Old Bailey Proceedings, 27th October 1825.
Reference Number: 18251027
Reference Number: f18251027-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 27th of OCTOBER, 1825, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. JOHN GARRATT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1825.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN GARRATT , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and John Thomas Thorp ; Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Venables, Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Edward Bowerbank ,

James Stevens ,

James Dalgathy ,

Jessee Cressford ,

John Cordell ,

George Blakeley ,

Charles Harding ,

Thomas Clark ,

John Edward Spicer ,

Thomas Thatcher ,

Ebeneza Holding ,

Thomas Graham .

Second

Thomas Shaw ,

Wm. Hopkins ,

George Heath ,

Thomas Critchmore ,

George Y. Headley ,

Thomas Barrel

Wm. Lovell ,

Edward Cousins ,

John Banks ,

Charles Wood ,

Wm. Weatherly ,

Thomas D. Meriton .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Davis ,

Wm. Moon ,

Peter Bean ,

Joshua Nunn ,

John Frost ,

John Ash ,

Robert Mopsey ,

David Edwards ,

John Proctor ,

Richard Holl ,

Walter Bentley ,

Thomas Stevens .

Second

Wm. Taylor ,

Jacob Richards ,

Samuel Fell ,

John Knight ,

James Tuckman ,

Wm. Henry Tucker ,

John Yardley ,

John Taylor ,

John Brooker ,

Joseph Craig ,

John White ,

Alex. Guthrie .

Third

John Reynolds ,

John Dix ,

Henry Alderson ,

Joseph Hall ,

Thomas Elliot ,

Isaac Fruen ,

Wm. Gray ,

Charles Hales ,

Joseph Alger ,

George Tate ,

Rowland Riley ,

Thomas Slaughter .

Fourth

Cornelius Wright ,

Thomas Bellingham ,

John Kent ,

Joseph Holland ,

James Blair ,

Alexander Smith ,

James Gould ,

Samuel Stopforth ,

Richard Free ,

James Cottle ,

James Ash ,

Samuel Beech .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY,

OCTOBER 15, 1825.

GARRATT, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18251027-1

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1607. JOSEPH HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , at St. James, Westminster , a microscope, value 10 l.; a case of surgical instruments, value 30 s.; three syringes, value 40 s.; a case of mathematical instruments, value 3 s.; three boxes, value 1 s.; three books, value 1 s., and four syringe tubes, value 1 s., the goods of Herbert Mayo , his master, in his dwelling-house .

HERBERT MAYO. I am a surgeon , and live in Berwick-street , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. The prisoner has been in my service since March last. On the 19th of September, having missed a microscope and case of instruments, I charged him with taking them, which he denied - I told him if he would inform me where they were I would not prosecute him, and in consequence of what he said I found them at a pawnbroker's; he offered to redeem them - I went to Marlborough-street, and got an officer, who searched, and found duplicates of my property upon him.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. On the 19th of September I was fetched to the prosecutor's house, and found the prisoner there, searched him, and found on him four duplicates of surgical instruments, and at his lodgings I found some other property of the prosecutor's - he said they were his lodgings.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He said at once they were his lodgings? A. Yes.

JOSEPH TILL . I am shopman to Mr. Perryman, pawnbroker, of Compton-street. I have three brass syringes, a microscope, and case of instruments, pawned in September, by the prisoner, at separate times. The microscope was pawned all at one time, for 3 l.; he only asked for that. I am no judge of its value.

Cross-examined. Q. Has he often redeemed things which he has pawned? A. Yes, often, for the last two years.

MR. MAYO. This property is all mine. The microscope is worth upwards of 10 l. I never authorised him to pawn or redeem goods. The value of the whole is 12 l. or 13 l.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the microscope in pieces, which could have been taken at different times? A. It is in different pieces. I said if he would confess to the two instruments I would not hurt him; I did not say I would allow him to work it out at so much a week; he shewed great contrition.

Two witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18251027-2

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1608. CHARLES SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , a mare, price 50 l. , the property of Henry Tubbs .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES TUBBS . I am the prosecutor's brother. On the 12th of May I went with him, and took this mare to the prisoner at Barlow-mews, Bruton-street, Bond-street - my brother left the mare with him to dispose of: he was not to sell her under 70 l.; my brother went to Twickenham. I called at the stables daily to inquire if he had sold it, and on the Sunday following he said he had sold it for 70 l., to General Conrad, who had paid him an order on Kirkland, an army-agent at Charing-cross. I saw the mare delivered at the General's stables, and saw the order, and asked the prisoner for the money - I went with him to Mr. Austin's, and three or four houses, to get it cashed, but could not - it was Sunday; it was the prisoner who proposed to get it cashed. I did not go into any of the houses with him; he came out, and said he could not get it done. I then begged he would give me the order, which he refused. I was very pressing for it, he still refused; I saw the order, and read it; he began to be very noisy, and asked if I thought him dishonest, and was afraid to trust him - I still insisted on having it; he refused, and eventually left me. I went to Twickenham to my brother, returned with him to town, and saw the prisoner again that evening, in Barlow-mews; my brother demanded the order - he would not give it up, and said he should neither have horses or money, and he would give him a good thrashing into the bargain. He afterwards went out with us to get it cashed, to Mr. Austin's, in Windmill-street; we waited outside: he said he could not get it cashed, but would pay us next morning, at ten o'clock, at Barlow-mews. I went there next morning alone, waited a quarter of an hour, and did not find him; I went to Charing-cross, and saw the prisoner in a gig, coming in a direction from Kirkland's; he merely passed me - I did not call to him. I saw my brother coming out of Kirk-land's - I was in a gig; I got out; my brother got into the gig, and drove after him; Mr. Hill was with me at Bruton-street,

and went with my brother in the gig. I walked after them to the British-hotel, Jermyn-street, where the General lodged; I met the prisoner, accompanied by General Conrad and Mr. Hill, walking in a direction from the hotel; my brother was following them in the gig. I followed after them, and waited in Market-street, in the gig, while they went into the General's stables; the next thing I saw was Shaw riding very fast by me on my brother's mare; she had no saddle on. My brother came running out after him, with Hill; they requested me to drive after him, but I could not see any thing of him; we went to Barlow-mews, but he did not come there. I did not see him again till the 23d of September. I went several times to the mews, but could never find him. I had him apprehended at Brentford, on the 23d of September.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the date of the transaction? A. The 16th of May. The prisoner gave the order into my hands - it was for 70 l., and I believe was genuine. He said he must have something for selling it; he did not say how much that I recollect; I do not remember his asking for 3 l., but will not swear he did not. I said. "Give me the money, and I will give you what is fair;" I did not say I thought half-a-sovereign sufficient. The horse was delivered on Thursday, and sold I believe on Saturday. I believe Austin is a horse-dealer. I think Kirkland's office opens at ten o'clock; it was about a quarter past ten when I saw him coming from there; I had known him about ten days; he had two other horses in the stables; a horse of my brother's had been put up there to bait for one day.

COURT. Q. Have you any reason to believe General Conrad is not now in possession of the horse? A. I have - the order was payable to the prisoner, and not to the bearer.

HENRY TUBBS. I went with my brother when the mare was delivered to the prisoner - I had known him about ten days before. I went to Twickenham - my brother fetched me to town on Sunday; we went to the prisoner; I demanded the order, which he refused. He made no demand on me, but behaved very insolent; we went to Austin's, but did not get the order cashed - he said he would pay us at his own stables on Monday, at ten o'clock - I went that evening to the General, at the British-hotel, and before eight o'clock the General and I went down to Kirkland's, to stop payment of the order. I came home, and went to the General's about half-past nine o'clock; I did not see him, and walked down to Kirkland's, and saw Mr. Kirkland; the prisoner came in there about ten minutes past ten o'clock, to have the order cashed - it was refused - he went out, and I drove to General Conrad, with Mr. Hill. I saw the prisoner, and the General together, in Jermyn-street; they went with me and Hill to the stables - the prisoner got on the mare directly I came into the yard; she had merely a bridle on, no saddle; Hill was in the yard before me. I laid hold of the bridle, and said, "Give me up my property;" he made no answer; I let go in consequence of what Hill said, and Shaw rode away; I ran after him, but lost him - went to his stables directly with my brother, and staid two hours; I went again next day, and five or six times afterwards, but did not see him; I saw his hostler. I saw the mare in Mr. Fitzroy M'Lean's stables, Cadogan-place, three weeks or a fortnight ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there not some dispute about what poundage he was to receive for selling this horse? - A. No; I do not think he asked for any thing for his trouble in selling it. I received a letter three weeks after, but cannot say it came from him. I did not go any where to receive the money in consequence of that letter.

Q. Did not the prisoner say he must have 3 l. as poundage, as he had promised it to the General's servant? A. He did not, at any time, nor did I offer him any sum; the letter I received stated I might receive 65 l. - I was to direct an answer to Barlow-mews, but the Magistrate advised me not to write.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you owe him any money? - A. Yes, for the keep of a horse for one night; nothing else, except for selling the horse. The General gave the horse up to the prisoner. I had no time to speak when I entered the yard, before he rode away. I never agreed with the General to put an end to the bargain.

MR. PHILLIPS to CHARLES TUBBS. Q. Did not the prisoner tell you he was ready to pay for the mare? A. He said he would pay it by degrees. When I went to the stables afterwards I saw the same hostler there.

HENRY HILL . I am an attorney, of Gray's Inn. On the 16th of May I accompanied the prosecutor to General Conrad, at the British-hotel, Jermyn-street, about eight o'clock in the morning, and about ten I saw the prisoner with him in the neighbourhood of the hotel - I got out of the gig. The General said he would deliver up the mare to the prisoner on receiving his cheque, and would have nothing to do with the dispute. I told Shaw he should not have the mare again; he said he would not part with her, for Tubbs owed him an account; I offered to pay him: he said his demand was 10 l. or 12 l.; he could not tell the exact amount without going to his stables. He, myself, and the General went to the General's stables, in Market-street; the General asked for the cheque; Shaw stepped back from us, and soon after I saw a paper in the General's hands; the General said, "Now bring out the horse:" Shaw asked for the loan of a bridle - one was lent him; the mare was brought out - Shaw got on her; the General's servant put on the bridle. I then said," You will meet us at the stable;" he made no answer. Tubbs stepped up, and laid hold of the bridle; I said, "Don't do that - he promises to meet us at the stable." Tubbs let go, and Shaw rode away. I went to the stables, and waited a quarter of an hour; he did not come.

Cross-examined. Q. What dispute did the General allude to? A. He said he would deliver the mare to nobody but Shaw.

COURT. Q. You allowed him to ride away with the horse? A. It was understood he was to meet us at the stables.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I had a warrant, dated the 11th of May, to apprehend the prisoner; I went repeatedly, early and late, to Barlow-mews, but could never find him there; he was given into my custody afterwards, and I asked him what he had done with Tubb's mare; he hesitated - then said he had taken her straight to Mr. M'Lean's, in Lincoln's Inn-fields, when he left Tubbs, as he had shewn her before to M'Lean. I asked what he got for her - he said nothing - that he had a mare

from M'Lean, and M'Lean had Tubbs' mare - that M'Lean was gone to Scotland, and he had not been able to see him to settle; this was on the 23d of September. I asked how he came to take her away against Tubb's direction; he said Tubbs owed him an account, and he had promised to give the servant three or five guineas, which Tubbs said was too much, and he thought half a guinea enough, and if Tubbs would be shabby with the servant he would be so with him, and he was determined to pay himself; he said he could not see how they could make a felony of it. I asked where he lodged; he told me - I went there; he was denied, but it afterwards turned out that he did lodge there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say what the 3 l. was for? A. As a present to the General's servant.

The Prisoner's Counsel called,

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I keep a horse establishment in Windmill-street, Haymarket, and have known the prisoner twenty years; he is in the same business as myself, at Barlow-mews; he came to me on a Sunday in May, to get the order cashed; he kept the stables in Barlow-mews for three months after that - I have been, and seen his servant there. I always have 5 per cent. commission for selling horses.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you know there was an indictment against him? A. No. I have been to his stables in Bruton-mews with him myself, after May. I will swear I saw him there a month afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-3

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1609. JOHN EDMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , at Hillingdon , a gelding, price 25 l. , the property of Richard Webb .

RICHARD WEBB. I live at Great Marlow, Bucks . On the 28th of August, or early on the 29th, this bay gelding was stolen out of a stable of mine, about four hundred yards from my house; I had seen it at work about eleven o'clock the morning before - it went about in a cart. About five o'clock in the morning my servant informed me it was gone; I sent my son to London, but heard nothing of it till the 10th of September, when I found it in Mr. Hollis' stables, at Windsor.

WILLIAM EADY . I am servant to Mr. Webb. I saw the gelding put into the stable at eight o'clock at night, and missed it at four o'clock in the morning.

CHARLES WEBB . I am the prosecutor's son. I came to town in search of the gelding - it was brought home on the 12th of September, from Hollis' stables.

WILLIAM HOLLIS . I live at Windsor. About the 3d of September this gelding was brought into my father's yard, by Hearn; I bought it for my father, for 24 l. - he brought it overnight; my father saw it: he was going to Brighton, and told me to bargain for it next morning; I had dealt with Hearn's father-in-law before - I do not know what he is.

THOMAS HEARN . I am a butcher, and live at Upton, near Slough. I sold this gelding to Hollis - I do not know the day of the month; I bought it on the 29th of August, about five o'clock in the evening, at Uxbridge, which is six miles from my house, of Stransom, a horse-dealer, for 16 l., at his own stables, and sold it three or four days after, for 24 l.

THOMAS STRANSOM . I am a horse-dealer, and live at Uxbridge. I sold a gelding to Hearn, for 16 l.; I bought it of the prisoner, about seven o'clock in the morning of the 29th of August. I knew him before, and knew he was Webb's servant; Webb lives about sixteen miles from me - he came to me on Sunday, the 28th, and said his master and him were coming through Uxbridge, to take some horses to town, for sale, and that I should have the first offer of them; he came again about five o'clock on Monday morning, and called me up; I said I was not well, and could not get up yet. I got up at seven, and dealt with him for this gelding; he had no others. I gave him 12 l., and 5 s. for himself. I sold it the same evening to Hearn.

RICHARD WEBB. I am certain the gelding found at Hollis' is mine. The prisoner was in my employ for a year and a half; he left on the 20th of August: he was a jobbing odd man ; I never employed him to sell a horse for me.

CHARLES WEBB. I have no doubt of the gelding being my father's; we had had it two years.

Prisoner. I have a wife and family.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18251027-4

1610. JOHN EDMONDS was again indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , at St. Pancras , a gelding, price 25 l. , the property of Richard Webb .

WILLIAM EADY . I am servant to Mr. Webb. After the stolen horse came back to my master's it was in my care - I saw it safe the night before Henley fair, which was on the 22d of September; I put it into the stable at eight o'clock, but did not lock the door: the stable is in the yard. I missed it about four o'clock in the morning, and informed my master.

RICHARD WEBB. The prisoner left my service on the 20th of August. When I heard this same gelding was again stolen I sent two of my sons to town; I went to Henley fair on Thursday, and had some conversation with Harris, a horse-dealer, and went to his place in Drummond-street, on the Tuesday following, and there found the gelding, and took it home with me.

JOB HARRIS . I am a horse-dealer. On the 22d of September, about eleven o'clock at night, I found a gelding in my stables, in Drummond-street, St. Pancras, and next morning, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came down my yard - he said, "Mr. Harris, you have got a brown gelding, which I left last night, in your stables, and it is to be sold - I have sold three more of my master's horses, and this I will endeavour to sell you;" I agreed to give him 14 l. for it, but would not pay him, suspecting it was stolen, having seen Webb at the fair the day before - I had him secured directly, and sent to Webb.

JOHN PLEVY . I am an officer. Harris sent for me; I took the prisoner in charge: I wished him to say nothing, but he told me he had stolen this horse from his master, Mr. Webb, twice. I asked if he did not think his master would be very severe with him; he said, No, he did not think he would. I said, "Then you are a very bad man to take it twice;" he said he wanted a little money, having been in bad company.

RICHARD WEBB. I have no doubt of this being my horse. I never employed the prisoner to sell it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18251027-5

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1611. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Yeomans , about two o'clock in the afternoon, of the 25th of September , at Chiswick (no person therein being), and stealing two gold chains, value 25 s.; three seals, value 7 s.; six rings, value 9 s.; a watch key, value 1 s.; four ornaments, value 4 s.; a silver neck chain, value 3 s.; a pair of bracelets, value 15 s.; a necklace, value 1 s.; a box, value 2 s.; a gold drop, value 6 d.; and three pieces of foreign coin, value 3 d., the goods of Pelegrine Treves .

JOHN YEOMANS. I am a shoemaker , and live in the parish of Chiswick. Mrs. Treves first came to lodge with me three or four months before this happened; she was absent at Richmond three weeks; I came to town on the 25th of September - I left home at twenty minutes after ten o'clock in the morning - I locked the house up and took the key with me - every thing was secure - Mrs. Treves' apartments were secure; I had information and got home by a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening - the doors were all shut, and the gate was shut but not locked. I am certain I had locked it. On entering the house I found Mrs. Treves' property taken out of the drawers and strewed about the floor; seven locks were broken - I found the prisoner in custody at the cage; Mrs. Hearn resided with Mrs. Treves.

ANN BOLDEN . I live at Turnham-green, on the opposite side of the way to Yeomans, but a little distance from his house. On the 25th of September I saw the prisoner and three other men waiting about his house for some time, and at last two of them went into the house; they appeared to put a key in the door and open it; the other two were waiting about - I did not see where they went - I saw the prisoner in custody of Davis in about twenty minutes afterwards; he is one of the two who I saw go into the house.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am servant to a butcher at Turnham-green; master's house is about 300 yards from Yeoman's. On the 25th of September I saw the prisoner and another man run down Yeomans' garden from the house - they were about fifteen yards from the house - they leaped over the wall - I met them and took the prisoner, and gave him to Featherstonhaugh; I am sure he is the man.

PHILIP FEATHERSTONHAUGH . I am constable of Chiswick. I was fetched to the prosecutor's a little before two o'clock, and on the way there met Davis with the prisoner; I put him into the cage and gave him to Huntley, the patrol then began to search him, and found a pair of bracelets, a gold watch-chain, three seals, five rings, an ear-ring, gold neck-chain, a silver chain, mock pearl chain, and scent-box, a ring, two coins, and two paste ornaments. I had told him to stand up in the cage and let me search him; he immediately produced these things from his breeches' pockets, and said "I will give you all I have;" I sent for Huntley, and saw him find a number of pick-lock keys on him.

GEORGE HUNTLEY . I am a Bow-street patrol, and live at Turnham-green. I was sent for, searched the prisoner, found sixteen skeleton keys, a knife, and pencil-case, on him - the keys would open street doors and drawers; I did not try them at Yeomans' house.

SARAH ELIZABETH HEARN . I lived with Mrs. Treves during her husband's absence in the East Indies; she resided at Yeomans', but had gone to Richmand for the benefit of her health - I went with her: on the alarm being given I went to her apartments, found every thing strewed about the rooms, two boxes broken open and the drawers. I know all these things to be her property, except the coins, which I believe to be hers - this gold watch is worth 10 l. - her husband's name is Pelegrine.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18251027-6

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1612. JOHN KELLY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Henely , about seven o'clock in the forenoon of the 30th of September , at St. Luke (Ann, the wife of the said Michael Henely, and others, being therein), and stealing two shirts, value 7 s., and a shawl, value 2 s., his property .

MICHAEL HENELY. I live at No. 1, Broad-arrow-court, Grub-street , in the parish of St. Luke's, and let lodgings. On the morning of the 30th of September I went out at six o'clock; it was light; I left the door on the latch; I tried the latch, and am sure the door was not open; I left my wife and two children in the house: I returned about seven - the door was not latched then; I found the prisoner in the passage, inside the door, and asked what he wanted there? he made no answer; I asked him again, and he said he wanted one Brown; I asked where Brown lived - he said at No. 16; he had an apron on, rolled up - he unrolled it himself - two sheets and a shawl were in it.

ANN GREASLEY HENELY . I am the prosecutor's wife. I was in bed and asleep on this morning, with my children - I had been washing the night before, and hung two shirts up to dry - this shawl hung in the room we slept in.

JOHN BEAL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing only; the Prosecutrix's name being incorrectly stated in the indictment .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-7

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1613. GEORGE NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , at St. Giles in the Fields , a watch, value 5 l., the goods of Richard Pack , Esq. and a gold ring, value 10 s., the goods of Elizabeth Hector , widow , (since deceased) in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Mary Nelson , widow .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MRS. MARY PACK . Miss Nelson was on a visit at my house in the Spring, and on the 27th of March I gave her a watch to get repaired for me.

HORATIO MARY NELSON . I received a watch from Mrs. Pack, and put it into a drawer in my room, and afterwards moved it into a drawer, which was not locked, in the front parlour, about the 8th of April, and missed it on the 9th; the prisoner was in my mother's service and had access to the room.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long was it in your possession? A. About a fortnight; it was not convenient to have it repaired directly.

JOHN BENJAMIN KNOWLES . I am foreman to Mr. Newby,

pawnbroker, Drury-lane. I have known the prisoner about two years, and know his person well - he came to the shop on the 2d of August and pawned a ring; on the 20th he pawned a watch - he had pawned other rings at our shop but I did not take them in; I took in the watch myself - it was handed to me to look at.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know who pawned the watch? A. I believe it to be the prisoner - to the best of my belief he pawned it - we advanced 4 l. on it, and 35 s. on the rings - both were pawned in the name of Newton; he had pawned two or three rings with the other person, and a small diamond ring.

COURT. Q. Have you any doubt of his pawning the watch? A. Very little - scarcely any; I told one of the lads in the shop to ask the person pawning for the name - I verily believe it to be the prisoner.

Q. Did the lad write the name on the duplicate from what you said or from his own knowledge of the name? A. From his own knowledge.

FRANCES ELIZABETH TOGWELL . In April last I was in the service of Mrs. Nelson as lady's-maid, for nine months - I left three weeks ago. The prisoner first came there about the middle of February as footman ; this watch was missed about Easter, and inquiry made among all the servants about it. About the middle of June some things were missing which were under my care; I opened the prisoner's box with the key of my tea-caddy; I know it was his box because he always had it in his possession. On opening it I found the watch and knew it by the name (looking at it). Here is "Silver," the maker's name, on it - I saw that when it was in his box - I saw a ring there with the name of Hector on it - I believe this to be the watch - I did not inform mistress of it because I was afraid; I took the cook to the box next day - the watch and ring were still there; I was still afraid to tell mistress; the cook left the service some time before I said any thing about it; I went to the box about a week after, to shew it to my mother, and asked her what I had better do, but it was then gone; I saw the duplicate of it in the box, with the name of Newby on it - my mother afterwards gave information. I was to be left in care of the house, with the prisoner, in the summer, and was afraid to mention it on that account. My mother told the family of it the latter end of September - I was going to leave the service then.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in place now? A. No; I did not know the prisoner before he came to live there. I had not a month's warning; my mistress had five different cooks during the time I lived there - they were not all exactly cooks, there was a char-woman for about a month. The prisoner and I were never otherways than on friendly terms - he had no regard for me - I did not know that my key would fit his box till I tried it: the cook was not examined before the Grand Jury. She went to live somewhere at Newington-green: I and the prisoner were a week in the house by ourselves.

Q. Were you in the confidence of your mistress? A. No, I am not exactly a lady's-maid, I call myself a housemaid: I did not particularly examine the duplicate, but my mother did: I saw the name of Newby on it, and there was a watch mentioned on it. I went to his box because I had missed some work, and he had given me some of it back a short time before: I expected to find some stockings which were missing: it was a small mahogany box.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What had he given up to you? A. I missed a pair of drawers and mentioned it; he put them on a table and told me I should find them there; I missed the stockings soon after and looked in his box for them.

FRANCES ANN RICHARDSON . I am Togwell's mother. I went to Gower-street the early part of July; she took and shewed me a small square box in the pantry; she opened it with a key and I saw the duplicates of a watch and ring in it; I looked at them and saw "a watch" written on one, and "a ring" on the other: I expected to see a watch and a ring: my daughter requested me not to mention it as she expected to be left in the house alone with the prisoner: the pawnbroker's name was Newby, No. 23, Drury lane. I afterwards told a friend of Mrs. Nelson, to inform her - that was the latter end of September or beginning of October: I thought it right Mrs. Nelson should know before my daughter left.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw nothing but two duplicates? A. No, I did not look further; I believe Mrs. Nelson was to leave London the next day: my daughter was afraid to be left with the prisoner if I told.

RICHARD PACK, ESQ. This is my watch - I bought it for Mrs. Pack fifteen years ago - it is worth eight guineas.

MRS. MARY PACK. I can swear to it.

JOHN NELSON . In April I resided with my mother, Elizabeth Mary Nelson, widow, who lives in Gower-street, in the parish of St. Giles in the fields. The prisoner was her footman: my grandmother lived in the house at that time - her name was Elizabeth Hector; this ring then belonged to her - I know it well - it is gold - she is now dead. When the prisoner was taken I attended before the Magistrate; what he said was not taken down; he acknowledged having picked up the ring on the drawing-room carpet.

Cross-examined. Q. How old was your grandmother? A. Seventy-five years: she was not infirm till within the last week.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. I heard him say he picked it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to ask the witness if there was more than one ring mentioned on the duplicate: I only found the ring on the 12th of July, and pledged it with some others of my own, but did not do it to defraud mistress of it.

FRANCES ELIZABETH TOGWELL. I believe there was more than one ring; I had not heard that one was missing.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37.

Reference Number: t18251027-8

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1614. JOSEPH IMPEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , at St. Giles in the fields , a time-piece, value 3 l., the goods of Alexander Millington , in his dwelling-house .

MARY YANDLE . I am servant to Mr. Alexander Millington, who lives at No. 80, Gower-street , in the parish of St. Giles in the fields - he occupies the whole house. On the 7th of October the prisoner was employed at the

house as a painter - he was missed at half-past five o'clock; I went up stairs to see the time and missed the time-piece, which was safe at a quarter to five o'clock: I found it on the 14th or 15th at the office. The painter's foreman and a carpenter were in the house at the time.

THOMAS DONDERS PERRY . I am shopman to Mr. Aldus, pawnbroker, Berwick-street, Soho. On Friday, the 7th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and brought this time-piece to pawn for 1 l. - I never saw him before; I asked whose it was; he said his own, and he had given 2 l. 10 s. for it: I asked what he had done with the glass shade which should cover it; he said a looking-glass had fallen down and broken, and had also broken the shade. I lent him 1 l. on it, but after he was gone, on examination, I ascertained that it was worth 5 l. to us. He came the next week for 15 s. more on it; I questioned him again - he said he had given 3 l. 10 s for it: I said you differ now in your story; he said he had made a mistake before, that it was 3 l. 10 s., and it had cost 16 l. I went out at the private door and gave him in charge of Gook: he gave me the name of John Tool, No. 44, Newport-street.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable, and took him in charge on the 14th, at Aldus's shop, took him to the watch-house, and on searching him, found the duplicate of a time-piece, pawned on the 7th. He at first denied having taken it, but afterwards said he had done it from distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was engaged to work at this house for two days; one of the labourers set me on; about half-past five o'clock I was very ill - six o'clock being the time to leave work, I left, and as I was going home I met a young man: he asked me to pawn some things for him; I said yes, if they were got honestly. I had been in his company, and won 3 l. of him at skittles, and said I would take them of him for that - he gave me the time-piece and two large table spoons.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18251027-9

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1615. ROBERT NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , at St. Mary-le-bone , in the dwelling-house of his Excellency Rufus King , a pocket-book, value 1 s.; two sovereigns, and a 10 l. Bank-note, the property of Richard Roberts .

RICHARD ROBERTS. I am butler to His Excellency Rufus King, ambassador for the United States: he lives in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. The prisoner was his footman . I had a pocket-book, containing a 10 l. note, and two sovereigns, locked up in my box in the pantry; I kept the key in a small drawer. On the evening of the 1st of October, I and the other servants were in the kitchen - the prisoner began to lay the things ready for supper, he said he was very thirsty, and should like some beer: I said the keys were in the dresser drawer, he could draw some, and draw the beer for supper at the same time: he went and was a long time gone; I went to see what he was after, and saw him in the pantry, making his escape from the side of the pantry, where my box was: I found him behind the door, and asked if he had drawn the beer; he said he could not find the key; I said it must be somewhere, perhaps it was in the cellar; I went to the cellar and found the key in the barrel; I returned to the pantry, found my box unlocked, the lid was down and the key in it; I had locked it that morning and put the key in the drawer; I said "Bless me, how came my box open?" he made no answer; I locked it without looking at the contents, and put the key into my pocket, and told him to come to supper; he said he would; he was walking about and I asked if he was not going to have any supper; he said he did not feel inclined; I said he could sit down - he did so for about five minutes, then lighted a candle, went out of the kitchen, and we thought that he was gone up to his room; I went and missed my pocket-book; I went up to his room with the watchman and Elizabeth Skinner; we found his room door shut - I knocked, and he asked who was there - I said it was me; he jumped out of bed and opened the door; I said I had lost my pocket-book with 12 l. in it, and did he know any thing of it; he said he did not: I said if he would deliver it up I would forgive him, and say nothing about it: he put his hand behind the drawers and brought the pocket-book out, and said he took it for nonsense, intending to return it in the morning. I found the money and note still in it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know that the parish is St. Mary-le-bone? A. I believe so. I lost nothing; we are not in the habit of playing tricks together.

ELIZABETH SKINNER . I was servant to Mr. King. I accompanied Roberts and the watchman up to the prisoner's room; Roberts said he had been robbed of his pocketbook out of his box, containing a 10 l. note, and two sovereigns; the prisoner said he had not got it. I saw him go behind the drawers, and deliver it to Roberts, who said, "Here you see, it contains a 10 l. note, and two sovereigns."

WILLIAM ESDAILE . I am a watchman, and accompanied the witnesses to the prisoner's room; we found the door fast, knocked, and he opened it; Roberts said he had lost this money: the prisoner said he knew nothing of it. I was put out of the room; they had some private conversation. I was afterwards admitted, and the pocketbook given to me.

JAMES MURRAY . I am a constable. I was sent for, and received the prisoner in charge with the property.

RICHARD ROBERTS. I believe it to be my note and sovereigns.

Prisoner. He promised to forgive me on my giving up the property.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character, and believing it to be his first offence.

Reference Number: t18251027-10

London Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

1616. TIMOTHY HALL GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , two sovereigns, and two half-crowns , the monies of John Beatson , and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-11

1617. JOHN PALIN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , four 1000 l. Bank notes, the property of Francis Robertson , from his person .

FRANCIS ROBERTSON, ESQ. On the 18th of November, 1824, I attended at the Auction-mart, to purchase an estate - I live at Kingston, Surry. I received nine notes of 1000 l. each, and one of 500 l., from Mr. Robert Clark Marsden , in Princes-street, Bank, not five minutes before I went to the Mart; I folded them in a paper, and put them into my left-hand trousers pocket. I bought the estate, and paid the 500 l. and five of the 1000 l. notes as a deposit, to Mr. Broderip, the solicitor. I had four 1000 l. notes left, which I folded in the same paper, and put it into the same pocket; there were a great many people in the room. I was anxious to go home, and was going out of the room a little before four o'clock; there was a considerable crowd, and the instant I got out I was putting on my great coat - when I got to the end of the room, where the crowd was less, I felt in my pocket, and the notes were gone; I thought they were stolen, but yet thought they might have dropped; I went back, looking on the ground, but did not find them; I immediately informed Mr. Thomas of my loss; he went over to the Bank, to stop payment of them. I went to France to make inquiry, and returned early in August. I had bills circulated here, and in France.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether the prisoner ever saw the bills you do not know? A. No. I was about two hours in the Auction room; I did not see the prisoner there - if he had been I think I should have observed him. I took great pains to inquire in France, and received information, which lead me to the agent of the Police; he went to a money changer there, and from information I gained there I went to the prisoner's house, on Holborn-hill; his wife was at home, and immediately told us where he was to be found; she said she had not got the keys; the officer broke open the drawer, where we found one of the 1000 l. notes in two parts, inclosed in a letter.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who directed you to the prisoner's house? A. A money changer in France, who keeps an hotel; she mentioned his name.

MR. ROBERT CLARK MARSDEN. (Looking at a cheque,) I took this cheque, for 9600 l., to Sir Peter Pole's, and received nine 1000 l., a 500 l., and a 100 l. Bank notes, which I delivered to Mr. Robertson.

THOMAS CLIFTON . I am clerk at Sir Peter Pole and Co's., and cashed this cheque, with a 100 l., a 500 l., and nine 1000 l. Bank notes; one of which was No. 302, dated the 13th of October, 1824.

MR. EDMUND ROBINS . I attended at this sale, and received the deposit money from Mr. Broderip; there were five 1000 l. and one 500 l. notes, and a cheque for 18 l. odd; I paid them into Messrs. Ransom's, with a considerable sum in cheques, but no other notes. I paid in the same notes as I received.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you sell the estate that day? A. No. I was in an elevated situation, and passed in and out of the room several times; I saw nobody like the prisoner there, to my recollection; the room was much thinner after the alarm.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you short sighted? A. Rather so. There might be 800 or 1000 persons in the room; I cannot recollect all their persons.

MR. FRANCIS BRODERIP . I attended as solicitor at this sale of the Marquis of Ormond's estate. I received the deposit money from Mr. Robertson, and handed the same to Mr. Robins.

MR. JOHN SQUIRE . I am one of the firm of Messrs. Ransom and Co. On the 18th of November five notes of 1000 l., forming part of 35,000 l. was paid in by Mr. Robins - No. 302 was not among them.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am one of the City Marshals. On the 2d of August last I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's house, on Holborn-bridge; he was not at home. I found a pocket-book in a bureau in the front parlour; I had a smith to force the drawer open; Mrs. Palin said Mr. Palin had the keys; the book contained a letter, written in English, and two parts of 1000 l. Bank note. I found the prisoner at Greenwich that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You went there in consequence of his wife directing you there? A. Yes, and I found the keys in his pocket - he made no attempt to escape.

MR. FRANCIS HOBLER . I am clerk to the Lord Mayor. On the 3d of August the prisoner was brought to the Mansion House; I took down his examination. (Reads.)

The prisoner being asked to account how he became possessed of the note, says "I took it in Paris, of Emerick, two months ago at a banking-house, or money-changer's; I paid 2500 francks and something - it has remained in my hands ever since. I brought it with me from France. [MR. COPE here produced a letter signed CAROLINE MARSEILLES : the prisoner continued] - I can prove she (Marseilles) paid the money. Emerick came to me at Marseilles' - I had seen him before at the Palais Royale; he said that the 1000 l. note which had been changed at his house he wished to have the money for. I said it was a good note; he said it had been stolen; I said I did not believe it; he said it was at his banker's; I said I was going away - I would leave the amount at the hotel which Marseilles kept. I left Paris the same afternoon, and left the money with Caroline Marseilles, and she forwarded the note to me, half at a time. I had previously been to his house with Mr. Vise - he was talking with two females, and asked them what they would give for a large note - they agreed and he had the money. The man came to me the following day. I might have been to his house before, to change a 5 or a 10 - he expressed dissatisfaction at the note; I asked if it was a forgery - he said he believed it was stolen - I wanted an English note. Vise had left Paris for some days. I was not present if it was offered a day or two before. I know I was there; I did not know where Vise was - it was William Vise - he lives at Islington, and is a haberdasher.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You do not mean that the prisoner delivered himself as you have read? A. It was in answer to questions. I have written the answers, but not the questions. The Lord Mayor said it became him as a man to give an account of it; the statement was not read over to him: he appears about seventy years old - his solicitor was with him. I took down what he said accurately.

MR. COPE. The letter signed "Marseilles" is not the letter the note was enclosed in, but it was found in the

same place, close to the note, which was in blank paper.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had he been in custody all night before he was examined? A. I took him at four o'clock, at Greenwich, dining with the officers of his parish; he was in the Compter all night.

The note was here produced, No. 302, 1000, dated 13th of October, 1824.

The Prisoner's Counsel called,

MR. THOMAS. I am solicitor for the prosecutor; I went with him to the Mart, and was next to him all the time he was there, till he left the room, after making the deposit; I was then in the auctioneer's room, under the inclosure. I observed several persons pressing on Mr. Robertson; I do not believe that the prisoner was one of them, but the pressure I allude to was before the estate was knocked down, and it being then at 85,000 l.; I thought they were persons who should not have to press up. Mr. Robertson came back afterwards, and said he had lost the notes; I ran to the Bank, and desired no 1000 l. notes should be paid. I saw nobody in the room resembling the prisoner; I do not believe he was near the prosecutor, but cannot say whether he was in the room or not. Mr. Robertson went half way towards the door, and made his way through the persons I had noticed.

MR. ROBERTSON. I found the crowd near the door very thin, so that I could have put on my great coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-12

1618. JOHN DADY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of John Waithman , from his person .

MR. JOHN WAITHMAN. I live in Fleet-street. On Sunday, the 2d of October, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking down Fleet-street , and thought I felt something at my pocket, I turned round, and observed the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand. I collared him, and took him as far as my own house, and gave him in charge; he begged hard for mercy, and said he would never do such a thing again.

DANIEL TURNER . I am an officer. Mr. Waithman delivered the prisoner into my charge; he said he hoped Mr. Waithman would forgive him. I have kept the handkerchief ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Fleet-street. The gentleman turned round, and the handkerchief dropped out of his pocket; I picked it up, and he collared me, and said I had picked his pocket; I begged for mercy, not being guilty of any such thing.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-13

1619. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , a deal end, value 2 s. 4 d. , the goods of Nicholas Richards .

PHILIP NICHOLS . I am in the employ of Nicholas Richards, a carpenter . On the evening of the 23d of September this deal end was in the passage of the shop, in London-wall . I was coming from the shop, and saw the prisoner come into the passage, take hold of it, and go out - I followed, and took him a few yards from the door, with it; it was two feet eight long. He said he was going to take it to Wood-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this passage for a necessary purpose, when this man seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-14

1620. THOMAS SPRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Everard Berckemyer , from his person .

JOHN EVERARD BERCKEMYER. I live in Doughty-street. On the 11th of October, about ten o'clock, I stopped in Newgate-street , to read a play bill; I perceived a very shabby boy approach me, but did not suspect him; he moved on, and immediately an officer came up, and asked if I had lost my handkerchief, and on feeling it was gone; he pursued, and brought the prisoner back: my handkerchief was produced at Guildhall.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. On the 11th of October I saw Mr. Berckemyer coming towards St. Martin's-le-grand; the prisoner was near him - I followed him as far as Butcherhall-lane; he kept near the prosecutor, who stopped at the corner of the lane, at a bookseller's - the prisoner was close behind him; some carts passed, and I being on the other side, could not see, but suspecting something, I went to the prosecutor, and from what he said, I went after the prisoner, and saw him crossing from St. Martin's-le-grand, shoving something into his breeches: I stopped him, and said he had something which did not belong to him; he said he had nothing: I believe another person was with him: I searched him, and at the back of his smallclothes, found a handkerchief, with Mr. Berckemyer's initials on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along and saw the handkerchief fall, but did not see who dropped it; I picked it up; a young lad said he had a right to half - I said I wanted one, and if there was any thing in the newspaper about it I would return it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-15

1621. THOMAS MUNNS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , sixteen handkerchiefs, value 20 s.; twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 20 s., and twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. , the goods of William Cook and others, his partners.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE CLAMP . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Widegate-street, Bishopsgate. On the 1st of September, sixteen handkerchiefs were pawned by the prisoner, and on the 17th twenty-eight yards of print, in the name of Munns; eight or nine days afterwards he brought twenty-six yards of Irish linen, and having suspicion, I asked him whose it was - he said his own; I asked what he was going to do with it - he said to make some shirts of it; I asked where he bought it - he said at Cook and Gladstones, Cheapside, at 12 1/2 d. a yard; I asked if he had a bill of it; he said he had; he felt in his pocket, and said he thought he had brought it with him, but he had not; he went for it, returned in ten minutes, and said he had lost it, and that he had bought the handkerchiefs and print at the same place; this was about twelve o'clock; I said if he called

about half-past twelve o'clock I would see if I could advance any thing on it - that I should go to Cook's, and inquire; he came to the shop - Mr. Gladstone was outside, and saw him; we all three went to the prosecutors' shop, and on the road I asked if he was certain he had bought the handkerchiefs there - he said Yes, of one of the young men in the shop, whom he could point out - we went there, and all the men were brought before him - he could not identify either of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Though you said you should go and inquire, still he was there ready to answer any questions? A. Yes; ten or eleven young men were brought before him - he said it was a shortish young man - there was a short young man.

JOHN GLADSTONE . I am in partnership with Mr. Wm. Cook and others, wholesale linen-drapers , Nos. 89 and 90, Cheapside . About the 1st of September, we were repairing the house - the prisoner was at work as a carpenter - bricklayers and plasterers were also at work: I was fetched to Clamp's on the 8th of October, and saw him come out of the door with Clamp; when we got to our house, I asked if he could fix on the young man who sold him the goods - he said he could; I called them singly - he selected none of them; he pointed out the part of the shop he bought the articles from; such goods were never placed there, nor sold there; he said he paid 10 d. each, for the handkerchiefs - they cost us 1 s. 5 d. - they have our private mark on them.

Cross-examined. Q. You would sell a piece of handkerchiefs with your private mark on it? A. Yes; we have separate warehouse for different goods - we have about twenty servants - I had them all up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a constable. I received him in charge; he saw all the servants, and said it was neither of them, but still insisted that he had bought them of somebody in the house, and next day he asked me if I thought he could get more than transportation.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was strongly recommended to mercy.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18251027-16

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1622. THOMAS RANDALL and ROBERT SHELDRICK were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , two half-crowns, and ten shillings, the monies of Miles Hudson , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-17

1623. JOHN REARDON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a carpenter's plow, value 8 s.; a stock, value 4 d., and a bit, value 4 d. , the goods of Edward Fall .

EDWARD FALL. I work at Mr. Terry's, at Belgrave-terrace, Pimlico . On the 29th of September I went to dinner at half-past twelve o'clock, and left my tools on the bench; my employer sent for me to return - I went back and found the prisoner in custody - my articles were taken from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS TERRY. I am a carpenter. Fall was in my employ on the 29th of September - when he was gone to dinner I heard the yard gate open - my wife looked through the window and said to me, "There is a person gone down the yard;" he went into the workshop and came out in about ten minutes, shut the shop door, and came down the yard as far as the archway by my house: I met him and said "My friend, what is your pleasure?" he said "I came for my tools:" I then took hold of him and found the saw tucked in the waistband of his breeches - the plow was behind him, and the stock in his pocket; he was very obstinate - I was about twenty minutes getting them - he was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I was stupidly drunk the night before, and was not much better that morning. I went to the yard to get some work - if I had been sober I should not have done it.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-18

1624. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a watch, value 30 s. , the goods of John Rose .

CHARLES THACKER . I am in the service of Mr. John Rose, watchmaker , No. 427, in the Strand . On the 19th of October the prisoner came into the shop to look at a mourning ring; I shewed him one at 1 l. - he said that was too large and wanted to look at another; I turned to the window, and on looking round, I saw a person bringing him in with the watch in his hand, which I had seen safe on the counter a quarter of an hour before; there was no other person in the shop but a lad who had been cleaning watches, which he put down on the counter to come to the window, to point out a ring which he thought might suit.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Can you undertake to say you saw the watch till it was put down on the counter by the prisoner? A. Yes, I saw it in his hand.

HENRY TOKELEY . I was passing near Mr. Rose's shop on the 19th of October, and saw the prisoner in the shop; he snatched a watch from the counter with his right hand, and ran toward the door; I seized him by the collar, and took him back. I did not see him lay the watch on the counter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my uncle's, and saw a mourning ring, which I wished to purchase; I went in and looked at it - it was rather too large - I asked if they had any smaller - they said No; I went out, and had got two or three doors off when the last witness came to me and said I had a watch; I said I had not - he pushed back me into the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-19

1625. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , two watches, value 30 s. , the goods of Robert Essex .

THOMAS COX . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Essex, pawnbroker , of the Strand . On the 23d of September there was a fire in part of our house; the prisoner was there assisting to move the goods; I was helping the fireman

to get the water up stairs, and on turning my head, I saw the prisoner take two watches from a drawer in the shop - he put them into his right-hand pocket: I told the constable not to let him pass; he brought him back, and I took the watches from him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take them or did I give them to you? A. I cannot say, as the fire was raging violently at the time.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner in the shop - Cox told me to stop him; I brought him back and found a substance in his pocket - he said "That is the property," and gave it to Cox.

Prisoner's Defence. Seeing a fire I went and told Mr. Cox of the danger - a person told me to remove some gunpowder - I was removing some other things to the house of Mr. Robinson, and could have taken many things if I had been disposed, but I was not; I removed the boxes or drawers, which had those watches in them, and two watches fell down - I took them up and put them into my pocket, being much confused.

WILLIAM EDWARDS re-examined. Q. Was he employed to remove things? A. No; there had been orders by the firemen not to remove any thing, which he must have heard.

Prisoner to THOMAS COX. Q. Had I not been employed to remove things before these were taken? A. Yes.

JURY. Q. Were these watches in a drawer? A. Yes, there was a pile of drawers, and this was the top one; he only moved the gunpowder.

Q. Had he left the house before he was stopped? A. Yes, he had got two doors off when the constable brought him back.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-20

1626. JOHN GUM was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , two books, value 7 s. , the goods of Nathaniel Smyth Machin and Robert Debenham .

JAMES WINSTANLEY . I am porter to Messrs. Nathaniel Smyth Machin and Robert Debenham, auctioneers , King-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner came to our auction room, and looked at some books; I said they were sold; he put them down, and went into the other room; in a few minutes a lad came and said he had got something in his umbrella; I said "What have you got that does not belong to you?" he said "Nothing." I found these two books in his umbrella - they had been sold about twenty minutes before, and placed in the back room.

Prisoner. Q. Were there any other books with them? A. Yes; several lots, but none loose; there were some drawing and mathematical instruments: it is not a rule not to touch books after twelve o'clock.

GEORGE LEADBITTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and produce the books, which the prosecutor said he had taken from him, and he had got them from the auction-room: he seemed much agitated, and begged to see Mr. Machin, and to explain something to him in the hope that he would forgive him.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated that he had put the books inside his umbrella, it being a rule not to examined lots after twelve o'clock, intending to look at them with a view of purchasing them.

JURY to WINSTANLEY. Q. Were the books down in the umbrella? A. Yes, they were.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-21

1627. CHARLES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , a watch, value 2 l.; a chain, value 2 l.; a seal, value 6 s.; a key, value 2 s.; a snuff-box, value 2 l., and a shirt pin, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Birch , from his person .

JOSEPH BIRCH. I am a musician , and live in Duke-street, Adelphi. I was returning home on the 7th of August, about five o'clock in the morning; I had seen a friend home to Broad-court, Covent-garden. I saw the prisoner in Bow-street - he accosted me as I was trying to get a glass of porter at the Brown Bear, public-house; he said he could take me to a house, which he did, in Clare-market , and went in there with me - we had some cold gin and water - I fell asleep, and when I awoke he was gone; I missed my watch, seal, and key, my silver snuffbox, and a gold pin with an amethyst; three of the articles are now in Court; I did not see him again till he was at Bow-street. I should have known him from a thousand. I had been with him about a quarter of an hour before I went to sleep.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You had got a little fresh? A. Yes, but I could walk; there were several persons in the tap-room, where I went to sleep, but none near me I think: I awoke before six o'clock; I can swear I was in a condition to swear to the prisoner; I had drank a little wine - I think not above a pint; but I had seen my friend home, who was worse than me, and the fatigue was such that I wanted a glass of porter before I got home; I did not see the prisoner again for seven weeks - I had looked at my watch in Bow-street.

WILLIAM DUTTON TOWNSHEND . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Russell-street, Covent-garden. On the 8th of August the prisoner pawned this seal and key.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen him before? A. No, but there was a little dialogue between us, because he said his name was Thompson, and a person said "Is that a namesake of yours," which made me look at him more than I should have done; he was there about five minutes - another person applied to redeem these articles about a fortnight afterwards. I saw the prisoner again at Bow-street: he offered me a pin at the time he brought them but I did not take it, because it was broken.

JAMES BAKER . I took up the prisoner, and found the duplicate on him of the pin.

BENJAMIN REEVES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pin which was taken in by a person in our shop; I was not there - it is an amethyst pin, and is broken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not the person who took any of the property.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-22

1628. RICHARD MOORE ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a bag, value 3 d.; a handkerchief, value 4 d.; a purse, value 2 d.; two shillings, and

two sixpences, the property of Sophia Roberts , from her person .

SOPHIA ROBERTS. I am single . On the 2d of October, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Clarges-street ; I had a bag hanging on my right arm, with a pocket handkerchief, a bunch of keys, and a purse with two shillings and two sixpences in it. About the middle of the street I felt a snatch - I turned round and saw a man crossing the street; I called Stop thief! and heard a person say "It is all right, I have it;" I crossed the street and saw the prisoner in custody of a coachman. I cannot tell whether he had the same dress on as the person who snatched the bag; the property was given to me by some person there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GREAVES . On Sunday evening, the 2d of October, I was at the door of Lady Atwood, in Clarges-street - I heard a female cry of Watch! watch! stop thief! the prisoner came across the road, running from the place - I stopped him, and he said "I have done nothing, let me go;" I said "I shall keep you till the watchman comes:" the lady then came up, and the watchman; the bag was picked up five or six yards from the place where I stopped him, by another man - the lady said "That is mine, and this is the man who robbed me of it."

DAVID ROWBOTTOM . I picked up the bag - I gave it to the prosecutrix; I saw the prisoner in custody.

CHARLES FOX . I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran immediately, and a person stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-23

1629. SARAH HARRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , two pillows, value 2 s.; a quilt, value 4 s.; a bolster, value 2 s., and a blanket, value 2 s., the goods of Martha Rayner , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARTHA RAYNER. I am a widow, and live in Huswell-street . The prisoner hired a lodging of me two years ago, and left on the 8th of this month without giving me notice, and left the key in the door; I went in the next day, and missed these articles, which had been let to her with the lodging; I found five duplicates there.

THOMAS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce this property, which was pawned by the prisoner, or her daughter. I am certain the prisoner pawned some, but I cannot say which: I have known her two or three years.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I took the prisoner. She acknowledged taking the articles and said they were Mrs. Rayner's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I own having pawned the things through great distress, under the determination of getting them again: she had said I should stay no longer than the ensuing week; my daughter had sent me word to go down to Egham; I left the duplicates, and a note, saying that on my return I would replace every thing.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-24

1630. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , four silver studs, value 8 s.; six towels, value 3 s.; a brush, value 1 s.; a pair of trousers, value 10 s.; two razors, value 5 s.; a neckcloth, value 1 s.; three pairs of stockings, value 2 s.; two pillows, value 2 s.; and a night-cap, value 6 d., the goods of James Henry Crawford , his master .

JAMES HENRY CRAWFORD. The prisoner was in my service. After he left me I went with the officer to the house of Dr. Jenner - I found him there and said "You have got yourself into a pretty situation;" he denied robbing me at all: I said it was useless his denying it, as I had seen part of the articles at his lodgings: he then fell on his knees and begged I would forgive him - some of them are new.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. How long had he been in your service? A. Since May last - he had a good character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. I went to Chesterfield-street, and found the prisoner there; I had been to his lodgings in Mill-street, and found some of the articles there.

Prisoner's Defence. These were cast away clothes, and were in a box of which Mr. Crawford has the key: I took the razors to get cleaned; he went to put on the trousers and they would not button, and he gave them to me to put in the box; I left the house in a day or two, and took the box, to let him have them when he wanted them.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-25

1631. CHARLES TANDY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , thirteen bottles, value 2 s.; six quarts of porter, value 2 s, and two quarts of ale, value 6 d., the goods of William Cornelius Offley ; his master ; and AMY WATSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM CORNELIUS OFFLEY. I live in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner Tandy lived eighteen months with me as confidential servant , and had access to my cellar whenever he asked for the key. I had given him no direction, on the 4th of October, to take any ale or porter out: he went to take four bottles of wine to a gentleman - I was shewn some bottles of porter by Mr. Hall, about eight o'clock that evening: I had given him directions to watch my premises previously, in consequence of information I had received: I had seen the female about my premises but she had never been employed by me; I never allowed Tandy to give her any ale or porter.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Do your servants ever take samples out without your orders? A. No.

THOMAS HALL . I am a chemist and druggist, and live opposite to Mr. Offley - he has the cellars under my house. On the evening of the 4th of October, I saw the female prisoner and Tandy's wife, near the house - Tandy put a basket, which I considered full, out of the cellar, on the flap, between the two women - Tandy's wife took it up and they both went away toward Bedford-court, in the direction of St. Martin's-lane; I then saw Tandy follow

them with a bottle in each hand, which he delivered to the female prisoner, in Mary's-buildings; he then went away, and I lost sight of him; I went up to the women and pushed them into a shoemaker's shop, when I got an officer; I looked at the basket, while it was in the shop, and it contained nine pint bottles of ale and four of stout; I then saw each of the women take two quart bottles of stout from the front of their dress, which they put down by the side of the basket - I asked the women what they had got - they said beer - I said they had got it from Offley.

Cross-examined. Q. Were these bottles put up from the cellar in the usual way? A. No, they generally open the whole flap.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer. I took the two women into custody in Mr. Harding's shop, and found these bottles there.

WILLIAM SMITH . I took Tandy on the evening of the 5th of October, in Tavistock-court; Mr. Offley was with me: Tandy fell on his knees and begged forgiveness.

TANDY'S Defence. I was sent to Bond-street with two bottles of wine - I know no more of the case - I might have passed this prisoner in the street, but she received nothing of me.

Seven witnesses gave Watson a good character.

TANDY - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

WATSON - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-26

1632. JAMES HOAR was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL MUMFORD . I am in partnership with John Ride - we are corn-dealers , and live in Newcastle-street, in the Strand . The prisoner was in our service; he was to carry out goods, and to bring what money he received when he returned with his cart. On the 23d of July we had sold some malt for 7 l. 8 s., and some hops for 2 l. 2 s., to Mr. James Robinson - the prisoner took them but never accounted for the money.

JOHN RIDE. The prisoner never accounted to me for the money.

ANN ROBINSON . I am the wife of James Robinson. On the 5th of September I paid the prisoner nine sovereigns and some silver - I have his bill, which he gave me at the time, and the receipt which he wrote.

SAMUEL MUMFORD re-examined. Q. Has the prisoner accounted for any money since the 5th of September? A. Yes, for money received from other customers, but not for this. I accused him of keeping this money and he said "The Lord have mercy upon me."

Prisoner. I hope you will be merciful to me.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-27

1633. ANDREW ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a coat, value 40 s.; a coach-glass, value 30 s., and a piece of baize, value 2 s. , the goods of George Forbes .

JOSEPH SMITH . I was in the service of Mr. G. Forbes, of Sloane-street . On the morning of the 27th of September, about five minutes after six o'clock, I met the prisoner about fifteen yards from the stable door; I caught hold of him and said "You have got something here which don't belong to you;" he then threw down the coat, the glass, and green baize, and got away from me: I called to the watchman, who stopped him.

ARCHIBALD BRECKEY . I am the watchman. I saw the prisoner running from the stable - he dropped the coat, and the coachman called to me - I stopped the prisoner directly, and took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM ALLEY . I am watch-house-keeper. I searched the prisoner there, and found a crow bar on him.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. I found this crow-bar in his coat pocket; I compared it with the marks on the door of the stable - it appeared to fit exactly.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-28

1634. JOHN HENRY BLACKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 40 lbs. of nails, value 10 s. , the goods of William Wood .

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a Bow-street patrole. On the 15th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at Hyde-park-corner, with a basket, which I thought appeared very heavy: I went and asked what he had got; he said a few nails, which he had bought of two men down the road for two pots of beer; he said there was about 20 lbs.; I said there must be more than that; I afterwards got them weighed, and there were 40 lbs. - they are worth about 1 l. He said it was a bad job, and what should he give me to make it up.

ROBERT BOCKET . I am in the employ of William Wood; he is a carpenter , and lives near Shepherd's-bush - the prisoner was at work for him at Kensington ; I gave him the key of the vaults where a quantity of nails are kept, on Thursday, the 15th of September: I went to them on the Monday following, and missed a great number of nails, the same kind as these, but I cannot swear to them.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-29

1635. EDWARD KEENE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a stone jar, value 2 s., and eight quarts of wine, value 6 s. , the goods of Priscilla Edwards , widow .

WILLIAM HEALEY . I am footman to Lady Knightly . On the morning of the 20th of September, she changed her residence, and the prisoner assisted in removing her goods - he was discharged in the afternoon, being drunk. I went the same evening to his lodgings with Fish, the officer, where we found this cask of gooseberry wine, which had been made by Priscilla Edwards, our housekeeper , for her own use - we found his wife in the room.

JOHN FISH . I went with Healey, and found this wine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and knew nothing of it till I awoke and saw it on the table.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-30

1636. HENRY MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , seventeen pieces of stained paper, value 2 l. , the goods of Horatio Robson and George Hale .

HORATIO ROBSON. I am in partnership with Mr. George Hale; we live in Piccadilly , and are decorators to his Majesty . About the 7th of October I told the people

in my shop to go and paper the bed-room of Mr. Huskinson; they looked for the paper, but it could not be found - there was some conversation about it, and I put some more of the same paper in hand. About ten or eleven o'clock the same morning the high constable of Staines came to our house, and brought a piece of the paper, part of the eighteen pieces missing; I had seen it in my house about the middle of August, when it came in - it was a particular pattern, and none had been made like it.

JAMES WATERER . I am a cabinet-maker, and live at Chertsey. On the 5th of October the prisoner came to my house, to sell some paper. I bought six pieces of him, which I gave afterwards to the constable.

JAMES ADAMS . I am high constable of Staines. I saw the prisoner offer a piece of this paper for sale at my door, and he said he had ten pieces more at the public-house, which he had bought at an auction room in Argyle-street, London; I said, "All paper is made under the Excise, and has the year it is made in stamped on it, and this was made this year." I then said, "What do you want for them?" he said a sovereign; I said, "Leave this piece, and go and fetch the other;" I called him back, and said, "Take this away, and let me see no more of you in this town;" he took it, and went away. I heard the same evening that he had been offering it about the town, and went to the public-house, where I found him, and took him to the Magistrate; we came up to town, and took a coach - the prisoner said, "Give me the check-string, and I will stop where I bought the paper;" he stopped at the back of Trotter's bazaar - we went in, but they knew nothing of it; the prisoner then said, "You will have a nice job to find it, and you may all be d - d." I then took him to Bow-street.

JOHN CROW . I am an artist. I drew the pattern of this paper about the middle of March last.

WILLIAM BULL . I made this paper, and delivered it on the 18th of August. I never heard of any pattern like this before.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-31

1637. SIMON SOLOMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , five pairs of shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of John Waugh .

JOHN WAUGH. I live in Whitechapel-road . On Monday, the 17th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, a person came, and said I had lost a bundle of shoes; I ran out, and overtook the prisoner with them. I had seen them safe when I lighted the lamps.

JOHN NEWMAN . I was going along the street, and saw a person hand the shoes off a hook, and give them to the prisoner - I gave information, and pursued him down Green Dragon-alley; he threw them behind him, and struck me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from the West India docks, where I have worked fourteen years; the prosecutor came up to me twice, and then came a third time, and said I had stolen some shoes; I said if I had he might take me where he pleased, for I had not taken any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-32

1638. HUMPHREY TOMKINS and WILLIAM SEABRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , a sheet, value 6 s. , the goods of Samuel William Pyall .

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL. I live in Frederick-street, Regent's Park . On Friday last, about six o'clock in the evening, my wife was in the wash-house, when a lad looked over the wall, and asked if she had lost any thing - she then missed the property off a line; there were three men running; I went out after them, and met my son-in-law, with Tomkins in custody.

THOMAS JAMES . On Friday evening I was in Little Albany-street, Regent's-park, and saw the two prisoners, in company with another person; Seabright helped Tomkins to the top of the wall, and he took a sheet from the line; they went towards Little Brook-street, towards the Hampstead-road.

HENRY RACKHAM . On Friday evening I went into the street about ten minutes past six o'clock, and saw Tomkins in Laxton-place, with the sheet wrapped up in a dark handkerchief; I asked him what he had done with it; he turned round, and threw it down an area. I got it up.

HANNAH PYALL . I am the prosecutor's wife. I hung three sheets on a line about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon of Friday last; I saw them safe about six o'clock - in about ten minutes a little boy called to me, and asked if I had lost any thing; I looked, and missed the sheet - I gave the alarm - my son and husband ran out; my son caught Tomkins, and brought him back with the sheet.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am an officer. I took Tomkins into custody, and Seabright the next day. I saw the witness, Thomas James, there, and when he saw Seabright he said that was one of the men who committed the robbery.

THOMAS JAMES re-examined. Q. Did you see Tomkins take the sheet? A. Yes. I knew him by sight before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TOMKINS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

SEABRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-33

1639. SARAH READ was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , a coat, value 8 s. , the goods of John Allen .

ANN ALLEN . I am the wife of John Allen, a tailor , of Church-street, Soho . The prisoner came into our shop about seven o'clock in the evening of the 8th of October, and offered some oil to sell - I turned round to stir my fire, and when I turned round she was gone. I found two waistcoats on the floor, and a coat was gone off the counter; a young woman who was there ran out, and caught her with it.

ELIZABETH HOYTON . I was at Allen's shop, and saw the prisoner; I did not see her go out, but as soon as she was gone we missed the coat; I pursued, and she had it on her arm; she appeared tipsy, but was sensible; she owned she had taken it, and was going to borrow 5 s. to pay Mr. Allen for it.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; she said she had taken the coat from the counter; she was quite tipsy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I owned that I had my husband's coat, and

took this by mistake. I said I had taken it to pawn to pay a man for beating some carpets for me.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-34

1640. JOHN CUNNINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , a jacket, value 4 s. , the goods of Peter Mackenzie .

PETER MACKENZIE. I am apprentice on board the Henry Davidson , which laid in the West India Docks . The prisoner had been working on board the same ship. I missed my jacket out of my chest in the cook's-berth, on the 3d of October; it was safe on the Saturday before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE FAULKNER . I am an apprentice on board the Henry Davidson. I received information from Mackenzie, and went on shore. I saw the prisoner with his own coat on his arm, and this jacket under it; he said he had found it on the windlass of the Thomas, of Bristol.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am an officer. I was standing at the entrance of the West India docks, and saw Faulkner accusing the prisoner. He said he took the jacket from the Thomas, of Bristol.

Prisoner. I never knew I had got it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-35

1641. CHARLES HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , two saws, value 7 s. , the goods of James Pink .

JAMES PINK. I am a carpenter . On the 11th of October I was at work in Upper Arthur-street ; I went to dinner at twelve o'clock, and left my tools in the front room first floor; there were three saws in my basket. James Moore came to me with his father and the prisoner; he asked me if these were my saws, and Moore, Sen. said he saw the prisoner come out of the house where I had been working, turn round, and try the door after him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES MOORE . On the 11th of October I saw the prisoner came out of the house, with these two saws. I took him and the saws to Mr. Pink.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-36

1642. THOMAS HALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 20 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. , the goods of a certain person unknown ; and JOHN BLACKERLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN TAYLOR . On the 8th of September I saw Halls go into Blackerly's shop, with some lead. I have not found any owner for it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not go to Halls' master's, to inquire if he had lost any lead, and he said so far from it, he was a very honest boy? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-37

1643. JOHN KITE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a time-piece, value 30 s. , the goods of William Jones .

CHARLOTTE JONES . I am the wife of William Jones - we live in Seymour-crescent . On the morning of the 11th of October I was cleaning my passage, and went into the kitchen for some water - when I came up again a gentleman gave me information; I went into the parlour, and missed the time-piece off the mantel-piece.

JAMES MONIGHAM . On the morning of the 11th of October I saw the prisoner in company with two others - he went into the house, and came out in about half a minute without any thing; he went in a second time, and came out with something before him, and a cloth over it. I gave information, and then pursued, and took him, but he had not got it then.

CHARLES COUSINS . I took charge of the prisoner. I asked him how he came to steal the time-piece; he said first that he had not done it, but afterwards that it was the first time he had done such a thing.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-38

1644. JOHN MUNDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , three gowns, value 10 l.; a scarf, value 3 l.; a shawl, value 6 l.; a bag, value 1 l.; a fan, value 10 s.; a card case, value 10 s.; an apron, value 1 l.; two printed books, value 30 s., and a box, value 1 s. , the goods of James Morley .

JAMES MORLEY. I live in Mecklenburgh-square. I went out on the 14th of October, and hired a hackney coach to return home.

SARAH MORLEY . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 14th of October my husband met me and some friends at the Angel, at Islington, on my return from Derby; he hired a hackney coach and a chariot; I saw my box put on the footboard of the coach in which we rode; a lady and gentleman rode in the chariot; we went home to Mecklenburgh-square , where the coach was discharged - the chariot staid. When we came to look over the luggage next morning the box was missing; it contained the articles stated - I have not seen any of them since.

JAMES MORLEY re-examined. Q. Did you notice the number of the coach? A. I did, but I have forgotten it. I remembered the number of the chariot, and found by that the driver of the coach; they were hired about half past nine o'clock.

JOSEPH GLOVER . I was driver of the chariot; the prisoner drove the coach. When we got to Mecklenburgh-square the coach was dismissed, and I remained. A day or two afterwards Mr. Morley came, and asked if I knew the driver of the coach; I saw the prisoner a day or two after that, and told him if he had the box to take it home; he said he had made it away: I said it was a very bad job.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known him long? A. About a year and a half; I did not see the coach on the stand that night: I do not know the number, the colour, nor the owner of it. The prisoner does not drive regularly - he stopped at the house about a quarter of an hour.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner on the 20th of October, in Bedford-street, Covent-garden. I told him I wanted him for a felony, and asked if he knew any thing about a box; he said No. I then took him to Bow-street, and found upon him 7 s., a key, and some copper. He said he lived at Westminster, but did not recollect the name of the street - it was a private house, but he refused to tell me where.

MR. MORLEY. I saw Glover on the Monday following, and offered him two guineas to tell me who drove the coach; he did not tell me the name till I threatened him with an action, as being an accessory.

Q. Did you notice the coachman? A. I noticed his being a short man, but I cannot swear to him. I cannot be positive whether Glover ever said he did not know the man.

WILLIAM CHEQUER . I am servant to Mr. Morley. I saw the coach and chariot at the door; I did not notice the coachman, but I remember Glover. I took the things from the coach into the house, but did not take any thing off the foot board.

Prisoner's Defence. I never carried the fare, nor knew any thing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-39

1645. CATHERINE RICHARDS , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , three shirts, value 30 s.; seven cravats, value 7 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 9 s.; a pair of drawers, value 1 s.; a bag, value 6 d.; seven pairs of stockings, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s., and a towel, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Constable .

CHARLES CONSTABLE. I am an attorney of Symond's-inn. On the 15th of October, Ann Taylor brought me some linen from her mistress, and I gave her the dirty linen, stated in the indictment, to take back; I paid her a sovereign - she tied it in the corner of a handkerchief, and carried away the linen in a bag and a basket.

ANN TAYLOR. I am turned eleven years of age. I live with Mrs. Smithers. I took the linen from Mr. Constable, and tied the sovereign in a handkerchief - I put the bag in a basket, and a cloth over it. I went on to the Bull public-house, at Somer's-town, where I saw the prisoner, whom I had seen before; she said, "Will you go on an errand for me?" I said, "I will run home with these things, and then go." She said, "Can't you come now? it is only just here." I said, "I am afraid to leave the things;" she said, "You had better go now." I put the things down at the corner of Smith-street, and went to a tailor's shop to get some work and five shillings for her. I left my brother with them - and when I was going, he cried, "Nancy! Nancy! the woman is running away with the things." I went back, and cried - "Stop Thief!" - a gentleman went and brought her back.

WILLIAM COTTON . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner from Mr. Fielder, who gave me the property.

JOHN FIELDER . I live in Brook-street, St. Pancras. On the morning of the 15th of October, I heard the little girl cry - "She has got my things." I saw the prisoner run with the basket, and followed her into a court. I found her in a privy with the basket, which I took up and gave to the constable.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-40

1646. WILLIAM WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , an umbrella, value 7 s. , the goods of James Beardswell .

JAMES BEARDSWELL. I am a silversmith and salesman , and live at Hammersmith . On Saturday, the 24th day of September, I saw a hand put into my shop, and an umbrella taken out; I went, and cried, "Stop Thief!" - I have seen it since - it was found in a garden.

FREDERICK VIZEY . I was at the corner of Angel-lane, opposite to Mr. Beardswell's house; I heard the cry of "Stop Thief!" and the prisoner ran up the lane by me, with the umbrella in his hand. I pursued and took him - he threw the umbrella over a wall into Mr. Brooks' garden, and said, "For God's sake let me go, I am distressed to the uttermost."

FRANCIS BROOKS . I am a carter. I found this umbrella on my premises.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm of Stop thief! I ran - I overtook a great many, and a gentleman took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-41

1647. JOHN GOULD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , a ring, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Folks , from the person of Jane, his wife .

JANE FOLKS . I am the wife of Thomas Folks. I was in Holborn , at ten o'clock at night, on the 25th of September. I fell in a fit, and found myself in an apothecary's shop; the prisoner and some other persons were there - he took me from the shop towards my house, and as we were going along I said, "I am poorly, let me stand here." He then took hold of my arm with his left hand, and with his right hand took my chased ring from my finger, which he put into his right hand trousers' pocket. I said, "Oh! dear, my ring;" he was collared instantly.

JOHN LYONS . I was in Holborn about ten o'clock; I saw the prosecutrix in a fit - I said it would be better to take her to a doctor's shop. I afterwards saw her and the prisoner come out of the shop, and heard her say - "Oh! my ring." I seized the prisoner - he was taken by the watchman, and the ring found in his pocket.

JOSEPH DOBBIN . I am watch-house keeper. I received the prisoner at the watch-house, and found the ring.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Holborn, and saw the prosecutrix in a fit; I held her, and took her into a doctor's shop - the doctor said, take her home. A little while after we got out she fell again, and the ring came off her finger into my left hand. I did not take it off; she directly said - "My ring," and I said - "I have got it."

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-42

1648. WILLIAM HAMMOND and SAMUEL COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Bath , from his person .

RICHARD BATH. On the 27th of September, I was in the City-road , going home from the city - I felt something at my left hand coat pocket: I turned round, and saw the two prisoners behind me, arm in arm. I seized Hammond by the collar, and accused him of having the handkerchief - they both spoke together, and denied it. I accused him a second time, and saw the handkerchief fall on the ground; while I stooped to pick it up, Collins ran away, but he was stopped about fifteen yards from me, without my losing sight of him. As we were going to the watch-house, Hammond said, he hoped I would

not do any thing to him, for he had friends in distressed circumstances.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBARTS. Q. When did they deny it? A. When I first took them.

Prisoner COLLINS. Q. Did not two gentlemen come to you and say, "This is not the man I am sure?" A. Yes; they pointed out Hammond, and said it was not Collins.

CHARLES CONSTABLE . I am a messenger. I was in the City-road, and saw the two prisoners coming towards me, arm in arm. - Mr. Bath was on before me, and the prisoners turned round and went after him - they observed his coat pockets, and I thought they meant to rob him. Mr. Bath stopped at a saddler's shop, and when I got on about thirty yards he passed me again; I then crossed the road, but kept my eye on them. I saw Mr. Bath turn round and take Hammond, and call to some person to take Collins. I followed and took him - I saw the handkerchief on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAMMOND'S Defence. I was coming down the City-road, and followed this gentleman - he put his hand to his pocket, and I suppose missed his handkerchief - he turned round and accused me of having it. I had not seen it - Collins was walking by my side pretty sharp - he was pursued and taken, we had not been together.

COLLINS' Defence. I was going to my aunt's. I was walking sharply, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - two gentlemen said, they were sure I had nothing to do with it.

HAMMOND - GUILTY . Aged 18.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-43

1649. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Frederick Burke , from his person .

FREDERICK BURKE. I am a clerk to a coachmaker . I was in Long Acre on the evening of the 19th of September; I am rather lame, and was walking rather slowly with my hands behind me under my coat. I felt a jerk and turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me; I took hold of him, and said "You are the boy who has robbed me." He was taken into custody - he said he was not the person who took it.

WILLIAM BATEMAN . I am thirteen years of age. I was walking down Long-acre, and saw the prisoner and another boy walking behind a gentleman in a brown coat; the prisoner said to me, "Why don't you go on, you young monkey." I then saw him put his hand into Mr. Burke's pocket, and take the handkerchief out. - Mr. Burke's turned round and said, "Now I am done." The prisoner gave the handkerchief to the other boy, who ran up Long-acre. I was in the road at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was in Long-acre, I saw a boy pick the gentleman's pocket, and run away with the handkerchief; the gentleman turned round and said, I had robbed him. I said, I had not. Two gentlemen came up and said, "You have got the wrong person."

FREDERICK BURKE. Nothing of the kind was said.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-44

1650. PHILIP WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , fourteen glass bottles, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Charles Hibbert and John Hibbert .

JOSEPH WEST . I am foreman to Messrs. Charles and John Hibbert - they carry on the coopering and bottle trade ; the prisoner was in their employ. On the 22d of September I stopped him as he went out of their warehouse; I took him back, and found five bottles upon him; he begged me to look over it - I told him I could not, as I suspected he had been at it some days before.

THOMAS MOODY . I took the prisoner. I found nine bottles more at his lodging.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been at sea all my life; I was eighteen years in the navy, but the last vessel I was on board of was the Albion steam packet - the mate had beer in some of these bottles to sell to the passengers; the captain said I might bring them on shore to make a shilling or two of. When I got this place I used to take my beer and tea in them, and the bottles found on me were my own. The woman of the house told the officer she knew the bottles had been in the house some time.

THOMAS MOODY re-examined. Q. Did you hear any thing of this? A. The woman said he had belonged to the Albion steam boat, and had brought some bottles on shore, but the bottles found on him were quite clean.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-45

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1651. HENRY> CORAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 cwt. of greaves, value 18 s., the goods of John Beit , his master .

JOHN BEIT. I am a merchant - I carry on my business in Savage-gardens; I live at Marsh-side, Edmonton . The prisoner was in my employ - I paid him weekly. I sent him on the day stated in the indictment to Globe-yard, Thames-street, to get some greaves and some meal; I went to the warehouse soon after him, and saw the greaves delivered to him: they were in cakes, and some small pieces to make up the weight. I was at home at Edmonton when he came home that evening, between eight and nine o'clock - I desired him to shoot the meal into a bin, and to draw the cart, leaving the greaves in it, into the shed; the next morning I went round my premises, and saw the ten cakes of greaves and the small pieces in the cart; I ordered him to put them on the top of the granary when he had done attending the cows. I then left for London - I returned in the evening, and on going round the following morning I found there were only eight cakes in the place where I had desired them to be put; there were two cakes missing - I asked him about it - he said he did not know how many cakes he had received; he had had 5 cwt. but did not notice the number. I then made some inquiries to ascertain how they had been got away from my premises, which are enclosed with a fence and moat - there is only one bridge over which any thing could pass, and as my wife had been in town she could not have given any one leave to have taken any thing off. I heard that my cart had been lent to a Mr. Waldron, and I asked the prisoner how he dared to lend it to him without my orders; he said he thought it very hard he could not lend it to him. I then went to a Magistrate, and got a warrant to

search Mr. Waldron's premises - I took the constable first to my house, to ascertain whether I was correct. We weighed the greaves, and found about 1 cwt. deficient; I then asked the prisoner about it, who said he knew nothing about it. We then went down to the water side, and met Waldron; I said, "You borrowed my cart yesterday" - "Yes," said he. I then said, "There are some greaves missing, and I shall search all the neighbourhood, and begin with your premises;" he made some objection, and we all went on together. I said to the prisoner "How many cakes did you give Waldron?" he said one; we went on, and under a hay-stack we found a cake and part of one.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that when you asked how many cakes he had given away he said one? A. I believe I did, but I will not swear it. I answered all the questions he proposed to me. The prisoner said he did not know what number of cakes there were; he had put them away as I directed, and thought they were all right - he was not an in-door servant; he slept there that night by my desire.

JOHN FOOT . I am a constable. Mr. Beit called on me, and I went with him, and weighed the greaves - he found a deficiency - we went on towards the house of Waldron, and met him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the prisoner say he had given a cake to Waldron? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false. The pigs can get into the premises, over the moat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-46

1652. JOHN GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , two saw handles, value 2 s., and twelve planes, value 12 s., the goods of James Watt , his master .

JAMES WATT. I am a carpenter and builder , of Paddington - the prisoner worked for me sixteen or eighteen months, and left me about four months ago. I had missed some saws and planes, and a great many locks, but did not think they were lost. On the 11th of September, when the prisoner had left me about two months, I made it known on the wharf that I had lost this property, and on the following Monday I missed some more locks from a shelf, and some planes. The prisoner had no business on my premises at that time. I have seen some of my property in the pawnbroker's hands.

JOHN LUCIE . I am a carter. On Sunday, the 11th of September, I saw the prisoner come into the yard of No. 10, at the basin at Paddington - he went up the ladder into Mr. Watt's premises, and brought out a basket; I saw him there again the following Sunday, when he again went up the ladder, unlocked the door, and staid about ten minutes - he then came out with something in a sack, which he hung by his side.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you at the time? A. I was in my own house or the yard. I have known him by working there.

THOMAS SMITH . I am assistant to Mr. Gideon, a pawnbroker, of Stafford-street, Lisson-green. I have twelve planes, which were pawned at our house in February last, but I cannot tell by whom.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner in Millbank-street - Mr. Watt was there, and found in his box a saw set: we then went to another lodging, in Pye-street, and there found two saw handles, which were identified; I then went to Mr. Gideon's, who produced these planes.

(Planes and saw handles sworn to.)

Prisoner. This property has been in my possession fifteen years. Did not I take you to my lodgings and shew you every thing I had? Witness. Yes.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring his innocence.

GUILTY. Aged 40. Of stealing the saw-handles . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-47

1653. JOHN WOOLSGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , ten loaves of bread, value 6 s. 8 d., the goods of James Hedges Keen , his master .

JAMES HEDGES KEEN. I am a baker , and live in Henry-street, Hampstead-road - the prisoner had been in my employ about five months. On the morning of the 5th of September, I delivered to him twenty loaves, which he delivered correctly: in the afternoon I delivered him forty more, which he should have taken to the same person, Mr. George Knight; I discharged him the week following - he came to me on the Saturday night for his wages, and I told him to come on the Tuesday, that I might have time to examine the books, and see that all was right

GEORGE KNIGHT . I deal with Keen for bread. On the 5th of September the prisoner brought me twenty loaves in the morning, and thirty in the afternoon. I have not received the other ten at all.

JAMES GRIBBLE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner - he said he had sold the bread and hoped his master would take the money.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-48

1654. MARIA BIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a brooch, value 3 l., the goods of John Howe , from his person .

JOHN HOWE. I am a jeweller , and live in Bride-court, Hoxton. On the 11th of October, I was in Copenhagen-fields , about ten o'clock in the morning - I saw the prisoner on before me - she turned round and saw me coming - I asked her if that was the way to Holloway-road - she said Yes, and then she behaved very improperly, and asked me to take a walk with her; I went with her into a little coppice - we sat down on a sort of bank, where she made free, and put her hand in my smallclothes - we presently afterwards got up, and walked on together - she wanted me to give her something, but I had only 3 1/4 d.; I gave her that, and she seemed angry, and challenged me to strike her - I said "No, I never strike a woman;" she then said she would knock my b - y nose flat to the ground, and flew at me - tore my diamond brooch out of my shirt, and took it away, without my consent; she ran across the field - I followed, but would not go far for fear of losing my watch, as I saw her run up to a man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it to me, and 5 d. in halfpence? A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not you tell me to pawn it for 4 s.? A. No.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am apprentice to Mr. Drew, pawnbroker, of Charles-place, Islington. The prisoner

brought a brooch to pawn on the 11th of October, between one and two o'clock; I had received information, and would not take it in. I detained her and sent for an officer - the value of it may be 3 l. or 4 l.

THOMAS POPE . On the 11th of October I was fetched by Thompson to take the prisoner - she said it was given her to pawn.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it me to pawn - he asked me if I was a servant - I said I was an unfortunate girl; we went where there was a place - he sat down and gave me the 1 1/2 d. from his pocket, and then the brooch, which he said I might pawn for 4 s., and he would come the next day and give me the money for it; he afterwards wanted it back - I told him if he would give me 2 s. I would give it him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-49

1655. JOHN PERRIGO was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Warwick Hele Tonkin, the younger , from his person .

WARWICK HELE TONKIN, THE YOUNGER. On the 28th of September, I was in Oxford-road, near the top of Regent-street - there was a crowd looking at a horse which had fallen: I felt a pull at my pocket and turned round - a constable, who had the prisoner in his hand, asked if I had lost a handkerchief - I saw my handkerchief at the prisoner's feet.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAND . I am a constable. On the 28th of September, about a quarter past two o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another boy coming down the street, and knowing the prisoner I followed them; there was a crowd through which Mr. Tonkin was going - the prisoner put his hand into his pocket and took the handkerchief out - I collared him, and told the gentleman what I had seen - the handkerchief was then on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-50

1656. EDWARD EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , three umbrellas, value 12 s. , the goods of James Wood .

JOSEPH KNOWLES . I am in the employ of James Wood, pawnbroker , of Islington . On the 10th of October he had six umbrellas stolen. I received information and went into the street - I ran down Pied-bull-yard, and saw the prisoner with three umbrellas under his arm, wrapped up in the cover of another umbrella - he turned the corner, and put them down - I collared him, and brought him back - he was delivered to the officer.

DANIEL WARREN . I am headborough. I took the prisoner and have the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN RAVER . I was coming past the shop and my child's bonnet blew off - I turned to pick it up and saw the prisoner take the umbrellas from the door - I gave information.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-51

1657. CHARLES BRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 4 ozs. of silk, value 4 s. , the goods of Francis Giles and John Giles .

Mr. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL LAFFLETT . I am a weaver, and live in Turville-street , with my father - we work for Messrs. Giles. The prisoner came to our house on Wednesday, the 21st of September, and said he wanted to turn on a cane, to which we consented; I said he had no reed - which was necessary; he said he would go and get one: I then went down stairs, and when I came up again I saw him near a box in which we had sixty-three bobbins of silk; he said he was picking up the cane; he then went down, and said he was going into the city: I counted the bobbins as soon as he was gone and missed three. I then turned on the prisoner's cane, and counted the bobbins again - I found there were but sixty: he came back in about two hours: I said to my father "That is the person who took the bobbins." I was sent for an officer, who came, and he confessed he had taken them.

COURT. Q. How long before he came had you seen the silk all right? A. Two or three weeks - the bobbins were marked.

WILLIAM GREGORY . I am an headborough. I was sent for, and took the prisoner: I asked if he had taken the silk - he said No, but if I would go with him he would tell me where it was: I went with him to the Three Crowns public-house, in Webb-square, and he said to the witness "Charles, I want that silk I left here;" he went to the back of the Knave of Clubs public-house, and got the silk out of a house - I took it to Mr. Lafflett's, where it was owned.

CHARLES STURMAN . I was sitting at the Crown, the prisoner came and asked for a handkerchief, to put some bobbins in, as he was going to get some more silk; in about half an hour afterwards I gave the silk to the officer which he gave me.

JOHN PERCEVAL . I am father-in-law of the first witness. I am employed by Messrs. Francis and John Giles - this is part of their silk.

JAMES LAYMAN . I am foreman to Messrs. Francis and John Giles. This is part of their silk.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness said if I would bring the silk he would buy it of me for 3 s., but only gave me one. I humbly beg for mercy, as I did it at his instigation.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-52

1658. HENRY GOATE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 56 lbs. of pepper, value 8 l. 15 s., and a bag, value 1 s. , the goods of William Sewell and Jonathan Whorley .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JULIA MAHONY . I am a laundress. On the 25th of October, I was in St. John-street , and saw a cart near Mr. Evans'; the prisoner came from the cart with a bag in his hand - he trembled, and looked back, as if to see if he was followed, I told the carter what I had seen - he was brought back.

THOMAS COLEMAN . I am carter to Messrs. William Sewell and Jonathan Whorley. On the 15th of October I was to deliver some goods at Mr. Evans', and among the rest a bag of pepper; I received some information from Mahony, and found the prisoner with the bag on his back,

about ten yards before he got to Charter-house-square. I asked him what he had got - he said he got it from a man; I laid hold of him and the bag - in a few minutes Mr. Evans' man came - he took the pepper and I took the prisoner - it had 56 lbs. of pepper in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down St. John-street, and saw a man crossing the road with this bag, which he asked me to carry; I took it to go round Charter-house-square - the man who gave it me ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-53

1659. CAROLINE GUEST was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , a coat, value 25 s. , the goods of John Wells .

GEORGE POILE . I am in the employ of Mr. Wells, pawnbroker , of Broad-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner came to our house on the 14th of October, between four and five o'clock; I saw her take a coat down, which she brought towards the counter; she kept it under her feet for some time, and then took it up and walked out with it down a court. I followed her and said, she had got a coat, she said "You lie." I brought her into the street again; part of the coat then fell on the ground - the street-keeper came up and took charge of her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up at the door, and went into the shop to ask the price; I went out again, and did not know I had it - I had kicked it before me.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-54

1660. CHARLES WILLIAM HOBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 7 lbs. of cheese, value 5 s. , the goods of George Read .

RACHAEL READ . I am the wife of George Read, of Euston-street, Euston-square . On the 24th of September, I saw the prisoner in our shop, he went to the counter and took the cheese which he put under his arm. I called, Stop thief! he dropped it in the shop, and went out, but was taken in about five minutes. I followed and got a man to stop him - he was not out of my sight; he said nothing, but cried much.

CHARLES EDWARD EVANS . I am a broker. I was coming up the street, and saw the prisoner running, the people all turned the corner of a new street. I followed and jumped down an area, and found the prisoner up a chimney; he said, "You have hurt my leg; I did not steal the cheese."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-55

1661. JAMES JERROM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a decanter stand, value 2 s. , the goods of William Elston .

WILLIAM ELSTON. I live in Fitzroy-square . The prisoner came to my house on Wednesday morning, the 5th of October, about half-past nine o'clock. The servant came while I was at breakfast, and said a boy had come respecting a pair of shoes which a lady had bought the day before. Mrs. Elston requested me to go down, as we had been robbed, and question the boy. I went down, and the prisoner repeated to me the same message, and asked if the shoes were large enough, or wanted enlarging. I saw him look into the dining-room, the door of which was open - but I did not suspect him, as his tale was so plausible. I went up again and said, I had no idea the boy was a thief. I afterwards went down again, and saw him in the hall beyond the folding-doors. I went into the dining-room, and missed the bottle-stand. I heard the street-door shut, and pursued - he had then got to Colonel Drinkwater 's door; he turned into Russell-mews; he took something from his person, and threw over a wall into the yard of the house No. 41. I directed my servant to go and inquire if the bottle-stand was there.

WILLILM SHEPHERD . I am a street-keeper. The prisoner was running down the mews - the people said the boy was secured, and the gentleman had him in custody. I knocked at the door of a house, and found this bottle stand in the garden.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-56

1662. GEORGE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , twenty-four yards of flannel, value 9 s. , the goods of Thomas Bass .

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer of the Thames Police. I saw the prisoner in company with another person, between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 14th of October, in Ratcliffe-highway . I watched them for an hour. I saw the prisoner take this flannel from the shop of Mr. Bass - he wrapped it up in a white apron, and ran away. I pursued and took hold of him - we both fell together; I still held him, and got him into a butcher's shop, where I handcuffed him.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am in the employ of Thomas Bass. This property was lying two feet from the door inside.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-57

1663. GEORGE MORANT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a necklace, value 10 s. , the goods of James Henshaw .

JAMES HENSHAW. I am a licensed victualler . The prisoner is my wife's brother, and served behind my counter - but at the time of the robbery, he was only living in the house, till something could be done for him. I missed a coral necklace on the 6th of October - I had seen it in the dressing table-drawer, in the bed-room, three or four days before.

JAMES POWELL . I live with Messrs. Barber and Jupp, pawnbrokers, who live in the Borough. I produce a necklace pawned at our shop on the 26th of September, in the name of Ann Hemming .

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner; he said, that he and another boy took it, but the other boy got it pawned, and the duplicate was sold. I went to the pawnbroker's, and found it there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-58

1664. JAMES NOLAN was indicted for s tealing, on the 9th of October , a plank, value 2 s. , the goods of John Wilson .

WILLIAM SIMMONS . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, the 9th of October, about one o'clock, I met the prisoner sixty yards from Mr. Wilson's house, with a plank on his shoulder, and I asked him where he was going to take it; he said, it belonged to his master, and he was going to take it home.

SAMUEL SCHOFIELD . I am a carpenter, in the employ of Mr. John Wilson; this plank is one which I cut to fit into a fence.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little intoxicated, and stumbled against this plank. I took it up to sell it, to get bread for my children.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-59

1665. SARAH ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , a pair of breeches, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Holder .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-60

1666. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a carpenter's plough, value 25 s., the goods of John Dunnell , and a plane, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Hill .

WILLIAM MERRY . I am a constable. About half-past eight o'clock at night, on the 17th of October, I was in Goswell-street-road; I saw the prisoner with two other persons; he had a bag with two planes in it; I stopped him and said "What have you got here?" he said "Some planes of my father's;" I said "Where does he live?" he then said he had no father nor mother; the other two got away.

JOHN DUNNELL. I am a carpenter . I had been at work in the Back-road, Islington . I lost my tools from a new house there, about a mile from Goswell-street - I had seen them safe on the 15th of October; this plough is my property.

RICHARD HILL. I am a carpenter . I was at work at this building; this is my plane.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-61

1667. JOSEPH TATE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , two saws, value 7 s.; a plane, value 1 s., and a square, value 18 d. the goods of John Kirby .

WILLIAM JEAPES . I am a carpenter - I work for Mr. John Kirby. On the 10th of October I left a basket of tools with a plane and a square in it, while I went to get a pot or two of porter; I stopped there till between ten and eleven o'clock; I was not the worse for liquor; when I went away I met the prisoner in Ball's-pond-road; he asked where I was going - I said home; he said "Don't go home - it is late - you can't get in:" we went up to the house out of which I came - he knocked down some boards, and we laid down and went to sleep. I awoke before day-light - I had put the tools under the floor, close by my side; when I first awoke he was there - I went to sleep, and when I awoke again he was gone - the square and saws were missing, which had been in my basket the night before, when I left the public-house - I afterwards found the tools at some pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. How many friends had you at the public-house? A. Only one; we had drank but three pots of beer - the basket had been by my side - there might have been a dozen people in the public-house. I did not keep my eye on my basket all the time.

GEORGE KETTERIDGE . I am a pawnbroker. I have two saws pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of October.

SEARLE WHITLOW . I have a plane and a square, pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of October.

THOMAS GRAFTON . I took the prisoner into custody, and found two duplicates on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you take the prisoner? A. To the watch-house, and searched him. I left him alone before he was searched, while I got a pen and ink, but I do not think he had time to have destroyed any thing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-62

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1668. GEORGE BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a counterpane, value 10 s., and a sheet, value 4 s., the goods of Donald M'Donald , in a lodging-room .

ANN M'DONALD . I am the wife of Donald M'Donald - we live in Little St. Andrew's-street, Seven-dials ; we let the prisoner a back room on the first floor, furnished, at 2 s. 6 d. a week. On the 2d of September he came in and asked me for the key of the room, which I gave him! I saw no more of him; and the next morning I had the door broken open, when I missed the counterpane and sheet: he never returned: he had lodged five or six weeks with us - he left on a Friday - his week ended on Monday.

DANIEL WARREN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of September, at the City farmhouse.

Prisoner. I pledged the property and lost the duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-63

1669. JOHN PHILLIPS and SUSANNAH PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a counterpane, value 5 s.; a blanket, value 1 s.; two sheets, value 2 s., a bolster, value 1 s., and a pepper-box, value 1 d., the goods of Alexander Woodward , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house .

EDITH WOODWARD . I am the wife of Alexander Woodward. We live in High-street, Portland-town . The prisoner and his wife rented a furnished room on our first floor at 4 s. a week, in August. I let these things with it

- they were a month with us. In September, I and my husband went into Staffordshire for three weeks, and left Clay, one of our lodgers, to receive the rents. When I returned the property was gone, and Susannah in custody.

SARAH CLAY . I lodge in this house, and was left to collect the rents; the prisoners paid none; on the 10th of September, I went to the room to ask the female prisoner to nurse my child; I knocked at the door - nobody answered - I opened the door, went in, and found all the clothes gone off the bed, and other things gone: the woman returned in the course of the morning, and said she knew nothing about them, but wished to go to her husband, who, she said, was at a public-house. I wished her to look at the room, and when she got there she said I need not be uneasy - that they wanted money, and they should be replaced in the evening; we could not find the husband - he did not return, but was taken in about three weeks - the property has not been found.

REBECCA KEOGH . I lodge in the next room. I heard the male prisoner go out at a quarter past five o'clock in the morning - nobody came in afterwards till Clay missed the property.

JOHN PHILLIPS' Defence. We went out to look for work; I got a job at Hendon; I received my wages late at night, and did not like to go home; on Sunday I met a man, who said my wife was in custody. I was employed working at a garden for three weeks, and know nothing of the things.

SUSANNAH PHILLIPS' Defence. The pepper-box is our own. I left every thing safe and the key in the door, as usual, as Clay had the use of part of the things; when I returned I was quite struck at hearing the things were gone.

SARAH CLAY. I missed the things on Saturday; the 10th of September - the man was at the house on Friday.

JOHN PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

SUSANNAH PHILLIPS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-64

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1670. WILLIAM HARWOOD was indicted for the wilful murder of George Barton .

ANN HILL . I have been housekeeper to the prisoner eight years; he is a coal-undertaker , and lived in Union-street, Shadwell . On the evening of the 19th of October , at half-past eight o'clock, George Barton, (the prisoner's grandson,) came in - he was twenty-three years old - he asked me to give him some meat; he did not live with the prisoner, but came when he thought proper; just as I was cutting him some meat the prisoner came in. I gave it to Barton - he asked for some lean to it; the prisoner said it should be cut fair; I said, nonsense, I will cut it fair; the prisoner after that, said he should never come there any more; Barton d - d his old eyes, and said he would come there, or else he would have his bl - y life; the prisoner said "Go out, and never come here any more." The deceased repeated that he would have his bl - y life, and he would have money; he called him a bl - y old b - r; he struck him a very hard blow in the mouth, with his double fist; he only struck him once at first. I said "George, for Heaven's sake, go out." He said d - n his bl - y eyes, he would not, he would have money, and it was his determination to have what he wanted. The prisoner left the room - he was not gone a moment, and when he returned he said "Get out;" Barton said he would not, and then fetched the prisoner two heavy blows in the stomach, with his double fist, as before. He was a strong powerful man: the prisoner then struck him with a dagger - I had not seen it in his hand till he struck him; Barton went as far as the street-door - I took hold of his arm - I did not think any thing was the matter with him, and said "George, what nonsense;" he fell on his back and fetched a sigh; I begged of the prisoner to call somebody in; he said "Who shall I call?" he opened the door and called Watch! Watch! I told him the watch was not on, and asked him to go next door, to call a man; he went and knocked at his door, but he was gone to bed - he went a little further, and asked if any one could tell him where to find an officer - he returned immediately and did not offer to run away. I have heard the deceased say, many times, that he was determined to have the prisoner's life; I told the prisoner of it - he has threatened my life many times, and to rob the house and murder us both. I have told the prisoner what he has said - he did rob the house six or eight months ago.

Q. Before the prisoner called the watch, had you not said, "Oh! he is killed?" A. Yes, and then he called the watchman. I did not observe any thing in his hand till after it was done.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Was not this as profligate and wicked a young man as could be? A. Nobody worse. The prisoner was doatingly fond of him, and did all in his power to reclaim him. The house was always open to him; he was always kindly received; he was a man likely to put his threat into execution. The prisoner was certainly in danger of his life.

JOHN JENNINGS . I am a coal whipper, and have known the prisoner and deceased about three years. I was at the Phoenix public-house on this evening, from five o'clock till half-past seven; the deceased was drinking there with me: the prisoner was sitting at another table, with a friend - the deceased was sober. A collection was made for a member of our club; the prisoner said he had 1 s., which he gave - the deceased said he had half-a-crown - somebody said he had better keep it, for he might want it himself; Barton said he should want some more money; I said I thought his grandfather would give him some; he said he had half-a-crown; I said that was enough for a young man to spend in an evening - he said it was not the half-quarter of a quarter of enough, and he would have some more from his grandfather, or would lose his own life, or have his bl - y old life - the prisoner was not near enough to hear this.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was he a violent passionate young man? A. Very; he was a wicked rash young man, and strong in stature.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a constable, and took the prisoner. I was taking him down the street, and heard him talking to the street-keeper about the case - I desired him not to say a word, for if he did I must give it in evidence; we walked a few yards; I had hold of his arm: he looked me in the face, and said, "I have done the job;" but before that he said,

"You will never take him again:" I had

him in custody for felony three or four years ago, and had been after him that week for a burglary.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I understand he was a terror to the neighbourhood? A. Yes, he was: the prisoner looked wild and overwhelmed when he said this.

JOSEPH MILLAR . I am a surgeon, and was called in to see the deceased, within five minutes of nine o'clock; he was dead, and in my judgment his death was occasioned by a wound in the left side of the chest; there was a great effusion of blood: I opened the body next day, and found a wound passing between the fourth and fifth ribs, through the lungs, and entering the right ventricle of the heart; the wound appeared to have been given by such an instrument as a dagger.

JAMES FOGG . I produce a dagger given to me by Murray.

JOHN MURRAY . The prisoner passed my door between half-past eight and nine o'clock, without hat, coat, or waistcoat, and said he wished to find an officer; he returned in five minutes without one, and seemed in a very agitated state; I followed him to his house, and saw the deceased laying in the passage; somebody went for a surgeon; a scabbard-sheath was found by the headborough. I went after the prisoner was gone to the watch-house, and searched the house - I found this dagger in the sitting-room, behind an old basket in a recess; it was quite wet with blood.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that the deceased had frequently threatened his life, and, being a man of depraved habits, was likely to put his threats into execution; but he was still so doatingly fond of him that he had bequeathed him a legacy, and always supplied him with money; and declared that he had only armed himself with this weapon with a view to alarm him, but the wound was given by accident, in defending himself.

ANN HILL. The prisoner struck the blow just after the deceased struck him - they were not closed together.

WILLIAM HAGGERTY . I am a coal whipper. I was at the Phoenix on this night, and went part of the way home with the prisoner; while we were on the road the deceased came up, and asked the prisoner for money - he said, "No, I have given you enough;" the deceased walked a few paces before us, then turned round, and said, "I want money, and money I must have, and if you don't give me money, you old b - r, I will have your life." The deceased left, and I saw no more.

FRANCES MYERS . I am acquainted with Mrs. Hill, and visited her at the prisoner's house. I have frequently seen the prisoner and deceased there; his conduct was very kind to the deceased, who used to bl - st and swear at him, and say he would have money. About a month before this happened I was at supper there; Barton came to the window, and asked the prisoner to give him money - the prisoner said, "George, you had some this morning" - he said, "You bl - y old b - r, if you don't give me money to night, I'll have your bl - y life." The prisoner was alarmed, went up stairs, opened the window, and called the watchman to assist him; he was very much frightened indeed.

The prisoner's will was here put in and proved - it was dated the 6th of February, 1825, and bequeathed 150 to the deceased; 25 to be paid immediately after his funeral, and the rest at 1 per week; also his household furniture, &c.

GUILTY. Aged 71. Of Manslaughter only .

Fined Forty Shillings and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-65

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1671. ALFRED FLOWER was indicted for the wilful murder of a certain male child .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution. The prisoner had assaulted Mary Sullivan (then pregnant) in the street, and kicked her in the abdomen - she was prematurely delivered two days afterwards of a child, which died in three days. Mr. Denton, a surgeon, who had delivered her, was unable to state that it had not died from natural causes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-66

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1672. JOHN RANKIN was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Ann Hunt .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

ELEANOR HUNT . I am the daughter of Mary Ann Hunt - we lodged in George-yard, Whitechapel ; there were three beds in the room. The prisoner had one, I and my mother another, and Mary M'Mullen another. I went to bed on the 23d of September , about ten o'clock; my mother was in the room with me; she was not quite sober; I left her up sitting by the fire; the prisoner and M'Mullen were in the room: my mother went out of the room while I was awake; I was asleep when she returned - she awoke me between two and three o'clock; there was no light in the room then; she desired me to get up to get a light, and said she had been to the young man's bed in the dark, and laid her hand upon his face in seeking for her bed - she was very angry with me for not having a light. I got up, struck one, and lighted a match; my mother stood by the side of our bed - the prisoner was sitting up in his bed - my mother appeared then to have slept herself sober. I asked the prisoner to be kind enough to hand me a piece of candle off the table - he made no answer; my mother told me to get up, and get it myself. I had the lighted match in my hand - my mother hit me, and put it out; she pushed me on the back of my head. I then got out of bed, and there was no light wanted, as my mother was in such a passion. She sat down on the side of her own bed to undress - some words arose between the prisoner and her; he called her a d - d dirty old b - h, because she was making a noise. She called him a d - d dirty thief - he said, if she repeated those words, he would make her a d - d dirty mouth; she repeated them. He immediately got out of bed - and I heard him hit her violently with something - it was quite dark. I ran between them, and begged him not to hit her again. I held his hand which he had a board in; I afterwards found it was the bed-board; he said he would hit her again. I ran to the window, called a watchman; I heard him hit her several times again. I never heard her speak after the first blow - I told him he had murdered my mother; he said, he had not, for the first blow he had given her with the board, could not have killed her. I struck a light, and ran to the bed where she was laying - he went with me - she lay across the bed on her back. I saw a large cut on the side of her

right eye, a large bruise on her forehead, and another on the back of her neck, and there was a piece cut out of the bridge of her nose - a little blood came from the cut on her eye. I told him he had killed her - he said he had - he began to dress. I saw a piece of board laying on our bed, it appeared to have been recently broken - it was the head-board of his bed. I ran down and fetched Brown the watchman. I left the prisoner in the room, and as we came in, met him coming out; the watchman told him to go back, and followed him up stairs to the room where my mother lay. I then found her laying strait on the bed. I had left the prisoner in the room and another man who came from above stairs. On the road to the watch-house the prisoner told me to go back - I refused. I heard him tell the watchman that he had murdered my mother, and I must have justice done.

Q. Had you struck your mother that night? A. I had not. His bed is not quite two yards from our's, it is nearer to our's than M'Mullen's, and is on my mother's side.

Q. When you lighted the match, if your mother had received an injury on the head, must you not have seen it? A. Yes. She had no injury then.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate, that your mother, another woman and you, had three pints of gin? A. No. I said when she came home she went into the landlady's room to pay her rent, and three or four half pints of gin were sent for, there were four of us in the room - I had part of it; I cannot say I was quite sober, but was more so than my mother. The Magistrate said, at the second examination, I had not said the same as before - but he did not give me time to say what I meant - and if he had it in his power, he would dismiss the prisoner.

COURT. Q. What was your mother? A. She sold a few pincushions in the street - I do the same.

MARY M'MULLEN. I lodge at this house, and sleep in the same room as the prisoner did; he was in bed at ten o'clock when I came into the room - nobody else was then in the room. Mrs. Hunt and her daughter came up in about three minutes - Mrs. Hunt began to quarrel with me for not keeping the fire together - they were both quite drunk; the daughter told her to hold her noise, and not scold me, for I had nothing to do with it; they then began to fall out about her scolding me - she went and pushed her mother on one side, till she fell down in her chair with her head against the wall; she pushed her down chair and all - the back of her head came against the wall - whether it hurt her I cannot tell. She did not complain, but got up and walked down stairs; the daughter remained in the room - this happened between ten and eleven o'clock. I went to bed directly - the daughter was sitting up feeding her child - she is not married. I remained awake all the time - the daughter remained up until the mother came back - there was a light in the room all the time - I had not gone to sleep. Mrs. Hunt came back about half-past twelve o'clock. The daughter was then up - I asked her to give me a sip of water - the mother said, she would be d - d before she would let her give me water. I got out of bed, put on my gown to go down and fetch some, and was taking the pitcher off the table - the mother said, she would see me d - d before I should have it. I went down without it - she called me a w - e, a b - h, and other bad names. I went down, returned directly - she still called me names; they were both up, and there was a light in the room - the daughter begged her mother to go to bed, (it was half-past twelve o'clock, when she first came in); the daughter went to bed with her child, and fell asleep, and the mother fell asleep on her chair. I stopped awake, being fearful of the house being on fire; the light was still burning, and in a short time the mother fell off her chair, across the fire-side - her left side was towards the fire, she fell sideways. I heard her head strike against the wall, she made no noise - but I heard her snoring all along - she was still asleep. I called the daughter, she did not answer me, she was so drunk or sleepy; the mother laid on the floor, still snoring. I remained awake - the candle went out between one and two o'clock. I remained in bed - I was afraid to assist her. After the watchman called three o'clock, I heard her rising up again, and going towards the prisoner's bed. I heard the prisoner ask, who was putting their hands on his face. She then began to curse and swear, saying she thought she was going to her own bed; she crossed the room to her own bed, and awoke her daughter, telling her to strike a light, saying she had been to the young man's bed, and thought it was her own; the daughter struck a light without getting out of bed - the mother began to drag her, and tear her clothes, and knocked the lighted match out of her hand. It was only lighted a moment, I could not see whether the daughter was dressed or not; she and her mother were quarrelling a good bit, and then the prisoner said he had put up with this work a good while, and would put up with it no longer; the mother asked what he said; he would not speak at first, but at last he said so again. She called him several bad names - scamp, a rogue, and thief; her daughter and the prisoner begged her to hold her noise and go to bed; she got worse, and worse. I heard her walk across the room, and go to his bed-side - he jumped up. I heard him making a noise, as if he was putting his clothes on, and heard Mrs. Hunt making a noise, as if he was pushing her from his own bed - she jumped up and said, she would be d - d before she would take that from him, and went as if across the room, and then I heard a blow; I thought it was her striking him. I then heard a blow, as if from him. I heard two blows struck with their hands, and heard the board breaking just at the time, as if they were trampling on it, or throwing one another on the top of it. The daughter cried out to him to give over, or he would murder her mother - all was quiet after that. The daughter jumped out of bed - went to the window, and called a watchman - she then struck a light. I was in bed, and saw Mrs. Hunt lying across the bed on her back - the prisoner stood by his own bed-side. I cannot tell whether he was dressed, I was so fatigued. I could see she was done when I was in bed - I mean she was dead. I could see a little blood on her forehead - I did not go near her. The daughter said, "You have murdered my mother - do not run away" - he said he was not going, he would stop until the watchman came; he did not leave the room until the watchman came.

Q. Then Brown took him out of the room where the

deceased lay? A. Yes; I am sure of that. I was so frightened I did not examine the deceased - she was removed next morning. I was quite sober, the deceased was more drunk when she came in a second time than before.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 4th of September, about one o'clock, the daughter came to me. I went to No. 28, George-yard, and saw the prisoner standing on the first floor landing-place - he was merely outside the door of the room, in which the deceased lay. The daughter said that man had almost killed her mother - I did not hear him reply; he was dressed. I told him to go back into the room - he did so - there was a light in the room, the deceased lay on the bed on her back - her hand felt cold and hard, but her head quite warm - she appeared to have died very recently. I asked how it happened - the daughter said, he had struck her mother with the head-board of the bed; he said I had better send for a doctor. I said I must take care of him first; he made no resistance. I saw one piece of the board on his bed, and the other on the ground by the head of the deceased's bed, and a third piece was found under his bedstead afterwards - here are the three pieces. There was no head-board to the prisoner's bedstead - I did not fit this one to it; as I took him to the watch-house, the daughter was behind us - I asked him how he came to commit such a deed; he said he did it, that he was sorry for it, and ready to give himself up to the laws of his country. I asked him how he came to hit her with the head-board, saying, he must have hit her more than once; he said he did, and he hoped God would forgive him - that she had been abusing him all night, and he could get no rest for her.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect the daughter being noisy in the street? A. Yes; I told her she had better go back, and see what she could do for her mother.

MR. JOHN CURTIS. I am a surgeon, and examined the body of the deceased, at Whitechapel work-house - I think it was on Wednesday; I found a considerable tumour over the angle of the right eye, a bruise on the right temple, and a small scratch on the nose. I removed the skull-cap, found a considerable effusion of blood on the surface of the brain (two or three ounces.) I dissected the brain, and all the appearances denoted acts of considerable external violence having been inflicted on the head; a coagulum of blood filled up one of the ventricles of the brain. I have no doubt of these circumstances being the cause of her death - it would be the immediate consequences of such injury. There was a fracture of the skull bone; on the opposite side, which sometimes happens, the external marks accounted for the oppression on the brain; a person intoxicated might be more likely to die from the injury, from the turgid state of the vessels - this board is sufficient to cause the marks, particularly the edge of it - a blow from a fall would produce the same appearances, but I think death would shortly follow - a fall from a chair might produce the same appearances.

ELRANOR HUNT re-examined. Q. You could not much notice the state of your mother's head while the match was a-light? A. Yes; I am certain nothing was the matter with it; I am sure I went to bed at ten o'clock; I did not sit up to feed my child; I was asleep when my mother came in; when I awoke the room was in darkness; when I returned with the watchman I met the prisoner coming out of the door; I think he was in the passage leading to the street.

Prisoner's Defence. The deceased came home several nights intoxicated, and was very abusive - I had to rise early to my labour, and required rest; I had put up with it a long time - I was not in the habit of swearing, as has been stated; I was struck twice by the deceased previous to returning the blow; she then fell on the bed, but whether my blow caused her death I do not know.

GUILTY. Aged 26. Of manslaughter only . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18251027-67

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

1673. THOMAS M'KINSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , two prints, framed and glazed, value 10 s. the goods of John Hunt .

JOHN HUNT. I keep the Three Castles public-house, St. Andrew's-hill . On Monday evening, about seven o'clock, three prints hung on the wall of my parlour; the prisoner came in and had some ale, about six o'clock, and two or three minutes after he was gone I missed them - nobody but him had been in the parlour. I went round two or three streets but did not find them; I sent my sons out and he was brought back with one of the prints, and said he was never in the house. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was he alone in the room? A. Yes; it is a private parlour for company; I went into the room directly he went - nobody else went into the room.

WILLIAM HUNT . I went in search of the prisoner, and found him on Blackfriars'-bridge; I told him he had been to my father's house and robbed him of some prints - he knocked me down - I got up, ran after him, calling Stop thief! he ran and took the prints out of a carpet bag which he had, and tried to throw them over into the water - the wind blew one back - I picked it up - the other lodged on the cornice of the bridge, and was found at ten o'clock at night by a waterman.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he is the man? A. Yes; I had not seen him in the house but stopped him from the description my father gave of him.

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am a seaman. I was going over the bridge, about half-past six o'clock - there was a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running in great fury, and followed him - he threw something over the bridge - this print blew back - Hunt picked it up, and gave it to me - he crossed the road - I followed him very close - he dropped the bag, started down a stable yard, and concealed himself in a corner; I collared him - Hunt said "That is him." I took him to the house and gave Mines the print.

NATHANIEL MINES . I am a constable. Carpenter delivered this print to me - one Perring picked up another.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-68

1674. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , a muff, value 2 l.; a pelisse, value 2 l.; a gown, value 10 s.; four pairs of shoes, value 4 s.; a box, value 4 d., and a canvass wrapper, value 6 d. ,

the goods of Thomas Pickford and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Elizabeth Ann Robberds .

JOHN BUNTING . I am watchman at Mr. Thomas Pickford's, Castle Inn yard, Wood-street - he has several partners. On the 20th of October, at half-past five o'clock, I went round the yard, and stopped the prisoner taking a box out of the yard, from one of the waggons; I asked what he was going to do with it: he said twice, that it was his own; he was alone; a person came to my assistance; I gave him in charge; the box has been opened, and contains the articles stated in the indictment.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ask if the box between the shafts of the waggon belonged to me, or to a man who went out of the yard at the time? A. No, I asked what he was going to do with it - he said it belonged to him - he had got it off the waggon on the ground, and had hold of it, but on seeing me he let go and drew away from it.

NATHAN JACKSON . I am porter in the yard. On the 20th of October, between five and six o'clock, Bunting called me, saying the prisoner was stealing a box; I secured him - it contained these articles; he proposed to give me money two or three times to let him go, saying it would be of no benefit to me to lock him up.

HENRY BATTEN . I signed the carrier's book for the delivery of the box, and saw it on one of the waggons in the yard about half-past five o'clock.

JAMES RICHARDS . I am porter to Mr. Pickford. I put the box on the near corner of the fore-part of the waggon - the prisoner had no business in the yard.

ROBERT LAMBERT . I am clerk to Thomas Pickford and Co. The box was directed to Elizabeth Ann Robberds, to the care of Cope, of Manchester.

JOHN SHEPPARD . I took charge of the prisoner. The box contained the articles stated in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from Manchester nine days previous; I received a letter, telling me that my box would be sent to Castle Inn yard, by the waggon - I went there, and on my way to the booking-office, I saw this gentleman, who accosted me by saying "What is that man doing with the box?" I said "I suppose it is his own, you had better ask him;" he walked round, and said "I shall detain you," and collared me: he said I was going to steal the box; I said I had nothing to do with it, and did not know the other man. On the way to the watch-house the man said "This is a very curious business, if you will give me some money I will make things pleasant for you." I said I had no money, but if drink would do, I would give him some rather than be locked up.

NATHAN JACKSON. I swear positively I never made any offer to him; he said nothing about expecting a box from Manchester.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-69

1675. RICHARD BURGESS was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY PHILLIPS . The prisoner was employed by me to hawk fancy goods . On the 8th of February he went out with goods; he entered in the day-book an account of how he disposed of them. I have not the book here, but a copy of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-70

1676. JAMES WALLACE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , ten sovereigns, twenty half-sovereigns, nine shillings, four sixpences, one thousand corking pins, value 7 s.; four silk stocks, value 6 s.; a Paris-cord stock, value 1 s. 3 d.; four 10 l. and four 5 l. Bank notes, the property of Joseph Todd , James Morrison , Richard Pearson , and George Crow , his masters .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN DILLON . I am managing clerk to Messrs. Joseph Todd, James Morrison, Richard Pearson, and George Crow. The prisoner was employed by them as cashier - he received money daily for necessary disbursements; he had the management of a till in the house, out of which he was to pay to certain signatures, and account for the balance at night; if nothing was paid he was to return the whole. On the night of the 27th of April, 1824, by the accounts in his own writing, he was indebted to the house, and next morning he received 85 l. 18 s. 11 d. and gave an acknowledgment for it. The clerk who paid him the money is dead; business begins at eight o'clock, and at nine he was missing; he might have made disbursements before nine o'clock, but there is no entry of any; he was apprehended a fortnight ago - he had given no notice of his intention to leave - he lived in the house; I assisted the solicitor and officer to open his box on the 29th, and found six papers of corking pins, worth about 7 s. 6 d.; each paper should contain 1008 - the six should be packed in one outer paper, which is taken off - also five new stocks (three of them with our private mark). I have no reason to believe that he ever bought such things.

JEREMIAH HERBERT . I apprehended the prisoner at the Marquis of Granby public-house, St. Catherine's, last Saturday fortnight, going by the name of Walker. I said he was the man I wanted for absconding from Messrs. Todds with 200 l. - he said it was only 110 l.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-71

1677. THOMAS HILL was indicted for stealing fifteen stuff hats, value 11 l., the goods of Thomas Richard Salt , from the person of

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-72

1678. MICHAEL MULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , a coat, value 5 s. 6 d.; a waistcoat, value 2 s. 6 d., and two shirts, value 5 s. , the goods of John Mann .

JOHN MANN. I live in Great Swan-alley, Coleman-street . I took the prisoner to lodge in the same room with me, and he left last Saturday evening, between six and seven o'clock, without notice, or paying his rent. On Sunday morning I missed this property from my box, which was locked; I found it still locked - a shirt has been produced since; I know it to be mine, by the make of it. He was taken on Tuesday.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Somers', a shoe-maker, where he worked - he directed me to his lodgings; I went there, and was directed to another place, where I found an empty box; on Wednesday I went to St. Martin's-le-grand, and used this shirt, which Mann claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I made up my mind to leave, as he was very uncivil. I was in a hurry to leave on Saturday, and packed up this shirt by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-73

1679. JAMES IVES and WILLIAM SWINDELL were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a person unknown , from his person .

JESSEE PHILLIPS . I am a dealer in glass, and live in City-terrace, City-road. On the 18th of August, between six and seven o'clock, I saw the prisoners on Holborn-hill , for about ten minutes, and watched them. I saw Swindell take a handkerchief from a gentleman's coat pocket, and hand it to Ives, who was close by; they had crossed over the way to the gentleman, and followed him for two or three minutes; I saw them from the opposite side: I do not know the gentleman. I collared Ives - Swindell ran through a corner shop, with two doors, and down Field-lane; I hallooed to the gentleman, but could not make him hear. Ives struggled with me, and dragged me down into Field-lane. I took the handkerchief from under his coat, and gave it to the constable. I did not see Swindell again till next morning, but am sure I am not mistaken in him. I watched them in consequence of Hughes pointing them out.

HENRY HUGHES . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoners going up Holborn-hill together, and knowing them before I watched them part of the way up the hill. I had occasion to stop, and did not see the felony committed. I saw Phillips taking Ives to the Compter. I took Swindell next morning, in King-street, Cheapside, and am sure he is the man. I fetched Phillips, who identified him - he said he had come there to look for his father. Phillips delivered the handkerchief to me - it is worth 3 s.

Prisoner IVES. Q. You never saw me in Swindell's company? A. I am positive of it. I knew them before; I have often seen them together.

IVES' Defence. As to Swindell taking it, it is false. I had it in my hand when Phillips collared me; he said he was an officer.

JESSEE PHILLIPS. I have been an officer, and said I was one.

SWINDELL'S Defence. I was never with him in my life.

IVES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SWINDELL - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-74

NEW COURT. (2d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1680. WILLIAM CROWTHER was indicted for embezzling a half-crown, two shillings, and three sixpences, which he had received for and on account of John Coxeter , his master .

HENRY COXETER . I am the son of John Coxeter, who is a Paddington coach master . The prisoner was engaged on the night of the 13th of September , to go with the coach, which I drove; he was to let passengers out, or take them up - he had 1 s. for every journey. He received money of the passengers, for which he should have accounted to me when he got to the Bank. About half-past nine o'clock that evening I saw him receive 6 s. from some passengers, but when I got to the Bank he was gone; he must have got down after we passed Lackington's library: I saw him no more till he was in custody: I then asked why he did not bring the money - he made no answer at first, but when I asked him again, he said he was very hungry.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKEBIDGE . I received the prisoner on another charge; he was accused of this, but did not deny it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18251027-75

1681. MARY ANN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , two gowns, value 5 s.; four petticoats, value 6 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; three shifts, value 3 s.; a shawl, value 1 s.; four caps, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a pair of stays, value 1 s.; a bible, value 2 s., and a bonnet, value 1 s., the goods of Catherine Holindon , widow ; and a shawl, value 1 s. , the goods of Mary Ann Brown .

SUSANNAH MATHEWS . I am door-keeper of the Guardian asylum, Back-lane, Cannon-street-road . The prisoner, with another person, named Sarah Hooker , left the Asylum a little after seven o'clock on the evening of the 19th of September; about six o'clock next morning I missed two bundles of linen from the mangling-room, which I had seen safe about five o'clock the evening before; they were the property of Catherine Holindon and Mary Ann Brown.

MARY ANN BROWN. I was at the Guardian Asylum on the 19th of September; the prisoner was going that night. I missed my shawl next morning. I did not see her again till about a fortnight ago, when she was in custody; she had my shawl on.

GEORGE GILES . I live with Mr. Russel, a pawnbroker. I produce a gown and two petticoats, which I think were pledged by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Wood.

MARY SMITH . I buy and sell books. I bought this bible of a young woman, and to the best of my belief the prisoner was with her.

JAMES WAYLING . I belong to the Thames Police. I took the prisoner, and found this shawl on her neck, which Brown claimed. I asked the prisoner what had become of the rest of the property, and told her she need not answer unless she thought proper. She said a gown and two petticoats were pawned in the Commercial-road, and the bible was sold near St. Giles's church.

JOHN JAMES JONES . I am an officer. I received some duplicates from the matron of the Guardian Society, and found this shift at a pawnbroker's in Tooley-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am innocent of the crime of pawning this gown and petticoat - Sarah Hooker took them, and staid some time, and I was going into the shop, when she came out with 7 s. in her hand, and a duplicate, which she put into her pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-76

1682. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , three books, value 30 s. , the goods of Peter Wright and William Wright .

PETER WRIGHT. I am in partnership with my son William - we are booksellers , and live in Broad-street, St. Giles's . These three books are ours - they were safe in the shop about ten minutes before the officer gave me information; they were tied up as they are now, with a label on the outside.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were they outside the door? A. No, on the cill - a person could not have reached them without coming on the step.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I was going to the Westminster sessions a little before ten o'clock in the morning of the 22d of October; the prisoner passed me with these books in Belton-street, Long-acre; I overtook him again in Broker's-alley, and asked him where he got them; he said he bought them for 1 l. in Paternoster-row. Mr. Wright afterwards claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he purchased them of a person in the street? A. No; not to my recollection.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him I had some books which I had bought of a licensed hawker of books, coming from Paternoster-row; to bind, and send to a friend in the country, as a present. I told him I gave 30 s. for them, which is the full value.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. He did not say any thing of the kind - he told me and Mr. Wright that he bought them in Paternoster-row.

MR. WRIGHT. He only said he bought them in Pater-noster-row; I said there was not time to have brought them from there. When he got to the office he changed his story, and said of a person coming from Paternoster-row.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-77

1683. ANN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a fender, value 8 s. , the goods of Joseph Jackson .

JOSEPH JACKSON. I am a broker , and live in Kingsland-road . This fender is mine - I had seen it safe on a shew-board inside my shop, on the 17th of October, about five minutes before the officer brought the prisoner in with it.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a headborough. About half-past seven o'clock, on the evening of the 17th of October, I saw the prisoner and another woman in conversation near Mr. Jackson's house - they then went to the shop, and looked very hard in at a gentleman who was at the back of the shop; they then stooped down: the prisoner took the fender from the shew-board; I crossed over, and took her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the road, and took the fender, not with an intention of stealing it, but to look at it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-78

1684. MARGARET DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , a blanket, value 10 s.; a cloak, value 12 s.; a shift, value 5 s.; a cap, value 1 s.; and an apron, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Ladley , her master .

THOMAS LADLEY. I am a licensed victualler , and live in Little Castle-street . The prisoner was in my service, and was discharged the latter end of April, or beginning of May. Soon after that I missed the articles stated in the indictment, from a drawer in the bed-room - I had lost the keys of the drawers a short time before she left. I met her the beginning of this month in Leicester-square, with my wife's cloak on.

Prisoner. I am now with child by him - the cloak is mine; I bought it in Ireland, and I bought the ticket of the blanket. My master gave me the other part of the property, and recommended me to another place.

SARAH LADLEY . I am the prosecutor's wife. This cloak I made myself, and know it to be mine. I missed it about the 18th of April.

Prisoner. She did not live in the house at the time - she was confined in Tothil-fields gaol. Witness. No - I came out on the 16th of April; I had been bound over to keep the peace; when I came out I did not return home, but my husband sent me my clothes; I then missed these articles.

Prisoner to THOMAS LADLEY. Q. Did not you give me these thing? A. No; I never gave her any thing, or took any liberty with her, or allowed her to take any thing.

Q. Did not you come to my bed-room and bring those things, throw them on the bed, and take liberties with me at the same time? A. I did not.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I found this shawl at a pawnbroker's, by a duplicate found in the prisoner's pocket; the blanket had been pawned, and the duplicate lost, but I found the affidavit of it in her pocket - she said they were her own.

Prisoner's Defence. I sent for a tailor named Hawkes, and told him to go and tell my master that I must look to him for support for my child; he said it could not be; Mr. Ladley then came to me: I asked him what he had told my master: he said he told him I should suit him; I then asked him about the child, and he said it was no such thing. I lived in the house three weeks with Mr Glover, who kept it after Mr. Ladley left; so that he could not turn me away.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-79

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1685. THOMAS BUNNAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , three whips, value 9 s. , the goods of James Depree .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-80

1686. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing on the 23d of September , a dead goose, value 6 s. , the goods of Cornelius Norris .

ANN NORRIS . I am the wife of Cornelius Norris - he is a poulterer , and lives in Leather-lane . About a quarter past nine o'clock on the 28th of September, the prisoner put his hand into the shop, and took the goose by the neck, which was laying on the counter; he walked away in

company with three others - I called Stop thief! and he threw it down. The watchman stopped him.

THOMAS KETTLEBY . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner near the house, with the goose in his hand, which he dropped at my feet; I took him into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-81

1687. JOSEPH BENFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a sheet, value 3 s., and a shirt, value 5 s. , the goods of Edward Smith .

EDWARD SMITH. I am a farrier , and live in Hackney-road . The prisoner used to work in a shop adjoining mine; I had no acquaintance with him; the articles were hanging in my shop to dry, about ten o'clock on the night of the 23d of September: when I went home on the following morning I heard they were gone - I found the shirt at a pawnbroker's, and got two officers to take the prisoner; I found him at a public-house; I accused him of having taken the articles, and he said he had pawned the shirt in the morning - I have not found the sheet.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH . I live with my uncle, a pawnbroker in Shoreditch; I have a sheet pawned on the 24th of September, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, by the prisoner, to the best of my belief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was coming from my work, and met Smith; we went into a public-house, I had a pint of beer, which I paid for - he then said he had been robbed, and gave charge of me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-82

1688. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a blanket, value 3 s.; a counterpane, value 1 s.; a pillow, value 2 s.; two pieces of calico, value 1 s., and a handkerchief, value 2 s. ; the goods of Mary Laing , spinster .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-83

London Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1689. DAVID GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Matthew Wilson , from his person .

MATTHEW WILSON. I was on Dowgate-hill a little before five o'clock on the 28th of September; I felt a pull at my coat-pocket, and turned round; I saw the prisoner and another person - each of them had hold of my silk handkerchief; I collared them both, but being very weak, I let the other go, and kept the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Was not I on before you about ten yards? A. No. you was behind me.

Q. Did not I ask you why you let the other man go, and you said, as I was the least, you would pummel me to the ground? A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS COLLINS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-84

1690. THOMAS SHARP BURKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a crape scarf, value 30 s.; a lace veil, value 20 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 20 s., and a handkerchief, value 20 s , the goods of William Elliott .

MR. ROBERTS conducted the prosecution.

ISABELLA ELLIOTT . I am the wife of William Elliott, an innkeeper of Bishopsgate-street ; the prisoner came to our house on the night of the 27th of September, and asked for lodgings; he had a coat and a dressing-case in his hand, and a porter with him carrying a trunk; he said he had lived in Spitalfields, but had lately been in the country, and was going to Hertfordshire the next day; he slept there that night; he came down in the morning: he said he had slept too late, and should go by the afternoon's coach; he then went out, and did not return; the next day I wanted some articles out of the drawers in the room where he had slept, and then missed these articles; I afterwards had the prisoner's trunk opened, which had remained in my house; I found some of my articles there; I gave an account of this to the officer, and described his person and name, which was on some of his things, he was apprehended, and this handkerchief found in his hat.

JAMES LATTER . I live with Alexander Purse ; he is a pawnbroker in London-wall; I have two pairs of trousers which were pawned by the prisoner on the 28th of September; I am positive of his person.

CHARLES WORLY . I am a pawnbroker; I have a scarf and a lace veil, pawned by the prisoner on the 28th of September; I put several questions to him, and am positive of his person.

WILLIAM COX . I am a constable; I received information, and took the prisoner; I found a handkerchief in his hat, which he said belonged to Mr. Elliott.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-85

1691. THOMAS WINDUST was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , two caps, value 3 d.; two shifts, value 10 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d.; two nightgowns, value 10 s., two aprons, value 3 s.; a table-cloth, value 3 s.; two pockets, value 2 s.; a body of a petticoat, value 3 d.; four petticoats, value 6 s.; five pairs of stockings, value 8 s.; ten towels, value 3 s., and two gowns, value 10 s. , the goods of Jane Pippen and Charlotte Pippen .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Mary Angel .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to belong to John Mason .

MARY ANGEL. I take in washing . On the 17th of October I went out with the cart to collect dirty linen; I received a bundle from Jane and Charlotte Pippen to wash; it contained the articles stated, according to the list which I received with it; I went on to Keppel-street, and then left John Mason to go with the cart to the Temple; I have seen some of the property since.

JOHN MASON. I am employed by Angel to drive the cart ; I took the bundle she has been speaking of, and went on to Temple-lane ; I saw the prisoner there, who asked me if he should look to the cart while I went away - I said No; I went up to Mr. Foster's office, but found no one there, but there was a note stating they would be there in half an hour; I went back to my cart to wait, and saw the prisoner again - he asked me what I was waiting for - I told him I had a sofa and a table to take, and the person would be there in half an hour - I stood talking

with him some time till the gentleman came to his chambers; I followed him in, and left the prisoner to take care of the cart; I returned in about five minutes - he was gone, and the bag of linen.

WILLIAM GEORGE GOODACRE . I live with Mr. Lorton, a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street; I have a gown and petticoat pawned by the prisoner on the 17th of October.

SEPTIMUS SADLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 17th of October the prisoner brought me some articles - I questioned him closely and he gave me very good answers, but I got an officer to take him to his lodgings; as they were leaving the house he stooped down to pick up a bag; the officer said he need not take it, but leave it with me - I found a number of articles of wearing apparel in it; the officer then went to the place where he stated he lived, but no tidings of him could be heard; I then gave charge of him, as I thought he had been robbing some poor woman - he said he had not; I then said I thought he had robbed some cart, and it would save a great deal of trouble to tell where he had got them; he said he had, and told the officer to go to No. 1, Temple-lane, where he left the cart and the man.

JANE PIPPIN. I have a sister named Charlotte - I delivered the bundle to the first witness to be washed - I know the articles to be ours.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-86

1692. FRANCIS CLINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a handkerchief, value 4 s. , the goods of James Walters .

JAMES WALTERS. I am clerk to a ship-insurance broker . Between twelve and one o'clock, on the 7th of October, I was in Lombard-street ; I felt something at my left-hand coat pocket, and on turning round I saw the prisoner close to me with my handkerchief in his hand - he dropped it, and while I stooped to pick it up, he turned a corner - a gentleman pointed him out to me - I followed, and took him - I am certain he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If he was so well known by you, why need any one have pointed him out to you? A. His back was turned towards me - he was walking very leisurely; when I took him, he fell on his knees, and begged I would let him off - he said some other person took it, and threw it to him - there was another person, who ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a lad before me - he stopped suddenly, and turned back, and I felt something come against my side - I looked, and it was a handkerchief; the gentleman turned and followed, and took me - I had not had the handkerchief at all.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-87

1693. SARAH HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , three gowns, value 6 s.; two coats, value 10 s.; a child's coat, value 4 s.; a child's cloak, value 5 s.; twelve napkins, value 2 s.; five shirts, value 2 s.; seven frocks, value 5 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; ten pinafores, value 3 s.; six chair covers, value 2 s.; two night gowns, value 2 s.; six curtains, value 3 s.; four petticoats, value 3 s.; four shirts, value 2 s.; two aprons, value 6 d.; two blankets, value 2 s.; a yard of silk, value 3 s., and a box, value 1 s., the goods of George Frederick Watkinson , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ANN WATKINSON . I am the wife of George Frederick Watkinson - we lodge on the second floor of No. 17, Moor-lane, Cripplegate . The prisoner is quite a stranger, and had no business in the house. I went out on the 22d of September, and staid about an hour; when I returned I sat down on the steps with my child, talking to my next door neighbour, and while there the prisoner run down the stairs, and passed me at the door, with a very large bundle in her apron. I am quite certain of her person. These articles had been in my drawers in my room, and the door locked. I had left the key on a shelf in the passage.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. What time did you go out? A. In the morning: while I was sitting on the steps she touched me on the shoulder, and said "Let me pass;" as soon as she had passed me I said "Where did that woman come from?" Mrs. Monkley said "From down your stairs;" she took the child from me, and said "Go up, and see if you have lost any thing;" I went up and missed the property. I should think a person could not have seen the key.

SUSANNAH MONKLEY . I live in this neighbourhood. On the 22d of September, I was talking to Watkinson, and saw the prisoner come down the stairs with a large bundle in her apron; I thought it might be mangling clothes - Watkinson went up stairs, then came down, and said she was robbed.

JOHN CARLILE . I am a patrol of the city. On the 22d of September I was sent for to Moor-lane; I found Mr. Tucker with the prisoner, in the prosecutrix's room and, by the side of the chair in which the prisoner sat I found the key of the door.

JOHN TUCKER . I am an officer. I was sent for between eleven and twelve o'clock - I found the prisoner on the stairs, and the bundle was given to me.

SARAH MONKWELL . I followed the prisoner and took the bundle from her - I held her till Mrs. Monkley came - she said a woman gave them to her on the stairs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The things were given me by a total stranger to carry a little way; I had been for work but it was not cut out.

GUILTY. Aged 24. Of Stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18251027-88

1694. WILLIAM FOWKES and JOSEPH BOAK were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , a pocket-book, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Samuel Partridge , from his person .

SAMUEL PARTRIDGE. I am a saddler . On the 10th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I had a pocketbook in my outside coat pocket, when I was at the Saracen's Head inn; I went from there to Friday-street, from there to Long-lane, and from there to Holborn - I missed my pocket-book there and saw it again the same evening.

EDWARD JONES . I am an officer. On the 10th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at the corner of Long-lane, Smithfield - I saw two

gentlemen at the corner - the prisoner Boak came from behind them - he put something in his left hand trousers' pocket, which I thought was a handkerchief; I looked round and saw Fowkes following the gentleman. I took them both into custody and found the pocket-book on Boak.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOAK'S Defence. I was coming down Long-lane, and a boy gave me the book, and told me to come along with him - we were looking at it when the officer took us.

BOAK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

FOWKES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-89

1695. JOHN YATES was indicted for stealing, on the the 23d of September , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of William Collender , from his person .

MARTIN FARMAN . I am a tailor. I was in Smithfield about five o'clock on the evening of the 23d of September - I saw Collender there - the prisoner, who was near him, took the handkerchief from his pocket - I informed Collender, and the prisoner was seized, but whether the handkerchief was found or not I do not know.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. Yes, I did.

WILLIAM COLLENDER. I am a paper-hanger . I was in Smithfield , and heard from Farman that my pocket had been picked; I pursued the prisoner and collared him - I told him to give me the handkerchief - he said he had none - he wanted to get away and struck me, and I saw him work the handkerchief down on the ground.

JOHN COULTER . I am an officer, and have had the custody of the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a quarrel about a horse, and a man in a fustian jacket, who stood by the prosecutor, put the handkerchief down on the ground - I went on and a gentleman came to me and said I had had it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-90

1696. HENRY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a great coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Joseph Brown .

JOSEPH BROWN. I am a builder . On Saturday, the 24th of September, my chaise stood at the corner of Butcher-hall-lane , with my coat in it; I went away for about a quarter of an hour - when I came back Chapman, who had the prisoner in custody, gave me information.

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am a glazier. I saw the prisoner go to the corner of Butcherhall-lane; he spoke to the lad who had the care of the chaise, and then went to the chaise and looked under the seats; he then took the coat, which he folded up and laid on the seat; he spoke to the boy again, and then took the coat, and ran down Butcherhall-lane; I pursued and he ran into Angel-street - he threw down the coat in a passage, and I took him as he came out again.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Did not the prisoner say he had been sent from the Angel inn, by a gentleman, to get the coat? A. Yes; he said so before Alderman Cox, and he went that way; the lad said he did not like his taking it, as the gentleman would be back directly.

HENRY STANNARD . I am a shoemaker. I was passing Butcherhall-lane, I saw an uproar, and went to see what was the matter - I took the prisoner and the coat from Chapman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-91

1697. WILLIAM HINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a basket, value 1 s.; eight fowls, value 12 s.; six rabbits, value 4 s., and six pigeons, value 3 s. , the goods of William Darvell .

WILLIAM DARVELL. I am a pork-butcher , and live at Newington. On the 13th of October my cart was in Gracechurch-street , with a basket, containing this poultry, which was on a stick in the cart; I left it about five minutes, to go up the market; I was fetched back and the property was gone.

WILLIAM GILL . I am a poulterer. I know the prosecutor's cart. I saw the prisoner get into it, and come out with the basket and rabbits on the top of it; I took him about twenty yards off - he said a man had sent him to get it.

WILLIAM WORCESTER . I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoner and the basket.

Basket produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-92

1698. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , three cloaks, value 36 s. , the goods of Robert James Millar

ROBERT JAMES MILLAR. I am a warehouseman , and live in Wood-street, Cheapside . I saw three cloaks on the 8th of October, which I know to be mine.

MARY ANN HICK . I am servant to Mr. Millar. On Saturday the 8th of October, I was washing down stairs, and was going up between six and seven o'clock to speak to the young lady. I saw some person in the counting-house, which I thought was the young lad who lived there - but it was the prisoner who came out with the cloak. I caught hold of him, and called to two men who were going by to assist me - the young lady came out, and took the cloak from him.

JANE WYNN . I saw the prisoner come out of the counting-house, and heard the servant cry, Stop thief! - I went and took the cloak from him on the cill of the door.

JOSEPH BURGIN . I am an officer, and took charge of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down the street, and had my hat thrown into the warehouse. I went in after it, and the young woman asked what I wanted - I said to get my hat; she said, stop until I get a light, which she did - and if I had been disposed I could have stolen other things, as there was a large bundle by my side; she then said I was going to steal something - she gave an alarm, and the postman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-93

1699. WINIFRED CAVANAGH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , a scarf, value 7 s., and two shawls, value 14 s., the goods of Henry Woollett , her master .

MARY WOOLLETT . I am the wife of Henry Woollett, an upholsterer , who lives in Aldersgate-street the prisoner was our servant . On the 23d of September - I was discharging her for having robbed me; but in consequence of the good opinion I had of her, as she suited me very well, I prevailed on my husband to keep her again. I then called her in, and told her we should keep her, but as she was not very well, she might go home for a few days. I thought it right to look over a small box, which she was taking with her, and asked her for the key of it - she said she must go up stairs for it; she went up, and took with her a small basket. I followed her up to the kitchen, and when I got up, the candle was put out, either by her or the other servant. I inquired why it was put out - the other servant made some excuse, and I staid there until the prisoner came down; she then unlocked the box, which I looked carelessly over, and let her go home - this was about eight o'clock; she was to return the following Tuesday. I went up stairs again, and inquired what Winifred came up for - the servant did not give me any answer, but about eleven o'clock she brought me a bundle, consisting of the articles in question, which had been in a band-box in my own room.

FRANCES HARRINGTON . I had been servant to the prosecutrix five weeks. On this evening when the prisoner went away to see her friends I was in the kitchen, when she came up and said - "Put out the light! put out the light!" I saw her go to the scullery, and I thought I heard the sash of the scullery pull down - my mistress then came into the kitchen, and asked the prisoner for a key. I did not tell my mistress what I heard, as I did not know what it was. I went out on an errand soon afterwards - the prisoner came to me in the street; she took my hand and said - she hoped I would stand her friend, and not tell mistress of the bundle which she threw out of the window, as if I did she would put an end to her life. I questioned her what it was, and she said it was not mistress, but she had got it from an officer in the country. I then swore, on my soul, I would not show it to my mistress until I had seen it myself - but if it belonged to mistress I would return it to her when I came in. I told the other servant who came in the same night, and after master and mistress were gone up stairs, I put up the window, and got the bundle in with the tongs. I shewed it to mistress that night.

ELIZABETH COLLINS . I saw Harrington open the window, and take in the bundle, which had the scarf and two shawls in it; it was shewn to mistress the same night - she claimed it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. I took the prisoner the day after the robbery.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-94

1700. JAMES FEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Pearson , from his person .

CHARLES BENWELL . I am a butcher, and live in Long-lane. I saw the prosecutor pass my house, between six and seven o'clock, on the evening of the 5th of October - the prisoner and another boy followed him quickly - I went to look after them, and saw the prisoner draw a handkerchief partly out of the prosecutor's pocket; when he got a little further he drew it quite out, and dropped it on the ground. I crossed the street, and cried Stop thief! - he ran away, and the patrol stopped him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time elapsed between these two pulls? A. About two minutes. I had not seen him before - but I know the other boy; the prisoner got out of my sight into a passage, where he was stopped.

JULIA BUSH . I took up the handkerchief, and gave it to the landlady of the wine vaults.

HUGH DAVENANT . I am the officer - I took the handkerchief.

JOHN PEARSON. I was in Long-lane , Benwell gave me notice that I had lost my handkerchief - I saw it again afterwards - I had used it not five minutes before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The officer went with the gentleman to the public-house, and the people there gave it to the gentleman - the witness said at Guildhall, that he did not see it drop.

CHARLES BENWELL. I did not see it drop, but I am sure it was dropped.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-95

1701. ELIZABETH STENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s.; a muslin apron, value 2 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a shell, value 6 d., and a pebble, value 6 d., the goods of Henry Piper , her master .

HENRY PIPER. I am a hatter , and live in Aldersgate-street . The prisoner was in my service for about a week - on the 23d of October my wife saw a piece of satin fall from the prisoner's dress; the other articles stated in the indictment were found in her box, which was corded up in the kitchen; she was going away that day, and had wished to go on the evening before. She opened her box herself after being repeatedly desired to do so.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner - the property was given to me; the prisoner acknowledged taking it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

There was a second indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18251027-96

1702. JOHN HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , three table-spoons, value 26 s., and a tea-spoon, value 4 s. , the goods of William Bartlett .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-97

1703. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , four sheets, value 8 s., and a blanket, value 2 s., the goods of John Davis , in a lodging-room .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-98

1704. GEORGE POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Goulding , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-99

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1705. JOHN BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , an iron cramp, value 25 s., the goods of Joseph Wilson , and an iron cramp, value 25 s. , the goods of George Egerton .

JOSEPH WILSON. I am journeyman to Mr. Cook, a chair maker - the prisoner was apprentice there on the 8th of October, but he did not come there again; I missed this iron cramp on the 10th of October.

GEORGE EGERTON. I was in the service of Mr. Cook. The prisoner left on the 8th of October - I missed my cramp afterwards.

GEORGE AVIS . I took the prisoner on the 19th of October - I told him it was for stealing these two cramps; I asked if there was any one implicated with him; he said Yes.

THOMAS SANDERS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker. This cramp was pawned with me on the 8th of October, by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a young man named Collender with me when I took them; he asked if I could get any money - I said I could take something and pawn, and get it out on Monday; I could not get it out, and then ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-100

1706. MICHAEL DONOGHAE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , five boards, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Cubitt , William Cubitt , and Lewis Cubitt .

WILLIAM DUNNAGE . I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas, William, and Lewis Cubitt, builders , of Gray's Inn-lane . The prisoner was employed there as a labourer about nine months. On the 23d of September I was sent for to the watch-house, and saw some boards there, one of which had a particular mark upon it, which I had marked myself, in the way I generally mark boards, with the day of the month, or a cross. I saw the prisoner at Marlborough-street next morning; I had paid him on the Saturday night before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you swear to any other board? A. No. I believe them to be ours. This one is marked with black lead, and is worth 8 d. or 10 d.

JOHN COUSINS . I am a watchman. About half-past twelve o'clock at night on the 23d of September I saw the prisoner with these boards on his shoulder; the serjeant of the watch said, "There is something fallen down;" I said it must come that way, as no one had passed my box - I waited till the prisoner came up with the timber on his shoulder, and said, "My friend, where did you get these?" he said, "My master gave them to me, to make a hod;" I said, "It is very odd he should give you these, when shorter pieces will do - I shall take you to the watch-house." He then threw them off his shoulder, and tried to escape from the serjeant, while I turned to lock my box, but another watchman was there, and he stopped him - the serjeant took up the boards, and we all went to the watch-house. He said, "Oh! that I was dead - I stole them;" he said at Marlborough-street, to Mr. Kinnaird, that he had stolen them from Mr. Cubitt.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you say to him before that? A. Nothing, but that I should take him to the watch-house, which was about a quarter of a mile from the place. He kept begging of me to let him go - he was not quite sober.

CHARLES COUSINS . I was officer of the night. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought there; he said his master had given him the boards; I said, "I am sure your master would not give you such things as these;" he then said he had taken them from Cubitt's buildings - I went there in the morning, and made inquiries.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Brick-lane - I met a friend who had just come from Ireland; we had a little to drink, and I do not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18251027-101

1707. GEORGE BARNES COLLIMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , a shawl, value 8 s. , the goods of George Brinkman .

ELIZA BRINKMAN . My husband's name is George. On the evening of the 15th of October I was at my father's house, in Union-street, Bishopsgate-street . I put my shawl into a drawer in the parlour, which opens into the passage; the prisoner is my brother - he was in the room at the time. I went up stairs for four or five minutes, and when I came down he was just gone from the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH CUTHBERT . I am servant to Mr. Collimore. I was in the passage while Mrs. Brinkman was up stairs. I looked into the parlour, and saw the prisoner stooping over the drawer where the shawl was, and looking towards the window - he saw me, and went away.

ROBERT WHITE . I am shopman to Mr. Lawton, a pawnbroker. This shawl was pawned by a woman, who called herself Ann Chapman .

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and asked what he had done with the shawl - he said he had taken it, and given it to Kitty, and it was in pawn in Bishopsgate-street, near Sun-street end; I went there, and found it. I believe he said he was sorry.

Prisoner's Defence. You may easily perceive what it is - my sister is lately married; and I think she was persuaded to do this to try to get me out of the country, that she may have more than she could if I was here.

Prisoner to ELIZA BRINKMAN. Q. You have said you would lay any thing in my way, and do any thing to get me out of the country? A. I have said that if he robbed me, as he had done his parents, I would prosecute him; I would scorn to say such a thing as he has stated.

HANNAH BRINKMAN . I am the wife of George Brinkman, the elder. The prosecutrix was one day drinking tea with me; she was taking some crumpets from the table, and she said if her brother robbed her of any thing, she would certainly prosecute him, if it was not worth 1 s.:

she always blamed her parents for allowing his conduct towards them; and said he had called his mother every thing he could think of, and robbed his parents.

JURY to WILLIAM ATTFIELD. Q. Did the prisoner say any thing else? A. He cried, and went down on his knees to his sister.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-102

1708. RICHARD HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a shirt, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a stock, value 6 d., and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. , the goods of John Fox .

JOHN FOX. The prisoner was a lodger and bed-fellow of mine, at the Queen's Head public-house, in Great Queen-street . I purchased of him, on Saturday, the 15th of October, a shirt, a waistcoat, a black stock, a pair of gloves, and a silk handkerchief. I got the waistcoat on Sunday, and the others on Monday morning. I went to Hanley to get work, but could not - I returned and missed my articles - I pursued the prisoner to Highgate, and got an officer to take him - they were found on him - he said he would give me them to let him go, but the officer would not let me do so.

JOHN CONWAY . I am the officer. The prosecutor came to me on Monday, the 17th of October - I went with him to South Mimms - in the afternoon we found the prisoner on the Birmingham coach - he began to cry, and said "Jack, take your things, but don't hurt me."

Prisoner's Defence. He did not buy the things of me. I came from Liverpool with him to get work, but could not. I asked him to assist me to return to my friends, and I would give him some of my things. He said he did not want my things, but gave me 12 s. on the Saturday night, and said he wished he could do more for me. I got up on the Monday morning, and went away.

JOHN FOX re-examined. Q. What did you say to him when he asked you to take them of him? A. He said he would sell them for 12 s., and we agreed about them; both our clothes were kept in one chest of drawers, but not in the same drawer.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-103

1709. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 25 lbs. of soap, value 13 s.; a penknife, value 6 d., and a tooth-pick, value 1 s. , the goods of John Howard ; and JAMES CONNER was indicted for receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN HOWARD. I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Whitecross-street . The prisoner Hill was employed to look after my horse , and attend the shop ; he had his meals with me, and slept at his uncle's (the other prisoner.) whose house is close to my back door. On the morning of the 26th of September, about twelve o'clock, I counted all the bars of soap in my back-yard; there were thirty-seven of yellow, and forty-nine and three-quarters of mottled; I counted them again at six o'clock. I then went to the west end of the town, and returned at ten o'clock. I called Hill to take my horse to the stable, and then counted the bars of soap. I found four bars of yellow deficient, and three and three-quarters of mottled. Hill returned in about half an hour. I told him he had robbed me of some soap - he denied it at first, but afterwards said he would go and fetch it from his uncle's. I sent for an officer, who found on him 25 s. in a purse, and my wife's pen-knife. I then went with him and the officer to his uncle's house - he said, "Mr. Howard is come for his soap, uncle." Conner said he had nothing of the kind, and objected to our going into the room, as his wife was in bed. The officer said he must do his duty - he went into the room, and began to search. Conner lifted up the clothes, and took the soap from under the bed - he said, "I suppose this is the soap you came for." I have compared it with what was left on my premises, and it appears exactly the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Does Conner's house join your's? A. No, it is six or eight yards from my back door. Conner gave us a light.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I am the officer. I went to the house, and said to Hill, "What have you been doing - you have been robbing Mr. Howard." I think he said Yes. I said, "Where is the soap you have taken?" He said, "At my uncle's." We went to Conner's, and Hill said, "Mr. Howard is come for the soap." The door was opened, and I showed my authority. Conner said, "You can't be admitted into this room, my wife is in bed." I made my way in - he had not then said any thing about soap, but that it was not there - I said "You have it, for it was put on the table to-night." I went in and got a light, and turned over several baskets and other things - he then turned up the counterpane, and said, "I suppose this is the soap you are looking for." It was wrapped up in a blue apron. I found the pen-knife and tooth-pick on Hill.

HILL'S Defence. No one knew any thing of the soap but myself. I took it there while my uncle and aunt it were out, and put it in the blue apron - there was no one in the house.

CONNER'S Defence. I knew nothing about it till the officer came - I made no refusal to let him in - I took the light to show them every part of my room, not knowing the soap was there.

ELIZABETH BROOKES . My husband is a bricklayer. I live in Conner's house - he sells tripe and cow-heel , at the corner of Red Lion-court, Whitecross-street - he generally leaves his stall at ten o'clock at night, but sometimes as late as eleven. On Monday, the 26th of September, my husband and I went to bed as usual about ten o'clock, and left Conner at his stall - I do not know how lately I had seen him that night - he has no one to help him in his business.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

CONNER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-104

1710. JAMES JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , three half-crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence , the monies of George Thrumwood .

GEORGE THRUMWOOD. I am a bricklayer's labourer - the prisoner was a stranger to me. I went to bed, on Saturday night, the 25th of September, at the Green Man public-house, on Finchley-common , and put my breeches under my head, with three half-crowns, a shilling, and a

sixpence in them - the prisoner, James Green , and the potboy, slept in the same room - in the morning I found that my breeches had been shifted from under my head, and the money gone - the prisoner was then in bed - I went to the landlord, and asked him to let me go up stairs to look for my money - I went up and looked over the clothes, but could not find it - the landlord then said, "It must be some one who slept in the room;" an officer was sent for, who found, in the prisoner's purse, the three half-crowns, the shilling, and the sixpence - there was no money found on the other persons - he must have put the money into the purse while the officer was gone for, because it was empty before, and he threw it on the table - I said it was my money - he made no answer, nor did not say how he came by it - I do not know that he knew the officer was sent for.

Prisoner. I said it was money I had laboured hard for. Witness. Yes, he said so before the Justice.

JAMES GREEN. I am a labourer, and slept in the same room. I heard the prisoner out of bed on the boards in the night. I said "Who is that?" He went to the window and put his hand out. I said "Does it rain?" he made no answer, and I went to sleep again; it was moonlight, and I saw his features plainly; in the morning I heard of the money being lost, and saw it found in the prisoner's purse; I had two half-crowns and some shillings of my own; I think 11 s. 6 d. in all; I had received it for wages the night before.

JOHN DODD . The prisoner came to work for me on the Saturday, and asked me to pass my word for a two-penny loaf for him; I said I would let him have sixpence, and when he left work I gave him two shillings more.

JAMES FRENCH . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found in his purse three half-crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence; the landlord said he suspected him to be the person who had taken it; he was all in a tremble; the prosecutor said it was his money.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-105

1711. WILLIAM POLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , six pieces of timber, value 30 s. , the goods of John Fryer .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FRYER. I am erecting a piano-forte manufactory for Mr. George Henry Gunter , at Camden-town , about four or five yards from the prisoner's premises - I think he is a sacking manufacturer ; it is a sort of shed, and he has apartments over it. In consequence of suspicion, I got a search-warrant, and went to his premises about half-past one o'clock on the 20th of September - we told him we had a warrant to search his premises for timber, which, we understood, he had stolen - he said we were perfectly welcome to search; we found the timber, which is here in the sheds below; he said he did not know how it came there; there were fifteen pieces, but not all in one place; I believe them to be mine, but cannot swear to more than six of them; some of them were standing up on their end in a corner, and a blanket hung over them; it was all new stuff, and worth more than 40 s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any private mark on them? A. No, but I believe them to be mine by the peculiarity of the timber and its grain - it is Dantzic timber; I cannot say how many thousand pieces of the same may be in London - I have no doubt there are many.

Q. Does not his yard and the yard of one Deacon join your's? A. I do not think so - both communicate with Mr. Gunter's; I do not know that Deacon has a yard; I was in the yard behind the prisoner's premises; I do not know whose it is; there is a yard joining to his, and communicating with Mr. Gunter's, but I do not know whose it is; the yard between the prisoner's and Mr. Gunter's communicate with Mr. Gunter's by a pair of gates; some part of my timber is placed in another person's yard; I have heard of a quarrel between Deacon, jun. and the prisoner; Deacon was the person who set me on watching.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was this a covered place or an enclosed shed? A. An enclosed shed.

COURT. Q. Does the yard where the wood was found communicate with the prisoner's premises? A. Yes, I compared it with the rest on Mr. Gunter's premises, and it corresponded exactly.

JOSEPH HALL . I am foreman to Mr. Fryer. I saw the property on the prisoner's premises - I knew it in a moment - there were fifteen or sixteen pieces - I examined them carefully, and have no doubt of their being my master's; the prisoner did not say how he came by them.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you got any of the timber from your master's corresponding with this? A. Yes, here are two pieces.

GEORGE LARGE . I am a sawyer in Mr. Fryer's employ; I saw the timber after it had been found; it was in a cart, and the officer showed it to me - I compared it, and really think it to be Mr. Fryer's property.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Fryer to make a search; I found Mr. Polley there; I desired him to show me his premises; he took me round, and then we went inside; he said he did not know whether he had anything or not, but I was welcome to see; in a corner behind some sash-frames I found some timber, covered with a blanket - in another corner I found some more covered with some old pieces - I brought them out, and showed them to Mr. Fryer, who identified them immediately.

Cross-examined. Q. You made a search, and did not find them about the premises? A. Yes; he told me I was welcome to search, and they were not his property - he had some building at the back, and said he had bought three pieces of old stuff - I do not recollect seeing any more.

COURT. Q. How many pieces were there in all? A. Fifteen or sixteen; three or four of the six pieces were behind the blanket, and some behind the old stuff; with the exception of one piece, which was tied up in a scaffold - they were all in a state of concealment - except the one in the scaffold.

WILLIAM DEACON, JUN. (examined by MR. PHILLIPS.) I live at Mr. Polly's house, with my father; Mr. Polly has a daughter, about seventeen years of age. I am acquainted with her - Mr. Polley has complained to my father about me, but not about his daughter - it was not me but my brother who gave the information, but I knew of it - I have had no quarrel with the prisoner.

JURY. Q. Was there any access to the place where the timber was? A. Yes; there were doors not locked; we have no yard; there is a yard between Mr. Gunter's and the prisoner's, which, I believe is not let.

JOSEPH HALL re-examined. I saw the timber on Mr. Fryer's premises, about a month before, and some later; I mark every stick of timber that comes there.

Prisoner's Defence. These are my premises where the timber was found, but I do not know how it came there; I had a serious quarrel with Mr. Deacon, and told him he must leave the premises if his sons did not leave off making holes in the wainscot, which they did in all parts of the house; there were men continually employed in all parts of the premises, who brought in timber at all times - there was none behind a blanket that I know of. I heard that a letter had been sent to Mr. Gunter, telling him that if he came there they thought he could find some timber. Mr. Deacon kept timber there himself, and other people have liberty to do so too - if fifty pieces had been put there I should not have known.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-106

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1712 GEORGE SUTTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Holloway , in the forenoon of the 24th of October , (he and others being therein) and stealing a cruet-stand, value 5 s.; six cruets, value 20 s., and a mustard spoon, value 5 s., his property .

JOHN HUMPHREYS . I am a labourer at the East India warehouse. On the 27th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I was near Mr. Holloway's house, which is in New-terrace, Mile-end , and saw a young man digging where the gas pipes were laid; the workmen were at breakfast, which made me suspect him; he was at the corner of the New-church, about thirty yards from Mr. Holloway's; I turned round, and saw two men against Mr. Holloway's front railing; his parlour window was open - I went across to the house, and saw the prisoner and another come out of the parlour window, with each a bundle in a handkerchief; they immediately run away - I gave an alarm, and pursued them across the fields; I lost sight of the prisoner for half a minute, as he turned the corner of Coburgh-street, where he was taken immediately - he had then dropped the bundle. I am sure he is the man; the other three separated when they got out of the window.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you an opportunity of seeing him? A. About half a minute. I never said I saw but one person come out of the window.

ISAAC NORMAN . I am a bricklayer. I was near Mr. Holloway's house, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran to the Commercial-road, and saw the prisoner running very fast with this bundle, and when I got within three yards of him he dropped it. I called Stop thief! and he was stopped immediately, without my losing sight of him. I picked up the bundle.

ABRAHAM PEARCE . I am a bricklayer. I was in Coburgh-street, and heard a cry of Stop-thief! saw the prisoner running, and Norman following - I stopped him. I saw him throw the bundle down.

JOHN HOLLOWAY . I live at Mile-end. I cannot swear that my parlour window was shut down - it was not fastened. This cruet-stand is mine, and worth 30 s. I have lost other property.

GUILTY. Aged 18. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-107

1713. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , at St. Luke , fifty yards of flannel, value 3 l. 10 s., the goods of Thomas Wood and William Wigley , in their dwelling-house .

GEORGE SEWELL . I am servant to Thomas Wood and William Wigley, linen drapers , No. 1, Finsbury-place , St. Luke - both contribute to the expenses of the concern; one of the partners sleeps in the house. On Saturday evening, the 24th of September, about a quarter to seven o'clock, I was in the shop - a lady came and gave me information - I missed a roll of flannel from inside the door; the string which held them together was cut; I ran into the street and saw the prisoner running along, with it on his shoulder, about sixty yards off. I overtook him in Finsbury-square, about one hundred yards off, with it: I asked what he had got there; he said he did not take it - it is worth 70 s. at least, and has our private mark on it.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge with the property; he said a man gave it him to carry - he would not say where he was taking it to.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing to eat or drink - a gentleman asked if I would earn 1 s., as he would give me one to carry it to Little Moorfields - he gave it me by a butcher's shop.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18251027-108

First London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

1714. WILLIAM HENRY AUSTIN was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the first eight counts of this indictment, herein after mentioned, was a person employed by and under the Post Office of Great Britain , in certain business relating to the said office, that is to say, in sorting letters and packets brought to the General Post Office in London, to wit, at the parish of St. Mary Abchurch , and that heretofore, to wit, on the 9th of July , in the parish aforesaid, a certain letter, then lately before sent by the Post, to wit, by the Post from Wimborn, in the County of Dorset, for, and to be delivered to a certain person at Oxford, to wit, to one John Pike , came to the hands and possession of the said prisoner whilst he was so employed, as aforesaid - the said letter containing therein one 5 l. Bank note, a promissory note for payment of and value 10 l., another promissory note, for payment of and value 5 l., another promissory note, for payment of and value 5 l., one bill of exchange, for payment of and value 14 l. 17 s. 6 d., another bill of exchange, for payment of and value 20 l., and another bill of exchange, for payment of and value 8 l. 14 s.; and that the said prisoner afterwards, to wit, on the same day, at the same parish, being such person so employed, as aforesaid, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said

Bank note, the said several promissory notes, and the said several bills of exchange, the property of Charles Gardner , against the statute.

2d COUNT, the same, only charging the prisoner with stealing from and out of the said letter the said Bank notes, instead of secreting the said letter.

3d and 4th COUNTS, the same as the two first, only calling it a packet instead of a letter.

5th and 6th COUNTS, the same as the two first, only stating the property to be of John Pike, instead of Charles Gardner.

7th and 8th COUNTS, the same as the 3d and 4th Counts, stating the property as in the 5th and 6th Counts.

9th COUNT, for feloniously stealing on the same day, at the same parish, from and out of a certain Post Office there situate, a certain other letter, then lately before sent by the Post of Great Britian, to wit, by the Post, from Wimborn, in the County of Dorset, for, and to be delivered to a certain person at Oxford, to wit, the said John Pike, and another letter, against the statute.

10th COUNT, the same as the 9th, only stating it to be a packet instead of a letter.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL with MESSRS. BOLLAND and SHEPPARD conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES GARDNER. I am a traveller , in the employ of Mr. John Pike, a hop merchant , who resides in the City of Oxford. On the 7th of July I was at Wimborn, in Dorsetshire; I made a remittance from there to Mr. Pike: I have a memorandum of the particulars made by me at the time - (reads) one note of Messrs. Raywood and Pool's Bank, firm Messrs. Welch, Lidyard, and Co., No. 211, dated 1st of December, 1821, 10 l. payable at Rogers, Toogood, and Co.: a Wincanton Bank note, Musgrave, Garratt, and Co., No. B. 3716, 1st of December, 1824. payable at Fry and Co., 5 l.; a Salisbury 5 l. note, Brodie and Co., No. 1298, October 5, 1824, payable at Remmington and Co's.; a 5 l. Bank of England note, No. 7955, signed Consett, dated the 19th of May, 1825; an acceptance of J. Harman, of Wilton, dated the 4th of July, 1825, at two months, payable at Messrs. Everett, 14 l. 17 s. 6 d.; an acceptance of D. J. Wright's, of Downton, dated the 6th of July, at two months, payable at Salisbury Bank, 18 l. 14 s.; an acceptance of Thomas Chaters, of Ringwood, dated the 6th of July, at two months, 20 l., payable at Sir R. C. Glynn and Co's.; the total amount is 78 l. 1 ls. 6 d.; I inclosed all these in a letter, which I sealed, and directed to Mr. John Pike, Oxford, and took it to the Post Office about five minutes past five o'clock of the afternoon of the 7th, and the box being closed I paid a penny; the post had not gone out.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What enables you to be particular to the date? A. I put it down on this memorandum. I have been twenty-four years in Mr. Pike's employ - he has no partner, and no other Christian name than John.

MARY ANN HUSSEY . I am post mistress at Wimborn, Dorset. I remember Mr. Gardner bringing me a letter on the 7th of July, directed to John Pike, of Oxford; it was a thick letter. The course of the post from Wimborn to the City of Oxford is by Southampton; letters directed any where in the County of Oxford, but not in the City, would go to London - it often happens by mistake that letters directed to the City of Oxford go to London. I should charge this letter treeble; the postage going from Wimborn to Oxford by London would be 2 s. 3 d.: we always send a letter bill in the London bag - this is the letter bill, sent up on that day; (reads) "From Wimborn, 7th of July, 1825, unpaid letters for London 12 s., ditto passing through London 2 s. 3 d., 14 s. 3 d., signed M. A. Hussey post mistress."

Q. Here is 2 s. 3 d. charged for letters to London? A. Yes; a double charge, I believe, is put on in London, for a letter to Oxford; 2 s. 3 d. is the charge to Oxford - if it went by Southampton the charge would be 2 s. 6 d.; it strikes me by this charge of 2 s. 3 d. that this letter went in the London bag. I tied the bag, and sealed the twine with the Crown seal.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe every post master has the Crown seal? A. Yes. I think I recollect sending this letter to London. I had a letter from Mr. Freeling about it about a month after. I do not enter on the bill how many letters are sent. I do not know what is in the letters, but charge according to the best of my ability - we generally weigh them. A letter directed to Oxford would mean the City, and unless I made a mistake I should send it to Southampton. I have been post mistress eighteen years; I do not generally make mistakes.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. Do you recollect on this day such a letter being delivered to you? A. I think I do; it being brought after time brings it to my recollection; I do recollect it certainly.

Q. Such a letter would be so charged? A. Yes. I cannot say whether any other letter was sent that day through London; very few go from Wimborn to Oxford. I recollect that this was directed to Oxford, but do not recollect the name.

CHARLES PIDDINGTON . On the 8th of July I was employed at the Post-office - it was my duty to receive the Wimborn bag - it arrived safe that morning, tied, and sealed as usual; I opened it my self, and placed all the letters on the letter F table.

Cross-examined. Q. You received the bag from the guard? A. No, from a messenger, who brings them to the table; this was about six or seven o'clock in the morning. I am second opener at the F table, where this bag is opened - there are two sorters at that table; a letter directed to Oxford would remain in the office till night; the next table to us is letter E - it is about two yards from us; there are persons employed at that table. The letters would remain on the table about an hour; they go into the hands of the sorter - this letter would be carried to the Shrewsbury division, being sorted for Shrewsbury, not to any table, into the Oxford box; the messenger takes the letters, and lays them in the division - they then go through the clerk's hands, at the Shrewsbury division, and are put into the box in the morning, and would not come out of the box till evening. I do not know how many sorters there are in the Shrewsbury division.

COURT. Q. They are taken out in the evening to be sorted for where they are going? A. Yes; they are taken out, and put into the bag.

SAMUEL JOHNSON. I am one of the presidents of the Post-office. The Wimborn bag comes in about seven o'clock in the morning, and goes to the F table to be opened

- there is a clerk and two openers at that table - they are sorted, and letters going the Shrewsbury road would go to that division. The country letters are sorted immediately behind the F table; only one sorter is employed at a time there, and that is the person who opens the bag. At the end of the morning duty these letters would be sorted, and carried to the different divisions, to which they belong; one for Oxford would be sorted to the Shrewsbury division; the Manchester division is two feet and a half or three feet from the Shrewsbury. I cannot say whether the prisoner was a sorter at that division that morning - there is a table behind the Shrewsbury division, and a ledge, where these letters going to various parts of the country would be put; we call them "inalls;" after being there deposited, the charge which the country post masters have made are erased, and the proper charge put on - they are then put into the respective boxes to which they belong, about nine or ten o'clock in the morning, and remain there till a sufficient number are taxed, and told up sufficient to form a bundle, when they are taken out, and tied up in bundles, ready to go out, and are put into the bags previous to dispatching the mails, by an officer, called an assistant of the division; the boxes are open during the process of duty.

Cross-examined. Q. A letter going through London to Oxford from Wimborn, would pass through seven or eight hands? A. Very possibly. The messengers convey them from the table to the divisions in their hands or arms, not in a tray - they would get on the ledge about a quarter past eight o'clock; the morning duty closes about nine or ten, according to the state of business - they would not be touched again till five o'clock in the afternoon, when they would be taken out of the boxes, tied up, and put into bags. A letter from Wimborn to Oxford would be in the Shrewsbury division, but it should not come to town regularly - there are four persons engaged at the Shrewsbury division in the evening; there are about twenty divisions in the room, and three or four persons at each. The Worcester division is on the right-hand side of the Shrewsbury - that is closer to it than the Manchester, which is on the left. The prisoner has been in the office sixteen or seventeen years. I never heard any thing to his prejudice.

JOSEPH BEDFORD . On the 8th of July I was a messenger at the Post-office, and delivered the letters to the different divisions; a letter for Oxford would go to the Shrewsbury division.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you there in the morning and evening? A. Yes, but have nothing to do with the letters in the evening; in the morning I carry letters from the table F to the respective divisions.

THOMAS BRIDGES . On the 8th of July I was a sorter at the Post-office, and made up the Oxford bag that night - a messenger closes it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at your post before the letters are brought to the table? A. They are brought to the table in the morning; I find them in a box by the table in the evening; I take them out. I get to the office at five o'clock - I am the only sorter - there is a messenger and clerk at the table: they were there that night.

HENRY FOLLEY . I am messenger at the Post-office. On the 8th of July, at night, I sealed the Oxford bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not strangers come into the office sometimes? A. I never saw any.

THOMAS BRICKNELL . I am post master of Oxford. - The London bag arrived safe on the morning of the 9th of July sealed as usual, and unbroken.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive it yourself from the guard? A. Yes.

JOHN PIKE. I am a hop-merchant, and live at Oxford. Mr. Gardner is my traveller. I received no letter on the 9th of July, with a remittance from Wimborn. I was at Oxford, but did not particularly expect one that day.

THOMAS BRIDGES re-examined. Q. Have you been assistant clerk at the Shrewsbury division any time? - A. Yes - the prisoner's duty I believe was at the Manchester division, but I do not recollect - Tetsworth and Oxford letters would come to my division; the prisoner has more than once left his own division. and come and examined my letters; he once gave me his reason for it, for he said he had friends living at Tetsworth. The Tetsworth box is within a few inches of the Oxford box.

Cross-examined. Q. When did he go to the Tetsworth box? A. I cannot recollect any particular time. I remember his being at that box two or three times - but I cannot remember at what period. I have heard since that a relative of his wife's did live there.

COURT. Q. How long have you been assistant at the Shrewsbury division? A. About seventeen months - I could not have seen him come there before that time.

ROBERT WATTS . I am one of the presidents of the Inland-office, and was on duty on the evening of the 8th of July. The prisoner was senior clerk at the Manchester division that day - it is next to the Shrewsbury division - letters for Oxford would be made up at the Shrewsbury division.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known him? A. Since his childhood - he always bore a perfectly good character. I have known his father forty years.

FREDERICK KELLY . I am in the service of the Post-office, and for the last six months have been at the Shrewsbury division every alternate evening, as taxing clerk; our division is within three feet of the Manchester. I have often seen the prisoner on duty at the Manchester division. I have sometimes seen him come to the Shrewsbury division - he has looked over some of the letters, which had been sorted into the boxes; I believe he once told me some relations of his lived on some part of the road, and I have heard it from others - but until this charge, I did not hear of the place - I have heard it is Tetsworth. There is only one box between that and the Oxford, and only six inches space between them.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not the practice of clerks to look for letters addressed to them or their friends? A. I believe they do look for letters going to their relatives, or coming to themselves. I should not think it extraordinary, I never did it myself, nor saw it done except by him. I think I have seen others do it - his looking excited no suspicion in my mind, because there were two or three clerks there at the time.

MR. ATTOREY GENERAL. Q. There could be no letters for him in the Shrewsbury division, he living in London? A. No.

CHARLES WALLIS . I have known the prisoner since 1811. About ten days before the 9th of July. I met him in Hoxton - I had not seen him for some time before that. I had been insolvent. When I met him he asked me how I was off. I said, "but middling;" he then said, he had an opportunity to put a trifle in my way; he took down my direction, No. 3, Bermondsey-new-road, with a pencil, and I bid him good day - we were not many minutes together, it was in the street. On the morning of the 9th of July, he called at my lodgings, in Bermondsey-new-road; he came into my house, and asked how I was engaged - what I had to do that day. I said, "Nothing particular - that I was at his service if he required," he then said, he wanted me to do a little business for him in the city, he had a few notes for me to change - this was about ten o'clock in the morning; he gave me three 5 l. country notes to change for sovereigns at the banker's in the city, where they were payable, and to meet him with the amount on Southwark-bridge, as soon as I had done it, which he thought would be a little after eleven o'clock; he went away, and I went out in about half an hour. I went to Stephenson, Remmington, and Co., Lombard-street, and changed a 5 l. note, which was payable there. I then went to Fry and Chapman's, Mildred's-court, and changed two 5 l. notes. I met him on Southwark-bridge and gave him the money - we walked to Cornhill together; he then said, he wished me to purchase 10 l. worth of French coin at the bullion-office, kept by Mr. Thomas, and then to go to Clerkenwell to fetch his watch from the watchmaker's, and to return with the French money and watch to Guildhall at two o'clock - he was to meet me there under Mr. Pitt's monument - he left me. I went to Mr. Thomas's, and stated what I wanted, and produced two 5 l. bank-notes which I had received from him; the person in the shop returned me one note, saying he did not like it, he would rather I would change it. I went to the Bank and received five sovereigns for it - previous to delivering it to the bank clerk, I wrote my own name and address - "C. Wallis, No. 3, Bermondsey-new-road," on it. I returned with the five sovereigns to Mr. Thomas, who delivered me the French money; it was mostly gold Napoleons, and some silver. I went to Mr. Fuller's, at Clerkenwell, and asked for the watch. Mr. Fuller's servant said they could not deliver it without an order. I returned without it, and met the prisoner at Guildhall - told him what had passed about the watch; he had given me a sovereign to pay for it. I delivered him the French money, and told him I had been to the Bank to change one of the 5 l. notes, which had been objected to by Mr. Thomas. He asked me if I had put my name on it - I said, "Yes;" he appeared rather flurried. I said, one could not be too open and candid, with a public body like the Bank of England, and therefore I had written my name on it as the regular way, in which they did business, required it, and it was very probable he would hear no more of the note. I mentioned about the watch - he said he was going out of town in a few days, for a few days - he desired me to keep the sovereign for myself. I told him it was too much for my time for that day; he said I might work it out another time - we parted. I met him accidentally five or six days after, he then asked if I had heard any more of the notes. I said No. He said, if I heard any thing further respecting it, I might meet him any time when he came to the office, and let him know. He said he came to the Post-office past the Beaver's Arms, public-house, near Kingsland-road turnpike, about four o'clock in the evening.

Q. Did you some time afterwards receive a letter respecting this Bank note? A. I did - this is it; it contains a description of the note; it came to me at No. 3, Bermondsey-new-road. Before I answered it, I met the prisoner coming to the office, about the spot he described. I shewed him the note, he read it, and told me he did not know who he received it from. I said, "I am afraid there is something wrong - if so, stop it." - He said, he did not wish his name to appear, as there had been several embezzlements taken place in the office - money being taken out of letters, or words to that effect, and he wished me to state that I received it in the regular way of business, and could not recollect of whom. He asked if my rent was paid - I signified that it was not, and it was about 30 s. - he gave me two sovereigns, and we parted. I went home, and wrote a letter to Mr. Freeling to that effect. I heard nothing further for some days. In consequence of being told somebody had called when I was out, I met the prisoner on the Waterloo-bridge, and told him I had written the letter, and somebody had called. He said he did not wish his name to appear in the business. I said, I would not mention it, if I could avoid it." He told me, if I saw the party who called, to see him afterwards, and tell him what passed - we parted. I saw him afterwards, and told him the party had been again, but I was not at home. I appointed to meet the prisoner on Monday, expecting the party would call on Monday morning, as he had appointed. I saw the prisoner before he did call, and agreed to see him next day on Waterloo-bridge, about the middle of the day. I was taken into custody on the Tuesday morning - before I met him I was taken to the Post-office, and did not mention that I was to meet him that day on the bridge.

Cross-examined. Q. What age are you? A. Thirty-two years. I never sold pens and paper to the clerks in the Post-office, nor seen them on any business; I never said I had sold them pens or paper, or had done any business with them. I did know two or three of the clerks by occasionally meeting them at the prisoner's house some few years ago - I should recognise them now if I met them, but am not acquainted with them personally - I understood them to be clerks.

Q. Do you know any of the messengers? A. I may have recognised persons about the office who I understood to be messengers, but never spoke to them. I have been there for letters, when I was in business. I do not know that I should recognise them now. I am now a dealer in writing paper: I never dealt in bills of exchange - I will not swear that I have not accepted accommodation bills in the course of my life. I do not know Mr. Williams, a currier, nor any of his clerks.

Q. Have you not accepted accommodation bills to a considerable amount? A. No; I was never in the habit of accepting.

Q. A few hundred pounds? A. No, nothing like it. I was originally in the hop trade. When I first came to

town I was clerk to Smith and Munn, in the Borough. I took the benefit of the Insolvent Act in 1820; I was in prison about three months; I was insolvent about 800 l.; there was not above 300 l. of it for bill transactions. I was in the hop trade then - my expenses were greater than my means - trade did not turn out so well as I expected. After my discharge I was traveller in the hop and seed trade for Mr. Buck. I only went out one season for him - I was afterwards in the service of Bush and Weir, for nine months, and then dealt in paper a short time. I afterwards got a situation in the hop trade with Mr. Beaver.

Q. Were you turned away for drunkenness? A. For irregularity; I was with him, on and off, for nine months, and then returned to the paper trade, and sold paper when Austin met me; I had not seen him for a year and a half; I owed him about 16 l. when I took the benefit of the act; I knew he was in the Post-office but had no suspicion whatever; knowing him to be a respectable man, such a thought never entered my mind. He had stated to me that he was agent to a party connected with the East India shipping.

Q. Did not his giving you a sovereign excite your suspicion? A. No, because he knew I was not well off. I did not suspect he was acting wrong. I had suspicions when I received a letter from Mr. Freeling. I did not go to Mr. Freeling - the impression on my mind was, that if any thing was wrong he stood in a very delicate situation, and it was out of regard to him that I kept his name out of view, as he explained it to me. I did not advise him to leave the country; I thought there might be some danger connected with the note; he met me till I was apprehended, and I informed him what passed. I was only in custody a few hours before I made this communication - it was on the day I was taken. I thought something was wrong when I wrote to Mr. Freeling, but wished to keep his name out of the question if I could; I looked at his respectability for a long time, and it did not strike me he was guilty of any thing. I hawk pens and paper about for sale, but never go to the Post-office with them - I have had nothing to call me there since I left business; I have never been inside nor have I been up to the office lately.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. You considered him respectable, and wrote your own name on the note without hesitation? A. Yes; when I had a letter from Mr. Freeling I entertained suspicion.

COURT. Q. You owed the prisoner 16 l, how came you indebted to him? A. I had a cash transaction with him - discounting a bill now and then for him.

Q. Then when he brought you these notes it was in the nature of your former transactions? A. Yes.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you examined at Guildhall when you were taken? A. No; I was examined twice at Bow-street: the first time was on Tuesday evening, the 24d of August. I was apprehended about nine o'clock in the morning, and was at the Post-office a considerable time - I considered myself in custody - I have remained in custody till now. I was first taken to the Post-office, and told this story there to the solicitor, before I went to Bow-street.

The Letter, from Mr. Freeling to the witness, was here read, requesting him to state from whom, and when he received the note, the particulars of which were stated.

WILLIAM ARCHIBALD MEARNS . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I produce a 5 l. note, No. 7955, dated the 19th of May, 1825; paid into the Bank on the 9th of July; on the top, in front, is written

"C. Wallis, No. 3, Bermondsey-new-road." I paid five sovereigns for it. Persons are requested to write their names and address on notes - here is the entry in my book.

Cross-examined. Q. Where does this note come from? A. The inspector's office.

MR. GARDNER. This is one of the notes I enclosed in the letter. I have written my initials on the back, and the name of Rogers, who I took it of.

CHARLES WALLIS . This is my hand-writing on it.

MR. SAMUEL THOMAS . On the 9th of July I recollect Wallis calling and presenting two 5 l. notes for 10 l. worth of French coin. I objected to one of the notes, and desired him to go to the Bank and get sovereigns for it; he left and returned in five minutes with the sovereigns; I gave him twenty gold Napoleons, worth 9 l. 15 s., and a 5 and a 1-francs piece, in French silver, for the 5 s.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not said you had but a faint recollection of his person? A. Seeing him several times when he was examined, I recollect him - when I first saw him I said I had a very faint recollection of him; I am now more certain; it was on or about the 9th of July - I cannot recollect the precise day. I was examined at Bow-street seven or eight weeks ago, and have seen Wallis once since, and am now certain of him.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Having heard him speak and seen him, do you believe him to be the man? A. I do. I remember no other transaction of a similar nature, about this time.

WILLIAM DINMORE . I am a bookseller, and live in Broad-street. I was clerk to Messrs. Fry and Chapman, No. 8, Mildred's-court. I have a book, containing the transactions of the 9th of July - here is an entry of a 5 l. Wincanton Bank note, paid on that day, No. 3716, in money.

Cross-examined. Q. What does letter B. mean on the note? A. I have no B. in my book - it means the book the note is entered in.

MR. GARDNER. This note was in the letter I sent; I have no mark, but the number and date correspond.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I am shopman to Samuel Fuller , watchmaker, Red-lion-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner brought his watch to be repaired, in the name of Austin - a person called for it - I would not deliver it - the prisoner called and had it on the 11th of July, as appears by my book; he asked why I did not deliver it - I said it was not regular to do so without an order.

RICHARD GARDENER . I am an officer of Bow-street. By direction of the solicitor of the Post-office, I went to No. 3, Bermondsey-new-road, to procure the attendance of Wallis; it was on a Thursday - I did not see him. I called on Friday and again on Tuesday morning; I then took him to the Post-office in custody; he was examined there and taken to Bow-street. He told me I should find the prisoner by the Beaver's-arms, Kingsland-road, a little before four o'clock. I went with the solicitor and took him; he wanted to know how we met him on that road, as it was out of the regular road, and either asked where Wallis was, or if it was Wallis who told me, but having an impediment

in his speech I could not understand which he said. I searched his person, and found one gold and two silver coins, which I produce. I found a pocket-book on him, with this memorandum in it (reads) - "14th July, left town for Deal - 22d, arrived in town."

Cross-examined. Q. He made no objection to your searching him? A. Not the least.

MR. THOMAS. This is a 20-franc gold Napoleon - this a 5, and the other a 1-franc piece - they correspond with the silver money I gave Wallis. I do not know whether I gave him Napoleons or Louis, but it was 20-franc pieces. I call them all Napoleons - I, most probably, gave him both.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his previous character.

Reference Number: t18251027-109

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1715. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-110

London Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Recorder.

1716. AMBROSE OLIVER was indicted for embezzlement

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-111

1717. HENRY PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Edward Paulin , from his person .

EDWARD PAULIN. I am an auctioneer , and live in Broad-street, Radcliffe. On the 19th of October, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was in Cornhill , going to Cheapside - my handkerchief was in my outside coat-pocket, about eleven o'clock in the morning, when I left home. I did not feel it taken out, but missed it at a jeweller's-shop, in Sweeting's-alley. On my return home by the Mansion-house, three quarters of an hour afterwards, an officer asked if I had had my pocket picked. I found the prisoner in custody with it - my name is on it at full length. I had not observed him near me.

THOMAS IZOD. I am a warehouseman, and live in Sherborne-lane. On the 19th of October, I was coming through St. Peter's-alley, into Cornhill, and saw the prisoner in company with two others behind Mr. Paulin - I watched them. Mr. Paulin crossed over, they followed him - and about three doors from Finch-lane, I saw one of the others take a handkerchief from Mr. Paulin's right hand pocket, and immediately throw it back to the prisoner - who received it. I immediately crossed over and seized the prisoner with it in his hand. Mr. Paulin was then out of sight - he threw the handkerchief down immediately as I seized him. I stopped to pick it up, and gave him to the officer with it. I was at the Mansion-house when Mr. Paulin came in.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not go with you to look for the gentleman, without your holding me? A. He did not attempt to escape - but I held him.

WILLIAM WORCESTER . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the road, when a boy threw the handkerchief right into my hand - I wondered at it, and directly threw it on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-112

1718. RICHARD WILLIAM JASPER was indicted, for that he, on the 1st of July , at St. Martin, Ludgate , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain bill of exchange, the tenor of which said false, forged, and counterfeited bill of exchange is as follows ; that is to say: -

London, June 25, 1825.

25 0 0

Six months after date, pay me or my order, the sum of twenty-five pounds, for value received.

RICHD. WM. JASPER.

Accepted Wm. Cuddon.

To Mr. Ambrose Cuddon, No. 62, Paternoster-row.

with intention to defraud William Suttaby , William Fox , and Robert Suttaby , against the statute, &c.

2d COUNT, the same as the 1st count, only stating the intention to be to defraud Ambrose Cuddon , against the statute, &c.

3d and 4th COUNTS, for uttering and publishing as true, a like false, forged, and counterfetted bill of exchange, with a like intent as in the 1st and 2d counts mentioned; he, the said prisoner, at the time he so uttered and published the same, well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, against the statute, &c.

5th COUNT, that said prisoner, on the said 1st of July, at the same parish, having in his possession a certain bill of exchange, whose tenor follows; (setting it forth;) which said bill of exchange was indorsed as follows; that is to say - "Richd. Wm. Jasper."

He, the said prisoner, on the said 1st of July, at the same parish, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, upon the said bill of exchange, an acceptance of the said bill of exchange, as follows; that is to say -

"Accepted, Ambrose Cuddon;"

with intent to defraud William Suttaby, William Fox, and Robert Suttaby, against the statute, &c.

6th COUNT, the same as the 5th, omitting the words in italics, and substituting the words, "and upon which said last mentioned bill of exchange was written a certain false, forged, and counterfeited acceptance of the same, as follows: that is to say:" then follows the acceptance, as in the 5th count. He, said prisoner, on the said 1st of July, at same parish, feloniously did utter and publish as true, the said last mentioned false, forged, and counterfeited acceptance of the said last mentioned bill of exchange, with a like intent as in the 5th count, he, said prisoner, at the time he uttered and published the same as true, well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, against the statute, &c.

7th COUNT, the same as the 5th count, only stating the intent to be to defraud Ambrose Cuddon.

8th COUNT, the same as the 6th, only with intention to defraud the said Ambrose Cuddon.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM SUTTABY. I am in partnership with Richard Suttaby and William Fox, of Stationer's-court, and

have no other partner - I live on Ludgate-hill. On the 1st of July the prisoner came to my place of business, and wanted mill-boards, and other materials for bookbinding; being a stranger, I inquired how he was to pay for them - he tendered me this instrument, and he wished to have goods to the amount of about 8 l. and the rest in money. I desired my servant to look out the goods he wanted - he looked out some, and said he would leave the others till another time, as he did not exactly know all he should want - he had part of the goods that day, and I paid him 16 l. 8 s., in money, taking 12 s., discount. I was acquainted with Mr. Cudden in business, as being a respectable man, and did not object to the bill.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You know nothing of him except from the transaction of that day? A. We have had several transactions since, but this is the first. I had some slight knowledge of him as having been apprenticed to a customer of ours.

The bill was here put in and read (see indictment). It was drawn of Mr. A. Cudden, and accepted in the name of Cuddon.

MR. SUTTARY. In consequence of some after dealing with him he called on me by appointment, and was taken into custody.

CHARLES CUDDON . I live at No. 53. Frith-street, Soho, and am clerk at Messrs. Wright and Co.'s banking-house, Henrietta-street. I know a person named Ambrose Cuddon - he lives at No. 62, Paternoster-row, and can say that the acceptance to this bill is certainly not his writing. I am in the habit of seeing a good many persons writing, and am well acquainted with Ambrose Cuddon's. If any one presented this bill to me, I should say it was not his writing; it does not appear to me to be like it.

Cross-examined. Q. What relation are you to him? A. His cousin. I do not know whether he has employed the prisoner on any business myself.

COURT. Q. Do you visit Ambrose Cuddon at No. 62, Paternoster-row? A. Yes; he is the house-keeper. I believe he has no lodgers - nobody else of his name lives in the house. I know no other Ambrose Cuddon, there or any where else.

JOHN KRULL. I am in the employ of Ambrose Cuddon, of No. 62, Paternoster-row - (looking at the bill) - this is nothing like master's hand-writing. I have been in his service about a year and a hall. I very often see him write, and am quite certain it is not his writing. The prisoner worked for master - I do not know whether he ever saw master write. I think I should know the prisoner's writing - I think the body of the bill is his writing - I do not know whose writing the acceptance is.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner write? A. Not very often - six times at least; the last time was two or three months ago; I saw him write a note to master, and saw what he wrote.

Q. Do not you know that bills were drawn by him, and accepted by your master, very frequently. A. No; there has been something that master has scolded him about; I know nothing about bills; I am my master's only servant; he is a bookseller.

MR. LAW. Q. Is there any lodger in the house named Ambrose Cuddon? A. No; I speak to his hand-writing from having seen him write; I know nothing of his drawing bills on master.

COURT. Q. From the 1st of July down to this time has your master had any lodger? A. I am not certain; I sleep in the house, and if he had, I must have known it I think; there have been persons lodging there, but I am not certain whether it is since that time; I heard their names; they were not at all like the sound of Cudden.

SAMUEL RIDLEY . I am a fringe-maker, and live at No. 70, Newgate-street, and have been well acquainted with Ambrose Cuddon's hand-writing for many years. I am quite satisfied that this acceptance is not his handwriting.

COURT. Q. Are you very intimate with him? A. Only in the course of business.

MARLOW JOHN FRANCIS SIDNEY . I am a colour manufacturer. I know Mr. Ambrose Cuddon, of Paternoster-row, and am well acquainted with his writing; the acceptance to this bill is not in the least like his; I have been familiar with his writing for four years; I frequently visited him at his own house; I do not know whether he had any lodgers, but think not; I never knew any body else of his name, or of a name like his, residing there.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury - I am not guilty of any intention to defraud Mr. Cuddon, or any one else; my life throughout has been a life of industry; my master, and many others, can speak to my character; I have an aged mother, a wife, and child, looking to me for support.

Eight witnesses deposed to the prisoner's previous good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Believing the bill was addressed to A. Cuddon.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutor on account of his good character.

Reference Number: t18251027-113

1719. RICHARD WILLIAM JASPER was again indicted for that he, on the 1st of August , at St. Martin, Ludgate , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and falsely counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging and counterfeiting a certain bill of exchange , which is as follows: -

London, July 28, 1825.

25 0 0

Six months after date, pay to me or my order, the sum of Twenty-five Pounds, for value received.

R. W. JASPER.

Accepted Ambrose Cuddon.

To Mr. Ambrose Cuddon, No. 62, Paternoster-row: with intent to defraud William Suttaby , William Fox , and Robert Suttaby , against the statute, &c.

2d COUNT, the same, only stating the prisoner's intention to be to defraud Ambrose Cuddon .

3d and 4th COUNTS, for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged and counterfeited bill of exchange, with like intentions.

FOUR other COUNTS, for forging and uttering and publishing as true, a forged acceptance of said bill of exchange, with the like intentions.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH .

Recommended to mercy, as before.

Reference Number: t18251027-114

1720. RICHARD GUILDFORD WILTSHIRE , and

MARIA O'GORMAN, his wife, were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a quilt, value 5 s., and a sheet, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of William Brenton , in a lodging-room .

HANNAH BRENTON . I am the wife of William Brenton - we live in Castle-street, Holborn . In November, 1824, the prisoners took my first floor front room furnished, at 9 s. a week. The man stated himself to be a man of rank and fortune, and about to sell a large estate, which would put him in possession of 8,000 l. On the 30th of September they owed me twenty-nine weeks' rent. I went to tell them they must leave, as they could not pay me - he said he would leave immediately and went out - his wife wished to follow, but I prevented her to examine the room - this quilt, and a pair of sheets were missing, among other things.

CHRISTIAN GEORGE MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I took charge of the female prisoner, and found the man in the street - the woman produced some duplicates; those for the quilt and sheet were among them.

WILLIAM CREE . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Gray's-inn-lane. On the 24th of September, the female prisoner pawned this quilt for 3 s. 6 d., and on the 19th the sheet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners put in a written defence, pleading the greatest distress.

R. G. WILTSHIRE - GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Fourteen Days .

M. O. WILTSHIRE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-115

1721. JOHN BIGNALL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of David Jones .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-116

1722. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a boat, called a wherry, value 5 l., and a pair of sculls, value 6 s. , the goods of Joseph Burnham .

JOSEPH BURNHAM. I live on Lambeth-hill, Thames-street. On the 1st of August I bought a wherry and pair of sculls for 6 l. 10 s.; I saw it on the 4th about eleven o'clock in the morning, at Queenhithe-stairs , hooked to one of the piles - it could not have drifted; about five in the evening she was gone; I had lent her to Jeffs, a waterman, (who is not here) for a few days, on Wednesday, the 3d of August, but he returned her, and never had her away from the stairs. I know the prisoner - he gets his living on the barges ; Clark, who is indicted with him, also gets his living on board the barges; I found my wherry on the 5th, at the Great Junction-wharf, near Blackfriars-bridge, pulled up on some timber - she had not been injured much; I never lent her to White of Clark.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not let it to Clark at 2 s. 6 d. a day? A. I neither let, nor lent it to him.

Q. Were you not drinking with me on the 3d of August? A. He might be in the same house, but was not in my company.

JOHN THOMAS MAXWELL . I am a lighterman. On the 4th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to Lambeth, and found White and Clark in company with a barge-builder, at the Duke's Head public-house; I asked the barge-builder if he had any barges to sell suitable for the Regent's Canal; White said, "I have a Bristol boat to sell;" Clark heard this. I asked at what time he would have her in town - he said in the course of a week; I asked where she was; he said, at Bristol, and he was going to fetch her to London directly. Clark then said, "We have got a little boat to sell now," and that it was at the boat-builder's. White heard this - Clark went and fetched her to Mr. Curtain's, the boat-builders, at Lambeth, for me to see - they both went into the boat with me to shew it to me, and agree about the price. They asked 6 l. for it - one interfered as much as the other. I said I would give them four guineas, and did not care about having it. Clark agreed to take it, but White objected, and said she ought to be 6 l. - he at last agreed to take four guineas. I gave them 2 s. 6 d. earnest - they both rowed me down to Whitefriars - I hauled the boat upon some timber at the Grand Junction-wharf. I went ashore with them, and paid them 4 l. 1 s. 6 d. - they said they could not write, and a person at the public-house, a friend of mine, wrote the receipt - Clark put his mark to it - White said there was plenty of witnesses without putting his name to it; I paid the money into White's hands; I went to Woolwich, and afterwards found the prosecutor, who claimed it. (Receipt read.)

Prisoner. Q. Did I go to fetch the boat for you? A. Clark fetched it to Curtain's - White received the money, and I saw him give Clark two sovereigns.

JOSEPH BURNHAM. The boat Maxwell shewed me is the one which was stolen from me.

JOHN BURNHAM . I am the son of Joseph Burnham. I saw the boat when it was found, and am sure it is my father's. I saw Clark and White jump into it on the 4th of August, between three and four o'clock - I think it was then fastened to a pile; I saw them untie her; they rowed away up the river; I knew Clark before; I went and told my father of it directly. Clark has absconded - he used to ply about the river.

FRANCIS HOLYLAND . I am a constable, and live at Reading. A warrant was sent down to me, and I apprehended White on the River, at Reading. Clark used to work about the river, but I have not seen him since, I told White I took him for stealing a wherry from Queenhithe - he said Clark persuaded him to do it.

NATHANIEL LAWRENCE . I am street-keeper, of Queenhithe. Maxwell brought me the receipt, saying, he had brought the boat, and desired me not to let it be sent to Bristol. I had it in my possession two months - Burnham and his son claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 3d of October I was drinking with the prosecutor in Trinity-lane; he was in liquor, and said he wished to sell the boat, and should be glad if I could get him a customer - I went home and next morning Clark hired it of him, and came to me between one and two o'clock, and said he had hired it; I said I wanted to sell a boat which was coming from Bristol; he got me into this boat, and said Burnham had authorised him to sell it; we rowed to Lambeth, and he sold it to this man.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-117

NEW COURT. (3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1723. THOMAS BUTCHER and RICHARD ALDSWORTH were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , five hundred bricks, value 10 s. , the goods of our Sovereign Lord the King; and ROBERT ADAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT stating them to belong to Edward Crocker .

Mr. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD CROCKER. I am employed by the Board of Works at the alterations in Downing-street . There are a great many bricks in the Treasury yard - the yard is open in the day time, and affords a passage through the Treasury into the Park - there is no passage of a night, but it is open towards Downing-street; the bricks there belong to Government, but are under my care. The prisoner Aldsworth was employed there by Mr. Whitehead, as bricklayer's foreman : Butcher was a bricklayer there - a man of the name of Kelly was employed as a labourer. I do not know Adams. I had never given any authority for the disposal of these bricks - there is a watchman employed by the office, but he does not go out of the Treasury yard.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were they new bricks: A. Some new and some old - they were the property of Government.

COURT. Q. Describe the place where the bricks were? A. You go up Downing-street, and there is a board as you enter it - the new bricks lie on the left hand side, and the old ones are about in different places.

GEORGE WINGATE . I am apprentice to the prisoner Adams. I remember removing some bricks on Wednesday morning, the 12th of October, with Thomas Ball , the labourer. My master had given me orders to go the night before; Cronin drove the cart; I did not know where we were to go - we went about a quarter before five o'clock into Downing-street, and turned round to the right into the stable-yard - there were some old bricks about the yard, and some new ones placed up; we found Butcher, Aldsworth, and Kelly there - they told us to throw up the bricks, and helped us to do so; the cart was then driven to my master's cellar in Gardener's-lane, and the bricks shot in there; I had got the key of Adams; I left Thomas Ball in the cellar; I gave the key to Handley the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What time was this? A. About five o'clock. I saw some old bricks and some new ones piled up; the cart was loaded with old bats, (which are broken bricks,) from houses that are pulled down - there were some whole bricks among them - it was Kelly who told us to load them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Does not your master boy a great quantity of old and new bricks? A. Yes; the cellar is his general depository for all his building materials - I could not have distinguished these bricks from others.

COURT. Q. Did you ever go on such an errand before? A. Yes; this was on the Wednesday before I went to the Magistrate.

JOHN BARTON . I am a watchman of St. Margaret, Westminster. On the morning of the 12th of October, I was on duty in Downing-street; the Treasury yard is in my beat; there are a number of bricks there; I saw the cart on the Tuesday, and on the Wednesday morning, about five o'clock, it drove into the Treasury yard empty; a man, named Ball, drove it; Butcher, Aldsworth and Wingate were with it; Kelly was in the yard; I do not know Cronin by name - I know Mr. Brown's carman; the cart staid in the yard about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; it was backed against some old bricks, and they began to load; I did not see Aldsworth do any thing - he is foreman there - Butcher assisted to load the cart with Kelly; I stood by the side; I thought every thing was right, seeing the foreman there - I gave some information on a former occasion.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you confining your statement to what happened on Wednesday, the 12th of October? A. Yes; the Treasury watchman was not there; it was Cronin who drove the cart - I was mistaken in saying it was Ball - Kelly was the principal person who loaded it - he was a private watchman at the house of Mr. Delaney, of Downing-street, and went with the cart to the yard - Butcher helped to heave the bricks into the cart.

COURT. Q. What is the Treasury watchman's name? A. Ford; he leaves about five o'clock; the business begins about ten minutes afterwards; the parish watchman goes at six o'clock. I have often known persons to come to work as early as five or ten minutes after five o'clock.

JAMES BROWN. I am a builder - my workshops are in Gardener's-lane, opposite to Mr. Adams'. I have often lent him my cart. On the morning of the 12th of October, I was going home from the watch-house, being a constable, and saw my cart in King-street - Cronin was driving; it went into Gardener's-lane; I believe it had bricks and bats in it - they were put down, and I saw Wingate throwing them into the cellar - it is a narrow street, not above twelve feet wide - I cannot swear there were any whole bricks in it.

EDWARD CROCKER re-examined. Q. Is Kelly a labourer? A. Yes; he is also employed as a watchman at a house the back part of which is pulled down.

COURT. Q. What becomes of the old bricks? A. They are used in the work, and when the work is done, what have not been used will be sold by auction.

PATRICK CRONIN . I am carman to Mr. Brown. On Wednesday, the 12th of October, I went out with the cart, about a quarter before five o'clock, with Wingate and Ball; we went into the Treasury yard, where I saw Kelly, Butcher, and Aldsworth - Butcher, Aldsworth, Ball and Kelly loaded the cart with whole bricks and broken ones, which were taken from a heap of bricks lying down - I brought them to Gardener's-lane, and shot them down in the street, close to Mr. Adams' cellar door - Ball and Wingate were with me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was this in the public-street? A. Yes, it was about half-past five o'clock - I do not remember seeing my master that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What time did you see Kelly? A. When I was in the Treasury yard. I cannot say that Butcher was there when I went, but he was before I came away; I stood at the head of the horse and cannot tell exactly what was put into the cart.

FREDERICK PRICE . I am a watchman of St. Margaret, Westminster. My beat is in Fludyer-street and King-street. I know Brown's cart; on Wednesday morning, the 12th of October, I saw the cart going empty up King-street, into Downing-street; it came back loaded with whole bricks and pieces, and went into Gardener's-lane; Cronin drove it; there was a person with it; I saw Butcher and Aldsworth walking together in King-street, after the cart; I saw Adams that morning but did not speak to him - I did not see the cart loaded or unloaded.

ALDSWORTH'S Defence. I know no more about it than this board.

ALDSWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

BUTCHER - NOT GUILTY .

ADAMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-118

1724. THOMAS BUTCHER and THOMAS BALL were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , three hundred bricks, value 15 s. , the goods of our sovereign Lord the King ; and ROBERT ADAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

EDWARD CROCKER . I am labourer in trust at the works in Downing-street, under the Board of Works. The bricks in the Treasury yard belong to Government; they are in general good bricks, but some are broken. I had never given any authority to any person to dispose of these.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there any body immediately under you who supervises these men? A. No; the bricklayers have a foreman, who is Aldsworth, and the carpenters have a foreman likewise. I know Handley and Weale, the officers. I gave them some direction on Thursday, the 14th of October.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. On Thursday, the 13th of October, I had some conversation with Mr. Crocker, in company with Weale; I met Mr. Weale the following morning, a little after four o'clock, and we proceeded at a quarter before five along Parliament street, in the direction of Downing-street; when we were opposite Little Charles-street, we heard an empty cart coming along King-street, towards us - there were three or four persons with it, but we could not see who was driving, it was so dark; I stood in front of a house in Downing-street, and saw it go into the Treasury yard. We lost sight of it for a few minutes - it came out quite full of bricks - three persons were in it - we followed it as far as the end of Downing-street, where I left it to go to the other end of Gardener's-lane, by Duke-street; I heard the cart rattling, and the noise of shooting something out; I made the best of my way up to the place, and saw Butcher and Ball throwing bricks into Adams' cellar; it was then just break of day; Cronin and Wingate were standing outside the heap; we secured the four persons; the greater part of the bricks were new, and some were old; I have a brick here which we took from that heap, and one from the stack in the Treasury yard. I took Wingate and Cronin, and as we were going along Wingate gave me a padlock key, which I tried to the padlock of the cellar, and it fitted exactly; I afterwards went back and found Adams in bed. Ball said he was a labourer in Adams' employ.

JOHN WEALE . I am an officer. I went with Handley, and saw what he has stated. I was two or three yards from the end of Downing-street when the cart went into the yard - it came out in a few minutes loaded with bricks - there was a tall, a short man, a lad, and another person, with it; I followed it and saw the load shot down - there were fifty or sixty new bricks shot into the cellar - the rest of the load was on the pavement - it was getting light - there was a gas light burning immediately opposite the cellar; I took Butcher and Ball to the watch-house - Butcher begged very hard that I would not take him; I then went back and met Handley with Wingate; I took Wingate, and then went with Cronin to Adams' - he was not up, but I sent the servant to say we should be glad to speak to him; he sent word he would come down; I said we had stopped a cart loaded with bricks, and I understood they belonged to him; he said "I hope there is nothing the matter;" I asked who he had bought them of - he said "The fact is they are not bought at all;" I cautioned him to be guarded in what he said, as it might come into a Court of Justice. We went towards the watch-house, and I told him I must be under the necessity of keeping him; he said he was very sorry, and asked me to go back with him, to give some orders to his workmen, which I did; the bricks were then lying in the street, and he wished them to be thrown into the cellar; I said I did not know whether it would be proper to do so or not, but I would consult Handley, and we would let him know in a few minutes; we then went out and met Aldsworth; Adams said "That is the man I had the bricks of;" we went into the parlour, and Aldsworth said "I told you last night you could have no bricks;" Mr. Adams made answer that Butcher had come to say he could, and in consequence of that message, he had directed his people to fetch them. I took them before the Magistrate - I do not know at what time the watchman leaves the yard - he ought to stop till the men come - I do not know whether he was there then.

GEORGE WINGATE . I am apprentice to Mr. Adams. I was in the cellar about seven o'clock on the night of the 13th of October; Adams was there - Butcher and Kelly came to the door, and said, "Is Mr. Adams at home" - he answered them himself - one of them said, "Mr. Adams, you will send the cart about five o'clock in the morning, a little sooner or later, for a load of bricks; there are some to come away;" Adams said, "Very well:" he then said to me, "George go up to your tea - the cart will be here to-morrow morning at five o'clock, and you must go with them to get a load of bricks." He then went up into the parlour, and I believe went to writing; the next morning the bell to call me up was rung; I came down stairs, and there was no one there; my master called to me, and said "George, is not that the bell;" I said, Yes - he said, "I dare say it is for you to go and get the bricks; here is the key of the cellar." I dressed myself, and went to Downing-street - there was no one there. I came back to Mr. Brown's stables, and saw Cronin, and said, "Patrick,

are you ready" - he said it was time enough; Ball was there, and we all three went to Downing-street; Butcher and Kelly were gone on before, and met us there. I was in the cart when it was between the end of Downing-street and the Treasury-yard, making a noise with my feet; Butcher said, "Hold your tongue;" I said, "Where is the harm of it;" he said, "You ought to know better than to make a noise;" I said, "Very well," and we went on to the yard: Kelly told us to back up against the bricks - we did so, and he said, "You are in the wrong place; back up against these; Butcher, Ball, and Cronin were there at the time; when we had backed up against the second pile of bricks, either Butcher or Kelly said, "Now fill the cart;" Butcher and Kelly then loaded it; Butcher then said, "Come on - I will go with you to the cellar, and help to get the bricks in;" it was rather dark, but was getting light.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When the men were talking with your master the night before, did they not ask for beer? A. Yes, but my master said, "I shall give you no beer - I pay a proper price for my bricks."

PATRICK CRONIN . I am carman to Mr. Brown. On the morning of the 14th of October I went with the cart to Downing-street, and brought back bricks; I held the horse's head; Kelly, Butcher, Ball, and Wingate loaded the cart. I did not know what bricks they were, till I shot them, and then I saw there were new and old together.

COURT. Q. Who gave you your orders? A. Mr. Adams' apprentice and Ball came together in the morning to get me to go; Ball had told me the night before to be ready at five o'clock - the cart is Mr. Brown's, and he lends it to Mr. Adams sometimes.

Q. What had you to do with your cart the rest of the day? A. I had to take some sashes for Mr. Adams, and then to take a load of goods for a person in Gardener's-lane.

JURY to GEORGE WINGATE. Q. Was Aldsworth present when the cart was loaded that morning? A. No; there were two watchmen there.

JAMES BROWN . My cart was applied for by Wingate, for this purpose, about half-past eight o'clock at night; I said I could not let it, as I wanted to carry a load of timber myself at ten o'clock, and it was to take the sashes at eight, for Mr. Adams; he then said it was to be at five o'clock; I said it must be back by ten: he mentioned five o'clock before I did.

BUTCHER'S Defence. Kelly came to my house while I was at supper, and told me to go in the morning for a load of whole bricks; I said, "Who ordered it" - he said the foreman, and I was to go to Mr. Adams' house, to know what time I was to go; I said, "I do not think it is right, as I never get a pin's head for doing it." I went, and met Kelly at Mr. Adams' door; he said, "There is a load of bricks" - I did not know, but I thought it might be a privilege of the foreman's.

ADAMS' Defence. I had no knowledge of their being stolen, or I should have had no dealings with them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-119

1725. JAMES CHURCH and THOMAS BRIAN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , four carriage springs, value 4 l. , the goods of John Augustus Thrupp and others, his partners; and JOHN CURTIS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ROBERTS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES OSBORNE . I am a coach-maker, in the employ of Messrs. Thrupps, George-street, Oxford-street . - On the morning of the 20th of September, about nine o'clock, I was in the privy - the door was partly open, and I could see the place where a large heap of iron lay; I saw Brian take a coach spring from there, and lodge it against the wall in the back entry, in a way which excited my suspicion; I went out in about two minutes - the spring was gone, and Brian likewise; I went into Queen-street, Grosvenor-square, and saw him coming from Curtis' premises - he had no spring with him; I then told Mr. Atwell, the clerk, of what I had seen - in the course of the day I saw a very similar spring in the counting-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were not the springs in the public shop? A. Yes. Brian's business led him there occasionally. I had passed him just before. I was about seven or eight yards from him, and he could see me.

CHARLES ATWELL . I am clerk to John Augustus Thrupp, Charles Joseph, and Henry Joseph Thrupp. I received some information from Osborne, which I communicated to Mr. Thrupp. I went away for about ten minutes; I afterwards met the officer, Ballard, who apprehended Brian, and asked him what he had done with the spring he had taken over to Curtis. He at first denied it; we then took him to Marlborough-street, where Mr. Thrupp met him - there was no Magistrate there then - he said he knew nothing about any spring at all, but when Mr. Thrupp requested him to state what he knew about the spring being taken out of the shop in the morning, he said he was very sorry to be placed in such a situation, and if Mr. Thrupp would suffer him to go home, and not lock him up, he would disclose all he knew about it - this was refused; we afterwards went to Church's, in Steven-street, Lisson-grove, and Ballard said he came to apprehend him for taking three springs to Curtis. We afterwards went to Curtis, and Ballard told him he came to examine his shop, to see whether there was a spring belonging to Mr. Thrupp - he asked if Thomas had brought a spring there in the course of the morning - he said, "Yes, it is one of these four here, and Church brought the other three" - we then went to Church's.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did not Curtis work for Mr. Thrupp? A. Yes, to repair iron work - he said they had been brought to have bolts put to them; he keeps an open shop, and the journeymen take work there. The springs laid in our sight, but they were not intended to be used, and did not want any bolts put to them.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer of Queen-square. I was employed by Messrs. Thrupps, and apprehended Brian - Mr. Atwell was there, and I said, "You must come back" - he said, "For what?" refused, and hesitated a great deal; I threatened to take him into a shop, and put a pair of handcuffs upon him, before he would come. I then said it was in consequence of having taken a spring

from Mr. Thrupps to Curtis - he said he had done no such thing, but on being told so two or three times he said he had taken a spring to be repaired, which belonged to Lady Duff Gordon's carriage, and he had brought it back, and put it on. I asked if he had got it painted - he said Yes. I asked if any person had ordered him to do it - he said, No - this was in the morning of the day I apprehended him. I then went to Curtis, and asked him where the spring was which had been brought in that morning - after some little hesitation, and being told by Mr. Thrupp or myself that Thomas had been seen to bring the spring over, he said, "They are there," and pointed to the side of the shop where some were standing; he said they were brought over for new bolts. I had gone there only for one spring, and I asked who had brought the other three - he said Church; and two or three men, who were at work in the shop, cried out, "They were brought over for new bolts." I then went to another person's house, and came back, and told Curtis I was very sorry he had deceived me, and told lies. We had some conversation, and I told him he had been over to Mr. Thrupp's shop, and had seen the springs, and agreed to give 40 s. for them - he said, with some hesitation, that it was so. I told him afterwards that Church told me so - he did not deny it, but said, "I am sold."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who was present then? A. Mr. Thrupp and Atwell. The springs were without bolts.

CURTIS' Defence. When the officer came I was hard at work at the anvil - Mr. Thrupp said, "Where is the spring which Brian brought in;" I said, there were four which were brought in. The officer then said, "I have got a warrant to search your premises" - he did search, and asked if I had got any more springs; I told him, I declared to God, by the word of a man, that I had not - Parker, my foreman, then made answer, "Master, there are four springs that were brought in - one by Brian, and three by Church, to be cleaned, and have bolts put in them." Mr. Thrupp then ordered his man to take them to his premises.

JOHN MARABAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Curtis. - I had often seen Brian bring work there, from Mr. Thrupp's - but never saw him bring a spring till this morning; those prings were down by the side of the anvil, where such jobs used to be. Mr. Curtis tried one bolt, and said there must be four made like that for the springs.

JURY to CHARLES ATWELL. Q. Were the men allowed to take work to Curtis' shop without an order? A. Not without a verbal order from Mr. Thrupp or myself. Brian was in the habit of taking work occasionally.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-120

1726. JOHN CHURCH , WILLIAM JORDAN , and THOMAS BRIAN were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , a pair of axletrees and four boxes, value 3 l. , the goods of John Augustus Thrupp and others, his partners - and JOHN CURTIS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. About the end of September, I was fetched to the manufactory of Messrs. Thrupps'. I went to Mr. Curtis', who gave me an account of some springs which were taken to Mr. Thrupps'. I then inquired, whether any of Mr. Thrupp's men had brought any other springs or any thing else; he said No. I then looked over his premises, in pursuance of my warrant. I afterwards saw another of Mr. Thrupp's workmen, the prisoner Church, at his own house, in Steven-street, Lisson-green; I told him I was an officer, and come to apprehend him, on a charge of robbing his master - he denied it, and said he had not. I said "Mind what you about - I have Thomas in custody, and I have been to Curtis's." He then said, he had taken three springs, and Brian had taken the others; I asked what he had for them - he said nothing. I asked what else he had taken - he said he could not recollect. I said, it was all nonsense, he must recollect. He then said, two axletrees had been taken - and he had taken one, and four boxes, and Jordan had taken the other from the saw-pit over to Curtis'. I asked what they had got for them - he said 24 s., was paid. I did not ask what was done with the money. Mr. Atwell was then with me. I then went to Curtis' house, and told him I was sorry he had deceived me, and told me lies, as he had received a pair of axle-trees. He said Yes, they were brought over for new boxes. I said "It can't be so, as four boxes had been brought with them," and he had paid 24 s., for them - he did not deny it, but said they were among some others, pointing to some which stood up. I asked where the boxes were - he made some hesitation, and then looked out four boxes, and said they must be them. Mr. Thrupp and Mr. Atwell were there then - the boxes and axle-trees were taken away. I went with Mr. Atwell to Jordan's house, and said I came to take him into custody, on a charge of robbing his master - he said he had not. I told him, he must go with me, and asked him if he knew any thing about an axletree. He said No - he knew nothing about it. I then told him part of what Church had said - I believe I said, "Do you know any thing about taking one from the saw-pit?" and that Church had said he had taken one, and Jordan the other. He then said he had taken that, and that was all he had taken from the saw-pit - and it would all come out about it. I asked what money he had got - he said at first, he could not recollect, but afterwards he said he had 7 s. 6 d., and Thomas and Church had the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear that you did not say, "Church has already told all, and it is of no use your denying it." A. No. I said nothing in the shape of a threat or an inducement.

MR. ROBERTS. Q. Were you aware that any thing in the shape of a promise or threat, would not be admissible? A. Yes? therefore I was cautious - I inquired if any one had asked him to take them over, he said No - they had all three consulted about them before.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. To what office do you belong. A. Marborough-street. I have been there two or three years. I asked these questions to get evidence from him - I did not think about the case being complete or incomplete, without Church gave me information; but I asked the questions to give his answers - whether they were for or against him; I did not tell him it was for the purpose of telling juries what he said against him - but I think I told him to be on his guard. I did not go to apprehend him, because Mr. Thrupp had

told me that it was his particular object to bring the receiver to justice - he said he would prosecute him if he was found. I will swear that Church said they got 24 s., for the boxes and axletrees - he did not say he had nothing to do with the money. I found him at his own lodging at mid-day, at what they call their dinner hour. I made some memorandums of what I heard - I merely put down the price, and two or three words of the conversation - I destroyed them after I gave my deposition.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say you inquired about the boxes and axletrees at Curtis'? A. Yes. I do not recollect his telling me he was not at home when they came, and did not know whether there were any or not - he afterwards showed me the boxes - and said those must be them. He did not say any thing about the money - but when I told him 24 s., was given for them, he said he believed it was so, after a slight pause.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What were you before you got your present situation? A. I was for three years a beadle and constable of Mary-le-bone. I had seen Mr. Thrupp and Church before I saw Jordan. I put the questions to Jordan to get his answers - but not knowing there was no evidence against him, to make him convict himself, I took the memorandum to assist my memory. I will swear that I did not say to Jordan, that Church had already told - and there was no use in his denying it.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. Do you mean you cannot tell what you said, relative to what Church had said? A. Yes; I told him I was an officer, and had come to take him about robbing his master.

COURT. Q. Do you say that you believe you told Jordan Church had said he had taken some of those things from the saw-pit? A. Yes; I believe I did.

CHARLES ATWELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Thrupps. I went to Curtis' on the 20th of September. I had seen Church before, but had no particular conversation with him. I went with the officer, and heard him say he had come about a spring, which Brian had brought over. Curtis said it was one of the four standing by the side of the forge. I remember the officer asking him if there was any thing more beside the springs, and Curtis said he had nothing more. I was afterwards at Church's, in company with the officer. I told Church I wanted to speak to him, and there was officer come to speak to him. The officer then said he came to take him in charge, in consequence of some springs being taken to Curtis'. He asked what spring, and denied having taken any; he was told by Ballard that was not correct, as he had taken three, and Brian one. He said "Yes - I did." I then asked him what he had done with a pair of wheels, which had been taken out of the shop within a few days - he said they were taken to Curtis'. Ballard then asked, what else - he said a pair of axletrees, and four boxes - that Jordan took one axletree, and he the other, from the saw-pit in the lower shop - we brought him away, and I went with him to Mr. Thrupp's; we left Jordan then, and I went with Ballard to Curtis'. Ballard said he was sorry he had told him an untruth, as he had got other things beside the springs; after speaking of the springs and the steps, he said he had got a pair of axletrees. After some hesitation he said he had - he was asked what he gave for them, he did not exactly answer the question, and Ballard told him he gave 1 l. 4 s. for them - he said "Yes, I did;" he then went to a part of the shop and looked out two axletrees, which Mr. Thrupp identified, and they were taken away. He was asked if there were any boxes - I forget exactly what he said in reply. Ballard stated there were four boxes, and Curtis looked out four, of which Mr. Thrupp took away three. I went again to Jordan's with Ballard - we saw him in the street - I told him I had come to speak with him on particular business, and at the same time I beckoned to Ballard to come forward, who said he had come to take him into custody; he asked what for, he had been guilty of nothing. Ballard said it was for stealing an axletree from Mr. Thrupp, and taking it to Curtis'; he denied it at first, but Ballard said he knew he had done it, and we had proof of it - we then brought him away, and in coming along he said "Well, I did take an axletree from the saw-pit;" there was some more conversation going along, but I did not hear it. I cannot recollect what Ballard had said to him before; he said Church took the other, and he had nothing to do with any of the other things.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you told all you heard Church say to Ballard? A. Yes; I believe all of importance - I went to hear, and to be a witness if necessary - I have upon my oath stated all I can recollect; Ballard made some memorandums in pencil. I do not know that it was a particular object with Mr. Thrupp to get the receiver; Mr. Thrupp keeps about forty men - Church had been at work that morning, and I dare say would have come in the afternoon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You say you heard Jordan deny, in the first instance, that he had taken these things? A. Yes; but he afterwards admitted it. I cannot say what Ballard had said to him to induce him to confess it - he had denied it for about a quarter of a mile as we went along. I had conversed with Mr. Thrupp before I went on this business. I knew when I went to Jordan's that there was no evidence against him but what Church had said - but it was not for the purpose of getting information that I went. I suppose Ballard might say twice to him, "We know that you have taken an axle-tree" - he was in earnest conversation with him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you told all that passed at Curtis' about the axletree? A. Yes; I think I have. Ballard took notes occasionally in pencil when he received answers. I did not hear Curtis say that he was from home when anything came - I did not hear all that was said. When I first went Ballard mentioned something about a spring. I mean to persist in saying that when 1 l. 4 s. was stated to have been given for the axle-tree, Curtis said, "Yes, I did give it." I know there is an account between Curtis and my master. I know Curtis has done work to axletrees.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had any of your men authority to take any work to Curtis without orders? A. No. These axletrees had not been sent by my direction.

CHARLES JOSEPH THRUPP . I am in partnership with John Augustus Thrupp and Henry Joseph Thrupp. I went with the officer to Curtis' - he pointed out the springs,

and said they were what the men had brought over that morning. I then asked if he had any more of my property whatever on his premises - he said No. I did not go to Church's, nor Jordan's, but I went a second time to Curtis', with Ballard, and Atwell followed - the officer told him he had spoken falsely, and asked where the axletrees were - he looked at the officer and me, and then said, "They are here - I had them to repair;" the officer said, "That is false - you paid 1 l. 4 s. for them;" he said, "I did" - they were then brought out, and he was asked for the boxes; he said there were none, but he afterwards looked out four; I took three of them; I could swear to the axle-trees - they were worth 3 l. or 4 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Whose were these axletrees? A. I do not know - they had been some time in the corner of the saw-pit. I have forty, or fifty, or sixty men. I applied at Marlborough-street Office; Ballard was sent to me the same morning; I gave him his orders with respect to his conduct to Brian, but not what steps he was to take - I gave no particular orders about Church, but I gave orders to apprehend him after we had first been to Curtis. I believe Church had been that morning to work - he had been in my service fifteen or sixteen years. I was not present at Jordan's.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you known Curtis? A. Not above a week before this happened. I had been in the country two months, and my brother employed him. I believe there was one instance of his being employed on an axletree - I saw it in the book. I can swear to these axletrees by some marks on them. Our manufactory is in George-street, Hanover-square.

CURTIS' Defence. There were four axletrees brought to my shop on the 13th of September - the boxes and nuts were fitted, and they were sent home; then one of the men ordered new boxes for them, and another said, "They need not make new boxes - I think we have some old ones" - they were then sent over, but they would not fit; and my man said, "We will begin then" - I said, "We will send for some iron for them," and now that man is sent away into the country, and we cannot find him any where.

Two witnesses gave Jordan an excellent character.

CHURCH - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

JORDAN - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

BRIAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-121

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1727. SARAH HODGE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , three shirts, value 30 s. , the goods of Robert Budden .

SARAH SKITTER . I live with my father and mother, at the corner of Shacklewell-lane. I was living as housemaid with Mr. Robert Budden, who is a captain in the army ; on the 10th of October the prisoner came for this linen to be washed, and it was given to her; there were three shirts of my master's - nothing else.

JANE TURRENT . I am cook to Captain Robert Budden. The prisoner came on the 10th of October, and said she came from the washer-woman, for the foul linen; I went to the house-maid, and she gave her the shirts, in my presence, for the purpose of being washed, to be returned on the following Wednesday - we never heard of them again.

JOSEPH MILTON . One night when I came home, the prisoner came to me and asked me to purchase two duplicates of three shirts. I said I would not till I saw them, but at last I did give 3 s. 6 d. for them - they were in pawn for 3 s. - these are the shirts.

THOMAS GREGSON . I am an officer. I have had the custody of the shirts, and took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was a second indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18251027-122

1728. JANE WHITTAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a half crown, six shillings, and a sixpence, the monies of William Lake , from his person .

WILLIAM LAKE. I am a journeyman baker , and live in Cromer-street. I fell in with the prisoner last Saturday night, about eleven o'clock, in Broad-street, St. Giles's - she wished me to go home with her - she was quite a stranger, but, it being late, I went with her to a house in George-street - I paid 2 s. for the room, and gave her 1 s. 6 d. - I awoke two or three times in the night, and about six o'clock I found her round on my side of the bed, and she took out of my pocket a half crown and six shillings - I said "Don't take that money" - she said she had got no money - I took hold of her hand, and the money was in it - she got away, but the landlady would not let her go - she was undressed - I put on my clothes, and got an officer, who found the money in her hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-123

1729. SARAH LEGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , two sheets, value 7 s.; two blankets, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 5 s., and a table-cloth, value 18 d., the goods of Richard Haycocks , in a lodging-room .

ANN HAYCOCKS . I am the wife of Richard Haycocks - we live in Collingwood-terrace, Bethnal-green . On the 17th of October I let a front parlour to the prisoner, at 6 s. a-week, ready furnished - the articles stated in the indictment were part of the furniture - she took possession of it on the 17th of October, and left on the 22d - while she was there a man came to see her, whom she called her husband - on the Tuesday after she came she wanted to exchange a blanket - I went into the room, and she pulled it out - I said "That is not the one I want" - I then missed the other articles - I asked what she had done with them, and she brought out seven duplicates.

PETER PAGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Bethnal-green. I have a pillow pawned by the prisoner for 2 s., on the 18th of October.

THOMAS BARNES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel-road. I have a pillow and sheet, pawned by the prisoner on the 18th of October.

RICHARD VARLEY . I live with Mr. Wakefield, a pawnbroker, Mile-end-road. I have a blanket, pawned by the prisoner on the 22d of October.

JOHN WOODING . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner, and have the duplicates.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-124

1730. KEZIAH CROCKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , a gown, value 5 s. , the goods of John Jones .

REBECCA JONES . I am the wife of John Jones, salesman , of Brick-lane, Old-street . On the 20th of October, I saw the prisoner looking at this gown, which hung within our premises - I was sitting behind the counter, and noticed her particularly - I did not see her take it, but I lost sight of her, and missed it in an instant - I ran to the door, and a strange man brought her to me with it in her apron.

JOHN LIDDIARD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-125

1731. WILLIAM CONDON and WILLIAM ROYSTON were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 3 lbs of pork, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Collins Parslow .

CHARLES BALLARD . I am in the upholstery business. I was passing the house of Mr. William Collins Parslow, in Exmouth-street , about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, on the 3d of October - the two prisoners and another person passed and re-passed the shop - Condon took a hand of pork, which he gave to Royston, and they made off - I knew Royston very well; and when they got to the corner of the street I tried to secure him - he dropped it, and got away - I secured Condon, and took him back to the shop.

JAMES PARSLOW . I am the brother of William Collins Parslow, and live with him as servant - I remember this circumstance - I knew the pork to be my brother's - it had been laying in the window.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner Condon - he acknowledged, at the watch-house, that he took it.

CONDON'S Defence. I saw the witness cross the road and seize some person, who dropped something, and got away - he then came to me and said I had taken the pork, which I had not.

ROYSTON'S Defence. I was assisting my partner in removing his goods - I was not out of the house at the time of the robbery.

CONDON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

ROYSTON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-126

1732. DENNIS HINDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 613 lbs. of molasses, value 9 l. 17 s. , the goods of William Wells Plaxton and George Dames .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WELLS PLAXTON. I am in partnership with George Dames - we are sugar-refiners , and live in Rupert-street, Whitechapel - the prisoner was our confidential clerk and warehouseman , at a salary of 30 l. per year, with fire, candle, and lodging - he had no authority to dispose of any part of our property, except to buyers for wholesale grocers, and to sugar-brokers. On the 8th of October, soon after coming to town, I received information - I inquired of him what molasses had been filled out within two or three days - he said two or three puncheons, but perhaps it might be three or four - I think that was his answer - I said was that all? - after a little hesitation he said, there was a half puncheon more for a friend of his; I had the book in my hand at the time, and said, "What, for a friend of your's, and not entered? I am afraid this is not all - I have reason to believe there is more." He then said there was another half puncheon. I said "That is not all." He then said "There is one more." I said "There is more yet." He said, in all there were four puncheons and a half. I expressed surprise at their being delivered without an entry - he said "Two were paid for, and two were not." I have since seen a person named Wade, to whom the prisoner had no right to sell - he is a stranger - this memorandum of figures is the prisoner's writing (looking at it) - it is not in the form in which an invoice would go from our house, having no name to it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you seen Mr. Wade since? A. Yes; I never received money of him before; if they had been entered, it would not have been right, as the prisoner had no right to sell to a person of this description - he had authority to sell to general dealers who we had business with - I cannot say I had given him any limit - he had never received money from the regular dealers, except once or twice when I sent him out for it.

COURT. Q. Did you authorise him to receive money from regular dealers? A. I think in one or two instances I have - he has received money from others - there is a man who was a very faithful servant in our employ, and we have indulged him with a small quantity of sugar and molasses, and from him the prisoner received money - this will explain one part of what may be called irregular dealing. About the month of April the prisoner came into the counting-house and said,

"Here is a person, who has been in the habit of coming from a wholesale grocer, for a half puncheon of molasses; he has no order now; but will you let him have half a puncheon? he will pay you." I said "You may let him have it," and I received the money the next day - that is another irregularity. About August the prisoner said, "Will you let a friend of mine have half a puncheon?" I said "I don't like it." He said "It is a friend of mine, a gingerbread baker, at the west end of the town; he will pay you for it;" and that is all I can recollect.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear there is no more? A. I cannot tell what may have been twelve months ago - I never gave the prisoner orders to receive generally, nor told him that the old servant was to be an exception - he was so well acquainted with the duties of a sugar-house I had no occasion to tell him - if he had entered these molasses, and paid the money, there would not have been a word of this here - I should have mentioned it - I never saw Mr. Wade pay any money to my clerk to my knowledge - I will swear he never paid money to me - I will not swear he never paid my clerk.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Whether the molasses were sold to

a regular dealer, or an irregular one, was not the irregularity in not entering them in the book? A. Yes.

JOHN HALL . I am a publican, and live in Rupert-street, Goodman's-fields, about fifty yards from Mr. Plaxton. I saw some molasses go from their house, about seven o'clock on the morning of the 7th of October; I told Mr. Dames of it. I had seen the cart several times, and I thought all was not right.

JOACHIM BOHLING . I am in the employ of Mr. Plaxton. Half a puncheon of molasses went out the day before the prisoner was taken up - they were delivered to Wade.

Cross-examined. Q. Was this done in your presence? A. Yes; he made a note of it, and desired me to weigh it.

GEORGE WADE . I purchased some molasses which were delivered to me on the 7th of October. I paid for them 9 l. 17 s.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you had an account with that house? A. About six months; I once paid some money to the prisoner in the presence of Mr. Plaxton, who has seen me there several times before. There is an account between me and Mr. Plaxton - I owe him money - it is to me these molasses are charged as being sold.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you ever deal with Mr. Plaxton or Mr. Dames for any article you had from their house? I was introduced by another grocer; I never personally dealt with Mr. Plaxton or Mr. Dames; what transactions I have had have been with the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. At the time you paid money to the prisoner, in Mr. Plaxton's presence, did he interfere or take any notice of it, or make any complaint? A. No, not the least.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-127

1733. CATHERINE KIDNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 1 s. 5 d. , the goods of John Metcalfe .

JOHN METCALFE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Crown-street . On the 18th of October, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take a piece of bacon; she did not say any thing, but walked out - I followed and took it from under her cloak - she said I might do as I liked with her.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that I did it - I did not know where I was.

GUILTY . Aged 69.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-128

1734. FRANCES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , sixteen yards of ribbon, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Pitts .

ELIZABETH PITTS . I am niece of Thomas Pitts, who lives at Paddington-street , and is a haberdasher . On the 5th of October the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at a pair of child's socks - I shewed her some - she bought a pair for 6 d., and gave me half a sovereign - I went to my uncle, to get change, in another part of the shop - I was gone two or three minutes - I then came back - she bought a bit of white ribbon and paid me 8 d. for it - she then left the shop, and in a minute or two I missed the piece of gauze ribbon - I told my uncle - he went out, and brought her back in two or three minutes.

THOMAS PITTS. I was on the drapery side of my shop; my niece came to me for change, which she gave the prisoner - when she was gone she told me she had taken some ribbon; I pursued and found her about fifty or sixty yards off, with the ribbon under her shawl, and in her basket - I took her back, and sent for Gibbs, the officer; she was very desirous for me to let her go, and said she would give me all the ribbon she had.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had my niece with me, and while I was looking at the socks, she put it into the basket, and I knew nothing about it.

JURY to ELIZABETH PITTS. Q. Had the prisoner any companion with her? A. She had a little girl, three or four years old - she could not reach the counter - she was not put on it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-129

1735. ELIZABETH ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , a kettle, value 2 s. , the goods of William Clark .

MARIA BRANCH . I live with my parents, who keep an oyster shop in Long-alley . Mr. Clark keeps a tin shop . On the 3d of October I saw the prisoner go to his house, and take the kettle from the window - she put it under her apron, and went away - I went and told Mr. Cheshire - he went and brought her back, with the kettle under her apron.

THOMAS CHESHIRE . I am the officer. Branch gave me information, I pursued the prisoner and took her about one hundred yards from Mr. Clark's house - she had the kettle under her apron, and begged for mercy.

WILLIAM CLARK. I keep the shop - this kettle is mine.

Prisoner. I begged his pardon and told him it was my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 71.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-130

1736. WILLIAM PECK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a till, value 1 s.; thirteen shillings, and 4 s. 5 1/4 d., in copper monies , the property of Samuel Poole .

ELIZABETH POOLE . I am the wife of Samuel Poole, grocer and cheesemonger , Upper Russell-street, Bryanstone-square . On the 18th of October, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in the little parlour, facing the shop door, and heard the halfpence rattle; I went into the shop, where I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, inside the counter, with the till, which he had got out - I caught him and asked what he was doing; he said Nothing, and struggled to get off; I held him, and cried out - one of my neighbours came in and took him. I had 13 s. 6 d. in silver, and 5 1/4 d. in copper in my till.

JAMES MALCOLM . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of this lad - he had the till at his feet.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-131

1737. GEORGE BACON FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , a plane, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Belleti .

JOSEPH BELLETI. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in

Long-alley . The prisoner applied to me for work on the 27th of August; he said he had just come from Brighton, and if I could give him work and lend him tools for a few days, his own tools would come from the country; I did so; on Monday following he did not come to work.

WILLIAM AAYES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a plane - I cannot tell who pawned it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-132

1738. REBECCA GREENWOOD and JUDITH SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , three shirts, value 16 s.: four caps, value 2 s.; a window curtain, value 9 d.; and a towel, value 9 d. , the goods of Mary Wilson , widow .

SUSAN SEACOLE . I live at No. 4, John's-row, St. Luke's. I know Mary Wilson, she is a widow, and takes in washing . On the 21st of October, my attention was called to the two prisoners for about ten minutes - I saw them go to her house, and Greenwood took an apple from a basket at the door; she then entered the passage to the house, and opened the parlour door - she returned to the window to Sullivan, and they stood there two or three minutes, and eat the apple. Greenwood then went into the parlour - Sullivan went as far as the parlour door. Greenwood brought out the bundle and gave to her, and they both went away. I went out to let Mrs. Wilson know - the prisoners ran off; I and another witness followed them; I saw Sullivan throw down the bundle - she was brought back in a few minutes.

CHARLES BENNETT . I saw the two prisoners come up to the door. Greenwood took the apple, she then opened the door, and returned to the other; they then went in, and Greenwood gave the bundle to Sullivan - she wrapped it up in her apron; the sleeve of a shirt was hanging down. I followed them, and cried Stop thief! Sullivan threw down the bundle, and ran away. I took Greenwood.

MARY WILSON. I live at this house, and take in washing. I had left the bundle in my front room, the door was shut but not locked.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GREENWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 13.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18251027-133

1739. JAMES HAINSBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of William Graham and John Stocks .

LEWIS FURNEAUX . I am in the employ of William Graham and John Stocks, pawnbrokers , of Tothill-street . The prisoner came there last Saturday night to redeem a pair of shoes, which he had pawned before. I asked what name, he said Hainsbury - I found them, and put them on the counter; he then said he wanted a handkerchief out - I said, "Pay me for the shoes, and you shall have it." I turned round to get it, and he ran off with the shoes. I pursued, and saw him running - he was taken with them in his hands - he was to have paid 3 s. 1 1/2 d. for them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a girl who asked me to go with her, I said I was going to take some things out of pawn - she said she would wait for me, she stood at the door and said "Are you going to stay there all night." I said "I have got the shoes, and I am waiting for the handkerchief, and have got the money in my hand." She snatched the money from me, and ran off - I ran after her, and called to a man who is not here to stop her, as I ran along the street. I kept the shoes in my hand all the time - here is the ticket of the handkerchief in my pocket. I have lived within thirty yards of this gentleman's house these three years.

LEWIS FURNEAUX re-examined. Q. Is this ticket your's? A. No; it belongs to another house - there was no woman there, nor did I hear him call after any one.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18251027-134

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, OCTOBER 31.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1740. WILLIAM HILL and RICHARD LANDERS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , four tables, value 7 l., the goods of Richard York , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD YORK. I am a broker , and live at No. 5, Hyson-street, Finsbury-circus , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. Hill was in my service as porter at this time, and had been so nearly two years; Landers is a stranger at my house, but worked for some people as occasional porter ; these tables were in my warehouse, which is part of my dwelling-house; one was taken on the 27th of September - that was a dining table - I found the others in pawn - I had seen the dining table safe in the warehouse at five o'clock in the evening, and missed it at half-past eight next morning - it cost me 2 l. 10 s., and was worth that at least - the other three were Pembroke, and each cost 33 s.

SARAH MOORE . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 27th of September, at seven o'clock in the morning, I saw Hill bring a dining table down the warehouse stairs, and give it to Landers, who stood at the door - he carried it away.

WILLIAM LARNER . I am a broker. On Tuesday, the 27th, I left home at half-past nine o'clock, and about twenty yards from my house, I met Landers; he asked me if I would buy a table - he had none with him; I asked what it was - he said a three-feet six inches dining table; I asked where it was; he said just by, and I went with him to the Brown Bear public-house, in the parlour, where it was; it is a house where porters generally stand for work - I saw it in the parlour, and asked the price - he said 45 s.; I said that was more than I should like to give, and offered 2 l., which he agreed to take; I said I was going into the city and should return in half an hour, if he would take it to my house and wait. I would pay him. I have known him nearly sixteen years - he occasionally worked for me, and was employed by mechanics to take goods out and sell; I always found him very punctual in his transactions. I returned from the city in half an hour, and found the table standing in my shop; he stood outside.

I live at No. 5, Long-alley, Moorfield. I paid Richard (Landers) two sovereigns, and he went away.

Q. You dealt with him for it as his own property. A. He said it was one he had brought out for sale from the mechanic - the maker. I did not ask who the maker was.

Q. You, being in the trade, must know the make of one man is very different from another - did you not ask him whose particular make it was? A. There are so many goods sent into the market by men who make them themselves, and I knew him so long, I did not think any thing wrong. I took no receipt - he did not sell it for his own.

MICHAEL PURCELL . I keep the Brown Bear, public-house, at the corner of Hyson-street, Moorfields, about twenty doors from York. Both the prisoners frequent my house. On the 27th of September, when I got up in the morning, I saw a new dining table in my parlour - Landers went out, and brought in a broker, who offered him two sovereigns for it - they did not deal; he went out again, and brought in Larner, and sold it for two sovereigns; he took it away some time after, and in about an hour he gave me two sovereigns to keep for him; I heard no more of it till the officer came in, and took him - my wife gave me a duplicate, which I gave the officer.

ROBERT WILD . I am shopman to Mr. Notley, pawnbroker, Bishopsgate-street. I produce a Pembroke table, pawned by Richard Landers, on Saturday evening, the 24th of September, for 15 s.; he said he and his brother manufactured them.

JAMES WHISKARD . I am shopman to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, Houndsditch. On the 20th of September, in the evening, Landers pawned a Pembroke table, for 15 s.

RICHARD YORK . I have seen the tables outside the door - they are mine; I have no doubt of any of them. - Landers and his brother did not make them - I asked Hill what table he had sent away; he said it was one a man asked him to let him leave there the night before; he never paid me any money for these tables. I would not have sold the dining table for less than 2 l. 18 s.

Three witnesses gave Hill a good character.

HILL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37.

LANDERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 54.

Reference Number: t18251027-135

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1741. MARY MOORE and ANN WADE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Hunt , about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 24th of September , at St. Luke , (Elizabeth, the wife of the said Stephen Hunt, and others being therein) and stealing a gown skirt, value 8 s.; a gown body, value 4 s., and a pair of gown sleeves, value 4 s., his property .

EDWARD INSKIP . I am an artificial-florist, and live in Milk-street. On Saturday, the 24th of September, I was going along Goswell-street-road, towards Islington, a little after twelve o'clock, and saw the prisoners before me, talking together, standing still - they came towards me, and passed me in a contrary direction. Having my suspicions, I turned round, and saw them standing at the window of a small shop - they appeared to me to be cutting the glass of the window; Wade came from her companion at the window, and went round to the door, which is at the side, turned the handle of the door, and went to look through the window again, then returned, opened the door gently, went in, and closed it after her; Moore remained at the window, looking through. I went to inquire for an officer, but could not find one. When I returned to the house again, I saw Moore come from the window - (I was not gone more than a minute) she opened the shop door - Wade came out - they both ran off together - I immediately crossed the road, ran after them into Parr's-place, went up to them, and told them to return, for they had got what did not belong to them; they rather hesitated, but returned with me. When I got back to the shop, I asked the person of the house if she had lost anything. When I took the prisoners, one of them looked very cunningly in my face, and said, "Pray let us go;" the other said, "Do, sir, we were hungry." I took them to the shop - the person said she had lost a new gown. Wade put her hands under her shawl, produced it, and laid it on the counter - they both asked the mistress of the shop forgiveness.

ELIZABETH HUNT . I am the wife of Stephen Hunt. We live in Goswell-road , in the parish of St. Luke; we rent the house, and keep a haberdasher's shop . On the 24th of September, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in the parlour, behind the shop; I had a little girl, twelve years old, and a lodger in the house. Wade came in, and asked for black ribbon; I told her I had not the width she wanted; she went out, and shut the door after her; it was on the latch, and could be opened from outside; I went into the back parlour to stir the fire, heard a noise in the street, and found the shop door open; I saw Mr. Inskip with the prisoners - he said he thought they had got some of my property. Wade laid the gown on the counter - it is new; (looking at it) it is all made, except putting together, and is worth 15 s. 9 d.; here is a gown, body, sleeves, and skirt - I am sure they are mine.

MOORE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

WADE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18251027-136

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1742. JOHN LOWE and SAMUEL ROBERTS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of our Lord the King, about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 23d of October , at Hampton , (John Young, and other persons, being therein) and stealing three shirts, value 7 s.; three neck-handkerchiefs, value 3 s., and three pair of stockings, value 2 s., the goods of the said John Young .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said John Young.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN YOUNG. I live in part of Hampton Court Palace . I have lived there thirty-one years; I live alone; my apartment is a detached building adjoining the Palace, in what is called Tennis-court-lane; it is within the walls of the Palace; I pay no rent for it; I hold it by permission of the Lord Chamberlain and the Office of Works - it has a separate entrance. On Sunday, the 23d of October, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was sitting by the fire reading, in what I call my sitting-room, on the first floor; the bell rang with a sharp pull; I got up out of my chair, went to the side-window, which looks into Tennis-court-lane. If I am at home on Sunday, I make

it a rule not to answer the people, unless I know the people who ring; I saw two men, and not knowing them, did not go to them; I waited at the window to see when they went away, to be certain they were persons I did not know; and while I was watching I looked out at the other window, which looks towards the Palace - they rang again in about five minutes, with a sharp pull; I did not answer it, and presently afterwards heard a noise below - I listened attentively, and thought it was like a person trying to open the door; I listened more attentively, and was convinced they were trying to open the outer door; I came away from the window; there is a door on the top of the landing-place - that door leads into a small passage, and in that passage are two doors - the key of the door was outside; I gently opened that door, took the key out, shut the door, slipped the private bolt under the lock, and sat down again for a short time. I heard them forcing the door on this landing-place of which I had bolted and brought the key in, and perceived that they were trying to come in, and I thought they would come into the room where I was. I got up out of my chair, went to my sitting-room door, waited there, and put my finger under the bolt of the lock, to keep it fast - there was no key to that lock, the bolt was the only security. After standing a little while with my finger under the bolt, I heard a crush of the outer door, on the landing, forced - it came open; I then heard a noise against my room door, and saw a little instrument, like a chisel, appear through the edge of the door, and saw part of a skeleton key in the key-hole; and as that would not open the lock, it was withdrawn, and that, or another, made its appearance in the lock, and was withdrawn - then a third made its appearance, and after that, this instrument was tried higher up the door - it did not succeed; I then saw another instrument put in, and the point of that made me know it was my own screw-driver, which I had seen last on the stone-landing, outside this door, which enters into the passage - that would not open the door, and the first instrument was withdrawn - the screw-driver remained in the door; they made another purchase, the screw-driver was withdrawn, and put in again edgeways; several forces were given against the door, and at last it was burst open; they were about five minutes in getting the door open; I caught hold of the nob of the lock, opened the door, and said, "What do you do here?" I saw Lowe standing upright - he put his hands up, gave a turn round, and Roberts came out of a little room on the landing, which I have not described yet, and, as Lowe turned round, Roberts passed him, and went down stairs; Lowe followed him, and I followed Lowe immediately; they went down Tennis-court-lane, towards the barracks, at a bit of a run; I followed them, and before I met any body, Lowe stopped doubled his fist at me, and said, "You shall not pass;" (Roberts was on before) I said I would; he said, "You shall not pass; I said, "I will," and did pass him, and after that Roberts turned round, doubled his fist at me, and said, "You shall not pass;" I said I would, and got before him. I was going to give the alarm to the soldiers. They did not offer any violence to me as I passed them. I met one Adams, and said, "Two thieves have been breaking into my house;" they were near enough to hear it. Adams said he would take them, but they turned back from him, and went by a mason's shop, got on some stones on the tiling, and over that is a garden; they returned from the top, and came back again; Adams had got up after them; I had by that time got to some soldiers, and said to them, "Here are two thieves, who have been robbing my house, here they are;" and when they came down from the tiling, they passed Adams and me, and came among the soldiers, but they would not lay hold of them; they walked on to get out of the Palace, and then got into the barrack-yard; I lost sight of them at Hampton Court Bridge; I had given an alarm all the way till I lost them.

COURT. Q. From the first time your door was burst open, till you finally lost sight of them, how long were they in view? A. I suppose above a quarter of an hour - I am quite sure the two prisoners are the men - I never lost sight of them for three hundred and thirty yards, and saw them in custody in about three quarters of an hour - I had seen Green before I lost sight of them - I knew them again when they were taken. On returning to my house I found two drawers had been pulled half-way out - I kept keys, and old springs, and smiths' tools in those drawers - a little box stood on the ground, with a key in it - three shirts, three neck handkerchiefs, and two pairs of stockings, which had been in that box, were pulled out, and laid on the ground by the side of the box - it was dirty linen - I had put some of it into the box that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I think you say your's is a detached house, but attached to the Palace? A. I mean to say it is attached to the Palace wall - it is a house by itself - there was nobody in it but me - it is a rule with me not to answer the bell on Sunday - I do not answer people out of the window, except I know them - I did not know whether, if I gave an alarm, they might not break in and do me a mischief - I could see nobody to give an alarm to - there are no sentinels about, except in the evening - I was a good deal alarmed and agitated - I was absent from the house about half an hour - I left all the doors open, but I got Adams to look after the house - I had not got out of the house many minutes before I saw him - he did not join in the pursuit, but went to look after my house - I found every thing right, but the dirty linen was moved - it was laid loosely down by the side of the box - there was not time to pack it up - it was a small box, about fourteen inches by twelve - I am a working smith - it was dirty linen, and old - it was as dirty as linen generally is - I intended to use it again when washed, but it was not my best.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were you not reported to have a good deal of money in your house? A. It was understood so.

COURT. Q. Does nobody live in the house with you? A. No; a woman comes twice a week to clean the apartments - there is nobody in the house but myself on Sundays at all.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a labourer, and live at Hampton. On Sunday, the 23d of October, I was in the Palace, about half-past twelve o'clock, and saw Young at a small distance from his house, and the two prisoners - Lowe was in the act of fencing with him - Roberts was at a short distance - Young got by them, met me, and said, "Stop them! stop them! they are two robbers; they have broken into

my house" - I immediately made my way towards them - they got on some stories on a roof, which leads to the melon ground - I followed them a short distance, and then went back to take care of Young's house - he was then following them up the parade, where the soldiers were - I remained at the house till he returned - nobody had entered it - I am certain they are the men - I did not see them again till next day, before the Justice, and knew them.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a gardener, and live at Hampton. I met Young in the barrack yard, following the two prisoners, who were going towards the bridge at a jog trot; Young said they had broken into his house; I told the soldiers to stop them - they said they had nothing to do with it; Young and I followed them to Hampton-court-bridge - I followed them over the bridge - they began to run and kept on together; I never lost sight of them till I saw them both taken; Lowe was taken first and Roberts three hundred yards further on; I saw a jemmy (a small crow-bar) found in Roberts' breeches' pocket, a sulphur-box, two or three keys, and a bag, were also found on him.

JOHN REDRIDGE . I am a labourer, and live at Moulsey. I saw the prisoners coming from the Palace yard - I followed them over the bridge, and saw Lowe throw something out of his side pocket into the water - I took him, and gave him to the constable - Roberts was taken in about five minutes - I saw the things taken from him.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am an officer. I have the jemmy and phosphorus-box found on Roberts, and some pick-lock keys, which were found in the river; I tried the jemmy to the door of Young's room - it matched in three places.

WILLIAM FAULKENER . I found these keys in the river.

JOHN YOUNG re-examined. There were three shirts in the box; I had worn them in that week - also two pairs of stockings, and three handkerchiefs - they are worth about 12 s., for they are almost worn out; nothing else was taken from the box.

LOWE - GUILTY . Aged 36.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

The Jury being of opinion that the prosecutor only was in the dwelling-house. - This case is reserved for the decision of the Twelve Judges, whether the capital part of the indictment is proved?

Reference Number: t18251027-137

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1743. WILLIAM SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , a watch, value 3 l., the goods of John Robinson , in his dwelling-house .

JANE ROBINSON . I am the wife of John Robinson - we live in Union-court, Spitalfields . On the 12th of September the prisoner came and engaged a bed-room; he came home to dinner, and said he and his fellow workmen were going to see who could turn the most spindles in the hour; after dinner he went down stairs, came back, and said "Mistress, will you give me the loan of your watch for an hour; do you think master will be angry?" I gave it to him, and soon after one o'clock one of the men came to see if he was at home: he never returned; I found the watch in pawn.

JOHN WILLIAM FIELD . I am a pawnbroker, and have a watch, which I took in pawn of the prisoner on the 14th of September, for 2 l.; he wanted 50 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was lent to me, and I was obliged to pawn it to pay my expenses, being in distress.

COURT. The watch being lent could not be stolen from the dwelling-house.

GUILTY. Aged 23. Of larceny only . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18251027-138

London Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Justice Park.

1744. JOHN BERGER, alias DE CLIFFORD , was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order for payment of money , as follows:

London, June 24 , 1825.

Messrs. Sansom, and Postlethwaite pay No. 486, I N or Bearer, 117.

JOSEPH GREEN and Co.

117.

with intent to defraud Joseph Green .

2d COUNT, for disposing of and putting the same away, well-knowing it to be forged.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud Henry Sansom and Thomas Postlethwaite .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BENNETT . I am clerk to Messrs. Henry Sansom and Thomas Postlethwaite, bankers . Joseph Green and Co. of Thames-street, keep an account at our house. On the 28th of June this cheque (looking at it) was presented at our counter; I paid it in twenty-two 5 l. notes, and 2 l. in cash. I do not know who presented it; the money has since been placed to the account of Joseph Green and Co. Mr. Green has also a private account with us; I am not aware that he has a partner.

A release, from Messrs. Sansom and Co., to Mr. Green, of all claim for the amount of this cheque, was here proved and read.

BENJAMIN GREEN . Joseph Green is my brother; he carries on business under the firm of Joseph Green and Co., but has no partner. The signature to this cheque, to the best of my belief, is not his writing; some of the letters are similar to his.

JOSEPH GREEN (looking at the cheque). The signature to this is not my writing. I was not in town at the time it is dated: nobody was authorised to draw in my name.

ALFRED JOHNSON . I am twenty two-years old. I was clerk to Messrs. Sansom & Co. banker's - I left them about July. I know one Peckham; he had lived in Upper King-street, Bloomsbury. I knew him for two months before June; the first place I recollect seeing him at was at Mrs. H'.s, oyster-rooms, Drury-lane. I was introduced to one Jones, by Peckham, at a public-house in the City-road, and very frequently saw him and Peckham afterwards. Jones (I believe) asked me for some cancelled cheques. I was to get them from my employers' counting-house, for them to copy to make forgeries. I gave them several signed by Green, of Thames-street, and Wilkinson. They were both present when I gave them the cheques. I used to get them in the evening, they were returned to me the same night once; and at another time they kept them all night; I replaced them where I took them from. On the 28th of June, a letter which I have

destroyed, came to me at the banking-house, and I was sent for to Grace-church-street; a porter from the Spread Eagle, brought it. I went to the Spread Eagle. I had not then ever seen the prisoner. I met Jones and Peckham at the Spread Eagle, in the house down stairs - they took me up into a kind of lobby, and shewed me this cheque; I believe it to be the same - it was near three o'clock. I returned to the counting-house, after conversing with them - and in about a quarter of an hour the prisoner came and presented this cheque at the counter to Mr. Bennett-he was dressed in a blue frock-coat, black waistcoat, with blue glass buttons, and had a gold or gilt chain round his neck; it appeared a watch chain. Mr. Bennett paid the cheque, and he went away - in a few minutes I went back to the Spread Eagle. I found Jones and Peckham there, I do not remember seeing the prisoner there, Jones, Peckham and I, had a coach, and went down to London-bridge, got out there opposite the church, and I went into the Shades wine-house, and had a glass of wine. Peckham and Jones went on a little way on the wharf, I came out and saw the prisoner with them. Peckham came up to me and told me, not to let the prisoner see me. I went aside, they all went into a public-house, opposite Old Swan-stairs, and I went back to the counting-house. I had made an appointment with Peckham, and after leaving business, about a quarter to six, I went to the public-house. I saw the mistress and servant, and asked if two gentlemen had been there, and left any message for me - I was told they were gone. I saw Peckham and Jones the same evening, at Peckham's lodging. I received at another place about 20 l. as my share.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after this? A. Several times - I once dined with him at Peckham's lodging; I asked him if he had received 20 l. for presenting the cheque, telling him I had heard he had received it - he said he received but 15 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long was this after the cheque was presented? A. It might be two or three days. I never saw him before he presented it, to my knowledge.

Q. If you had not seen him again could you have sworn he was the man who presented it? A. Yes. I knew his dress; it was very remarkable, and he had been described to me. I did not see his dress on any other day. There was an inquiry made in our house about it about a week after. I saw him six times or more after he presented it - I did not see him at the Spread Eagle. I only knew what he was to do from what Jones and Peckham said. I had been nearly three years in Messrs. Sansom's service.

Q. You entered into a conspiracy to rob your masters? A. That is what we did. I had been acquainted with them two months before I saw the prisoner.

Q. You have mentioned Mrs. H's and a public-house in the City-road - at what other houses used you to meet them? A. I have been at gambling houses with them, and public-houses, and at a coffee-house in the Hay-market, under the Colonade. I was not there with Peckham, but with Jones. I made no mark on the cheque, but believe it to be the same as I saw given into Mr. Bennett's hand - I have seen it before.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were you standing at the counter? A. No, but my attention was called to the transaction - the person who was to come having been described. I sat at my seat, and looked over. The person presenting it answered the description.

JOHN BENNETT re-examined. I paid no other cheque of this amount drawn by Green.

HENRY COOPER PECKHAM . I was in the service of Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Smith, bankers, for about two years - I left them in 1821. On the 5th of August last I was apprehended on a charge of forgery upon them. I first became acquainted with the prisoner in March last; I know Jones - his real name is John Jones Shenton - I knew him from November last; I had met him at Mr. Ross', Arundel-place, Pentonville; I have met him at Canterbury, and at different taverns in London. I lived at Mr. Parteridge's, No. 19, Upper King-street, Bloomsbury, and he lodged in the same street - I have met him at his lodgings and my own. I have known Johnson two years, as a banker's clerk, but not personally, to be on intimate terms with him - he lived with Messrs. Sansom and Co. - I have met him at the Saloon, in Piccadilly, at my lodging, and his own; I first spoke to him about March last. I first saw the prisoner in February or March, at a gambling house, in King-street, St. James - I have frequently seen him there; the first time I ever went to that house was with two persons, and I was introduced to him there, and then frequently saw him there, and at other houses of the same description. I have seen Jones at several of these houses. About March I and Jones proposed to Johnson to procure cancelled cheques, drawn by any respectable house, who had any amount at his employer's - he was then to get blank cheques - Jones said he could get them imitated - Johnson furnished us with both cancelled and blank cheques - I applied to the prisoner, in the presence of Jones, at my lodgings, about them - I had seen him the previous evening at a gambling-house, and asked him to breakfast, but did not explain any thing to him then - he came - I and Jones were present - I think it was on a Wednesday in June, but am not confident - he had formerly made a proposal to me, (when I met him at a gaming-house, when I belonged to the firm of H. C. Peckham and Co., paper-makers, at Dover and Cheriton, in partnership with my father-in-law - he knew I had quarrelled with my father-in-law, and that bills on the firm were then negociating; he proposed to me to put into his hands some bills on the firm, to be dated prior to a commission of bankruptcy issued against me, and he could negociate them; I did not consent to it, for my father-in-law was very hostile to me, and was sole assignee;) after breakfast on this morning, I referred to the former conversation about the bills, and told him as he was willing before to enter into the case of the bills, now he could do it more safe, by receiving these drafts, which had been forged, and would be paid by the clerk at the banking-house, who was connected in it; several forged cheques were then shewn to him, and this among others; I told him they were forged, and that immediately they were paid they would be destroyed by the clerk who paid them, who was intended to be Johnson, as they were to be presented when the cashier was at dinner; he said he would receive them, but he should like to know the clerk first; I Jones, and Berger, then proceeded to the Spread Eagle; a note was

written to Johnson, in the coffee-room there, either by me or Jones, and was sent to the banking-house by the porter, requesting him to come to us at the Spread Eagle; we had wine and prawns there for lunch, and remained together for some time, but when Johnson came I was gone up stairs, and as I was coming down I saw him; he was not introduced to the prisoner; the prisoner was in the coffee-room, I think; Johnson saw him, but was not introduced to him; the cheque was given to Berger, by Jones or me, in the coffee-room; he was dressed in a blue frock coat, dark trousers, and, I believe, a dark waistcoat; he had a watch in his waistcoat pocket, with a chain round his neck; the watch and chain belonged to Mrs. Grant; she had intrusted me with it to get it repaired; she lodged at the same house as me; I had broken it the previous night; it was on the breakfast table at my lodgings; I said I should take it into the City to be repaired, and as we went along Berger said he should prefer wearing it when he received the cheque at Sansom's, as it would give less suspicion of his knowing it to be forged, if it should be detected, by his not being supposed to be in want of money; I lent it to him; the cheque was given to him in the coffee-room; I thought he was gone, when he came back into the coffee-room with the cheque in his hand, and said aloud that he had found it in the watercloset; nobody else was in the room; it had been in his possession about five minutes; he then went away with it; Johnson came back to us; we three went down to the Shades in a coach, got out at the foot of London-bridge, and went in there, where we had appointed to meet Berger; he had not arrived; Johnson and Jones remained outside, while I went in to the Shades to see if he was there; I could not find him, and came out; Johnson left us, and went back to the counting-house, but I think, previous to that, we went to the Swan public-house, it being more retired; I and Johnson went to the Swan; Johnson had left us, (I think) but we told him to call at the Swan; Berger came to us outside of the Shades shortly after Johnson had left (I think he had left us); he said he had been there twice, but could not find us; I, Berger, and Jones, then went to the Swan; I cannot say whether Johnson was with us; I think not; we then went into the back parlour; we asked him previously if it was all right; he said he had received the cheque; when we got into the back parlour we had some gin and water and biscuits; I think he took the notes out of his coat pocket; they were all fives, and pinched up together; they were unfolded and counted; two fives were missing; he said he was so flurried after receiving the cheque, that he supposed he must have dropped them when he put them into his pocket, but if we doubted it, we might deduct it from what he had received; we asked why he had not gone to the Bank and changed them for sovereigns; he said they were equally the same, as they could be changed at any of the gambling-houses, without any fear of tracing them to him; we asked what he expected for receiving them; he said he thought we could afford to give him 40 l. out of it; Jones said it was a great deal too much; that it was to be divided into five shares - he would give him what he had proposed, and asked if the 17 l. would be sufficient, besides the 10 l. he had lost; Jones said he must make that do, for he would have to receive some heavier ones; I think he had 17 l., leaving 90 l. in our hands; it was paid him in three fives and two sovereigns, which he had received at the bankers; I think I saw him again the next day; I never knew where he lived, but have seen him at gambling-houses in King-street, and two or three others; one in Jermyn-street, two in Bury-street, at the Colonade Hotel, and at Russell's Hotel, Piazza, Covent-garden, where we occasionally slept; the door of the Colonade Hotel comes into Charles-street; I have seen Johnson at gambling-houses in Pall-mall; we occasionally meet there; we were taken there by Jones; I have also seen Johnson at the Colonade Hotel, I think; I have seen him at the Saloon, Piccadilly, and many other places; at my lodgings, and at Jones's, No. 37, Upper King-street; I have not met him there, but have been with him to the door.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When were you charged with forgery by Messrs. Smith and Payne? A. On the 5th of August - I have been in custody ever since - a commission of bankruptcy was issued against me in October or November last year - I never applied for my certificate - I was never charged with perjury or conspiracy - Mr. Harmer was employed against me, but I took it to be for an assault - I was in Dover gaol three or four days, for an alleged assault on William Wright - I have been at Bow-street several times, and was brought, into the prisoner's presence to be identified, but not examined - I saw Johnson there several times, as he passed by to be taken away, but was never with him - he was not examined in my presence - I was not examined at all - this was the first cheque I ever saw to my knowledge - it was proposed a fortnight or more before it was forged - it was proposed by Jones about May or June, or hardly so long ago - Jones and I shewed the prisoner four cheques - I never saw any before that - I had seen those the previous day - the cancelled cheques were given to Jones by Johnson sometime previous, but could not be executed, and were returned - any cheques would do if the name was not too much obliterated, if the person had cash in the house - Jones was to take three shares; two for the parties who executed the cheque, Johnson one, and I the other, after having paid the party for receiving - I was connected with them - I have known Johnson some time, but not intimately - I never passed a forged cheque.

COURT. Q. We understand you to say you first spoke to Johnson about March, but did not then talk about forged cheques? A. No, I knew him as I did other banker's clerks.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You had not known him to speak to him before? A. Merely to say, "How do you do?" I recollected him when he was a banker's clerk, but do not recollected whether he was in London when I left Smith and Co. in 1821 or 1822 - I do not know which; I think it was 1822 - I said 1821 at first, because I was flurried - I thought it was 1821, but now think it is 1822.

Q. You went with the prisoner and Jones to the Spread Eagle? A. Yes, I was coming down stairs into the inn yard when I first saw Johnson - I called him up to me, and took him into a parlour up stairs before he went into the coffee-room.

Q. Did you shut the room door? A. I do not recollect.

Q. However, you took him into a room? A. I think it was in a small room, in the parlour, as we went up stairs, on the landing-place; I do not recollect whether

Jones came up; we then went down into the coffee-room; I did not introduce him to Berger, but I think he saw him; I do not say I took him up to the box where he was, but I think he saw him to be able to know him; when he came to the banking-house, the prisoner was told that the clerk who would pay him was connected; I have never heard Johnson examined, nor he me.

JOHN COSTER . I am porter at the Spread Eagle, Grace-church-street. In June last a letter was given to me up stairs, addressed to Mr. Johnson, at Messrs. Sanson and Co., Lombard-street; I went there and gave Johnsom the note; I brought back a verbal answer, that he would attend to it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You do not know who gave you the note? A. No, it was neither of the parties.

CATHERINE CALLNAN . I am servant at the Old Swan, public-house, near London-bridge. In June last I saw Peckham there with the prisoner and another person; Peckham gave me a 5 l. note to take the reckoning out of, in the prisoner's presence; there were other papers laying on the table; they had some gin and water; they were all three together; one of them said, if a young man, named Johnson, should come, to say they should call in the afternoon; about an hour after they were gone, a person called, and delivered that message.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know on what day of the week this was? A. Monday was the first day, and then the note was changed - I am sure of that; I said at Bow-street I could not exactly swear to the prisoner, but I can swear to him now.

COURT. Q. What makes you sure now? A. When he came to our place he had mustachios on, and at Bow-street he had none.

MR. LAW. Q. You mention the first day - did they come more than once? A. They came four times - Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday; the prisoner was always with them; I am certain of his person.

ROBERT PARTERIDGE . I am son of Francis Parteridge . We live at No. 12, Upper King-street, Bloomsbury; Peckham lodged with us for about three months; I have seen the prisoner at our house four or five times - he went by the name of Major de Clifford, and was with Peckham; Johnson also used to visit Peckham; I do not remember the prisoner and Johnson dining there.

MRS. PARTERIDGE. I am the wife of Francis Parteridge. Peckham lodged in our house in May, June, and July; a person, named Jones, visited him; I have seen Johnson and the prisoner there; Peckham slept in the attic, and had a small parlour; Mrs. Grant lodged on my second floor - she had a gold watch and chain; I remember the watch being broken - I do not know how it was done - I saw Peckham with it, and in a day or two Mrs. Grant had it again - she is now in Africa.

GEORGE DOWN . I am head waiter at the Colonade hotel. I have seen the prisoner there in April, May, and June - he went by the name of De Clifford. I have seen Peckham there, but do not know whether he was in the prisoners' company. I believe Johnson is the man who met a short man, named Jones, there twice: Johnson, Jones, and the prisoner had tea together there once or twice.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You are sure Johnson drank tea with the prisoner and Jones? A. Yes, in April or May.

JOHN BENNETT. The cheque was paid on Tuesday, the 28th of June.

The prisoner in a long address to the Court stated, that his taking the name of Berger, arose from his having met with a reverse of fortune - that he had met Peckham at public places, and from his address and appearance, supposed him to be a respectable gentleman, as he represented himself to have had 25,000 with wife - but denied all knowledge of the transaction in question, or any dishonest act. He received an excellent character from several respectable individuals.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-139

London Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

1704. HENRY YATES , JONATHAN THOMAS JOHNSON , and JAMES HUNTER GRAY were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a portable writing-desk, value 8 l. 10 s., a Russia leather dressing-case, value 4 l. 10 s.; four razors, value 1 l.; two pairs of scissors, value 9 s.; a silver tongue-scraper, value 3 s. 6 d.; two tooth-brushes, value 1 s.; a nail brush, value 1 s. 3 d.; a glass soap-dish and plated top, value 6 s. 6 d.; two tooth powder glasses, value 4 s. 6 d.; a scent bottle, value 2 s. 6 d.; a looking-glass, value 5 s.; a pair of boot-hooks, value 5 s.; a pen-knife, value 2 s.; two hair brushes, value 3 s.; a cover for a dressing-case, value 6 s. 6 d., and a nail-knife, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of James Wyer .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

NICHOLAS HOSKIN . On the 5th of October, I was in the employ of Mr. James Wyer, of No. 341, Oxford-street , who is since dead. The prisoner Yates came to the shop and looked out a portable Russia leather dressing-desk, at 8 l. 10 s. and a desk at 8 l., and ordered them to be sent, at four o'clock, to No. 205, Upper Thames-street, and the money was to be paid on delivery. He gave me a card, with "Mr. Yates" engraved on it, and wrote on it himself "Craggs and Yates, 205, Upper Thames-street," he said he would return the money by the man who brought the goods. I sent them by Wildash, with orders not to leave them without the money - if he could not get it he was to bring them back, for I had some suspicion. He returned some time after five o'clock - I have never got goods or money. I manage the business.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who carries on the business now? A. Elizabeth Ann Wyer , the daughter - she was not in the business before her father's death.

THOMAS WILDASH . On the 5th of October I went, by Mr. Hoskins' order, with a writing, a dressing-case, and bill of parcels, to take to Craggs and Yates, No 205, Upper Thames-street; I was not to leave them without the money. I got there at the time appointed - saw the prisoner Grey, and asked him if Mr. Yates was within - he said he was not, and asked what I had got there - if it was a portable writing-desk and dressing-case, for Mr. Yates; I said "Yes, Sir;" he then took a letter out and said "I have just received this note from Mr. Yates, saying he will not be here this evening, nor before eleven o'clock in the morning;" he told me to leave the goods - that

they would be perfectly safe, and to call at eleven o'clock in the morning, and I should get my money. Johnson then came in at the same door as I did, and asked if Mr. Yates was within; Grey said he had just received this note, saying he would not be there till eleven o'clock in the morning. Johnson turned round and asked me if I had brought those goods for Mr. Yates; I said I had; he said if I left them they would be perfectly safe; I made no answer but left them, as they said they would be safe, and seeing other goods there I thought they would be safe. Johnson and I came out together, and went up Thames-street; he went up a turning and I returned to the counting-house, having brought two bags away which I took them in - I returned to put them over the goods, to prevent them being scratched; I saw Grey and asked if I might cover them; he said "Certainly, it is a pity they should be scratched;" I covered them up, and went home. Mr. Hoskins blamed me for leaving them without the money, and sent me the same evening to make inquiry about them, and next morning at 11 o'clock I went again. Mrs. Lodge opened the door - I waited an hour and a half but saw neither of the prisoners - nobody came while I was there - my goods were gone but the bags were left; in the counting-house, on the ground floor, I saw a large account book on the desk; "Craggs and Co." was written on the door - I never saw them again till they were apprehended, and have never got goods or money.

Cross-examined. Q. The appearance of respectability induced you to leave the goods? A. Yey; their saying the money would be safe. I did not go there after the next day. Gray asked if I had a writing-desk and dressing-case for Mr. Yates.

ROBERT PIKE . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, pawnbroker, Jermyn-street, St. James's. On the 5th of October, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, Yates and Johnson brought this dressing-case and desk to pawn, with other property, and asked a larger amount than I choose to give - I at last lent 3 l. on the desk, and 3 l. on the dressing-case, in the name of Yates, Watling-street - they were both together.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not said at the time that it was Yates' property? A. The transaction was with him - I knew him before. Johnson observed that he thought Yates had paid a great price for it, and asked me the value of it, whether he said he had paid, or was to pay, I cannot recollect. Yates had pawned things before, and redeemed them.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many times has he pawned goods at your house within the last six months? A. Not above once - perhaps within the last year he has been six times at my house; he once brought some knives - I did not know where he lived, only by the address he gave me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY ANN LODGE . I am the wife of Joseph Lodge; we have lived at No. 205, Upper Thames-street three years - I let the counting-house to Yates; he came on the 5th of August: he was absent fourteen days; Craggs and Co, was written on the door; the other two prisoners came backwards and forward sometimes every other day, and sometimes every day - they never stopped long. There are two ways of getting out of the counting-house - one leads into a court, and the other into the street. I have seen goods brought there several times, but do not know what became of them. Gray was very frequently there.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the name of Craggs and and Yates put up? A. No; Craggs and Co.; it is on the door now.

YATES, in a long address to the Court, denied having purchased the goods with a fraudulent intention, but in the regular course of business, with a bill of parcels - that Johnson was a considerable creditor of his - the purport of his frequent visits was to obtain money from him; and Gray was his clerk, and totally ignorant of the affair.

JOHNSON'S Defence. The prosecutors are well aware that I am a creditor of Yates'.

GRAY'S Defence. I was recommended to Mr. Yates as a clerk, by an old acquaintance of mine.

MR. BRODRICK to THOMAS WILDASH. Q. Did not Johnson say, "You had better take them away, and bring them at eleven o'clock in the morning?" A. No - I heard him say nothing of the kind - if he had I should have taken them; Mrs. Lodge let me in, and went backwards - she was not in the counting-house. The bill was made out to Yates only; I kept the receipt.

NICHOLAS HOSKINS . Yates ordered the goods between one and three o'clock. I made out the bill to Grey and Yates - I have it here. I sent a blank receipt stamp.

Prisoner YATES. I told you my name was Yates - that Grey was my partner, and I wished them sent to my counting-house - Witness. He said nothing of the kind; he desired me to be particular, to be there by four o'clock, and I should have the money.

MRS. LODGE. I opened the door to Wildash; I did not go into the counting-house. I heard Johnson say, "You may either take them, or leave them, for Mr. Yates won't be in till to-morrow morning."

YATES - GUILTY . Aged 32.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 39.

GREY - NOT GUILTY .

See the 5th Day.

Reference Number: t18251027-140

NEW COURT.

(4th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1747. GEORGE EMBLETON and DOROTHY, his WIFE, were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , seventeen volumes of books, value 35 s. , the goods of John Jones .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

DR. JOHN JONES. I am a doctor of law , and live at No. 13, Great Coram-street, St. George, Bloomsbury . The female prisoner was cook in my family - I paid her her wages on the 10th of September, and one month in advance, with a present of 2 l., to go and visit her friends in the North, as she had expressed a desire to go - she then said she should not go to the North at that time, being actually engaged to be married very soon, and she asked me so give her leave to continue two or three weeks in my house after marriage; I agreed, and her husband slept in the house every night. When the 10th of October arrived (the period to which I had paid her) I told her I had got new servants - that Mrs. Jones and the family were about

to return. On the following morning I was awoke by a noise in the attic, and heard a box being carried out. On the Saturday following (the 15th) she collected her boxes into the hall, and said, "Here are my boxes - would you wish to look at them?" I said, "No, if I had mistrusted you it would be too late now." I had not then made any charge against them. These circumstances, and the number of boxes put me on inquiring, and either on that Saturday or the Sunday, I missed a number of articles, and a great many books. I got a search-warrant, and went to their lodgings with the officer - they were both there. I found many books there, and among the rest the first and third volumes of Percy's Relics of English Poetry - I have the second volume of it here.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you among those a history of the Inquisition? A. Yes.

Q. Did you not send this book to the female prisoner by your own son? A. No; he is not five years of age. - My nephew had access to my library, and could take what books he liked, but he never spoiled a set; I did once find that he had mislaid some of my books, and taken some away with him, but this is two years and a half ago. The female prisoner had been in my house from November 1824 - if he had taken any books away it must have been previous to her coming. I have not said that some of my sets had been broken in consequence of what he took away; I have missed single books, but no sets broken - there were odd volumes in my library. I made the female prisoner a present of a watch, and I gave her some other trifling presents about ten days before she went away. I was expecting the female part of my family in town, when I gave her notice to go, because I had ample reason to be dissatisfied with her conduct, in the absence of Mrs. Jones. She asked me as a favour to let her stay a fortnight after her marriage; she had never before her marriage slept in the kitchen to my knowledge, as I stand in the presence of your Lordship and of heaven; she never slept on the dresser with the door bolted, she slept in the attic, there was a fastening to that door, there are locks to all my doors up stairs. I do not upon my oath, know of the fastening being taken off that door. I suppose there was a key to the lock, but I never got possession of it. I gave her an old fender, and a lamp which had been in the chimney in my dressing-room, and was very black; a man was coming to make me a new lamp, and I told him I would let him have it, if he would allow me something for it; she came up stairs and said, Sir. "Will you let me have the lamp, for what the lamp-maker would allow for it?" I said "No - Chambers, I can't think of selling any thing to you, I would rather give it you." I really thought at that time, that the glass of it was broken - this is the lamp (looking at one produced.) I bought it about five years ago for 3 l. 10 s., but we had never used it scarcely - I ordered another of a different kind. Mary Strives is my housemaid. I never offered the prisoner a gold watch, if she would not take the silver one. I gave a chronometer for the use of the kitchen, which was lent by my watchmaker; but when I gave the prisoner what I did at last, I took that away again. I gave her a silver watch which cost 6 l. I did not gave her The History of the Inquisition - there was something said about me by Mary Strives, at the time of the prisoner's nuptials - but the prisoner remained in the house after that. Mary Strives has not been discharged since she was subpoenaed to be a witness. Mrs. Jones discharged her a month ago. I was not present at the time - my nephew's name is James Shirvet. I have not seen the room where the prisoner slept for some time; but my house was undergoing a thorough repair, about two months ago, and the locks were taken away, and replaced again before the prisoner went away. I do not know the state of the fastening of her door - but I suppose the carpenters took off every lock, and replaced them. Upon my oath, I did not have a small bolt taken off her door, nor take the key of a middle door. I do not know of any middle door in my house - the report of Mary Strives was first circulated about the 10th of September, when the prisoner's nuptials were celebrated - it was not then that I made the prisoner a present. I gave her warning a week before her marriage - I paid her her wages, and a month in advance; I did not then know of her marriage - she told me she was to be married on the ensuing Monday. I did not give her warning on the day she told me what Mary Strives had said; I do not know in what room Mary Strives slept - the report was, that when I was in the country, I had followed two young women about fourteen years of age into a field - it was Mary Strives who brought this report to town. When the cook had put some money into the bank, I advised Mary Strives to save her money, and put it there, and it was said by Chambers that I had offered Mary Strives 100 l. to be my wife - there was not a report that the female prisoner had caught me in a particular situation with Mary Strives. I do not owe the prisoner a farthing. I think she left me on the 15th of October, and was apprehended on the following Thursday. - When she left, she pretended to say she had not received all her wages, and went to Mrs. Jones on the subject. I had been inquiring into the state of things, and got the warrant on the Thursday, this letter (looking at it) was written about the time I discharged her - it contains a statement of the money she had received, and what she had to receive; she had been attempting to perplex me with her account, and I put it down upon paper; I do not remember that I was afraid of any abuse or disturbance at that time. I could state, on oath, if I was on a dying-bed, I do not recollect threatening to take her before a Magistrate - I do not recollect any cause for it - I gave her this letter about the time of her discharge. I never gave the prisoner a writing-desk - I gave her 2 l. when she was going away. Mrs. Jones gave her 2 l., and might have given her some profiles, but not to my knowledge - this letter is my writing:

(read.)

For MRS. CHAMBERS.

Mrs. Jones has settled with Chambers till the month of May; but of this she was not quite certain, as her cook is in Coram-street, and if there is any mistake, she will rectify it. Wages from the month of May to the 9th of September, 5 l. 12 s.; till the month of October, the month in advance, 1 l. 8 s., makes 7 l., according to sixteen guineas per annum. On account of your care of the children, you were promised to have your wages made up to 20 l.; Mrs. Jones accordingly made you a present of 2 l., and I

4 l., which was paid for a watch, as which you have a receipt for six guineas. You deposited four sovereigns with Mrs. Jones, but I having advanced you three, leaves your wages just eight sovereigns. I promised you something towards your expenses to see your father and mother, and I now fulfil the promise, by giving you, in addition to the 2 l., enclosing a bank-note of 10 l. Now, Chambers, what have you done to merit this extraordinary kindness thus shewn you? Your conduct has been unprincipled; your behaviour scandalous - since three months past you have neglected your duty, having left the house in complete filth and disorder, even the knives being left in dust and rust; and since Mrs. Jones went into the country you have declined to wash your own clothes, and, without my knowledge or consent, gave them to my washerwoman. I intrusted you with the key of my book-room, and you left them all unlocked, so that the workmen in the house might, and doubtless have, taken many of them away. With all this, you put me to great expense in having a worthless girl with you in the house, and that without adding any thing to my comfort, or to the proper management of the house. Yet, on account of some qualities, I forgive you, and wish you well. When you return, it will be a good time for you to have a situation; and Mrs. Jones will give you, doubtless, an undeniable character. You have always been kind and good to the children, and, for this reason, I and Mrs. Jones would be happy to cherish unfeigned good-will towards you, and would be glad occasionally to see you - but, with respect to myself, whatever may be my feelings, it is my present intention never to speak to you again.

J. JONES.

I shall take a copy of this letter, and, if rendered necessary, by abuse or disturbance on your part, I will send it to your uncle, and immediately go to a Magistrate to ask his advice how to act towards you.

Cross-examination continued. Q. What abuse did you expect? A. I certainly experienced her abuse and clamour while the workmen were there, and I wanted to turn her away then, but I did not. I said then to her, in reference to the violence she had displayed, that she was mortified at the idea of going, and was impudent to me - upon my oath it did not allude to any misconduct to the prisoner or Mary Strives. Upon my oath The History of the Inquisition was not given to her, in consequence of her having stated, that she found me in a particular situation with Mary Strives.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At the time you gave her this lamp, did you know where the top was? A. No - I did not; it was only the stand I gave her, it was not in a state fit for use - I did not think it worth 6 d. My nephew had left me two years and a half; the set of Relics of Ancient Poetry was complete after he left me. I am certain I had it in my hand, and had occasion to refer to it at the time. I first gave the female prisoner notice to quit - I did not know of her marriage - I did not hear of the report that Mary Strives had given out, until the nuptials of the prisoner had taken place. I never authorised my nephew, or my son, to give her any books; I never took any liberty with her or Strives, in my life; I am fifty-seven years of age - I am married, and have two children - my youngest child was taken ill, and the prisoner offered her service to attend her, and by her assiduity I had reason to believe the child was restored - the medical gentleman said so; this created great gratitude in Mrs. Jones' bosom and in mine; she asked to have the child left in her care during the winter, which was complied with, and Mrs. Jones said, in addition to her regular wages of 16 l. per year, she should have two sovereigns on the child's birth-day, and on the birth-day of my son I should have given her two sovereigns but as she had complained of the want of a time-piece in the kitchen, I said I would commute the four sovereigns into a watch, which cost 6 l.

JURY. Q. When the prisoner was going away, what did she ask you? A. To look at her boxes if I pleased. I understood her to mean to search them.

Prisoner GEORGE EMBLETON. Q. Was not a woman of the name of Garrat, or Becket, or Thompson, the cause of my wife being turned out of the house? A. That woman had nothing whatever to do with her dismissal.

COURT. Q. Is Elizabeth Carter the worthless girl you allude to in your letter? A. Yes - I did not hire her; she was a cousin of the cook's, and she brought her.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I went with an officer, named Lloyd, to the prisoner's lodgings, and found her there; I understood it was her mother's lodgings; these are the books we found there; I did not say any thing. The female prisoner said they were most of them given to her by Dr. Jones. Dr. Jones was there, and said he had not given her any.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were there not a great many others which Dr. Jones did not claim? A. Yes; he said he had given her the lamp.

DOROTHY EMBLETON 'S Defence. Dr. Jones gave me the watch one night when I had been out, and when I returned he was along with a woman in the parlour, and he told me not to say any thing about it - at another time he took the key from the middle door; he has knocked me down on the stairs frequently, and given me a bottle of wine and 1 lb. of tea, and a bottle of Hollands; that woman left her cap in the house, and took Dr. Jones's hat.

MARY STRIVES. I have been in the service of Dr. Jones, but am to leave it in a few days. I received my notice to attend here on Saturday evening, and Mrs. Jones gave me warning the next day; the female prisoner made some discovery respecting Dr. Jones, and me about five months ago; she was going out one morning, and the Dr. had his hat and coat on, as if he was going out; as soon as she was gone, he took them off again, and came down into the kitchen to insult me; he followed me into the front kitchen while I was washing my hands, and put his arms round my waist; the prisoner came down at that time, and found him in that situation; she did not say much to him there - but more up stairs; she said he had insulted her, and she thought it a shame he should insult a young girl who had not been in the house a fortnight.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you under notice to quit? A. Yes, I staid some time in town after this; I have been near four months at Sawbridgeworth with Mrs. Jones; the subpoena was served there; Mrs. Jones afterwards brought me to town; she, and her mother, had subpoenas at the same time; I have been at her mother's house since I came to town; I was not to go to her house till after the trial; I was sent for this morning by the officer, and Mrs. Jones brought me here to-day with her; I was very angry

with my master for insulting me, but I did not tell Mrs. Jones, because he desired me not, before the prisoner at that moment. I have been in his service about eleven months, and a fortnight since, but I have been three months in the country.

MR. LAW. Q. What portion of the time has Mrs. Jones been in the country? A. The last three months. Elizabeth Morler was in the house during that time as charwoman; I heard that Mrs. Becket was there, but never saw her. When Dr. Jones begged I would not mention it to my mistress, he made the same request to the female prisoner, and it was after that the presents were given.

COURT. Q. Was this about a fortnight after you got to the house? A. Yes; Mrs. Jones was not in town at the time. Dr. Jones and I were the only persons in the house; I was wiping my hands in the front kitchen at a round towel; he came and said I was a nice girl, and wanted to kiss me, but I would not let him - he was interrupted by the cook coming down the area steps - she had not been out three minutes; I do not know how she came to return, unless it was she thought he meant to insult me, as she had not seen him go out; as I was going down the kitchen stairs, I saw him in the hall with his hat and coat on; when the prisoner returned, she left the children outside the gate; she told him he ought to be ashamed of himself, to insult a young girl, and she would leave the house directly; she went up stairs and fetched her box down, and he begged her to take it up again; he said he hoped she would not name it to Mrs. Jones; he did not at that time give her, or me any presents, or promise us any thing to suppress what had passed; the prisoner then went up stairs with her clothes, and he followed her into the bed-room, as she told me afterwards. He told me, about five months ago, that if I would consent to be his wife, I should have hundreds in the Bank - this was when he was insulting me again in the back parlour - no one saw that, but I afterwards told the prisoner of it. I never knew of any book being given or sent to her; he never in my hearing offered her any money to conceal what she had seen. He brought down a silver watch into the kitchen, and said, "Chambers, there is a watch I have bought, and I will give it you." This might be about a month after the first insult was offered to me; he said she had been a good servant, and she deserved it, and she might either have that or his own gold watch. When he was insulting me, she said he had insulted her, and she would not stop in the house; she said afterwards, that he had offered her presents in her bed-room, not to say anything to Mrs. Jones about it - I did not say anything to Mrs. Jones. The report generally spread in the country was, that there were two little girls, one about thirteen and the other about fourteen years of age, who went into the fields at Sawbridgeworth, and Dr. Jones asked if he might accompany them - I mentioned it in town, when I came about the wedding - but only to my fellow servants.

ROBERT CLARK . The female prisoner is my niece, but she has been most of her life in the country. I have assisted in supporting her; I know Dr. Jones's son, and recollect his bringing The History of the Inquisition to my house one day in November last, when I was dressing to attend Lord Chief Justice Abbot to go to the Levee. I think it was on the day Fountleroy's report went up; he said to me "See what a nice book papa has given Chamber's - she says you must read it;" I said I have no time - but he persisted in saying I must read it, and it was left there ten days or a fortnight. I said to the prisoner's sister "Mary, if Dorothy comes, beg her to take this book it must have been given her as waste paper." I did not know my niece was married - I met her at the Police-office and I saw Dr. Jones there - he said "Oh, my God, what a piece of business this is;" I said "Who brought it on?" he said "Do get this business settled, nobody can settle it but you." I told him if he could point out a way I should be glad; he said "If I had known I would never have brought them here; I meant to have called upon you, and wanted Mr. Fox to have called." I said "If I had known what was going forward in your house she should not have been there an hour;" he said it was all lies - I did not describe what was going on - I thought he knew. He said he would have the house searched again - there was nobody there but the poor old father - the mother was at the office. As we were going to the house he stopped at the corner, and said "For God's sake get it settled;" I said "Point out a way and I shall be happy - there is but one way, by withdrawing the prosecution." He searched the house and found nothing but a sixpenny blue handkerchief; he said "This is mine, I can swear to it." The woman said "Doctor, I gave 6 d. for it." The lamp was then shewn me - it was not then broken - it was a very handsome one, and I ordered it to be taken to the office, to shew the Magistrate what a handsome glass he had given the poor girl - it was broken at the office. I have had her in my house for months together, and she was very honest - as to her husband, I lived under his father forty-five years ago, and a more honest young man never existed - I have assisted him with money.

Cross-examined. Q. You spoke to Dr. Jones at the office? A. Yes, and represented it would be the ruin of these people; he said he was very sorry, and if it came to the ears of his connexion it would be his ruin. I did not then give him to understand what reports I alluded to, but I did afterwards, and he said it was all lies. Dr. Jones has often asked me to dine with him in his house - I never did, but I have often taken wine in the kitchen, with the servants, which he has brought down. His son is about five years of age.

JOHN BODLY. I know the female prisoner - I bought this book, The Tale of a Tub, at a book-stand in Miller-street, for 1 s. 6 d. - I lent it to the prisoner two or three years ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you write any name in it. A. No, I do not recollect that I did - I have read different parts of it - I bought it two or three years ago, but have not read it through - I cannot tell what it is about.

COURT. Q. Are there any marks in it? A. Yes; but I do not remember them. I have not lent it to any other person.

DR. JONES re-examined. Q. How do you know this book to be your's? A. I have had it in my library long ago. I have not a doubt of it.

Four witnesses gave the female prisoner a good character.

G. EMBLETON - NOT GUILTY .

D. EMBLETON - GUILTY. Aged 27. Of stealing two books .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18251027-141

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury,

1748. SARAH HOOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , two gowns, value 5 s.; four petticoats, value 6 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; three shifts, value 3 s.; a shawl, value 1 s.; four caps, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a pair of stays, value 1 s.; a Bible, value 2 s., and a bonnet, value 1 s. , the goods of Catherine Holinden , widow ; and a shawl, value 1 s. the goods of Mary Ann Brown .

MARY ANN BROWN. The prisoner was an inmate of the Guardian Society's house . She left on the 19th of September, with Mary Ann Wood (see page 636); on the following morning I missed my shawl from the mangling room, which was generally kept locked for the use of the laundry maid - I afterwards saw my shawl at the office on Wood's neck.

JAMES WAYLING . I took the prisoner on Friday evening last - she was brought to me by Matthews, after the trial of Wood. I asked her what had become of the rest of the property - she told me of several places where they were pawned or sold - I told her Wood had been convicted. and she cried.

SUSANNAH MATTHEWS . I am matron of the Guardian Society's house. I missed four petticoats and two aprons on Tuesday morning, the day after the prisoner and Wood went away. I saw the prisoner after Wood's trial, and told her Wood had been tried, and I hoped she would be punished too; she cried and said she did not care what became of her - I told her any thing was better than being in the street - she then said she had been to the bottom of the garden with Wood, and had taken the two outfits (as we call them) and thrown them over the wall to Wood, who had got over by means of the laundry steps - they were tied up separately but one person might have taken them both - I am certain this Bible was in the house on the Monday at five o'clock.

MARY SMITH . I buy books. The Bible was sold to me, I think on the Wednesday after the prisoner left the Guardian society; I have had it in my possession ever since. I am certain she brought it, and I gave her 2 s. for it - I did not know of her having been in the Guardian house till I saw the officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I live with Mr. Howe, pawnbroker, High-street, St. Giles'. I believe the prisoner to he the person who came with Mary Ann Wood, to pawn these stays at our house. I cannot swear to her.

Prisoner. I was not in the shop when Mary Ann Wood pawned them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-142

1749. DOROTHY HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a petticoat, value 18 d.; three blankets, value 2 s.; three frocks, value 3 s.; a gown, value 6 d.; a table cloth, value 2 s., and a wrapper, value 3 d. , the goods of John Edwards .

SARAH EDWARDS . I am the wife of John Edwards, a butcher , and live in Princess-street . The prisoner lived in my house between six and seven months, and left it the latter end of June; before she went I missed a flannel petticoat and asked her about it - she said she knew nothing of it - I have since missed the other articles.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not pawn these things for you. A. No.

Q. The way I became possessed of the ticket was, you had got my ticket instead? A. I have none belonging to her, and never had.

HENRY CAMPER . I am a pawnbroker and live in White-chapel-road - these articles were pawned at our shop, but I cannot tell by whom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY MAGNUS . I took the prisoner on another charge - I told her what she was charged with - she said she knew nothing about it - I found the key of her room, and she told me that in the cupboard was a pocket-book, which she wished me to take particular care of, as there were things in it of great importance; I got it, and found in it forty duplicates, and this was one of them.

Prisoner. I told him where the pocket-book was - my husband is at sea, and it is all spite because I cannot pay her - I am indebted to her in a great sum of money which I cannot pay till my husband comes home.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18251027-143

1750. JAMES CHURCH and THOMAS BRIAN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a pair of carriage steps, value 10 s. , the goods of John Augustus Thrupp and others, his partners; and JOHN CURTIS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES JOSEPH THRUPP . I am in partnership with my two brothers - our manufactory is in George-street, Grosvenor-square ; the principal entrance is in Oxford-street. The prisoner Curtis lives in Queen-street, opposite the back part of our premises; Church was in our employ. In September last I went with my clerk and Ballard to Curtis' premises, about some springs, and orders were given to remove some from there. I then asked Curtis if he had any thing more of my property on his premises - he said nothing whatever; he then varied his answer, and said, "Nothing at all." I did not go to Church's, but I saw Ballard and Atwell again in about an hour and a half afterwards, and went with them to Curtis a second time. The officer told Curtis he had been speaking falsely, he had told lies, and asked where the axletrees were - after they were produced one of us said, "Where are the steps?" he looked about, and said, "O! there they are, among a quantity of old iron;" a pair of steps were then brought out, which my clerk said were not ours; another pair were then brought out, which I did not know, but my clerk did; there was a sum mentioned, but I cannot tell what. The officer said, "You gave (I believe it was) 4 s. for them;" Curtis said Yes - it was more than they were worth.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Curtis work as a jobbing smith for you? A. Yes. I saw one man in his shop and two boys - it was an open shop, and there seemed to be several odd steps laying together; my pair laid uppermost. I have no recollection of Curtis saying

ing he knew nothing about their being there, but I will not say he did not. Atwell and Ballard, and some of his men, were there; I had not missed the steps. I am quite certain he said he gave some money for them - it did not apply to the steps which had been put back, as not being mine. I certainly did not say to Curtis, "I am come to detect a robbery, and I put you on your guard;" he was charged with a fact, and he admitted it.

Re-examined. Q. Was he not charged with having told a falsity? A. Yes.

JURY. Q. When he said he had no property of your's had you been talking of property that was lost? A. Yes. I said my men had robbed me, and I came to see whether my lost property was there. It was in the course of that morning he said he had no other property of mine. I went in first, the officer second, and the clerk third.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I was sent for on the 20th of September, to go to Mr. Thrupp's. I went with him and Atwell to Curtis', about a spring - I questioned him about it, and said Thomas had been seen to bring a spring over. I then asked him if he had any other springs, or any thing else belonging to Mr. Thrupp, which the men had brought over - he said No. I then went to Church's and saw him - Mr. Atwell was with me. I told him I was an officer, and had come to take him into custody upon a charge of having robbed his master - he denied it, and said, "Of what?" I told him to mind what he was about, as I had Thomas in custody, and I had been to Curtis'. After something had passed about the springs I asked him what else he had taken over - he said he could not recollect; I said it was nonsense - he must recollect, and what was it - he then mentioned a pair of axletrees, and then a pair of carriage-steps, which Curtis had given 4 s. for-that he had received 1 s. 6 d., and Pitcher, Harry, and John had something to drink out of the remainder, with Thomas, meaning Brian. I then went to Curtis' again, with Mr. Thrupp and Atwell; I told him I was sorry he had deceived me, and told lies. After the conversation ended about the axletrees, I said, "You have got a pair of carriage-steps, for which you paid 4 s.;" he said he believed he had - a pair was then looked out, which Mr. Thrupp and Atwell said were not his; another pair were found, which were marked by me, and taken away.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was the first person who spoke to Curtis when you went the second time? A. I was - Mr. Thrupp spoke to him, but I did not hear what he said; if he had said, "My men have been robbing me, and I am come to see whether any of the property is here," I might have heard it, or I might not. I did not wish to get him into conversation to convict him - I went to get his answers; I asked him respecting the springs, and said Thomas had been seen to come over with the springs, and I asked where they were - he said, with some little hesitation, "There," and pointed to the side of the shop - we did not tell him that Mr. Thrupp had been robbed, and we were come to see if any of the property was there; Curtis looked out the first steps, and Atwell the second. When I said, "You have got a pair of carriage-steps, and you have given 4 s. for them" - he said he believed it was so. This was before the steps were looked out.

CHARLES ATWELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Thrupps. - On the 20th of September, about eleven o'clock, I went with Mr. Thrupp and Ballard to speak to Curtis about some springs; he was then asked if he had got any thing else - he said, No, he had not. I then went with Ballard to Church's; Ballard told him he had come to take him into custody for stealing some springs - he was afterwards asked if he had taken any thing else; he said, "Yes, a pair of wheels, and a pair of steps" - that he had received 4 s. for the steps, and had received 1 s. 5 d. for himself - that three men of the shop were treated with one shilling, and Brian had kept the remainder. I went again to Curtis' with Ballard and Mr. Thrupp; Ballard said he was very sorry he had deceived him, for he found he had received other things - he said, "You have received a pair of steps, and given 4 s. for them" - he said he had. I was desired to look about the shop, and I found a pair which were Mr. Thrupp's property. Curtis had before taken up a pair of steps, and I said, "That is not Mr. Thrupp's" - they are worth about 10 s.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who put the question to Church about the steps? A. There was no question about the steps; Ballard put the question after mentioning some other things - he named the steps. He told him he came to apprehend him about some springs - he said, "What springs?" he told him he knew he had taken three springs to Curtis', and Brian one; he then asked what else - he said a pair of axletrees. He then said, "What have you done with the pair of wheels?" he said he had taken them; he then said, "What else" - he said, "I have taken a pair of steps." No promise had been made to him to make him confess.

Prisoner CURTIS. Q. At the time the steps lay in the shop how many pairs were there? A. Two pairs.

Q. Did you not say, "I think these to be the steps; I was going to sell them to a hackneyman?" A. I said "I know them to be the steps, as I was going to sell them to a man for half-a-guinea."

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there any thing by which you can swear to these steps? A. By their general appearance; I believe them to be the make of Mr. Holland - I had had them in my hand a fortnight before.

CURTIS' Defence. I do assure you that all this is false, for when Mr. Thrupp asked me whether I had got any more springs, he did not mention about any other iron - I said, "I declare to God I have no more springs here," but with respect to other iron work I could not, because I had a seat iron to make some more by, and several other articles; and how was it possible I could say I had no more iron work, when they could see it in the shop. - There were bolts and other things to make new ones by; there is iron work that stops there a month from Messrs. Coleman and Taylor's, and there it lays till I get directions to get it done. With respect to these steps I declare to Almighty God I had not seen them, nor did I know they were there, for I had been out all the morning. - There have often been jobs brought to my shop before Atwell was up, soon after six o'clock - jobs to steps and other things - and the workmen now in their employ can prove it.

CHARLES ATWELL re-examined. Q. Do you know whether there was any more iron work there of Mr. Thrupp's? A. Not that I know of.

Prisoner CURTIS. I have a new seat iron there now that has not been opened.

CHARLES ATWELL re-examined. Q. Was any thing to be done to these steps, in the way of Curtis' trade? A. No, there was not - he had done work for the firm; he had made a seat iron, and done some other jobs. An old seat iron had been sent over as a pattern, to have some new ones made by. I did not see the old one there when I went. When work was taken to him to be done it was customary to take a verbal message from me or Mr. Thrupp.

CHURCH - GUILTY . Aged 42.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

BRIAN - NOT GUILTY .

See page 655.

Reference Number: t18251027-144

1751. JAMES CHURCH , WILLIAM JORDAN , and THOMAS BRIAN were again indicted for stealing, a pair wheels, value 18 s. , the goods of John Augustus Thrupp and others, his partners; and JOHN CURTIS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

No evidence

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-145

1752. ROBERT TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , eleven yards of flannel, value 7 s. , the goods of Richard Kettlewell .

RICHARD KETTLEWELL. I am a linen-draper , and live in Church-street, Hackney . About ten o'clock, on the 20th of October, I was in the kitchen - I had a full view of the street - I saw two persons go to the corner of the steps at the shop-door - I presently saw one of them with a piece of flannel under his arm - I went up stairs, and they were out of sight; but judging they had gone down King's-row towards London I gave chase, and overtook the prisoner with the flannel under his arm - I called Stop thief! and a man stopped him - he then dropped it - I cannot swear that he is one of the persons I saw about the shop door, but I believe him to be one of them.

SAMUEL HARMAN . I am a bricklayer. I was in London-field, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I saw the prisoner running, and another man before him with a blue jacket on - I stopped the prisoner - he said "Pray don't stop me" - he had nothing about him - I did not see the flannel till I took him back to Mr. Kettlewell - I then saw it in his hand.

MARY ANN BUSHELL . I live at Hackney. I was going by Mr. Kettlewell's shop, and saw a man in a blue jacket take the flannel out of the rail on the steps - there was no one with him - the prisoner was about the middle of King's-road, about a dozen yards from the shop - he beckoned the other man twice, and said "Come on:" the man in the blue jacket gave the flannel to the prisoner, and they both ran up King's-road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a man looking into the shop, and as I stood there he put the flannel into my arm, and said "Come on." I did not know it was stolen.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-146

1753. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , a bag, value 6 d., and 58 lbs. of ginger, value 30 s. , the goods of Joseph Elliott .

JOSEPH ELLIOTT. I am a grocer , and live in Crown-street, Finsbury . About six o'clock in the evening of the 15th of October, I was in my room up stairs, which overlooks the shop - I saw a man going from my door - he had nothing - I saw another man stooping down and taking a bag of ginger from within the shop-door - I went down, and saw the prisoner a little distance off, with the ginger - he let it fall, and I pursued, and took him in about two minutes.

THOMAS CHESHIRE . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the property - he said he had no friends in London.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-147

1754. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , a pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Owen .

JOHN OWEN. I keep a sale shop near Battle-bridge . About eleven o'clock on the morning of the 28th of September, Mr. Taylor, a neighbour of mine, gave me some information, and I looked and missed a pair of boots, which I am certain I had seen safe at half-past ten o'clock - I overtook the prisoner, with the boots in his custody, in Vine-street, Saffron-hill - I did not see him till I got there - he was not running.

EDWARD TAYLOR . I live opposite Mr. Owen. On the morning of the 28th of September, I saw the prisoner in Gray's-inn-lane - he said "Do you want to buy a pair of boots?" I said "Let me look at them," and I knew them to be John Owen's, as I had seen them a few days before. I said "If you will go into the Olive Branch public-house and have a pint of beer, and stay a few minutes, I will buy them of you." I went on to Owen's, and told him what I had seen. We went to the Olive Branch, but the prisoner had not been there; we traced him to Saffron-hill, and he had the boots on his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and bought these boots; and as I was going home these men came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-148

1755. JOHN WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a whip, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Worboys .

HENRY WORBOYS. I live in Homer-street, Mary-le-bone , and am a stage-coachman . On the 4th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I left my whip on the roof of the coach in the mews - the horses were not to the carriage - I returned in about an hour and a half, and it was gone - I saw it next morning in possession of the officer.

THOMAS SHOLSWELL . I am a patrol. On the evening of the 4th of October, I saw the prisoner kneeling on the step of a shop, and robbing the brass work of this whip on the step - when he saw me he crossed the road - I crossed, and asked him where he got it - he said

it was his own, and he found it in the Mary-le-bone-road the day before - it had been very wet the day before, and on the morning of that day, and I knew if he had found it it would have been dirty, but it was quite clean; I took him to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. About half past six o'clock that evening I was going up to Paddington - I picked up this whip, and got on to Brown-street, when the officer took me with it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-149

1756. SARAH USDON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , twenty yards of silk, value 3 l., the goods of Samuel Hilditch , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM KIGHT . I am in the service of Samuel Hilditch, of Oxford-street . On the 15th of October, about five o'clock, the prisoner and another person came to the shop, and were there about five minutes - her companion bought two yards of net - they paid for it, and went out - soon afterwards our next door neighbour came and gave us some information - I went out with him, and saw the prisoner and another person in the street - I insisted upon their going back - they hesitated, but I insisted upon it - the prisoner then gave me the piece of silk from under her clothes, and said the other person who had been in the shop took it, and she had gone away.

Prisoner. Q. Did not your master say I had not been into the shop? A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MORRIS . I am an officer, and took her into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going up Newman-street, two young girls came and asked me to hold that for them till they returned - I said they must not be long, as I was going on an errand - they left it, and I had it open in my hand when the gentleman came, and said I must go back with him to the shop - I said "What shop?" for I did not know where it was, and the gentleman of the shop said I had not been there - I had not been in the shop at all.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-150

1757. JAMES CURTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 3 d., the goods of Joseph Foss Dession , from his person .

JOSEPH FOSS DESSION. On the 14th of October I was in King-street, Seven-dials , when the officer came and told me I had been robbed. I put my hand to my left side coat pocket and found my handkerchief was gone, which I had had five minutes before.

DANIEL REARDON . About half-past nine o'clock that evening I saw the prisoner, with another person, follow the prosecutor and a lady in Broad-street - I saw the prisoner take hold of the pocket, and take out this handkerchief - I spoke to the prosecutor, and desired him to go back with me - we overtook them - I secured the prisoner, but the other got away.

Prisoner. Q. Why did not you take me directly? A. did, as soon as I had told the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-151

1758. JAMES HAYNES and WILLIAM HARPER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Atkinson Brown , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-152

1759. MARTHA TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , four frocks, value 2 s.; two shirts, value 2 s.; a coat, value 10 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d., and a waistcoat, value 5 s., the goods of James Walker , her master .

JAMES WALKER. I am a hatter , and live in Liquor-pond-street - the prisoner came from the work-house to take care of my family since the death of my wife - I paid her 2 s. a-week till the few last weeks, when I did not pay her quite so much. On Sunday, the 2d of October, she did not come as usual - I missed a pair of black stockings, and a black waistcoat, which I usually wore on Sundays - I afterwards found them, with some other things, at a pawnbroker's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MICHAEL ASHBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Theobald's-road - these articles were pawned at our shop by the prisoner at different times.

WILLIAM LEE . I took up the prisoner, and asked what she had done with the property - she said she never had any property of Mr. Walker's.

Prisoner. I am ashamed of what I have done.

GUILTY . Aged 71.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-153

1760. HENRY JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a sheet, value 7 s., and a blanket, value 7 s., the goods of William Davis , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM DAVIS. I live in West-street, Carnaby-market . I let a furnished lodging to the prisoner and his wife, on the 6th of September - they stayed there till the 8th of October, and left without paying their rent - they left the door locked, but the key in it - I missed the blanket and sheet.

ALEXANDER TATE . I am a pawnbroker; this sheet was pawned, on the 24th of September, by a man who gave his name John Benton.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am a pawnbroker; this blanket was pawned at my house by a man in the name of John Benton.

RICHARD CHARLES CHAPMAN . I took up the prisoner, and found the duplicates in his right hand pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The tickets were given me by my wife after I left the lodging - I knew nothing of them - the blanket, I am certain, is not Mr. Davis's.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-154

1761. WILLIAM BLACKSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a truck, value 40 s. , the goods of Charles Petty .

CHARLES PETTY. I live in Dean-street, Holborn , and am a green grocer . On the 19th of September I lent the prisoner a truck, at fourpence an hour, to take some carpets to beat.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not hire the truck? A. Yes.

Q. Have I had it before? A. I believe you have, but I do not remember.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-155

1762. GEORGE BOWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a sack, value 1 s., and four bushels of oats, value 18 s. , the goods of John Dare ; and GEORGE WYETH , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES ARGENT . I am captain of the Brig Elizabeth . There were some Riga oats on board on the 18th of September in sacks; the brig was moored near the Orange Tree, at Isleworth. I went about half-past five the next morning, and missed a sack of oats. I went to Wyeth's stables, about one hundred and fifty yards off, and just within the door I found the oats in a strange sack, my sack was there on some hurdles, and had no oats in it - I believe they were part of my cargo. I asked Wyeth how he got them, he said he found them, and if they were mine I was welcome to have them, and he lent me a hand to shoot them into my sack. Bowley was there, and he said he found them, when he went to get a pail of water.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not he tell you this at once? A. Yes.

MICHAEL WARREN . I am foreman of the Isleworth-wharf . I got up that morning, about half-past five o'clock; the prisoners told me they had found a sack of oats in the river, and if any body came forward to claim it they were welcome to it, but they expected something for their trouble.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-156

1763. JOHN BLATCHLEY and STEPHEN CLAXTON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a fixture, (i.e.) a copper, value 25 s., of and belonging to Joseph Lush , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating, it to be fixed to a building.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I live in James'-street, Lisson-grove ; I am a gardener, my house belongs to Mr. Joseph Lush. About six o'clock on the morning of the 17th of October, I missed a copper, which had been fixed to a wash-house, I had seen it safe at nine o'clock the night before, when I locked the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD PARRUSS . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 17th of October, I saw the two prisoners in Lisson-street, about six o'clock - Claxton had the copper on his shoulder, and on seeing me he said to the other, "We must make great haste to get this copper repaired, as they are going to washing." Claxton said to me, "You may depend upon it, it is all right - for there is the brother of the person who own's it," and Blatchley said, "It is your time to go away, you may as well go with us:" I said "Very well." In Portman-square, I said to Blatchley, "You are the brother of the person who own's the copper?" "Not I, indeed," says he. - "Yes," said Claxton, "he is." We then went on to Gee's-court, and they knocked at a door; I then took hold of them and said, "This business must be settled at watch-house." A watchman came up, and I told him take hold of one of them - which he did, and they were taken into custody.

GEORGE CULL . On the 17th of October, the under watch-house keeper asked me if I knew any one who had lost a copper. I went out and inquired, and got to the premises at James'-street, Lisson-grove. I found the lock and the staple broken off the door which led into the yard, and from there into little James'-street - they had got the copper over the wall, and had left black marks on the bricks.

BLATCHLEY'S Defence. I was going to look for work, and a man asked us, if we were willing to earn a shilling; I said "Yes," and we took the copper to Gee's-court.

BLATCHLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CLAXTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-157

1764. ELIZABETH DISNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a gown, value 10 d. , the goods of John Symonds .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-158

1765. MARY FLINN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a shawl, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Welsh .

THOMAS WELSH. I am a labourer . The prisoner lodged in my house - she slept in the same room with me and my wife. On the 24th of October I got up about five o'clock - she was gone. My wife missed a gown and a shawl, which I had seen the night before. I saw her again, about half past one o'clock, in the St. George, public-house, with the shawl on her shoulders. The officer came in and took it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner with this shawl on; she owned taking this and a waistcoat, from the lodging.

Prisoner. I did not take it to steal it, but to go and see a friend of mine.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-159

1766. ALEXANDER GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , eight shirts, value 8 s. , the goods of James Mynas .

JAMES MYNAS. I am a schoolmaster , and live at Potter's Bar . On the evening of the 10th of October I heard some shirts had been stolen from the laundry - I went there and found they were brought back, with the prisoner, by one of the witnesses; they belonged to my pupils.

WILLIAM WILMOTT . I am a labouring man. I had seen the prisoner twice on the day before this robbery. I saw him again that day, near Mr. Mynas's door, with a few matches - I went into a field after some cows, and upon coming back up a lane. I again met him with the shirts under his arm - I asked him where he was going? he said to Whitechapel. I said there was no road that way, but that if he would come back, I would direct him - he agreed; and I asked him what he had got - he said two or three shirts which were given him. I asked him if he would sell some of them - he said he did not care. I looked at them and found they were boys' shirts - he said you shall have them all for 8 s. I said, I'll take you and

all, for they are wet - as we were going along he said, "This will hang me, I have been transported before."

Prisoner. I had had them in my possession half an hour. I said, I am going to London; and he said that was no thoroughfare - he asked what I had got there - I said some shirts, and if they were mine, I should sell them for 8 s., but they were not mine - when we got to the house, three women were washing, and one of them came out and said," this man was here half an hour before, if he took these he might have taken fifty more.

Q. Did I not say that a man had given them to me?

A. No, you did not.

SAMUEL LANGLEY . I am a constable. The property was given to me with the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never was here before. I was coming from St. Alban's, and turned out of the road and went to Potter's Bar. I met a man who said, "Is not your name Graham - did not you belong to the Mary Jane" - I said Yes; he said, "Hold this bundle which has got a few shirts in it, and when I come back I will give you an old shirt, I am sorry you have not got one." I said "Never mind, I shall soon go to the parish."

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-160

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1767. WILLIAM DUST was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a watch, value 2 l., and a metal key, value 1 d., the goods of James Little , from his person .

JAMES LITTLE. I am a boot-closer , and live at No. 4, King's-Head-court, Coleman-street. On the 19th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at the Gloucester public-house, in Gloucester-court, Upper Whitecross-street , and was quite sober - I remained there about five hours - I drank with five or six people, all strangers, for about three hours, and previous to that I had drank with another man. I was not at all intoxicated. I cannot say when the prisoner came in, but he called me over to the company, and sat down opposite to me. Between ten and eleven o'clock he reached across the table, put his hand in here, and took my watch. I reached after it, but was prevented from getting it by some other man there - there were two men at the end of the table, and some women. I said to the prisoner "Give me that" - he said, "I have got nothing," and held up his hands. I called to the landlord, who is not here, to bar the door - which he did; he then came to the tap-room - but I saw three persons go out at the back door.

COURT. Q. Why did not you resist? A. I did resist as well as I could, but I had not a friend in the house. I got away, and when I went back again, the house was clear.

Q. Did not the landlord take you to the watch-house for breaking the glasses and not paying for them? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-161

1768. WILLIAM EASTERBROOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , six pairs of stays, value 22 s. , the goods of Edward Arpthorp .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD ARPTHORP. I am a stay manufacturer , and live in High-street, Southwark . The prisoner was in my employ; I was going along Shoreditch, and saw some stays in Mr. Attenborow 's window - I made inquiries, and the servant sent me to his master's shop in Crown-street, Finsbury; I there found six pairs - I gave information to an officer, and we went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Bishopsgate-street, where I found his wife and two daughters - the duplicates were produced out of the wife's pocket, in a very reluctant manner, a few at a time; having got these I went to my own place of business in High-street, Southwark, where the prisoner was at work; he is in the habit of taking stays home for his family to cover them with cotton. I never allow any to be taken out without being entered, and I found no entry in the book of these six pairs of stays. I called the prisoner down stairs, and shewed him the stays - I told him I had proof that his daughter had sold them, and asked him to account for them - he said he knew nothing about them. The officer then asked him what he would say if he was told his wife was in custody, and those duplicates had been taken from her; he then said he hoped I would forgive him, as it was sickness in his family that had occasioned it. I had the stays with me, which I got in Crown-street. I then said "Have you taken the whole of these yourself, or has your son taken any?" he said "My son is perfectly innocent - I have taken them all myself" - the value of the six pairs was 20 s. or 21 s.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who makes those entries in the book? A. I do, sometimes - this first entry is mine, which is copied from a former book - there is no one entry of mine made since this book began - there is no person here who made any of these entries - I do not know whether they are correct - I do not know whether the prisoner and his family make stays completely - he does one department. When I produced the stays I opened the paper, and stated they were mine, and he said he hoped I would forgive him. I found some stays afterwards in his drawers - I can swear to five pairs of these, as being cut out of two particular pieces of stuff - one of them is about a penny or three-half-pence a yard worse than the other - they tally in such direct coincidence that I have no hesitation in swearing to them.

MR. LAW. Q. Have you informed your own mind by the materials of which they are composed? A. They correspond in workmanship and materials, with those in my house; the stays missing were never entered - all the stays in this book are returned, except those found in the prisoner's drawers.

COURT. Q. Has this book any account of those six pairs in it. A. No, it has not - the entries are made by his dictation.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer of Worship-street. I accompanied the prosecutor and his brother to the Borough - the prisoner was sent for down into the dining-room, and was asked if he knew of any stays being sold to Mr. Attenborow - he said No - I then said "What will you say if I tell you your wife is in custody, and I have the duplicates here." He then fell on his knees, and said he hoped he would forgive him, it was through having a sick daughter, and he would sell the bed from under him to make it up - his son had no hand in it.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am an apprentice to Mr. Attenborow, in Crown-street - I have six pairs of stays which were sold to us by two young women - I gave the same to the prosecutor.

MR. ADOLPHUS to EDWARD ARPTHORP. Q. What state were they in when taken from your house? A. Without the bones they might have been taken in the state they are now.

Q. Might not the prisoner have taken the materials, and made them himself? A. Yes, he might, but I do not think it likely.

MR. LAW. Q. Did he make the defence made by his learned Counsel - that they were not stays when he took them? A. No; he had the most easy access possible to the place where he could have got the stays when they were finished - if he had not brought back stays he had to finish, it would have been detected by the book.

COURT. Q. In what state are they when they leave your house? A. They go to his wife to be covered, and then he uses the iron to finish them in my house.

ROBERT DICK . I am the landlord of the house in which the prisoner lives. If any manufacture of stays had taken place in that house, I think I must have known it; I have never seen whalebone or work people going there. I am myself acquainted with the business, and am sure stay-making could not have been carried on without my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. The whole that has been said against me I solemnly deny. I never made any confession to the officer; he said my wife and daughter had acknowledged to taking some stays, and I thought they had taken some; they then asked me about my son, and I said he had nothing to do with it. I then said to my master that I hoped he would forgive my wife if she had done wrong, and I would make it up in the best manner I could. I said I had taken charge of the stays which were taken home for my wife, and if I had taken any others, the shop-girls would have seen me, and I should have been detected. I have been in the habit of making a few stays to sell or to pawn, as all my family are able to do them - the articles I can purchase at different shops, which I have done for years past; as to the pattern of the stays, it is natural I should make them to the pattern I had been accustomed to.

JOHN PELL . I am a broker and live in, Brick-lane, Spitalfields. I have known the prisoner eleven years; he has worked in the warehouses, and for this gentleman after he was done. I have often seen him cut out stays at home, and his wife and daughters have made them; he has made some for my wife. I have seen this not more than two months ago.

THOMAS SMURDON . I live in the Commercial-road. I have known the prisoner for 30 years. I have been an officer with him in the Excise, and know his character well. I was in his house on the 26th of September, and saw his daughters at work on stays.

Cross-examined. Q. Were those stays the same that were sold at Attenborow's? A. Yes, they were working on them; I did not know in whose employ he was at that time.

THOMPSON . I am a linen-draper, and live in Shoreditch. I have sold goods to the prisoner's wife for six or seven years, especially coloured jeans to make stays and lining, and fents of various kinds - I always considered it as for stays.

EDWARD ARPTHORP re-examined. Q. You had some conversation with the prisoner, will you have the goodness to repeat it? A. When he came to the room, I asked him what account he could give of the stays which I produced, which I knew, or had evidence, that his daughters had sold to Mr. Attenborow. He said he knew nothing about them. The officer said, "What will you say to it, when you are told your wife is in custody; and the duplicates. I have in my hand were found on her?" He said he hoped I would forgive him - it was sickness that induced him to do it. I then asked if his son had taken any, and he said, No.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are these stays your's? (producing another pair) A. No, they are not; this line is not made by my rule. I cannot see any other difference, but I should say they were not made in my shop; they are not so finished.

COURT. Q. Did you mention to him where the stays had been sold? A. Yes.

JEREMIAH BOYS . I am a stay-maker. I see no difference in those two pairs of stays, they are so much a like - there is more difference in those which are made by the same rule. I have made the same difference, and Mr. Arpthorpe has, and so has every man - here is another pair of Mr. Arpthorp's, where the line is different from the first pair of his own.

MR. LAW. Q. Are they not ruled alike? A. No. I do not think either of these pair of stays are stolen, by the look of them.

Re-examined. Q. Is there any thing by which any man could swear that these stays were made by different people? A. No, there certainly is not.

JANE EASTERBROOKE . I am the prisoner's daughter. I myself made the greater part of this pair of stays - my mother and sister did the other part, and my brother boned them. I had neither of these other stays by me to make them from. I have made many pairs like them.

MR. LAW. Q. Then, without seeing the pattern, you have made them so much alike, that the last conscientious witness cannot tell the difference? A. Yes, from having made so many. My sister and myself took these half dozen pairs of stays and sold them. My father goes to the East India warehouse, then cuts work for us at home, and then goes to Mr. Arpthorp's. I was present when the officer took the duplicates from my mother - she took them out one by one.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you made many such stays in your life? A. Yes, if a person were to order a pair now I should sit down and make them like these, without seeing the pattern. It is possible for persons to make stays in our room without our landlord knowing it. My father is sometimes at the warehouse from seven till two o'clock, and sometimes from eight till three.

JURY to THOMPSON. Q. Have you sold any materials like these six pairs of stays to the prisoner's wife? A. I cannot say that I have, for there are different shades of them.

Prisoner. When I desired the prosecutor to forgive me, I did not know what my wife and daughter had done, and I wished him to forgive them if they had done wrong.

JURY to EDWARD ARPTHORP. Q. How do you know the jean? A. I bought the whole two pieces together -

the front of them is of a better quality, and the other inferior, though it matched in colour.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-162

1769. JOHN JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , four boards, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Henry Leatherdale .

HENRY LEATHERDALE. I am a carpenter , and live in Devonshire-street, Mile-end . I lost four six feet boards from an enclosed yard, on the 24th of September; they had been nailed up before they were lost.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-163

1770. JAMES BODSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , two bushels of coals, value 2 s.; and a truss of clover hay, value 2 s., the goods of Edward Green and Joshua Barrett , his masters .

EDWARD GREEN. I am in partnership with Joshua Barrett - we are coal-merchants , and wharfingers , at Regent's-wharf, Islington-road . The prisoner was a carman in our employ - in consequence of information I took particular notice of the coals - after the men left work, on Friday evening, the 22d of October, I trimmed the coals in the first shed to what we call a skirt, and marked four lumps with chalk. I made an excuse for the prisoner to call on me in the morning, for me to give him the vender's ticket, and as soon as he had set off I looked at the coals, and found they were altered, and deficient, and among the rest I missed two of the lumps which I had marked the night before, I went after the waggon, which the prisoner was driving with three chaldrons of coals - the front one was for Mr. Snark, the middle one for a new customer, and the hind one was for a smith, and was a particularly small coal. When I got to Holloway the only thing I saw in the waggon, beside what he ought to have, was a truss of clover hay - I followed it on to Upper Holloway, and when it got to a house which I thought was a receiving house, I stopped the waggon; the prisoner came to the back of it, and I said, "James, I am astonished that you should continue robbing us in this way, after the lenity we have shewn you, in forgiving you in the former instance, and I insist upon knowing what you have done with the coals taken from the first shed" - he hesitated, and I thought from his manner he was about to run; I said, "Don't run, as I am armed; but I insist upon knowing what you have done with them;" he said, "I hope you will forgive me, Sir - they are upon the waggon, and I will never do so again." I said he had made the same promise before, but it had now become too serious a matter: I then called to the man who was with him, and desired him to get into the waggon, and put the coals on James' back, as he should carry them back to the wharf; the prisoner said, "They are not in the sack." I then desired the man to take the whip, and go back with me to the turnpike gate. I got into the waggon, and in the hind chaldron the mouths of the sacks had been held up, and filled with round picked coals, and in one of the sacks was one of the lumps which I had marked the previous night - the bushel measure was likewise filled with round coals, and a corn sack had above a bushel in it; the whole of them was two or three bushels altogether.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did you tell him you were armed? A. Yes. - I did not tell him I would shoot him - three porters had loaded the coals - he might have had them, and some other person have put them into the sacks.

COURT. Q. How far was he from your premises when you began to watch him? A. I suppose he was a mile and a half.

THOMAS COLSON . I was called by Green, and looked over the coals - I found some in a corn-sack and some in a bushel. Mr. Green claimed them - the prisoner did not deny it.

WILLIAM LEECH . I am an officer, and took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. Sometimes the men put the coals up without being measured; they are ordered to be measured, but when the master's back is turned, they sometimes put them in without.

EDWARD GREEN re-examined. Q. Do you give orders to the porters, if there is any deficiency in the sacks, to fill them up? A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-164

1771. WILLIAM KNOWLES and FRANCIS TURNER were indicted for stealing on the 9th of September , a pair of trousers, value 5 s. , the goods of Solomon Benjamin .

JOHN HARWARD . I am a bellows-maker. Benjamin is a clothes salesman , and lives in Whitecross-street . I live in the house - On the 19th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the two prisoners near the house, in company with another person. I saw Knowles go down a step of the cellar where I works, and he asked me some question about a job which I had done some time before; Turner stood at the head of the cellar, and I saw him handling a pair of trousers; I thought for the purpose of buying them - immediately as Knowles stepped up again, they both assisted in taking down the trousers - Knowles put them into his apron, and they walked away. I ran up into the street and cried Stop thief! and called the prosecutor. Turner did not get out of our sight, but Knowles did, with the trousers, but he was brought back the next morning. I am quite positive of them - They have not been found.

SOLOMON BENJAMIN. I keep this shop - I lost a pair of trousers from there, which I have not seen since.

JOHN WALL . I am a constable; I took Turner into custody, and found Knowles the next morning.

KNOWLES' Defence. I was standing talking to my sister when the officer said he had information against me for stealing a pair of trousers. I said I knew nothing about them, and asked him from where - he said Mr. Benjamin's; I went to the house and saw his wife; I asked her if she had any information against me. The witness came up out of the cellar, and the officer said, "Is this the man," he said, "I think it is;" he then went into the cellar and brought up a lad, and asked him if he could swear to my person; he said, "I think I can;" then said he, "If you can, I can."

TURNER'S Defence. I was going for some grindery for my brother, for whom I work, and the witness came and said I had a pair of trousers in my apron. I had none.

JOHH HAYWARD re-examined. Q. You say that Knowles came and spoke to you? A. Yes, the officer called, me up into the shop, and I said, before a word was spoken, "That is the man" - the boy was then called and asked if he could say it was him - he said he could.

One witnesses gave Turner a good character.

KNOWLES - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-165

1772. THOMAS PARMENTER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , thirty-six penny pieces, and eighty-two half-pence , the monies of Eleanor Hilton .

ELEANOR HILTON. I am a widow - I keep a bottle shop in Turkey-street, Mary-le-bone . On the 26th of October I went to see a woman at the next house, and left my shop open; I returned in about ten minutes, and saw the prisoner in the shop near the parlour door - I heard some halfpence chink and I said to him "You have got my money;" he said "No, I've only got my own money;" I called Mr. Smith, whose wife I had been to see; the prisoner returned put 6 s. 5 d. out of his pockets on the breakfast table - 4 s. 6 d. of it had been on the table, and the rest in the till. I have seen him coming constantly to my shop for small articles.

JOHN SMITH . I am a broker. I was called in - the prisoner's pockets were empty before I got in - he did not make any excuse for being in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-166

1773. JOSEPH KIRK PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , twenty-two yards of calico, value 11 s. the goods of John Brown , privately in his shop .

JOHN BROWN. I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the evening of the 21st of October, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner and his wife came to my shop, and looked at several shawls - they staid about twenty minutes - they selected one and said they would call again, but did not - I heard the next morning that there was a loss of some calico, and one of the witnesses brought it to my shop to see if he could find an owner for it. I had not seen it to my knowledge on the preceding evening, nor could I miss it, as we have a great number of the same description - it would be impossible for me to say it is mine. I did not know when it was taken.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a draper, and live in Ratcliffe-highway. About eight o'clock on the evening of the 21st of October I went to the shop of Mr. Lord; he asked me if I knew the prisoner, I said I did; he said "How do you know him;" I replied "He and his wife came to our shop and asked to look at some calicoes; I asked what he had got in his basket - he said something that did not belong to me - I said "Let me see;" he said I should not - I said I would, and then I put my hand in, and pulled out a pair of stockings, with a ticket attached to them - I said I should insist upon seeing what he had further - he then took out a piece of calico wrapped up in a shawl - I said "Where did you get this?" he said "I bought it in the Commercial-road" - I asked him how much there was, and he said sixty yards.

JAMES HAWKINS . I was sent for to take the prisoner.

JOHN BROWN. This has my private mark. When I sell a piece of calico I sell it with the mark on - this is folded in the way we buy it - not as if we had measured it. I have three shopmen, and one of them attended to the prisoner, but they are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-167

1774. MARY SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a pair of ear-rings, value 2 s.; a gown, value 2 s.; a broach, value 2 s., and a pair of drops, value 2 s. , the goods of John Kimber .

JOHN KIMBER. I am a scale-maker , and live in Little Prescott-street, Goodman's-fields - the prisoner was my servant for one week. On the 27th of September, I went out, and when I returned she sent me up stairs to my wife, who lay-in; she then crossed the road, and said a person had been in and robbed me - the articles were found at the pawnbroker's, except the drops, which were found on her person.

MARTHA STONE . I live opposite to Kimber - the prisoner came to me, and said they had been robbed. I afterwards went to the house, by the desire of the officer, and the prisoner said she had taken the things, and gave me two duplicates out of her bosom, and the coral drops.

THOMAS EMMETT . I live with Mr. Harris, pawnbroker, Sparrow-corner, Minories. I have a gown, and a broach, pawned by the prisoner, on the 26th and 27th of of September.

FREDERICK LINDER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of ear-rings, pawned by the prisoner, on the 24th of September.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-168

1775. WILLIAM TOWNSEND , THOMAS MARNE , THOMAS SAWYER , BENJAMIN TAYLOR , THOMAS FLOOD , THOMAS BRADFORD , and THOMAS FURY , were indicted for feloniously entering into a certain orchard, of and belonging to Jacob Phillips , on the 28th of September , at Edmonton , and then and there, in the said orchard, feloniously did take, remove, and carry away certain fruit, (i.e.) two hundred walnuts, value 2 s., the property of and belonging to the said Jacob Phillips , against the statute; and ANN PEARSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

JACOB PHILLIPS. I am a fruiterer , and live at Edmonton. I purchase orchards of different farmers about the parish. I had purchased the fruit of this orchard, which is in the parish of Edmonton, of a person named Standingford, about three or four months before - I had paid for all the fruit in it, of different descriptions - it contains between thirteen and fourteen acres, and is inclosed with a hedge all round it. On the 28th of September, I and a witness who was with me saw nine boys, (of whom the prisoners are part), under the trees in the orchard, hitting them, and dashing the trees about, with sticks and stones, and pocketing the fruit - I can swear they were

all in the act of knocking them down. I ran up to them, and called to Thomas Marne, who had worked for me six years, and said, "Mind Sir, I know you - I am sure to have you," - they all ran away as fast as they could. I was then about two acres from them - I gave some directions to my man, and we caught Townsend in the ground - the others got away. I said, "Now Townsend you have been in the ground many times, and I have caught you at last - you have given me a great deal of trouble." He begged I would forgive him - which I had done many times before - but then he was not with such a large gang. I sent for an officer, and had him out of the orchard - about nineteen walnuts were taken from his pocket. I took him before the Magistrate, and took warrants for three more, whom I could recognise. I can only swear to Marne, Sawyer, Townsend and Fury. I know they have been in the ground hundreds of times. Nothing more passed on that day, but Townsend told who the rest were. I know nothing at all about the woman - but the lads said, they sold the walnuts to her.

WILLIAM GREGORY . I was with Phillips on the 28th of September - I remember the day of the month, because I had a paper sent to me - I do not know what day of the week it was - I saw Fury, Townsend, and Sawyer, in the orchard - Fury knocked down the walnuts; Sawyer and Townsend picked them up under the trees - I assisted in taking Townsend, who had some walnuts about him.

JOHN CAMP . I am constable of Edmonton. On the 28th of September I was sent for to apprehend Townsend - I searched him, and found eighteen or nineteen walnuts - I took him to the Magistrate - Mr. Phillips and his man then swore to three more boys, whom I took the following morning - they then all told of one another, and all came forward together, and confessed they were in the orchard - there was no inducement held out to them to tell the truth - I never saw them till they came to the gate, and Mr. Morees, the Magistrate, said, "I make you no promise, but I want the truth;" and they all confessed they were there, which was taken in writing, and they, one and all, signed their names to it.

TOWNSEND - GUILTY . Aged 12.

FURY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

MARNE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

SAWYER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Recommended to Mercy.

TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

FLOOD - NOT GUILTY .

BRADFORD - NOT GUILTY .

PEARSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-169

OLD COURT.

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1775. EMANUEL DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a writing-desk, value 4 l., the goods of John Robinson , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ROBINSON. I live in Carrington-street, Clerkenwell . On the 13th of October, about one o'clock, I was in the back parlour, and saw the prisoner enter my shop - he immediately ran out, I followed, and saw this desk under his arm - he had taken it off my counter - I pursued him about thirty yards - he then dropped it on the pavement - he turned a corner - I then returned and picked the desk up, and lost sight of him - he was brought back by some person who pursued, as I called Stop thief! - I had a good view of his face, as he turned sideways when he dropped it - I am certain he is the man - I found him in custody in less than three-quarters of an hour.

GEORGE BUSS . I saw the prisoner enter the shop, and come out with the desk - I am certain he is the man.

SAMUEL FROST . I saw Robinson pursuing the prisoner - I saw him drop the desk, and took him in ten minutes, in Fleur-de-lis-court, without losing sight of him.

WILLIAM LEE . I took him in charge with the desk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to take it.

GUILTY. Aged 20. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-170

1776. MICHAEL CRAWLEY was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of James Heatley , in the night of the 4th of October , and stealing a jacket, value 3 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; a coat, value 4 s.; a pair of trousers, value 2 s., and twenty yards of silk, value 20 s., his property .

JAMES HEATLEY. I am a dyer , and live in Church-road, St. George in the East . On the 4th of October I went to bed at half-past twelve o'clock, and fastened the house up - I was awoke, between two and three in the morning, by something falling against my bedstead - I sleep on the ground floor - I got up, found the door wide open, struck a light, and missed this property - the window was open; I had fastened it the night before; I pulled the window down, pulled the shutters to, and in a short time heard a rap at the shutters - I said, "Are not you satisfied in having robbed me of all I have got?" somebody answered "Good morning;" I unlocked the door, went out, and saw two men; one dressed in a coat and trousers, and the other in a jacket and trousers - I spoke to the watchman, and lost sight of them.

THOMAS LOVE . I am a patrol. On the 5th of October, about a quarter to three o'clock in the morning, I was on my beat in Bluegate-fields, and saw two men - I went up to them, and knew one by sight - his name is Jennett. They were about five minutes' walk from Heatley's house. One was dressed in a blue coat and trousers, and the other in a blue jacket, light trousers, and a Scotch cap. As I returned, I met Heatley, who informed me of the robbery, and about twenty minutes past five o'clock I was in Bluegate-fields again, and saw Crawley standing there - I asked what he was doing there at that time; he said he had left his mother's house at two o'clock to sleep with a girl in Hyam's-buildings, but he could not get in, and he was going to work at Spitalfields as a weaver. I took him in charge - he was dressed in a blue coat and light

trousers - his clothes were reddish, as if he had been among the bricks.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge, and found four sheets of whitey-brown paper in his hat; the back of his coat appeared as if he had been rubbing against a wall. I went to Heatley's, and his wall was of the same colour as the dirt on his coat. I returned to him, and said his coat was very dirty; he said, Yes - he got it where he slept.

Q. The window-shutter could be opened without his putting his back against the wall? A. Yes.

THOMAS PIERCEY . I am an officer. On the 5th of October, between one and two o'clock, I was in some waste ground by the Docks, near a stack of bricks, and found a blue handkerchief sticking out of the bricks, with several pieces of silk - a pinafore and gown in it; it was about a quarter of a mile from Heatley's house. I have seen Crawley wear a handkerchief similar to that the things are in, and have often seen him on that ground.

MARY ANN HEATLEY . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had four sheets of whitey-brown paper on the table, under the window at half-past twelve o'clock the night before, it was gone in the morning - it was folded in half then - this is folded more; the other things are ours.

Prisoner's Defence. My sister uses that paper to wrap bonnets in - I took it to put round my hat, which was too large.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-171

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1777. JAMES ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , at Paddington , a gelding, price 10 l. , the property of John Neighbour .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN NEIGHBOUR. I live at Beaconsfield, Bucks. On the 3d of September I had a bay gelding; I desired my brother William to put it into a paddock; I missed it on Sunday morning, the 4th, and found it again on Friday the 9th, in Smithfield, in possession of Rance; I saw the prisoner on the Monday following in custody; I did not hear him say any thing except before the Alderman.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The last time you saw it safe was on the 3d of September? A. Yes, I did not see it at all in the paddock. I had had it six years, or six years and a half, and was quite familiar with it; it was impossible to alter it so that I should not know it; I think it is blind in the near eye, but that is not visible; I was bringing it up here, but it became lame, and left it at Southwell. I first went before the Alderman on the 10th of September; the prisoner appeared there, but whether in custody or not, I cannot say; he was remanded, and sent into custody; Rance was first taken up.

WILLIAM NEIGHBOUR . I am the prosecutor's brother, and placed his horse in the paddock on the 3d of September. I have known it five or six years; I am certain the one I have seen since is the same - I saw it at Beaconsfield.

Cross-examined. Q. How late on the 3d of September did you see it safe? A. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon - it could not have strayed.

SAMUEL RANCE . I am carter to Mr. Davis. I was in Smithfield one Friday in September, when Neighbour found the horse - my master gave it to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take it to Smithfield? A. No, master brought that one - I brought two more.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I keep the Crown inn at Bayswater. I bought this horse of the prisoner for eight sovereigns, on the 8th of September - Thursday, I think - I am certain he is the man; he said he came from town, and some butchers who were with him knew him very well, or I should not have bought it; he said he had been down the road. My man was taken into custody about it, and after he was taken, I went in search of the prisoner, and found a companion of his, named Manning; he came next day himself to the Alderman; Manning was in custody in one of the city compters for a night and a day - he was with the prisoner when he sold me the gelding; I had sent Rance to sell the horse, and he was detained.

Q. And then you was taken up? A. I came forward; the officer said he should not take me, but my man; I went home, and attended before the Alderman next day, according to his directions, and before I went into the Alderman's presence I saw the prisoner, and asked if he knew any thing about the horse he had sold me, as it was proved to be stolen; he said it was no such thing, for he was confident he knew where it came from; I said, "That I have nothing to do with - you are here;" "Ah! (said he) I shall soon relieve it!" - he said he had the horse from some gentleman, naming him, but what name I do not recollect - no such person came forward to prove he had sold it to him - this passed before he went before the Alderman - he was detained, and has been so ever since - I asked him where the man who he bought it of lived - he said he should tell that when he came into Court - I understood him to mean, when he went before the Alderman.

Q. Was the person's name Brown? A. I think it was, and he told the Alderman where Brown was to be found; he did not tell me where he was to be found before we went into the office.

Cross-examined. Q. Where do you live - at Bayswater, or Bagnigge-wells? A. At Bayswater; I bought the horse, at my door there - the prisoner was at the door with Manning, and three or four others - I did not then ask him who he bought it of.

Q. Did you not afterwards learn that he had it from Brown, with whom he had had dealings before? A. Yes, and he said he sold for Brown, on commission; that he could find Brown, from references to him in Smithfield, and he would go before the Alderman, and state it all right; and he came to the Alderman by himself.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he say how long he had been in the habit of selling for Brown? A. No, he said he had been in the habit of doing so - I think I gave more than the worth of the horse.

COURT. Q. How came you to give more than its value? A. When I bought it I did not know what had happened to it - I did not ride him two hundred yards before he fell with me; I bought it between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; he had two broken knees - he fell, and threw me off; I do not deal in horses; I buy one for my own use, and if it does not suit, I sell or change again. I keep three or four teams; I sent two cart horses to be sold with this - I had had them three or four months - I bought them in Smithfield - one was a

grey horse, and the other a chesnut mare. I asked the prisoner his name when I bought the horse of him; he said Adams, and that he lived in St. George's-fields, by the Shepherd and Shepherdess public-house; Manning, and two or three others, who were with him, knew him extremely well. I was not in custody.

Q. When you were before the Alderman, were you not ordered round into the place where persons charged with felony are placed? A. Yes, with the man - I remained there about an hour. I left word at the prisoner's lodgings, in St. George's-fields; I did not find his lodgings, but I left word at different houses where he used to go.

Q. Then you did not leave word at his lodgings? A. Why, at places - he might lodge there.

JOSEPH MANNING . I am a pork-butcher. I was in Adams' company when he sold this horse to Davis - I had not been with him a quarter of an hour before he sold it - he was riding the horse - I did not ask him where it came from - I had known him some years - I and two friends had been out for a ride, and overtook him, or he overtook us - he was coming towards town - a friend of mine asked him if the horse was for sale - he said Yes, and asked 10 l. for it I believe, and when we got to Davis's, at Bayswater, we stopped and had some porter - Davis heard him talking about selling the horse, and asked him the price - he said 10 l. - Davis bought it for 8 l. - Adams walked home after selling it - he said he lived by the Elephant and Castle - that is all the address he gave me.

Q. Did not Davis take his address? A. I cannot say - I believe he told Davis he lived by the Elephant and Castle - Abbott, a friend of mine, who is now in Court, found him out for Davis afterwards - he was not present when the horse was sold - he was gone as far as the turnpike when the money was paid - I always knew the prisoner to be a respectable man, and had no idea of the horse being stolen - he said he was selling it for some person, and was to take eight sovereigns home, or not sell him - he mentioned no person's name then, nor where he lived - I have known him slightly for seven or eight years, but had not seen him for a year before.

Cross-examined. Q. Abbott was present? A. Not to see the money paid - he knew the prisoner as well as I did - the Elephant and Castle is near St. George's-fields - we were not half an hour at Davis's - it was about five o'clock in the afternoon - Davis rode it up and down to try it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He rode him up and down several times? A. Yes, he trotted him.

EDMUND NEIGHBOUR . I am the prosecutor's brother. The prisoner described the man, whose name he said was Brown, as about five feet eight inches high, light complexion, and wearing a fustian frock, and patent top boots - he said there was not a market-day in a thousand but what he was to be found at the Windmill public-house, St. John-street, and that he was well known there - I went there, and inquired of the master of the yard, the head hostler, and the master of the inn, and described the man as he had done - they knew nothing of such a person - the prisoner said Brown was a dealer in horses - neither of them knew any such person - I described the horse, as he said Brown had had it at the Windmill.

Cross-examined. Q. How many people are there at the Windmill? A. Only one hostler - I also asked a porter who attends in the yard - I mentioned the man's name and description - I went there two or three market-days.

COURT. Q. What distance is Beaconsfield from town? A. Twenty-three miles from Tyburn.

THOMAS PIKE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody - he came to the Compter when I was going to take Rance up, and voluntarily accompanied me to Guildhall - this was on Saturday.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

THOMAS GREEN . I live in Charles-street, Hackney-road. On the 3d of September the prisoner lodged with me - I then lived at No. 9, Devonshire-street, Stones-end, Borough, which used to be called St. George's-fields, and is within a stone's throw of the Elephant and Castle - he was taken into custody on Monday, the 12th of September - he was unwell for eight, ten, or twelve days before that - he is troubled at times with a swimming in his head, brought on by his blood flowing to the head - he kept at home, being ill - he was at home on the evening of the 3d of September - I am an Excise officer, and came home about ten o'clock that evening (Saturday) - I said to Mrs. Green, "Is all in?" - she said "Yes, they are all in; Adams is gone to bed very ill." I asked that question, because I always lock the door, and wanted to know whether Adams or his wife were out - I locked the door, took the key with me, as I always do, and went to bed - I got up next morning about eight o'clock, opened the parlour shutters, unlocked the street door, and about nine, or between nine and ten, the prisoner came down with a child in his arms - I said "Well, Adams, how are you this morning?" - he said "I am a little better than I was, but am very ill;" and he looked very ill - he went out, and came in in about half an hour with something for dinner - it was then between nine and ten o'clock on Sunday morning, the 4th.

Q. Did you know a man named Brown, who was in the habit of calling? A. A man named Brown called on Wednesday morning, the 7th of September - I never saw him before to my knowledge - he came between seven and eight o'clock - Adams was at home in bed - he got up and came down to him - I opened my window, and heard Brown say, "Adams, I have brought you a horse to sell, as you sell on commission - he and the prisoner went away down the street together - the prisoner was in his shirt sleeves - Brown was on the horse - on the 10th, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, he called again on horseback - I heard nothing pass between them that morning - the prisoner got up, came down, and went with him.

COURT. Q. Did you take notice whether he was on the same horse as he rode the first morning? A. No, for the horse was covered with a horse-cloth both times - I could only see the head.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has your house a number? A. No, eight and ten are on each side of me, but mine is fresh painted, and has no number - the prisoner has lived there ever since the end of February, or beginning of March - his health was very bad at the time - he was ill on Sunday - this was Wednesday - he was generally sickly.

Q. What did Brown say to you? A. He said did

Adams live there - I said Yes - I opened my bed-room door, tapped at his door, and said, "Adams, you are wanted;" I did not know the man's name - Adams went down, dressed in his shirt sleeves, and went away with him without a coat, and was gone twenty minutes or half an hour, and had no coat on when he came back.

Q. Did you say "You are ill, and should not go out without your coat?" A. I did not speak to him - I was in my room, and saw him through the window - my wife was in bed, and I was not dressed - I had never seen Brown before - I heard him say, "I have brought you a horse to sell for me by commission - the horse was entirely covered as far as the chest, buckled all round as far as the neck, and had a saddle on the top of the cloth - it was girthed round the cloth - I have seen sickly horses so - nothing but its rump was to be seen - I paid no attention to the colour - I believe Adams sold horses on commission - I know of nobody else bringing him horses to sell - I have no stables, nor has he - I only knew him while he lodged with me - I understood he left a butcher's shop to come to me - he certainly knew the name of the street he lived in - I should think he could give the name of the street instantly, if he was asked - the horse, also, had a cloth on when Brown came a second time - he knocked at the door - I was in bed, looked out of the window, and said "Who did you want?" he said Adams - I knocked at the bedroom door, and said "Adams, somebody at the door wants you;" I did not tell him who it was - I saw him outside talking to the man - he had no coat on then - he went away with Brown without his coat that morning also - I never knew him go out without his coat but on those two mornings, except on a warm morning - I never saw him with horses.

Q. How was Brown dressed that day? A. In a fustian frock coat and top boots - it was a frock coat, not a jacket - he is about five feet eight inches high.

Q. What coloured coat was it? A. It was cloth, not fustian.

Q. You said this instant it was a fustian frock coat - now was it fustian or not? A. It was a brown cloth frock coat, not fustian - if I said so it was a mistake - I dare say I did say so. He looked more like a gentleman's groom; the buttons were covered with cloth - his boot-tops were a kind of yellow colour; he looked like a horse dealer - he had no whip, but an ash stick: I did not notice whether he had spurs; he had a white handkerchief; his coat was buttoned up - I could not see his waistcoat. He might have stood talking to Adams the first morning for six or seven minutes; I was looking out of the bed-room window - Mrs. Green got up before they went away both mornings, and saw them - she looked through the curtains both mornings. When Adams was taken his wife told me he was charged with felony - he sent for me, and when I got there the evidence was going on; this was on the 12th of September; the horse was proved to have been stolen on the 3d, and when I got home I said to my wife, "Do you remember last Saturday night at what time Adams came home?"

Q. This man's health was but middling - was he in the habit of riding ten or twelve miles into the country? A. Not that I know of. Brown was dressed the same both days - I could tell if he had a different coat on; I believe he is the only man I ever saw come to my house on horseback. I have no other lodgers, and no servant - I do not know how he got his bread - he always paid his rent.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What was his illness? A. A swimming in his head. The early part of September was very warm weather - my business takes me from home in the day time.

COURT. Q. When did you move to Charles-street? A. On the 29th of September. I lived in Devonshire-street four years. I think he brought home a sheep's head to make broth for dinner on Sunday - his child is about six months old; they have no other child: they live in the back room second floor - I sleep in the first floor front room. I attended the two last examinations at Guildhall; they were before Alderman Magnay: I heard on the first examination when the horse was said to have been stolen. I told the Alderman he was in bed at my house at the time.

Q. You stated that to Mr. Alderman Magnay? A. To the best of my knowledge I did not say a word at the first examination; I only heard Neighbour and one Amor examined at the first examination - Davis, Rance, and Pike were examined at the second examination, which I think was seven or eight days after the first. I told the Alderman I could prove he was in my house all that night; he said that might do in another Court - I offered to swear it - my wife was not there; they would not hear me. The prisoner said he had a man to prove he was at home in bed - the Alderman said he could not hear that.

Q. Did you tell the Alderman so? A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Did you offer to be examined? A. I do not know that I spoke, but the prisoner did.

Q. Do you mean to state that you told Alderman Magnay you could prove he was at home in your house? A. I did not state that, I only stated about Brown coming to the house. I said nothing about his being in my house on the 3d of September.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was Mr. Humphries, the prisoner's solicitor, in attendance, and did he know what you could prove about the Saturday night, and about Brown? A. Yes.

LUCY GREEN . I am the last witness's wife. Adams lodged with us in Devonshire-street - he had the back room first floor, with his wife and baby; he lodged with us six months; he said he had left a butcher's-shop when he first came. I understood from him that he sold horses. He slept at home on the night of the 3d of September - he complained of an overflowing of blood in the head, which he was subject to - he had been in and out that day, and went to bed about eight o'clock, or a little after. We were generally all in bed by ten or eleven o'clock, except Mr. Green - he went out next morning between eight and nine o'clock, to the butcher's, and brought in, I think, a sheep's head for broth. A person called on him on the Wednesday morning, before I was up; my husband spoke to him out of window; I did not hear the person's name - I merely saw him through the blind, on horseback. I got out of bed - I noticed that he had a black hat and brown coat on, and there was a cloth over the horse. Adams and him went away together; I saw Adams cross the road; I think he had got his coat on, but

will not be sure. The same man called again on Saturday, on horseback - I was getting up, and saw him, and thought he was the same man, from having the same dress on - I think his buttons were the same colour as his coat - he and Adams went away together.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you heard any part of your husband's evidence here to-day? A. No - Adams frequently complained of this overflowing. I did not know of his having stables. I understood he sold horses, and he had money which he got by letting his shop, as Mrs. Adams told me. I have not seen Brown before nor since - he came about the same time both mornings - they stood at the door talking a few minutes, and then went down the opposite street; to the best of my recollection Adams' coat was not on - I am certain he had none on either time. I have frequently seen him take his child out without his coat, and go as far as the Wellington public-house without it - that is about a stone's throw; he was out with Brown about half an hour at both times. I am certain he was not out an hour the second time - he generally came home at nine, ten, or eleven o'clock at night. I have very ill-health, and did not go before the Magistrate - I could have gone in a coach - I was up but did not go out at the time he was examined. - I had no doctor then. I have been attended by a physician for three years. I knew he was before the Magistrate, but was not asked to go. I knew he was charged with the robbery on the 3d, and was remanded, but I did not go; my husband said Adams was taken up, and could I call to mind the Saturday and Saturday week - I said I could. Three or four respectable men have called on him at my house - sometimes in a one-horse chaise. I did not notice whether Brown had a whip, he had a brown cloth coat - not fustian. I did not observe his boots or handkerchief. - I merely looked through the curtains.

MR. ANDRREWS. Q. You were not well when he was examined? A. No. I was not asked to go before the Magistrate - he had been bled a week or a fortnight before, for the weakness in his head.

COURT. Q. When any body in your house went out, how did they get in? A. I had a key as well as my husband - I always let him in. I let him in on Sunday, when he brought the sheep's head in - I think he had the liver also. I do not know whether he had any vegetables - I do not know where my husband was when he brought in the sheep's-head - he might be in the kitchen, which is on a level with the stairs.

COURT to THOMAS GREEN. Q. Have we taken it down correct, that the prisoner was in bed, when Brown called at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, you called him, and he came down? A. Yes; he might be two or three minutes before he came down. Brown knocked at the door - my wife is very nervous, and it frightened her - he must have got off his horse to knock.

JAMES AMOR . I am a butcher, and live in Wellington-street, Newington-causeway. I have lived there eight years, and have known the prisoner eleven years; his character was honest as far as I knew - he let his shop at Vauxhall, where he was a butcher, and got his living with the money he let his shop for, I suppose.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you been intimate with him for eleven years? A. Yes; in fact he is my brother-in-law: Green's is within half a stone's throw of my house - my wife took the apartment for him - it is No. 9, Devonshire-street; I saw Brown bring the horse.

COURT. Q. Have you had any conversation with any body, while this cause has been going on? A. None whatever; I saw Brown bring him the horse - it was on a Wednesday, and I think the 7th; about eight o'clock in the morning, as near as I can judge; I had got home from Newgate market: I did not know Brown's name at the time; when I first saw him he was on foot, leading the horse down for Adams; he had just been there and was coming down to the Wellington, which is opposite my house; I was rather busy, having just come from market, and did not speak to them at first.

Q. How soon after did you see Adams? A. About eleven o'clock; I saw him and Brown shewing the horse to a neighbour of mine.

Q. When you saw them about eight o'clock in the morning, did you see them go into the Wellington? A. I believe they went in.

Q. When he passed you about eight in the morning was there any thing remarkable about him? A. Nothing at all - he had been poorly with a pain in his head. I saw Brown again on the Saturday, when he called on the prisoner, and brought a second horse with a cloth on, and it was a better horse. I cannot say what colour the cloth was; I think it is called a rug; the first horse had no cloth on; the second was a different shaped horse, and of more value; I could not see the colour of it on account of the cloth; the first was a bright bayhorse; there was no star or mark on its sides - if there had been I must have seen it; he did not take it into the Wellington - he took it to a neighbour of mine named Mills, and put it into his shed; he is down at Hounslow - this was the first horse; I have stables - he did not come to my house at all; Mills bid him money for the horse - seven pound or guineas; Brown and Adams were both there; Adams told him, in my presence, that it did not belong to him but to Brown. I saw Mills yesterday - I believe the prisoner's name was on the list for trial yesterday, and I was here, also on Saturday and Friday; I did not tell Mills I had been attending here, for, in fact, I had no opportunity; he is at Hounslow - he keeps a go-cart; I saw him after I went home last night; I told him that the trial had not come on; I did not ask him to come.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had Brown a long whip in his hand? A. I saw no whip - I think he had an ash stick. Green lives half a stone's throw from me; I saw Brown at his door before he went to the Wellington, holding the horse by the bridle; I saw my brother and him on Saturday morning, and saw money pass between them; I observed nothing remarkable in the prisoner.

COURT. Q. What coloured coat had your brother-in-law on the second day? A. A blue coat, as he generally wears - it was a body coat - he wore the same coat on the first day; it was not a great coat, but a blue body coat; I am sure he had his coat on both days - it had yellow buttons - I cannot be mistaken.

COURT. Q. How long were Adams and Mills trying to make a bargain? A. I dare say a quarter of an hour - it was not at the public-house that I saw him and Mills; I

am sure the first horse had no body clothing, the second had; I never saw Brown but these two times; I have looked about for him when I have been at Smithfield; I should know him if I saw him; I have not been at the Windmill.

Q. Did not your brother-in-law represent that there was hardly a market day but he was there? A. I never heard it - I never heard him say he was to be found there.

JOHN NEIGHBOUR re-examined. Q. Did you attend the examination before Mr. Alderman Magnay? A. Yes; the first examination was before Mr. Alderman Thorpe - the prisoner was not there then; Green was at the two last examinations; the prisoner said he had witnesses to call; I do not know whether he stated what they were to prove; the Alderman said that should be inquired into at another place; I did not observe Green attempt to speak; I was at all the examinations, and attended to all that passed.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his good character.

Reference Number: t18251027-172

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1778. NANCY SHELTON was indicted for the wilful murder of Patrick Doyle .

MARY KILRONAN . I live in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles'. Patrick Doyle was my nephew - he lodged in Church-lane. On Friday, the 30th of September, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was at the >Black Horse, public-house, at the corner of George-street - Doyle, Frank Smith, and I were taking half a gallon of beer in the tap-room - I was there half an hour; the prisoner, (who had lived with the deceased as his wife for twelve years) came in, looked round, said nothing, but went to the bar in about two minutes, and brought a half-gallon beer can under her cloak; she appeared sober; Doyle and Smith were talking together; Doyle was drunk - he turned his head towards her; she raised the can, and struck him with it near the temple, and ran out as hard as she could; he stooped his head down, and it bled very much; he remained in the tap-room about two hours, and then went out with Smith. I saw no more that night. They had seven children, and sometimes lived sociable together. On Saturday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw her coming out of her place where they lived - she said, "Good morning," and told me to tell my sister's son to keep clear of her - she would be his bl - y butcher, and the end of him. I went to his lodgings on the Sunday night - he was sitting on the side of the bed, very ill - she was in the room; he said he was very ill, and asked what was good for the head-ache; I said I always dipped my head in cold water; she was kind and attentive to him. He lived till the Tuesday week following, and died at the hospital.

Prisoner. Q. Did not he strike me at the public-house? A. No, I never saw him strike her, nor kick her. I know nothing of his head being fractured before.

LAWRENCE DOYLE . I am the deceased's brother. I was at his lodging, four weeks ago yesterday - he and I went out that morning, and earned 5 s. 10 d.; he gave the prisoner 4 s. out of it, to get some supper; they lived together - we returned at six o'clock - she would not get it and we went to a cook's-shop. I my brother, and another man had had four pots of beer at five o'clock that afternoon; we came home, without having any thing at the cook-shop; the prisoner was sitting on the bed-side - her two children were in bed - one is seven, and the other four years old, and she was pregnant. I had a separate bed in the same room; there was a fire, but no candle; the deceased wanted to go to bed - the prisoner said he should not live there; he laid on the floor, with his clothes on: the prisoner got up, and said she would not lay where he did, and was going out - he said she should not go out at that hour, and gave her a violent push with one hand, and pushed her over across the bed; he did not strike her. I cannot tell on what part of her body she fell; the moment she got up he put his hand under his head, leaning on the table, and sitting on a chair - she got up, and went to the chimney-piece, laid hold of a hammer which laid there, and struck him on the head five times - one blow was very heavy; I could not see with which end of it she struck him; (I had laid down) I got up, went between them, and he knocked me down three times - he was in a violent rage, and she also; he laid hold of me, and said, "Oh! brother, I am undone!" she went out, and did not come back till day-light. A good deal of blood came from his head - I did not tie it up.

Prisoner. Q. Was not he in bed? A. No - she sat on the bed-side with her clothes on.

COURT. Q. Have you not said she was in bed, and got up and dressed herself? A. No. I wiped his head with his shirt - one blow felled him to the ground; he laid on the bed after she was gone. I got another lodging, but saw her two days after, and told her her husband's head was cut - she laughed, and went off. I was sober when this happened.

JURY. Q. Did you see your brother strike her except when he pushed her? A. No. I have heard that my brother received an injury in his head at Liverpool twelve months ago; he gave the prisoner a violent push.

JOSEPH BURGESS . I am apothecary of St. Giles's parish. On the 24th of October the deceased was brought to the Infirmary; he was extremely ill, and complained of great pain in his head - he was slightly convulsed. Early next morning he became extremely convulsed, but not altogether insensible - he complained of being sick. There were wounds on his head; he complained of being stunned. The sickness is a proof that his brain was very much injured. I had him removed in the evening to Middlesex Hospital. I should think the blows which caused the wound must have been severe; five blows given with this hammer were undoubtedly sufficient to produce inflammation of the brain.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come to the work-house to see him? A. She did, and felt great anxiety about him.

MR. EDWARD WILLIAM TUSON . I am a surgeon, of Middlesex Hospital. The deceased was brought in on Tuesday night, the 25th of October; he was quite insensible - his head was shaved, and found considerably bruised all over - there was an incised wound on the right side of his forehead; the wound was almost healed and must have been an old one - he was trepanned in my presence, but it was ineffectual, and he died at half-past one o'clock

in the morning; his head was opened - I found the pericranium was detached from the skull, and part of the skull was undergoing the process of exfoliation. On examining the brain I found an abscess in the anterior lobe to contain pus, which is quite sufficient to cause his death - these appearances were the natural consequences of heavy blows - if attended to in the first instance they might not have been in that state - the hammer would have given the external bruise.

Q. If this had been the consequence of a blow a year ago, could he have continued in that state for a year? A. No. my Lord - he might have lived three weeks after.

The prisoner, in her defence, entered into a long and unconnected account about a quarrel with the deceased, respecting a dog, and stated that he had struck her several blows, on the evening in question, that he came home late afterwards, and attacked her so violently as to break four of her ribs, when she struck him with a file, but not with a hammer.

MR. TUSON. A file could not have inflicted the wounds.

LAWRENCE DOYLE re-examined. My wife slept in the room, but was out when this happened; I did not strike my brother when he knocked me down.

GUILTY. Aged 25. Of manslaughter only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18251027-173

1779. WILLIAM APPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , a warrant, for payment of and value 135 l. 18 s. 6 d., the property of Robert Gobby , in his dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT GOBBY. I am a breeches'-maker , and live in - street, Regent-street . On the 3d of September, I received from Captain Shaw an order on Messrs. Deffell and Co. No. 3, Billiter-court, for 135 l. 18 s. 6 d. - this is it (looking at it). Mr. Duffell is agent to Mr. Shaw; I put the order into the cheque box, and gave my wife directions to receive it that morning, but she was too late, and did not get it cashed; I saw it in the box after that. On Monday I inquired for it - it was produced by my wife - I saw her take it from the box - it then lay on the corner of the drawers - I asked for it afterwards and it was missing - I was some time looking for it, and then went very hastily to Billiter-court - I could not find the place - I went again and found it, and in consequence of what I heard there I went to Messrs. Payne and Smith's - I have not received the money.

MARY GOBBY . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Monday, the 5th of September, I took this order out of the cash-box, and placed it on the end of the drawers - my pocket handkerchief was put over it - the servant called me to the door to the baker, and another person wanted me - I took up my handkerchief, and am not certain whether I took any thing else up with it - I went to the street door, and saw the prisoner, who was the baker - he served our house with bread - a boy was also there - the prisoner did not come into the house; he stood at the door; I stood on the mat, and the servant stood at the door; I asked him for change for a half sovereign; he said he could not give it to me; I drew my handkerchief from my pocket, and returned from the door, and the servant followed me, leaving the prisoner and the boy at the door; my husband made inquiry after the order in about five minutes; I looked on the drawers for it, and then in the passage, but could not find it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your servant here? A. No she has left me; I did not think it necessary for her to come; she walked behind me from the door; she held the door in her hand, and I was about a yard from it; we have no yard door, nor any back window; there is no thorough air through the house; the door was left open, and the servant followed me to see if I had change to pay him; I had not, and he went away; the servant went and shut the door; it was about two o'clock in the afternoon.

COURT. Q. Had the prisoner his basket with him? A. Yes, he was serving bread, and had some bills in his hand; I left him standing close to the door, and went into the parlour; I did not return to him myself.

SUSANNAH WHITE . I live in King-street, Soho; my husband is a baker; the prisoner's brother was in our employ, in September, as foreman; the prisoner has come to my house to see his brother several times. On the 5th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, he came into our shop, and asked if Mr. White was at home; I said No; he asked if his brother Ned was within; I said No, he had been gone twenty minutes; he produced a paper to me, saying he had got another (he had come to his brother on the Monday before with a cheque for 151 l.); I said "Another what?" he said "Another cheque," and produced a piece of paper to me; I read it, and believe the cheque produced to be it; it was a draft for 135 l. 18 s. 6 d. (the other was a printed cheque); it was without a stamp, and all written; I remember that it was from Mr. Shaw, payable to Gobby; I am sure this is the paper; I said "William, I am rather astonished to see this - what does it mean? to have two cheques of this amount in one week; I am afraid somebody is laying a trap for you;" he said nothing, but seemed in a flurry, took the check, and went away as fast as he could towards Oxford-street; I looked after him, for it attracted my attention.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know that the week before a cheque had come into his hands, when he advertised, and took much trouble to restore it to the owner? A. No; he told me he went to the banker's to get it cashed, and the money was being told out to him, when one of the gentlemen asked him if it was all right, and he said "No; the truth is, I picked it up," and they withdrew the money.

Q. On your telling him this was a trap, did he not say "Well, I found it in the street, and shall throw it into the street again?" A. No, he went instantly up the street.

JOHN DEFFELL . My father is agent to Captain Smith; the office is in Billiter-court. On the 5th of September, about half-past three o'clock, this order was presented to me by a man who I do not recollect; I gave him a cheque on Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Co., for the amount; this is the cheque (producing it).

JOHN PRIESTMAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Co. I cashed this draft about half-past four o'clock. I have a slight recollection of the person. I do not believe the prisoner to be the man. I think he had a green coat on.

Cross-examined. Q. In what did you pay it? A. Ten 10 l. notes, and the rest in gold.

SUSANNAH WHITE . When he came to my house he was alone, but there was a man accompanying him in Frith-street; I saw that man; he had dark trousers, and a bottle green coat on.

JOHN PRIESTMAN. That corresponds with my recollection of the person.

HENRY SAXBY . I live at Chelsea. I was standing at Mr. Gobby's door early in September, and while there the prisoner came; I saw nobody else at the door; Mrs. Gobby came to speak to him; I saw her drop a bit of paper from her pocket, as she was getting something out of her pocket; it fell just by the mat in the passage; I went away, leaving the prisoner there, and the paper remaining in the passage; I did not mention it.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you not to mention it? A. I thought she saw it, or I should have told her; she was standing there when I left; I saw it almost a yard from the door; she stood just by the side of the mat; I have been to the house since.

MRS. GOBBY re-examined. The passage is five yards and a half long from the parlour door; nobody had been into the passage, from the time my husband inquired for the cheque.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of September; I found nine sovereigns in his box, and a few bakers' bills on his person.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I knew the prisoner. When he was brought from the lock-up-place to be examined at Marlborough-street I asked him what he had done with Mr. Gobby's cheque? he smiled, and said he picked it up by the side of his basket, inside the step of the door, and he should tell the Magistrate what he had done with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear him explain it to the Magistrate? A. Yes - he said he had picked up a cheque a short time before, and had been at a good deal of expense, and got nothing for his trouble, in finding the owner; and when he found it was not for money he threw it away.

Prisoner. I have no more to say than what I said at the office.

EDWARD HALL . The prisoner worked for me; I saw several sovereigns in his box a week before this occurred.

GUILTY. Aged 22. Of larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-174

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1780. THOMAS WINTER PRESTON and HENRY THOMAS READING were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Palmer , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th of September , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , (Jane, the wife of the said George Palmer, and others being therein) and stealing two handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; a coat, value 30 s.; a hat, value 3 s.; a gown, value 2 s.; a whittle, value 1 s.; and a shawl, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Girling .

THOMAS GIRLING. On the 19th of September I lived at No. 34 Long-alley, Moorfields , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, in the house of George Palmer, who lives there himself. I am a copper-smith . I left home at half past four o'clock that morning, (the 19th), and left my wife at home. I returned about eight o'clock in the evening; it was then dark, and my wife was not at home. I found my room door open - the street door used to be kept shut, but opened with a catch - we let ourselves in; - I was not in the room above a minute before I came out, locked the door, and went in search of my wife. We each have a key; I returned, and met my wife; we went home together; the room was in disorder.

LYDIA GIRLING . I am the prosecutor's wife. I left the house at half past seven o'clock in the morning - I locked the door, and to the best of my knowledge, took the key with me; when I returned, I found the things which I had left there in the morning, taken away. I missed a Norwich-crape gown, which I had worn on the Sunday before; this was Monday; my husband's blue coat, his hat, two silk handkerchiefs, and a shawl.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You think you locked the door? A. To the best of my knowledge I did. It is usual for me to go and breakfast with my mother, and to come back to see if I had locked it, and I did so that morning. The prisoner Reading's mother lodged in the house, and I believe he lived with her; I had not seen him that day; there is another lodger in the house; the street door goes on a pully in the day time.

COURT. Q. Were there any marks of violence on the room door? A. None.

JANE PALMER . I am the wife of George Palmer, who rents this house - it is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. Reading's mother lodges there, also Girling and his wife. On the 19th of September, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners - Preston was in the yard - I saw Reading come to him. - I thought Reading went up stairs as he went back, and Preston went into the privy. Girling lives in the first floor back-room. I did not see Preston come out - but shortly afterwards I saw Reading go into the privy, and thought they were both there. I was in the house myself - but I do not know whether any body else was.

GEORGE PALMER. I rent this house. I was a head-borough at this time, and in consequence of information apprehended Reading that night, at the bottom of Wentworth-street, Whitechapel, a little before twelve o'clock: and as I was taking him to the watch-house, the prosecutor said he did not wish to prosecute, if he could get his property. Reading took me to a house in Fluer-de-lis-street, Spitalfield's, where I took Preston.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I live with Mr. Price, pawnbroker, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel. On the 19th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, both the prisoner's came to the shop with a great coat, a gown, a shawl, two handkerchiefs, a hat and whittle. I asked who they came from - they said from their father, who lived at No. 2, Fashion-street, Spitalfields; that he was at Smithfield waiting for 2 l., as he had bought a horse for ten guineas, and he wanted 2 l., or two guineas more. I said I could advance only 35 s. - they said they must bring something more for 5 s. I lent them 35 s. - they gave the name of Thomas Williams, Fashion-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know either of them before? A. I do not recollect having seen them - I live about a mile from Palmer's. I could only afford 5 s.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. Reading told me the duplicate of the goods was in the crevice of a wall, in a court in George-yard - I went there with him, and found it.

WILLIAM BELCHER. It is the duplicate I gave him.

MRS. GIRLING. Here is my shawl, the handkerchief is my husband's - I know the hat by a paper inside it, it being too large.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you positively swear you locked your door that morning? A. I will not positively swear it, but I have every reason to believe I did - it is a spring lock, not a latch. I believe I tried the door after I went out.

PRESTON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

READING - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Subject to the decision of the Twelve Judges, in the case of the King, against Lowe and Roberts, page 662. - Reading was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor - having lead to the discovery of the property, and expressed great contrition.

Reference Number: t18251027-175

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

1781. HENRY YATES , JONATHAN THOMAS JOHNSON , and JAMES HUNTER GRAY , were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a backgammon-board, value 22 s.; thirty-two chessmen, value 7 l. 7 s.; thirty draftsmen, value 18 s. 6 d., and two ivory dice boxes, value 10 s. , the goods of James Dunnett, the younger .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JAMES DUNNETT. I live in Cheapside . On the 4th of October, the prisoner, Yates, came to my shop; I did not know him before; he looked out the goods stated in the indictment, amounting to 11 l. 1 s. 6 d., and desired me to send them particularly at six o'clock to a direction which he wrote in my presence, (reading it) "Craggs and Co., 205, Upper Thames-street," for his chaise would be at the door, and he was going out of town - the bill was to be sent, and they were to be paid for on delivery. I sent Hutron, my porter, with them, at ten minutes before six o'clock, and followed him myself, as he had left one of the pieces of chess-men behind him. I told him not to leave them without the money, and if he did not get it, to bring them back. I arrived there before the porter, and saw no chaise at the door; I knocked, and Mrs. Lodge opened it; I asked for Mr. Craggs, supposing him to be Mr. Craggs, and without answering my question, she opened the door. I saw Johnson and Gray; I asked Gray if Mr. Craggs was within? (I had not heard the name of Yates at that time) Gray said, "No;" Johnson immediately said, "Dear me, I am astonished you did not see Mr. Craggs, for he has this moment gone out of the counting-house door." I had passed nobody as I went in, or I must have seen him. I returned home without seeing the porter, and in about ten minutes he brought the goods back. Next morning, about half-past nine o'clock, I went to the counting-house, taking the articles, the porter being engaged. Mrs. Lodge opened the door. I staid a quarter of an hour, but saw neither of the prisoners. I was induced to leave the backgamon-table, containing the drafts and boxes, seeing the name of Lodge, sextoness, on the door, I thought the house respectable. I returned home - it was before eleven o'clock, and sent my man immediately, telling him to wait till he saw some of the persons; he was gone about five hours, and returned without goods or money. I went again that day, and saw Gray - told him my porter had come back, stating that a note had been received from Mr. Yates, and that it was rather singular Mr. Yates should desire me to send the goods and receive the money, and no one had been there to pay for them. Gray handed me the note, after reading it. I asked him where Mr. Yates lived; he said he believed about Edmonton, but really he could not say for certain, for he had only been in his service three days - nothing else passed - I left. I went next morning at half-past nine o'clock, and remained there five or six hours. Mrs. Lodge opened the desk - there was nothing there but rubbish; there was a ledger on the desk - I opened it - the date of the last entry was fifteen years ago. I found my goods at Rochford's.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You left part of the goods? A. The backgammon table and drafts. I was not asked to leave them; I brought the chessmen away, and sent the porter with them - they were worth 7 l.; I never saw Yates there. I understood, from the conversation I had with Mrs. Moss, that Craggs and Yates were the same persons. I never countermanded the order I first gave the porter, nor did I repeat it.

PHILIP HURRON . On the 4th of October my master sent me with these goods to Upper Thames-street; I got there at five minutes past six o'clock; there was no chaise at the door; a girl let me in, and Mrs. Lodge shewed me into the counting-house; I asked for Mr. Gray - she said they had been gone out about 5 minutes, and went for somebody, but no one came. I took the goods back, went again next morning, a little after eleven o'clock, and saw Gray - I asked him if Mr. Craggs was in the way - he said he would be in in a few minutes, he expected - that he was detained coming from the country, and so stopped at the Exchange, as he was a gentleman who used the Exchange; he said he would be in in a few minutes, and if not he would not be there till two o'clock; I waited a few minutes; he then said it was no use waiting - he did not then expect him till after 'Change was over. I said I had got a parcel for Mr. Gray - he said I might leave it, and on presenting it to him he did not open it; it was packed in brown paper; I said it was a set of chessmen, from Mr. Dunnett - he said it was quite right, and perfectly safe; I had a bill with me, and a blank receipt stamp; my master had told me to leave them, and receive the money; he had desired me on the Tuesday evening not to leave them without the money - that order was never changed. I left the bill and goods, as Gray told me Mr. Dunnett had left part himself that morning; I left them in consequence of that. I told him I was to have the money, or not leave them - he said they were perfectly safe there, and if Mr. Craggs should call before two o'clock he would leave the money; sometimes the name of Craggs was used, and sometimes Yates. Gray said if Mr. Craggs did not leave the money he would leave the address where I might find him, and he would pay me - that Mr. Yates was a gentleman who used Hambro'-wharf, the Exchange, and Hambro'-coffee-house - that Hambro'-wharf was written up in large gold letters, and asked if I

knew Mr. Yates; I said I did not, for I had not seen him. I then left the goods, and went home - I told my master; he desired me to go back immediately for the goods or money; (this was Wednesday morning.) I went immediately, and got there about twelve o'clock, saw Gray, and asked if Mr. Craggs had been in - he said he had, and had taken the chessmen out with him, and he thought he was gone to Mr. Dunnett's, to pay for them; I waited there till half-past four o'clock, and just before I came away a note was brought, which Gray opened, looked it over, and said, Mr. Yates was detained at the London-docks, and would not be there any more that evening - as he was seeing some wine shipped, and Gray was to say if the man called about the chessmen, they were approved of, and to call next morning for the money; I went out, and waited an hour and a half outside, to see if any body went in, but nobody came; I did not see Gray go out - there was another door, opening into the court, which he might have gone out of, without my seeing him. It was four o'clock when he said Yates was at the London-docks.

ROBERT PIKE . I am in the employ of Mrs. Rochford, pawnbroker, Jermyn-street, St. James's. On the 5th of October, about half-past 7 o'clock in the evening, Yates and Johnson brought this backgammon board and men to pawn, they came into the counting-house behind the shop, they were brought with a writing-desk and dressing-case. Yates said he wanted to raise money on them, I think he asked for 15 l. or 16 l., I agreed to lend 4 l. on the articles now produced; he wished them put separately for the convenience of redeeming them, and gave me the name of Matthew Yates, Watling-street, a housekeeper; Johnson said nothing except admiring the things, and asked my opinion as to what was paid for them. They went away together; the goods have not been redeemed. The board came packed in brown paper, and the men in tissue paper, as the manufacturer would pack them.

Prisoner YATES. Q. On your oath did I give my name Matthew Yates? A. That is on the duplicate, I put the name he gave me, and gave him a duplicate with that on it, and he did not object to it. They brought the box of chessmen a short time before, and another young man advanced something on them, and, in a short time, they brought these things. I cancelled the first transaction by their desire, and put them together for 4 l.

COURT Q. Did you know Yates before? A. Yes. I did not know whether he was concerned in shipping. He has pawned goods, and named a time for redeeming them, and always did so.

MARY ANN LODGE . My husband rents this house, No. 205, Upper Thames-street. Yates took the counting-house on the 5th of August, in the name of Yates, and a week afterwards "Cragg's and Co." was written up on the door; nobody slept there. There are two doors, one leads into a court, and the other into the street. In a week or two Gray came there sometimes late, and at times early; he stopped an hour or two, sometimes only ten minutes. He used to write and answer people who came with things, Johnson used to come at times daily, and then not for a few days. I remember Hurron bringing these goods, and I saw Mr. Dunnet bring a parcel, which he left in the morning. I did not see Yates there that day. I left Hurron in the counting-house; Grey was there. When Mr. Dunnet came I opened the desks, the prisoners never appeared there afterwards - they had given me no notice - my rent was not paid.

Prisoner YATES. Q. Did we leave any property in the place? A. No, - Yes, there were a set of globes quite new - I saw them in custody about a week after - I found a pocket book in their possession.

HURRON. I left the goods on Wednesday, the 5th.

ROBERT LOCK , I am an officer. I apprehended Johnson and Gray on the 8th, in White-street, Moorfields. I received Yates from St. George's watch-house on the following Monday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

YATES - GUILTY . Aged 32.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 39.

GRAY - GUILTY . Aged 76.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-176

NEW COURT. (5th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1782. ELIZABETH HOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , nine spoons, value 20 s.; a reading glass, value 2 s.; a piece of silver, value 6 d. and two keys, value 2 d. , the goods of Samuel Drummond .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-177

1783. CATHERINE WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , four books, value 30 s. , the goods of William Reynolds .

JAMES LINCH . The prisoner lodged with me. Mr. Reynolds is a bookseller , and lives in Oxford-street , about three hundred yards from my house. On the 20th of October the prisoner came in with four books, which, she said, she brought from Leeds; she asked me the value of them, and said she was going to pawn them. I looked outside and saw the price of them; I kept one, which was a prayer-book: she then went out, and on her return, said she had left them in Gee's-court, or Barry's-court, for 2 s.; my wife went and gave information to Reynolds.

HENRY WILLIAM WOODS . I am an apprentice to William Reynolds. I know these books to be his, by the private marks in them.

JOHN MARTIN . I am an officer. I have the books - the prayer-book was at Linch's house.

JOHN TEW . The prisoner brought me the books, stating herself to be in great distress, and asked me to lend her 2 s. on them for a few days - in the course of the time she sent her landlady to me with half-a-crown.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband had lately died, and I took this room: I was going down to Windmill-street - I saw this parcel covered with straw - I took it up, and went back to my lodging; I said to Lynch "Here is something which I cannot read?" he looked at them, and said they were valuable books; I said something to him and he struck me; I went to bed, and in the morning I got up, and as I wanted money I went to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-178

1784. MARY ANN LAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , two pillows, value 10 s.; a sheet, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 10 s.; a flat iron, value 2 s., and a candlestick, value 2 s. the goods of Robert Clayards , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house .

SARAH CLAYARDS . I live in Crown-street, St. Giles' . I let a second floor back-room furnished, to the prisoner, for 5 s. a week, about three months before the 30th of June - she went away without giving me notice - she owed me about 2 l.; the key of her room was sent me about ten o'clock at night; I went into the room and missed these articles.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you or your husband live in that house? A. No, we let it all out. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-179

1785. HARRIET PINNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a gown, value 12 s.; a shift, value 5 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s., and a frill, value 1 s., the goods of Samuel Lucas , her master .

MARY LUCAS . My husband's name is Samuel. We live in Bow-yard, St. Giles . The prisoner was my servant , and had been with me four or five months. I have but one room and missed these articles on the 19th of September, and the prisoner was gone - the beadle lives in the same house, and she came to him in the street on the following Sunday, and gave him information. I have found the gown since - I never authorised her to pawn or sell it.

CHARLES JAMES MAYNARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Clare-street, Clare-market. I have a gown pawned by the prisoner on the 19th of September.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person - I have not been in the shop for four months; I was not a servant to the prosecutrix; I worked for her by the day, and had not been in her house a fortnight.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-180

1786. RICHARD WADE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 24 ozs. of horse-hair, value 18 d. , the goods of William Hampstead .

WILLIAM HAMPSTEAD. I am a horse-hair manufacturer , and live in Pleasant-row, Mile-end . The prisoner was my journeyman , and worked for me twelve months. On the 30th of September, as he was going out I called him back - he delivered some horse-hair out of his hat - I sent for an officer, and during that time he pulled some more out of his smallclothes - there was about 1 1/4 lbs. in all - it is worth about 1 s. 2 d. per pound; he said it was the first time.

SAMUEL DOBSON . I am an officer. I took him and have the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had some boys there, and they used to play tricks, and put hair into my hat and shoes; I did not know there was any hair in my hat till I had got it on. I have worked twenty-two years in Chancery-lane, and in other places; I knew my handkerchief, was in my hat, but did not know the horse-hair was there.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-181

1787. ANN MURRAY and MARIA MURRAY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a shawl, value 25 s., the goods of Joseph Rumbell , privately in his shop .

EDWARD ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Rumbell, linen-draper of Leicester-square . The two prisoners came to the shop on the 11th of October, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon - I shewed them some shawls - they objected to the patterns - I left them to go to the window to fetch some more, which they each looked at, but still objected to the patterns, and wished to leave half-a-crown, and fetch a friend of theirs to decide on the pattern - from this circumstance I suspected them, and opened the cloak of the prisoner Ann, and found under her arm-pit a shawl - I looked at the mark, and found it to be one I had previously shewn them, and the other prisoner wept bitterly, and offered to pay the value.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had not the elder prisoner plenty of money? A. She seemed to have three or four pounds.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am an officer. I took the prisoners - they were searched by the watch-house-keeper's wife, who said, in their presence, that she found 1 l. 5 s. on the younger prisoner, and, I think, 3 l. 8 s. on the other.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN MURRAY'S Defence. My sister knew nothing at all about it.

ANN MURRAY - GUILTY. Aged 14. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

MARIA MURRAY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-182

1788. ANN BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , a watch, value 2 l., the goods of George Wetton , from his person .

GEORGE WETTON. I am a baker , and live with my father in Devonshire-street, Mile-end. I am nineteen years of age. I met the prisoner, who was alone, about half-past six o'clock on the evening of the 26th of September, in Whitechapel - I was quite sober - she asked me to go down Wentworth-street with her - I went to a house in Woodgate-court , into a room on the left hand, up one pair of stairs - we were there alone - I had sixpence in my pocket, and that I gave her, and a few halfpence to get a candle - I took my breeches off, and folded them up carefully, and put them on a chair - I am certain my watch was then in the fob, because I tucked the ribbon of it down - I was not in the room above five minutes when another girl came in, and held me while the prisoner took my breeches out of the room - I got down as soon as I could, and got hold of the tail of my breeches - the prisoner swore at me like a trooper, and hit me over the head - I got the breeches, but the watch was gone - I am quite certain of her person - she was taken into custody two days afterwards, by my describing her person to the officer.

MOSES FORTUNE . The prosecutor came to me on this night - he appeared perfectly sober - I talked with him for ten minutes - he described the two girls to me, and having some slight knowledge of such girls, I took them two days afterwards in Whitechapel.

Prisoner. I am not guilty.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transpored for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-183

1789. FREDERICK GLADMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , a hat, value 10 s., the goods of Charles Price , from his person .

CHARLES PRICE. I am servant to Mr. Benn, a horse-dealer. On Wednesday, the 12th of October, I was standing in the turnpike-road, when the prisoner came out of a house and said, "Halloo, young man, what is the matter?" he took my hat off and ran away with it - he was taken into custody on the Saturday following - I know him by sight - he lived about two miles from me - I have seen the hat in the possession of the constable.

Prisoner. It was at the fair, and we had all been drinking together, and had got a little too much beer. Witness. He was as sober as I am; my witness stood by me and said if I ran after him I should get beat.

WILLIAM TRIP . I was with Price. I saw the prisoner take his hat - he was as sober and solid as I am. I told Price not to pursue him, because there was a company of them, and I thought they would ill use him, if he got out of the town - I am a labouring man, and the prisoner worked the same as I do, at what he could get to do.

JOHN LEVICK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and had the hat delivered to me on the Sunday following, by one of his workmates, whom the prisoner ordered to take it to my house.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it with an intention of keeping it - I thought he would come after it - I sent it home on the following Sunday by another man, because I did not like to lose my work.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Publicly Whipped, and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-184

1790. WILLIAM SMITH and THOMAS PARTRIDGE were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a watch, value 3 l.; two seals, value 2 l.; a handkerchief, value 3 s.; a sovereign; a crown, and 10 s., the property of Samuel Russell , from his person .

SAMUEL RUSSELL. I am a stone-mason , and work for Mr. Malcolm, who is building the New Post-office. On Sunday, the 23d of October I had been a short distance from town to see a friend; I was returning home quite sober, along Aldersgate-street, and about a quarter before twelve o'clock at night, I met two girls, and went home with them to James'-court, James'-street, St. Lukes' , into the lower room of a house; and I gave one of them 3 s. for the use of the room; she said she was hungry, and went out to get bread and cheese; but did not return. I went to bed with the girl who remained; I felt my watch in the fob of my breeches when I pulled them off - it was a silver watch, and had two gold seals to it. There was a sovereign, a crown piece, and 10 s. in my left-hand breeches' pocket. I put my breeches under the pillow when I got into bed. In about two minutes three men came into the room; I am quite certain the prisoners were two of them. They all began swearing at me for being there; and Partridge told me for a b - r to get up; and asked where his wife was; the girl who was in bed with me, said his wife was gone out, and would not be a minute, and that I was a friend of her's; he again told me to get out of bed - she said, "O! never mind, don't make such a noise;" and told me to lie still, and never to mind them. I said, "I hope you won't ill use me." The woman then took my breeches from under the pillow, and took the watch out of the pocket; I saw it in her hand, and the seals hanging down, but I dare not speak; I was afraid; the men were not swearing then; she got out of bed and went to them, and they pushed each other about. I saw her give the watch to Smith; I took my trousers, and said to them all, "You have got my watch and money;" Smith said, "you are a d - d liar." They then all went out together, and left me in the room - I got up and dressed. I then missed a silk handkerchief, which had been lying on the table, but I had not seen them take it. I immediately went to the watchman, and described all the parties. I have never seen any of the property since. Smith was taken that night, and the others the following morning. I had only had one pint of beer that day.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is this the way in which you generally spend Sunday? A. No, but I was rather late that night; I was quite sober; I had been to Pimlico to see a man and his wife; I had only had dinner and tea, and had no liquor all the way home. These women enticed me away, or I should not have gone; there was one candle in the room when I went to bed; I was in a great fright at seeing the three men in the room, but I know I saw the woman take my watch and money. I had not given her any thing.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. Did not I stop in the room with you, after the others were gone? A. No, you went out with them.

EDWARD HANDS . I am a watchman. The prosecutor came to me as I was calling the hour of twelve, and described what had happened. I believe him to have been perfectly sober. He said there were three men who came into the room; but he did not say what sort of men they were; I had seen three men go down the court; he took me down and shewed me the room; I looked all over it, to find his property, but I could see none. I said "I saw two girls go down with you, and I know one of them." I asked him if he would wish to find his property; he said "Yes;" and I took him to the watch-house, where he gave his orders. As we came back I saw a girl and took her. I then went down the court, and heard a bustle in the room - I went to the window and heard three men talking. Smith was one; he uttered an oath, and said, "We are all right;" - he then came to the door, and said, "Watchman give me a light to my pipe." - I caught hold of him, and took him to the watch-house - he wanted to know what for - I said "Come to the watch-house and you will know."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the men come into the court? A. Yes; I do not believe that Partridge was one of them; I was close to them, and they were near a door which leads to the room. Smith I am sure was one, but I do not think Partridge was - it was before the robbery that I saw them go down the court.

COURT. Q. Had you known these men before? A. I had known Smith by sight - I do not know who was in the room with him, when he used the language I have described.

MARTIN JONES . I am constable of the night, and was on duty at the watch-house. The prosecutor came with the watchman, and stated he had been robbed of his watch, and money. Partridge was taken the next day, at the

Baker and Basket, public-house, where he came while I and Smith were waiting there; the prosecutor said - "That is one of them." I said, "Are you sure?" he said, Yes, he was. I made him stand up again, he said he was sure of it. I called him out and told him: he made no resistance, but said he would willingly go with me any where.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. Did you not say at Worship-street, you did not think it was me who used that expression? A. No - I did not.

SAMUEL RUSSELL re-examined. Q. How long were the three men in the room with you? A. Not above two or three minutes - I will swear positively that Partridge was one.

Cross-examined. Q. What part of the room was the candle in? A. On the mantel-piece - the bed was on the right-hand side of the room opposite to the candle - I was lying in the bed - any person coming in, would be between me and the light.

JURY. Q. Did you say Partridge was the man who asked about his wife? A. Yes.

SMITH'S Defence. I work at Pimlico, and went to this court, as I knew the girl who lives in the house. I went into the room, and she got up, and ran out with the two men - I asked the prosecutor what was the matter - and staid in the room and looked for his watch. I do not know whether he was in the room or not - I do not think he was. I went down to the room again, in about an hour to see for her, and the watchman took me.

PARTRIDGE. I was at home that night at about ten minutes past eleven o'clock.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

PARTRIDGE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-185

1791. THOMAS WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Messenger , from his person .

JOSEPH MESSENGER. I am an undertaker . On the 26th of September, a little before eight o'clock in the evening, I was at the top of Great Queen-street . I had a handkerchief in my pocket - I felt a jerk, and on looking round, in less than a minute, I saw my handkerchief in the possession of the prisoner. Phillips had him custody - he was stepping off the curb when he was taken.

JESSEE PHILLIPS . I was in the street, and saw the prisoner attempting the prosecutor's pocket - he took the handkerchief out - but he saw me watching him, and dropped it. I seized him, and he struck me on the head and face, and attempted to get away, but I held him until the Bow-street patrol happened to come by.

JOHN WOODWARD . I saw the prisoner fighting in the road, and heard Phillips call the watchman - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. A lady picked it up, and gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18251027-186

1792. FREDERICK WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a saucepan, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Heals .

RICHAD HEALS. I live in Tottenham-court-road , and am an ironmonger . I saw the prisoner at my door last Saturday about five o'clock - he took this saucepan, and crossed the road. I followed him and took it.

Prisoner. Q. Was the saucepan in your door, or outside? A. It was partly in, and partly out.

Prisoner's Defence. I have had a situation at Liverpool - I came to London six weeks ago, to get a situation - on Saturday last, I did get one, to go to the East Indies. I met with some young men and got tipsy - I then met a young woman, and took this saucepan for fun, as well as I could recollect, and said to the young woman, "Will you buy a saucepan?" I was then returning to put it back on the shelf, and then the gentleman took me. I was very tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

The prisoner has been under sentence of death before.

Reference Number: t18251027-187

1793. MARY STALLION was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , ten yards of linen, value 10 s. , the goods of Samuel Brown .

SAMUEL BROWN. I am a linen-draper , and live at Enfield . On the 29th of October I was in the room adjoining my shop; my wife had been attending the prisoner, who had then left the shop - she came to me, and said she was sure the woman had taken something; she described her person; I went out, and took her, and said, "Have you not taken something by mistake which does not belong to you?" she said, "No, I have nothing, but what I have paid for - you may feel my pockets." I found this piece of cloth concealed under her clothes.

WILLIAM ALFREY . I am an officer. I took the woman, and have the linen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Three witnesses gave the prisoner (who was pregnant) an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18251027-188

1794. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , twenty yards of ribbon, value 7 s.; an ounce of cotton, value 2 d.; seven yards of lace, value 20 s.; a yard of muslin, value 18 d.; a piece of quilling net, value 1 s.; three laces, value 3 d., and a piece of bobbin, value 2 d., the goods of Edmund Haighton , her master .

EDMUND HAIGHTON. I am a linen-draper , and live in Lowndes-place, Holloway . The prisoner lived servant with me for a week - I had a good character with her. In consequence of some suspicion I sent for a constable; before he came the prisoner confessed that she had stolen some property out of the shop; the constable found it in her box.

THOMAS EATOFF . I searched her box, and found the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18251027-189

1795. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , seven handkerchiefs, value 26 s. , the goods of Thomass Moss Bass .

THOMAS MOSS BASS. I am a haberdasher and draper ,

and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the 27th of October I received some information from a lad; I went out, and saw the prisoner running, about a quarter of a mile from my house; I supposed he was the person, by the description, having a Scotch cap on. I took hold of him, and he dropped a piece of silk handkerchiefs, when I called Stop thief!

JOHN TUCKEY . I live with Mr. Francis, next door to Mr. Bass'. I saw the prisoner looking in at my master's window, with a Scotch cap on - I did not see him do any thing. There was another boy with him, who went somewhere and came back with some handkerchiefs by his side, which he gave to the prisoner; I went, and told the gentleman.

WILLIAM CHESHIRE . I am an officer, and produced the piece of handkerchiefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-190

1796. MICHAEL RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , a hat, value 2 s., the goods of William Hamilton , from his person .

MARTHA WILSON . I live at No. 34, Drury-lane. I saw William Hamilton asleep on some steps in Drury-lane , about ten o'clock in the evening of the 25th of September. The prisoner went up to him, and lifted his hat off his head, but he saw me notice him, and he put it upon the boy's head again. I then went to my own door, and did not seem to notice; I turned my head again, and saw him crossing the street, and the boy was without his hat; I went and took the hat from a little basket in the prisoner's hand. I gave notice to the watchman.

WILLIAM HAMILTON. I belong to St. George's Bloomsbury school . I take out medicines for a doctor after school hours . When I got home on this night my mother was not at home, and I sat down and fell asleep. I had a hat on my head, when I went to sleep, and did not see the prisoner near me. I saw my hat afterwards.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I heard the cry of Watch! and took the prisoner - this woman gave me the hat, which the prisoner said he had found.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Drury-lane, and making the best of my way to my lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-191

1797. SAMUEL FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , six sovereigns, four half-crowns, and twenty shillings , the monies of Alfred Carter .

ALFRED CARTER. I am a shoe manufacturer , and live in Blackfriars-road . On the evening of the 20th of October I found the prisoner (who was employed by me to clean boots , and go on errands ) laying in a gateway, drunk - I sent him to the watch-house, and next morning I had him brought to my house by the officer; I admonished him and discharged him from my service - in the course of the day my apprentice went to my curriers, and found he had been there, and taken away as much as he could stand under. I afterwards found he had been to a shop in Cranbourn-street, and got 7 l. 10 s. from a customer.

ANN DAVIS . I am shop-woman to Mr. Curtis, of Cranbourne-passage. On the 20th of October the prisoner came about three o'clock, and asked me for the cash, for Mr. Carter - I asked if he had a note; he said No. I gave him six sovereigns, and 1 l. 16 s. in silver - he appeared sober, and said his master had desired him to get it.

ALFRED CARTER re-examined. Q. Had you authorized him to receive this money? A. No. I had not taken him to the Magistrate, but admonished him, and said he had disgraced himself.

HENRY BARKER . I live with Mr. Carter. I remember the prisoner being taken into custody - he asked Davis what money he had from her, and she told him - he then said he had none.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18251027-192

1798. RICHARD BENBOW was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a copper still, value 1 l. , the goods of Richard Barker .

WILLIAM RAYNER . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Tuesday, the 25th of October, I was on duty, and saw the two prisoners in James-street , about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's house - he had nothing with him, but I took him to No. 16, Gee's-court, and in a dust hole in the back yard there I found this still.

ELIZABETH CHESWORTH . I live at No. 4, Gee's-court, and sell ironmongery. On Tuesday last the prisoner brought this still to me, and asked me to purchase it; I said I did not buy any such things; he then went away: I am certain of his person.

THOMAS SMITH . I am clerk to Richard Baker - he is a mangle manufacturer ; this still is his property - I had seen it about five o'clock on the evening it was stolen.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I was with Rayner, and took the prisoner, when we searched the house, and found the still, he said, "I know nothing about it;" I said, "We will see;" he then said, "You can but transport me - you can't hang me for it."

Prisoner. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

The prisoner was recognized as an old offender.

Reference Number: t18251027-193

1799. HENRY DYER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Pearse , from his person .

JESSE PHILLIPS . I am a dealer in glass and earthenware, and live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields. About half-past nine o'clock on Sunday evening, the 30th of October, I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket in Hand-court - I collared him, and called to the prosecutor - he threw it on the-step of a door, - I picked it up - he was alone.

JAMES PEARSE. I am a journeyman tallow-chandler , I was in Hand-court , and heard Phillip's call to me - he had the prisoner by the collar, and the handkerchief in his hand - I knew it to be mine.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON . I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Sunday evening I left my mother's to go to Exeter-street; I saw the handkerchief drop from the gentleman, and ran to take it up - before I got it the witness took hold of me, and produced his staff;

he said I had picked the gentleman's pocket - I said I had not, but he took me to the watch-house.

GUILTY . - Aged 18.

Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-194

1792. ELIZABETH ROWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a bonnet, value 30 s., a handkerchief, value 5 s. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. and three yards of ribbon, value 1 s. the goods of William George Richardson .

SARAH BARLOW RICHARDSON . I am the wife of William George Richardson, he is an engineer , and works for Mr. Peck, of St. John's-street. Last Tuesday evening the prisoner came to pay me a visit at No. 11, Prince's-street, Clerkenwell , I had only seen her three times before; her husband is an engineer, and works for Mr. Peck; she remained with me about half an hour, in the course of which time I went out for about ten minutes to fetch a quartern of gin; she gave me 1 s. to get it; she drank it all; she stopped about a quarter of an hour longer, and then went away - the next afternoon I went to get a handkerchief and missed these things - I suspected her and got a search warrant; I went with the officer to execute it at the prisoner's lodgings; I saw him find the property, and knew it to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Are you certain you are married? A. I am. I found her at the house where I went with the officer - I had worn the articles on Sunday, and she came on the Tuesday - she and I went away together to the corner of the street - I saw none of these things on her - she must have concealed them under her clothes.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I executed the search warrant at the prisoner's lodgings - I found this bonnet wrapped up in the skirt of a gown, in a trunk which I ordered her to open - she hid it behind the trunk, but I ordered her to take it up again.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the trunk open? A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the bonnet in June last, and I have another which came from St. Petersburgh - the prosecutrix states she only saw me three times before, but I suppose she has been a dozen times to my house.

GUILTY - Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-195

1793. MARY ANN PEARCE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Montefield , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 30th of September , (Susan, his wife, and others being therein,) and stealing a pair of breeches, value 18 d. his property; a gown, value 8 s.; a pair of stays, value 10 s.; a petticoat, value 4 s.; a shawl, value 5 s.; a handkerchief, value 9 d.; and a bonnet, value 5 s.; the goods of Mary Morey .

SUSANNAH MONTEFIELD . I am the wife of James Montefield, we live in Helmet-row, St. Luke's, Old Street . Morey occupied the back-room, up one pair of stairs. On Friday, the 30th of September, between one and two o'clock in the day, I and other persons were at home - I had occasion to go to my own room, and passed Morey's room - I saw the door a little ajar - I staid about a minute; and then pushed it open, and saw the prisoner in the act of tying up a bundle on the bed; I said, "Pray who do you want here?" she said, "Mr. Jones;" I said, "I have no Mr. Jones lives in my house, but I see you are come to rob." The articles had been placed on the table about eleven o'clock in the morning; I staid in the room and sent for an officer; he took charge of her and took the bundle - Mr. Morey was then in the kitchen with my family - I cannot say whether the door had been fastened or not, but the key was down stairs - these breeches are my husband's, they had been in a drawer in Morey's room.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are there not a great many lodgers in your house? A. Yes, I did not know the prisoner before - there had not been a woman named Jones living in the house - we have kept the house two years, and the house adjoining eight years.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am an officer. I was sent for and found Montefield in the room up stairs with the prisoner - I put several questions to the prisoner, she made no answer - I have the breeches and the handkerchief; Mrs. Morey had occasion for some of the articles, which the Magistrate directed her to have.

(Handkerchief and breeches sworn to.)

MARY MOREY. I occupy the back-room first floor, in Mr. Montefield's house. On the 30th of September, Mr. Montefield called me up stairs - I found the prisoner there, and some articles of mine on the bed, which I had left on the table - they were all new and worth more than 30 s. - I had seen them safe between ten and eleven o'clock that morning, and it was between one and two when I saw the prisoner there, I had locked the door and put the key in the kitchen - none of the lodgers knew where it was kept - I can positively state that I locked the door when I went down, and I afterwards found the key in the kitchen where I had hung it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there many ladies in that house? A. None but myself and an old lady - I do not know how many lodgers there are in the house - my name is Mary Ann Morey.

GUILTY - Aged 28. Of stealing to the value of 1 s. 6 d. only .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-196

1794. MARY MAYHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a silk dress, value 15 s.; a bonnet, value 20 s.; a gown, value, 10 s., and a pair of shoes, value 2 s., the goods of Catherine Rumball , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

CATHERINE RUMBALL. I am single, and a straw-bonnet maker , and live in Baldwin-street, City-road . I keep the house; the prisoner lived servant with me two years ago. On Saturday, the 17th of September, I went to her father's, and they said she was in the hospital. On Saturday, the 14th, she came to my house, and said she would clean the place if I had not got a servant. I went out about three o'clock, and left her there; I returned before dusk; the prisoner was then gone, and the things for cleaning were left in the passage; I called Mary, and as she did not answer, I ran up stairs, and missed my dress from my bed-room, which was valued at 15 s.; I then returned to the parlourr, and missed a Leghorn bonnet, which was valued at 20 s.; I then missed the gown, valued at 10 s.; and the pair of shoes, which were all safe when I left

after dinner. I gave information, and the street-keeper took her.

AMBROSE BRADBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brown-lane, Spitalfields. I have a gown pawned on the 29th September, by a woman, in the name of Mary Taylor .

ROBERT LOCK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in White Cross-street, about half-past eight o'clock on the morning of the 25th of October. I have a bonnet, a gown, and a pair of shoes which I found on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress, and received an excellent character from two witnesses, who engaged to provide for her.

GUILTY. Aged 16. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-197

1795. RICHARD TAYLOR and THOMAS REEVES were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , two planes, value 5 s, and a file, value 9 d., the goods of Henry Taylor ; and a cap, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Perrin .

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a constable, and live in Shore-place, Hackney. On Sunday last, about three o'clock, I saw the two prisoners passing my house. I had reason to suspect them, and followed them about fifty yards. I stopped Taylor, and saw something inside his waistcoat - I asked what it was - he said a plane, which he had found; I then saw another in his coat pocket - he said he had found that; I then turned to Reeves, and saw the handle of a file, which he said he had found. I took hold of them by the collar, and Reeves said he would not go back unless he was carried; he took hold of some pales; I desired two young men, who were going past, to loose his hands; I then took them back - and in Taylor's hat I found another plane - and in Reeves' hat a cap and a small bag - I asked where they got them - they said they had already told me, and they would say no more - the cap, Reeves said, was his own - that he worked in the Docks, and made use of the bag to carry his victuals in, but in about two minutes he said he found it with the planes in it. I then took them to the watch-house, and in Reeves' fob I found two duplicates.

HENRY TAYLOR. I am a carpenter . I was at work at an unfinished house at Hackney . I left my tools there on Saturday last, and locked the door - these two planes and this file is mine.

CHARLES PERRIN. I am a carpenter . I was at work at the same house. I left my cap there about five o'clock on Saturday evening - this is it; the premises were locked, - the back part had been broken into by some bricks being taken out of the wall.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 19.

REEVES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18251027-198

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1796. THOMAS WOODFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 4 ozs. of tea, value 6 d. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

PELL HOWELL . I am a commodore in the employ of the East India Company. The prisoner came to their warehouse in Crutched Friars , about eight o'clock in the morning of the 14th of October; between ten and eleven o'clock he was mending one of the tea-chests , and I saw him take some tea from it, and put it into the right pocket of his trousers. I told what I had seen to Fraser, one of the elders. He was taken and searched, and 4 ozs. of tea found on him, which I compared with that in the chest, and it appeared to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see the tea in his hand? A. No, but I saw his hand grasped, and put into his pocket; there is an interior case of lead in the chest, which was whole before he went to it.

ALEXANDER FRAZER . I am an elder; on the 14th of October Howell called my attention to the conduct of the prisoner, who was employed in mending the wood of this chest; I went for Lines the officer; the prisoner was taken to the elder's room and searched - some tea was found in his right-hand pocket and some in his left; there were four ounces in all; it was black tea and seemed the same as that in the chest; there is no tea there but what belonged to the Company - the prisoner had 16 s. 6 d. a week, and worked from eight to two o'clock.

JOHN LINES . I am an officer. I was called to search the prisoner and found some tea in his right and left pockets - I compared it with that in the chest, and it appeared to correspond; it is worth 6 d., without the duty - I went to his lodgings and found four pounds thirteen ounces there.

Prisoner. It is the first time I was brought before a Court of Justice, or was ever in custody.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-199

1797. GEORGE SAVORY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 3 ozs. of tea, value 6 d. ; the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

JOHN UPTON . I am a Commodore in the service of the East India Company. The prisoner was in their service, and was at work on the fourth floor, of No. 74 room, at their warehouse in Billiter-lane , repairing the damaged chests . On the 3d of October, about a quarter before two o'clock, I had occasion to go to No. 145, on the third floor; I might be there a quarter of an hour; when I came back I saw the prisoner in the alley, where the tea was lying; he was looking towards the door of No. 19; he then put his right hand into the chest, and took out a handful of tea, which he put into his right-hand breeches pocked - I waited to see if he would take any more, which he did not - he then rubbed down his breeches and thigh and threw some of the tooth and egg into the chest. I went up to him and said, "Are you satisfied;" he said "Yes, it is all right;" I said, "I am not," and I desired him to go with me; he said he had taken a little tea, and he hoped I should not hurt him. I took him to the counting-house; he wanted to go back to fetch his stick, but I would not let him. I told the elder what I had seen;

I desired him to get a tray, I put my hand in the prisoner's breeches and took out the tea.

JOHN BITTLESTON . I am an elder in the East India Company service. I was called to elder's office by Upton; I said, "What is the matter;" he said, "Here is a tea job - I saw it taken from his right hand breeches' pocket;" I do not think the prisoner said any thing about it. I weighed the tea, and found 4 ozs. - has been in the service ten years.

The prisoner pleaded poverty, and received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-200

1789. JOSEPH EASTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting, Mary Ann Wallis , on the 18th of October , and taking from her person a purse, value 2 d., and fourteen sovereigns, her property .

MARY ANN WALLIS. I live at Walworth. I am a widow ; the prisoner had been paying his addresses to me for some time. On the 17th of October I received a note from him; this is it. - (Read.)

MY DEAR WALLIS,

I shall find a pleasure in speaking with you as quick as possible, at the White-bear, Kennington-road, near the Common.

I remain your's, for life, J. EASTON.

To Mrs. Wallis, Cow-keeper, Hill-street, Newington.

I went there, and he said "My dear, I am happy to see you: I have been thinking about taking a public-house in the country;" which he said he thought would be better than my going round with milk; he said he never loved a woman so well in his life, but one, and she died; he talked about taking out three hundred and fifty guineas on the morrow, but he should want money to take it out with; he asked if I had any; I said about ten guineas; he said he would buy a license on the morrow, and be married on the Wednesday; he came to my house and slept with my son, who is about fourteen years of age; the next morning we set off to come to town; he stopped at a public-house, and called for a trunk; I asked what he was going to do with it; he said he had a particular reason for wishing to take it to town, that it contained all his clothes and a roll of parchment - When we got to Doctors' Commons , he said, "You will not dishonour me;" I said, "What do you mean?" he said, "You will give me the money;" I said, No, I should go myself and see it paid. I put my hand into my pocket, and he took it out, and put his hand in, and took out my money; he said "I shall soon return and bring a lawyer's clerk, and sign the papers before you." I did not at the time consider myself as robbed, but waited for him till one o'clock; he did not come; I got a coach and put the trunk in, and went home - I opened it, and there was nothing in it but a frying-pan without a handle, a garden pot, a cheek of a range, and an iron hanger.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-201

1799. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of a person unknown , from his person .

JESSE PHILLIPS . I live in Queen-street, and am a dealer in earthenware. About eight o'clock in the evening of the 19th of September, I met the prisoner and another person on Snow-street - he was attempting to pick a gentleman's pocket. I followed him to Newgate-street , and when he got a short distance beyond Newgate-market, he took a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket - he threw it down, and ran towards Newgate-market - I followed him till he was stopped - I was quite close to him, and am certain of his person - I took him to the Compter - I called to the gentleman who lost the handkerchief, but he went away.

THOMAS PIKE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - I found nothing on him - I received the handkerchief from Phillips - the prisoner said nothing, but did not deny the charge.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I have to state, for the information of your Lordship, that the prosecutor makes a practice of trepanning young men, for the purpose of getting the expenses of the Court; he has no less than five or six young lads in custody these Sessions, and has no owners to a part of the property. I am innocent of the felony; the prosecutor was five or six minutes previous to his coming up to me, and, consequently, must have lost sight of me; even had I been the person he was in pursuit of.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-202

1700. REBECCA CARLTON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-203

1801. MARY RIVERS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-204

1802. GEORGE VINCEY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

AVEY ADKINS . I keep the Ben Jonson's Head public-house in Shoe-lane . Between twelve and one o'clock in the morning of the 5th of October , my wife and servants were gone to bed, and most of the lights were out; I went into the parlour, where I had two gentlemen, and I heard a shuffling in the bar - I came out, and caught the prisoner in the bar, with his hand upon my till, which was nearly drawn out - I had seen it safe about a minute and a half before - I called the two gentlemen from the parlour, and shewed them the situation in which I had found him, and the till - he was sent to the watch-house, and a number of duplicates were found on him - he had been a casual customer, but was not on terms of intimacy with me.

THOMAS ACTON . I had occasion to go into the bar, and saw the till safe about a minute before the prisoner was seized. I did not hear him say any thing there, but before the Alderman, he said he was going to the yard in the dark, and mistook his way and got into the bas - he said he had known the house five months.

WILLIAM SYDENHAM . I was called out, and saw the prisoner as has been described.

WILLIAM ELMES . I was night constable, and searched the prisoner at the watch-house - I found on him two shillings, a farthing, and a number of duplicates - he said he was entirely innocent, and mistook his way - I think he was a little in liquor, not a great deal.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had mistaken his way to the yard, but denied having entered the bar; that he had engaged a bed at the house for the night.

AVEY ADKINS. I believe he had asked my wife for a bed - I had left the bar about a minute and a half before - the till was then shut, but I cannot say it was locked - he had his hand upon the till when I saw him.

JURY. Q. Was the bar in darkness when you came out of the parlour? A. Yes; and I had a light in my hand.

GUILTY .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18251027-205

1803. HENRY UPTON was indicted for a fraud .

VERNELL JACKSON. I am warehouseman to John and William Jacombs - they are ribbon manufacturers , at Nuneaton - their warehouse is in St. Michael, Wood-street - Messrs. Cross and Sewell are customers of theirs. On the 1st of October I was in the counting-house, and hearing a voice, I went into the warehouse - I found the prisoner, who was a stranger, there, and the first word I heard him say was "What is the price of these pads?" I asked him who they were for, and he said Sewell and Cross - I and William Jacombs let him have four pieces of ribbon, in half pieces; I made out the invoice in Sewell and Cross's name, and William Jacombs delivered him the goods which he took away with him.

WILLIAM JACOMBS. I am a relation of Messrs. Jacombs. I was at their warehouse on the 29th of September. The prisoner came and asked to look at some pad ribbon - he selected one piece, and asked to look at some lustring ribbons, which I shewed him - he then asked the price of shaded pads, I told him, and he selected one piece; I asked who they were for - he said Sewell and Cross - he went away - the last witness was not there that day.

GEORGE DRAKE SEWELL . On the 29th of September, I and Mr. Cross were both in town; but I gave the prisoner no orders to go to Messrs. Jacombs; he had lived with us ten or twelve months, and I had an excellent character with him - while he was with me he had been in the habit of going to Messrs. Jacombs with orders. Mr. Cross is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-206

1804. HENRY UPTON was again indicted for a fraud .

GEORGE DRAKE SEWELL . Mr. Cross was in town on the 22d of September, but he is not here to-day.

JOHN PROCTOR . I took the prisoner into custody; he said he was sorry for what he had done, but did not say what it was. Mr. Jacombs charged him with obtaining goods under false pretences - he made no answer to that.

FREDERICK CROKER . I am in the warehouse of John Bradbury , Jeremiah Greatorex , and John Teale , in Aldermanbury : I saw the prisoner in their warehouse on the 22d of September ; he said he wanted some crimson silk shawls for Sewell and Cross, who are customers of theirs - I shewed him some; he selected two - I gave him an invoice, and he carried them away - I let him have them on his representation that he wanted them for Sewell and Cross.

GEORGE DRAKE SEWELL re-examined. Q. Had you given the prisoner any orders to get these shawls? A. No.

FREDERICK CROKER re-examined. Q. Did you state at Guildhall, what passed between the prisoner and you? A. Yes, I said to the Alderman, in the prisoner's presence, that he said he came from Sewell and Cross.

JOHN PROCTOR. It was when I brought the prisoner from Guildhall, that he stated what I mentioned on the former trial.

GUILTY .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18251027-207

OLD COURT.

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1805. JAMES STACK and WILLIAM ADAMS were on indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 4 lbs. of ham, value 2 s. , the goods of Anthony Benson .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18251027-208

London Cases - Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

1806. THOMAS HUGHES , CHARLOTTE WATTS , JOHN COLYER , SAMUEL HAY , SARAH HAY , and RICHARD BREWER , were indicted for a conspiracy . MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and LAW conducted the prosecution.

AMBROSE PARISH . I am clerk in the offices of the King's Bench prison. The defendant Hughes was in our custody in January, 1823, and discharged under the Insolvent Act, on the 22d of January. Samuel Hay came in as prisoner, on the 25th of April last - he was never in our prison to my knowledge before, but is now in custody; he came in on the 26th of February last - I have an entry, on the 8th of November, 1819, of John Colyer coming in - he was discharged under the Insolvent Act on the 8th of June.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. You do not know how much Hay paid in the pound? A. No, I remember his person. Hughes came into custody on the 27th of January last, and was part of the time within the walls - he is in custody now for an attachment for payment of costs.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Whether the Colyer you mention is the defendant you do not know? A. No.

JAMES SPENCER . I am keeper of Whitecross-street prison. Hughes came into my custody on the 16th of June, 1823, and was discharged on the 29th of March, 1824, by the Insolvent Court, and still detained till the 3d of April 1824, by a Judge's warrant. Brewer came into my custody on the 10th of June, 1823, and was discharged on the 10th of January, 1824. One Thomas Bullen came in in 1823 - I have not my book here to state the date - Hughes and Bullen both occupied the room No. 8.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. At whose suit was Hughes committed in June, 1823? A. Of one George Chatteris , for 35 l. - there were detainers against him for 17 l., 14 l., 12 l. 12 s., and 11 l., besides a Judge's warrant.

HARRIOT COOPER . I am the wife of Peter Cooper , of No. 8, Bridge-place, Harrow-road - I am a milk-woman. About the end of 1822 Hay and his wife lodged with me - I understood from them that they came from Lisson Street - my husband was employed by Hay to cart some goods and was never paid - the debt was about 30 l. - they were not in good circumstances - they had two rooms in my house; his child died while they were in my house, and I believe was buried by the parish. Mrs. Hay then washed for gentlemen's families, and employed women to wash for her. I believe she had a very good house and furniture in Lisson-street - she had a very good bed when she came to my house; she told me she had lost her goods in Lisson-street, and laid on shavings - they were certainly in distressed circumstances.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You understood she had a good house in Lisson-street? A. I understood, that by her husband becoming a bankrupt, she had lost her goods. I believe she only slept on shavings a few nights as a neighbour took her in - I know they asked for the parish ground to bury the child - they would not let her have it unless she had a parish coffin - the fees are high in Paddington parish. I know that Hay was building some houses in Park-place.

MR. LAW. Q. Was it while he was building that he became a bankrupt? A. He began building before his bankruptcy, and went on afterwards with assistance.

COURT. Q. Is your debt still unpaid? A. We received a dividend three years ago - I do not know how much it was. He has honourably paid me a milk bill of 6 l. incurred since the bankruptcy; it had been running when they were in distress, for six or seven months or more.

WILLIAM MOODY . I know Hughes - our acquaintance commenced in 1822 or 1823, in the King'-bench prison. I had been a prisoner, and was a messenger there, and at times waited upon him - I attended him the same year when he was in Whitecross-street prison, and wrote occasionally for him. I remember his living in Exmouth-street, Clerkenwell - he professed to be an auctioneer, but I never knew him do business as such - he was arrested there, and came into Whitecross-street prison - Hay frequently visited him there. After Hughes was discharged from Whitecross-street, he occupied Mrs. Bruce's cottage at Highgate, which was furnished - he was acquainted with one Bullen and his wife - Bullen and Hughes told me they could always have whatever they ordered there, just what they wanted he could have by sending for, for their firm was good. Bullen told me there was a table lamp sent there directed for - Bullen, Esq. which Hay took to his own house - I gave Mrs. Bruce possession of the cottage myself afterwards, as she came in, and said, she would not leave till she had possession. I gave her the keys, the furniture was pawned, but we got them back from the different pawnbrokers; they inhabited the cottage above half a year - Hughes went with me to get the goods out of pawn, and sent me to the cottage with them; he then lodged at Mr. Bowers', Clarendon-street, Somer's-town - Hays introduced him there, Charlotte Watts lived with him there as Mrs. Hughes; he got possession of a house in Speldhurst-street the latter end of November last - Bullen and his wife were there at first - Collyer and his wife came afterwards - it was repaired and opened for business - there was no furniture, only goods, except a few chairs, a deal table, and two French bedsteads. I was porter there - Hughes agreed to give me 18 s. a week - I was not paid - he at times gave me 5 s. on a Saturday night, to take home to a wife and six children, and sometimes 10 s. - he knew what family I had. When he opened the shop he wrote to me to come; I was there the first morning it was opened, and the first thing I did was to pawn a piece of silk by his direction - he said he meant to act with honour and pay me what he owed, which was then above 22 l. About a fortnight or three weeks after this he explained how the business was to be conducted - he said he thought he should be able to make a good thing of it, if he could only run about six months - he thought he should do very well - he should get plenty of goods as he had a good backer in Mr. Hay; he knew, with the backers he had got, nobody could get over him - that he hoped I would stick true to him, and not deceive him - that I would go to none of his creditors and expose him - he said, "I expect money from the country, and shall be able to recover myself - you are to take goods to different pawnbrokers and pawn them." I took out goods to the sale shops, and took some to Mr. Bullock's, in Holborn, three or four times. On a Saturday night I took some flannels and blankets in a truck there - he said he wanted money, as he had made an appointment with a warehouseman in the City to pay some money at six o'clock that evening, and should not wish to disappoint him, or he should not keep him sweet, and told me to take them to Mr. Bullock, who was to advance money on them. I took them and brought a cheque, for I think 10 l. - he abused me for bringing a cheque, saying, "I know if I take this into the City I shall be spoiled at once, they will know it is from a saleroom, and the name of Bullock will spoil me.

Q. What was to be done at the end of six months? - A. He said he meant to get all he possibly could, and then turn bankrupt - that he should never take the benefit of the act again; he said Mr. Hay would strike the docket, and they would work the commission, and then all might go to the devil.

Q. What were you to have for being so useful? A. Why, he arrested me after I was summoned before the Commissioners, and gave me eight months in Whitecross-street prison for it; he had promised to send me a quantity of broad-cloth, drugget and Irish linens, lawn, ribbons, &c. I used to pawn goods for 5 l., 8 l., 6 l., - and sometimes only 4 s. or 5 s. I pawned most of them with Hall, of Mary-le-bone-street; the cloths were taken in rolls as they came, the other things were all torn off into dress lengths. He said he was short, and wanted to pawn to raise himself a bit - and when he had some cambrick, he tore off a piece and said, "If this will do, I think I can make it answer. I can get a good many of these" but they would not advance much on them.

Q. When pawning did not answer, what was the next plan? A. He said "Now we will try the auction-rooms, and see what they will do." We sent a lot of flannels into Bullock's to see what they would fetch - there were a good many goods sent there - I attended the sale, and put down what they fetched. When I returned I said, I did not think they had sold well. He said, "O yes, they have - this will do very well." He said he should

be able to get more, and it was better to send to the sale rooms than to the pawnbrokers. Mrs. Bullen went to pick out the goods which she thought would suit for pawning, and she pawned a good many herself, and told me the best shops to go to, to get the most for them. Hughes was present in the shop when she said the best pawnbrokers were at Islington - Hughes said, "That will do - Mrs. Bullen knows the pawnbroker's better than you do." Hughes was arrested in January last. Charlotte Watts came out of the room and said Mr. Hughes was arrested, and told me to get down a piece of superfine woollen cloth, and raise some money for him. I did so - and took it to him, at Mr. Hughes' lock-up-house, in Cursitor-street - it was 4 l. or 5 l. He said, "I shall soon be out of this, and we shall make the thing right." - Charlotte Watts attended the shop as mistress, and went by the name of Mrs. Hughes - she managed the shop when he was absent, and while he was in custody she began to move the goods from the shop. I saw Hay at the lock-up-house, he told Hughes it was a bad job, and they must make the best of it. Hughes said, he should make it all right again. Hay seemed to be doubtful of it - but said "Never mind, we will push it all on as far as we can." I saw Brewer at the lock-up-house, he was employed to get Hughes out of this mess - he called Hughes Tom, and said what they wanted he could do, but did not care what it was, so long as he could have money. Hughes said,

"I know you are the man who can do it, if any body can;" he said he was afraid the creditors would come and take all the goods. Brewer said he would go and stop that - he would go to the house to Charlotte Watts, and make all things right - he was a prisoner in Whitecross-street when Hughes was there. Bullen, who occupied a room with Hughes there, is the person who is indicted. I have seen Brewer and Hughes together frequently in Speldhurst-street, he was particularly acquainted with Hughes, and did a good deal of writing in the back parlour. I know Colyer accepted bills for Hughes, for I took a lot to his house once, and brought them back accepted. Colyer said, "I am afraid we shall all be done together - but we may as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb - and so here goes," and then wrote his name - this was at his own house at Paddington. The bills were drawn by Hughes.

Q. Did he say what he meant by being all done together? A. He said he had an execution then hanging over his head; it was on the very day Hughes was arrested that he accepted these bills, early in January - Mr. and Mrs. Bullen and Charlotte Watts have pawned goods. Mrs. Bullen attended daily at Speldhurst-street; Henry Hughes and Co. was over the door - his real name is Thomas; I know no Henry Hughes, nor any company except the persons indicted; very few goods were sold in the shop - a great many bales and parcels of different sorts came in; they were chiefly pawned or sold at sale-rooms. I found a good many goods on the premises when I went, and they continued to come in. The chief part were pawned, or sold at sales - the shop was kept open about ten weeks - a good many goods came in while Hughes was in the lock-up-house; they had been ordered by him; particularly one lot of hosiery, from Mr. Brown's, of Goldsmith-street, Wood-street. I took a letter from Hughes at the lock-up-house, to Brown, to order them - they were brought afterwards to the lock-up-house - there were a great many in parcels of twelve pairs each; I should think more than fifty dozen: I left them in Hughes' possession. I have taken flannels to Bullock's two or three times. When he was arrested the goods remaining in the shop were taken to No. 17, Draper's-place, Burton-crescent, to a lodging which Mrs. Bullen took; she and her daughter assisted me in moving them - there was a great quantity. I have seen her take coach loads of goods from Draper's-place; she said her motive for taking them to her lodging was, that we might take them away in coach loads at a time, so that the neighbours should not notice what was being moved. What became of them I do not know.

Q. Were you ever a brick-maker? A. Never - either as master or servant. I never lived at Kilburn, or at No. 22, Oxford-street, or kept any account there. A man named Cash or Case lived there, but I did not know him. I know Hughes' hand-writing; he writes two or three different hands. I know Colyer's writing.

Q. Whose hand-writing is this bill? (looking at it) A. This is Hughes'; the acceptance is mine: it is for 14 l. 6 s. - here is a 20 l. bill: it is drawn by Hughes; the acceptance is Colyer's: here is another 20 l. bill - the same drawer and acceptor. Here is a letter addressed to me, dated, the 19th of November, but without the year, but it was 1824, for it was then I accepted the bill; it is Hughes' writing; here is another letter, dated the 7th of December, 1824, and another, the 3d of January, both in Hughes' writing: here is another of Hughes' writing, addressed to Messrs. Gilman and Co., Newgate-street. My acceptance is dated the 6th of November, 1824; I lived in Kent-street, Borough, at that time, and kept a marine-store shop, and had lived there three years - he persuaded me to accept the bill; he said he should do good for me, by sending me goods; I became his porter after I accepted the bill; he told me he would take a house for me in Somer's-town, and send me in goods to cover me. (Looking at a bill for 28 l. 11 s.) - this is drawn by Hughes, at three months - I will not swear to the acceptance; it is dated the 23d of December, 1824. (Looking at another bill) - this is accepted, "Hughes and Co." I firmly believe the acceptance to be Charlotte Watts' writing - it is drawn by Brown, and dated the 4th of January, 1825; here is a letter attached to it, which is Watts' hand-writing I believe, but will not speak positively to it - I have often seen her write in the shop books. Here is a bill for 29 l. 10 s., dated the 1st of January, 1825 - it is drawn by Hughes, in his writing, and accepted by Colyer; here is another bill, for 35 l. 13 s., drawn by Messrs. Jones and Williams - the acceptance is Hughes' writing. This letter, dated December, 1824, is Hughes' writing; here is a bill for 95 l. 7 s., drawn by Griffin and Co., by procuration of Rose; the acceptance is "H. Hughes and Co.," in Hughes' writing. This bill, for 18 l. 18 s. is drawn "Hughes and Co.," in Hughes' writing - the acceptance is mine; I was his porter at that time; it is addressed to me, as a haberdasher, at No. 27, Union-street, Somer's-town; I lived there then, but kept no haberdasher's shop - one had been taken there for me, but I never had any goods, but 6 l. worth, and never opened. I gave the goods up to the assignees.

I told him I would accept no more bills, as I had not value; he said if I did not accept this he would arrest me for the one I had accepted, which Messrs. Gilman and Lucas had. I accepted three bills in all, and never had value for any of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You do not know yourself of goods being moved from the house at Highgate? A. I took them out of pawn, and Hughes told me he had brought them up, and pawned them himself; he went with me to redeem them. I was not present when the house in Speldhurst-street was taken; I had been on the premises several times before the shop was opened. I do not know when it was taken; I lived at Somer's-town when I was his porter.

Q. You gave no information about this business till Hughes brought an action against you? A. I was summoned before the Commissioners, and he arrested me next day. I gave information to the attorney before I was arrested; it was after Hughes' arrest. I never said I would ruin him. I know Samuel Wood - I do not know Wilson.

Q. Did you never say to either of them that you would swear any thing to hang Hughes, or Hay, if you were transported for it? A. I never used that expression - I do not recollect what passed - I know Wood came to me as a spy - I cannot say what passed, but I never said I would ruin Hughes, or hang him, nor any thing like it - I said nothing about transportation. I took the benefit of the Insolvent Act in 1822. I accepted no bills for any other persons - I do not know the amount of the bills - he said he would take them up and send me goods to cover me. I did not think him responsible, but expected the goods.

Q. You thought goods were goods, come from where they might? A. I said, why if they came to that shop and found it empty, what would they say - he said "Oh. they won't come to inquire after you; they will take my word. I knew the goods were not paid for; I would not have accepted the bills if he had not said he would pay them. I certainly expected he would pay for the goods he bought; I believed, at the time, he would act with honour to all his creditors.

Q. You really believed he was going to pay them? A. I thought he might recover himself, but soon found out, by his conversation, that he meant to pay nobody. I accepted the last bill through fear. I at first thought he wished to establish a trade.

Q. The circumstances at Highgate did not raise your suspicion? A. I did not like the Highgate concern, but he said he would get into a concern, and pay every one - I thought he might reform - he left Highgate three or four weeks before he set up in Speldhurst-street.

Q. Did not you say that in Whitecross-street you wrote for him? A. Never; I never could write - I wrote my name. I gave up my business in Kent-street, as he promised to start me with about 50 l. worth of goods - I knew he had no money, but I thought his guarantee might do - he always gammoned me about paying me my money but arrested me instead.

Q. I suppose, at times, you met with a windfall out of the shop yourself? A. No, by G - d, they took care of that - they always had the duplicates and money. He was declared a bankrupt on the 4th, and arrested me on the 5th; I was two or three weeks in his service before I went to Bullock's - he said I was his servant, and must do as he told me.

Q. Look at this bill - is it not one of their shop bills? A. Yes, it says

"Bought of Hughes and Co." but over the door is "Henry Hughes and Co.;" Hay bailed Hughes out of prison - I have seen him in Whitecross-street several times, with Hughes - he might be there a dozen of times and I not notice him - I have seen him there more than once, in No. 8 Ward, but cannot say how often - I will swear I have seen him twice.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long have you known Colyer. A. Not long, I first saw him in November or December, I think - I have seen him at his own house and in Speldhurst-street - he accepted the bills on the 3d of January - I saw him accept them at his own house in a back room - I cannot speak to these bills being the same as I took (looking at one); this is accepted

"John Colyer;" I will not swear to the hand-writing.

Q. And yet you know his hand-writing? A. I know the bills I had before to be his hand-writing; but whether he can write two or three hands, as Hughes does, I cannot say. I took the bills to him in a letter - Hay did not go with me - I recollect the circumstance very well, for Hughes sent me for the stamps, and when I brought the change he said "Well, they have done themselves - they have given you sixpence too much," and I thought he might have given me that sixpence. I did not represent to Colyer that Hughes was a respectable man - he knew him as well as I did - I never bailed Hughes.

MR. BEDDOME . I am a solicitor. The defendant Hughes is the person against whom a commission of bankruptcy was issued, which I produce - It is dated the 4th of February, 1825 - the last examination of the bankrupt states, that he had once been a bankrupt before, and twice taken the benefit of the Insolvent Act - it is signed by the bankrupt and the Commissioners; the whole valuation of goods is 99 l. 8 s. 6 d. - the amount of debts due by him to his creditors is 1031 l. 18 s. 1 d. - he was present at the meeting of the creditors.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you present? A. Yes, every time; the commissioners ordered Mr. Copley to pay Brewer 13 s. 4 d. for two hours attendance, out of the bankrupt's estate.

HENRY GREGORY . I am a partner in the firm of Welch, Gregory and Cubit, No. 3, Skinner-street, City. The defendant came into our warehouse, and introduced himself about the 4th of last November; there were occasional servants in the warehouse, and he was referred to me; he stated himself to be Henry Hughes, a surveyor and auctioneer; that his wife was on the point of opening a shop in Speldhurst-street, Burton-crescent, in the haberdashery line - I observed that it was necessary a confidence should be established between us previous to our entrusting him, - he then gave me a reference to George William Case, No. 22, Oxford-street; this is his writing in my memorandum book - I then made a memorandum myself of another person to whom he referred, a Mr. Stock, No. 15 Cannon-street, St. George's in the east, but we did not apply to him. The prisoner said he should want Leghorn hats, flowers, feathers, and other things connected with the millinery business; he came again, alone, I think, two days afterwards

I stated to him that the reference was not satisfactory, and as a tradesman I could not open an account with him; he then stated he had a friend, Mr. Hay, a builder, and a man of property, who felt particularly interested in his wellfare; and he had no doubt, upon application, he would give us security to the amount of 50 l or 60 l. The following day he came with Mr. Hay, (the defendant, I think) and Charlotte Watts, who represented herself as Mrs. Hughes; Hay, myself, and Hughes, went into the counting-house together, and Watts remained in the shop; when we were in the counting-house Hay gave us a guarantee to the amount of 50 l.; this is the paper: -(Read.) -

Messrs. WELCH, GREGORY, ANE CUBIT -

In consequence of your giving credit, in the way of your trade, to Mr. Henry Hughes, of Speldhurst-street, I hereby guarantee to you the payment of the remaining balance of his accounts, from time to time, not exceeding 50 l.

In consequence of this we gave Hughes credit; and the person calling herself Mrs. Hughes looked out goods to the amount of 52 l., or 53 l.; which were sent the same evening; we had further dealing with Hughes in consequence of a letter which we received three or four days afterwards, containing an order for more goods, and a bill of exchange for 28 l. 11 s., dated the 23d of December 1824; drawn by Hughes, and Co., at three months after date, and accepted, "John Colyer, Builder, No. 2, North Wharf-road, Paddington." Our clerk took means to find the acceptor; but it was never paid. The whole amount of the goods the defendant had, was 65 l. 7 s. 3 d.; for which we have never received a single farthing.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did not Mr. Hay give you the guarantee at once? A. Yes; we have not sued upon it - our account would have become due, by an acceptance at two months, at Lady-day last - we have made no demand for payment on Mr. Hay.

JOHN PALK GRIFFIN . I live in Skinner-street, Snow-hill. In November last the defendant applied at my house, and stated that he was about to commence business in the milinery and haberdashery line, and he should want some goods of me; I said I should require references, and if all was right, I should have no objection; he said he could give undeniable references; he could bring a person of property, who was a builder, and had several houses, who would give me a guarantee to the amount of 100 l. I said I should like to see him, and make inquiries respecting him; the next day he brought this person with him to the counting-house, who represented himself as Mr. Hay. I asked him a few questions, and he signed this guarantee. I mentioned the circumstance to my head clerk, Mr. Rowe, and in about an hour we let the defendant have some goods. Watts, who represented herself as Mrs. Hughes, went with them up to the silk warehouse, and took goods to the amount of 95 l.; we drew a bill for it, but not one farthing of it has ever been paid.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did Hay say any thing? A. No, he only signed this paper.

Q. Did Hay give you any reference as it respected himself? A. Yes, to a banker somewhere near Charing-Cross; our goods should have been paid for in three months; I do not know on what day he called - it was in November; I have never called on Mr. Hay in consequence of this guarantee - I never saw him after he was in my warehouse.

CHARLOTTE WATTS. Q. Can you swear to me as being the person? A. Yes, I can.

The guarantee, and a bill for 95 l. 7 s., accepted H. Hughes, at two months after date, were here put in and read.

RICHARD WOOD LUCAS . I am a partner in the house of Joseph Gillman and John Copley , of Newgate-street. We are lace-dealers; I know the defendant; Hughes. In the month of November last, I think from the 17th to the 19th, he applied to me personally, and said he wished to open an account with us, for some particular description of goods, stating, at the same time, that he had bought some silk goods at the house of Griffin - and a person of the name of Hay had given a guarantee to that house, to the amount of 100 l., and that he intended to give us a guarantee to the same amount. He represented himself as a surveyor, and said he did not know anything at all about the business himself, but his wife would call and look out the goods the next day. I asked how it was that this gentleman had come forward in so liberal a way, to give so many guarantees. He explained that he himself was a surveyor, and Hay was a builder. I informed him, that if he opened an account with us, independent of the guarantee, I should expect part of the account to be paid in cash. He then said, being a surveyor, he was in the habit of drawing upon different builders, and, if I had no objection, he would give me these bills instead of my drawing upon him - I agreed. He paid 10 l. in cash, and remarked, at the same time, that he had a bill of about 14 l., if I had no objection to take it - it was sent to us in a letter. We sent goods to Mr. Hughes at that time, and afterwards to the amount of 170 l. I do not recollect how many went at first. This is the bill I received by the post -(read.)

This was Moody's acceptance, at two months, for 14 l. 6 s. I never received any part of the money for this Bill. He called again, and ordered more goods - I should think within a few weeks. I do not recollect what took place upon that second call, but I remember his once desiring a particular description of goods, on which he wished to have an extension of credit; I believe there were two bills received, but I cannot be positive. I think we have been paid on his account about 50 l., and the balance now due is about 130 l.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Then he paid you various sums? A. Yes, I should think till within two months of his bankruptcy - I do not know when his commission took place. I was in the country in February and March. I cannot tell whether we received anything in January. I think the 50 l. was received in small sums, of about 10 l. each.

COURT. Q. Was it required that money should be paid on the sending out of goods? A. A certain amount was to be paid the first, and second times; there was not in any case an agreement that any part of the money should be paid before the goods were delivered. I saw Mr. Hay, when he brought the guarantee, and I think the defendant is that gentleman - I have not seen him for twelve months, but, to the best of my belief, this is the same person. We afterwards endeavoured to find out Mr. Hay, but I did not go myself; I believe I have not seen him since the time of the guarantee, except on a trial at Westminster - he was pointed out to me then.

HUGHES. Q. Are you not assignee to the estate? A. My partner is.

Q. Did not I bring an action against you for suing out a fictitious commission? A. He did; this indictment was preferred by my partner; but I think I can venture to say it never was thought of till the prisoner brought his action - I cannot any how long it was before the bill was preferred - I cannot say whether he paid me 30 l. in cash after the last goods were sent in - he paid something, but I do not know the amount - I think the bills of parcels and receipts were made out in the name of Henry Hughes and Co. - I never knew them by any other name - I knew nothing respecting a Thomas Hughes. When they applied to us, on the 21st of June last, I have heard the defendant had offered a warrant of attorney, but I was out of town at the time - when he brought his action the verdict was in our favour - I was not present, at the trial - I think I have heard my partner say 50 l. has been received from their estate, the produce of the property on the premises - our house is very largely out of pocket by this transaction - there was a petition before the Lord Chancellor - instructions were given to our solicitor to prefer this indictment, and the Society for the Protection of Trade afterwards took it up.

JAMES CALLOW . I am in the employ of Messrs. Gillman, Lucas, and Co. - some dealings took place between Hughes and them - I was sent about a guarantee - I did not see Hughes at that time; he was not at home - I left the guarantee with his wife, with a particular charge that it should be signed and sent to the warehouse by the two penny post, if there were no other conveyance - I saw it, bearing the name of Hay - it was produced in the Common Pleas, but not by me - I have not seen Mr. Hay since to converse with him - I have seen this bill, drawn on Moody - it came due on a Sunday, and I made inquiries about it on Monday, the 10th of January, at No. 22, Oxford-street - I think it was a fancy jewellers - he was a new comer, and referred me to a person named Cave, who had occupied the house previously - I found him in Hand-court, Soho - he is a manufacturer of fringes and bed lace - he professed to know nothing of the parties; I went several times to Kilburn, but could find no such person known there; I inquired at every shop and public-house in the village, and among the brickmakers; I went to Speldhurst-street, and saw Miss Watts; supposing her to be Mrs. Hughes, I informed her of what I had been about, and that I could find no such parties; I directed her to inform Mr. Hughes of it; she said Mr. Hughes was at Chichester upon auctioneering business, or it might have been Colchester or Winchester; she said she supposed we were aware that he was concerned in that business, or words to that effect; I asked whether he had taken any part of his own stock with him; she said No; I said this from the appearance of the stock; I had been there repeatedly on application for money, and used to see Mrs. Hughes, as she was called, or sometimes Mr. Hughes; I have seen another person there, but I cannot say who; I asked Miss Watts where I might find Mr. Moody; she said she knew no more of him than the address upon the bill; she appeared rather confused, and expressed her surprise that the bill had not been taken up, and said she would send immediately for Mr. Hay, Mr. Hughes' friend, and he would take it up; I was present when Colyer came to our house; I have spoken to him repeatedly in the King's Bench; I cannot say when, but it was some time after the warrant; I conversed with him about the transaction, and he wished my employers to withdraw, or something of that, to give him liberty to support his family.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you see Mr. Hay in this business? A. Yes, repeatedly, at his house; but I did not see him at the commencement of the business.

Re-examined. Q. Had you, at any time, any conversation with Hay? A. Yes, I was in the counting-house when Hay and another person, who might be Colyer, were there, but I cannot say what passed; the account of Hughes and Co. was then open in the ledger; I never saw him write.

RICHARD FRIEND . I am salesman to Messrs. Gilman and Lucas. I went with Mr. Coplin, one of the partners, to the house in Speldhurst-street; I cannot recollect the time; I saw Watts there, and asked for Mr. Hughes; she said he was not at home; we called in consequence of a bill of Moody's being dishonoured; Watts said Hughes was in the country; in March and April I received two bills, accepted by Colyer, at No. 2, North-wharf-road, Paddington; I found the house shut up; I have never found him out to present them.

TIMOTHY ROWE . I am clerk to Messrs. Helps and Ray, of Cheapside; we supplied Hay with goods; he paid in part for the first parcel, with a bill on Moody for 18 l. 18 s.; here is the bill; it is drawn on William Moody, haberdasher, Union-street, Somer's-town, dated the 28th of September; I presented it; the house was shut up, and the bill dishonoured; a guarantee was given us; we credited them to the amount of about 100 l.

HUGHES. Q. Do you know this handwriting? A. Yes, it is Helps and Ray's receipt.

RICHARD THRESHER . I am porter to Messrs. Helps and Co.; I carried goods to Speldhurst-street, in November last, and saw Hughes there; Hay was there giving directions about having bolts put to the door; Hughes wrote this guarantee (looking at it); Hay signed it; I witnessed it in their presence, and delivered it to master.

This guarantee was here read, limiting the amount to 100 l.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You are quite sure Hay is the person? A. Yes, they were preparing the shop for opening; I saw no carpenter there; Hay was giving orders to the smith.

SAMUEL GREATHEAD . I am in the employ of Samuel Fossick , who is a quaker. The defendant Hughes bought goods of him to the amount of 114 l. - flannels, baize, and other things - our warehouse is in Mumford-court, Milk-street - I was on a journey at the time, but when I returned, I applied at Speldhurst-street for the money several times but could never see him - it was about the 6th of January, I saw Watts, whom I understood to be Mrs. Hughes, and always got promises, sometimes she said he was at Highgate, sometimes at Hackney - I said I would wait upon him at any time, night or day, if he would appoint a time, but never could get an appointment. I called forty or fifty times, he was always gone somewhere. I said it was very strange - she said his business was of that

nature he was continually out - my master has not received a farthing.

Prisoner HUGHES. Q. Is this your bill of parcels? A. Yes, our regular credit is three months, two and a half per cent. off - the month they are bought in and the month they are due makes five.

Q. You called for money not due? A. I understood you were going to pay some on account, and went for it, the credit would expire on the 30th of April. I recollect once seeing Hughes at the warehouse with Colyer and Hay.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When was that? A. They came on account of a bill which Mr. Fossick had received, and did not approve of, they called and had it back.

EDWARD PRIOR . I am shopman to Thomas Farren, warehouseman, Bread-street. Hughes applied to us for goods - he was brought to us by Messrs. Helps's warehouseman, named Carter, who is now in our employ - I asked him what property he had, he said he had, or should have, very shortly, 500 l. or 600 l. - we afterwards received a guarantee from the defendant Hay - I think I have seen him at master's with Hughes; I do not know on what business. We received some bills from Hughes - I think we had one on Colyer. A person once came with Hay and Hughes; I think it was Colyer, but am not certain - the amount of the debt is about 150 l. - 10 l. in cash was paid a few days after - he had the goods and a bill on Colyer which is not paid; I and Hays, guarantee.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You do not know whether the guarantee is valuable? A. I think it is not.

Prisoner HUGHES. Q. I was introduced by Mr. Carter? A. Yes, we trusted him from that introduction, and did not require a reference - the goods became due the last Thursday in March - I asked for a guarantee or some security.

EVAN JONES . I am in the woollen trade, in partnership with Mr. Williams. On the 8th of December, I was in Mr. Stack's warehouse in Cheapside, and saw Hughes there - I was introduced to him, and solicited him to buy goods of me - our warehouse is in Wood-street; he said he did not want any thing in my way as he bought every thing he wanted of Mr. Fossick. I went home, and he came into my warehouse in two or three hours and bought a few flannels amounting to 8 l. 9 s. - he did not pay for them. On the 14th he gave me another order, amounting to 15 l. 15 s. 6 d., and bought another parcel which came to 11 l. 8 s. 8 d. On the 17th he gave me a guarantee for the amount. I drew a bill on him for 35 l. 13 s., dated the 1st of January, sent it for acceptance, and received it back accepted, as it is now, this is it (looking at it.) About the end of January, or beginning of February, I saw Hay and spoke to him about the guarantee; he said he would take it up in the course of a week or so; it has never been paid. Hughes bought goods very easily, which roused my suspicion - I advanced ten or fifteen per cent. the second time and he made no objection.

A guarantee from Hay to the witness for 100 l. was here read.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. The last time you saw Hay was when this conversation took place about the guarantee? A. I saw him at no other time - I shewed him the guarantee - he said the signature was his writing. I saw him afterwards at the King's-bench; he said he expected to receive some hundreds of pounds in a week or two, and then he would take it up.

Prisoner HUGHES. Q. Did you not write to me, stating that you should like to be placed on the same footing as Mr. Fossick? A. I wrote for a guarantee - I drew at three months for my goods - the bill would be due on the 4th of April. I remember calling on the 4th of February and asking for money, none was due, and I asked for goods but was not aware that a docket was struck against him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Look at this bill and two letters, did you receive them from Hughes? A. I did, I had reasons for not crediting them further. (Read).

The first, letter stated, that the guarantee of Mr. Hay was enclosed - the second enclosed the bill of 35 l., and stated that they should send a guarantee for 35 l. and withdraw the one for 100 l. - also wishing to know why the goods ordered were not sent.

ISAAC JAMES MORRIS . I am a flannel-draper, and live in May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane. On the 25th of January one Evans called, and left an order with my wife, in consequence of which I sent to Mr. Hughes, in Speldhurst-street, some flannel, by Jones my porter, and next day I took some myself. I went with the goods the first day, and saw Hughes - he asked the price which I named; he said they were rather too high. I asked if he meant to pay money, or credit; he said it was no object to him so that the price was low in proportion - they came to about 25 l., he paid 5 l., and wished to see some of a finer quality. I took some, he was not at home - I asked Watts what time he would be in; she said probably I could not see him that night, but in the morning I might. I called in the evening, and left a fine piece of flannel - called again in the morning, saw Hughes, and agreed for it. He said they came to more than he had got, but he had a good bill, which he paid me - this is the same date and amount, (a bill on Colyer for 29 l. 10 s.); he said where Colyer lived, and lent me the bill, or a copy of it to make inquiry; he said he was a timber merchant, and builder, at Paddington. I went to inquire, leaving the flannel to abide the event of my inquiry. I was not satisfied, they told me not to trust Colyer. I returned the same evening, and saw Mrs. Watts; she said the flannels were gone to a master tailor, who was likely to keep one or more of them, and I if would take the bill (my account was 43 l. 10 s.) I should have the balance money next day. I took the balance, which was 13 l., there was a bad sovereign among it. I was induced to give her a receipt for the 13 l., and to make a memorandum of the bill I had received. I came out and met Mr. Miller, and in consequence of what he said, I went next morning to Bullock's auction-room, Holborn, and saw my flannels there; they were put up to auction on Saturday, and I bought them in for 30 l. odd, which was 13 l. less than what I sold them for. I went on Friday evening before the sale, and saw Mrs. Watts at Speldhurst-street, and asked her for the money for the bill and bad sovereign; she said I had been exposing her, and if I did not get out of the house, she would send for an officer; she said Mr. Hughes was out. I looked through the glass-door, and saw him in the parlour, and said so; they

then threatened me with an officer - I then offered to take 10 l. for the 29 l. bill; they would give me nothing, but told me to wait until it became due. As I came out of the auction-room I saw Hughes, and told him I had bought my own flannels back again; he said that could not be, it was my mistake. I said, I had marks on them; he went in and said, "You have not bought them under what I gave for them." I said, I had. He said - "Well Mr. Bullock must abide by it, if he has sold them for less." I then offered him the 29 l. 10 s. bill for them; he would not take it, but flew off. I paid Mr. Bullock for them: I sold the bill for 5 l. to Messrs. Gilman and Co.: this is it, (looking at it) reads.

EDWARD BULLOCK . I keep auction-rooms in Holborn, In January last, I remember some flannels coming to my room, in the name of Hughes, in Spelderhurst-street; they were sold to Morris; there was a reserved price on them; they were sold rather under it; I do not remember what the reserved price was; I made an advance on them before the sale; the balance (which was very trifling) was paid to Hughes' order; they came in two days before the sale.

MR. SPENCER re-examined. I have now the book, by which I find that Bullen was committed on the 1st of August 1823, and was discharged on the 26th of August. He was in the room No. 8, with Hughes; Brewer was in No. 7; he came in after Hughes was discharged the first time - but the second time Hughes came, they were together, and Brewer was in No. 7.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Brewer was in a room by himself? A. Yes; but in the same yard - it was well known that he was an attorney.

JOSEPH MILLER . I lodged in the house in Speldhurst-street; my wife lodged there before we married. I had an opportunity in many instances of observing their conduct. I observed goods brought into the house in the day time and moved the same night; I suppose two-thirds of them went off in that way. I remember seeing the invoice of one parcel, which amounted to 95 l.; Mrs. Bullen was represented to me as the forewoman - Hughes was absent fourteen or twenty days in January; Watts managed the business then; she was called Mrs. Hughes, and told me he was gone to Chichester on business, (not to Chichester-rents), I followed some goods which were taken out to the house of Hurst, a sheriff's-officer, in Tooke's-court, Cursitor-street, and saw them taken in there. I have seen Brewer at Speldhurst-street, three or four times, and early on a Sunday morning; he has remained there during the day. I merely saw him come down stairs, and cannot say what he did there; I saw Morris there, and made a communication to put him on his guard.

HUGHES. Q. How could you ascertain that the same goods which came in in the morning, went out at night? A. They were left in my wife's apartment - she received them, as nobody else was in the house, and in the evening some of them were removed out; this was before the shop was opened; I did not sleep in the house then; it was before my marriage. I cannot say that the goods were not brought back after the shop was opened - I do not believe they were. I visited there daily, and was married shortly after.

Q. Have you not frequently threatened to ruin me off the face of the face of the earth? A. Never; I never used an angry word to him, except once, when I found how business was conducted - I said I considered it my duty to inform his creditors: I supplied him with goods amounting to 20 l. - there were some bottle stands among them - you said they were highly approved of - I bought goods of him to the amount of 19 l. or 20 l. I did not go to the landlord to get him to distrain for rent. I was served with a notice of action for defamation of character, used by my wife, in January, but have heard no more of it.

Prisoner WATTS. Q. Did you not abuse me very much one night, and hold out threats? A. Never; I applied for a balance of account, but used no abusive language: she said he was at Chichester; I said he was not - she seemed much affected, and nothing further passed.

MARY AMBROSIA MILLER . I am Mr. Miller's wife. Before we married I lodged in Hughes' house, in Speldhurst-street, before November last, before the shop was opened, and continued there till the end of January. Before the shop was opened, feathers, flowers, Leghorn hats, silks, and ribbons, were brought in - I called them over to the invoices myself, being alone in the house, I wished to see if they were correct before I received them - I think they came from Messrs. Gregory and Co.'s, Snow-hill, and from Mr. Griffith. When Hughes came to reside in the house, he told me he was an auctioneer, and had been married to Watts about six months - that he took the shop expressly for her, and if the produce was 500 l. a year, it was entirely for her use; goods were continually coming in, and were carried out by different persons, which I thought very strange - they were large packages, in boxes and paper parcels; some were carried out in the same way as they came in. I have seen Moody, and a man named Bullen, take them away - I used to receive written orders from Watts, before they resided there, to deliver goods to Smith, the servant - this continued after the shop opened - I have seen hackney coaches take large parcels away, and one evening saw a cart taking goods away. I think there was very little custom to the shop, but I had not much opportunity of observing. I did not notice as a spy - it was merely what came under my observation. Mrs. Bullen was employed in the shop very constantly - I have seen Mrs. Colyer several times there - I have seen Mrs. Hay at tea with Hughes, once or twice, and I believe the house was shewn to her. - Brewer was up and down in the house and breakfasted there once or twice. I may have seen him there three times.

HUGHES. Q. Did I not say I took the goods to have them trimmed? A. Some were sent for that purpose.

Q. Two days before the shop was opened were not a number of boxes brought from my house? A. A number of boxes came in, but came from the City, for I received them - the servant certainly brought in, perhaps, a dozen bonnets trimmed.

WATTS. Q. Have you not frequently told me you thought I had not a will of my own? A. I have no recollection of it; I may have said so.

MARY ELIZA SMITH . I am now in the service of Mr. Evans, of Marchmont-street. I lived in Hughes' service, at No. 43, Carrington-street, Somer's-town, before he went to Speldhurst-street - he occupied the front parlour, furnished;

Watts, who passed as Mrs. Hughes, lived with him; about a month before we went to Speldhurst-street he said, in my presence, that he had taken a house in Speldhurst-street, for his wife - that he was an auctioneer, and his wife was to be a haberdasher. Mr. Hay and Mr. Bullen visited him in Speldhurst-street, and sometimes their wives came with them. I have seen Colyer there, but not Brewer. I have seen Mr. Hay there, but not his wife; I went to the house in Speldhurst-street daily, before the shop opened; I heard that Hay and Colyer were both builders; they were talked to as builders. Hughes took the shop three weeks or a month before he went to live in it; Mrs. Miller lodged there when he took it; parcels used to come from the City, and I used to take them in; there were bonnets, hats, cloaks, and several parcels, which I did not open. I took two or three hats myself to Mr. Hunt, in Tooke's-court afterwards.

Q. Before Hughes came into the house did all the goods remain there? A. I do not know. Mr. Hay, Mr. and Mrs. Colyer, Bullen, and Brewer visited them in Speldhurst-street; Brewer first came the beginning of January - I only saw Mrs. Hay there twice; Mrs. Bullen was frequently there, and while Hughes was in the spunging-house she lived there continually. A parcel of hosiery came in while he was in the spunging-house; and some flannel came from Morris'; some goods went away in coaches of a night. Jackson, an oilman, who lived at Paddington, used to take them away - Mr. and Mrs. Hughes used to give them to him - that happened once, and once some things went in a coach to the spunging-house; old Mrs. Hurst and Mrs. Hughes took them. I know the flannel went to the auction-room. Mrs. Bullen took a parcel of shawls to a pawnbroker's, in Skinner-street, Somer's-town - I was going out, and watched her; the parcel was large enough to contain six; I used to brush Hughes' clothes sometimes, and duplicates used to fall out of his pockets; I suppose one hundred fell out one morning after he left the spunging-house (he was there from the 3d to the 20th of January;) I saw Mr. Hay and Colyer visiting him at the spunging-house - Mr. Dimsdale came in, and asked Watts for Mr. Hughes, when he was at the spunging-house - she said he was gone to Chichester. A person once came to inquire the character of Mr. Bullen; Mrs. Hughes said he was a very respectable man down at Brighton, and his wife was a milliner there - Mrs. Bullen was present, and heard all this, and when the man was gone said she was very much obliged to Mrs. Hughes for giving Mr. Bullen that character. Mr. Brewer was at Speldhurst-street while Hughes was at the spunging-house, and after he came out Bullen was frequently there, writing, up stairs. Hughes was at home a week, and surrendered to prison on the 27th; Hay and Brewer were at the house during that week - no goods came in that week, but some were taken away by a Mr. Olive, a tailor, who lived in Old Cavendish-street; he took away a large quantity of cloth, and Hughes' brother took a small parcel; the goods looked much less in quantity than before I missed them, but did not know how they were gone; there was not much custom to the shop.

Q. Between the 27th of January, when Hughes surrendered, and the 4th of February, when the messenger under the commission came, were any goods taken away? A. I took some myself to a coach with Mrs. Hughes; they were shop goods, as many as we could carry - there was broad-cloth among it; Brewer was not there when goods were being moved that I know of; I took a new ladies, cloak to Mrs. Colyer in that week, and Mrs. Bullen had some goods. Watts slept at the spunging-house, but came home every morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You never saw Mrs. Hay in Carrington-street? A. No, I saw her twice in Speldhurst-street. Mr. Hay was at Carrington-street two or three times a day - he was a carpenter and builder, and repaired the house.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. You took the cloak from the shop before the messenger came in? A. I took it in the morning, as he came at night. Mrs. Colyer told me to mind it was not for her - she did not say who it was for; I was told to take it to her from Mrs. Hughes. Watts had a sister living in North-street, Manchester-square, I believe. Colyer lived at a shabby house in Wharf-row, Paddington.

HUGHES. Q. Did not you in the first three weeks in November take several large quantities of goods from Speldhurst-street to Clarendon-street? A. Yes, the bonnets were trimmed by Watts - I do not know what the others were taken for. I took the bonnets back, but nothing else. The landlord of the house in Clarendon-street kept a servant, named Maria - she assisted in moving a basket of childrens's bonnets and gentlemans's hats - the hats did not come from Spelder-street; a number of cloaks were moved - Maria helped me but once. I am positive Watts made up two or three caps in Clarendon-street. I took several band-boxes to Speldhurst-street - I do not know whether they contained bonnets or caps. I was told to deliver the cloak to Mrs. Colyer - nothing was said about Mrs. Young - I do not know her. I know nothing of Watts and Mrs. Miller quarreling; Mr. Hughes quarrelled with Mr. Miller.

Q. Have you not heard him say he would swear anything for 5 s.? A. Never; I never said I would injure you all I could, for not leaving me sufficient money, while the messenger was in possession. On the Sunday after the messenger came, I came to you at Agnes-place, St. George's-fields, but said nothing of the kind - I went to say I was going to a situation next day. Mrs. Hughes once sent me to Moody's for a blanket and pair of sheets - I did not get them then, but Mrs. Moody gave them to me on the following day - Moody was not at home the first time.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Hay continue his visits two or times a-day when the repairs were all over? A. Yes; I received such a character from Mrs. Hughes, as enabled me to get another place.

COURT. Q. Did Hay call two or three times a-day in Clarendon-street or Speldhurst-street? A. In Clarendon-street; and he often called in Speldhurst-street - two or three times a week.

MR. PRENDERGAST addressed the Court on behalf of the defendant Hay, contending that, although he was now a prisoner in the King's Bench, and in difficulties, yet he was a man of property, and eventually he would be able to meet the guarantees which he had given, believing the business would be conducted honourably.

MR. CRESWELL addressed the Court on behalf of Colyer, whom he represented as having innocently accepted the

bills, and being altogether unconnected with the nature of the transactions at Speldhurst-street.

HUGHES' Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury - Though placed in this degraded situation, you will find I have been more sinned against than I have sinned. Up to 1820 I was a man of very respectable connexions, at Cheltenham; but from loss in trade, and an illness of two years, I was never able to recover myself; and I was compelled to seek the benefit of the Insolvent Act in 1823, when I gave up property amounting to 15 s. in the pound. During the time I was in the King's Bench prison, my wife became acquainted with a man of the name of Chartris, a prisoner in that place; and in two months afterwards I was arrested by Chartris, on a pretended debt of 200 l., and thrown into Whitecross-street prison; and during that time he eloped with my wife and child, whom I have never seen since, and left me without a change of linen. I remained in prison till 1824, when I was released by the Insolvent Debtor's Act. In consequence of having obtained damages from Chartris. I had a conversation with some friends, and among the rest with Mr. Hay; who offered to advance the sum of 500 l., as soon as he could dispose of his houses in Park-place, Paddington. I then took the house in Speldhurst-street, Hay fitted it up for 100 l., which he agreed should remain for one or two years on my paying him the interest. I was promised several sums of money, in March and April, from my brother, who keeps an Hotel at Cheltenham. I paid for the fixtures of my house, and other sums of money; when I had not much left, and felt myself in dilemma. I called on Mr. Hay, who lent me cash at different times to the amount of 100 l. He put up several houses for sale, by Mr. Robins, and made up his mind to advance me the 500 l. I applied to several houses to purchase goods on the usual mercantile terms, and among the rest of the houses which have been mentioned. The credit was short; I was therefore compelled to make sacrifices to pay their money. I spoke to Mr. Lucas, who said he did not like to do more, till some more money was paid, and asked for a reference, which I gave to Mr. Case - this was about the 9th of November; I called the next day, and saw them, when they said they should require the guarantee. I applied to Mr. Hay, and after a great deal of trouble I did prevail on him to become a guarantee; I called on Messrs. Gillman and Co., and told them I had got a guarantee - they said they drew their own guarantees, and they would send it to him. On the 12th or 13th of November they did furnish a guarantee; I went there on the 15th of November, and Hay signed it, in the presence of Lucas, who said, "As you are a stranger, you will give us a reference," when he gave them a referrence to Messrs. Cox and Co., bankers, Charing-cross. I called again, and they said they did not like the reference of a banker, and they wished some other. I called on Mr. Hay, and he referred to a Mr. Rowley. They sent in the goods on the 19th of November; on the 18th I called on Messrs. Gillman and Co., who said they would send the goods, and wished to know when I would look them out - I called on the following morning, and Lucas said that as their credit was short, it would be better for me to pay in what money I could from time to time, and then I should make a good market. He asked if I could not give them some money then - I told them all the money I had was 10 l., which I paid them. On the 19th I told Watts to go and select some goods at their warehouse, which she did, and received memoranda like these; Hughes and Co. paid Gilman and Co. such a sum. One was in the shape of a note: "We have received 10 l. by bearer, for which we return you our thanks." I sent them five ten pounds between the 19th of November and the 30th of December. On the 3d of January, wishing to make my account as low as I could, knowing that Gilman and Co.'s account would be due on the 4th of February, I applied to John Colyer, a friend of Watts, to accommodate me with the loan of a few bills at two and three months, but I never had any connexion with him till the second week in December, and did not even know him personally for some time. In consequence of his knowing Watts he lent the bills; and I sent two of them, one at two months, and one at three months, to Gilman and Co., to place to my account. I was arrested by one Plaister for a sum of nearly 200 l., but I was discharged on Judge Littledale's order, that debt having been in my schedule; this was on the 3d of January; I was put into a lock-up-house, and my creditors all brought around me, in consequence of the wrong information which had been circulated. I remained there till the 21st. During the time I was there, they contrived to get two persons, of the name of Courtney and Kirk, to lodge a detainer against me for 14 l., which sum I was compelled to raise by sending goods to the auctioneer, and to raise the rent and taxes, to remove them from my dwelling-house. I continued in business till the 27th, when I was arrested on a writ of contempt from the Court of King's Bench. I was compelled to raise the money by sending the flannel to Bullock, and getting 25 l. upon it; I sent for the party, who refused to take it, unless I would pay an enormous sum of costs, which I would not. I was sent that night to the King's Bench prison; I got out by day rules, and exerted myself to pay the bill of Gilman and Co. on the 4th of February. On the 3d of February they struck a docket against me, and, on the following day, took possession of my goods. The assignees got a quantity of goods of other people, and placed them with mine, that I should not know which were mine and which theirs, which the catalogue will confirm. I felt happy that I never committed an act of bankruptcy. About three days after the commission had been opened, they handed an account in to Mr. Hay, wherein they state that I had received goods, and they leave a balance of 91 l. 0 s. 10 d.; and what did they do but withdraw the two bills, which they received on the 3d of January, and which had been paid into their banker's hands, and then say the balance is 91 l. 0 s. 10 d., and the bills 40 l.; but not satisfied with this, they suffered the bills to become due, and sent the following notice: "That the bills on J. Colyer have been presented, and returned unpaid." I never had any transaction with Colyer until the beginning of 1825; Hay never knew I was in insolvent circumstances; and as for Watts, she acted as my housekeeper, and passed as my wife. Morris was recommended to me, about the 24th of January, by a person named Evans; he came to my house several times, and did not find me; he was very anxious to sell goods; and at last I saw him, and purchased goods of him to the amount of 26 l., and paid him with a bill, and 13 l. in cash;

he wrote on the invoice - "Received of Mr. Hughes, deposit for goods, 5 l.; 26th January." On the 27th, in the morning, he called on me, and received the balance, and gave me the following receipt: "Received, January 27th, 1825, 13 l. 11 s., and a bill of 29 l. 10 s., due the 4th of March." He returned and said that he had heard that Colyer's house was mortgaged, but he would take the bill on my recommendation. You have had it in evidence that I had not much business, and I was forced to send goods to the sale-rooms to establish my credit, and to get on till spring; these sacrifices were made for no other purpose. They have stated that my stock was sold for 90 l., but it cost me more than 200 l., and the stock and fixtures amounted to nearly 400 l.; my debts, and the surplus of my estate, will more than cover every penny I owe in the world. Moody has stated that he would swear any thing to hang me; he has offered himself as bail, and been rejected; he has stated that his name was John M'Cleland, and passed by that name. I can prove that what Miller and his wife have stated is wholly untrue.

WATTS'S Defence (written). The prisoner was up to the month of July, 1824, a dress-maker of respectability, and of character unimpeachable; at that time she became acquainted and became housekeeper of defendant Hughes, and acted, on all occasions, as she was directed by Hughes. In the month of November, when Hughes took his house in Speldhurst-street, she was instructed by him to pass as his wife, and continued to do so under the promise of his making her his wife, so soon as Hughes could obtain a divorce against his present wife, (who has been living in a state of adultery for six years.) Watts managed the dress-making department, and, in Hughes absence, always attended in his shop to serve customers; she was directed by Hughes, on the 19th of November last, to go with him to the house of Gilman and Co., and select out some goods as she understood the lace trade better than him. The goods were selected out and approved by Hughes and sent to the house that day on the 24th of November; Watts went again by directions of Hughes, and purchased for him more goods, which were sent accordingly; on the 29th, Watt's again went to the house of Gillman and Co., by Hughes directions, and purchased more goods which were part sent.

JOSEPH ROWLEY . I am a boot-maker, and live in New-street, Covent-garden. I have known Hay three years; his character has been a very good one; I have done business for him; he has paid me well; there has been some money transactions between him and me, for about ten pairs of boots and shoes. I have visited him in the way of business, and saw him building three or four houses at Paddington; he resided in one of them, and shewed me the others; they are second or third rate houses; there were a great many men at work, and he had the control over them; that was in the course of the summer of 1824; I know he had the direction of them in October; I called on him in the summer of the present year, and he was then living in one of them; I know he had the control of them when I was there the last time, because he was speaking about the work people; it was on a Sunday evening; I was necessitated for a little money; and he gave me a cheque for 20 l., which was paid at his banker's at Charing-cross; this was in the early part of January, 1824, according to the best of my recollection, but I cannot be certain what month; it was in last year; I repaid him in about three months, in two five pound notes and a ten pound note; I have been distressed since, as tradesmen are; I will not swear it was not as late as July in last year.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What month do you believe it was? A. In January.

Q. Was it for a particular time? A. Yes, for three months.

Q. How long have you been in business there? A. Nine years.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say you have known this gentleman three years? A. Yes.

Q. Did you serve him with boots on your first becoming acquainted with him? A. No; I believe I began to serve him in a very few months afterwards. I first became acquainted with him in the summer time, about three years ago.

Q. Where did he live in 1822, when you first became acquainted with him? A. In a place nearly opposite where he built the houses.

Q. At the house of a Mrs. Hooper, the milk woman? A. I believe it was, but I never went into the house.

Q. Do not you know that at that time he was in a state of most distressing poverty, and lying on a bed of shavings? A. No.

Q. When did you become acquainted with his great opulence? A. I think it was in 1824, when I saw him inhabiting a house. I did not know of his being in Whitecross-street prison.

Q. Will you swear that you have, within these two months, seen him at his home? A. No.

Q. Will you swear to four or six months that you have seen him on a Sunday evening at his own house? A. It must have been light in the evening.

Q. Will you swear to May, June, July, and August, that you saw him there on a Sunday evening? A. No.

Q. Will you swear that at any time this year you have seen him there? A. Yes.

Q. Can you swear that he had a bed to lie on or bread to eat, or that he had not a child that died and was buried by the parish? A. No.

Q. And yet will you swear that you have seen him at his house at Paddington? A. Yes; I think very lately.

Q. Now, I will tell you, man, to your utter confusion, that he has been in prison ever since April - have you ever been bailed at Westminster? A. I have been arrested on common process, and been bailed once, within the last twelve months.

Q. How often within the six months before that? A. Never.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You say you have seen this person at this house this summer? A. Yes; I cannot swear at any particular time, but it was in the summer; if he was committed in April I must have been mistaken.

STEPHEN ROGERS . I am a clerk to Mr. M'Dowall - he is a timber-merchant, of Cleveland-street, Fitzroy-square. He has been in Court, but went home ill. I know the defendant Hay - I have known him about two years and a half, since I have been with Mr. M'Dowall - I went there on the 1st of March, 1823. Mr. M'Dowall knew Hay, and we have had connexions with him in business - we have

intrusted him with goods - I should think he has had 700 l. worth of goods - we have had various payments from him - money has been received of him - I think between 300 l. and 400 l. - he is a builder - I do not know whether he has been lately engaged in any particular business - the last job was the house in Park-place. In November last we were supplying him with goods, which were sent up to certain buildings at Paddington - I do not know of my own knowledge what houses he has been building there - there were six or eight or ten - I cannot tell how many, and besides them some stables - they were eight roomed houses - I have seen them myself, and seen Hay engaged on them, but not within the last six or seven months.

Q. Did you see him in November, December, January, and February? A. I think almost every week in these months he has been engaged in these buildings - I have understood they were for him - I know he purchased these houses after his bankruptcy from the assignees, because Mr. M'Dowall was one of them. The bankruptcy was before I went to Mr. M'Dowall.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know any thing about this man's circumstances? A. Except about his buildings, these houses I did not. Mr. M'Dowall began to trust him about July, 1823 - we had no hold on these houses; Mr. M'Dowall trusted him, and we did not limit him; there was a mortgage on them. Mr. Hay has told me that there was a mortgage. I have never seen any title deeds of these houses in his possession; whether it was his own speculation, or any other persons, I cannot tell; the remainder of the 700 l. is still due; I think the last he paid us was 100 l. in August, 1824. I knew of his being in the King's-bench prison, and he has had goods since; we are not in expectation of having money from any other person, if he does not pay us we shall not have it.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Are you still intrusting him with timber? A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge and belief; we have nobody to look to but himself; I have heard from him that some person is the mortgagee. I have not heard to what value, that depends on the situation, but I believe that to be a good situation. Some of them have been sold, I do not know how long since; many of them are still unsold, I think about six, some of them are not finished; and it might, perhaps, cost 100 l. to finish them. I cannot tell what they may be worth, perhaps from 500 l. to 600 l. a piece.

COURT. Q. Were they sold before or after August, 1824? A. I think before - I do not know the ground rent or terms - I have not thought of it. They were put up for sale this spring, but not sold.

CHARLES SUGARS . I am clerk to Messrs. Cox, Cox, and Biddulph, bankers, Charing-cross. Hay kept an account at our house, which commenced in February, 1823, and closed the 9th of June, 1825; here is the pass book of his account - the first entry is the 13th of February, 1823. On the 10th of July, 1824, he paid in 700 l., and commenced drawing upon it immediately; from the 16th of August, to the 1st of January, 1825, there was a balance of 94 l. 19 s. which was drawn out in three small sums soon afterwards, during the year 1823; the sum which passed through our hands was 2447 l. 9 s. 6 d