it. I had seen my money safe on the Sunday before. I had the box broken open on the Wednesday following, when I found that eight sovereigns, a half sovereign, and two crowns were gone; a 5l. note, and some silver, were left. The officer afterwards shewed me the key of my box; the prisoner had an opportunity of going into the room when he liked; I have often seen him in the room; he sometimes made his father's bed - the door was never locked.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was it in the morning that you missed your key? A. No, between two and three o'clock, when I put on a clean shirt and clean waistcoat, on a Sunday - I had seen the money safe on the Sunday before I missed the key - there had been 30s. in silver in it. The first key the officer shewed me was not mine, but it would open my box - the second he shewed me was mine; seven men worked at the stables, and any body who worked in the yard, could go into the room.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 25th of November. I have a bent key which Mr. Ham gave me - I tried it to the prosecutor's box, and it opened it very easily. The prisoner lived at Mr. Hall's, in Gray's-inn-lane-road; I searched different things there, and found this other key in a case which the prisoner said was his; I tried it to the prosecutor's box, and it opened it more easily than the other - I showed both to the prosecutor, and he identified the key found in the case as his.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you first go to the prisoner's lodgings? A. On the 25th of November I told him I came to search, on a suspicion of felony - he said this was his case, and I went there again on the 28th; I saw the same key again; I saw two persons and a child there - I do not know whether there were any other lodgers - it was a common lock. I had taken away the prisoner on the 25th; he was not at liberty afterwards.

SARAH HALL . I am the wife of James Hall , who lives in Upper-north-place, Gray's-inn-lane-road - he is a pork butcher. I have a boy four years of age, and a girl of fourteen; the prisoner lodged in my kitchen and slept there; I have seen this case in his room - it is his; this bent key is the key of my kitchen cupboard door, in which I keep some dishes - no one goes into the kitchen but I, my husband, and the prisoner; I had missed this key twice before the 31st of October - it was taken away, and filed, and I had a difficulty in unlocking the door with it; I missed it again on the 1st of November, again on the 7th, and again on the 11th. On the 7th of November I saw the prisoner in the kitchen, and on the 11th he paid me two crown pieces, between ten and eleven o'clock at night - he appeared, about that time, to be flush of money, and had bought clothes and rings, and two very fine seals.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he pay you your rent regularly? A. Yes, about every three weeks or a month; I cannot tell when I missed the key first; I have a gentleman who sleeps in the top room - the prisoner's father frequently came to see him.

WILLIAM HAM . I keep the livery stables; the prosecutor slept in a room in my yard - I have seen the prisoner in that room, and in my house, many times; I do not know whether he ever makes his father's bed - he goes there when he pleases - he slept there formerly.

Q. Is there a fence round your yard? A. Yes, there are stables and coach houses, all round, and a gate which shuts up; you cannot go from the stable into the street without coming into the yard - it is some time since the prisoner was in service as a groom.

COURT. Q. Are all the rooms over the stables occupied by servants of yours? A. Yes.

JOHN PETTER DICK. I know this key by the small bend in it - I did that myself under a gate - I have no other mark on it.

ANN HALL re-examined. The prisoner had been to Brighton in the summer - he bought his clothes before he went there, and his rings after he returned.

Prisoner's Defence. I had access to the room, but I know nothing of the money - nor ever bad it.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-158

158. JOHN WILLIAMS and WILLIAM DUNN were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , at St. Maryle-bone, 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of William Beckford , and a coat, value 1l., the goods of Joseph Furbank , in the dwelling-house of the said William Beckford .

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. On the morning of the 24th of November I was in Castle-street, Oxford-market, about five minutes past nine o'clock, and saw the two prisoners, whom I had known before, going before me at a pretty brisk pace, towards Newman-street - Williams had a bundle under his arm; I followed and got before them in Newman-street; I looked them both in the face- Williams then crossed the way; they turned down Oxford-street, towards Rathbone-place. I followed at a small distance, and at the end of Rathbone-place they divided. Williams went round the hackney-coaches, and turned back up Oxford-street again on the other side of the way. Dunn went towards St. Giles's - Williams them turned into Dean-street, and looked occasionally over his shoulder to see if I was watching. I followed him down Dean-street - he ran very fast down Carlisle-street into Soho-square, and into Bateman's-buildings. I gained upon him very fast, and he threw down the bundle. I

took it up, and cried Stop thief! he was stopped by a young man in my presence. I took him to the watch-house; the bundle was loose in a silk handkerchief. I found it contained a top coat, and a livery coat, and two cards with "Mrs. William Beckford, No. 12, Manchester-square," on them; in the prisoner's coat pocket, there were five bundles of matches, and in his hat twelve more. I found on him a duplicate in the name of John Dunn; upon Dunn's being taken the next day, another duplicate, in the name of John Dunn, was found on him. Williams said the man I had seen him with had given him the coats to carry. I gave information to Bertraun and others, and Burtraun brought Dunn the next night into Wardour-street, and I saw him there. I knew them both before.

JOSEPH FURBANK . I was in Mr. William Beckford's service on the 24th of November - his house is in St. Mary-le-bone parish. I had fastened up the house on the 23d of November, at eleven o'clock at night; my master's driving coat, and my coat, were on the clothes' horse in the servant's hall, opposite the door; the next morning, a little after nine o'clock, I went to brush them, and missed them both; I informed my master, and he sent me out to enquire. I saw Gook at Marlborough-street, about eleven o'clock - here are the coats - mine is worth 1l. and my master's worth 3l.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . On the morning of the 24th of November, about eight o'clock, I was under the Portico of the Pantheon, and I saw the two prisoners going towards Manchester-square. I went to Marlborough-street Office, about half-past eleven o'clock, and saw Williams at the bar. I was told by Gook, that it was for stealing two coats, and that he could swear to the other man if he saw him, and having seen them both together in the morning, I went after Dunn, and found him the next day. I told him I wanted him concerning some coats - he said he knew nothing about them. I took him down to Gook, who identified him. I found a duplicate on him for a coat pawned in the name of John Dunn. I took him to the watch-house - Roberts was with me at the time.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Bertraun - his account is correct.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I have been ill for twelve months and unable to get a living. I have been trying to get a little pittance for myself, and an aged mother, by selling a few matches. On the morning I was taken, I had been hired to carry the bundle, not knowing it contained stolen articles, and was told I should have 1s. I carried it to Oxford-street, and when I found I was watched by an officer, I ran to get away lest it should affect my liberty.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

DUNN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18251208-159

159. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of James Thomas .

JAMES THOMAS. I lost a coat, on Wednesday, the 7th of December, from a loft over the stables of Mr. Smith, in North-street, Mary-le-bone - I missed it about six o'clock. The prisoner had worked for Mr. Smith, but not at that time. As I was returning home about half-past five o'clock I saw him in the stable.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is it an open yard? A. It has gates, but they were open - there had been several persons there.

CHARLES EDWARDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paddington-street. I saw the prisoner on the 7th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - he brought this coat to pawn.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you see him again? A. The next morning at the office. I am positive he is the man.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge - he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-160

160. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a medicine chest, value 6l., the goods of Thomas Field Savory and others, his partners, in their dwelling-house .

The prosecutors did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-161

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 12.

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

161. THOMAS RAYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 8 bushels of oats, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Gibbons .

THOMAS GIBBONS. I live in Earl-street, Westminster, and am a carter . I rent a stable and loft in Mr. Perry's yard, Market-street, Westminster - my part of the loft is parted off, about eight feet high, but there is a space of eight or ten feet above the partition - I keep corn there. On the 26th of November I went to Mr. Perry for the key of his stable - he went to the prisoner, who is his servant, and brought the key - the prisoner followed him. Perry did not give me the key, but went and put it in the stable door himself - he could not open it - but the prisoner did. I found two sacks in the stable - the prisoner untied one, and I found some black oats in it. I examined the other afterwards. I had twenty-five quarters of oats shot loose in my loft, and could not miss any - but if a quantitity had been taken, they might have been missed by a man who saw them frequently. When I pulled some of the oats out of the sack, the prisoner said they belonged to Hatchet and Dyke, who have horses standing in the same yard - there was a little more than four bushels in each sack.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you miss any of them? A. No; the lofts communicate over the partition - mine is a corner of Mr. Perry's, but I have a door from my loft into my own premises - the two sacks were in the stables, any one going in might easily see them - black oats are very common.

JOHN SHELTON . I am Mr. Gibbons' carter. On the 25th of November, about five o'clock, I went home with his horses to Market-street - when I unhooked the chainhorse, I saw the prisoner at the top of the ladder, with a sack on his shoulder - the ladder was standing on the pavement, to go up to Mr. Perry's loft, where there was a parcel of scaffolding kept - the loft door was open - he came down the ladder, and went out of the yard with

the sack, which hung very heavy on his shoulder - in two or three minutes he returned, went up the ladder, and pulled out another sack and brought it down, and went out of the yard again, with it into the street - he came back in a short time, went up the ladder and shut the door, pinned it and took the ladder away. Next morning, about half-past five o'clock, I went and told my master, and when he sent me home, I found some black oats scattered about where the ladder had been - the door opens into the street - and if a man wanted to take oats from that loft to Mr. Perry's stables, he would go the same way the prisoner was then going.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the prisoner a servant of Mr. Chapman's? A. I do not know; he was a servant of Mr. Perry's - if he wanted to come out of his master's loft, that would be the way he would have come down - he went entirely out into the street, and I did not see where he put the sacks. I know Mr. Gibbon's stables, but I did not see him put anything there - he had as good an opportunity of seeing me as I had of him.

WILLIAM MERCOTT . I am in the service of Mr. Gibbons. I was coming out of his stables on Friday night, the 25th of November - I saw Shelton in the yard, and the prisoner with a sack on his shoulder - he brought it into the street - I followed him, he said something to me in the street, but I do not know what. He then went into Mr. Perry's stables, put the sack down, and came out again.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not Mr. Perry's loft that he came out of? A. Yes; and he went into his master's stable.

GEORGE POPLE . I am a constable. I went with Mr. Gibbons, to Millbank-street, to take the prisoner - we were walking behind him, and he turned and said, "Mr. Gibbons, what is this about your clover and oats?" I told him he must go with me. He said he would be d-d if he would - we took hold of him, and went about twenty yards - he then made another stop, and we were obliged to handle him rather roughly. As we were going to the watch-house, I asked how he came by the oats we had found in the stable. He said a man like a coal-heaver asked him, the day before, to let him leave them there - but who he was he did not know. On the following Monday we went to the stable, to get a sample - Mr. Gibbons took the sample from the heap, and I from the sacks - there were some beans mixed with them.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not horses eat beans as well as oats? A. I believe they do. Mr. Perry has a loft there.

CHARLES PERRY . The prisoner was in my employ for about six weeks. I never recollect keeping oats in my part of the loft.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any rubbish in your part of the loft, that the prisoner would have occasion to put away if he cleaned it? A. There were some scaffolding, and other things which were frequently moved. I think I have heard that the prisoner has four children - I had a good character with him. I had no horse, and did not go to the stable - the prisoner kept the key of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the things into the loft according to my masters orders - and what corn we had left I put into the binn - the person who left these sacks, brought them in a little cart about twelve o'clock, and said they belonged to a Mr. Hatchard, I believe - but he did not call for them again.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-162

162. GEORGE PIPER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 shirt, value 2s. the goods of Mary Derry .

MARY DERRY. I am a widow , and keep a clothes shop in Play-house-yard. The prisoner, with another person, came to my shop about seven o'clock in the evening of the 30th of November - his companion asked for a shirt - I shewed him three - there was one which he said he would give 1s. 6d. for - I said I could not take it - he then wrapped it up and took it away - I ran after him, but he got away - I stopped the prisoner, and asked where his friend lived - he said he did not know; I detained him; I had heard them talking outside the door for seven or eight minutes before they came in, and one of them said "Cheapen one."

JANE KEMBLE . I lodge at Mrs. Derry's. On this night I was up stairs, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went down and saw the prisoner sitting in the shop; the officer came and took him - he got up to go, and I told him to sit down again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Baker and Basket public-house, in Red-lion-street, having a pint of beer, and a young man came in and asked me to go with him to buy a shirt. We went to this lady's house - we were not at the window above a minute before we went in; he said he would give her 1s. 6d. - she said she could not take it - he said no more, but took it up and ran away - the woman said I must stay.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-163

163. JOHN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 27s.; 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of George Townsend .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-164

164. JOHN COTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Henry Bell , and 2 pewter pots, value 3s. , the goods of Horatio Nathaniel Phillips .

HENRY BELL. I am a publican , and live in the Regent's park. This pewter pot belongs to me.

HORATIO NATHANIEL PHILLIPS. I am a publican . These two pots are mine - they were shewn to me on Friday by the officer.

MICHAEL FLINN . I am a watchman, at the new buildings in Chester-terrace. On Thursday last I went into the vault of an unfinished house, and found these three pots, covered with some bricks and a board - I left them there and went to my work till five o'clock - I then took another person with me, and we saw the prisoner come and take them; we let him go into the main road; I then said"Cotton, you have got something there you should not have;" he said "I have a bit of wood;" I said "You have something else;" he then pulled out one quart pot- I said "You have more," and he pulled out the two pints - I took him to my master.

JOHN M'HUGH. I was with Flinn - he has stated the truth.

CHARLES COUSINS . I took the prisoner at his lodgings, and produce the pots.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-165

165. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of November , 1 cart, value 8l., and 1 set of harness, value 1l.; the goods of Robert Partridge , of which John Smith has been tried and convicted of stealing, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HARMER . I am an attorney. I have an office copy of the record of the conviction of James Smith, at Chelmsford. I have compared it with the original, and found it correct, read.

ROBERT PARTRIDGE . I live at Horset, in Essex - I am a publican and a little farmer . I lost a cart and harness on the 18th of November - it had been safe the night before - I have seen it since at the prisoner's premises at Sermon-lane, Islington - it was worth 9l.

JAMES YOUNG . I am a baker. The prisoner rented the stable of me, in which the cart was found - I had one key of it, and had the privilege of keeping a truck there. On the morning the cart was found, the 18th of November, my truck was brought and put under my window - it was brought there sometimes by the prisoner, and sometimes by others; I afterwards went with the street-keeper and an officer, to the stable; I tried to open it with the key, but could not; I then found the lock was gone, and it was tied with a bit of string to the cill, and a book; I saw a strange cart there and a harness.

JURY. Q. Was there room for your truck when the cart was there? A. When Saunders' own cart was there there was, but not when the strange cart was there - I could not get it in.

Prisoner. Q. Who put in your truck on the night before? A. I do not know whether it was in or out. I did not see it standing out - I did not put it in myself - the cart was brought there on the Thursday morning.

THOMAS COPE . I am street-keeper. On the morning of Friday, the 18th of November, I went, by the direction of the prisoner, to Sermon-lane. I had apprehended him on another charge, and, as I was going to put him into the inner place, he said "I will tell you something - if you go to my stable, and wait there, a tall man, with a rough great coat, and pockets outside, will come on a horse, to fetch a cart away! but you must hang up the lantern in a particular place, and whistle, or it will be no go. I went and did so, and the man came about a quarter before six o'clock, it was one Smith.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you tell me it would be better to tell the whole truth? A. No, I told you to hold your bother.

Q. Did not you say I was not to tell the Magistrate that? A. No; I made no promise of any sort.

WILLIAM LACK . I can state no more than the apprehension of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the misfortune to become acquainted with Smith, through a man whom I used to meet at the market - he came and asked if I could make room in my stable to put a horse and cart in; I said I did not know, but if it was not large, I would see; he said he should not want it there longer than Friday night; I said I would make room for it. He came on Thursday night- it was put in, and he sent a man, with a truss of hay, to clean the horse; all I was to receive was the remains of the hay, and 1s. As to making any confession, and saying it would be of no go, I declare, by the word of God and man, it is false; I merely stated that a man would come to take the cart; the stable door was open and Mr. Young had a key as well as myself.

COURT to THOMAS Cope. Q. Are you quite sure he made use of the expression that you must hang up the light and whistle, or it would be of no go? A. Yes, I am.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years . See page 17.

Reference Number: t18251208-166

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

166. JAMES WIGHTMAN was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GODFREY . I am an egg merchant , and live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell; the prisoner was my weekly servant , and intrusted to receive money, which it was his duty to bring home, and give an account of every day. I have a customer in Oxford-street, named James Somers - on the 3d of November he owed me 28l.; the prisoner never brought to me ten sovereigns and a 5l. draft, received of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had not the prisoner told you of his receiving this 28l? A. No; on the 2d of November, I would not take a cheque for the 28l., because the 11s. was deducted from it.

Q. Then you might have had it with the 11s. short? A. Yes.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Then you returned that? A. Yes, the prisoner was with me on the 2d, when he offered me the payment with the 11s. deducted, and the next day he received ten sovereigns and the 5l. draft.

COURT. Q. The first transaction was between Mr. Somers and you? A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not always in the prisoner's hands a floating balance left? A. No, not on any occasion.

JAMES SOMERS , JUN. I am the son of James Somers, of Oxford-street. I saw 15l. paid to the prisoner on the 3d of November - there were some sovereigns and a draft of 5l. - I paid it to him on his master's account.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been always as positive of this? A. Yes; I stated before the Magistrate, that there was some part paid in sovereigns, but I could not tell what; I said I had paid 10l. in cash, but I could not say what number of sovereigns; I am positive I paid some sovereigns.

THOMAS GODFREY re-examined. Q. How long was it before you found he had received the money? A. Not till the 30th of November; I had asked him about it two or three times a week, and he said he had not paid him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of serving Mr. Somers a good while, and Mr. Godfrey had never done any business with him before I went there; I was in his shop on the 2d of November, and Mr. Somers, the el

der, gave me a cheque for the goods; I had sold him for 28l., and told me if I called again he would give me the rest. I went and gave Mr. Godfrey the cheque, as he was in the cart at the door; he said "I shall not take it without the 11s., unless you make it good;" I went back, and said"Mr. Godfrey will not take it without the 11s. and I cannot lose money every time;" he said "Call again and I will pay you;" I called several times and he would not pay it, on account of the 11s. Mr. Godfrey has said that he brought this case forward merely because he understood I was going to leave him, and set up in opposition to him.

THOMAS GODFREY re-examined. Q. Did you ever say you brought forward this case in revenge? A. No, I never heard he was going to set up in opposition.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18251208-167

167. JAMES WIGHTMAN was again indicted for a like offence .

WILLIAM STEPHENS . I live in Gray's-inn-lane, and am cheesemonger . I owed Mr. Godfrey 3l. 2s. 6d., which I paid the prisoner for him on the 28th of November - to the best of my recollection there were three sovereigns - but I am sure I paid two.

THOMAS GODFREY . The prisoner was my servant . I asked him for this 3l. 2s. 6d., but he never paid it me.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Godfrey allowed me credit for one thing under another. I offered him this money, and he said he would not have it, I should go to Hatton-garden. I sold the goods the week before, and was to receive the money on Monday. I went about the middle of the day - he asked if I had received it. I said I had, and would give it him then if he pleased.

THOMAS GODFREY . He did not offer me the money until the officer had him in custody - he said, before, that he had not received it.

Q. Was there a current account between you? A. No; he was a mere common servant, and had his regular wages.

Q. Had you any account with Mr. Stephens before this young man lived with you? A. Yes - my former servant had served him.

Prisoner to MR. STEPHENS. Q. Was not I the means of your being a customer to Mr. Godfrey? A. No; I have bought of Mr. Godfrey's man before I bought of you.

COURT. Q. To whom did you consider yourself to be indebted? A. To Mr. Godfrey only. I received no receipt, only a memorandum.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-168

168. EDWARD COCKRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 sovereign, and 15 shillings , the property of John Francis Borley .

ANN BORLEY . I am the wife of John Francis Borley, who lives in Sydney's-alley, Leicester-square - he is a jeweller . The prisoner came to our shop on the 19th of November, and asked to look at a small hunting-watch, which hung in the window. I shewed it to him with a seal, and said the two would come to 3l. 5s., and which he agreed to give - he offered me this note in payment, it is payable to Messrs. Bernard, Savory and Co. Bankers, London, Dated, 12th July, 1825, for 5l. I said it was a country note - he said it was payable in London I sent my servant out to get change for it, which she brought. I gave the prisoner 1l. 15s. in change, and he took away the goods; next morning but one, the note was returned to me, and I was told it was good for nothing.

COURT. Q. Did you part with the goods entirely, believing the note genuine? A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever get your watch or seal again? A. No; he was a stranger to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. The prisoner came and asked to purchase a watch and seal for 3l. 5s. and he agreed to give you that? A. Yes; having so agreed I gave him the watch and seal to keep, and he gave me the note in payment - such notes are commonly taken. I took it and gave him change - he went away with the goods with my approbation.

COURT. Q. If you had not believed the note good, and genuine, of course you would not have let him had the goods? A. No - I put no mark on the note.

ANN JONES . I am servant to the prosecutor. I remember taking the note on the 19th of November - I got it changed at Mr. Prothero's, the butcher's, with whom we deal - he is not here; he gave me the change, and I gave it to my mistress. I saw him mark the note which I had taken - this is his mark "No. 2, Sydney's-alley."

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him mark a note? A. Yes, and this note has the same mark. I do not know that this is the note he marked while I was there.

GEORGE SAMS . I am a stationer, and live at No. 17, Little Queen-street, Holborn. The prisoner came to my house on Tuesday, November, the 8th, and asked me if I could engrave a plate for a promissory note in the course of that week, from a copy which he left me, which I have not got here - he told me it was for a new Bank that was then going to commence. I engraved the plate from the copy he left, and by his orders, I printed five hundred. I have received some letters from Bath, but I have not communicated with the prisoner on the subject of them - there is no one here from Bath; this note is one of my engraving by his order. I think he gave me 3l. 11s. for them. I had not made any inquiry whether there was such a Bank forming, as I had not the least suspicion, till he called for the five hundred, paid for them immediately, and gave me a further order to take the five out, and put a two in, to make 2l. notes, to save the expence of another plate; he had called on the Saturday evening, and had four or five notes, and on the Monday he had the remainder. I never engraved a plate precisely similar to this for any body else.

Cross-examined. Q. You employ people to engrave these things when they are ordered, and if a man wanted a cheque plate, or a draft plate, it is quite in the way of your trade? A. Yes; he ordered the 5 to be taken out, and a 2 put in, which is quite a common thing.

COURT. Q. Have you ever been to Bath to inquire if there is such a firm as Hobhouse, Wright and Hunter there? A. No - I wrote, and have the letter I received in answer.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am in the employ of Mr. Hawkins, he lives at No. 14, St. Martin's-court, and is a jeweller.

On Saturday, December the 3d, the prisoner came to our shop, and asked me to let him look at some rings. I shewed him some which I took out of the window - he chose a ring and a brooch, and agreed to give 1l. for them; he tendered a Pontefract Bank note for five guineas - here is the note. I looked at it, and remarked that it was not payable in London; he said he would give me one that was, and produced this Bath and Bristol note for 5l. - I have never been to Bath to inquire about it.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer. I took him into custody. I know there is no such house in London as is specified. I have made every inquiry, and there is no such Bankers.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner was charged upon three other indictments, with stealing three sovereigns and 5s. of William Adeney ; three sovereigns of Josiah Treeble , and four sovereigns of George Goer. These monies had been obtained by the utterance of forged notes, similar to that produced in the last case. The Court directed an acquittal, and ordered the prisoner to be detained on charges of uttering forged notes.

Reference Number: t18251208-169

169. WILLIAM INGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 47lbs. of lead , the goods of William Richardson .

JOHN BURKE . I am foreman to Mr. William Richardson, of Great Portland-street , a carpenter and builder - the prisoner is a plumber's labourer . On the 9th of December, a few minutes before five o'clock I saw him at the top of my master's buildings, where he had been at work. I saw he was standing stiff, so that he could not move; I laid my hand upon his trousers, and felt this 47lbs. of lead; I said, "Are you not ashamed of yourself?" he said, "I can't help it now." I unbuttoned his trousers and jacket, and took the lead out.

ROBERT WILLANS . I am an officer and took him into custody.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-170

170. SAMUEL DAVIS was indicted for feloniously putting off 20 counterfeit shillings to William Cousins , at and for a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination did import, and were counterfeited for .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM COUSINS. I live in Castle-street, Whitechapel, and am a green-grocer . I was employed by Mr. Drew to detect persons selling counterfeit coin. On the morning of the 19th of November I saw the officer, who searched me, and found I had no money - they then gave me 4 shillings and 2 sixpences, which I had about me at ten minutes past nine o'clock that morning; the prisoner came to me by appointment on the Friday - he brought me twenty counterfeit shillings, for which I gave him the four shillings and two sixpences, which I had received of the officers, who were very near; while the prisoner and I were dealing. I then went to Halls' house - he and Drew followed me; Hall asked me what I had got- I told him twenty counterfeit shillings, which I gave him; he searched me, and found I had no more money about me - they were wrapped up in a piece of this paper in four fives; all I did was under their direction.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the officer I was not the man you recollected as selling this coin? A. I never used such words.

THOMAS DREW . I am one of the conductors of the patrol. I saw Cousins on the 17th of November, and again on the 19th, when Hall was with me; he was searched by Hall, in my presence, who took all the money he had from him, and we gave him four shillings and two sixpences; we then followed him to Whitechapel, and he crossed the street, to his stall. I saw the prisoner come down Petticoat-lane; Cousins put up his hand, and came across to him; we were in a house close by; the prisoner and Cousins spoke, and something passed from Cousins to the prisoner, and from the prisoner to Cousins; he then went away - I went out and took Cousins to Hall's house, where he gave him twenty counterfeit shillings, which Hall took and marked; I followed Cousins all the way, and it was impossible he could have received them from any one else; they are done up in fives. I took the prisoner on the 23d, in Whitechapel, and two shillings were found on him.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. What has been stated is correct - I saw the transaction between the prisoner and Cousins, and assisted in taking the prisoner on the 23d; I found on him two shillings, which I had marked and delivered to Cousins.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. - these are all counterfeit, and have never been in circulation; they are all from one die; it is copper slightly washed with silver.

Prisoner to WILLIAM HALL . Q. When you took me into custody on the 23d, did not Cousins say I was not the man he gave information of? A. No.

Q. You said you had not had a charge some time, and that you wanted to make something of me? A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a conspiracy against me - he met a man who was coming to speak for me before the Magistrate, and he put the man in bodily fear of appearing.

THOMAS DREW. It is utterly false.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18251208-171

171. JOHN HUBBARD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 basket, value 6d.; 6 shirts, value 25s.; 4 neckcloths, value 4s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 13s.; 3 caps, value 9s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 3 aprons, value 1s.; 3 frills, value 2s.; 7 shirt collars, value 3s., and two frocks, value 2s. , the goods of Rebecca Price .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-172

172. PETER MONNAGAN and TIMOTHY RILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 140lbs. of rope, value 12s. , the goods of Samuel Davis .

Riley pleaded GUILTY .

SAMUEL DAVIS. I am a wheelwright , and live in the Commercial-road, Limehouse . I lost 140lbs. weight of rope from my premises there on the 5th of December - it had been under cover. Before I was up that morning one of my lads said some of it had been found in the field- I got up to see if we could trace it, but we could not.

I then went to the marine-store dealers about there, and to a marine-store dealer of the name of Hart, in Well-street; I looked through his window, into the back of his premises, and there I saw my property. I asked Hart if the person who was there had brought it - he said he had, but the person denied it. I had seen it safe on the Sunday.

SAMUEL WILLIAM HART . I am a dealer in marine-stores. The prisoners brought the rope to me about seven o'clock on Monday morning; Riley staid outside while Monnagan came in, and said he had got some rope to sell - I knew him to be a bad character, and I told him I had no change; he insisted upon leaving it till eight o'clock; I then turned him out of the shop; nothing had passed between us about price; I was not up when he came. I sleep in the shop, and I told him as I laid in bed that the rope should not be left - he took it away, and sent another man with, what I believe to be, the same rope; it appeared so. I remarked the rope to be about 1cwt., 1qr., and 10lbs. I had not given information about it.

FRANCIS MURPHY . I am a labourer. Last Monday morning, I went to Blackwall to get work, and the morning being wet I was sent home to get my breakfast - as I was going up Robinhood-lane, I met the two prisoners, and they called me and said, if I would sell the rope for them, they would pay me for it, or give me some beer. I took this rope to Mr. Hart's, and asked him to buy it - he asked what was the price of it - I said I did not know - he said he would give me 7s. a cwt. - it was put into the scale and weighed 1 cwt. 1 quarter and 7lbs. - while I was there the prosecutor came in, collared me, and asked where I got it. I said of these two young men - he took me to the constable's - and as we were going along I met Monnagan and said that was one of the young men I had it from.

JOHN BURKE . I work for Captain Clarke. On Monday morning last I went to work, and was sent home to breakfast - as I came back I saw the prisoners - they told me they had given some rope to the last witness to sell. I said, "Why did you not sell it yourselves, if you got it honestly." Monnagan said he had fell out with the man at the marine store-shop, and had sent Murphy to sell it.

MONNAGAN'S Defence. I met Riley at the corner of Bow-lane - he asked me to go and sell the rope, and he would give me 1s. I took it, and they would not buy it of me - he then sent Murphy who sold it, and he had the money.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Both Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251208-173

173. THOMAS SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 glove, value 1d., and 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Edward Woodward .

SAMUEL TATE . I am a watchman, of Great Cumberland-street. About three o'clock on the morning of the 9th of December, I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor pass by me - the prosecutor seemed very much intoxicated, and the prisoner was supporting him along; in about twenty minutes I saw the prisoner run by on the other side of the street, and the prosecutor came running as well as he could after him without a coat - he cried Stop thief! I went after the prisoner, and saw him taken in Oxford-street. As I went behind him, he dropped this glove, which I picked up.

Prisoner. Q. Had I the coat when I passed you? A. You had something dark under your arm, which appeared to be a coat.

JOHN GUEST . I am a watchman. I was on duty at the corner of Old Quebec-street. I heard the alarm, and the rattles - the prisoner ran by me in Oxford-street. I followed, and saw him drop this coat - while I took it up he gained ground on me; he was stopped at the corner of Park-lane. The prosecutor came up in his shirt sleeves - he was intoxicated but he knew his coat immediately.

EDWARD WOODWARD . I am a gardener . I live at Maida-hill; I was in London the 9th of December - I was very much intoxicated - I can remember losing my coat, and seeing a man run away with it - I cried Stop thief! and the prisoner was taken. I cannot pretend to say how he got my coat off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with a person up the Edgware-road - it rained fast, and I ran to get home. - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and the watchman said,"If you don't stop, I will knock you down?" I know nothing of the coat nor the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-174

174. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , a pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of Hugh Gair .

HUGH GAIR. I live in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate . I am a tavern-keeper - a pair of boots hung in my back kitchen - the prisoner came in on Thursday, the 1st of December - he stated that he had come from a voyage to Cadiz - he stopped that night and next day; about six o'clock on the evening of the 2d I heard a scuffling in the passage near the door - I then saw the prisoner struggling with my boy - he had hold of the boots and got away. I have never seen the boots since.

JAMES GRAY . I attend at this house sometimes to play on the Scotch pipes - I was there on the 12th of December; the prisoner was there most of the day. I saw him take the boots from the side of the fire-place, and go to the bar door. I followed, and told him they were not his - he said "Go along, you young rascal," and he gave me such a blow that I was stupid; when I got better I told the people.

JAMES WHALING . I am an officer. On the evening of the 3d of December, I was sent for, and took the prisoner; he said he had never seen any boots; he was committed for re-examination. I asked where he had sold them - he said he had not sold them, for he gave them to a man to hold while he made water, and the man went off with them.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have a pint of beer - there was a sailor there; he asked if I belonged to a vessel; he had a pair of boots to sell, and told me they were sailor's boots. We sat there about half an hour; when the boy came in the man said to me "Come, let us go and sell them, and get something to drink;" the boy stood there, and said "Whose boots are they?" I said "They are not yours - go along;" I went out of the door, and

wanted to make water - the man took hold of the boots, and I saw no more of him.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251208-175

London Cases, Second Jury.

175. ELIZABETH OWEN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-176

176. ELEANOR CURRAN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JOHN WILSON . I keep the Bull's Head, public-house, in Leadenhall-street. On the 25th of November the prisoner came in between twelve and one o'clock, and asked for half-a-pint of porter - she gave me a sixpence, which I said was a bad one; she gave me another, and I gave her 41/2d.; I saw she had a number of halfpence - I should think 1s. worth; I kept the had sixpence by me - I let her go, having seen her before. I am confident she is the person. She came again two days afterwards, and offered a bad sixpence to my wife, who tapped at the window and called me.

ELIZABETH WILSON . On the 27th of November the prisoner came to me for half a pint of porter, for which she gave me sixpence, and I saw in her hand some halfpence; I went to my husband for change, knowing it to be bad - I had seen the prisoner on the Friday before; the first sixpence my husband rubbed on the bearth-stone, and it was quite coppery - the second seemed like it; we sent for the officer, and gave her in charge - she had 1s. 3d. in copper, about her.

JOHN OVERTON . I am the officer. I produce two sixpences which I received from Mr. Wilson; I found 1s. 3d. in copper on the prisoner.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin. These are both counterfeits, and from the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not there on Friday. I generally buy hare skins, and I want copper - that is the reason I offered the sixpence.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Months and to find Surities for Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-177

177. FRANCIS EDMONDS was indicted for a fraud .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-178

178. EDWARD DOWSE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , six pairs of stockings, value 10s. , the goods of John Benjamin Nevill , and others, his partners.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - Aged 24.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18251208-179

179. JAMES SMITH was indicted for a fraud .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-180

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

182. HANNAH SWIFT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 6lbs. of bacon, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Harben and Henry Harben , the younger.

GEORGE SHARP . I am shopman to Henry Harben and Henry Harben, jun.; they live in St. Giles's, and are cheesemongers . Last Saturday night I was in the back of their shop, and saw the prisoner come and take a piece of bacon out of the window; she came a little way into the shop afterwards, and went out immediately. I went and took her one house off; I brought her back with the bacon under her arm.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner. I went into the shop to buy a bit of bacon, and there was not a bit to suit me; I walked out again, and was not three yards from the shop, when the young man came and took me back to the door of the back parlour - he said, "What have you got there?" I said, "I have nothing;" he turned back to the shop - he then saw a piece of bacon by my side on the counter, and said,"Here it is."

GEORGE SHARP re-examined. I brought her back with it in her arm - when I got her to the back of the shop I said, "Where is the bacon," and the young man who was in the shop said, "Here it is;" he saw her lay it down on the counter. I declare that she took it from the window; I saw her take it and bring it into the shop, and go out again. I did not see her put it on the counter, but I saw her with it.

JURY. Q. Did you see it in her possession after you brought her back into the shop? A. No; she had put it down.

COURT. Q. Here is what you stated before the Magistrate, and signed, "I followed after her, and took her at the corner of Hampshire Hog-yard, and took from underneath her shawl the piece of bacon now produced;" now which of these is true? A. My Lord, I might have made a mistake; but I have said nothing falsely.

Q. Are you sure the bacon you saw on the counter is the piece you saw her take? A. I found the property on her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251208-181

182. STEPHEN DARK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 waistcoat, value 4s. , the goods of John Lewis .

WILLIAM CARTER . I live at No. 63, Tottenham-court-road, and am errand-boy to Mr. Hall, a cheesemonger. I was in the shop on the 16th of November, and saw the prisoner about John Lewis's shop - he is a haberdasher , and lives opposite our shop; he stood there about a minute - then put his foot on the cill, and took a waistcoat from the inside of the door - I kept my eye upon him, and went and told Mr. Lewis; I then pursued, and took him with the property. Mr. Lewis came over, and we took him to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: o18251208-1

On the Second Day of the Sessions, Mr. Justice Bayley delivered the opinion of the Twelve Judges, upon the following cases, reserved for their Lordships' consideration.

Benjamin Bullock and Moses Samuel (vide Seventh Sessions, 1825, page 540). The prisoners were convicted of a larceny - the indictment charged it to have been committed in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate - but the parish was proved to be St. Botolph, without Aldgate. Their Lordships' were unanimously of opinion, that, as in case of larceny, the proof of the parish was unnecessary, and as the prisoners had not proved that there was no such parish, the conviction was legal.

John Lowe and Samuel Roberts , (vide Eighth Sessions, 1825, page 662). The prisoners were charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Young , in the day time, (the said John Young, and others being therein), and stealing goods, value 12s. - it was proved in evidence, that John Young was in the dwelling-house, but no other person, their Lordships' were of opinion, that Young being in the dwelling-house, was sufficient to constitute the offence, it being only required by the statute that a person be therein, and as such the prisoners were rightly convicted.

Thomas Winter Preston and Henry Reading , (vide Eighth Sessions, page 688) - were called to the bar, and informed by Mr. Justice Park, that he had respited the judgment in their case, upon precisely the same point as that decided in the case of Lowe and Roberts, the decision of which was equally binding in theirs. Lowe and Roberts, Preston and Rea ling, have accordingly received sentence of death . Bullock and Samuel, to be imprisoned for the term of one year .


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